Science.gov

Sample records for hydrogen desorption kinetics

  1. Hydrogen desorption kinetics for aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma processed silicon (001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Carter, Richard J.; Schneider, Thomas P.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    The desorption kinetics of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from silicon (001) surfaces exposed to aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasmas were examined using temperature programmed desorption. Multiple H{sub 2} desorption states were observed and attributed to surface monohydride (SiH), di/trihydride (SiH{sub 2/3}), and hydroxide (SiOH) species, subsurface hydrogen trapped at defects, and hydrogen evolved during the desorption of surface oxides. The observed surface hydride species were dependent on the surface temperature during hydrogen plasma exposure with mono, di, and trihydride species being observed after low temperature exposure (150 °C), while predominantly monohydride species were observed after higher temperature exposure (450 °C). The ratio of surface versus subsurface H{sub 2} desorption was also found to be dependent on the substrate temperature with 150 °C remote hydrogen plasma exposure generally leading to more H{sub 2} evolved from subsurface states and 450 °C exposure leading to more H{sub 2} desorption from surface SiH{sub x} species. Additional surface desorption states were observed, which were attributed to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111) facets formed as a result of surface etching by the remote hydrogen plasma or aqueous hydrogen fluoride treatment. The kinetics of surface H{sub 2} desorption were found to be in excellent agreement with prior investigations of silicon surfaces exposed to thermally generated atomic hydrogen.

  2. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  3. Gas Diffusion in Metals: Fundamental Study of Helium-Point Defect Interactions in Iron and Kinetics of Hydrogen Desorption from Zirconium Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang

    The behavior of gaseous foreign species (e.g., helium and hydrogen), which are either generated, adsorbed or implanted within the structural materials (e.g., iron and zirconium) exposed to irradiation environments, is an important and largely unsolved topic, as they intensively interact with the irradiation-induced defects, or bond with the lattice atoms to form new compounds, and impose significant effects on their microstructural and mechanical properties in fission and fusion reactors. This research investigates two cases of gas diffusion in metals (i.e., the helium-point defect interactions in iron and kinetics of hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride) through extensive experimental and modeling studies, with the objective of improving the understanding of helium effects on the microstructures of iron under irradiation and demonstrating the kinetics of hydrogen diffusion and precipitation behavior in zirconium that are crucial to predict cladding failures and hydride fuel performance. The study of helium effects in structural materials aims to develop a self-consistent, experimentally validated model of helium---point defect, defect cluster and intrinsic defects through detailed inter-comparisons between experimental measurements on helium ion implanted iron single crystals and computational models. The combination of thermal helium desorption spectrometry (THDS) experiment with the cluster dynamic model helps to reveal the influence of impurities on the energetics and kinetics of the He-defect interactions and to realize the identification of possible mechanisms governing helium desorption peaks. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is employed to acquire additional information on He-vacancy cluster evolution, which provides an opportunity to validate the model qualitatively. The inclusion of He---self-interstitial clusters extends the cluster dynamic model while MD simulations explore the effects of dislocation loops on helium clustering. In addition, the

  4. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  5. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    SciTech Connect

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-21

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53–75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  6. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53-75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  7. Molecular beam-thermal hydrogen desorption from palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, R. F. M.; Berardo, F. M. V.; Ribeiro, J. H. F.

    2010-04-15

    Among the most efficient techniques for hydrogen desorption monitoring, thermal desorption mass spectrometry is a very sensitive one, but in certain cases can give rise to uptake misleading results due to residual hydrogen partial pressure background variations. In this work one develops a novel thermal desorption variant based on the effusive molecular beam technique that represents a significant improvement in the accurate determination of hydrogen mass absorbed on a solid sample. The enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for trace hydrogen is on the order of 20%, and no previous calibration with a chemical standard is required. The kinetic information obtained from the hydrogen desorption mass spectra (at a constant heating rate of 1 deg. C/min) accounts for the consistency of the technique.

  8. Superior hydrogen desorption kinetics of Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} hollow nanospheres mixed with MgH{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Lei; Li Yaoqi; Yang Rong; Liu Yang; Li Xingguo

    2008-06-09

    Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} nanocubes were prepared by vaporized bulk magnesium in ammonia atmosphere associated with plasma metal reaction. Then the product transformed to Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} hollow nanospheres after it was reacted with NH{sub 3} based on the Kirkendall effect. The electron microscopy results suggested that the obtained hollow nanospheres were around 100 nm and the shell thickness was about 10 nm. Because of its short distance for Mg{sup 2+} diffusion and large specific surface area for interaction between Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} and MgH{sub 2}, the structure dramatically enhanced the hydrogen desorption kinetics of Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-2MgH{sub 2}.

  9. Diffusion Analysis Of Hydrogen-Desorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1988-01-01

    Distribution of hydrogen in metal explains observed desorption rate. Report describes application of diffusion theory to anaylsis of experimental data on uptake and elimination of hydrogen in high-strength alloys of 25 degree C. Study part of program aimed at understanding embrittlement of metals by hydrogen. Two nickel-base alloys, Rene 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, studied. Desorption of hydrogen explained by distribution of hydrogen in metal. "Fast" hydrogen apparently not due to formation of hydrides on and below surface as proposed.

  10. Desorption kinetics of cesium from Fukushima soils.

    PubMed

    Murota, Kento; Saito, Takumi; Tanaka, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the behaviors of Cs(+) in soils is crucial for evaluation of the impacts of disposal of soils contaminated by radiocesium, (137)Cs. The desorption rate of Cs(+) evaluated in relatively short periods of time may not be adequate for such a purpose. In this study, we investigated long-term desorption kinetics of (137)Cs and (133)Cs from soils collected in Fukushima Prefecture by batch desorption experiments in the presence of cation exchange resin as a sorbent. The sorbent can keep the concentration of Cs(+) in the aqueous phase low and prevent re-sorption of desorbed Cs(+). Up to 60% of (137)Cs was desorbed after 139 d in dilute KCl media, which was larger than the desorption by conventional short-term extraction with 1 M ammonium acetate. Desorption of (137)Cs continued even after this period. It was also found that high concentration of K(+) prevented desorption of Cs(+) in the initial stage of desorption, but the effect was alleviated with time. The desorbed fraction of stable Cs was smaller than that of (137)Cs. This indicated that (137)Cs may gradually move to more stable states in soils. The half-life of (137)Cs desorption from the slowest sorption site was estimated to be at least two years by a three-site desorption model. PMID:26773507

  11. Superior hydrogen absorption and desorption behavior of Mg thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianglan; Wang, Yuntao; Xie, Lei; Zheng, Jie; Liu, Yang; Li, Xingguo

    Pd-capped Mg films prepared by magnetron sputtering achieved complete dehydrogenation in air at room temperature and behaved as favorable gasochromic switchable mirrors. Their cyclic hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics in air were investigated by using the Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The overall activation energy was 80 kJ mol -1, while the reaction orders controlling desorption were deduced to be n = 2 at 328 K and n = 1 at lower temperatures by analyzing the transmittance data. The hydrogen diffusion coefficient and the corresponding activation energy were calculated by electrochemical measurements. Mg thin films exhibited the smaller activation energy and remarkable diffusion kinetics at room temperature which implied potential applications in smart windows.

  12. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption and desorption of halogen and other gaseous species from surfaces is a key fundamental process for both wet chemical and dry plasma etch and clean processes utilized in nanoelectronic fabrication processes. Therefore, to increase the fundamental understanding of these processes with regard to aluminum nitride (AlN) surfaces, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been utilized to investigate the desorption kinetics of water (H{sub 2}O), fluorine (F{sub 2}), hydrogen (H{sub 2}), hydrogen fluoride (HF), and other related species from aluminum nitride thin film surfaces treated with an aqueous solution of buffered hydrogen fluoride (BHF) diluted in methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). Pre-TPD XPS measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH:BHF treated AlN surfaces showed the presence of a variety of Al-F, N-F, Al-O, Al-OH, C-H, and C-O surfaces species in addition to Al-N bonding from the AlN thin film. The primary species observed desorbing from these same surfaces during TPD measurements included H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, HF, F{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH with some evidence for nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) desorption as well. For H{sub 2}O, two desorption peaks with second order kinetics were observed at 195 and 460 °C with activation energies (E{sub d}) of 51 ± 3 and 87 ± 5 kJ/mol, respectively. Desorption of HF similarly exhibited second order kinetics with a peak temperature of 475 °C and E{sub d} of 110 ± 5 kJ/mol. The TPD spectra for F{sub 2} exhibited two peaks at 485 and 585 °C with second order kinetics and E{sub d} of 62 ± 3 and 270 ± 10 kJ/mol, respectively. These values are in excellent agreement with previous E{sub d} measurements for desorption of H{sub 2}O from SiO{sub 2} and AlF{sub x} from AlN surfaces, respectively. The F{sub 2} desorption is therefore attributed to fragmentation of AlF{sub x} species in the mass spectrometer ionizer. H{sub 2} desorption exhibited

  13. HYDROGEN AND ITS DESORPTION IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH,H.C.

    2002-11-11

    Hydrogen is the dominating gas specie in room temperature, ultrahigh vacuum systems of particle accelerators and storage rings, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven. Rapid pressure increase of a few decades in hydrogen and other residual gases was observed during RHIC's recent high intensity gold and proton runs. The type and magnitude of the pressure increase were analyzed and compared with vacuum conditioning, beam intensity, number of bunches and bunch spacing. Most of these pressure increases were found to be consistent with those induced by beam loss and/or electron stimulated desorption from electron multipacting.

  14. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-09-18

    The desorption kinetics of methanol, ethanol, and water from graphene covered Pt(111) are investigated. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra for both methanol and ethanol have well-resolved first, second, third, and multilayer layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent with zero-order desorption kinetics from all layers. In contrast, for water the first and second layers are not resolved. At low water coverages (< 1 ML) the initial desorption leading edges are aligned but then fall out of alignment at higher temperatures. For thicker water layers (10 to 100 ML), the desorption leading edges are in alignment throughout the desorption of the film. The coverage dependence of the desorption behavoir suggests that at low water coverages the non-alignment of the desorption leading edges is due to water dewetting from the graphene substrate. Kinetic simulations reveal that the experimental results are consistent with zero-order desorption. The simulations also show that fractional order desorption kinetics would be readily apparent in the experimental TPD spectra.

  15. Desorption kinetics of methanol, ethanol, and water from graphene.

    PubMed

    Smith, R Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D

    2014-09-18

    The desorption kinetics of methanol, ethanol, and water from graphene covered Pt(111) are investigated. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra for both methanol and ethanol have well-resolved first, second, third, and multilayer layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent with zero-order desorption kinetics from all layers. In contrast, for water, the first and second layers are not resolved. At low water coverages (<1 monolayer (ML)) the initial desorption leading edges are aligned but then fall out of alignment at higher temperatures. For thicker water layers (10-100 ML), the desorption leading edges are in alignment throughout the desorption of the film. The coverage dependence of the desorption behavoir suggests that at low water coverages the nonalignment of the desorption leading edges is due to water dewetting from the graphene substrate. Kinetic simulations reveal that the experimental results are consistent with zero-order desorption. The simulations also show that fractional order desorption kinetics would be readily apparent in the experimental TPD spectra. PMID:24654652

  16. Sequential desorption energy of hydrogen from nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Deepika,; Kumar, Rakesh; R, Kamal Raj.; Kumar, T. J. Dhilip

    2015-06-24

    We report reversible Hydrogen adsorption on Nickel clusters, which act as a catalyst for solid state storage of Hydrogen on a substrate. First-principles technique is employed to investigate the maximum number of chemically adsorbed Hydrogen molecules on Nickel cluster. We observe a maximum of four Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom, but the average Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom decrease with cluster size. The dissociative chemisorption energy per Hydrogen molecule and sequential desorption energy per Hydrogen atom on Nickel cluster is found to decrease with number of adsorbed Hydrogen molecules, which on optimization may help in economical storage and regeneration of Hydrogen as a clean energy carrier.

  17. Hydrogen Desorption and Adsorption Measurements on Graphite Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, C. C.; Ye, Y.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Witham, C. K.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Fultz, B.

    1998-01-01

    Graphite nanofibers were synthesized and their hydrogen desorption and adsorption properties are reported for 77 and 300 K. Catalysts were made by several different methods including chemical routes, mechanical alloying and gas condensation.

  18. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Aluminum Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wanseop; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jaeyong

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3 or alane) is known to store maximum 10.1 wt.% of hydrogen at relatively low temperature (< 100 degrees C), which partially fulfills the U.S. department of energy requirements for gravimetric loading capacity. However, its detailed mechanisms of appearing of different phases, structural stability, and dynamics of hydrogen desorption are still not clear. To understand the desorption properties of hydrogen in alane, thermodynamically stable α-AlH3 was synthesized by employing an ethereal reaction method. The dependence of pathways on phase formation and the properties of hydrogen evolution were investigated, and the results were compared with the ones for γ-AlH3. It was found that γ-AlH3 requires 10 degrees C higher than that of γ-AlH3 to form, and its decomposition rate demonstrated enhanced endothermic stabilities. For desorption, all hydrogen atoms of alane evolved under an isothermal condition at 138 degrees C in less than 1 hour, and the sample completely transformed to pure aluminum. Our results show that the total amount of desorbed hydrogen from α-AlH3 exceeded 9.05 wt.%, with a possibility of further increase. Easy synthesis, thermal stability, and a large amount of hydrogen desorption of alane fulfill the requirements for light-weight hydrogen storage materials once the pathway of hydrogen cycling is provided. PMID:27455747

  19. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Aluminum Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wanseop; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jaeyong

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3 or alane) is known to store maximum 10.1 wt.% of hydrogen at relatively low temperature (< 100 degrees C), which partially fulfills the U.S. department of energy requirements for gravimetric loading capacity. However, its detailed mechanisms of appearing of different phases, structural stability, and dynamics of hydrogen desorption are still not clear. To understand the desorption properties of hydrogen in alane, thermodynamically stable α-AlH3 was synthesized by employing an ethereal reaction method. The dependence of pathways on phase formation and the properties of hydrogen evolution were investigated, and the results were compared with the ones for γ-AlH3. It was found that γ-AlH3 requires 10 degrees C higher than that of γ-AlH3 to form, and its decomposition rate demonstrated enhanced endothermic stabilities. For desorption, all hydrogen atoms of alane evolved under an isothermal condition at 138 degrees C in less than 1 hour, and the sample completely transformed to pure aluminum. Our results show that the total amount of desorbed hydrogen from α-AlH3 exceeded 9.05 wt.%, with a possibility of further increase. Easy synthesis, thermal stability, and a large amount of hydrogen desorption of alane fulfill the requirements for light-weight hydrogen storage materials once the pathway of hydrogen cycling is provided.

  20. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  1. Adsorption and desorption kinetics of carbofuran in acid soils.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Pateiro-Moure, Miriam; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Simal-Gándara, Jesús; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2011-06-15

    Carbofuran adsorption and desorption were investigated in batch and stirred flow chamber (SFC) tests. The carbofuran adsorption capacity of the soils was found to be low and strongly dependent on their clay and organic carbon contents. Carbofuran sorption was due mainly (>80%) to fast adsorption processes governed by intraparticle diffusion. The adsorption kinetic constant for the pesticide ranged from 0.047 to 0.195 min(-1) and was highly correlated with constant n in the Freundlich equation (r=0.965, P<0.05). Batch tests showed carbofuran desorption to be highly variable and negatively correlated with eCEC and the clay content. The SFC tests showed that soil organic carbon (C) plays a key role in the irreversibility of carbofuran adsorption. Carbofuran desorption increased rapidly at C contents below 4%. The desorption kinetic constant for the compound (0.086-0.195 min(-1)) was generally higher than its adsorption kinetic constant; therefore, carbofuran is more rapidly desorbed than it is adsorbed in soil.

  2. Role of deuterium desorption kinetics on the thermionic emission properties of polycrystalline diamond films with respect to kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, W. F. Howell, M.; Kang, W. P.; Davidson, J. L.; Brooks, M. M.; Tolk, N.

    2014-06-21

    The desorption kinetics of deuterium from polycrystalline chemical vapor deposited diamond films were characterized by monitoring the isothermal thermionic emission current behavior. The reaction was observed to follow a first-order trend as evidenced by the decay rate of the thermionic emission current over time which is in agreement with previously reported studies. However, an Arrhenius plot of the reaction rates at each tested temperature did not exhibit the typical linear behavior which appears to contradict past observations of the hydrogen (or deuterium) desorption reaction from diamond. This observed deviation from linearity, specifically at lower temperatures, has been attributed to non-classical processes. Though no known previous studies reported similar deviations, a reanalysis of the data obtained in the present study was performed to account for tunneling which appeared to add merit to this hypothesis. Additional investigations were performed by reevaluating previously reported data involving the desorption of hydrogen (as opposed to deuterium) from diamond which further indicated this reaction to be dominated by tunneling at the temperatures tested in this study (<775 °C). An activation energy of 3.19 eV and a pre-exponential constant of 2.3 × 10{sup 12} s{sup −1} were determined for the desorption reaction of deuterium from diamond which is in agreement with previously reported studies.

  3. A thermal desorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen trapping in polycrystalline α-uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R. S.; Forsyth, R. T.

    2015-03-14

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from polycrystalline α-uranium (α-U) was examined using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The goal was to identify the major trap sites for hydrogen and their associated trap energies. In polycrystalline α-U six TDS adsorption peaks were observed at temperatures of 521 K, 556 K, 607 K, 681 K, 793 K and 905 K. In addition, the desorption was determined to be second order based on peak shape. The position of the first three peaks was consistent with desorption from UH3. To identify the trap site corresponding to the high temperature peaks the data were compared to a plastically deformed sample and a high purity single crystal sample. The plastically deformed sample allowed the identification of trapping at dislocations while the single crystal sample allow for the identification of high angle boundaries and impurities. Thus, with respect to the desorption energy associated with each peak, values between 12.9 and 26.5 kJ/mole were measured.

  4. A thermal desorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen trapping in polycrystalline α-uranium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lillard, R. S.; Forsyth, R. T.

    2015-03-14

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from polycrystalline α-uranium (α-U) was examined using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The goal was to identify the major trap sites for hydrogen and their associated trap energies. In polycrystalline α-U six TDS adsorption peaks were observed at temperatures of 521 K, 556 K, 607 K, 681 K, 793 K and 905 K. In addition, the desorption was determined to be second order based on peak shape. The position of the first three peaks was consistent with desorption from UH3. To identify the trap site corresponding to the high temperature peaks the data were compared tomore » a plastically deformed sample and a high purity single crystal sample. The plastically deformed sample allowed the identification of trapping at dislocations while the single crystal sample allow for the identification of high angle boundaries and impurities. Thus, with respect to the desorption energy associated with each peak, values between 12.9 and 26.5 kJ/mole were measured.« less

  5. Desorption kinetics of benzene in a sandy soil in the presence of powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Choi, J-W; Kim, S-B; Kim, D-J

    2007-02-01

    Desorption kinetics of benzene was investigated with a modified biphasic desorption model in a sandy soil with five different powdered activated carbon (PAC) contents (0, 1, 2, 5, 10% w/w) as sorbents. Sorption experiments followed by series dilution desorption were conducted for each sorbent. Desorption of benzene was successively performed at two stages using deionized water and hexane. Modeling was performed on both desorption isotherm and desorption rate for water-induced desorption to elucidate the presence of sorption-desorption hysteresis and biphasic desorption and if present to quantify the desorption-resistant fraction (q (irr)) and labile fraction (F) of desorption site responsible for rapid process. Desorption isotherms revealed that sorption-desorption exhibited a severe hysteresis with a significant fraction of benzene being irreversibly adsorbed onto both pure sand and PAC, and that desorption-resistant fraction (q (irr)) increased with PAC content. Desorption kinetic modeling showed that desorption of benzene was biphasic with much higher (4-40 times) rate constant for rapid process (k (1)) than that for slow process (k (2)), and that the difference in the rate constant increased with PAC content. The labile fraction (F) of desorption site showed a decreasing tendency with PAC. The experimental results would provide valuable information on remediation methods for soils and groundwater contaminated with BTEX.

  6. Measurement of hydrogen solubility and desorption rate in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Erck, R.; Park, E.T.

    1997-04-01

    Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium was measured at a hydrogen pressure of 9.09 x 10{sup {minus}4} torr at temperatures between 250 and 700{degrees}C. Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium decreased with temperature. The measured desorption rate of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti is a thermally activated process; the activation energy is 0.067 eV. Oxygen-charged V-4Cr-4Ti specimens were also investigated to determine the effect of oxygen impurity on hydrogen solubility and desorption in the alloy. Oxygen in V-4Cr-4Ti increases hydrogen solubility and desorption kinetics. To determine the effect of a calcium oxide insulator coating on V-4Cr-4Ti, hydrogen solubility in lithium-calcium alloys that contained 0-8.0 percent calcium was also measured. The distribution ratio R of hydrogen between liquid lithium or lithium-calcium and V-4Cr-4Ti increased as temperature decreased (R {approx} 10 and 100 at 700 and 250{degrees}C, respectively). However at <267{degrees}C, solubility data could not be obtained by this method because of the slow kinetics of hydrogen permeation through the vanadium alloy.

  7. Thermal Desorption Analysis of Hydrogen in High Strength Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, M.; Hirakami, D.; Tarui, T.

    2012-02-01

    Thermal desorption analyses (TDA) were conducted in high strength martensitic steels containing carbon from 0.33 to 1.0 mass pct, which were charged with hydrogen at 1223 K (950 °C) under hydrogen of one atmospheric pressure and quenched to room temperature. In 0.33C steel, which had the highest M s temperature, only one desorption peak was observed around 373 K (100 °C), whereas two peaks, one at a similar temperature and the other around and above 573 K (300 °C), were observed in the other steels, the height of the second peak increasing with carbon content. In 0.82C steel, both peaks disappeared during exposure at room temperature in 1 week, whereas the peak heights decreased gradually over 2 weeks in specimens electrolytically charged with hydrogen and aged for varying times at room temperature. From computer simulation, by means of the McNabb-Foster theory coupled with theories of carbon segregation, these peaks are likely to be due to trapping of hydrogen in the strain fields and cores of dislocations, and presumably to a lesser extent in prior austenite grain boundaries. The results also indicate that carbon atoms prevent and even expel hydrogen from trapping sites during quenching and aging in these steels.

  8. Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material

    SciTech Connect

    Guterl, Jerome Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2015-07-28

    Desorption phase of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments performed on tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion relevant conditions is analyzed using a reaction-diffusion model describing hydrogen retention in material bulk. Two regimes of hydrogen desorption are identified depending on whether hydrogen trapping rate is faster than hydrogen diffusion rate in material during TDS experiments. In both regimes, a majority of hydrogen released from material defects is immediately outgassed instead of diffusing deeply in material bulk when the evolution of hydrogen concentration in material is quasi-static, which is the case during TDS experiments performed with tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion related conditions. In this context, analytical expressions of the hydrogen outgassing flux as a function of the material temperature are obtained with sufficient accuracy to describe main features of thermal desorption spectra (TDSP). These expressions are then used to highlight how characteristic temperatures of TDSP depend on hydrogen retention parameters, such as trap concentration or activation energy of detrapping processes. The use of Arrhenius plots to characterize retention processes is then revisited when hydrogen trapping takes place during TDS experiments. Retention processes are also characterized using the shape of desorption peaks in TDSP, and it is shown that diffusion of hydrogen in material during TDS experiment can induce long desorption tails visible aside desorption peaks at high temperature in TDSP. These desorption tails can be used to estimate activation energy of diffusion of hydrogen in material.

  9. A study of the kinetics of isothermal nicotine desorption from silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnadjevic, Borivoj; Lazarevic, Natasa; Jovanovic, Jelena

    2010-12-01

    The isothermal kinetics of nicotine desorption from silicon dioxide (SiO 2) was investigated. The isothermal thermogravimetric curves of nicotine at temperatures of 115 °C, 130 °C and 152 °C were recorded. The kinetic parameters ( Ea, ln A) of desorption of nicotine were calculated using various methods (stationary point, model constants and differential isoconversion method). By applying the "model-fitting" method, it was found that the kinetic model of nicotine desorption from silicon dioxide was a phase boundary controlled reaction (contracting volume). The values of the kinetic parameters, Ea,α and ln Aα, complexly change with changing degree of desorption and a compensation effect exists. A new mechanism of activation for the desorption of the absorbed molecules of nicotine was suggested in agreement with model of selective energy transfer.

  10. An investigation of the desorption of hydrogen from lithium oxide using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kopasz, J.P.; Johnson, C.E.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1994-09-01

    The addition of hydrogen to the purge stream has been shown to enhance tritium release from ceramic breeder materials. In an attempt to determine the mechanism for this enhancement the authors have investigated the adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and water from lithium oxide (a leading candidate for the breeder material) by temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy. The results from these studies indicate that several different types of hydroxide groups are formed on the lithium oxide surface. They also suggest that under certain conditions hydride species form on the surface. The role of these species in tritium release from lithium oxide is discussed.

  11. Synergy on catalytic effect of Fe-Zr additives mixed in different proportions on the hydrogen desorption from MgH{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, A.; Bazzanella, N.; Checchetto, R.; Miotello, A.

    2009-05-18

    Mg films with mixed Fe and Zr metallic additives were prepared by rf magnetron sputtering keeping the total metal content constant, about 7 at. %, and changing the [Fe]/[Zr] ratio. Isothermal hydrogen desorption curves showed that the kinetics depends on [Fe]/[Zr] ratio and is fastest when the [Fe]/[Zr] ratio is {approx}1.8. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed formation of Fe nanoclusters and Mg grain refinement. The improvement of the hydrogen desorption kinetics can be explained by the presence of atomically dispersed Zr and Fe nanoclusters acting as nucleation centers, as well as Mg grain refinement.

  12. Adsorption, Desorption, and Diffusion of Nitrogen in a Model Nanoporous Material: I. Surface Limited Desorption Kinetics in Amorphous Solid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Zubkov, Tykhon; Smith, R. Scott; Engstrom, Todd R.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2007-11-14

    The adsorption and desorption kinetics of N2 on porous amorphous solid water (ASW) films were studied using molecular beam techniques, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). The ASW films were grown on Pt(111) at 23 K by ballistic deposition from a collimated H2O beam at various incident angles to control the film porosity. The experimental results show that the N2 condensation coefficient is essentially unity until near saturation, independent of the ASW film thickness. This means that N2 transport within the porous films is rapid. The TPD results show that the desorption of a fixed dose of N2 shifts to higher temperature with ASW film thickness. Kinetic analysis of the TPD spectra shows that a film thickness rescaling of the coverage dependent activation energy curve results in a single master curve. Simulation of the TPD spectra using this master curve results in a quantitative fit to the experiments over a wide range of ASW thicknesses (up to 1000 layers, ~0.5 mm). The success of the rescaling model indicates that N2 transport within the porous film is rapid enough to maintain a uniform distribution throughout the film on a time scale faster than desorption.

  13. [Kinetic characteristics of Cd2+ desorption in minerals and soils under simulated acid rain].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dai-chang; Jiang, Xin; Bian, Yong-rong; Gao, Hong-jian; Jiao, Wen-tao

    2004-07-01

    The kinetic characteristics of Cd2+ desorption in minerals and soils under simulated acid rain were studied by using the flow-stirred method. It showed that Cd2+ desorption could be described by first-order kinetics. Percents of desorption amounts of Cd2+ calculated were 70%-100% in red soil and goethite, and 25%-50% in latosols and kaolinite. Parabolic diffusion could describe Cd2+ desorption kinetics in latosols and not suitable for red soil and goethite and kaolinite. Cd2+ desorption, regarded as a heterogeneous diffusion in minerals and soils, could be fitted by Elovich equation more than Parabolic diffusion and two-constant equation. Cd2+ desorption could be divided into fast reaction and slow reaction. Except for latosols, fast reaction would be over during 60 min and be close to quasi-equilibrium. Adsorption forms of Cd2+ in soil surface could be exchangeable and specific. Fast reaction was relative to easily desorbed Cd2+. The affinity of edge hydroxyl to Cd2+ would lead to the difference of Cd2+ desorption rate and amounts. Increase of pH value in effluent indicated H+ consumption in the processes of Cd2+ desorption.

  14. The effect of stress on hydrogen uptake and desorption by A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1991-01-01

    The uptake and desorption of hydrogen by A-286 as a function of stress was studied using electrochemical methods. It was found that the apparent surface hydrogen concentration, the mean hydrogen concentration, and the hydrogen distribution uniformity all increased up to a stress level 50 percent of yield and decreased thereafter. The value of the hydrogen diffusion coefficient was relatively unaffected by stress while the percent of trapped hydrogen appeared to decrease with increasing stress.

  15. A New Approach to Simulate the Kinetics of Metal Desorption from Mineral Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Powell, B. A.; Kersting, A. B.; Zavarin, M.

    2010-12-01

    The relevance of colloid-facilitated metal transport is largely dependent on metal sorption/desorption kinetics and the degree of reversibility of metal surface binding. Thus, transport predictions need to incorporate modeling concepts that can simulate time- and history-dependent surface processes on the microscale. In this study, we characterized the sorption and desorption kinetics of neptunium(V) reactions on goethite in a flow-cell experiment. Modeling was used to evaluate differences between sorption and desorption kinetics in terms of aging, hysteresis, and ‘irreversible’ sorption. First, aging represents a series of surface-chemical processes on the microscale that lead to changes in contaminant surface speciation over time. Second, hysteresis effects indicate fundamental, chemical differences in the microscopic pathways of reactions for net sorption and desorption processes. Both phenomena may result in a sorbed contaminant fraction that is not readily available for exchange with the solution phase (apparent irreversible sorption). Most currently available kinetic sorption/desorption models incorporate fundamental changes in adsorption and desorption behavior indirectly, e.g., by postulating surface sites with different kinetic rates or ‘irreversible’ sorption behavior. We propose a new approach that allows for the specific incorporation of changes in overall reaction pathways for (ad)sorption and desorption processes. Based on experimental results, observed rates for Np(V) desorption from goethite are substantially slower than for (ad)sorption processes. Differences in metal sorption and desorption kinetics can be simulated with a minimum number of fitting parameters by combining isotherm-based sorption rate laws with a modeling concept related to transition state theory (TST). This concept is based on the assumption that changes in reaction pathways for (ad)sorption and desorption processes lead to differences in overall driving forces and

  16. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  17. Desorption kinetics of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal fines and coal contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Shorten, C.V.

    1989-01-01

    Batch with fluid replacement (BFR) and time resolved leaching (TRL) methods were developed to determine the desorption kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coal fines and coal contaminated sediments using various organic solvent/water mixtures. The two techniques were relatively comparable, with a given solvent, solid phase, and experimental time scale. TRL is the method of choice for short term (one day or less) experiments while BFR is better suited for long term desorption studies. Both phenanthrene and chrysene desorbed from coal contaminated sediments following first order kinetics. Predicted equilibrium concentrations ((C){sub eq}) and desorption rate constants (k{sub d}) were estimated using both one and two stage first order kinetic models. Acetone/water solvent mixtures induced desorption of greater amounts of phenanthrene than did more highly polar methanol/water mixtures, and desorption rate coefficients were higher in the acetone mixtures than they were in the methanol mixtures. As predicted by cosolvent theory and microscopic equilibrium, k{sub d} values increased (slightly) with increasing mole fraction cosolvent and (C){sub eq} values also increased (significantly) with increasing mole fraction cosolvent. Experimental design and period of observation of the desorption process appeared to be important in the consideration of observed desorption constants. Solids concentration in the BFR reactors was varied from 1000 to 100,000 mg/l. Total mas of both compounds released to the liquid phase increased significantly with increasing suspended solids concentrations, but relationship between rate constants and solids concentration were more complex.

  18. Trapping of hydrogen atoms in X-irradiated salts at room temperature and the decay kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    The salts (hypophosphites, formates, a phosphite, a phosphate, and an oxalate) were X-irradiated, whereby hydrogen formed chemically by a radiolytic process becomes trapped in the solid. By room temperature vacuum extraction, the kinetics for the evolution of this trapped hydrogen was studied mass spectrometrically. All salts except two exhibited second-order kinetics. The two exceptions (NaH2PO2(H2O) and K2HPO4) showed first-order kinetics. Based on experimental results, the escape of hydrogen involves three steps: the diffusion of hydrogen atoms from the bulk to the surface, association of these atoms on the surface (rate controlling step for second-order hydrogen evolution), and the desorption of molecular hydrogen from the surface. The hydrogen does not escape if the irradiated salt is stored in air, apparently because adsorbed air molecules occupy surface sites required in the escape mechanism.

  19. Dependence of effective desorption kinetic parameters on surface coverage and adsorption temperature: CO on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingcai; Yates, John T., Jr.

    1989-06-01

    The effective desorption kinetic parameters of CO on the Pd(111) surface have been studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy. The zero coverage effective desorption activation energy and the preexponential factor were found to be 35.5 kcal/mol and 1013.5 s-1, respectively. As a function of CO coverage, a four-stage correlation between Ed(θ) and the development of stable low-energy electron desorption (LEED) structures was observed for the first time at Tads= 200 K. Ed and ν1 showed a strong compensation effect with Tc=519 K. The adsorption temperature dependence of Ed from Tads=87 to 200 K was observed and interpreted qualitatively by a model involving the production of different domain structures at various adsorption temperatures and the preservation of domain structures at higher coverages during temperature programmed desorption.

  20. Kinetics of neptunium(V) sorption and desorption on goethite: An experimental and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, Ruth M.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Powell, Brian A.; Kersting, Annie B.

    2011-11-01

    Various sorption phenomena, such as aging, hysteresis and irreversible sorption, can cause differences between contaminant (ad)sorption and desorption behavior and lead to apparent sorption 'asymmetry'. We evaluate the relevance of these characteristics for neptunium(V) (Np(V)) sorption/desorption on goethite using a 34-day flow-cell experiment and kinetic modeling. Based on experimental results, the Np(V) desorption rate is much slower than the (ad)sorption rate, and appears to decrease over the course of the experiment. The best model fit with a minimum number of fitting parameters was achieved with a multi-reaction model including (1) an equilibrium Freundlich site (site 1), (2) a kinetically-controlled, consecutive, first-order site (site 2), and (3) a parameter ψ, which characterizes the desorption rate on site 2 based on a concept related to transition state theory (TST). This approach allows us to link differences in adsorption and desorption kinetics to changes in overall reaction pathways, without assuming different adsorption and desorption affinities (hysteresis) or irreversible sorption behavior a priori. Using modeling as a heuristic tool, we determined that aging processes are relevant. However, hysteresis and irreversible sorption behavior can be neglected within the time-frame (desorption over 32 days) and chemical solution conditions evaluated in the flow-cell experiment. In this system, desorption reactions are very slow, but they are not irreversible. Hence, our data do not justify an assumption of irreversible Np(V) sorption to goethite in transport models, which effectively limits the relevance of colloid-facilitated Np(V) transport to near-field environments. However, slow Np(V) desorption behavior may also lead to a continuous contaminant source term when metals are sorbed to bulk mineral phases. Additional long-term experiments are recommended to definitely rule out irreversible Np(V) sorption behavior at very low surface loadings and

  1. Change in soft magnetic properties of Fe-based metallic glasses during hydrogen absorption and desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, L.; Lovas, A.; Kiss, L.F.

    2005-08-15

    The stress level can be altered in soft magnetic amorphous alloys by hydrogen absorption. The resulting changes in the soft magnetic parameters are reversible or irreversible, depending on the chemical composition. Some of these effects are demonstrated in Fe-B, Fe-W-B, and Fe-V-B glassy ribbons, in which various magnetic parameters are measured mainly during hydrogen desorption. The rate of hydrogen desorption is also monitored by measuring the pressure change in a hermetically closed bomb. The observed phenomena are interpreted on the basis of induced stresses and chemical interactions between the solute metal and hydrogen.

  2. Adsorption and desorption kinetics of n-octane and n-nonane vapors on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, A.J.; Thomas, K.M.

    1999-09-28

    This investigation has involved the study of the adsorption and desorption kinetics of two n-alkanes on a wood-based active carbon (BAX950). The adsorption and desorption characteristics of n-octane vapor on the activated carbon were investigated over the relative pressure (p/p{sup o}) range 0--0.97 for temperatures in the range 288--313 K in a static vapor system. The adsorption characteristics of n-nonane were studied over the relative pressure range 0--0.977 and temperature range 303--323 K. The adsorption and desorption kinetics were studied with different amounts of preadsorbed n-octane for set changes in relative vapor pressure (p/p{sup o}). The desorption kinetics were much slower than the corresponding adsorption kinetics for the same pressure step. The rate constants for adsorption increased with increasing relative pressure and surface coverage. The kinetic data for adsorption were used to calculate the activation energies for each increase in relative pressure. The activation energy was highest at low p/p{sup o} and decreased with increasing p/p{sup o} until a maximum was reached at p/p{sup o}{approximately}0.075. n-Nonane adsorption showed similar trends in adsorption kinetics and activation energies to the n-octane adsorption isotherm and mechanism.

  3. Sorption/desorption kinetics of contaminants on mobile particles: Modeling and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bold, Steffen; Kraft, Siegfried; Grathwohl, Peter; Liedl, Rudolf

    2003-12-01

    In this study the impact of sorption/desorption kinetics between organic contaminants and mobile particles suspended in subsurface water is analyzed. TCE migration through a granular activated carbon column is investigated at different transport velocities with lignite and activated carbon particles as mobile carriers. The measured breakthrough characteristics of TCE can be reproduced by a reactive transport model simulating sorption/desorption kinetics applying an intraparticle diffusion approach for mobile particles and the packed bed of granular activated carbon. Model predictions are based on independently measured physicochemical parameters, i.e., no calibration of TCE sorption/desorption is required. The close matches of experimental data to predicted data validate the exclusively process-based model assumptions and indicate that this approach has large predictive capabilities. Extending these findings, a sensitivity study is presented in order to specify under which conditions sorption/desorption of contaminants in mobile particles has to be modeled as a kinetic process. It is found that sorption/desorption kinetics are of major importance for Damköhler numbers between 0.01 and 100.

  4. Mg-based nanocomposites with high capacity and fast kinetics for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiangdong; Wu, Chengzhang; Du, Aijun; Lu, Gao Qing; Cheng, Huiming; Smith, Sean C; Zou, Jin; He, Yinghe

    2006-06-22

    Magnesium and its alloys have shown a great potential in effective hydrogen storage due to their advantages of high volumetric/gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity and low cost. However, the use of these materials in fuel cells for automotive applications at the present time is limited by high hydrogenation temperature and sluggish sorption kinetics. This paper presents the recent results of design and development of magnesium-based nanocomposites demonstrating the catalytic effects of carbon nanotubes and transition metals on hydrogen adsorption in these materials. The results are promising for the application of magnesium materials for hydrogen storage, with significantly reduced absorption temperatures and enhanced ab/desorption kinetics. High level Density Functional Theory calculations support the analysis of the hydrogenation mechanisms by revealing the detailed atomic and molecular interactions that underpin the catalytic roles of incorporated carbon and titanium, providing clear guidance for further design and development of such materials with better hydrogen storage properties.

  5. GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

    1999-05-26

    Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N15H3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia.

  6. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrogen Combustion Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2008-04-02

    A detailed chemical kinetic model is used to explore the flammability and detonability of hydrogen mixtures. In the case of flammability, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for hydrogen is coupled to the CHEMKIN Premix code to compute premixed, laminar flame speeds. The detailed chemical kinetic model reproduces flame speeds in the literature over a range of equivalence ratios, pressures and reactant temperatures. A series of calculation were performed to assess the key parameters determining the flammability of hydrogen mixtures. Increased reactant temperature was found to greatly increase the flame speed and the flammability of the mixture. The effect of added diluents was assessed. Addition of water and carbon dioxide were found to reduce the flame speed and thus the flammability of a hydrogen mixture approximately equally well and much more than the addition of nitrogen. The detailed chemical kinetic model was used to explore the detonability of hydrogen mixtures. A Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) detonation model coupled with detailed chemical kinetics was used to model the detonation. The effectiveness on different diluents was assessed in reducing the detonability of a hydrogen mixture. Carbon dioxide was found to be most effective in reducing the detonability followed by water and nitrogen. The chemical action of chemical inhibitors on reducing the flammability of hydrogen mixtures is discussed. Bromine and organophosphorus inhibitors act through catalytic cycles that recombine H and OH radicals in the flame. The reduction in H and OH radicals reduces chain branching in the flame through the H + O{sub 2} = OH + O chain branching reaction. The reduction in chain branching and radical production reduces the flame speed and thus the flammability of the hydrogen mixture.

  7. Heavy metal desorption kinetic as affected by of anions complexation onto manganese dioxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Muhammad Iqbal; Mustafa, Syed; Khan, Sadullah; Xing, Baoshan

    2009-10-01

    Oxides of Fe, Al, and Mn have been studied extensively for heavy metals fixation in soil. However, little is known about the effect of anions on the desorption processes of these metals, especially from manganese dioxide. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of residence time, temperature, and interacting anions on desorption of Pb(2+), Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) from MnO(2). MnO(2) was characterized by different experimental techniques prior to desorption studies. The sorption-desorption studies were conducted for Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Cd(2+) ions in the presence of different electrolytes and at different temperature in the range 293-323 K. For all the sorption experiments, Pb(2+) sorption was the greatest and almost 100% sorption occurred in the presence of 0.001 M potassium phosphate. The sorption of metals under investigation followed the order Pb(2+)>Cu(2+)>Cd(2+), whereas the desorption order was Cd(2+)>Cu(2+)>Pb(2+) in 0.01 M potassium nitrate and sulphate. Only a small quantity of desorbed Pb was detected, even at the low value of pH 3. These results indicated the stability of lead phosphate precipitates or that phosphate treatment imparted stability to the ternary complexes formed at the MnO(2) surface. The detailed desorption kinetics were conducted only for Cd(2+) in 0.01 M potassium nitrate or 0.001 M phosphate at pH values of 3 and 4 in the temperature range 303-323 K. A substantial decrease in Cd(2+) desorption was noted with increasing pH and temperature and the desorption process reached equilibration in 3h at pH 4. However, at pH 3 the desorption fluctuated, which is probably due the dissolution of the solid at such low pH values.

  8. Validation of a hybrid two-site gamma model for naphthalene desorption kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, I.S.; Lion, L.W.; Shuler, M.L.

    1999-09-15

    Three models for sorption/desorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminants from soil were compared for their ability to predict the transport of PAH in soil: a gamma model, a two-site/two-region nonequilibrium model, and a hybrid model. In the hybrid model, soil organic matter was conceptually divided into two compartments; a fraction with rapid sorption/desorption kinetics and a compartment with mass-transfer-limited kinetics. Contaminant sorbed in the rapid compartment was assumed to be in instantaneous equilibrium with the aqueous phase, while the release of contaminant from the slow fraction was assumed to be governed by a gamma distribution of rate coefficients. The hybrid model successfully described the initial rapid release of a model PAH contaminant, naphthalene, from a sieved soil sample of moderate organic content ({approx_equal} 2.3%) as well as the following slow release observed over 25 days in batch desorption experiments. Other necessary model parameters, such as the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient of naphthalene and the macropore porosity, were evaluated in separate experiments. A transport model incorporating the hybrid model for naphthalene sorption/desorption successfully predicted the elution profile of naphthalene in independent soil-column experiments with no adjustable parameters. The success of the hybrid model suggests that a wide array of rate controls govern PAH desorption. This conclusion is consistent with the view of soils as consisting of a mix of different sorptive constituents and heterogeneous physical constraints on PAH release.

  9. Kinetics of porphyrin adsorption and DNA-assisted desorption at the silica-water interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiqin; Powell, Hayley V; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Unwin, Patrick R

    2010-03-16

    Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) has been used to study in situ the kinetics of the adsorption of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridiniumyl)porphyrin (TMPyP) from pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution (PBS) to the silica-water interface and the interaction of calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with the resulting TMPyP-functionalized surface. TMPyP was delivered to the silica surface using an impinging jet technique to allow relatively fast surface kinetics to be accessed. Adsorption was first-order in TMPyP, and the initial adsorption rate constant at the bare surface was found to be k = (4.1 +/- 0.6) x 10(-2) cm s(-1). A deceleration in the adsorption kinetics was observed at longer times that could be described semiquantitatively using an Elovich-type kinetic expression. The limiting value of the absorbance corresponded approximately to monolayer coverage (6.2 x 10(13) molecules cm(-2)). Exposure of the TMPyP-modified silica surface to CT-DNA, achieved by flowing CT-DNA solution over the functionalized surface, resulted in efficient desorption of the TMPyP. The desorption process was driven by the interaction of TMPyP with CT-DNA, which UV-vis spectroscopy indicated involved intercalative binding. The desorption kinetics were also simulated using complementary finite element modeling of convection-diffusion coupled to a surface process.

  10. Effects and Mechanisms of Mechanical Activation on Hydrogen Sorption/ Desorption of Nanoscale Lithium Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Leon, L.; Yang, Gary, Z.; Crosby, Kyle; Wwan, Xufei. Zhong, Yang; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Osborn, William; Hu, Jianzhi; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2012-04-26

    The objective of this project is to investigate and develop novel, mechanically activated, nanoscale Li3N-based and LiBH4-based materials that are able to store and release {approx}10 wt% hydrogen at temperatures near 100 C with a plateau hydrogen pressure of less than 10 bar. Four (4) material systems have been investigated in the course of this project in order to achieve the project objective. These 4 systems are (i) LiNH2+LiH, (ii) LiNH2+MgH2, (iii) LiBH4, and (iv) LiBH4+MgH2. The key findings we have obtained from these 4 systems are summarized below. *The thermodynamic driving forces for LiNH2+LiH and LiBH4 systems are not adequate to enable H2 release at temperatures < 100 C. *Hydrogen release in the solid state for all of the four systems is controlled by diffusion, and thus is a slow process. *LiNH2+MgH2 and LiBH4+MgH2 systems, although possessing proper thermodynamic driving forces to allow for H2 release at temperatures < 100 C, have sluggish reaction kinetics because of their diffusion-controlled rate-limiting steps. *Reducing particles to the nanometer length scale (< 50 nm) can improve the thermodynamic driving force to enable H2 release at near ambient temperature, while simultaneously enhancing the reaction kinetics as well as changing the diffusion-controlled rate-limiting step to gas desorption-controlled rate-limiting step. This phenomenon has been demonstrated with LiBH4 and offers the hope that further work along this direction will make one of the material systems, i.e., LiBH4, LiBH4+MgH2 and LiNH2+MgH2, possess the desired thermodynamic properties and rapid H2 uptake/release kinetics for on-board applications. Many of the findings and knowledge gained from this project have been published in archival refereed journal articles [1-15] and are accessible by general public. Thus, to avoid a bulky final report, the key findings and knowledge gained from this project will be succinctly summarized, particularly for those findings and knowledge

  11. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Scherwitzl, Boris Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2014-05-14

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  12. Numerical comparison of hydrogen desorption behaviors of metal hydride beds based on uranium and on zirconium-cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Kyoung, S.; Yoo, H.; Ju, H.

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, the hydrogen delivery capabilities of uranium (U) and zirconium-cobalt (ZrCo) are compared quantitatively in order to find the optimum getter materials for tritium storage. A three-dimensional hydrogen desorption model is applied to two identically designed cylindrical beds with the different materials, and hydrogen desorption simulations are then conducted. The simulation results show superior hydrogen delivery performance and easier thermal management capability for the U bed. This detailed analysis of the hydrogen desorption behaviors of beds with U and ZrCo will help to identify the optimal bed material, bed design, and operating conditions for the storage and delivery system in ITER. (authors)

  13. Plutonium desorption from mineral surfaces at environmental concentrations of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Begg, James D; Zavarin, Mavrik; Kersting, Annie B

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of Pu adsorption and desorption behavior on mineral surfaces is crucial for understanding its environmental mobility. Here we demonstrate that environmental concentrations of H2O2 can affect the stability of Pu adsorbed to goethite, montmorillonite, and quartz across a wide range of pH values. In batch experiments where Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite for 21 days at pH 4, 6, and 8, the addition of 5-500 μM H2O2 resulted in significant Pu desorption. At pH 6 and 8 this desorption was transient with readsorption of the Pu to goethite within 30 days. At pH 4, no Pu readsorption was observed. Experiments with both quartz and montmorillonite at 5 μM H2O2 desorbed far less Pu than in the goethite experiments highlighting the contribution of Fe redox couples in controlling Pu desorption at low H2O2 concentrations. Plutonium(IV) adsorbed to quartz and subsequently spiked with 500 μM H2O2 resulted in significant desorption of Pu, demonstrating the complexity of the desorption process. Our results provide the first evidence of H2O2-driven desorption of Pu(IV) from mineral surfaces. We suggest that this reaction pathway coupled with environmental levels of hydrogen peroxide may contribute to Pu mobility in the environment. PMID:24815745

  14. Plutonium desorption from mineral surfaces at environmental concentrations of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Begg, James D; Zavarin, Mavrik; Kersting, Annie B

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of Pu adsorption and desorption behavior on mineral surfaces is crucial for understanding its environmental mobility. Here we demonstrate that environmental concentrations of H2O2 can affect the stability of Pu adsorbed to goethite, montmorillonite, and quartz across a wide range of pH values. In batch experiments where Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite for 21 days at pH 4, 6, and 8, the addition of 5-500 μM H2O2 resulted in significant Pu desorption. At pH 6 and 8 this desorption was transient with readsorption of the Pu to goethite within 30 days. At pH 4, no Pu readsorption was observed. Experiments with both quartz and montmorillonite at 5 μM H2O2 desorbed far less Pu than in the goethite experiments highlighting the contribution of Fe redox couples in controlling Pu desorption at low H2O2 concentrations. Plutonium(IV) adsorbed to quartz and subsequently spiked with 500 μM H2O2 resulted in significant desorption of Pu, demonstrating the complexity of the desorption process. Our results provide the first evidence of H2O2-driven desorption of Pu(IV) from mineral surfaces. We suggest that this reaction pathway coupled with environmental levels of hydrogen peroxide may contribute to Pu mobility in the environment.

  15. An investigation of the kinetics for hydrogen chemisorption on iron metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    A quasi-isothermal approach was used to study the kinetics of hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide chemisorption onto iron film in an effort to understand the environmental degradation of steels. The coverage of chemisorbed hydrogen or chemisorbed sulfur was observed as a function of time for fixed conditions of substrate temperature. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to observe the sulfur and chemisorption-induced resistance change was employed to monitor hydrogen coverage. To compare the results obtained from studying the kinetics by two different techniques, the kinetics of oxygen chemisorption onto iron films was also studied. A reaction model utilized to interpret the H2/Fe2 chemisorption kinetics was applied to data from an earlier study on the desorption kinetics for H2 chemisorbed onto nicket films in the vicinity of the Curie temperature of the film. This analysis permitted a separation of the gross desorption process into individual components so that the influence of the magnetic phase transition on the rate constants could be determined.

  16. Description of time-varying desorption kinetics. Release of naphthalene from contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Connaughton, D.F.; Stedinger, J.R.; Lion, L.W.; Shuler, M.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Release rates of naphthalene from suspensions of freshly contaminated (days to weeks) and aged (approximately 30 years) soil samples were obtained using a gas purge method. A continuously increasing resistance to desorption was observed with increasing purge time. Initial desorption rates were similar to those estimated using available empirical relationships, but subsequent desorption rates were lower by more than 1 order of magnitude. A model incorporating a continuum of compartments with a gamma ([Gamma]) distribution of rate coefficients was postulated to describe the experimental data. An analytical equation with two adjustable parameters was obtained for the mass fraction desorbed. Release profiles with this [open quotes][Gamma] model[close quotes] were able to describe the experimental release profiles for long term desorption experiments. An implication of the gamma model is that increased incubation time will allow organic compounds to be sorbed to compartments or regions in the sorbent that exhibit slow adsorption/desorption kinetics. This has important implications for the fate and remediation of sites that have been contaminated with hydrophobic organic compounds for extended time periods. 31 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO2

    PubMed Central

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2015-01-01

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer des orption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. PMID:24832297

  18. Radionuclide desorption kinetics on synthetic Zn/Ni-labeled montmorillonite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, F. M.; Heck, S.; Truche, L.; Bouby, M.; Brendlé, J.; Hoess, P.; Schäfer, T.

    2015-01-01

    Sorption/desorption kinetics for selected radionuclides (99Tc(VII), 232Th(IV), 233U(VI), 237Np(V), 242Pu and 243Am(III)) under Grimsel (Switzerland) ground water conditions (pH 9.7 and ionic strength of ∼1 mM) in the presence of synthetic Zn or Ni containing montmorillonite nanoparticles and granodiorite fracture filling material (FFM) from Grimsel were examined in batch studies. The structurally bound Zn or Ni in the octahedral sheet of the synthetic colloids rendered them suitable as colloid markers. Only a weak interaction of the montmorillonite colloids with the fracture filling material occurs over the experimental duration of 10,000 h (∼13 months). The tri- and tetravalent radionuclides are initially strongly associated with nanoparticles in contrast to 99Tc(VII), 233U(VI) and 237Np(V) which showed no sorption to the montmorillonite colloids. Radionuclide desorption of the nanoparticles followed by sorption to the fracture filling material is observed for 232Th(IV), 242Pu and 243Am(III). Based on the conceptual model that the driving force for the kinetically controlled radionuclide desorption from nanoparticles and subsequent association to the FFM is the excess in surface area offered by the FFM, the observed desorption kinetics are related to the colloid/FFM surface area ratio. The observed decrease in concentration of the redox sensitive elements 99Tc(VII), 233U(VI) and 237Np(V) may be explained by reduction to lower oxidation states in line with Eh-pH conditions prevailing in the experiments and thermodynamic considerations leading to (i) precipitation of a sparingly soluble phase, (ii) sorption to the fracture filling material, (iii) possible formation of eigencolloids and/or (iv) sorption to the montmorillonite colloids. Subsequent to the sorption/desorption kinetics study, an additional experiment was conducted investigating the potential remobilization of radionuclides/colloids attached to the FFM used in the sorption/desorption kinetic

  19. Kinetic modeling of antimony(V) adsorption-desorption and transport in soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Li, Lulu; Zhou, Shiwei

    2014-09-01

    Antimonate [Sb(V)] adsorption-desorption and transport in an acidic red soil (Yingtan) and a calcareous soil (Huanjiang) was investigated using kinetic batch and miscible displacement experiments. Different formulations of a multi-reaction model (MRM) were evaluated for their capabilities of describing the retention and transport mechanisms of Sb(V) in soils. The experimental results showed that adsorption of Sb(V) by two soils was kinetically controlled and largely irreversible. The Sb(V) adsorption capacity and kinetic rate of the acidic red soil was much higher than that of the calcareous soil. The asymmetrical breakthrough curves indicated the strong dominance of non-equilibrium retention of Sb(V). A four step sequential extraction procedure provided evidence that majority of applied Sb(V) was irreversibly retained. A formulation of MRM with two kinetic sorption sites (reversible and irreversible) successfully described Sb(V) adsorption-desorption data. The use of kinetic batch rate coefficients for predictions of breakthrough curves (BTCs) underestimated Sb(V) retention and overestimated its mobility. In an inverse mode with optimized rate coefficients, the MRM formulation was capable of simulating Sb(V) transport in soil columns.

  20. Effect of carboxylic and thiol ligands (oxalate, cysteine) on the kinetics of desorption of Hg(II) from kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Senevirathna, W. U.; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Baohua

    2010-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of Hg(II) on clay minerals can impact the biogeochemical cycle and bio-uptake of Hg in the environment. We studied the kinetics of the desorption of Hg(II) from kaolinite as affected by oxalate and cysteine, representing the ligands with carboxylic and thiol groups of different affinities for Hg(II). The effects of pH (3, 5, and 7), ligand concentration (0.25 and 1.0 mM), and temperature (15 C, 25 C, and 35 C) on the Hg(II) desorption were investigated through desorption kinetics. Our study showed that the Hg(II) desorption was pH dependent. In the absence of any organic ligand, >90% of the previously adsorbed Hg(II) desorbed at pH 3 within 2 h, compared to <10% at pH 7. Similar results were observed in the presence of oxalate, showing that it hardly affected the Hg(II) desorption. Cysteine inhibited the Hg(II) desorption significantly at all the pH tested, especially in the first 80 min with the desorption less than 20%, but the inhibition of the desorption appeared to be less prominent afterwards. The effect of the ligand concentration on the Hg(II) desorption was small, especially in the presence of oxalate. The effect of temperature on the Hg(II) desorption was nearly insignificant. The effect of the organic acids on the Hg(II) sorption and desorption is explained by the formation of the ternary surface complexes involving the mineral, ligand, and Hg(II). The competition for Hg(II) between the cysteine molecules adsorbed on the particle surfaces and in the solution phase probably can also affect the Hg(II) desorption.

  1. Desorption kinetics of radiocesium from subsurface sediments at Hanford Site, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Smith, Steve C.; McKinley, James P.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2003-08-01

    The desorption of 137Cs + was investigated on sediments from the United States Hanford site. Pristine sediments and ones that were contaminated by the accidental release of alkaline 137Cs +-containing high level nuclear wastes (HLW, 2 × 10 6 to 6 × 10 7 pCi 137Cs +/g) were studied. The desorption of 137Cs + was measured in Na +, K +, Rb +, and NH 4+electrolytes of variable concentration and pH, and in presence of a strong Cs +-specific sorbent (self-assembled monolayer on a mesoporous support, SAMMS). 137Cs + desorption from the HLW-contaminated Hanford sediments exhibited two distinct phases: an initial instantaneous release followed by a slow kinetic process. The extent of 137Cs + desorption increased with increasing electrolyte concentration and followed a trend of Rb + ≥ K + > Na + at circumneutral pH. This trend followed the respective selectivities of these cations for the sediment. The extent and rate of 137Cs + desorption was influenced by surface armoring, intraparticle diffusion, and the collapse of edge-interlayer sites in solutions containing K +, Rb +, or NH 4+. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed HLW-induced precipitation of secondary aluminosilicates on the edges and basal planes of micaceous minerals that were primary Cs + sorbents. The removal of these precipitates by acidified ammonium oxalate extraction significantly increased the long-term desorption rate and extent. X-ray microprobe analyses of Cs +-sorbed micas showed that the 137Cs + distributed not only on mica edges, but also within internal channels parallel to the basal plane, implying intraparticle diffusive migration of 137Cs +. Controlled desorption experiments using Cs +-spiked pristine sediment indicated that the 137Cs + diffusion rate was fast in Na +-electrolyte, but much slower in the presence of K + or Rb +, suggesting an effect of edge-interlayer collapse. An intraparticle diffusion model coupled with a two-site cation exchange model was used to interpret the

  2. Role of microstructure and heat treatments on the desorption kinetics of tritium from austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chêne, J.; Brass, A.-M.; Trabuc, P.; Gastaldi, O.

    2007-02-01

    The liquid scintillation counting of solid samples (LSC-SS technique) was successfully used to study the role of microstructure and heat treatments on the behavior of residual tritium in several austenitic stainless steels (as-cast remelted tritiated waste, 316LN and 321 steels). The role of desorption annealing in the 100-600 °C range on the residual amount of tritium in tritiated waste was investigated. The residual tritium concentration computed from surface activity measurements is in good agreement with experimental values measured by liquid scintillation counting after full dissolution of the samples. The kinetics of tritium desorption recorded with the LSC-SS technique shows a significant desorption of residual tritium at room temperature, a strong barrier effect of thermal oxide films on the tritium desorption and a dependance of the tritium release on the steels microstructure. Annealing in the 300-600 °C range allows to desorb a large fraction of the residual tritium. However a significant trapping of tritium is evidenced. The influence of trapping phenomena on the concentration of residual tritium and on its dependance with the annealing temperature was investigated with different recrystallized and sensitized microstructures. Trapping is evidenced mainly below 150 °C and concerns a small fraction of the total amount of tritium introduced in austenitic steels. It presumably occurs preferentially on precipitates such as Ti(CN) or on intermetallic phases.

  3. Role of desorption kinetics in the rhamnolipid-enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Congiu, Eleonora; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio

    2014-09-16

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a rhamnolipid biosurfactant on biodegradation of (14)C-labeled phenanthrene and pyrene under desorption-limiting conditions. The rhamnolipid caused a significant solubilization and enhanced biodegradation of PAHs sorbed to soils. The enhancement was, however, negatively influenced by experimental conditions that caused an enrichment of slow desorption fractions. These conditions included aging, a higher organic matter content in soil, and previous extraction with Tenax to remove the labile-desorbing chemical. The decline in bioavailability caused by aging on sorbed (14)C-pyrene was partially reversed by rhamnolipids, which enhanced mineralization of the aged compound, although not so efficiently like with the unaged chemical. This loss in biosurfactant efficiency in promoting biodegradation can be explained by intra-aggregate diffusion of the pollutant during aging. We suggest that rhamnolipid can enhance biodegradation of soil-sorbed PAHs by micellar solubilization, which increase the cell exposure to the chemicals in the aqueous phase, and partitioning into soil organic matter, thus enhancing the kinetics of slow desorption. Our study show that rhamnolipid can constitute a valid alternative to chemical surfactants in promoting the biodegradation of slow desorption PAHs, which constitutes a major bottleneck in bioremediation.

  4. Kinetics of protein adsorption/desorption mediated by pH-responsive polymer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiao-Hang; Lei, Qun-Li; Ren, Chun-Lai

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new way of regulating protein adsorption by using a pH-responsive polymer. According to the theoretical results obtained from the molecular theory and kinetic approaches, both thermodynamics and kinetics of protein adsorption are verified to be well controlled by the solution pH. The kinetics and the amount of adsorbed proteins at equilibrium are greatly increased when the solution environment changes from acid to neutral. The reason is that the increased pH promotes the dissociation of the weak polyelectrolyte, resulting in more charged monomers and more stretched chains. Thus the steric repulsion within the polymer layer is weakened, which effectively lowers the barrier felt by the protein during the process of adsorption. Interestingly, we also find that the kinetics of protein desorption is almost unchanged with the variation of pH. It is because although the barrier formed by the polymer layer changes along with the change of pH, the potential at contact with the surface varies equally. Our results may provide useful insights into controllable protein adsorption/desorption in practical applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21274062, 11474155, and 91027040).

  5. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of temperature programed desorption of O/Rh(111).

    PubMed

    Franz, T; Mittendorfer, F

    2010-05-21

    We present a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation based on ab initio calculations for the thermal desorption of oxygen from a Rh(111) surface. Several models have been used for the parametrization of the interaction between the adsorbed atoms. We find that models based on a parametrization with only pairwise interactions have a relatively large error in the predicted adsorption energies. This error can be significantly reduced by including three- and four-body interactions. In addition, we find that a significant amount of atoms adsorb in a second adsorption site - the hcp-hollow site - at an elevated temperature. Consequently, only a many-body multisite model of the oxygen interactions yields appropriate desorption spectra for the full coverage range, while more simple models only capture the correct shape in the low-coverage case. Our parametrization allows us to predict the adsorption energies of an arbitrary configuration of adsorbates with a mean average error of less than 6 meV/atom.

  6. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Huang, Xiaobo; Kang, Zhan

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  7. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Kang, Zhan; Huang, Xiaobo

    2015-08-28

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  8. Diffusion barriers in the kinetics of water vapor adsorption/desorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.W.; Foley, N.J.; Thomas, K.M.; Norman, P.R.; Francis, D.C.

    1998-07-07

    The adsorption of water vapor on a highly microporous coconut-shell-derived carbon and a mesoporous wood-derived carbon was studied. These carbons were chosen as they had markedly different porous structures. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of water vapor on the activated carbons were investigated over the relative pressure range p/p{degree} = 0--0.9 for temperatures in the range 285--313 K in a static water vapor system. The adsorption isotherms were analyzed using the Dubinin-Serpinski equation, and this provided an assessment of the polarity of the carbons. The kinetics of water vapor adsorption and desorption were studied with different amounts of preadsorbed water for set changes in pressure relative to the saturated vapor pressure (p/p{degree}). The adsorption kinetics for each relative pressure step were compared and used to calculate the activation energies for the vapor pressure increments. The kinetic results are discussed in relation to their relative position on the equilibrium isotherm and the adsorption mechanism of water vapor on activated carbons.

  9. Analysis of molecular hydrogen formation on low-temperature surfaces in temperature programmed desorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Vidali, G; Pirronello, V; Li, L; Roser, J; Manicó, G; Congiu, E; Mehl, H; Lederhendler, A; Perets, H B; Brucato, J R; Biham, O

    2007-12-13

    The study of the formation of molecular hydrogen on low-temperature surfaces is of interest both because it enables the exploration of elementary steps in the heterogeneous catalysis of a simple molecule and because of its applications in astrochemistry. Here, we report results of experiments of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate surfaces using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). In these experiments, beams of H and D atoms are irradiated on the surface of an amorphous silicate sample. The desorption rate of HD molecules is monitored using a mass spectrometer during a subsequent TPD run. The results are analyzed using rate equations, and the energy barriers of the processes leading to molecular hydrogen formation are obtained from the TPD data. We show that a model based on a single isotope provides the correct results for the activation energies for diffusion and desorption of H atoms. These results are used in order to evaluate the formation rate of H2 on dust grains under the actual conditions present in interstellar clouds. It is found that, under typical conditions in diffuse interstellar clouds, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H2 formation when the grain temperatures are between 9 and 14 K. This temperature window is within the typical range of grain temperatures in diffuse clouds. It is thus concluded that amorphous silicates are good candidates to be efficient catalysts of H2 formation in diffuse clouds.

  10. Hydrogenation of CO-bearing species on grains: unexpected chemical desorption of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Moudens, A.; Baouche, S.; Chaabouni, H.; Dulieu, F.

    2016-05-01

    The amount of methanol in the gas phase and the CO depletion from the gas phase are still open problems in astrophysics. In this work, we investigate solid-state hydrogenation of CO-bearing species via H-exposure of carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and methanol-thin films deposited on cold surfaces, paying attention to the possibility of a return to the gas phase. The products are probed via infrared spectroscopy (reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy), and two types of mass spectroscopy protocols: temperature-programmed desorption, and during-exposure desorption techniques. In the case of the [CO+H] reactive system, we have found that chemical desorption of CO is more efficient than H-addition reactions and HCO and H2CO formation; the studies of the [H2CO +H] reactive system show a strong competition between all surface processes, chemical desorption of H2CO, H-addition (CH3OH formation) and H-abstraction (CO formation); finally, [CH3OH + H] seems to be a non-reactive system and chemical desorption of methanol is not efficient. CO-bearing species present a see-saw mechanism between CO and H2CO balanced by the competition of H-addition and H2-abstraction that enhances the CO chemical desorption. The chemical network leading to methanol has to be reconsidered. The methanol formation on the surface of interstellar dust grain is still possible through CO+H reaction; nevertheless, its consumption of adsorbed H atoms should be higher than previously expected.

  11. Kinetics of catalytic transfer hydrogenation of soybean lecithin

    SciTech Connect

    Naglic, M.; Smidovnik, A.; Koloini, T.

    1997-12-01

    Catalytic transfer hydrogenation of soybean lecithin has been studied using aqueous sodium formate solution as hydrogen donor and palladium on carbon as catalyst. Kinetic constants and selectivity have been determined at intensive stirring. Hydrogenation reactions followed the first-order kinetics with respect to fatty acids. In addition to short reaction time, this method offers safe and easy handling. Hydrogenated soybean lecithin provides products with increased stability with respect to oxidation.

  12. Desorption of Hydrogen from Si(111) by Resonant Excitation of the Si-H Vibrational Stretch Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhiheng; Feldman, Leonard C.; Tolk, Norman; Zhang, Zhenyu; Cohen, Philip I

    2006-01-01

    Past efforts to achieve selective bond scission by vibrational excitation have been thwarted by energy thermalization. Here we report resonant photodesorption of hydrogen from a Si(111) surface using tunable infrared radiation. The wavelength dependence of the desorption yield peaks at 0.26 electron volt: the energy of the Si-H vibrational stretch mode. The desorption yield is quadratic in the infrared intensity. A strong H/D isotope effect rules out thermal desorption mechanisms, and electronic effects are not applicable in this low-energy regime. A molecular mechanism accounting for the desorption event remains elusive.

  13. Ultraviolet Photon-Induced Desorption and Decomposition Kinetics and Dynamics of Methyl Nitrite on SILVER(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressley, Laura Ann

    The wavelength-dependent cross section for decomposition and surface fragment reaction mechanisms for the photon -induced decomposition of CH_3ONO on Ag(111) are determined using the surface analytical techniques of temperature programmed desorption with mass spectroscopy (TPD), x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS, respectively), residual gas analysis with mass spectroscopy (RGA), and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Methyl nitrite adsorbs reversibly on Ag(111) at 100 K with monolayer and multilayer desorption occurring at 131 and 118 K, respectively. The major photodecomposition fragments formed at 100 K include O(a), CH_2 (a), CH_3(a), CH _2O(a), and CH_3O(a). Upon heating to 350 K, these fragments recombine and desorb as H_2 and CH_2OHCH=O. The desorption channel at 350 K accounts for ~ 85% of the available fragments retained on the surface. The remaining fragments react and desorb as CH_3 OCH=O and CH_2OHCH=O at 200 K and 250 K, respectively. The photon-induced desorption dynamics of the nascent fragment, NO, is determined using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (TOF). At 254, 308, and 313 nm, the translational energy distributions of the desorbing NO is measured at 100 K. Two desorption channels are observed in the TOF spectra at all wavelengths investigated. Irrespective of the excitation wavelength, the flux-weighted mean translational energy, < E_{trans }>/2k, of the slower channel is around 115 +/- 10 K. We propose that this channel results from an extended interaction of the NO with the Ag(111) surface. The measured < E_{trans}>/2k of the faster desorption channel of the nascent NO photofragment at 254, 308, and 351 nm is 1980 +/- 100 K, 617 +/- 100 K, and 846 +/- 100 K, respectively. Comparison of the surface and gas phase photochemical kinetics and dynamics indicates that the dominant photodecomposition mechanism on the Ag(111) surface is the direct absorbance of the photon by the adsorbate.

  14. Effect of fulvic acid surface coatings on plutonium sorption and desorption kinetics on goethite.

    PubMed

    Tinnacher, Ruth M; Begg, James D; Mason, Harris; Ranville, James; Powell, Brian A; Wong, Jennifer C; Kersting, Annie B; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2015-03-01

    The rates and extent of plutonium (Pu) sorption and desorption onto mineral surfaces are important parameters for predicting Pu mobility in subsurface environments. The presence of natural organic matter, such as fulvic acid (FA), may influence these parameters. We investigated the effects of FA on Pu(IV) sorption/desorption onto goethite in two scenarios: when FA was (1) initially present in solution or (2) found as organic coatings on the mineral surface. A low pH was used to maximize FA coatings on goethite. Experiments were combined with kinetic modeling and speciation calculations to interpret variations in Pu sorption rates in the presence of FA. Our results indicate that FA can change the rates and extent of Pu sorption onto goethite at pH 4. Differences in the kinetics of Pu sorption were observed as a function of the concentration and initial form of FA. The fraction of desorbed Pu decreased in the presence of FA, indicating that organic matter can stabilize sorbed Pu on goethite. These results suggest that ternary Pu-FA-mineral complexes could enhance colloid-facilitated Pu transport. However, more representative natural conditions need to be investigated to quantify the relevance of these findings. PMID:25607800

  15. Effect of fulvic acid surface coatings on plutonium sorption and desorption kinetics on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Tinnacher, Ruth M.; Begg, James D.; Mason, Harris; Ranville, James; Powell, Brian A.; Wong, Jennifer C.; Kersting, Annie B.; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2015-01-21

    The rates and extent of plutonium (Pu) sorption and desorption onto mineral surfaces are important parameters for predicting Pu mobility in subsurface environments. The presence of natural organic matter, such as fulvic acid (FA), may influence these parameters. We investigated the effects of FA on Pu(IV) sorption/desorption onto goethite in two scenarios: when FA was (1) initially present in solution or (2) found as organic coatings on the mineral surface. A low pH was used to maximize FA coatings on goethite. Experiments were combined with kinetic modeling and speciation calculations to interpret variations in Pu sorption rates in the presence of FA. Our results indicate that FA can change the rates and extent of Pu sorption onto goethite at pH 4. Differences in the kinetics of Pu sorption were observed as a function of the concentration and initial form of FA. The fraction of desorbed Pu decreased in the presence of FA, indicating that organic matter can stabilize sorbed Pu on goethite. These results suggest that ternary Pu–FA–mineral complexes could enhance colloid-facilitated Pu transport. In conclusion, more representative natural conditions need to be investigated to quantify the relevance of these findings.

  16. Effect of fulvic acid surface coatings on plutonium sorption and desorption kinetics on goethite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tinnacher, Ruth M.; Begg, James D.; Mason, Harris; Ranville, James; Powell, Brian A.; Wong, Jennifer C.; Kersting, Annie B.; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2015-01-21

    The rates and extent of plutonium (Pu) sorption and desorption onto mineral surfaces are important parameters for predicting Pu mobility in subsurface environments. The presence of natural organic matter, such as fulvic acid (FA), may influence these parameters. We investigated the effects of FA on Pu(IV) sorption/desorption onto goethite in two scenarios: when FA was (1) initially present in solution or (2) found as organic coatings on the mineral surface. A low pH was used to maximize FA coatings on goethite. Experiments were combined with kinetic modeling and speciation calculations to interpret variations in Pu sorption rates in the presencemore » of FA. Our results indicate that FA can change the rates and extent of Pu sorption onto goethite at pH 4. Differences in the kinetics of Pu sorption were observed as a function of the concentration and initial form of FA. The fraction of desorbed Pu decreased in the presence of FA, indicating that organic matter can stabilize sorbed Pu on goethite. These results suggest that ternary Pu–FA–mineral complexes could enhance colloid-facilitated Pu transport. In conclusion, more representative natural conditions need to be investigated to quantify the relevance of these findings.« less

  17. Effect of fulvic acid surface coatings on plutonium sorption and desorption kinetics on goethite.

    PubMed

    Tinnacher, Ruth M; Begg, James D; Mason, Harris; Ranville, James; Powell, Brian A; Wong, Jennifer C; Kersting, Annie B; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2015-03-01

    The rates and extent of plutonium (Pu) sorption and desorption onto mineral surfaces are important parameters for predicting Pu mobility in subsurface environments. The presence of natural organic matter, such as fulvic acid (FA), may influence these parameters. We investigated the effects of FA on Pu(IV) sorption/desorption onto goethite in two scenarios: when FA was (1) initially present in solution or (2) found as organic coatings on the mineral surface. A low pH was used to maximize FA coatings on goethite. Experiments were combined with kinetic modeling and speciation calculations to interpret variations in Pu sorption rates in the presence of FA. Our results indicate that FA can change the rates and extent of Pu sorption onto goethite at pH 4. Differences in the kinetics of Pu sorption were observed as a function of the concentration and initial form of FA. The fraction of desorbed Pu decreased in the presence of FA, indicating that organic matter can stabilize sorbed Pu on goethite. These results suggest that ternary Pu-FA-mineral complexes could enhance colloid-facilitated Pu transport. However, more representative natural conditions need to be investigated to quantify the relevance of these findings.

  18. Absorption and desorption of hydrogen with particle beds of several zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuishi, N.; Fukada, S.

    1990-12-01

    For the storage of tritium and the recovery of hydrogen isotopes from inert gas mixtures in the fuel cycle of a D-T fusion reactor, metallic particle beds of elementary zirconium and vanadium, and intermetallic compounds of zirconium such as ZrV 2, Zr(V 0.83Fe 0.17) 2 and ZrNi are compared. One of the samples is packed in a quartz column, through which H 2-Ar gas mixtures at 50-600°C for absorption or Ar gas at 400-800°C for desorption is passed. In conclusion: activation of the Zr, ZrNi and ZrV 2 beds is easier than activation of the Zr(V 0.83Fe 0.17) 2 bed; any of the beds of the compounds can absorb hydrogen up to a concentration of less than 1 ppm at the outlet at 100°C; the hydrogen absorption rate of ZrV 2 is enhanced by the addition of iron to it; the amount of the hydrogen storage in ZrNi is the highest in this experimental condition; and absorption and desorption rates of the Zr(V 0.83Fe 0.17) 2 alloy are the fastest.

  19. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Rates of U(VI) release from individual dry-sieved size fractions of a field-aggregated, field-contaminated composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. The principal source of variability in equilibrium U(VI) adsorption properties of the various size fractions was the impact of variable chemistry on adsorption. This source of variability was represented using surface complexation models (SCMs) with different stoichiometric coefficients with respect to hydrogen ion and carbonate concentrations for the different size fractions. A reactive transport model incorporating equilibrium expressions for cation exchange and calcite dissolution, along with rate expressions for aerobic respiration and silica dissolution, described the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through reactor experiments. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multirate SCM with an assumed lognormal distribution for the mass-transfer rate coefficients. The estimated mean and standard deviation of the rate coefficients were the same for all <2 mm size fractions but differed for the 2–8 mm size fraction. Micropore volumes, assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data, were also the same for all dry-sieved <2 mm size fractions, indicating a link between micropore volumes and mass-transfer rate properties. Pore volumes for dry-sieved size fractions exceeded values for the corresponding wet-sieved fractions. We hypothesize that repeated field wetting and drying cycles lead to the formation of aggregates and/or coatings containing (micro)pore networks which provided an additional mass-transfer resistance over that associated with individual particles. The 2–8 mm fraction exhibited a larger average and standard deviation in the distribution of mass-transfer rate coefficients, possibly caused by the abundance of

  20. Hydrogen diffusion kinetics and structural integrity of superhigh pressure Mg-5 wt%Ni alloys with dendrite interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hui; Wu, Wenshi; Dou, Yang; Liu, Baozhong; Li, Hanning; Peng, Qiuming

    2016-07-01

    A strategy of low-angle orientation dendrite interface-high index planes-which prepared by super-high pressure (SHP) technique, is proposed and successfully improved the hydrogen storage properties of Mg based materials for the first time, wherein a simple binary Mg-Ni alloy is used as a sample to elucidate its related mechanisms. The phase composition, morphology variation and hydrogen storage properties of the as-cast and SHP Mg-5Ni alloys in the temperature range of 1100-1600 °C are systemically investigated. The reversible hydrogen storage capacities and plateau hydrogen pressure of the as-cast and SHP alloys are close due to the same hydrogen storage phases (Mg and Mg2Ni). Note that although SHP treatment at 1600 °C has a large weight fraction of Mg6Ni compound, it still effectively reduces the onset temperature of dehydriding (∼262 °C), as well as improves the hydrogen desorption kinetics at low temperatures and structural integrity. The low onset temperature and outstanding hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics are mainly associated with the formation of a large number of dendrite interface, in which the hydrogen atoms readily occur "zig-zag" jumps along {11-20} prismatic planes. This dendrite interface of high index planes which prepared by SHP technique paves a new pathway to enhance the hydrogen storage performances of magnesium based alloys.

  1. Interactions of N2O5 and related nitrogen oxides with ice surfaces: desorption kinetics and collision dynamics.

    PubMed

    Romero Lejonthun, Liza S E; Andersson, Patrik U; Hallquist, Mattias; Thomson, Erik S; Pettersson, Jan B C

    2014-11-26

    The detailed interactions of nitrogen oxides with ice are of fundamental interest and relevance for chemistry in cold regions of the atmosphere. Here, the interactions of NO, NO2, N2O4, and N2O5 with ice surfaces at temperatures between 93 and 180 K are investigated with molecular beam techniques. Surface collisions are observed to result in efficient transfer of kinetic energy and trapping of molecules on the ice surfaces. NO and NO2 rapidly desorb from pure ice with upper bounds for the surface binding energies of 0.16 ± 0.02 and 0.26 ± 0.03 eV, respectively. Above 150 K, N2O4 desorption follows first-order kinetics and is well described by the Arrhenius parameters Ea = 0.39 ± 0.04 eV and A = 10((15.4±1.2)) s(-1), while a stable N2O4 adlayer is formed at lower temperatures. A fraction of incoming N2O5 reacts to form HNO3 on the ice surface. The N2O5 desorption rates are substantially lower on pure water ice (Arrhenius parameters: Ea = 0.36 ± 0.02 eV; A = 10((15.3±0.7)) s(-1)) than on HNO3-covered ice (Ea = 0.24 ± 0.02 eV; A = 10((11.5±0.7)) s(-1)). The N2O5 desorption kinetics also sensitively depend on the sub-monolayer coverage of HNO3, with a minimum in N2O5 desorption rate at a low but finite coverage of HNO3. The studies show that none of the systems with resolvable desorption kinetics undergo ordinary desorption from ice, and instead desorption likely involves two or more surface states, with additional complexity added by coadsorbed molecules.

  2. Kinetics of desorption of hexane from the microporous metal organic framework RPM-1

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.; Culp, J. T.; Bittner, E.; Parker, B.; Li, J.; Bockrath, B. C.

    2007-03-06

    The kinetics of desorption of hexane from the microporous metal framework RPM-1 has been studied using a pulse mass analyzer. In this method a small sample of organic liquid was injected into a heated carrier gas that passes through a packed bed of adsorbent. The change in mass of the bed with time was observed following the adsorption of the pulse. RPM-1 is a microporous material of the general formula [M3(bpdc)3(bpy)] · 4DMF · H2O, where M is either Co or Zn, bpdc is biphenyl dicarboxylate and bpy is 4,4'-bipyridine. The pores are channels of larger supercages (11 × 11 × 5 Å) connected by smaller windows of approximately 8 Å diameter. The desorption of hexane was well represented by a combination of two first order processes. Activation energies determined for the two processes over a temperature range of 373–473 K were 56 and 63 kJ/mol for RPM-1 (Co). The two activation energies are similar to isosteric heats of adsorption measured independently in earlier work at corresponding coverages. Similar values were found for RPM-1 (Zn). The pulse mass analyzer was found to be an effective way to investigate the dynamics of adsorption processes.

  3. Effect of the Surface on Charge Reduction and Desorption Kinetics of Soft Landed Peptide Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjar, Omar; Wang, Peng; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia

    2009-06-01

    Charge reduction and desorption kinetics of ions and neutral molecules produced by soft-landing of mass-selected singly and doubly protonated Gramicidin S (GS) on different surfaces was studied using time dependant in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) integrated in a specially designed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) research instrument. Soft-landing targets utilized in this study included inert self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 1-dodecane thiol (HSAM) and its fluorinated analog (FSAM) on gold and hydrophilic carboxyl-terminated (COOH-SAM) and amine-terminated (NH2-SAM) SAM surfaces. We observed efficient neutralization of soft-landed ions on the COOH-SAM surface, partial retention of only one proton on the HSAM surface and efficient retention of two protons on the FSAM surface. Slow desorption rates measured experimentally indicate fairly strong binding between peptide molecules and SAM surfaces with the binding energy of 20-25 kcal/mol.

  4. Adsorption and desorption kinetics in ZrO2 TiO2 by photoacoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto Neto, A.; Moura, D.; Kuranaga, C.; Silva, M. D.; Miranda, L. C. M.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper we report on the photoacoustic (PA) characterization of ZrO2-TiO2 ceramic wafers as a sensing element for solvent adulteration evaluation. The experiments consisted of photoacoustic time dependent monitoring of the sorption and desorption of a droplet of a solvent deposited on the outer face of a ceramic wafer. The used solvents were isopropanol and chloroform. For the polar isopropanol molecule the results shown diffusion into the sample, with a characteristic diffusion time τ_1, accompanied by the evaporation at a rate with a time constant τ_2. Indeed, for the non polar chloroform, wetting-drying kinetics is adequately described by a simple diffusion-evaporation.

  5. Analysis and optimization of carbon nanotubes and graphene sensors based on adsorption-desorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sang-Zi; Chen, Gugang; Harutyunyan, Avetik R.; Cole, Milton W.; Sofo, Jorge O.

    2013-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes mats and graphene have shown great potential as gas sensors. We analyze NO adsorption/sensing experiments with the kinetic Langmuir model adapted to include adsorption sites from which the molecule does not desorb. The model reproduces the available experimental data. Its fitting parameters provide information on the microscopic phenomena governing adsorption, and variation of these parameters allows the optimization of the sensitivity, detection limit, and time response of the sensors. The result reveals an optimal operating temperature before thermal desorption becomes dominant at high temperature, the potential improvement of selectivity by tuning the gate voltage in a field effect transistor configuration, and quantifies the benefits of reducing the density of defects in the sensing materials.

  6. Desorption kinetics of hydrophobic organic chemicals from sediment to water: a review of data and models.

    PubMed

    Birdwell, Justin; Cook, Robert L; Thibodeaux, Louis J

    2007-03-01

    Resuspension of contaminated sediment can lead to the release of toxic compounds to surface waters where they are more bioavailable and mobile. Because the timeframe of particle resettling during such events is shorter than that needed to reach equilibrium, a kinetic approach is required for modeling the release process. Due to the current inability of common theoretical approaches to predict site-specific release rates, empirical algorithms incorporating the phenomenological assumption of biphasic, or fast and slow, release dominate the descriptions of nonpolar organic chemical release in the literature. Two first-order rate constants and one fraction are sufficient to characterize practically all of the data sets studied. These rate constants were compared to theoretical model parameters and functionalities, including chemical properties of the contaminants and physical properties of the sorbents, to determine if the trends incorporated into the hindered diffusion model are consistent with the parameters used in curve fitting. The results did not correspond to the parameter dependence of the hindered diffusion model. No trend in desorption rate constants, for either fast or slow release, was observed to be dependent on K(OC) or aqueous solubility for six and seven orders of magnitude, respectively. The same was observed for aqueous diffusivity and sediment fraction organic carbon. The distribution of kinetic rate constant values was approximately log-normal, ranging from 0.1 to 50 d(-1) for the fast release (average approximately 5 d(-1)) and 0.0001 to 0.1 d(-1) for the slow release (average approximately 0.03 d(-1)). The implications of these findings with regard to laboratory studies, theoretical desorption process mechanisms, and water quality modeling needs are presented and discussed. PMID:17373505

  7. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater-bentonite-fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L(-1)) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10(-10) M (241)Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (k(f)) of 0.01-0.02 h(-1). Am recoveries in each column were 55-60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h(-1) in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. Our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long distance scales because

  8. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater-bentonite-fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L(-1)) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10(-10) M (241)Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (k(f)) of 0.01-0.02 h(-1). Am recoveries in each column were 55-60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h(-1) in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. Our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long distance scales because

  9. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-07-13

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater–bentonite–fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. Themore » colloidal suspension (100 mg L–1) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10–10 M241Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (kf) of 0.01–0.02 h–1. Am recoveries in each column were 55–60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h–1 in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. As a result, our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long

  10. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-07-13

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater–bentonite–fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L–1) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10–10 M241Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (kf) of 0.01–0.02 h–1. Am recoveries in each column were 55–60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h–1 in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. As a result, our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill

  11. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Ritter, James A.; Ebner, Armin D.; Wang, Jun; Holland, Charles E.

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  12. Tuning the hydrogen desorption of Mg(BH4)2 through Zn alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, D.; Thonhauser, T.

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of Zn alloying on the hydrogen desorption properties of Mg(BH4)2 using ab initio simulations. In particular, we investigate formation/reaction enthalpies/entropies for a number of compounds and reactions at a wide range of temperatures and Zn concentrations in Mg1-xZnx(BH4)2. Our results show that the thermodynamic stability of the resulting material can be significantly lowered through Zn alloying. We find, e.g., that the solid solution Mg2/3Zn1/3(BH4)2 has a reaction enthalpy for the complete hydrogen desorption of only 25.3 kJ/mol H2—a lowering of 15 kJ/mol H2 compared to the pure phase and a corresponding lowering in critical temperature of 123 K. In addition, we find that the enthalpy of mixing is rather small and show that the decrease in reaction enthalpy with Zn concentration is approximately linear.

  13. Removal of mercury contamination on primary mass standards by hydrogen plasma and thermal desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, P.; Marti, K.; Russi, S.

    2013-02-01

    The removal of a high mercury contamination on a Pt reference mass by thermal desorption was studied directly by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently the contamination mechanism was investigated. Samples of PtIr and AuPt exposed to vapour of mercury in air were studied using XPS and gravimetric mass determination. We find an extremely rapid mercury contamination which takes place within minutes and reaches an initial equilibrium state after 2 h to 4 h. Roughly 1 to 2 monolayers of mercury adsorbs directly on the metal surface. A natural contamination of carbon and oxygen compounds is at the top. Due to the accumulation of mercury, we find a gain in mass which corresponds to 20 µg to 26 µg for a PtIr standard. XPS data from a historical Pt standard give strong evidence for further average mercury accumulation of (1.3 ± 0.1) µg/year during a period of more than a century. This can be explained by a two-step mechanism presented in this study. The speed of contamination depends on the initial surface conditions. Polishing activates the surface and results in an enhanced accumulation of mercury. Natural contamination by C and O can delay but not prevent contamination. We further demonstrate that the mercury contamination can be removed by both hydrogen plasma and thermal desorption. The removal of mercury by hydrogen plasma can directly be attributed to the synthesis of gaseous mercury dihydrides at low pressures.

  14. Desorption isotherms and mathematical modeling of thin layer drying kinetics of tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghith, Amira; Azzouz, Soufien; ElCafsi, Afif

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there is an increased demand on the international market of dried fruits and vegetables with significant added value. Due to its important production, consumption and nutrient intake, drying of tomato has become a subject of extended and varied research works. The present work is focused on the drying behavior of thin-layer tomato and its mathematical modeling in order to optimize the drying processes. The moisture desorption isotherms of raw tomato were determined at four temperature levels namely 45, 50, 60 and 65 °C using the static gravimetric method. The experimental data obtained were modeled by five equations and the (GAB) model was found to be the best-describing these isotherms. The drying kinetics were experimentally investigated at 45, 55 and 65 °C and performed at air velocities of 0.5 and 2 m/s. In order to investigate the effect of the exchange surface on drying time, samples were dried into two different shapes: tomato halves and tomato quarters. The impact of various drying parameters was also studied (temperature, air velocity and air humidity). The drying curves showed only the preheating period and the falling drying rate period. In this study, attention was paid to the modeling of experimental thin-layer drying kinetics. The experimental results were fitted with four different models.

  15. Eriobotrya japonica seed biocomposite efficiency for copper adsorption: Isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamic and desorption studies.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mehwish; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Iqbal, Munawar; Noreen, Saima

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption techniques are widely used to remove pollutants from wastewater; however, composites are gaining more importance due to their excellent adsorption properties. Bentonite composite with Eriobotrya japonica seed was prepared and used for the adsorption of copper (Cu) metal from aqueous media. The process variables such as pH, Cu(II) ions initial concentration, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature were optimized for maximum Cu(II) adsorption. At pH 5, adsorbent dose 0.1 g, contact time 45 min, Cu(II) ions initial concentration 75 mg/L and temperature 45 °C, maximum Cu(II) adsorption was achieved. Desorption studies revealed that biocomposite is recyclable. Langmuir, Freundlich and Harkins-Jura isotherms as well as pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order kinetics models were applied to understand the adsorption mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0)) suggest that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm fitted well to the adsorption data. Results showed that biocomposite was more efficient for Cu(II) adsorption in comparison to individuals native Eriobotrya japonica seed biomass and Na-bentonite.

  16. Eriobotrya japonica seed biocomposite efficiency for copper adsorption: Isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamic and desorption studies.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mehwish; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Iqbal, Munawar; Noreen, Saima

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption techniques are widely used to remove pollutants from wastewater; however, composites are gaining more importance due to their excellent adsorption properties. Bentonite composite with Eriobotrya japonica seed was prepared and used for the adsorption of copper (Cu) metal from aqueous media. The process variables such as pH, Cu(II) ions initial concentration, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature were optimized for maximum Cu(II) adsorption. At pH 5, adsorbent dose 0.1 g, contact time 45 min, Cu(II) ions initial concentration 75 mg/L and temperature 45 °C, maximum Cu(II) adsorption was achieved. Desorption studies revealed that biocomposite is recyclable. Langmuir, Freundlich and Harkins-Jura isotherms as well as pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order kinetics models were applied to understand the adsorption mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0)) suggest that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm fitted well to the adsorption data. Results showed that biocomposite was more efficient for Cu(II) adsorption in comparison to individuals native Eriobotrya japonica seed biomass and Na-bentonite. PMID:27039361

  17. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Phase Transformations in Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-08-31

    The aim of this project is to develop and apply computational materials science tools to determine and predict critical properties of hydrogen storage materials. By better understanding the absorption/desorption mechanisms and characterizing their physical properties it is possible to explore and evaluate new directions for hydrogen storage materials. Particular emphasis is on the determination of the structure and thermodynamics of hydrogen storage materials, the investigation of microscopic mechanisms of hydrogen uptake and release in various materials and the role of catalysts in this process. As a team we have decided to focus on a single material, NaAlH{sub 4}, in order to fully be able to study the many aspects of hydrogen storage. We have focused on phase stability, mass transport and size-dependent reaction mechanisms in this material.

  18. Surface PEGylation of Silver Nanoparticles: Kinetics of Simultaneous Surface Dissolution and Molecular Desorption.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Chang; Tai, Jui-Ting; Wang, Hsiao-Fang; Ho, Rong-Ming; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Tsai, De-Hao

    2016-09-27

    A quantitative study of the stability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) conjugated with thiolated polyethylene glycol (SH-PEG) was conducted using gas-phase ion-mobility and mass analyses. The extents of aggregation and surface dissolution of AgNPs, as well as the amount of SH-PEG adsorption and desorption, were able to be characterized simultaneously for the kinetic study. The results show that the SH-PEG with a molecular mass of 6 kg/mol (SH-PEG6K) was able to adsorb to the surface of AgNP to form PEG6K-HS-AgNP conjugates, with the maximum surface adsorbate density of ∼0.10 nm(-2). The equilibrium binding constant for SH-PEG6K on AgNPs was calculated as ∼(4.4 ± 0.9) × 10(5) L/mol, suggesting a strong affinity due to thiol bonding to the AgNP surface. The formation of SH-PEG6K corona prevented PEG6K-HS-AgNP conjugates from aggregation under the acidic environment (pH 1.5), but dissolution of core AgNPs occurred following a first-order reaction. The rate constant of Ag dissolution from PEG6K-HS-AgNP was independent of the starting surface packing density of SH-PEG6K on AgNP (σ0), indicating that the interactions of H(+) with core AgNP were not interfered by the presence of SH-PEG6K corona. The surface packing density of SH-PEG6K decreased simultaneously following a first-order reaction, and the desorption rate constant of SH-PEG6K from the conjugates was proportional to σ0. Our work presents the first quantitative study to illustrate the complex mechanism that involves simultaneous aggregation and dissolution of core AgNPs in combination with adsorption and desorption of SH-PEG. This work also provides a prototype method of coupled experimental scheme to quantify the change of particle mass versus the corresponding surface density of functional molecular species on nanoparticles. PMID:27578534

  19. An investigation of the desorption of hydrogen from lithium oxide using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kopasz, J.P.; Johnson, C.E.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1995-04-01

    The addition of hydrogen to the purge stream has been shown to enhance tritium release from ceramic breeder materials; however, this added hydrogen can lead to increased costs in the tritium purification system. The objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the interactions between hydrogen and lithium oxide surfaces so that the authors can take full advantage of the observed enhancement of tritium release caused by hydrogen addition without incurring high costs in the tritium purification plant.

  20. Kinetics of hydrogen release from lunar soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustin, Roberta

    1990-10-01

    With increasing interest in a lunar base, there is a need for extensive examination of possible lunar resources. Hydrogen will be needed on a lunar base for many activities including providing fuel, making water, and serving as a reducing agent in the extraction of oxygen from its ores. Previous studies have shown the solar wind has implanted hydrogen in the lunar regolith and that hydrogen is present not only in the outer layer of soil but to considerable depths, depending on the sampling site. If this hydrogen is to be mined and used on the lunar surface, a number of questions need to be answered. How much energy must be expended in order to release the hydrogen from the soil. What temperatures must be attained, and how long must the soil be heated. This study was undertaken to provide answers to practical questions such as these. Hydrogen was determined using a Pyrolysis/GC technique in which hydrogen was released by heating the soil sample contained in a quartz tube in a resistance wire furnace, followed by separation and quantitative determination using a gas chromatograph with a helium ionization detector. Heating times and temperatures were varied, and particle separates were studied in addition to bulk soils. The typical sample size was 10 mg of lunar soil. All of the soils used were mature soils with similar hydrogen abundances. Pre-treatments with air and steam were used in an effort to find a more efficient way of releasing hydrogen.

  1. Kinetics of hydrogen release from lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bustin, Roberta

    1990-01-01

    With increasing interest in a lunar base, there is a need for extensive examination of possible lunar resources. Hydrogen will be needed on a lunar base for many activities including providing fuel, making water, and serving as a reducing agent in the extraction of oxygen from its ores. Previous studies have shown the solar wind has implanted hydrogen in the lunar regolith and that hydrogen is present not only in the outer layer of soil but to considerable depths, depending on the sampling site. If this hydrogen is to be mined and used on the lunar surface, a number of questions need to be answered. How much energy must be expended in order to release the hydrogen from the soil. What temperatures must be attained, and how long must the soil be heated. This study was undertaken to provide answers to practical questions such as these. Hydrogen was determined using a Pyrolysis/GC technique in which hydrogen was released by heating the soil sample contained in a quartz tube in a resistance wire furnace, followed by separation and quantitative determination using a gas chromatograph with a helium ionization detector. Heating times and temperatures were varied, and particle separates were studied in addition to bulk soils. The typical sample size was 10 mg of lunar soil. All of the soils used were mature soils with similar hydrogen abundances. Pre-treatments with air and steam were used in an effort to find a more efficient way of releasing hydrogen.

  2. Effect of thermal desorption kinetics on vapor injection peak irregularities by a microscale gas chromatography preconcentrator.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jung Hwan; Liu, Jing; Fan, Xudong; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2012-08-01

    Microscale gas chromatography (μGC) is an emerging analytical technique for in situ analysis and on-site monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in moderately complex mixtures. One of the critical subcomponents in a μGC system is a microfabricated preconcentrator (μ-preconcentrator), which enables detection of compounds existing in indoor/ambient air at low (~sub ppb) concentrations by enhancing their signals. The prevailing notion is that elution peak broadening and tailing phenomena resulting from undesirable conditions of a microfabricated separation column (μ-column) are the primary sources of poor chromatographic resolution. However, previous experimental results indicate that the resolution degradation still remains observed for a μ-column integrated with other μGC subcomponents even after setting optimal separation conditions. In this work, we obtain the evidence that the unoptimized μ-preconcentrator vapor release/injection performance significantly contributes to decrease the fidelity of μGC analysis using our state-of-the-art passive preconcentrator microdevice. The vapor release/injection performance is highly affected by the kinetics of the thermal desorption of compounds trapped in the microdevice. Decreasing the heating rate by 20% from the optimal rate of 90 °Cs(-1) causes a 340% increase in peak tailing as well as 70% peak broadening (30% peak height reduction) to the microscale vapor injection process.

  3. Effect of humic acid on the adsorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on goethite. Isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Jeison Manuel; Waiman, Carolina C; Zanini, Graciela P; Avena, Marcelo J

    2016-02-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption/desorption of glyphosate (Gly) on goethite were investigated under pseudo equilibrium conditions by adsorption isotherms and under kinetic conditions by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Isotherms reveal that the attachment of Gly is almost completely inhibited by HA molecules. The opposite effect is not observed: HA adsorption is not affected by the presence of Gly. ATR-FTIR allowed the simultaneous detection of adsorbed HA and Gly during kinetic runs, revealing that HA at the surface decreases markedly the adsorption rate of Gly likely as a result of a decreased availability of sites for Gly adsorption and because of electrostatic repulsion. In addition, HA in solution increases the desorption rate of Gly. The rate law for Gly desorption could be determined giving important insights on the desorption mechanism. The herbicide is desorbed by two parallel processes: i) a direct detachment from the surface, which is first order in adsorbed Gly; and ii) a ligand exchange with HA molecules, which is first order in adsorbed Gly and first order in dissolved HA. Rate constants for both processes were quantified, leading to half-lives of 3.7 h for the first process, and 1.4 h for the second process in a 400 mg L(-1) HA solution. These data are important for modeling the dynamics of glyphosate in environmentally relevant systems, such as soils and surface waters. PMID:26657085

  4. Effect of humic acid on the adsorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on goethite. Isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Jeison Manuel; Waiman, Carolina C; Zanini, Graciela P; Avena, Marcelo J

    2016-02-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption/desorption of glyphosate (Gly) on goethite were investigated under pseudo equilibrium conditions by adsorption isotherms and under kinetic conditions by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Isotherms reveal that the attachment of Gly is almost completely inhibited by HA molecules. The opposite effect is not observed: HA adsorption is not affected by the presence of Gly. ATR-FTIR allowed the simultaneous detection of adsorbed HA and Gly during kinetic runs, revealing that HA at the surface decreases markedly the adsorption rate of Gly likely as a result of a decreased availability of sites for Gly adsorption and because of electrostatic repulsion. In addition, HA in solution increases the desorption rate of Gly. The rate law for Gly desorption could be determined giving important insights on the desorption mechanism. The herbicide is desorbed by two parallel processes: i) a direct detachment from the surface, which is first order in adsorbed Gly; and ii) a ligand exchange with HA molecules, which is first order in adsorbed Gly and first order in dissolved HA. Rate constants for both processes were quantified, leading to half-lives of 3.7 h for the first process, and 1.4 h for the second process in a 400 mg L(-1) HA solution. These data are important for modeling the dynamics of glyphosate in environmentally relevant systems, such as soils and surface waters.

  5. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-02-12

    Rates of contaminant U(VI) release from individual size fractions of a composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through batch reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. Variability in equilibrium adsorption among the various size fractions was determined in static batch reactors and analyzed using the surface complexation modeling approach. The estimated stoichiometric coefficients of U(VI) surface complexation reactions with respect to pH and carbonate concentrations varied with size fractions. This source of variability significantly increased the uncertainty in U(VI) conditional equilibrium constants over that estimated from experimental errors alone. A minimum difference between conditional equilibrium constants was established in order to evaluate statistically significant differences between sediment adsorption properties. A set of equilibrium and kinetic expressions for cation exchange, calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration, and silica dissolution were incorporated in a reaction-rate model to describe the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through batch experiments. Parameters in the reaction-rate model, calibrated using experimental data for select size fractions, predicted the changes in solute concentrations for the bulk, <2 mm, sediment sample. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multi-rate surface complexation model with an assumed lognormal distribution for the rate constants. The estimated mean and standard deviation were the same for all < 2mm size fractions, but differed in the 2-8mm size fraction. Micropore volumes in the varied size fractions were also similar as assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data. These findings provide further support for the link between microporosity and particle-scale mass transfer rates controlling kinetic U(VI) adsorption/desorption and for the utility of N2 desorption

  6. Photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production - Kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, E.

    1982-01-01

    The simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen was measured in a study of the steady-state turnover times of two biological systems, by driving them into the steady state with repetitive, single-turnover flash illumination. The systems were: (1) in vitro, isolated chloroplasts, ferredoxin and hydrogenase; and (2) the anaerobically-adapted green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. It is found that the turnover times for production of both oxygen and hydrogen in photosynthetic water splitting are in milliseconds, and either equal to, or less than, the turnover time for carbon dioxide reduction in intact algal cells. There is therefore mutual compatibility between hydrogen and oxygen turnover times, and partial compatibility with the excitation rate of the photosynthetic reaction centers under solar irradiation conditions.

  7. Characterization of hot hydrogen-atom reactions by kinetic spectrography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomalesky, R. E.; Sturm, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    The flash photolysis of hydrogen iodide in the presence of nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, and water has been investigated by kinetic spectroscopy. Although the fraction of hydrogen iodide dissociated was very large, the only observable intermediate was imidogen. It was demonstrated that the rapid removal of imidogen and the apparent absence of hydroxyl radicals in each case is a result of the following two reactions, respectively: (1) NH + HI yields NH2 + I; and (2) OH + HI yields H2O + I.

  8. The Effect of Platinum-coatings on Hydrogen- and Water-absorption and Desorption Characteristics of Lithium Zirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, B.; Bandow, S.; Nagata, S.; Saito, K.; Tokunaga, K.; Morita, K.

    Hydrogen (H)- and water (H2O)-storage and desorption characteristics of 25 nm thick Pt films onLi2ZrO3composite materials, exposed to normal air at room temperature, have been investigated by means of elastic recoil detection (ERD), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), weight gain measurement (WGM), and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) techniques. It was found by the ERD and TDS that H and H2O were absorbed into the Pt-coated Li2ZrO3 in air at room temperature and desorbed from it in vacuum at much low temperatures of approximately 317 and 309 K, respectively. In addition, the WGM and TDS spectra revealed that the absorption and desorption characters ofsome gases such as CH4, CO, and CO2including H as well as H2Ointo the Li2ZrO3 bulk were improved by Pt deposition.

  9. First Observation of Charge Reduction and Desorption Kinetics of Multiply Protonated Peptides Soft Landed onto Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjar, Omar; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia

    2007-12-13

    The kinetics of charge reduction and desorption of different species produced by soft-landing of mass-selected ions was studied using in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). The improved SIMS capability described in this work utilizes an in-line 8 keV Cs+ ion gun and allows us to interrogate the surface both during the ion deposition and after the deposition is terminated. As a model system doubly protonated ions of Gramicidin S were deposited onto a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (FSAM) surface. Our results demonstrate for the first time that various peptide-related peaks in FT-ICR SIMS spectra follow very different kinetics. We obtained unique kinetics signatures for doubly protonated, singly protonated and neutral peptides retained on the surface and followed their evolution as a function of time. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with a kinetic model that takes into account charge reduction and thermal desorption of different species from the surface.

  10. Experimental study of water desorption isotherms and thin-layer convective drying kinetics of bay laurel leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghnimi, Thouraya; Hassini, Lamine; Bagane, Mohamed

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the desorption isotherms and the drying kinetics of bay laurel leaves (Laurus Nobilis L.). The desorption isotherms were performed at three temperature levels: 50, 60 and 70 °C and at water activity ranging from 0.057 to 0.88 using the statistic gravimetric method. Five sorption models were used to fit desorption experimental isotherm data. It was found that Kuhn model offers the best fitting of experimental moisture isotherms in the mentioned investigated ranges of temperature and water activity. The Net isosteric heat of water desorption was evaluated using The Clausius-Clapeyron equation and was then best correlated to equilibrium moisture content by the empirical Tsami's equation. Thin layer convective drying curves of bay laurel leaves were obtained for temperatures of 45, 50, 60 and 70 °C, relative humidity of 5, 15, 30 and 45 % and air velocities of 1, 1.5 and 2 m/s. A non linear regression procedure of Levenberg-Marquardt was used to fit drying curves with five semi empirical mathematical models available in the literature, The R2 and χ2 were used to evaluate the goodness of fit of models to data. Based on the experimental drying curves the drying characteristic curve (DCC) has been established and fitted with a third degree polynomial function. It was found that the Midilli Kucuk model was the best semi-empirical model describing thin layer drying kinetics of bay laurel leaves. The bay laurel leaves effective moisture diffusivity and activation energy were also identified.

  11. Electron-ion dynamics in laser-assisted desorption of hydrogen atoms from H-Si(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Varga, Kalman

    2011-09-15

    In the framework of real time real space time-dependent density functional theory we have studied the electron-ion dynamics of a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface H-Si(111) subjected to intense laser irradiation. Two surface fragments of different sizes have been used in the simulations. When the intensity and duration of the laser exceed certain levels (which depend on the wavelength) we observe the desorption of the hydrogen atoms, while the underlying silicon layer remains essentially undamaged. Upon further increase of the laser intensity, the chemical bonds between silicon atoms break as well. The results of the simulations suggest that with an appropriate choice of laser parameters it should be possible to remove the hydrogen layer from the H-Si(111) surface in a matter of a few tens of femtoseconds. We have also observed that at high laser field intensities (2-4 V/A in this work) the desorption occurs even when the laser frequency is smaller than the optical gap of the silicon surface fragments. Therefore, nonlinear phenomena must play an essential role in such desorption processes.

  12. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression.

  13. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression. PMID:22565543

  14. Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Li, Zhenjun; Chen, Long; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-07-17

    The adsorption, desorption, and displacement kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110) are investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and molecular beam techniques. The TPD spectra for both H2O and CO2 have well-resolved peaks corresponding to desorption from bridge-bonded oxygen (BBO), Ti, and oxygen vacancies (VO) sites in order of increasing peak temperature. Analysis of the saturated monolayer peak for both species reveals that the corresponding adsorption energies on all sites are greater for H2O and for CO2. Sequential dosing of H2O and CO2 reveals that, independent of the dose order, H2O molecules will displace CO2 in order to occupy the highest energy binding sites available. Isothermal experiments show that the displacement of CO2 by H2O occurs between 75 and 80 K. Further analysis shows that a ratio of 4 H2O to 3 CO2 molecules is needed to displace CO2 from the TiO2(110) surface.

  15. In-situ neutron investigation of hydrogen absorption kinetics in La(FexSi1-x)13 magnetocaloric alloys for room-temperature refrigeration application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Xueying; Mayer, Charlotte; Colin, Claire V.; Miraglia, Salvatore

    2016-02-01

    Promising magnetocaloric material La(Fe,Si)13 with a first-order magnetic transition has been widely investigated. The observed instability of hydrogen in the material is detrimental for its industrial upscale and a better control of the hydrogen absorption/desorption is necessary to optimize its application potential. In this article, the hydrogen absorption kinetics is studied through an in-situ neutron diffraction experiment. The results allow us to have an inside look at the structure "breathing" to accommodate the interstitial atoms and compare the effect of hydrides with carbohydrides.

  16. Control of Uniform and Interconnected Macroporous Structure in PolyHIPE for Enhanced CO2 Adsorption/Desorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanyong; Liu, Yao; Chen, Jian; Du, Zhongjie; Mi, Jianguo

    2016-07-19

    The highly uniform and interconnected macroporous polymer materials were prepared within the high internal phase hydrosol-in-oil emulsions (HIPEs). Impregnated with polyethylenimine (PEI), the polyHIPEs were then employed as solid adsorbents for CO2 capture. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests were performed with pure CO2, 10% CO2/N2, and moist CO2, respectively. It has shown that the polyHIPE with suitable surface area and PEI impregnation exhibits high CO2 adsorption capacity, remarkable CO2/N2 selectivity, excellent adsorption/desorption kinetics, enhanced efficiency in the presence of water, and admirable stability in capture and release cycles. The results demonstrate the superior comprehensive performance of the present PEI-impregnated polyHIPE for CO2 capture from the postcombustion flue gas. PMID:27322734

  17. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Chongxuan; Hu, Bill X.; Zhang, Guannan

    2014-01-01

    A multi-rate expression for uranyl [U(VI)] surface complexation reactions has been proposed to describe diffusion-limited U(VI) sorption/desorption in heterogeneous subsurface sediments. An important assumption in the rate expression is that its rate constants follow a certain type probability distribution. In this paper, a Bayes-based, Differential Evolution Markov Chain method was used to assess the distribution assumption and to analyze parameter and model structure uncertainties. U(VI) desorption from a contaminated sediment at the US Hanford 300 Area, Washington was used as an example for detail analysis. The results indicated that: 1) the rate constants in the multi-rate expression contain uneven uncertainties with slower rate constants having relative larger uncertainties; 2) the lognormal distribution is an effective assumption for the rate constants in the multi-rate model to simualte U(VI) desorption; 3) however, long-term prediction and its uncertainty may be significantly biased by the lognormal assumption for the smaller rate constants; and 4) both parameter and model structure uncertainties can affect the extrapolation of the multi-rate model with a larger uncertainty from the model structure. The results provide important insights into the factors contributing to the uncertainties of the multi-rate expression commonly used to describe the diffusion or mixing-limited sorption/desorption of both organic and inorganic contaminants in subsurface sediments.

  18. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE ON TRICHLOROETHYLENE DESORPTION FROM SILICA GEL AND NATURAL SEDIMENTS. 2. KINETICS. (R822626)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isothermal desorption rates were measured at 15, 30, and 60 src="/ncer/pubs/images/deg.gif">C for trichloroethylene (TCE) on a silica gel,
    an aquifer sediment, a soil, a sand fraction, and a clay and silt fraction, all
    at 100% relative humidity. Temperature-st...

  19. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  20. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons hydrogenation. 1: Experimental reaction pathways and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Korre, S.C.; Klein, M.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Quann, R.J. . Paulsboro Research Lab.)

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between molecular structure and hydrogenation reactivity in heavy oil hydroprocessing was sought via the elucidation of the controlling reaction pathways and kinetics of one-, two-, three-, and four-fused ring compounds. Hydrogenation reactions of o-xylene, tetralin, naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene, and chrysene and their multicomponent mixtures were studied in cyclohexane solvent using a presulfided CoMo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalyst in a 1-liter batch autoclave at P[sub H[sub 2

  1. Structural and kinetic studies of metal hydride hydrogen storage materials using thin film deposition and characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Stephen Thomas

    absorption and desorption kinetics and degrades the material texture. Cycling the films to greater hydrogen loading accelerates the changes to the kinetics and material texture. In addition to in situ XRD experiments, in situ neutron reflectivity experiments on epitaxial Mg films exposed to hydrogen gas reveal details about the microstructural development of the growing hydride layer as the film absorbs and releases hydrogen. Small (10 wt%) additions of Ti to epitaxial Mg films during growth result in metastable solid solution films of Ti in Mg that deposit epitaxially on (001) Al2O3 substrates with epitaxy similar to the pure Mg films. These metastable alloy films absorb hydrogen faster than pure Mg films under identical conditions. Subsequent film cycling results in altered reaction kinetics and a transition to a different kinetic mechanism during desorption than for pure Mg films.

  2. Role of point defects and additives in kinetics of hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Walle, Chris

    2010-03-01

    First-principles computational studies of hydrogen interactions with storage materials can provide direct insight into the processes of H uptake and release, and may help in developing guidelines for designing storage media with improved storage capacity and kinetics. One important conclusion is that the defects involved in kinetics of semiconducting or insulating H-storage materials are charged, and hence their formation energy is Fermi-level dependent and can be affected by the presence of impurities that change the Fermi level [1,2]. This provides an explanation for the role played by transition-metal impurities in the kinetics of NaAlH4 and related materials. Desorption of H and decomposition of NaAlH4 requires not only mass transport of H but also of Al and/or Na. This process is mediated by native defects. We have investigated the structure, stability, and migration enthalpy of native defects based on density functional theory. The results allow us to estimate diffusion activation energies for the defects that may be involved in mass transport. Most of the relevant defects exist in charge states other than neutral, and consideration of these charge states is essential for a proper description of kinetics. We propose specific new mechanisms to explain the observed activation energies and their dependence on the presence of impurities. We have also expanded our studies to materials other than NaAlH4. In the case of LiBH4 and Li4BN3H10 we have found that the calculations have predictive power in terms of identifying which impurities will actually enhance kinetics. Other complex hydrides that we are currently investigating include Li2NH and LiNH2. [4pt] [1] A. Peles and C. G. Van de Walle, Phys. Rev. B 76, 214101 (2007). [0pt] [2] C. G. Van de Walle, A. Peles, A. Janotti, and G. B. Wilson-Short, Physica B 404, 793 (2009).

  3. The development of microstructure during hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination treatment of sintered neodymium-iron-boron-type magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, R. S.; Harris, I. R.; Walton, A.

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of the hydrogenation disproportionation desorption and recombination (HDDR) process on scrap sintered neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) type magnets have been investigated. At each stage of the process, the microstructural changes have been studied using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points and then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. This process was accelerated at particle surfaces and at free surfaces produced by any cracks in the powder particles. However, the recombination reaction appeared to initiate randomly throughout the particles with no apparent preference for particle surfaces or internal cracks. During the hydrogenation of the grain boundaries and triple junctions, the disproportionation reaction was, however, affected by the much higher oxygen content of the sintered NdFeB compared with that of the as-cast NdFeB alloys. Throughout the entire HDDR reaction the oxidised triple junctions (from the sintered structure) remained unreacted and hence, remained in their original form in the fine recombined microstructure. This resulted in a very significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure and this could lend to improved consolidation in the recycled magnets.

  4. Improvement in hydrogen desorption from β- and γ-MgH2 upon transition-metal doping.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tanveer; Maark, Tuhina Adit; Chakraborty, Sudip; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-08-24

    A thorough study of the structural, electronic, and hydrogen-desorption properties of β- and γ-MgH2 phases substituted by selected transition metals (TMs) is performed through first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The TMs considered herein include Sc, V, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Y, Zr, and Nb, which substitute for Mg at a doping concentration of 3.125 % in both the hydrides. This insertion of TMs causes a variation in the cell volumes of β- and γ-MgH2 . The majority of the TM dopants decrease the lattice constants, with Ni resulting in the largest reduction. From the formation-energy calculations, it is predicted that except for Cu and Ni, the mixing of all the selected TM dopants with the MgH2 phases is exothermic. The selected TMs also influence the stability of both β- and γ-MgH2 and cause destabilization by weakening the MgH bonds. Our results show that doping with certain TMs can facilitate desorption of hydrogen from β- and γ-MgH2 at much lower temperatures than from their pure forms. The hydrogen adsorption strengths are also studied by density-of-states analysis.

  5. Modulation of the thermodynamic, kinetic, and magnetic properties of the hydrogen monomer on graphene by charge doping.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang Feng; Ni, Mei Yan; Zhang, Guo Ren; Zhou, Wang Huai; Li, Yong Gang; Zheng, Xiao Hong; Zeng, Zhi

    2011-08-14

    The thermodynamic, kinetic, and magnetic properties of the hydrogen monomer on doped graphene layers were studied by ab initio simulations. Electron doping heightens the diffusion potential barrier, while hole doping lowers it. However, both kinds of dopings heighten the desorption potential barrier. The underlying mechanism was revealed by investigating the effect of charge doping on the bond strength of graphene and on the electron transfer and the coulomb interaction between the hydrogen monomer and graphene. The kinetic properties of H and D monomers on doped graphene layers during both the annealing process (annealing time t(0) = 300 s) and the constant-rate heating process (heating rate α = 1.0 K/s) were simulated. Macroscopic diffusion of hydrogen monomers on graphene can be achieved when the doping-hole density reaches 5.0 × 10(13) cm(-2). Both electron and hole dopings linearly reduce the total magnetic moment and exchange splitting, which was explained by a simple exchange model. The laws found in this work had been generalized to explain many phenomena reported in literature. This study can further enhance the understanding of the interaction between hydrogen and graphene and was expected to be helpful in the design of hydrogenated-graphene-based devices. PMID:21842947

  6. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Wade C.; Lewis, Charlotte R.; Openshaw, Anna P.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration.

  7. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wade C; Lewis, Charlotte R; Openshaw, Anna P; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27380389

  8. Kinetic modelling of molecular hydrogen transport in microporous carbon materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hankel, M.; Zhang, H.; Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K.; Gray, S. K.; Smith, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The proposal of kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes is explored by employing statistical rate theory methods to describe the kinetics of molecular hydrogen transport in model microporous carbon structures. A Lennard-Jones atom-atom interaction potential is utilized for the description of the interactions between H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} and the carbon framework, while the requisite partition functions describing the thermal flux of molecules through the transition state are calculated quantum mechanically in view of the low temperatures involved in the proposed kinetic molecular sieving application. Predicted kinetic isotope effects for initial passage from the gas phase into the first pore mouth are consistent with expectations from previous modeling studies, namely, that at sufficiently low temperatures and for sufficiently narrow pore mouths D{sub 2} transport is dramatically favored over H{sub 2}. However, in contrast to expectations from previous modeling, the absence of any potential barrier along the minimum energy pathway from the gas phase into the first pore mouth yields a negative temperature dependence in the predicted absolute rate coefficients - implying a negative activation energy. In pursuit of the effective activation barrier, we find that the minimum potential in the cavity is significantly higher than in the pore mouth for nanotube-shaped models, throwing into question the common assumption that passage through the pore mouths should be the rate-determining step. Our results suggest a new mechanism that, depending on the size and shape of the cavity, the thermal activation barrier may lie in the cavity rather than at the pore mouth. As a consequence, design strategies for achieving quantum-mediated kinetic molecular sieving of H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} in a microporous membrane will need, at the very least, to take careful account of cavity shape and size in addition to pore-mouth size in order to ensure that the selective step, namely passage

  9. Adsorption and desorption kinetics of bovine serum albumin in ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on silica matrices.

    PubMed

    Conder; Hayek

    2000-12-01

    Large scale chromatographic separation of proteins can be carried out more rapidly on rigid adsorbents than on soft gel media. The kinetics of adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been studied on rigid adsorbents based on a wide-pore, hydrophilically-coated silica gel matrix in a packed bed (chromatographic column). Process parameters have been varied comprehensively. The effects of surface chemistry (weak anion exchanger and hydrophobic interaction), particle size and liquid flow velocity have been studied on both the adsorption and desorption processes. The relative influences of the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherm on the shape of the breakthrough curve are found to vary with the process parameters in an interpretable and therefore, predictable manner. Pore diffusion resistance is dominant over the external liquid film resistance in controlling the adsorption kinetics, with Biot numbers in the range 170-2600. A two-step model based on these two resistances simulates the breakthrough curves with only limited quantitative accuracy, but gives good predictions of the effect of changes in process parameters. PMID:11080653

  10. Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on Forsterite, Mg2SiO4(011)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Li, Zhenjun; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-12-18

    We have examined the adsorbate-substrate interaction kinetics of CO2 and H2O on a natural forsterite crystal surface, Mg2SiO4(011), with 10-15% of substitutional Fe2+. We use temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and molecular beam techniques to determine the adsorption, desorption, and displacement kinetics for H2O and CO2. Neither CO2 nor H2O has distinct sub-monolayer desorption peaks but instead both have a broad continuous desorption feature that evolve smoothly into multilayer desorption. Inversion of the monolayer coverage spectra for both molecules reveals that the corresponding binding energies for H2O are greater than that for CO2 on all sites. The relative strength of these interactions is the dominant factor in the competitive adsorption/displacement kinetics. In experiments where the two adsorbates are co-dosed, H2O always binds to the highest energy binding sites available and displaces CO2. The onset of CO2 displacement by H2O occurs between 65 and 75 K.

  11. Properties of hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination NdFeB powders prepared from recycled sintered magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périgo, E. A.; da Silva, S. C.; Martin, R. V.; Takiishi, H.; Landgraf, F. J. G.

    2012-04-01

    The effects of the hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination (HDDR) processing conditions on the microstructure and magnetic properties of NdFeB powders prepared from recycling sintered N42 grade magnets were evaluated. Temperatures below 840 oC and above 900 oC are deleterious to HDDR powders' properties. The hydrogen pressure, ranging from 60 to 135 kPa, has a major influence on the remanence compared to that on the intrinsic coercivity. The best magnetic properties (Jr = 0.58 T and μ0Hc = 1.15 T) were obtained with Trecomb = 860 °C, PH2 = 135 kPa, and trecomb = 330 s. Such coercivity value corresponds to 93% of the starting material, not achieved yet by optimizing the HDDR process and without using Dy.

  12. Kinetic Method for Hydrogen-Deuterium-Tritium Mixture Distillation Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sazonov, A.B.; Kagramanov, Z.G.; Magomedbekov, E.P.

    2005-07-15

    Simulation of hydrogen distillation plants requires mathematical procedures suitable for multicomponent systems. In most of the present-day simulation methods a distillation column is assumed to be composed of theoretical stages, or plates. However, in the case of a multicomponent mixture theoretical plate does not exist.An alternative kinetic method of simulation is depicted in the work. According to this method a system of mass-transfer differential equations is solved numerically. Mass-transfer coefficients are estimated with using experimental results and empirical equations.Developed method allows calculating the steady state of a distillation column as well as its any non-steady state when initial conditions are given. The results for steady states are compared with ones obtained via Thiele-Geddes theoretical stage technique and the necessity of using kinetic method is demonstrated. Examples of a column startup period and periodic distillation simulations are shown as well.

  13. Desorption kinetics of N,N-dimethylformamide vapor from granular activated carbon and hydrophobic zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Ching-Yuan Chang; Wen-Tien Tsai; Horng-Chia Lee

    1996-07-01

    Such thermodynamic properties as enthalpy, free energy, and entropy of adsorption have been computed for N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) vapor on two commercial adsorbents: coconut shell Type PCB of activated carbon and Type DAY of hydrophobic zeolite. The computation is based on the Langmuir adsorption isotherms obtained at 293, 303, and 313 K as reported by Tsai et al. The laden adsorbents were regenerated with hot inert nitrogen gas and studied by thermal gravimetric analysis at three different heating rates. The apparent activation energies (E{sub des}) of thermal desorption were determined by using the Friedman method. The zeolite DAY has an adsorption potential higher than that of activated carbon PCB as indicated by the more negative value of the adsorption enthalpy of DMF vapor. The average value of E{sub des} of zeolite DAY is larger than that of activated carbon PCB.

  14. Hydrogen recombination kinetics and nuclear thermal rocket performance prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, K.K.; Solomon, W.C.

    1994-07-01

    The rate constants for the hydrogen three-body collisional recombination reaction with atomic and molecular hydrogen acting as third bodies have been determined by numerous investigators during the past 30 yr, but these rates exhibit significant scatter. The discrepancies in the rate constants determined by different investigators are as great as two orders of magnitude in the temperature range of interest for nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) operation, namely, 2000-3300 K. The impact of this scatter on our ability to predict the specific impulse (I(sub sp)) delivered by a 30-klbf NTR has been determined for chamber pressures and temperatures from, respectively, 20-1000 psia and 2700-3300 K. The variation in I(sub sp) produced by using the different rate constants is as great as 10%, or 100 s. This variation also obscures the influence of chamber pressure on I(sub sp); using fast kinetics, low pressures yield significantly improved performance, while using slow or nominal kinetics, the pressure dependence of I(sub sp) is negligible. Because the flow composition freezes at very small area ratios, optimization of the nozzle contour in the near-throat region maximizes recombination. Vibrational relaxation is found to produce negligible losses in I(sub sp). 36 refs.

  15. Hydrogen recombination kinetics and nuclear thermal rocket performance prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, Kyle K.; Solomon, Wayne C.

    1994-07-01

    The rate constants for the hydrogen three-body collisional recombination reaction with atomic and molecular hydrogen acting as third bodies have been determined by numerous investigators during the past 30 yr, but these rates exhibit significant scatter. The discrepancies in the rate constants determined by different investigators are as great as two orders of magnitude in the temperature range of interest for nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) operation, namely, 2000-3300 K. The impact of this scatter on our ability to predict the specific impulse (I(sub sp)) delivered by a 30-klbf NTR has been determined for chamber pressures and temperatures from, respectively, 20-1000 psia and 2700-3300 K. The variation in I(sub sp) produced by using the different rate constants is as great as 10%, or 100 s. This variation also obscures the influence of chamber pressure on I(sub sp); using fast kinetics, low pressures yield significantly improved performance, while using slow or nominal kinetics, the pressure dependence of I(sub sp) is negligible. Because the flow composition freezes at very small area ratios, optimization of the nozzle contour in the near-throat region maximizes recombination. Vibrational relaxation is found to produce negligible losses in I(sub sp).

  16. Kinetic calibration using dominant pre-equilibrium desorption for on-site and in vivo sampling by solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Simon Ningsun; Zhao, Wennan; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2008-01-15

    A new kinetic calibration was developed using dominant pre-equilibrium desorption by solid-phase microextracton. The calibration was based on isotropism between absorption and desorption, which was proved theoretically and experimentally in an aqueous solution and semisolid matrix. This approach allows for the calibration of absorption using desorption to compensate for matrix effects. Moreover, concentration profiles are initially proposed to verify isotropism between the absorption and desorption, while providing a linear approach to obtain time constants for the purpose of quantitative analysis. This linear approach is more convenient, robust, and accurate than the nonlinear version with the previously used time profiles. Furthermore, the target analytes are used as the internal standards; thus, radioactive or deuterated internal standards are not necessary. In addition, dominant pre-equilibrium desorption utilizes the pre-equilibrium approach and offers a shorter sample preparation time, which is typically suitable for in vivo sampling. This kinetic calibration method was successfully applied to prepare samples of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a flow-through system and in vivo pesticide sampling in a jade plant (Crassula ovata).

  17. Dual-mode modeling of competitive and concentration-dependent sorption and desorption kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongye; Pignatello, Joseph J.; White, Jason C.; Braida, Washington; Ferrandino, Francis

    2001-08-01

    A radial dual-mode diffusion model is proposed for mass transfer of hydrophobic compounds in soil organic matter (SOM) that is able to predict competitive and concentration effects on sorption and desorption rates. On the basis of dual-mode sorption theory for glassy polymers the model assumes a population of specific adsorption sites ("holes") interspersed uniformly in the dissolution (partition) domain of SOM. It further assumes Fickian diffusion in the dissolution domain and immobilization in the holes, with microscopic local equilibrium between the two domains. The model is solved numerically (Crank-Nicolson implicit method). Using parameters from single-solute equilibrium and kinetic experiments, the model adequately predicts batch transient sorption and desorption of phenanthrene (primary solute) as a function of pyrene (cosolute) concentration, and batch transient sorption of phenanthrene as a function of its own concentration, in two soils. The model shows that phenanthrene sorption approaches equilibrium faster with increasing cosolute or self-concentration owing to the concentration dependence of the apparent diffusivity, as predicted by a simple hole-plugging mechanism (i.e., fewer and fewer holes are available). Simulations show the effect to be greatest under infinite bath uptake conditions. Under finite bath conditions this positive effect on rate may be opposed by a batch process temporal bias present when the water:soil ratio is kept constant in a series of experiments. The bias is due to gradient driving force effects that slow the rate as a result of the decrease in percent of solute finally taken up by the solid as cosolute or concentration increases.

  18. Kinetic release of hydrogen peroxide from different whitening products.

    PubMed

    da Silva Marques, Duarte Nuno; Silveira, Joao Miguel; Marques, Joana Rita; Amaral, Joao Almeida; Guilherme, Nuno Marques; da Mata, António Duarte

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide (HP) release from five different bleaching products: VivaStyle® 10% fitted tray gel, VivaStyle® 30% in-office bleaching gel, VivaStyle® Paint-On Plus paint-on bleaching varnish, Opalescence PF® 10% carbamide peroxide gel and Trèswhite Supreme™ 10% HP gel. Each product was firstly titrated for its HP content by a described method. HP release kinetics was assessed by a modified spectrophotometric technique. One sample t test was performed to test for differences between the manufacturers' claimed HP concentrations and the titrated HP content in the whitening products. Analysis of variance plus Tamhane's post hoc tests and Pearson correlation analysis were used as appropriate. Values of P < 0.05 were taken as significant. Titrated HP revealed an increased content when compared to the manufacturer's specifications for all the products tested (P < 0.05), although only products from one manufacturer produced significantly higher results. All products presented a significant (P < 0.05) and sustained release of HP. However, the product with paint-on cellulose-based matrix resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) faster kinetics when compared to other products tested. These results are consistent with manufacturers' reduced recommended application times. The results of this study suggest that modifying the matrix composition may be a viable alternative to HP concentration increase, since this may result in faster release kinetics without exposure to high HP concentrations. PMID:22908081

  19. Kinetic modeling of α-hydrogen abstractions from unsaturated and saturated oxygenate compounds by hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Paschalis D; Sabbe, Maarten K; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Papayannakos, Nikos G; Marin, Guy B

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen-abstraction reactions play a significant role in thermal biomass conversion processes, as well as regular gasification, pyrolysis, or combustion. In this work, a group additivity model is constructed that allows prediction of reaction rates and Arrhenius parameters of hydrogen abstractions by hydrogen atoms from alcohols, ethers, esters, peroxides, ketones, aldehydes, acids, and diketones in a broad temperature range (300-2000 K). A training set of 60 reactions was developed with rate coefficients and Arrhenius parameters calculated by the CBS-QB3 method in the high-pressure limit with tunneling corrections using Eckart tunneling coefficients. From this set of reactions, 15 group additive values were derived for the forward and the reverse reaction, 4 referring to primary and 11 to secondary contributions. The accuracy of the model is validated upon an ab initio and an experimental validation set of 19 and 21 reaction rates, respectively, showing that reaction rates can be predicted with a mean factor of deviation of 2 for the ab initio and 3 for the experimental values. Hence, this work illustrates that the developed group additive model can be reliably applied for the accurate prediction of kinetics of α-hydrogen abstractions by hydrogen atoms from a broad range of oxygenates. PMID:25209711

  20. Study of kinetic desorption rate constant in fish muscle and agarose gel model using solid phase microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Togunde, Oluranti Paul; Oakes, Ken; Servos, Mark; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2012-09-12

    This study aims to use solid phase microextraction (SPME), a simple tool to investigate diffusion rate (time) constant of selected pharmaceuticals in gel and fish muscle by comparing desorption rate of diffusion of the drugs in both agarose gel prepared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; pH 7.4) and fish muscle. The gel concentration (agarose gel model) that could be used to simulate tissue matrix (fish muscle) for free diffusion of drugs under in vitro and in vivo conditions was determined to model mass transfer phenomena between fibre polymer coating and environmental matrix such that partition coefficients and desorption time constant (diffusion coefficient) can be determined. SPME procedure involves preloading the extraction phase (fibre) with the standards from spiked PBS for 1h via direct extraction. Subsequently, the preloaded fibre is introduced to the sample such fish or agarose gel for specified time ranging from 0.5 to 60 h. Then, fibre is removed at specified time and desorbed in 100 μL of desorption solution (acetonitrile: water 1:1) for 90 min under agitation speed of 1000 rpm. The samples extract were immediately injected to the instrument and analysed using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The limit of detection of the method in gel and fish muscle was 0.01-0.07 ng mL(-1) and 0.07-0.34 ng g(-1), respectively, while the limit quantification was 0.10-0.20 ng mL(-1) in gel samples and 0.40-0.97 ng g(-1) in fish sample. The reproducibility of the method was good (5-15% RSD). The results suggest that kinetics of desorption of the compounds in fish tissue and different viscosity of gel can be determined using desorption time constant. In this study, desorption time constant which is directly related to desorption rate (diffusion kinetics) of selected drugs from the fibre to the gel matrix is faster as the viscosity of the gel matrix reduces from 2% (w/v) to 0.8% (w/v). As the concentration of gel reduces

  1. Activated desorption at heterogeneous interfaces and long-time kinetics of hydrocarbon recovery from nanoporous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Thomas; Bocquet, Lydéric; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-06-01

    Hydrocarbon recovery from unconventional reservoirs (shale gas) is debated due to its environmental impact and uncertainties on its predictability. But a lack of scientific knowledge impedes the proposal of reliable alternatives. The requirement of hydrofracking, fast recovery decay and ultra-low permeability--inherent to their nanoporosity--are specificities of these reservoirs, which challenge existing frameworks. Here we use molecular simulation and statistical models to show that recovery is hampered by interfacial effects at the wet kerogen surface. Recovery is shown to be thermally activated with an energy barrier modelled from the interface wetting properties. We build a statistical model of the recovery kinetics with a two-regime decline that is consistent with published data: a short time decay, consistent with Darcy description, followed by a fast algebraic decay resulting from increasingly unreachable energy barriers. Replacing water by CO2 or propane eliminates the barriers, therefore raising hopes for clean/efficient recovery.

  2. Activated desorption at heterogeneous interfaces and long-time kinetics of hydrocarbon recovery from nanoporous media

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas; Bocquet, Lydéric; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon recovery from unconventional reservoirs (shale gas) is debated due to its environmental impact and uncertainties on its predictability. But a lack of scientific knowledge impedes the proposal of reliable alternatives. The requirement of hydrofracking, fast recovery decay and ultra-low permeability—inherent to their nanoporosity—are specificities of these reservoirs, which challenge existing frameworks. Here we use molecular simulation and statistical models to show that recovery is hampered by interfacial effects at the wet kerogen surface. Recovery is shown to be thermally activated with an energy barrier modelled from the interface wetting properties. We build a statistical model of the recovery kinetics with a two-regime decline that is consistent with published data: a short time decay, consistent with Darcy description, followed by a fast algebraic decay resulting from increasingly unreachable energy barriers. Replacing water by CO2 or propane eliminates the barriers, therefore raising hopes for clean/efficient recovery. PMID:27327254

  3. Comparison of the growth kinetics of In2O3 and Ga2O3 and their suboxide desorption during plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Patrick; Bierwagen, Oliver

    2016-08-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the In2O3 growth kinetics during plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and compare it to that of the related oxide Ga2O3 [P. Vogt and O. Bierwagen, Appl. Phys. Lett. 108, 072101 (2016)]. The growth rate and desorbing fluxes were measured during growth in-situ by a laser reflectometry set-up and line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometer, respectively. We extracted the In incorporation as a function of the provided In flux, different growth temperatures TG, and In-to-O flux ratios r. The data are discussed in terms of the competing formation of In2O3 and desorption of the suboxide In2O and O. The same three growth regimes as in the case of Ga2O3 can be distinguished: (i) In-transport limited, O-rich (ii) In2O-desorption limited, O-rich, and (iii) O-transport limited, In-rich. In regime (iii), In droplets are formed on the growth surface at low TG. The growth kinetics follows qualitatively that of Ga2O3 in agreement with their common oxide and suboxide stoichiometry. The quantitative differences are mainly rationalized by the difference in In2O and Ga2O desorption rates and vapor pressures. For the In2O, Ga2O, and O desorption, we extracted the activation energies and frequency factors by means of Arrhenius-plots.

  4. Electron-stimulated desorption study of hydrogen-exposed aluminum films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, CH.; Bujor, M.; Poppa, H.

    1984-01-01

    H2 adsorption of evaporated clean and H2-exposed aluminum films is investigated by using the electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) method. A strong H(+)ESD signal is observed on a freshly evaporated aluminum surface which is clean according to previously proposed cleanlines criteria. An increased H(+) yield on H2 exposure is also observed. However, the increasing rate of H(+) emission could be directly correlated with small increases in H2O partial pressure during H2 exposure. It is proposed that the oxidation of aluminum by water vapor and subsequent adsorption of H2 or water is the primary process of the enhanced high H(+) yield during H2 exposure.

  5. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  6. Kinetic Controls on the Desorption/Dissolution of Sorbed U(VI) and their Influence on Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Chongxuan Liu; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; McKinley, James P.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Davis, James A.

    2006-04-05

    source to groundwater. (2) Measure desorption/dissolution rates of sorbed U(VI), quantify controlling factors, and develop descriptive kinetic models to provide a scientific basis to forecast U(VI) fluxes to groundwater, future plume dynamics, and long-term contaminant attenuation. (3) Establish reaction networks and determine geochemically/ physically realistic reaction parameters to drive state-of-the-art reactive transport modeling of U in vadose zone pore fluids and groundwater.

  7. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  8. Tailoring Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides towards Applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongfeng; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state hydrogen storage using various materials is expected to provide the ultimate solution for safe and efficient on-board storage. Complex hydrides have attracted increasing attention over the past two decades due to their high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. In this account, we review studies from our lab on tailoring the thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage in complex hydrides, including metal alanates, borohydrides and amides. By changing the material composition and structure, developing feasible preparation methods, doping high-performance catalysts, optimizing multifunctional additives, creating nanostructures and understanding the interaction mechanisms with hydrogen, the operating temperatures for hydrogen storage in metal amides, alanates and borohydrides are remarkably reduced. This temperature reduction is associated with enhanced reaction kinetics and improved reversibility. The examples discussed in this review are expected to provide new inspiration for the development of complex hydrides with high hydrogen capacity and appropriate thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage.

  9. Trapping state of hydrogen isotopes in carbon and graphite investigated by thermal desorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, H.; Tanabe, T.; Shikama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) has been investigated to obtain fundamental information of tritium behavior in graphite and carbon materials especially at high temperatures. 29 brands of graphite, HOPG, glassy carbon and CFC materials charged with deuterium gas are tested up to the temperature of 1735 K with a heating rate of 0.1 K/s. TDS spectra have five peaks at 600-700 K, around 900 K, 1200 K, 1300-1450 K and 1600-1650 K. The amounts of released deuterium have been compared with crystallographic parameters derived from XRD analysis. The results can be summarized as follows. First, TDS spectra of deuterium were quite varied among the samples tested, such as existence of peaks, peak temperatures and release amounts of deuterium. Secondly, TDS spectra may consist of five peaks, which are peak 1 (600-700 K), peak 2 (around 900 K), peak 3 (around 1200 K), peak 4 (1300-1450 K) and peak 5 (1600-1650 K). Thirdly, the correlations between the estimated surface area of edge surface and the total amount of released deuterium could be observed for peaks 4 and 5. Fourthly, high energy trapping site (peak 5) may exist even at edge surface or a near surface region, not only for intercalary. And fifth, in order to obtain the lower tritium retention for graphite and CFC materials, the material should be composed of a filler grain with a smaller crystallite size or having the smaller net edge surface in its structure. It is shown that heat treatment does not reduce originally existing trapping sites but trapping sites generated by neutron irradiation for instance can be reduced in some degree.

  10. Effectiveness of passivation techniques on hydrogen desorption in a tritium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodall, Steven Michael

    2009-11-01

    Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. It is used as a fuel in fusion reactors, a booster material in nuclear weapons and as a light source in commercial applications. When tritium is used in fusion reactors, and especially when used in the manufacture of nuclear weapons, purity is critical. For U.S. Department of Energy use, tritium is recycled by Savannah River Site in South Carolina and is processed to a minimum purity of 99.5%. For use elsewhere in the country, it must be shipped and stored, while maintaining the highest purity possible. As an isotope of hydrogen it exchanges easily with the most common isotope of hydrogen, protium. Stainless steel bottles are used to transport and store tritium. Protium, present in air, becomes associated in and on the surface of stainless steel during and after the manufacture of the steel. When filled, the tritium within the bottle exchanges with the protium in and on the surface of the stainless steel, slowly contaminating the pure tritium with protium. The stainless steel is therefore passivated to minimize the protium outgrowth of the bottles into the pure tritium. This research is to determine how effective different passivation techniques are in minimizing the contamination of tritium with protium. Additionally, this research will attempt to determine a relationship between surface chemistry of passivated steels and protium contamination of tritium. The conclusions of this research found that passivated bottles by two companies which routinely provide passivated materials to the US Department of Energy provide low levels of protium outgrowth into pure tritium. A bottle passivated with a material to prevent excessive corrosion in a highly corrosive environment, and a clean and polished bottle provided outgrowth rates roughly twice those of the passivated bottles above. Beyond generally high levels of chromium, oxygen, iron and nickel in the passivated bottles, there did not appear to be a strong correlation

  11. Hydrogen and water desorption on the moon - Approximate, on-line simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanford, G. E.; Borgesen, P.; Moeller, W.; Maurette, M.; Monart, B.

    1985-01-01

    The basic models that have been used over the last 15 years to describe the accumulation and release of solar wind-related species at lunar conditions at the lunar surface are reviewed. Recent results which show that these models are not totally valid are discussed. It is suggested that mature lunar surface soils may act as efficient converters for transforming the flux of energetic solar wind protons into a flux of low-energy hydrogen and water molecules continuously injected into the lunar atmosphere.

  12. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15Ni-CNT Nanocomposite Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enayati, M. H.; Karimzadeh, F.; Jafari, M.; Sabooni, S.

    2015-03-01

    In this research, the effects of nanocrystallization and incorporation of aluminum, titanium, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on hydrogen desorption behavior of Mg2Ni alloy were investigated. Toward this purpose, nanocrystalline Mg2Ni intermetallic compound with average grain size of 20 nm was prepared by ball milling of elemental magnesium and nickel powders. Mg2Ni powder was then ball milled with aluminum and titanium powders for 20 h to dissolve these elements into the Mg2Ni structure, leading to the formation of Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15Ni compound. The elemental x-ray mapping analysis revealed the uniform dissolution of aluminum and titanium inside the Mg2Ni structure. Mg2Ni and Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15Ni compounds were further ball milled with 3 wt.% CNT for 5 h. The high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed that CNTs have retained their tubular shape after ball-milling process. The hydrogen desorption properties of the samples were identified using a Sieverts-type apparatus at 473 K. The Mg2Ni, Mg2Ni-CNT, and Mg1.7Ti0.15Al0.15-CNT samples showed the desorbed hydrogen of 0.17, 0.25, and 0.28 wt.% after 1 h, respectively, indicating 47 and 65% increase in the hydrogen desorption capability of Mg2Ni via CNT addition and co-presence of aluminum-titanium-CNT. The direct hydrogen diffusion through CNTs and development of local atomic distortion due to substitution of magnesium atoms by aluminum and titanium appears to be responsible for enhancement of desorption behavior of Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15-3 wt.% CNT.

  13. Implementation of New TPD Analysis Techniques in the Evaluation of Second Order Desorption Kinetics of Cyanogen from Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Hinch, B.J.; Senanayake, S.; Ciftlikli, E.Z.; Lee, E.Y.M.; Lallo, J.; Rangan, S.

    2010-12-21

    The interactions of cyanide species with a copper (001) surface were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adsorbed cyanide species (CN{sub (a)}) undergo recombinative desorption evolving molecular cyanogen (C{sub 2}N{sub 2}). As the adsorbed CN species charge upon adsorption, mutually repulsive dipolar interactions lead to a marked desorption energy reduction with increasing CN{sub (a)} coverages. Two new TPD analysis approaches were developed, which used only accurately discernible observables and which do not assume constant desorption energies, E{sub d}, and pre-exponential values, v. These two approaches demonstrated a linear variation of E{sub d} with instantaneous coverage. The first approach involved an analysis of the variations of desorption peak asymmetry with initial CN coverages. The second quantitative approach utilized only temperatures and intensities of TPD peaks, together with deduced surface coverages at the peak maxima, also as a function of initial surface coverages. Parameters derived from the latter approach were utilized as initial inputs for a comprehensive curve fit analysis technique. Excellent fits for all experimental desorption curves were produced in simulations. The curve fit analysis confirms that the activation energy of desorption of 170-180 kJ/mol at low coverage decreases by up to 14-15 kJ/mol at CN saturation.

  14. Implementation of New TPD Analysis Techniques in the Evaluation of Second Order Desorption Kinetics of Cyanogen from Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    E Ciftlikli; E Lee; J Lallo; S Rangan; S Senanayake; B Hinch

    2011-12-31

    The interactions of cyanide species with a copper (001) surface were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adsorbed cyanide species (CN{sub (a)}) undergo recombinative desorption evolving molecular cyanogen (C{sub 2}N{sub 2}). As the adsorbed CN species charge upon adsorption, mutually repulsive dipolar interactions lead to a marked desorption energy reduction with increasing CN{sub (a)} coverages. Two new TPD analysis approaches were developed, which used only accurately discernible observables and which do not assume constant desorption energies, E{sub d}, and pre-exponential values, v. These two approaches demonstrated a linear variation of E{sub d} with instantaneous coverage. The first approach involved an analysis of the variations of desorption peak asymmetry with initial CN coverages. The second quantitative approach utilized only temperatures and intensities of TPD peaks, together with deduced surface coverages at the peak maxima, also as a function of initial surface coverages. Parameters derived from the latter approach were utilized as initial inputs for a comprehensive curve fit analysis technique. Excellent fits for all experimental desorption curves were produced in simulations. The curve fit analysis confirms that the activation energy of desorption of 170-180 kJ/mol at low coverage decreases by up to 14-15 kJ/mol at CN saturation.

  15. Kinetic Interpretation of Water Vapor Adsorption-Desorption Behavior of a Desiccant Rotor Showing S-shaped Adsorption Isotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kumiko; Oshima, Kazunori; Takewaki, Takahiko; Kodama, Akio

    Adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor in a desiccant rotor containing an iron aluminophosphate type zeolite FAM-Z01 (Functional Adsorbent Material Zeolite 01) was experimentally investigated for humidity swing. This rotor exhibited an S-shaped adsorption isotherm with its temperature dependence. Humidity swing, using a small piece of the rotor, could be usefully applied to interpret adsorption / desorption mechanisms by observing their rates. The most significant finding was that the adsorption / desorption rates in humidity swing could be described by the amount of adsorption, temperature and amplitude of the humidity swing, not by cycle time. Also, using the liner driving force (LDF) model, the overall mass transfer coefficient changed with the elapse of time or with the amount of adsorbed water. This implied that the LDF model, considering constant value of the overall mass transfer coefficient, was probably unable to explain the water adsorption / desorption behavior of FAM-Z01 desiccant rotor.

  16. Effect of Clay Nanoparticle Transport, Desorption Kinetics and Redox Equilibrium on Radionuclide Mobility in Fractured Rock investigated at the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, T.; Huber, F. M.; Lagos, M.; Quinto, F.; Heck, S.; Martin, A. J.; Blechschmidt, I.; Lanyon, G. W.; Reiche, T.; Noseck, U.

    2015-12-01

    Transport of contaminants in crystalline environments might occur through dissolved species or attached to colloidal or nanoparticulate phases being mobile in water conducting features of the host rock. In this presentation we will discuss the mobility of clay nanoparticles as detected by laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) as a function of fracture surface roughness and groundwater chemistry. The on site observed Tc-99, U-233, Np-237, Pu-242 and Am-243 sorption/desorption kinetics with and without natural or synthetic clay minerals (smectites) are compared to laboratory studies under similar groundwater conditions. The desorption or redox kinetics were monitored over a duration of up to 426 days using natural fracture filling material as a concurrence ligand and monitoring the colloid attachment via detection of Al, Si, Ni and Zn as smectite structural elements. For trivalent actinides smectite desorption rates in the range of 1.2-3.7E-3 per hour could be determined and significantly lower desorption rates for tetravalent actinides were found. This results will be compared with field data of migration experiments performed at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS, Switzerland) using the same radionuclides and clay colloidal phases varying the fracture residence time by flow rate adjustment. Furthermore, the long-term actinide mobility will be addressed by presenting AMS/RIMS measurements of (a) samples collected several months into the tailing of the breakthrough curves not any longer detectable by HR-ICP-MS and (b) background samples of different GTS ground waters showing fallout U-236, whereas fallout Pu could not be detected indicating a much lower mobility under the given conditions.

  17. Kinetics Study of Solid Ammonia Borane Hydrogen Release – Modeling and Experimental Validation for Chemical Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yong-Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Maupin, Gary D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2014-02-24

    Ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage with 19.6 wt% gravimetric hydrogen capacity of which 16.2 wt% hydrogen can be utilized below 200°C. We have investigated the kinetics of hydrogen release from AB and from an AB-methyl cellulose (AB/MC) composite at temperatures of 160-300°C using both experiments and modeling. The purpose of our study was to show safe hydrogen release without thermal runaway effects and to validate system model kinetics. AB/MC released hydrogen at ~20°C lower than neat AB and at a rate that is two times faster. Based on the experimental results, the kinetics equations were revised to better represent the growth and nucleation process during decomposition of AB. We explored two different reactor concepts; Auger and fixed bed. The current Auger reactor concept turned out to not be appropriate, however, we demonstrated safe self-propagation of the hydrogen release reaction of solid AB/MC in a fixed bed reactor.

  18. Kinetics of hydrogenation of acetophenone to methylphenylcarbinol on KGA-43 copper-chromium catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ziyatdinov, A.Sh.; Stepanenko, V.V.; Chernykh, I.S.; Leonova, E.B.; Pisarenko, V.N.; Kafarov, V.V.

    1988-08-20

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the kinetics of the hydrogenation of acetophenone on KGA-43 catalyst, to establish a kinetic model for it, and to test the adequacy of the kinetic model for experiment. The kinetic studies of the hydrogenation of acetophenone on the new KGA-43 catalyst were conducted on a laboratory unit. Using the theory of steady-state reactions a kinetic model incorporating 10 unknown parameters was constructed. To determine the point estimates of the kinetic constants they used the method of maximum probability. The results of five repeated experiments were used to calculate the elements of a dispersion-covariation matrix of the reproducibility of the observations.

  19. Reaction kinetics for the oxygen hydrogenation process on Pt(111) derived from temperature-programmed XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näslund, Lars-Åke

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen hydrogenation under ultra high vacuum conditions at the platinum surface was explored using temperature-programmed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Through modeling of the oxygen consumption, information on the reaction kinetics was obtained indicating that the reaction rate of the oxygen hydrogenation process depends on the hydrogen diffusion and on the lifetime of hydroxyl intermediates. The reaction rate is, however, enhanced when an autocatalytic process stabilizes the hydroxyl intermediates through hydrogen bonding to neighboring water molecules. The overall activation energy for the hydrogenation of atomic oxygen to form water was determined to be 0.20 eV with a frequency factor of only 103 s- 1.

  20. Graphene CVD growth on copper and nickel: role of hydrogen in kinetics and structure.

    PubMed

    Losurdo, Maria; Giangregorio, Maria Michela; Capezzuto, Pio; Bruno, Giovanni

    2011-12-14

    Understanding the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) kinetics of graphene growth is important for advancing graphene processing and achieving better control of graphene thickness and properties. In the perspective of improving large area graphene quality, we have investigated in real-time the CVD kinetics using CH(4)-H(2) precursors on both polycrystalline copper and nickel. We highlighted the role of hydrogen in differentiating the growth kinetics and thickness of graphene on copper and nickel. Specifically, the growth kinetics and mechanism is framed in the competitive dissociative chemisorption of H(2) and dehydrogenating chemisorption of CH(4), and in the competition of the in-diffusion of carbon and hydrogen, being hydrogen in-diffusion faster in copper than nickel, while carbon diffusion is faster in nickel than copper. It is shown that hydrogen acts as an inhibitor for the CH(4) dehydrogenation on copper, contributing to suppress deposition onto the copper substrate, and degrades quality of graphene. Additionally, the evidence of the role of hydrogen in forming C-H out of plane defects in CVD graphene on Cu is also provided. Conversely, resurfacing recombination of hydrogen aids CH(4) decomposition in the case of Ni. Understanding better and providing other elements to the kinetics of graphene growth is helpful to define the optimal CH(4)/H(2) ratio, which ultimately can contribute to improve graphene layer thickness uniformity even on polycrystalline substrates. PMID:22006173

  1. Structural transformation of hydrogen-adsorbed Si(111)-√3×√3-Ag surfaces induced by electron-stimulated desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    1997-07-01

    Atomic hydrogen irradiated Si(111)-√3×√3-Ag surfaces, which involve nanometer size Ag clusters and hydrogen terminated regions, are studied by combined surface analysis with ultrahigh-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (UHV-SEM), scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM), microprobe reflection high-energy electron diffration (μ-RHEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Electron beam irradiation onto this surface results in disappearance of the Ag clusters, and subsequent low-temperature annealing at 275°C transforms the surface to the original √3×√3-Ag structure. Hydrogen removal from the Si surface induced by electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) and surface diffusion of Ag atoms on the bare regions by low-temperature annealing explain this structural transformation.

  2. Kinetic and Prediction of Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs, B; McLean II, W

    2006-08-31

    In most industrial or device applications, LiH is placed in either an initially dry or a vacuum environment with other materials that may release moisture slowly over many months, years, or even decades. In such instances, the rate of hydrogen outgassing from the reaction of LiH with H{sub 2}O can be reasonably approximated by the rate at which H{sub 2}O is released from the moisture containing materials. In a vacuum or dry environment, LiOH decomposes slowly with time into Li{sub 2}O even at room temperature according to: 2LiOH(s) {yields} Li{sub 2}O(s) + H{sub 2}O(g) (1). The kinetics of the decomposition of LiOH depends on the dryness/vacuum level and temperature. It was discovered by different workers that vacuum thermal decomposition of bulk LiOH powder (grain sizes on the order of tens to hundreds of micrometers) into Li{sub 2}O follows a reaction front moving from the surface inward. Due to stress at the LiOH/vacuum interface and defective and missing crystalline bonding at surface sites, lattice vibrations at the surfaces/interfaces of most materials are at frequencies different than those in the bulk, a phenomenon observed in most solids. The chemical reactivity and electronic properties at surfaces and interfaces of materials are also different than those in the bulk. It is, therefore, expected that the amount of energy required to break bonds at the LiOH/vacuum interface is not as large as in the bulk. In addition, in an environment where there is a moisture sink or in the case of a continuously pumped vacuum chamber, H{sub 2}O vapor is continuously removed and LiOH decomposes into Li{sub 2}O from the LiOH/vacuum interface (where it is thermally less stable) inward according to reaction (1) in an effort to maintain the equilibrium H{sub 2}O vapor pressure at the sample/vacuum interface. In a closed system containing both LiH and LiOH, the H{sub 2}O released from the decomposition of LiOH reacts with LiH to form hydrogen gas according to the following

  3. Hydrogen sulphide in human nasal air quantified using thermal desorption and selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wondimu, Taddese; Wang, Rui; Ross, Brian

    2014-09-01

    The discovery that hydrogen sulphide (H2S) acts as a gasotransmitter when present at very low concentrations (sub-parts per billion (ppbv)) has resulted in the need to quickly quantify trace amounts of the gas in complex biological samples. Selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) is capable of real-time quantification of H2S but many SIFT-MS instruments lack sufficient sensitivity for this application. In this study we investigate the utility of combining thermal desorption with SIFT-MS for quantifying H2S in the 0.1-1 ppbv concentration range. Human orally or nasally derived breath, and background ambient air, were collected in sampling bags and dried by passing through CaCl2 and H2S pre-concentrated using a sorbent trap optimised for the capture of this gas. The absorbed H2S was then thermally desorbed and quantified by SIFT-MS. H2S concentrations in ambient air, nasal breath and oral breath collected from 10 healthy volunteers were 0.12  ±  0.02 (mean ± SD), 0.40  ±  0.11 and 3.1  ±  2.5 ppbv respectively, and in the oral cavity H2S, quantified by SIFT-MS without pre-concentration, was present at 13.5  ±  8.6 ppbv. The oral cavity H2S correlates well with oral breath H2S but not with nasal breath H2S, suggesting that oral breath H2S derives mainly from the oral cavity but nasal breath is likely pulmonary in origin. The successful quantification of such low concentrations of H2S in nasal air using a rapid analytical procedure paves the way for the straightforward analysis of H2S in breath and may assist in elucidating the role that H2S plays in biological systems.

  4. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  5. A study of spin isomer conversion kinetics in supercritical fluid hydrogen for cyrogenic fuel storage technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Petitpas, Guillaume; Aceves, Salvador M.

    2011-08-01

    A detailed kinetic study of para-ortho hydrogen conversion under supercritical conditions using rotational Raman scattering is presented. Isochoric measurements of initially low ortho concentrations over temperatures 32 < T < 280 K and densities 0.014 < ρ < 0.060 g/cm3 were used to derive kinetic rate constants k(ρ, T) by solving an autocatalytic kinetic rate equation. At low ortho concentrations and T < 100 K, k is found to be ˜2× higher than previous results based on thermal conductivity measurements, decreasing weakly with temperature, similar to Wigner's original paramagnetic theory. Accurate modeling of k(ρ, T) is critical in predicting cryogenic hydrogen fuel tank dormancy performance for hydrogen-power vehicles.

  6. The calcium-modulated structures of calmodulin and S100b proteins are useful to monitor hydrogen/deuterium exchange efficiency using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pingerelli, Peter L; Ozols, Victor V; Saleem, Haroon; Anderson, Carly R; Burns, Richard S

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) is a sensitive, salt-tolerant and high-throughput method useful to probe protein conformation and molecular interactions. However, a drawback of the MALDI HDX technique is that sample preparation methods can typically result in higher levels of artificial deuterium in-exchange and/or hydrogen back- exchange just prior to or during mass analysis; this may impair data reproducibility and impede structural and kinetic data interpretation. While methods to minimize effects of back-exchange during protein analyte deposition on MALDI plates have been reported, this study presents a readily available, highly sensitive protein control set to facilitate rapid MALDI HDX protocol workup. The Ca(2+)-induced solvent accessible surface area (ASA) changes of calmodulin (CaM) and S100 proteins were employed to monitor and optimize HDX protocol efficiency. Under non- stringent room temperature conditions, the Ca(2+)-induced deuterium exchange of CaM, DeltaD(ca2+ -apo), MH(+) shifts -17 to -24 Da, while S100 DeltaD(ca2+ -apo) MH(+) shifts +8 to +12 Da. By comparing the divergent CaM and S100 Ca(2+)-induced deuterium mass shift differences, HDX sample workup and MALDI plate spotting conditions can easily be monitored. PMID:19940340

  7. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.; Ren, Ruiming; Hu, Jian Z.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2009-04-01

    Solid-state reversible hydrogen storage systems hold great promise for on-board applications. The key criteria for a successful solid-state reversible storage material are high storage capacity, suitable thermodynamic properties, and fast hydriding and dehydriding kinetics. The LiNH2 + LiH system has been utilized as an example system to illustrate these critical issues that are common among other solid-state reversible storage materials. The progress made in thermodynamic destabilization and kinetic enhancements via various approaches have been emphasized. The implications of these advancements in the development of future solid-state reversible hydrogen storage materials are discussed.

  8. Kinetics of liquid-phase hydrogenation of phenol on a palladium catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kotova, V.G.; Kul'kova, N.V.; Temkin, M.I.

    1988-08-01

    The kinetics of liquid-phase hydrogenation of phenol into cyclohexanone on a Pd catalyst were studied. At atmospheric pressure, the reaction rate is described by the equation previously obtained for liquid-phase hydrogenation of benzoic acid. At pressures of 0.7-4 MPa, the rate obeys a zero-order equation. The preexponential factor of the Arrhenius equation for the number of rotations in the zero-order region correspond to a transmission coefficient of /kappa/ << 1.

  9. Changes in metal availability, desorption kinetics and speciation in contaminated soils during repeated phytoextraction with the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Jia, Mingyun; Wu, Longhua; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yongming

    2016-02-01

    Phytoextraction is one of the most promising technologies for the remediation of metal contaminated soils. Changes in soil metal availability during phytoremediation have direct effects on removal efficiency and can also illustrate the interactive mechanisms between hyperaccumulators and metal contaminated soils. In the present study the changes in metal availability, desorption kinetics and speciation in four metal-contaminated soils during repeated phytoextraction by the zinc/cadmium hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola (S. plumbizincicola) over three years were investigated by chemical extraction and the DGT-induced fluxes in soils (DIFS) model. The available metal fractions (i.e. metal in the soil solution extracted by CaCl2 and by EDTA) decreased greatly by >84% after phytoextraction in acid soils and the deceases were dramatic at the initial stages of phytoextraction. However, the decreases in metal extractable by CaCl2 and EDTA in calcareous soils were not significant or quite low. Large decreases in metal desorption rate constants evaluated by DIFS were found in calcareous soils. Sequential extraction indicated that the acid-soluble metal fraction was easily removed by S. plumbizincicola from acid soils but not from calcareous soils. Reducible and oxidisable metal fractions showed discernible decreases in acid and calcareous soils, indicating that S. plumbizincicola can mobilize non-labile metal for uptake but the residual metal cannot be removed. The results indicate that phytoextraction significantly decreases metal availability by reducing metal pool sizes and/or desorption rates and that S. plumbizincicola plays an important role in the mobilization of less active metal fractions during repeated phytoextraction. PMID:26650084

  10. Changes in metal availability, desorption kinetics and speciation in contaminated soils during repeated phytoextraction with the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Jia, Mingyun; Wu, Longhua; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yongming

    2016-02-01

    Phytoextraction is one of the most promising technologies for the remediation of metal contaminated soils. Changes in soil metal availability during phytoremediation have direct effects on removal efficiency and can also illustrate the interactive mechanisms between hyperaccumulators and metal contaminated soils. In the present study the changes in metal availability, desorption kinetics and speciation in four metal-contaminated soils during repeated phytoextraction by the zinc/cadmium hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola (S. plumbizincicola) over three years were investigated by chemical extraction and the DGT-induced fluxes in soils (DIFS) model. The available metal fractions (i.e. metal in the soil solution extracted by CaCl2 and by EDTA) decreased greatly by >84% after phytoextraction in acid soils and the deceases were dramatic at the initial stages of phytoextraction. However, the decreases in metal extractable by CaCl2 and EDTA in calcareous soils were not significant or quite low. Large decreases in metal desorption rate constants evaluated by DIFS were found in calcareous soils. Sequential extraction indicated that the acid-soluble metal fraction was easily removed by S. plumbizincicola from acid soils but not from calcareous soils. Reducible and oxidisable metal fractions showed discernible decreases in acid and calcareous soils, indicating that S. plumbizincicola can mobilize non-labile metal for uptake but the residual metal cannot be removed. The results indicate that phytoextraction significantly decreases metal availability by reducing metal pool sizes and/or desorption rates and that S. plumbizincicola plays an important role in the mobilization of less active metal fractions during repeated phytoextraction.

  11. Pyrrole Hydrogenation over Rh(111) and Pt(111) Single-Crystal Surfaces and Hydrogenation Promotion Mediated by 1-Methylpyrrole: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, Christopher J.; Bieri, Marco; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-03-04

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of pyrrole over both Pt(111) and Rh(111) single-crystal surfaces at Torr pressures (3 Torr pyrrole, 30 Torr H{sub 2}) to form pyrrolidine and the minor product butylamine. Over Pt(111) at 298 K it was found that pyrrole adsorbs in an upright geometry cleaving the N-H bond to bind through the nitrogen evidenced by SFG data. Over Rh(111) at 298 K pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry relative to the surface through the p-aromatic system. A pyrroline surface reaction intermediate, which was not detected in the gas phase, was seen by SFG during the hydrogenation over both surfaces. Significant enhancement of the reaction rate was achieved over both metal surfaces by adsorbing 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. SFG vibrational spectroscopic results indicate that reaction promotion is achieved by weakening the bonding between the N-containing products and the metal surface because of lateral interactions on the surface between 1-methylpyrrole and the reaction species, reducing the desorption energy of the products. It was found that the ring-opening product butylamine was a reaction poison over both surfaces, but this effect can be minimized by treating the catalyst surfaces with 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. The reaction rate was not enhanced with elevated temperatures, and SFG suggests desorption of pyrrole at elevated temperatures.

  12. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, Mickey R.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this program was to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. Although hydrogen degradation of metallic materials is believed to result from dissolved protonic hydrogen, the heterogeneous hydrogen interface transport processes often dominate the kinetics of degradation. The initial step in the interface transport process is the dissociative chemisorption of the molecular species at the metal surface followed by hydrogen absorption into and transport through the bulk. The interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2(Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma(TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied.

  13. GEOMETRY, HEAT REMOVAL AND KINETICS SCOPING MODELS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B

    2007-11-16

    It is recognized that detailed models of proposed hydrogen storage systems are essential to gain insight into the complex processes occurring during the charging and discharging processes. Such insight is an invaluable asset for both assessing the viability of a particular system and/or for improving its design. The detailed models, however, require time to develop and run. Clearly, it is much more efficient to begin a modeling effort with a good system design and to progress from that point. To facilitate this approach, it is useful to have simplified models that can quickly estimate optimal loading and discharge kinetics, effective hydrogen capacities, system dimensions and heat removal requirements. Parameters obtained from these models can then be input to the detailed models to obtain an accurate assessment of system performance that includes more complete integration of the physical processes. This report describes three scoping models that assess preliminary system design prior to invoking a more detailed finite element analysis. The three models address the kinetics, the scaling and heat removal parameters of the system, respectively. The kinetics model is used to evaluate the effect of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the loading and discharge kinetics. As part of the kinetics calculations, the model also determines the mass of stored hydrogen per mass of hydride (in a particular reference form). As such, the model can determine the optimal loading and discharge rates for a particular hydride and the maximum achievable loading (over an infinite period of time). The kinetics model developed with the Mathcad{reg_sign} solver, runs in a mater of seconds and can quickly be used to identify the optimal temperature and pressure for either the loading or discharge processes. The geometry scoping model is used to calculate the size of the system, the optimal placement of heat transfer elements, and the gravimetric and volumetric capacities for a particular

  14. A Chemical Kinetic Mechanism for the Ignition of Silane/Hydrogen Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.; Mclain, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the oxidation of silane/hydrogen mixtures is presented and discussed. Shock-tube ignition delay time data were used to evaluate and refine the mechanism. Good agreement between experimental results and the results predicted by the mechanism was obtained by adjusting the rate coefficient for the reaction SiH3 + O2 yields SiH2O + OH. The reaction mechanism was used to theoretically investigate the ignition characteristics of silane/hydrogen mixtures. The results revealed that over the entire range of temperature examined (800 K to 1200 K), substantial reduction in ignition delay times is obtained when silane is added to hydrogen.

  15. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Kinetics studies of d-glucose hydrogenation over activated charcoal supported platinum catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Muthanna J.

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic hydrogenation of d-glucose to produce d-sorbitol was studied in a three-phase laboratory scale reactor. The hydrogenation reactions were performed on activated charcoal supported platinum catalyst in the temperature range 25-65°C and in a constant pressure of 1 atm. The kinetic data were modeled by zero, first and second-order reaction equations. In the operating regimes studied, the results show that the hydrogenation reaction was of a first order with respect to d-glucose concentration. Also the activation energy of the reaction was determined, and found to be 12.33 kJ mole-1. A set of experiment was carried out to test the deactivation of the catalyst, and the results show that the deactivation is slow with the ability of using the catalyst for several times with a small decrease in product yield.

  17. Fragmentation processes of hydrogen-deficient peptide radicals in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) has been described. The MALDI-ISD with an oxidizing matrix is initiated by hydrogen abstraction from peptides to matrix molecules, leading to hydrogen-deficient peptide radicals. Subsequently, the C(α)-C and C(α)-H bonds are cleaved, forming the a•/x fragment pair and [M-2H], respectively. Those reactions competitively occur during MALDI-ISD processes. Our results suggest that the C(α)-H bond cleavage to form [M-2H] was induced by collisions between hydrogen-deficient peptide radicals and matrix molecules in the MALDI plume. In contrast, the C(α)-C bond cleavages occur via a unimolecular dissociation process and independently of the collision rate in the MALDI plume. The formation mechanism of the a-, b-, and d-series fragments are also described. We report 2,5-bis(2-hydroxyethoxy)-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (bisHE-TCNQ), being known as an organic semiconductor and an electron acceptor, as a novel suitable matrix for the MALDI-ISD of peptides via hydrogen abstraction.

  18. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The reaction kinetics were studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principle result of the study was the determination of the rate constant for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k sub 1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles.

  19. Measuring Drug Metabolism Kinetics and Drug-Drug Interactions Using Self-Assembled Monolayers for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lyndsey L; Berns, Eric J; Bugga, Pradeep; George, Alfred L; Mrksich, Milan

    2016-09-01

    The competition of two drugs for the same metabolizing enzyme is a common mechanism for drug-drug interactions that can lead to altered kinetics in drug metabolism and altered elimination rates in vivo. With the prevalence of multidrug therapy, there is great potential for serious drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions. In an effort to prevent adverse drug reactions, the FDA mandates the evaluation of the potential for metabolic inhibition by every new chemical entity. Conventional methods for assaying drug metabolism (e.g., those based on HPLC) have been established for measuring drug-drug interactions; however, they are low-throughput. Here we describe an approach to measure the catalytic activity of CYP2C9 using the high-throughput technique self-assembled monolayers for matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (SAMDI) mass spectrometry. We measured the kinetics of CYP450 metabolism of the substrate, screened a set of drugs for inhibition of CYP2C9 and determined the Ki values for inhibitors. The throughput of this platform may enable drug metabolism and drug-drug interactions to be interrogated at a scale that cannot be achieved with current methods. PMID:27467208

  20. Kinetics of Hydrogen-Transfer Isomerizations of Butoxyl Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, J.; Truhlar, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    Five isomerization reactions involving intramolecular hydrogen-transfer in butoxyl radicals have been studied using variational transition state theory with small curvature tunneling. A set of best estimates of barrier heights and reaction energies for these five reactions was obtained by using coupled cluster theory including single and double excitations with a quasiperturbative treatment of connected triple excitations and a basis set extrapolated to the complete basis set limit plus core–valence correlation contributions and scalar relativistic corrections. This work predicts high-pressure limiting rate constants of these five reactions over the temperature range 200–2500 K and clarifies the available experimental data from indirect measurements. This study shows the importance of performing rate calculations with proper accounting for tunneling and torsional anharmonicity. We also proposed two new models for use in fitting rate constants over wide ranges of temperature.

  1. Kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution:. ionic strength effects and temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaß, Frank; Elias, Horst; Wannowius, Klaus J.

    Conductometry was used to study the kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite, HSO -3, by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous non-buffered solution at the low concentration level of 10 -5-10 -6 M, typically found in cloud water. The kinetic data confirm that the rate law reported for the pH range 3-6 at higher concentration levels, rate= kH·[H +]·[HSO -3]·[H 2O 2], is valid at the low concentration level and at low ionic strength Ic. At 298 K and Ic=1.5×10 -4 M, third-order rate constant kH was found to be kH=(9.1±0.5)×10 7 M -2 s -1. The temperature dependence of kH led to an activation energy of Ea=29.7±0.9 kJ mol -1. The effect of the ionic strength (adjusted with NaCl) on rate constant kH was studied in the range Ic=2×10 -4-5.0 M at pH=4.5-5.2 by conductometry and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The dependence of kH on Ic can be described with a semi-empirical relationship, which is useful for the purpose of comparison and extrapolation. The kinetic data obtained are critically compared with those reported earlier.

  2. The adsorption of atomic hydrogen on tellurium and formation of H 2Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outka, Duane A.

    1990-09-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen on a polycrystalline tellurium surface has been studied with temperature programmed desorption. Atomic hydrogen adsorbs on a tellurium surface and reacts to form H 2Te. Molecular hydrogen, in contrast, does not adsorb or react with tellurium at temperatures down to 80 K. When a tellurium surface which has been exposed to atomic hydrogen is heated, two desorption products are observed, H 2 and H 2Te. The H 2Te desorbs in three peaks at 130, 150, and 270 K. The H 2 desorbs in two peaks at 150 and 270 K. The desorption peaks at 270 K for both H 2 and H 2Te are unusually broad with a half-width of 80 K, and standard kinetic analysis of these peaks yields unusual desorption parameters. Overall, the adsorption of hydrogen on tellurium is similar to hydrogen adsorption on other covalent solids and differs in several respects from hydrogen adsorbed on metal surfaces.

  3. Determination of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in metals from the rate of change in the electrical resistance in desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Mikitishin, S.I.; Fedorov, V.V.; Sergienko, O.M.; Sokolovskii, O.R.; Spas, Y.M.

    1985-07-01

    A proposed method of measuring the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen D from the rate of change in electrical resistance in degassing of hydrogenimpregnated specimens is presented. Distinguished by simplicity, the method makes it possible to determine the coefficients with any method of hydrogen impregnation in a broad temperature range.

  4. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen has been studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principal result of the study was the determination of the rate constant k1 for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles. The data are fit closely by the expression k1 = 1.34 times 10 to the fourteenth power exp(-49 200/RT) cu cm/mole-sec. These data appear to be the first available for this rate constant.

  5. Time-dependent gas phase kinetics in a hydrogen diluted silane plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, S.; Kondo, M.; Yoshida, I.

    2009-02-16

    The gas phase kinetics in a high-pressure hydrogen diluted silane plasma has been studied at time scales of 10{sup -2}-6x10{sup 2} s. The time-resolved gas phase composition shows the following kinetics at different time scales: silane decomposition and polysilane generation in < or approx. 2x10{sup -1} s, nanoparticle formation and plasma density reduction in 10{sup -1}-10{sup 0} s, polysilane accumulation in 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} s, and silane depletion and electrode heating in > or approx. 10{sup 1} s. Disilane radicals are implied to be the dominant film precursors in addition to silyl radicals.

  6. Process development for hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on growth and product formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Florian; Morweiser, Michael; Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Kruse, Olaf; Posten, Clemens

    2012-11-30

    Certain strains of microalgae are long known to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase enzyme recombines electrons from the chloroplast electron transport chain with protons to form molecular hydrogen directly inside the chloroplast. A sustained hydrogen production can be obtained under low sulfur conditions in C. reinhardtii, reducing the net oxygen evolution by reducing the photosystem II activity and thereby overcoming the inhibition of the hydrogenases. The development of specially adapted hydrogen production strains led to higher yields and optimized biological process preconditions. So far sustainable hydrogen production required a complete exchange of the growth medium to establish sulfur-deprived conditions after biomass growth. In this work we demonstrate the transition from the biomass growth phase to the hydrogen production phase in a single batch culture only by exact dosage of sulfur. This eliminates the elaborate and energy intensive solid-liquid separation step and establishes a process strategy to proceed further versus large scale production. This strategy has been applied to determine light dependent biomass growth and hydrogen production kinetics to assess the potential of H₂ production with C. reinhardtii as a basis for scale up and further process optimization.

  7. Process development for hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on growth and product formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Florian; Morweiser, Michael; Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Kruse, Olaf; Posten, Clemens

    2012-11-30

    Certain strains of microalgae are long known to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase enzyme recombines electrons from the chloroplast electron transport chain with protons to form molecular hydrogen directly inside the chloroplast. A sustained hydrogen production can be obtained under low sulfur conditions in C. reinhardtii, reducing the net oxygen evolution by reducing the photosystem II activity and thereby overcoming the inhibition of the hydrogenases. The development of specially adapted hydrogen production strains led to higher yields and optimized biological process preconditions. So far sustainable hydrogen production required a complete exchange of the growth medium to establish sulfur-deprived conditions after biomass growth. In this work we demonstrate the transition from the biomass growth phase to the hydrogen production phase in a single batch culture only by exact dosage of sulfur. This eliminates the elaborate and energy intensive solid-liquid separation step and establishes a process strategy to proceed further versus large scale production. This strategy has been applied to determine light dependent biomass growth and hydrogen production kinetics to assess the potential of H₂ production with C. reinhardtii as a basis for scale up and further process optimization. PMID:22750091

  8. Influence of adsorption or desorption and surface diffusion on the formation kinetics of open half-monolayer coverage.

    PubMed

    Feldman, E P; Stefanovich, L I; Terekhova, Yu V

    2014-06-01

    The formation kinetics of open half-monolayer films on solid substrates is studied by the deposition of particles from a gaseous (vapor) phase to a cold substrate (room temperature) provided the lateral interaction between the particles of adsorbed layer (adlayer) is attractive. A detailed analysis of two limiting cases is presented: when the half-monolayer film formation rate is limited by the adsorption of particles from the gas phase and when the formation of the half-monolayer film surface is determined by the rate of surface diffusion of the adsorbed particles. The asymptotic analysis of the coverage dispersion evolution and the characteristic spatial scale of coverage inhomogeneities at the early and late stages of relaxation of a submonolayer film after quenching under the spinodal is carried out. It is found that separation of the adlayer occurs, so inhomogeneities of submonolayer films at the later stages of the process tend to equilibrium values of coverage in any case. However, asymptotic and numerical analysis shows that in the second case for some relationship between the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the adlayer an intermediate asymptotic relaxation process can be observed. It testifies to a kinetic slowdown of the separation process at the spinodal values of coverages. This fact manifests as the appearance of the intermediate plateau in the evolution curves for the coverage dispersion and nonmonotonic change of the characteristic spatial scale of coverage inhomogeneities. Moreover, at the early stages of the coverage evolution, the incubation period is revealed in the development of its inhomogeneities. It is shown that at the later stages of the separation of the half-monolayer film, the characteristic spatial scale of coverage inhomogeneities increases with time according to the law τ {1/2} and the width of the transition region between enriched and depleted regions of adlayer decreases as 1/τ {1/2}.

  9. Analytical chemical kinetic investigation of the effects of oxygen, hydrogen, and hydroxyl radicals on hydrogen-air combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, G. T., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Quantitative values were computed which show the effects of the presence of small amounts of oxygen, hydrogen, and hydroxyl radicals on the finite-rate chemical kinetics of premixed hydrogen-air mixtures undergoing isobaric autoignition and combustion. The free radicals were considered to be initially present in hydrogen-air mixtures at equivalence ratios of 0.2, 0.6, 1.0, and 1.2. Initial mixture temperatures were 1100 K, 1200 K, and 1500 K, and pressures were 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 atm. Of the radicals investigated, atomic oxygen was found to be the most effective for reducing induction time, defined as the time to 5 percent of the total combustion temperature rise. The reaction time, the time between 5 percent and 95 percent of the temperature rise, is not decreased by the presence of free radicals in the initial hydrogen-air mixture. Fuel additives which yield free radicals might be used to effect a compact supersonic combustor design for efficient operation in an otherwise reaction-limited combustion regime.

  10. Oxygen atom kinetics in silane-hydrogen-nitrous oxide mixtures behind reflected shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javoy, S.; Mével, R.; Dupré, G.

    2010-11-01

    Resonance Absorption Spectroscopy has been used to study the O-atom dynamics behind reflected shock waves in highly argon diluted silane-hydrogen-nitrous oxide mixtures in the temperature range 1606-2528 K and at total pressures from 234 to 584 kPa. The absorptions at 130.5 nm of N 2O, SiH 4 and Si have been taken into account to compare simulated and experimental absorption profiles. A detailed kinetic model has been also used to interpret the results and reaction pathway and sensitivity analyses have been performed to underline important elementary reactions. A comparison with the O-atom kinetic in silane-nitrous oxide and hydrogen-nitrous oxide mixtures is also proposed.

  11. First-passage kinetic Monte Carlo on lattices: Hydrogen transport in lattices with traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Toussaint, U.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Schmid, K.

    2015-08-01

    A new algorithm for the diffusion in 2D and 3D discrete simple cubic lattices based on a recently proposed technique, Green-functions or first-passage kinetic Monte Carlo has been developed. It is based on the solutions of appropriately chosen Greens functions, which propagate the diffusing atoms over long distances in one step (superhops). The speed-up of the new approach over standard kinetic Monte Carlo techniques can be orders of magnitude, depending on the problem. Using this new algorithm we simulated recent hydrogen isotope exchange experiments in recrystallized tungsten at 320 K, initially loaded with deuterium. It was found that the observed depth profiles can only be explained with 'active' traps, i.e. traps capable of exchanging atoms with activation energies significantly lower than the actual trap energy. Such a mechanism has so far not been considered in the modeling of hydrogen transport.

  12. Modeling the kinetics of the competitive adsorption and desorption of glyphosate and phosphate on goethite and gibbsite and in soils.

    PubMed

    Gimsing, Anne Louise; Borggaard, Ole K; Sestoft, Peter

    2004-03-15

    The herbicide glyphosate and inorganic phosphate compete for adsorption sites in soil and on oxides. This competition may have consequences for the transport of both compounds in soil and hence for the contamination of groundwater. We present and evaluate six simple, kinetic models that only take time and concentrations into account. Three of the models were found suitable to describe the competition in soil. These three models all assumed both competitive and additive adsorption, but with different equations used to describe the adsorption. For the oxides, three additional models assuming only competitive adsorption were also found suitable. This is in accordance with the observation that the adsorption in soil is both competitive and additive, whereas the adsorption on oxides is competitive. All models can be incorporated in transport models such as the convection-dispersion equation.

  13. Reduced kinetic mechanism of ignition for nonpremixed hydrogen/air in a supersonic mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Y.; Niioka, T. . Inst. of Fluid Science)

    1994-11-01

    Transient ignition processes in a two-dimensional spatially evolving supersonic mixing layer consisting of a parallel nonpremixed airstream and a hydrogen stream both with temperatures higher than 1,000 K were investigated numerically by using the full chemistry and its reduced chemistry. A phenomenon different from that examined in previous studies, in which ignition of hydrogen/oxygen mixtures was considered, was found in the nonpremixed case examined here. It was shown that the concentration of O was greater than that of OH before ignition, but became smaller with the development of ignition process. Fourteen important reactions for ignition were obtained and verified using sensitivity analyses of ignition delay time and radical concentrations. Several different four-step and three-step reduced kinetic mechanisms were then deduced by introducing the steady-state approximation to different species. Comparison of these reduced kinetic mechanisms with the full chemistry showed that the steady-state approximation of O used in previous studies caused serious errors in the prediction of ignition delay time in supersonic flow, in which nonpremixed character is predominant and the transport phenomenon is important. Ignition locations predicted with the proper four-step and three-step reduced kinetic mechanisms were within 5% and 20% of those predicted with the full chemistry. Finally, these two reduced mechanisms were used to evaluate the effect of viscous dissipation on ignition in the supersonic shear layer. Good agreements between the results of the present reduced kinetic mechanisms and those of the full chemistry were obtained.

  14. Optimization, equilibrium, kinetic, thermodynamic and desorption studies on the sorption of Cu(II) from an aqueous solution using marine green algae: Halimeda gracilis.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, R; Rajasimman, M; Karthikeyan, C

    2015-11-01

    The aptitude of marine green algae Helimeda gracilis for sorption of Cu(II) ions from an aqueous solution was studied in batch experiments. The effect of relevant parameters such as function of pH, sorbent dosage, agitation speed and contact time was evaluated by using Response surface methodology (RSM). A maximum percentage removal of Cu (II) by Halimeda gracilis occurs at pH-4.49, sorbent dosage-1.98g/L, agitation speed-119.43rpm and contact time-60.21min. Further, the sorbent was characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. Experimental data were analyzed in terms of pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, intraparticle diffusion, power function and elovich kinetic models. The results showed that the sorption process of Cu(II) ions followed well pseudo-second order kinetics. The sorption data of Cu(II) ions at 308.15K are fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R), Temkin, Sips and Toth isotherms. Sorption of Cu(II) onto marine green algae Helimeda gracilis followed the Langmuir and Toth isotherm models (R(2)=0.998 and R(2)=0.999) with the maximum sorption capacity of 38.46 and 38.07mg/g. The calculated thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° showed that the sorption of Cu(II) ions onto Helimeda gracilis biomass was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic. Desorption study shows that the sorbent could be regenerated using 0.2M HCl solution, with up to 89% recovery.

  15. In situ oxidation remediation technologies: kinetic of hydrogen peroxide decomposition on soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Romero, Arturo; Santos, Aurora; Vicente, Fernando; Rodriguez, Sergio; Lafuente, A Lopez

    2009-10-30

    Rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition were investigated in soils slurries. The interaction soil-hydrogen peroxide was studied using a slurry system at 20 degrees C and pH 7. To determine the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, several experiments were carried out with two soils with different SOM content (S1=15.1%, S2=10%). The influence of the oxidant dosage ([H2O2](o) from 10 to 30 g L(-1) and soil weight to liquid phase volume ratio=500 g L(-1)) was investigated using the two calcareous loamy sand soil samples. The results showed a rate dependency on both SOM and hydrogen peroxide concentration being the H2O2 decomposition rate over soil surface described by a second-order kinetic expression r(H2O2) = -dn(H2O2) / W(SOM) dt = kC(H2O2) C(SOM). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to evaluate the effect caused by the application of this oxidant on the SOM content. It was found a slightly increase of SOM content after treatment with hydrogen peroxide, probably due to the incorporation of oxygen from the oxidant (hydrogen peroxide).

  16. In situ hydrogen consumption kinetics as an indicator of subsurface microbial activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, S.H.; Smith, R.L.; Suflita, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    There are few methods available for broadly assessing microbial community metabolism directly within a groundwater environment. In this study, hydrogen consumption rates were estimated from in situ injection/withdrawal tests conducted in two geochemically varying, contaminated aquifers as an approach towards developing such a method. The hydrogen consumption first-order rates varied from 0.002 nM h-1 for an uncontaminated, aerobic site to 2.5 nM h-1 for a contaminated site where sulfate reduction was a predominant process. The method could accommodate the over three orders of magnitude range in rates that existed between subsurface sites. In a denitrifying zone, the hydrogen consumption rate (0.02 nM h-1) was immediately abolished in the presence of air or an antibiotic mixture, suggesting that such measurements may also be sensitive to the effects of environmental perturbations on field microbial activities. Comparable laboratory determinations with sediment slurries exhibited hydrogen consumption kinetics that differed substantially from the field estimates. Because anaerobic degradation of organic matter relies on the rapid consumption of hydrogen and subsequent maintenance at low levels, such in situ measures of hydrogen turnover can serve as a key indicator of the functioning of microbial food webs and may be more reliable than laboratory determinations. ?? 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  17. Hydrogen atom abstraction from organometallic hydrogen sources: First kinetics of H atom abstraction by benzyl radical from `Mo-S-H`

    SciTech Connect

    Birbaum, J.C.; Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen transfers are very important in catalytic and stoichiometric organometallic reaction schemes, yet few kinetic studies of the transfers from a metal hydride to an organic radical have been performed. To our knowledge there are no kinetic studies of hydrogen atom transfers from atoms attached to metals such as sulfur or oxygen. We present the first study with the extremely fast hydrogen atom transfer from (CpMoSSH){sub 2} to benzyl radical. The rate constant for this reaction was found to be greater than 10{sup 6} M{sup -1}s{sup -1} at room temperature.

  18. Polymer-induced surface modifications of Pd-based thin films leading to improved kinetics in hydrogen sensing and energy storage applications.

    PubMed

    Ngene, Peter; Westerwaal, Ruud J; Sachdeva, Sumit; Haije, Wim; de Smet, Louis C P M; Dam, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    The catalytic properties of Pd alloy thin films are enhanced by a thin sputtered PTFE coating, resulting in profound improvements in hydrogen adsorption and desorption in Pd-based and Pd-catalyzed hydrogen sensors and hydrogen storage materials. The remarkably enhanced catalytic performance is attributed to chemical modifications of the catalyst surface by the sputtered PTFE leading to a possible change in the binding strength of the intermediate species involved in the hydrogen sorption process.

  19. Adsorption of lead(II) on O₂-plasma-oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes: thermodynamics, kinetics, and desorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin-Yao; Luo, Tao; Zhang, Yong-Xing; Jia, Yong; Zhu, Bang-Jing; Fu, Xu-Cheng; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2011-07-01

    O(2)-plasma-oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (po-MWCNTs) have been used as an adsorbent for adsorption of lead(II) in water. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy measurements show that the bulk properties of MWCNTs were not changed after O(2)-plasma oxidation. The adsorption capacity of MWCNTs for lead(II) was greatly enhanced after plasma oxidation mainly because of the introduction of oxygen-containing functional groups onto the surface of MWCNTs. The removal of lead(II) by po-MWCNTs occurs rather quickly, and the adsorption kinetics can be well described by the pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption isotherm of lead(II) onto MWCNTs fits the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption of lead(II) onto MWCNTs is strongly dependent upon the pH values. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that the adsorption mechanism is mainly due to the chemical interaction between lead(II) and the surface functional groups of po-MWCNTs. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH°, ΔS°, and ΔG°) calculated from the adsorption isotherms suggest that the adsorption of lead(II) onto MWCNTs is endothermic and spontaneous. The regeneration performance shows that lead(II) can be easily regenerated from po-MWCNTs by altering the pH values of the solution.

  20. Isothermal-desorption-rate measurements in the vicinity of the Curie temperature for H2 chemisorbed on nickel films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the isothermal desorption rate of H2 chemisorbed onto polycrystalline nickel films made for temperatures spanning the Curie temperature of the nickel film are presented. Desorption kinetics were followed by measuring the decay of the change in resistance of the nickel film brought about by hydrogen chemisorption after gas-phase H2 had been rapidly evacuated. The desorption rate is found to undergo an anomalous decrease in the vicinity of the Curie temperature, accompanied by an increase in the desorption activation energy and the equilibrium constant for the chemisorbed hydrogen. The results are interpreted in terms of anomalous variations in rate constants for the formation of the precursor molecular adsorbed state and the chemisorbed atomic state due to the phase transition in the nickel. The changes in rate constants are also considered to be in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions based on a spin coupling between the adatom and the magnetic substrate.

  1. Kinetic measurement and prediction of the hydrogen outgassing from the polycrystalline LiH/LiOH system

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Grant, D M; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Leckey, J H; Siekhaus, W J; Balazs, B; McLean II, W

    2005-03-09

    In this report, we present the use of temperature programmed reaction/decomposition (TPR) in the isoconversion mode to measure outgassing kinetics and to make kinetic prediction concerning hydrogen release from the polycrystalline LiH/LiOH system in the absence of any external H{sub 2}O source.

  2. A kinetic study on the adsorption and reaction of hydrogen over silica-supported ruthenium and silver-ruthenium catalysts during the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    VanderWiel, D.P.

    1999-02-12

    Although the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide has been a subject of considerable investigation for many years, its increasing economical attractiveness as an industrial source of hydrocarbons has recently led to a search for more active and selective catalysts. A fundamental problem in the development of such catalysts is an incomplete knowledge of the operative surface processes, due in large part to the inability to accurately measure surface concentrations of reactant species during reaction. Specifically, the concentration of surface hydrogen proves difficult to estimate using normally revealing techniques such as transient isotopic exchange due to kinetic isotope effects. Knowledge of such concentrations is essential to the determination of the mechanisms of adsorption and reaction, since many kinetic parameters are concentration dependent. It is the aim of this research to investigate the mechanism and kinetics of the adsorption and reaction of hydrogen on silica-supported ruthenium and silver-ruthenium catalysts during the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. By preadsorbing carbon monoxide onto the surface of ruthenium and silver-ruthenium catalysts, the kinetics of hydrogen adsorption and reaction can be monitored upon exposure of this surface to ambient hydrogen gas. This is accomplished by conducting identical experiments on two separate systems. First, the formation of methane is monitored using mass spectroscopy, and specific reaction rates and apparent activation energies are measured. Next, in situ {sup 1}H-NMR is used to monitor the amount of hydrogen present on the catalyst surface during adsorption and reaction. The results for these two sets of experiments are then combined to show a correlation between the rate of reaction and the surface hydrogen concentration. Finally, transition state theory is applied to this system and is used to explain the observed change in the apparent activation energy. The structure sensitivity of hydrogen

  3. Fundamental Kinetics of Supercritical Coal Liquefaction: Effect of Catalysts and Hydrogen-Donor Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Ben J; Madras, Girodhar; Smith, J M; Kodera, Yoichi

    1997-04-16

    This is the quarterly report on our recent progress toward the overall objective to understand the supercritical fluid extraction of hydrocarbons from coal. Our strategy is to simulate coal as a high molecular-weight polymeric material by studying the degradation of polymers under various conditions. The hypothesis we are testing is that degradation of such macromolecules is applicable to the decomposition (depolymerization) of the coal network. Polymer degradation and coal liquefaction are influenced strongly by the solvent in the reaction. This motivated our investigation of the effect of hydrogen donor solvents on polymer degradation. In particular, we obtained new experimental data to show how a hydrogen donor, 6-hydroxy tetralin, influences the degradation rate of polystyrene. We also developed a detailed radical mechanism for hydrogen donation based on the Rice-Herzfeld chain reaction concept with the elementary steps of initiation, depropagation, hydrogen abstraction, and termination. Expressions for the degradation rate parameters were obtained by applying continuous distribution kinetics to the MWD of the reacting polymer. The theory explains the different influences of the hydrogen donor solvent on the degradation rate coefficients for different polymers. Though developed for the degradation of polymers, the mechanism and the theory are potentially applicable for chain scission and addition reactions among distributions of paraffins, olefins, and radicals of all chain lengths. The concepts can, in principle, be extended to examine the effect of hydrogen donors on coal liquefaction and on the complex mixture of liquefaction compounds. Based on this work, a research paper titled "Effect of Hydrogen Donors on Polymer Degradation", has been submitted for publication. Our research paper entitled, "Molecular weight effect on the dynamics of polystyrene degradation", has been accepted for publication by the journal, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research.

  4. Investigation of the metallurgical factors affecting hydrogen embrittlement of solution heat treated and aged Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr (wt.%) employing fracture, microscopy and desorption methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudett, Michelle Anne

    The effects of pre-dissolved hydrogen (H) on room temperature fracture initiation in Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr (wt%) have been investigated. The peak aged condition (STA) shows enhanced H embrittlement susceptibility compared to the solutionized condition (ST) as measured by reductions in the fracture initiation stress with H content and the introduction of intergranular (IG) fracture. Fracture initiation testing of cold worked, ST condition suggests that yield strength alone does not control H-assisted IG fracture initiation of the STA condition. Stroke rate studies, thermal desorption, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction investigations of H partitioning suggests that equilibrium hydriding and/or irreversible trapping do not singularly control IG fracture. Examination of additional metallurgical conditions show that grain boundary alpha colonies or films are not responsible for IG fracture. Deformation studies suggest that plastic deformation is concentrated at or near the grain boundaries in the STA condition. An increase in IG cracking with aging time is consistent with the segregation of a critical species to the grain boundaries. Therefore, a H-induced IG initiation mechanism that includes the deleterious effects of grain boundary segregation and deformation on the grain boundary fracture stress is proposed. Thermal desorption spectroscopy was employed to compare the hydrogen detrapping and desorption characteristics of the ST and STA conditions. Due to the oxide barrier that prevents H egress until high temperatures (˜350-400sp°C) and a dominant H desorption peak due to lattice H, resolution of possible trapping states was difficult. Modeling of H desorption showed that the ST and STA conditions do not have any trapping states of a binding energy greater than 65 kJ/mol. The limitations of the thermal desorption spectroscopy technique led us to examine and model the mechanism by which H desorbs from Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr. In the temperature

  5. Dehydrogenation kinetics, reversibility, and reaction mechanisms of reversible hydrogen storage material based on nanoconfined MgH2-NaAlH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plerdsranoy, Praphatsorn; Meethom, Sukanya; Utke, Rapee

    2015-12-01

    Studies of dehydrogenation kinetics, reversibility, and reaction mechanisms during de/rehydrogenation of nanoconfined MgH2-NaAlH4 into carbon aerogel scaffold (CAS) for reversible hydrogen storage material are for the first time proposed. Two different MgH2:NaAlH4 molar ratios (1:1 and 2:1) of hydride composite are melt infiltrated into CAS under 1:1 (CAS:hydride composite) weight ratio. Successful nanoconfinement is confirmed by N2 adsorption-desorption. Multiple-step dehydrogenation of milled samples is reduced to two-step reaction due to nanoconfinement. Peak temperatures corresponding to main dehydrogenation of nanoconfined samples significantly reduce as compared with those of milled samples, i.e., ∆T=up to 50 and 34 °C for nanoconfined sample with 1:1 and 2:1 (MgH2:NaAlH4) molar ratios, respectively. Hydrogen content released (the 1st cycle) and reproduced (the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cycles) of nanoconfined samples enhance up to 80% and 68% with respect to theoretical hydrogen storage capacity, respectively, while those of milled samples are 71% and 38%, respectively. Remarkable hydrogen content reproduced after nanoconfinement is due to the fact that metallic Al obtained after dehydrogenation (T=300 °C under vacuum) of nanoconfined samples prefer to react with MgH2 and produces Al12Mg17, favorable for reversibility of MgH2-NaAlH4 system, whereas that of milled samples stays in the form of unreacted Al under the same temperature and pressure condition.

  6. An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, Robers; Dryer, Frederick; Ju, Yiguang

    2013-09-30

    An integrated and collaborative effort involving experiments and complementary chemical kinetic modeling investigated the effects of significant concentrations of water and CO2 and minor contaminant species (methane [CH4], ethane [C2H6], NOX, etc.) on the ignition and combustion of HHC fuels. The research effort specifically addressed broadening the experimental data base for ignition delay, burning rate, and oxidation kinetics at high pressures, and further refinement of chemical kinetic models so as to develop compositional specifications related to the above major and minor species. The foundation for the chemical kinetic modeling was the well validated mechanism for hydrogen and carbon monoxide developed over the last 25 years by Professor Frederick Dryer and his co-workers at Princeton University. This research furthered advance the understanding needed to develop practical guidelines for realistic composition limits and operating characteristics for HHC fuels. A suite of experiments was utilized that that involved a high-pressure laminar flow reactor, a pressure-release type high-pressure combustion chamber and a high-pressure turbulent flow reactor.

  7. Ab Initio Kinetics of Hydrogen Abstraction from Methyl Acetate by Hydrogen, Methyl, Oxygen, Hydroxyl, and Hydroperoxy Radicals.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ting; Yang, Xueliang; Krauter, Caroline M; Ju, Yiguang; Carter, Emily A

    2015-06-18

    The kinetics of hydrogen abstraction by five radicals (H, O((3)P), OH, CH3, and HO2) from methyl acetate (MA) is investigated theoretically in order to gain further understanding of certain aspects of the combustion chemistry of biodiesels, such as the effect of the ester moiety. We employ ab initio quantum chemistry methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples correction (CCSD(T)) and multireference averaged coupled pair functional theory (MRACPF2), to predict chemically accurate reaction energetics. Overall, MRACPF2 predicts slightly higher barrier heights than CCSD(T) for MA + H/CH3/O/OH, but slightly lower barrier heights for hydrogen abstraction by HO2. Based on the obtained reaction energies, we also report high-pressure-limit rate constants using transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with the separable-hindered-rotor approximation, the variable reaction coordinate TST, and the multi-structure all-structure approach. The fitted modified Arrhenius expressions are provided over a temperature range of 250 to 2000 K. The predictions are in good agreement with available experimental results. Abstractions from both of the methyl groups in MA are expected to contribute to consumption of the fuel as they exhibit similar rate coefficients. The reactions involving the OH radical are predicted to have the highest rates among the five abstracting radicals, while those initiated by HO2 are expected to be the lowest. PMID:25974050

  8. Kinetic Isotope Effects as a Probe of Hydrogen Transfers to and from Common Enzymatic Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Daniel; Islam, Zahidul; Kohen, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes use a number of common cofactors as sources of hydrogen to drive biological processes, but the physics of the hydrogen transfers to and from these cofactors is not fully understood. Researchers study the mechanistically important contributions from quantum tunneling and enzyme dynamics and connect those processes to the catalytic power of enzymes that use these cofactors. Here we describe some progress that has been made in studying these reactions, particularly through the use of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). We first discuss the general theoretical framework necessary to interpret experimental KIEs, and then describe practical uses for KIEs in the context of two case studies. The first example is alcohol dehydrogenase, which uses a nicotinamide cofactor to catalyze a hydride transfer, and the second example is thymidylate synthase, which uses a folate cofactor to catalyze both a hydride and a proton transfer. PMID:24161942

  9. Decomposition Kinetics of Hydrogen Peroxide: Novel Lab Experiments Employing Computer Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramovitch, Dorota A.; Cunningham, Latrice K.; Litwer, Mitchell R.

    2003-07-01

    The quantitative catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide has been used in many general chemistry experiments. The typical procedure involves measuring the volume of oxygen generated in the reaction under constant pressure using a displacement method and calculating the necessary data. A pressure sensor interfaced with a computer using LabWorks II software allowed us to modify this reaction and to measure the change in pressure, at constant volume. Since the software allows the collection and display of real-time data and the ability to import the data to Excel, we re-examined the kinetics of this reaction. Using different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and catalase enzyme and graphing initial concentrations versus initial rates, we determined the rate and the order of the decomposition.

  10. Computation of Kinetics for the Hydrogen/Oxygen System Using the Thermodynamic Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John

    1996-01-01

    A new method for predicting chemical rate constants using thermodynamics has been applied to the hydrogen/oxygen system. This method is based on using the gradient of the Gibbs free energy and a single proportionality constant D to determine the kinetic rate constants. Using this method the rate constants for any gas phase reaction can be computed from thermodynamic properties. A modified reaction set for the H/O system is determined. A11 of the third body efficiencies M are taken to be unity. Good agreement was obtained between the thermodynamic method and the experimental shock tube data. In addition, the hydrogen bromide experimental data presented in previous work is recomputed with M's of unity.

  11. Kinetic isotope effects as a probe of hydrogen transfers to and from common enzymatic cofactors.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Islam, Zahidul; Kohen, Amnon

    2014-02-15

    Enzymes use a number of common cofactors as sources of hydrogen to drive biological processes, but the physics of the hydrogen transfers to and from these cofactors is not fully understood. Researchers study the mechanistically important contributions from quantum tunneling and enzyme dynamics and connect those processes to the catalytic power of enzymes that use these cofactors. Here we describe some progress that has been made in studying these reactions, particularly through the use of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). We first discuss the general theoretical framework necessary to interpret experimental KIEs, and then describe practical uses for KIEs in the context of two case studies. The first example is alcohol dehydrogenase, which uses a nicotinamide cofactor to catalyze a hydride transfer, and the second example is thymidylate synthase, which uses a folate cofactor to catalyze both a hydride and a proton transfer.

  12. Microscopic Observation of Kinetic Molecular Sieving of Hydrogen Isotopes in a Nanoporous Material

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K.; Jobic, H.

    2010-08-20

    We report quasielastic neutron scattering studies of H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} diffusion in a carbon molecular sieve, demonstrating remarkable quantum effects, with the heavier isotope diffusing faster below 100 K, confirming our recent predictions. Our transition state theory and molecular dynamics calculations show that while it is critical for this effect to have narrow windows of size comparable to the de Broglie wavelength, high flux requires that the energy barrier be reduced through small cages. Such materials will enable novel processes for kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes.

  13. Hydrogen release kinetics during reactive magnetron sputter depostion of a-Si:H: An isotope labeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, J. R.; Mandrell, L.; Doyle, J. R.

    1994-08-01

    The release of moleculear hydrogen from the growing surface of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films is determined using an isotope labeling technique. The results demonstrate that surface-bonded H atoms are readily abstracted by atomic hydrogen arriving from the gas phase. The films are deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering of a silicon target in an argon-hydrogen atmosphere. To achieve isotope labeling, we first deposit a deuterated amorphous silicon film, then commence growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon and measure the transient release of HD and D2 from the growing surface using mass spectrometry. Release occurs when the supply of reactive hydrogen in the growth flux exceeds the incorporation rate into the film, and is observed under all experimental conditions. The net rate of H incorporation is known from ex situ measurments of film growth and hydrogen content. We combine the H release and incorporation data in a mass balance argument to determine the H-surface kinetics. Under conditions which produce electronically useful films, (1) 0.5-1.0 hydrogen atoms react with the growing surface per incorporated silicon atom, (2) the near surface of the growing film contains 1-3 x 10(exp 15)/sq cm pf excess hydrogen, the dominant hydrogen release mechanism is by direct abstraction to form H2 molecules, and the kinetics of H release and incorportation can be described by constant rate coefficients. These data are supported by studies of H interactions with single-crystal silicon and amorphous carbon surfaces.

  14. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Investigation of Hydrogen Release from Ethane 1,2-di-amineborane

    SciTech Connect

    Neiner, Doinita; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Bowden, Mark; Choi, Young Joon; Luedtke, Avery T.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Fisher, Allison M.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Autrey, Thomas

    2011-07-18

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (H2) release from ethane 1,2-di-amineborane (EDAB, BH3NH2CH2CH2NH2BH3) were measured using Calvet and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), pressure-composition isotherms, and volumetric gas-burette experiments. The results presented here indicate that EDAB releases ~ 9 wt.% H2 at temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 200 °C in two moderately exothermic steps, approximately -10±1 kJ/mol H2 and -3.8±1 kJ/mol H2. Isothermal kinetic analysis shows that EDAB is more stable than ammonia borane (AB) at temperatures lower than 100°C; however, the rates of hydrogen release are faster for EDAB than for AB at temperatures higher than 120°C. In addition, no volatile impurities in the H2 released by EDAB were detected by mass spectrometry upon heating with 1°C/min to 200°C in a calorimeter.

  15. Kinetic study of the reactions between chloramine disinfectants and hydrogen peroxide: temperature dependence and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    McKay, Garrett; Sjelin, Brittney; Chagnon, Matthew; Ishida, Kenneth P; Mezyk, Stephen P

    2013-09-01

    The temperature-dependent kinetics for the reaction between hydrogen peroxide and chloramine water disinfectants (NH2Cl, NHCl2, and NCl3) have been determined using stopped flow-UV/Vis spectrophotometry. Rate constants for the mono- and dichloramine-peroxide reaction were on the order of 10(-2)M(-1)s(-1) and 10(-5)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. The reaction of trichloramine with peroxide was negligibly slow compared to its thermal and photolytically-induced decomposition. Arrhenius expressions of ln(kH2O2-NH2Cl)=(17.3±1.5)-(51500±3700)/RT and ln(kH2O2-NHCl2)=(18.2±1.9)-(75800±5100)/RT were obtained for the mono- and dichloramine peroxide reaction over the temperature ranges 11.4-37.9 and 35.0-55.0°C, respectively. Both monochloramine and hydrogen peroxide were first-order in the rate-limiting kinetic step and concomitant measurements made using a chloride ion selective electrode showed that the chloride was produced quantitatively. These data will aid water utilities in predicting chloramine concentrations (and thus disinfection potential) throughout the water distribution system.

  16. Chromium(VI) reduction by hydrogen sulfide in aqueous media: stoichiometry and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, C; Zhou, Q; Deng, B; Thornton, E C; Xu, H

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the reaction stoichiometry, kinetics, and mechanism for Cr(VI) reduction by hydrogen sulfide in the aqueous phase. Batch experiments with excess [Cr(VI)] over [H2S]T indicated that the molar amount of sulfide required for the reduction of 1 M Cr(VI) was 1.5, suggesting the following stoichiometry: 2CrO4(2-) + 3H2S + 4H+-->2Cr(OH)3(s) + 3S(s) + 2H2O. Further study with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) confirmed that chromium hydroxide and elemental sulfur were the stable products. The kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by hydrogen sulfide was measured under various initial concentrations of Cr(VI) and sulfide as well as pH values controlled by HEPES, phosphate, and borate buffers. Results showed that the overall reaction was second-order, i.e., first-order with respect to Cr(VI) and first-order to sulfide. The reaction rate increased as pH was decreased, and the pH dependence correlated well with the fraction of fully protonated sulfide (H2S) in the pH range of 6.5-10. The nature of buffers did not influence the reaction rate significantly in the homogeneous system. The reaction kinetics could be interpreted by a three-step mechanism: formation of an inner-sphere chromate-sulfide intermediate complex ((H2O4CrVIS)2-), intramolecular electron transfer to form Cr(IV) species, and subsequent fast reactions leading to Cr(III).

  17. Metastable olivine provides regional constraints on hydrogen content based on transformation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Frane, W. L.; Sharp, T. G.; Mosenfelder, J. L.; Leinenweber, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    187 +/- 40 kJ/mol. These rates are similar to rates for olivine with 300 ppm D2O: 2.1x10-9 m/s at 900 °C, 18 GPa with activation enthalpy of 232 kJ/mol [Diedrich, et al., 2009]. The similarity of growth rates for olivine containing a range of H2O (75-300 ppm) suggests that even a small amount of hydrogen can significantly enhance olivine growth rates as long as enough hydrogen partitions to the rim to hydrolytically weaken it, and prevent the buildup of elastic strain energy. Nominally anhydrous olivine may also transform at a similar rate if the growth rims have sufficiently high viscoelastic relaxation rates in Earth. Without the effects of elastic strain energy, growth rates of this magnitude have been demonstrated by thermo-kinetic models to be incompatible with formation of a metastable olivine wedge [Marton, et al., 2006]. Therefore if metastable olivine exists within subducting slabs, olivine must contain less than 75 ppm H2O and transformation rates must be reduced by elastic strain energy. Evidence of metastable olivine in subducting slabs would thus produce regional constraints on hydrogen content in earth’s transition zone.

  18. Modeling of hydrogen production methods: Single particle model and kinetics assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.S.; Bellan, J.

    1996-10-01

    The investigation carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is devoted to the modeling of biomass pyrolysis reactors producing an oil vapor (tar) which is a precursor to hydrogen. This is an informal collaboration with NREL whereby JPL uses the experimentally-generated NREL data both as initial and boundary conditions for the calculations, and as a benchmark for model validation. The goal of this investigation is to find drivers of biomass fast-pyrolysis in the low temperature regime. The rationale is that experimental observations produce sparse discrete conditions for model validation, and that numerical simulations produced with a validated model are an economic way to find control parameters and an optimal operation regime, thereby circumventing costly changes in hardware and tests. During this first year of the investigation, a detailed mathematical model has been formulated for the temporal and spatial accurate modeling of solid-fluid reactions in biomass particles. These are porous particles for which volumetric reaction rate data is known a priori and both the porosity and the permeability of the particle are large enough to allow for continuous gas phase flow. The methodology has been applied to the pyrolysis of spherically symmetric biomass particles by considering previously published kinetics schemes for both cellulose and wood. The results show that models which neglect the thermal and species boundary layers exterior to the particle will generally over predict both the pyrolysis rates and experimentally obtainable tar yields. An evaluation of the simulation results through comparisons with experimental data indicates that while the cellulose kinetics is reasonably accurate, the wood pyrolysis kinetics is not accurate; particularly at high reactor temperatures. Current effort in collaboration with NREL is aimed at finding accurate wood kinetics.

  19. Kinetic Analysis of Competitive Electrocatalytic Pathways: New Insights into Hydrogen Production with Nickel Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Wiedner, Eric S; Brown, Houston J S; Helm, Monte L

    2016-01-20

    The hydrogen production electrocatalyst Ni(P(Ph)2N(Ph)2)2(2+) (1) is capable of traversing multiple electrocatalytic pathways. When using dimethylformamidium, DMF(H)(+), the mechanism of H2 formation by 1 changes from an ECEC to an EECC mechanism as the potential approaches the Ni(I/0) couple. Two electrochemical methods, current-potential analysis and foot-of-the-wave analysis (FOWA), were performed on 1 to measure detailed kinetics of the competing ECEC and EECC pathways. A sensitivity analysis was performed on the methods using digital simulations to understand their strengths and limitations. Chemical rate constants were significantly underestimated when not accounting for electron-transfer kinetics, even when electron transfer was fast enough to afford a reversible noncatalytic wave. The EECC pathway of 1 was faster than the ECEC pathway under all conditions studied. Buffered DMF:DMF(H)(+) mixtures afforded an increase in the catalytic rate constant (k(obs)) of the EECC pathway, but k(obs) for the ECEC pathway did not change when using buffered acid. Further kinetic analysis of the ECEC path revealed that base increases the rate of isomerization from exo-protonated Ni(0) isomers to the catalytically active endo-isomers, but decreases the rate of protonation of Ni(I). FOWA did not provide accurate rate constants, but FOWA was used to estimate the reduction potential of the previously undetected exo-protonated Ni(I) intermediate. Comparison of catalytic Tafel plots for 1 under different conditions reveals substantial inaccuracies in the turnover frequency at zero overpotential when the kinetic and thermodynamic effects of the conjugate base are not accounted for properly.

  20. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, Mickey R.

    1991-01-01

    The goal was to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. Although hydrogen degradation of metallic materials is believed to result from dissolved protonic hydrogen, the heterogeneous hydrogen interface transport processes often dominate the kinetics of the degradation process. The initial step in the interface transport process is the dissociative chemisorption of the molecular species at the metal surface followed by hydrogen absorption into and transport through the bulk. Modern advanced aerospace applications often require the use of structural materials in high pressure hydrogen environments at temperatures which range from low cryogenic temperatures to very high temperatures (1300 K and greater). Materials proposed for these applications, such as the titanium aluminides, beta-titanium alloys, nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys, molybdenum-rhenium alloys, beryllium, and various beryllides, need to possess a high degree of immunity from hydrogen induced degradation of mechanical properties. In the present program, the interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2 (Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma (TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied. The interaction of low pressure hydrogen with gamma titanium aluminide and beryllium was found to be relatively weak, in the sense that adsorption leads to a low surface concentration of dissociated hydrogen, i.e., the chemisorption process is reversible at room temperature (300 K) for gamma titanium aluminide and the sticking coefficient for chemisorption is extremely small for beryllium. Hydrogen was found to interact readily with alpha-2 titanium aluminide to form a stable surface hydride at 300 K. These results correlate well with other recent studies which show that the mechanical properties for alpha-2 titanium aluminide are readily degraded in

  1. Synthetic use of the primary kinetic isotope effect in hydrogen atom transfer: generation of α-aminoalkyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Wood, Mark E; Bissiriou, Sabine; Lowe, Christopher; Norrish, Andrew M; Sénéchal, Katell; Windeatt, Kim M; Coles, Simon J; Hursthouse, Michael B

    2010-10-21

    The extent to which deuterium can act as a protecting group to prevent unwanted 1,5-hydrogen atom transfer to aryl and vinyl radical intermediates was examined in the context of the generation of α-aminoalkyl radicals in a pyrrolidine ring. Intra- and intermolecular radical trapping following hydrogen atom transfer provides an illustration of the use of the primary kinetic isotope effect in directing the outcome of synthetic C-C bond-forming processes.

  2. Hybrid electrodynamics and kinetics simulation for electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Bin

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a hybrid electrodynamics and kinetics numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method and lattice Boltzmann method is presented for electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas. In this framework, the multicomponent Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model considering both elastic and Coulomb collisions and the multicomponent force model based on the Guo model are introduced, which supply a hyperfine description on the interaction between electromagnetic wave and weakly ionized plasma. Cubic spline interpolation and mean filtering technique are separately introduced to solve the multiscalar problem and enhance the physical quantities, which are polluted by numerical noise. Several simulations have been implemented to validate our model. The numerical results are consistent with a simplified analytical model, which demonstrates that this model can obtain satisfying numerical solutions successfully.

  3. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect.

    PubMed

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-08-12

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D2O and a catalytic amount of H2SO4. The resulting labeled product is characterized by (1)H NMR. Students also visualize a significant kinetic isotope effect (k H/k D ≈ 3 to 4) by adding iodine tincture to solutions of unlabeled resorcinol and the H-D exchange product. This method is highly adaptable to fit a target audience and has been successfully implemented in a pedagogical capacity with second-year introductory organic chemistry students as part of their laboratory curriculum. It was also adapted for students at the advanced high school level. PMID:25132687

  4. Spectroscopic application of an iterative kinetic cathode sheath model to high voltage hollow cathode glow discharge in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasojević, Dj.; Mijin, S.; Šišović, N. M.; Konjević, N.

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple one-dimensional iterative kinetic model of the cathode sheath region of high voltage, low-pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The model's convenience as a supplemental diagnostic tool is demonstrated by determining the most relevant discharge parameters through an analysis of the spectral shape of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line recorded along the axis of a cylindrically symmetrical high voltage low-pressure hollow cathode glow discharge in hydrogen. Thus, an effectively one-dimensional approach is tested and shown to give satisfactory spectral lines fits with reasonable values for discharge parameters, most notably the gas temperature.

  5. Chemical kinetic analysis of hydrogen-air ignition and reaction times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. C.; Schexnayder, C. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An anaytical study of hydrogen air kinetics was performed. Calculations were made over a range of pressure from 0.2 to 4.0 atm, temperatures from 850 to 2000 K, and mixture equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 2.0. The finite rate chemistry model included 60 reactions in 20 species of the H2-O2-N2 system. The calculations also included an assessment of how small amounts of the chemicals H2O, NOx, H2O2, and O3 in the initial mixture affect ignition and reaction times, and how the variation of the third body efficiency of H2O relative of N2 in certain key reactions may affect reaction time. The results indicate that for mixture equivalence ratios between 0.5 and 1.7, ignition times are nearly constant; however, the presence of H2O and NO can have significant effects on ignition times, depending on the mixture temperature. Reaction time is dominantly influenced by pressure but is nearly independent of initial temperature, equivalence ratio, and the addition of chemicals. Effects of kinetics on reaction at supersonic combustor conditions are discussed.

  6. Hydrogen donor-acceptor fluctuations from kinetic isotope effects: a phenomenological model.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Cheatum, Christopher M; Kohen, Amnon

    2012-08-28

    Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and their temperature dependence can probe the structural and dynamic nature of enzyme-catalyzed proton or hydride transfers. The molecular interpretation of their temperature dependence requires expensive and specialized quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to provide a quantitative molecular understanding. Currently available phenomenological models use a nonadiabatic assumption that is not appropriate for most hydride and proton-transfer reactions, while others require more parameters than the experimental data justify. Here we propose a phenomenological interpretation of KIEs based on a simple method to quantitatively link the size and temperature dependence of KIEs to a conformational distribution of the catalyzed reaction. This model assumes adiabatic hydrogen tunneling, and by fitting experimental KIE data, the model yields a population distribution for fluctuations of the distance between donor and acceptor atoms. Fits to data from a variety of proton and hydride transfers catalyzed by enzymes and their mutants, as well as nonenzymatic reactions, reveal that steeply temperature-dependent KIEs indicate the presence of at least two distinct conformational populations, each with different kinetic behaviors. We present the results of these calculations for several published cases and discuss how the predictions of the calculations might be experimentally tested. This analysis does not replace molecular QM/MM investigations, but it provides a fast and accessible way to quantitatively interpret KIEs in the context of a Marcus-like model.

  7. Coal desulfurization in oxidative acid media using hydrogen peroxide and ozone: a kinetic and statistical approach

    SciTech Connect

    F.R. Carrillo-Pedroza; A. Davalos Sanchez; M. Soria-Aguilar; E.T. Pecina Trevino

    2009-07-15

    The removal of pyritic sulfur from a Mexican sub-bituminous coal in nitric, sulfuric, and hydrochloric acid solutions was investigated. The effect of the type and concentration of acid, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and ozone as oxidants, in a temperature range of 20-60{sup o}C, was studied. The relevant factors in pyrite dissolution were determined by means of the statistical analysis of variance and optimized by the response surface method. Kinetic models were also evaluated, showing that the dissolution of pyritic sulfur follows the kinetic model of the shrinking core model, with diffusion through the solid product of the reaction as the controlling stage. The results of statistical analysis indicate that the use of ozone as an oxidant improves the pyrite dissolution because, at 0.25 M HNO{sub 3} or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 20{sup o}C and 0.33 g/h O{sub 3}, the obtained dissolution is similar to that of 1 M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 1 M HNO{sub 3} or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 40{sup o}C. 42 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Y; Moreh, R; Shang, S L; Shchur, Ya; Wang, Y; Liu, Z K

    2016-02-01

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH2PO4, X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD2PO4, X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X3H(SO4)2 superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M3H(SO4)2 compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance ROO, being a measure of the HB strength. PMID:26851916

  9. Fundamental Kinetics of Supercritical Coal Liquefaction: Effect of Catalysts and Hydrogen-Donor Solvents.

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, B.J.; Smith, J.M.

    1997-07-21

    Most research on polymer degradation is for single polymers, even though the thermal decomposition of polymer mixtures is of interest both practically and theoretically. Polymer degradation rates depend on the mixture type, and adding a polymer can increase, decrease, or leave unchanged the degradation rate of the first polymer. We show how distribution-kinetics theory, based on molecular-weight distributions (MWDs), provides expressions for degradation rates of binary polymer mixtures. The approach accounts for initiation, termination, hydrogen abstraction, and radical chain scission in the governing equations for MWDS. Molecular-weight moments yield expressions for molar and mass concentrations and rate coefficients for combinations of random and chain-end scission. Experimental data show the concentration effect of poly((x-methyl styrene)) (PAMS) on the degradation of polystyrene dissolved in mineral oil at 275 {degrees}C in a batch reactor. Samples analyzed by gel permeation chromatography yielded the time evolution of the MD. The results indicated that, owing to the interaction of mixed radicals with polymer by hydrogen abstraction, polystyrene degradation rate decreases with increasing PAMS concentration.

  10. Capacitively coupled radio-frequency hydrogen discharges: The role of kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, L.; Jolly, J.; Alves, L. L.

    2007-09-01

    This paper presents a systematic characterization of capacitively coupled radio-frequency hydrogen discharges, produced within a parallel plate cylindrical setup at different rf applied voltages (Vrf=50-600V), frequencies (f=13.56-40.68MHz), and pressures (p=0.2-1torr). A two-dimensional, time-dependent fluid model for charged particle transport is self-consistently solved coupled to a homogeneous kinetic model for hydrogen, including vibrationally excited molecular species and electronically excited atomic species. Numerical simulations are compared with experimental measurements of various plasma parameters. A good quantitative agreement is found between simulations and experiment for the coupled electrical power and the plasma potential. The model underestimates the values of the electron density, the self-bias potential, and the H(n =1) atom density with respect to measurements, but agrees with experiment when predicting that all these parameters increase with either Vrf, f, or p. The dissociation degree is about 10-3 for the work conditions considered. Simulations adopt a wall recombination probability for H atoms that was experimentally measured, thus accounting for surface modification with discharge operating conditions. Results show the key role played by the atomic wall recombination mechanism in plasma description.

  11. Synthetic use of the primary kinetic isotope effect in hydrogen atom transfer 2: generation of captodatively stabilised radicals.

    PubMed

    Wood, Mark E; Bissiriou, Sabine; Lowe, Christopher; Windeatt, Kim M

    2013-04-28

    Using C-3 di-deuterated morpholin-2-ones bearing N-2-iodobenzyl and N-3-bromobut-3-enyl radical generating groups, only products derived from the more stabilised C-3, rather than the less stabilised C-5 translocated radicals, were formed after intramolecular 1,5-hydrogen atom transfer, suggesting that any kinetic isotope effect present was not sufficient to offset captodative stabilisation.

  12. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer involving Os-centered radicals: evidence for tunneling.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Grills, David C; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os(•) and (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2Os(•) radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons are in the range 1.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) to 1.7 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.8 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 °C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies (E(D) - E(H)) and the pre-exponential factor ratio (A(H)/A(D)). For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2Os(•), the (E(D) - E(H)) = 3.3 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1) and A(H)/A(D) = 0.06 ± 0.02 values suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism.

  13. Stability of hydrogenation states of graphene and conditions for hydrogen spillover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sang Soo; Jung, Hyun; Jung, Dong Hyun; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Park, Noejung

    2012-04-01

    The hydrogen spillover mechanism has been discussed in the field of hydrogen storage and is believed to have particular advantage over the storage as metal or chemical hydrides. We investigate conditions for practicality realizing the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto carbon surfaces, using first-principles methods. Our results show that contrary to common belief, types of hydrogenation configurations of graphene (the aggregated all-paired configurations) can satisfy the thermodynamic requirement for room-temperature hydrogen storage. However, the peculiarity of the paired adsorption modes gives rise to a large kinetic barrier against hydrogen migration and desorption. It means that an extremely high pressure is required to induce the migration-derived hydrogenation. However, if mobile catalytic particles are present inside the graphitic interstitials, hydrogen migration channels can open and the spillover phenomena can be realized. We suggest a molecular model for such a mobile catalyst which can exchange hydrogen atoms with the wall of graphene.

  14. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen defect pairs in SrTiO3 from density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Bork, Nicolai; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Rossmeisl, Jan; Vegge, Tejs

    2011-09-01

    A density functional theory investigation of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen-hydrogen defect interactions in the cubic SrTiO(3) perovskite is presented. We find a net attraction between two hydrogen atoms with an optimal separation of ∼2.3 Å. The energy gain is ca. 0.33 eV compared to two non-interacting H defects. The main cause of the net attractive potential is elastic defect interactions through lattice deformation. Two possible diffusion paths for the hydrogen defect pair are investigated and are both determined to be faster than the corresponding diffusion path for single hydrogen atoms. Finally, we set up a simple model to determine the contribution from the double hydrogen defect to the total hydrogen flux, and find the double defect to be the main diffusing species at temperatures below ca. 400 °C. Post submission infrared absorption experiments show excellent agreement with the proposed properties of the double hydrogen defect. PMID:21769355

  15. Cyclic CO{sub 2} chemisorption–desorption behavior of Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}: Structural, microstructural and kinetic variations produced as a function of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-dlCruz, Lorena; Pfeiffer, Heriberto

    2013-08-15

    A structural, microstructural and kinetic analysis of the Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}–CO{sub 2} system was performed over 20 chemisorption–desorption cycles. Different cyclic experiments were performed between 500 and 800 °C. Although the best results were obtained in Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} sample treated at 550 °C, all the samples treated between 500 and 700 °C presented good CO{sub 2} chemisorption efficiencies and stabilities. On the contrary, Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} sample treated at 800 °C presented a continuous decrement of the CO{sub 2} chemisorption. After 20 cycles all the samples presented a partial Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} decomposition, determined by the ZrO{sub 2} formation, which was associated to sodium sublimation. Additionally, the Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} microstructural analysis showed a systematic morphological evolution. It was microscopically observed that Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} particles tend to fracture due to the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} formation. Later, after several cycles these tiny fractured particles sinter producing new polyhedral and dense Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}–ZrO{sub 2} particles. Finally, an exhaustive kinetic analysis showed a high CO{sub 2} chemisorption–desorption stability at different temperatures. - Graphical abstract: A CO{sub 2} chemisorption–desorption analysis was performed in the Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}–CO{sub 2} system. Different cyclic experiments were performed between 500 and 800 °C and the results showed high CO{sub 2} chemisorption efficiencies. Nevertheless the Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} composition and microstructure evolved during the cycles. Highlights: • Different CO{sub 2} chemisorption–desorption cycles were performed in the Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} phase. • Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} presents interesting microstructural changes depending on temperature. • At T≤550 °C, Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} presents the best cyclability due to microstructural factors. • At T≥600 °C, Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} presents a partial decomposition after 20 cycles

  16. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Boron Removal from Silicon by Humidified Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Tang, Kai; Olsen, Jan Erik; Andersson, Stefan; Tranell, Gabriella; Hildal, Kjetil

    2016-04-01

    The removal of boron from silicon by top blowing of humidified hydrogen has been studied in the present work through experimental work, thermodynamic calculations, computational fluid dynamic modeling, and quantum chemistry calculations. The effect of process parameters; temperature, lance diameter, lance distance from the melt surface, gas flow rate, and crucible material on the kinetics of boron removal were studied. It has been shown that the rate of boron removal is decreased with increasing temperature due to the competitive reactions between silicon and oxygen as well as boron and oxygen, which can be confirmed with the increases of p SiO/ p HBO in the system. The rate of boron removal is increased with increasing the gas flow rate due mainly to the better supply and transport of the gas over the melt surface, as confirmed by the CFD modeling. Moreover, the rate of boron removal in alumina crucible is the highest followed by that in quartz and graphite crucibles, respectively. Faster B removal in quartz crucible than that in graphite crucible can be attributed to more oxygen dissolves in silicon melts. The fastest boron removal in alumina crucible is attributed to the additional boron gasification through aluminum borate (AlBO2) formation on the melt surface. Thermodynamic properties of the AlBO2 species have thus been revised by quantum chemistry calculations, which were more accurate to describe the formation of gaseous AlBO2 than those in the JANAF Thermochemical Tables. The main chemical reactions for boron gasification from silicon melts are proposed as In graphite, quartz and alumina crucible:quad \\underline{{B}} + \\underline{{H}} + \\underline{{O}} = {{ HBO}}( {{g}} ) {{In alumina crucible}}:\\underline{{Al}} + \\underline{{B}} + \\underline{{O}} = {{ AlBO}}2 ( {{g}} ) Based on the obtained results, it has been proposed that boron removal from silicon melt by humidified hydrogen is controlled both by the chemical reaction for boron gasification and

  17. Biomimetic Kinetic Resolution: Highly Enantio- and Diastereoselective Transfer Hydrogenation of Aglain Ketones To Access Flavagline Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported asymmetric syntheses and absolute configuration assignments of the aglains (+)-ponapensin and (+)-elliptifoline and proposed a biosynthetic kinetic resolution process to produce enantiomeric rocaglamides and aglains. Herein, we report a biomimetic approach for the synthesis of enantiomerically enriched aglains and rocaglamides via kinetic resolution of a bridged ketone utilizing enantioselective transfer hydrogenation. The methodology has been employed to synthesize and confirm the absolute stereochemistries of the pyrimidone rocaglamides (+)-aglaiastatin and (−)-aglaroxin C. Additionally, the enantiomers and racemate of each metabolite were assayed for inhibition of the heat-shock response, cytotoxicity, and translation inhibition. PMID:25514979

  18. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, Mickey R.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this program has been to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. During the present program, the interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2 (Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma (TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied. The interaction of low pressure hydrogen with gamma titanium aluminide and beryllium was found to be relatively weak. Weak in the sense that adsorption leads to a low surface concentration of dissociated hydrogen, i.e., the chemisorption process is reversible at room temperature (300 K) for gamma titanium aluminide and the sticking coefficient for chemisorption is extremely small for beryllium. Hydrogen was found to interact readily with alpha-2 titanium aluminide to form a stable surface hydride at 300 K. These results correlate well with other recent studies which show that the mechanical properties for alpha-2 titanium aluminide are readily degraded in hydrogen while gamma titanium aluminide exhibits less degradation and beryllium essentially no degradation. The interaction of oxygen with the surface of several of these materials was studied. More recently, preliminary hydrogen permeation studies were completed for three high temperature alloys, Incoloy 909, Mo-47.5Re (wt. %), and this past year, Haynes 188.

  19. Kinetics of hydrogen isotope exchange in β-phase Pd-H-D

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Weifang; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2015-07-22

    Hydrogen isotope gas exchange within palladium powders is examined using a batch-type reactor coupled to a residual gas analyzer (RGA). Furthermore, the exchange rates in both directions (H2 + PdD and D2 + PdH) are measured in the temperature range 178–323 K for the samples with different particle sizes. The results show this batch-type exchange is closely approximated as a first-order kinetic process with a rate directly proportional to the surface area of the powder particles. An exchange rate constant of 1.40 ± 0.24 μmol H2/atm cm2 s is found for H2 + PdD at 298 K, 1.4 times higher than that for D2 + PdH, with an activation energy of 25.0 ± 3.2 kJ/mol H for both exchange directions. Finally, a comparison of exchange measurement techniques shows these coefficients, and the fundamental exchange probabilities are in good agreement with those obtained by NMR and flow techniques.

  20. Kinetics of hydrogen isotope exchange in β-phase Pd-H-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Luo, Weifang; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2015-07-22

    Hydrogen isotope gas exchange within palladium powders is examined using a batch-type reactor coupled to a residual gas analyzer (RGA). Furthermore, the exchange rates in both directions (H2 + PdD and D2 + PdH) are measured in the temperature range 178–323 K for the samples with different particle sizes. The results show this batch-type exchange is closely approximated as a first-order kinetic process with a rate directly proportional to the surface area of the powder particles. An exchange rate constant of 1.40 ± 0.24 μmol H2/atm cm2 s is found for H2 + PdD at 298 K, 1.4 times highermore » than that for D2 + PdH, with an activation energy of 25.0 ± 3.2 kJ/mol H for both exchange directions. Finally, a comparison of exchange measurement techniques shows these coefficients, and the fundamental exchange probabilities are in good agreement with those obtained by NMR and flow techniques.« less

  1. Desorption Kinetics of H2O from Cab-O-Sil-M-7D and Hi-Sil-233 Silica Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L.; Balooch, M.; LeMay, J.D.

    2000-01-26

    Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) was performed at temperatures up to 850K on Cab-O-Sil-M-7D and Hi-Sil-233 silica particles. Physisorbed water molecules on both types of silica had activation energies in the range of 9-14.5 kcal/mol. However, the activation energies of desorption for chemisorbed water varied from {approx} 19 kcal/mol to > 59 kcal/mol for Cab-O-Sil-M-7D, and {approx} 23-37 kcal/mol for Hi-Sil-233. Our results suggest that physisorbed water can be effectively pumped away at room temperature (or preferably at 320 K) in a matter of hours. Chemisorbed water with high activation energies of desorption (>30 kcal/mol) will not escape the silica surfaces in 100 years even at 320 K, while a significant amount of the chemisorbed water with medium activation energies (19-26 kcal/mol) will leave the silica surfaces in that time span. Most of the chemisorbed water with activation energies < 30 kcal/mol can be pumped away in a matter of days in a good vacuum environment at 500 K. We had previously measured about 0.1-0.4 wt. % of water in M9787 polysiloxane formulations containing {approx} 21% Cab-O-Sil-M-7D and {approx} 4% Hi-Sil-233. Comparing present results with these formulations, we conclude that absorbed H{sub 2}O and Si-OH bonds on the silica surfaces are the major contributors to water outgassing from M97 series silicones.

  2. A probabilistic approach to the effect of water hydrogen bonds on the kinetics of protein folding and protein denaturation.

    PubMed

    Djikaev, Y S; Ruckenstein, E

    2010-02-26

    Previously, we presented a review of our kinetic models for the nucleation mechanism of protein folding and for the protein thermal denaturation in a barrierless way. A protein was treated as a random heteropolymer consisting of hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and neutral beads. As a crucial idea of the model, an overall potential around the cluster of native residues wherein a residue performs a chaotic motion was considered as the combination of the average dihedral, effective pairwise, and confining potentials. The overall potential as a function of the distance from the cluster has a double well shape. This allowed one to develop kinetic models for the nucleation mechanism of protein folding (NMPF) and barrierless protein denaturation (BPD) by using the mean first passage time analysis. In the original models, however, hydrogen bonding effects were taken into account only indirectly which affected the accuracy of the models because hydrogen bonding does play a crucial role in the folding, stability, and denaturation of proteins. To improve the NMPF and BPD models and explicitly take into account the hydrogen bonding "water-water" and "water-protein residue", we have developed a probabilistic hydrogen bond (PHB) model for the effect of hydrogen bond networks of water molecules around two solute particles (immersed in water) on their interaction, and have then combined the PHB model with the NMPF and BPD models. In this paper, that can be regarded as sequel of our previous review, we analyze the modified NMPF and BPD models that explicitly take into account the effect of water-water hydrogen bonding on these processes. As expected, the application of the modified models to the folding/unfolding of two model proteins (one short, consisting of 124 residues and the other large, consisting of 2500 residues) demonstrate that the hydrogen bond networks play a very important role in the protein folding/unfolding phenomena.

  3. Kinetic model for photoinduced and thermally induced creation and annihilation of metastable defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulhalim, I.

    1995-03-01

    A microscopic many-body model is proposed for the kinetics of metastable defects (MSDs) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). It is based on the existence of short-lived large energy fluctuations which induce transient traps for carriers that release their energy and enhance the creation or annihilation of MSDs. The expressions found for the photoinduced and thermally induced creation and annihilation rates' coefficients explain the dependence on the variety of parameters.

  4. OTEC gas desorption studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F. C.; Golshani, A.

    1982-02-01

    Experiments on deaeration in packed columns and barometric intake systems, and with hydraulic air compression for open-cycle OTEC systems are reported. A gas desorption test loop consisting of water storage tanks, a vacuum system, a liquid recirculating system, an air supply, a column test section, and two barometric leg test sections was used to perform the tests. The aerated water was directed through columns filled with either ceramic Raschig rings or plastic pall rings, and the system vacuum pressure, which drives the deaeration process, was found to be dependent on water velocity and intake pipe height. The addition of a barometric intake pipe increased the deaeration effect 10%, and further tests were run with lengths of PVC pipe as potential means for noncondensibles disposal through hydraulic air compression. Using the kinetic energy from the effluent flow to condense steam in the noncondensible stream improved the system efficiency.

  5. Zirconium-nickel crystals—hydrogen accumulators: Dissolution and penetration of hydrogen atoms in alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysina, Z. A.; Zaginaichenko, S. Yu.; Shchur, D. V.; Gabdullin, M. T.; Kamenetskaya, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    The calculation of the free energy, thermodynamic equilibrium equations, and kinetic equations of the intermetallic compound Zr2NiH x has been carried out based on molecular-kinetic concepts. The equilibrium hydrogen concentration depending on the temperature, pressure, and energy parameters has been calculated. The absorption-desorption of hydrogen has been studied, and the possibility of the realization of the hysteresis effect has been revealed. The kinetics of the dissolution and permeability of hydrogen is considered, the time dependence of these values has been found, and conditions for the extremum character of their time dependence have been determined. Relaxation times of the dissolution and permeability of hydrogen into the alloy have been calculated. The calculation results are compared with the experimental data available in the literature.

  6. Hydrogen storage development

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.

    1998-08-01

    A summary of the hydride development efforts for the current program year (FY98) are presented here. The Mg-Al-Zn alloy system was studied at low Zn levels (2--4 wt%) and midrange Al contents (40--60 wt%). Higher plateau pressures were found with Al and Zn alloying in Mg and, furthermore, it was found that the hydrogen desorption kinetics were significantly improved with small additions of Zn. Results are also shown here for a detailed study of the low temperature properties of Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}, and a comparison made between conventional melt cast alloy and the vapor process material.

  7. Effects of pH and ORP on microbial ecology and kinetics for hydrogen production in continuously dark fermentation.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiaxiu; An, Dong; Ren, Nanqi; Zhang, Yongming; Chen, Ying

    2011-12-01

    The microbial structure and kinetic characteristics of the hydrogen producing strains in two fermentative continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTRs) were studied by controlling pH and oxidation and reduction potential (ORP). The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests were conducted to investigate the fermentative performance of Clostridium histolyticum (C. histolyticum), Clostridium lituseburense (C. lituseburense) and Enterobacteriaceae. The experimental results showed that in ethanol-type reactor 1#, the relative abundance of the strains was 48%, 30% and 22%. Comparatively, the relative abundance in butyric acid-type reactor 2# was 24%, 55% and 19% with butyric acids and hydrogen as the main products. The kinetic results indicated that the hydrogen yield coefficients YP/X in both reactors were 8.357 and 5.951 l-H2/g, while the coefficients of the cellular yield were 0.0268 and 0.0350 g-Cell/g, respectively. At the same biomass, the hydrogen yield in ethanol-type reactors was more than that in butyric acid reactors. However, the cellular synthesis rate in ethanol-type reactors was low when the same carbon source was used.

  8. A Kinetic Platform to Determine the Fate of Hydrogen Peroxide in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Adolfsen, Kristin J.; Brynildsen, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is used by phagocytic cells of the innate immune response to kill engulfed bacteria. H2O2 diffuses freely into bacteria, where it can wreak havoc on sensitive biomolecules if it is not rapidly detoxified. Accordingly, bacteria have evolved numerous systems to defend themselves against H2O2, and the importance of these systems to pathogenesis has been substantiated by the many bacteria that require them to establish or sustain infections. The kinetic competition for H2O2 within bacteria is complex, which suggests that quantitative models will improve interpretation and prediction of network behavior. To date, such models have been of limited scope, and this inspired us to construct a quantitative, systems-level model of H2O2 detoxification in Escherichia coli that includes detoxification enzymes, H2O2-dependent transcriptional regulation, enzyme degradation, the Fenton reaction and damage caused by •OH, oxidation of biomolecules by H2O2, and repair processes. After using an iterative computational and experimental procedure to train the model, we leveraged it to predict how H2O2 detoxification would change in response to an environmental perturbation that pathogens encounter within host phagosomes, carbon source deprivation, which leads to translational inhibition and limited availability of NADH. We found that the model accurately predicted that NADH depletion would delay clearance at low H2O2 concentrations and that detoxification at higher concentrations would resemble that of carbon-replete conditions. These results suggest that protein synthesis during bolus H2O2 stress does not affect clearance dynamics and that access to catabolites only matters at low H2O2 concentrations. We anticipate that this model will serve as a computational tool for the quantitative exploration and dissection of oxidative stress in bacteria, and that the model and methods used to develop it will provide important templates for the generation of comparable

  9. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations for the reaction of semiquinone radicals to form superoxide and hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Buettner, Garry R.

    2010-01-01

    The quinone/semiquinone/hydroquinone triad (Q/SQ•−/H2Q) represents a class of compounds that has great importance in a wide range of biological processes. The half-cell reduction potentials of these redox couples in aqueous solutions at neutral pH, E°′, provide a window to understanding the thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of this triad and their associated chemistry and biochemistry in vivo. Substituents on the quinone ring can significantly influence the electron density “on the ring” and thus modify E°′ dramatically. E°′ of the quinone governs the reaction of semiquinone with dioxygen to form superoxide. At near-neutral pH the pKa's of the hydroquinone are outstanding indicators of the electron density in the aromatic ring of the members of these triads (electrophilicity) and thus are excellent tools to predict half-cell reduction potentials for both the one-electron and two-electron couples, which in turn allow estimates of rate constants for the reactions of these triads. For example, the higher the pKa's of H2Q, the lower the reduction potentials and the higher the rate constants for the reaction of SQ•− with dioxygen to form superoxide. However, hydroquinone autoxidation is controlled by the concentration of di-ionized hydroquinone; thus, the lower the pKa's the less stable H2Q to autoxidation. Catalysts, e.g., metals and quinone, can accelerate oxidation processes; by removing superoxide and increasing the rate of formation of quinone, superoxide dismutase can accelerate oxidation of hydroquinones and thereby increase the flux of hydrogen peroxide. The principal reactions of quinones are with nucleophiles via Michael addition, for example, with thiols and amines. The rate constants for these addition reactions are also related to E°′. Thus, pKa's of a hydroquinone and E°′ are central to the chemistry of these triads. PMID:20493944

  10. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Carbon-to-Metal Hydrogen Atom Transfer Involving Os-Centered Radicals: Evidence for Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowska-Androlojc, Anna; Grills, David C.; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R. Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-05

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Studies by means of time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os• and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os• radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons were found to be in the range 1.54 × 105 M 1 s 1 -1.73 × 107 M 1 s-1 at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.6 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 -C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies and the pre-exponential factor ratio. For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os•, the (ED - EH) = 3.25 ± 0.20 kcal/mol and AH/AD = 0.056 ± 0.018 values are greater than the semi-classical limits and thus suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism. The work at BNL was carried out under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. RMB also thanks the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  12. H2 Desorption from MgH2 Surfaces with Steps and Catalyst-Dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, Jason M.; Wang, Lin-Lin; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-03-10

    Light-metal hydrides, like MgH2, remain under scrutiny as prototypes for reversible H-storage materials. For MgH2, we assess hydrogen desorption/adsorption properties (enthalpy and kinetic barriers) for stepped, catalyst-doped surfaces occurring, e.g., from ball-milling in real samples. Employing density functional theory and simulated annealing in a slab model, we studied initial H2 desorption from stepped surfaces with(out) titanium (Ti) catalytic dopant. Extensive simulated annealing studies were performed to find the dopant’s site preferences. For the most stable initial and final (possibly magnetic) states, nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations were performed to determine the H2-desorption activation energy. We used a moment-transition NEB method to account for the dopant’s transition to the lowest-energy magnetic state at each image along the band. We identify a dopant-related surface-desorption mechanism that reloads via bulk H diffusion. While reproducing the observed bulk enthalpy of desorption, we find a decrease of 0.24 eV (a 14% reduction) in the activation energy on doped stepped surface; together with a 22% reduction on a doped flat surface, this brackets the assessed 18% reduction in kinetic barrier for ball-milled MgH2 samples with low concentration of Ti from experiment.

  13. Variations in protein/flavin hydrogen bonding in a LOV domain produce non-Arrhenius kinetics of adduct decay†

    PubMed Central

    Zoltowski, Brian D.; Nash, Abigail I.; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    Light Oxygen Voltage (LOV) domains utilize a conserved blue light-dependent mechanism to control a diverse array of effector domains in biological and engineered proteins. Variations in the kinetics and efficiency of LOV photochemistry fine tune various aspects of the photic response. Characterization of the kinetics of a key aspect of this photochemical mechanism in EL222, a blue-light responsive DNA binding protein from Erythrobacter litoralis HTCC2594, reveals unique non-Arrhenius behavior in the rate of dark state cleavage of the photochemically-generated adduct. Sequence analysis and mutagenesis studies establish that this effect stems from a Gln to Ala mutation unique to EL222 and homologous proteins from marine bacteria. Kinetic and spectroscopic analyses reveal that hydrogen bonding interactions between the FMN N1, O2 and ribityl hydroxyls with the surrounding protein regulate photocycle kinetics and stabilize the LOV active site from temperature-induced alteration in local structure. Substitution of residues interacting with the N1-O2 locus modulates adduct stability, structural flexibility and sequestration of the active site from bulk solvent without perturbation of light-activated DNA binding. Together, these variants link non-Arrhenius behavior to specific alteration of an H-bonding network, while affording tunability of photocycle kinetics. PMID:21923139

  14. Distillation Kinetics of Solid Mixtures of Hydrogen Peroxide and Water and the Isolation of Pure Hydrogen Peroxide in Ultrahigh Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teolis, B. D.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    We present results of the growth of thin films of crystalline H2O2 and H2O2.2H2O (dihydrate) in ultrahigh vacuum by distilling an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. We traced the process using infrared reflectance spectroscopy, mass loss on a quartz crystal microbalance, and in a few cases ultraviolet-visible reflectance. We find that the different crystalline phases-water, dihydrate, and hydrogen peroxide-have very different sublimation rates, making distillation efficient to isolate the less volatile component, crystalline H2O2.

  15. USING METHANOL-WATER SYSTEMS TO INVESTIGATE PHENANTHRENE SORPTION-DESORPTION ON SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption isotherm nonlinearity, sorption-desorption hysteresis, slow desorption kinetics, and other nonideal phenomena have been attributed to the differing sorptive characteristics of the natural organic matter (NOM) polymers associated with soils and sediments. A conceptualizat...

  16. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H]4+ ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å2 and 446 Å2; the [M + 3H]3+ ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å2 and 367 Å2. Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H]3+ ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H]4+ ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H]4+ ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  17. Kinetics and mechanisms of heterogeneous reaction of gaseous hydrogen peroxide on mineral oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Chen, Zhongming; Shen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xuan

    2011-04-15

    Recent studies have shown that heterogeneous reactions of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on aerosol surfaces may play an important role in tropospheric chemistry. The data concerning the kinetics and mechanisms of these reactions, however, are quite scarce so far. Here, we investigated, for the first time, the heterogeneous reactions of gaseous H(2)O(2) on SiO(2) and α-Al(2)O(3) particles, two major components of mineral dust aerosol, using transmission-Fourier Transform Infrared (T-FTIR) spectroscopy, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It is found that H(2)O(2) molecularly adsorbs on SiO(2), and a small amount of molecularly adsorbed H(2)O(2) decomposes due to its thermal instability. For α-Al(2)O(3), catalytic decomposition of H(2)O(2) evidently occurs, but there is also a small amount of H(2)O(2) molecularly adsorbed on the particle surface. The BET uptake coefficients of H(2)O(2) on both particles appear to be independent of gaseous H(2)O(2) concentration (1.27-13.8 ppmv) and particle sample mass (2.8-6.5 mg for SiO(2) and 8.6-18.9 mg for α-Al(2)O(3)), but are strongly dependent on relative humidity with the values ranging from (1.55 ± 0.14) × 10(-8) and (1.21 ± 0.04) × 10(-7) at 2% RH to (0.61 ± 0.06) × 10(-8) and (0.76 ± 0.09) × 10(-7) at 76% RH for SiO(2) and α-Al(2)O(3), respectively. On the basis of the experimental results and literature data, the potential mechanisms for heterogeneous decomposition of H(2)O(2) were proposed, and the atmospheric implications of these reactions were discussed. It is found that heterogeneous reaction of H(2)O(2) on both mineral oxides plays a significant role in processing mineral aerosols, although its role as a sink for ambient H(2)O(2) is probably limited.

  18. Influence of different types of effectors on the kinetic parameters of suicide inactivation of catalase by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ghadermarzi, M; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A

    1999-04-12

    The effects of cyanide and azide ions (class A), sodium-n-dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and 2-mercaptoethanol (class B), 3-aminotriazole (class C) and NADPH (class D) on the initial activity (ai), inactivation rate constant (ki) and the partition ratio (r) of bovine liver catalase reaction with its suicide substrate, hydrogen peroxide, were studied in 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0 at 27 degrees C. The above kinetic parameters were determined by processing the progress curve data. In class A, which contains fast and reversible inhibitors of catalase, a proportional decrease in ai and ki was observed by inhibitors, so that the r remained constant. In class B, which contains slow and irreversible inactivators, a decrease in ai and constancy of ki and r were observed when catalase was incubated in the presence of such inactivators for a determined time. In class C, containing effector which can combine with intermediate compound I, ai was relatively unchanged but an increase in ki and a decrease in r were observed. In class D, containing effector which reduces compound I to ferricatalase, ai was not affected significantly but some decrease in ki was detected which was linked with an increase in r. These results demonstrate that different classes of effectors affect the determined kinetic parameters of catalase in various ways. Thus, determination of such parameters by simple kinetic experiments can be carried out for classification of the agents which have an effect on the kinetics of catalase. PMID:10209276

  19. Theoretical and kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of unsaturated C6 methyl esters with hydroxyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quan-De; Ni, Zhong-Hai

    2016-04-01

    This work reports a systematic ab initio and chemical kinetic study of the rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction reactions by hydroxyl radical (OH) on typical isomers of unsaturated C6 methyl esters at the CBS/QB3 level of theory. The high-pressure limit rate constants at different reaction sites for all the methyl esters in the temperature range from 500 to 2000 K are calculated via transition-state theory with the Wigner method for quantum tunneling effect and fitted to the modified three parameters Arrhenius expression using least-squares regression. Further, a branching ratio analysis for each reaction site has been performed.

  20. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Lens, Piet N L; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Bester, Kai; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2011-05-30

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria, were suspended in aqueous solution at pH similar to that of corroded concrete. Hydrogen sulfide was supplied to the reactor to provide the source of reduced sulfur. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen was monitored. The utilization rates of both hydrogen sulfide and oxygen suggested exponential bacterial growth with median growth rates of 1.25 d(-1) and 1.33 d(-1) as determined from the utilization rates of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, respectively. Elemental sulfur was found to be the immediate product of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation. When exponential growth had been achieved, the addition of hydrogen sulfide was terminated leading to elemental sulfur oxidation. The ratio of consumed sulfur to consumed oxygen suggested that sulfuric acid was the ultimate oxidation product. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first study to determine the growth rate of bacteria involved in concrete corrosion with hydrogen sulfide as source of reduced sulfur. PMID:21440988

  1. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Lens, Piet N L; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Bester, Kai; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2011-05-30

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria, were suspended in aqueous solution at pH similar to that of corroded concrete. Hydrogen sulfide was supplied to the reactor to provide the source of reduced sulfur. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen was monitored. The utilization rates of both hydrogen sulfide and oxygen suggested exponential bacterial growth with median growth rates of 1.25 d(-1) and 1.33 d(-1) as determined from the utilization rates of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, respectively. Elemental sulfur was found to be the immediate product of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation. When exponential growth had been achieved, the addition of hydrogen sulfide was terminated leading to elemental sulfur oxidation. The ratio of consumed sulfur to consumed oxygen suggested that sulfuric acid was the ultimate oxidation product. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first study to determine the growth rate of bacteria involved in concrete corrosion with hydrogen sulfide as source of reduced sulfur.

  2. Electrochemical studies of kinetic properties of titanium- and vanadium-hydrogen systems at intermediate temperatures using molten salt techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, B.Y.; Deublein, G.; Huggins, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    A novel molten salt technique for studying hydrogen transport in Ti an V metals is described. The molten-salt electrolytes were eutectic mixtures of alkali halides dissolved with excess LiH, operating in temperature ranges typically above 300 C, to which electrochemical techniques were difficult to apply conventionally. The authors used the molten salt technique to investigate the thermodynamic properties of the Ti-H system previously. In this work, they determined composition-dependent diffusion and permeation data of hydrogen in Ti and in binary hydride phases using a galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT). The results are in accordance with the best values reported by others using different techniques. They also reported some preliminary results regarding the kinetic properties of hydrogen in V and its hydride measured by more conventional time-lag and steady-state permeation techniques. The successful application of this molten salt technique in the metal hydrogen systems opened a new arena for potential application in energy conversion and storage.

  3. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies of the [palladium(Ar-bian)]-catalyzed semi-hydrogenation of 4-octyne.

    PubMed

    Kluwer, Alexander M; Koblenz, Tehila S; Jonischkeit, Thorsten; Woelk, Klaus; Elsevier, Cornelis J

    2005-11-01

    The kinetics of the stereoselective semi-hydrogenation of 4-octyne in THF by the highly active catalyst [Pd{(m,m'-(CF(3))(2)C(6)H(3))-bian}(ma)] (2) (bian = bis(imino)acenaphthene; ma = maleic anhydride) has been investigated. The rate law under hydrogen-rich conditions is described by r = k[4-octyne](0.65)[Pd][H(2)], showing first order in palladium and dihydrogen and a broken order in substrate. Parahydrogen studies have shown that a pairwise transfer of hydrogen atoms occurs in the rate-limiting step. In agreement with recent theoretical results, the proposed mechanism consists of the consecutive steps: alkyne coordination, heterolytic dihydrogen activation (hydrogenolysis of one Pd-N bond), subsequent hydro-palladation of the alkyne, followed by addition of N-H to palladium, reductive coupling of vinyl and hydride and, finally, substitution of the product alkene by the alkyne substrate. Under hydrogen-limiting conditions, side reactions occur, that is, formation of catalytically inactive palladacycles by oxidative alkyne coupling. Furthermore, it has been shown that (Z)-oct-4-ene is the primary reaction product, from which the minor product (E)-oct-4-ene is formed by an H(2)-assisted, palladium-catalyzed isomerization reaction.

  4. Fast hydrogen sorption from MgH2-VO2(B) composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, Sanja; Kurko, Sandra; Pasquini, Luca; Matović, Ljiljana; Vujasin, Radojka; Novaković, Nikola; Novaković, Jasmina Grbović

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH2‒VO2(B) composites synthesised by mechanical milling have been studied. The microstructural properties of composites were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Particle size analysis (PSD), while sorption behaviour was followed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Sievert measurements. Results have shown that although desorption temperature reduction is moderate; there is a substantial improvement in hydrogen sorption kinetics. The complete desorption of pure MgH2 at elevated temperature takes place in more than 30 min while the composite fully desorbs in less than 2 min even at lower temperatures. It has been shown that the metastable γ-MgH2 phase and the point defects have a decisive role in desorption process only in the first sorption cycle, while the second and the subsequent sorption cycles are affected by microstructural and morphological characteristics of the composite.

  5. Estimation of kinetic parameters related to biochemical interactions between hydrogen peroxide and signal transduction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Paula M.; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The lack of kinetic data concerning the biological effects of reactive oxygen species is slowing down the development of the field of redox signaling. Herein, we deduced and applied equations to estimate kinetic parameters from typical redox signaling experiments. H2O2-sensing mediated by the oxidation of a protein target and the switch-off of this sensor, by being converted back to its reduced form, are the two processes for which kinetic parameters are determined. The experimental data required to apply the equations deduced is the fraction of the H2O2 sensor protein in the reduced or in the oxidized state measured in intact cells or living tissues after exposure to either endogenous or added H2O2. Either non-linear fittings that do not need transformation of the experimental data or linearized plots in which deviations from the equations are easily observed can be used. The equations were shown to be valid by fitting to them virtual time courses simulated with a kinetic model. The good agreement between the kinetic parameters estimated in these fittings and those used to simulate the virtual time courses supported the accuracy of the kinetic equations deduced. Finally, equations were successfully tested with real data taken from published experiments that describe redox signaling mediated by the oxidation of two protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B and SHP-2, which are two of the few H2O2-sensing proteins with known kinetic parameters. Whereas for PTP1B estimated kinetic parameters fitted in general the present knowledge, for SHP-2 results obtained suggest that reactivity toward H2O2 as well as the rate of SHP-2 regeneration back to its reduced form are higher than previously thought. In conclusion, valuable quantitative kinetic data can be estimated from typical redox signaling experiments, thus improving our understanding about the complex processes that underlie the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling responses. PMID:25325054

  6. Estimation of kinetic parameters related to biochemical interactions between hydrogen peroxide and signal transduction proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Paula; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    The lack of kinetic data concerning the biological effects of reactive oxygen species is slowing down the development of the field of redox signaling. Herein, we deduced and applied equations to estimate kinetic parameters from typical redox signaling experiments. H2O2-sensing mediated by the oxidation of a protein target and the switch-off of this sensor, by being converted back to its reduced form, are the two processes for which kinetic parameters are determined. The experimental data required to apply the equations deduced is the fraction of the H2O2 sensor protein in the reduced or in the oxidized state measured in intact cells or living tissues after exposure to either endogenous or added H2O2. Either non-linear fittings that do not need transformation of the experimental data or linearized plots in which deviations from the equations are easily observed can be used. The equations were shown to be valid by fitting to them virtual time courses simulated with a kinetic model. The good agreement between the kinetic parameters estimated in these fittings and those used to simulate the virtual time courses supported the accuracy of the kinetic equations deduced. Finally, equations were successfully tested with real data taken from published experiments that describe redox signaling mediated by the oxidation of two protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B and SHP-2, which are two of the few H2O2-sensing proteins with known kinetic parameters. Whereas for PTP1B estimated kinetic parameters fitted in general the present knowledge, for SHP-2 results obtained suggest that reactivity towards H2O2 as well as the rate of SHP-2 regeneration back to its reduced form are higher than previously thought. In conclusion, valuable quantitative kinetic data can be estimated from typical redox signaling experiments, thus improving our understanding about the complex processes that underline the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling responses.

  7. Estimation of kinetic parameters related to biochemical interactions between hydrogen peroxide and signal transduction proteins.

    PubMed

    Brito, Paula M; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The lack of kinetic data concerning the biological effects of reactive oxygen species is slowing down the development of the field of redox signaling. Herein, we deduced and applied equations to estimate kinetic parameters from typical redox signaling experiments. H2O2-sensing mediated by the oxidation of a protein target and the switch-off of this sensor, by being converted back to its reduced form, are the two processes for which kinetic parameters are determined. The experimental data required to apply the equations deduced is the fraction of the H2O2 sensor protein in the reduced or in the oxidized state measured in intact cells or living tissues after exposure to either endogenous or added H2O2. Either non-linear fittings that do not need transformation of the experimental data or linearized plots in which deviations from the equations are easily observed can be used. The equations were shown to be valid by fitting to them virtual time courses simulated with a kinetic model. The good agreement between the kinetic parameters estimated in these fittings and those used to simulate the virtual time courses supported the accuracy of the kinetic equations deduced. Finally, equations were successfully tested with real data taken from published experiments that describe redox signaling mediated by the oxidation of two protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B and SHP-2, which are two of the few H2O2-sensing proteins with known kinetic parameters. Whereas for PTP1B estimated kinetic parameters fitted in general the present knowledge, for SHP-2 results obtained suggest that reactivity toward H2O2 as well as the rate of SHP-2 regeneration back to its reduced form are higher than previously thought. In conclusion, valuable quantitative kinetic data can be estimated from typical redox signaling experiments, thus improving our understanding about the complex processes that underlie the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling responses.

  8. First-principles-based kinetic Monte Carlo studies of diffusion of hydrogen in Ni–Al and Ni–Fe binary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tafen, De Nyago

    2015-02-14

    The diffusion of dilute hydrogen in fcc Ni–Al and Ni–Fe binary alloys was examined using kinetic Monte Carlo method with input kinetic parameters obtained from first-principles density functional theory. The simulation involves the implementation of computationally efficient energy barrier model that describes the configuration dependence of the hydrogen hopping. The predicted hydrogen diffusion coefficients in Ni and Ni89.4Fe10.6 are compared well with the available experimental data. In Ni–Al, the model predicts lower hydrogen diffusivity compared to that in Ni. Overall, diffusion prefactors and the effective activation energies of H in Ni–Fe and Ni–Al are concentration dependent of the alloying element. Furthermore, the changes in their values are the results of the short-range order (nearest-neighbor) effect on the interstitial diffusion of hydrogen in fcc Ni-based alloys.

  9. First-principles-based kinetic Monte Carlo studies of diffusion of hydrogen in Ni–Al and Ni–Fe binary alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tafen, De Nyago

    2015-02-14

    The diffusion of dilute hydrogen in fcc Ni–Al and Ni–Fe binary alloys was examined using kinetic Monte Carlo method with input kinetic parameters obtained from first-principles density functional theory. The simulation involves the implementation of computationally efficient energy barrier model that describes the configuration dependence of the hydrogen hopping. The predicted hydrogen diffusion coefficients in Ni and Ni89.4Fe10.6 are compared well with the available experimental data. In Ni–Al, the model predicts lower hydrogen diffusivity compared to that in Ni. Overall, diffusion prefactors and the effective activation energies of H in Ni–Fe and Ni–Al are concentration dependent of the alloying element.more » Furthermore, the changes in their values are the results of the short-range order (nearest-neighbor) effect on the interstitial diffusion of hydrogen in fcc Ni-based alloys.« less

  10. Reduced and Validated Kinetic Mechanisms for Hydrogen-CO-sir Combustion in Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Yiguang Ju; Frederick Dryer

    2009-02-07

    Rigorous experimental, theoretical, and numerical investigation of various issues relevant to the development of reduced, validated kinetic mechanisms for synthetic gas combustion in gas turbines was carried out - including the construction of new radiation models for combusting flows, improvement of flame speed measurement techniques, measurements and chemical kinetic analysis of H{sub 2}/CO/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent mixtures, revision of the H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} kinetic model to improve flame speed prediction capabilities, and development of a multi-time scale algorithm to improve computational efficiency in reacting flow simulations.

  11. Atomic hydrogen interaction with Ru(1010).

    PubMed

    Vesselli, E; Comelli, G; Rosei, R

    2004-05-01

    The interaction of atomic hydrogen with clean and deuterium precovered Ru(1010) was studied by means of temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) spectroscopy. Compared to molecular hydrogen experiments, after exposure of the clean surface to gas-phase atomic hydrogen at 90 K, two additional peaks grow in the desorption spectra at 115 and 150 K. The surface saturation coverage, determined by equilibrium between abstraction and adsorption reactions, is 2.5 monolayers. Preadsorbed deuterium abstraction experiments with gas-phase atomic hydrogen show that a pure Eley-Rideal mechanism is not involved in the process, while a hot atom (HA) kinetics describes well the reaction. By least-squares fitting of the experimental data, a simplified HA kinetic model yields an abstraction cross section value of 0.5 +/- 0.2 angstroms2. The atomic hydrogen interaction with an oxygen precovered surface was also studied by means of both TPD and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: oxygen hydrogenation and water production take place already at very low temperature (90 K).

  12. Proton-transfer mechanism for dispersed decay kinetics of single molecules isolated in potassium hydrogen phthalate.

    PubMed

    Bott, Eric D; Riley, Erin A; Kahr, Bart; Reid, Philip J

    2009-08-25

    The excited-state decay kinetics of single 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) molecules oriented and overgrown within crystals of potassium acid phthalate (KAP) are reported. Time-correlated single-photon counting measurements (TCSPC) of 56 DCF molecules in KAP reveal that single-exponential decay is exhibited by roughly half of the molecules. The remainder demonstrates complex excited-state decay kinetics that are well fit by a stretched exponential function consistent with dispersed kinetics. Histograms of single-molecule luminescence energies revealed environmental fluctuations and distinct chemical species. The TCSPC results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations employing a first-passage model for excited-state decay. Agreement between experiment and theory, on both bulk and single-molecule levels, suggests that a subset of the DCF molecules in KAP experience fluctuations in the surrounding environment that modify the energy barrier to proton transfer leading to dispersed kinetics.

  13. Application of electron stimulated desorption techniques to measure the isotherm and the mean residence time of hydrogen physisorbed on a metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Ichiro Shimizu, Hideyuki; Kawarabuki, Taku; Yamakawa, Koichiro; Miura, Takashi

    2015-03-15

    Electron stimulated desorption techniques were applied to probe the density of H{sub 2} physisorbed on a cold surface. The adsorption isotherm of H{sub 2} on a copper surface was measured in the equilibrium pressure range between 10{sup −9} and 10{sup −4} Pa at surface temperatures of 6.5 and 4.2 K. The mean residence times of H{sub 2} on copper were obtained from the observation of the time development of the surface density in a transitional state approaching equilibrium, and are 50–500 s for the coverage between 1 and 0.18 at 4.2 K of the substrate temperature. The adsorption energies of 1.18–1.27 kJ/mol, and the condensation coefficient of 0.074–0.018 were also deduced.

  14. Hydrogen tunneling in adenosylcobalamin-dependent glutamate mutase: evidence from intrinsic kinetic isotope effects measured by intra-molecular competition †

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Miri; Song, Hangtian; Håkansson, Kristina; Marsh, E. Neil G.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen atom transfer reactions between substrate and coenzyme are a key mechanistic feature of all AdoCbl-dependent enzymes. For one of these enzymes, glutamate mutase, we have investigated whether hydrogen tunneling makes a significant contribution to the mechanism by examining the temperature-dependence of the deuterium kinetic isotope effect associated with hydrogen atom transfer from methylaspartate to the coenzyme. To do this we designed a novel intra-molecular competition experiment that allowed us to measure the intrinsic kinetic isotope effect, even though hydrogen transfer may not be rate determining. From the Arrhenius plot of the kinetic isotope effect, the ratio of the pre-exponential factors AH/AD was 0.17 ± 0.04 and the isotope effect on the activation energy, ΔEa(D – H) was 1.94 ± 0.13 kcal/mol. The results imply that significant degree of hydrogen tunneling occurs in glutamate mutase, even though the intrinsic kinetic isotope effects are well within the semi-classical limit and are much smaller than those measured for other AdoCbl enzymes and model reactions for which hydrogen tunneling has been implicated. PMID:20225826

  15. Modeling the reaction kinetics of a hydrogen generator onboard a fuel cell -- Electric hybrid motorcycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Karthik

    Owing to the perceived decline of the fossil fuel reserves in the world and environmental issues like pollution, conventional fuels may be replaced by cleaner alternative fuels. The potential of hydrogen as a fuel in vehicular applications is being explored. Hydrogen as an energy carrier potentially finds applications in internal combustion engines and fuel cells because it is considered a clean fuel and has high specific energy. However, at 6 to 8 per kilogram, not only is hydrogen produced from conventional methods like steam reforming expensive, but also there are storage and handling issues, safety concerns and lack of hydrogen refilling stations across the country. The purpose of this research is to suggest a cheap and viable system that generates hydrogen on demand through a chemical reaction between an aluminum-water slurry and an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution to power a 2 kW fuel cell on a fuel cell hybrid motorcycle. This reaction is essentially an aluminum-water reaction where sodium hydroxide acts as a reaction promoter or catalyst. The Horizon 2000 fuel cell used for this purpose has a maximum hydrogen intake rate of 28 lpm. The study focuses on studying the exothermic reaction between the reactants and proposes a rate law that best describes the rate of generation of hydrogen in connection to the surface area of aluminum available for the certain reaction and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution. Further, the proposed rate law is used in the simulation model of the chemical reactor onboard the hybrid motorcycle to determine the hydrogen flow rate to the fuel cell with time. Based on the simulated rate of production of hydrogen from the chemical system, its feasibility of use on different drive cycles is analyzed. The rate of production of hydrogen with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide and smaller aluminum powder size was found to enable the installation of the chemical reactor on urban cycles with frequent stops and starts

  16. Systematic evaluation of nitrate and perchlorate bioreduction kinetics in groundwater using a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Ziv-El, Michal C; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the simultaneous reduction kinetics of the oxidized compounds, we treated nitrate-contaminated groundwater (approximately 9.4 mg-N/L) containing low concentrations of perchlorate (approximately 12.5 microg/L) and saturated with dissolved oxygen (approximately 8 mg/L) in a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). We systematically increased the hydrogen availability and simultaneously varied the surface loading of the oxidized compounds on the biofilm in order to provide a comprehensive, quantitative data set with which to evaluate the relationship between electron donor (H(2)) availability, surface loading of the electron acceptors (oxidized compounds), and simultaneous bioreduction of the electron acceptors. Increasing the H(2) pressure delivered more H(2) gas, and the total H(2) flux increased linearly from approximately 0.04 mg/cm(2)-d for 0.5 psig (0.034 atm) to 0.13 mg/cm(2)-d for 9.5 psig (0.65 atm). This increased rate of H(2) delivery allowed for continued reduction of the acceptors as their surface loading increased. The electron acceptors had a clear hydrogen-utilization order when the availability of hydrogen was limited: oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, and then perchlorate. Spiking the influent with perchlorate or nitrate allowed us to identify the maximum surface loadings that still achieved more than 99.5% reduction of both oxidized contaminants: 0.21 mg NO(3)-N/cm(2)-d and 3.4 microg ClO(4)/cm(2)-d. Both maximum values appear to be controlled by factors other than hydrogen availability.

  17. Electrical and mechanical controlling of the kinetic and magnetic properties of hydrogen atoms on free-standing silicene.

    PubMed

    Podsiadły-Paszkowska, Agata; Krawiec, Mariusz

    2016-07-20

    Effects of strain, charge doping and external electric field on kinetic and magnetic properties of hydrogen atoms on a free-standing silicene layer are investigated by first-principles density functional theory. It was found that the charge doping and strain are the most effective ways of changing the hydrogen-silicene binding energy, but they can only raise its value. The perpendicular external electric field can also lower it albeit in a narrower range. The strain has also the strongest impact on diffusion processes, and the diffusion barrier can be modified up to 50% of its unstrained value. The adsorption of hydrogen atoms results in a locally antiferromagnetic ground state with the effective exchange constant of approximately 1 eV. The system can easily be driven into a nonmagnetic phase by the charge doping and strain. The obtained results are very promising in view of the silicene functionalization and potential applications of silicene in fields of modern nanoelectronics and spintronics. PMID:27228502

  18. Electrical and mechanical controlling of the kinetic and magnetic properties of hydrogen atoms on free-standing silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podsiadły-Paszkowska, Agata; Krawiec, Mariusz

    2016-07-01

    Effects of strain, charge doping and external electric field on kinetic and magnetic properties of hydrogen atoms on a free-standing silicene layer are investigated by first-principles density functional theory. It was found that the charge doping and strain are the most effective ways of changing the hydrogen-silicene binding energy, but they can only raise its value. The perpendicular external electric field can also lower it albeit in a narrower range. The strain has also the strongest impact on diffusion processes, and the diffusion barrier can be modified up to 50% of its unstrained value. The adsorption of hydrogen atoms results in a locally antiferromagnetic ground state with the effective exchange constant of approximately 1 eV. The system can easily be driven into a nonmagnetic phase by the charge doping and strain. The obtained results are very promising in view of the silicene functionalization and potential applications of silicene in fields of modern nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  19. Electrical and mechanical controlling of the kinetic and magnetic properties of hydrogen atoms on free-standing silicene.

    PubMed

    Podsiadły-Paszkowska, Agata; Krawiec, Mariusz

    2016-07-20

    Effects of strain, charge doping and external electric field on kinetic and magnetic properties of hydrogen atoms on a free-standing silicene layer are investigated by first-principles density functional theory. It was found that the charge doping and strain are the most effective ways of changing the hydrogen-silicene binding energy, but they can only raise its value. The perpendicular external electric field can also lower it albeit in a narrower range. The strain has also the strongest impact on diffusion processes, and the diffusion barrier can be modified up to 50% of its unstrained value. The adsorption of hydrogen atoms results in a locally antiferromagnetic ground state with the effective exchange constant of approximately 1 eV. The system can easily be driven into a nonmagnetic phase by the charge doping and strain. The obtained results are very promising in view of the silicene functionalization and potential applications of silicene in fields of modern nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  20. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamics and desorption studies for uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solution by novel microporous composite P(HEMA-EP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkaya, Recep; Akkaya, Birnur

    2013-03-01

    In this research, a novel composite, poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate-expanded perlite) [P(HEMA-EP)], was synthesized and its adsorptive features were investigated. P(HEMA-EP)'s adsorptive features were evaluated for UO22+ and Th4+ ions in terms of the dependency upon the ion concentration, pH, temperature, and time. P(HEMA-EP) was able to bind UO22+ and Th4+ ions with strong chemical affinity. The adsorption results were fitted to the classical Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) sorption models. P(HEMA-EP) was also used to study the removal of UO22+ and Th4+ ions from aqueous solutions in a batch system. The adsorption capacity (XL) of UO22+ and Th4+ ions was found to be 0.29 and 0.44 mol kg-1, respectively. The kinetic data corresponds well to the pseudo-second-order equation. Changes in the enthalpy and entropy values demonstrated that the overall adsorption process was spontaneous (ΔG < 0), endothermic (ΔH > 0), and had increased entropy (ΔS > 0), as expected. The reusability of the composites was confirmed for five sequential reuses.

  1. FUNDAMENTAL KINETICS OF SUPERCRITICAL COAL LIQUEFACTION: EFFECT OF CATALYSTS AND HYDROGEN-DONOR SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin J. McCoy; J.M. Smith

    1998-08-01

    This report outlines a distribution kinetics approach to macromolecular reactions that has been applied to several processes. The objective was to develop an understanding of high-temperature, dense-phase thermolytic processes for complex macromolecular systems, such as coal. Experiments and theory are described for chemical models that simulate depolymerization of coal. The approach has been exceptionally successful for the model macromolecular systems. Development of a novel chemical reaction engineering analysis, based on distribution kinetics, was a major accomplishment of the current research.

  2. Thermal decomposition pathway and desorption study of isopropanol and tert-butanol on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Kim, Kwansoo; Yong, Kijung

    2002-09-01

    Thermal decomposition pathway and desorption of isopropanol (IPA) and tert-butanol on Si(100) were studied using temperature programed desorption. Adsorbed alcohols studied were decomposed into atomic hydrogen and alkoxy on the surface. During heating the sample up to 1000 K, acetone, propylene, and hydrogen were desorbed as decomposition products of IPA on Si(100). Desorption pathways of IPA on Si(100) were largely consistent with those on metal surfaces: beta-hydride elimination reaction to acetone and C-O scission to propylene. For tert-butanol, which has no beta-hydrogen, isobutene and hydrogen were observed as main desorption products. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  3. Repeated appearance and disappearance of localized surface plasmon resonance in 1.2 nm gold clusters induced by adsorption and desorption of hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Ryo; Yamazoe, Seiji; Koyasu, Kiichirou; Tsukuda, Tatsuya

    2016-02-01

    Addition of an aqueous solution of NaBH4 to a dispersion of small (∼1.2 nm) gold clusters stabilized by poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (Au:PVP) induced a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption for a certain period of time while maintaining the cluster size. The duration of the LSPR band could be lengthened by increasing the NaBH4 concentration and shortened by increasing the concentration of dissolved O2, and the LSPR band could be made to appear and reappear repeatedly. The appearance of the LSPR band is explained by the electron donation to the Au core from the adsorbed H atoms that originate from NaBH4, whereas its disappearance is ascribed to the removal of H atoms by their reaction with O2. These results suggest that the transition between the metallic and non-metallic electronic structures of the Au clusters can be reversibly induced by the adsorption and desorption of H atoms, which are electronically equivalent to Au.

  4. Photon simulated desorption revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, D.

    A promising new method for surface investigations is discussed: Photon stimulated desorption. The electronic excitations of adsorbate complexes on surfaces, either by electron impact or photon absorption, which can lead to repulsive states of the complex and therefore to expulsion of ions and neutrals are considered. Such processes are termed electron (or photon) stimulated desorption, ESD and PSD, respectively. Apart from the primary agent (electrons or photons), these processes are similar, and common label "desorption induced by electronic transitions" (acronym DIET) was proposed. Desorption effects, intrinsic photoneffects, and some of the advantages of PSD over ESD are discussed.

  5. An investigation of the kinetics of hydrogen chemisorption on iron metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The isothermal kinetics of H2, H2S, and O2 chemisorption onto epitaxially grown (III) oriented Fe films were studied. The measurements were made using the techniques of chemisorption induced resistance change and Auger electron spectroscopy (for adsorbed sulfur and oxygen). Also the origin of the chemisorption induced resistance change for these systems and its applicability to kinetic measurements were established. The chemisorption kinetics were interpreted as dissociative chemisorption via an adsorbed molecular species. The applicable rate constants were established. In none of the studies were the rate constants observed to be coverage dependent. By comparing the temperature dependence of the rate constants with absolute rate theory, the binding energies and activation energies of all the kinetic processes were obtained for the H2/Fe system. The initial sticking coefficient was pressure dependent for both the H2/Fe and H2S/Fe systems. This results from the step between the adsorbed molecular state and the dissociated chemisorbed state being the rate limiting step for absorption at certain pressures and temperatures. Estimates were obtained for the temperature dependence of the rate constants for the O2/Fe system.

  6. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D[subscript 2]O and a catalytic amount of H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4]. The resulting labeled product is characterized by [superscript 1]H NMR. Students also…

  7. Kinetics of hydrogen consumption by rumen fluid, anaerobic digestor sludge, and sediment.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J A; Tiedje, J M

    1982-12-01

    Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for H(2) consumption by three methanogenic habitats were determined from progress curve and initial velocity experiments. The influences of mass transfer resistance, endogenous H(2) production, and growth on apparent parameter estimates were also investigated. Kinetic parameters could not be determined for undiluted rumen fluid and some digestor sludge from gas-phase measurements of H(2), since mass transfer of H(2) across the gas-liquid interface was rate limiting. However, accurate values were obtained once the samples were diluted. H(2) consumption by digestor sludge with a long retention time and by hypereutrophic lake sediment was not phase transfer limited. The K(m) values for H(2) uptake by these habitats were similar, with means of 5.8, 6.0, and 7.1 muM for rumen fluid, digestor sludge, and sediment, respectively. V(max) estimates suggested a ratio of activity of approximately 100 (rumen fluid):10 (sludge):1 (sediment); their ranges were as follows: rumen fluid, 14 to 28 mM h; Holt sludge, 0.7 to 4.3 mM h; and Wintergreen sediment, 0.13 to 0.49 mM h. The principles of phase transfer limitation, studied here for H(2), are the same for all gaseous substrates and products. The limitations and errors associated with gas phase determination of kinetic parameters were evaluated with a mathematical model that combined mass transport and Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Three criteria are described which can be used to evaluate the possibility that a phase transfer limitation exists. If it does not exist, (i) substrate consumption curves are Michaelis-Menten and not first order, (ii) the K(m) is independent of initial substrate concentration, and (iii) the K(m) is independent of biomass (V(max)) and remains constant with dilution of sample. Errors in the Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters are caused by endogenously produced H(2), but they were <15% for rumen fluid and 10% for lake sediment and digestor sludge. Increases in V

  8. The kinetics of iodide oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenković, M. C.; Stanisavljev, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The kinetics of the complex reaction between I- and H2O2 in acid media was investigated. The particular attention was focused on the determination of the rate constant of the reaction between HIO and H2O2 involved in the investigated complex process. The examination of the whole kinetics was performed by simultaneously monitoring the evolution of O2 pressure, I{3/-} and I- concentrations. We modeled the behavior of experimentally followed components based on Liebhafsky's research. Our preliminary results suggest a significantly higher rate constant (3.5 × 107 M-1 s-1) of the reaction between HIO and H2O2 as those proposed in the literature.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of hydrogen-air detonations with detailed kinetics and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Joseph; Romick, Christopher; Aslam, Tariq

    2014-11-01

    We consider the calculation of unsteady detonation in a mixture of calorically imperfect ideal gases with detailed kinetics. The use of detailed kinetics introduces multiple reaction length scales, and their interaction gives rise to complex dynamics. These are predicted using a wavelet-based adaptive mesh refinement technique and includes multi-component species, momentum, and energy diffusion, as well as DuFour and Soret effects. In the one-dimensional limit, we predict a transition from stability to unstable limit cycles as a driving piston velocity is lowered. At low overdrive, energy is partitioned into a variety of high frequency oscillatory modes. For weak low frequency instabilities, the dynamics are largely explained by a competition between advection and reaction time scales, with diffusion serving to perturb the dynamics. For higher frequency instabilities, the influence of diffusion is larger. We present new extensions to two-dimensional dynamics.

  10. Enantiodivergent Atroposelective Synthesis of Chiral Biaryls by Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation: Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Mori, Keiji; Itakura, Tsubasa; Akiyama, Takahiko

    2016-09-12

    Reported herein is an enantiodivergent synthesis of chiral biaryls by a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reaction. Upon treatment of biaryl lactols with aromatic amines and a Hantzsch ester in the presence of chiral phosphoric acid, dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) involving a reductive amination reaction proceeded smoothly to furnish both R and S isomers of chiral biaryls with excellent enantioselectivities by proper choice of hydroxyaniline derivative. This trend was observed in wide variety of substrates, and various chiral biphenyl and phenyl naphthyl adducts were synthesized with satisfactory enantioselectivities in enantiodivergent fashion. The enantiodivergent synthesis of synthetically challenging, chiral o-tetrasubstituted biaryls were also accomplished, and suggests high synthetic potential of the present method. PMID:27491630

  11. An Investigation of the Effect of Surface Impurities on the Adsorption Kinetics of Hydrogen Chemisorbed onto Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    The original goal of this program was to investigate the effect surface impurities have on the heterogeneous kinetic processes of those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. However, shortly after the initiation of the original program, the program's NASA Technical Monitor, Dr. Howard Nelson, requested that the effort supported by this Co-operative Agreement be redirected to study more pressing materials issues associated to the development of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The results of these efforts are outlined in this report. Detailed discussions of specific work, including experimental techniques and procedures, will be found in the publications listed with the subsection discussing that specific work as well and in Section 5. No inventions were generated or disclosed within this Agreement.

  12. Kinetic study of the effects of calcium ions on cationic artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase: calcium binding, steady-state kinetics and reactions with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Sidrach, Lara; Chazarra, Soledad; Varón, Ramón; Tudela, José; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2004-01-01

    The apparent catalytic constant (k(cat)) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase (AKPC) with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) increased 130-fold in the presence of calcium ions (Ca2+) but the affinity (K(m)) of the enzyme for ABTS was 500 times lower than for Ca2+-free AKPC. AKPC is known to exhibit an equilibrium between 6-aquo hexa-coordinate and penta-coordinate forms of the haem iron that is modulated by Ca2+ and affects compound I formation. Measurements of the Ca2+ dissociation constant (K(D)) were complicated by the water-association/dissociation equilibrium yielding a global value more than 1000 times too high. The value for the Ca2+ binding step alone has now been determined to be K(D) approximately 10 nM. AKPC-Ca2+ was more resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and exhibited increased catalase activity. An analysis of the complex H(2)O(2) concentration dependent kinetics of Ca2+-free AKPC is presented.

  13. Implementation of steady state approximation for modelling of reaction kinetic of UV catalysed hydrogen peroxide oxidation of starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumoro, Andri Cahyo; Retnowati, Diah Susetyo; Ratnawati, Budiyati, Catarina Sri

    2015-12-01

    With regard to its low viscosity, high stability, clarity, film forming and binding properties, oxidised starch has been widely used in various applications specifically in the food, paper, textile, laundry finishing and binding materials industries. A number of methods have been used to produce oxidised starch through reactions with various oxidizing agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, air oxygen, ozone, bromine, chromic acid, permanganate, nitrogen dioxide and hypochlorite. Unfortunately, most of previous works reported in the literatures were focused on the study of reaction mechanism and physicochemical properties characterization of the oxidised starches produced without investigation of the reaction kinetics of the oxidation process. This work aimed to develop a simple kinetic model for UV catalysed hydrogen peroxide oxidation of starch through implementation of steady state approximation for the radical reaction rates. The model was then verified using experimental data available in the literature. The model verification revealed that the proposed model shows its good agreement with the experimental data as indicated by an average absolute relative error of only 2.45%. The model also confirmed that carboxyl groups are oxidised further by hydroxyl radical. The carbonyl production rate was found to follow first order reaction with respect to carbonyl concentration. Similarly, carboxyl production rate also followed first order reaction with respect to carbonyl concentration. The apparent reaction rate constant for carbonyl formation and oxidation were 6.24 × 104 s-1 and 1.01 × 104 M-1.s-1, respectively. While apparent reaction rate constant for carboxyl oxidation was 4.86 × 104 M-1.s-1.

  14. Thermochemical and kinetics studies of the CH3SH+S (3P) hydrogen abstraction and insertion reactions.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Daniely V V; Cunha, Leonardo A; Spada, Rene F K; Ferrão, Luiz F A; Roberto-Neto, Orlando; Machado, Francisco B C

    2014-09-01

    Sulfur-containing molecules have a significant impact on atmosphere and biosphere. In this work we studied, from the point of view of electronic structure and chemical kinetics methods, the elementary reactions between a methanethiol molecule and a sulfur atom leading to hydrogen abstraction C-S bond cleavage (CH(3)SH+S; R1:→ CH(3)S+SH; R2: → CH(2)SH+SH; R3:→ CH(3)+HS(2)). The geometrical structures of the reactants, products, and saddle points for the three reaction paths were optimized using the BB1K method with the aug-cc-pV(T+d)Z basis set. The thermochemical properties were improved using single point coupled-cluster (CCSD(T)) calculations on the BB1K geometries followed by extrapolation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. This methodology was previously applied and has given accurate values of thermochemical and kinetics properties when compared to benchmark calculations and experimental data. For each reaction, the thermal rate constants were calculated using the improved canonical variational theory (ICVT) including the zero-curvature (ICVT/ZCT) and small-curvature (ICVT/SCT) tunneling corrections. For comparison, the overall ICVT/SCT reaction rate constant at 300 K obtained with single-point CCSD(T)/CBS calculations for the CH(3)SH+S reaction is approximately 1400 times lower than the isovalent CH(3)SH+O reaction, obtained with CVT/SCT. The reaction path involving the hydrogen abstraction from the thiol group is the most important reactive path in all temperatures.

  15. Ab initio study of the kinetics of hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Britt, Phillip F; Buchanan III, A C; Harrison, Robert J; Hathorn, Bryan C

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen abstraction reactions play a key role in many thermal and catalytic processes involved in the production of fuels and chemicals. In this paper, the reaction barriers and rate constants for the hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin by the benzyl radical are calculated by ab initio methods. These reactions are representatives of similar reactions occurring in the thermolysis of lignin model compounds containing the phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) structural moiety. Thermolysis of PPE occurs by a free radical chain mechanism in which the product selectivity arises from competitive hydrogen abstraction at the benzylic and nonbenzylic methylen sites by chain carrying benzyl and phenoxyl radicals. The title reactions serve to calibrate the theoretical methods to be used in the study of PPE through comparison of the rate constants and the reaction enthalpies with reliable experimental values. In this study, we used two different hybrid density functionals (BHandHLYP, B3LYP) and second-order perturbation theory to obtain equilibrium and transition state geometries. Multiple transition states were found for both reactions. BHandHLYP underestimates and second-order perturbation theory overestimates the reaction barriers; B3LYP energy barriers agree well with experiment. Absolute and relative rate constants were calculated using transition state theory. We found that the relative rate constant using the B3LYP functional agrees within a factor of 2.0 with experiment at the experimental temperature of 333 K, indicating that the B3LYP functional will be successful in predicting relative rate constants for hydrogen abstraction reactions participating in the pyrolysis of PPE.

  16. One-step reduced kinetics for lean hydrogen-air deflagration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Galisteo, D.; Sanchez, A.L.; Linan, A.; Williams, F.A.

    2009-05-15

    A short mechanism consisting of seven elementary reactions, of which only three are reversible, is shown to provide good predictions of hydrogen-air lean-flame burning velocities. This mechanism is further simplified by noting that over a range of conditions of practical interest, near the lean flammability limit all reaction intermediaries have small concentrations in the important thin reaction zone that controls the hydrogen-air laminar burning velocity and therefore follow a steady state approximation, while the main species react according to the global irreversible reaction 2H{sub 2} + O{sub 2} {yields} 2H{sub 2}O. An explicit expression for the non-Arrhenius rate of this one-step overall reaction for hydrogen oxidation is derived from the seven-step detailed mechanism, for application near the flammability limit. The one-step results are used to calculate flammability limits and burning velocities of planar deflagrations. Furthermore, implications concerning radical profiles in the deflagration and reasons for the success of the approximations are clarified. It is also demonstrated that adding only two irreversible direct recombination steps to the seven-step mechanism accurately reproduces burning velocities of the full detailed mechanism for all equivalence ratios at normal atmospheric conditions and that an eight-step detailed mechanism, constructed from the seven-step mechanism by adding to it the fourth reversible shuffle reaction, improves predictions of O and OH profiles. The new reduced-chemistry descriptions can be useful for both analytical and computational studies of lean hydrogen-air flames, decreasing required computation times. (author)

  17. Understanding the role of few-layer graphene nanosheets in enhancing the hydrogen sorption kinetics of magnesium hydride.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang; Wang, Yijing; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2014-07-23

    The catalytic effects of few-layer, highly wrinkled graphene nanosheet (GNS) addition on the dehydrogenation/rehydrogenation performance of MgH2 were investigated. It was found that MgH2-5 wt %GNSs nanocomposites prepared by ball milling exhibit relatively lower sorption temperature, faster sorption kinetics, and more stable cycling performance than that of pure-milled MgH2. The dehydrogenation step confirms that the Avrami exponent n increases from 1.22 to 2.20 by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) formalism when the desorption temperature is reduced from 350 °C to 320 °C and 300 °C, implying that a change in the decomposition temperature can alter the mechanism during the dehydrogenation process. For rehydrogenation, the Avrami value n is close to 1; further study by several models coincident with n = 1 reveals that the absorption process of the MgH2-5 wt %GNSs sample conforms to the Mampel equation formulated through the random nucleation approach and that the nature of the absorption mechanism does not change within the temperature range studied. Furthermore, microstructure analysis demonstrated that the defective GNSs are distributed uniformly among the MgH2 particles and that the grain size of the MgH2-5 wt %GNSs nanocomposite is approximately 5-9 nm. The efficient metal-free catalytic dehydrogenation/rehydrogenation of MgH2 can be attributed to the coupling of the nanosize effect and defective GNSs.

  18. Degradation kinetics and mechanism of trace nitrobenzene by granular activated carbon enhanced microwave/hydrogen peroxide system.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dina; Zeng, Honghu; Liu, Jie; Yu, Xiaozhang; Liang, Yanpeng; Lu, Lanjing

    2013-07-01

    The kinetics of the degradation of trace nitrobenzene (NB) by a granular activated carbon (GAC) enhanced microwave (MW)/hydrogen peroxide (H202) system was studied. Effects of pH, NB initial concentration and tert-butyl alcohol on the removal efficiency were examined. It was found that the reaction rate fits well to first-order reaction kinetics in the MW/GAC/H202 process. Moreover, GAC greatly enhanced the degradation rate of NB in water. Under a given condition (MW power 300 W, H202 dosage 10 mg/L, pH 6.85 and temperature (60 +/- 5)degrees C), the degradation rate of NB was 0.05214 min-1when 4 g/L GAC was added. In general, alkaline pH was better for NB degradation; however, the optimum pH was 8.0 in the tested pH value range of 4.0-12.0. At H202 dosage of 10 mg/L and GAC dosage of 4 g/L, the removal of NB was decreased with increasing initial concentrations of NB, indicating that a low initial concentration was beneficial for the degradation of NB. These results indicated that the MW/GAC/H202 process was effective for trace NB degradation in water. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that a hydroxyl radical addition reaction and dehydrogenation reaction enhanced NB degradation. PMID:24218864

  19. Hydrogen peroxide release kinetics into saliva from different whitening products: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Marques, Duarte Nuno da Silva; da Mata, António Duarte Sola Pereira; Silveira, João Miguel Lourenço; Marques, Joana Rita Oliveira Faria; Amaral, João Pedro de Almeida Rato; Guilherme, Nuno Filipe Rito Parada Marques

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare salivary hydrogen peroxide (HP) release kinetics and potential toxicity of systemic exposure of four different whitening products. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in a Portuguese dental faculty clinic. Two hundred forty volunteers were randomized to eight intervention groups. Participants were randomly assigned to receive active or placebo applications of one of four different products: Opalescence 10% PF™ (OPL), Vivastyle® 10%™ (VS10%), Vivadent Paint On Plus™ (PO+), and Trés White Supreme™ (TWS). Saliva collection was obtained by established methods at different times. The HP salivary content was determined by a photometric method. Salivary HP variations, total amount of salivary HP, and counts of subjects above the safe daily HP dose were the main outcome measures. All whitening systems significantly released HP to the saliva when compared to placebo, and all showed different release kinetics. The adaptable tray system (TWS) presented a risk increase of 37% [20-54%, 95% confidence interval] when compared to the other systems. The use of an adaptable tray whitening system with higher concentration of HP increases the toxicity potential.

  20. High-yield hydrogen production from biomass by in vitro metabolic engineering: Mixed sugars coutilization and kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rollin, Joseph A.; Martin del Campo, Julia; Myung, Suwan; Sun, Fangfang; You, Chun; Bakovic, Allison; Castro, Roberto; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W. W.; Senger, Ryan S.; Zhang, Y. -H. Percival

    2015-04-06

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a fuel offers enhanced energy conversion efficiency and tremendous potential to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, but producing it in a distributed, carbon-neutral, low-cost manner requires new technologies. Herein we demonstrate the complete conversion of glucose and xylose from plant biomass to H2 and CO2 based on an in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway. Glucose and xylose were simultaneously converted to H2 with a yield of two H2 per carbon, the maximum possible yield. Parameters of a nonlinear kinetic model were fitted with experimental data using a genetic algorithm, and a global sensitivity analysis was used to identify the enzymes that have the greatest impact on reaction rate and yield. After optimizing enzyme loadings using this model, volumetric H2 productivity was increased 3-fold to 32 mmol H2∙L₋1∙h₋1. The productivity was further enhanced to 54 mmol H2∙L₋1∙h₋1 by increasing reaction temperature, substrate, and enzyme concentrations—an increase of 67-fold compared with the initial studies using this method. The production of hydrogen from locally produced biomass is a promising means to achieve global green energy production.

  1. High-yield hydrogen production from biomass by in vitro metabolic engineering: Mixed sugars coutilization and kinetic modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rollin, Joseph A.; Martin del Campo, Julia; Myung, Suwan; Sun, Fangfang; You, Chun; Bakovic, Allison; Castro, Roberto; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W. W.; et al

    2015-04-06

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a fuel offers enhanced energy conversion efficiency and tremendous potential to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, but producing it in a distributed, carbon-neutral, low-cost manner requires new technologies. Herein we demonstrate the complete conversion of glucose and xylose from plant biomass to H2 and CO2 based on an in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway. Glucose and xylose were simultaneously converted to H2 with a yield of two H2 per carbon, the maximum possible yield. Parameters of a nonlinear kinetic model were fitted with experimental data using a genetic algorithm, and a global sensitivity analysis was usedmore » to identify the enzymes that have the greatest impact on reaction rate and yield. After optimizing enzyme loadings using this model, volumetric H2 productivity was increased 3-fold to 32 mmol H2∙L₋1∙h₋1. The productivity was further enhanced to 54 mmol H2∙L₋1∙h₋1 by increasing reaction temperature, substrate, and enzyme concentrations—an increase of 67-fold compared with the initial studies using this method. The production of hydrogen from locally produced biomass is a promising means to achieve global green energy production.« less

  2. High-yield hydrogen production from biomass by in vitro metabolic engineering: Mixed sugars coutilization and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Rollin, Joseph A; Martin del Campo, Julia; Myung, Suwan; Sun, Fangfang; You, Chun; Bakovic, Allison; Castro, Roberto; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W W; Senger, Ryan S; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2015-04-21

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a fuel offers enhanced energy conversion efficiency and tremendous potential to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, but producing it in a distributed, carbon-neutral, low-cost manner requires new technologies. Herein we demonstrate the complete conversion of glucose and xylose from plant biomass to H2 and CO2 based on an in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway. Glucose and xylose were simultaneously converted to H2 with a yield of two H2 per carbon, the maximum possible yield. Parameters of a nonlinear kinetic model were fitted with experimental data using a genetic algorithm, and a global sensitivity analysis was used to identify the enzymes that have the greatest impact on reaction rate and yield. After optimizing enzyme loadings using this model, volumetric H2 productivity was increased 3-fold to 32 mmol H2⋅L(-1)⋅h(-1). The productivity was further enhanced to 54 mmol H2⋅L(-1)⋅h(-1) by increasing reaction temperature, substrate, and enzyme concentrations--an increase of 67-fold compared with the initial studies using this method. The production of hydrogen from locally produced biomass is a promising means to achieve global green energy production.

  3. High-yield hydrogen production from biomass by in vitro metabolic engineering: Mixed sugars coutilization and kinetic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rollin, Joseph A.; Martin del Campo, Julia; Myung, Suwan; Sun, Fangfang; You, Chun; Bakovic, Allison; Castro, Roberto; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W. W.; Senger, Ryan S.; Zhang, Y.-H. Percival

    2015-01-01

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a fuel offers enhanced energy conversion efficiency and tremendous potential to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, but producing it in a distributed, carbon-neutral, low-cost manner requires new technologies. Herein we demonstrate the complete conversion of glucose and xylose from plant biomass to H2 and CO2 based on an in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway. Glucose and xylose were simultaneously converted to H2 with a yield of two H2 per carbon, the maximum possible yield. Parameters of a nonlinear kinetic model were fitted with experimental data using a genetic algorithm, and a global sensitivity analysis was used to identify the enzymes that have the greatest impact on reaction rate and yield. After optimizing enzyme loadings using this model, volumetric H2 productivity was increased 3-fold to 32 mmol H2⋅L−1⋅h−1. The productivity was further enhanced to 54 mmol H2⋅L−1⋅h−1 by increasing reaction temperature, substrate, and enzyme concentrations—an increase of 67-fold compared with the initial studies using this method. The production of hydrogen from locally produced biomass is a promising means to achieve global green energy production. PMID:25848015

  4. Analysis of the lifetime and spatial localization of hydrogen peroxide generated in the cytosol using a reduced kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joseph B; Huang, Beijing K; Deen, William M; Sikes, Hadley D

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) acts as a signaling molecule via its reactions with particular cysteine residues of certain proteins. Determining the roles of direct oxidation by H2O2 versus disulfide exchange reactions (i.e. relay reactions) between oxidized and reduced proteins of different identities is a current focus. Here, we use kinetic modeling to estimate the spatial and temporal localization of H2O2 and its most likely oxidation targets during a sudden increase in H2O2 above the basal level in the cytosol. We updated a previous redox kinetic model with recently measured parameters for HeLa cells and used the model to estimate the length and time scales of H2O2 diffusion through the cytosol before it is consumed by reaction. These estimates were on the order of one micron and one millisecond, respectively. We found oxidation of peroxiredoxin by H2O2 to be the dominant reaction in the network and that the overall concentration of reduced peroxiredoxin is not significantly affected by physiological increases in intracellular H2O2 concentration. We used this information to reduce the model from 22 parameters and reactions and 21 species to a single analytical equation with only one dependent variable, i.e. the concentration of H2O2, and reproduced results from the complete model. The reduced kinetic model will facilitate future efforts to progress beyond estimates and precisely quantify how reactions and diffusion jointly influence the distribution of H2O2 within cells.

  5. First-principles study of water desorption from montmorillonite surface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Meng, Yingfeng; Liu, Houbin; Yang, Mingli

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge about water desorption is important to give a full picture of water diffusion in montmorillonites (MMT), which is a driving factor in MMT swelling. The desorption paths and energetics of water molecules from the surface of MMT with trapped Li(+), Na(+) or K(+) counterions were studied using periodic density functional theory calculations. Two paths--surface and vacuum desorption--were designed for water desorption starting from a stationary structure in which water bonds with both the counterion and the MMT surface. Surface desorption is energetically more favorable than vacuum desorption due to water-surface hydrogen bonds that help stabilize the intermediate structure of water released from the counterion. The energy barriers of water desorption are in the order of Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+), which can be attributed to the short ionic radius of Li(+), which favors strong binding with the water molecule. The temperature dependence of water adsorption and desorption rates were compared based on the computed activation energies. Our calculations reveal that the water desorption on the MMT surface has a different mechanism from water adsorption, which results from surface effects favoring stabilization of water conformers during the desorption process. PMID:27083565

  6. Two tools for applying chromatographic retention data to the mass-based identification of peptides during hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments by nano-liquid chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gershon, P D

    2010-12-15

    Two tools are described for integrating LC elution position with mass-based data in hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments by nano-liquid chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (nanoLC/MALDI-MS, a novel approach to HDX-MS). The first of these, 'TOF2H-Z Comparator', highlights peptides in HDX experiments that are potentially misidentified on the basis of mass alone. The program first calculates normalized values for the organic solvent concentration responsible for the elution of ions in nanoLC/MALDI HDX experiments. It then allows the solvent gradients for the multiple experiments contributing to an MS/MS-confirmed peptic peptide library to be brought into mutual alignment by iteratively re-modeling variables among LC parameters such as gradient shape, solvent species, fraction duration and LC dead time. Finally, using the program, high-probability chromatographic outliers can be flagged within HDX experimental data. The role of the second tool, 'TOF2H-XIC Comparator', is to normalize the LC chromatograms corresponding to all deuteration timepoints of all HDX experiments of a project, to a common reference. Accurate normalization facilitates the verification of chromatographic consistency between all ions whose spectral segments contribute to particular deuterium uptake plots. Gradient normalization in this manner revealed chromatographic inconsistencies between ions whose masses were either indistinguishable or separated by precise isotopic increments.

  7. Adsorption and dissociation kinetics of alkanes on CaO(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakradhar, A.; Liu, Y.; Schmidt, J.; Kadossov, E.; Burghaus, U.

    2011-08-01

    The adsorption kinetics of ethane, butane, pentane, and hexane on CaO(100) have been studied by multi-mass thermal desorption (TDS) spectroscopy. The sample cleanliness was checked by Auger electron spectroscopy. A molecular and dissociative adsorption pathway was evident for the alkanes, except for ethane, which does not undergo bond activation. Two TDS peaks appeared when recording the parent mass, which are assigned to different adsorption sites/configurations of the molecularly adsorbed alkanes. Bond activation leads to desorption of hydrogen and several alkane fragments assigned to methane and ethylene formation. Only one TDS feature is seen in this case. Formation of carbon residuals was absent.

  8. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Doppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Forster, E.; Gode, S.; Gregori, G.; Harmand, M.; Hilbert, V.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Mithen, J. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbaumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; White, T. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.; Tschentscher, T.

    2015-09-25

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities of ${10}^{15}-{10}^{16}\\;$ W cm–2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about $25$ and $40\\;\\mathrm{eV}$ for simulated delay times up to $+70\\;\\mathrm{fs}$ after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8–18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and $30\\;$eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. In conclusion, we resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser–matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.

  9. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Döppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Harmand, M.; Hilbert, V.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Mithen, J. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; White, T. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.; Tschentscher, T.

    2015-11-01

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities of {10}15-{10}16 W cm-2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about 25 and 40 {eV} for simulated delay times up to +70 {fs} after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8-18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and 30 eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. We resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser-matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.

  10. Kinetics and mechanisms of iron sulfide reductions in hydrogen and in carbon monoxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiltowski, T.; Hinckley, C.C.; Smith, Gerard V.; Nishizawa, T.; Saporoschenko, Mykola; Shiley, R.H.; Webster, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The reduction of iron sulfides by hydrogen and by carbon monoxide has been studied using plug flow and thermogravimetric methods. The reactions were studied in the 523-723??K temperature range and were found to be first-order processes. Plug flow studies were used to correlate reaction rates between pyrite and the gases as a function of the surface area of the pyrite. The rate of H2S formation increases with the surface area of the pyrite sample. The results of thermogravimetric experiments indicate that the reactions consist of several steps. Rate constants for the pyrite reduction by H2 and by CO were obtained. The activation energies increased with degree of reduction. Values of Ea were 113.2 (step I) and 122.5 kJ/mole (step II) for pyrite reduction with CO and 99.4 (step I), 122.4 (step II), 125.2 (step III), and 142.6 kJ/mole (step IV) for pyrite reduction with hydrogen. ?? 1987.

  11. A model of redox kinetics implicates the thiol proteome in cellular hydrogen peroxide responses.

    PubMed

    Adimora, Nnenna J; Jones, Dean P; Kemp, Melissa L

    2010-09-15

    Hydrogen peroxide is appreciated as a cellular signaling molecule with second-messenger properties, yet the mechanisms by which the cell protects against intracellular H(2)O(2) accumulation are not fully understood. We introduce a network model of H(2)O(2) clearance that includes the pseudo-enzymatic oxidative turnover of protein thiols, the enzymatic actions of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, peroxiredoxin, and glutaredoxin, and the redox reactions of thioredoxin and glutathione. Simulations reproduced experimental observations of the rapid and transient oxidation of glutathione and the rapid, sustained oxidation of thioredoxin on exposure to extracellular H(2)O(2). The model correctly predicted early oxidation profiles for the glutathione and thioredoxin redox couples across a range of initial extracellular [H(2)O(2)] and highlights the importance of cytoplasmic membrane permeability to the cellular defense against exogenous sources of H(2)O(2). The protein oxidation profile predicted by the model suggests that approximately 10% of intracellular protein thiols react with hydrogen peroxide at substantial rates, with a majority of these proteins forming protein disulfides as opposed to protein S-glutathionylated adducts. A steady-state flux analysis predicted an unequal distribution of the intracellular anti-oxidative burden between thioredoxin-dependent and glutathione-dependent antioxidant pathways, with the former contributing the majority of the cellular antioxidant defense due to peroxiredoxins and protein disulfides.

  12. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Doppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Forster, E.; et al

    2015-09-25

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities ofmore » $${10}^{15}-{10}^{16}\\;$$ W cm–2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about $25$ and $$40\\;\\mathrm{eV}$$ for simulated delay times up to $$+70\\;\\mathrm{fs}$$ after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8–18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and $$30\\;$$eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. In conclusion, we resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser–matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.« less

  13. Ultrafine Nanocrystalline CeO2@C-Containing NaAlH4 with Fast Kinetics and Good Reversibility for Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yongfeng; Wang, Ke; Li, You; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2015-12-21

    A nanocrystalline CeO2@C-containing NaAlH4 composite is successfully synthesized in situ by hydrogenating a NaH-Al mixture doped with CeO2@C. Compared with NaAlH4 , the as-prepared CeO2@C-containing NaAlH4 composite, with a minor amount of excess Al, exhibits significantly improved hydrogen storage properties. The dehydrogenation onset temperature of the hydrogenated [NaH-Al-7 wt % CeO2@C]-0.04Al sample is 77 °C lower than that of the pristine sample because of a reduced kinetic barrier. More importantly, the dehydrogenated sample absorbs ∼4.7 wt % hydrogen within 35 min at 100°C and 10 MPa of hydrogen. Compositional and structural analyses reveal that CeO2 is converted to CeH2 during ball milling and that the newly formed CeH2 works with the excess of Al to synergistically improve the hydrogen storage properties of NaAlH4. Our findings will aid in the rational design of novel catalyst-doped complex hydride systems with low operating temperatures, fast kinetics, and long-term cyclability. PMID:26632764

  14. Ultrafine Nanocrystalline CeO2@C-Containing NaAlH4 with Fast Kinetics and Good Reversibility for Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yongfeng; Wang, Ke; Li, You; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2015-12-21

    A nanocrystalline CeO2@C-containing NaAlH4 composite is successfully synthesized in situ by hydrogenating a NaH-Al mixture doped with CeO2@C. Compared with NaAlH4 , the as-prepared CeO2@C-containing NaAlH4 composite, with a minor amount of excess Al, exhibits significantly improved hydrogen storage properties. The dehydrogenation onset temperature of the hydrogenated [NaH-Al-7 wt % CeO2@C]-0.04Al sample is 77 °C lower than that of the pristine sample because of a reduced kinetic barrier. More importantly, the dehydrogenated sample absorbs ∼4.7 wt % hydrogen within 35 min at 100°C and 10 MPa of hydrogen. Compositional and structural analyses reveal that CeO2 is converted to CeH2 during ball milling and that the newly formed CeH2 works with the excess of Al to synergistically improve the hydrogen storage properties of NaAlH4. Our findings will aid in the rational design of novel catalyst-doped complex hydride systems with low operating temperatures, fast kinetics, and long-term cyclability.

  15. Picosecond kinetics of excited state decay processes in internally hydrogen-bonded polymer photostabilizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, A. L.; Scott, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    A construction of economically practical solar energy conversion devices could be based on the employment of inexpensive, visible-radiation transparent, durable, light-fast materials. Difficulties arise in connection with the availability of such materials. Plastics which are not particularly susceptible to solar ultraviolet degradation are, in general, expensive, while less expensive optically transparent films are susceptible to deterioration when exposed to solar radiation. However, techniques are known for protecting polymers from photochemical degradation. According to these techniques, the composition or structure of polymeric material is modified by incorporation of photostabilizers. Two classes of ultraviolet absorbers are used as commercial photostabilizers. These classes include 2-hydroxybenzophenone (HB) and 2-(2-prime -hydroxyphenyl)benzotriazole (HPB). The present investigation is concerned with the results of spectroscopic and kinetics measurements related to the study of the mechanism of excited-state relaxation of polymer photostabilizers in the class HB and HPB.

  16. Gastrointestinal distribution and kinetic characterization of the sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform 8 (NHE8).

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua; Chen, Huacong; Dong, Jiali; Lynch, Ronald; Ghishan, Fayez K

    2008-01-01

    NHE8 is a newly identified NHE isoform expressed in rat intestine. To date, the kinetic characteristics and the intestinal segmental distribution of this NHE isoform have not been studied. This current work was performed to determine the gene expression pattern of the NHE8 transporter along the gastrointestinal tract, as well as its affinity for Na(+), H(+), and sensitivity to known NHE inhibitors HOE694 and S3226. NHE8 was differentially expressed along the GI tract. Higher NHE8 expression was seen in stomach, duodenum, and ascending colon in human, while higher NHE8 expression was seen in jejunum, ileum and colon in adult mouse. Moreover, the expression level of NHE8 is much higher in the stomach and jejunum in young mice compared with adult mice. To evaluate the functional characterictics of NHE8, the pH indicator SNARF-4 was used to monitor the rate of intra-cellular pH (pH(i)) recovery after an NH(4)Cl induced acid load in NHE8 cDNA transfected PS120 cells. The NHE8 cDNA transfected cells exhibited a sodium-dependent proton exchanger activity having a Km for pH(i) of approximately pH 6.5, and a Km for sodium of approximately 23 mM. Low concentration of HOE694 (1 microM) had no effect on NHE8 activity, while high concentration (10 microM) significantly reduced NHE8 activity. In the presence of 80 microM S3226, the NHE8 activity was also inhibited significantly. In conclusion, our work suggests that NHE8 is expressed along the gastrointestinal tract and NHE8 is a functional Na(+)/H(+) exchanger with kinetic characteristics that differ from other apically expressed NHE isoforms.

  17. Iridium Catalyzed Dehydrogenation of Substituted Amine Boranes: Kinetics, Thermodynamics and Implications for Hydrogen Storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Brandon L.; Goldberg, Karen I.; Heinekey, D. M.; Autrey, Thomas; Linehan, John C.

    2008-10-06

    Dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB) and methylamine-borane (MeAB) is catalyzed efficiently by the iridium pincer complex (η3-1,3-(OPtBu2)2C6H3)Ir(H)2 (1). With MeAB and with MeAB/AB mixtures, rapid release of one equivalent of H2 is observed to yield soluble oligomeric products at rates similar to those previously reported for the dehydrogenation of AB catalyzed by 1. The rapid dehydrogenation reaction has allowed the experimental determination of the reaction enthalpy (ΔH) for the dehydrogenation of AB, MeAB, and AB/MeAB mixtures by calorimetry. The reactions are significantly more exothermic than suggested by some computational studies. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. PNNL is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  18. Reduction of ferrylmyoglobin by hydrogen sulfide. Kinetics in relation to meat greening.

    PubMed

    Libardi, Silvia H; Pindstrup, Helene; Cardoso, Daniel R; Skibsted, Leif H

    2013-03-20

    The hypervalent meat pigment ferrylmyoglobin, MbFe(IV)═O, characteristic for oxidatively stressed meat and known to initiate protein cross-linking, was found to be reduced by hydrogen sulfide to yield sulfmyoglobin. Horse heart myoglobin, void of cysteine, was used to avoid possible interference from protein thiols. For aqueous solution, the reactions were found to be second-order, and an apparent acid catalysis could be quantitatively accounted for in terms of a fast reaction between protonated ferrylmyoglobin, MbFe(IV)═O,H(+), and hydrogen sulfide, H2S (k2 = (2.5 ± 0.1) × 10(6) L mol(-1) s(-1) for 25.0 °C, ionic strengh 0.067, dominating for pH < 4), and a slow reaction between MbFe(IV)═O and HS(-) (k2 = (1.0 ± 0.7) × 10(4) L mol(-1) s(-1) for 25.0 °C, ionic strengh 0.067, dominating for pH > 7). For meat pH, a reaction via the transition state {MbFe(IV)═O···H···HS}([symbol: see text]) contributed significantly, and this reaction appeared almost independent of temperature with an apparent energy of activation of 2.1 ± 0.7 kJ mol(-1) at pH 7.4, as a result of compensation among activation energies and temperature influence on pKa values explaining low temperature greening of meat.

  19. Kinetics of Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide on Authentic Mineral Dust: Effects of Relative Humidity and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liubin; Zhao, Yue; Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming

    2015-09-15

    Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on mineral dust seems to be an important sink for SO2. However, kinetic data about this reaction on authentic mineral dust are scarce and are mainly limited to low relative humidity (RH) conditions. In addition, little is known about the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in this reaction. Here, we investigated the uptake kinetics of SO2 on three authentic mineral dusts (i.e., Asian mineral dust (AMD), Tengger desert dust (TDD), and Arizona test dust (ATD)) in the absence and presence of H2O2 at different RHs using a filter-based flow reactor, and applied a parameter (effectiveness factor) to the estimation of the effective surface area of particles for the calculation of the corrected uptake coefficient (γc). We found that with increasing RH, the γc decreases on AMD particles, but increases on ATD and TDD particles. This discrepancy is probably due to the different mineralogy compositions and aging extents of these dust samples. Furthermore, the presence of H2O2 can promote the uptake of SO2 on mineral dust at different RHs. The probable explanations are that H2O2 rapidly reacts with SO2 on mineral dust in the presence of adsorbed water, and OH radicals, which can be produced from the heterogeneous decomposition of H2O2 on the mineral dust, immediately react with adsorbed SO2 as well. Our results suggest that the removal of SO2 via the heterogeneous reaction on mineral dust is an important sink for SO2 and has the potential to alter the physicochemical properties (e.g., ice nucleation ability) of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere. PMID:26281003

  20. Kinetics of Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide on Authentic Mineral Dust: Effects of Relative Humidity and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liubin; Zhao, Yue; Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming

    2015-09-15

    Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on mineral dust seems to be an important sink for SO2. However, kinetic data about this reaction on authentic mineral dust are scarce and are mainly limited to low relative humidity (RH) conditions. In addition, little is known about the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in this reaction. Here, we investigated the uptake kinetics of SO2 on three authentic mineral dusts (i.e., Asian mineral dust (AMD), Tengger desert dust (TDD), and Arizona test dust (ATD)) in the absence and presence of H2O2 at different RHs using a filter-based flow reactor, and applied a parameter (effectiveness factor) to the estimation of the effective surface area of particles for the calculation of the corrected uptake coefficient (γc). We found that with increasing RH, the γc decreases on AMD particles, but increases on ATD and TDD particles. This discrepancy is probably due to the different mineralogy compositions and aging extents of these dust samples. Furthermore, the presence of H2O2 can promote the uptake of SO2 on mineral dust at different RHs. The probable explanations are that H2O2 rapidly reacts with SO2 on mineral dust in the presence of adsorbed water, and OH radicals, which can be produced from the heterogeneous decomposition of H2O2 on the mineral dust, immediately react with adsorbed SO2 as well. Our results suggest that the removal of SO2 via the heterogeneous reaction on mineral dust is an important sink for SO2 and has the potential to alter the physicochemical properties (e.g., ice nucleation ability) of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere.

  1. Effects of protein-ligand interactions on hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics: canonical and noncanonical scenarios.

    PubMed

    Sowole, Modupeola A; Konermann, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) methods are widely used for monitoring protein-ligand interactions. This approach relies on the fact that ligand binding can modulate the extent of protein structural fluctuations that transiently disrupt hydrogen bonds and expose backbone amides to the solvent. It is commonly observed that ligand binding causes a reduction of HDX rates. This reduction can be restricted to elements adjacent to the binding site, but other regions can be affected as well. Qualitatively, ligand-induced HDX protection can be rationalized on the basis of two-state models that equate structural dynamics with global unfolding/refolding. Unfortunately, such models tend to be unrealistic because the dynamics of native proteins are dominated by subglobal transitions and local fluctuations. Ligand binding lowers the ground-state free energy. It is not obvious why this should necessarily be accompanied by a depletion of excited-state occupancies, which would be required for a reduction of HDX rates. Here, we propose a framework that implies that ligand binding can either slow or accelerate amide deuteration throughout the protein. These scenarios are referred to as "type 1" and "type 2", respectively. Evidence for type 1 binding is abundant in the literature, whereas the viability of type 2 interactions is less clear. Using HDX mass spectrometry (MS), we demonstrate that the oxygenation of hemoglobin (Hb) provides a dramatic example of a type 2 scenario. The observed behavior is consistent with cooperative T → R switching, where part of the intrinsic O2 binding energy is reinvested for destabilization of the ground state. This destabilization increases the Boltzmann occupancy of unfolded conformers, thereby enhancing HDX rates. Surprisingly, O2 binding to myoglobin (Mb) also induces elevated HDX rates. These Mb data reveal that type 2 behavior is not limited to cooperative multisubunit systems. Although enhanced protection from deuteration is widely

  2. Inhibition of Tafel Kinetics for Electrolytic Hydrogen Evolution on Isolated Micron Scale Electrocatalysts on Semiconductor Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Coridan, Robert H; Schichtl, Zebulon G; Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2016-09-21

    Semiconductor-liquid junctions are ubiquitous in photoelectrochemical approaches to artificial photosynthesis. By analogy with the antennae and reaction centers in natural photosynthetic complexes, separating the light-absorbing semiconductor and electrocatalysts can improve catalytic efficiency. A catalytic layer can also impair the photovoltage-generating energetics of the electrode without appropriate microscopic organization of catalytically active area on the surface. Here, we have developed a method using high-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging to study in situ electrolytic bubble growth on semiconductor electrodes fabricated with isolated, micron-scale platinum electrocatalysts. X-rays are a nonperturbative probe by which gas evolution dynamics can be studied under conditions relevant to solar fuels applications. The self-limited growth of a bubble residing on the isolated electrocatalyst was measured by tracking the evolution of the gas-liquid boundary. Contrary to observations on macroscopic electrodes, bubble evolution on isolated, microscopic Pt pads on Si electrodes was insensitive to increasing overpotential. The persistence of the bubble causes mass transport limitations and inhibits the expected Tafel-like kinetics. The observed scaling of catalytic current densities with pad size implies that electrolysis is occurring predominantly on the perimeter of the active area. PMID:27575549

  3. Water gas shift reaction kinetics and reactor modeling for fuel cell grade hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek; Stenger, Harvey G.

    The kinetics of the water gas shift reaction was studied to evaluate existing reaction mechanisms, test various rate expressions and simulate the performance in a methanol fuel processor for fuel cell applications. The reaction was carried out in a micro reactor testing unit using a commercial Sud-Chemie Cu/ZnO/Al 2O 3 catalyst between 120 and 250 °C with a range of feed rates and compositions. Using non-linear least squares optimization, the parameters in five rate expressions were fit to the experimental data. Based on a review of published work on the WGS reaction mechanism, our study found that a rate expression derived from a regenerative mechanism and another rate expression derived from adsorptive mechanism fit the experimental data equally well. Numerical integration of a one-dimensional PFR model was used for this parameter fitting. An empirical rate expression, rCO= kPCOPH 2O (1- β) with activation energy of 47.4 kJ/mol was also obtained from the experimental data. Reactor performance was simulated to determine catalyst loadings required to achieve specific CO conversions as a function of temperature and water feed rate. These results are useful in studying the design trade offs available to reformer systems.

  4. Modeling kinetic processes controlling hydrogen and acetate concentrations in an aquifer-derived microcosm.

    PubMed

    Watson, Ian A; Oswald, Sascha E; Mayer, K Ulrich; Wu, Youxian; Banwart, Steven A

    2003-09-01

    Groundwater contaminants may degrade via fermentation to intermediate species, which are subsequently consumed by terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs). A numerical model of an aquifer-derived laboratory microcosm is developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of fermentation and respiration in groundwater by coupling microbial growth and substrate utilization kinetics with a formulation that also includes aqueous speciation and other geochemical reactions including surface complexation, mineral dissolution, and precipitation. The model is used to test approaches that currently make use of H2(aq) to diagnose prevalent TEAPs in groundwater. Competition between TEAPs is integral to the conceptual model of the simulation, and the results indicate that competitive exclusion is significant but with some overlap found in the temporal sequence of TEAPs. Steady-state H2(aq) concentrations observed during different TEAPs do not differ significantly. The results are not consistent with previous applications of the partial equilibrium approach since most TEAP redox pairs exhibit free energies that suggest a particular process is able to proceed, yet observations here show that this process does not proceed.

  5. Reaction kinetics of hydrogen peroxide with copper and iron in sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Moffett, J.W.; Zika, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    The oxidation of Fe(II) and Cu(I) and the reduction of Fe(III) and Cu(II) by hydrogen peroxide in sea water have been studied to understand their mechanisms and probable significance in the upper marine water column. At 10/sup -7/ M H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, a level commonly found in surface sea water, reaction with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is the dominant oxidation pathway for Fe(II). Reduction of Fe(III) by peroxide was not observed in the pH range 7-8. Reduction of Cu(II) and oxidation of Cu(I) by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ contribute to a dynamic redox cycling of that element in the upper water column. Calculations based on these data indicate that CU(I) oxidation and FE(II) oxidation by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ are at least as important as nitrite photolysis as a source of OH radicals in the ocean. 47 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Hydrogen Storage Characteristics of Nanocrystalline and Amorphous Nd-Mg-Ni-Based NdMg12-Type Alloys Synthesized via Mechanical Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanghuan; Shang, Hongwei; Hou, Zhonghui; Yuan, Zeming; Yang, Tai; Qi, Yan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, Mg was partially substituted by Ni with the intent of improving the hydrogen storage kinetics performance of NdMg12-type alloy. Mechanical milling technology was adopted to fabricate the nanocrystalline and amorphous NdMg11Ni + x wt pct Ni (x = 100, 200) alloys. The effects of Ni content and milling duration on the microstructures and hydrogen storage kinetics of as-milled alloys have been systematically investigated. The structures were characterized by XRD and HRTEM. The electrochemical hydrogen storage properties were tested by an automatic galvanostatic system. Moreover, the gaseous hydrogen storage properties were investigated by Sievert apparatus and a differential scanning calorimeter connected with a H2 detector. Hydrogen desorption activation energy of alloy hydrides was estimated by using Arrhenius and Kissinger methods. The results reveal that the increase of Ni content dramatically ameliorates the gaseous and electrochemical hydrogen storage kinetics performance of the as-milled alloys. Furthermore, high rate discharge ability (HRD) reach the maximum value with the variation of milling time. The maximum HRDs of the NdMg11Ni + x wt pct Ni (x = 100, 200) alloys are 80.24 and 85.17 pct. The improved gaseous hydrogen storage kinetics of alloys via increasing Ni content and milling time can be attributed to a decrease in the hydrogen desorption activation energy.

  7. Pioneers of Study on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions; Achievements by Dr. Yoshioki Ishikawa and Dr. Yoshio Ohta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, Kazuhiko; Nambu, Akira

    Dr. Yoshioki Ishikawa is a pioneer who carried out systematic electron stimulated desorption (ESD) investigations for hydrogen adsorbed on a clean platinum plate (H2/Pt) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions in 1942. (His name is spelled as Yosioki Isikawa in the original papers.) Although his papers are referred in several papers on desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET), these seem to be not as well-known as famous ones by Menzel, Gomer, and Redhead in 1964. We describe his pioneering work in this article. He developed an UHV apparatus made of glass with a Pt plate and an oxide cathode pumped by a small mercury pump via a liquid air trap. Clear ESD signals were observed for H2/Pt at excitation energies of 8, 12, 14, 33-46, and 46-51 eV. He assigned the desorbate to atomic hydrogen (H), because it was pumped by a glass wall baked above 350°C. Based on these results and the potential curves of H2 in the gas phase, he proposed a model for the ESD of H from H2/Pt that is, the first step is an electronic transition of adsorbed H2, and the second is the desorption of H along the repulsive potential surface of the excited state. This was the first introduction of the notion of DIET. He also carried out an ESD study of H2O/Pt in 1943. We also introduce achievements by Dr. Yoshio Ohta, who was another pioneer in the field of DIET. He measured electron-stimulated ion desorption from an oxidized Ni plate. He found that the threshold excitation energy for ion desorption is 22 eV, and that the kinetic energy of the desorbed ion is 1˜2 eV. To explain these results, he also proposed the concept of DIET.

  8. Surface structure and surface kinetics of InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy: A HREELS study

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Ananta R. E-mail: anantaach@gmail.com; Thoms, Brian D.; Nepal, Neeraj; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-03-15

    The surface bonding configuration and kinetics of hydrogen desorption from InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy have been investigated. High resolution electron energy loss spectra exhibited loss peaks assigned to a Fuchs–Kliewer surface phonon, N-N and N-H surface species. The surface N-N vibrations are attributed to surface defects. The observation of N-H but no In-H surface species suggested N-terminated InN. Isothermal desorption data were best fit by the first-order desorption kinetics with an activation energy of (0.88 ± 0.06) eV and pre-exponential factor of (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 5 }s{sup −1}.

  9. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  10. Hydrogenation of the alpha,beta-Unsaturated Aldehydes Acrolein, Crotonaldehyde, and Prenal over Pt Single Crystals: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, C.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-11-26

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the surface reaction intermediates during the hydrogenation of three {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal, over Pt(111) at Torr pressures (1 Torr aldehyde, 100 Torr hydrogen) in the temperature range of 295K to 415K. SFG-VS data showed that acrolein has mixed adsorption species of {eta}{sub 2}-di-{sigma}(CC)-trans, {eta}{sub 2}-di-{sigma}(CC)-cis as well as highly coordinated {eta}{sub 3} or {eta}{sub 4} species. Crotonaldehyde adsorbed to Pt(111) as {eta}{sub 2} surface intermediates. SFG-VS during prenal hydrogenation also suggested the presence of the {eta}{sub 2} adsorption species, and became more highly coordinated as the temperature was raised to 415K, in agreement with its enhanced C=O hydrogenation. The effect of catalyst surface structure was clarified by carrying out the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde over both Pt(111) and Pt(100) single crystals while acquiring the SFG-VS spectra in situ. Both the kinetics and SFG-VS showed little structure sensitivity. Pt(100) generated more decarbonylation 'cracking' product while Pt(111) had a higher selectivity for the formation of the desired unsaturated alcohol, crotylalcohol.

  11. Hydrogen exchange kinetics and the mechanism of reaction B of yeast tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Turner, P D; Loughrey, H C; Bailey, C J

    1985-12-20

    It has been shown that yeast tryptophan synthase (L-serine hydro-lyase (adding indoleglycerol-phosphate) EC 4.2.1.20) catalyses tritium exchange reactions between protons on the alpha-carbon of L-serine of L-tryptophan, and water. The absolute rates of these reactions and indole-serine condensation (reaction B), all of which are pyridoxal phosphate-dependent, were measured. L-Serine exchange was resolved into two components, a high-affinity, slow, Michaelian reaction (KmS,H = 0.06 mM, kcats,H 3 X 10(-3) s-1) and a faster reaction (kcat greater than 2.5 S-1) which was not saturated even at 100 mM L-serine. Hydrogen exchange by tryptophan was a Michaelian process (KmT,H = 2.9 mM; kcatT,H = 0.6 s-1). Indole did not inhibit either exchange reaction. A plausible explanation of the results, that reaction B has a ping-pong mechanism with serine as first substrate and water and L-tryptophan as first and second products, respectively, was inadequate because of the observations that L-tryptophan is as first and second products, respectively, was inadequate because of the observations that L-tryptophan is synthesised with less than 1 mol of exchanged proton per mol amino acid, and that the ratio kcat/Km for serine changes between enzyme reactions. A branched modification with two enzyme-serine complexes, only one of which will exchange protons with water, will fit all the results. PMID:3935173

  12. Catalyzed light hydride nanomaterials embedded in a micro-channels hydrogen storage container.

    PubMed

    Dehouche, Zahir; Peretti, Hernán A; Yoo, Yeong; Belkacemi, Khaled; Goyette, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Activated alloys synthesized by arc-melting were examined as catalysts for improving the hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured magnesium hydride, proposed as a reversible hydrogen storage material. The MgH(2)-catalyst absorbing materials were prepared by ball milling of pure MgH(2) with hydrided Zr(47)Ni(53), Zr(9)Ni(11), and other alloys investigated. The nanostructured MgH(2)-intermetallic systems were tested at 250 degrees C and catalyst addition of eutectoid Zr(47)Ni(53) resulted in the fastest desorption time and highest initial desorption rate. The catalyzed Mg-hydride with activated Zr(9)Ni(11) and Zr(7)Ni(10) phases showed fast desorption kinetics. Moreover, the results demonstrated that the composition of dispersed Zr(x)Ni(y)catalysts has a strong influence on the amount of accumulated hydrogen and desorption rate of Mg-nanocomposite. Part two covers advanced micro-channels hydrogen storage module design based on the results of semi-empirical computer simulations of heat and mass transfers in the container. The micro-channels reservoir concept offers many advantages over the conventional metal hydride hydrogen storage system. It is a micro-structured system that can pack a lot of power into a small space and dissipate effectively the heat of the sorption reactions. This review summarizes recent patents related to CNTS.

  13. Departures of the electron energy distribution from a Maxwellian in hydrogen. I - Formulation and solution of the electron kinetic equation. II - Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoub, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of calculating the steady-state free-electron energy distribution in a hydrogen gas is considered in order to study departures of that distribution from a Maxwellian at sufficiently low degrees of ionization. A model kinetic equation is formulated and solved analytically for the one-particle electron distribution function in a steady-state partially ionized hydrogen gas, and it is shown that the formal solution can be accurately approximated by using the WKB method. The solutions obtained indicate that the high-energy tail of the distribution is susceptible to distortion by imbalanced inelastic collisions for ionization fractions not exceeding about 0.1 and that such departures from a Maxwellian can lead to significant changes in the collisional excitation and ionization rates of ground-state hydrogen atoms. Expressions for the electron-hydrogen collision rates are derived which explicitly display their dependence on the hydrogen departure coefficients. The results are applied in order to compare self-consistent predictions with those based on the a priori assumption of a Maxwellian distribution for models of the thermal ionization equilibrium of hydrogen in the optically thin limit, spectral-line formation by a gas consisting of two-level atoms, and radiative transfer in finite slabs by a gas of four-level hydrogen atoms.

  14. Improved hydrogen-storage thermodynamics and kinetics for an RbF-doped Mg(NH2)2-2 LiH system.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Liu, Yongfeng; Gu, Yingjie; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2013-09-01

    The introduction of RbF into the Mg(NH2)2-2 LiH system significantly decreased its (de-)hydrogenation temperatures and enhanced its hydrogen-storage kinetics. The Mg(NH2)2-2 LiH-0.08 RbF composite exhibits the optimal hydrogen-storage properties as it could reversibly store approximately 4.76 wt % hydrogen through a two-stage reaction with the onset temperatures of 80 °C for dehydrogenation and 55 °C for hydrogenation. At 130 °C, approximately 70 % of hydrogen was rapidly released from the 0.08 RbF-doped sample within 180 min, and the fully dehydrogenated sample could absorb approximately 4.8 wt % of hydrogen at 120 °C. Structural analyses revealed that RbF reacted readily with LiH to convert to RbH and LiF owing to the favorable thermodynamics during ball-milling. The newly generated RbH participated in the following dehydrogenation reaction, consequently resulting in a decrease in the reaction enthalpy change and activation energy.

  15. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron. Annual status report, 1 January-31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Shanabarger, M.R.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of this program has been to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. During the present program, the interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2 (Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma (TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied. The interaction of low pressure hydrogen with gamma titanium aluminide and beryllium was found to be relatively weak. Weak in the sense that adsorption leads to a low surface concentration of dissociated hydrogen, i.e., the chemisorption process is reversible at room temperature (300 K) for gamma titanium aluminide and the sticking coefficient for chemisorption is extremely small for beryllium. Hydrogen was found to interact readily with alpha-2 titanium aluminide to form a stable surface hydride at 300 K. These results correlate well with other recent studies which show that the mechanical properties for alpha-2 titanium aluminide are readily degraded in hydrogen while gamma titanium aluminide exhibits less degradation and beryllium essentially no degradation. The interaction of oxygen with the surface of several of these materials was studied. More recently, preliminary hydrogen permeation studies were completed for three high temperature alloys, Incoloy 909, Mo-47.5Re (wt. %), and this past year, Haynes 188.

  16. Measurement and decomposition kinetics of residual hydrogen peroxide in the presence of commonly used excipients and preservatives.

    PubMed

    Towne, Victoria; Oswald, C Brent; Mogg, Robin; Antonello, Joseph; Will, Mark; Gimenez, Juan; Washabaugh, Michael; Sitrin, Robert; Zhao, Qinjian

    2009-11-01

    Quantitation of residual hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and evaluation of the impact on product stability is necessary as unwanted H(2)O(2) can potentially be introduced during the manufacturing of pharmaceuticals, biologics, and vaccines. A sensitive and convenient microplate-based method with fluorescence detection for H(2)O(2) quantitation was recently reported (Towne et al., 2004, Anal Biochem 334: 290-296). This method was found to be highly robust and reproducible, with a level of detection of 0.015 ppm and a level of quantitation of 0.025 ppm (in water). The relatively small sample requirements and amenability for automation make this assay an attractive tool for detecting residual H(2)O(2) levels. Without additional manipulation, the assay can be conducted on heterogeneous solutions with significant degree of turbidity, such as the presence of suspensions or aluminum-containing adjuvants. The quantitation of H(2)O(2) and its decomposition kinetics was also studied in presence of two common vaccine preservatives (thimerosal and phenol) and eight commonly used excipients (polyols). Over time, there is a distinct, temperature dependent decrease in H(2)O(2) recovered in thimerosal and phenol containing samples versus non-preservative containing controls. Based on the half-life of spiked H(2)O(2), the decay rates in eight polyols tested were found to be: ribose > sucrose > (glycerol, glucose, lactose, mannitol, sorbitol, and xylose).

  17. Exposure of Microcystis aeruginosa to Hydrogen Peroxide under Light: Kinetic Modeling of Cell Rupture and Simultaneous Microcystin Degradation.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiangchen; Chang, De-Wei; Tseng, Jing-Hua; Burch, Michael D; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2015-05-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the cell integrity of a cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa, and on the release and degradation of microcystins (MCs) under simulated sunlight was investigated. The cyanobacterium was exposed to H2O2 in the range of 0-60 mg·L(-1) for 3.5 h. Production of OH radical in the solution was estimated by a chemical probe method. More than 99% (2 log) of the M. aeruginosa cells were ruptured or damaged by 3 h for all the treatments. Loss of cell integrity over time revealed two distinct phases. Cells retained their integrity during the initial lag phase and rapidly ruptured following first-order reaction afterward. A linear relationship was found between the duration of the lag phase and the steady-state concentration of OH radical. Release of MCs was closely correlated with the loss of cell integrity. Sequential reaction models were developed to simulate the release and degradation of MCs. These models were able to quantitatively describe the kinetics of all reactions under different H2O2 doses and extended exposure time. In particular, the models successfully predicted the concentration change of MCs using independently measured parameters. These models provide a simple and quantitative means to estimate the interaction of oxidants and cells and the consequent release of metabolites during oxidation treatment of cyanobacterium-laden waters.

  18. Evaluation of Tafel-Volmer kinetic parameters for the hydrogen oxidation reaction on Pt(1 1 0) electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. F.; Thurgood, C. P.

    2011-05-01

    Modelling of PEM fuel cells has long been an active research area to improve understanding of cell and stack operation, facilitate design improvements and support simulation studies. The prediction of activation polarization in most PEM models has concentrated on the cathode losses since anode losses are commonly much smaller and tend to be ignored. Further development of the anode activation polarization term is being undertaken to broaden the application and usefulness of PEM models in general. Published work on the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) using Pt(h k l) electrodes in dilute H2SO4 has been recently reassessed and published. Correlations for diffusion-free exchange current densities were developed and empirical predictive equations for the anode activation polarization were proposed for the experimental conditions of the previously published work: Pt(1 0 0), Pt(1 1 0) and Pt(1 1 1) electrodes, pH2 of 1 atm, and temperatures of 1, 30 and 60 °C. It was concluded that the HOR on Pt(1 1 0) electrodes followed a Tafel-Volmer reaction sequence. The aim of the present paper is to generalize these Tafel-Volmer correlations, apply them to published data for Pt(1 1 0) electrodes and further develop the modelling of anode activation polarization over the range of operating conditions found in PEMFC operation.

  19. METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSORS: A REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman Jr, Robert C; Yartys, Dr. Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Dr. Michael V; Pollet, Dr. B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is an efficient and reliable method allowing a conversion of energy from heat into a compressed hydrogen gas. The most important component of such a thermal engine the metal hydride material itself should possess several material features in order to achieve an efficient performance in the hydrogen compression. Apart from the hydrogen storage characteristics important for every solid H storage material (e.g. gravimetric and volumetric efficiency of H storage, hydrogen sorption kinetics and effective thermal conductivity), the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen systems is of primary importance resulting in a temperature dependence of the absorption/desorption pressures). Several specific features should be optimized to govern the performance of the MH-compressors including synchronisation of the pressure plateaus for multi-stage compressors, reduction of slope of the isotherms and hysteresis, increase of cycling stability and life time, together with challenges in system design associated with volume expansion of the metal matrix during the hydrogenation. The present review summarises numerous papers and patent literature dealing with MH hydrogen compression technology. The review considers (a) fundamental aspects of materials development with a focus on structure and phase equilibria in the metal-hydrogen systems suitable for the hydrogen compression; and (b) applied aspects, including their consideration from the applied thermodynamic viewpoint, system design features and performances of the metal hydride compressors and major applications.

  20. Modeling arsenic desorption from herbicide-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongqiang; Donahoe, Rona J

    2009-06-01

    The application of arsenical herbicides has created legacy environmental problems by contaminating soil in some agricultural areas and at various industrial sites. Numerous previous studies have suggested that the adsorption of arsenic by common soil components is largely controlled by kinetic factors. Four arsenic-contaminated soil samples collected from industrial sites were characterized and subjected to sequential leaching using a synthetic acid rain solution in order to study the release of arsenic. A dual-site numerical sorption-desorption model was constructed that describes arsenic desorption from these soils in terms of two different release mechanisms: Release from type I (equilibrium) and type II (kinetic) sorption sites. Arsenic held on both type I and II sorption sites is accessible through extensive acid rain leaching. Arsenic desorption from these sites follows a linear Kd model; the manner of approaching the Kd model, however, differs. Arsenic desorption from type I sites reached equilibrium with the aqueous phase under the physical environment provided by the experiment (shaking for 24 h at 25 degrees C), while desorption from type II sites followed a first-order kinetic pattern when approaching equilibrium. During synthetic acid rain sequential leaching of the soils, type I sites released their sorbed arsenic rapidly and subsequent desorption was dominated by the kinetic release of arsenic from type II sites. This shift in desorption mechanism dominance generated data corresponding to two intersecting straight lines in the n-logC dimension for all four soils. The dual-site desorption model was solved analytically and proven to be successful in simulating sorption processes where two different mechanisms are simultaneously controlling the aqueous concentration of a trace element.

  1. Temperature programmed desorption of weakly bound adsorbates on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhart, Daniel P.; Wagner, Roman J. V.; Meling, Artur; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim

    2016-08-01

    We have performed temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to analyze the desorption kinetics of Ar, Kr, Xe, C2H2, SF6, N2, NO and CO on Au(111). We report desorption activation energies (Edes), which are an excellent proxy for the binding energies. The derived binding energies scale with the polarizability of the molecules, consistent with the conclusion that the surface-adsorbate bonds arise due to dispersion forces. The reported results serve as a benchmark for theories of dispersion force interactions of molecules at metal surfaces.

  2. A nanoscale demonstration of hydrogen atom spillover and surface diffusion across silica using the kinetics of CO2 methanation catalyzed on spatially separate Pt and Co nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Simon K; Alayoglu, Selim; Specht, Colin; Kruse, Norbert; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-08-13

    Hydrogen spillover is of great importance to understanding many phenomena in heterogeneous catalysis and has long been controversial. Here we exploit well-defined nanoparticles to demonstrate its occurrence through evaluation of CO2 methanation kinetics. Combining platinum and cobalt nanoparticles causes a substantial increase in reaction rate, but increasing the spatial separation between discrete cobalt and platinum entities results in a dramatic ∼ 50% drop in apparent activation energy, symptomatic of H atom surface diffusion limiting the reaction rate. PMID:25026434

  3. Modeling Organic Contaminant Desorption from Municipal Solid Waste Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappe, D. R.; Wu, B.; Barlaz, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    low plastics content, the model predicted that 50% of the initially sorbed toluene desorbed over a period of 5.8 days. In contrast, the model predicted that 50% of the initially sorbed toluene desorbed over a period of 4 years for the newer MSW mixture. These results suggest that toluene desorption rates from old MSW mixtures exceed methanogenic toluene degradation rates (toluene half-lives of about 30 to 100 days have been reported for methanogenic systems) and thus imply that biodegradation kinetics control the rate at which sorbed toluene is mineralized in old landfills. For newer MSW mixtures with a larger plastics content, toluene desorption rates are substantially slower; therefore, toluene desorption kinetics likely control the rate at which sorbed toluene can be mineralized in new landfills.

  4. Pulsed UV laser induced desorption of ions from aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David Paul; Helvajian, Henry

    2000-04-01

    A study of pulsed UV laser induced desorption (LID) has been performed on an Al(111) sample. The positive ion desorption was investigated at low laser fluence, in a regime in which the ion yield exhibits a highly non-linear dependence on the laser fluence. The peak of the kinetic energy distribution of the desorbed ions has been measured to be about 15 eV. This result is consistent with the conjecture that the ion departing the metal surface can acquire a kinetic energy kick from a process associated with plasmon annihilation. The Al + ion kinetic energy peak is asymmetric and about 3 eV full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). This experiment indicates that plasmon excitation can play a significant role in laser stimulated desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET).

  5. Reaction kinetics of hydrogen abstraction reactions by hydroperoxyl radical from 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Harish Kumar; Fernandes, Ravi X

    2013-06-20

    Highly accurate rate parameters for H-abstraction reactions by HO2 radicals are needed for development of predictive chemical kinetic models for ignition. In this article, we report the rate coefficients for reaction of hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) with 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF) and 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran (DMTHF) computed employing CBS-QB3 and CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory in the temperature range of 500-2000 K. Conventional transition state theory (CTST) with hindered rotor approximation for low frequency torsional modes and RRHO (rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator) approximation for all other vibrational modes is employed to evaluate the high pressure rate constants as a function of temperature. Rate constant of each individual hydrogen abstraction channel is taken into account to calculate the overall rate constant. Three-parameter Arrhenius expressions have been obtained by fitting to the computed rate constants of all abstraction channels between 500 and 2000 K. Eight transition states have been identified for MTHF and four for slightly more stable trans-DMTHF. Intrinsic reaction coordinates (IRC) calculations were performed to verify the connectivity of all the transition states (TSs) with reactants and products. One dimensional Eckart's asymmetrical method has been used to calculate quantum mechanical tunneling effect. Results of the theoretically calculated rate coefficients indicate that the hydrogen abstraction by HO2 from the C2 carbon of both MTHF and DMTHF is the most dominant path among all reaction pathways attributed to its lowest barrier height. The total rate coefficients of the MTHF and DMTHF with HO2 at CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory are k(T) = 8.60T(3.54) exp(-8.92/RT) and k(T)= 3.17T(3.63) exp(-6.59/RT) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), respectively. At both the level of theories, the predicted total abstraction rate constant for DMTHF is found to be higher as compared to that of MTHF over an entire temperature range

  6. Modeling temperature dependent kinetic isotope effects for hydrogen transfer in a series of soybean lipoxygenase mutants: The effect of anharmonicity upon transfer distance

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Matthew P.; Klinman, Judith P.

    2010-01-01

    Soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO) catalyzes the oxidation of linoleic acid. The rate-limiting step in this transformation is the net abstraction of the pro-S hydrogen atom from the center of the 1,5-pentadienyl moiety in linoleic acid. The large deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for this step appears in the first order rate constant (Dkcat = 81 ± 5 at T = 25 °C). Furthermore, the KIE and the rate for protium abstraction are weakly temperature dependent (EA,D − EA,H = 0.9 ± 0.2 kcal/mol and EA,H = 2.1 ± 0.2 kcal/mol, respectively). Mutations at a hydrophobic site about 13 Å from the active site Fe(III), Ile553, induce a marked temperature dependence that varies roughly in accordance with the degree to which the residue is changed in bulk from the wild type Ile. While the temperature dependence for these mutants varies from the wild type enzyme, the magnitude of the KIE at 25 °C is on the same order of magnitude. A hydrogen tunneling model [Kuznetsov, A.M., Ulstrup, J. Can. J. Chem. 77 (1999) 1085–1096] is utilized to model the KIE temperature profiles for the wild type SLO and each Ile553 mutant. Hydrogenic wavefunctions are modeled using harmonic oscillators and Morse oscillators in order to explore the effects of anharmonicity upon computed kinetic observables used to characterize this hydrogen transfer. PMID:21132078

  7. Evaluation of recycling the effluent of hydrogen fermentation for biobutanol production: kinetic study with butyrate and sucrose concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Hsing; Jian, Zih-Ce

    2013-10-01

    Butyrate in the effluent of hydrogen-producing bioreactor is a potential feed for biobutanol production. For recycling butyrate, this study investigated the kinetics of biobutanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B592 from different paired concentrations of butyrate and sucrose in a series of batch reactors. Results show that the lag time of butanol production increased with higher concentration of either sucrose or butyrate. In regression analyses, the maximum specific butanol production potential of 6.49 g g(-1) of dry cell was projected for 31.9 g L(-1) sucrose and 1.3 g L(-1) butyrate, and the maximum specific butanol production rate of 0.87 g d(-1) g(-1) of dry cell was predicted for 25.0 g L(-1) sucrose and 2.6 g L(-1) butyrate. The specific butanol production potential will decrease if more butyrate is added to the reactor. However, both sucrose and butyrate concentrations are weighted equally on the specific butanol production rate. This observation also is true on butanol yield. The maximum butanol yield of 0.49 mol mol(-1) was projected for 25.0 g L(-1) sucrose and 2.3 g L(-1) butyrate. In addition, a confirmation study found butanol yield increased from 0.2 to 0.3 mol mol(-1) when butyrate addition increased from 0 to 1 g L(-1) under low sugar concentration (3.8 g L(-1) sucrose). The existence of butyrate increases the activity of biobutanol production and reduces the fermentable sugar concentration needed for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

  8. Theoretical and kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of esters with H(O.)2 radicals.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Jorge; Zhou, Chong-Wen; Curran, Henry J

    2013-12-27

    This work details an ab initio and chemical kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions by the hydroperoxyl radical (HȮ2) on the following esters: methyl ethanoate, methyl propanoate, methyl butanoate, methyl pentanoate, methyl isobutyrate, ethyl ethanoate, propyl ethanoate, and isopropyl ethanoate. Geometry optimizations and frequency calculations of all of the species involved, as well as the hindrance potential descriptions for reactants and transition states, have been performed with the Møller-Plesset (MP2) method using the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. A validation of all of the connections between transition states and local minima was performed by intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations. Electronic energies for all of the species are reported at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory in kcal mol(-1) with the zero-point energy corrections. The CCSD(T)/CBS (extrapolated from CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ, in which X = D, T, Q) was used for the reactions of methyl ethanoate + HȮ2 radicals as a benchmark in the electronic energy calculations. High-pressure limit rate constants, in the temperature range 500-2000 K, have been calculated for all of the reaction channels using conventional transition state theory with asymmetric Eckart tunneling corrections. The 1-D hindered rotor approximation has been used for the low frequency torsional modes in both reactants and transition states. The calculated individual and total rate constants are reported for all of the reaction channels in each reaction system. A branching ratio analysis for each reaction site has also been investigated for all of the esters studied in this work. PMID:24175616

  9. Structural and kinetic investigation of the hydride composite Ca(BH4)2 + MgH2 system doped with NbF5 for solid-state hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Fahim; Pranzas, P Klaus; Pistidda, Claudio; Puszkiel, Julián A; Milanese, Chiara; Vainio, Ulla; Paskevicius, Mark; Emmler, Thomas; Santoru, Antonio; Utke, Rapee; Tolkiehn, Martin; Minella, Christian B; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Boerries, Stefan; Buckley, Craig E; Enzo, Stefano; Schreyer, Andreas; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Designing safe, compact and high capacity hydrogen storage systems is the key step towards introducing a pollutant free hydrogen technology into a broad field of applications. Due to the chemical bonds of hydrogen-metal atoms, metal hydrides provide high energy density in safe hydrogen storage media. Reactive hydride composites (RHCs) are a promising class of high capacity solid state hydrogen storage systems. Ca(BH4)2 + MgH2 with a hydrogen content of 8.4 wt% is one of the most promising members of the RHCs. However, its relatively high desorption temperature of ∼350 °C is a major drawback to meeting the requirements for practical application. In this work, by using NbF5 as an additive, the dehydrogenation temperature of this RHC was significantly decreased. To elucidate the role of NbF5 in enhancing the desorption properties of the Ca(BH4)2 + MgH2 (Ca-RHC), a comprehensive investigation was carried out via manometric measurements, mass spectrometry, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), in situ Synchrotron Radiation-Powder X-ray Diffraction (SR-PXD), X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (ASAXS), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques.

  10. Structural and kinetic investigation of the hydride composite Ca(BH4)2 + MgH2 system doped with NbF5 for solid-state hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Fahim; Pranzas, P Klaus; Pistidda, Claudio; Puszkiel, Julián A; Milanese, Chiara; Vainio, Ulla; Paskevicius, Mark; Emmler, Thomas; Santoru, Antonio; Utke, Rapee; Tolkiehn, Martin; Minella, Christian B; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Boerries, Stefan; Buckley, Craig E; Enzo, Stefano; Schreyer, Andreas; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Designing safe, compact and high capacity hydrogen storage systems is the key step towards introducing a pollutant free hydrogen technology into a broad field of applications. Due to the chemical bonds of hydrogen-metal atoms, metal hydrides provide high energy density in safe hydrogen storage media. Reactive hydride composites (RHCs) are a promising class of high capacity solid state hydrogen storage systems. Ca(BH4)2 + MgH2 with a hydrogen content of 8.4 wt% is one of the most promising members of the RHCs. However, its relatively high desorption temperature of ∼350 °C is a major drawback to meeting the requirements for practical application. In this work, by using NbF5 as an additive, the dehydrogenation temperature of this RHC was significantly decreased. To elucidate the role of NbF5 in enhancing the desorption properties of the Ca(BH4)2 + MgH2 (Ca-RHC), a comprehensive investigation was carried out via manometric measurements, mass spectrometry, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), in situ Synchrotron Radiation-Powder X-ray Diffraction (SR-PXD), X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (ASAXS), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques. PMID:26418174

  11. Kinetic and geometric isotope effects originating from different adsorption potential energy surfaces: cyclohexane on Rh(111).

    PubMed

    Koitaya, Takanori; Shimizu, Sumera; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Novel isotope effects were observed in desorption kinetics and adsorption geometry of cyclohexane on Rh(111) by the use of infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, photoelectron spectroscopy, and spot-profile-analysis low energy electron diffraction. The desorption energy of deuterated cyclohexane (C(6)D(12)) is lower than that of C(6)H(12). In addition, the work function change by adsorbed C(6)D(12) is smaller than that by adsorbed C(6)H(12). These results indicate that C(6)D(12) has a shallower adsorption potential than C(6)H(12) (vertical geometric isotope effect). The lateral geometric isotope effect was also observed in the two-dimensional cyclohexane superstructures as a result of the different repulsive interaction between interfacial dipoles. The observed isotope effects should be ascribed to the quantum nature of hydrogen involved in the C-H···metal interaction.

  12. Improved hydrogen storage kinetics of the Li-Mg-N-H system by addition of Mg(BH4)2.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongge; Shi, Songbo; Liu, Yongfeng; Li, Bo; Yang, Yanjing; Gao, Mingxia

    2013-03-21

    A Mg(BH(4))(2)-added Mg(NH(2))(2)-2LiH system was prepared by ball milling the corresponding chemicals. The hydrogen storage properties of the Mg(NH(2))(2)-2LiH-xMg(BH(4))(2) (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3) samples and the role played by Mg(BH(4))(2) were systematically investigated. The results show that the onset and peak temperatures for hydrogen desorption from the Mg(BH(4))(2)-added Mg(NH(2))(2)-2LiH sample shifted to lower temperatures. In particular, the Mg(NH(2))(2)-2LiH-0.1Mg(BH(4))(2) sample could reversibly absorb ~4.5 wt% of hydrogen in the temperature range of 120-150 °C, which is superior to the pristine sample. During ball milling, a metathesis reaction between Mg(BH(4))(2) and LiH readily occurred to form LiBH(4) and MgH(2) and subsequently, the newly formed MgH(2) reacted with Mg(NH(2))(2) to generate MgNH. Upon heating, the presence of LiBH(4) not only decreased the recrystallization temperature of Mg(NH(2))(2) but also reacted with LiNH(2) to form the Li(4)(BH(4))(NH(2))(3) intermediate, which weakens the N-H bonding and enhances the ion conductivity. Meanwhile, MgNH may act as the nucleation center for the dehydrogenation product of Li(2)MgN(2)H(2) due to the structural similarity. Thus, the in situ formed LiBH(4) and MgNH provide a synergetic effect to improve the hydrogen storage performances of the Mg(NH(2))(2)-2LiH system. PMID:23178338

  13. Phase, microstructure and hydrogen storage properties of Mg-Ni materials synthesized from metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Huaiyu; Chen, Chunguang; Liu, Tong; Li, Xingguo

    2014-04-01

    After Mg and Ni nanoparticles were fabricated by hydrogen plasma metal reaction, Mg-rich MgxNi100-x(75 < x < 90) materials were synthesized from these metal nanoparticles to study the synergistic effects for hydrogen storage in these samples to show both good kinetics and high capacity. These MgxNi100-x materials may absorb hydrogen with a capacity of around 3.3-5.1 wt% in 1 min at 573 K. The Mg90Ni10 sample shows a hydrogen capacity of 6.1 wt%. The significant kinetic enhancement is thought to be due to the unique nanostructure from the special synthesis route, the catalytic effect of the Mg2Ni nano phase, and the synergistic effects between the Mg2Ni and Mg phases in the materials. An interesting phenomenon which has never been reported before was observed during pressure composition isotherm (PCT) measurements. One steep step in the absorption process and two obviously separated steps in the desorption process during PCT measurements of Mg80Ni20 and Mg90Ni10 samples were observed and a possible reason from the kinetic performance of the Mg2Ni and Mg phases in absorption and desorption processes was explained. These MgxNi100-x materials synthesized from Mg and Ni nanoparticles show high capacity and good kinetics, which makes these materials very promising candidates for thermal storage or energy storage and utilization for renewable power.

  14. Phase, microstructure and hydrogen storage properties of Mg-Ni materials synthesized from metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shao, Huaiyu; Chen, Chunguang; Liu, Tong; Li, Xingguo

    2014-04-01

    After Mg and Ni nanoparticles were fabricated by hydrogen plasma metal reaction, Mg-rich MgxNi₁₀₀₋x(75 < x < 90) materials were synthesized from these metal nanoparticles to study the synergistic effects for hydrogen storage in these samples to show both good kinetics and high capacity. These MgxNi₁₀₀₋x materials may absorb hydrogen with a capacity of around 3.3-5.1 wt% in 1 min at 573 K. The Mg₉₀Ni₁₀ sample shows a hydrogen capacity of 6.1 wt%. The significant kinetic enhancement is thought to be due to the unique nanostructure from the special synthesis route, the catalytic effect of the Mg₂Ni nano phase, and the synergistic effects between the Mg₂Ni and Mg phases in the materials. An interesting phenomenon which has never been reported before was observed during pressure composition isotherm (PCT) measurements. One steep step in the absorption process and two obviously separated steps in the desorption process during PCT measurements of Mg₈₀Ni₂₀ and Mg₉₀Ni₁₀ samples were observed and a possible reason from the kinetic performance of the Mg₂Ni and Mg phases in absorption and desorption processes was explained. These MgxNi₁₀₀₋x materials synthesized from Mg and Ni nanoparticles show high capacity and good kinetics, which makes these materials very promising candidates for thermal storage or energy storage and utilization for renewable power.

  15. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART I.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-07-10

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I will discuss the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  16. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-08-17

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I discussed the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  17. [Desorption characteristics of phosphorus in tea tree rhizosphere soil].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Bao, Chun-Hong; Miao, Xiao-Lin; Hu, Wen-Min

    2013-07-01

    In order to explore the phosphorus (P) release process and its supply mechanism in tea tree rhizosphere soil, an exogenous P adsorption and culture experiment was conducted to study the P desorption process and characters in the tea tree rhizosphere soils having been cultivated for different years and derived from different parent materials. The least squares method was used to fit the isotherms of P desorption kinetics. There was an obvious difference in the P desorption process between the rhizosphere soils and non-rhizosphere soils. The P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils was significantly higher than that of the non-rhizosphere soils. As compared with non-rhizosphere soils, rhizosphere soils had higher available P content, P desorption rate, and beta value (desorbed P of per unit adsorbed P), with the average increment being 5.49 mg x kg(-1), 1.7%, and 24.4%, respectively. The P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils derived from different parent materials was in the order of granite > quaternary red clay > slate. The average available P content and P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils increased with increasing cultivation years. PMID:24175512

  18. [Desorption characteristics of phosphorus in tea tree rhizosphere soil].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Bao, Chun-Hong; Miao, Xiao-Lin; Hu, Wen-Min

    2013-07-01

    In order to explore the phosphorus (P) release process and its supply mechanism in tea tree rhizosphere soil, an exogenous P adsorption and culture experiment was conducted to study the P desorption process and characters in the tea tree rhizosphere soils having been cultivated for different years and derived from different parent materials. The least squares method was used to fit the isotherms of P desorption kinetics. There was an obvious difference in the P desorption process between the rhizosphere soils and non-rhizosphere soils. The P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils was significantly higher than that of the non-rhizosphere soils. As compared with non-rhizosphere soils, rhizosphere soils had higher available P content, P desorption rate, and beta value (desorbed P of per unit adsorbed P), with the average increment being 5.49 mg x kg(-1), 1.7%, and 24.4%, respectively. The P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils derived from different parent materials was in the order of granite > quaternary red clay > slate. The average available P content and P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils increased with increasing cultivation years.

  19. Is It Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Catalysis Derived from [RhCp*Cl2]2? In Operando-XAFS, Kinetic and Crucial Kinetic Poisoning Evidence for Subnanometer Rh4 Cluster-Based Benzene Hydrogenation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bayram, Ercan; Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Roberts, John A.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Ozkar, Saim; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Finke, Richard G.

    2011-11-23

    Determining the true, kinetically dominant catalytically active species, in the classic benzene hydrogenation system pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers 34 years ago starting with [RhCp*Cl2]2 (Cp* = [{eta}5-C5(CH3)5]), has proven to be one of the most challenging case studies in the quest to distinguish single-metal-based 'homogeneous' from polymetallic, 'heterogeneous' catalysis. The reason, this study will show, is the previous failure to use the proper combination of (i) operando spectroscopy to determine the dominant form(s) of the precatalyst's mass under catalysis (i.e., operating) conditions, plus then and crucially also (ii) the previous lack of the necessary kinetic studies, catalysis being a 'wholly kinetic phenomenon' as J. Halpern long ago noted. An important contribution from this study will be to reveal the power of quantitiative kinetic poisoning experiments for distinguishing single-metal, or in this case subnanometer Rh4 cluster-based catalysis from larger, polymetallic Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysis, at least under favorable conditions. The combined operando-XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) spectroscopy and kinetic evidences provide a compelling case for Rh4-based, with average stoichiometry 'Rh4Cp*2.4Cl4Hc', benzene hydrogenation catalysis in 2-propanol with added Et3N and at 100 C and 50 atm initial H2 pressure. The results also reveal, however, that if even ca. 1.4% of the total soluble Rh(0)n had formed nanoparticles, then those Rh(0)n nanoparticles would have been able to account for all the observed benzene hydrogenation catalytic rate (using commercial, ca. 2 nm, polyethyleneglycol-dodecylether hydrosol stabilized Rh(0)n nanoparticles as a model system). The results 'especially the poisoning methodology developed and employed' are of significant, broader interest since determining the nature of the true catalyst continues to be a central, often vexing issue in any and all catalytic reactions. The results are also of fundamental

  20. Is it homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysis derived from [RhCp*Cl2]2? In operando XAFS, kinetic, and crucial kinetic poisoning evidence for subnanometer Rh4 cluster-based benzene hydrogenation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Ercan; Linehan, John C; Fulton, John L; Roberts, John A S; Szymczak, Nathaniel K; Smurthwaite, Tricia D; Özkar, Saim; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Finke, Richard G

    2011-11-23

    Determining the true, kinetically dominant catalytically active species, in the classic benzene hydrogenation system pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers 34 years ago starting with [RhCp*Cl(2)](2) (Cp* = [η(5)-C(5)(CH(3))(5)]), has proven to be one of the most challenging case studies in the quest to distinguish single-metal-based "homogeneous" from polymetallic, "heterogeneous" catalysis. The reason, this study will show, is the previous failure to use the proper combination of: (i) in operando spectroscopy to determine the dominant form(s) of the precatalyst's mass under catalysis (i.e., operating) conditions, and then crucially also (ii) the previous lack of the necessary kinetic studies, catalysis being a "wholly kinetic phenomenon" as J. Halpern long ago noted. An important contribution from this study will be to reveal the power of quantitiative kinetic poisoning experiments for distinguishing single-metal, or in the present case subnanometer Rh(4) cluster-based catalysis, from larger, polymetallic Rh(0)(n) nanoparticle catalysis, at least under favorable conditions. The combined in operando X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and kinetic evidence provide a compelling case for Rh(4)-based, with average stoichiometry "Rh(4)Cp*(2.4)Cl(4)H(c)", benzene hydrogenation catalysis in 2-propanol with added Et(3)N and at 100 °C and 50 atm initial H(2) pressure. The results also reveal, however, that if even ca. 1.4% of the total soluble Rh(0)(n) had formed nanoparticles, then those Rh(0)(n) nanoparticles would have been able to account for all the observed benzene hydrogenation catalytic rate (using commercial, ca. 2 nm, polyethyleneglycol-dodecylether hydrosol stabilized Rh(0)(n) nanoparticles as a model system). The results--especially the poisoning methodology developed and employed--are of significant, broader interest since determining the nature of the true catalyst continues to be a central, often vexing issue in any and all catalytic reactions

  1. Beryllium Desorption from Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, V.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Beryllium isotopes have provided a useful tool in the field of geochronology and geomorphology over the last 25 years. The amount of cosmogenic meteoric 10Be and native 9Be absorbed to soils often scales with the residence time and chemical weathering of sediments in a landscape, respectively. Thus, the concentrations in river sediment may be used to quantify the denudation of specific watersheds. When deposited in ocean sediment, these concentrations are thought to record the history of denudation on Earth over the last ~10 Ma. The use of both isotopes often relies on the premise of beryllium retention to sediment surfaces in order to preserve a landscape's erosion and weathering signature. Changes in setting, en route from the soil to fluvial system to the ocean, can cause beryllium desorption and may preclude some applications of the 10Be/9Be system. Four mechanisms were tested to determine the desorption potential of beryllium including a reduction in pH, an increase in ionic strength and complexation with soluble organic and inorganic species. These processes have the potential to mobilize beryllium into solution. For example, by both reducing the pH and increasing the ionic strength, competition for adsorption sites increases, potentially liberating beryllium from the sediment surface. In addition, organic and inorganic ligands can complex beryllium causing it to become mobilized. To determine which of these alterations influence beryllium desorption and to quantify the effect, we prepared separate solutions of beryllium bound to minerals and organic compounds and measured beryllium concentrations in solution before and after adjusting the pH, ionic strength, and changing inorganic and organic ligand concentrations. We conclude from our observations that overall, beryllium sorbed to organic compounds was more resistant to desorption relative to mineral-associated beryllium. Among the methods tested, a reduction in pH resulted in the greatest amount of

  2. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  3. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  4. Kinetics of Mo, Ni, V and Al leaching from a spent hydrodesulphurization catalyst in a solution containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna

    2011-02-28

    The kinetics of molybdenum, nickel, vanadium and aluminium leaching from a spent hydrodesulphurization catalyst in a solution containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The effects of temperature and particle size were examined. In addition, the reaction mechanism for the dissolution of the spent catalyst was discussed. The results of the kinetic analysis for various experimental conditions indicated that the reaction rate of leaching process is controlled by chemical reaction at the particle surface. The values of the activation energies of 31±2, 36±4, 30±4 and 57±3 kJ mol(-1) for Mo, Ni, V and Al, respectively, are characteristic for mechanism controlled by chemical reaction. PMID:21167639

  5. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of alcohols and hydroxylamines by hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by methyltrioxorhenium, MTO, and the oxygen binding properties of cobalt Schiff base complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zauche, Timothy

    1999-02-12

    Catalysis is a very interesting area of chemistry, which is currently developing at a rapid pace. A great deal of effort is being put forth by both industry and academia to make reactions faster and more productive. One method of accomplishing this is by the development of catalysts. Enzymes are an example of catalysts that are able to perform reactions on a very rapid time scale and also very specifically; a goal for every man-made catalyst. A kinetic study can also be carried out for a reaction to gain a better understanding of its mechanism and to determine what type of catalyst would assist the reaction. Kinetic studies can also help determine other factors, such as the shelf life of a chemical, or the optimum temperature for an industrial scale reaction. An area of catalysis being studied at this time is that of oxygenations. Life on this earth depends on the kinetic barriers for oxygen in its various forms. If it were not for these barriers, molecular oxygen, water, and the oxygenated materials in the land would be in a constant equilibrium. These same barriers must be overcome when performing oxygenation reactions on the laboratory or industrial scale. By performing kinetic studies and developing catalysts for these reactions, a large number of reactions can be made more economical, while making less unwanted byproducts. For this dissertation the activation by transition metal complexes of hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen coordination will be discussed.

  6. Efficient Estimators for Quantum Instanton Evaluation of theKinetic Isotope Effects: Application to the Intramolecular HydrogenTransfer in Pentadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Vanicek, Jiri; Miller, William H.

    2007-06-13

    The quantum instanton approximation is used to compute kinetic isotope effects for intramolecular hydrogen transfer in cis-1,3-pentadiene. Due to the importance of skeleton motions, this system with 13 atoms is a simple prototype for hydrogen transfer in enzymatic reactions. The calculation is carried out using thermodynamic integration with respect to the mass of the isotopes and a path integral Monte Carlo evaluation of relevant thermodynamic quantities. Efficient 'virial' estimators are derived for the logarithmic derivatives of the partition function and the delta-delta correlation functions. These estimators require significantly fewer Monte Carlo samples since their statistical error does not increase with the number of discrete time slices in the path integral. The calculation treats all 39 degrees of freedom quantum-mechanically and uses an empirical valence bond potential based on a modified general AMBER force field.

  7. Sorption-desorption of aminocyclopyrachlor in selected Brazilian soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminocyclopyrachlor sorption and desorption was investigated in 14 soils from Brazil, representing a range of pH, and organic carbon (OC) and clay contents. Sorption kinetics demonstrated that soil-solution equilibrium was attained in a 24-h period. Freundlich equation adequately described behavior ...

  8. Sorption-desorption of indaziflam in selected agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorption and desorption of indaziflam in 6 soils from Brazil and 3 soils from the USA, with different physical chemical properties, were investigated using the batch equilibration method. Sorption kinetics demonstrated that soil-solution equilibrium was attained in a 24-h period. The Freundlich equa...

  9. Superior dehydrogenation/hydrogenation kinetics and long-term cycling performance of K and Rb cocatalyzed Mg(NH(2))(2)-2LiH system.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Liu, Yongfeng; Ma, Ruijun; Zhang, Xin; Li, You; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2014-10-01

    The coaddition of KH and RbH significantly improves the hydrogen storage properties of the Mg(NH2)2-2LiH system. An Mg(NH2)2-2LiH-0.04KH-0.04RbH composite was able to reversibly store 5.2 wt % H2 when the dehydrogenation operates at 130 °C and the hydrogenation operates at 120 °C. The isothermal dehydrogenation rate at 130 °C was approximately 43 times that of a pristine sample. During ball-milling, KH reacts with RbH to form a K(Rb)H solid solution. Upon heating, RbH first separates from the K(Rb)H solid solution and participates in the first step of dehydrogenation reaction, and then the remaining KH participates in the second dehydrogenation reaction. The presence of RbH and KH provide synergetic effects, which improve the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen storage in the Mg(NH2)2-2LiH system. In particular, more than 93% of the hydrogen storage capacity (4.4 wt %) remains after cycling a sample with 0.04 mol of KH and RbH for 50 cycles, indicating notably better cycling stability compared with any presently known Li-Mg-N-H systems. PMID:25230404

  10. Hydrogen storage in metal-hydrogen systems and their derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, U.; Arnold, G.; von Helmolt, R.

    During the last years, the power densities of automotive fuel cell systems have been raised dramatically. However, a major technology improvement is still needed for the on-board fuel storage system since hydrogen exhibits a rather low volumetric energy density (regardless whether it is stored as a liquid at cryogenic temperatures or as a compressed gas). Furthermore, the cost for current hydrogen containers is far from what gasoline tanks cost. Therefore, alternatives like solid-state absorbers of hydrogen (e.g. metal hydrides or complex hydrides) are investigated for their feasibility by the car industry. These kinds of systems show very high volumetric storage densities on a materials basis. Unfortunately, the host compounds are usually quite heavy and thus possess a low gravimetric storage density. Also, the thermodynamics and kinetics of the absorption/desorption reactions and their impact on the tank design in general (and on the heat management in particular) have to be considered. Within the framework of this paper, the properties of the most promising solid-state storage systems are discussed and compared to those of the liquid and compressed gaseous hydrogen technologies.

  11. Hydrogen-induced mitigation of O on Ru(1010): a density-functional study.

    PubMed

    Yakovkin, I N

    2009-07-21

    The reaction of hydrogen with oxygen adsorbed on an Ru(1010) surface has been studied by density-functional calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In agreement with experiment, it has been found that molecular hydrogen does not react with adsorbed O. In contrast, the hydrogenation of oxygen by an atomic H beam occurs spontaneously and results in the formation of adsorbed OH molecules. Subsequent impinging H-atoms can either initiate the formation of water, which readily desorbs at room temperature thus removing the O from the surface, or lead to formation and desorption of H2. It is the latter channel that hinders, at 300 K, a complete removal of O from Ru capping layers on Si/Mo mirrors for extreme ultraviolet radiation. The estimated height of the barrier for the Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction between adsorbed H and OH, 0.92 eV, and related position of the H2O peak in model desorption spectra (approximately 320 K) are consistent with recent experiments. The H2 desorption peak appears at higher temperature, approximately 350 K, so that in the range from 320 to 330 K adsorbed hydrogen atoms will react predominantly with OH. Hence, the present simulations predict that an efficient removal of the chemisorbed O from Ru capping layers can be achieved by heating the surface to 320-330 K in a molecular hydrogen atmosphere.

  12. The kinetic and mechanical aspects of hydrogen-induced failure in metals. Ph.D. Thesis, 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Premature hydrogen-induced failure observed to occur in many metal systems involves three stages of fracture: (1) crack initiation, (2) stable slow crack growth, and (3) unstable rapid crack growth. The presence of hydrogen at some critical location on the metal surface or within the metal lattice was shown to influence one or both of the first two stages of brittle fracture but has a negligible effect on the unstable rapid crack growth stage. The relative influence of the applied parameters of time, temperature, etc., on the propensity of a metal to exhibit hydrogen induced premature failure was investigated.

  13. Combined capillary electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography studies on the kinetics and mechanism of the hydrogen peroxide-thiocyanate reaction in a weakly alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Song, Yanan; Horváth, Attila K; Cui, Yin; Ji, Chen; Zhao, Yuemin; Gao, Qingyu

    2014-03-01

    The hydrogen peroxide-thiocyanate reaction has been reinvestigated by means of capillary electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography under weakly alkaline conditions at 25.0±0.1 °C. Concentration-time series of thiocyanate, sulfate and cyanate have been followed by capillary electrophoresis as well as that of thiocyanate and hydrogen peroxide by HPLC. It has been clearly demonstrated that OxSCN(-) (where x=1, 2 and 3) cannot be accumulated in detectable amount in contrast to the results of Christy and Egeberg, hence these species can only be regarded as short-lived intermediates. It has been shown that the overall rate law is first-order with respect to both reactants, but no pH-dependence was observed within the pH range of 8.86-10.08. A simple kinetic model has been proposed to fit all the concentration-time curves simultaneously at five different pHs demonstrating the powerful combination of the experimental techniques CE and HPLC with simultaneous evaluation of kinetic curves. It is also enlightened that the quality of the buffer strongly affects the rate of the overall reaction that increases in the order of application of ammonia, phosphate, carbonate and borate, respectively at a constant ionic strength and pH.

  14. Nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tashlykova-Bushkevich, Iya I.

    2015-12-31

    The present work summarizes recent progress in the investigation of nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys foils produced at exceptionally high cooling rates. We focus here on the potential of modification of hydrogen desorption kinetics in respect to weak and strong trapping sites that could serve as hydrogen sinks in Al materials. It is shown that it is important to elucidate the surface microstructure of the Al alloy foils at the submicrometer scale because rapidly solidified microstructural features affect hydrogen trapping at nanostructured defects. We discuss the profound influence of solute atoms on hydrogen−lattice defect interactions in the alloys. with emphasis on role of vacancies in hydrogen evolution; both rapidly solidified pure Al and conventionally processed aluminum samples are considered.

  15. Improved metal hydride technology for the storage of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Sapru, K.; Ming, L.; Ramachandran, S.

    1995-09-01

    Low cost, high density storage of hydrogen will remove the most serious barrier to large-scale utilization of hydrogen as a non-polluting, zero-emission fuel. An important challenge for the practical use of Mg-based, high capacity hydrogen storage alloys has been the development of a low-cost, bulk production technique. Two difficulties in preparation of Mg-based alloys are the immiscibility of Mg with many transition metals and the relatively high volatility of Mg compared to many transition metals. These factors preclude the use of conventional induction melting techniques for the Mg-based alloy preparation. A mechanical alloying technique, in which Mg immiscibility and volatility do not present a problem, was developed and shows great promise for production of Mg-based alloys. A number of Mg-based alloys were prepared via modified induction melting and mechanical alloying methods. The alloys were tested for gas phase hydrogen storage properties, composition, structure and morphology. The mechanically alloyed samples are multi-component, multi-phase, highly disordered materials in their as-prepared state. These unoptimized alloys have shown reversible H-storage capacity of more than 5 wt.% hydrogen. After 2000 absorption/desorption cycles, the alloys show no decline in storage capacity or desorption kinetics. The alloys have also demonstrated resistance to CH{sub 4} and CO poisoning in preliminary testing. Upon annealing, with an increase in crystallinity, the H-storage capacity decreases, indicating the importance of disorder.

  16. Hydrogen Characteristics of Ti-Based Icosahedral Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viano, A. M.; Hanneken, J. W.; Kelton, K. F.; Gibbons, P. C.

    1997-03-01

    The ability of Ti-based icosahedral quasicrystals to store significant amounts of hydrogen is now well-known. Up to 64 atomic percent of hydrogen can be stored in Ti_45Zr_38Ni_17 with only a small fraction of the sample transforming to crystalline hydrides. The amount of crystalline phase present depends on both the method of hydrogenation and the surface preparation of the sample. The surface oxide layer, which has been characterized in air-exposed samples, greatly influences the absorption and desorption kinetics. To accurately determine the hydrogen characteristics, studies were performed on unoxidized, powdered quasicrystalline Ti_xZr_yNiz This was accomplished by gently ball-milling the as-quenched quasicrystalline ribbons in a stainless-steel vessel which was then connected directly to a modified Sieverts' apparatus. Absorption and desorption rates for the quasicrystal will be discussed and compared to those for other related alloys. The saturation limit of hydrogen in the quasicrystal, as measured from a determination of the pressure-composition isotherms, will also be presented.

  17. Activatino of Erbium Films for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    M Brumbach; j Ohlhausen; K Zavadil; C Snow; J Woicik

    2011-12-31

    Hydriding of metals can be routinely performed at high temperature in a rich hydrogen atmosphere. Prior to the hydrogen loading process, a thermal activation procedure is required to promote facile hydrogen sorption into the metal. Despite the wide spread utilization of this activation procedure, little is known about the chemical and electronic changes that occur during activation and how this thermal pretreatment leads to increased rates of hydrogen uptake. This study utilized variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to interrogate the changes during in situ thermal annealing of erbium films, with results confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and low energy ion scattering. Activation can be identified by a large increase in photoemission between the valence band edge and the Fermi level and appears to occur over a two stage process. The first stage involves desorption of contaminants and recrystallization of the oxide, initially impeding hydrogen loading. Further heating overcomes the first stage and leads to degradation of the passive surface oxide leading to a bulk film more accessible for hydrogen loading.

  18. Activation of erbium films for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Ohlhausen, James A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Snow, Clark S.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2011-06-01

    Hydriding of metals can be routinely performed at high temperature in a rich hydrogen atmosphere. Prior to the hydrogen loading process, a thermal activation procedure is required to promote facile hydrogen sorption into the metal. Despite the wide spread utilization of this activation procedure, little is known about the chemical and electronic changes that occur during activation and how this thermal pretreatment leads to increased rates of hydrogen uptake. This study utilized variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to interrogate the changes during in situ thermal annealing of erbium films, with results confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and low energy ion scattering. Activation can be identified by a large increase in photoemission between the valence band edge and the Fermi level and appears to occur over a two stage process. The first stage involves desorption of contaminants and recrystallization of the oxide, initially impeding hydrogen loading. Further heating overcomes the first stage and leads to degradation of the passive surface oxide leading to a bulk film more accessible for hydrogen loading.

  19. Laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voumard, Pierre; Zenobi, Renato

    1995-10-01

    A complete study on the energy partitioning upon laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces was undertaken. The measurements include characterization of the aniline-quartz adsorption system using temperature-programmed desorption, the extrapolation of quasiequilibrium desorption temperatures to the regime of laser heating rates on the order of 109-1010 K/s by computational means, measurement of the kinetic energy distributions of desorbing aniline using a pump-probe method, and the determination of internal energies with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. The measurements are compared to calculations of the surface temperature rise and the resulting desorption rates, based on a finite-difference mathematical description of pulsed laser heating. While the surface temperature of laser-heated silica reaches about 600-700 K at the time of desorption, the translational temperature of laser-desorbed aniline was measured to be Tkin=420±60 K, Tvib was 360±60 K, and Trot was 350±100 K. These results are discussed using different models for laser-induced thermal desorption from surfaces.

  20. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of vacuum UV photo-processed methanol ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, D. M.; Bossa, J.-B.; Linnartz, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Methanol in the interstellar medium mainly forms upon sequential hydrogenation of solid CO. With typical abundances of up to 15% (with respect to water) it is an important constituent of interstellar ices where it is considered as a precursor in the formation of large and complex organic molecules (COMs), e.g. upon vacuum UV (VUV) photo-processing or exposure to cosmic rays. Aims: This study aims at detecting novel complex organic molecules formed during the VUV photo-processing of methanol ice in the laboratory using a technique more sensitive than regular surface diagnostic tools. In addition, the formation kinetics of the main photo-products of methanol are unravelled for an astronomically relevant temperature (20 K) and radiation dose. Methods: The VUV photo-processing of CH3OH ice is studied by applying laser desorption post-ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDPI TOF-MS), and analysed by combining molecule-specific fragmentation and desorption features. Results: The mass spectra correspond to fragment ions originating from a number of previously recorded molecules and from new COMs, such as the series (CO)xH, with x = 3 and y < 3x-1, to which prebiotic glycerin belongs. The formation of these large COMs has not been reported in earlier photolysis studies and suggests that such complex species may form in the solid state under interstellar conditions.

  1. Kinetics of hydrogen consumption by methanogenic consortia and cultures of hydrogen-consuming anaerobes. [Methanospirillum PM1, M. hungatei JF-1, Methanosarcina barkeri MS, Methanobacterium PM2, Desulfovibrio G11 and PS1

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Hydrogen plays a central role in the breakdown of organic matter in anaerobic habitats, influencing the nature of the fermentation end products and possibly, rates at which the initial substrates are degraded. The kinetics were examined for H/sub 2/ consumption by samples from natural anaerobic habitats, pure cultures of H/sub 2/-consuming anaerobes, and co-cultures comprised of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. These kinetic studies were performed using a gas-recirculation system that allowed precise measurements of gaseous phase H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/. Uptake and growth kinetic parameters were estimated for the natural samples and suspensions of H/sub 2/-consumers by fitting H/sub 2/ depletion (progress curve) data to integrated forms of Michaelis-Menten and Monod equations. Samples included eutrophic lake sediments, anaerobic digestor sludge, and rumen fluid. The bacteria studied were methanospirillum PM1, Methanosarcina barkeri MS, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1, Methanohbacterium PM2, and Desulfovibrio strains G11 and PS1.

  2. Hydrogenation properties of KSi and NaSi Zintl phases.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wan Si; Chotard, Jean-Noël; Raybaud, Pascal; Janot, Raphaël

    2012-10-14

    The recently reported KSi-KSiH(3) system can store 4.3 wt% of hydrogen reversibly with slow kinetics of several hours for complete absorption at 373 K and complete desorption at 473 K. From the kinetics measured at different temperatures, the Arrhenius plots give activation energies (E(a)) of 56.0 ± 5.7 kJ mol(-1) and 121 ± 17 kJ mol(-1) for the absorption and desorption processes, respectively. Ball-milling with 10 wt% of carbon strongly improves the kinetics of the system, i.e. specifically the initial rate of absorption becomes about one order of magnitude faster than that of pristine KSi. However, this fast absorption causes a disproportionation into KH and K(8)Si(46), instead of forming the KSiH(3) hydride from a slow absorption. This disproportionation, due to the formation of stable KH, leads to a total loss of reversibility. In a similar situation, when the pristine Zintl NaSi phase absorbs hydrogen, it likewise disproportionates into NaH and Na(8)Si(46), indicating a very poorly reversible reaction.

  3. Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4/In2O3 Model Catalyst: A Combined DFT and Kinetic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Jingyun; Liu, Changjun; Mei, Donghai; Ge, Qingfeng

    2014-08-01

    Methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation on Pd4/In2O3 has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and microkinetic modeling. In this study, three possible routes in the reaction network of CO2 + H2 → CH3OH + H2O have been examined. Our DFT results show that the HCOO route competes with the RWGS route whereas a high activation barrier kinetically blocks the HCOOH route. DFT results also suggest that H2COO* + H* ↔ H2CO* +OH* and cis-COOH* + H* ↔CO* + H2O* are the rate limiting steps in the HCOO route and the RWGS route, respectively. Microkinetic modeling results demonstrate that the HCOO route is the dominant reaction route for methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation. We found that the activation of H adatom on the small Pd cluster and the presence of H2O on the In2O3 substrate play important roles in promoting the methanol synthesis. The hydroxyl adsorbed at the interface of Pd4/In2O3 induces the transformation of the supported Pd4 cluster from a butterfly structure into a tetrahedron structure. This important structure change not only indicates the dynamical nature of the supported nanoparticle catalyst structure during the reaction but also shifts the final hydrogenation step from H2COH to CH3O.

  4. Oxidation of vanadium(III) by hydrogen peroxide and the oxomonoperoxo vanadium(V) ion in acidic aqueous solutions: a kinetics and simulation study.

    PubMed

    Du, Guodong; Espenson, James H

    2005-07-25

    The reaction between vanadium(III) and hydrogen peroxide in aqueous acidic solutions was investigated. The rate law shows first-order dependences on both vanadium(III) and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, with a rate constant, defined in terms of -d[H(2)O(2)]/dt, of 2.06 +/- 0.03 L mol(-)(1) s(-)(1) at 25 degrees C; the rate is independent of hydrogen ion concentration. The varying reaction stoichiometry, the appreciable evolution of dioxygen, the oxidation of 2-PrOH to acetone, and the inhibition of acetone formation by the hydroxyl radical scavengers, dimethyl sulfoxide and sodium benzoate, point to a Fenton mechanism as the predominant pathway in the reaction. Methyltrioxorhenium(VII) does not appear to catalyze this reaction. A second-order rate constant for the oxidation of V(3+) by OV(O(2))(+) was determined to be 11.3 +/- 0.3 L mol(-)(1) s(-)(1) at 25 degrees C. An overall reaction scheme consisting of over 20 reactions, in agreement with the experimental results and literature reports, was established by kinetic simulation studies.

  5. Hydrogen kinetics in a-Si:H and a-SiC:H thin films investigated by real-time ERD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halindintwali, S.; Khoele, J.; Nemroaui, O.; Comrie, C. M.; Theron, C. C.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen effusion from hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si1-xCx:H) thin films during a temperature ramp between RT and 600 °C was studied by in situ real-time elastic recoil detection analysis. Point to point contour maps show the hydrogen depth profile and its evolution with the ramped temperature. This paper proposes a diffusion limited evolution model to study H kinetic properties from total retained H contents recorded in a single ramp. In a compact a-Si:H layer where H predominantly effuses at high temperatures between 500 and 600 °C, an activation energy value of ∼1.50 eV and a diffusion pre-factor of 0.41 × 10-4 cm2/s were obtained. Applied to an non-stoichiometric a-Si1-xCx:H film in the same range of temperature, the model led to reduced values of activation energy and diffusion prefactor of ∼0.33 eV and 0.59 × 10-11 cm2/s, respectively.

  6. Surface interactions of aromatic organoarsenical compounds with hematite nanoparticles using ATR-FTIR: kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Arts, Derek; Abdus Sabur, Md; Al-Abadleh, Hind A

    2013-03-14

    Aromatic organoarsenicals p-arsanilic acid (pAsA) and roxarsone (ROX) are used as feed additives in developing countries that allow the use of arsenic-containing compounds in their poultry industry. These compounds are introduced to the environment through the application of contaminated poultry litter. Little is known about the surface chemistry of these organoarsenicals on the molecular level with reactive components in soils. We report herein the first in situ and surface-sensitive rapid kinetic studies on the adsorption and desorption of pAsA to/from hematite nanoparticles at pH 7 using ATR-FTIR. Values for the apparent initial rates of adsorption and desorption were extracted from experimental data as a function of spectral components. Hydrogen phosphate was used as a desorbing agent due to its ubiquitous presence in litter, and its adsorption kinetics was investigated on surfaces with and without surface arsenic. Initial first-order pseudo-adsorption rate constant for pAsA was lower by a factor of 1.6 than that of iAs(V), suggesting an average behavior for the formation of quantitatively more weakly bonded monodentate or hydrogen-bonded complexes for the former relative to strongly bonded bidentate surface complexes for the latter under our experimental conditions. Initial first-order pseudo-adsorption rate constants for hydrogen phosphate decrease in this order: fresh hematite > pAsA/hematite ≈ phenylarsonic acid (PhAs)/hematite > iAs/hematite by factors 1.5 and 3 relative to fresh films, respectively. Initial desorption kinetics of aromatic organoarsenicals due to flowing hydrogen phosphate proceed with a nonunity overall order, suggesting a complex mechanism, which is consistent with the existence of more than one type of surface complexes. The impact of our studies on the environmental fate and transport of aromatic organoarsenicals in geochemical environments and their overall surface chemistry with iron (oxyhyr)oxides is discussed.

  7. A Microscale Approach to Chemical Kinetics in the General Chemistry Laboratory: The Potassium Iodide Hydrogen Peroxide Iodine-Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattsangi, Prem D.

    2011-01-01

    A microscale laboratory for teaching chemical kinetics utilizing the iodine clock reaction is described. Plastic pipets, 3 mL volume, are used to store and deliver precise drops of reagents and the reaction is run in a 24 well plastic tray using a total 60 drops of reagents. With this procedure, students determine the rate of reaction and the…

  8. Release kinetics of 5-aminosalicylic acid from halloysite.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, C; Viseras, C; Cerezo, P; Salcedo, I; Sánchez-Espejo, R; Valenzuela, C

    2013-05-01

    This paper investigates desorption of 5-aminosalicilyc acid (5-ASA) adsorbed onto halloysite (HL). Desorption isotherms were fitted according to kinetic laws obtained considering release of 5-ASA from HL as the phase of desorption of the previously adsorbed drug molecules both inside the nanotubes of HL as onto the surface of clay particles and/or in the inter-particle spaces of their aggregates. Desorption isotherms has been also fitted with other equations frequently used in drug release kinetics studies. The best fitting corresponded to the kinetic model proposed; in agreement with the results of adsorption.

  9. THE ABSORPTION OF HYDROGEN ON LOW PRESSURE HYDRIDE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, G.; Korinko, P.

    2012-04-03

    For this study, hydrogen getter materials (Zircaloy-4 and pure zirconium) that have a high affinity for hydrogen (and low overpressure) have been investigated to determine the hydrogen equilibrium pressure on Zircaloy-4 and pure zirconium. These materials, as with most getter materials, offered significant challenges to overcome given the low hydrogen equilibrium pressure for the temperature range of interest. Hydrogen-zirconium data exists for pure zirconium at 500 C and the corresponding hydrogen overpressure is roughly 0.01 torr. This manuscript presents the results of the equilibrium pressures for the absorption and desorption of hydrogen on zirconium materials at temperatures ranging from 400 C to 600 C. The equilibrium pressures in this temperature region range from 150 mtorr at 600 C to less than 0.1 mtorr at 400 C. It has been shown that the Zircaloy-4 and zirconium samples are extremely prone to surface oxidation prior to and during heating. This oxidation precludes the hydrogen uptake, and therefore samples must be heated under a minimum vacuum of 5 x 10{sup -6} torr. In addition, the Zircaloy-4 samples should be heated at a sufficiently low rate to maintain the system pressure below 0.5 mtorr since an increase in pressure above 0.5 mtorr could possibly hinder the H{sub 2} absorption kinetics due to surface contamination. The results of this study and the details of the testing protocol will be discussed.

  10. Non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures based on a biological kinetic model of aerobic enzymatic methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vavilin, Vasily A; Rytov, Sergey V; Shim, Natalia; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-06-01

    The non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures during methane oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria Methylosinus sporium strain 5 (NCIMB 11126) and Methylocaldum gracile strain 14 L (NCIMB 11912) under copper-rich (8.9 µM Cu(2+)), copper-limited (0.3 µM Cu(2+)) or copper-regular (1.1 µM Cu(2+)) conditions has been described mathematically. The model was calibrated by experimental data of methane quantities and carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of methane measured previously in laboratory microcosms reported by Feisthauer et al. [ 1 ] M. gracile initially oxidizes methane by a particulate methane monooxygenase and assimilates formaldehyde via the ribulose monophosphate pathway, whereas M. sporium expresses a soluble methane monooxygenase under copper-limited conditions and uses the serine pathway for carbon assimilation. The model shows that during methane solubilization dominant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation occurs. An increase of biomass due to growth of methanotrophs causes an increase of particulate or soluble monooxygenase that, in turn, decreases soluble methane concentration intensifying methane solubilization. The specific maximum rate of methane oxidation υm was proved to be equal to 4.0 and 1.3 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. sporium under copper-rich and copper-limited conditions, respectively, and 0.5 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. gracile. The model shows that methane oxidation cannot be described by traditional first-order kinetics. The kinetic isotope fractionation ceases when methane concentrations decrease close to the threshold value. Applicability of the non-linear model was confirmed by dynamics of carbon isotope signature for carbon dioxide that was depleted and later enriched in (13)C. Contrasting to the common Rayleigh linear graph, the dynamic curves allow identifying inappropriate isotope data due to inaccurate substrate concentration analyses. The non-linear model pretty adequately described experimental

  11. Enhanced saturation coverages in adsorption-desorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tassel, Paul R.; Viot, Pascal; Tarjus, Gilles; Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Talbot, Julian

    2000-01-01

    Many experimental studies of protein deposition on solid surfaces involve alternating adsorption/desorption steps. In this paper, we investigate the effect of a desorption step (separating two adsorption steps) on the kinetics, the adsorbed-layer structure, and the saturation density. Our theoretical approach involves a density expansion of the pair distribution function and an application of an interpolation formula to estimate the saturation density as a function of the density at which the desorption process commences, ρ1, and the density of the depleted configuration, ρ2. The theory predicts an enhancement of the saturation density compared with that of a simple, uninterrupted random sequential adsorption (RSA) process and a maximum in the saturation density when ρ2=(2/3)ρ1. The theoretical results are in qualitative and semiquantitative agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  12. Formation of a knudsen layer in electronically induced desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibold, D.; Urbassek, H. M.

    1992-10-01

    For intense desorption fluxes, particles desorbed by electronic transitions (DIET) from a surface into a vacuum may thermalize in the gas cloud forming above the surface. In immediate vicinity to the surface, however, a non-equilibrium layer (the Knudsen layer) exists which separates the recently desorbed, non-thermal particles from the thermalized gas cloud. We investigate by Monte Carlo computer simulation the time it takes to form a Knudsen layer, and its properties. It is found that a Knudsen layer, and thus also a thermalized gas cloud, is formed after around 200 mean free flight times of the desorbing particles, corresponding to a desorption of 20 monolayers. At the end of the Knudsen layer, the gas density will be higher, and the flow velocity and temperature smaller, than literature values indicate for thermal desorption. These data are of fundamental interest for the modeling of gas-kinetic and gas-dynamic effects in DIET.

  13. Electrochemical Surface Interrogation of a MoS2 Hydrogen-Evolving Catalyst: In Situ Determination of the Surface Hydride Coverage and the Hydrogen Evolution Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyun S; Bard, Allen J

    2016-07-21

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on an electrodeposited a-MoS2 electrode was investigated by a surface-selective electrochemical titration technique by application of surface interrogation scanning electrochemical microscopy. In a mildly acidic (pH 4.6) environment, the saturated surface hydride coverage of MoS2 was determined to be 31%, much higher than that expected for a crystalline nanoparticle. The HER rate constant of a surface molybdenum atom was measured for the first time in situ to be 3.8 s(-1) at a 600 mV overpotential. At high Mo-H coverages, a change in the nature of the active sites was observed upon consumption of Mo-H by HER.

  14. Electrochemical Surface Interrogation of a MoS2 Hydrogen-Evolving Catalyst: In Situ Determination of the Surface Hydride Coverage and the Hydrogen Evolution Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyun S; Bard, Allen J

    2016-07-21

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on an electrodeposited a-MoS2 electrode was investigated by a surface-selective electrochemical titration technique by application of surface interrogation scanning electrochemical microscopy. In a mildly acidic (pH 4.6) environment, the saturated surface hydride coverage of MoS2 was determined to be 31%, much higher than that expected for a crystalline nanoparticle. The HER rate constant of a surface molybdenum atom was measured for the first time in situ to be 3.8 s(-1) at a 600 mV overpotential. At high Mo-H coverages, a change in the nature of the active sites was observed upon consumption of Mo-H by HER. PMID:27383727

  15. Desorption of Mercury(II) on Kaolinite in the Presence of Oxalate or Cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Senevirathna, W. U.; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Baohua

    2011-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of Hg(II) on clay minerals can impact the biogeochemical cycle and bio- uptake of Hg in aquatic systems. We studied the desorption of Hg(II) on kaolinite in the presence of oxalate or cysteine, representing the ligands with carboxylic and thiol groups of different affinities for Hg(II). The effects of pH (3, 5, 7), ligand concentration (0.25, 1.0 mM), and temperature (15, 25, 35 C) on the Hg(II) desorption were investigated through desorption kinetics. Our study showed that the Hg(II) desorption was pH-dependant. In the absence of any organic ligand, >90% of the previously adsorbed Hg(II) desorbed at pH 3 within 2 h, compared to <10% at pH 7. Similar results were observed in the presence of oxalate, showing that it hardly affected the Hg(II) desorption. Cysteine inhibited the Hg(II) desorption significantly at all the pH tested, especially in the first 80 min with the desorption less than 20%, but it appeared to enhance the Hg(II) desorption afterwards. The effect of ligand concentration on the Hg(II) desorption was small, especially in the presence of oxalate. The effect of temperature on the desorption was nearly insignificant. The effect of the organic acids on the Hg(II) sorption and desorption is explained by the formation of the ternary surface complexes involving the mineral, ligand, and Hg(II). The competition for Hg(II) between the cysteine molecules adsorbed on the particles and in the solution probably can also affect the Hg(II) desorption.

  16. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron. Annual Status Report, 1 Jan. - 31 Dec. 1991. [titanium aluminides and beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Shanabarger, M.R.

    1991-12-01

    The goal was to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. Although hydrogen degradation of metallic materials is believed to result from dissolved protonic hydrogen, the heterogeneous hydrogen interface transport processes often dominate the kinetics of the degradation process. The initial step in the interface transport process is the dissociative chemisorption of the molecular species at the metal surface followed by hydrogen absorption into and transport through the bulk. Modern advanced aerospace applications often require the use of structural materials in high pressure hydrogen environments at temperatures which range from low cryogenic temperatures to very high temperatures (1300 K and greater). Materials proposed for these applications, such as the titanium aluminides, beta-titanium alloys, nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys, molybdenum-rhenium alloys, beryllium, and various beryllides, need to possess a high degree of immunity from hydrogen induced degradation of mechanical properties. In the present program, the interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2 (Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma (TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied. The interaction of low pressure hydrogen with gamma titanium aluminide and beryllium was found to be relatively weak, in the sense that adsorption leads to a low surface concentration of dissociated hydrogen, i.e., the chemisorption process is reversible at room temperature (300 K) for gamma titanium aluminide and the sticking coefficient for chemisorption is extremely small for beryllium. Hydrogen was found to interact readily with alpha-2 titanium aluminide to form a stable surface hydride at 300 K.

  17. Two-stage hydrotreating of a bitumen-derived middle distillate to produce diesel and jet fuels, and kinetics of aromatics hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Yui, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The middle distillate from a synthetic crude oil derived from Athabasca bitumen was further hydrotreated in a downflow pilot unit over a typical NiMo catalyst at 330 to 400 C, 7 to 11 MPa and 0.63 to 1.39 h{sup {minus}1} LHSV. Feed and liquid products were characterized for aromatics, cetane index (CI) and other diesel specification items. Aromatics were determined by a supercritical fluid chromatography method, while CI was determined using the correlation developed at Syncrude Canada Ltd. Also feed and selected products were distilled into a jet fuel cut (150/260 C) by spinning band distillation for the determination of smoke point and other jet fuel specification items. A good relationship between aromatics content and CI was obtained. Kinetics of aromatics hydrogenation were investigated, employing a simple-first order reversible reaction model.

  18. Kinetic study of terahertz generation based on the interaction of two-color ultra-short laser pulses with molecular hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani Gishini, M. S.; Ganjovi, A.; Saeed, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, using a two dimensional particle in cell-Monte Carlo collision simulation scheme, interaction of two-color ultra-short laser pulses with the molecular hydrogen gas (H2) is examined. The operational laser parameters, i.e., its pulse shape, duration, and waist, are changed and, their effects on the density and kinetic energy of generated electrons, THz electric field, intensity, and spectrum are studied. It is seen that the best pulse shape generating the THz signal radiation with the highest intensity is a trapezoidal pulse, and the intensity of generated THz radiation is increased at the higher pulse durations and waists. For all the operational laser parameters, the maximum value of emitted THz signal frequency always remains lower than 5 THz. The intensity of applied laser pulses is taken about 1014 w/cm2, and it is observed that while a small portion of the gaseous media gets ionized, the radiated THz signal is significant.

  19. Kinetic isotope effect of proton-coupled electron transfer in a hydrogen bonded phenol-pyrrolidino[60]fullerene.

    PubMed

    Ravensbergen, Janneke; Brown, Chelsea L; Moore, Gary F; Frese, Raoul N; van Grondelle, Rienk; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Kennis, John T M

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a central role in photosynthesis and potentially in solar-to-fuel systems. We report a spectroscopy study on a phenol-pyrrolidino[60]fullerene. Quenching of the singlet excited state from 1 ns to 250 ps is assigned to PCET. A H/D exchange study reveals a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 3.0, consistent with a concerted PCET mechanism.

  20. Kinetic measurement and prediction of the hydrogen outgassing from the polycrystalline LiH/Li2O/LiOH system

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Grant, D M; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Siekhaus, W J; Balazs, B; Leckey, J H; Kirkpatrick, J; McLean II, W

    2005-04-06

    Due to the exothermic reaction of lithium hydride (LiH) salt with water during transportation and handling, there is always a thin film of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) present on the LiH surface. In dry or vacuum storage, this thin LiOH film slowly decomposes. We have used temperature-programmed reaction/decomposition (TPR) in combination with the isoconversion method of thermal analysis to determine the outgassing kinetics of H{sub 2}O from pure LiOH and H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O from this thin LiOH film. H{sub 2} production via the reaction of LiH with LiOH, forming a lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O) interlayer, is thermodynamically favored, with the rate of further reaction limited by diffusion through the Li{sub 2}O and the stability of the decomposing LiOH. Lithium hydroxide at the LiOH/vacuum interface also decomposes easily to Li{sub 2}O, releasing H{sub 2}O which subsequently reacts with LiH in a closed system to form H{sub 2}. At the onset of dry decomposition, where H{sub 2} is the predominant product, the activation energy for outgassing from a thin LiOH film is lower than that for bulk LiOH. However, as the reactions at the LiH/Li{sub 2}O/LiOH and at the LiOH/vacuum interfaces proceed, the overall activation energy barrier for the outgassing approaches that of bulk LiOH decomposition. The kinetics developed here predicts a hydrogen evolution profile in good agreement with hydrogen release observed during long term isothermal storage.

  1. Elucidating hydrogen oxidation/evolution kinetics in base and acid by enhanced activities at the optimized Pt shell thickness on the Ru core

    SciTech Connect

    Elbert, Katherine; Hu, Jue; Ma, Zhong; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Guangyu; An, Wei; Liu, Ping; Isaacs, Hugh S.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Wang, Jia X.

    2015-10-05

    Hydrogen oxidation and evolution on Pt in acid are facile processes, while in alkaline electrolytes, they are 2 orders of magnitude slower. Thus, developing catalysts that are more active than Pt for these two reactions is important for advancing the performance of anion exchange membrane fuel cells and water electrolyzers. Herein, we detail a 4-fold enhancement of Pt mass activity that we achieved using single-crystalline Ru@Pt core–shell nanoparticles with two-monolayer-thick Pt shells, which doubles the activity on Pt–Ru alloy nanocatalysts. For Pt specific activity, the two- and one-monolayer-thick Pt shells exhibited enhancement factors of 3.1 and 2.3, respectively, compared to the Pt nanocatalysts in base, differing considerably from the values of 1 and 0.4, respectively, in acid. To explain such behavior and the orders of magnitude difference in activity on going from acid to base, we performed kinetic analyses of polarization curves over a wide range of potential from –250 to 250 mV using the dual-pathway kinetic equation. From acid to base, the activation free energies increase the most for the Volmer reaction, resulting in a switch of the rate-determining step from the Tafel to the Volmer reaction, and a shift to a weaker optimal hydrogen binding energy. Furthermore, the much higher activation barrier for the Volmer reaction in base than in acid is ascribed to one or both of the two catalyst-insensitive factors: slower transport of OH than H+ in water and a stronger O–H bond in water molecules (HO–H) than in hydrated protons (H2O–H+).

  2. Elucidating hydrogen oxidation/evolution kinetics in base and acid by enhanced activities at the optimized Pt shell thickness on the Ru core

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Elbert, Katherine; Hu, Jue; Ma, Zhong; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Guangyu; An, Wei; Liu, Ping; Isaacs, Hugh S.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Wang, Jia X.

    2015-10-05

    Hydrogen oxidation and evolution on Pt in acid are facile processes, while in alkaline electrolytes, they are 2 orders of magnitude slower. Thus, developing catalysts that are more active than Pt for these two reactions is important for advancing the performance of anion exchange membrane fuel cells and water electrolyzers. Herein, we detail a 4-fold enhancement of Pt mass activity that we achieved using single-crystalline Ru@Pt core–shell nanoparticles with two-monolayer-thick Pt shells, which doubles the activity on Pt–Ru alloy nanocatalysts. For Pt specific activity, the two- and one-monolayer-thick Pt shells exhibited enhancement factors of 3.1 and 2.3, respectively, compared tomore » the Pt nanocatalysts in base, differing considerably from the values of 1 and 0.4, respectively, in acid. To explain such behavior and the orders of magnitude difference in activity on going from acid to base, we performed kinetic analyses of polarization curves over a wide range of potential from –250 to 250 mV using the dual-pathway kinetic equation. From acid to base, the activation free energies increase the most for the Volmer reaction, resulting in a switch of the rate-determining step from the Tafel to the Volmer reaction, and a shift to a weaker optimal hydrogen binding energy. Furthermore, the much higher activation barrier for the Volmer reaction in base than in acid is ascribed to one or both of the two catalyst-insensitive factors: slower transport of OH– than H+ in water and a stronger O–H bond in water molecules (HO–H) than in hydrated protons (H2O–H+).« less

  3. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 1: Intrinsic crack propagation kinetics in hydrogenous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Deleterious environmental effects on steady-state, intrinsic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates (da/dN) in peak aged Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 are established by electrical potential monitoring of short cracks with programmed constant delta K and K(sub max) loading. The da/dN are equally unaffected by vacuum, purified helium, and oxygen but are accelerated in order of decreasing effectiveness by aqueous 1 percent NaCl with anodic polarization, pure water vapor, moist air, and NaCl with cathodic polarization. While da/dN depends on delta K(sup 4.0) for the inert gases, water vapor and chloride induced multiple power-laws, and a transition growth rate 'plateau'. Environmental effects are strongest at low delta K. Crack tip damage is ascribed to hydrogen embrittlement because of the following: (1) accelerated da/dN due to part-per-million levels of H2O without condensation; (2) impeded molecular flow model predictions of the measured water vapor pressure dependence of da/dN as affected by mean crack opening; (3) the lack of an effect of film-forming O2; (4) the likelihood for crack tip hydrogen production in NaCl, and (5) the environmental and delta K-process zone volume dependencies of the microscopic cracking modes. For NaCl, growth rates decrease with decreasing loading frequency, with the addition of passivating Li2CO3, and upon cathodic polarization. These variables increase crack surface film stability to reduce hydrogen entry efficiency. The hydrogen environmental FCP resistance of 2090 is similar to other 2000 series alloys and is better than 7075.

  4. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. I - Intrinsic crack propagation kinetics in hydrogenous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Deleterious environmental effects on steady-state, intrinsic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates (da/dN) in peak aged Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 are established by electrical potential monitoring of short cracks with programmed constant delta K and K(sub max) loading. The da/dN are equally unaffected by vacuum, purified helium, and oxygen but are accelerated in order of decreasing effectiveness of aqueous 1 percent NaCl with anodic polarization, pure water vapor, moist air, and NaCl with cathodic polarization. While da/dN depends on delta K(sup 4.0) for the inert gases, water vapor and chloride induced multiple power-laws, and a transition growth rate 'plateau'. Environmental effects are strongest at low delta K. Crack tip damage is ascribed to hydrogen embrittlement because of the following: (1) accelerated da/dN due to part-per-million levels of H2O without condensation; (2) impeded molecular flow model predictions of the measured water vapor pressure dependence of da/dN as affected by mean crack opening; (3) the lack of an effect of film-forming O2; (4) the likelihood for crack tip hydrogen production in NaCl; and (5) the environmental and delta K-process zone volume dependencies of the microscopic cracking modes. For NaCl, growth rates decrease with decreasing loading frequency, with the addition of passivating Li2CO3, and upon cathodic polarization. These variables increase crack surface film stability to reduce hydrogen entry efficiency. The hydrogen environmental FCP resistance of 2090 is similar to other 2000 series alloys and is better than 7075.

  5. Preparation of Pt/Al2O3 catalyst in CTAB microemulsion and kinetics of m-chloronitrobenzene hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Cao, Bo; Ma, Rui; Song, Hualin; Song, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Pt/Al2O3 catalyst was prepared successfully by a microemulsion method using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as the surfactant and N2H5OH as the reducing agent. Selective hydrogenation of m-chloronitrobenzene ( m-CNB) was used as a probe to investigate how parameters affect the preparation of catalysts via the microemulsion method. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) show that Pt particles (mean size 3 nm) were distributed uniformly on the catalyst and were in polycrystalline structure. Experiments on m-CNB selective hydrogenation show that at 303 K and hydrogen pressure of 0.1 MPa, the turnover frequency (TOF) was 0.216 s-1, the m-CNB conversion was 99.6% and the m-CAN selectivity was 98.9%, indicating high dechlorination inhibition effect. The reaction was an approximately first-order process with apparent activation energy of 26.92 kJ mol-1.

  6. Kinetic measurements of the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide and ozone towards small atmospherically relevant aldehydes, ketones and organic acids in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, L.; Herrmann, H.

    2014-05-01

    Free radical reactions are an important degradation process for organic compounds within the aqueous atmospheric environment. Nevertheless, non-radical oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and ozone also contribute to the degradation and conversion of these substances (Tilgner and Herrmann, 2010). In this work, kinetic investigations of non-radical reactions were conducted using UV / Vis spectroscopy (dual-beam spectrophotometer and stopped flow technique) and a capillary electrophoresis system applying pseudo-first order kinetics to reactions of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic, pyruvic and glycolic acid as well as methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) with H2O2 and ozone at 298 K. The measurements indicate rather small rate constants at room temperature of k2nd < 3 M-1 s-1 (except for the unsaturated compounds exposed to ozone). Compared to radical reaction rate constants the values are about 10 orders of magnitude smaller (kOH • ~109 M-1 s-1). However, when considering the much larger non-radical oxidant concentrations compared to radical concentrations in urban cloud droplets, calculated first-order conversion rate constants change the picture towards H2O2 reactions becoming more important, especially when compared to the nitrate radical. For some reactions mechanistic suggestions are also given.

  7. Kinetic measurements on the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide and ozone towards small atmospherically relevant aldehydes, ketones and organic acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, L.; Herrmann, H.

    2013-10-01

    Within the aqueous atmospheric environment free radical reactions are an important degradation process for organic compounds. Nevertheless, non-radical oxidants like hydrogen peroxide and ozone also contribute to the degradation and conversion of this substance group (Tilgner und Herrmann, 2010). In this work kinetic investigations of non-radical reactions were conducted using UV/Vis spectroscopy (dual-beam spectrophotometer and Stopped Flow technique) and a capillary electrophoresis system applying pseudo-first order kinetics of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic, pyruvic and glycolic acids as well as methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) towards H2O2 and ozone. The measurements indicate rather small rate constants at room temperature of k2nd < 3 M-1 s-1 (except for the unsaturated compounds exposed to ozone). Compared to radical reaction rate constants the values are about 10 orders of magnitude smaller (kOH· ~ 109 M-1 s-1). However, when considering the much larger non-radical oxidant concentrations compared to radical concentrations in urban cloud droplets, calculated turnovers change the picture to more important H2O2 reactions especially when compared to the nitrate radical. For some reactions also mechanistic suggestions are given.

  8. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Kinetics Demonstrate Long Range Allosteric Effects of Thumb Site 2 Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Deredge, Daniel; Li, Jiawen; Johnson, Kenneth A; Wintrode, Patrick L

    2016-05-01

    New nonnucleoside analogs are being developed as part of a multi-drug regimen to treat hepatitis C viral infections. Particularly promising are inhibitors that bind to the surface of the thumb domain of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B). Numerous crystal structures have been solved showing small molecule non-nucleoside inhibitors bound to the hepatitis C viral polymerase, but these structures alone do not define the mechanism of inhibition. Our prior kinetic analysis showed that nonnucleoside inhibitors binding to thumb site-2 (NNI2) do not block initiation or elongation of RNA synthesis; rather, they block the transition from the initiation to elongation, which is thought to proceed with significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme-RNA complex. Here we have mapped the effect of three NNI2 inhibitors on the conformational dynamics of the enzyme using hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics. All three inhibitors rigidify an extensive allosteric network extending >40 Å from the binding site, thus providing a structural rationale for the observed disruption of the transition from distributive initiation to processive elongation. The two more potent inhibitors also suppress slow cooperative unfolding in the fingers extension-thumb interface and primer grip, which may contribute their stronger inhibition. These results establish that NNI2 inhibitors act through long range allosteric effects, reveal important conformational changes underlying normal polymerase function, and point the way to the design of more effective allosteric inhibitors that exploit this new information. PMID:27006396

  9. Mechanisms of some hydrogen-transfer reactions: temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect and intramolecular C-H insertion: synthesis of (+/-)-pentalenolactone E methyl ester

    SciTech Connect

    Schuchardt, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanisms of three familiar organic hydrogen transfer reactions have been investigated by a study of the temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect. The Oppenauer oxidation of benzhydrol to benzophenone resulted in relatively small isotope effects (k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 2.3 10/sup 0/C), which are consistent with either a linear, unsymmetrical or a nonlinear H-transfer. The temperature dependence of k/sub H//k/sub D/ is in doubt due to an unanticipated isotopic scrambling effect. The Grignard reduction of benzophenone by isobutylmagnesium bromide shows significant temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect. The less-than-maximum isotope effects and activation energy difference suggest an unsymmetrical linear H-transfer mechanism. There is no evidence of tunneling in either the Oppenauer oxidation of the Grignard reduction with the system investigated. The reduction of benzyl bromide by tri-n-butyltin hydride gives temperature-dependent isotope effects and activation parameters consistent with an unsymmetrical linear H-transfer. The results for cyclohexyl bromide were less illuminating. (+/-)-Pentalenolactone E methyl ester was synthesized in 12 steps from 4,4-dimethylcyclohexanone. Disconnection of the target molecule at a unveils substantial molecular symmetry. The key to the analysis is the synthetic step which allows bond formation to an unfunctionalized carbon atom. The key step, rhodium-mediated intramolecular C-H insertion successfully generated the tricyclic skeleton of pentalenolactone via a sterically congested transition state.

  10. Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, M.; Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.

    1996-10-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The key consequences of SERP are: (i) reformation reaction is carried out at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than that in a conventional SMR reactor (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (ii) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 98+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (iii) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The first phase of the program has focused on the development of a sorbent for CO{sub 2} which has (a) reversible CO{sub 2} capacity >0.3 mmol/g at low partial pressures of CO{sub 2} (0.1 - 1.0 atm) in the presence of excess steam (pH{sub 2}O/pCO{sub 2}>20) at 400-500{degrees}C and (b) fast sorption-desorption kinetics for CO{sub 2}, at 400-500{degrees}C. Several families of supported sorbents have been identified that meet the target CO{sub 2} capacity. A few of these sorbents have been tested under repeated sorption/desorption cycles and extended exposure to high pressure steam at 400-500{degrees}C. One sorbent has been scaled up to larger quantities (2-3 kg) and tested in the laboratory process equipment for sorption and desorption kinetics of CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2}, sorption and desorption kinetics are desirably fast. This was a critical path item for the first phase of the program and now has been successfully demonstrated. A reactor has been designed that will allow nearly isothermal operation for SERP-SMR. This reactor was integrated into an overall process flow diagram for the SERP-SMR process.

  11. Atomic Oxygen Desorption from an Amorphous Silicate Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-06-01

    Oxygen is the third most abundant element in space. How oxygen-containing molecules form in space, and whether they form through gas-phase or grain-surface reactions, depends largely on the availability of atomic oxygen in gas-phase versus on surfaces of dust grains. The relative abundance of O in gas-phase versus on grain surfaces is determined by the residence time, or equivalently, desorption energy, of atomic oxygen on grain surfaces. Though important in astrochemical modeling, experimental investigations of atomic oxygen desorption from grain surfaces are lacking in the literature. In most astrochemical models, the O desorption energy value has been taken to be 800 K, which is a guessed value without experimental support. Based on this value, the predicted molecular oxygen abundance in space is at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than what space observations have found. This long running discrepancy of molecular oxygen abundance could be resolved if the O desorption energy is twice as the widely used value (Melnick, G., Tolls, V., et al. 2012, Astrophys. J., 752, 26). We performed TPD (thermal programmed desorption) experiments to study the ozone formation process via O+O2 on an amorphous silicate surface that emulates interstellar conditions. A rate equation model was used to characterize the surface kinetics of both atomic and molecular oxygen. The O desorption energy was extracted from rate equation simulations that best fit the TPD data. The value was found to be 1764±232 K, which agrees with what Melnick et al. proposed. We suggest that the newly found value for the O desorption energy should be used in astrochemical modeling. This work is supported by NSF, Astronomy & Astrophysics Division (Grants No. 0908108 and 1311958), and NASA (Grant No. NNX12AF38G). We thank Dr. J.Brucato of the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri for providing the samples used in these experiments.

  12. Kinetic evidence for the formation of discrete 1,4-dehydrobenzene intermediates. Trapping by inter- and intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer and observation of high-temperature CIDNP

    SciTech Connect

    Lockhart, Thomas P.; Comita, Paul B.; Bergman, Robert G.

    1981-07-01

    Upon heating, alkyl-substituted cis-1,2-diethynyl olefins undergo cyclization to yield reactive 1,4-dehydrobenzenes; the products isolated may be derived from either unimolecular or bimolecular reactions of the intermediate. (Z)-4,5-Diethynyl-4-octene (4) undergoes rearrangement to yield 2,3-di-n-propyl-1,4-dehydrobenzene (17). Solution pyrolysis of 4 in inert aromatic solvents produces three unimolecular products, (Z)-dodeca-4,8-diyn-6-ene (7), benzocyclooctene (9), and o-allyl-n-propylbenzene (10), in high yield. When 1,4-cyclohexadiene is added to the pyrolysis solution as a trapping agent, high yields of the reduced product o-di-n-propylbenzene (12) are obtained. The kinetics of solution pyrolysis of 4 in the presence and absence of trapping agent establish that 2,3-di-n-propyl-1,4-dehydrobenzene is a discrete intermediate on the pathway leading to products. When the reaction was run in the heated probe of an NMR spectrometer, CIDNP was observed in 10. This observation, along with kinetic and chemical trapping evidence, indicates the presence of two additional intermediates, formed from 17 by sequential intramolecular [1,5] hydrogen transfer, on the pathway to products. The observation of CIDNP, coupled with the reactivity exhibited by 17 and the other two intermediates, implicate a biradical description of these molecules. Biradical 17 has been estimated to have a lifetime of about 10-9 s at 200°C and to lie in a well of about 5 kcal/mol with respect to the lowest energy unimolecular pathway ([1,5] hydrogen transfer). Ring opening (expected to be the lowest energy process for 1,4-dehydrobenzenes in which intramolecular hydrogen transfer is unlikely) to the isomeric diethynyl olefin 7 appears to have an activation enthalpy of about 10 kcal/moL Upon thermal reaction in the gas phase (400°C) or in solution in inert solvents (Z)-hexa-2,3-diethyl-1,5-diyn-3-ene (5) rearranges in good yield to the isomeric diethynyl olefin (Z)-deca-3,7-diyn-5-ene (8

  13. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively. PMID:26717711

  14. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively.

  15. Atomic oxygen diffusion on and desorption from amorphous silicate surfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Jiao; Jing, Dapeng; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-02-28

    Surface reactions involving atomic oxygen have attracted much attention in astrophysics and astrochemistry, but two of the most fundamental surface processes, desorption and diffusion, are not well understood. We studied diffusion and desorption of atomic oxygen on or from amorphous silicate surfaces under simulated interstellar conditions using a radio-frequency dissociated oxygen beam. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments were performed to study the formation of ozone from reaction of atomic and molecular oxygen deposited on the surface of a silicate. It is found that atomic oxygen begins to diffuse significantly between 40 K and 50 K. A rate equation model was used to study the surface kinetics involved in ozone formation experiments. The value of atomic oxygen desorption energy has been determined to be 152 ± 20 meV (1764 ± 232 K). The newly found atomic oxygen desorption energy, which is much higher than the well-accepted value, might explain the discrepancy in abundance of molecular oxygen in space between observations and chemical models.

  16. Surface response of tungsten to helium and hydrogen plasma flux as a function of temperature and incident kinetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukumar, Harikrishnan

    Tungsten is a leading candidate material for the diverter in future nuclear fusion reactors. Previous experiments have demonstrated that surface defects and bubbles form in tungsten when ex- posed to helium and hydrogen plasmas, even at modest ion energies. In some regimes, between 1000K and 2000K, and for He energies below 100eV, "fuzz" like features form. The mechanisms leading to these surfaces comprised of nanometer sized tungsten tendrils which include visible helium bubbles are not currently known. The role of helium bubble formation in tendril morphology could very likely be the starting point of these mechanisms. Using Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the role of helium and hydrogen exposure in the initial formation mechanisms of tungsten "fuzz" are investigated. Molecular dynamics simulations are well suited to describe the time and length scales associated with initial formation of helium clusters that eventually grow to nano-meter sized helium bubbles. MD simulations also easily enable the modeling of a variety of surfaces such as single crystals, grain boundaries or "tendrils". While the sputtering yield of tungsten is generally low, previous observations of surface modification due to plasma exposure raise questions about the effects of surface morphology and sub-surface helium bubble populations on the sputtering behavior. Results of computational molecular dynamics are reported that investigate the influence of sub-surface helium bubble distributions on the sputtering yield of tungsten (100) and (110) surfaces induced by helium ion exposure in the range of 300 eV to 1 keV. The calculated sputtering yields are in reasonable agreement with a wide range of experimental data; but do not show any significant variation as a result of the pre-existing helium bubbles. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a number of sub-surface mechanisms leading to nanometer- sized "fuzz" in tungsten exposed to low-energy helium plasmas. We find that during the bubble

  17. Retention of Nickel in Soils: Sorption-Desorption and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Experiments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption and desorption of heavy metals in soils are primary factors that influence their bioavailability and mobility in the soil profile. To examine the characteristics of nickel (Ni) adsorption-desorption in soils, kinetic batch experiments were carried out followed by Ni re...

  18. Fate and transport with material response characterization of green sorption media for copper removal via desorption process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Lin, Kuen-Song; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple adsorption and desorption cycles are required to achieve the reliable operation of copper removal and recovery. A green sorption media mixture composed of recycled tire chunk, expanded clay aggregate, and coconut coir was evaluated in this study for its desorptive characteristics as a companion study of the corresponding adsorption process in an earlier publication. We conducted a screening of potential desorbing agents, batch desorption equilibrium and kinetic studies, and batch tests through 3 adsorption/desorption cycles. The desorbing agent screening revealed that hydrochloric acid has good potential for copper desorption. Equilibrium data fit the Freundlich isotherm, whereas kinetic data had high correlation with the Lagergren pseudo second-order model and revealed a rapid desorption reaction. Batch equilibrium data over 3 adsorption/desorption cycles showed that the coconut coir and media mixture were the most resilient, demonstrating they could be used through 3 or more adsorption/desorption cycles. FE-SEM imaging, XRD, and EDS analyses supported the batch adsorption and desorption results showing significant surface sorption of CuO species in the media mixture and coconut coir, followed by partial desorption using 0.1 M HCl as a desorbing agent. PMID:27081796

  19. Composition-Dependent Reaction Pathways and Hydrogen Storage Properties of LiBH₄/Mg(AlH₄)₂ Composites.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yuepeng; Liu, Yongfeng; Zhang, Xin; Li, Qian; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2015-11-01

    Herein, an initial attempt to understand the relationships between hydrogen storage properties, reaction pathways, and material compositions in LiBH4-x Mg(AlH4)2 composites is demonstrated. The hydrogen storage properties and the reaction pathways for hydrogen release from LiBH4-x Mg(AlH4)2 composites with x=1/6, 1/4, and 1/2 were systematically investigated. All of the composites exhibit a four-step dehydrogenation event upon heating, but the pathways for hydrogen desorption/absorption are varied with decreasing LiBH4/Mg(AlH4)2 molar ratios. Thermodynamic and kinetic investigations reveal that different x values lead to different enthalpy changes for the third and fourth dehydrogenation steps and varied apparent activation energies for the first, second, and third dehydrogenation steps. Thermodynamic and kinetic destabilization caused by the presence of Mg(AlH4)2 is likely to be responsible for the different hydrogen desorption/absorption performances of the LiBH4-x Mg(AlH4)2 composites.

  20. Probing Electron Transfer Dynamics at MgO Surfaces by Mg-Atom Desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Joly, Alan G.; Henyk, Matthias; Beck, Kenneth M.; Trevisanutto, P. E.; Sushko, Petr V.; Hess, Wayne P.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2006-08-14

    Desorption of a weakly bound adsorbate from a porous solid was studied for the case of N2 on amorphous solid water (ASW). Porous ASW films of different thickness were grown on Pt(111) by ballistic deposition. N2 adsorption and desorption kinetics were monitored mass-spectrometrically. Temperature programmed desorption spectra show that with the increasing film thickness, the N2 desorption peak systematically shifts to higher temperatures. The results are explained and quantitatively reproduced by a simple model, which assumes that the N2 transport within the film is faster than the depletion rate to vacuum. The local coverage at the pore mouth determines the desorption rate. For thick ASW films (>1 μm), the assumption of the fast equilibration within the film is shown to be no longer valid due to diffusion limitations. The mechanisms of the adsorbate transport are discussed.

  1. Electrochemical kinetic performances of electroplating Co-Ni on La-Mg-Ni-based hydrogen storage alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Tao, Yang; Ke, Dandan; Ma, Yufei; Han, Shumin

    2015-12-01

    Electroplating Co-Ni treatment was applied to the surface of the La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.48 alloy electrodes in order to improve the electrochemical and kinetic performances. The Scanning electron microscope-Energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results showed that the electrodes were plated with a homogeneous Co-Ni alloy film. The alloy coating significantly improved the high rate dischargeability of the alloy electrode, and the HRD value increased to 57.5% at discharge current density 1875 mA/g after the Co-Ni-coating. The exchange current density I0, the limiting current density IL and the oxidation peak current also increased for the coated alloy. The improvement of overall electrode performances was attributed to an enhancement in electro-catalytic activity and conductivity at the alloy surface, owing to the precipitation of the Co-Ni layer.

  2. THERMOCHEMICAL AND PHOTOCHEMICAL KINETICS IN COOLER HYDROGEN-DOMINATED EXTRASOLAR PLANETS: A METHANE-POOR GJ436b?

    SciTech Connect

    Line, Michael R.; Yung, Yuk L.; Vasisht, Gautam; Chen, Pin; Angerhausen, D. E-mail: gv@s383.jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-09-01

    We introduce a thermochemical kinetics and photochemical model. We use high-temperature bidirectional reaction rates for important H, C, O, and N reactions (most importantly for CH{sub 4} to CO interconversion), allowing us to attain thermochemical equilibrium, deep in an atmosphere, purely kinetically. This allows the chemical modeling of an entire atmosphere, from deep-atmosphere thermochemical equilibrium to the photochemically dominated regime. We use our model to explore the atmospheric chemistry of cooler (T{sub eff} < 10{sup 3} K) extrasolar giant planets. In particular, we choose to model the nearby hot-Neptune GJ436b, the only planet in this temperature regime for which spectroscopic measurements and estimates of chemical abundances now exist. Recent Spitzer measurements with retrieval have shown that methane is driven strongly out of equilibrium and is deeply depleted on the day side of GJ436b, whereas quenched carbon monoxide is abundant. This is surprising because GJ436b is cooler than many of the heavily irradiated hot Jovians and thermally favorable for CH{sub 4}, and thus requires an efficient mechanism for destroying it. We include realistic estimates of ultraviolet flux from the parent dM star GJ436, to bound the direct photolysis and photosensitized depletion of CH{sub 4}. While our models indicate fairly rich disequilibrium conditions are likely in cooler exoplanets over a range of planetary metallicities, we are unable to generate the conditions for substantial CH{sub 4} destruction. One possibility is an anomalous source of abundant H atoms between 0.01 and 1 bars (which attack CH{sub 4}), but we cannot as yet identify an efficient means to produce these hot atoms.

  3. Kinetics study of fermentative hydrogen production from liquid swine manure supplemented with glucose under controlled pH.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Zhu, Jun; Miller, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    Kinetics of H2 production from liquid swine manure supplemented with glucose by mixed anaerobic cultures was investigated using batch experiments under four different pH conditions (4.4, 5.0, 5.6, and uncontrolled). The temperature for the experiments was controlled at 37 ± 1°C and the length of experiments varied between 50 and 120 hours, depending upon the time needed for completion of each individual experiment. The modified Gompertz model was evaluated for its suitability for describing the H2 production potential, H2 production rate, and substrate consumption rate for all the experiments. The results showed that the Gompertz model could adequately fit the experimental results. The effect of pH was significant on all kinetic parameters for H2 production including yield, production rate and lag time, and the substrate utilization rate. The optimal pH was found to be 5.0, at which a maximum H2 production rate (0.64 L H2/h) was obtained, and deviation from the optimal pH could result in substantial reductions in H2 production rate (0.32 L H2/h for pH 4.0 and 0.43 L H2/h for pH 5.6). The results also showed that if pH was not controlled for the batch fermentation process, the substrate utilization efficiency could steeply decrease from 98.8% to 33.7%.

  4. Catalyzed Nano-Framework Stablized High Density Reversible Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xia; Opalka, Susanne M.; Mosher, Daniel A; Laube, Bruce L; Brown, Ronald J; Vanderspurt, Thomas H; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Ronnebro, Ewa; Boyle, Tim; Cordaro, Joseph

    2010-06-30

    A wide range of high capacity on-board rechargeable material candidates have exhibited non-ideal behavior related to irreversible hydrogen discharge / recharge behavior, and kinetic instability or retardation. This project addresses these issues by incorporating solvated and other forms of complex metal hydrides, with an emphasis on borohydrides, into nano-scale frameworks of low density, high surface area skeleton materials to stabilize, catalyze, and control desorption product formation associated with such complex metal hydrides. A variety of framework chemistries and hydride / framework combinations were investigated to make a relatively broad assessment of the method's potential. In this project, the hydride / framework interactions were tuned to decrease desorption temperatures for highly stable compounds or increase desorption temperatures for unstable high capacity compounds, and to influence desorption product formation for improved reversibility. First principle modeling was used to explore heterogeneous catalysis of hydride reversibility by modeling H2 dissociation, hydrogen migration, and rehydrogenation. Atomic modeling also demonstrated enhanced NaTi(BH4)4 stabilization at nano-framework surfaces modified with multi-functional agents. Amine multi-functional agents were found to have more balanced interactions with nano-framework and hydride clusters than other functional groups investigated. Experimentation demonstrated that incorporation of Ca(BH4)2 and Mg(BH4)2 in aerogels enhanced hydride desorption kinetics. Carbon aerogels were identified as the most suitable nano-frameworks for hydride kinetic enhancement and high hydride loading. High loading of NaTi(BH4)4 ligand complex in SiO2 aerogel was achieved and hydride stability was improved with the aerogel. Although improvements of desorption kinetics was observed, the incorporation of Ca

  5. Hydrogen interaction kinetics of Ge dangling bonds at the Si0.25Ge0.75/SiO2 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stesmans, A.; Nguyen Hoang, T.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2014-07-01

    The hydrogen interaction kinetics of the GePb1 defect, previously identified by electron spin resonance (ESR) as an interfacial Ge dangling bond (DB) defect occurring in densities ˜7 × 1012 cm-2 at the SiGe/SiO2 interfaces of condensation grown (100)Si/a-SiO2/Ge0.75Si0.25/a-SiO2 structures, has been studied as function of temperature. This has been carried out, both in the isothermal and isochronal mode, through defect monitoring by capacitance-voltage measurements in conjunction with ESR probing, where it has previously been demonstrated the defects to operate as negative charge traps. The work entails a full interaction cycle study, comprised of analysis of both defect passivation (pictured as GePb1-H formation) in molecular hydrogen (˜1 atm) and reactivation (GePb1-H dissociation) in vacuum. It is found that both processes can be suitably described separately by the generalized simple thermal (GST) model, embodying a first order interaction kinetics description based on the basic chemical reactions GePb1 + H2 → GePb1H + H and GePb1H → GePb1 + H, which are found to be characterized by the average activation energies Ef = 1.44 ± 0.04 eV and Ed = 2.23 ± 0.04 eV, and attendant, assumedly Gaussian, spreads σEf = 0.20 ± 0.02 eV and σEd = 0.15 ± 0.02 eV, respectively. The substantial spreads refer to enhanced interfacial disorder. Combination of the separately inferred kinetic parameters for passivation and dissociation results in the unified realistic GST description that incorporates the simultaneous competing action of passivation and dissociation, and which is found to excellently account for the full cycle data. For process times ta ˜ 35 min, it is found that even for the optimum treatment temperature ˜380 °C, only ˜60% of the GePb1 system can be electrically silenced, still far remote from device grade level. This ineffectiveness is concluded, for the major part, to be a direct consequence of the excessive spreads in the activation energies, ˜2

  6. Hydrogen inhibition in steam gasification of annealed Saran char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Michael Gerard, Jr.

    1998-12-01

    Annealed Saran and coal chars were gasified in mixtures of H2O/H 2/Ar at 1123 K and varying pressures to varying extents of conversion, followed by transient kinetic desorption and TPD to 1773 K, in order to characterize hydrogen adsorbed onto char surfaces during gasification and to identify the mode(s) of hydrogen inhibition at varying extents of char conversion. Adsorbed hydrogen concentration on annealed Saran char was found to be independent of reactant gas composition and pressure, to increase from an initial surface concentration of 3 x 10-5 to 1.5 x 10 -3 0--3 mmolH2(STP)/m2 over the first 1% conversion, and to increase very gradually after this. Gasification rate declines significantly over the initial 1% carbon conversion and is inhibited mainly by dissociative hydrogen adsorption over this range. Linearized Langmiur-Hinshellwood type rate expressions based on the three primary modes of hydrogen inhibition have been developed for all gasification data above 1% char conversion. The expression which indicates reverse oxygen exchange or "associative" hydrogen adsorption fits the data well, while the expression for dissociative hydrogen adsorption does not. Calculation of the equilibrium constant for oxygen exchange (k1/k-1 = 0.029) indicates a low fractional coverage of adsorbed oxygen complexes (C(O)), while the equilibrium constant for "associative" hydrogen adsorption (k3/k-3 = 425 MPa-1) stipulates a high fractional coverage of "associatively" adsorbed hydrogen. Because no "associatively" bound hydrogen was detected and because low concentrations of surface oxides were found during gasification, it is concluded that reverse oxygen exchange is the primary mode of hydrogen inhibition past 1% char conversion for Saran char. Active site propagation along graphitic zig-zag edges is proposed as the main source of surface carbon consumption for steady-state char gasification in steam.

  7. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  8. Direct Observation of the Kinetically Relevant Site of CO Hydrogenation on Supported Ru Catalyst at 700 K by Time-Resolved FT-IR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, Heinz; Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

    2008-06-04

    Time-resolved FT-IR spectra of carbon monoxide hydrogenation over alumina-supported ruthenium particles were recorded on themillisecond time scale at 700 K using pulsed release of CO and a continuous flow of H2/N2 (ratio 0.067 or 0.15, 1 atm total pressure). Adsorbed carbon monoxide was detected along with gas phase products methane (3016 and 1306 cm-1), water (1900 +- 1300 cm-1), and carbon dioxide (2348 cm-1). Aside from adsorbed CO, no other surface species were observed. The rate of formation of methane is 2.5 +- 0.4 s-1 and coincides with the rate of carbon dioxide growth (3.4 +- 0.6 s-1), thus indicating that CH4 and CO2 originate from a common intermediate. The broad band of adsorbed carbon monoxide has a maximum at 2010 cm-1 at early times (36 ms) that shifts gradually to 1960 cm-1 over a period of 3 s as a result of the decreasing surface concentration of CO. Kinetic analysis of the adsorbed carbon monoxide reveals that surface sites absorbing at the high frequency end of the infrared band are temporally linked to gas phase product growth. Specifically, a (linear) CO site at 2026 cm-1 decays with a rate constant of 2.9 +- 0.1 s-1, which coincides with the rise constant of CH4. This demonstrates that the linear CO site at 2026 cm-1 is the kinetically most relevant one for the rate-determining CO dissociation step under reaction conditions at 700 K.

  9. A statistical mechanical theory of proton transport kinetics in hydrogen-bonded networks based on population correlation functions with applications to acids and bases.

    PubMed

    Tuckerman, Mark E; Chandra, Amalendu; Marx, Dominik

    2010-09-28

    Extraction of relaxation times, lifetimes, and rates associated with the transport of topological charge defects in hydrogen-bonded networks from molecular dynamics simulations is a challenge because proton transfer reactions continually change the identity of the defect core. In this paper, we present a statistical mechanical theory that allows these quantities to be computed in an unbiased manner. The theory employs a set of suitably defined indicator or population functions for locating a defect structure and their associated correlation functions. These functions are then used to develop a chemical master equation framework from which the rates and lifetimes can be determined. Furthermore, we develop an integral equation formalism for connecting various types of population correlation functions and derive an iterative solution to the equation, which is given a graphical interpretation. The chemical master equation framework is applied to the problems of both hydronium and hydroxide transport in bulk water. For each case it is shown that the theory establishes direct links between the defect's dominant solvation structures, the kinetics of charge transfer, and the mechanism of structural diffusion. A detailed analysis is presented for aqueous hydroxide, examining both reorientational time scales and relaxation of the rotational anisotropy, which is correlated with recent experimental results for these quantities. Finally, for OH(-)(aq) it is demonstrated that the "dynamical hypercoordination mechanism" is consistent with available experimental data while other mechanistic proposals are shown to fail. As a means of going beyond the linear rate theory valid from short up to intermediate time scales, a fractional kinetic model is introduced in the Appendix in order to describe the nonexponential long-time behavior of time-correlation functions. Within the mathematical framework of fractional calculus the power law decay ∼t(-σ), where σ is a parameter of the

  10. The kinetics and mechanism of methanol synthesis by hydrogenation of CO 2 over a Zn-deposited Cu(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, T.; Nakamura, I.; Uchijima, T.; Nakamura, J.

    1997-07-01

    The hydrogenation of CO 2 over a Zn-deposited Cu(111) surface has been studied using an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) apparatus combined with a high-pressure flow reactor. It was shown that the turnover frequency (TOF) for methanol formation linearly increased with Zn coverage below ϑZn=0.19 and decreased above ϑZn=0.20. The optimum TOF obtained at ϑZn=0.19 was thirteen-fold larger than that of the Zn-free Cu(111) surface. On the other hand, the TOF for CO formation started to decrease at ϑZn=0.10 and approached zero at ϑZn=0.5. No promotional effect of Zn was thus observed for the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction on Cu(111). Post-reaction surface analysis by XPS showed the formation of formate species (HCOO a) on the Cu(111) surfaces. The formate coverage linearly increased with the Zn coverage below ϑZn=0.15, suggesting that the formation of the formate species was stabilized by the Zn species. The relation between ϑHCOO and ϑZn is similar to that between TOF and ϑZn; thus, the formate species is considered to be the reaction intermediates during methanol formation, and the amount of the formate species should determine the rate of the reaction. It was found that the surface chemistry of the Zn-deposited Cu surface drastically changed at ϑZn=0.15. At higher Zn coverages ( ϑZn>0.15), Zn on Cu(111) was readily oxidized to ZnO during the CO 2 hydrogenation reaction. On the other hand, at low Zn coverages below ϑZn=0.15, Zn was partially oxidized in the absence of oxygen in ZnO or O a on the Cu surface under the reaction conditions. It was suggested that the Zn on Cu(111) was directly bound to the oxygen in the surface formate species as the role of the active sites.

  11. Changes in the kinetic behaviour of threonine transport into Trypanosoma brucei elicited by variation in hydrogen ion concentration

    PubMed Central

    Voorheis, H. Paul

    1977-01-01

    1. The dependence of V and V/Km for threonine transport into Trypanosoma brucei upon the external concentration of H+ was studied. 2. Two ionizing groups, the α-amino group of the substrate and a group at the substrate-binding site of the carrier, were found to influence the observed kinetic behaviour of transport. 3. The pK of the group at the substrate-binding site on the free carrier was found to be 6.95 at 30°C and to be temperature-dependent; its heat of ionization was −63.8kJ, which is outside the range for most proton dissociations and suggests a significant contribution from some other source, possibly the remainder of the carrier or the membrane environment. 4. Binding of substrate caused the pK of its α-amino group to shift to a higher value, whereas that of the carrier group shifted to a lower value (6.65 at 30°C). 5. The ionic interaction between substrate and carrier appeared to be involved in the stabilizing of the protonated substrate and the species of the carrier–substrate complex required for the membrane-translocation step. 6. The same ionic species of carrier–substrate complex is required for both substrate dissociation and translocation of the substrate through the membrane. 7. H+ symport or antiport did not occur during threonine uptake. PMID:18141

  12. Structural analysis of kinetic folding intermediates for a TIM barrel protein, indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase, by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry and Gō model simulation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenyu; Rao, Maithreyi K; Forsyth, William R; Finke, John M; Matthews, C Robert

    2007-11-23

    The structures of partially folded states appearing during the folding of a (betaalpha)(8) TIM barrel protein, the indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase from Sulfolobus solfataricus (sIGPS), was assessed by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) and Gō model simulations. HX-MS analysis of the peptic peptides derived from the pulse-labeled product of the sub-millisecond folding reaction from the urea-denatured state revealed strong protection in the (betaalpha)(4) region, modest protection in the neighboring (betaalpha)(1-3) and (betaalpha)(5)beta(6) segments and no significant protection in the remaining N and C-terminal segments. These results demonstrate that this species is not a collapsed form of the unfolded state under native-favoring conditions nor is it the native state formed via fast-track folding. However, the striking contrast of these results with the strong protection observed in the (betaalpha)(2-5)beta(6) region after 5 s of folding demonstrates that these species represent kinetically distinct folding intermediates that are not identical as previously thought. A re-examination of the kinetic folding mechanism by chevron analysis of fluorescence data confirmed distinct roles for these two species: the burst-phase intermediate is predicted to be a misfolded, off-pathway intermediate, while the subsequent 5 s intermediate corresponds to an on-pathway equilibrium intermediate. Comparison with the predictions using a C(alpha) Gō model simulation of the kinetic folding reaction for sIGPS shows good agreement with the core of the structure offering protection against exchange in the on-pathway intermediate(s). Because the native-centric Gō model simulations do not explicitly include sequence-specific information, the simulation results support the hypothesis that the topology of TIM barrel proteins is a primary determinant of the folding free energy surface for the productive folding reaction. The early misfolding reaction must involve aspects of

  13. Changes in the hydrogen exchange kinetics of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamylase produced by effector binding and subunit association.

    PubMed Central

    Lennick, M; Allewell, N M

    1981-01-01

    Large changes in solvent accessibility to aspartate transcarbamylase (aspartate carbamoyltransferase, carbamoylphosphate:L-aspartate carbamoyltransferase, EC 2.1.3.2), as monitored by tritium exchange, result from binding of substrates and substrate analogs to the catalytic subunit (c3), binding of nucleoside triphosphates to the regulatory subunit (r2), and subunit association. Rates of exchange are reduced in each of these cases, although to different degrees. Succinate, in the presence of carbamoyl phosphate, retards exchange from c3 no more than carbamoyl phosphate alone, and less than N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate, a bisubstrate analog. Larger changes in rates of exchange from r2 are produced by CTP than by ATP; however, both CTP and ATP accelerate exchange from c3 to the same extent. The changes in the kinetics of exchange that result from binding of both substrate analogs and nucleoside triphosphates to the native enzyme (c6r6) are much smaller. Carbamoyl phosphate, with or without succinate, retards exchange only slightly, while the bisubstrate analog has a somewhat larger effect. Experiments with reconstituted enzyme, in which only c3 is tritium labeled, indicate that changes in solvent accessibility produced by active site ligands are largely confined to c3. Neither CTP nor ATP alters the overall rate of exchange from c6r6 significantly. The possibility of opposing changes in the two types of subunits was ruled out in experiments in which only one subunit was labeled. The nonadditive effects of ligation and subunit association imply a set of responsive protons common to both processes and suggest that they are linked not only thermodynamically and functionally but also dynamically. PMID:7031660

  14. Changes induced on the surfaces of small Pd clusters by the thermal desorption of CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doering, D. L.; Poppa, H.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The stability and adsorption/desorption properties of supported Pd crystallites less than 5 nm in size were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and repeated flash thermal desorption of CO. The Pd particles were grown epitaxially on heat-treated, UHV-cleaved mica at a substrate temperature of 300 C and a Pd impingement flux of 10 to the 13th atoms/sq cm s. Auger analysis allowed in situ measurement of relative particle dispersion and contamination, while FTD monitored the CO desorption properties. The results show that significant changes in the adsorption properties can be detected. Changes in the Pd Auger signal and the desorption spectrum during the first few thermal cycles are due to particle coalescence and facetting and the rate of this change is dependent on the temperature and duration of the desorption. Significant reductions in the amplitude of the desorptions peak occur during successive CO desorptions which are attributed to increases of surface carbon, induced by the desorption of CO. The contamination process could be reversed by heat treatment in oxygen or hydrogen

  15. Kinetic schemes of chemical transformations and particle morphology upon interaction between Ln2(SO4)3 (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, Sm) and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, P. O.; Sal'nikova, E. I.; Andreev, O. V.; Kovenskii, I. M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase compositions of samples obtained during the treatment of anhydrous sulfates Ln2(SO4)3 (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, Sm) in a stream with an excess of hydrogen in the temperature range of 400 to 1100°C at exposures of up to 420 min are determined. Kinetic schemes are compiled for the chemical transformations and changes of phase composition of the mixtures in coordinates of temperature and time that have six fields of the phase combinations: Ln2(SO4)3, Ln2(SO4)3 + Ln2O2SO4, Ln2O2SO4, Ln2O2SO4 + Ln2O2S, Ln2O2S, and Ln2O2S + Ln2O3. Single-phase samples of Ln2O2SO4 compounds are obtained at temperatures (°C) of 540-560 (La), 460-520 (Pr), 470-520 (Nd), and 480-520 (Sm). The temperatures (°C) of Ln2O2S compounds are 580-920 (La), 600-900 (Pr), 600-900 (Nd), and 600-800 (Sm). It is shown via electron microscopy that particles of La2(SO4)3 in the shape of cylinders are converted into flakes of Ln2O2SO4, predominantly flat Ln2O2S crystallites.

  16. Human Salivary Aldehyde Dehydrogenase: Purification, Kinetic Characterization and Effect of Ethanol, Hydrogen Peroxide and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate on the Activity of the Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Fazle; Laskar, Amaj Ahmed; Choudhary, Hadi Hasan; Younus, Hina

    2016-09-01

    Human salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase (hsALDH) enzyme appears to be the first line of defense in the body against exogenous toxic aldehydes. However till date much work has not been done on this important member of the ALDH family. In this study, we have purified hsALDH to homogeneity by diethylaminoethyl-cellulose (DEAE-cellulose) ion-exchange chromatography in a single step. The molecular mass of the homodimeric enzyme was determined to be approximately 108 kDa. Four aromatic substrates; benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, 2-naphthaldehyde and 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde were used for determining the activity of pure hsALDH. K m values for these substrates were calculated to be 147.7, 5.31, 0.71 and 3.31 μM, respectively. The best substrates were found to be cinnamaldehyde and 2-naphthaldehyde since they exhibited high V max /K m values. 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde substrate was used for further kinetic characterization of pure hsALDH. The pH and temperature optima of hsALDH were measured to be pH 8 and 45 °C, respectively. The pure enzyme is highly unstable at high temperatures. Ethanol, hydrogen peroxide and SDS activate hsALDH, therefore it is safe and beneficial to include them in mouthwashes and toothpastes in low concentrations. PMID:27324040

  17. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Hydrogenation of CpCr(CO)3•/[CpCr(CO)3]2 Equilibrium to CpCr(CO)3H

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, Jack R.; Spataru, Tudor; Camaioni, Donald M.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Li, Gang; Choi, Jongwook; Franz, James A.

    2014-05-26

    The kinetics of the hydrogenation of 2 CpCr(CO)3•/[CpCr(CO)3]2 to CpCr(CO)3H has been investigated. The reaction is second-order in Cr and first-order in H2, with a rate constant of 45 M 2s 1 at 25 °C in benzene. DFT calculations rule out an H2 complex as an intermediate, and suggest (a) end-on approach of H2 to one Cr of [CpCr(CO)3]2 as the Cr-Cr bond undergoes heterolytic cleavage, (b) heterolytic cleavage of the coordinated H2 between O and Cr, and (c) isomerization of the resulting O-protonated CpCr(CO)2(COH) to CpCr(CO)3H. The work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences; Battelle operates PNNL for DOE.

  18. Thermal Programmed Desorption of C32 H 66

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisternas, M.; Del Campo, V.; Cabrera, A. L.; Volkmann, U. G.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.

    2011-03-01

    Alkanes are of interest as prototypes for more complex molecules and membranes. In this work we study the desorption kinetics of dotriacontane C32 adsorbed on Si O2 /Si substrate. We combine in our instrument High Resolution Ellipsometry (HRE) and Thermal Programmed Desorption (TPD). C32 monolayers were deposited in high vacuum from a Knudsen cell on the substrate, monitorizing sample thickness in situ with HRE. Film thickness was in the range of up to 100 AA, forming a parallel bilayer and perpendicular C32 layer. The Mass Spectrometer (RGA) of the TPD section was detecting the shift of the desorption peaks at different heating rates applied to the sample. The mass registered with the RGA was AMU 57 for parallel and perpendicular layers, due to the abundance of this mass value in the disintegration process of C32 in the mass spectrometers ionizer. Moreover, the AMU 57 signal does not interfere with other signals coming from residual gases in the vacuum chamber. The desorption energies obtained were ΔEdes = 11,9 kJ/mol for the perpendicular bilayer and ΔEdes = 23 ,5 kJ/mol for the parallel bilayer.

  19. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: THERMAL DESORPTION TREATMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is an EX SITU means to physically separate volatile and some semivolatile contaminants from soil, sediments, sludge, and filter cakes by heating them at temperatures high enough to volatilize the organic contaminants. For wastes containing up to 10 percent orga...

  20. Low Temperature Milling of the LiNH2 + LiH Hydrogen Storage System

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.; Hu, Jian Z.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2009-05-01

    Ball milling of the LiNH2 + LiH storage system was performed at 20°C, -40°C, and -196°C, and the resulting powders were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), specific surface area (SSA) analysis, and kinetics cycling measurements. Ball milling at -40°C showed no appreciable deviations from the 20°C sample, but the -196°C powder exhibited a significant increase in the hydrogen desorption kinetics. NMR analysis indicates that a possible explanation for the kinetics increase is the retention of internal defects generated during the milling process that are annealed at the collision site at higher milling temperatures.

  1. Exploring several different routes to produce Mg- based nanomaterials for Hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, D. R.; Chanchetti, L. F.; Floriano, R.; Ishikawa, T. T.; Botta, W. J.

    2014-08-01

    Severe mechanical processing routes based on high-energy ball milling (HEBM) or severe plastic deformation (SPD) can be used to produce Mg nanomaterials for hydrogen storage applications. In the last few years, we have been exploring in our research group different SPD processing routes in Mg systems to achieve good activation (first hydrogenation) and fast H-absorption/desorption kinetics, combined with enhanced air resistance. In this paper, we compare SPD techniques applied to Mg with HEBM applied to MgH2. Both advanced - melt spinning (MS), high-pressure torsion (HPT) - and more conventional - cold rolling (CR), cold forging (CF)- techniques are evaluated as means of production of bulk samples with very refined microstructures and controlled textures. In the best SPD processing conditions, attractive H-absorption/desorption kinetic properties are obtained, which are comparable to the ones of MgH2 milled powders, even if the needed temperatures are higher - 350°C compared to 300°C.CR and CF stand out as the processes with higher potential for industrial application, considering the level of the attained hydrogen storage properties, its simplicity and low cost.

  2. Laser desorption studies of high mass biomolecules in Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Solouki, T; Russell, D H

    1992-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization is used to obtain Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra of model peptides (e.g., gramicidin S, angiotensin I, renin substrate, melittin, and bovine insulin). Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization yields ions having appreciable kinetic energies. Two methods for trapping the high kinetic energy ions are described: (i) the ion signal for [M+H]+ ions is shown to increase with increasing trapping voltages, and (ii) collisional relaxation is used for the detection of [M+H]+ ions of bovine insulin. Images PMID:1378614

  3. Adsorption, Desorption, and Clustering H20 on Pt (111)

    SciTech Connect

    Daschbach, John L.; Peden, Brandon M.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2004-01-15

    The adsorption, desorption, and clustering behavior of H20 on Pt(111) has been investigated by specular He scattering. The data show that water adsorbed on a clean Pt(111) surface undergoes a transition from a random to a clustered structure near 60 K. The initial helium scattering cross sections as a function of temperature are found to be insensitive to H20 flux over a range of 0.005 ML/s to 0.55 ML/s indicating the clustering process is more complex than simple surface diffusion. The coarsening process of an initially random distribution of water deposited at 25 K is found to occur over a broad temperature range, 60 K< T <140 K, during thermal annealing. The desorption kinetics for submonolayer water are determined to be zero-order for surface coverages greater than 0.05 ML and temperatures between 150 K and 174 K. The zero-order desorption kinetics are consistent with a two-dimensional two-phase coexistence between H2O condensed phase and a 2-gas phase on the Pt surface

  4. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  5. Influence of cobalt and manganese content on the dehydrogenation capacity and kinetics of air-exposed LaNi 5+ x-type alloys in solid gas and electrochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raekelboom, E.; Cuevas, F.; Knosp, B.; Percheron-Guégan, A.

    The effect of cobalt and manganese content on the dehydrogenation properties of air-exposed MmB 5+ x-type (Mm = mischmetal; B = Ni, Al, Co and Mn) alloys was investigated both in solid gas and electrochemical reactions. The cobalt and manganese content were varied separately while keeping constant the plateau pressure of the hydrides. The increase of the cobalt content leads to a decrease of the hydrogen capacity whereas the manganese content has no much effect. In solid gas reactions, the kinetics were found to be limited by the hydrogen diffusion through the surface oxidation layer. As for the electrochemistry, the kinetics are limited by a corrosion layer formed in alkaline medium. The desorption rates for both processes increase as the cobalt or manganese content decreases. This is thought to be due to an enhancement of the hydrogen diffusivity through the oxidation layer. As a result, a low cobalt or manganese content in MmB 5+ x alloys is found to be beneficial for the hydrogen desorption kinetics in both processes.

  6. Thermal desorption of helium from homogeneously implanted graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, P.; Schroeder, H.

    1991-11-01

    Super-fine grain graphite (FGG) and pyrolytic carbon (PYC) of thicknesses around 200 μm were homogeneously implanted at room temperature with α-particles (0.5 MeV ≤ Eα ≤ 22 MeV). Thermal helium desorption spectrometry in the temperature range from 400 to 1900 K can be described by diffusion kinetics with an activation energy of 1.1 eV in FGG and about 0.75 eV in PYC. Desorption during temperature ramping at a constant rate of 0.83 K/s also shows significant differences of the two graphite species. It is found that in FGG and especially in PYC a considerable fraction of the implanted helium is retained even beyond 1000 K. This is in contrast to results reported after low energy implantations to high doses for various graphite species.

  7. The quantum nature of C-H···metal interaction: vibrational spectra and kinetic and geometric isotope effects of adsorbed cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Koitaya, Takanori; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2014-10-01

    The nature of C-H···M (M = metal surface) interactions is reviewed based mainly on our recent investigations of cyclohexane on Rh(111). Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy measurements at low temperature (∼20 K) have shown that the softened CH stretching band consists of several sharp peaks. At temperatures above 80 K, each peak is broadened, most probably by anharmonic coupling with thermally excited low-energy frustrated translational modes. The origin of fine structure in this band and its similarity to that in hydrogen bond systems are discussed. In addition, novel isotope effects were observed in desorption kinetics and adsorption geometry of cyclohexane on Rh(111) using temperature programmed desorption, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and spot profile analysis low-energy electron diffraction. The desorption energy of deuterated cyclohexane (C6 D12 ) is lower than that of C6 H12 (inverse kinetic isotope effect). In addition, the work function change by adsorbed C6 D12 is smaller than that by adsorbed C6 H12 . These results indicate that C6 D12 molecules are slightly more distant from the surface than C6 H12 molecules (vertical geometric isotope effect). A lateral geometric isotope effect was also observed for the two-dimensional cyclohexane superstructures as a result of the repulsive interaction between interfacial dipoles (= work function change). These isotope effects are ascribed to the quantum nature of hydrogen involved in the C-H···M interaction.

  8. OTEC gas-desorption studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.; Golshani, A.

    1981-01-01

    OTEC gas desorption studies were initiated with the goal of mitigating these effects and were carried out in four areas: (1) vacuum deaeration in a packed column, (2) deaeration in a barometric water intake system, (3) noncondensibles disposal through hydraulic air compression, and (4) OTEC deaeration subsystems' analysis. Laboratory experiments to date have completed the vacuum deaeration test of three different kinds of packings, barometric intake deaeration experiments, and a series of hydraulic air compression tests. Preliminary analyses based on the experimental data have shown that, as compared to the previous baseline study, reduction both in deaerator cost and pumping power can be realized with a combination of barometric intake and packed column deaeration. The design and operation of the gas desorption test loop, experimental and computer simulation results obtained, and an analysis of OTEC deaeration subsystem design based on the test results and their implication on OTEC open-cycle power systems are presented.

  9. The effects of temperature and pH on the kinetics of reactions between catalase and its suicide substrate hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ghadermarzi, M; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A

    1997-12-01

    Variation of initial (intact) activity (ai), inactivation rate constant (ki) and the partition ratio (r) of bovine liver catalase in the reaction with its suicide substrate, hydrogen peroxide, were determined in workable ranges of temperature (17-42 degrees C) or pH (5-10.5), using the data of progress curves. The changes of temperature had a slight effect on ai, giving a Q10 of 1.15 for the enzymatic breakdown of H2O2, corresponding to an improved value for its activation energy of 8.8 +/- l kJ.mol-1. In contrast, the ki was greatly increased by elevation of temperature, giving a Q10 of 2.1 for the suicide inactivation reaction of catalase. Consequently, a significant decrease of r was observed by increasing of temperature. In pH studies, decreasing of pH from 7.0 to 5.0 led to reduction of ai whereas the ki value was not effected significantly, possibly due to the parallel changes in affinities to free catalase and compound I for H2O2. Reduction of ki and alpha i were observed at pH > 9.5, where reversible dissociation of tetrameric enzyme into catalytically inactive subunits is possible. The r had a maximum value at pH around 7.5, similar to that of catalase activity. The effect of ionic strength on the above kinetic parameters was studied. There was not an observable influence when the ammonium sulfate concentration was below l M. PMID:9541866

  10. Role of hydrogen abstraction acetylene addition mechanisms in the formation of chlorinated naphthalenes. 2. Kinetic modeling and the detailed mechanism of ring closure.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Grant J; Russell, Douglas K

    2014-12-26

    The dominant formation mechanisms of chlorinated phenylacetylenes, naphthalenes, and phenylvinylacetylenes in relatively low pressure and temperature (∼40 Torr and 1000 K) pyrolysis systems are explored. Mechanism elucidation is achieved through a combination of theoretical and experimental techniques, the former employing a novel simplification of kinetic modeling which utilizes rate constants in a probabilistic framework. Contemporary formation schemes of the compounds of interest generally require successive additions of acetylene to phenyl radicals. As such, infrared laser powered homogeneous pyrolyses of dichloro- or trichloroethylene were perturbed with 1,2,4- or 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene. The resulting changes in product identities were compared with the major products expected from conventional pathways, aided by the results of our previous computational work. This analysis suggests that a Bittner-Howard growth mechanism, with a novel amendment to the conventional scheme made just prior to ring closure, describes the major products well. Expected products from a number of other potentially operative channels are shown to be incongruent with experiment, further supporting the role of Bittner-Howard channels as the unique pathway to naphthalene growth. A simple quantitative analysis which performs very well is achieved by considering the reaction scheme as a probability tree, with relative rate constants being cast as branching probabilities. This analysis describes all chlorinated phenylacetylene, naphthalene, and phenylvinylacetylene congeners. The scheme is then tested in a more general system, i.e., not enforcing a hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism, by pyrolyzing mixtures of di- and trichloroethylene without the addition of an aromatic precursor. The model indicates that these mechanisms are still likely to be operative.

  11. Hydrogen interaction kinetics of Ge dangling bonds at the Si{sub 0.25}Ge{sub 0.75}/SiO{sub 2} interface

    SciTech Connect

    Stesmans, A. Nguyen Hoang, T.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2014-07-28

    The hydrogen interaction kinetics of the GeP{sub b1} defect, previously identified by electron spin resonance (ESR) as an interfacial Ge dangling bond (DB) defect occurring in densities ∼7 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} at the SiGe/SiO{sub 2} interfaces of condensation grown (100)Si/a-SiO{sub 2}/Ge{sub 0.75}Si{sub 0.25}/a-SiO{sub 2} structures, has been studied as function of temperature. This has been carried out, both in the isothermal and isochronal mode, through defect monitoring by capacitance-voltage measurements in conjunction with ESR probing, where it has previously been demonstrated the defects to operate as negative charge traps. The work entails a full interaction cycle study, comprised of analysis of both defect passivation (pictured as GeP{sub b1}-H formation) in molecular hydrogen (∼1 atm) and reactivation (GeP{sub b1}-H dissociation) in vacuum. It is found that both processes can be suitably described separately by the generalized simple thermal (GST) model, embodying a first order interaction kinetics description based on the basic chemical reactions GeP{sub b1} + H{sub 2} → GeP{sub b1}H + H and GeP{sub b1}H → GeP{sub b1} + H, which are found to be characterized by the average activation energies E{sub f} = 1.44 ± 0.04 eV and E{sub d} = 2.23 ± 0.04 eV, and attendant, assumedly Gaussian, spreads σE{sub f} = 0.20 ± 0.02 eV and σE{sub d} = 0.15 ± 0.02 eV, respectively. The substantial spreads refer to enhanced interfacial disorder. Combination of the separately inferred kinetic parameters for passivation and dissociation results in the unified realistic GST description that incorporates the simultaneous competing action of passivation and dissociation, and which is found to excellently account for the full cycle data. For process times t{sub a} ∼ 35 min, it is found that even for the optimum treatment temperature ∼380 °C, only ∼60% of the GeP{sub b1} system

  12. Hydrodefluorination and hydrogenation of fluorobenzene under mild aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Rebekka; McNeill, Kristopher

    2012-09-18

    Fluorinated organic compounds are increasingly used in many applications, and their release to the environment is expected. It is therefore important to find suitable methods for degradation of fluorinated compounds under environmentally relevant conditions. In this study, a simple heterogeneous rhodium-based catalytic system (Rh/Al(2)O(3) and H(2)) for hydrodefluorination and hydrogenation of fluorobenzene under mild aqueous conditions (1 atm of H(2), ambient temperature) was developed and the underlying reaction mechanism was investigated. Fluorobenzene degraded rapidly (t(1/2) ≈ 0.2 h) to form cyclohexane and fluoride (F(-)) as the stable end products, with benzene and cyclohexene observed as intermediates. Cyclohexadiene intermediates were not observed but were expected to form during the hydrogenation of benzene. Three postulated but unobserved fluorinated intermediates were subjected to the catalytic reaction conditions, and it was concluded that they most likely do not form during the fluorobenzene degradation reaction. Isotope labeling experiments showed that the unsaturated intermediates undergo rapid and reversible hydrogenation/dehydrogenation under the reaction conditions and also that fully saturated compounds are unreactive in the catalytic system. Both molecular hydrogen and water were sources of hydrogen in the final cyclohexane product. Kinetic fitting indicated that sorption/desorption of fluorobenzene onto the catalyst surface plays an important role in the mechanism. PMID:22871102

  13. Desorption of pyrethroids from suspended solids.

    PubMed

    Fojut, Tessa L; Young, Thomas M

    2011-08-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been widely detected in sediments at concentrations that can cause toxicity to aquatic organisms. Desorption rates play an important role in determining the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds, such as pyrethroids, because these compounds are more likely to be sorbed to solids in the environment, and times to reach sorptive equilibrium can be long. In the present study, sequential Tenax desorption experiments were performed with three sorbents, three aging times, and four pyrethroids. A biphasic rate model was fit to the desorption data with r(2)  > 0.99, and the rapid and slow compartment desorption rate constants and compartment fractions are reported. Suspended solids from irrigation runoff water collected from a field that had been sprayed with permethrin 1 d before were used in the experiments to compare desorption rates for field-applied pyrethroids with those for laboratory-spiked materials. Suspended solids were used in desorption experiments because suspended solids can be a key source of hydrophobic compounds in surface waters. The rapid desorption rate parameters of field-applied permethrin were not statistically different from those of laboratory spiked permethrin, indicating that desorption of the spiked pyrethroids is comparable to desorption of the pyrethroids added and aged in the field. Sorbent characteristics had the greatest effect on desorption rate parameters; as organic carbon content of the solids increased, the rapid desorption fractions and rapid desorption rate constants both decreased. The desorption rate constant of the slow compartment for sediment containing permethrin aged for 28 d was significantly different compared to aging for 1 d and 7 d, whereas desorption in the rapid and slow compartments did not differ between these treatments.

  14. Hydrogen storage in platinum decorated hydrogen exfoliated graphene sheets by spillover mechanism.

    PubMed

    P, Divya; Ramaprabhu, S

    2014-12-28

    Development of lightweight materials with high hydrogen storage capacities is a great challenge for the hydrogen economy. Here, we report high pressure hydrogen adsorption-desorption studies of platinum-decorated hydrogen-exfoliated graphene sheets (Pt-HEG). Pt-HEG shows a maximum hydrogen uptake capacity of 1.4 wt% at 25 °C and 3 MPa. Analysis of the isosteric heat of adsorption provides evidence of spillover mechanism.

  15. HGMS: Glasses and Nanocomposites for Hydrogen Storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinska, Kris; Hemmers, Oliver

    2013-02-17

    directly address any hydrogen storage technical barriers or targets in terms of numbers. Specifically, hydrogen sorption and desorption tests or kinetics measurements were not part of the project scope. However, the insights gained from these studies could help to answer fundamental questions necessary for considering glass-based materials as hydrogen storage media and could be applied indirectly towards the DOE hydrogen storage technical targets such as system weight and volume, system cost and energy density. Such questions are: Can specific macro-crystals, proven to attract hydrogen when in a macroscopic form (bulk), be nucleated in glass matrices as nanocrystals to create two-phased materials? What are suitable compositions that enable to synthetize glass-based, two-phase materials with nanocrystals that can attract hydrogen via surface or bulk interactions? What are the limits of controlling the microstructure of these materials, especially limits for nanocrystals density and size? Finally, from a technological point of view, the fabrication of glass-derived nanocomposites that we explore is a very simple, fast and inexpensive process that does not require costly or specialized equipment which is an important factor for practical applications.

  16. Angular distributions of surface produced H{sup −} ions for reflection and desorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M. Kasuya, T.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2014-02-15

    A numerical simulation code, Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target, has been run to clarify the effects due to the incident angle of hydrogen flux onto surface collision cascade in the subsurface region of a Cs covered Mo plasma grid. The code has taken into account the threshold energy for negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ions to leave the surface. This modification has caused the shift of energy distribution functions of H{sup −} from that of hydrogen atoms leaving the surface. The results have shown that large incident angle of hydrogen particle tilt the angular distribution of reflection component, while it caused a small effect onto the angular distribution of desorption component. The reflection coefficient has increased, while the desorption yield has decreased for increased angle of incidence measured from the surface normal.

  17. Angular distributions of surface produced H(-) ions for reflection and desorption processes.

    PubMed

    Wada, M; Kasuya, T; Kenmotsu, T; Sasao, M

    2014-02-01

    A numerical simulation code, Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target, has been run to clarify the effects due to the incident angle of hydrogen flux onto surface collision cascade in the subsurface region of a Cs covered Mo plasma grid. The code has taken into account the threshold energy for negative hydrogen (H(-)) ions to leave the surface. This modification has caused the shift of energy distribution functions of H(-) from that of hydrogen atoms leaving the surface. The results have shown that large incident angle of hydrogen particle tilt the angular distribution of reflection component, while it caused a small effect onto the angular distribution of desorption component. The reflection coefficient has increased, while the desorption yield has decreased for increased angle of incidence measured from the surface normal.

  18. Electronic Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials with Photon-in/Photon-out Soft-X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jinghua

    2008-09-22

    The applications of resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy on a variety of carbon systems have yielded characteristic fingerprints. With high-resolution monochromatized synchrotron radiation excitation, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering has emerged as a new source of information about electronic structure and excitation dynamics. Photon-in/photon-out soft-X-ray spectroscopy is used to study the electronic properties of fundamental materials, nanostructure, and complex hydrides and will offer potential in-depth understanding of chemisorption and/or physisorption mechanisms of hydrogen adsorption/desorption capacity and kinetics.

  19. The role of surface Pt on the coadsorption of hydrogen and CO on Pt monolayer film modified Ru(0001) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemant, T.; Hartmann, H.; Bansmann, J.; Behm, R. J.

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated the impact and role of the Pt surface modification on the coadsorption of hydrogen and CO on structurally well defined bimetallic Pt monolayer island/film modified Ru(0001) surfaces with Pt contents up to a complete Pt layer, employing temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Kinetic limitations in the surface diffusion are shown to play an important role for adsorption at 90 K, and lead to profound effects of the dosing sequence on the adsorption and desorption characteristics. Furthermore, they are responsible for spill-over effects during the TPD measurements, where COad becomes mobile and can spill-over from weakly bonding Pt monolayer areas to strongly bonding Pt-free Ru(0001) areas, which displaces Dad from these surface areas. The present findings are discussed in comparison with previous results on related metallic and bimetallic adsorption and coadsorption systems.

  20. Kinetics of NiO and NiCl2 Hydrogen Reduction as Precursors and Properties of Produced Ni/Al2O3 and Ni-Pd/Al2O3 Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sokić, Miroslav; Kamberović, Željko; Nikolić, Vesna; Marković, Branislav; Korać, Marija; Anđić, Zoran; Gavrilovski, Milorad

    2015-01-01

    The objects of this investigation were the comparative kinetic analysis of the NiO and NiCl2 reduction by hydrogen during an induction period and elimination of the calcination during the synthesis of Ni/Al2O3 catalysts. The effect of temperature and time on NiO and NiCl2 reduction degrees was studied. Avrami I equation was selected as the most favorable kinetic model and used to determine activation energy of the NiO and NiCl2 reduction for the investigated temperature range (623–923 K) and time intervals (1–5 minutes). The investigation enabled reaching conclusions about the reaction ability and rate of the reduction processes. Afterward, Ni/Al2O3 catalysts were obtained by using oxide and chloride precursor for Ni. The catalysts were supported on alumina-based foam and prepared via aerosol route. Properties of the samples before and after low-temperature hydrogen reduction (633 K) were compared. Obtained results indicated that the synthesis of Ni/Al2O3 catalysts can be more efficient if chloride precursor for Ni is directly reduced by hydrogen during the synthesis process, without the calcination step. In addition, Ni-Pd/Al2O3 catalysts with different metal content were prepared by using chloride precursors. Lower reduction temperature was utilized and the chlorides were almost completely reduced at 533 K. PMID:25789335

  1. Compositional effects on the hydrogen storage properties of Mg(NH2)2-2LiH-xKH and the activity of KH during dehydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Liu, Yongfeng; Pang, Yuepeng; Gu, Yingjie; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2014-02-14

    Potassium hydride (KH) was directly added to a Mg(NH2)2-2LiH system to improve the hydrogen storage properties; the corresponding mechanisms were elucidated. The Mg(NH2)2-2LiH-0.08KH composite displays optimized hydrogen-storage properties, reversibly storing approximately 5.2 wt% hydrogen through a two-stage reaction and a dehydrogenation onset at 70 °C. The 0.08KH-added sample fully dehydrogenated at 130 °C begins to absorb hydrogen at 50 °C, and takes up approximately 5.1 wt% of hydrogen at 140 °C. Adding KH significantly enhances the de-/hydrogenation kinetic properties; however, an overly rapid hydrogenation rate enlarges the particle size and raises the dehydrogenation temperature. A cycling evaluation reveals that the KH-added Mg(NH2)2-2LiH system possesses good reversible hydrogen storage abilities, although the operational temperatures for de-/hydrogenation increase during cycling. Detailed mechanistic investigations indicate that adding KH catalytically decreases the activation energy of the first dehydrogenation step and reduces the enthalpy of desorption during the second dehydrogenation step as a reactant, significantly improving the hydrogen storage properties of Mg(NH2)2-2LiH. PMID:24131957

  2. Compositional effects on the hydrogen storage properties of Mg(NH2)2-2LiH-xKH and the activity of KH during dehydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Liu, Yongfeng; Pang, Yuepeng; Gu, Yingjie; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2014-02-14

    Potassium hydride (KH) was directly added to a Mg(NH2)2-2LiH system to improve the hydrogen storage properties; the corresponding mechanisms were elucidated. The Mg(NH2)2-2LiH-0.08KH composite displays optimized hydrogen-storage properties, reversibly storing approximately 5.2 wt% hydrogen through a two-stage reaction and a dehydrogenation onset at 70 °C. The 0.08KH-added sample fully dehydrogenated at 130 °C begins to absorb hydrogen at 50 °C, and takes up approximately 5.1 wt% of hydrogen at 140 °C. Adding KH significantly enhances the de-/hydrogenation kinetic properties; however, an overly rapid hydrogenation rate enlarges the particle size and raises the dehydrogenation temperature. A cycling evaluation reveals that the KH-added Mg(NH2)2-2LiH system possesses good reversible hydrogen storage abilities, although the operational temperatures for de-/hydrogenation increase during cycling. Detailed mechanistic investigations indicate that adding KH catalytically decreases the activation energy of the first dehydrogenation step and reduces the enthalpy of desorption during the second dehydrogenation step as a reactant, significantly improving the hydrogen storage properties of Mg(NH2)2-2LiH.

  3. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  4. Adsorption-desorption behavior of thiram onto humic acid.

    PubMed

    Filipe, O M S; Vidal, M M; Duarte, A C; Santos, E B H

    2009-06-10

    The adsorption/desorption behavior of pure thiram (Thi-P) and formulated thiram (Thi-F) onto commercial humic acids (HA) was studied using a batch equilibration procedure. Results of adsorption kinetic experiments showed that thiram adsorption is a fast process since 85% of the equilibrium concentration is reached within two hours. Experimental K(D) values between 0.110 to 0.210 L g(-1) were obtained for the adsorption of both Thi-P and Thi-F onto HA, suggesting that thiram is strongly sorbed by humic acids. In general, for both Thi-P and Thi-F, the lower the initial thiram concentration, the stronger is its adsorption (higher K(D) and percentage adsorption values). The adsorption isotherms were found to match the BET model. The results show that thiram adsorption onto condensed humic acids cannot be explained only in terms of specific interactions, such as those identified in studies of adsorption of thiram with humic acids in solution. The comparison of sorption and desorption results allowed the observation of hysteresis phenomena. Desorption K(D) values were consistently higher than those for adsorption at the same equilibrium concentration. Hysteresis was lower for the formulated thiram suggesting that adsorption is more reversible in the presence of the formulation components turning the pesticide more susceptible to be leached.

  5. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.; Powell, Brian A.

    2015-01-28

    Strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time implicates near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption–desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Moreover, following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethitemore » was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.« less

  6. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.; Powell, Brian A.

    2015-01-28

    Strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time implicates near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption–desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Moreover, following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethite was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.

  7. An experimental and modeling study of grain-scale uranium desorption from field-contaminated sediments and the potential influence of microporosity on mass-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoliker, D.; Liu, C.; Kent, D. B.; Zachara, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The aquifer below the 300-Area of the Hanford site (Richland, WA, USA) is plagued by a persistent plume of dissolved uranium (U(VI)) in excess of the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water maximum contamination level even after the removal of highly contaminated sediments. The aquifer sediments in the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone act as both a source and sink for uranium during stage changes in the nearby Columbia River. Diffusion limitation of uranium mass-transfer within these sediments has been cited as a potential cause of the plume's persistence. Equilibrium U(VI) sorption is a strong function of variable chemical conditions, especially carbonate, hydrogen, and uranyl ion activities. Field-contaminated sediments from the site require up to 1,000 hours to reach equilibrium in static batch reactors. Increases in U(VI) concentrations over longer time-scales result from changes in chemical conditions, which drive reactions with sediments that favor U(VI) desorption. Grain-scale U(VI) sorption/desorption rates are slow, likely owing to diffusion of U(VI) and other solutes through intra-granular pore domains. In order to improve understanding of the impact of intra-granular diffusion and chemical reactions controlling grain-scale U(VI) release, experiments were conducted on individual particle size fractions of a <8 mm composite of field-contaminated, lower vadose zone sediments. For each size fraction, equilibrium U(VI) sorption/desorption in static batch reactors was well-described by surface complexation models over a range of chemical conditions applicable to the field site. Desorption rates from individual size fractions in flow-through batch reactors, examined under a single set of constant chemical conditions with multiple stop-flow events, were similar for all size fractions <2 mm. Kinetic U(VI) desorption in flow-through batch reactors was modeled using a multi-rate surface complexation approach, where sorption/desorption rates were

  8. Desorption of ciprofloxacin from clay mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingfeng; Li, Zhaohui; Hong, Hanlie; Li, Rongbiao; Jiang, Wei-Teh

    2013-01-01

    Desorption from soil clay components may affect the transport and fate of antibiotics in the environment. In this study, ciprofloxacin (CIP) desorption from a kaolinite and a montmorillonite was investigated under different pHs, different concentrations of metal cations of various valencies (Na(+), Ca(2+) and Al(3+)) and a cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), and different desorption cycles. Desorption of CIP from kaolinite and montmorillonite was strongly pH-dependent and desorption isotherms were well fitted with the Langmuir equation. The percentage of CIP desorbed increased with increasing initial CIP loadings, desorbing cation concentrations, and desorption cycles. Comparatively, CIP was more readily desorbed from kaolinite than from montmorillonite. Moreover, the hysteresis index values were all negative, suggesting that the presence of metal cations and HDTMA in solution promoted CIP desorption from clay minerals, owing to cation exchange. The XRD analyses indicated that desorption of CIP occurred from both external and interlayer surfaces of montmorillonite. Formation of Al-CIP complex on solid surface and then detachment of Al-CIP from the solid surface may contribute to the higher CIP desorption by Al(3+) in comparison to Na(+) and Ca(2+). PMID:23123088

  9. Three applications of path integrals: equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects, and the temperature dependence of the rate constant of the [1,5] sigmatropic hydrogen shift in (Z)-1,3-pentadiene.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Tomáš; Vaníček, Jiří

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments have confirmed the importance of nuclear quantum effects even in large biomolecules at physiological temperature. Here we describe how the path integral formalism can be used to describe rigorously the nuclear quantum effects on equilibrium and kinetic properties of molecules. Specifically, we explain how path integrals can be employed to evaluate the equilibrium (EIE) and kinetic (KIE) isotope effects, and the temperature dependence of the rate constant. The methodology is applied to the [1,5] sigmatropic hydrogen shift in pentadiene. Both the KIE and the temperature dependence of the rate constant confirm the importance of tunneling and other nuclear quantum effects as well as of the anharmonicity of the potential energy surface. Moreover, previous results on the KIE were improved by using a combination of a high level electronic structure calculation within the harmonic approximation with a path integral anharmonicity correction using a lower level method.

  10. Wide-range and accurate modeling of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) adsorption/desorption on agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Rodríguez, B; Zafra-Gómez, A; Reis, M S; Duarte, B P M; Verge, C; de Ferrer, J A; Pérez-Pascual, M; Vílchez, J L

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, rigorous data and adequate models about linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) adsorption/desorption on agricultural soil are presented, contributing with a substantial improvement over available adsorption works. The kinetics of the adsorption/desorption phenomenon and the adsorption/desorption equilibrium isotherms were determined through batch studies for total LAS amount and also for each homologue series: C10, C11, C12 and C13. The proposed multiple pseudo-first order kinetic model provides the best fit to the kinetic data, indicating the presence of two adsorption/desorption processes in the general phenomenon. Equilibrium adsorption and desorption data have been properly fitted by a model consisting of a Langmuir plus quadratic term, which provides a good integrated description of the experimental data over a wide range of concentrations. At low concentrations, the Langmuir term explains the adsorption of LAS on soil sites which are highly selective of the n-alkyl groups and cover a very small fraction of the soil surface area, whereas the quadratic term describes adsorption on the much larger part of the soil surface and on LAS retained at moderate to high concentrations. Since adsorption/desorption phenomenon plays a major role in the LAS behavior in soils, relevant conclusions can be drawn from the obtained results. PMID:26070080

  11. Wide-range and accurate modeling of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) adsorption/desorption on agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Rodríguez, B; Zafra-Gómez, A; Reis, M S; Duarte, B P M; Verge, C; de Ferrer, J A; Pérez-Pascual, M; Vílchez, J L

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, rigorous data and adequate models about linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) adsorption/desorption on agricultural soil are presented, contributing with a substantial improvement over available adsorption works. The kinetics of the adsorption/desorption phenomenon and the adsorption/desorption equilibrium isotherms were determined through batch studies for total LAS amount and also for each homologue series: C10, C11, C12 and C13. The proposed multiple pseudo-first order kinetic model provides the best fit to the kinetic data, indicating the presence of two adsorption/desorption processes in the general phenomenon. Equilibrium adsorption and desorption data have been properly fitted by a model consisting of a Langmuir plus quadratic term, which provides a good integrated description of the experimental data over a wide range of concentrations. At low concentrations, the Langmuir term explains the adsorption of LAS on soil sites which are highly selective of the n-alkyl groups and cover a very small fraction of the soil surface area, whereas the quadratic term describes adsorption on the much larger part of the soil surface and on LAS retained at moderate to high concentrations. Since adsorption/desorption phenomenon plays a major role in the LAS behavior in soils, relevant conclusions can be drawn from the obtained results.

  12. A Holistic Approach to Understanding the Desorption of Phosphorus in Soils.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Zhang, Hao; Stutter, Marc; Giles, Courtney D; Darch, Tegan; George, Timothy S; Shand, Charles; Lumsdon, David; Blackwell, Martin; Wearing, Catherine; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Haygarth, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    The mobility and resupply of inorganic phosphorus (P) from the solid phase were studied in 32 soils from the UK. The combined use of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT), diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) and the "DGT-induced fluxes in sediments" model (DIFS) were adapted to explore the basic principles of solid-to-solution P desorption kinetics in previously unattainable detail. On average across soil types, the response time (Tc) was 3.6 h, the desorption rate constant (k-1) was 0.0046 h(-1), and the desorption rate was 4.71 nmol l(-1) s(-1). While the relative DGT-induced inorganic P flux responses in the first hour is mainly a function of soil water retention and % Corg, at longer times it is a function of the P resupply from the soil solid phase. Desorption rates and resupply from solid phase were fundamentally influenced by P status as reflected by their high correlation with P concentration in FeO strips, Olsen, NaOH-EDTA and water extracts. Soil pH and particle size distribution showed no significant correlation with the evaluated mobility and resupply parameters. The DGT and DET techniques, along with the DIFS model, were considered accurate and practical tools for studying parameters related to soil P desorption kinetics. PMID:26911395

  13. Influence of the medium's viscosity on the kinetics of hydrogen atom self-exchange for N-hydroxy phthalimide/piperidine-N-oxyl (NHPI/PINO˙) measured by CW-ESR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bächle, Josua; Goni, Freskida; Grampp, Günter

    2015-10-28

    CW-ESR line broadening experiments are used to investigate the kinetics of fast hydrogen atom self-exchange reactions. The system NHPI/PINO˙ was studied in five different aprotic organic solvents at room temperature with a focus on the influence of the viscosity of the medium. Our findings support the theoretical descriptions derived from the statistical dynamics of the impact of the reorganization of the medium. In an Arrhenius type description the influence appears in the preexponential factor as a linear dependence on the dynamic viscosity.

  14. Kinetic modeling of light limitation and sulfur deprivation effects in the induction of hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Part II: Definition of model-based protocols and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Degrenne, B; Pruvost, J; Titica, M; Takache, H; Legrand, J

    2011-10-01

    Photosynthetic hydrogen production under light by the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was investigated in a torus-shaped PBR in sulfur-deprived conditions. Culture conditions, represented by the dry biomass concentration of the inoculum, sulfate concentration, and incident photon flux density (PFD), were optimized based on a previously published model (Fouchard et al., 2009. Biotechnol Bioeng 102:232-245). This allowed a strictly autotrophic production, whereas the sulfur-deprived protocol is usually applied in photoheterotrophic conditions. Experimental results combined with additional information from kinetic simulations emphasize effects of sulfur deprivation and light attenuation in the PBR in inducing anoxia and hydrogen production. A broad range of PFD was tested (up to 500 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1) ). Maximum hydrogen productivities were 1.0 ± 0.2 mL H₂ /h/L (or 25 ± 5 mL H₂ /m(2) h) and 3.1 mL ± 0.4 H₂ /h L (or 77.5 ± 10 mL H₂ /m(2) h), at 110 and 500 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1) , respectively. These values approached a maximum specific productivity of approximately 1.9 mL ± 0.4 H₂ /h/g of biomass dry weight, clearly indicative of a limitation in cell capacity to produce hydrogen. The efficiency of the process and further optimizations are discussed.

  15. Photoinduced Br Desorption from CsBr Thin Films Grown on Cu(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Halliday, Matthew T.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.; Shluger, AL

    2015-10-22

    Thin films of CsBr deposited onto metals such as copper are potential photocathode materials for light sources and other applications. We investigate desorption dynamics of Br atoms from CsBr films grown on insulator (KBr, LiF) and metal (Cu) substrates induced by sub-bandgap 6.4 eV laser pulses. The experimental results demonstrate that the peak kinetic energy of Br atoms desorbed from CsBr/Cu films is much lower than that for the hyperthermal desorption from CsBr/LiF films. Kelvin probe measurements indicate negative charge at the surface following Br desorption from CsBr/Cu films. Our ab initio calculations of excitons at CsBr surfaces demonstrate that this behavior can be explained by an exciton model of desorption including electron trapping at the CsBr surface. Trapped negative charges reduce the energy of surface excitons available for Br desorption. We examine the electron-trapping characteristics of low-coordinated sites at the surface, in particular, divacancies and kink sites. We also provide a model of cation desorption caused by Franck-Hertz excitation of F centers at the surface in the course of irradiation of CsBr/Cu films. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms of photoinduced structural evolution of alkali halide films on metal substrates and activation of metal photocathodes coated with CsBr.

  16. Understanding Arsenate Reaction Kinetics with Ferric Hydroxides

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, James; Chaudhary, Binod K.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding arsenic reactions with ferric hydroxides is important in understanding arsenic transport in the environment and in designing systems for removing arsenic from potable water. Many experimental studies have shown that the kinetics of arsenic adsorption on ferric hydroxides is biphasic, where a fraction of the arsenic adsorption occurs on a time scale of seconds while full equilibrium may require weeks to attain. This research employed density functional theory modeling in order to understand the mechanisms contributing to biphasic arsenic adsorption kinetics. The reaction energies and activation barriers for three modes of arsenate adsorption to ferric hydroxides were calculated. Gibbs free energies of reaction depended on the net charge of the complexes, which is a function of the system pH value. Physical adsorption of arsenate to ferric hydroxide proceeded with no activation barrier, with Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −21 to −58 kJ/mol. The highest Gibbs free energies of reaction for physical adsorption resulted from negative charge assisted hydrogen bonding between H atoms on the ferric hydroxide and O atoms in arsenate. The conversion of physically adsorbed arsenate into monodentate surface complexes had Gibbs free energies of activation ranging from 62 to 73 kJ/mol, and Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −23 to −38 kJ/mol. The conversion of monodentate surface complexes to bidentate, binuclear complexes had Gibbs free energies of activation ranging from 79 to 112 kJ/mol, and Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −11 to −55 kJ/mol. For release of arsenate from uncharged bidentate complexes, energies of activation as high as 167 kJ/mol were encountered. Increasingly negative charges on the complexes lowered the activation barriers for desorption of arsenate, and in complexes with −2 charges, the highest activation barrier was 65 kJ/mol. This study shows that the slow kinetics associated with arsenic

  17. Competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline on two acid soils: Stirred flow chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Fernández-Sanjurjo, Maria J; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work was to study the competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC) and chlortetracycline (CTC) on two acid soils. We used the stirred flow chamber technique to obtain experimental data on rapid kinetic processes affecting the retention/release of the antibiotics. Both adsorption and desorption were higher on soil 1 (which showed the highest carbon, clay and Al and Fe oxides content) than on soil 2. Moreover, hysteresis affected the adsorption/desorption processes. Experimental data were fitted to a pseudo-first order equation, resulting qamax (adsorption maximum) values that were higher for soil 1 than for soil 2, and indicating that CTC competed with TC more intensely than OTC in soil 1. Regarding soil 2, the values corresponding to the adsorption kinetics constants (ka) and desorption kinetics constants for fast sites (kd1), followed a trend inverse to qamax and qdmax respectively. In conclusion, competition affected adsorption/desorption kinetics for the three antibiotics assayed, and thus retention/release and subsequent transport processes in soil and water environments.

  18. Uranium for hydrogen storage applications : a materials science perspective.

    SciTech Connect

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Tewell, Craig R.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Kolasinski, Robert D.

    2010-08-01

    Under appropriate conditions, uranium will form a hydride phase when exposed to molecular hydrogen. This makes it quite valuable for a variety of applications within the nuclear industry, particularly as a storage medium for tritium. However, some aspects of the U+H system have been characterized much less extensively than other common metal hydrides (particularly Pd+H), likely due to radiological concerns associated with handling. To assess the present understanding, we review the existing literature database for the uranium hydride system in this report and identify gaps in the existing knowledge. Four major areas are emphasized: {sup 3}He release from uranium tritides, the effects of surface contamination on H uptake, the kinetics of the hydride phase formation, and the thermal desorption properties. Our review of these areas is then used to outline potential avenues of future research.

  19. Desorption induced by electronic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, V. N.

    1994-10-01

    A survey is presented of the techniques and instruments used in studies of desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) that can be stimulated by irradiating a solid surface by electrons (ESD) or photons (PSD). The most general characteristics and aspects of this phenomenon are systematized. An analysis is made of relations between DIET and crystallographic and band structure of the substrate, the nature of adsorption bonding and specific features of desorbing particles. The main DIET models involving various electronic excitations of adsorption bonding and their relaxation as particles escape from the surface are discussed, and their predictions are compared with the available experimental data. Particular attention is focussed on the DIET models involving many-electron excitations. The various applications of DIET techniques to studies of adsorbed layers and of surface processes are considered. The radiation stability of solid surfaces and of film coatings with respect to excitation of their electronic subsystem is discussed.

  20. Gravimetric analysis of the adsorption and desorption of CO2 on amine-functionalized mesoporous silica mounted on a microcantilever array.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongkyu; Jin, Yusung; Jung, Namchul; Lee, Jaehyuk; Lee, Jinwoo; Jeong, Yong Shik; Jeon, Sangmin

    2011-07-01

    The kinetics of CO(2) adsorption and desorption over amine-functionalized mesoporous silica were investigated using silicon microcantilever arrays. Three types of mesoporous silica with different pore sizes were synthesized and functionalized with a variety of amine molecules. After depositing the silica sorbents onto the free end of each cantilever in an array, mass changes due to the adsorption and desorption of CO(2) were determined in situ with picogram sensitivity by measuring variations in the cantilever frequencies. The adsorption and desorption kinetics were found to be diffusion-controlled, and the kinetics were accelerated by increasing the temperature and pore size. The activation energies for adsorption and desorption of CO(2) were determined from Arrhenius plots.

  1. Gas-phase synthesis of Mg-Ti nanoparticles for solid-state hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Calizzi, M; Venturi, F; Ponthieu, M; Cuevas, F; Morandi, V; Perkisas, T; Bals, S; Pasquini, L

    2016-01-01

    Mg-Ti nanostructured samples with different Ti contents were prepared via compaction of nanoparticles grown by inert gas condensation with independent Mg and Ti vapour sources. The growth set-up offered the option to perform in situ hydrogen absorption before compaction. Structural and morphological characterisation was carried out by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of an extended metastable solid solution of Ti in hcp Mg was detected up to 15 at% Ti in the as-grown nanoparticles, while after in situ hydrogen absorption, phase separation between MgH2 and TiH2 was observed. At a Ti content of 22 at%, a metastable Mg-Ti-H fcc phase was observed after in situ hydrogen absorption. The co-evaporation of Mg and Ti inhibited nanoparticle coalescence and crystallite growth in comparison with the evaporation of Mg only. In situ hydrogen absorption was beneficial to subsequent hydrogen behaviour, studied by high pressure differential scanning calorimetry and isothermal kinetics. A transformed fraction of 90% was reached within 100 s at 300 °C during both hydrogen absorption and desorption. The enthalpy of hydride formation was not observed to differ from bulk MgH2.

  2. Characterization and high throughput analysis of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelo, Steven James

    -Ni mixtures. Finally, another technique for improving hydrogen storage performance is presented which focuses on promising materials studied using the high throughput technique. TiO2 powder was ball milled together with NaBH 4, and gravimetric analysis shows a 50% improvement in the kinetics of the hydrogen desorption reaction and a reduction in desorption temperature of 60°C.

  3. Evaluated kinetics of terminal and non-terminal addition of hydrogen atoms to 1-alkenes: a shock tube study of H + 1-butene.

    PubMed

    Manion, Jeffrey A; Awan, Iftikhar A

    2015-01-22

    Single-pulse shock tube methods have been used to thermally generate hydrogen atoms and investigate the kinetics of their addition reactions with 1-butene at temperatures of 880 to 1120 K and pressures of 145 to 245 kPa. Rate parameters for the unimolecular decomposition of 1-butene are also reported. Addition of H atoms to the π bond of 1-butene results in displacement of either methyl or ethyl depending on whether addition occurs at the terminal or nonterminal position. Postshock monitoring of the initial alkene products has been used to determine the relative and absolute reaction rates. Absolute rate constants have been derived relative to the reference reaction of displacement of methyl from 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (135TMB). With k(H + 135TMB → m-xylene + CH3) = 6.7 × 10(13) exp(-3255/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), we find the following: k(H + 1-butene → propene + CH3) = k10 = 3.93 × 10(13) exp(-1152 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), [880-1120 K; 145-245 kPa]; k(H + 1-butene → ethene + C2H5) = k11 = 3.44 × 10(13) exp(-1971 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), [971-1120 K; 145-245 kPa]; k10/k11 = 10((0.058±0.059)) exp [(818 ± 141) K/T), 971-1120 K. Uncertainties (2σ) in the absolute rate constants are about a factor of 1.5, while the relative rate constants should be accurate to within ±15%. The displacement rate constants are shown to be very close to the high pressure limiting rate constants for addition of H, and the present measurements are the first direct determination of the branching ratio for 1-olefins at high temperatures. At 1000 K, addition to the terminal site is favored over the nonterminal position by a factor of 2.59 ± 0.39, where the uncertainty is 2σ and includes possible systematic errors. Combining the present results with evaluated data from the literature pertaining to temperatures of <440 K leads us to recommend the following: k∞(H + 1-butene → 2-butyl) = 1.05 × 10(9)T(1.40) exp(-366/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), [220-2000 K]; k∞(H + 1-butene → 1

  4. FORMATION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN FROM METHANE ICE

    SciTech Connect

    He Jiao; Gao Kun; Vidali, Gianfranco; Bennett, Chris J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2010-10-01

    To study the formation of molecular hydrogen in the wake of the processing of interstellar ices by energetic cosmic-ray particles, we investigated the interaction of energetic electrons, as formed in the track of galactic cosmic-ray particles, with deuterated methane ices (CD{sub 4}) at 11 K. The energetic electrons mimic energy-transfer processes that occur in the track of the trajectories of energetic cosmic-ray particles; deuterated methane ice was utilized to discriminate the molecular deuterium (m/z = 4) formed during the radiation exposure from the residual molecular hydrogen gas (m/z = 2) released inside the ultrahigh vacuum scattering chamber from outgassing of the stainless steel material. The ices were characterized online and in situ using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, while the evolution of the molecular deuterium (D{sub 2}) into the gas phase was monitored using a mass spectrometer. A mass spectrometric signal proportional to the number density of the deuterium molecules generated inside the ice and released during the irradiation was analyzed kinetically using a set of coupled rate equations. From the fit to the experimental data, we obtain activation energies for the diffusion of atomic deuterium (E{sub 0} = 37 {+-} 1 meV), and for the desorption of atomic (E{sub 1} = 32 {+-} 1 meV) and molecular deuterium (E{sub 2} = 32 {+-} 1 meV). These energies are placed in context and then transferred to atomic and molecular hydrogen to yield astrophysically relevant data. The experimental yield of molecular deuterium is then used to calculate the formation rate of molecular hydrogen due to cosmic-ray interaction with ice-covered grains in dense clouds.

  5. Hydrogenation Behaviors on MgHx-BZY (BaZr0.8Y0.2O3-δ) Composites.

    PubMed

    Lee, YoungSang; Hong, TaeWhan

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium hydride is suitable as a hydrogen storage alloy material because of it has a high hydrogen storage capacity of 7.5 wt% and is a light weight metal, low cost metal. But magnesium hydride is limited for practical use because of its higher temperature and slower rate of hydrogen absorption/desorption. Thus, a catalyst is required to improve the kinetic. BZY (BaZr0.8Y0.2O3-δ) as proton conducting ceramics are expected as catalyst to be a good influence on the kinetics of hydrogenation behavior. In this study, we prepared MgH(x)-BZY composites using Mechanical Alloying (MA). BZY powder, prepared by the sol-gel method was added to Mg hydride. The fabricated MgH(x)-BZY composites were characterized by XRD, SED, EDS, TG/DSC and BET. The hydrogenation behaviors were evaluated using a Sievert's type automatic PCT apparatus at various temperature and pressure. As a result, the BZY composites used as a catalyst are expected to have a positive influence on hydrogenation behavior. PMID:26726612

  6. Investigation on hydrogenation performance of Mg{sub 2}Ni+10 wt.% NbN composite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Han, Shumin; Zhu, Yi; Chen, Xiaocui; Ke, Dandan; Wang, Zhibin; Liu, Ting; Ma, Yufei

    2015-01-15

    The Mg{sub 2}Ni+10 wt.% NbN composite was prepared by mechanical milling and its hydrogen absorption/desorption properties and microstructure were systematically investigated. XRD results indicated that NbN was stable during ball milling process while partly decomposed into NbN{sub 0.95} and NbH during hydriding/dehydriding cycles irreversibly. The composite exhibited excellent hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics performance with 2.71 wt.% hydrogen absorbed in 60 s at 423 K and 0.81 wt.% hydrogen released in 2 h at 523 K, respectively. The H diffusion constant of the composite reached 14.98×10{sup −5} s{sup −1} which was more than twice increased than that of pure Mg{sub 2}Ni powder. The superior hydrogen storage properties of the composite were ascribed to the refined grain size and abundant N-defect points provided by NbN and NbN{sub 0.95} in the composite. - Graphical abstract: The Mg{sub 2}Ni+10 wt.% NbN composite displays improvements on particle size distribution as well as hydrogen storage properties compared with that of pure Mg{sub 2}Ni. - Highlights: • NbN is introduced into Mg{sub 2}Ni hydride by Ar protected ball-milling. • Surfaces of the additive NbN particle are reduced by Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}. • Hydrogenation kinetic property at 423 K is double improved. • Dehydrogenation capacity at 523 K of composites is beyond double improved.

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of hydrogen release during the heterogeneous catalytic dehydrogenation of cis- and trans-isomers of perhydro-m-terphenyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenchuk, A. N.; Bogorodskii, S. E.; Bogdan, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    Comparative studies on the temperature dependence of the dehydrogenation of cis- and trans-isomers of perhydro- m-terphenyl are performed in a flow catalytic reactor. Rate constants and equilibrium constants of all elementary acts of this reaction are calculated on basis of experimental data using the KINET 0.8 program for the mathematical modeling of the kinetics of complex reactions. The resulting data indicate that perhydro- m-terphenyl cis- and trans-isomers structural differences have no appreciable effect on dehydrogenation.

  8. Kinetics of sulfate and hydrogen uptake by the thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria Thermodesulfobacterium sp. strain JSP and Thermodesulfovibrio sp. strain R1Ha3

    SciTech Connect

    Sonne-Hansen, J.; Ahring, B.K.; Westermann, P.

    1999-03-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction and methanogenesis are the main terminal processes in the anaerobic food chain. Both the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and the methane-producing archaea (MPA) use acetate and hydrogen as substrates and, therefore, compete for common electron donors in sulfate-containing natural environments. Due to a higher affinity for the electron donors acetate and hydrogen, SRB outcompete MPA for these compounds whenever sulfate is present in sufficient concentrations. Half-saturation constants (K{sub m}), maximum uptake rates (V{sub max}), and threshold concentrations for sulfate and hydrogen were determined for two thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in an incubation system without headspace. K{sub m} values determined for the thermophilic SRB were similar to the constants described for mesophilic SRB isolated from environments with low sulfate concentrations.

  9. Adsorption/desorption characteristics and separation of anthocyanins from muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia) juice pomace by use of macroporous adsorbent resins.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Amandeep K; Gu, Liwei

    2013-02-20

    In this study, the adsorption/desorption characteristics of anthocyanins on five Amberlite resins (FPX-66, XAD-7HP, XAD-16N, XAD-1180, and XAD-761) were evaluated. FPX-66 and XAD-16N showed the highest adsorption and desorption capacities and ratios for anthocyanins from muscadine pomace extract, while XAD-7HP had the lowest adsorption and desorption capacities and ratios. On the basis of static adsorption and desorption tests, three resins (FPX-66, XAD-16N, and XAD-1180) were selected for adsorption kinetics and isotherms. The adsorption mechanism was better explained by the pseudo-first-order kinetics for FPX-66 and XAD-16N; however, for XAD-1180, pseudo-second-order kinetics was the most suitable model. The experimental data fitted best to Langmuir isotherm model for all three resins. Dynamic testing was done on a column packed with FPX-66 resin and breakthrough volume was reached at 17 bed volumes of muscadine pomace water extract during adsorption. Three bed volumes of aqueous ethanol (70%) resulted in complete desorption. Resin adsorption resulted in a concentrated pomace extract that contained 13% (w/w) anthocyanins with no detectable sugars. PMID:23368425

  10. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  11. Stereodirectional Origin of anti-Arrhenius Kinetics for a Tetraatomic Hydrogen Exchange Reaction: Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics for OH + HBr.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Nayara D; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Silva, Valter H C; Camargo, Ademir J; Mundim, Kleber C; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B

    2016-07-14

    Among four-atom processes, the reaction OH + HBr → H2O + Br is one of the most studied experimentally: its kinetics has manifested an unusual anti-Arrhenius behavior, namely, a marked decrease of the rate constant as the temperature increases, which has intrigued theoreticians for a long time. Recently, salient features of the potential energy surface have been characterized and most kinetic aspects can be considered as satisfactorily reproduced by classical trajectory simulations. Motivation of the work reported in this paper is the investigation of the stereodirectional dynamics of this reaction as the prominent reason for the peculiar kinetics: we started in a previous Letter ( J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2015 , 6 , 1553 - 1558 ) a first-principles Born-Oppenheimer "canonical" molecular dynamics approach. Trajectories are step-by-step generated on a potential energy surface quantum mechanically calculated on-the-fly and are thermostatically equilibrated to correspond to a specific temperature. Here, refinements of the method permitted a major increase of the number of trajectories and the consideration of four temperatures -50, +200, +350, and +500 K, for which the sampling of initial conditions allowed us to characterize the stereodynamical effect. The role is documented of the adjustment of the reactants' mutual orientation to encounter the entrance into the "cone of acceptance" for reactivity. The aperture angle of this cone is dictated by a range of directions of approach compatible with the formation of the specific HOH angle of the product water molecule; and consistently the adjustment is progressively less effective the higher the kinetic energy. Qualitatively, this emerging picture corroborates experiments on this reaction, involving collisions of aligned and oriented molecular beams, and covering a range of energies higher than the thermal ones. The extraction of thermal rate constants from this molecular dynamics approach is discussed and the systematic

  12. Stereodirectional Origin of anti-Arrhenius Kinetics for a Tetraatomic Hydrogen Exchange Reaction: Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics for OH + HBr.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Nayara D; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Silva, Valter H C; Camargo, Ademir J; Mundim, Kleber C; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B

    2016-07-14

    Among four-atom processes, the reaction OH + HBr → H2O + Br is one of the most studied experimentally: its kinetics has manifested an unusual anti-Arrhenius behavior, namely, a marked decrease of the rate constant as the temperature increases, which has intrigued theoreticians for a long time. Recently, salient features of the potential energy surface have been characterized and most kinetic aspects can be considered as satisfactorily reproduced by classical trajectory simulations. Motivation of the work reported in this paper is the investigation of the stereodirectional dynamics of this reaction as the prominent reason for the peculiar kinetics: we started in a previous Letter ( J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2015 , 6 , 1553 - 1558 ) a first-principles Born-Oppenheimer "canonical" molecular dynamics approach. Trajectories are step-by-step generated on a potential energy surface quantum mechanically calculated on-the-fly and are thermostatically equilibrated to correspond to a specific temperature. Here, refinements of the method permitted a major increase of the number of trajectories and the consideration of four temperatures -50, +200, +350, and +500 K, for which the sampling of initial conditions allowed us to characterize the stereodynamical effect. The role is documented of the adjustment of the reactants' mutual orientation to encounter the entrance into the "cone of acceptance" for reactivity. The aperture angle of this cone is dictated by a range of directions of approach compatible with the formation of the specific HOH angle of the product water molecule; and consistently the adjustment is progressively less effective the higher the kinetic energy. Qualitatively, this emerging picture corroborates experiments on this reaction, involving collisions of aligned and oriented molecular beams, and covering a range of energies higher than the thermal ones. The extraction of thermal rate constants from this molecular dynamics approach is discussed and the systematic

  13. Comparison of batch, stirred flow chamber, and column experiments to study adsorption, desorption and transport of carbofuran within two acidic soils.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Rodríguez-Salgado, Isabel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    Different methods (batch, column and stirred flow chamber experiments) used for adsorption and desorption of carbofuran studies were compared. All tested methods showed that the carbofuran adsorption was higher in the soil with the higher organic matter content, whereas the opposite behaviour was observed for the percentage of carbofuran desorbed. However, different methods have revealed some discrepancies in carbofuran adsorption/desorption kinetics. Although batch method showed interesting data on equilibrium experiments, such as a low heterogeneity for the carbofuran adsorption sites independent of soil organic matter content, it had some disadvantages for carbofuran adsorption/desorption kinetic studies. The disadvantages were related with the excessive limitations of this method on kinetics, i.e., no difference could be detected between different soils. However, with column and stirred flow chamber methods the carbofuran adsorption/desorption kinetics of different soils could be compared. Moreover, the absolute values of carbofuran adsorption/desorption and its rate were higher in the stirred flow chamber than in the batch and column experiments. Using stirred flow chamber experiments the carbofuran desorption was significantly faster than its adsorption, whereas carbofuran using column experiments they were similar. These discrepancies should be considered when the results obtained only with one method is discussed.

  14. UV laser desorption of nitric oxide from semiconducting C60/Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoger, T.; Grimmer, D.; Zacharias, H.

    2007-08-01

    The desorption of NO from a well-characterized, epitaxially grown semiconducting C60 surface is reported. Two different channels are identified in the laser desorption. Both channels yield a comparably high desorption cross section of σ1=7.0×10-17 cm2 and σ2=5.5×10-17 cm2 for the first and second channel, respectively. The laser desorbed NO molecules are detected with rovibrational state selectivity by (1+1) REMPI in the A^2Σ^+ to{X}^2 Pi γ-bands. In the first channel the desorbing molecules are highly excited with an average kinetic energy of =174 meV. The rotational population distribution can be fitted by a rotational temperature of Trot=800 K. A rotational translational coupling is observed, with velocities ranging from 1000 m/s for low to 1300 m/s for high rotational states. The vibrationally excited population is estimated to be less than 1% of the ground state. The second channel yields less excited molecules and an almost Boltzmann distributed rotational population with a temperature of Trot=280 K. The apparent velocity distribution derived from the pump-probe delay yields molecules much too slow to be explained by even a thermal desorption. This desorption is probably caused by a long-lived electronic excitation in the substrate for which a lifetime of τ≈160 μs is estimated.

  15. Gas-phase hydrogenation/hydrogenolysis of phenol over supported nickel catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, E.J.; Keane, M.A.

    2000-04-01

    The gas-phase hydrogenation/hydrogenolysis of alcoholic solutions of phenol between 423 and 573 K has been studied using a Y zeolite-supported nickel catalyst (2.2% w/w Ni) and Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts (1.5--20.3% w/w Ni). This is a viable means of treating concentrated phenol streams to generate recyclable raw material. Phenol hydrogenation proceeded in a stepwise fashion with cyclohexanone as a reactive intermediate while a combination of hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation yielded cyclohexane. Hydrogenolysis to benzene is favored by high nickel loadings and elevated temperatures. A catalytic hydrogen treatment of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol helped to establish the overall reaction network/mechanism. The possible role of thermodynamic limitations is considered and structure sensitivity is addressed; reaction data are subjected to a pseudo-first-order kinetic treatment. Hydrogen temperature-programmed desorption (H{sub 2}-TPD) has revealed the existence of different forms of surface hydrogen. Selectivity is interpreted on the basis of the H{sub 2}-TPD profiles and the possible phenol/catalyst interactions. The zeolite sample only catalyzed (via the surface Bronsted acidity) anisole formation in the presence of methanol, but this was suppressed when hexanol was used; the zeolite then promoted hydrogenolysis. The zeolite, however, deactivated and this was not reversed by heating in hydrogen. The results of the hydrogen treatment of aqueous rather than alcoholic phenol solutions are presented, where a switch from methanol to water was accompanied by a move from highly selective hydrogenolysis to highly selective hydrogenation.

  16. Desorption of TEDA from impregnated charcoals

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.

    1980-01-01

    Triethylenediamine (TEDA) is one of the most effective charcoal impregnants for trapping organic forms of radioiodine from air. It is used in air cleaning adsorbers, air samplers, and air purifying respirator canisters and cartridges for airborne radioiodine. Volatility of the pure crystals suggested the possibility of significant TEDA desorption in these applications, resulting in toxic levels of amine and/or degradation of sorbent efficiency. Measurements of TEDA desorption rates were made for four commercial charcoals. Temperatures of 70 to 120/sup 0/C were used to give levels detectable with a photoionization detector. Extrapolations to temperatures nearer normal ambient were made by using Clapeyron equation plots. Among three charcoals with the same 5% level of TEDA impregnation, desorption rates varied over factors as great as 10. Slopes of Clapeyron plots were similar, giving an average 25 kcal/mol heat of desorption. This corresponds to a doubling of the TEDA desorption rate with each 5/sup 0/C (9/sup 0/F) rise in temperature. Desorption rates were directly proportional to airflow rates or velocities through the test beds and independent of humidity. Desorption rates per unit weight of charcoal decreased exponentially with bed depth, presumably due to TEDA readsorption. Calculations based on this data and the geometry of a standard adsorber cell showed that at normal ambient temperatures: (1) concentrations of TEDA in effluent air are well below expected toxic levels; and (2) losses of TEDA may be significant. At elevated temperatures TEDA desorption rates are high enough to affect methyl iodide trapping efficiencies and, possibly, charcoal ignition temperatures.

  17. Functions of MgH2 in hydrogen storage reactions of the 6LiBH4-CaH2 reactive hydride composite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yifan; Liu, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2012-08-28

    A significant improvement of hydrogen storage properties was achieved by introducing MgH(2) into the 6LiBH(4)-CaH(2) system. It was found that ~8.0 wt% of hydrogen could be reversibly stored in a 6LiBH(4)-CaH(2)-3MgH(2) composite below 400 °C and 100 bar of hydrogen pressure with a stepwise reaction, which is superior to the pristine 6LiBH(4)-CaH(2) and LiBH(4) samples. Upon dehydriding, MgH(2) first decomposed to convert to Mg and liberate hydrogen with an on-set temperature of ~290 °C. Subsequently, LiBH(4) reacted with CaH(2) to form CaB(6) and LiH in addition to further hydrogen release. Hydrogen desorption from the 6LiBH(4)-CaH(2)-3MgH(2) composite finished at ~430 °C in non-isothermal model, a 160 °C reduction relative to the 6LiBH(4)-CaH(2) sample. JMA analyses revealed that hydrogen desorption was a diffusion-controlled reaction rather than an interface reaction-controlled process. The newly produced Mg of the first-step dehydrogenation possibly acts as the heterogeneous nucleation center of the resultant products of the second-step dehydrogenation, which diminishes the energy barrier and facilitates nucleation and growth, consequently reducing the operating temperature and improving the kinetics of hydrogen storage. PMID:22842399

  18. Effect of delivery condition on desorption rate of ZrCo metal hydride bed for fusion fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.G.; Yun, S.H.; Chung, D.; Oh, Y.H.; Chang, M.H.; Cho, S.; Chung, H.; Song, K.M.

    2015-03-15

    For the safety of fusion fuel cycle, hydrogen isotope gases including tritium are stored as metal hydride form. To satisfy fueling requirement of fusion machine, rapid delivery from metal hydride bed is one of major factors for the development of tritium storage and delivery system. Desorption from metal hydride depends on the operation scenario by pressure and temperature control of the bed. The effect of operation scenario and pump performance on desorption rate of metal hydride bed was experimentally investigated using ZrCo bed. The results showed that the condition of pre-heating scenario before actual delivery of gas affected the delivery performance. Different pumps were connected to desorption line from bed and the effect of pump capacity on desorption rate were also found to be significant. (authors)

  19. Diffusion and elastoplastic analyses of polycrystalline magnesium for solid state hydrogen storage application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathakari, Amey

    Solid state hydrogen storage can be an effective way of storing hydrogen as an energy source for mobile applications. The advantage includes high energy density, low setup cost, safe operation, abundance of metal hydrides, low maintenance, etc. Magnesium is one of the potential metals for the application. However, sluggish desorption kinetics of magnesium requiring relatively high operation temperature has hindered its practical realization. In the present study, an attempt is made to analyze effects of grain boundary on diffusion and diffusion induced stresses in polycrystalline magnesium. Grain boundaries in nanostructured magnesium can undergo severe plastic deformations during the hydrogen insertion and desertion processes. Such boundaries are characterized by excess grain boundary energy, presence of long range elastic stresses and enhanced pathways for hydrogen transport. Finite element models have been developed for the analyses by realizing the different physical and chemical parameters of magnesium grains and grain boundaries. The study provides convincing evidence of the importance of the presence of grain boundaries. The results may help find ways to improve hydrogen charging/discharging efficiency by means of plastic deformations in grain boundaries while maintaining the overall structural integrity of host magnesium.

  20. A Theoretical Study of Methanol Synthesis from CO(2) Hydrogenation on Metal-doped Cu(111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu P.; Yang, Y.; White, M.G.

    2012-01-12

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations were employed to investigate the methanol synthesis reaction from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation (CO{sub 2} + 3H{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3}OH + H{sub 2}O) on metal-doped Cu(111) surfaces. Both the formate pathway and the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction followed by a CO hydrogenation pathway (RWGS + CO-Hydro) were considered in the study. Our calculations showed that the overall methanol yield increased in the sequence: Au/Cu(111) < Cu(111) < Pd/Cu(111) < Rh/Cu(111) < Pt/Cu(111) < Ni/Cu(111). On Au/Cu(111) and Cu(111), the formate pathway dominates the methanol production. Doping Au does not help the methanol synthesis on Cu(111). Pd, Rh, Pt, and Ni are able to promote the methanol production on Cu(111), where the conversion via the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathway is much faster than that via the formate pathway. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the methanol yield on Cu(111) was controlled by three factors: the dioxomethylene hydrogenation barrier, the CO binding energy, and the CO hydrogenation barrier. Accordingly, two possible descriptors are identified which can be used to describe the catalytic activity of Cu-based catalysts toward methanol synthesis. One is the activation barrier of dioxomethylene hydrogenation, and the other is the CO binding energy. An ideal Cu-based catalyst for the methanol synthesis via CO{sub 2} hydrogenation should be able to hydrogenate dioxomethylene easily and bond CO moderately, being strong enough to favor the desired CO hydrogenation rather than CO desorption but weak enough to prevent CO poisoning. In this way, the methanol production via both the formate and the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathways can be facilitated.