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Sample records for hydrogen desorption process

  1. Hydrogen desorption kinetics for aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma processed silicon (001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Carter, Richard J.; Schneider, Thomas P.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    The desorption kinetics of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from silicon (001) surfaces exposed to aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasmas were examined using temperature programmed desorption. Multiple H{sub 2} desorption states were observed and attributed to surface monohydride (SiH), di/trihydride (SiH{sub 2/3}), and hydroxide (SiOH) species, subsurface hydrogen trapped at defects, and hydrogen evolved during the desorption of surface oxides. The observed surface hydride species were dependent on the surface temperature during hydrogen plasma exposure with mono, di, and trihydride species being observed after low temperature exposure (150 °C), while predominantly monohydride species were observed after higher temperature exposure (450 °C). The ratio of surface versus subsurface H{sub 2} desorption was also found to be dependent on the substrate temperature with 150 °C remote hydrogen plasma exposure generally leading to more H{sub 2} evolved from subsurface states and 450 °C exposure leading to more H{sub 2} desorption from surface SiH{sub x} species. Additional surface desorption states were observed, which were attributed to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111) facets formed as a result of surface etching by the remote hydrogen plasma or aqueous hydrogen fluoride treatment. The kinetics of surface H{sub 2} desorption were found to be in excellent agreement with prior investigations of silicon surfaces exposed to thermally generated atomic hydrogen.

  2. Diffusion Analysis Of Hydrogen-Desorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1988-01-01

    Distribution of hydrogen in metal explains observed desorption rate. Report describes application of diffusion theory to anaylsis of experimental data on uptake and elimination of hydrogen in high-strength alloys of 25 degree C. Study part of program aimed at understanding embrittlement of metals by hydrogen. Two nickel-base alloys, Rene 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, studied. Desorption of hydrogen explained by distribution of hydrogen in metal. "Fast" hydrogen apparently not due to formation of hydrides on and below surface as proposed.

  3. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  4. Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material

    SciTech Connect

    Guterl, Jerome Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2015-07-28

    Desorption phase of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments performed on tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion relevant conditions is analyzed using a reaction-diffusion model describing hydrogen retention in material bulk. Two regimes of hydrogen desorption are identified depending on whether hydrogen trapping rate is faster than hydrogen diffusion rate in material during TDS experiments. In both regimes, a majority of hydrogen released from material defects is immediately outgassed instead of diffusing deeply in material bulk when the evolution of hydrogen concentration in material is quasi-static, which is the case during TDS experiments performed with tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion related conditions. In this context, analytical expressions of the hydrogen outgassing flux as a function of the material temperature are obtained with sufficient accuracy to describe main features of thermal desorption spectra (TDSP). These expressions are then used to highlight how characteristic temperatures of TDSP depend on hydrogen retention parameters, such as trap concentration or activation energy of detrapping processes. The use of Arrhenius plots to characterize retention processes is then revisited when hydrogen trapping takes place during TDS experiments. Retention processes are also characterized using the shape of desorption peaks in TDSP, and it is shown that diffusion of hydrogen in material during TDS experiment can induce long desorption tails visible aside desorption peaks at high temperature in TDSP. These desorption tails can be used to estimate activation energy of diffusion of hydrogen in material.

  5. HYDROGEN AND ITS DESORPTION IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH,H.C.

    2002-11-11

    Hydrogen is the dominating gas specie in room temperature, ultrahigh vacuum systems of particle accelerators and storage rings, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven. Rapid pressure increase of a few decades in hydrogen and other residual gases was observed during RHIC's recent high intensity gold and proton runs. The type and magnitude of the pressure increase were analyzed and compared with vacuum conditioning, beam intensity, number of bunches and bunch spacing. Most of these pressure increases were found to be consistent with those induced by beam loss and/or electron stimulated desorption from electron multipacting.

  6. Fragmentation processes of hydrogen-deficient peptide radicals in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) has been described. The MALDI-ISD with an oxidizing matrix is initiated by hydrogen abstraction from peptides to matrix molecules, leading to hydrogen-deficient peptide radicals. Subsequently, the C(α)-C and C(α)-H bonds are cleaved, forming the a•/x fragment pair and [M-2H], respectively. Those reactions competitively occur during MALDI-ISD processes. Our results suggest that the C(α)-H bond cleavage to form [M-2H] was induced by collisions between hydrogen-deficient peptide radicals and matrix molecules in the MALDI plume. In contrast, the C(α)-C bond cleavages occur via a unimolecular dissociation process and independently of the collision rate in the MALDI plume. The formation mechanism of the a-, b-, and d-series fragments are also described. We report 2,5-bis(2-hydroxyethoxy)-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (bisHE-TCNQ), being known as an organic semiconductor and an electron acceptor, as a novel suitable matrix for the MALDI-ISD of peptides via hydrogen abstraction.

  7. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  8. Molecular beam-thermal hydrogen desorption from palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, R. F. M.; Berardo, F. M. V.; Ribeiro, J. H. F.

    2010-04-15

    Among the most efficient techniques for hydrogen desorption monitoring, thermal desorption mass spectrometry is a very sensitive one, but in certain cases can give rise to uptake misleading results due to residual hydrogen partial pressure background variations. In this work one develops a novel thermal desorption variant based on the effusive molecular beam technique that represents a significant improvement in the accurate determination of hydrogen mass absorbed on a solid sample. The enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for trace hydrogen is on the order of 20%, and no previous calibration with a chemical standard is required. The kinetic information obtained from the hydrogen desorption mass spectra (at a constant heating rate of 1 deg. C/min) accounts for the consistency of the technique.

  9. Sequential desorption energy of hydrogen from nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Deepika,; Kumar, Rakesh; R, Kamal Raj.; Kumar, T. J. Dhilip

    2015-06-24

    We report reversible Hydrogen adsorption on Nickel clusters, which act as a catalyst for solid state storage of Hydrogen on a substrate. First-principles technique is employed to investigate the maximum number of chemically adsorbed Hydrogen molecules on Nickel cluster. We observe a maximum of four Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom, but the average Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom decrease with cluster size. The dissociative chemisorption energy per Hydrogen molecule and sequential desorption energy per Hydrogen atom on Nickel cluster is found to decrease with number of adsorbed Hydrogen molecules, which on optimization may help in economical storage and regeneration of Hydrogen as a clean energy carrier.

  10. Hydrogen Desorption and Adsorption Measurements on Graphite Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, C. C.; Ye, Y.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Witham, C. K.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Fultz, B.

    1998-01-01

    Graphite nanofibers were synthesized and their hydrogen desorption and adsorption properties are reported for 77 and 300 K. Catalysts were made by several different methods including chemical routes, mechanical alloying and gas condensation.

  11. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Aluminum Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wanseop; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jaeyong

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3 or alane) is known to store maximum 10.1 wt.% of hydrogen at relatively low temperature (< 100 degrees C), which partially fulfills the U.S. department of energy requirements for gravimetric loading capacity. However, its detailed mechanisms of appearing of different phases, structural stability, and dynamics of hydrogen desorption are still not clear. To understand the desorption properties of hydrogen in alane, thermodynamically stable α-AlH3 was synthesized by employing an ethereal reaction method. The dependence of pathways on phase formation and the properties of hydrogen evolution were investigated, and the results were compared with the ones for γ-AlH3. It was found that γ-AlH3 requires 10 degrees C higher than that of γ-AlH3 to form, and its decomposition rate demonstrated enhanced endothermic stabilities. For desorption, all hydrogen atoms of alane evolved under an isothermal condition at 138 degrees C in less than 1 hour, and the sample completely transformed to pure aluminum. Our results show that the total amount of desorbed hydrogen from α-AlH3 exceeded 9.05 wt.%, with a possibility of further increase. Easy synthesis, thermal stability, and a large amount of hydrogen desorption of alane fulfill the requirements for light-weight hydrogen storage materials once the pathway of hydrogen cycling is provided. PMID:27455747

  12. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Aluminum Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wanseop; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jaeyong

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3 or alane) is known to store maximum 10.1 wt.% of hydrogen at relatively low temperature (< 100 degrees C), which partially fulfills the U.S. department of energy requirements for gravimetric loading capacity. However, its detailed mechanisms of appearing of different phases, structural stability, and dynamics of hydrogen desorption are still not clear. To understand the desorption properties of hydrogen in alane, thermodynamically stable α-AlH3 was synthesized by employing an ethereal reaction method. The dependence of pathways on phase formation and the properties of hydrogen evolution were investigated, and the results were compared with the ones for γ-AlH3. It was found that γ-AlH3 requires 10 degrees C higher than that of γ-AlH3 to form, and its decomposition rate demonstrated enhanced endothermic stabilities. For desorption, all hydrogen atoms of alane evolved under an isothermal condition at 138 degrees C in less than 1 hour, and the sample completely transformed to pure aluminum. Our results show that the total amount of desorbed hydrogen from α-AlH3 exceeded 9.05 wt.%, with a possibility of further increase. Easy synthesis, thermal stability, and a large amount of hydrogen desorption of alane fulfill the requirements for light-weight hydrogen storage materials once the pathway of hydrogen cycling is provided.

  13. Superior hydrogen absorption and desorption behavior of Mg thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianglan; Wang, Yuntao; Xie, Lei; Zheng, Jie; Liu, Yang; Li, Xingguo

    Pd-capped Mg films prepared by magnetron sputtering achieved complete dehydrogenation in air at room temperature and behaved as favorable gasochromic switchable mirrors. Their cyclic hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics in air were investigated by using the Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The overall activation energy was 80 kJ mol -1, while the reaction orders controlling desorption were deduced to be n = 2 at 328 K and n = 1 at lower temperatures by analyzing the transmittance data. The hydrogen diffusion coefficient and the corresponding activation energy were calculated by electrochemical measurements. Mg thin films exhibited the smaller activation energy and remarkable diffusion kinetics at room temperature which implied potential applications in smart windows.

  14. Plutonium desorption from mineral surfaces at environmental concentrations of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Begg, James D; Zavarin, Mavrik; Kersting, Annie B

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of Pu adsorption and desorption behavior on mineral surfaces is crucial for understanding its environmental mobility. Here we demonstrate that environmental concentrations of H2O2 can affect the stability of Pu adsorbed to goethite, montmorillonite, and quartz across a wide range of pH values. In batch experiments where Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite for 21 days at pH 4, 6, and 8, the addition of 5-500 μM H2O2 resulted in significant Pu desorption. At pH 6 and 8 this desorption was transient with readsorption of the Pu to goethite within 30 days. At pH 4, no Pu readsorption was observed. Experiments with both quartz and montmorillonite at 5 μM H2O2 desorbed far less Pu than in the goethite experiments highlighting the contribution of Fe redox couples in controlling Pu desorption at low H2O2 concentrations. Plutonium(IV) adsorbed to quartz and subsequently spiked with 500 μM H2O2 resulted in significant desorption of Pu, demonstrating the complexity of the desorption process. Our results provide the first evidence of H2O2-driven desorption of Pu(IV) from mineral surfaces. We suggest that this reaction pathway coupled with environmental levels of hydrogen peroxide may contribute to Pu mobility in the environment. PMID:24815745

  15. Plutonium desorption from mineral surfaces at environmental concentrations of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Begg, James D; Zavarin, Mavrik; Kersting, Annie B

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of Pu adsorption and desorption behavior on mineral surfaces is crucial for understanding its environmental mobility. Here we demonstrate that environmental concentrations of H2O2 can affect the stability of Pu adsorbed to goethite, montmorillonite, and quartz across a wide range of pH values. In batch experiments where Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite for 21 days at pH 4, 6, and 8, the addition of 5-500 μM H2O2 resulted in significant Pu desorption. At pH 6 and 8 this desorption was transient with readsorption of the Pu to goethite within 30 days. At pH 4, no Pu readsorption was observed. Experiments with both quartz and montmorillonite at 5 μM H2O2 desorbed far less Pu than in the goethite experiments highlighting the contribution of Fe redox couples in controlling Pu desorption at low H2O2 concentrations. Plutonium(IV) adsorbed to quartz and subsequently spiked with 500 μM H2O2 resulted in significant desorption of Pu, demonstrating the complexity of the desorption process. Our results provide the first evidence of H2O2-driven desorption of Pu(IV) from mineral surfaces. We suggest that this reaction pathway coupled with environmental levels of hydrogen peroxide may contribute to Pu mobility in the environment.

  16. Thermal Desorption Analysis of Hydrogen in High Strength Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, M.; Hirakami, D.; Tarui, T.

    2012-02-01

    Thermal desorption analyses (TDA) were conducted in high strength martensitic steels containing carbon from 0.33 to 1.0 mass pct, which were charged with hydrogen at 1223 K (950 °C) under hydrogen of one atmospheric pressure and quenched to room temperature. In 0.33C steel, which had the highest M s temperature, only one desorption peak was observed around 373 K (100 °C), whereas two peaks, one at a similar temperature and the other around and above 573 K (300 °C), were observed in the other steels, the height of the second peak increasing with carbon content. In 0.82C steel, both peaks disappeared during exposure at room temperature in 1 week, whereas the peak heights decreased gradually over 2 weeks in specimens electrolytically charged with hydrogen and aged for varying times at room temperature. From computer simulation, by means of the McNabb-Foster theory coupled with theories of carbon segregation, these peaks are likely to be due to trapping of hydrogen in the strain fields and cores of dislocations, and presumably to a lesser extent in prior austenite grain boundaries. The results also indicate that carbon atoms prevent and even expel hydrogen from trapping sites during quenching and aging in these steels.

  17. An investigation of the desorption of hydrogen from lithium oxide using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kopasz, J.P.; Johnson, C.E.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1994-09-01

    The addition of hydrogen to the purge stream has been shown to enhance tritium release from ceramic breeder materials. In an attempt to determine the mechanism for this enhancement the authors have investigated the adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and water from lithium oxide (a leading candidate for the breeder material) by temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy. The results from these studies indicate that several different types of hydroxide groups are formed on the lithium oxide surface. They also suggest that under certain conditions hydride species form on the surface. The role of these species in tritium release from lithium oxide is discussed.

  18. Analysis of molecular hydrogen formation on low-temperature surfaces in temperature programmed desorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Vidali, G; Pirronello, V; Li, L; Roser, J; Manicó, G; Congiu, E; Mehl, H; Lederhendler, A; Perets, H B; Brucato, J R; Biham, O

    2007-12-13

    The study of the formation of molecular hydrogen on low-temperature surfaces is of interest both because it enables the exploration of elementary steps in the heterogeneous catalysis of a simple molecule and because of its applications in astrochemistry. Here, we report results of experiments of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate surfaces using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). In these experiments, beams of H and D atoms are irradiated on the surface of an amorphous silicate sample. The desorption rate of HD molecules is monitored using a mass spectrometer during a subsequent TPD run. The results are analyzed using rate equations, and the energy barriers of the processes leading to molecular hydrogen formation are obtained from the TPD data. We show that a model based on a single isotope provides the correct results for the activation energies for diffusion and desorption of H atoms. These results are used in order to evaluate the formation rate of H2 on dust grains under the actual conditions present in interstellar clouds. It is found that, under typical conditions in diffuse interstellar clouds, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H2 formation when the grain temperatures are between 9 and 14 K. This temperature window is within the typical range of grain temperatures in diffuse clouds. It is thus concluded that amorphous silicates are good candidates to be efficient catalysts of H2 formation in diffuse clouds.

  19. Hydrogenation of CO-bearing species on grains: unexpected chemical desorption of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Moudens, A.; Baouche, S.; Chaabouni, H.; Dulieu, F.

    2016-05-01

    The amount of methanol in the gas phase and the CO depletion from the gas phase are still open problems in astrophysics. In this work, we investigate solid-state hydrogenation of CO-bearing species via H-exposure of carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and methanol-thin films deposited on cold surfaces, paying attention to the possibility of a return to the gas phase. The products are probed via infrared spectroscopy (reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy), and two types of mass spectroscopy protocols: temperature-programmed desorption, and during-exposure desorption techniques. In the case of the [CO+H] reactive system, we have found that chemical desorption of CO is more efficient than H-addition reactions and HCO and H2CO formation; the studies of the [H2CO +H] reactive system show a strong competition between all surface processes, chemical desorption of H2CO, H-addition (CH3OH formation) and H-abstraction (CO formation); finally, [CH3OH + H] seems to be a non-reactive system and chemical desorption of methanol is not efficient. CO-bearing species present a see-saw mechanism between CO and H2CO balanced by the competition of H-addition and H2-abstraction that enhances the CO chemical desorption. The chemical network leading to methanol has to be reconsidered. The methanol formation on the surface of interstellar dust grain is still possible through CO+H reaction; nevertheless, its consumption of adsorbed H atoms should be higher than previously expected.

  20. Measurement of hydrogen solubility and desorption rate in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Erck, R.; Park, E.T.

    1997-04-01

    Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium was measured at a hydrogen pressure of 9.09 x 10{sup {minus}4} torr at temperatures between 250 and 700{degrees}C. Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium decreased with temperature. The measured desorption rate of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti is a thermally activated process; the activation energy is 0.067 eV. Oxygen-charged V-4Cr-4Ti specimens were also investigated to determine the effect of oxygen impurity on hydrogen solubility and desorption in the alloy. Oxygen in V-4Cr-4Ti increases hydrogen solubility and desorption kinetics. To determine the effect of a calcium oxide insulator coating on V-4Cr-4Ti, hydrogen solubility in lithium-calcium alloys that contained 0-8.0 percent calcium was also measured. The distribution ratio R of hydrogen between liquid lithium or lithium-calcium and V-4Cr-4Ti increased as temperature decreased (R {approx} 10 and 100 at 700 and 250{degrees}C, respectively). However at <267{degrees}C, solubility data could not be obtained by this method because of the slow kinetics of hydrogen permeation through the vanadium alloy.

  1. The effect of stress on hydrogen uptake and desorption by A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1991-01-01

    The uptake and desorption of hydrogen by A-286 as a function of stress was studied using electrochemical methods. It was found that the apparent surface hydrogen concentration, the mean hydrogen concentration, and the hydrogen distribution uniformity all increased up to a stress level 50 percent of yield and decreased thereafter. The value of the hydrogen diffusion coefficient was relatively unaffected by stress while the percent of trapped hydrogen appeared to decrease with increasing stress.

  2. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  3. Change in soft magnetic properties of Fe-based metallic glasses during hydrogen absorption and desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, L.; Lovas, A.; Kiss, L.F.

    2005-08-15

    The stress level can be altered in soft magnetic amorphous alloys by hydrogen absorption. The resulting changes in the soft magnetic parameters are reversible or irreversible, depending on the chemical composition. Some of these effects are demonstrated in Fe-B, Fe-W-B, and Fe-V-B glassy ribbons, in which various magnetic parameters are measured mainly during hydrogen desorption. The rate of hydrogen desorption is also monitored by measuring the pressure change in a hermetically closed bomb. The observed phenomena are interpreted on the basis of induced stresses and chemical interactions between the solute metal and hydrogen.

  4. GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

    1999-05-26

    Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N15H3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia.

  5. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process.

    PubMed

    Minissale, M; Dulieu, F

    2014-07-01

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O2) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N2 on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  6. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    SciTech Connect

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F.

    2014-07-07

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O{sub 2}) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N{sub 2} on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  7. Enhanced saturation coverages in adsorption-desorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tassel, Paul R.; Viot, Pascal; Tarjus, Gilles; Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Talbot, Julian

    2000-01-01

    Many experimental studies of protein deposition on solid surfaces involve alternating adsorption/desorption steps. In this paper, we investigate the effect of a desorption step (separating two adsorption steps) on the kinetics, the adsorbed-layer structure, and the saturation density. Our theoretical approach involves a density expansion of the pair distribution function and an application of an interpolation formula to estimate the saturation density as a function of the density at which the desorption process commences, ρ1, and the density of the depleted configuration, ρ2. The theory predicts an enhancement of the saturation density compared with that of a simple, uninterrupted random sequential adsorption (RSA) process and a maximum in the saturation density when ρ2=(2/3)ρ1. The theoretical results are in qualitative and semiquantitative agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  8. Numerical comparison of hydrogen desorption behaviors of metal hydride beds based on uranium and on zirconium-cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Kyoung, S.; Yoo, H.; Ju, H.

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, the hydrogen delivery capabilities of uranium (U) and zirconium-cobalt (ZrCo) are compared quantitatively in order to find the optimum getter materials for tritium storage. A three-dimensional hydrogen desorption model is applied to two identically designed cylindrical beds with the different materials, and hydrogen desorption simulations are then conducted. The simulation results show superior hydrogen delivery performance and easier thermal management capability for the U bed. This detailed analysis of the hydrogen desorption behaviors of beds with U and ZrCo will help to identify the optimal bed material, bed design, and operating conditions for the storage and delivery system in ITER. (authors)

  9. Advanced Hydrogen Liquefaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Joseph; Kromer, Brian; Neu, Ben; Jankowiak, Jerome; Barrett, Philip; Drnevich, Raymond

    2011-09-28

    The project identified and quantified ways to reduce the cost of hydrogen liquefaction, and reduce the cost of hydrogen distribution. The goal was to reduce the power consumption by 20% and then to reduce the capital cost. Optimizing the process, improving process equipment, and improving ortho-para conversion significantly reduced the power consumption of liquefaction, but by less than 20%. Because the efficiency improvement was less than the target, the program was stopped before the capital cost was addressed. These efficiency improvements could provide a benefit to the public to improve the design of future hydrogen liquefiers. The project increased the understanding of hydrogen liquefaction by modeling different processes and thoroughly examining ortho-para separation and conversion. The process modeling provided a benefit to the public because the project incorporated para hydrogen into the process modeling software, so liquefaction processes can be modeled more accurately than using only normal hydrogen. Adding catalyst to the first heat exchanger, a simple method to reduce liquefaction power, was identified, analyzed, and quantified. The demonstrated performance of ortho-para separation is sufficient for at least one identified process concept to show reduced power cost when compared to hydrogen liquefaction processes using conventional ortho-para conversion. The impact of improved ortho-para conversion can be significant because ortho para conversion uses about 20-25% of the total liquefaction power, but performance improvement is necessary to realize a substantial benefit. Most of the energy used in liquefaction is for gas compression. Improvements in hydrogen compression will have a significant impact on overall liquefier efficiency. Improvements to turbines, heat exchangers, and other process equipment will have less impact.

  10. Hydrogen recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2000-01-01

    A treatment process for a hydrogen-containing off-gas stream from a refinery, petrochemical plant or the like. The process includes three separation steps: condensation, membrane separation and hydrocarbon fraction separation. The membrane separation step is characterized in that it is carried out under conditions at which the membrane exhibits a selectivity in favor of methane over hydrogen of at least about 2.5.

  11. Electron-ion dynamics in laser-assisted desorption of hydrogen atoms from H-Si(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Varga, Kalman

    2011-09-15

    In the framework of real time real space time-dependent density functional theory we have studied the electron-ion dynamics of a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface H-Si(111) subjected to intense laser irradiation. Two surface fragments of different sizes have been used in the simulations. When the intensity and duration of the laser exceed certain levels (which depend on the wavelength) we observe the desorption of the hydrogen atoms, while the underlying silicon layer remains essentially undamaged. Upon further increase of the laser intensity, the chemical bonds between silicon atoms break as well. The results of the simulations suggest that with an appropriate choice of laser parameters it should be possible to remove the hydrogen layer from the H-Si(111) surface in a matter of a few tens of femtoseconds. We have also observed that at high laser field intensities (2-4 V/A in this work) the desorption occurs even when the laser frequency is smaller than the optical gap of the silicon surface fragments. Therefore, nonlinear phenomena must play an essential role in such desorption processes.

  12. A thermal desorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen trapping in polycrystalline α-uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R. S.; Forsyth, R. T.

    2015-03-14

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from polycrystalline α-uranium (α-U) was examined using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The goal was to identify the major trap sites for hydrogen and their associated trap energies. In polycrystalline α-U six TDS adsorption peaks were observed at temperatures of 521 K, 556 K, 607 K, 681 K, 793 K and 905 K. In addition, the desorption was determined to be second order based on peak shape. The position of the first three peaks was consistent with desorption from UH3. To identify the trap site corresponding to the high temperature peaks the data were compared to a plastically deformed sample and a high purity single crystal sample. The plastically deformed sample allowed the identification of trapping at dislocations while the single crystal sample allow for the identification of high angle boundaries and impurities. Thus, with respect to the desorption energy associated with each peak, values between 12.9 and 26.5 kJ/mole were measured.

  13. A thermal desorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen trapping in polycrystalline α-uranium

    DOE PAGES

    Lillard, R. S.; Forsyth, R. T.

    2015-03-14

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from polycrystalline α-uranium (α-U) was examined using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The goal was to identify the major trap sites for hydrogen and their associated trap energies. In polycrystalline α-U six TDS adsorption peaks were observed at temperatures of 521 K, 556 K, 607 K, 681 K, 793 K and 905 K. In addition, the desorption was determined to be second order based on peak shape. The position of the first three peaks was consistent with desorption from UH3. To identify the trap site corresponding to the high temperature peaks the data were compared tomore » a plastically deformed sample and a high purity single crystal sample. The plastically deformed sample allowed the identification of trapping at dislocations while the single crystal sample allow for the identification of high angle boundaries and impurities. Thus, with respect to the desorption energy associated with each peak, values between 12.9 and 26.5 kJ/mole were measured.« less

  14. The development of microstructure during hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination treatment of sintered neodymium-iron-boron-type magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, R. S.; Harris, I. R.; Walton, A.

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of the hydrogenation disproportionation desorption and recombination (HDDR) process on scrap sintered neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) type magnets have been investigated. At each stage of the process, the microstructural changes have been studied using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points and then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. This process was accelerated at particle surfaces and at free surfaces produced by any cracks in the powder particles. However, the recombination reaction appeared to initiate randomly throughout the particles with no apparent preference for particle surfaces or internal cracks. During the hydrogenation of the grain boundaries and triple junctions, the disproportionation reaction was, however, affected by the much higher oxygen content of the sintered NdFeB compared with that of the as-cast NdFeB alloys. Throughout the entire HDDR reaction the oxidised triple junctions (from the sintered structure) remained unreacted and hence, remained in their original form in the fine recombined microstructure. This resulted in a very significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure and this could lend to improved consolidation in the recycled magnets.

  15. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Huang, Xiaobo; Kang, Zhan

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  16. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Kang, Zhan; Huang, Xiaobo

    2015-08-28

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  17. Desorption of Hydrogen from Si(111) by Resonant Excitation of the Si-H Vibrational Stretch Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhiheng; Feldman, Leonard C.; Tolk, Norman; Zhang, Zhenyu; Cohen, Philip I

    2006-01-01

    Past efforts to achieve selective bond scission by vibrational excitation have been thwarted by energy thermalization. Here we report resonant photodesorption of hydrogen from a Si(111) surface using tunable infrared radiation. The wavelength dependence of the desorption yield peaks at 0.26 electron volt: the energy of the Si-H vibrational stretch mode. The desorption yield is quadratic in the infrared intensity. A strong H/D isotope effect rules out thermal desorption mechanisms, and electronic effects are not applicable in this low-energy regime. A molecular mechanism accounting for the desorption event remains elusive.

  18. Properties of hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination NdFeB powders prepared from recycled sintered magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périgo, E. A.; da Silva, S. C.; Martin, R. V.; Takiishi, H.; Landgraf, F. J. G.

    2012-04-01

    The effects of the hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination (HDDR) processing conditions on the microstructure and magnetic properties of NdFeB powders prepared from recycling sintered N42 grade magnets were evaluated. Temperatures below 840 oC and above 900 oC are deleterious to HDDR powders' properties. The hydrogen pressure, ranging from 60 to 135 kPa, has a major influence on the remanence compared to that on the intrinsic coercivity. The best magnetic properties (Jr = 0.58 T and μ0Hc = 1.15 T) were obtained with Trecomb = 860 °C, PH2 = 135 kPa, and trecomb = 330 s. Such coercivity value corresponds to 93% of the starting material, not achieved yet by optimizing the HDDR process and without using Dy.

  19. Absorption and desorption of hydrogen with particle beds of several zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuishi, N.; Fukada, S.

    1990-12-01

    For the storage of tritium and the recovery of hydrogen isotopes from inert gas mixtures in the fuel cycle of a D-T fusion reactor, metallic particle beds of elementary zirconium and vanadium, and intermetallic compounds of zirconium such as ZrV 2, Zr(V 0.83Fe 0.17) 2 and ZrNi are compared. One of the samples is packed in a quartz column, through which H 2-Ar gas mixtures at 50-600°C for absorption or Ar gas at 400-800°C for desorption is passed. In conclusion: activation of the Zr, ZrNi and ZrV 2 beds is easier than activation of the Zr(V 0.83Fe 0.17) 2 bed; any of the beds of the compounds can absorb hydrogen up to a concentration of less than 1 ppm at the outlet at 100°C; the hydrogen absorption rate of ZrV 2 is enhanced by the addition of iron to it; the amount of the hydrogen storage in ZrNi is the highest in this experimental condition; and absorption and desorption rates of the Zr(V 0.83Fe 0.17) 2 alloy are the fastest.

  20. Effects and Mechanisms of Mechanical Activation on Hydrogen Sorption/ Desorption of Nanoscale Lithium Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Leon, L.; Yang, Gary, Z.; Crosby, Kyle; Wwan, Xufei. Zhong, Yang; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Osborn, William; Hu, Jianzhi; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2012-04-26

    The objective of this project is to investigate and develop novel, mechanically activated, nanoscale Li3N-based and LiBH4-based materials that are able to store and release {approx}10 wt% hydrogen at temperatures near 100 C with a plateau hydrogen pressure of less than 10 bar. Four (4) material systems have been investigated in the course of this project in order to achieve the project objective. These 4 systems are (i) LiNH2+LiH, (ii) LiNH2+MgH2, (iii) LiBH4, and (iv) LiBH4+MgH2. The key findings we have obtained from these 4 systems are summarized below. *The thermodynamic driving forces for LiNH2+LiH and LiBH4 systems are not adequate to enable H2 release at temperatures < 100 C. *Hydrogen release in the solid state for all of the four systems is controlled by diffusion, and thus is a slow process. *LiNH2+MgH2 and LiBH4+MgH2 systems, although possessing proper thermodynamic driving forces to allow for H2 release at temperatures < 100 C, have sluggish reaction kinetics because of their diffusion-controlled rate-limiting steps. *Reducing particles to the nanometer length scale (< 50 nm) can improve the thermodynamic driving force to enable H2 release at near ambient temperature, while simultaneously enhancing the reaction kinetics as well as changing the diffusion-controlled rate-limiting step to gas desorption-controlled rate-limiting step. This phenomenon has been demonstrated with LiBH4 and offers the hope that further work along this direction will make one of the material systems, i.e., LiBH4, LiBH4+MgH2 and LiNH2+MgH2, possess the desired thermodynamic properties and rapid H2 uptake/release kinetics for on-board applications. Many of the findings and knowledge gained from this project have been published in archival refereed journal articles [1-15] and are accessible by general public. Thus, to avoid a bulky final report, the key findings and knowledge gained from this project will be succinctly summarized, particularly for those findings and knowledge

  1. Gas Diffusion in Metals: Fundamental Study of Helium-Point Defect Interactions in Iron and Kinetics of Hydrogen Desorption from Zirconium Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang

    influence of pre-existing defects on helium behavior in iron is studied by applying a hybrid model, which includes the defect evolution during neutron irradiation and the subsequent He ion implantation and THDS. These modeling predictions will be assessed in future experiments. The hydrogen desorption process from zirconium hydride and zirconium in vacuum is also studied by coordinated experimental and modeling methods. The production and verification of the desired delta-zirconium hydride is discussed while thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is employed to obtain the hydrogen desorption spectra directly. In addition, a one-dimensional two-phase moving boundary model coupled with a kinetic description of hydrogen desorption from a two-phase region of delta-ZrH1.6+/-n and α-Zr is developed to compare with the TDS experimental results.

  2. Hydrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael; Xie, Xiaobing; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul; Wright, Harold

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  3. Tuning the hydrogen desorption of Mg(BH4)2 through Zn alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, D.; Thonhauser, T.

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of Zn alloying on the hydrogen desorption properties of Mg(BH4)2 using ab initio simulations. In particular, we investigate formation/reaction enthalpies/entropies for a number of compounds and reactions at a wide range of temperatures and Zn concentrations in Mg1-xZnx(BH4)2. Our results show that the thermodynamic stability of the resulting material can be significantly lowered through Zn alloying. We find, e.g., that the solid solution Mg2/3Zn1/3(BH4)2 has a reaction enthalpy for the complete hydrogen desorption of only 25.3 kJ/mol H2—a lowering of 15 kJ/mol H2 compared to the pure phase and a corresponding lowering in critical temperature of 123 K. In addition, we find that the enthalpy of mixing is rather small and show that the decrease in reaction enthalpy with Zn concentration is approximately linear.

  4. Removal of mercury contamination on primary mass standards by hydrogen plasma and thermal desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, P.; Marti, K.; Russi, S.

    2013-02-01

    The removal of a high mercury contamination on a Pt reference mass by thermal desorption was studied directly by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently the contamination mechanism was investigated. Samples of PtIr and AuPt exposed to vapour of mercury in air were studied using XPS and gravimetric mass determination. We find an extremely rapid mercury contamination which takes place within minutes and reaches an initial equilibrium state after 2 h to 4 h. Roughly 1 to 2 monolayers of mercury adsorbs directly on the metal surface. A natural contamination of carbon and oxygen compounds is at the top. Due to the accumulation of mercury, we find a gain in mass which corresponds to 20 µg to 26 µg for a PtIr standard. XPS data from a historical Pt standard give strong evidence for further average mercury accumulation of (1.3 ± 0.1) µg/year during a period of more than a century. This can be explained by a two-step mechanism presented in this study. The speed of contamination depends on the initial surface conditions. Polishing activates the surface and results in an enhanced accumulation of mercury. Natural contamination by C and O can delay but not prevent contamination. We further demonstrate that the mercury contamination can be removed by both hydrogen plasma and thermal desorption. The removal of mercury by hydrogen plasma can directly be attributed to the synthesis of gaseous mercury dihydrides at low pressures.

  5. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of vacuum UV photo-processed methanol ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, D. M.; Bossa, J.-B.; Linnartz, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Methanol in the interstellar medium mainly forms upon sequential hydrogenation of solid CO. With typical abundances of up to 15% (with respect to water) it is an important constituent of interstellar ices where it is considered as a precursor in the formation of large and complex organic molecules (COMs), e.g. upon vacuum UV (VUV) photo-processing or exposure to cosmic rays. Aims: This study aims at detecting novel complex organic molecules formed during the VUV photo-processing of methanol ice in the laboratory using a technique more sensitive than regular surface diagnostic tools. In addition, the formation kinetics of the main photo-products of methanol are unravelled for an astronomically relevant temperature (20 K) and radiation dose. Methods: The VUV photo-processing of CH3OH ice is studied by applying laser desorption post-ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDPI TOF-MS), and analysed by combining molecule-specific fragmentation and desorption features. Results: The mass spectra correspond to fragment ions originating from a number of previously recorded molecules and from new COMs, such as the series (CO)xH, with x = 3 and y < 3x-1, to which prebiotic glycerin belongs. The formation of these large COMs has not been reported in earlier photolysis studies and suggests that such complex species may form in the solid state under interstellar conditions.

  6. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15Ni-CNT Nanocomposite Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enayati, M. H.; Karimzadeh, F.; Jafari, M.; Sabooni, S.

    2015-03-01

    In this research, the effects of nanocrystallization and incorporation of aluminum, titanium, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on hydrogen desorption behavior of Mg2Ni alloy were investigated. Toward this purpose, nanocrystalline Mg2Ni intermetallic compound with average grain size of 20 nm was prepared by ball milling of elemental magnesium and nickel powders. Mg2Ni powder was then ball milled with aluminum and titanium powders for 20 h to dissolve these elements into the Mg2Ni structure, leading to the formation of Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15Ni compound. The elemental x-ray mapping analysis revealed the uniform dissolution of aluminum and titanium inside the Mg2Ni structure. Mg2Ni and Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15Ni compounds were further ball milled with 3 wt.% CNT for 5 h. The high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed that CNTs have retained their tubular shape after ball-milling process. The hydrogen desorption properties of the samples were identified using a Sieverts-type apparatus at 473 K. The Mg2Ni, Mg2Ni-CNT, and Mg1.7Ti0.15Al0.15-CNT samples showed the desorbed hydrogen of 0.17, 0.25, and 0.28 wt.% after 1 h, respectively, indicating 47 and 65% increase in the hydrogen desorption capability of Mg2Ni via CNT addition and co-presence of aluminum-titanium-CNT. The direct hydrogen diffusion through CNTs and development of local atomic distortion due to substitution of magnesium atoms by aluminum and titanium appears to be responsible for enhancement of desorption behavior of Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15-3 wt.% CNT.

  7. An investigation of the desorption of hydrogen from lithium oxide using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kopasz, J.P.; Johnson, C.E.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1995-04-01

    The addition of hydrogen to the purge stream has been shown to enhance tritium release from ceramic breeder materials; however, this added hydrogen can lead to increased costs in the tritium purification system. The objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the interactions between hydrogen and lithium oxide surfaces so that the authors can take full advantage of the observed enhancement of tritium release caused by hydrogen addition without incurring high costs in the tritium purification plant.

  8. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    DOEpatents

    Hindin, Saul G.; Roberts, George W.

    1980-08-12

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

  9. Angular distributions of surface produced H{sup −} ions for reflection and desorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M. Kasuya, T.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2014-02-15

    A numerical simulation code, Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target, has been run to clarify the effects due to the incident angle of hydrogen flux onto surface collision cascade in the subsurface region of a Cs covered Mo plasma grid. The code has taken into account the threshold energy for negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ions to leave the surface. This modification has caused the shift of energy distribution functions of H{sup −} from that of hydrogen atoms leaving the surface. The results have shown that large incident angle of hydrogen particle tilt the angular distribution of reflection component, while it caused a small effect onto the angular distribution of desorption component. The reflection coefficient has increased, while the desorption yield has decreased for increased angle of incidence measured from the surface normal.

  10. Angular distributions of surface produced H(-) ions for reflection and desorption processes.

    PubMed

    Wada, M; Kasuya, T; Kenmotsu, T; Sasao, M

    2014-02-01

    A numerical simulation code, Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target, has been run to clarify the effects due to the incident angle of hydrogen flux onto surface collision cascade in the subsurface region of a Cs covered Mo plasma grid. The code has taken into account the threshold energy for negative hydrogen (H(-)) ions to leave the surface. This modification has caused the shift of energy distribution functions of H(-) from that of hydrogen atoms leaving the surface. The results have shown that large incident angle of hydrogen particle tilt the angular distribution of reflection component, while it caused a small effect onto the angular distribution of desorption component. The reflection coefficient has increased, while the desorption yield has decreased for increased angle of incidence measured from the surface normal.

  11. The Effect of Platinum-coatings on Hydrogen- and Water-absorption and Desorption Characteristics of Lithium Zirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, B.; Bandow, S.; Nagata, S.; Saito, K.; Tokunaga, K.; Morita, K.

    Hydrogen (H)- and water (H2O)-storage and desorption characteristics of 25 nm thick Pt films onLi2ZrO3composite materials, exposed to normal air at room temperature, have been investigated by means of elastic recoil detection (ERD), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), weight gain measurement (WGM), and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) techniques. It was found by the ERD and TDS that H and H2O were absorbed into the Pt-coated Li2ZrO3 in air at room temperature and desorbed from it in vacuum at much low temperatures of approximately 317 and 309 K, respectively. In addition, the WGM and TDS spectra revealed that the absorption and desorption characters ofsome gases such as CH4, CO, and CO2including H as well as H2Ointo the Li2ZrO3 bulk were improved by Pt deposition.

  12. Electron-stimulated desorption study of hydrogen-exposed aluminum films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, CH.; Bujor, M.; Poppa, H.

    1984-01-01

    H2 adsorption of evaporated clean and H2-exposed aluminum films is investigated by using the electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) method. A strong H(+)ESD signal is observed on a freshly evaporated aluminum surface which is clean according to previously proposed cleanlines criteria. An increased H(+) yield on H2 exposure is also observed. However, the increasing rate of H(+) emission could be directly correlated with small increases in H2O partial pressure during H2 exposure. It is proposed that the oxidation of aluminum by water vapor and subsequent adsorption of H2 or water is the primary process of the enhanced high H(+) yield during H2 exposure.

  13. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Ritter, James A.; Ebner, Armin D.; Wang, Jun; Holland, Charles E.

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  14. Role of desorption processes in the formation of K in tenuous planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madey, T. E.; Yakshinskiy, B. V.

    2001-11-01

    We will discuss recent laboratory data indicating that DIET processes (desorption induced by electronic transitions) may affect planetary atmospheres. We focus on the origins of neutral potassium vapor in the atmospheres of the planet Mercury, the Moon, and the icy satellites of Jupiter. We are conducting ultrahigh-vacuum studies of adsorption and desorption of atomic potassium on model mineral systems (SiO2 thin films), as well as on models of icy satellite surfaces (condensed water ice films). We found evidence previously that non-thermal processes - mainly photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) by UV photons - may play a dominant role in desorption of Na atoms from the lunar surface[1], and the present results indicate that K can be desorbed by PSD. The desorption mechanism involves a photon-excited charge-exchange process, in which adsorbed ionic K is converted to neutral K, which desorbs. Recent data on desorption from a lunar sample will be discussed. [1] B. V. Yakshinskiy and T. E. Madey, Nature 400(1999) 642; Surface Science 451 (2000) 160. This work has been supported in part by NASA

  15. Hydrogen in the Methanol Production Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralj, Anita Kovac; Glavic, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very important industrial gas in chemical processes. It is very volatile; therefore, it can escape from the process units and its mass balance is not always correct. In many industrial processes where hydrogen is reacted, kinetics are often related to hydrogen pressure. The right thermodynamic properties of hydrogen can be found for…

  16. Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, M.; Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.

    1996-10-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The key consequences of SERP are: (i) reformation reaction is carried out at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than that in a conventional SMR reactor (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (ii) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 98+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (iii) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The first phase of the program has focused on the development of a sorbent for CO{sub 2} which has (a) reversible CO{sub 2} capacity >0.3 mmol/g at low partial pressures of CO{sub 2} (0.1 - 1.0 atm) in the presence of excess steam (pH{sub 2}O/pCO{sub 2}>20) at 400-500{degrees}C and (b) fast sorption-desorption kinetics for CO{sub 2}, at 400-500{degrees}C. Several families of supported sorbents have been identified that meet the target CO{sub 2} capacity. A few of these sorbents have been tested under repeated sorption/desorption cycles and extended exposure to high pressure steam at 400-500{degrees}C. One sorbent has been scaled up to larger quantities (2-3 kg) and tested in the laboratory process equipment for sorption and desorption kinetics of CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2}, sorption and desorption kinetics are desirably fast. This was a critical path item for the first phase of the program and now has been successfully demonstrated. A reactor has been designed that will allow nearly isothermal operation for SERP-SMR. This reactor was integrated into an overall process flow diagram for the SERP-SMR process.

  17. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    DOEpatents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  18. Improvement in hydrogen desorption from β- and γ-MgH2 upon transition-metal doping.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tanveer; Maark, Tuhina Adit; Chakraborty, Sudip; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-08-24

    A thorough study of the structural, electronic, and hydrogen-desorption properties of β- and γ-MgH2 phases substituted by selected transition metals (TMs) is performed through first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The TMs considered herein include Sc, V, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Y, Zr, and Nb, which substitute for Mg at a doping concentration of 3.125 % in both the hydrides. This insertion of TMs causes a variation in the cell volumes of β- and γ-MgH2 . The majority of the TM dopants decrease the lattice constants, with Ni resulting in the largest reduction. From the formation-energy calculations, it is predicted that except for Cu and Ni, the mixing of all the selected TM dopants with the MgH2 phases is exothermic. The selected TMs also influence the stability of both β- and γ-MgH2 and cause destabilization by weakening the MgH bonds. Our results show that doping with certain TMs can facilitate desorption of hydrogen from β- and γ-MgH2 at much lower temperatures than from their pure forms. The hydrogen adsorption strengths are also studied by density-of-states analysis.

  19. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Wade C.; Lewis, Charlotte R.; Openshaw, Anna P.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration.

  20. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wade C; Lewis, Charlotte R; Openshaw, Anna P; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27380389

  1. Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

    2013-06-25

    The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

  2. Shell middle distillate hydrogenation process

    SciTech Connect

    Lucien, J.P.; Berg, J.P. van den; Hooijdonk, H.M.J.H. van; Thielemans, G.L.B.; Germaine, G.; Gjers, M.

    1994-12-31

    The strive towards cleaner environment has lead to low sulfur specifications for middle distillate fuels. In addition compositional specifications are presently debated. Thus, to meet future emissions standards regarding, specifically, particulates emissions, the motor industry calls for improved automotive gasoil quality. Although automotive gasoil quality affects emissions from diesel engines it is considered less influential than engine design and maintenance. Sulfur, density and cetane number are the fuel properties having the greatest influence on diesel engine emissions although also aromatics and endpoint specifications have been defined in environmentally adopted government initiatives. This paper reviews the options which are available to tackle these new requirements. The high severity single stage concept (using conventional mixed sulfides catalysts) will be discussed in its potential to meet more severe product requirements as well as in terms of its limitations, especially at the point of aromatics saturation and cetaine upgrading. Furthermore, it is shown that the option of severe hydrotreating followed by hydrogenation with conventional noble metal catalysts is preferred if deep aromatics saturation is aimed at. However, this conventional two stage concept has limitations with respect to heaviness and sulfur and nitrogen content of feedstocks. The new Shell Middle Distillate Hydrogenation (SMDH) technology, applying a (semi) two stage approach based on the Shell developed hydrogenation catalyst is presented. The SMDH process will be discussed in its potential to break the limitations of the conventional options. The new catalyst is crucial in this process and allows a highly integrated mode of operation. A number of applications of this novel process will be discussed.

  3. UV photoprocessing of CO2 ice: a complete quantification of photochemistry and photon-induced desorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Doménech, R.; Manzano-Santamaría, J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Cruz-Díaz, G. A.; Chen, Y.-J.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Ice mantles that formed on top of dust grains are photoprocessed by the secondary ultraviolet (UV) field in cold and dense molecular clouds. UV photons induce photochemistry and desorption of ice molecules. Experimental simulations dedicated to ice analogs under astrophysically relevant conditions are needed to understand these processes. Aims: We present UV-irradiation experiments of a pure CO2 ice analog. Calibration of the quadrupole mass spectrometer allowed us to quantify the photodesorption of molecules to the gas phase. This information was added to the data provided by the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer on the solid phase to obtain a complete quantitative study of the UV photoprocessing of an ice analog. Methods: Experimental simulations were performed in an ultra-high vacuum chamber. Ice samples were deposited onto an infrared transparent window at 8K and were subsequently irradiated with a microwave-discharged hydrogen flow lamp. After irradiation, ice samples were warmed up until complete sublimation was attained. Results: Photolysis of CO2 molecules initiates a network of photon-induced chemical reactions leading to the formation of CO, CO3, O2, and O3. During irradiation, photon-induced desorption of CO and, to a lesser extent, O2 and CO2 took place through a process called indirect desorption induced by electronic transitions, with maximum photodesorption yields (Ypd) of ~1.2 × 10-2 molecules incident photon-1, ~9.3 × 10-4 molecules incident photon-1, and ~1.1 × 10-4 molecules incident photon-1, respectively. Conclusions: Calibration of mass spectrometers allows a direct quantification of photodesorption yields instead of the indirect values that were obtained from infrared spectra in most previous works. Supplementary information provided by infrared spectroscopy leads to a complete quantification, and therefore a better understanding, of the processes taking place in UV-irradiated ice mantles. Appendix A is available in

  4. Effectiveness of passivation techniques on hydrogen desorption in a tritium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodall, Steven Michael

    2009-11-01

    Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. It is used as a fuel in fusion reactors, a booster material in nuclear weapons and as a light source in commercial applications. When tritium is used in fusion reactors, and especially when used in the manufacture of nuclear weapons, purity is critical. For U.S. Department of Energy use, tritium is recycled by Savannah River Site in South Carolina and is processed to a minimum purity of 99.5%. For use elsewhere in the country, it must be shipped and stored, while maintaining the highest purity possible. As an isotope of hydrogen it exchanges easily with the most common isotope of hydrogen, protium. Stainless steel bottles are used to transport and store tritium. Protium, present in air, becomes associated in and on the surface of stainless steel during and after the manufacture of the steel. When filled, the tritium within the bottle exchanges with the protium in and on the surface of the stainless steel, slowly contaminating the pure tritium with protium. The stainless steel is therefore passivated to minimize the protium outgrowth of the bottles into the pure tritium. This research is to determine how effective different passivation techniques are in minimizing the contamination of tritium with protium. Additionally, this research will attempt to determine a relationship between surface chemistry of passivated steels and protium contamination of tritium. The conclusions of this research found that passivated bottles by two companies which routinely provide passivated materials to the US Department of Energy provide low levels of protium outgrowth into pure tritium. A bottle passivated with a material to prevent excessive corrosion in a highly corrosive environment, and a clean and polished bottle provided outgrowth rates roughly twice those of the passivated bottles above. Beyond generally high levels of chromium, oxygen, iron and nickel in the passivated bottles, there did not appear to be a strong correlation

  5. Fate and transport with material response characterization of green sorption media for copper removal via desorption process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Lin, Kuen-Song; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple adsorption and desorption cycles are required to achieve the reliable operation of copper removal and recovery. A green sorption media mixture composed of recycled tire chunk, expanded clay aggregate, and coconut coir was evaluated in this study for its desorptive characteristics as a companion study of the corresponding adsorption process in an earlier publication. We conducted a screening of potential desorbing agents, batch desorption equilibrium and kinetic studies, and batch tests through 3 adsorption/desorption cycles. The desorbing agent screening revealed that hydrochloric acid has good potential for copper desorption. Equilibrium data fit the Freundlich isotherm, whereas kinetic data had high correlation with the Lagergren pseudo second-order model and revealed a rapid desorption reaction. Batch equilibrium data over 3 adsorption/desorption cycles showed that the coconut coir and media mixture were the most resilient, demonstrating they could be used through 3 or more adsorption/desorption cycles. FE-SEM imaging, XRD, and EDS analyses supported the batch adsorption and desorption results showing significant surface sorption of CuO species in the media mixture and coconut coir, followed by partial desorption using 0.1 M HCl as a desorbing agent. PMID:27081796

  6. Process for thermochemically producing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, Donald M.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen is produced by the reaction of water with chromium sesquioxide and strontium oxide. The hydrogen producing reaction is combined with other reactions to produce a closed chemical cycle for the thermal decomposition of water.

  7. Synergy on catalytic effect of Fe-Zr additives mixed in different proportions on the hydrogen desorption from MgH{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, A.; Bazzanella, N.; Checchetto, R.; Miotello, A.

    2009-05-18

    Mg films with mixed Fe and Zr metallic additives were prepared by rf magnetron sputtering keeping the total metal content constant, about 7 at. %, and changing the [Fe]/[Zr] ratio. Isothermal hydrogen desorption curves showed that the kinetics depends on [Fe]/[Zr] ratio and is fastest when the [Fe]/[Zr] ratio is {approx}1.8. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed formation of Fe nanoclusters and Mg grain refinement. The improvement of the hydrogen desorption kinetics can be explained by the presence of atomically dispersed Zr and Fe nanoclusters acting as nucleation centers, as well as Mg grain refinement.

  8. Investigation of the metallurgical factors affecting hydrogen embrittlement of solution heat treated and aged Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr (wt.%) employing fracture, microscopy and desorption methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudett, Michelle Anne

    range of 325-490sp°C, hydrogen release was not observed until the oxide film was dissolved and sufficient O diffusion into the matrix occurred. Mixed diffusion-surface recombination controlled desorption was observed with apparent activation energies for desorption that agree well with theory. At intermediate temperatures (490-620sp°C), isothermal egress showed a change in the rate controlling process from diffusion control to surface recombination control.

  9. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this mission-oriented research program is the production of renewable hydrogen for fossil fuel processing. This program will build upon promising results that have been obtained in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the utilization of intact microalgae for photosynthetic water splitting. In this process, specially adapted algae are used to perform the light-activated cleavage of water into its elemental constituents, molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of their hydrogen-producing capability. These are: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the original development of an evacuated photobiological reactor for real-world engineering applications; (6) the potential for using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. The significance of each of these points in the context of a practical system for hydrogen production is discussed. This program will be enhanced by collaborative research between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and senior faculty members at Duke University, the University of Chicago, and Iowa State University. The special contribution that these organizations and faculty members will make is access to strains and mutants of unicellular algae that will potentially have useful properties for hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting.

  10. The effect of chars and their water extractable organic carbon (WEOC) fractions on atrazine adsorption-desorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoski, I.; Jablonowski, N.; Burauel, P.; Miano, T.

    2012-04-01

    Chars are carbonaceous material produced from different type of biomass by pyrolysis. They are known as highly effective adsorbents for atrazine therefore limiting its degradation and its diffusion into the aqueous phase. The aim of the present work is to study the effects of different chars and char's derived WEOC on atrazine sorption-desorption processes. The five chars been used in this study derived from: 1) fast pyrolysis from hard wood (FP1); 2) flash pyrolysis from soft wood (FP2); 3) slow pyrolysis from deciduous wood (CC); 4) gasification from deciduous wood (GC) and 5) the market, purchased as activated charcoal standard (AC). Short-term batch equilibration tests were conducted to assess the sorption-desorption behavior of 14C-labeled atrazine on the chars, with a special focus on the desorption behavior using successive dilution method with six consecutive desorption step. Chars and their WEOC were physically and chemically characterized. Results demonstrate that biomass and pyrolysis process used to produce chars affect their physical and chemical properties, and atrazine adsorption-desorption behavior. Atrazine desorption resulted from the positive and competitive interactions between WEOC and chars surfaces. WEOC pool play important role in atrazine adsorption-desorption behavior. FP1 and FP2 with higher concentration of WEOC showed higher desorption rates, whereas GC, CC and AC with insignificant WEOC concentration strongly adsorb atrazine with low desorption rates. According to our results, when high WEOC pools chars are concerned, an increase in atrazine desorption can be observed but further studies would help in confirming the present results.

  11. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  12. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, R.; Randhava, S.S.; Tsai, S.P.

    1997-09-02

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} laden permeate. 1 fig.

  13. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Rathin; Randhava, Sarabjit S.; Tsai, Shih-Perng

    1997-01-01

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H.sub.2 O.sub.2 laden permeate.

  14. Trapping state of hydrogen isotopes in carbon and graphite investigated by thermal desorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, H.; Tanabe, T.; Shikama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) has been investigated to obtain fundamental information of tritium behavior in graphite and carbon materials especially at high temperatures. 29 brands of graphite, HOPG, glassy carbon and CFC materials charged with deuterium gas are tested up to the temperature of 1735 K with a heating rate of 0.1 K/s. TDS spectra have five peaks at 600-700 K, around 900 K, 1200 K, 1300-1450 K and 1600-1650 K. The amounts of released deuterium have been compared with crystallographic parameters derived from XRD analysis. The results can be summarized as follows. First, TDS spectra of deuterium were quite varied among the samples tested, such as existence of peaks, peak temperatures and release amounts of deuterium. Secondly, TDS spectra may consist of five peaks, which are peak 1 (600-700 K), peak 2 (around 900 K), peak 3 (around 1200 K), peak 4 (1300-1450 K) and peak 5 (1600-1650 K). Thirdly, the correlations between the estimated surface area of edge surface and the total amount of released deuterium could be observed for peaks 4 and 5. Fourthly, high energy trapping site (peak 5) may exist even at edge surface or a near surface region, not only for intercalary. And fifth, in order to obtain the lower tritium retention for graphite and CFC materials, the material should be composed of a filler grain with a smaller crystallite size or having the smaller net edge surface in its structure. It is shown that heat treatment does not reduce originally existing trapping sites but trapping sites generated by neutron irradiation for instance can be reduced in some degree.

  15. Hydrogen and water desorption on the moon - Approximate, on-line simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanford, G. E.; Borgesen, P.; Moeller, W.; Maurette, M.; Monart, B.

    1985-01-01

    The basic models that have been used over the last 15 years to describe the accumulation and release of solar wind-related species at lunar conditions at the lunar surface are reviewed. Recent results which show that these models are not totally valid are discussed. It is suggested that mature lunar surface soils may act as efficient converters for transforming the flux of energetic solar wind protons into a flux of low-energy hydrogen and water molecules continuously injected into the lunar atmosphere.

  16. Visualization and Measurement of Adsorption/Desorption Process of Ethanol in Activated Carbon Adsorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hitoshi; Murata, Kenta; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yasushi

    Adsorption refrigerator is one of the efficient tools for waste heat recovery, because the system is driven by heat at relative low temperature. However, the coefficient of performance is low due to its batch operation and the heat capacity of the adsorber. In order to improve the performance, it is important to optimize the configuration to minimize the amount of driving heat, and to clarify adsorption/desorption phenomena in transient conditions. Neutron radiography was applied to visualize and measure the adsorption amount distribution in an adsorber. The visualization experiments had been performed at the neutron radiography facility of E-2 port of Kyoto University Research Reactor. Activated carbon and ethanol were used as the adsorbent and refrigerant. From the acquired radiographs, adsorption amount was quantitatively measured by applying the umbra method using a checkered neutron absorber with boron powder. Then, transient adsorption and desorption processes of a rectangular adsorber with 84 mm in width, 50 mm in height and 20 mm in depth were visualized. As the result, the effect of fins in the adsorbent layer on the adsorption amount distribution was clearly visualized.

  17. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION OF A THERMAL DESORPTION/UV PHOTOLYSIS PROCESS FOR DECONTAMINATING SOILS CONTAINING HERBICIDE ORANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This treatability study report presents the results of laboratory and field tests on the effectiveness of a new decontamination process for soils containing 2,4-D/2,4,5-T and traces of dioxin. The process employs three operations, thermal desorption, condensation and absorp...

  18. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    SciTech Connect

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-21

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53–75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  19. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53-75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  20. First-principles study of water desorption from montmorillonite surface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Meng, Yingfeng; Liu, Houbin; Yang, Mingli

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge about water desorption is important to give a full picture of water diffusion in montmorillonites (MMT), which is a driving factor in MMT swelling. The desorption paths and energetics of water molecules from the surface of MMT with trapped Li(+), Na(+) or K(+) counterions were studied using periodic density functional theory calculations. Two paths--surface and vacuum desorption--were designed for water desorption starting from a stationary structure in which water bonds with both the counterion and the MMT surface. Surface desorption is energetically more favorable than vacuum desorption due to water-surface hydrogen bonds that help stabilize the intermediate structure of water released from the counterion. The energy barriers of water desorption are in the order of Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+), which can be attributed to the short ionic radius of Li(+), which favors strong binding with the water molecule. The temperature dependence of water adsorption and desorption rates were compared based on the computed activation energies. Our calculations reveal that the water desorption on the MMT surface has a different mechanism from water adsorption, which results from surface effects favoring stabilization of water conformers during the desorption process. PMID:27083565

  1. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.; Tevault, C.V.

    1995-06-01

    In the fundamental biological process of photosynthesis, atmospheric carbon dioxide is reduced to carbohydrate using water as the source of electrons with simultaneous evolution of molecular oxygen: H{sub 2}O + CO{sub 2} + light {yields} O{sub 2} + (CH{sub 2}O). It is well established that two light reactions, Photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) working in series, are required to perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Experimental data supporting the two-light reaction model are based on the quantum requirement for complete photosynthesis, spectroscopy, and direct biochemical analysis. Some algae also have the capability to evolve molecular hydrogen in a reaction energized by the light reactions of photosynthesis. This process, now known as biophotolysis, can use water as the electron donor and lead to simultaneous evolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen. In green algae, hydrogen evolution requires prior incubation under anaerobic conditions. Atmospheric oxygen inhibits hydrogen evolution and also represses the synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme. CO{sub 2} fixation competes with proton reduction for electrons relased from the photosystems. Interest in biophotolysis arises from both the questions that it raises concerning photosynthesis and its potential practical application as a process for converting solar energy to a non-carbon-based fuel. Prior data supported the requirement for both Photosystem I and Photosystem II in spanning the energy gap necessary for biophotolysis of water to oxygen and hydrogen. In this paper we report the at PSII alone is capable of driving sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen in an anaerobically adapted PSI-deficient strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, mutant B4, and that CO{sub 2} competes as an electron acceptor.

  2. Structural transformation of hydrogen-adsorbed Si(111)-√3×√3-Ag surfaces induced by electron-stimulated desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    1997-07-01

    Atomic hydrogen irradiated Si(111)-√3×√3-Ag surfaces, which involve nanometer size Ag clusters and hydrogen terminated regions, are studied by combined surface analysis with ultrahigh-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (UHV-SEM), scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM), microprobe reflection high-energy electron diffration (μ-RHEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Electron beam irradiation onto this surface results in disappearance of the Ag clusters, and subsequent low-temperature annealing at 275°C transforms the surface to the original √3×√3-Ag structure. Hydrogen removal from the Si surface induced by electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) and surface diffusion of Ag atoms on the bare regions by low-temperature annealing explain this structural transformation.

  3. IN-SITU PROBING OF RADIATION-INDUCED PROCESSING OF ORGANICS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ICE ANALOGS-NOVEL LASER DESORPTION LASER IONIZATION TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Yang Rui E-mail: ryang73@ustc.edu

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the evolution of organic molecules in ice grains in the interstellar medium (ISM) under cosmic rays, stellar radiation, and local electrons and ions is critical to our understanding of the connection between ISM and solar systems. Our study is aimed at reaching this goal of looking directly into radiation-induced processing in these ice grains. We developed a two-color laser-desorption laser-ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopic method (2C-MALDI-TOF), similar to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy. Results presented here with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) probe molecules embedded in water-ice at 5 K show for the first time that hydrogenation and oxygenation are the primary chemical reactions that occur in astrophysical ice analogs when subjected to Ly{alpha} radiation. We found that hydrogenation can occur over several unsaturated bonds and the product distribution corresponds to their stabilities. Multiple hydrogenation efficiency is found to be higher at higher temperatures (100 K) compared to 5 K-close to the interstellar ice temperatures. Hydroxylation is shown to have similar efficiencies at 5 K or 100 K, indicating that addition of O atoms or OH radicals to pre-ionized PAHs is a barrierless process. These studies-the first glimpses into interstellar ice chemistry through analog studies-show that once accreted onto ice grains PAHs lose their PAH spectroscopic signatures through radiation chemistry, which could be one of the reason for the lack of PAH detection in interstellar ice grains, particularly the outer regions of cold, dense clouds or the upper molecular layers of protoplanetary disks.

  4. Process for recovery of hydrogen and

    DOEpatents

    James, Brian R.; Li-Lee, Chung; Lilga, Michael A.; Nelson, David A.

    1987-01-01

    on of sulfur Abstract A process of abstracting sulfur from H.sub.2 S and generating hydrogen is disclosed comprising dissolving Pd.sub.2 X.sub.2 (.mu.-dppm).sub.2 in a solvent and then introducing H.sub.2 S. The palladium complex abstracts sulfur, forming hydrogen and a (.mu.-S) complex. The (.mu.-S) complex is readily oxidizable to a (.mu.-SO.sub.2) adduct which spontaneously loses SO.sub.2 and regenerates the palladium complex.

  5. Photon simulated desorption revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, D.

    A promising new method for surface investigations is discussed: Photon stimulated desorption. The electronic excitations of adsorbate complexes on surfaces, either by electron impact or photon absorption, which can lead to repulsive states of the complex and therefore to expulsion of ions and neutrals are considered. Such processes are termed electron (or photon) stimulated desorption, ESD and PSD, respectively. Apart from the primary agent (electrons or photons), these processes are similar, and common label "desorption induced by electronic transitions" (acronym DIET) was proposed. Desorption effects, intrinsic photoneffects, and some of the advantages of PSD over ESD are discussed.

  6. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-10-12

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of "local equilibrium" assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of U

  7. Hydrogen sulphide in human nasal air quantified using thermal desorption and selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wondimu, Taddese; Wang, Rui; Ross, Brian

    2014-09-01

    The discovery that hydrogen sulphide (H2S) acts as a gasotransmitter when present at very low concentrations (sub-parts per billion (ppbv)) has resulted in the need to quickly quantify trace amounts of the gas in complex biological samples. Selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) is capable of real-time quantification of H2S but many SIFT-MS instruments lack sufficient sensitivity for this application. In this study we investigate the utility of combining thermal desorption with SIFT-MS for quantifying H2S in the 0.1-1 ppbv concentration range. Human orally or nasally derived breath, and background ambient air, were collected in sampling bags and dried by passing through CaCl2 and H2S pre-concentrated using a sorbent trap optimised for the capture of this gas. The absorbed H2S was then thermally desorbed and quantified by SIFT-MS. H2S concentrations in ambient air, nasal breath and oral breath collected from 10 healthy volunteers were 0.12  ±  0.02 (mean ± SD), 0.40  ±  0.11 and 3.1  ±  2.5 ppbv respectively, and in the oral cavity H2S, quantified by SIFT-MS without pre-concentration, was present at 13.5  ±  8.6 ppbv. The oral cavity H2S correlates well with oral breath H2S but not with nasal breath H2S, suggesting that oral breath H2S derives mainly from the oral cavity but nasal breath is likely pulmonary in origin. The successful quantification of such low concentrations of H2S in nasal air using a rapid analytical procedure paves the way for the straightforward analysis of H2S in breath and may assist in elucidating the role that H2S plays in biological systems.

  8. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of ultraviolet photo-processed ices

    SciTech Connect

    Paardekooper, D. M. Bossa, J.-B.; Isokoski, K.; Linnartz, H.

    2014-10-01

    A new ultra-high vacuum experiment is described that allows studying photo-induced chemical processes in interstellar ice analogues. MATRI²CES - a Mass Analytical Tool to study Reactions in Interstellar ICES applies a new concept by combining laser desorption and time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the ultimate goal to characterize in situ and in real time the solid state evolution of organic compounds upon UV photolysis for astronomically relevant ice mixtures and temperatures. The performance of the experimental setup is demonstrated by the kinetic analysis of the different photoproducts of pure methane (CH₄) ice at 20 K. A quantitative approach provides formation yields of several new species with up to four carbon atoms. Convincing evidence is found for the formation of even larger species. Typical mass resolutions obtained range from M/ΔM ~320 to ~400 for CH₄ and argon, respectively. Additional tests show that the typical detection limit (in monolayers) is ⩽0.02 ML, substantially more sensitive than the regular techniques used to investigate chemical processes in interstellar ices.

  9. Extension lifetime for dye-sensitized solar cells through multiple dye adsorption/desorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yi-Fang; Chen, Ruei-Tang; Shen, Po-Shen; Chen, Peter; Guo, Tzung-Fang

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we propose a novel concept of extending the lifetime of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) and reducing the costs of re-conditioning DSCs by recycling the FTO/TiO2 substrates. The photovoltaic performances of DSCs using substrates with various cycles of dye uptake and rinse off history are tested. The results show that dye adsorption and Voc are significantly increased under multiple dye adsorption/desorption process and resulted in the improvement of power conversion efficiency. Moreover, the dyeing kinetics is faster after multiple recycling processes, which is favorable for the industrial application. With surface analysis and charge transport characteristics, we also demonstrate the optimal functionality of TiO2/dye interface for the improved Voc and efficiency. The results confirm that the improved performances are due to increased dye loading and dense packing of dye molecules. Our results are beneficial for the understanding on the extension of DSCs lifetime after long-term operation in the application of DSC modules. This approach may also be applied in the replacement of newly synthesized photosensitizes to the active cells.

  10. Hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured Pd–10Rh processed by cryomilling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, Joshua K.; Zhang, Zhihui; Kurmanaeva, Lilia; Cappillino, Patrick; Stavila, Vitalie; Lavernia, Enrique J.; San Marchi, Chris

    2014-10-03

    Palladium and its alloys are model systems for studying solid-state storage of hydrogen. Mechanical milling is commonly used to process complex powder systems for solid-state hydrogen storage; however, milling can also be used to evolve nanostructured powder to modify hydrogen sorption characteristics. In the present study, cryomilling (mechanical attrition milling in a cryogenic liquid) is used to produce nanostructured palladium-rhodium alloy powder. Characterization of the cryomilled Pd-10Rh using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and surface area analysis reveals that (i) particle morphology evolves from spherical to flattened disk-like particles; while the (ii) crystallite size decreases from several microns to less than 100 nm and (iii) dislocation density increases with increased cryomilling time. Hydrogen absorption and desorption isotherms as well as the time scales for absorption were measured for cryomilled Pd-10Rh, and correlated with observed microstructural changes induced by the cryomilling process. In short, as the microstructure of the Pd-10Rh alloy is refined by cryomilling: (i) the maximum hydrogen concentration in the α-phase increases, (ii) the pressure plateau becomes flatter, and (iii) the equilibrium hydrogen capacity at 760 Torr increases. In addition, the rate of hydrogen absorption was reduced by an order of magnitude compared to non-cryomilled (atomized) powder.

  11. Hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured Pd–10Rh processed by cryomilling

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, Joshua K.; Zhang, Zhihui; Kurmanaeva, Lilia; Cappillino, Patrick; Stavila, Vitalie; Lavernia, Enrique J.; San Marchi, Chris

    2014-10-03

    Palladium and its alloys are model systems for studying solid-state storage of hydrogen. Mechanical milling is commonly used to process complex powder systems for solid-state hydrogen storage; however, milling can also be used to evolve nanostructured powder to modify hydrogen sorption characteristics. In the present study, cryomilling (mechanical attrition milling in a cryogenic liquid) is used to produce nanostructured palladium-rhodium alloy powder. Characterization of the cryomilled Pd-10Rh using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and surface area analysis reveals that (i) particle morphology evolves from spherical to flattened disk-like particles; while the (ii) crystallite size decreases from several microns to less thanmore » 100 nm and (iii) dislocation density increases with increased cryomilling time. Hydrogen absorption and desorption isotherms as well as the time scales for absorption were measured for cryomilled Pd-10Rh, and correlated with observed microstructural changes induced by the cryomilling process. In short, as the microstructure of the Pd-10Rh alloy is refined by cryomilling: (i) the maximum hydrogen concentration in the α-phase increases, (ii) the pressure plateau becomes flatter, and (iii) the equilibrium hydrogen capacity at 760 Torr increases. In addition, the rate of hydrogen absorption was reduced by an order of magnitude compared to non-cryomilled (atomized) powder.« less

  12. Implications of Using Thermal Desorption to Remediate Contaminated Agricultural Soil: Physical Characteristics and Hydraulic Processes.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Peter L; DeSutter, Thomas M; Casey, Francis X M; Derby, Nathan E; Wick, Abbey F

    2016-07-01

    Given the recent increase in crude oil production in regions with predominantly agricultural economies, the determination of methods that remediate oil contamination and allow for the land to return to crop production is increasingly relevant. Ex situ thermal desorption (TD) is a technique used to remediate crude oil pollution that allows for reuse of treated soil, but the properties of that treated soil are unknown. The objectives of this research were to characterize TD-treated soil and to describe implications in using TD to remediate agricultural soil. Native, noncontaminated topsoil and subsoil adjacent to an active remediation site were separately subjected to TD treatment at 350°C. Soil physical characteristics and hydraulic processes associated with agricultural productivity were assessed in the TD-treated samples and compared with untreated samples. Soil organic carbon decreased more than 25% in both the TD-treated topsoil and the subsoil, and total aggregation decreased by 20% in the topsoil but was unaffected in the subsoil. The alteration in these physical characteristics explains a 400% increase in saturated hydraulic conductivity in treated samples as well as a decrease in water retention at both field capacity and permanent wilting point. The changes in soil properties identified in this study suggest that TD-treated soils may still be suitable for sustaining vegetation, although likely at a slightly diminished capacity when directly compared with untreated soils. PMID:27380094

  13. Implications of Using Thermal Desorption to Remediate Contaminated Agricultural Soil: Physical Characteristics and Hydraulic Processes.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Peter L; DeSutter, Thomas M; Casey, Francis X M; Derby, Nathan E; Wick, Abbey F

    2016-07-01

    Given the recent increase in crude oil production in regions with predominantly agricultural economies, the determination of methods that remediate oil contamination and allow for the land to return to crop production is increasingly relevant. Ex situ thermal desorption (TD) is a technique used to remediate crude oil pollution that allows for reuse of treated soil, but the properties of that treated soil are unknown. The objectives of this research were to characterize TD-treated soil and to describe implications in using TD to remediate agricultural soil. Native, noncontaminated topsoil and subsoil adjacent to an active remediation site were separately subjected to TD treatment at 350°C. Soil physical characteristics and hydraulic processes associated with agricultural productivity were assessed in the TD-treated samples and compared with untreated samples. Soil organic carbon decreased more than 25% in both the TD-treated topsoil and the subsoil, and total aggregation decreased by 20% in the topsoil but was unaffected in the subsoil. The alteration in these physical characteristics explains a 400% increase in saturated hydraulic conductivity in treated samples as well as a decrease in water retention at both field capacity and permanent wilting point. The changes in soil properties identified in this study suggest that TD-treated soils may still be suitable for sustaining vegetation, although likely at a slightly diminished capacity when directly compared with untreated soils.

  14. Process hydrogenates unwanted diolefins and acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vora, B.V. )

    1988-12-05

    Diolefins and actetylenes in C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ olefin streams can be selectively hydrogenated to produce high-purity mono-olefins for downstream polyolefin production. C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ olefin sources, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), steam crackers, and dehydrogenation of C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ paraffins, all contain these undesirable polyunsaturated compounds. Hydrogenation of these compounds in alkylation unit feeds can also improve the economics of the alkylation process. Production of high-purity mono-olefins for downstream polyolefins production requires a feedstock that is essentially free of dienes and acetylenes to minimize undesirable side reactions. Although alkylation units can tolerate some diolefins in the feed, economics dictate that these diolefins should be minimized. The selective hydrogenation process (SHP) developed by others at its Marl, West Germany, plant, has undergone additional development work since commercialization of the process in 1980. The unit was designed to feed 160,000 metric tons/year of clean C/sub 4/ raffinate from a steam cracker, with a maximum polyunsaturated content of 0.8 wt%.

  15. Process and apparatus for coal hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruether, J.A.; Simpson, T.B.

    1990-12-31

    In a coal liquefaction process an aqueous slurry of coal is prepared containing a dissolved liquefaction catalyst. A small quantity of oil is added to the slurry and then coal-oil agglomerates are prepared by agitation of the slurry at atmospheric pressure. The resulting mixture is drained of excess water and dried at atmospheric pressure leaving catalyst deposited on the agglomerates. The agglomerates then are fed to an extrusion device where they are formed into a continuous ribbon of extrudate and fed into a hydrogenation reactor at elevated pressure and temperature. The catalytic hydrogenation converts the extrudate primarily to liquid hydrocarbons in the reactor. The liquid drained in recovering the agglomerates is recycled. 1 fig.

  16. Process and apparatus for coal hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Ruether, John A.; Simpson, Theodore B.

    1991-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process an aqueous slurry of coal is prepared containing a dissolved liquefaction catalyst. A small quantity of oil is added to the slurry and then coal-oil agglomerates are prepared by agitation of the slurry at atmospheric pressure. The resulting mixture is drained of excess water and dried at atmospheric pressure leaving catalyst deposited on the agglomerates. The agglomerates then are fed to an extrusion device where they are formed into a continuous ribbon of extrudate and fed into a hydrogenation reactor at elevated pressure and temperature. The catalytic hydrogenation converts the extrudate primarily to liquid hydrocarbons in the reactor. The liquid drained in recovering the agglomerates is recycled.

  17. Assessment of biological Hydrogen production processes: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafpour, G. D.; Shahavi, M. H.; Neshat, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Energy crisis created a special attention on renewable energy sources. Among these sources; hydrogen through biological processes is well-known as the most suitable and renewable energy sources. In terms of process yield, hydrogen production from various sources was evaluated. A summary of microorganisms as potential hydrogen producers discussed along with advantages and disadvantages of several bioprocesses. The pathway of photo-synthetic and dark fermentative organisms was discussed. In fact, the active enzymes involved in performance of biological processes for hydrogen generation were identified and their special functionalities were discussed. The influential factors affecting on hydrogen production were known as enzymes assisting liberation specific enzymes such as nitrogenase, hydrogenase and uptake hydrogenase. These enzymes were quite effective in reduction of proton and form active molecular hydrogen. Several types of photosynthetic systems were evaluated with intension of maximum hydrogen productivities. In addition dark fermentative and light intensities on hydrogen productions were evaluated. The hydrogen productivities of efficient hydrogen producing strains were evaluated.

  18. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  19. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  20. ADSORPTION, DESORPTION AND OXIDATION OF ARSENIC AFFECTED BY CLAY MINERALS AND AGING PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption/desorption and oxidation/reduction of arsenic at clay surfaces are very important to the natural attenuation of arsenic in the subsurface environment. Although numerous studies have concluded that iron oxides have high affinities for the adsorption of As(V), very litt...

  1. Process, including membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2001-01-01

    Processes for providing improved methane removal and hydrogen reuse in reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved methane removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the reactor recycle loop across membranes selective in favor of methane over hydrogen, and capable of exhibiting a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the process conditions.

  2. Determination of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in metals from the rate of change in the electrical resistance in desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Mikitishin, S.I.; Fedorov, V.V.; Sergienko, O.M.; Sokolovskii, O.R.; Spas, Y.M.

    1985-07-01

    A proposed method of measuring the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen D from the rate of change in electrical resistance in degassing of hydrogenimpregnated specimens is presented. Distinguished by simplicity, the method makes it possible to determine the coefficients with any method of hydrogen impregnation in a broad temperature range.

  3. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran formation and emission in the thermal desorption waste treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, J.H.

    1995-03-01

    It is extremely unlikely that significant amounts of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) or polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) will be emitted in the off-gas stream from the thermal desorption process, or the treated waste, particularly if the baseline design and anticipated operating conditions of the enhanced bench-scale (EBS) system are used. However, because of the acute toxicity of these compounds and because most of the data on their formation have been extrapolated from studies more related to incineration and fire conditions than thermal desorption, specific laboratory tests and specific EBS runs should be performed to monitor the rate of emission of PCDDs and PCDFs under thermal desorption conditions. In general, the following four conditions need to exist for significant amounts of PCDD or PCDF to be formed: (1) the presence of fly ash; (2) the presence of an oxidizing source; (3) a suitable temperature, and (4) the presence of a suitable precursor. Although the EBS system provides some of these conditions, it is unlikely that enough fly ash will be produced in the system to allow a significant amount of PCDD or PCDF formation. Additionally, particulate matter controls will be used to remove airborne particulates from the gas phase. If PCDD/Fs are presented in a waste stream being evaluated in the EBS, they will likely volatilize in the kiln and subsequently condense in the venturi scrubber system.

  4. Superior hydrogen desorption kinetics of Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} hollow nanospheres mixed with MgH{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Lei; Li Yaoqi; Yang Rong; Liu Yang; Li Xingguo

    2008-06-09

    Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} nanocubes were prepared by vaporized bulk magnesium in ammonia atmosphere associated with plasma metal reaction. Then the product transformed to Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} hollow nanospheres after it was reacted with NH{sub 3} based on the Kirkendall effect. The electron microscopy results suggested that the obtained hollow nanospheres were around 100 nm and the shell thickness was about 10 nm. Because of its short distance for Mg{sup 2+} diffusion and large specific surface area for interaction between Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} and MgH{sub 2}, the structure dramatically enhanced the hydrogen desorption kinetics of Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-2MgH{sub 2}.

  5. Process and apparatus for coal hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Ruether, John A.

    1988-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process an aqueous slurry of coal is prepared containing a dissolved liquefaction catalyst. A small quantity of oil is added to the slurry and then coal-oil agglomerates are prepared by agitation of the slurry at atmospheric pressure. The resulting mixture of agglomerates, excess water, dissolved catalyst, and unagglomerated solids is pumped to reaction pressure and then passed through a drainage device where all but a small amount of surface water is removed from the agglomerates. Sufficient catalyst for the reaction is contained in surface water remaining on the agglomerates. The agglomerates fall into the liquefaction reactor countercurrently to a stream of hot gas which is utilized to dry and preheat the agglomerates as well as deposit catalyst on the agglomerates before they enter the reactor where they are converted to primarily liquid products under hydrogen pressure.

  6. Novel simple process for tocopherols selective recovery from vegetable oils by adsorption and desorption with an anion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Hiromori, Kousuke; Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Nakashima, Kazunori; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2016-03-01

    A novel and simple low-temperature process was used to recover tocopherols from a deodorizer distillate, which is a by-product of edible oil refining. The process consists of three operations: the esterification of free fatty acids with a cation-exchange resin catalyst, the adsorption of tocopherols onto an anion-exchange resin, and tocopherol desorption from the resin. No degradation of tocopherols occurred during these processes. In the tocopherol-rich fraction, no impurities such as sterols or glycerides were present. These impurities are commonly found in the product of the conventional process. This novel process improves the overall recovery ratio and the mass fraction of the product (75.9% and 51.0wt%) compared with those in the conventional process (50% and 35wt%).

  7. Process for the thermochemical production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.; Russell, Jr., John L.; Porter, II, John T.; McCorkle, Kenneth H.; Roemer, Thomas S.; Sharp, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen is thermochemically produced from water in a cycle wherein a first reaction produces hydrogen iodide and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 by the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water under conditions which cause two distinct aqueous phases to be formed, i.e., a lighter sulfuric acid-bearing phase and a heavier hydrogen iodide-bearing phase. After separation of the two phases, the heavier phase containing most of the hydrogen iodide is treated, e.g., at a high temperature, to decompose the hydrogen iodide and recover hydrogen and iodine. The H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is pyrolyzed to recover sulfur dioxide and produce oxygen.

  8. Hydrogen-donor coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Jr., Edward L.; Mitchell, Willard N.

    1980-01-01

    Improved liquid yields are obtained during the hydrogen-donor solvent liquefaction of coal and similar carbonaceous solids by maintaining a higher concentration of material having hydrogenation catalytic activity in the downstream section of the liquefaction reactor system than in the upstream section of the system.

  9. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.H.; Bauer, H.F.; Grimes, R.W.

    1993-03-30

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  10. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.; Bauer, Hans F.; Grimes, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen an carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  11. Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors

    DOEpatents

    Perdieu, Louisa H.

    2000-09-09

    A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

  12. On plate graphite supported sample processing for simultaneous lipid and protein identification by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; van der Werf, Inez Dorothé; Sabbatini, Luigia; Palmisano, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous identification of lipids and proteins by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) after direct on-plate processing of micro-samples supported on colloidal graphite is demonstrated. Taking advantages of large surface area and thermal conductivity, graphite provided an ideal substrate for on-plate proteolysis and lipid extraction. Indeed proteins could be efficiently digested on-plate within 15 min, providing sequence coverages comparable to those obtained by conventional in-solution overnight digestion. Interestingly, detection of hydrophilic phosphorylated peptides could be easily achieved without any further enrichment step. Furthermore, lipids could be simultaneously extracted/identified without any additional treatment/processing step as demonstrated for model complex samples such as milk and egg. The present approach is simple, efficient, of large applicability and offers great promise for protein and lipid identification in very small samples.

  13. Process for the production of hydrogen from water

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Maroni, Victor A.; Willit, James L.

    2010-05-25

    A method and device for the production of hydrogen from water and electricity using an active metal alloy. The active metal alloy reacts with water producing hydrogen and a metal hydroxide. The metal hydroxide is consumed, restoring the active metal alloy, by applying a voltage between the active metal alloy and the metal hydroxide. As the process is sustainable, only water and electricity is required to sustain the reaction generating hydrogen.

  14. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  15. A Hydrogen Containment Process For Nuclear Thermal Engine Ground Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric; Canabal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    A hydrogen containment process was proposed for ground testing of a nuclear thermal engine. The hydrogen exhaust from the engine is contained in two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a tubular heat exchanger. The burner burns off the majority of the hydrogen, and the remaining hydrogen is removed in the tubular heat exchanger through the species recombination mechanism. A multi-dimensional, pressure-based multiphase computational fluid dynamics methodology was used to conceptually sizing the oxygen-rich burner, while a one-dimensional thermal analysis methodology was used to conceptually sizing the heat exchanger. Subsequently, a steady-state operation of the entire hydrogen containment process, from pressure vessel, through nozzle, diffuser, burner and heat exchanger, was simulated numerically, with the afore-mentioned computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational results show that 99% of hydrogen reduction is achieved at the end of the burner, and the rest of the hydrogen is removed to a trivial level in the heat exchanger. The computed flammability at the exit of the heat exchanger is less than the lower flammability limit, confirming the hydrogen containment capability of the proposed process.

  16. Probing Adsorption / Desorption Processes at the Liquid / Solid Interface: Thiols and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles; Jung, Linda S.; Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer; Nelsen, K. E.; Stayton, P. S.; Gelb, M. H.; Aebersold, R.

    2001-03-01

    The adsorption of molecules from liquid solutions onto solid surfaces can be monitored with high sensitivity and fast time response by following changes in the angle or wavelength at which the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a thin metal film is optically excited. Simple methods convert these measured changes into adsorbate concentrations. We report here the adsorption and desorption kinetics and equilibrium coverages of a variety of species on well-characterized surfaces as determined by SPR techniques. When the diffusion constant of the adsorbing species is known in the liquid phase, the intrinsic rate constants can be determined from the kinetic results. The sticking probability, defined as the rate of adsorption per molecular collision with the surface, directly expresses the difficulty encountered by a molecule in scaling the barrier to adsorption. Its prior use has been restricted to adsorption of gases. A method extending this concept to adsorption from liquid solutions is applied to transient measurements of alkylthiol adsorption onto gold from ethanol solutions. The initial sticking probability increases from 10-8 to 10-6 with alkyl chain length, implying a stabilization of the transition state by 0.65 kJ/mol per CH_2. Since their sticking probabilities in gas phase are 1.0, the solvent increases the activation free energy by 40 kJ/mol. Applications of gold-thin-film SPR sensors in quantifying biological interactions will be described also. A gold surface containing a few biotin headgroups in a self assembled alkylthiolate monolayer of mainly oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) headgroups selectively adsorbs the protein streptavidin with a structure that depends on the biotin / OEG ratio. The free biotin sites in the resulting streptavidin monolayer have been used as strong linker sites for further attachment of intact, biotinylated lipid vesicles and biotinylated, double-stranded oligonucleotides to the surface. These complex biological films then provide a

  17. A superior process for forming titanium hydrogen isotopic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Process forms stoichiometric, continuous, strongly bonded titanium hydrogen isotopic films. Films have thermal and electrical conductivities approximately the same as bulk pure titanium, ten times greater than those of usual thin films.

  18. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation and hydroconversion process

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, James B.; McLean, Joseph B.; Comolli, Alfred G.

    1989-01-01

    A process for two-stage catalytic hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent and fed at temperature below about 650.degree. F. into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils at conditions favoring hydrogenation reactions. The first stage reactor is maintained at 650.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-60 lb coal/hr/ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The partially hydrogenated material from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the close-coupled second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at a temperature at least about 25.degree. F. higher than for the first stage reactor and within a range of 750.degree.-875.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and thermal hydroconversion reactions. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, which results in significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of undesirable residuum and unconverted coal and hydrocarbon gases, with use of less energy to obtain the low molecular weight products, while catalyst life is substantially increased.

  19. Effect of process variables on photosynthetic algal hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Hahn, John J; Ghirardi, Maria L; Jacoby, William A

    2004-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green alga that can use the sun's energy to split water into O(2) and H(2). This is accomplished by means of a two-phase cycle, an aerobic growth phase followed by an anaerobic hydrogen production phase. The effects of process variables on hydrogen production are examined here. These variables include cell concentration, light intensity, and reactor design parameters that affect light transport and mixing. An optimum cell concentration and light intensity are identified, and two reactor designs are compared. The maximum hydrogen production observed in this study was 0.29 mL of hydrogen per milliliter of suspension. This was measured at atmospheric pressure during a 96 h production cycle. This corresponds to an average hydrogen production rate of 0.12 mmol/mL.h. PMID:15176910

  20. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  1. NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V Park

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

  2. Process for producing cracked distillate and hydrogen from heavy oil

    SciTech Connect

    Aizawa, S.; Fujimori, K.; Satomi, Y.; Suzuka, T.

    1980-09-23

    A process is disclosed for producing a cracked distillate and hydrogen from a heavy oil which comprises cracking the heavy oil in the presence of laterite or a laterite-containing catalyst while simultaneously depositing coke on said laterite or laterite-containing catalysts, reducing the laterite or laterote-containing catalyst on which the coke is deposited, and forming a hydrogen-rich gas by contacting the reduced laterite or laterite-containing catalyst with steam.

  3. Hydrogen donor solvent coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Plumlee, Karl W.

    1978-01-01

    An indigenous hydrocarbon product stream boiling within a range of from about C.sub.1 -700.degree. F., preferably C.sub.1 -400.degree. F., is treated to produce an upgraded hydrocarbon fuel component and a component which can be recycled, with a suitable donor solvent, to a coal liquefaction zone to catalyze the reaction. In accordance therewith, a liquid hydrocarbon fraction with a high end boiling point range up to about 700.degree. F., preferably up to about 400.degree. F., is separated from a coal liquefaction zone effluent, the separated fraction is contacted with an alkaline medium to provide a hydrocarbon phase and an aqueous extract phase, the aqueous phase is neutralized, and contacted with a peroxygen compound to convert indigenous components of the aqueous phase of said hydrocarbon fraction into catalytic components, such that the aqueous stream is suitable for recycle to the coal liquefaction zone. Naturally occurring phenols and alkyl substituted phenols, found in the aqueous phase, are converted, by the addition of hydroxyl constituents to phenols, to dihydroxy benzenes which, as disclosed in copending Application Ser. Nos. 686,813 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,536; 686,814 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,537; 686,827 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,051,012 and 686,828, K. W. Plumlee et al, filed May 17, 1976, are suitable hydrogen transfer catalysts.

  4. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  5. Process for hydrogen isotope concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, William H.

    1976-09-21

    A process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas, wherein liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted, in an exchange section, with one another and with at least one catalyst body comprising at least one metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table and preferably a support therefor, the catalyst body has a liquid-water-repellent, gas permeable polymer or organic resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone coating, so that the isotope concentration takes place by two simultaneously occurring steps, namely, ##EQU1## WHILE THE HYDROGEN GAS FED TO THE EXCHANGE SECTION IS DERIVED IN A REACTOR VESSEL FROM LIQUID WATER THAT HAS PASSED THROUGH THE EXCHANGE SECTION.

  6. Plasma processing methods for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Jasiński, Mariusz

    2016-08-01

    In the future a transfer from the fossil fuel-based economy to hydrogen-based economy is expected. Therefore the development of systems for efficient H2 production becomes important. The several conventional methods of mass-scale (or central) H2 production (methane, natural gas and higher hydrocarbons reforming, coal gasification reforming) are well developed and their costs of H2 production are acceptable. However, due to the H2 transport and storage problems the small-scale (distributed) technologies for H2 production are demanded. However, these new technologies have to meet the requirement of producing H2 at a production cost of (1-2)/kg(H2) (or 60 g(H2)/kWh) by 2020 (the U.S. Department of Energy's target). Recently several plasma methods have been proposed for the small-scale H2 production. The most promising plasmas for this purpose seems to be those generated by gliding, plasmatron and nozzle arcs, and microwave discharges. In this paper plasma methods proposed for H2 production are briefly described and critically evaluated from the view point of H2 production efficiency. The paper is aiming at answering a question if any plasma method for the small-scale H2 production approaches such challenges as the production energy yield of 60 g(H2)/kWh, high production rate, high reliability and low investment cost. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  7. A mechanism for the hydrogen uptake process in zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen uptake data for thin Zircaloy-2 specimens in steam at 300-400°C have been analysed to show that there is a decrease in the rate of uptake with respect to the rate of oxidation when the terminal solid solubility (TSS) of hydrogen in the metal is exceeded. In order for TSS to be reached during pre-transition oxidation a very thin 0.125 mm Zircaloy sheet was used. The specimens had been pickled initially removing all Zr 2(Fe/Ni) particles from the initial surfaces, yet the initial hydrogen uptake rates were still much higher than for Zircaloy-4 or a binary Zr/Fe alloy that did not contain phases that dissolve readily during pickling. Cathodic polarisation at room temperature in CuSO 4 solution showed that small cracks or pores formed the cathodic sites in pre-transition oxide films. Some were at pits resulting from the initial dissolution of the Zr 2(Fe/Ni) phase; others were not; none were at the remaining intermetallics in the original surface. These small cracks are thought to provide the ingress routes for hydrogen. A microscopic steam starvation process at the bottoms of these small cracks or pores, leading to the accumulation of hydrogen adjacent to the oxide/metal interface, and causing breakdown of the passive oxide forming at the bottom of the flaw, is thought to provide the mechanism for the hydrogen uptake process during both pre-transition and post-transition oxidation.

  8. Changes induced on the surfaces of small Pd clusters by the thermal desorption of CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doering, D. L.; Poppa, H.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The stability and adsorption/desorption properties of supported Pd crystallites less than 5 nm in size were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and repeated flash thermal desorption of CO. The Pd particles were grown epitaxially on heat-treated, UHV-cleaved mica at a substrate temperature of 300 C and a Pd impingement flux of 10 to the 13th atoms/sq cm s. Auger analysis allowed in situ measurement of relative particle dispersion and contamination, while FTD monitored the CO desorption properties. The results show that significant changes in the adsorption properties can be detected. Changes in the Pd Auger signal and the desorption spectrum during the first few thermal cycles are due to particle coalescence and facetting and the rate of this change is dependent on the temperature and duration of the desorption. Significant reductions in the amplitude of the desorptions peak occur during successive CO desorptions which are attributed to increases of surface carbon, induced by the desorption of CO. The contamination process could be reversed by heat treatment in oxygen or hydrogen

  9. Chill Down Process of Hydrogen Transport Pipelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Renwei; Klausner, James

    2006-01-01

    A pseudo-steady model has been developed to predict the chilldown history of pipe wall temperature in the horizontal transport pipeline for cryogenic fluids. A new film boiling heat transfer model is developed by incorporating the stratified flow structure for cryogenic chilldown. A modified nucleate boiling heat transfer correlation for cryogenic chilldown process inside a horizontal pipe is proposed. The efficacy of the correlations is assessed by comparing the model predictions with measured values of wall temperature in several azimuthal positions in a well controlled experiment by Chung et al. (2004). The computed pipe wall temperature histories match well with the measured results. The present model captures important features of thermal interaction between the pipe wall and the cryogenic fluid, provides a simple and robust platform for predicting pipe wall chilldown history in long horizontal pipe at relatively low computational cost, and builds a foundation to incorporate the two-phase hydrodynamic interaction in the chilldown process.

  10. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrogen. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquids. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  11. A Hydrogen Containment Process for Nuclear Thermal Engine Ground testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric; Canabal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose a new total hydrogen containment process to enable the testing required for NTP engine development. This H2 removal process comprises of two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a shell-and-tube type of heat exchanger. This new process is demonstrated by simulation of the steady state operation of the engine firing at nominal conditions.

  12. The ferrosilicon process for the generation of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, E R; Berry, W M; Bohnson, V L; Gordon, B D

    1920-01-01

    Report describes the generation of hydrogen by the reaction between ferrosilicon, sodium hydroxide, and water. This method known as the ferrosilicon method is especially adapted for use in the military field because of the relatively small size and low cost of the generator required to produce hydrogen at a rapid rate, the small operating force required, and the fact that no power is used except the small amount required to operate the stirring and pumping machinery. These advantages make it possible to quickly generate sufficient hydrogen to fill a balloon with a generator which can be transported on a motor truck. This report gives a summary of the details of the ferrosilicon process and a critical examination of the means which are necessary in order to make the process successful.

  13. Thin film hydrogen sensors: A materials processing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Raviprakash

    Hydrogen (H2) is consumed and produced in large quantities by chemical, petroleum, plastic, space and glass industries. Detection and quantitative estimation of H2 in a reliable and efficient manner is of great value in these applications, not only from a safety stand point but also economically beneficial. Hence the requirement for a simple but efficient hydrogen sensor. The simplest hydrogen sensors are based on monitoring changes in electrical properties of group VIII transition metals, especially palladium (Pd). Hydrogen adsorbs on Pd surface and diffuses into its bulk altering its electrical and optical properties. This variation is used to detect/estimate hydrogen in the ambience. However, at high hydrogen concentrations palladium undergoes a phase change. This causes an expansion of the lattice---a problem for fabricating reliable sensors using this metal. This problem was overcome by alloying palladium with nickel. Currently, sensors made from palladium alloy thin films (resistors and FET's) can detect/estimate hydrogen from ppm to 100% concentrations. However, these sensors are affected by the total gas pressure and other gases like carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO 2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S). This work, for most part deals with resistors (chemiresistors). Resistors estimate hydrogen by correlating the change in resistance to the hydrogen concentration. Magnetron sputtering enables the deposition of films of different compositions and morphology. In this work, Pd and Pd/Ni alloy thin films resistors were fabricated by sputtering. Morphology was seen to have a significant effect on the hydrogen sensing property of these films. In presence of CO the response of these sensors are extremely sluggish, however by employing SiO2 barrier layer the response was greatly improved. It was noted that despite the sluggish response, the signal from the chemiresistors did saturate to same level as seen in absence of CO from gas mixture; contrary to the earlier

  14. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, S.; Anand, M.; Carvill, B.

    1995-09-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process, the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The consequences of SER are: (1) reformation reaction at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than conventional SMR (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (2) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 99+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (3) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The early focus of the program will be on the identification of an adsorbent/chemisorbent for CO{sub 2} and on the demonstration of the SER concept for SMR in our state-of-the-art bench scale process. In the latter stages, a pilot plant will be built to scale-up the technology and to develop engineering data. The program has just been initiated and no significant results for SMR will be reported. However, results demonstrating the basic principles and process schemes of SER technology will be presented for reverse water gas shift reaction as the model reaction. If successful, this technology will be commercialized by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) and used in its existing hydrogen business. APCI is the world leader in merchant hydrogen production for a wide range of industrial applications.

  15. Hydrogen production: two stage processes for waste degradation.

    PubMed

    Gómez, X; Fernández, C; Fierro, J; Sánchez, M E; Escapa, A; Morán, A

    2011-09-01

    The dark fermentation process generates hydrogen by biological means. It presents two main advantages: fulfilling requirements for mild operational conditions and gaining benefit from the residual biomass. The process itself may be seen as a pre-treatment step in a complete stabilisation chain, with the aim of attaining the valorisation of residual biomass. However, increasing the yield of H2 production is an imperative task. In this manuscript, a review of recent work in the field of fermentative hydrogen production is presented. As dark fermentation has a maximum yield of 33% (on sugars), a description is also presented of possible second stage processes for the degradation of dark fermentation effluents. Alternatives considered were photofermentation and bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as processes capable of converting fermentation sub-products into H2. Anaerobic digestion as a final stabilisation stage was also considered owing to the wide application of this technology in the treatment of bio-wastes.

  16. PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

    1960-09-27

    A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

  17. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOEpatents

    Lyke, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  18. Sulfur Iodine Process Summary for the Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection: Process Performance Package

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Russ

    2009-06-01

    This document describes the details of implementing a Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) hydrogen production plant to deploy with the Next General Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP). Technical requirements and specifications are included, and a conceptual plant design is presented. The following areas of interest are outlined in particular as a baseline for the various technology comparisons: (1) Performance Criteria - (a) Quantity of hydrogen produced, (b) Purity of hydrogen produced, (c) Flexibility to serve various applications, (d) Waste management; (2) Economic Considerations - (a) Cost of hydrogen, (b) Development costs; and (3) Risk - (a) Technical maturity of the S-I process, (b) Development risk, (c) Scale up options.

  19. Microscopic dynamics and relaxation processes in liquid hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, R.; Giura, P.; Monaco, G.; Sette, F.; Fioretto, D.; Ruocco, G.

    2004-12-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering and Brillouin light scattering measurements of the dynamic structure factor of liquid hydrogen fluoride have been performed in the temperature range T=214-283 K. The data, analyzed using a viscoelastic model with a two time-scale memory function, show a positive dispersion of the sound velocity c(Q) between the low frequency value c{sub 0}(Q) and the high frequency value c{sub {infinity}}{sub {alpha}}(Q). This finding confirms the existence of a structural ({alpha}) relaxation directly related to the dynamical organization of the hydrogen bonds network of the system. The activation energy E{sub a} of the process has been extracted by the analysis of the temperature behavior of the relaxation time {tau}{sub {alpha}}(T) that follows an Arrhenius law. The obtained value for E{sub a}, when compared with that observed in another hydrogen bond liquid as water, suggests that the main parameter governing the {alpha}-relaxation process is the number of hydrogen bonds per molecule.

  20. Modeling hydrogen diffusion for solar cell passivation and process optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi

    A diffusion model for hydrogen (H) in crystalline silicon was established which takes into account the charged state conversion, junction field, mobile traps, and complex formation and dissociation at dopant and trap sites. Carrier exchange among the various charged species is a "fast" process compared to the diffusion process. A numerical method was developed to solve the densities of various charged species from the Poisson's equation that involves shallow-level dopants and one "negative U" impurity, e.g., H. Time domain implicit method was adopted in finite difference scheme to solve the fully coupled equations. Limiting versions of the model were applied to the problems that are of interest to photovoltaics. Simplified trap-limited model was used to describe the low temperature diffusion profiles, assuming process-induced traps, a constant bulk trap level, and trapping/detrapping mechanisms. The results of the simulation agreed with those obtained from experiments. The best fit yielded a low surface free H concentration, Cs, (˜10 14 cm-3) from high temperature extrapolated diffusivity value. In the case of ion beam hydrogenation, mobile traps needed to be considered. PAS analysis showed the existence of vacancy-type defects in implanted Si substrates. Simulation of hydrogen diffusion in p-n junction was first attempted in this work. The order of magnitude of Cs (˜10 14 cm-3) was confirmed. Simulation results showed that the preferred charged state of H is H- (H +) in n- (p-) side of the junction. The accumulation of H- (H+) species on n+ (p+) side of the n+-p (p+-n) junction was observed, which could retard the diffusion in junction. The diffusion of hydrogen through heavily doped region in a junction is trap-limited. Several popular hydrogenation techniques were evaluated by means of modeling and experimental observations. In particular, PECVD followed by RTP hydrogenation was found to be two-step process: PECVD deposition serves as a predeposition step of H

  1. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1981-01-06

    A process for the removal of H/sub 2/S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO/sub 2/ at temperatures between 250* and 450* F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H/sub 2/, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H/sub 2/S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO, CS/sub 2/, SO/sub 3/ and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H/sub 2/S and subsequently removing the H/sub 2/S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  2. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1982-01-19

    A process for the removal of H2S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO2 at temperatures between 250 and 450/sup 0/F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H2, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H2S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO2 and H2S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO CS2, SO3 and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H2S and subsequently removing the H2S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  3. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption and desorption of halogen and other gaseous species from surfaces is a key fundamental process for both wet chemical and dry plasma etch and clean processes utilized in nanoelectronic fabrication processes. Therefore, to increase the fundamental understanding of these processes with regard to aluminum nitride (AlN) surfaces, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been utilized to investigate the desorption kinetics of water (H{sub 2}O), fluorine (F{sub 2}), hydrogen (H{sub 2}), hydrogen fluoride (HF), and other related species from aluminum nitride thin film surfaces treated with an aqueous solution of buffered hydrogen fluoride (BHF) diluted in methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). Pre-TPD XPS measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH:BHF treated AlN surfaces showed the presence of a variety of Al-F, N-F, Al-O, Al-OH, C-H, and C-O surfaces species in addition to Al-N bonding from the AlN thin film. The primary species observed desorbing from these same surfaces during TPD measurements included H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, HF, F{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH with some evidence for nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) desorption as well. For H{sub 2}O, two desorption peaks with second order kinetics were observed at 195 and 460 °C with activation energies (E{sub d}) of 51 ± 3 and 87 ± 5 kJ/mol, respectively. Desorption of HF similarly exhibited second order kinetics with a peak temperature of 475 °C and E{sub d} of 110 ± 5 kJ/mol. The TPD spectra for F{sub 2} exhibited two peaks at 485 and 585 °C with second order kinetics and E{sub d} of 62 ± 3 and 270 ± 10 kJ/mol, respectively. These values are in excellent agreement with previous E{sub d} measurements for desorption of H{sub 2}O from SiO{sub 2} and AlF{sub x} from AlN surfaces, respectively. The F{sub 2} desorption is therefore attributed to fragmentation of AlF{sub x} species in the mass spectrometer ionizer. H{sub 2} desorption exhibited

  4. Studies of the use of heat from high temperature nuclear sources for hydrogen production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    Future uses of hydrogen and hydrogen production processes that can meet the demand for hydrogen in the coming decades were considered. To do this, a projection was made of the market for hydrogen through the year 2000. Four hydrogen production processes were selected, from among water electrolysis, fossil based and thermochemical water decomposition systems, and evaluated, using a consistent set of ground rules, in terms of relative performance, economics, resource requirements, and technology status.

  5. Catalytic hydrogenation process and apparatus with improved vapor liquid separation

    DOEpatents

    Chervenak, Michael C.; Comolli, Alfred G.

    1980-01-01

    A continuous hydrogenation process and apparatus wherein liquids are contacted with hydrogen in an ebullated catalyst reaction zone with the liquids and gas flowing vertically upwardly through that zone into a second zone substantially free of catalyst particles and wherein the liquid and gases are directed against an upwardly inclining surface through which vertical conduits are placed having inlet ends at different levels in the liquid and having outlet ends at different levels above the inclined surface, such that vapor-rich liquid is collected and discharged through conduits terminating at a higher level above the inclined surface than the vapor-poor liquid which is collected and discharged at a level lower than the inclined surface.

  6. Cobalt-based nanocatalysts for green oxidation and hydrogenation processes.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesh, Rajenahally V; Stemmler, Tobias; Surkus, Annette-Enrica; Bauer, Matthias; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Radnik, Jörg; Junge, Kathrin; Junge, Henrik; Brückner, Angelika; Beller, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    This protocol describes the preparation of cobalt-based nanocatalysts and their applications in environmentally benign redox processes for fine chemical synthesis. The catalytically active material consists of nanoscale Co3O4 particles surrounded by nitrogen-doped graphene layers (NGrs), which have been prepared by pyrolysis of phenanthroline-ligated cobalt acetate on carbon. The resulting materials have been found to be excellent catalysts for the activation of both molecular oxygen and hydrogen; in all tested reactions, water was the only by-product. By applying these catalysts, green oxidations of alcohols and hydrogenation of nitroarenes for the synthesis of nitriles, esters and amines are demonstrated. The overall time required for catalyst preparation and for redox reactions is 35 h and 10-30 h, respectively.

  7. Beryllium Desorption from Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, V.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Beryllium isotopes have provided a useful tool in the field of geochronology and geomorphology over the last 25 years. The amount of cosmogenic meteoric 10Be and native 9Be absorbed to soils often scales with the residence time and chemical weathering of sediments in a landscape, respectively. Thus, the concentrations in river sediment may be used to quantify the denudation of specific watersheds. When deposited in ocean sediment, these concentrations are thought to record the history of denudation on Earth over the last ~10 Ma. The use of both isotopes often relies on the premise of beryllium retention to sediment surfaces in order to preserve a landscape's erosion and weathering signature. Changes in setting, en route from the soil to fluvial system to the ocean, can cause beryllium desorption and may preclude some applications of the 10Be/9Be system. Four mechanisms were tested to determine the desorption potential of beryllium including a reduction in pH, an increase in ionic strength and complexation with soluble organic and inorganic species. These processes have the potential to mobilize beryllium into solution. For example, by both reducing the pH and increasing the ionic strength, competition for adsorption sites increases, potentially liberating beryllium from the sediment surface. In addition, organic and inorganic ligands can complex beryllium causing it to become mobilized. To determine which of these alterations influence beryllium desorption and to quantify the effect, we prepared separate solutions of beryllium bound to minerals and organic compounds and measured beryllium concentrations in solution before and after adjusting the pH, ionic strength, and changing inorganic and organic ligand concentrations. We conclude from our observations that overall, beryllium sorbed to organic compounds was more resistant to desorption relative to mineral-associated beryllium. Among the methods tested, a reduction in pH resulted in the greatest amount of

  8. A Compact, Solid-State UV (266 nm) Laser System Capable of Burst-Mode Operation for Laser Ablation Desorption Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arevalo, Ricardo, Jr.; Coyle, Barry; Paulios, Demetrios; Stysley, Paul; Feng, Steve; Getty, Stephanie; Binkerhoff, William

    2015-01-01

    Compared to wet chemistry and pyrolysis techniques, in situ laser-based methods of chemical analysis provide an ideal way to characterize precious planetary materials without requiring extensive sample processing. In particular, laser desorption and ablation techniques allow for rapid, reproducible and robust data acquisition over a wide mass range, plus: Quantitative, spatially-resolved measurements of elemental and molecular (organic and inorganic) abundances; Low analytical blanks and limits-of-detection ( ng g-1); and, the destruction of minimal quantities of sample ( g) compared to traditional solution and/or pyrolysis analyses (mg).

  9. Process Integration of Bioethanol from Sugar Cane and Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, L.; Kafarov, V.

    In this study several alternatives for process integration of bioethanol from sugar cane and hydrogen production were evaluated. Bioethanol was produced above all in the fermentation of sweetened juice from sugar cane, stillage was removed. Stillage and bagasse are the process byproducts. The bioethanol steam reforming is an endothermic catalytic process when vaporized ethanol and steam are fed using a 1:6 molar ratio to reformer with a Ni-catalyst at atmospheric pressure and 350xC. Taking into account the processes properties mentioned above, it is possible to integrate the bioethanol production from sugar cane and its reforming by using byproducts like bagasse and stillage and to produce energy for steam reforming and bioethanol solution concentration by direct firing (for bagasse) or anaerobic digestion to get methane (for stillage).

  10. Process and composition for drying of gaseous hydrogen halides

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1989-08-01

    A process for drying a gaseous hydrogen halide of the formula HX, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine, to remove water impurity therefrom, comprising: contacting the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide with a scavenger including a support having associated therewith one or more members of the group consisting of: (a) an active scavenging moiety selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) metal halide compounds dispersed in the support, of the formula MX.sub.y ; and (ii) metal halide pendant functional groups of the formula -MX.sub.y-1 covalently bonded to the support, wherein M is a y-valent metal, and y is an integer whose value is from 1 to 3; (b) corresponding partially or fully alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, of the metal halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); wherein the alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, when present, are reactive with the gaseous hydrogen halide to form the corresponding halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); and M being selected such that the heat of formation, .DELTA.H.sub.f of its hydrated halide, MX.sub.y.(H.sub.2 O).sub.n, is governed by the relationship: .DELTA.H.sub.f .gtoreq.n.times.10.1 kilocalories/mole of such hydrated halide compound wherein n is the number of water molecules bound to the metal halide in the metal halide hydrate. Also disclosed is an appertaining scavenger composition and a contacting apparatus wherein the scavenger is deployed in a bed for contacting with the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide.

  11. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -454.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent (83) and recycled as process solvent (16). The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance.

  12. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone, the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1,500 psig (105 kg/cm[sup 2]), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone at a temperature in the range of between about 455 and about 500 C to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425 C to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C[sub 5]-454 C is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent. The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance. 6 figs.

  13. Non-Debye relaxation in the dielectric response of nematic liquid crystals: Surface and memory effects in the adsorption-desorption process of ionic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, J. L.; Santoro, P. A.; Zola, R. S.; Lenzi, E. K.; Evangelista, L. R.; Ciuchi, F.; Mazzulla, A.; Scaramuzza, N.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that the presence of ions in insulating materials such as nematic liquid crystals may be responsible for the dielectric spectroscopy behavior observed experimentally. It is shown that, at low frequencies, an essentially non-Debye relaxation process takes place due to surface effects. This is accomplished by investigating the effects of the adsorption-desorption process on the electrical response of an electrolytic cell when the generation and recombination of ions is present. The adsorption-desorption is governed by a non-usual kinetic equation in order to incorporate memory effects related to a non-Debye relaxation and the roughness of the surface. The analysis is carried out by searching for solutions to the drift-diffusion equation that satisfy the Poisson equation relating the effective electric field to the net charge density. We also discuss the effect of the mobility of the ions, i.e., situations with equal and different diffusion coefficients for positive and negative ions, on the impedance and obtain an exact expression for the admittance. The model is compared with experimental results measured for the impedance of a nematic liquid crystal sample and a very good agreement is obtained.

  14. APPLICATION OF THERMAL DESORPTION TECHNOLOGIES TO HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is a separation process frequently used to remediate many Superfund sites. Thermal desorption technologies are recommended and used because of (1) the wide range of organic contaminants effectively treated, (2) availability and mobility of commercial systems, ...

  15. Application of electron stimulated desorption techniques to measure the isotherm and the mean residence time of hydrogen physisorbed on a metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Ichiro Shimizu, Hideyuki; Kawarabuki, Taku; Yamakawa, Koichiro; Miura, Takashi

    2015-03-15

    Electron stimulated desorption techniques were applied to probe the density of H{sub 2} physisorbed on a cold surface. The adsorption isotherm of H{sub 2} on a copper surface was measured in the equilibrium pressure range between 10{sup −9} and 10{sup −4} Pa at surface temperatures of 6.5 and 4.2 K. The mean residence times of H{sub 2} on copper were obtained from the observation of the time development of the surface density in a transitional state approaching equilibrium, and are 50–500 s for the coverage between 1 and 0.18 at 4.2 K of the substrate temperature. The adsorption energies of 1.18–1.27 kJ/mol, and the condensation coefficient of 0.074–0.018 were also deduced.

  16. NEST-GENERATION TCAP HYDROGEN ISOTOPE SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L; Henry Sessions, H; Anita Poore, A; William Jacobs, W; Christopher Williams, C

    2007-08-07

    A thermal cycling absorption process (TCAP) for hydrogen isotope separation has been in operation at Savannah River Site since 1994. The process uses a hot/cold nitrogen system to cycle the temperature of the separation column. The hot/cold nitrogen system requires the use of large compressors, heat exchanges, valves and piping that is bulky and maintenance intensive. A new compact thermal cycling (CTC) design has recently been developed. This new design uses liquid nitrogen tubes and electric heaters to heat and cool the column directly so that the bulky hot/cold nitrogen system can be eliminated. This CTC design is simple and is easy to implement, and will be the next generation TCAP system at SRS. A twelve-meter column has been fabricated and installed in the laboratory to demonstrate its performance. The design of the system and its test results to date is discussed.

  17. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for the production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.; Gaffney, T.; Nataraj, S.; Rao, M.; Sircar, S.

    1998-08-01

    The novel Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process has the potential to decrease the cost of hydrogen production by steam methane reforming. Current effort for development of this technology has focused on adsorbent development, experimental process concept testing, and process development and design. A preferred CO{sub 2} adsorbent, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted hydrotalcite, satisfies all of the performance targets and it has been scaled up for process testing. A separate class of adsorbents has been identified which could potentially improve the performance of the H{sub 2}-SER process. Although this material exhibits improved CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the HTC adsorbent, its hydrothermal stability must be improved. Single-step process experiments (not cyclic) indicate that the H{sub 2}-SER reactor performance during the reaction step improves with decreasing pressure and increasing temperature and steam to methane ratio in the feed. Methane conversion in the H{sub 2}-SER reactor is higher than for a conventional catalyst-only reactor operated at similar temperature and pressure. The reactor effluent gas consists of 90+% H{sub 2}, balance CH{sub 4}, with only trace levels (< 50 ppm) of carbon oxides. A best-case process design (2.5 MMSCFD of 99.9+% H{sub 2}) based on the HTC adsorbent properties and a revised SER process cycle has been generated. Economic analysis of this design indicates the process has the potential to reduce the H{sub 2} product cost by 25--31% compared to conventional steam methane reforming.

  18. Processing Raman Spectra of High-Pressure Hydrogen Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    The Raman Code automates the analysis of laser-Raman-spectroscopy data for diagnosis of combustion at high pressure. On the basis of the theory of molecular spectroscopy, the software calculates the rovibrational and pure rotational Raman spectra of H2, O2, N2, and H2O in hydrogen/air flames at given temperatures and pressures. Given a set of Raman spectral data from measurements on a given flame and results from the aforementioned calculations, the software calculates the thermodynamic temperature and number densities of the aforementioned species. The software accounts for collisional spectral-line-broadening effects at pressures up to 60 bar (6 MPa). The line-broadening effects increase with pressure and thereby complicate the analysis. The software also corrects for spectral interference ("cross-talk") among the various chemical species. In the absence of such correction, the cross-talk is a significant source of error in temperatures and number densities. This is the first known comprehensive computer code that, when used in conjunction with a spectral calibration database, can process Raman-scattering spectral data from high-pressure hydrogen/air flames to obtain temperatures accurate to within 10 K and chemical-species number densities accurate to within 2 percent.

  19. The calcium-modulated structures of calmodulin and S100b proteins are useful to monitor hydrogen/deuterium exchange efficiency using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pingerelli, Peter L; Ozols, Victor V; Saleem, Haroon; Anderson, Carly R; Burns, Richard S

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) is a sensitive, salt-tolerant and high-throughput method useful to probe protein conformation and molecular interactions. However, a drawback of the MALDI HDX technique is that sample preparation methods can typically result in higher levels of artificial deuterium in-exchange and/or hydrogen back- exchange just prior to or during mass analysis; this may impair data reproducibility and impede structural and kinetic data interpretation. While methods to minimize effects of back-exchange during protein analyte deposition on MALDI plates have been reported, this study presents a readily available, highly sensitive protein control set to facilitate rapid MALDI HDX protocol workup. The Ca(2+)-induced solvent accessible surface area (ASA) changes of calmodulin (CaM) and S100 proteins were employed to monitor and optimize HDX protocol efficiency. Under non- stringent room temperature conditions, the Ca(2+)-induced deuterium exchange of CaM, DeltaD(ca2+ -apo), MH(+) shifts -17 to -24 Da, while S100 DeltaD(ca2+ -apo) MH(+) shifts +8 to +12 Da. By comparing the divergent CaM and S100 Ca(2+)-induced deuterium mass shift differences, HDX sample workup and MALDI plate spotting conditions can easily be monitored. PMID:19940340

  20. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Scherwitzl, Boris Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2014-05-14

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  1. Hydrogen gettering packing material, and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.; Thompson, Lisa M.; Smith, Henry Michael; Schicker, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  2. Hydrogen gettering packing material and process for making same

    SciTech Connect

    LeMay, James D.; Thompson, Lisa M.; Smith, Henry Michael; Schicker, James R.

    1999-09-09

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  3. Thermal decomposition pathway and desorption study of isopropanol and tert-butanol on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Kim, Kwansoo; Yong, Kijung

    2002-09-01

    Thermal decomposition pathway and desorption of isopropanol (IPA) and tert-butanol on Si(100) were studied using temperature programed desorption. Adsorbed alcohols studied were decomposed into atomic hydrogen and alkoxy on the surface. During heating the sample up to 1000 K, acetone, propylene, and hydrogen were desorbed as decomposition products of IPA on Si(100). Desorption pathways of IPA on Si(100) were largely consistent with those on metal surfaces: beta-hydride elimination reaction to acetone and C-O scission to propylene. For tert-butanol, which has no beta-hydrogen, isobutene and hydrogen were observed as main desorption products. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  4. Repeated appearance and disappearance of localized surface plasmon resonance in 1.2 nm gold clusters induced by adsorption and desorption of hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Ryo; Yamazoe, Seiji; Koyasu, Kiichirou; Tsukuda, Tatsuya

    2016-02-01

    Addition of an aqueous solution of NaBH4 to a dispersion of small (∼1.2 nm) gold clusters stabilized by poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (Au:PVP) induced a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption for a certain period of time while maintaining the cluster size. The duration of the LSPR band could be lengthened by increasing the NaBH4 concentration and shortened by increasing the concentration of dissolved O2, and the LSPR band could be made to appear and reappear repeatedly. The appearance of the LSPR band is explained by the electron donation to the Au core from the adsorbed H atoms that originate from NaBH4, whereas its disappearance is ascribed to the removal of H atoms by their reaction with O2. These results suggest that the transition between the metallic and non-metallic electronic structures of the Au clusters can be reversibly induced by the adsorption and desorption of H atoms, which are electronically equivalent to Au.

  5. Process for recovering evolved hydrogen enriched with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope

    DOEpatents

    Tanaka, John; Reilly, Jr., James J.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a separation means and method for enriching a hydrogen atmosphere with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope by using a solid titaniun alloy hydride. To this end, the titanium alloy hydride containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of vanadium, chromium, manganese, molybdenum, iron, cobalt and nickel is contacted with a circulating gaseous flow of hydrogen containing at least one heavy hydrogen isotope at a temperature in the range of -20.degree. to +40.degree. C and at a pressure above the dissociation pressure of the hydrided alloy selectively to concentrate at least one of the isotopes of hydrogen in the hydrided metal alloy. The contacting is continued until equilibrium is reached, and then the gaseous flow is isolated while the temperature and pressure of the enriched hydride remain undisturbed selectively to isolate the hydride. Thereafter, the enriched hydrogen is selectively recovered in accordance with the separation factor (S.F.) of the alloy hydride employed.

  6. OTEC gas desorption studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F. C.; Golshani, A.

    1982-02-01

    Experiments on deaeration in packed columns and barometric intake systems, and with hydraulic air compression for open-cycle OTEC systems are reported. A gas desorption test loop consisting of water storage tanks, a vacuum system, a liquid recirculating system, an air supply, a column test section, and two barometric leg test sections was used to perform the tests. The aerated water was directed through columns filled with either ceramic Raschig rings or plastic pall rings, and the system vacuum pressure, which drives the deaeration process, was found to be dependent on water velocity and intake pipe height. The addition of a barometric intake pipe increased the deaeration effect 10%, and further tests were run with lengths of PVC pipe as potential means for noncondensibles disposal through hydraulic air compression. Using the kinetic energy from the effluent flow to condense steam in the noncondensible stream improved the system efficiency.

  7. Reaction kinetics for the oxygen hydrogenation process on Pt(111) derived from temperature-programmed XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näslund, Lars-Åke

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen hydrogenation under ultra high vacuum conditions at the platinum surface was explored using temperature-programmed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Through modeling of the oxygen consumption, information on the reaction kinetics was obtained indicating that the reaction rate of the oxygen hydrogenation process depends on the hydrogen diffusion and on the lifetime of hydroxyl intermediates. The reaction rate is, however, enhanced when an autocatalytic process stabilizes the hydroxyl intermediates through hydrogen bonding to neighboring water molecules. The overall activation energy for the hydrogenation of atomic oxygen to form water was determined to be 0.20 eV with a frequency factor of only 103 s- 1.

  8. Process conditions for the mineralization of a biorefractory polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in soils using catalyzed hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, P.C.; Watts, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and soluble iron or mineral catalysts) was investigated as a basis for mineralizing benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a hydrophobic and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, in two soils of varied complexity. The process is based on Fenton`s reagent, which can be implemented in soils to generate hydroxyl radicals. This short-lived species reacts with most organic contaminants at near diffusion-controlled rates, providing a mechanism for potential rapid soil remediation. Benzo[a]pyrene labeled with {sup 14}C was added to silica sand and a silt loam loess soil; mineralization processes were then optimized using central composite rotatable experimental designs. Variables investigated during the optimization included H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, slurry volume, iron (II) amendment, and pH. Experimental data were evaluated by linear regression to develop empirical relationships and interactions between the variables. The equations were then used to develop three-dimensional response surfaces to describe BaP mineralization. The results from the response surfaces showed that 74% and 78% BaP mineralization was achieved in the silica sand and loess soils, respectively. The balance of the contaminant carbon remained with the soil fraction and was probably irreversibly sorbed. Desorption measurements over 5 d confirmed negligible desorption; however, oxidation reactions, which were complete within 24 h, documented >78% BaP mineralization, suggesting that the contaminant was oxidized, at least in part, in the sorbed phase. The results show that catalyzed H{sub 2}O{sub 2} has the ability to rapidly mineralize BaP that is not irreversibly sorbed.

  9. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation: Processes and equipment. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning methods, processes, and apparatus for coal liquefaction and hydrogenation. Included are patents for catalytic two-stage, catalytic single-step, fixed-bed, hydrogen-donor, internal heat transfer, and multi-phase processes. Topics also include catalyst production, catalyst recovery, desulfurization, pretreatment of coals, energy recovery processes, solvent product separation, hydrogenating gases, and pollution control. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Kevin; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2008-08-24

    The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle.

  11. Molecular processes in astrophysics: Calculations of hydrogen + hydrogen gas excitation, de-excitation, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Matthew Thomas

    The implications of H+H2 cooling in astrophysics is important to several applications. One of the most significant and pure applications is its role in cooling in the early universe. Other applications would include molecular dynamics in nebulae and their collapse into stars and astrophysical shocks. Shortly after the big bang, the universe was a hot primordial gas of photons, electrons, and nuclei among other ingredients. By far the most dominant nuclei in the early universe was hydrogen. In fact, in the early universe the matter density was 90 percent hydrogen and only 10 percent helium with small amounts of lithium and deuterium. In order for structure to form in the universe, this primordial gas must form atoms and cool. One of the significant cooling mechanisms is the collision of neutral atomic hydrogen with a neutral diatomic hydrogen molecule. This work performs calculations to determine collisional cooling rates of hydrogen using two potential surfaces.

  12. Process, including PSA and membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2001-01-01

    An improved process for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons. The process includes a pressure swing adsorption step, a compression/cooling step and a membrane separation step. The membrane step relies on achieving a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the conditions of the process.

  13. Development of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schubert, W.; Knight, J.; Quigley, M.; Forsberg, G.; Ganapathi, G.; Yarbrough, C.; Koukol, R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will present test data and discussion on the work we are conducting at JPL to address the following issues: 1) efficacy of sterilization process; 2) diffusion of hydrogen peroxide under sterilization process conditions into hard to reach places; 3) materials and components compatibility with the sterilization process and 4) development of methodology to protect sensitive components from hydrogen peroxide vapor.

  14. Process for forming hydrogen and other fuels utilizing magma

    DOEpatents

    Galt, John K.; Gerlach, Terrence M.; Modreski, Peter J.; Northrup, Jr., Clyde J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a method for extracting hydrogen from magma and water by injecting water from above the earth's surface into a pocket of magma and extracting hydrogen produced by the water-magma reaction from the vicinity of the magma.

  15. Process and reactor design for biophotolytic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Tamburic, Bojan; Dechatiwongse, Pongsathorn; Zemichael, Fessehaye W; Maitland, Geoffrey C; Hellgardt, Klaus

    2013-07-14

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has the ability to produce molecular hydrogen (H2), a clean and renewable fuel, through the biophotolysis of water under sulphur-deprived anaerobic conditions. The aim of this study was to advance the development of a practical and scalable biophotolytic H2 production process. Experiments were carried out using a purpose-built flat-plate photobioreactor, designed to facilitate green algal H2 production at the laboratory scale and equipped with a membrane-inlet mass spectrometry system to accurately measure H2 production rates in real time. The nutrient control method of sulphur deprivation was used to achieve spontaneous H2 production following algal growth. Sulphur dilution and sulphur feed techniques were used to extend algal lifetime in order to increase the duration of H2 production. The sulphur dilution technique proved effective at encouraging cyclic H2 production, resulting in alternating Chlamydomonas reinhardtii recovery and H2 production stages. The sulphur feed technique enabled photobioreactor operation in chemostat mode, resulting in a small improvement in H2 production duration. A conceptual design for a large-scale photobioreactor was proposed based on these experimental results. This photobioreactor has the capacity to enable continuous and economical H2 and biomass production using green algae. The success of these complementary approaches demonstrate that engineering advances can lead to improvements in the scalability and affordability of biophotolytic H2 production, giving increased confidence that H2 can fulfil its potential as a sustainable fuel of the future. PMID:23689756

  16. Two tools for applying chromatographic retention data to the mass-based identification of peptides during hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments by nano-liquid chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gershon, P D

    2010-12-15

    Two tools are described for integrating LC elution position with mass-based data in hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments by nano-liquid chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (nanoLC/MALDI-MS, a novel approach to HDX-MS). The first of these, 'TOF2H-Z Comparator', highlights peptides in HDX experiments that are potentially misidentified on the basis of mass alone. The program first calculates normalized values for the organic solvent concentration responsible for the elution of ions in nanoLC/MALDI HDX experiments. It then allows the solvent gradients for the multiple experiments contributing to an MS/MS-confirmed peptic peptide library to be brought into mutual alignment by iteratively re-modeling variables among LC parameters such as gradient shape, solvent species, fraction duration and LC dead time. Finally, using the program, high-probability chromatographic outliers can be flagged within HDX experimental data. The role of the second tool, 'TOF2H-XIC Comparator', is to normalize the LC chromatograms corresponding to all deuteration timepoints of all HDX experiments of a project, to a common reference. Accurate normalization facilitates the verification of chromatographic consistency between all ions whose spectral segments contribute to particular deuterium uptake plots. Gradient normalization in this manner revealed chromatographic inconsistencies between ions whose masses were either indistinguishable or separated by precise isotopic increments.

  17. Applications of light-induced electron-transfer and hydrogen-abstraction processes: photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen from reducing radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, K.; Whitten, D.G.

    1980-07-16

    A study of several photoprocesses which generate reducing radicals in similar photoelectrochemical cells was reported. Coupling of a light-induced reaction to produce a photocurrent concurrent with hydrogen generation in a second compartment can occur for a number of electron transfers and hydrogen abstractions in what appears to be a fairly general process. Irradiation of the RuL/sub 3//sup +2//Et/sub 3/N: photoanode compartment leads to production of a photocurrent together with generation of hydrogen at the cathode. A rather different type of reaction that also results in formation of two reducing radicals as primary photoproducts if the photoreduction of ketones and H-heteroaromatics by alcohols and other hydrogen atom donors. Irradiation of benzophenone/2-propanol/MV/sup +2/ solutions in the photoanode compartment (intensity 1.4 x 10/sup -8/ einstein/s) leads to a buildup of moderate levels of MV/sup +/ and to a steady photocurrent of 320 ..mu..A. The MV/sup +/ is oxidized at the anode of the photolyzed compartment with concomitant reduction of H/sup +/ in the cathode compartment. There was no decrease in benzophenone concentration over moderate periods of irradiation, and a steady production of hydrogen in the cathode compartment was observed. The photocurrent produced was linear with the square of absorbed light intensity. The quantum efficiency at the above-indicated intensity is 22%; quantitative analysis of the hydrogen produced gives good agreement with this value. 1 figure, 1 table. (DP)

  18. Hydrogen uptake on film surfaces produced by a unique codeposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Kenneth V.; Carroll, David W.; Trkula, Mitchell; Sandoval, Cynthia W.

    2003-05-01

    Hydrogen uptake on several different film surfaces has been achieved by deposition of a conventional hydrogen gettering system via a novel combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. We decided to use a conventional hydrogen gettering system, developed by Smith and Schicker [J.R. Schicker, AS/KCD Project No. EPN-047620, May 1994], that uses an acetylenic organic compound mixed with carbon supported palladium metal. The organic material, 1,4-bis-(phenylethynyl) benzene (DEB), is mixed with palladium and carbon by employing conventional solid state ceramic preparative techniques. Our novel codeposition process combines PVD and CVD techniques for fabricating thin-film coatings of the palladium-catalyzed DEB hydrogen gettering system. Hydrogen uptake was confirmed by 1H NMR and our novel process lends itself well to placing hydrogen getter onto complex shapes and substrates of various compositions.

  19. Desorption kinetics of benzene in a sandy soil in the presence of powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Choi, J-W; Kim, S-B; Kim, D-J

    2007-02-01

    Desorption kinetics of benzene was investigated with a modified biphasic desorption model in a sandy soil with five different powdered activated carbon (PAC) contents (0, 1, 2, 5, 10% w/w) as sorbents. Sorption experiments followed by series dilution desorption were conducted for each sorbent. Desorption of benzene was successively performed at two stages using deionized water and hexane. Modeling was performed on both desorption isotherm and desorption rate for water-induced desorption to elucidate the presence of sorption-desorption hysteresis and biphasic desorption and if present to quantify the desorption-resistant fraction (q (irr)) and labile fraction (F) of desorption site responsible for rapid process. Desorption isotherms revealed that sorption-desorption exhibited a severe hysteresis with a significant fraction of benzene being irreversibly adsorbed onto both pure sand and PAC, and that desorption-resistant fraction (q (irr)) increased with PAC content. Desorption kinetic modeling showed that desorption of benzene was biphasic with much higher (4-40 times) rate constant for rapid process (k (1)) than that for slow process (k (2)), and that the difference in the rate constant increased with PAC content. The labile fraction (F) of desorption site showed a decreasing tendency with PAC. The experimental results would provide valuable information on remediation methods for soils and groundwater contaminated with BTEX.

  20. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO2

    PubMed Central

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2015-01-01

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer des orption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. PMID:24832297

  1. Modular Advanced Oxidation Process Enabled by Cathodic Hydrogen Peroxide Production

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO•) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d–1. The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO• scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m–3, with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  2. Modular advanced oxidation process enabled by cathodic hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Barazesh, James M; Hennebel, Tom; Jasper, Justin T; Sedlak, David L

    2015-06-16

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d(-1). The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO(•) scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m(-3), with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices.

  3. Modular advanced oxidation process enabled by cathodic hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Barazesh, James M; Hennebel, Tom; Jasper, Justin T; Sedlak, David L

    2015-06-16

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d(-1). The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO(•) scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m(-3), with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  4. Effects of volatile fatty acids on a thermophilic anaerobic hydrogen fermentation process degrading peptone.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S S; Chang, S M; Chen, S T

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen fermentation using glucose as a single substrate caused abrupt pH drops and the gradual losses of hydrogen producers, which in turn led to system failure. In this study the use of a proteinaceous substrate, peptone, avoided the abrupt pH drops in the reactive system and allowed for further exploration of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and pH effects on the hydrogen fermentation process. Our results showed that: (1) during the hydrogen fermentation tests, the abrupt pH drops were avoided thus system stability increased due to the production of ammonia from the peptone fermented, (2) pH control was not necessary and the addition of acetate to the process had little effect on the hydrogen fermentation process, (3) at the extreme pHs the addition of acetate either lengthened the lag phase (pH < or = 6) or slowed the hydrogen production rate (pH > or = 8), and both situations were not desired, and (4) high VFA content in the system sped up the consumption of hydrogen gas. Results of this study suggested that the hydrogen fermentation using the protein-containing substances as substrate was beneficial in maintaining the system pH. As long as the pH was maintained around 6-8, system inhibition due to VFAs accumulation was minimized. Thus, the optimal operation of a hydrogen fermentation process would be achievable via the control of substrate composition at a certain carbohydrate-to-protein ratio.

  5. Experimental and modeling study of adsorption-desorption processes with application to a deep-well injection radioactive waste disposal site.

    PubMed

    Rumynin, V G; Konosavsky, P K; Hoehn, E

    2005-01-01

    Radionuclide (Sr-90 and Cs-137) behavior in the subsurface environment was evaluated with respect to natural attenuation, sorption and desorption kinetics, and equilibrium. Batch experiments were conducted with synthesized groundwater or acid (NaNO3; pH approximately 3) solutions under different temperature (T=20 and 70 degrees C) and pressure (P=Patm and P=3 MPa) conditions. Samples of sedimentary rock were selected as the solid phase from a radioactively contaminated site associated with deep-well injection of the radioactive waste. Groundwater and a NaNO3 waste-brine solution were used as the liquid phase. All experiments revealed hysteresis in radionuclide adsorption. Moreover, some of the experiments indicated that the adsorption process may be irreversible. A simultaneous temperature and pressure increase leads to anomalous behavior of the adsorption kinetics: a period of a rapid concentration drop of the radionuclides in solution, which is caused by their sorption uptake, is changed by a stage of a gradual increase in the corresponding concentrations. To explain the observed phenomena, several hypotheses were examined. Thus, an analytical model describing the mutual interference of adsorption kinetics and dissolution of carbonate minerals was developed resulting in a nonmonotonic behavior of the concentration curves obtained at the adsorption stage. For the description of the batch experiments with radionuclides at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, a dual-site adsorption model has been used.

  6. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

  7. Study on hydrogen removal of AZ91 alloys using ultrasonic argon degassing process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Wenyi; Le, Qichi; Bao, Lei; Cui, Jianzhong; Jiang, Jiajia

    2015-09-01

    Argon degassing, ultrasonic degassing and a novel ultrasonic argon degassing treatment were applied for the hydrogen removal of AZ91 magnesium alloy. The hydrogen concentration, microstructures and mechanical properties have also been investigated. AZ91 alloys contains a high hydrogen concentration. The mechanical properties of the as-cast alloy are much improved using degassing process, which should be mainly attributed to the hydrogen removal. Among the three degassing process, the ultrasonic argon treatment is a high efficient process both for hydrogen removal and microstructure refining. One hand, ultrasonic wave could break up the purged argon bubble to improve the degassing efficiency of these bubbles. On the other hand, ultrasound could also generate many cavitation bubbles in the melt, which should account for the microstructure refinement. The ultrasonic argon treatment involves dynamics between the ascending argon bubbles and ultrasonic effects, such as cavitation and streaming, etc.

  8. Methods of controlling hydrogen fluoride pressure during chemical fabrication processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Wiesmann, Harold

    2009-11-24

    The present invention is a method for producing a crystalline end-product. The method comprising exposing a fluoride-containing precursor to a hydrogen fluoride absorber under conditions suitable for the conversion of the precursor into the crystalline end-product.

  9. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1980-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  10. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  11. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  12. Techno-economic evaluation of a two-step biological process for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Ljunggren, Mattias; Zacchi, Guido

    2010-01-01

    An integrated biological process for the production of hydrogen based on thermophilic and photo-heterotrophic fermentation was evaluated from a technical and economic standpoint. Besides the two fermentation steps the process also includes pretreatment of the raw material (potato steam peels) and purification of hydrogen using amine absorption. The study aimed neither at determining the absolute cost of biohydrogen nor at an economic optimization of the production process, but rather at studying the effects of different parameters on the production costs of biohydrogen as a guideline for future improvements. The effect of the key parameters, hydrogen productivity and yield and substrate concentration in the two fermentations on the cost of the hydrogen produced was studied. The selection of the process conditions was based mainly on laboratory data. The process was simulated by use of the software Aspen Plus and the capital costs were estimated using the program Aspen Icarus Process Evaluator. The study shows that the photo-fermentation is the main contributor to the hydrogen production cost mainly because of the cost of plastic tubing, for the photo-fermentors, which represents 40.5% of the hydrogen production cost. The costs of the capital investment and chemicals were also notable contributors to the hydrogen production cost. Major economic improvements could be achieved by increasing the productivity of the two fermentation steps on a medium-term to long-term scale.

  13. Process for synthesis of ammonia borane for bulk hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Autrey, S Thomas; Heldebrant, David J; Linehan, John C; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J; Zheng, Feng

    2011-03-01

    The present invention discloses new methods for synthesizing ammonia borane (NH.sub.3BH.sub.3, or AB). Ammonium borohydride (NH.sub.4BH.sub.4) is formed from the reaction of borohydride salts and ammonium salts in liquid ammonia. Ammonium borohydride is decomposed in an ether-based solvent that yields AB at a near quantitative yield. The AB product shows promise as a chemical hydrogen storage material for fuel cell powered applications.

  14. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Alex J.; Ren, Shoujie; Ye, Philip; Kim, Pyoungchung; Labbe, Niki; Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2015-06-30

    A new approach to hydrogen production using a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50 3.2% to76 0.5% while anode coulombic efficiency ranged from 54 6.5% to 96 0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%, respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass.

  15. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via an integrated pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J; Ren, S; Ye, X; Kim, P; Labbe, N; Borole, A P

    2015-11-01

    A new approach to hydrogen production using an integrated pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L anode-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50±3.2% to 76±0.5% while anode Coulombic efficiency ranged from 54±6.5% to 96±0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%, respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass.

  16. Hydrogen uptake in single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by the hydrogen arc plasma jet method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Ruiz, L. A.; Ortiz-Lopez, J.; de Ita de La Torre, A.; Arellano-Peraza, J. S.; Flores-Díaz, G.

    2006-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by a modified electric arc discharge method under hydrogen atmosphere using a catalytic mixture of powders with composition C/Ni/Co/Fe/FeS. The samples were characterized with transmission and scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Unpurified samples contain 20 wt% of carbon nanotubes, 2 wt% of other forms of carbon and 78 wt% of catalytic metals. Adsorption/desorption of hydrogen in unpurified samples at atmospheric pressure measured with gravimetric methods was of the order of 2 wt%. Samples for these measurements were prepared with a three-step treatment: (i) oxidation in air for 30 min at 500 ^oC, (ii) ball- milling for 1 hr, and (iii) second oxidation in air for 30 min at 500 ^oC. This treatment was applied to eliminate other forms of carbon as well as to shorten the tubes and open their caps. Hydrogen desorption was also measured in degassed samples (400 ^oC for 20 min in vacuum) which adsorbed H2 while cooling to room temperature. Desorption in degassed/hydrogenated samples is a two-step process which we attribute to distinct desorption characteristics of nanotubes and of residual oxidized metal catalysts.

  17. Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Muradov, Nazim Z.

    2011-08-23

    A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

  18. Certification of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schubert, W.; Koukol, R.; Foster, T. L.; Stabekis, P. D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the selection process and research activities JPL is planning to conduct for certification of hydrogen peroxide as a NASA approved technique for sterilization of various spacecraft parts/components and entire modern spacecraft.

  19. Hydrogen storage development

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.

    1998-08-01

    A summary of the hydride development efforts for the current program year (FY98) are presented here. The Mg-Al-Zn alloy system was studied at low Zn levels (2--4 wt%) and midrange Al contents (40--60 wt%). Higher plateau pressures were found with Al and Zn alloying in Mg and, furthermore, it was found that the hydrogen desorption kinetics were significantly improved with small additions of Zn. Results are also shown here for a detailed study of the low temperature properties of Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}, and a comparison made between conventional melt cast alloy and the vapor process material.

  20. Electrochemical synthesis of hydrogen with depolarization of the anodic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulskiy, Gennadiy; Tulskaya, Alena; Skatkov, Leonid; Gomozov, Valeriy; Deribo, Svetlana

    2016-05-01

    A new active composite coating for graphite gas diffusion electrode for hybrid sulfur cycle was proposed. The kinetics of oxidation of SO2 were studied on porous graphite anodes with different catalytic coatings. It was shown that the most efficient composite coating is based on activated carbon and platinum supported on graphite gas diffusion substrate. The voltage drop in the laboratory electrochemical cell was 1.3 V at a current density of 1000 A·m-2. This corresponds to a specific consumption of 3.1 kWh electric energy per 1 m3 of hydrogen.

  1. Process development for hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on growth and product formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Florian; Morweiser, Michael; Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Kruse, Olaf; Posten, Clemens

    2012-11-30

    Certain strains of microalgae are long known to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase enzyme recombines electrons from the chloroplast electron transport chain with protons to form molecular hydrogen directly inside the chloroplast. A sustained hydrogen production can be obtained under low sulfur conditions in C. reinhardtii, reducing the net oxygen evolution by reducing the photosystem II activity and thereby overcoming the inhibition of the hydrogenases. The development of specially adapted hydrogen production strains led to higher yields and optimized biological process preconditions. So far sustainable hydrogen production required a complete exchange of the growth medium to establish sulfur-deprived conditions after biomass growth. In this work we demonstrate the transition from the biomass growth phase to the hydrogen production phase in a single batch culture only by exact dosage of sulfur. This eliminates the elaborate and energy intensive solid-liquid separation step and establishes a process strategy to proceed further versus large scale production. This strategy has been applied to determine light dependent biomass growth and hydrogen production kinetics to assess the potential of H₂ production with C. reinhardtii as a basis for scale up and further process optimization.

  2. Process development for hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on growth and product formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Florian; Morweiser, Michael; Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Kruse, Olaf; Posten, Clemens

    2012-11-30

    Certain strains of microalgae are long known to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase enzyme recombines electrons from the chloroplast electron transport chain with protons to form molecular hydrogen directly inside the chloroplast. A sustained hydrogen production can be obtained under low sulfur conditions in C. reinhardtii, reducing the net oxygen evolution by reducing the photosystem II activity and thereby overcoming the inhibition of the hydrogenases. The development of specially adapted hydrogen production strains led to higher yields and optimized biological process preconditions. So far sustainable hydrogen production required a complete exchange of the growth medium to establish sulfur-deprived conditions after biomass growth. In this work we demonstrate the transition from the biomass growth phase to the hydrogen production phase in a single batch culture only by exact dosage of sulfur. This eliminates the elaborate and energy intensive solid-liquid separation step and establishes a process strategy to proceed further versus large scale production. This strategy has been applied to determine light dependent biomass growth and hydrogen production kinetics to assess the potential of H₂ production with C. reinhardtii as a basis for scale up and further process optimization. PMID:22750091

  3. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

  4. Monitoring the biochemical hydrogen and methane potential of the two-stage dark-fermentative process.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Andrea; Cantù, Cristina; Spagni, Alessandro

    2011-03-01

    A two-step process has been recently proposed whereby the products of biological hydrogen production processes are used as substrates for biological methane production. The aim of the present study is to evaluate a simple bench-scale batch procedure for measuring the biochemical hydrogen and methane potential of organic substances as a two-step simulated process. Glucose fermentation showed an hydrogen and methane recovery (measured as the ratio of electron equivalents recovered as hydrogen and methane and electron equivalents of the initial substrate added) from the initial substrate of 13.3% and 75.5%, respectively, that approximates mass balance closure. On the contrary, gas recoveries ranging from 61% to 75% were measured from wastes originating from the food-industry. Moreover, the results demonstrate that the substrate origins significantly influence the ratio of H(2) and CH(4) recovery.

  5. Polymer-induced surface modifications of Pd-based thin films leading to improved kinetics in hydrogen sensing and energy storage applications.

    PubMed

    Ngene, Peter; Westerwaal, Ruud J; Sachdeva, Sumit; Haije, Wim; de Smet, Louis C P M; Dam, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    The catalytic properties of Pd alloy thin films are enhanced by a thin sputtered PTFE coating, resulting in profound improvements in hydrogen adsorption and desorption in Pd-based and Pd-catalyzed hydrogen sensors and hydrogen storage materials. The remarkably enhanced catalytic performance is attributed to chemical modifications of the catalyst surface by the sputtered PTFE leading to a possible change in the binding strength of the intermediate species involved in the hydrogen sorption process.

  6. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam degradates in several agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Processes regulating pesticide fate in the environment are influenced by the physicochemical properties of pesticides and soils. Sorption-desorption are important processes as they regulate movement of pesticides in soil. Although sorption-desorption is widely studied for herbicides, studies involvi...

  7. Thermodynamics of the hybrid interaction of hydrogen with palladium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griessen, Ronald; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Giessen, Harald

    2016-03-01

    Palladium-hydrogen is a prototypical metal-hydrogen system. It is therefore not at all surprising that a lot of attention has been devoted to the absorption and desorption of hydrogen in nanosized palladium particles. Several seminal articles on the interaction of H with Pd nanocubes and nanoparticles have recently been published. Although each article provides for the first time detailed data on specific aspects of hydrogen in nanoparticles, they individually do not contain enough information to draw firm conclusions about the involved mechanisms. Here, we show that the large body of data available so far in literature exhibits general patterns that lead to unambiguous conclusions about the processes involved in H absorption and desorption in Pd nanoparticles. On the basis of a remarkably robust scaling law for the hysteresis in absorption-desorption isotherms, we show that hydrogen absorption in palladium nanoparticles is consistent with a coherent interface model and is thus clearly different from bulk Pd behaviour. However, H desorption occurs fully coherently only for small nanoparticles (typically smaller than 50 nm) at temperatures sufficiently close to the critical temperature. For larger particles it is partially incoherent, as in bulk, where dilute α-PdHx and high concentration β-PdHx phases coexist.

  8. Thermodynamics of the hybrid interaction of hydrogen with palladium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Griessen, Ronald; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Giessen, Harald

    2016-03-01

    Palladium-hydrogen is a prototypical metal-hydrogen system. It is therefore not at all surprising that a lot of attention has been devoted to the absorption and desorption of hydrogen in nanosized palladium particles. Several seminal articles on the interaction of H with Pd nanocubes and nanoparticles have recently been published. Although each article provides for the first time detailed data on specific aspects of hydrogen in nanoparticles, they individually do not contain enough information to draw firm conclusions about the involved mechanisms. Here, we show that the large body of data available so far in literature exhibits general patterns that lead to unambiguous conclusions about the processes involved in H absorption and desorption in Pd nanoparticles. On the basis of a remarkably robust scaling law for the hysteresis in absorption-desorption isotherms, we show that hydrogen absorption in palladium nanoparticles is consistent with a coherent interface model and is thus clearly different from bulk Pd behaviour. However, H desorption occurs fully coherently only for small nanoparticles (typically smaller than 50 nm) at temperatures sufficiently close to the critical temperature. For larger particles it is partially incoherent, as in bulk, where dilute α-PdHx and high concentration β-PdHx phases coexist.

  9. Thermodynamics of the hybrid interaction of hydrogen with palladium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Griessen, Ronald; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Giessen, Harald

    2016-03-01

    Palladium-hydrogen is a prototypical metal-hydrogen system. It is therefore not at all surprising that a lot of attention has been devoted to the absorption and desorption of hydrogen in nanosized palladium particles. Several seminal articles on the interaction of H with Pd nanocubes and nanoparticles have recently been published. Although each article provides for the first time detailed data on specific aspects of hydrogen in nanoparticles, they individually do not contain enough information to draw firm conclusions about the involved mechanisms. Here, we show that the large body of data available so far in literature exhibits general patterns that lead to unambiguous conclusions about the processes involved in H absorption and desorption in Pd nanoparticles. On the basis of a remarkably robust scaling law for the hysteresis in absorption-desorption isotherms, we show that hydrogen absorption in palladium nanoparticles is consistent with a coherent interface model and is thus clearly different from bulk Pd behaviour. However, H desorption occurs fully coherently only for small nanoparticles (typically smaller than 50 nm) at temperatures sufficiently close to the critical temperature. For larger particles it is partially incoherent, as in bulk, where dilute α-PdHx and high concentration β-PdHx phases coexist. PMID:26569476

  10. Solubility of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti and lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Dragel, G.; Erck, R.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    The solubility of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium was determined at 400-675{degrees}C and a hydrogen pressure of 1.76x10{sup -4} torr (2.35 x 10{sup -2}Pa). Hydrogen concentration in both materials decreased as temperature increased, and the ratio of the hydrogen concentration in liquid lithium and V-4Cr-4Ti (hydrogen distribution ratio R) increased with temperature, e.g., R was {approx} 17 at 400{degrees}C and {approx} 80 at 700{degrees}C. Desorption of hydrogen from V-4Cr-4Ti is a thermally activated process and the activation energy of the desorption rate is 0.405 eV.

  11. Measurement of hydrogen peroxide in an advanced oxidation process using an automated biosensor.

    PubMed

    Modrzejewska, B; Guwy, A J; Dinsdale, R; Hawkes, D L

    2007-01-01

    A hydrogen peroxide biosensor was used to monitor hydrogen peroxide concentrations in a UV/hydrogen peroxide immobilised Fenton advanced oxidation process (AOP). The biosensor is based on gas phase monitoring and thus is more resistant to fouling from the liquid phase constituents of industrial processes. The biosensor is supplied with catalase continually, therefore overcoming any problems with enzyme degradation, which would occur in an immobilised enzyme biosensor. The biosensors response was linear within the experimental range 30-400mg H(2)O(2)l(-1) with a R(2) correlation of 0.99. The hydrogen peroxide monitor was used to monitor residual peroxide in an AOP, operated with a step overload of hydrogen peroxide, with correlation factors of 0.96-0.99 compared to offline hydrogen peroxide determinations by UV spectroscopy. Sparging the sample with nitrogen was found to be effective in reducing the interference from dissolved gases produced with the AOP itself. It is proposed that this biosensor could be used to improve the effectiveness of AOPs via hydrogen peroxide control.

  12. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, James B.; Comolli, Alfred G.; McLean, Joseph B.

    1989-01-01

    A process for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600.degree.-750.degree. F. to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650.degree. F. and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft.sup.3 catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760.degree.-860.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600.degree.-750.degree. F..sup.+ fraction containing 0-20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials.

  13. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

    1989-10-17

    A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

  14. New insights into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hydrogen production processes by combined microarray/RNA-seq transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Toepel, Jörg; Illmer-Kephalides, Maike; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Straube, Jasmin; May, Patrick; Goesmann, Alexander; Kruse, Olaf

    2013-08-01

    Hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii induced by sulphur starvation is a multiphase process while the cell internal metabolism is completely remodelled. The first cellular response is characterized by induction of genes with regulatory functions, followed by a total remodelling of the metabolism to provide reduction equivalents for cellular processes. We were able to characterize all major processes that provide energy and reduction equivalents during hydrogen production. Furthermore, C. reinhardtii showed a strong transcript increase for gene models responsible for stress response and detoxification of oxygen radicals. Finally, we were able to determine potential bottlenecks and target genes for manipulation to increase hydrogen production or to prolong the hydrogen production phase. The investigation of transcriptomic changes during the time course of hydrogen production in C. reinhardtii with microarrays and RNA-seq revealed new insights into the regulation and remodelling of the cell internal metabolism. Both methods showed a good correlation. The microarray platform can be used as a reliable standard tool for routine gene expression analysis. RNA-seq additionally allowed a detailed time-dependent study of gene expression and determination of new genes involved in the hydrogen production process. PMID:23551401

  15. Prospects for hydrogen storage in graphene.

    PubMed

    Tozzini, Valentina; Pellegrini, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen-based fuel cells are promising solutions for the efficient and clean delivery of electricity. Since hydrogen is an energy carrier, a key step for the development of a reliable hydrogen-based technology requires solving the issue of storage and transport of hydrogen. Several proposals based on the design of advanced materials such as metal hydrides and carbon structures have been made to overcome the limitations of the conventional solution of compressing or liquefying hydrogen in tanks. Nevertheless none of these systems are currently offering the required performances in terms of hydrogen storage capacity and control of adsorption/desorption processes. Therefore the problem of hydrogen storage remains so far unsolved and it continues to represent a significant bottleneck to the advancement and proliferation of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Recently, however, several studies on graphene, the one-atom-thick membrane of carbon atoms packed in a honeycomb lattice, have highlighted the potentialities of this material for hydrogen storage and raise new hopes for the development of an efficient solid-state hydrogen storage device. Here we review on-going efforts and studies on functionalized and nanostructured graphene for hydrogen storage and suggest possible developments for efficient storage/release of hydrogen under ambient conditions.

  16. Radiolytic hydrogen production from process vessels in HB line - production rates compared to evolution rates and discussion of LASL reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.

    1992-11-12

    Hydrogen production from radiolysis of aqueous solutions can create a safety hazard since hydrogen is flammable. At times this production can be significant, especially in HB line where nitric acid solutions containing high concentrations of Pu-238, an intense alpha emitter, are processed. The hydrogen production rates from these solutions are necessary for safety analyses of these process systems. The methods and conclusions of hydrogen production rate tests are provided in this report.

  17. Thermochemical production of hydrogen via multistage water splitting processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents and reviews the fundamental thermodynamic principles underlying thermochemical water splitting processes. The overall system is considered first and the temperature limitation in process thermal efficiency is developed. The relationship to an ideal water electrolysis cell is described and the nature of efficient multistage reaction processes is discussed. The importance of the reaction entropy change and the relation of the reaction free energy change to the work of separation is described. A procedure for analyzing thermochemical water splitting processes is presented and its use to calculate individual stage efficiency is demonstrated. A number of processes are used to illustrate the concepts and procedures.

  18. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

    2004-02-01

    This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space

  19. Role of deuterium desorption kinetics on the thermionic emission properties of polycrystalline diamond films with respect to kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, W. F. Howell, M.; Kang, W. P.; Davidson, J. L.; Brooks, M. M.; Tolk, N.

    2014-06-21

    The desorption kinetics of deuterium from polycrystalline chemical vapor deposited diamond films were characterized by monitoring the isothermal thermionic emission current behavior. The reaction was observed to follow a first-order trend as evidenced by the decay rate of the thermionic emission current over time which is in agreement with previously reported studies. However, an Arrhenius plot of the reaction rates at each tested temperature did not exhibit the typical linear behavior which appears to contradict past observations of the hydrogen (or deuterium) desorption reaction from diamond. This observed deviation from linearity, specifically at lower temperatures, has been attributed to non-classical processes. Though no known previous studies reported similar deviations, a reanalysis of the data obtained in the present study was performed to account for tunneling which appeared to add merit to this hypothesis. Additional investigations were performed by reevaluating previously reported data involving the desorption of hydrogen (as opposed to deuterium) from diamond which further indicated this reaction to be dominated by tunneling at the temperatures tested in this study (<775 °C). An activation energy of 3.19 eV and a pre-exponential constant of 2.3 × 10{sup 12} s{sup −1} were determined for the desorption reaction of deuterium from diamond which is in agreement with previously reported studies.

  20. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART I.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-07-10

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I will discuss the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  1. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-08-17

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I discussed the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  2. A Micro-fabricated Hydrogen Storage Module with Sub-atmospheric Activation and Durability in Air Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xi; Payer, Joe H; Wainright, Jesse S; Dudik, Laurie

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this work was to develop a hydrogen storage module for onboard electrical power sources suitable for use in micro power systems and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Hydrogen storage materials were developed as thin-film inks to be compatible with an integrated manufacturing process. Important design aspects were (a) ready activation at sub-atmospheric hydrogen pressure and room temperature and (b) durability, i.e. capable of hundreds of absorption/desorption cycles and resistance to deactivation on exposure to air. Inks with palladium-treated intermetallic hydrogen storage alloys were developed and are shown here to be compatible with a thin-film micro-fabrication process. These hydrogen storage modules absorb hydrogen readily at atmospheric pressure, and the absorption/desorption rates remained fast even after the ink was exposed to air for 47 weeks.

  3. MEASUREMENT AND PREDICTION OF RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN PRODUCTION IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING SLURRIES AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N; John Pareizs, J; Terri Fellinger, T; Cj Bannochie, C

    2007-01-10

    This paper presents results of measurements and predictions of radiolytic hydrogen production rates from two actual process slurries in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Hydrogen is a flammable gas and its production in nuclear facilities can be a safety hazard if not mitigated. Measurements were made in the Shielded Cells of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a sample of Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) currently being processed by the DWPF. Predictions were made using published values for rates of radiolytic reactions producing H{sub 2} in aqueous solutions and the measured radionuclide and chemical compositions of the two slurries. The agreement between measured and predicted results for nine experiments ranged from complete agreement to 24% difference. This agreement indicates that if the composition of the slurry being processed is known, the rate of radiolytic hydrogen production can be reasonably estimated.

  4. Desorption Induced by Excited Electrons from Semiconductor Surfaces (I)
    Desorption Induced by Electron-/hole-injection into Halogen-adsorbed Silicon Surfaces—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shudo, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masatoshi

    We review excited-electron-induced desorption from halogen-adsorbed semiconductor surfaces, focusing on desorption processes associated with electron-beam irradiation using an electron gun and hole-injection using a scanning tunneling microscope. Recent studies on halogen-adsorbed silicon surfaces, i.e., typical etching systems, are described from the viewpoint of desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET).

  5. Processes with neutral hydrogen and deuterium molecules relevant to edge plasma in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadez, I.; Markelj, S.; Rupnik, Z.; Pelicon, P.

    2008-07-01

    Detailed understanding and characterization of plasma-wall interaction and edge plasma in present tokamaks and future fusion reactors is becoming more and more important due to the ITER project. Involved processes determine the physical and chemical sputtering of the wall material, fuel retention in exposed material, edge plasma properties, disruption phenomena etc. Neutral hydrogen atoms and molecules are present in the edge plasma. They are continuously generated by ion recombination on the wall of the fusion reactor and on the other plasma facing components and subsequently reemitted in the plasma. Neutral molecules are especially important for plasma detachment in tokamak divertors. The interaction of excited neutral molecules with the walls and their importance for the edge plasma is still not well understood since there are not many experimental studies of relevant processes. Moreover, spectroscopic results from tokamak edge plasma are dominated by processes involving ions and electrons, so that direct evidence of the influence of neutrals is difficult to extract. Direct correlation of the observed phenomena to the processes with neutrals is mainly possible by numerical simulations. We have constructed a set-up for vibrational spectroscopy of hydrogen molecules (H_2 and D_2) that is based on the properties of the dissociative electron attachment in hydrogen in order to facilitate dedicated experimental studies of relevant processes with hydrogen molecules. For the same purpose we also developed a technique for in-situ hydrogen depth profiling on the samples exposed to the controlled hydrogen atmosphere. This is done by Ion Beam Analytical (IBA) method ERAD (Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis), utilizing 4.2 MeV probing beam of ^7Li^2+ ions. A short description of experimental techniques and results on chemical erosion of graphite layers, production of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules on tungsten and isotope exchange on tungsten are to be presented in

  6. Numerical and Experimental Study of Mixing Processes Associated with Hydrogen and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, Vincent; Hill, Scott; Akbari, Amin; McDonell, Vincent

    2011-09-30

    As simulation capability improves exponentially with increasingly more cost effective CPUs and hardware, it can be used ?routinely? for engineering applications. Many commercial products are available and they are marketed as increasingly powerful and easy to use. The question remains as to the overall accuracy of results obtained. To support the validation of the CFD, a hierarchical experiment was established in which the type of fuel injection (radial, axial) as well as level of swirl (non-swirling, swirling) could be systematically varied. The effort was limited to time efficient approaches (i.e., generally RANS approaches) although limited assessment of time resolved methods (i.e., unsteady RANS and LES) were considered. Careful measurements of the flowfield velocity and fuel concentration were made using both intrusive and non-intrusive methods. This database was then used as the basis for the assessment of the CFD approach. The numerical studies were carried out with a statistically based matrix. As a result, the effect of turbulence model, fuel type, axial plane, turbulent Schmidt number, and injection type could be studied using analysis of variance. The results for the non-swirling cases could be analyzed as planned, and demonstrate that turbulence model selection, turbulence Schmidt number, and the type of injection will strongly influence the agreement with measured values. Interestingly, the type of fuel used (either hydrogen or methane) has no influence on the accuracy of the simulations. For axial injection, the selection of proper turbulence Schmidt number is important, whereas for radial injection, the results are relatively insensitive to this parameter. In general, it was found that the nature of the flowfield influences the performance of the predictions. This result implies that it is difficult to establish a priori the ?best? simulation approach to use. However, the insights from the relative orientation of the jet and flow do offer some

  7. Physics and Chemistry of the Hydrogen Fluoride Production Process from Fluorine Containing Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, A. N.; Kraydenko, R. I.; Lesnikova, M. S.; Malyutin, L. N.; Petlin, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the aluminum industry wastes on the environment is established. The resource efficient method of aluminum industry fluorine-containing wastes processing, which includes wastes oxidizing roasting to remove carbon component and the interaction of fluorine- containing particles with sulfuric acid in order to produce hydrogen fluoride, is considered. The economic and environmental effect of the proposed processing method is substantiated.

  8. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex temperature-programmed desorption data by multivariate curve resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Reyes, Juan Carlos F.; Teplyakov, Andrew V.; Brown, Steven D.

    2010-10-01

    The substantial amount of information carried in temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments is often difficult to mine due to the occurrence of competing reaction pathways that produce compounds with similar mass spectrometric features. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) is introduced as a tool capable of overcoming this problem by mathematically detecting spectral variations and correlations between several m/z traces, which is later translated into the extraction of the cracking pattern and the desorption profile for each desorbate. Different from the elegant (though complex) methods currently available to analyze TPD data, MCR analysis is applicable even when no information regarding the specific surface reaction/desorption process or the nature of the desorbing species is available. However, when available, any information can be used as constraints that guide the outcome, increasing the accuracy of the resolution. This approach is especially valuable when the compounds desorbing are different from what would be expected based on a chemical intuition, when the cracking pattern of the model test compound is difficult or impossible to obtain (because it could be unstable or very rare), and when knowing major components desorbing from the surface could in more traditional methods actually bias the quantification of minor components. The enhanced level of understanding of thermal processes achieved through MCR analysis is demonstrated by analyzing three phenomena: i) the cryogenic desorption of vinyltrimethylsilane from silicon, an introductory system where the known multilayer and monolayer components are resolved; ii) acrolein hydrogenation on a bimetallic Pt-Ni-Pt catalyst, where a rapid identification of hydrogenated products as well as other desorbing species is achieved, and iii) the thermal reaction of Ti[N(CH 3) 2] 4 on Si(100), where the products of surface decomposition are identified and an estimation of the surface composition after the

  9. An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhicheng Wang

    2007-03-15

    The new technology concept integrates two significant complementary hydrogen production and CO{sub 2}-sequestration approaches that have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Clark Atlanta University. The process can convert biomass into hydrogen and char. Hydrogen can be efficiently used for stationary power and mobile applications, or it can be synthesized into Ammonia which can be used for CO{sub 2}-sequestration, while char can be used for making time-release fertilizers (NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) by absorption of CO{sub 2} and other acid gases from exhaust flows. Fertilizers are then used for the growth of biomass back to fields. This project includes bench scale experiments and pilot scale tests. The Combustion and Emission Lab at Clark Atlanta University has conducted the bench scale experiments. The facility used for pilot scale tests was built in Athens, GA. The overall yield from this process is 7 wt% hydrogen and 32 wt% charcoal/activated carbon of feedstock (peanut shell). The value of co-product activated carbon is about $1.1/GJ and this coproduct reduced the selling price of hydrogen. And the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $6.95/GJ. The green house experimental results show that the samples added carbon-fertilizers have effectively growth increase of three different types of plants and improvement ability of keeping fertilizer in soil to avoid the fertilizer leaching with water.

  10. Sulfur Iodine Process Summary for the Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Russ

    2009-05-01

    This report summarizes the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting process for the purpose of supporting the process for evaluating and recommending a hydrogen production technology to deploy with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). This package provides the baseline process description as well as a comparison with the process as it was implemented in the Integrated Lab Scale (ILS) experiment conducted at General Atomics from 2006-2009.

  11. Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

    2012-09-14

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

  12. Enhanced bio-energy recovery in a two-stage hydrogen/methane fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Song, J H; Hwang, S J

    2009-01-01

    A two-stage hydrogen/methane fermentation process has emerged as a feasible engineering system to recover bio-energy from wastewater. Hydrogen-producing bacteria (HPB) generate hydrogen from readily available carbohydrates, and organic acids produced during the hydrogen fermentation step can be degraded to generate methane in the following step. Three strong acids, HCl, H(2)SO(4), and HNO(3), were tested to determine the appropriate pre-treatment method for enhanced hydrogen production. The hydrogen production rates of 230, 290, and 20 L/kg(-glucose)/day was observed for the sludge treated with HCl, H(2)SO(4), and HNO(3), respectively, indicating that the acid pre-treatment using either HCl or H(2)SO(4) resulted in a significant increase in hydrogen production. The fluorescent in situ hybridization method indicated that the acid pre-treatment selectively enriched HPB including Clostridium sp. of cluster I from inoculum sludge. After hydrogen fermentation was terminated, the sludge was introduced to a methane fermentation reactor. This experiment showed methane production rates of 100, 30, and 13 L/kg(-glucose)/day for the sludge pre-treated with HCl, H(2)SO(4), and HNO(3), respectively, implying that both sulfate and nitrate inhibited the activity of methane-producing bacteria. Consequently, the acid pre-treatment might be a feasible option to enhance biogas recovery in the two-stage fermentation process, and HCl was selected as the optimal strong acid for the enrichment of HPB and the continuous production of methane.

  13. Hydrogen radical processing -- In-situ semiconductor surface cleaning for epitaxial regrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Kuenzel, H.; Hase, A.; Griebenow, U.

    1996-12-31

    The achievement of high-quality interfaces for improved semiconductor device structures necessitates in-situ surface cleaning between different material deposition processes. In this contribution in-situ hydrogen radical exposure is presented as an advanced technique to obtain semiconductor surfaces adequate for MBE regrowth. Exposure of In-P-based materials to a thermal hydrogen radical beam at relatively low temperatures removes the native oxide layer from GaInAsP as well as AlGaInAs. In addition, accumulation of carbon, being the most prominent contaminant due to the exposure to air or intermediate ex-situ processing steps, is efficiently reduced. There is no indication of the occurrence of degradation of the treated material due to the hydrogen radical process which makes it especially suited for the fabrication of complex device structures.

  14. Direct Chlorination Process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5% hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90% excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

  15. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits 4 Table 4 to Subpart DDDDD of Part 63 Protection of... Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits As stated in § 63.7500, you must comply with the following applicable operating limits: If you demonstrate compliance with applicable hydrogen chloride emission...

  16. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits 4 Table 4 to Subpart DDDDD of Part 63 Protection of... Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits As stated in § 63.7500, you must comply with the following applicable operating limits: If you demonstrate compliance with applicable hydrogen chloride emission...

  17. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits 4 Table 4 to Subpart DDDDD of Part 63 Protection of... Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits As stated in § 63.7500, you must comply with the following applicable operating limits: If you demonstrate compliance with applicable hydrogen chloride emission...

  18. Desorption of intrinsic cesium from smectite: inhibitive effects of clay particle organization on cesium desorption.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Sakai, Haruka; Itono, Taeko; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji

    2014-09-16

    Fine clay particles have functioned as transport media for radiocesium in terrestrial environments after nuclear accidents. Because radiocesium is expected to be retained in clay minerals by a cation-exchange reaction, ascertaining trace cesium desorption behavior in response to changing solution conditions is crucially important. This study systematically investigated the desorption behavior of intrinsic Cs (13 nmol/g) in well-characterized Na-montmorillonite in electrolyte solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) under widely differing cation concentrations (0.2 mM to 0.2 M). Batch desorption experiments demonstrated that Cs(+) desorption was inhibited significantly in the presence of the environmental relevant concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (>0.5 mM) and high concentrations of K(+). The order of ability for Cs desorption was Na(+) = K(+) > Ca(2+) = Mg(2+) at the highest cation concentration (0.2 M), which is opposite to the theoretical prediction based on the cation-exchange selectivity. Laser diffraction grain-size analyses revealed that the inhibition of Cs(+) desorption coincided with the increase of the clay tactoid size. Results suggest that radiocesium in the dispersed fine clay particles adheres on the solid phase when the organization of swelling clay particles occurs because of changes in solution conditions caused by both natural processes and artificial treatments.

  19. The contribution of dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines in hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The contribution of molecular dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines is considered for a steady-state hydrogen plasma. If the contribution of dissociative processes is dominant, a substantial simplification in plasma diagnostics can be achieved. Numerical calculations have been performed for the production of Balmer alpha, beta, and gamma lines in hydrogen plasmas with medium and large degrees of ionization (x greater than about 0.0001) and for electron temperatures of 5000-45,000 K and electron densities of 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 16th/cu cm.

  20. Hydrogen isotope analysis of amino acids and whole cells reflects biosynthetic processing of nutrient- and water-derived hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, P.; Newsome, S.; Steele, A.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen (H) isotopes serve as sensitive tracers of biochemical processes that can be exploited to answer critical questions in biogeochemistry, ecology, and microbiology. Despite this apparent utility, relatively little is known about the specific mechanisms of H isotope fractionation involved in biosynthesis. In order to understand how organisms incorporate hydrogen from their chemical milieu into biomass, we have cultured the model bacterium E. coli MG1655 in a variety of media composed of deuterium-labeled nutrients and waters. Isotopic analysis of bulk cell mass reveals that the H fractionation between media water and cell material varies as a function of the nutrient source, with commonly used organic food sources (glucose and tryptone) leading to far smaller fractionation signals than non-standard ones (such as formamide, adenine, and urea). In addition, we have completed compound specific isotope analysis of amino acids using combined GC-IRMS. Amino acids harvested from E. coli cultured on glucose in water of varied D/H composition posses an extraordinary range of isotopic compositions (400-600 %). Furthermore, these amino acids follow a systematic distribution of D/H where proline is always heaviest and glycine is always lightest. However, when the short-chain peptide tryptone is used in place of glucose, only the non-essential amino acids reflect media water D/H values, suggesting the direct incorporation of some media-borne amino acids into cellular protein. These observations provide a foundation for understanding the cellular routing of hydrogen obtained from food and water sources and indicate that D/H analysis can serve as a powerful probe of biological function.

  1. Aasgard B process selection of hydrogen sulfide removal and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Son, K.J. van; Chludzinski, G.; Charles, P.R.

    1999-07-01

    The Aasgard offshore project consists of a 2-stage development to produce the oil and gas reserves from three fields in the Norwegian Sea. The three fields Midgard, Smoerbukk and Smoerbukk Soer have reserves of approximately 220 Gia standard cubic meters (Gsm{sup 3}, 8 Tcf) and 120 (Mm{sup 3}, 750 MMbbls) of crude oil and condensate. The Aasgard unit will be jointly developed by Statoil and Saga, and operated by Statoil. Other partners are Neste Petroleum, Mobil, Total, Agip and Norsk Hydro. This paper will focus on the process selection and preliminary design of the gas treating system.

  2. Aqueous process for recovering sulfur from hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Arunabha

    2015-05-05

    A process for recovering sulfur from a hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas utilizes an aqueous reaction medium, a temperature of about 110-150.degree. C., and a high enough pressure to maintain the aqueous reaction medium in a liquid state. The process reduces material and equipment costs and addresses the environmental disadvantages associated with known processes that rely on high boiling point organic solvents.

  3. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process

    DOE PAGES

    Lewis, Alex J.; Ren, Shoujie; Ye, Philip; Kim, Pyoungchung; Labbe, Niki; Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2015-06-30

    A new approach to hydrogen production using a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50 3.2% to76 0.5% while anode coulombic efficiency ranged from 54 6.5% to 96 0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%,more » respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass.« less

  4. Liquid-to-Gas Mass Transfer in Anaerobic Processes: Inevitable Transfer Limitations of Methane and Hydrogen in the Biomethanation Process

    PubMed Central

    Pauss, André; Andre, Gérald; Perrier, Michel; Guiot, Serge R.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid-to-gas mass transfer in anaerobic processes was investigated theoretically and experimentally. By using the classical definition of kLa, the global volumetric mass transfer coefficient, theoretical development of mass balances in such processes demonstrates that the mass transfer of highly soluble gases is not limited in the usual conditions occurring in anaerobic fermentors (low-intensity mixing). Conversely, the limitation is important for poorly soluble gases, such as methane and hydrogen. The latter could be overconcentrated to as much as 80 times the value at thermodynamic equilibrium. Such overconcentrations bring into question the biological interpretations that have been deduced solely from gaseous measurements. Experimental results obtained in three different methanogenic reactors for a wide range of conditions of mixing and gas production confirmed the general existence of low mass transfer coefficients and consequently of large overconcentrations of dissolved methane and hydrogen (up to 12 and 70 times the equilibrium values, respectively). Hydrogen mass transfer coefficients were obtained from the direct measurements of dissolved and gaseous concentrations, while carbon dioxide coefficients were calculated from gas phase composition and calculation of related dissolved concentration. Methane transfer coefficients were based on calculations from the carbon dioxide coefficients. From mass balances performed on a gas bubble during its simulated growth and ascent to the surface of the liquid, the methane and carbon dioxide contents in the gas bubble appeared to be controlled by the bubble growth process, while the bubble ascent was largely responsible for a slight enrichment in hydrogen. PMID:16348206

  5. Atomic hydrogen interaction with Ru(1010).

    PubMed

    Vesselli, E; Comelli, G; Rosei, R

    2004-05-01

    The interaction of atomic hydrogen with clean and deuterium precovered Ru(1010) was studied by means of temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) spectroscopy. Compared to molecular hydrogen experiments, after exposure of the clean surface to gas-phase atomic hydrogen at 90 K, two additional peaks grow in the desorption spectra at 115 and 150 K. The surface saturation coverage, determined by equilibrium between abstraction and adsorption reactions, is 2.5 monolayers. Preadsorbed deuterium abstraction experiments with gas-phase atomic hydrogen show that a pure Eley-Rideal mechanism is not involved in the process, while a hot atom (HA) kinetics describes well the reaction. By least-squares fitting of the experimental data, a simplified HA kinetic model yields an abstraction cross section value of 0.5 +/- 0.2 angstroms2. The atomic hydrogen interaction with an oxygen precovered surface was also studied by means of both TPD and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: oxygen hydrogenation and water production take place already at very low temperature (90 K).

  6. Thermochemical processes for hydrogen production by water decomposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, D.D.

    1980-08-01

    The principal contributions of the research are in the area of gas-solid reactions, ranging from models and data interpretation for fundamental kinetics and mixing of solids to simulations of engineering scale reactors. Models were derived for simulating the heat and mass transfer processes inside the reactor and tested by experiments. The effects of surface renewal of solids on the mass transfer phenomena were studied and related to the solid mixing. Catalysis by selected additives were studied experimentally. The separate results were combined in a simulation study of industrial-scale rotary reactor performance. A study was made of the controlled decompositions of a series of inorganic sulfates and their common hydrates, carried out in a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA), a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), and a Differential Thermal Analyzer (DTA). Various sample sizes, heating rates, and ambient atmospheres were used to demonstrate their influence on the results. The purposes of this study were to: (i) reveal intermediate compounds, (ii) determine the stable temperature range of each compound, and (iii) measure reaction kinetics. In addition, several solid additives: carbon, metal oxides, and sodium chloride, were demonstrated to have catalytic effects to varying degrees for the different salts.

  7. Thermochemical process for the production of hydrogen using chromium and barium compound

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, Donald M.

    1977-01-25

    Hydrogen is produced by a closed cyclic process involving the reduction and oxidation of chromium compounds by barium hydroxide and the hydrolytic disproportionation of Ba.sub.2 CrO.sub.4 and Ba.sub.3 (CrO.sub.4).sub.2.

  8. Anion effects to deliver enhanced iridium catalysts for hydrogen isotope exchange processes.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan R; Kerr, William J; Moir, Rory; Reid, Marc

    2014-10-28

    Synthesis of a series of iridium(I) complexes of the type [(COD)Ir(IMes)(PPh3)]X (X = BF4, OTf, and BArF) has been established. Application of these species in mild hydrogen isotope exchange processes revealed more efficient catalysis and, further, a wider solvent scope when employing larger, more weakly coordinating counterions. PMID:25208265

  9. NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  10. Recovery of hydrogen and removal of nitrate from water by electrocoagulation process.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Jothinathan; Sozhan, Ganapathy; Vasudevan, Subramanyan

    2013-04-01

    The present study provides an optimization of electrocoagulation process for the recovery of hydrogen and removal of nitrate from water. In doing so, the thermodynamic, adsorption isotherm, and kinetic studies were also carried out. Aluminum alloy of size 2 dm(2) was used as anode and as cathode. To optimize the maximum removal efficiency, different parameters like effect of initial concentration, effect of temperature, pH, and effect of current density were studied. The results show that a significant amount of hydrogen can be generated by this process during the removal of nitrate from water. The energy yield calculated from the hydrogen generated is 3.3778 kWh/m(3). The results also showed that the maximum removal efficiency of 95.9% was achieved at a current density of 0.25 A/dm(2), at a pH of 7.0. The adsorption process followed second-order kinetics model. The adsorption of NO3(-) preferably fitting the Langmuir adsorption isotherm suggests monolayer coverage of adsorbed molecules. Thermodynamic studies showed that adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The energy yield of generated hydrogen was ~54% of the electrical energy demand of the electrocoagulation process. With the reduction of the net energy demand, electrocoagulation may become a useful technology to treat water associated with power production. The aluminum hydroxide generated in the cell removes the nitrate present in the water and reduced it to a permissible level making the water drinkable.

  11. Desorption induced by electronic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, V. N.

    1994-10-01

    A survey is presented of the techniques and instruments used in studies of desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) that can be stimulated by irradiating a solid surface by electrons (ESD) or photons (PSD). The most general characteristics and aspects of this phenomenon are systematized. An analysis is made of relations between DIET and crystallographic and band structure of the substrate, the nature of adsorption bonding and specific features of desorbing particles. The main DIET models involving various electronic excitations of adsorption bonding and their relaxation as particles escape from the surface are discussed, and their predictions are compared with the available experimental data. Particular attention is focussed on the DIET models involving many-electron excitations. The various applications of DIET techniques to studies of adsorbed layers and of surface processes are considered. The radiation stability of solid surfaces and of film coatings with respect to excitation of their electronic subsystem is discussed.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of the formation of sp3 hybridized bonds in hydrogenated diamondlike carbon deposition processes.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yasuo; Horiguchi, Seishi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2010-04-01

    The formation process of sp3 hybridized carbon networks (i.e., diamondlike structures) in hydrogenated diamondlike carbon (DLC) films has been studied with the use of molecular-dynamics simulations. The processes simulated in this study are injections of hydrocarbon (CH3 and CH) beams into amorphous carbon (a-C) substrates. It has been shown that diamondlike sp3 structures are formed predominantly at a subsurface level when the beam energy is relatively high, as in the "subplantation" process for hydrogen-free DLC deposition. However, for hydrogenated DLC deposition, the presence of abundant hydrogen at subsurface levels, together with thermal spikes caused by energetic ion injections, substantially enhances the formation of carbon-to-carbon sp3 bonds. Therefore, the sp3 bond formation process for hydrogenated DLC films essentially differs from that for hydrogen-free DLC films.

  13. CATALYTIC INTERACTIONS OF RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM, AND MERCURY DURING SIMULATED DWPF CPC PROCESSING WITH HYDROGEN GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D

    2008-10-09

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels were performed as part of the ongoing investigation into catalytic hydrogen generation. Rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury have been identified as the principal elemental factors affecting the peak hydrogen generation rate in the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) for a given acid addition. The primary goal of this study is to identify any significant interactions between the three factors. Noble metal concentrations were similar to recent sludge batches. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%. An experimental matrix was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), two duplicate midpoint runs, and two additional replicate runs to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing can identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. Six Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed to supplement the SME hydrogen generation database. Some of the preliminary findings from this study include: (1) Rh was linked to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the first two hours after acid addition in preliminary statistical modeling. (2) Ru was linked conclusively to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the last four hours of reflux in preliminary statistical modeling. (3) Increasing the ratio of Hg/Rh shifted the noble metal controlling the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate from

  14. Perlite as a potential support for nickel catalyst in the process of sunflower oil hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radonjić, V.; Krstić, J.; Lončarević, D.; Jovanović, D.; Vukelić, N.; Stanković, M.; Nikolova, D.; Gabrovska, M.

    2015-12-01

    Investigation was conducted in order to elucidate the possibility of using perlite as support for preparation of nickel based precursor catalyst, potentially applicable in vegetable oil hydrogenation process. On three differently prepared expanded perlite, nickel catalyst precursors with identical Ni/SiO2 = 1.1 and Ni/Mg = 10/1 ratios were synthesized by precipitation-deposition method. Different techniques, SEM micrography, He-pycnometry, calcimetry, Hg-porosimetry, N2-physisorption, H2-chemisorption and temperature programmed reduction, were used for characterization of obtained samples. Determining the precursor texture, morphology and reducibility shows a successfully deposited nickel phase on perlite support with promising properties for vegetable oil hydrogenation. Chosen precursor was reduced and passivated in paraffin oil and the obtained catalyst showed significant catalytic activity in the test of sunflower oil hydrogenation.

  15. Temperature of hydrogen radio frequency plasma under dechlorination process of polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Y. Abe, K.; Kumada, A.; Hidaka, K.; Amano, K.; Itoh, K.; Oono, T.

    2014-10-27

    It has been reported that RF (radio frequency) hydrogen plasmas promote the dechlorination process of PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) under irradiation of MW (microwave). A relative emission intensity spectroscope system was used for single-shot imaging of two-dimensional temperature distributions of RF hydrogen plasmas generated in chemical solutions with several mixing ratios of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and insulation oil under MW irradiation. Our experimental results showed that the plasma generation frequencies for the oil-contaminating solutions were higher than that for the pure IPA solution. In addition, the plasma temperature in the compound liquids including both oil and IPA was higher than that in the pure IPA and oil solutions. A combination of the plasma temperature measurements and plasma composition analysis indicated that the hydrogen radicals generated in a chemical solution containing the equal volumes of IPA and oil were almost the same amounts of H and H{sup +}, while those produced in the other solutions were mainly H.

  16. CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-04-28

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface. PMID:22433948

  17. [Desorption characteristics of phosphorus in tea tree rhizosphere soil].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Bao, Chun-Hong; Miao, Xiao-Lin; Hu, Wen-Min

    2013-07-01

    In order to explore the phosphorus (P) release process and its supply mechanism in tea tree rhizosphere soil, an exogenous P adsorption and culture experiment was conducted to study the P desorption process and characters in the tea tree rhizosphere soils having been cultivated for different years and derived from different parent materials. The least squares method was used to fit the isotherms of P desorption kinetics. There was an obvious difference in the P desorption process between the rhizosphere soils and non-rhizosphere soils. The P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils was significantly higher than that of the non-rhizosphere soils. As compared with non-rhizosphere soils, rhizosphere soils had higher available P content, P desorption rate, and beta value (desorbed P of per unit adsorbed P), with the average increment being 5.49 mg x kg(-1), 1.7%, and 24.4%, respectively. The P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils derived from different parent materials was in the order of granite > quaternary red clay > slate. The average available P content and P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils increased with increasing cultivation years. PMID:24175512

  18. [Desorption characteristics of phosphorus in tea tree rhizosphere soil].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Bao, Chun-Hong; Miao, Xiao-Lin; Hu, Wen-Min

    2013-07-01

    In order to explore the phosphorus (P) release process and its supply mechanism in tea tree rhizosphere soil, an exogenous P adsorption and culture experiment was conducted to study the P desorption process and characters in the tea tree rhizosphere soils having been cultivated for different years and derived from different parent materials. The least squares method was used to fit the isotherms of P desorption kinetics. There was an obvious difference in the P desorption process between the rhizosphere soils and non-rhizosphere soils. The P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils was significantly higher than that of the non-rhizosphere soils. As compared with non-rhizosphere soils, rhizosphere soils had higher available P content, P desorption rate, and beta value (desorbed P of per unit adsorbed P), with the average increment being 5.49 mg x kg(-1), 1.7%, and 24.4%, respectively. The P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils derived from different parent materials was in the order of granite > quaternary red clay > slate. The average available P content and P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils increased with increasing cultivation years.

  19. Process for the production of 1:4 butanediol from maleic anhydride via ester hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Towers, R.G.; Harris, N.; McKee, D.

    1986-01-01

    A process has been developed for the production of 1:4 butanediol (1:4 BDO from maleic anhydride (MA). The three process steps are:- a) Esterifiction of MA to produce a dialkyl maleate ester based on a modification of commercially proven esterification technology; b) Hydrogenation of the ester, at moderate temperatures and pressures, to 1:4 BD using novel low pressure ester hydrogenation technology. Gamma-Butyrolactone (gamma-BL) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) are produced as co-products. The 1:4 BD/Gamma-BL product ratio can be adjusted to respond to market requirements by recycle of the less desirable product, and THF productivity controlled over wide limits by variation of process parameters; c) Product separation by distillation.

  20. RECENT ADVANCES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.

    2010-07-22

    Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process, which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. In the HyS Process, sulfur dioxide is oxidized in the presence of water at the electrolyzer anode to produce sulfuric acid and protons. The protons are transported through a cation-exchange membrane electrolyte to the cathode and are reduced to form hydrogen. In the second stage of the process, the sulfuric acid by-product from the electrolyzer is thermally decomposed at high temperature to produce sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The two gases are separated and the sulfur dioxide recycled to the electrolyzer for oxidation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been exploring a fuel-cell design concept for the SDE using an anolyte feed comprised of concentrated sulfuric acid saturated with sulfur dioxide. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency and small footprint compared to a parallel-plate electrolyzer design. This paper will provide a summary of recent advances in the development of the SDE for the HyS process.

  1. Colouration process of colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles in the presence of hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi Garavand, N.; Ranjbar, M.; Mahdavi, S. M.; Iraji zad, A.

    2012-10-01

    In this study, tungsten oxide nanoparticles were fabricated by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of tungsten target using the first harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) in deionized water. After ablation, a 0.2 g/lit PdCl2 solution was added to activate the solution against the hydrogen gas. Dynamic light scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to measure the average size and the surface chemical composition of the synthesized nanoparticles, respectively. The aim is to investigate the influence of hydrogen exposure time on colouration process of colloidal nanoparticles. According to optical measurements, hydrogen bubbling into the produced colloidal Pd-WO3 led to formation of several absorption peaks at ∼1.26, ∼1.6 and ∼1.97 eV. We observed the appearance and growth of a peak at 1.6 eV at the initial stages of hydrogen exposure. However, two other peaks became dominant at long exposure times. The coloration process is reversible in the presence of oxygen gas.

  2. Reaction engineering for materials processing in space: Reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shadman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is a consumable material which needs to be produced continuously in most space missions. Its use for propulsion as well as life support makes oxygen one of the largest volume chemicals to be produced in space. Production of oxygen from lunar materials is of particular interest and is very attractive possibility. The kinetics and mechanism of reduction of ilmenite by carbon monoxide and hydrogen at 800 to 1100 C were investigated. The temporal profiles of conversion for carbon monoxide have a sigmoidal shape and indicate the presence of three different stages (induction, acceleration, and deceleration) during the reduction reaction. The apparent activation energy decreases from 18 kcal/mole at 10 percent conversion to 10 kcal/mole at 50 percent conversion. The reaction is first order with respect to carbon monoxide under the experimental conditions studied. Both SEM and EDX analysis show that the diffusion of Fe product away from the reaction front and through the TiO2 phase, followed by the nucleation and growth of a separate Fe phase are important steps affecting the process kinetics. The results from hydrogen reduction show that the mechanism of ilmenite reduction by hydrogen is similar to that by carbon monoxide. However, the titanium dioxide can be further reduced by hydrogen at 800 to 1000 C. The detailed comparison and theoretical modeling of both reduction processes is presented.

  3. Use of once-through treat gas to remove the heat of reaction in solvent hydrogenation processes

    DOEpatents

    Nizamoff, Alan J.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process wherein feed coal is contacted with molecular hydrogen and a hydrogen-donor solvent in a liquefaction zone to form coal liquids and vapors and coal liquids in the solvent boiling range are thereafter hydrogenated to produce recycle solvent and liquid products, the improvement which comprises separating the effluent from the liquefaction zone into a hot vapor stream and a liquid stream; cooling the entire hot vapor stream sufficiently to condense vaporized liquid hydrocarbons; separating condensed liquid hydrocarbons from the cooled vapor; fractionating the liquid stream to produce coal liquids in the solvent boiling range; dividing the cooled vapor into at least two streams; passing the cooling vapors from one of the streams, the coal liquids in the solvent boiling range, and makeup hydrogen to a solvent hydrogenation zone, catalytically hydrogenating the coal liquids in the solvent boiling range and quenching the hydrogenation zone with cooled vapors from the other cooled vapor stream.

  4. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 2: Microscopic hydrogen cracking processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    Based on a fractographic analysis of fatigue crack propagation (FCP) in Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 stressed in a variety of inert and embrittling environments, microscopic crack paths are identified and correlated with intrinsic da/dN-delta K kinetics. FCP rates in 2090 are accelerated by hydrogen producing environments (pure water vapor, moist air, and aqueous NaCl), as defined in Part 1. For these cases, subgrain boundary fatigue cracking (SGC) dominates for delta K values where the crack tip process zone, a significant fraction of the cyclic plastic zone, is sufficiently large to envelop 5 micron subgrains in the unrecrystallized microstructure. SGC may be due to strong hydrogen trapping at T1 precipitates concentrated at sub-boundaries. At low delta K, the plastic zone diameter is smaller than the subgrain size and FCP progresses along (100) planes due to either local lattice decohesion or aluminum-lithium hydride cracking. For inert environments (vacuum, helium, and oxygen), or at high delta K where the hydrogen effect on da/dN is small, FCP is along (111) slip planes; this mode does not transition with increasing delta K and plastic zone size. The SGC and (100) crystallographic cracking modes, and the governing influence of the crack tip process zone volume (delta K), support hydrogen embrittlement rather than a surface film rupture and anodic dissolution mechanism for environmental FCP. Multi-sloped log da/dN-log delta K behavior is produced by changes in process zone hydrogen-microstructure interactions, and not by purely micromechanical-microstructure interactions, in contradiction to microstructural distance-based fatigue models.

  5. Ambient pressure laser desorption and laser-induced acoustic desorption ion mobility spectrometry detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Sven; Walte, Andreas; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-11-19

    The development of fast, mobile, and sensitive detection systems for security-relevant substances is of enormous importance. Because of the low vapor pressures of explosives and improvised explosive devices, adequate sampling procedures are crucial. Ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) are fast and sensitive instruments that are used as detection systems for explosives. Ambient pressure laser desorption (APLD) and ambient pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption (AP-LIAD) are new tools suitable to evaporate explosives in order to detect them in the vapor phase. Indeed, the most important advantage of APLD or AP-LIAD is the capability to sample directly from the surface of interest without any transfer of the analyte to other surfaces such as wipe pads. A much more gentle desorption, compared to classical thermal-based desorption, is possible with laser-based desorption using very short laser pulses. With this approach the analyte molecules are evaporated in a very fast process, comparable to a shock wave. The thermal intake is reduced considerably. The functionality of APLD and AP-LIAD techniques combined with a hand-held IMS system is shown for a wide range of common explosives such as EGDN (ethylene glycol dinitrate), urea nitrate, PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate), HMTD (hexamethylene triperoxide diamine), RDX (hexogen), tetryl (2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine), and TNT (trinitrotoluene). Detection limits down to the low nanogram range are obtained. The successful combination of IMS detection and APLD/AP-LIAD sampling is shown.

  6. Suitability of different construction materials for use in aseptic processing environments decontaminated with gaseous hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Unger, Beatriz; Rauschnabel, Uta; Düthorn, Berthold; Kottke, Volker; Hertel, Christian; Rauschnabel, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the behavior of different materials towards the microbial inactivation kinetic of gaseous hydrogen peroxide. Samples of 49 materials potentially used in aseptic processing environments were inoculated with 106 spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC #12980 and exposed to defined periods using a reproducible hydrogen peroxide bio-decontamination cycle. The inactivation characteristic of each material was investigated by means of repeated D-value calculations. The results demonstrate that different materials show highly variable performance regarding the inactivation pattern of spores on each particular surface. Not only the chemical composition of the material but also differences in manufacturing processes and surface treatments were found to have an effect on the resistance of the test organisms. From the data obtained it is concluded that some correlation exists between the calculated D-values and roughness as well as wettability of the materials. Best- and worst-case materials were identified, and the dependence of specific decontamination characteristics on material properties was investigated. It is suggested to integrate studies regarding the inactivation characteristics of incorporated materials into the construction process of new aseptic processing systems bio-decontaminated with hydrogen peroxide. PMID:17933208

  7. A survey of processes for producing hydrogen fuel from different sources for automotive-propulsion fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F.

    1996-03-01

    Seven common fuels are compared for their utility as hydrogen sources for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells used in automotive propulsion. Methanol, natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, ethanol, and hydrogen are the fuels considered. Except for the steam reforming of methanol and using pure hydrogen, all processes for generating hydrogen from these fuels require temperatures over 1000 K at some point. With the same two exceptions, all processes require water-gas shift reactors of significant size. All processes require low-sulfur or zero-sulfur fuels, and this may add cost to some of them. Fuels produced by steam reforming contain {approximately}70-80% hydrogen, those by partial oxidation {approximately}35-45%. The lower percentages may adversely affect cell performance. Theoretical input energies do not differ markedly among the various processes for generating hydrogen from organic-chemical fuels. Pure hydrogen has severe distribution and storage problems. As a result, the steam reforming of methanol is the leading candidate process for on-board generation of hydrogen for automotive propulsion. If methanol unavailability or a high price demands an alternative process, steam reforming appears preferable to partial oxidation for this purpose.

  8. Effect of organic matter and calcium carbonate on behaviors of cadmium adsorption-desorption on/from purple paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiulan; Jiang, Tao; Du, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Batch experiments and sequential extraction analysis were employed to investigate the effects of soil organic matter and CaCO3 on the adsorption and desorption of cadmium (Cd(2+)) onto and from two purple paddy soils, an acidic purple paddy soil (APPS) and a calcareous purple paddy soil (CPPS). The Cd(2+) adsorption isotherms on both soils could be well-described by the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. CPPS had a higher capacity and a stronger affinity for Cd(2+) adsorption compared with APPS. The adsorption process of Cd(2+) on APPS was dominated by electrostatic attractions, whereas the adsorption mechanism varied depending on the Cd(2+) concentrations in equilibrium solutions on CPPS. At low equilibrium concentrations, the adsorption process was primarily specific adsorption, but nonspecific adsorption dominated at high equilibrium concentrations. Removal of organic matter decreased the amount of Cd(2+) adsorption on both of the soils, slightly affected the Cd(2+) desorption rate and exchangeable Cd (EXC-Cd) in APPS and increased the desorption rate and EXC-Cd in CPPS, suggesting that the effect of organic matter on Cd(2+) adsorption-desorption depends on the soils. CPPS and APPS containing CaCO3 exhibited higher adsorption amounts but lower desorption rates and lower proportions of EXC-Cd than those of their corresponding soils without CaCO3, demonstrating that CaCO3 played an important role in Cd(2+) specific adsorption on soil. The changes in the thermodynamic parameters, including free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)) and entropy (ΔS(0)), as evaluated by the Van't Hoff equations, indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process with the primary interaction forces of dipole interactions and hydrogen bonds on APPS, whereas both physical and chemical interactions dominated the adsorption on CPPS.

  9. Enhanced coproduction of hydrogen and methane from cornstalks by a three-stage anaerobic fermentation process integrated with alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi-Yu; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A three-stage anaerobic fermentation process including H(2) fermentation I, H(2) fermentation II, methane fermentation was developed for the coproduction of hydrogen and methane from cornstalks. Hydrogen production from cornstalks using direct microbial conversion by Clostridium thermocellum 7072 was markedly enhanced in the two-stage thermophilic hydrogen fermentation process integrated with alkaline treatment. The highest total hydrogen yield from cornstalks in the two-stage fermentation process reached 74.4 mL/g-cornstalk. The hydrogen fermentation effluents and alkaline hydrolyzate were further used for methane fermentation by anaerobic granular sludge, and the total methane yield reached 205.8 mL/g-cornstalk. The total energy recovery in the three-stage anaerobic fermentation process integrated with alkaline hydrolysis reached 70.0%.

  10. Process for forming a nickel foil with controlled and predetermined permeability to hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Engelhaupt, Darell E.

    1981-09-22

    The present invention provides a novel process for forming a nickel foil having a controlled and predetermined hydrogen permeability. This process includes the steps of passing a nickel plating bath through a suitable cation exchange resin to provide a purified nickel plating bath free of copper and gold cations, immersing a nickel anode and a suitable cathode in the purified nickel plating bath containing a selected concentration of an organic sulfonic acid such as a napthalene-trisulfonic acid, electrodepositing a nickel layer having the thickness of a foil onto the cathode, and separating the nickel layer from the cathode to provide a nickel foil. The anode is a readily-corrodible nickel anode. The present invention also provides a novel nickel foil having a greater hydrogen permeability than palladium at room temperature.

  11. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schwartz

    2003-07-01

    ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of

  12. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schwartz

    2004-01-01

    ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of

  13. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schwartz

    2003-10-01

    ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of

  14. Facile Synthesis of Nb3Sn Via a Hydrogen Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Jiao, Shuqiang; Zhang, Long; Li, Yanxiang; Zhu, Hongmin

    2016-09-01

    A controllable and facile process for the preparation of Nb3Sn intermetallic compound nanopowders using NbCl5 and SnCl2 vapors reduced by hydrogen has been developed. The vaporizing rates of the two chlorides are controlled by measuring their mass loss as a function of carrier gas (argon) flow rate at certain vaporization temperatures, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicate that hydrogenous Nb3Sn products are obtained under the vaporizing rate of 0.155 g min-1 for NbCl5 and 0.036 g min-1 for SnCl2 with the hydrogen flow rate of 2100 ml min-1 at 1273 K (1000 °C). Results of semi-quantitative analysis by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) demonstrate that the atomic ratio of Nb to Sn in the as-synthesized products is 3.48:1, and the content of (Nb + Sn) is taken up to 89.61 wt pct from the total weight of the products. The products can be purified by vacuum heat treatment. Images of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show that the products are homogenous particles with a mean diameter of 31 nm. In addition, the reaction ratio of the chlorides and the powder yield are controllable by hydrogen flow rate.

  15. Hydrogen as the solar energy translator. [in photochemical and photovoltaic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Many concepts are being investigated to convert sunlight to workable energy forms with emphasis on electricity and thermal energy. The electrical alternatives include direct conversion of photons to electricity via photovoltaic solar cells and solar/thermal production of electricity via heat-energy cycles. Solar cells, when commercialized, are expected to have efficiencies of about 12 to 14 percent. The cells would be active about eight hours per day. However, solar-operated water-splitting process research, initiated through JPL, shows promise for direct production of hydrogen from sunlight with efficiencies of up to 35 to 40 percent. The hydrogen, a valuable commodity in itself, can also serve as a storable energy form, easily and efficiently converted to electricity by fuel cells and other advanced-technology devices on a 24-hour basis or on demand with an overall efficiency of 25 to 30 percent. Thus, hydrogen serves as the fundamental translator of energy from its solar form to electrical form more effectively, and possibly more efficiently, than direct conversion. Hydrogen also can produce other chemical energy forms using solar energy.

  16. Catalytic process for control of NO.sub.x emissions using hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2010-05-18

    A selective catalytic reduction process with a palladium catalyst for reducing NOx in a gas, using hydrogen as a reducing agent. A zirconium sulfate (ZrO.sub.2)SO.sub.4 catalyst support material with about 0.01-2.0 wt. % Pd is applied to a catalytic bed positioned in a flow of exhaust gas at about 70-200.degree. C. The support material may be (ZrO.sub.2--SiO.sub.2)SO.sub.4. H.sub.2O and hydrogen may be injected into the exhaust gas upstream of the catalyst to a concentration of about 15-23 vol. % H.sub.2O and a molar ratio for H.sub.2/NO.sub.x in the range of 10-100. A hydrogen-containing fuel may be synthesized in an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle power plant for combustion in a gas turbine to produce the exhaust gas flow. A portion of the fuel may be diverted for the hydrogen injection.

  17. PEPTIDE FORMATION MEDIATED BY HYDROGEN CYANIDE TETRAMER: A POSSIBLE PREBIOTIC PROCESS

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sherwood; Flores, Jose; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1969-01-01

    Chemical evolution on the primitive earth must have involved condensation of α-amino acids to peptides. Under aqueous conditions consistent with current conceptions of primordial waters, heating glycerine with the hydrogen cyanide tetramer, diaminomaleonitrile, yields dipeptide. If nitrogen was cycled through primordial waters as cyanide, peptide synthesis by stepwise tetramer-mediated condensation of α-amino acids would have been a plausible process. PMID:5264133

  18. An analysis of hydrogen production via closed-cycle schemes. [thermochemical processings from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, R. E.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis and state-of-the-art review of three basic schemes for production of hydrogen from water: electrolysis, thermal water-splitting, and multi-step thermochemical closed cycles is presented. Criteria for work-saving thermochemical closed-cycle processes are established, and several schemes are reviewed in light of such criteria. An economic analysis is also presented in the context of energy costs.

  19. Innovative site remediation technology: Thermal desorption. Volume 6

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.C.

    1993-11-01

    The monograph on thermal desorption is one of a series of eight on innovative site and waste remediation technologies that are the culmination of a multiorganization effort involving more than 100 experts over a two-year period. The thermal desorption processes addressed in this monograph use heat, either direct or indirect, ex situ, as the principal means to physically separate and transfer contaminants from soils, sediments, sludges, filter cakes, or other media. Thermal desorption is part of a treatment train; some pre- and postprocessing is necessary.

  20. Combined production and purification of hydrogen from methanol using steam iron process in fixed bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, R.; Durán, P.; Plou, J.; Herguido, J.; Peña, J. A.

    2013-11-01

    A research work is being conducted to study the combined production and purification of hydrogen by means of redox processes departing from biomass fast pyrolysis oils (bio-oils). To achieve that goal, methanol has been used as featured material because it is the most representative compound of the alcoholic fraction of bio-oils. The study has been carried out in a fixed bed reactor where methanol decomposes in H2 and CO when gets in contact with a reactive solid based in an iron oxide at temperatures above 600 °C. During the first stage of the “steam-iron” process, reactive gases reduce the iron oxide to metallic iron. Afterward, in a following step, the previously reduced iron is reoxidized by steam producing a high purity hydrogen stream. Although coke deposition does exist during the reducing stage, this behaves as inert during the reoxidation process. Coke inert role has been corroborated by GC, SEM and TEM techniques, showing that carbon deposits were constituted by ordered structures (carbon nanotubes). The determination of the hydrogen production along successive cycles allowed the evaluation of the effect of temperature and alternating reactive atmospheres on the stability of the solid, as well as the optimum conditions for such purpose.

  1. Application of a diffusion-desorption rate equation model in astrochemistry.

    PubMed

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Desorption and diffusion are two of the most important processes on interstellar grain surfaces; knowledge of them is critical for the understanding of chemical reaction networks in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, a lack of information on desorption and diffusion is preventing further progress in astrochemistry. To obtain desorption energy distributions of molecules from the surfaces of ISM-related materials, one usually carries out adsorption-desorption temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments, and uses rate equation models to extract desorption energy distributions. However, the often-used rate equation models fail to adequately take into account diffusion processes and thus are only valid in situations where adsorption is strongly localized. As adsorption-desorption experiments show that adsorbate molecules tend to occupy deep adsorption sites before occupying shallow ones, a diffusion process must be involved. Thus, it is necessary to include a diffusion term in the model that takes into account the morphology of the surface as obtained from analyses of TPD experiments. We take the experimental data of CO desorption from the MgO(100) surface and of D2 desorption from amorphous solid water ice as examples to show how a diffusion-desorption rate equation model explains the redistribution of adsorbate molecules among different adsorption sites. We extract distributions of desorption energies and diffusion energy barriers from TPD profiles. These examples are contrasted with a system where adsorption is strongly localized--HD from an amorphous silicate surface. Suggestions for experimental investigations are provided.

  2. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry studies of ion processes in air at atmospheric pressure and their application to thermal desorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabo, Martin; Malásková, Michaela; Matejčík, Štefan

    2014-02-01

    In this study we have investigated the negative reactant ion formation in a negative corona discharge (CD) using the corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight (CD-IMS-oaTOF) technique. The reactant ions were formed in the CD operating in the reverse gas flow mode at an elevated temperature of 363.5 K in synthetic and ambient air. Under these conditions mainly O_{2}^{-} and their clusters were formed. We have also studied the influence of CCl4 admixture to air (dopant gas) on the composition of the reactant ions, which resulted in the formation of Cl- and its clusters with a reduced ion mobility of 3.05 cm2 V-1 s-1 as a major reactant ion peak. Additional IMS peaks with reduced ion mobilities of 2.49, 2.25 and 2.03 cm2 V-1 s-1 were detected, and Cl- · (NO2) and Cl- · (NO)n(n = 2, 3) anions were identified. The negative reactant ions were used to detect 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) using the thermal desorption (TD) technique using a CD-IMS instrument. Using TD sampling and a negative CD ion source doped by CCl4 we have achieved a limit of detection of 350 pg for direct surface analysis of TNT.

  3. Fast hydrogen sorption from MgH2-VO2(B) composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, Sanja; Kurko, Sandra; Pasquini, Luca; Matović, Ljiljana; Vujasin, Radojka; Novaković, Nikola; Novaković, Jasmina Grbović

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH2‒VO2(B) composites synthesised by mechanical milling have been studied. The microstructural properties of composites were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Particle size analysis (PSD), while sorption behaviour was followed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Sievert measurements. Results have shown that although desorption temperature reduction is moderate; there is a substantial improvement in hydrogen sorption kinetics. The complete desorption of pure MgH2 at elevated temperature takes place in more than 30 min while the composite fully desorbs in less than 2 min even at lower temperatures. It has been shown that the metastable γ-MgH2 phase and the point defects have a decisive role in desorption process only in the first sorption cycle, while the second and the subsequent sorption cycles are affected by microstructural and morphological characteristics of the composite.

  4. Advanced oxidation process using hydrogen peroxide/microwave system for solubilization of phosphate.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ping Huang; Wong, Wayne T; Lo, Kwang Victor

    2005-01-01

    An advanced oxidation process (AOP) combining hydrogen peroxide and microwave heating was used for the solubilization of phosphate from secondary municipal sludge from an enhanced biological phosphorus removal process. The microwave irradiation is used as a generator agent of oxidizing radicals as well as a heating source in the process. This AOP process could facilitate the release of a large amount of the sludge-bound phosphorus from the sewage sludge. More than 84% of the total phosphorous could be released at a microwave heating time of 5 min at 170 degrees C. This innovative process has the potential of being applied to simple sludge treatment processes in domestic wastewater treatment and to the recovery of phosphorus from the wastewater.

  5. Process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein nitrogen is separated from hydrogen via ammonia synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Stetka, Steven S.; Nazario, Francisco N.

    1982-01-01

    In a process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein bottoms residues are upgraded with a process wherein air is employed, the improvement wherein nitrogen buildup in the system is avoided by ammonia synthesis. In a preferred embodiment hydrogen from other portions of the liquefaction process will be combined with hydrogen produced as a result of the bottoms upgrading to increase the H.sub.2 :N.sub.2 ratio in the ammonia reactor.

  6. Biological hydrogen production by immobilized cells of Clostridium tyrobutyricum JM1 isolated from a food waste treatment process.

    PubMed

    Jo, Ji Hye; Lee, Dae Sung; Park, Donghee; Park, Jong Moon

    2008-09-01

    A fermentative hydrogen-producing bacterium, Clostridium tyrobutyricum JM1, was isolated from a food waste treating process using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). A fixed-bed bioreactor packed with polyurethane foam as support matrix for the growth of the isolate was operated at different hydraulic retention time (HRT) to evaluate its performance for hydrogen production. The reactor achieved the maximal hydrogen production rate of 7.2 l H(2)l(-1)d(-1) at 2h HRT, where hydrogen content in biogas was 50.0%, and substrate conversion efficiency was 97.4%. The maximum hydrogen yield was 223 ml (g-hexose)(-1) with an influent glucose concentration of 5 g l(-1). Therefore, the immobilized reactor using C. tyrobutyricum JM1 was an effective and stable system for continuous hydrogen production.

  7. Process and apparatus for the production of hydrogen by steam reforming of hydrocarbon

    DOEpatents

    Sircar, Shivaji; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Nataraj, Shankar

    2000-01-01

    In the steam reforming of hydrocarbon, particularly methane, under elevated temperature and pressure to produce hydrogen, a feed of steam and hydrocarbon is fed into a first reaction volume containing essentially only reforming catalyst to partially reform the feed. The balance of the feed and the reaction products of carbon dioxide and hydrogen are then fed into a second reaction volume containing a mixture of catalyst and adsorbent which removes the carbon dioxide from the reaction zone as it is formed. The process is conducted in a cycle which includes these reactions followed by countercurrent depressurization and purge of the adsorbent to regenerate it and repressurization of the reaction volumes preparatory to repeating the reaction-sorption phase of the cycle.

  8. Developing an energy efficient steam reforming process to produce hydrogen from sulfur-containing fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simson, Amanda

    Hydrogen powered fuel cells have the potential to produce electricity with higher efficiency and lower emissions than conventional combustion technology. In order to realize the benefits of a hydrogen fuel cell an efficient method to produce hydrogen is needed. Currently, over 90% of hydrogen is produced from the steam reforming of natural gas. However, for many applications including fuel cell vehicles, the use of a liquid fuel rather than natural gas is desirable. This work investigates the feasibility of producing hydrogen efficiently by steam reforming E85 (85% ethanol/15% gasoline), a commercially available sulfur-containing transportation fuel. A Rh-Pt/SiO2-ZrO2 catalyst has demonstrated good activity for the E85 steam reforming reaction. An industrial steam reforming process is often run less efficiently, with more water and at higher temperatures, in order to prevent catalyst deactivation. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a process that can operate without catalyst deactivation at more energy efficient conditions. In this study, the steam reforming of a sulfur-containing fuel (E85) was studied at near stoichiometric steam/carbon ratios and at 650C, conditions at which catalyst deactivation is normally measured. At these conditions the catalyst was found to be stable steam reforming a sulfur-free E85. However, the addition of low concentrations of sulfur significantly deactivated the catalyst. The presence of sulfur in the fuel caused catalyst deactivation by promoting ethylene which generates surface carbon species (coke) that mask catalytic sites. The amount of coke increased during time on stream and became increasingly graphitic. However, the deactivation due to both sulfur adsorption and coke formation was reversible with air treatment at 650°C. However, regenerations were found to reduce the catalyst life. Air regenerations produce exotherms on the catalyst surface that cause structural changes to the catalyst. During regenerations the

  9. The effect of selective desorption mechanisms during interstellar ice formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvāns, J.

    2015-04-01

    Major components of ices on interstellar grains in molecular clouds—water and carbon oxides—occur at various optical depths. This implies that selective desorption mechanisms are at work. An astrochemical model of a contracting low-mass molecular cloud core is presented. Ice was treated as consisting of the surface and three subsurface layers (i.e., sublayers). Photodesorption, reactive desorption, and indirect reactive desorption were investigated. The latter manifests itself through desorption from H+H reaction on grains. Desorption of shallow subsurface species was also included. Modeling results suggest the existence of a “photon-dominated ice” during the early phases of core contraction. Subsurface ice is chemically processed by interstellar photons, which produces complex organic molecules (COMs). Desorption from the subsurface layer results in high COM gas-phase abundances at AV = 2.4-10 mag. This may contribute toward an explanation for COM observations in dark cores. It was found that photodesorption mostly governs the onset of ice accumulation onto grains. Reaction-specific reactive desorption is efficient for small molecules that form via highly exothermic atom-addition reactions. Higher reactive desorption efficiency results in lower gas-phase abundances of COMs. Indirect reactive desorption allows for closely reproducing the observed H2O:CO:CO2 ratio toward a number of background stars. Presumably, this can be done by any mechanism whose efficiency fits with the sequence CO≥slant C{{O}2}\\gg {{H}2}O. After the freeze-out has ended, the three sublayers represent chemically distinct parts of the mantle. The likely AV threshold for the appearance of CO ice is 8-10.5 mag. The lower value is supported by observations.

  10. Negative hydrogen ion yields at plasma grid surface in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2015-04-08

    Negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion yield from the plasma grid due to incident hydrogen ions and neutrals has been evaluated with the surface collision cascade model, ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) coupled to a negative surface ionization models. Dependence of negative ion fractions upon the velocity component normal to the surface largely affect the calculation results of the final energy and angular distributions of the H{sup −} ions. The influence is particularly large for H{sup −} ions desorbed from the surface due to less than several eV hydrogen particle implact. The present calculation predicts that H{sup −} ion yield can be maximized by setting the incident angle of hydrogen ions and neutrals to be 65 degree. The Cs thickness on the plasma grid should also affect the yields and mean energies of surface produced H{sup −} ions by back scattering and ion induced desorption processes.

  11. Energy efficacy used to score organic refuse pretreatment processes for hydrogen anaerobic production.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Bernardo; Luongo Malave, Andrea C; Bernardi, Milena; Fino, Debora

    2013-11-01

    The production of hydrogen through Anaerobic Digestion (AD) has been investigated to verify the efficacy of several pretreatment processes. Three types of waste with different carbon structures have been tested to obtain an extensive representation of the behavior of the materials present in Organic Waste (OW). The following types of waste were selected: Sweet Product Residue (SPR), i.e., confectionary residue removed from the market after the expiration date, Organic Waste Market (OWM) refuse from a local fruit and vegetable market, and Coffee Seed Skin (CSS) waste from a coffee production plant. Several pretreatment processes have been applied, including physical, chemical, thermal, and ultrasonic processes and a combination of these processes. Two methods have been used for the SPR to remove the packaging, manual (SPR) and mechanical (SPRex). A pilot plant that is able to extrude the refuse to 200atm was utilized. Two parameters have been used to score the different pretreatment processes: efficiency (ξ), which takes into account the amount of energy produced in the form of hydrogen compared with the available energy embedded in the refuse, and efficacy (η), which compares the efficiency obtained using the pretreated refuse with that obtained using the untreated refuse. The best result obtained for the SPR was the basic pretreatment, with η=6.4, whereas the thermal basic pretreatment gave the highest value, η=17.0 for SPRex. The best result for the OWM was obtained through a combination of basic/thermal pretreatments with η=9.9; lastly, the CSS residue with ultrasonic pretreatment produced the highest quantity of hydrogen, η=5.2.

  12. Energy efficacy used to score organic refuse pretreatment processes for hydrogen anaerobic production.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Bernardo; Luongo Malave, Andrea C; Bernardi, Milena; Fino, Debora

    2013-11-01

    The production of hydrogen through Anaerobic Digestion (AD) has been investigated to verify the efficacy of several pretreatment processes. Three types of waste with different carbon structures have been tested to obtain an extensive representation of the behavior of the materials present in Organic Waste (OW). The following types of waste were selected: Sweet Product Residue (SPR), i.e., confectionary residue removed from the market after the expiration date, Organic Waste Market (OWM) refuse from a local fruit and vegetable market, and Coffee Seed Skin (CSS) waste from a coffee production plant. Several pretreatment processes have been applied, including physical, chemical, thermal, and ultrasonic processes and a combination of these processes. Two methods have been used for the SPR to remove the packaging, manual (SPR) and mechanical (SPRex). A pilot plant that is able to extrude the refuse to 200atm was utilized. Two parameters have been used to score the different pretreatment processes: efficiency (ξ), which takes into account the amount of energy produced in the form of hydrogen compared with the available energy embedded in the refuse, and efficacy (η), which compares the efficiency obtained using the pretreated refuse with that obtained using the untreated refuse. The best result obtained for the SPR was the basic pretreatment, with η=6.4, whereas the thermal basic pretreatment gave the highest value, η=17.0 for SPRex. The best result for the OWM was obtained through a combination of basic/thermal pretreatments with η=9.9; lastly, the CSS residue with ultrasonic pretreatment produced the highest quantity of hydrogen, η=5.2. PMID:23891078

  13. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes - May 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Kevin C.; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Christopher, Aardahl L.

    2008-05-12

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report: Technical report describing assessment of hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOE’s hydrogen storage targets.

  14. History of desorption induced by electronic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madey, Theodore E.

    1994-01-01

    Desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) encompasses electron- and photon-stimulated desorption (ESD and PSD) of atoms, molecules and ions from surfaces. In this paper, we focus on the key experimental and theoretical developments that have led to a fundamental understanding of DIET processes. We emphasize the effects of ionizing radiation, i.e., electrons and photons with energies ≳ 10 eV. The first DIET studies were occasioned mainly by the observation of anomalous peaks in mass spectrometers and spurious signals in ionization gauges. These observations were followed in the early 1960's by systematic studies of Redhead, and Menzel and Gomer, who independently proposed a Franck-Condon excitation model for electron-stimulated desorption of ions and neutrals from surfaces. In the years after this seminal work, ESD and PSD developed as fields of active interest to surface scientists. In addition to providing insights into the fundamental mechanisms linking atomic motion and electronic energy dissipation at surfaces, DIET investigations are continuing to impact upon radiation damage processes in areas as diverse as X-ray optics, semiconductor electronics, surface analysis and synthesis of molecules in interplanetary space.

  15. Calcium lignosulfonate adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Reid B; Bai, Baojun

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes adsorption and desorption studies carried out with calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) on Berea sandstone. Circulation experiments were performed to determine CLS adsorption isotherms and the effects of CLS concentration, temperature, salinity, brine hardness, and injection rate on adsorption density. Flow-through experiments were performed to assess the reversibility of CLS adsorption and the influence of postflush rate, brine concentration, brine hardness, brine pH, and temperature on the desorption process. Results indicate that CLS adsorption isotherms on Berea sandstone follow the Freundlich isotherm law. The results presented in this paper on the effects of CLS adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone show that: (1) increasing CLS concentration and salinity increases CLS adsorption density; (2) increasing temperature will decrease adsorption density; (3) increasing injection rate of CLS solution will slightly decrease CLS adsorption density; (4) postflush rate and salinity of brine have a large impact on the CLS desorption process; (5) the adsorption and desorption process are not completely reversible; and (5) temperature and pH of the postflush brine have little effect on desorption.

  16. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Phase Transformations in Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-08-31

    The aim of this project is to develop and apply computational materials science tools to determine and predict critical properties of hydrogen storage materials. By better understanding the absorption/desorption mechanisms and characterizing their physical properties it is possible to explore and evaluate new directions for hydrogen storage materials. Particular emphasis is on the determination of the structure and thermodynamics of hydrogen storage materials, the investigation of microscopic mechanisms of hydrogen uptake and release in various materials and the role of catalysts in this process. As a team we have decided to focus on a single material, NaAlH{sub 4}, in order to fully be able to study the many aspects of hydrogen storage. We have focused on phase stability, mass transport and size-dependent reaction mechanisms in this material.

  17. Novel Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation in Gasification Processes in Vision 21 Energy Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Michael

    2001-11-06

    ITN Energy Systems, Inc. (ITN) and its partners, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, LLC and Praxair, Inc. are developing composite membranes for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is pursuing a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into module fabrication designs; combining functionally-graded materials, monolithic module concept and thermal spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows for the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing techniques with low costs. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, are being assessed. This will result in an evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed ICCM hydrogen separation approach for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and

  18. Trapping of hydrogen atoms in X-irradiated salts at room temperature and the decay kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    The salts (hypophosphites, formates, a phosphite, a phosphate, and an oxalate) were X-irradiated, whereby hydrogen formed chemically by a radiolytic process becomes trapped in the solid. By room temperature vacuum extraction, the kinetics for the evolution of this trapped hydrogen was studied mass spectrometrically. All salts except two exhibited second-order kinetics. The two exceptions (NaH2PO2(H2O) and K2HPO4) showed first-order kinetics. Based on experimental results, the escape of hydrogen involves three steps: the diffusion of hydrogen atoms from the bulk to the surface, association of these atoms on the surface (rate controlling step for second-order hydrogen evolution), and the desorption of molecular hydrogen from the surface. The hydrogen does not escape if the irradiated salt is stored in air, apparently because adsorbed air molecules occupy surface sites required in the escape mechanism.

  19. A metal-free strategy to release chemisorbed H2 from hydrogenated boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Lisa; Bhunya, Sourav; Paul, Ankan

    2014-11-10

    Chemisorbed hydrogen on boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) can only be released thermally at very high temperatures above 350 °C. However, no catalyst has been identified that could liberate H2 from hydrogenated BN nanotubes under moderate conditions. Using different density functional methods we predict that the desorption of chemisorbed hydrogen from hydrogenated BN nanotubes can be facilitated catalytically by triflic acid at low free-energy activation barriers and appreciable rates under metal free conditions and mildly elevated temperatures (40-50 °C). Our proposed mechanism shows that the acid is regenerated in the process and can further facilitate similar catalytic release of H2 , thus suggesting all the chemisorbed hydrogen on the surface of the hydrogenated nanotube can be released in the form of H2 . These findings essentially raise hope for the development of a sustainable chemical hydrogen storage strategy in BN nanomaterials. PMID:25132421

  20. A green lead hydrometallurgical process based on a hydrogen-lead oxide fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Pan, Junqing; Sun, Yanzhi; Li, Wei; Knight, James; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    The automobile industry consumed 9 million metric tons of lead in 2012 for lead-acid batteries. Recycling lead from spent lead-acid batteries is not only related to the sustainable development of the lead industry, but also to the reduction of lead pollution in the environment. The existing lead pyrometallurgical processes have two main issues, toxic lead emission into the environment and high energy consumption; the developing hydrometallurgical processes have the disadvantages of high electricity consumption, use of toxic chemicals and severe corrosion of metallic components. Here we demonstrate a new green hydrometallurgical process to recover lead based on a hydrogen-lead oxide fuel cell. High-purity lead, along with electricity, is produced with only water as the by-product. It has a >99.5% lead yield, which is higher than that of the existing pyrometallurgical processes (95-97%). This greatly reduces lead pollution to the environment.

  1. Microbicidal efficacy of an advanced oxidation process using ozone/hydrogen peroxide in water treatment.

    PubMed

    Sommer, R; Pribil, W; Pfleger, S; Haider, T; Werderitsch, M; Gehringer, P

    2004-01-01

    The combined application of ozone and hydrogen peroxide represents a kind of advanced oxidation for water treatment. The radicals that are generated during the process are used for the degradation of organic pollutants from groundwater and industrial effluents. The aim of our study was to evaluate the possible microbicidal, and particularly virucidal, efficacy of such a process, since no substantial data were available. The investigations were performed at a pilot plant installed for the elimination of perchloroethylene from polluted groundwater (reduction efficacy for perchloroethylene from 26 microg/L to 5 microg/L). To enable a reliable evaluation of the microbicidal effect, a set of alternate test organisms was used. As model viruses we chose bacteriophages MS2 (F+ specific, single-stranded RNA), phiX174 (single-stranded DNA) and PRD-1 (coated, double-stranded DNA). Furthermore, spores of Bacillus subtilis were included as possible surrogates for protozoa and Escherichia coli as representative for traditional indicator bacteria used in water analysis. The microbicidal efficiency was compared to the inactivation by means of ozone under two standard conditions (20 degrees C): (a) 0.4 mg/L residual after 4 min and (b) 0.1 mg/L residual after 10 min. Surprisingly, a good microbicidal effect of the ozone/hydrogen peroxide process was found. This was somewhat unexpected, because we had assumed that the disinfection potential of ozone would have been interfered with by the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Escherichia coli and the three test viruses revealed a reduction of about 6-log. In contrast, spores of Bacillus subtilis showed after the total process a reduction of 0.4-log. These results matched the effect of the ozone treatment (a) with a residual of 0.4 mg/L after 4 min contact time (20 degrees C). The test condition (b) with a residual of 0.1 mg/L ozone after a contact time of 10 min at 20 degrees C gave a higher reduction of the B. subtilis spores (1.5-log

  2. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schwartz

    2004-12-01

    This report describes the work performed, accomplishments and conclusion obtained from the project entitled ''Novel Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation in Gasification Processes in Vision 21 Energy Plants'' under the United States Department of Energy Contract DE-FC26-01NT40973. ITN Energy Systems was the prime contractor. Team members included: the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory; Nexant Consulting; Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair. The objective of the program was to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The separation technology module is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The program developed and evaluated composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules were fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed Ion Conducting Ceramic Membrane (ICCM) approach, including system integration issues, were also assessed. This resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of integration schemes of ICCM hydrogen separation technology within Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Several results and conclusion were obtained during this program. In the area of materials synthesis, novel

  3. Plasma-chemical treatment of hydrogen sulfide in natural gas processing. Final report, May 1991--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

    1993-05-01

    A new process for the treatment of hydrogen sulfide waste that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology has been under development in Russia and the United States. Whereas the present waste-treatment technology, at best, only recovers sulfur, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur by dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a plasma by means of a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. A research project has been undertaken to determine the suitability of the plasma process in natural gas processing applications. The experiments tested acid-gas compositions with 30--65% carbon dioxide, 0--7% water, and 0--0.2% of a standard mixture of pipeline gas. The balance gas in all cases was hydrogen sulfide. The reactor pressure for the experiments was 50 torr, and the microwave power was 1.0 kW. Conversions of hydrogen sulfide ranged from 80 to 100%, while 35--50% of the carbon dioxide was converted to carbon monoxide. This conversion of carbon dioxide resulted in a loss of hydrogen production and an energy loss from a hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment perspective. Tests of a direct natural gas treatment concept showed that hydrocarbon losses were unacceptably high; consequently, the concept would not be economically viable.

  4. Characterization of the surface changes during the activation process of erbium/erbium oxide for hydrogen storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Snow, Clark Sheldon; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Brumbach, Michael Todd

    2010-10-01

    Erbium is known to effectively load with hydrogen when held at high temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere. To make the storage of hydrogen kinetically feasible, a thermal activation step is required. Activation is a routine practice, but very little is known about the physical, chemical, and/or electronic processes that occur during Activation. This work presents in situ characterization of erbium Activation using variable energy photoelectron spectroscopy at various stages of the Activation process. Modification of the passive surface oxide plays a significant role in Activation. The chemical and electronic changes observed from core-level and valence band spectra will be discussed along with corroborating ion scattering spectroscopy measurements.

  5. EFFECT OF MINOR ADDITIONS OF HYDROGEN TO ARGON SHIELDING GAS WHEN WELDING AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WITH THE GTAW PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2004-12-15

    This paper provides the technical basis to conclude that the use of hydrogen containing shielding gases during welding of austenitic stainless steels will not lead to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) of the weld or weld heat affected zone. Argon-hydrogen gas mixtures, with hydrogen additions up to 35% [1], have been successfully used as the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of austenitic stainless steels. The addition of hydrogen improves weld pool wettability, bead shape control, surface cleanliness and heat input. The GTAW process is used extensively for welding various grades of stainless steel and is preferred when a very high weld quality is desired, such as that required for closure welding of nuclear materials packages. The use of argon-hydrogen gas mixtures for high-quality welding is occasionally questioned, primarily because of concern over the potential for HIC. This paper was written specifically to provide a technical basis for using an argon-hydrogen shielding gas in conjunction with the development, at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), of an ''optimized'' closure welding process for the DOE standardized spent nuclear fuel canister [2]. However, the basis developed here can be applied to other applications in which the use of an argon-hydrogen shielding gas for GTAW welding of austenitic stainless steels is desired.

  6. Influence of the postplasma process conditions on the surface conductivity of hydrogenated diamond surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snidero, E.; Tromson, D.; Mer, C.; Bergonzo, P.; Foord, John S.; Nebel, C.; Williams, Oliver A.; Jackman, Richard B.

    2003-03-01

    It is a common observation that diamond surface conductivity rises after exposure to hydrogen plasmas. Hydrogenation treatments are known to induce a p-type conductive layer, which is not present on non-hydrogenated samples. However, the particular mechanisms predominant in the plasma treatment process are still controversial, and several antagonist conditions have been reported to be of importance, such as sample temperature (500 °C to 800 °C), duration (a few seconds to 1 h), and microwave (MW) power density, etc. Further, the post-plasma step is also crucial, especially since the surface conductivity has been reported to be affected by the presence of an adsorbate layer on the diamond surface. By setting up the arrangement to enable the in situ measurement of the surface conductivity after treatment, we have been able to control all parameters that could affect the surface conductivity, in order to determine those of importance. Among the parameters studied, we were able to analyze the influence of the surface temperature, the gas phase exposure (dry air, wet air, neutral gas, CH4, O2, and H2), the MW plasma conditions (O2,H2) as well as the exposure to UV (Hg and deuterium) and the importance of the sequence and duration of each of these treatments. We found that hydrogenated surfaces are strongly influenced by the combination of wet air exposure and UV light. We noticed that the effect of UV light is persistent and cannot be related to direct photoconduction and has to be attributed to a modification of the trapped defect population. This can, therefore, be compared with the modification of filled defect density as observed in persistent photoconduction.

  7. Elimination Of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In Defense Waste Processing Facility Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2013-01-22

    Based on lab-scale simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) slurry chemistry, the addition of sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide to waste slurries at concentrations sufficient to take the aqueous phase into the alkaline region (pH > 7) with approximately 500 mg nitrite ion/kg slurry (assuming <25 wt% total solids, or equivalently 2,000 mg nitrite/kg total solids) is sufficient to effectively deactivate the noble metal catalysts at temperatures between room temperature and boiling. This is a potential strategy for eliminating catalytic hydrogen generation from the list of concerns for sludge carried over into the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) or Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). These conclusions are drawn in large part from the various phases of the DWPF catalytic hydrogen generation program conducted between 2005 and 2009. The findings could apply to various situations, including a solids carry-over from either the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) into the SMECT with subsequent transfer to the RCT, as well as a spill of formic acid into the sump system and transfer into an RCT that already contains sludge solids. There are other potential mitigating factors for the SMECT and RCT, since these vessels are typically operated at temperatures close to the minimum temperatures that catalytic hydrogen has been observed to occur in either the SRAT or SME (pure slurry case), and these vessels are also likely to be considerably more dilute in both noble metals and formate ion (the two essential components to catalytic hydrogen generation) than the two primary process vessels. Rhodium certainly, and ruthenium likely, are present as metal-ligand complexes that are favored under certain concentrations of the surrounding species. Therefore, in the SMECT or RCT, where a small volume of SRAT or SME material would be significantly diluted, conditions would be less optimal for forming or sustaining the

  8. High-sensitivity detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed onto soot particles using laser desorption/laser ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry: An approach to studying the soot inception process in low-pressure flames

    SciTech Connect

    Faccinetto, Alessandro; Desgroux, Pascale; Therssen, Eric; Ziskind, Michael; Focsa, Cristian

    2011-02-15

    Species adsorbed at the surfaces of soot particles sampled at different locations in a low-pressure methane flame have been analyzed. The analysis method is laser desorption/laser ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD/LI/TOF-MS) applied to soot particles deposited on a filter after probe extraction in the flame. In order to fully characterize the experimental apparatus, a strategy of systematic investigations has been adopted, beginning with the study of less complex systems constituted by model soot (standard polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs, adsorbed on black carbon), and then natural soot sampled from a literature reference ethylene flame. This characterization allowed a good understanding of the analytical response of PAHs to the desorption and ionization processes and the definition of the optimal experimental conditions. The soot PAH content was then investigated on a low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen premixed flat flame ({phi} = 2.32) as a function of the sampling height above the burner (HAB). The obtained mass spectra are reproducible, fragment-free, well resolved in the analyzed m/z range and they are characterized by an excellent signal-to-noise ratio. They all feature regular peak sequences, where each signal peak has been assigned to the most stable high-temperature-formed PAHs. The structure of the mass spectra depends on the sampling HAB into the flame, i.e., on the reaction time. An original contribution to the data interpretation comes from the development of a new sampling method that makes it possible to infer hypotheses about the PAH partition between the gas phase and the soot particles. This method highlights the presence of high-mass PAHs in the soot nucleation zone, and it suggests the importance of heterogeneous reactions occurring between flame PAHs and soot particles. (author)

  9. Lead sorption-desorption from organic residues.

    PubMed

    Duarte Zaragoza, Victor M; Carrillo, Rogelio; Gutierrez Castorena, Carmen M

    2011-01-01

    Sorption and desorption are mechanisms involved in the reduction of metal mobility and bioavailability in organic materials. Metal release from substrates is controlled by desorption. The capacity of coffee husk and pulp residues, vermicompost and cow manure to adsorb Pb2+ was evaluated. The mechanisms involved in the sorption process were also studied. Organic materials retained high concentrations of lead (up to 36,000 mg L(-1)); however, the mechanisms of sorption varied according to the characteristics of each material: degree of decomposition, pH, cation exchange capacity and percentage of organic matter. Vermicompost and manure removed 98% of the Pb from solution. Lead precipitated in manure and vermicompost, forming lead oxide (PbO) and lead ferrite (PbFe4O7). Adsorption isotherms did not fit to the typical Freundlich and Langmuir equations. Not only specific and non-specific adsorption was observed, but also precipitation and coprecipitation. Lead desorption from vermicompost and cow manure was less than 2%. For remediation of Pb-polluted sites, the application of vermicompost and manure is recommended in places with alkaline soils because Pb precipitation can be induced, whereas coffee pulp residue is recommended for acidic soils where Pb is adsorbed.

  10. Light-induced atomic desorption: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, E.; Atutov, S. N.; Biancalana, Valerio; Bocci, S.; Burchianti, A.; Marinelli, C.; Nasyrov, K. A.; Pieragnoli, B.; Moi, L.

    2001-04-01

    Light induced atomic desorption (LIAD) is an impressive manifestation of a new class of phenomena involving alkali atoms, dielectric films and light. LIAD consists of a huge emission of alkali atoms (experimentally proved for sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) from siloxane films when illuminated by laser or ordinary light. Most of the experiments have been performed in glass cells suitably coated by a thin film (of the order of 10 micrometer) either of poly - (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a polymer, or of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OCT), a crown molecule. LIAD is a combination of two processes: direct photo-desorption from the surface and diffusion within the siloxane layer. The photo-desorbed atoms are replaced by fresh atoms diffusing to the surface. Moreover, from the experimental data it comes out that the desorbing light increases atomic diffusion and hence the diffusion coefficient. To our knowledge this is the first time that such an effect is clearly observed, measured and discussed: LIAD represents a new class of photo-effects characterized by two simultaneous phenomena due to the light: surface desorption and fastened bulk diffusion.

  11. Identification of sources and production processes of bottled waters by stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Brencic, Mihael; Vreca, Polona

    2006-01-01

    Bottled water is a food product that considerably depends on the environment from which it originates, not only at the place where it is produced, but predominantly on the conditions in the recharge area of the wells captured for bottling. According to their source and the bottling process, bottled waters can be divided into natural and artificially sparkling waters, still and flavoured waters. These waters originate from various parts of the hydrological cycle and their natural origin is reflected in their hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopic compositions (delta(2)H and delta(18)O). A total of 58 domestic and foreign brands and 16 replicates of bottled waters, randomly collected on the Slovene market in September 2004, were analysed for delta(2)H and delta(18)O. The isotopic composition varied between -83 per thousand and -46 per thousand with an average of -66 per thousand for hydrogen, and between -11.9 per thousand and -7.5 per thousand with an average of -9.6 per thousand for oxygen. This investigation helped (1) to determine and test the classification of bottled waters, (2) to determine the natural origin of bottled water, and (3) to indicate differences between the natural and production processes. The production process may influence the isotopic composition of flavoured waters and artificially sparkling waters. No such modification was observed for still and natural sparkling waters. The methods applied, together with hydrological knowledge, can be used for the authentication of bottled waters for regulatory and consumer control applications.

  12. Solar thermal hydrogen production process: Final report, January 1978-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Under sponsorship by the United States Department of Energy, Westinghouse Advanced Energy-Systems Division has investigated the potential for using solar thermal energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. A hybrid thermochemical/electrochemical process, known as the Sulfur Cycle, has been the focus of these investigations. Process studies have indicated that, with adequate and ongoing research and development, the Sulfur Cycle can be effectively driven with solar heat. Also, economic analyses have indicated that the cycle has the potential to produce hydrogen in economic competitiveness with conventional methods (e.g. methane/steam reforming) by the turn of the century. A first generation developmental system has been defined along with its critical components, i.e. those components that need substantial engineering development. Designs for those high temperature components that concentrate, vaporize and decompose the process circulating fluid, sulfuric acid, have been prepared. Extensive experimental investigations have been conducted with regard to the selection of construction materials for these components. From these experiments, which included materials endurance tests for corrosion resistance for periods up to 6000 hours, promising materials and catalysts have been identified.

  13. Production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, and chemicals from catalytic processing of bio-oils

    DOEpatents

    Huber, George W; Vispute, Tushar P; Routray, Kamalakanta

    2014-06-03

    Disclosed herein is a method of generating hydrogen from a bio-oil, comprising hydrogenating a water-soluble fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, and reforming the water-soluble fraction by aqueous-phase reforming in the presence of a reforming catalyst, wherein hydrogen is generated by the reforming, and the amount of hydrogen generated is greater than that consumed by the hydrogenating. The method can further comprise hydrocracking or hydrotreating a lignin fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrocracking catalyst wherein the lignin fraction of bio-oil is obtained as a water-insoluble fraction from aqueous extraction of bio-oil. The hydrogen used in the hydrogenating and in the hydrocracking or hydrotreating can be generated by reforming the water-soluble fraction of bio-oil.

  14. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION TCAP HYDROGEN ISOTOPE SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L; Henry Sessions, H; Steve Xiao, S; Heather Mentzer, H

    2009-01-09

    The first generation of TCAP hydrogen isotope separation process has been in service for tritium separation at the Savannah River Site since 1994. To prepare for replacement, a next-generation TCAP process has been developed. This new process simplifies the column design and reduces the equipment requirements of the thermal cycling system. An experimental twelve-meter column was fabricated and installed in the laboratory to demonstrate its performance. This new design and its initial test results were presented at the 8th International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology and published in the proceedings. We have since completed the startup and demonstration the separation of protium and deuterium in the experimental unit. The unit has been operated for more than 200 cycles. A feed of 25% deuterium in protium was separated into two streams each better than 99.7% purity.

  15. Influences of pH and hydraulic retention time on anaerobes converting beer processing wastes into hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Lay, J J; Tsai, C J; Huang, C C; Chang, J J; Chou, C H; Fan, K S; Chang, J I; Hsu, P C

    2005-01-01

    To convert high-solids organic wastes (3% w./w.) to high-value hydrogen, a full factorial experimental design was employed in planning the experiments for learning the effects of pH and hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the hydrogen production in a chemostat reactor using waste yeast obtained from beer processing wastes. For determining which experimental variable settings affect hydrogen production, predictive polynomial quadratic equation and response surface methodology were employed to determine and explain the conditions required for high-value hydrogen production. Experimental results indicate that a maximum hydrogen production rate of 460 mL/gVSS/d was obtained at pH = 5.8 and HRT = 32 hours. Moreover, hydrogenase targeted RT-PCR results indicate that Clostridium thermocellum and Klebsiella pneumoniae predominated.

  16. Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Michael W. Patterson

    2008-05-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible

  17. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  18. The production of hydrogen by dark fermentation of municipal solid wastes and slaughterhouse waste: A two-phase process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, X.; Morán, A.; Cuetos, M. J.; Sánchez, M. E.

    A two-phase fermentation process for the treatment of waste, intended for the recovery of hydrogen for energy use, was investigated in its initial fermentation phase. Hydrogen production was obtained from a mixed culture based on an active mesophilic inoculum without any selective treatment being applied. The liquid stream generated by the hydrogen fermentation process was stabilized in the following, methanogenic, phase for the recovery of methane and further breaking down of the waste stream. The whole process was carried out at a temperature in the mesophilic range (34 °C). The substrate used was an unsterilized mixture of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) and slaughterhouse waste from a poultry-processing plant. The hydrogen-producing phase was capable of stable performance under the hydraulic retention times (HRTs) evaluated (3 and 5 days). No methane was detected in the first phase at any point during the whole period of the experiment and the hydrogen yield showed no symptoms of declining as time elapsed. The amount of hydrogen obtained from the fermentation process was in the range of 52.5-71.3 N L kg -1 VS rem.

  19. Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

    2008-11-30

    We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

  20. Dynamics of hydrogen-producing bacteria in a repeated batch fermentation process using lake sediment as inoculum.

    PubMed

    Romano, Stefano; Paganin, Patrizia; Varrone, Cristiano; Tabacchioni, Silvia; Chiarini, Luigi

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of lake sediment as inoculum for hydrogen production through dark fermentation in a repeated batch process. In addition, we investigated the effect of heat treatment, applied to enrich hydrogen-producing bacteria, on the bacterial composition and metabolism. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and molecular cloning, both performed using the 16S rDNA gene as target gene, were used to monitor the structure of the bacterial community. Hydrogen production and bacterial metabolism were analysed via gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. Both treated and non-treated inocula were able to produce high amounts of hydrogen. However, statistical analysis showed a clear difference in their bacterial composition and metabolism. The heat treatment favoured the growth of different Clostridia sp., in particular of Clostridium bifermentans, allowing the production of a constant amount of hydrogen over prolonged time. These cultures showed both butyrate and ethanol fermentation types. Absence of heat treatment allowed species belonging to the genera Bacillus, Sporolactobacillus and Massilia to outgrow Clostridia sp. with a reduction in hydrogen production and a significant metabolic change. Our data indicate that lake sediment harbours bacteria that can efficiently produce hydrogen over prolonged fermentation time. Moreover, we could show that the heat treatment stabilizes the bacterial community composition and the hydrogen production.

  1. Quantum-chemical ab initio investigation of the two-step charge transfer process of hydrogen reaction: approach of reaction pathways via hydrogen intermediate on Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, An. M.; Lorenz, W.

    1994-08-01

    Local reaction events in the course of the electrochemical two-step hydrogen evolution reaction have been investigated by means of quantum-chemical all-electron ab initio calculations on interfacial supermolecular cluster models including a hydrated hydrogen intermediate on Cu(100). Expanding on preceding study to larger hydration clusters, an approach to relevant reaction path characteristics has been pursued for two processes: (i) the transfer of hydrated hydronium ion into a chemisorbed hydrogen intermediate: (ii) the reaction of hydronium ion with the intermediate to molecular hydrogen. Computations were carried out on RHF level, using contracted (12,8,4)/[8,6,2,] and/or 6-31G * or G ** pol-O bases for the metal and adsorbate part, respectively. Destruction of the hydronium configuration in process (i) has been confirmed. Electronic partial charge transfer dut to chemical bond conversions in both steps (i) and (ii) has been displayed along relevant cuts of adiabatic potential surfaces, proving significantly different amounts of charge transfer in both steps, λ 1 > 1, λ 2≡(2-λ 1) < 1. In advance of consideration of macroscopic double layer effects, first insight has been gained into coupled nuclear motions and into the origin of reaction barriers

  2. Modeling arsenic desorption from herbicide-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongqiang; Donahoe, Rona J

    2009-06-01

    The application of arsenical herbicides has created legacy environmental problems by contaminating soil in some agricultural areas and at various industrial sites. Numerous previous studies have suggested that the adsorption of arsenic by common soil components is largely controlled by kinetic factors. Four arsenic-contaminated soil samples collected from industrial sites were characterized and subjected to sequential leaching using a synthetic acid rain solution in order to study the release of arsenic. A dual-site numerical sorption-desorption model was constructed that describes arsenic desorption from these soils in terms of two different release mechanisms: Release from type I (equilibrium) and type II (kinetic) sorption sites. Arsenic held on both type I and II sorption sites is accessible through extensive acid rain leaching. Arsenic desorption from these sites follows a linear Kd model; the manner of approaching the Kd model, however, differs. Arsenic desorption from type I sites reached equilibrium with the aqueous phase under the physical environment provided by the experiment (shaking for 24 h at 25 degrees C), while desorption from type II sites followed a first-order kinetic pattern when approaching equilibrium. During synthetic acid rain sequential leaching of the soils, type I sites released their sorbed arsenic rapidly and subsequent desorption was dominated by the kinetic release of arsenic from type II sites. This shift in desorption mechanism dominance generated data corresponding to two intersecting straight lines in the n-logC dimension for all four soils. The dual-site desorption model was solved analytically and proven to be successful in simulating sorption processes where two different mechanisms are simultaneously controlling the aqueous concentration of a trace element.

  3. Demonstration of a micro-fabricated hydrogen storage module for micro-power systems.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xi; Payer, Joe H; Wainright, Jesse S; Dudik, Laurie

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate a micro-fabricated hydrogen storage module for micro-power systems. Hydrogen storage materials were developed as thin-film inks to be compatible with an integrated manufacturing process. Performance and durability of storage modules were evaluated. Further, applications were demonstrated for a nickel-hydrogen battery and a micro-fabricated hydrogen-air PEM fuel cell. The ink making process, in which polymer binders and solvents were added to the palladium-treated alloys, slightly decreased the storage capacities, but had little effect on the activation properties of the treated alloys. After 5000 absorption/desorption cycles under hydrogen, the hydrogen storage capacities of the thin-film inks remained high. Absorption/desorption behavior of the ink was tested in the environment of a new type nickel-hydrogen battery, in which it would in contact with 26wt% KOH solution, and the ink showed no apparent degradation. Storage modules were used as the successfully as hydrogen source for PEM fuel cell.

  4. Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  5. General Thermal Texturization Process of MoS2 for Efficient Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kiriya, Daisuke; Lobaccaro, Peter; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Taheri, Peyman; Hettick, Mark; Shiraki, Hiroshi; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M; Zhao, Peida; Gao, Wei; Maboudian, Roya; Ager, Joel W; Javey, Ali

    2016-07-13

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been widely examined as a catalyst containing no precious metals for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER); however, these examinations have utilized synthesized MoS2 because the pristine MoS2 mineral is known to be a poor catalyst. The fundamental challenge with pristine MoS2 is the inert HER activity of the predominant (0001) basal surface plane. In order to achieve high HER performance with pristine MoS2, it is essential to activate the basal plane. Here, we report a general thermal process in which the basal plane is texturized to increase the density of HER-active edge sites. This texturization is achieved through a simple thermal annealing procedure in a hydrogen environment, removing sulfur from the MoS2 surface to form edge sites. As a result, the process generates high HER catalytic performance in pristine MoS2 across various morphologies such as the bulk mineral, films composed of micron-scale flakes, and even films of a commercially available spray of nanoflake MoS2. The lowest overpotential (η) observed for these samples was η = 170 mV to obtain 10 mA/cm(2) of HER current density. PMID:27322506

  6. General Thermal Texturization Process of MoS2 for Efficient Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kiriya, Daisuke; Lobaccaro, Peter; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Taheri, Peyman; Hettick, Mark; Shiraki, Hiroshi; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M; Zhao, Peida; Gao, Wei; Maboudian, Roya; Ager, Joel W; Javey, Ali

    2016-07-13

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been widely examined as a catalyst containing no precious metals for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER); however, these examinations have utilized synthesized MoS2 because the pristine MoS2 mineral is known to be a poor catalyst. The fundamental challenge with pristine MoS2 is the inert HER activity of the predominant (0001) basal surface plane. In order to achieve high HER performance with pristine MoS2, it is essential to activate the basal plane. Here, we report a general thermal process in which the basal plane is texturized to increase the density of HER-active edge sites. This texturization is achieved through a simple thermal annealing procedure in a hydrogen environment, removing sulfur from the MoS2 surface to form edge sites. As a result, the process generates high HER catalytic performance in pristine MoS2 across various morphologies such as the bulk mineral, films composed of micron-scale flakes, and even films of a commercially available spray of nanoflake MoS2. The lowest overpotential (η) observed for these samples was η = 170 mV to obtain 10 mA/cm(2) of HER current density.

  7. Improved identification of yeast species directly from positive blood culture media by combining Sepsityper specimen processing and Microflex analysis with the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization Biotyper system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yingjun; He, Ying; Maier, Thomas; Quinn, Criziel; Shi, Gongyi; Li, Haijing; Stratton, Charles W; Kostrzewa, Markus; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2011-07-01

    Current methods for identification of yeast from blood cultures may take several days after these microorganisms have been observed by Gram stain smears from positive blood cultures. We explored the use of a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) Biotyper system in combination with Sepsityper specimen processing and Microflex analysis for improved detection and identification of yeast species directly from positive blood culture specimens demonstrating yeast-like organisms by Gram stain. The limit of detection of yeast species in blood culture medium was determined to be 5.9 × 10(5) CFU, with intra- and interstrain coefficients of variation of 1.8 to 3.6% and 2.9%, respectively. A total of 42 yeast-containing positive blood culture specimens were processed, and the identification results were compared to those obtained by routinely used phenotypic methods. Specimens with discrepant results between the Biotyper and phenotypic methods were identified on the basis of internal transcribed spacer region sequencing. The MALDI Biotyper system correctly identified the 42 specimens to species level, including 28 (66.7%) Candida albicans, 8 (19.0%) Candida parapsilosis, and 5 (11.9%) Candida tropicalis isolates and 1 (2.4%) Cryptococcus neoformans isolate. The entire procedure, from specimen extraction to final result reporting, can be completed within 1 h. Our data indicated that the Sepsityper specimen processing and Microflex analysis by the MALDI Biotyper system provide a rapid and reliable tool for yeast species identification directly from positive blood culture media.

  8. Hydrogen production from sugar beet juice using an integrated biohydrogen process of dark fermentation and microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Hafez, Hisham; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-12-01

    An integrated dark fermentation and microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) process was evaluated for hydrogen production from sugar beet juice. Different substrate to inoculum (S/X) ratios were tested for dark fermentation, and the maximum hydrogen yield was 13% of initial COD at the S/X ratio of 2 and 4 for dark fermentation. Hydrogen yield was 12% of initial COD in the MEC using fermentation liquid end products as substrate, and butyrate only accumulated in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production from the integrated biohydrogen process was 25% of initial COD (equivalent to 6 mol H2/mol hexoseadded), and the energy recovery from sugar beet juice was 57% using the combined biohydrogen.

  9. Round-the-clock power supply and a sustainable economy via synergistic integration of solar thermal power and hydrogen processes.

    PubMed

    Gençer, Emre; Mallapragada, Dharik S; Maréchal, François; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-12-29

    We introduce a paradigm-"hydricity"-that involves the coproduction of hydrogen and electricity from solar thermal energy and their judicious use to enable a sustainable economy. We identify and implement synergistic integrations while improving each of the two individual processes. When the proposed integrated process is operated in a standalone, solely power production mode, the resulting solar water power cycle can generate electricity with unprecedented efficiencies of 40-46%. Similarly, in standalone hydrogen mode, pressurized hydrogen is produced at efficiencies approaching ∼50%. In the coproduction mode, the coproduced hydrogen is stored for uninterrupted solar power production. When sunlight is unavailable, we envision that the stored hydrogen is used in a "turbine"-based hydrogen water power (H2WP) cycle with the calculated hydrogen-to-electricity efficiency of 65-70%, which is comparable to the fuel cell efficiencies. The H2WP cycle uses much of the same equipment as the solar water power cycle, reducing capital outlays. The overall sun-to-electricity efficiency of the hydricity process, averaged over a 24-h cycle, is shown to approach ∼35%, which is nearly the efficiency attained by using the best multijunction photovoltaic cells along with batteries. In comparison, our proposed process has the following advantages: (i) It stores energy thermochemically with a two- to threefold higher density, (ii) coproduced hydrogen has alternate uses in transportation/chemical/petrochemical industries, and (iii) unlike batteries, the stored energy does not discharge over time and the storage medium does not degrade with repeated uses. PMID:26668380

  10. Round-the-clock power supply and a sustainable economy via synergistic integration of solar thermal power and hydrogen processes

    PubMed Central

    Gençer, Emre; Mallapragada, Dharik S.; Maréchal, François; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a paradigm—“hydricity”—that involves the coproduction of hydrogen and electricity from solar thermal energy and their judicious use to enable a sustainable economy. We identify and implement synergistic integrations while improving each of the two individual processes. When the proposed integrated process is operated in a standalone, solely power production mode, the resulting solar water power cycle can generate electricity with unprecedented efficiencies of 40–46%. Similarly, in standalone hydrogen mode, pressurized hydrogen is produced at efficiencies approaching ∼50%. In the coproduction mode, the coproduced hydrogen is stored for uninterrupted solar power production. When sunlight is unavailable, we envision that the stored hydrogen is used in a “turbine”-based hydrogen water power (H2WP) cycle with the calculated hydrogen-to-electricity efficiency of 65–70%, which is comparable to the fuel cell efficiencies. The H2WP cycle uses much of the same equipment as the solar water power cycle, reducing capital outlays. The overall sun-to-electricity efficiency of the hydricity process, averaged over a 24-h cycle, is shown to approach ∼35%, which is nearly the efficiency attained by using the best multijunction photovoltaic cells along with batteries. In comparison, our proposed process has the following advantages: (i) It stores energy thermochemically with a two- to threefold higher density, (ii) coproduced hydrogen has alternate uses in transportation/chemical/petrochemical industries, and (iii) unlike batteries, the stored energy does not discharge over time and the storage medium does not degrade with repeated uses. PMID:26668380

  11. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  12. Round-the-clock power supply and a sustainable economy via synergistic integration of solar thermal power and hydrogen processes.

    PubMed

    Gençer, Emre; Mallapragada, Dharik S; Maréchal, François; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-12-29

    We introduce a paradigm-"hydricity"-that involves the coproduction of hydrogen and electricity from solar thermal energy and their judicious use to enable a sustainable economy. We identify and implement synergistic integrations while improving each of the two individual processes. When the proposed integrated process is operated in a standalone, solely power production mode, the resulting solar water power cycle can generate electricity with unprecedented efficiencies of 40-46%. Similarly, in standalone hydrogen mode, pressurized hydrogen is produced at efficiencies approaching ∼50%. In the coproduction mode, the coproduced hydrogen is stored for uninterrupted solar power production. When sunlight is unavailable, we envision that the stored hydrogen is used in a "turbine"-based hydrogen water power (H2WP) cycle with the calculated hydrogen-to-electricity efficiency of 65-70%, which is comparable to the fuel cell efficiencies. The H2WP cycle uses much of the same equipment as the solar water power cycle, reducing capital outlays. The overall sun-to-electricity efficiency of the hydricity process, averaged over a 24-h cycle, is shown to approach ∼35%, which is nearly the efficiency attained by using the best multijunction photovoltaic cells along with batteries. In comparison, our proposed process has the following advantages: (i) It stores energy thermochemically with a two- to threefold higher density, (ii) coproduced hydrogen has alternate uses in transportation/chemical/petrochemical industries, and (iii) unlike batteries, the stored energy does not discharge over time and the storage medium does not degrade with repeated uses.

  13. Manifestation of oxygen desorption in photoluminescence spectra of ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopyan, I. Kh.; Labzovskaya, M. E.; Lisachenko, A. A.; Novikov, B. V.; Serov, A. Yu.; Titov, V. V.; Filosofov, N. G.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of oxygen desorption on the photoluminescence of zinc oxide has been investigated. Photodesorption and thermal desorption of oxygen have been controlled using mass spectrometry. It has been found that the removal of oxygen from the ZnO surface leads to a manifold increase in the exciton photoluminescence intensity. The process has a reversible character. The mechanism of increase in the exciton luminescence intensity of ZnO during the oxygen desorption has been discussed.

  14. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: THERMAL DESORPTION TREATMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is an EX SITU means to physically separate volatile and some semivolatile contaminants from soil, sediments, sludge, and filter cakes by heating them at temperatures high enough to volatilize the organic contaminants. For wastes containing up to 10 percent orga...

  15. Activatino of Erbium Films for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    M Brumbach; j Ohlhausen; K Zavadil; C Snow; J Woicik

    2011-12-31

    Hydriding of metals can be routinely performed at high temperature in a rich hydrogen atmosphere. Prior to the hydrogen loading process, a thermal activation procedure is required to promote facile hydrogen sorption into the metal. Despite the wide spread utilization of this activation procedure, little is known about the chemical and electronic changes that occur during activation and how this thermal pretreatment leads to increased rates of hydrogen uptake. This study utilized variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to interrogate the changes during in situ thermal annealing of erbium films, with results confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and low energy ion scattering. Activation can be identified by a large increase in photoemission between the valence band edge and the Fermi level and appears to occur over a two stage process. The first stage involves desorption of contaminants and recrystallization of the oxide, initially impeding hydrogen loading. Further heating overcomes the first stage and leads to degradation of the passive surface oxide leading to a bulk film more accessible for hydrogen loading.

  16. Activation of erbium films for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Ohlhausen, James A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Snow, Clark S.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2011-06-01

    Hydriding of metals can be routinely performed at high temperature in a rich hydrogen atmosphere. Prior to the hydrogen loading process, a thermal activation procedure is required to promote facile hydrogen sorption into the metal. Despite the wide spread utilization of this activation procedure, little is known about the chemical and electronic changes that occur during activation and how this thermal pretreatment leads to increased rates of hydrogen uptake. This study utilized variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to interrogate the changes during in situ thermal annealing of erbium films, with results confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and low energy ion scattering. Activation can be identified by a large increase in photoemission between the valence band edge and the Fermi level and appears to occur over a two stage process. The first stage involves desorption of contaminants and recrystallization of the oxide, initially impeding hydrogen loading. Further heating overcomes the first stage and leads to degradation of the passive surface oxide leading to a bulk film more accessible for hydrogen loading.

  17. Catalytic lignin valorization process for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zakzeski, Joseph; Jongerius, Anna L; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2012-08-01

    With dwindling reserves of fossil feedstock as a resource for chemicals production, the fraction of chemicals and energy supplied by alternative, renewable resources, such as lignin, can be expected to increase in the foreseeable future. Here, we demonstrate a catalytic process to valorize lignin (exemplified with kraft, organosolv, and sugarcane bagasse lignin) using a mixture of cheap, bio-renewable ethanol and water as solvent. Ethanol/water mixtures readily solubilize lignin under moderate temperatures and pressures with little residual solids. The molecular weight of the dissolved lignins was shown to be reduced by gel permeation chromatography and quantitative HSQC NMR methods. The use of liquid-phase reforming of the solubilized lignin over a Pt/Al(2)O(3) catalyst at 498 K and 58 bar is introduced to yield up to 17 % combined yield of monomeric aromatic oxygenates such as guaiacol and substituted guaiacols generating hydrogen as a useful by-product. Reduction of the lignin dissolved in ethanol/water using a supported transition metal catalyst at 473 K and 30 bar hydrogen yields up to 6 % of cyclic hydrocarbons and aromatics. PMID:22740175

  18. Nanocrystalline mesoporous SMO thin films prepared by sol gel process for MEMS-based hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jianwei; Fei, Weifeng; Seal, Sudipta; Chen, Quanfang

    2004-01-01

    MEMS based SnO2 gas sensor with sol gel synthesized mesoporous nanocrystalline (<10 nm) semiconductor thin (100~150 nm) film has been recently developed. The SnO2 nano film is fabricated with the combination of polymeric sol gel chemistry with block copolymers used for structure directing agents. The novel hydrogen sensor has a fast response time (1s) and quick recovery time (3s), as well as good sensitivity (about 90%), comparing to other hydrogen sensors developed. The improved capabilities are credited to the large surface to volume ratio of gas sensing thin film with nano sized porous surface topology, which can greatly increase the sensitivity even at relatively low working temperature. The gas sensing film is deposited onto a thin dielectric membrane of low thermal conductivity, which provides good thermal isolation between substrate and the gas-sensitive heated area on the membrane. In this way the power consumption can be kept very low. Since the fabrication process is completely compatible with IC industry, it makes mass production possible and greatly reduces the cost. The working temperature of the new sensor can be reduced as low as 100°C. The low working temperature posse advantages such as lower power consumption, lower thermal induced signal shift as well as safe detection in certain environments where temperature is strictly limited.

  19. Engineered Three-Dimensional Electrodes by HVOF Process for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghasibeig, Maniya; Moreau, Christian; Dolatabadi, Ali; Wuthrich, Rolf

    2016-09-01

    High velocity oxy-fuel process was used to prepare nickel electrode coatings for hydrogen production by alkaline water electrolysis. To further increase the active surface area of the electrodes, pyramidal fin arrays with two different sizes were deposited on the top surface of the electrodes using mesh screen masks. The surface microstructure, topology and roughness of the coatings were studied using scanning electron microscope, optical microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Steady-state polarization curves were used to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity of the electrodes. The performance of the electrodes coated using mesh outperformed the electrode deposited without using mesh. In addition, the electrode that was coated using the coarse mesh was characterized with the highest activity with the exchange current density and overpotential values of 9.3 × 10-3 A/cm2 and -306 mV, respectively. Formation of different roughness levels due to the combination of normal and off-normal impact of the coating particles on the surface of the fins was identified as the main factor for the increased activity of this electrode toward the hydrogen evolution reaction.

  20. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: CLEAN BERKSHIRES, INC. THERMAL DESORPTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The thermal desorption process devised by Clean Berkshires, Inc., works by vaporizing the organic contaminants from the soil with heat, isolating the contaminant! in a gas stream, and then destroying them in a high efficiency afterburner. The processed solids are either replaced ...

  1. Configuring the thermochemical hydrogen sulfuric acid process step for the Tandem Mirror Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, T.R.

    1981-05-01

    This paper identifies the sulfuric acid step as the critical part of the thermochemical cycle in dictating the thermal demands and temperature requirements of the heat source. The General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle is coupled to a Tandem Mirror. The sulfuric acid decomposition process step is focused on specifically since this step can use the high efficiency electrical power of the direct converter together with the other thermal-produced electricity to Joule-heat a non-catalytic SO/sub 3/ decomposer to approximately 1250/sup 0/K. This approach uses concepts originally suggested by Dick Werner and Oscar Krikorian. The blanket temperature can be lowered to about 900/sup 0/K, greatly alleviating materials problems, the level of technology required, safety problems, and costs. A moderate degree of heat has been integrated to keep the cycle efficiency around 48%, but the number of heat exchangers has been limited in order to keep hydrogen production costs within reasonable bounds.

  2. Catalytic enantioselective OFF ↔ ON activation processes initiated by hydrogen transfer: concepts and challenges.

    PubMed

    Quintard, Adrien; Rodriguez, Jean

    2016-08-18

    Hydrogen transfer initiated processes are eco-compatible transformations allowing the reversible OFF ↔ ON activation of otherwise unreactive substrates. The minimization of stoichiometric waste as well as the unique activation modes provided by these transformations make them key players for a greener future for organic synthesis. Long limited to catalytic reactions that form racemic products, considerable progress on the development of strategies for controlling diastereo- and enantioselectivity has been made in the last decade. The aim of this review is to present the different strategies that enable enantioselective transformations of this type and to highlight how they can be used to construct key synthetic building blocks in fewer operations with less waste generation. PMID:27381644

  3. Recent advances in SRS on hydrogen isotope separation using thermal cycling absorption process

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Kit Heung, L.; Sessions, H.T.

    2015-03-15

    TCAP (Thermal Cycling Absorption Process) is a gas chromatograph in principle using palladium in the column packing, but it is unique in the fact that the carrier gas, hydrogen, is being isotopically separated and the system is operated in a semi-continuous manner. TCAP units are used to purify tritium. The recent TCAP advances at Savannah River Site (SRS) include compressor-free concept for heating/cooling, push and pull separation using an active inverse column, and compact column design. The new developments allow significantly higher throughput and better reliability from 1/10 of the current production system's footprint while consuming 60% less energy. Various versions are derived in the meantime for external customers to be used in fusion energy projects.

  4. Decomposition of acetone by hydrogen peroxide/ozone process in a rotating packed contactor.

    PubMed

    Ku, Young; Huang, Yun-Jen; Chen, Hua-Wei; Hou, Wei-Ming

    2011-07-01

    The direct use of ozone (O3) in water and wastewater treatment processes is found to be inefficient, incomplete, and limited by the ozone transfer between the gas-liquid interface because of its low solubility and instability in aqueous solutions. Therefore, rotating packed contactors were introduced to improve the transfer of ozone from the gaseous phase to the solution phase, and the effect of several reaction parameters were investigated on the temporal variations of acetone concentration in aqueous solution. The decomposition rate constant of acetone was enhanced by increasing the rotor speed from 450 to 1800 rpm. Increasing the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)/O3 molar ratios accelerated the decomposition rate until a certain optimum H2O2/O3 molar ratio was reached; further addition of H2O2 inhibited the decomposition of acetone, possibly because excessive amounts of H2O2 added might serve as a scavenger to deplete hydroxyl free radicals.

  5. Treatment of coking wastewater by an advanced Fenton oxidation process using iron powder and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Chu, Libing; Wang, Jianlong; Dong, Jing; Liu, Haiyang; Sun, Xulin

    2012-01-01

    In this study the treatment of coking wastewater was investigated by an advanced Fenton oxidation process using iron powder and hydrogen peroxide. Particular attention was paid to the effect of initial pH, dosage of H(2)O(2) and to improvement in biodegradation. The results showed that higher COD and total phenol removal rates were achieved with a decrease in initial pH and an increase in H(2)O(2) dosage. At an initial pH of less than 6.5 and H(2)O(2) concentration of 0.3 M, COD removal reached 44-50% and approximately 95% of total phenol removal was achieved at a reaction time of 1 h. The oxygen uptake rate of the effluent measured at a reaction time of 1h increased by approximately 65% compared to that of the raw coking wastewater. This indicated that biodegradation of the coking wastewater was significantly improved. Several organic compounds, including bifuran, quinoline, resorcinol and benzofuranol were removed completely as determined by GC-MS analysis. The advanced Fenton oxidation process is an effective pretreatment method for the removal of organic pollutants from coking wastewater. This process increases biodegradation, and may be combined with a classical biological process to achieve effluent of high quality. PMID:22014660

  6. Performance of an innovative two-stage process converting food waste to hydrogen and methane.

    PubMed

    Han, Sun-Kee; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2004-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of an innovative two-stage process, BIOCELL, that was developed to produce hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) from food waste on the basis of phase separation, reactor rotation mode, and sequential batch technique. The BIOCELL process consisted of four leaching-bed reactors for H2 recovery and post-treatment and a UASB reactor for CH4 recovery. The leaching-bed reactors were operated in a rotation mode with a 2-day interval between degradation stages. The sequential batch technique was useful to optimize environmental conditions during H2 fermentation. The BIOCELL process demonstrated that, at the high volatile solids (VS) loading rate of 11.9 kg/m3 x day, it could remove 72.5% of VS and convert VS(removed) to H2 (28.2%) and CH4 (69.9%) on a chemical oxygen demand (COD) basis in 8 days. H2 gas production rate was 3.63 m3/m3 x day, while CH4 gas production rate was 1.75 m3/m3 x day. The yield values of H2 and CH4 were 0.31 and 0.21 m3/kg VS(added), respectively. Moreover, the output from the post-treatment could be used as a soil amendment. The BIOCELL process proved to be stable, reliable, and effective in resource recovery as well as waste stabilization.

  7. Intramolecular motion in DIET: Desorption and dissociation of chemisorbed ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, A. R.; Stechel, E. B.; Jennison, D. R.

    1995-06-01

    We show that quantum-specific detection of DIET processes of polyatomic adsorbates reveals the multidimensional dynamics of intramolecular motion. Specifically, we present an analysis of the 6-350 eV electron-induced desorption and dissociation of chemisorbed NH 3 and ND 3 on Pt(1 1 1). State-selective detection of the neutral DIET products is accomplished by 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). Desorption and dissociation occur as a result of distinct electronic excitations that result in different, uncoupled, modes of intramolecular motion. We find that desorption results from 3a 1-1-induced inversion motion. Trajectories on a two-dimensional potential energy surface reveal that the excited molecule fully inverts; upon deexcitation, the inverted molecule is sufficiently high on the hard wall of the substrate interaction to have enough energy to desorb. Given the short excitation lifetime, the time scale in which the (H) D atoms reach the inversion geometry directly affects the desorption yield and results in an appreciable enhancement of NH 3 desorption over that of ND 3. In general, multidimensional molecule-surface potential energy surfaces should be considered in DIET processes involving molecular adsorbates.

  8. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Characterization of coal-derived materials by field desorption mass spectrometry, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, supercritical fluid extraction, and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Robins, W.H.

    1992-07-01

    Under contract from the DOE , and in association with CONSOL Inc., Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated four principal and several complementary techniques for the analysis of non-distillable direct coal liquefaction materials in support of process development. Field desorption mass spectrometry (FDMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods were examined for potential usefulness as techniques to elucidate the chemical structure of residual (nondistillable) direct coal liquefaction derived materials. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) were evaluated for effectiveness in compound-class separation and identification of residual materials. Liquid chromatography (including microcolumn) separation techniques, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and GC/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods were applied to supercritical fluid extracts. The full report authored by the PNL researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal liquefaction materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of CONSOL`s contract.

  9. Thermal desorption of circumstellar and cometary ice analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Doménech, R.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Bueno, J.; Goesmann, F.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Thermal annealing of interstellar ices takes place in several stages of star formation. Knowledge of this process comes from a combination of astronomical observations and laboratory simulations under astrophysically relevant conditions. Aims: For the first time we present the results of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments with pre-cometary ice analogs composed of up to five molecular components: H2O, CO, CO2, CH3OH, and NH3. Methods: The experiments were performed with an ultra-high vacuum chamber. A gas line with a novel design allows the controlled preparation of mixtures with up to five molecular components. Volatiles desorbing to the gas phase were monitored using a quadrupole mass spectrometer, while changes in the ice structure and composition were studied by means of infrared spectroscopy. Results: The TPD curves of water ice containing CO, CO2, CH3OH, and NH3 present desorption peaks at temperatures near those observed in pure ice experiments, volcano desorption peaks after water ice crystallization, and co-desorption peaks with water. Desorption peaks of CH3OH and NH3 at temperatures similar to the pure ices takes place when their abundance relative to water is above ~3% in the ice matrix. We found that CO, CO2, and NH3 also present co-desorption peaks with CH3OH, which cannot be reproduced in experiments with binary water-rich ice mixtures. These are extensively used in the study of thermal desorption of interstellar ices. Conclusions: These results reproduce the heating of circumstellar ices in hot cores and can be also applied to the late thermal evolution of comets. In particular, TPD curves represent a benchmark for the analysis of the measurements that mass spectrometers on board the ESA-Rosetta cometary mission will perform on the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which will be active before the arrival of Rosetta according to our predictions.

  10. Atomic Oxygen Desorption from an Amorphous Silicate Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-06-01

    Oxygen is the third most abundant element in space. How oxygen-containing molecules form in space, and whether they form through gas-phase or grain-surface reactions, depends largely on the availability of atomic oxygen in gas-phase versus on surfaces of dust grains. The relative abundance of O in gas-phase versus on grain surfaces is determined by the residence time, or equivalently, desorption energy, of atomic oxygen on grain surfaces. Though important in astrochemical modeling, experimental investigations of atomic oxygen desorption from grain surfaces are lacking in the literature. In most astrochemical models, the O desorption energy value has been taken to be 800 K, which is a guessed value without experimental support. Based on this value, the predicted molecular oxygen abundance in space is at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than what space observations have found. This long running discrepancy of molecular oxygen abundance could be resolved if the O desorption energy is twice as the widely used value (Melnick, G., Tolls, V., et al. 2012, Astrophys. J., 752, 26). We performed TPD (thermal programmed desorption) experiments to study the ozone formation process via O+O2 on an amorphous silicate surface that emulates interstellar conditions. A rate equation model was used to characterize the surface kinetics of both atomic and molecular oxygen. The O desorption energy was extracted from rate equation simulations that best fit the TPD data. The value was found to be 1764±232 K, which agrees with what Melnick et al. proposed. We suggest that the newly found value for the O desorption energy should be used in astrochemical modeling. This work is supported by NSF, Astronomy & Astrophysics Division (Grants No. 0908108 and 1311958), and NASA (Grant No. NNX12AF38G). We thank Dr. J.Brucato of the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri for providing the samples used in these experiments.

  11. Development Program of IS Process Pilot Test Plant for Hydrogen Production With High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Iwatsuki; Atsuhiko Terada; Hiroyuki Noguchi; Yoshiyuki Imai; Masanori Ijichi; Akihiro Kanagawa; Hiroyuki Ota; Shinji Kubo; Kaoru Onuki; Ryutaro Hino

    2006-07-01

    At the present time, we are alarmed by depletion of fossil energy and effects on global environment such as acid rain and global warming, because our lives depend still heavily on fossil energy. So, it is universally recognized that hydrogen is one of the best energy media and its demand will be increased greatly in the near future. In Japan, the Basic Plan for Energy Supply and Demand based on the Basic Law on Energy Policy Making was decided upon by the Cabinet on 6 October, 2003. In the plan, efforts for hydrogen energy utilization were expressed as follows; hydrogen is a clean energy carrier without carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission, and commercialization of hydrogen production system using nuclear, solar and biomass, not fossil fuels, is desired. However, it is necessary to develop suitable technology to produce hydrogen without CO{sub 2} emission from a view point of global environmental protection, since little hydrogen exists naturally. Hydrogen production from water using nuclear energy, especially the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is one of the most attractive solutions for the environmental issue, because HTGR hydrogen production by water splitting methods such as a thermochemical iodine-sulfur (IS) process has a high possibility to produce hydrogen effectively and economically. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been conducting the HTTR (High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) project from the view to establishing technology base on HTGR and also on the IS process. In the IS process, raw material, water, is to be reacted with iodine (I{sub 2}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) to produce hydrogen iodide (HI) and sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), the so-called Bunsen reaction, which are then decomposed endo-thermically to produce hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}), respectively. Iodine and sulfur dioxide produced in the decomposition reactions can be used again as the reactants in the Bunsen reaction. In JAEA, continuous

  12. Quantum dots assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection of carbohydrates: qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Aisha; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-04-01

    A quantum dots (QDs) assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (QDA-LDI-MS) strategy was proposed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of a series of carbohydrates. The adsorption of carbohydrates on the modified surface of different QDs as the matrices depended mainly on the formation of hydrogen bonding, which led to higher MS intensity than those with conventional organic matrix. The effects of QDs concentration and sample preparation method were explored for improving the selective ionization process and the detection sensitivity. The proposed approach offered a new dimension to the application of QDs as matrices for MALDI-MS research of carbohydrates. It could be used for quantitative measurement of glucose concentration in human serum with good performance. The QDs served as a matrix showed the advantages of low background, higher sensitivity, convenient sample preparation and excellent stability under vacuum. The QDs assisted LDI-MS approach has promising application to the analysis of carbohydrates in complex biological samples.

  13. OTEC gas-desorption studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.; Golshani, A.

    1981-01-01

    OTEC gas desorption studies were initiated with the goal of mitigating these effects and were carried out in four areas: (1) vacuum deaeration in a packed column, (2) deaeration in a barometric water intake system, (3) noncondensibles disposal through hydraulic air compression, and (4) OTEC deaeration subsystems' analysis. Laboratory experiments to date have completed the vacuum deaeration test of three different kinds of packings, barometric intake deaeration experiments, and a series of hydraulic air compression tests. Preliminary analyses based on the experimental data have shown that, as compared to the previous baseline study, reduction both in deaerator cost and pumping power can be realized with a combination of barometric intake and packed column deaeration. The design and operation of the gas desorption test loop, experimental and computer simulation results obtained, and an analysis of OTEC deaeration subsystem design based on the test results and their implication on OTEC open-cycle power systems are presented.

  14. Thermal desorption of CO and H2 from degassed 304 and 347 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaie-Serej, S.; Outlaw, R.A.

    1994-10-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), along with Auger electron spectroscopy, was used to study the desorption of H2 and CO from baked 304 and 347 stainless-steel samples exposed only to residual gases. Both 347 and 304 samples gave identical TDS spectra. The spectra for CO contained a sharp leading peak centered in the temperature range 410-440C and an exponentially increasing part for temperatures higher than 500C, with a small peak around 600C appearing as a shoulder. The leading peak followed a second-order desorption behavior with an activation energy of 28+/-2 kcal/mol, suggesting that the rate-limiting step for this peak is most likely a surface reaction that produces the CO molecules in the surface layer. The amount of desorbed CO corresponding to this peak was approximately 0.5X10(exp 14) molecules/cm(exp 2) . The exponentially rising part of the CO spectrum appeared to originate from a bulk diffusion process. The TDS spectrum for H2 consisted of a main peak centered also in the temperature range 410-440C, with two small peaks appearing as shoulders at approximately 500 and 650C. The main peak in this case also displayed a second-order behavior with an activation energy of 14+/-2 kcal/mol. The amount of desorbed H2, approximately 1.9X 10(exp 15) molecules/cm(exp 2) , appeared to be independent of the concentration of hydrogen in the bulk, indicating that the majority of the desorbed H2 originated from the surface layer.

  15. Thermal desorption of CO and H2 from degassed 304 and 347 stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezaie-Serej, S.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), along with Auger electron spectroscopy, was used to study the desorption of H2 and CO from baked 304 and 347 stainless-steel samples exposed only to residual gases. Both 347 and 304 samples gave identical TDS spectra. The spectra for CO contained a sharp leading peak centered in the temperature range 410-440C and an exponentially increasing part for temperatures higher than 500C, with a small peak around 600C appearing as a shoulder. The leading peak followed a second-order desorption behavior with an activation energy of 28+/-2 kcal/mol, suggesting that the rate-limiting step for this peak is most likely a surface reaction that produces the CO molecules in the surface layer. The amount of desorbed CO corresponding to this peak was approximately 0.5X10(exp 14) molecules/cm(exp 2) . The exponentially rising part of the CO spectrum appeared to originate from a bulk diffusion process. The TDS spectrum for H2 consisted of a main peak centered also in the temperature range 410-440C, with two small peaks appearing as shoulders at approximately 500 and 650C. The main peak in this case also displayed a second-order behavior with an activation energy of 14+/-2 kcal/mol. The amount of desorbed H2, approximately 1.9X 10(exp 15) molecules/cm(exp 2) , appeared to be independent of the concentration of hydrogen in the bulk, indicating that the majority of the desorbed H2 originated from the surface layer.

  16. Enhancement of bioenergy production from organic wastes by two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane production process.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-09-01

    The present study investigated a two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane process for increasing bioenergy production from organic wastes. A two-stage process with hydraulic retention time (HRT) 3d for hydrogen reactor and 12d for methane reactor, obtained 11% higher energy compared to a single-stage methanogenic process (HRT 15 d) under organic loading rate (OLR) 3 gVS/(L d). The two-stage process was still stable when the OLR was increased to 4.5 gVS/(Ld), while the single-stage process failed. The study further revealed that by changing the HRT(hydrogen):HRT(methane) ratio of the two-stage process from 3:12 to 1:14, 6.7%, more energy could be obtained. Microbial community analysis indicated that the dominant bacterial species were different in the hydrogen reactors (Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum-like species) and methane reactors (Clostridium thermocellum-like species). The changes of substrates and HRT did not change the dominant species. The archaeal community structures in methane reactors were similar both in single- and two- stage reactors, with acetoclastic methanogens Methanosarcina acetivorans-like organisms as the dominant species.

  17. Processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production -- Dissolution of metal foil targets by alkaline hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, D.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Amini, S.; Hersubeno, J.B.; Nasution, H.; Nampira, Y.

    1995-09-01

    In FY 1995, the authors started studies on a new process for dissolution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets for {sup 99}Mo production. In this process, an LEU metal foil target is dissolved in a mixture of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide, then {sup 99}Mo is recovered from the dissolved solution. They focused on the dissolution kinetics to develop a mechanistic model for predicting the products and the rate of uranium dissolution under process conditions. They thoroughly studied the effects of hydrogen peroxide concentration, sodium hydroxide concentration, and temperature on the rate of uranium dissolution. It was found that uranium dissolution can be classified into a low-base (< 0.2M) and a high-base (> 0.2M) process. In the low-base process, both the equilibrium hydrogen peroxide and hydroxide concentrations affect the rate of uranium dissolution; in the high base process, uranium dissolution is a 0.25th order reaction with respect to the equilibrium hydrogen peroxide. The dissolution activation energy was experimentally determined to be 48.8 kJ/mol. Generally, the rate of uranium dissolution increases to a maximum as the hydroxide concentration is increased from 0.01 to about 1.5M, then it decreases as the hydroxide concentration is further increased. The alkalinity of the dissolution solution is an important factor that affects not only the dissolution rate, but also the amount of radioactive waste.

  18. DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence: Synthesis and Processing of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Hydrogen Storage and Catalyst Supports

    SciTech Connect

    David B. Geohegan; Hui Hu; Mina Yoon; Alex A. Puretzky; Christopher M. Rouleau; Norbert Thonnard; Gerd Duscher; Karren More

    2011-05-24

    The objective of the project was to exploit the unique morphology, tunable porosity and excellent metal supportability of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) to optimize hydrogen uptake and binding energy through an understanding of metal-carbon interactions and nanoscale confinement. SWNHs provided a unique material to understand these effects because they are carbon nanomaterials which are synthesized from the 'bottom-up' with well-defined, sub-nm pores and consist of single-layer graphene, rolled up into closed, conical, horn-shaped units which form ball-shaped aggregates of {approx}100-nm diameter. SWNHs were synthesized without metal catalysts by the high-temperature vaporization of solid carbon, so they can be used to explore metal-free hydrogen storage. However, SWNHs can also be decorated with metal nanoparticles or coatings in post-processing treatments to understand how metals augment hydrogen storage. The project first explored how the synthesis and processing of SWNHs could be modified to tailor pore sizes to optimal size ranges. Nanohorns were rapidly synthesized at 20g/hr rates by high-power laser vaporization enabling studies such as neutron scattering with gram quantities. Diagnostics of the synthesis process including high-speed videography, fast pyrometry of the graphite target, and differential mobility analysis monitoring of particle size distributions were applied in this project to provide in situ process control of SWNH morphology, and to understand the conditions for different pore sizes. We conclude that the high-temperature carbon-vaporization process to synthesize SWNHs is scalable, and can be performed by electric arc or other similar techniques as economically as carbon can be vaporized. However, the laser vaporization approach was utilized in this project to permit the precise tuning of the synthesis process through adjustment of the laser pulse width and repetition rate. A result of this processing control in the project was to

  19. Efficient induction of formate hydrogen lyase of aerobically grown Escherichia coli in a three-step biohydrogen production process.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihito; Nishimura, Taku; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2007-03-01

    A three-step biohydrogen production process characterized by efficient anaerobic induction of the formate hydrogen lyase (FHL) of aerobically grown Escherichia coli was established. Using E. coli strain SR13 (fhlA (++), DeltahycA) at a cell density of 8.2 g/l medium in this process, a specific hydrogen productivity (28.0 +/- 5.0 mmol h(-1) g(-1) dry cell) of one order of magnitude lower than we previously reported was realized after 8 h of anaerobic incubation. The reduced productivity was attributed partly to the inhibitory effects of accumulated metabolites on FHL induction. To avoid this inhibition, strain SR14 (SR13 DeltaldhA DeltafrdBC) was constructed and used to the effect that specific hydrogen productivity increased 1.3-fold to 37.4 +/- 6.9 mmol h(-1) g(-1). Furthermore, a maximum hydrogen production rate of 144.2 mmol h(-1) g(-1) was realized when a metabolite excretion system that achieved a dilution rate of 2.0 h(-1) was implemented. These results demonstrate that by avoiding anaerobic cultivation altogether, more economical harvesting of hydrogen-producing cells for use in our biohydrogen process was made possible.

  20. Process stability and microbial community structure in anaerobic hydrogen-producing microflora from food waste containing kimchi.

    PubMed

    Jo, Ji Hye; Jeon, Che Ok; Lee, Dae Sung; Park, Jong Moon

    2007-09-15

    Hydrogen production by the dark fermentation of food wastes is an economic and environmentally friendly technology to produce the clean energy source as well as to treat the problematic wastes. However, the long-term operations of the continuous anaerobic reactor for fermentative hydrogen production were frequently unstable. In this study, the structure of microbial community within the anaerobic reactor during unstable hydrogen production was examined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) techniques. The changes in microbial community from H(2)-producing Clostridium spp. to lactic acid-producing Lactobacillus spp. were well coincident with the unexpected process failures and the changes of metabolites concentrations in the effluent of the anaerobic reactor. As the rate of hydrogen production decreased, effluent lactic acid concentration increased. Low rate of hydrogen production and changes in microbial community were related to the 'kimchi' content and storage temperature of food waste feed solution. After low temperature control of the storage tank of the feed solution, any significant change in microbial community within the anaerobic reactor did not occur and the hydrogen production was very stably maintained for a long time.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMODYNAMICS GOVERNING METAL HYDRIDE SYNTHESIS IN THE MOLTEN STATE PROCESS.

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, A; Polly Berseth, P; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Donald Anton, D

    2007-08-23

    Complex metal hydrides have been synthesized for hydrogen storage through a new synthetic technique utilizing high hydrogen overpressure at elevated temperatures (molten state processing). This synthesis technique holds the potential of fusing different complex hydrides at elevated temperatures and pressures to form new species with enhanced hydrogen storage properties. Formation of these compounds is driven by thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. We report on investigations of the thermodynamics. Novel synthetic complexes were formed, structurally characterized, and their hydrogen desorption properties investigated. The effectiveness of the molten state process is compared with mechanicosynthetic ball milling.

  2. New horizons in chemical propulsion. [processes using free radicals, atomic hydrogen, excited species, etc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, W.

    1973-01-01

    After a review of the work of the late-Fifties on free radicals for propulsion, it is concluded that atomic hydrogen would provide a potentially large increase in specific impulse. Work conducted to find an approach for isolating atomic hydrogen is considered. Other possibilities for obtaining propellants of greatly increased capability might be connected with the technology for the generation of activated states of gases, metallic hydrogen, fuels obtained from other planets, and laser transfer of energy.

  3. Desorption of pyrethroids from suspended solids.

    PubMed

    Fojut, Tessa L; Young, Thomas M

    2011-08-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been widely detected in sediments at concentrations that can cause toxicity to aquatic organisms. Desorption rates play an important role in determining the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds, such as pyrethroids, because these compounds are more likely to be sorbed to solids in the environment, and times to reach sorptive equilibrium can be long. In the present study, sequential Tenax desorption experiments were performed with three sorbents, three aging times, and four pyrethroids. A biphasic rate model was fit to the desorption data with r(2)  > 0.99, and the rapid and slow compartment desorption rate constants and compartment fractions are reported. Suspended solids from irrigation runoff water collected from a field that had been sprayed with permethrin 1 d before were used in the experiments to compare desorption rates for field-applied pyrethroids with those for laboratory-spiked materials. Suspended solids were used in desorption experiments because suspended solids can be a key source of hydrophobic compounds in surface waters. The rapid desorption rate parameters of field-applied permethrin were not statistically different from those of laboratory spiked permethrin, indicating that desorption of the spiked pyrethroids is comparable to desorption of the pyrethroids added and aged in the field. Sorbent characteristics had the greatest effect on desorption rate parameters; as organic carbon content of the solids increased, the rapid desorption fractions and rapid desorption rate constants both decreased. The desorption rate constant of the slow compartment for sediment containing permethrin aged for 28 d was significantly different compared to aging for 1 d and 7 d, whereas desorption in the rapid and slow compartments did not differ between these treatments.

  4. Atomic oxygen diffusion on and desorption from amorphous silicate surfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Jiao; Jing, Dapeng; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-02-28

    Surface reactions involving atomic oxygen have attracted much attention in astrophysics and astrochemistry, but two of the most fundamental surface processes, desorption and diffusion, are not well understood. We studied diffusion and desorption of atomic oxygen on or from amorphous silicate surfaces under simulated interstellar conditions using a radio-frequency dissociated oxygen beam. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments were performed to study the formation of ozone from reaction of atomic and molecular oxygen deposited on the surface of a silicate. It is found that atomic oxygen begins to diffuse significantly between 40 K and 50 K. A rate equation model was used to study the surface kinetics involved in ozone formation experiments. The value of atomic oxygen desorption energy has been determined to be 152 ± 20 meV (1764 ± 232 K). The newly found atomic oxygen desorption energy, which is much higher than the well-accepted value, might explain the discrepancy in abundance of molecular oxygen in space between observations and chemical models.

  5. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively. PMID:26717711

  6. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively.

  7. Hydrogen storage in platinum decorated hydrogen exfoliated graphene sheets by spillover mechanism.

    PubMed

    P, Divya; Ramaprabhu, S

    2014-12-28

    Development of lightweight materials with high hydrogen storage capacities is a great challenge for the hydrogen economy. Here, we report high pressure hydrogen adsorption-desorption studies of platinum-decorated hydrogen-exfoliated graphene sheets (Pt-HEG). Pt-HEG shows a maximum hydrogen uptake capacity of 1.4 wt% at 25 °C and 3 MPa. Analysis of the isosteric heat of adsorption provides evidence of spillover mechanism.

  8. A viable process for producing hydrogen synfuel using nuclear fusion heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, T. R.; Brown, L. C.

    Analytical and costing analyses of a thermochemical water splitting plant powered by a tandem mirror fusion reactor are presented. Design criteria indicated directing high quality steam to the chemical plant, where no liquid metal coolants would be used. Minimal pumping distances for high pressure He, multiple barriers between the neutron-activated blanket and the hydrogen product, and modular construction where possible are necessary. A He-Brayton topping cycle, coupled to a steam-Rankine bottoming cycle are selected. Slightly over 1111 MWt and about 720 MWe could be produced by the plant if all low grade waste heat is directed to the Rankine cycle. SO3 is used with water for the splitting process, then recombined. H2 is siphoned off as a fuel and O2 is delivered to a coal reforming plant. A 30 yr plant life is projected, operating at a 70% thermal efficiency for the splitting process and producing H2 at $10-12/GJ. The plant is expected to become economically viable in the year 2030 if debt financing is available at 12.25% per year.

  9. Low-voltage-exposure-enabled hydrogen silsesquioxane bilayer-like process for three-dimensional nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Quan; Chen, Yiqin; Wang, Yasi; Zheng, Mengjie; Li, Zhiqin; Peng, Wei; Zhou, Yanming; Feng, Bo; Chen, Yifang; Duan, Huigao

    2016-06-01

    We report a bilayer-like electron-beam lithographic process to obtain three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures by using only a single hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) resist layer. The process utilizes the short penetration depth of low-energy (1.5 keV) electron irradiation to first obtain a partially cross-linked HSQ top layer and then uses a high-voltage electron beam (30 keV) to obtain self-aligned undercut (e.g. mushroom-shaped) and freestanding HSQ nanostructures. Based on the well-defined 3D resist patterns, 3D metallic nanostructures were directly fabricated with high fidelity by just depositing a metallic layer. As an example, Ag-coated mushroom-shaped nanostructures were fabricated, which showed lower plasmon resonance damping compared to their planar counterparts. In addition, the undercut 3D nanostructures also enable more reliable lift-off in comparison with the planar nanostructures, with which high-quality silver nanohole arrays were fabricated which show distinct and extraordinary optical transmission in the visible range.

  10. Modeling the Hydrogen-Proton Charge-Exchange Process in Global Heliospheric Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, A.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2015-12-01

    The environment surrounding our Solar System has a vast and dynamic structure. As the Sun rounds the Milky Way galaxy, interstellar dust and gas interact with the Sun's outflow of solar wind. A bubble of hot plasma forms around the Sun due to this interaction, called the heliosphere. In order to understand the structure of the heliosphere, observations and simulations must work in tandem. Within the past decade or so, 3D models of the heliosphere have been developed exhibiting non- symmmetric as well as predicting structures such as the hydrogen wall and the IBEX ribbon. In this poster we explore new ways to compute charge-exchange source terms. The charge-exchange process is the coupling mechanism between the MHD and kinetic theories. The understanding of this process is crucial in order to make valuable predictions. Energy dependant cross section terms will aid in settling non-linear affects coupling the intestellar and solar particles. Through these new ways of computing source terms, resolving fine structures in the plasma in the heliopause may be possible. In addition, other non-trivial situations, such as charge-exchange mediated shocks, may be addressed.

  11. Associative Electron Stimulated Desorption of Neutral CO Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šutara, F.; Matolín, V.

    2001-11-01

    The Electron Stimulated Desorption (ESD) of neutral CO molecules was studied on polycrystalline Ni surface. Combined ESD and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) measurements were used to observe the variations of neutral ESD yield in dependence on CO coverage, containing direct information about the cross section for ESD of neutral CO molecules in relation to various CO adsorption states. The results show evidence of ESD of neutral CO molecules from dissociative adsorption states. The cross section for this associative ESD process is relatively high in comparison with the CO ESD cross section for molecular CO adsorption.

  12. Femtosecond laser pulse induced desorption: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lončarić, Ivor; Alducin, Maite; Saalfrank, Peter; Juaristi, J. Iñaki

    2016-09-01

    In recent simulations of femtosecond laser induced desorption of molecular oxygen from the Ag(110) surface, it has been shown that depending on the properties (depth and electronic environment) of the well in which O2 is adsorbed, the desorption can be either induced dominantly by hot electrons or via excitations of phonons. In this work we explore whether the ratios between the desorption yields from different adsorption wells can be tuned by changing initial surface temperature and laser pulse properties. We show that the initial surface temperature is an important parameter, and that by using low initial surface temperatures the electronically mediated process can be favored. In contrast, laser properties seem to have only a modest influence on the results.

  13. Pulsed UV laser induced desorption of ions from aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David Paul; Helvajian, Henry

    2000-04-01

    A study of pulsed UV laser induced desorption (LID) has been performed on an Al(111) sample. The positive ion desorption was investigated at low laser fluence, in a regime in which the ion yield exhibits a highly non-linear dependence on the laser fluence. The peak of the kinetic energy distribution of the desorbed ions has been measured to be about 15 eV. This result is consistent with the conjecture that the ion departing the metal surface can acquire a kinetic energy kick from a process associated with plasmon annihilation. The Al + ion kinetic energy peak is asymmetric and about 3 eV full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). This experiment indicates that plasmon excitation can play a significant role in laser stimulated desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET).

  14. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  15. Theoretical Design of Thermosyphon for Process Heat Transfer from NGNP to Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely produce electricity and process heat, with both being considered for hydrogen production. To capture nuclear process heat, and transport it to a distant industrial facility requires a high temperature system of heat exchangers, pumps and/or compressors. The heat transfer system is particularly challenging not only due to the elevated temperatures (up to ~ 1300K) and industrial scale power transport (=50 MW), but also due to a potentially large separation distance between the nuclear and industrial plants (100+m) dictated by safety and licensing mandates. The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase thermosyphon heat transfer performance with alkali metals. A thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. In contrast to single-phased forced convective heat transfer via ‘pumping a fluid’, a thermosyphon (also called a wickless heat pipe) transfers heat through the vaporization / condensing process. The condensate is further returned to the hot source by gravity, i.e. without any requirement of pumps or compressors. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. Two-phase heat transfer by a thermosyphon has the advantage of high enthalpy transport that includes the sensible heat of the liquid, the latent heat of vaporization, and vapor superheat. In contrast, single-phase forced convection transports only the sensible heat of the fluid. Additionally, vapor-phase velocities within a thermosyphon are much greater than single-phase liquid velocities within a forced convective loop. Thermosyphon performance can be limited by the sonic limit (choking) or vapor flow and/or by condensate entrainment. Proper thermosyphon requires analysis of both.

  16. Investigation of Iron Oxide Morphology in a Cyclic Redox Water Splitting Process for Hydrogen Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bobek, MM; Stehle, RC; Hahn, DW

    2012-10-23

    A solar fuels generation research program is focused on hydrogen production by means of reactive metal water splitting in a cyclic iron-based redox process. Iron-based oxides are explored as an intermediary reactive material to dissociate water molecules at significantly reduced thermal energies. With a goal of studying the resulting oxide chemistry and morphology, chemical assistance via CO is used to complete the redox cycle. In order to exploit the unique characteristics of highly reactive materials at the solar reactor scale, a monolithic laboratory scale reactor has been designed to explore the redox cycle at temperatures ranging from 675 to 875 K. Using high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), the oxide morphology and the oxide state are quantified, including spatial distributions. These images show the change of the oxide layers directly after oxidation and after reduction. The findings show a significant non-stoichiometric O/Fe gradient in the atomic ratio following oxidation, which is consistent with a previous kinetics model, and a relatively constant, non-stoichiometric O/Fe atomic ratio following reduction.

  17. Dynamics of the fully stripped ion-hydrogen atom charge exchange process in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Wan, Jiang-feng; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Xiao, Guo-qing; Duan, Wen-shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    The plasma screening effects of dense quantum plasmas on charge exchange processes of a fully stripped ion colliding with a hydrogen atom are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The inter-particle interactions are described by the exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. It is found that in weak screening conditions, cross sections increase with the increase of the ionic charge Z. However, in strong screening conditions, the dependence of cross sections on the ionic charge is related to the incident particle energy. At high energies, cross sections show a linear increase with the increase of Z, whereas at low energies, cross sections for Z≥4 become approximately the same. The He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+} impacting charge exchange cross sections in dense quantum plasmas are also compared with those in weakly coupled plasmas. The interactions are described by the static screened Coulomb potential. It is found that for both He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+}, the oscillatory screening effects of dense quantum plasmas are almost negligible in weak screening conditions. However, in strong screening conditions, the oscillatory screening effects enhance the screening effects of dense quantum plasmas, and the enhancement becomes more and more significant with the increase of the screening parameter and the ionic charge.

  18. In situ gasification process for producing product gas enriched in carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Capp, John P.; Bissett, Larry A.

    1978-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an in situ coal gasification process wherein the combustion zone within the underground coal bed is fed with air at increasing pressure to increase pressure and temperature in the combustion zone for forcing product gases and water naturally present in the coal bed into the coal bed surrounding the combustion zone. No outflow of combustion products occurs during the build-up of pressure and temperature in the combustion zone. After the coal bed reaches a temperature of about 2000.degree. F and a pressure in the range of about 100-200 psi above pore pressure the airflow is terminated and the outflow of the combustion products from the combustion zone is initiated. The CO.sub.2 containing gaseous products and the water bleed back into the combustion zone to react endothermically with the hot carbon of the combustion zone to produce a burnable gas with a relatively high hydrogen and carbon monoxide content. About 11 to 29 percent of the gas recovered from the combustion zone is carbon monoxide which is considerably better than the 4 to 10 percent carbon monoxide obtained by employing previously known coal gasification techniques.

  19. Process for producing hydrogen from water using cobalt and barium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, deceased, Donald M.

    1979-01-01

    A thermochemical process for producing hydrogen comprises the step of reacting CoO with BaO or Ba(OH).sub.2 in the presence of steam to produce H.sub.2 and novel double oxides of Ba and Co having the empirical formulas BaCoO.sub.2.33 and Ba.sub.2 CoO.sub.3.33. The double oxide can be reacted with H.sub.2 O to form Co.sub.3 O.sub.4 and Ba(OH).sub.2 which can be recycled to the original reaction. The Co.sub.3 O.sub.4 is converted to CoO by either of two procedures. In one embodiment Co.sub.3 O.sub.4 is heated, preferably in steam, to form CoO. In another embodiment Co.sub.3 O.sub.4 is reacted with aqueous HCl solution to produce CoCl.sub.2 and Cl.sub.2. The CoCl.sub.2 is reacted with H.sub.2 O to form CoO and HCl and the CoO is recycled to the initial reaction step. The Cl.sub.2 can be reacted with H.sub.2 O to produce HCl. HCl can be recycled for reaction with Co.sub.3 O.sub.4.

  20. Novel Magnetically Fluidized Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Renwei; Hahn, David; Klausner, James; Petrasch, Jorg; Mehdizadeh, Ayyoub; Allen, Kyle; Rahmatian, Nima; Stehle, Richard; Bobek, Mike; Al-Raqom, Fotouh; Greek, Ben; Li, Like; Chen, Chen; Singh, Abhishek; Takagi, Midori; Barde, Amey; Nili, Saman

    2013-09-30

    The coal to hydrogen project utilizes the iron/iron oxide looping process to produce high purity hydrogen. The input energy for the process is provided by syngas coming from gasification process of coal. The reaction pathways for this process have been studied and favorable conditions for energy efficient operation have been identified. The Magnetically Stabilized Porous Structure (MSPS) is invented. It is fabricated from iron and silica particles and its repeatable high performance has been demonstrated through many experiments under various conditions in thermogravimetric analyzer, a lab-scale reactor, and a large scale reactor. The chemical reaction kinetics for both oxidation and reduction steps has been investigated thoroughly inside MSPS as well as on the surface of very smooth iron rod. Hydrogen, CO, and syngas have been tested individually as the reducing agent in reduction step and their performance is compared. Syngas is found to be the most pragmatic reducing agent for the two-step water splitting process. The transport properties of MSPS including porosity, permeability, and effective thermal conductivity are determined based on high resolution 3D CT x-ray images obtained at Argonne National Laboratory and pore-level simulations using a lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBE)-based mesoscopic model developed during this investigation. The results of those measurements and simulations provide necessary inputs to the development of a reliable volume-averaging-based continuum model that is used to simulate the dynamics of the redox process in MSPS. Extensive efforts have been devoted to simulate the redox process in MSPS by developing a continuum model consist of various modules for conductive and radiative heat transfer, fluid flow, species transport, and reaction kinetics. Both the Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches for species transport of chemically reacting flow in porous media have been investigated and verified numerically. Both approaches lead to correct

  1. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1991-10-15

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figures.

  2. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1990-08-28

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the producer gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figs.

  3. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the produce gas from coal gasification processes.

  4. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes.

  5. Nonthermal desorption from surfaces of ices and other oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madey, Theodore E.

    2001-03-01

    Non-thermal DIET processes at surfaces (desorption induced by electronic transitions) may affect both terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. One case concerns observations of neutral sodium and potassium vapor in the tenuous atmospheres of the planet Mercury and the Moon, as well as Jupiter's icy satellite, Europa. In a series of model experiments, we find strong evidence that non-thermal processes - mainly photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) by UV photons - play a dominant role in desorption of Na atoms from the lunar surface, and may affect Na and K in the other atmospheres also. The second case involves measurements that may impact on understanding the destruction of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the earth's upper atmosphere, via electron-induced processes on ice particles in polar stratospheric clouds. We observe giant Cl^- and F^- enhancements by several orders of magnitude in electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of a fractional monolayer of CF_2Cl2 coadsorbed with water ice and ammonia ice on a metal surface at ~25 K, respectively. The negative-ion enhancements are attributed to dissociation of CF_2Cl2 by capture of low-energy secondary electrons trapped by coadsorbed polar water or ammonia.

  6. Development of a hydrogen-based annealing process for desulfurization of single crystalline, nickel-based superalloy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.; Mickle, T.H.; Frazier, W.E.; Waldman, J.

    1994-11-05

    The presence of minor amounts of sulfur (1-10 ppm) in nickel-based superalloys has been associated with reduced oxidation resistance and premature spallation of protective coatings. A hydrogen annealing process has been developed by NAWCADWAR which effectively reduces the sulfur content of superalloys. The conditions which allow effective desulfurization are delineated. Diffusion of sulfur through the superalloy is found to be the rate controlling step for the process.

  7. Nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tashlykova-Bushkevich, Iya I.

    2015-12-31

    The present work summarizes recent progress in the investigation of nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys foils produced at exceptionally high cooling rates. We focus here on the potential of modification of hydrogen desorption kinetics in respect to weak and strong trapping sites that could serve as hydrogen sinks in Al materials. It is shown that it is important to elucidate the surface microstructure of the Al alloy foils at the submicrometer scale because rapidly solidified microstructural features affect hydrogen trapping at nanostructured defects. We discuss the profound influence of solute atoms on hydrogen−lattice defect interactions in the alloys. with emphasis on role of vacancies in hydrogen evolution; both rapidly solidified pure Al and conventionally processed aluminum samples are considered.

  8. Integrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aijie; Sun, Dan; Cao, Guangli; Wang, Haoyu; Ren, Nanqi; Wu, Wei-Min; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen gas production from cellulose was investigated using an integrated hydrogen production process consisting of a dark fermentation reactor and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as power sources for a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Two MFCs (each 25 mL) connected in series to an MEC (72 mL) produced a maximum of 0.43 V using fermentation effluent as a feed, achieving a hydrogen production rate from the MEC of 0.48 m(3) H(2)/m(3)/d (based on the MEC volume), and a yield of 33.2 mmol H(2)/g COD removed in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production for the integrated system (fermentation, MFC and MEC) was increased by 41% compared with fermentation alone to 14.3 mmol H(2)/g cellulose, with a total hydrogen production rate of 0.24 m(3) H(2)/m(3)/d and an overall energy recovery efficiency of 23% (based on cellulose removed) without the need for any external electrical energy input.

  9. Degradation of metallic surfaces under space conditions, with particular emphasis on Hydrogen recombination processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznajder, Maciej; Geppert, Ulrich; Dudek, Mirosław

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of metallic structures in space technology brings risk of degradation which occurs under space conditions. New types of materials dedicated for space applications, that have been developed in the last decade, are in majority not well tested for different space mission scenarios. Very little is known how material degradation may affect the stability and functionality of space vehicles and devices during long term space missions. Our aim is to predict how the solar wind and electromagnetic radiation degrade metallic structures. Therefore both experimental and theoretical studies of material degradation under space conditions have been performed. The studies are accomplished at German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Bremen (Germany) and University of Zielona Góra (Poland). The paper presents the results of the theoretical part of those studies. It is proposed that metal bubbles filled with Hydrogen molecular gas, resulting from recombination of the metal free electrons and the solar protons, are formed on the irradiated surfaces. A thermodynamic model of bubble formation has been developed. We study the creation process of H2 -bubbles as function of, inter alia, the metal temperature, proton dose and energy. Our model has been verified by irradiation experiments completed at the DLR facility in Bremen. Consequences of the bubble formation are changes of the physical and thermo-optical properties of such degraded metals. We show that a high surface density of bubbles (up to 108cm-2) with a typical bubble diameter of ∼ 0.4 μm will cause a significant increase of the metallic surface roughness. This may have serious consequences to any space mission. Changes in the thermo-optical properties of metallic foils are especially important for the solar sail propulsion technology because its efficiency depends on the effective momentum transfer from the solar photons onto the sail structure. This transfer is proportional to the reflectivity of a sail. Therefore

  10. Isothermal-desorption-rate measurements in the vicinity of the Curie temperature for H2 chemisorbed on nickel films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the isothermal desorption rate of H2 chemisorbed onto polycrystalline nickel films made for temperatures spanning the Curie temperature of the nickel film are presented. Desorption kinetics were followed by measuring the decay of the change in resistance of the nickel film brought about by hydrogen chemisorption after gas-phase H2 had been rapidly evacuated. The desorption rate is found to undergo an anomalous decrease in the vicinity of the Curie temperature, accompanied by an increase in the desorption activation energy and the equilibrium constant for the chemisorbed hydrogen. The results are interpreted in terms of anomalous variations in rate constants for the formation of the precursor molecular adsorbed state and the chemisorbed atomic state due to the phase transition in the nickel. The changes in rate constants are also considered to be in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions based on a spin coupling between the adatom and the magnetic substrate.

  11. Desorption kinetics of cesium from Fukushima soils.

    PubMed

    Murota, Kento; Saito, Takumi; Tanaka, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the behaviors of Cs(+) in soils is crucial for evaluation of the impacts of disposal of soils contaminated by radiocesium, (137)Cs. The desorption rate of Cs(+) evaluated in relatively short periods of time may not be adequate for such a purpose. In this study, we investigated long-term desorption kinetics of (137)Cs and (133)Cs from soils collected in Fukushima Prefecture by batch desorption experiments in the presence of cation exchange resin as a sorbent. The sorbent can keep the concentration of Cs(+) in the aqueous phase low and prevent re-sorption of desorbed Cs(+). Up to 60% of (137)Cs was desorbed after 139 d in dilute KCl media, which was larger than the desorption by conventional short-term extraction with 1 M ammonium acetate. Desorption of (137)Cs continued even after this period. It was also found that high concentration of K(+) prevented desorption of Cs(+) in the initial stage of desorption, but the effect was alleviated with time. The desorbed fraction of stable Cs was smaller than that of (137)Cs. This indicated that (137)Cs may gradually move to more stable states in soils. The half-life of (137)Cs desorption from the slowest sorption site was estimated to be at least two years by a three-site desorption model. PMID:26773507

  12. Desorption of ciprofloxacin from clay mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingfeng; Li, Zhaohui; Hong, Hanlie; Li, Rongbiao; Jiang, Wei-Teh

    2013-01-01

    Desorption from soil clay components may affect the transport and fate of antibiotics in the environment. In this study, ciprofloxacin (CIP) desorption from a kaolinite and a montmorillonite was investigated under different pHs, different concentrations of metal cations of various valencies (Na(+), Ca(2+) and Al(3+)) and a cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), and different desorption cycles. Desorption of CIP from kaolinite and montmorillonite was strongly pH-dependent and desorption isotherms were well fitted with the Langmuir equation. The percentage of CIP desorbed increased with increasing initial CIP loadings, desorbing cation concentrations, and desorption cycles. Comparatively, CIP was more readily desorbed from kaolinite than from montmorillonite. Moreover, the hysteresis index values were all negative, suggesting that the presence of metal cations and HDTMA in solution promoted CIP desorption from clay minerals, owing to cation exchange. The XRD analyses indicated that desorption of CIP occurred from both external and interlayer surfaces of montmorillonite. Formation of Al-CIP complex on solid surface and then detachment of Al-CIP from the solid surface may contribute to the higher CIP desorption by Al(3+) in comparison to Na(+) and Ca(2+). PMID:23123088

  13. Ni-Si Alloys for the S-I Reactor-Hydrogen Production Process Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph W. Newkirk; Richard K. Brow

    2010-01-21

    The overall goal of this project was to develop Ni-Si alloys for use in vessels to contain hot, pressurized sulfuric acid. The application was to be in the decomposition loop of the thermochemical cycle for production of hydrogen.

  14. The Hy-C process (thermal decomposition of natural gas): Potentially the lowest cost source of hydrogen with the least CO{sub 2} emission

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.

    1994-12-01

    The abundance of natural gas as a natural resource and its high hydrogen content make it a prime candidate for a low cost supply of hydrogen. The thermal decomposition of natural gas by methane pyrolysis produces carbon and hydrogen. The process energy required to produce one mol of hydrogen is only 5.3% of the higher heating value of methane. The thermal efficiency for hydrogen production as a fuel without the use of carbon as a fuel, can be as high as 60%. Conventional steam reforming of methane requires 8.9% process energy per mole of hydrogen even though 4 moles of hydrogen can be produced per mole of methane, compared to 2 moles by methane pyrolysis. When considering greenhouse global gas warming, methane pyrolysis produces the least amount of CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of hydrogen and can be totally eliminated when the carbon produced is either sequestered or sold as a materials commodity, and hydrogen is used to fuel the process. Conventional steam reforming of natural gas and CO shifting produces large amounts of CO{sub 2} emissions. The energy requirement for non-fossil, solar, nuclear, and hydropower production of hydrogen, mainly through electrolysis, is much greater than that from natural gas. From the resource available energy and environmental points of view, production of hydrogen by methane pyrolysis is most attractive. The by-product carbon black, when credited as a saleable material, makes hydrogen by thermal decomposition of natural gas (the Hy-C process) potentially the lowest cost source of large amounts of hydrogen.

  15. Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Process Interface Including the HyPEP Model

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-05-01

    The Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Plant interface is the intermediate heat transport loop that will connect a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) to a thermochemical, high-temperature electrolysis, or hybrid hydrogen production plant. A prototype plant called the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 2018-2021 timeframe, and will involve a VHTR, a high-temperature interface, and a hydrogen production plant. The interface is responsible for transporting high-temperature thermal energy from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant while protecting the nuclear plant from operational disturbances at the hydrogen plant. Development of the interface is occurring under the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) and involves the study, design, and development of high-temperature heat exchangers, heat transport systems, materials, safety, and integrated system models. Research and development work on the system interface began in 2004 and is expected to continue at least until the start of construction of an engineering-scale demonstration plant.

  16. Characteristics of hydrogen and methane production from cornstalks by an augmented two- or three-stage anaerobic fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Lai, Qiheng; Zhang, Chong; Zhao, Hongxin; Ma, Kun; Zhao, Xuebing; Chen, Hongzhang; Liu, Dehua; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents the co-production of hydrogen and methane from cornstalks by a two- or three-stage anaerobic fermentation process augmented with effective artificial microbial community. Two-stage fermentation by using the anaerobic sludge and DGGE analysis showed that effective and stable strains should be introduced into the system. We introduced Enterobacter aerogens or Clostridium paraputrificum into the hydrogen stage, and C. paraputrificum was proven to be more effective. In the three-stage process consisting of the improved hydrolysis, hydrogen and methane production stages, the highest soluble sugars (0.482 kg/kg cornstalks) were obtained after the introduction of Clostridium thermocellum in the hydrolysis stage, under the thermophilic (55 degrees C) and acidic (pH 5.0) conditions. Hydrolysates from 1 kg of cornstalks could produce 2.61 mol (63.7 l) hydrogen by augmentation with C. paraputrificum and 4.69 mol (114.6 l) methane by anaerobic granular sludge, corresponding to 54.1% energy recovery.

  17. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, Eloise A.; Morgan, Peter E. D.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N.sub.n H.sub.(n+m) wherein: n=1-4 and m=2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200.degree.-1700.degree. C. for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si-N-H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics.

  18. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, E.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1987-09-15

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N/sub n/H/sub (n+m)/ wherein: n = 1--4 and m = 2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200--1700/degree/C for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si/endash/N/endash/H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid-state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics

  19. Characterizing the role of desorption in gas production from Devonian shales

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, H.S.; Watson, A.T. ); Lancaster, D.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Previous investigators suggest that more than one half of the gas stored in the Devonian Shales may exist in an adsorbed state. However, adsorption is considered to be an unconventional mode of gas storage and is not often accounted for in conventional reservoir engineering analysis. This article examines the role that desorption may play in gas production from Devonian Shale reservoirs. The results suggest that accounting from gas desorption can have a significant effect on production forecasts and estimates of gas reserves. A methodology is presented for detecting the presence of gas desorption and for estimating the parameters that describe the desorption process from Devonian Shale production data. The accuracy of these parameter estimates and the effects of stimulating the desorption mechanisms are also examined.

  20. [Kinetic characteristics of Cd2+ desorption in minerals and soils under simulated acid rain].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dai-chang; Jiang, Xin; Bian, Yong-rong; Gao, Hong-jian; Jiao, Wen-tao

    2004-07-01

    The kinetic characteristics of Cd2+ desorption in minerals and soils under simulated acid rain were studied by using the flow-stirred method. It showed that Cd2+ desorption could be described by first-order kinetics. Percents of desorption amounts of Cd2+ calculated were 70%-100% in red soil and goethite, and 25%-50% in latosols and kaolinite. Parabolic diffusion could describe Cd2+ desorption kinetics in latosols and not suitable for red soil and goethite and kaolinite. Cd2+ desorption, regarded as a heterogeneous diffusion in minerals and soils, could be fitted by Elovich equation more than Parabolic diffusion and two-constant equation. Cd2+ desorption could be divided into fast reaction and slow reaction. Except for latosols, fast reaction would be over during 60 min and be close to quasi-equilibrium. Adsorption forms of Cd2+ in soil surface could be exchangeable and specific. Fast reaction was relative to easily desorbed Cd2+. The affinity of edge hydroxyl to Cd2+ would lead to the difference of Cd2+ desorption rate and amounts. Increase of pH value in effluent indicated H+ consumption in the processes of Cd2+ desorption.

  1. Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Storage Technology: Fundamental Research for Optimization of Hydrogen Storage and Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Nadavalath, Balakrishnan; Cornelius, Andrew; Hatchett, David; Bae, Chusung; Pang, Tao; Kim, Eunja; Hemmers, Oliver

    2011-03-28

    Design and development of improved low-cost hydrogen fuel cell catalytic materials and high-capacity hydrogenn storage media are paramount to enabling the hydrogen economy. Presently, effective and durable catalysts are mostly precious metals in pure or alloyed form and their high cost inhibits fuel cell applications. Similarly, materials that meet on-board hydrogen storage targets within total mass and volumetric constraints are yet to be found. Both hydrogen storage performance and cost-effective fuel cell designs are intimately linked to the electronic structure, morphology and cost of the chosen materials. The FCAST Project combined theoretical and experimental studies of electronic structure, chemical bonding, and hydrogen adsorption/desorption characteristics of a number of different nanomaterials and metal clusters to develop better fundamental understanding of hydrogen storage in solid state matrices. Additional experimental studies quantified the hydrogen storage properties of synthesized polyaniline(PANI)/Pd composites. Such conducting polymers are especially interesting because of their high intrinsic electron density and the ability to dope the materials with protons, anions, and metal species. Earlier work produced contradictory results: one study reported 7% to 8% hydrogen uptake while a second study reported zero hydrogen uptake. Cost and durability of fuel cell systems are crucial factors in their affordability. Limits on operating temperature, loss of catalytic reactivity and degradation of proton exchange membranes are factors that affect system durability and contribute to operational costs. More cost effective fuel cell components were sought through studies of the physical and chemical nature of catalyst performance, characterization of oxidation and reduction processes on system surfaces. Additional development effort resulted in a new hydrocarbon-based high-performance sulfonated proton exchange membrane (PEM) that can be manufactured at low

  2. A FORTRAN program for modeling methane gas desorption from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, V. U.

    Coal has a strong affinity for methane gas, and the process of gas adsorption (or desorption) is modeled customarily by empirical relations between the amount of gas adsorbed (or desorbed) and time. In this paper, a new and unified theory formulated to depict the process and mechanism of methane gas transport in coal is presented. The theory is validated by conventional sorption tests on cylindrical cores, and its description coded in FORTRAN is presented.

  3. Hydrogen passivation of defects and rapid thermal processing for high-efficiency silicon ribbon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ji-Weon

    2002-01-01

    The use of photovoltaic (PV) system offers a unique opportunity to solve the energy and the environmental problems simultaneously because solar energy is free and can be directly converted into electrical energy by solar cells without any undesirable impact on the environment. In spite of the many advantages, PV still accounts for less than 0.05% of the current U.S. energy portfolio. This is mainly because PV is 2-4 times more expensive than traditional energy sources. PV modules should cost about $1/W to produce electricity at a rate of 6¢/kWh and to compete with fossil fuels. Since Si material accounts for ˜40% of the cost of current Si PV modules, the use of low-cost Si substrate is critical for cost reduction. Edge-defined film-fed grown (EFG) Si ribbon is the focus as substrate materials for this research because it is one of the most promising for low-cost PV. However, as-grown EFG Si has a lot of impurities and crystal defects resulted from the Si feedstock and its growth system, which reduce the bulk lifetime of less than 3 ms. In this research, first, the requirements for achieving 16% efficiency have been established using computer model simulations. To improve the bulk lifetime, manufacturable P and Al gettering techniques are developed to remove the lifetime-killing impurities from the active to inactive device regions. PECVD SiN-induced hydrogen defect passivation is investigated and maximized through the fundamental understanding of the role of Al, the impact of RTP firing, and the difference between two PECVD SiN films. For low-cost contact formation, a novel RTP firing process is developed for high-quality screen-printed contacts and Al-BSF. Finally, a complete process sequence that involves the optimal conditions for defect passivation and contacts is developed to produce ˜16% efficiency on screen-printed EFG Si solar cells, which is the highest efficiency for any screen-printed Si ribbon solar cells to date.

  4. The Validation of Vapor Phase Hydrogen Peroxide Microbial Reduction for Planetary Protection and a Proposed Vacuum Process Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack; Kern, Roger; Koukol, Robert; Cash, Howard

    2006-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in conjunction with the NASA Planetary Protection Officer, has selected the vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for continued development as a NASA approved sterilization technique for spacecraft subsystems and systems. The goal is to include this technique, with an appropriate specification, in NPR 8020.12C as a low temperature complementary technique to the dry heat sterilization process.To meet microbial reduction requirements for all Mars in-situ life detection and sample return missions, various planetary spacecraft subsystems will have to be exposed to a qualified sterilization process. This process could be the elevated temperature dry heat sterilization process (115 C for 40 hours) which was used to sterilize the Viking lander spacecraft. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements.The VHP process is widely used by the medical industry to sterilize surgical instruments and biomedical devices, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material properties. Our goal for this study was to determine the minimum VHP process conditions to achieve microbial reduction levels acceptable for planetary protection.

  5. Autowave process of the localized plastic deformation of high-chromium steel saturated with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkareva, A. V.; Barannikova, S. A.; Li, Yu V.; Lunev, A. G.; Zuev, L. B.

    2016-06-01

    The deformation behavior of high-chromium stainless steel of sorbitic structure upon high-temperature tempering and of electrically saturated with hydrogen in the electrochemical cell during 12 hours is investigated. The stress-strain curves for each state were obtained. From the stress-strain curves, one can conclude that hydrogen markedly reduces the elongation to the fracture of specimen. Using double-exposed speckle photography method it was found that the plastic flow of the material is of a localized character. The pattern distribution of localized plastic flow domains at the linear hardening stage was investigated. Comparative study of autowave parameters was carried out for the tempered steel as well as the electrically saturated with hydrogen steel.

  6. Thermal Programmed Desorption of C32 H 66

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisternas, M.; Del Campo, V.; Cabrera, A. L.; Volkmann, U. G.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.

    2011-03-01

    Alkanes are of interest as prototypes for more complex molecules and membranes. In this work we study the desorption kinetics of dotriacontane C32 adsorbed on Si O2 /Si substrate. We combine in our instrument High Resolution Ellipsometry (HRE) and Thermal Programmed Desorption (TPD). C32 monolayers were deposited in high vacuum from a Knudsen cell on the substrate, monitorizing sample thickness in situ with HRE. Film thickness was in the range of up to 100 AA, forming a parallel bilayer and perpendicular C32 layer. The Mass Spectrometer (RGA) of the TPD section was detecting the shift of the desorption peaks at different heating rates applied to the sample. The mass registered with the RGA was AMU 57 for parallel and perpendicular layers, due to the abundance of this mass value in the disintegration process of C32 in the mass spectrometers ionizer. Moreover, the AMU 57 signal does not interfere with other signals coming from residual gases in the vacuum chamber. The desorption energies obtained were ΔEdes = 11,9 kJ/mol for the perpendicular bilayer and ΔEdes = 23 ,5 kJ/mol for the parallel bilayer.

  7. Adsorption and desorption kinetics of carbofuran in acid soils.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Pateiro-Moure, Miriam; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Simal-Gándara, Jesús; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2011-06-15

    Carbofuran adsorption and desorption were investigated in batch and stirred flow chamber (SFC) tests. The carbofuran adsorption capacity of the soils was found to be low and strongly dependent on their clay and organic carbon contents. Carbofuran sorption was due mainly (>80%) to fast adsorption processes governed by intraparticle diffusion. The adsorption kinetic constant for the pesticide ranged from 0.047 to 0.195 min(-1) and was highly correlated with constant n in the Freundlich equation (r=0.965, P<0.05). Batch tests showed carbofuran desorption to be highly variable and negatively correlated with eCEC and the clay content. The SFC tests showed that soil organic carbon (C) plays a key role in the irreversibility of carbofuran adsorption. Carbofuran desorption increased rapidly at C contents below 4%. The desorption kinetic constant for the compound (0.086-0.195 min(-1)) was generally higher than its adsorption kinetic constant; therefore, carbofuran is more rapidly desorbed than it is adsorbed in soil.

  8. Temperature Dependence in Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, T. F.; Misewich, J. A.

    1996-03-01

    The process of desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) is a subject of great theoretical and experimental interest. We have extended the classic MGR model for DIET to include initial thermal excitation of the adsorbate. In the MGR model, an electronic transition causes the adsorbate to move on excited potential energy surface. Desorption ensues whenever the adsorbate stays in the excited state long enough to acquire the necessary energy to escape from the surface. At finite temperatures, the initial transition occurs from a distribution of ground-state vibrational energies and momenta. Compared with the zero temperature desorption yield some components of the finite-temperature distribution will have enhanced yields while others will have suppressed yields. Averaging over the initial distribution, we find that the desorption yield increases substantially with temperature, particularly for short excited-state lifetimes. These findings and their extension to the multiple excitation regime are relevant to understanding the long-time scale response observed in femtosecond two-pulse correlation measurements of O_2/Pd(111). J. A. Misewich et al., J. Chem. Phys. 100, 736 (1994)

  9. Evaluation of aeration pretreatment to prepare an inoculum for the two-stage hydrogen and methane production process.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Andrea; Sarli, Valentina; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Spagni, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the effect of aeration pretreatment to prepare an inoculum for H₂ and CH₄ production in a two-stage process. Moreover, the biochemical hydrogen potential and biochemical methane potential of waste from the food industry in a two-stage process was assessed. The results confirmed the possibility of using an aerobic stress for selecting a hydrogen-producing inoculum. The inoculum was fairly stable since no hydrogenotrophic-methanogenic activity was observed in 25 days. The yields measured using glucose as substrate were of approximately 160 and 280 N mL(H₂) g(COD⁻¹) of glucose for hydrogen and methane, respectively, which are in agreement with other studies using heat-shock for the pretreatment of the inoculum. When waste of the food industry (wheat milling) was used as substrate, a lower H₂ yield was achieved by the aerobically-pretreated inoculum if compared to heat-shock; however, when combined with methane production in a two-stage process, much higher CH₄ yield was achieved. PMID:24908606

  10. A soil-column gas chromatography (SCGC) approach to explore the thermal desorption behavior of hydrocarbons from soils.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Liu, Liang; Shao, Ziying; Ju, Tianyu; Sun, Bing; Benadda, Belkacem

    2016-01-01

    A soil-column gas chromatography approach was developed to simulate the mass transfer process of hydrocarbons between gas and soil during thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction (T-SVE). Four kinds of hydrocarbons-methylbenzene, n-hexane, n-decane, and n-tetradecane-were flowed by nitrogen gas. The retention factor k' and the tailing factor T f were calculated to reflect the desorption velocities of fast and slow desorption fractions, respectively. The results clearly indicated two different mechanisms on the thermal desorption behaviors of fast and slow desorption fractions. The desorption velocity of fast desorption fraction was an exponential function of the reciprocal of soil absolute temperature and inversely correlated with hydrocarbon's boiling point, whereas the desorption velocity of slow desorption fraction was an inverse proportional function of soil absolute temperature, and inversely proportional to the log K OW value of the hydrocarbons. The higher activation energy of adsorption was found on loamy soil with higher organic content. The increase of carrier gas flow rate led to a reduction in the apparent activation energy of adsorption of slow desorption fraction, and thus desorption efficiency was significantly enhanced. The obtained results are of practical interest for the design of high-efficiency T-SVE system and may be used to predict the remediation time.

  11. A soil-column gas chromatography (SCGC) approach to explore the thermal desorption behavior of hydrocarbons from soils.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Liu, Liang; Shao, Ziying; Ju, Tianyu; Sun, Bing; Benadda, Belkacem

    2016-01-01

    A soil-column gas chromatography approach was developed to simulate the mass transfer process of hydrocarbons between gas and soil during thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction (T-SVE). Four kinds of hydrocarbons-methylbenzene, n-hexane, n-decane, and n-tetradecane-were flowed by nitrogen gas. The retention factor k' and the tailing factor T f were calculated to reflect the desorption velocities of fast and slow desorption fractions, respectively. The results clearly indicated two different mechanisms on the thermal desorption behaviors of fast and slow desorption fractions. The desorption velocity of fast desorption fraction was an exponential function of the reciprocal of soil absolute temperature and inversely correlated with hydrocarbon's boiling point, whereas the desorption velocity of slow desorption fraction was an inverse proportional function of soil absolute temperature, and inversely proportional to the log K OW value of the hydrocarbons. The higher activation energy of adsorption was found on loamy soil with higher organic content. The increase of carrier gas flow rate led to a reduction in the apparent activation energy of adsorption of slow desorption fraction, and thus desorption efficiency was significantly enhanced. The obtained results are of practical interest for the design of high-efficiency T-SVE system and may be used to predict the remediation time. PMID:26335523

  12. Modeling of a Novel Desorption Cycle by Dielectric Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumja, M.; Ng, K. C.; Yap, C.; Yanagi, H.; Koyama, S.; Saha, B. B.; Chakraborty, A.

    The paper presents an adsorption cycle for cooling using the dielectric heating method for the regeneration process. Conventional adsorption (AD) chillers employs thermally driven processes for desorption and adsorption where the thermal resistances are high, resulting in a relatively low chiller COP. In this paper, dielectric heating is used to irradiate where the microwave power vibrates the dipole structure of the molecules. Owing to the direct method of energy delivery, the heating process is thus efficient, contributing to an increase in the chiller performance and the COPs. We present the modeling and simulations of the adsorption-desorption cycle in an AD chiller, demonstrating a significant improvement in chiller performance by as much as three folds.

  13. Adsorption and Thermal Processing of Glycolaldehyde, Methyl Formate, and Acetic Acid on Graphite at 20 K.

    PubMed

    Burke, Daren J; Puletti, Fabrizio; Woods, Paul M; Viti, Serena; Slater, Ben; Brown, Wendy A

    2015-07-01

    We present the first detailed comparative study of the adsorption and thermal processing of the three astrophysically important C2O2H4 isomers glycolaldehyde, methyl formate, and acetic acid adsorbed on a graphitic grain analogue at 20 K. The ability of the individual molecule to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds is extremely important, dictating the growth modes of the ice on the surface and the measured desorption energies. Methyl formate forms only weak intermolecular bonds and hence wets the graphite surface, forming monolayer, bilayer, and multilayer ices, with the multilayer having a desorption energy of 35 kJ mol(-1). In contrast, glycolaldehyde and acetic acid dewet the surface, forming clusters even at the very lowest coverages. The strength of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding for glycolaldehyde and acetic acid is reflected in their desorption energies (46.8 and 55 kJ mol(-1), respectively), which are comparable to those measured for other hydrogen-bonded species such as water. Infrared spectra show that all three isomers undergo structural changes as a result of thermal processing. In the case of acetic acid and glycolaldehyde, this can be assigned to the formation of well-ordered, crystalline, structures where the molecules form chains of hydrogen-bonded moieties. The data reported here are of relevance to astrochemical studies of hot cores and star-forming regions and can be used to model desorption from interstellar ices during the warm up phase with particular importance for complex organic molecules.

  14. Hydrogen and methoxy coadsorption in the computation of the catalytic conversion of methanol on the ceria (111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beste, Ariana; Overbury, Steven H.

    2016-06-01

    Methanol decomposition to formaldehyde catalyzed by the ceria (111) surface was investigated using the DFT + U method. Our results rationalize experimental temperature programmed desorption experiments on the fully oxidized surface. Particular attention was paid to the effect of coadsorption of methoxy and hydrogen on various aspects of the conversion process. This issue had been raised by the experimental observation of water desorption at low temperature removing hydrogen from the system. Within this context, we also investigated hydrogen diffusion on the ceria surface. The hydrogen/methoxy interaction on ceria was shown to be ionic regardless of separation distance. The barrier for dehydrogenation of methoxy using the ionic model system, where hydrogen is coadsorbed, is above 1 eV. This barrier becomes negligible if an incorrect neutral model without coadsorbed hydrogen is employed. While water formation from isolated surface hydrogen is unlikely at low temperature, the presence of coadsorbed methoxy reduces the reaction energy for water formation considerably. For the dehydrated surface, we observed that the preference of the electron to locate at the methoxy oxygen instead of the cerium atom results in a surface that does not contain Ce3 + ions, despite the existence of a vacancy.

  15. The oxidized soot surface: Theoretical study of desorption mechanisms involving oxygenated functionalities and comparison with temperature programed desorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barco, Gianluca; Maranzana, Andrea; Ghigo, Giovanni; Causà, Mauro; Tonachini, Glauco

    2006-11-01

    The desorption mechanism for oxygenated functionalities on soot is investigated by quantum mechanical calculations on functionalized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) models and compared with recently published temperature programed desorption-mass spectrometry results. Substituents on PAHs of increasing size (up to 46 carbon atoms in the parent PAH) are chosen to reproduce the local features of an oxidized graphenic soot platelet. Initially, the study is carried out on unimolecular fragmentation (extrusion, in some cases) processes producing HO, CO, or CO2, in model ketones, carboxylic acids, lactones, anhydrides, in one aldehyde, one peroxyacid, one hydroperoxide, one secondary alcohol, and one phenol. Then, a bimolecular process is considered for one of the carboxylic acids. Furthermore, some cooperative effect which can take place by involving two vicinal carboxylic groups (derived from anhydride hydrolysis) is investigated for other four bifunctionalized models. The comparison between the computed fragmentation (desorption) barriers for the assessed mechanisms and the temperature at which maxima occur in TPD spectra (for HO, CO, or CO2 desorption) offers a suggestion for the assignment of these maxima to specific functional groups, i.e., a key to the description of the oxidized surface. Notably, the computations suggest that (1) the desorption mode from a portion of a graphenic platelet functionalized by a carboxylic or lactone groups is significantly dependent from the chemical and geometric local environment. Consequently, we propose that (2) not all carboxylic groups go lost at the relatively low temperatures generally stated, and (3) lactone groups can be identified as producing not only CO2 but also CO.

  16. Process of converting wind energy to elemental hydrogen and apparatus therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, R.E.

    1982-06-15

    A system is described for the conversion of the energy in the wind over oceanic regions into hydrogen which can be used as a supplement to or replacement for fossil fuels. The system is based on the use of modified sailing vessels which serve as water electrolysis plants. In operation, the wind propels the vessel through the water in the manner common to all sailing vessels except that the vessel in this system does not carry a mast and does not need the ballasting characteristic of conventional sailcraft. The propulsion of the vessel causes an immersed screw propeller to power an electromagnetic generator, the electric current from which electrolytically decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen is stored on board the vessel by allowing it to combine with suitable metal alloys such as the Fe-Ti alloys to form a hydride. The metal alloy hydride is stored in cannisters which are allowed to desorb their hydrogen at sea for use as a fuel source, or alternatively may be discharged ashore through pipelines at suitable intervals.

  17. Process for producing methane from gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. While carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having hydrogen or water present therein can be used only the carbon monoxide available after reaction with said hydrogen or water is decomposed to form said active surface carbon. Although hydrogen or water will be converted, partially or completely, to methane that can be utilized in a combustion zone to generate heat for steam production or other energy recovery purposes, said hydrogen is selectively removed from a CO--H.sub.2 -containing feed stream by partial oxidation thereof prior to disproportionation of the CO content of said stream.

  18. Ultralow field emission from thinned, open-ended, and defected carbon nanotubes by using microwave hydrogen plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian-Hua; Cheng, Lin; Wang, Fan-Jie; Yu, Bin; Li, Guo-Zheng; Li, De-Jun; Cheng, Guo-An

    2015-01-01

    Ultralow field emission is achieved from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by using microwave hydrogen plasma processing. After the processing, typical capped CNT tips are removed, with thinned, open-ended, and defected CNTs left. Structural analyses indicate that the processed CNTs have more SP3-hybridized defects as compared to the pristine ones. The morphology of CNTs can be readily controlled by adjusting microwave powers, which change the shape of CNTs by means of hydrogen plasma etching. Processed CNTs with optimal morphology are found to have an ultralow turn-on field of 0.566 V/μm and threshold field of 0.896 V/μm, much better than 0.948 and 1.559 V/μm of the as-grown CNTs, respectively. This improved FE performance is ascribed to the structural changes of CNTs after the processing. The thinned and open-ended shape of CNTs can facilitate electron tunneling through barriers and additionally, the increased defects at tube walls can serve as new active emission sites. Furthermore, our plasma processed CNTs exhibit excellent field emission stability at a large emission current density of 10.36 mA/cm2 after being perfectly aged, showing promising prospects in applications as high-performance vacuum electron sources.

  19. Production of xylitol and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol from xylan in napier grass by a hydrothermal process with phosphorus oxoacids followed by aqueous phase hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Takata, Eri; Tsuruoka, Tatsushi; Tsutsumi, Ken; Tsutsumi, Yuji; Tabata, Kenji

    2014-09-01

    The production of xylitol and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA) from napier grass was studied using two steps: a hydrothermal process with phosphorus oxoacids followed by aqueous phase hydrogenation with Pd/C. Xylose obtained from the napier grass by the hydrothermal treatment with 3.0 wt% phosphorous acid was subsequently converted into xylitol at 51.6% yield of the xylan in napier grass by hydrogenation with 5.0 wt% Pd/C. The furfural produced from napier grass with a 3.0 wt% phosphoric acid treatment was also directly subjected to the hydrogenation as a hydrolysate to yield 41.4% THFA based on the xylan in napier grass. The yields of xylitol and THFA obtained by hydrogenation using the napier grass hydrolysate containing xylose or furfural were almost the same as those of hydrogenation using commercial materials. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the production of THFA in high yield by hydrogenation directly from biomass hydrolysate.

  20. Processing real-world waste plastics by pyrolysis-reforming for hydrogen and high-value carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunfei; Nahil, Mohamad A; Miskolczi, Norbert; Huang, Jun; Williams, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    Producing both hydrogen and high-value carbon nanotubes (CNTs) derived from waste plastics is reported here using a pyrolysis-reforming technology comprising a two-stage reaction system, in the presence of steam and a Ni-Mn-Al catalyst. The waste plastics consisted of plastics from a motor oil container (MOC), commercial waste high density polyethylene (HDPE) and regranulated HDPE waste containing polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The results show that hydrogen can be produced from the pyrolysis-reforming process, but also carbon nanotubes are formed on the catalyst. However, the content of 0.3 wt.% polyvinyl chloride in the waste HDPE (HDPE/PVC) has been shown to poison the catalyst and significantly reduce the quantity and purity of CNTs. The presence of sulfur has shown less influence on the production of CNTs in terms of quantity and CNT morphologies. Around 94.4 mmol H2 g(-1) plastic was obtained for the pyrolysis-reforming of HDPE waste in the presence of the Ni-Mn-Al catalyst and steam at a reforming temperature of 800 °C. The addition of steam in the process results in an increase of hydrogen production and reduction of carbon yield; in addition, the defects of CNTs, for example, edge dislocations were found to be increased with the introduction of steam (from Raman analysis).

  1. Processing real-world waste plastics by pyrolysis-reforming for hydrogen and high-value carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunfei; Nahil, Mohamad A; Miskolczi, Norbert; Huang, Jun; Williams, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    Producing both hydrogen and high-value carbon nanotubes (CNTs) derived from waste plastics is reported here using a pyrolysis-reforming technology comprising a two-stage reaction system, in the presence of steam and a Ni-Mn-Al catalyst. The waste plastics consisted of plastics from a motor oil container (MOC), commercial waste high density polyethylene (HDPE) and regranulated HDPE waste containing polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The results show that hydrogen can be produced from the pyrolysis-reforming process, but also carbon nanotubes are formed on the catalyst. However, the content of 0.3 wt.% polyvinyl chloride in the waste HDPE (HDPE/PVC) has been shown to poison the catalyst and significantly reduce the quantity and purity of CNTs. The presence of sulfur has shown less influence on the production of CNTs in terms of quantity and CNT morphologies. Around 94.4 mmol H2 g(-1) plastic was obtained for the pyrolysis-reforming of HDPE waste in the presence of the Ni-Mn-Al catalyst and steam at a reforming temperature of 800 °C. The addition of steam in the process results in an increase of hydrogen production and reduction of carbon yield; in addition, the defects of CNTs, for example, edge dislocations were found to be increased with the introduction of steam (from Raman analysis). PMID:24283272

  2. Numerical simulation of impurity desorption induced by nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Yinsheng; Lin Xiaohui; Chen Minhua; Chen Yunfei

    2006-08-01

    A model based on a stochastic process was developed to study the impurity molecule desorption from a substrate induced by nanosecond and femtosecond lasers. The dynamics of adsorbed molecules irradiated by the laser pulses can be considered to be a Brownian motion in the bath of excited energy carriers. A two-step model was used to describe the nonequilibrium heating process induced by the femtosecond laser pulses. The difference between the desorption processes induced by nanosecond and femtosecond lasers was discussed based on the numerical results for the desorption of CO molecules from a Ru surface. Results indicate that the femtosecond laser is a much better tool for desorption than the nanosecond laser.

  3. The adsorption of atomic hydrogen on tellurium and formation of H 2Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outka, Duane A.

    1990-09-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen on a polycrystalline tellurium surface has been studied with temperature programmed desorption. Atomic hydrogen adsorbs on a tellurium surface and reacts to form H 2Te. Molecular hydrogen, in contrast, does not adsorb or react with tellurium at temperatures down to 80 K. When a tellurium surface which has been exposed to atomic hydrogen is heated, two desorption products are observed, H 2 and H 2Te. The H 2Te desorbs in three peaks at 130, 150, and 270 K. The H 2 desorbs in two peaks at 150 and 270 K. The desorption peaks at 270 K for both H 2 and H 2Te are unusually broad with a half-width of 80 K, and standard kinetic analysis of these peaks yields unusual desorption parameters. Overall, the adsorption of hydrogen on tellurium is similar to hydrogen adsorption on other covalent solids and differs in several respects from hydrogen adsorbed on metal surfaces.

  4. A New Approach to Simulate the Kinetics of Metal Desorption from Mineral Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Powell, B. A.; Kersting, A. B.; Zavarin, M.

    2010-12-01

    The relevance of colloid-facilitated metal transport is largely dependent on metal sorption/desorption kinetics and the degree of reversibility of metal surface binding. Thus, transport predictions need to incorporate modeling concepts that can simulate time- and history-dependent surface processes on the microscale. In this study, we characterized the sorption and desorption kinetics of neptunium(V) reactions on goethite in a flow-cell experiment. Modeling was used to evaluate differences between sorption and desorption kinetics in terms of aging, hysteresis, and ‘irreversible’ sorption. First, aging represents a series of surface-chemical processes on the microscale that lead to changes in contaminant surface speciation over time. Second, hysteresis effects indicate fundamental, chemical differences in the microscopic pathways of reactions for net sorption and desorption processes. Both phenomena may result in a sorbed contaminant fraction that is not readily available for exchange with the solution phase (apparent irreversible sorption). Most currently available kinetic sorption/desorption models incorporate fundamental changes in adsorption and desorption behavior indirectly, e.g., by postulating surface sites with different kinetic rates or ‘irreversible’ sorption behavior. We propose a new approach that allows for the specific incorporation of changes in overall reaction pathways for (ad)sorption and desorption processes. Based on experimental results, observed rates for Np(V) desorption from goethite are substantially slower than for (ad)sorption processes. Differences in metal sorption and desorption kinetics can be simulated with a minimum number of fitting parameters by combining isotherm-based sorption rate laws with a modeling concept related to transition state theory (TST). This concept is based on the assumption that changes in reaction pathways for (ad)sorption and desorption processes lead to differences in overall driving forces and

  5. A statistical study on in vivo sorption and desorption of water in ichthyosis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, S; Gupta, A B

    1994-02-01

    Experiments on the variation of electrical conductance on sorption and desorption of water were performed on the skin of 34 subjects: 17 ichthyosis vulgaris patients and 17 normal subjects, matched for age and gender, under different ambient conditions. An exponential model of the form ft = theta oe theta t, where ft denotes fractional conductance at time t, describes the process of desorption with high accuracy. The parameter theta, identifiable as the rate of desorption, is significantly different between the ichthyotic and normal populations. The study discusses the impaired barrier function of the ichthyotic skin.

  6. First-principles calculations of helium and neon desorption from cavities in silicon.

    PubMed

    Eddin, A Charaf; Pizzagalli, L

    2012-05-01

    Combining density functional theory, the nudged elastic band technique, and the ultradense fluid model, we investigated the desorption process of He and Ne in silicon. Our results show that the internal surfaces of gas-filled bubbles are not a limiting factor during desorption experiments, since the surface reconstruction opens diffusion paths easier than in the bulk. We show that the vibrational contribution to the energy of helium in the bulk has to be considered in order to determine realistic pressures in the bubbles, when comparing experiments and simulations. At the maximum of desorption, an average pressure of 1-2 GPa is computed.

  7. Process for generation of hydrogen gas from various feedstocks using thermophilic bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Ooteghem, Suellen Van

    2005-09-13

    A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45.degree. C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

  8. Process for Generation of Hydrogen Gas from Various Feedstocks Using Thermophilic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ooteghem Van, Suellen

    2005-09-13

    A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45 degrees C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

  9. Formation of Molecular Hydrogen in the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidali, Gianfranco; Pirronello, V.; Biham, O.

    2008-05-01

    The ubiquitous presence of molecular hydrogen in very different environments of the interstellar medium (from diffuse to dark clouds and photodissociating regions) poses considerable challenges in explaining its formation. In these environments, it is believed that molecular hydrogen forms on dust grains, but the understanding of the actual processes and rates leading to its formation is unsatisfactory. I'll describe the type of information that can be extracted from carefully designed experiments and how experimentally determined physical parameters are used in theoretical calculations to yield molecular hydrogen formation rates in actual ISM environments. Our most recent investigation on the recombination reaction of hydrogen atoms on amorphous silicates1,2 reveals the importance of understanding and quantifying the basic physical-chemical processes at grain surfaces. This work was supported by NASA through NASA NNG06GD84G, and NSF AST-0507405 (G.V.), by the Israel Science Foundation and the Adler Foundation for Space Research (Ofer Biham), and by the Italian Ministry for University and Scientific Research through Grant 21043088 (Valerio Pirronello) 1. H.B.Perets, A.Lederhendler, O.Biham, G.Vidali, L. Li, S.Swords, E.Congiu, J. Roser, G.Manico', J.R.Brucato, V.Pirronello: "Molecular Hydrogen Formation on Amorphous Silicates Under Interstellar Conditions" Ap.J. 661, L163 (2007). 2. G.Vidali, V.Pirronello, L.Li, J.Roser, G.Manico', H.Mehl, A.Lederhendler, H.B.Perets, J.R.Brucato, and O.Biham: "Analysis of Molecular Hydrogen Formation on Low Temperature Surfaces in Temperature Programmed Desorption Experiments", J.Phys.Chem. A, 111, 12611 (2007).

  10. Heavy metal desorption kinetic as affected by of anions complexation onto manganese dioxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Muhammad Iqbal; Mustafa, Syed; Khan, Sadullah; Xing, Baoshan

    2009-10-01

    Oxides of Fe, Al, and Mn have been studied extensively for heavy metals fixation in soil. However, little is known about the effect of anions on the desorption processes of these metals, especially from manganese dioxide. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of residence time, temperature, and interacting anions on desorption of Pb(2+), Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) from MnO(2). MnO(2) was characterized by different experimental techniques prior to desorption studies. The sorption-desorption studies were conducted for Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Cd(2+) ions in the presence of different electrolytes and at different temperature in the range 293-323 K. For all the sorption experiments, Pb(2+) sorption was the greatest and almost 100% sorption occurred in the presence of 0.001 M potassium phosphate. The sorption of metals under investigation followed the order Pb(2+)>Cu(2+)>Cd(2+), whereas the desorption order was Cd(2+)>Cu(2+)>Pb(2+) in 0.01 M potassium nitrate and sulphate. Only a small quantity of desorbed Pb was detected, even at the low value of pH 3. These results indicated the stability of lead phosphate precipitates or that phosphate treatment imparted stability to the ternary complexes formed at the MnO(2) surface. The detailed desorption kinetics were conducted only for Cd(2+) in 0.01 M potassium nitrate or 0.001 M phosphate at pH values of 3 and 4 in the temperature range 303-323 K. A substantial decrease in Cd(2+) desorption was noted with increasing pH and temperature and the desorption process reached equilibration in 3h at pH 4. However, at pH 3 the desorption fluctuated, which is probably due the dissolution of the solid at such low pH values.

  11. Modeling of biomass to hydrogen via the supercritical water pyrolysis process

    SciTech Connect

    Divilio, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    A heat transfer model has been developed to predict the temperature profile inside the University of Hawaii`s Supercritical Water Reactor. A series of heat transfer tests were conducted on the University of Hawaii`s apparatus to calibrate the model. Results of the model simulations are shown for several of the heat transfer tests. Tests with corn starch and wood pastes indicated that there are substantial differences between the thermal properties of the paste compared to pure water, particularly near the pseudo critical temperature. The assumption of constant thermal diffusivity in the temperature range of 250 to 450 C gave a reasonable prediction of the reactor temperatures when paste is being fed. A literature review is presented for pyrolysis of biomass in water at elevated temperatures up to the supercritical range. Based on this review, a global reaction mechanism is proposed. Equilibrium calculations were performed on the test results from the University of Hawaii`s Supercritical Water Reactor when corn starch and corn starch and wood pastes were being fed. The calculations indicate that the data from the reactor falls both below and above the equilibrium hydrogen concentrations depending on test conditions. The data also indicates that faster heating rates may be beneficial to the hydrogen yield. Equilibrium calculations were also performed to examine the impact of wood concentration on the gas mixtures produced. This calculation showed that increasing wood concentrations favors the formation of methane at the expense of hydrogen.

  12. Potential for green microalgae to produce hydrogen, pharmaceuticals and other high value products in a combined process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Green microalgae for several decades have been produced for commercial exploitation, with applications ranging from health food for human consumption, aquaculture and animal feed, to coloring agents, cosmetics and others. Several products from green algae which are used today consist of secondary metabolites that can be extracted from the algal biomass. The best known examples are the carotenoids astaxanthin and β-carotene, which are used as coloring agents and for health-promoting purposes. Many species of green algae are able to produce valuable metabolites for different uses; examples are antioxidants, several different carotenoids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, anticancer and antiviral drugs. In many cases, these substances are secondary metabolites that are produced when the algae are exposed to stress conditions linked to nutrient deprivation, light intensity, temperature, salinity and pH. In other cases, the metabolites have been detected in algae grown under optimal conditions, and little is known about optimization of the production of each product, or the effects of stress conditions on their production. Some green algae have shown the ability to produce significant amounts of hydrogen gas during sulfur deprivation, a process which is currently studied extensively worldwide. At the moment, the majority of research in this field has focused on the model organism, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, but other species of green algae also have this ability. Currently there is little information available regarding the possibility for producing hydrogen and other valuable metabolites in the same process. This study aims to explore which stress conditions are known to induce the production of different valuable products in comparison to stress reactions leading to hydrogen production. Wild type species of green microalgae with known ability to produce high amounts of certain valuable metabolites are listed and linked to species with ability to produce hydrogen

  13. Potential for green microalgae to produce hydrogen, pharmaceuticals and other high value products in a combined process.

    PubMed

    Skjånes, Kari; Rebours, Céline; Lindblad, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Green microalgae for several decades have been produced for commercial exploitation, with applications ranging from health food for human consumption, aquaculture and animal feed, to coloring agents, cosmetics and others. Several products from green algae which are used today consist of secondary metabolites that can be extracted from the algal biomass. The best known examples are the carotenoids astaxanthin and β-carotene, which are used as coloring agents and for health-promoting purposes. Many species of green algae are able to produce valuable metabolites for different uses; examples are antioxidants, several different carotenoids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, anticancer and antiviral drugs. In many cases, these substances are secondary metabolites that are produced when the algae are exposed to stress conditions linked to nutrient deprivation, light intensity, temperature, salinity and pH. In other cases, the metabolites have been detected in algae grown under optimal conditions, and little is known about optimization of the production of each product, or the effects of stress conditions on their production. Some green algae have shown the ability to produce significant amounts of hydrogen gas during sulfur deprivation, a process which is currently studied extensively worldwide. At the moment, the majority of research in this field has focused on the model organism, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, but other species of green algae also have this ability. Currently there is little information available regarding the possibility for producing hydrogen and other valuable metabolites in the same process. This study aims to explore which stress conditions are known to induce the production of different valuable products in comparison to stress reactions leading to hydrogen production. Wild type species of green microalgae with known ability to produce high amounts of certain valuable metabolites are listed and linked to species with ability to produce hydrogen

  14. Desorption kinetics of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal fines and coal contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Shorten, C.V.

    1989-01-01

    Batch with fluid replacement (BFR) and time resolved leaching (TRL) methods were developed to determine the desorption kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coal fines and coal contaminated sediments using various organic solvent/water mixtures. The two techniques were relatively comparable, with a given solvent, solid phase, and experimental time scale. TRL is the method of choice for short term (one day or less) experiments while BFR is better suited for long term desorption studies. Both phenanthrene and chrysene desorbed from coal contaminated sediments following first order kinetics. Predicted equilibrium concentrations ((C){sub eq}) and desorption rate constants (k{sub d}) were estimated using both one and two stage first order kinetic models. Acetone/water solvent mixtures induced desorption of greater amounts of phenanthrene than did more highly polar methanol/water mixtures, and desorption rate coefficients were higher in the acetone mixtures than they were in the methanol mixtures. As predicted by cosolvent theory and microscopic equilibrium, k{sub d} values increased (slightly) with increasing mole fraction cosolvent and (C){sub eq} values also increased (significantly) with increasing mole fraction cosolvent. Experimental design and period of observation of the desorption process appeared to be important in the consideration of observed desorption constants. Solids concentration in the BFR reactors was varied from 1000 to 100,000 mg/l. Total mas of both compounds released to the liquid phase increased significantly with increasing suspended solids concentrations, but relationship between rate constants and solids concentration were more complex.

  15. In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

    2002-09-20

    The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

  16. Phase, microstructure and hydrogen storage properties of Mg-Ni materials synthesized from metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Huaiyu; Chen, Chunguang; Liu, Tong; Li, Xingguo

    2014-04-01

    After Mg and Ni nanoparticles were fabricated by hydrogen plasma metal reaction, Mg-rich MgxNi100-x(75 < x < 90) materials were synthesized from these metal nanoparticles to study the synergistic effects for hydrogen storage in these samples to show both good kinetics and high capacity. These MgxNi100-x materials may absorb hydrogen with a capacity of around 3.3-5.1 wt% in 1 min at 573 K. The Mg90Ni10 sample shows a hydrogen capacity of 6.1 wt%. The significant kinetic enhancement is thought to be due to the unique nanostructure from the special synthesis route, the catalytic effect of the Mg2Ni nano phase, and the synergistic effects between the Mg2Ni and Mg phases in the materials. An interesting phenomenon which has never been reported before was observed during pressure composition isotherm (PCT) measurements. One steep step in the absorption process and two obviously separated steps in the desorption process during PCT measurements of Mg80Ni20 and Mg90Ni10 samples were observed and a possible reason from the kinetic performance of the Mg2Ni and Mg phases in absorption and desorption processes was explained. These MgxNi100-x materials synthesized from Mg and Ni nanoparticles show high capacity and good kinetics, which makes these materials very promising candidates for thermal storage or energy storage and utilization for renewable power.

  17. Phase, microstructure and hydrogen storage properties of Mg-Ni materials synthesized from metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shao, Huaiyu; Chen, Chunguang; Liu, Tong; Li, Xingguo

    2014-04-01

    After Mg and Ni nanoparticles were fabricated by hydrogen plasma metal reaction, Mg-rich MgxNi₁₀₀₋x(75 < x < 90) materials were synthesized from these metal nanoparticles to study the synergistic effects for hydrogen storage in these samples to show both good kinetics and high capacity. These MgxNi₁₀₀₋x materials may absorb hydrogen with a capacity of around 3.3-5.1 wt% in 1 min at 573 K. The Mg₉₀Ni₁₀ sample shows a hydrogen capacity of 6.1 wt%. The significant kinetic enhancement is thought to be due to the unique nanostructure from the special synthesis route, the catalytic effect of the Mg₂Ni nano phase, and the synergistic effects between the Mg₂Ni and Mg phases in the materials. An interesting phenomenon which has never been reported before was observed during pressure composition isotherm (PCT) measurements. One steep step in the absorption process and two obviously separated steps in the desorption process during PCT measurements of Mg₈₀Ni₂₀ and Mg₉₀Ni₁₀ samples were observed and a possible reason from the kinetic performance of the Mg₂Ni and Mg phases in absorption and desorption processes was explained. These MgxNi₁₀₀₋x materials synthesized from Mg and Ni nanoparticles show high capacity and good kinetics, which makes these materials very promising candidates for thermal storage or energy storage and utilization for renewable power.

  18. Calcium looping process for high purity hydrogen production integrated with capture of carbon dioxide, sulfur and halides

    DOEpatents

    Ramkumar, Shwetha; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2013-07-30

    A process for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (i) gasifying a fuel into a raw synthesis gas comprising CO, hydrogen, steam, sulfur and halide contaminants in the form of H.sub.2S, COS, and HX, wherein X is a halide; (ii) passing the raw synthesis gas through a water gas shift reactor (WGSR) into which CaO and steam are injected, the CaO reacting with the shifted gas to remove CO.sub.2, sulfur and halides in a solid-phase calcium-containing product comprising CaCO.sub.3, CaS and CaX.sub.2; (iii) separating the solid-phase calcium-containing product from an enriched gaseous hydrogen product; and (iv) regenerating the CaO by calcining the solid-phase calcium-containing product at a condition selected from the group consisting of: in the presence of steam, in the presence of CO.sub.2, in the presence of synthesis gas, in the presence of H.sub.2 and O.sub.2, under partial vacuum, and combinations thereof.

  19. Calcium looping process for high purity hydrogen production integrated with capture of carbon dioxide, sulfur and halides

    DOEpatents

    Ramkumar, Shwetha; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-11-04

    A process for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (i) gasifying a fuel into a raw synthesis gas comprising CO, hydrogen, steam, sulfur and halide contaminants in the form of H.sub.2S, COS, and HX, wherein X is a halide; (ii) passing the raw synthesis gas through a water gas shift reactor (WGSR) into which CaO and steam are injected, the CaO reacting with the shifted gas to remove CO.sub.2, sulfur and halides in a solid-phase calcium-containing product comprising CaCO.sub.3, CaS and CaX.sub.2; (iii) separating the solid-phase calcium-containing product from an enriched gaseous hydrogen product; and (iv) regenerating the CaO by calcining the solid-phase calcium-containing product at a condition selected from the group consisting of: in the presence of steam, in the presence of CO.sub.2, in the presence of synthesis gas, in the presence of H.sub.2 and O.sub.2, under partial vacuum, and combinations thereof.

  20. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  1. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  2. Desorption of TEDA from impregnated charcoals

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.

    1980-01-01

    Triethylenediamine (TEDA) is one of the most effective charcoal impregnants for trapping organic forms of radioiodine from air. It is used in air cleaning adsorbers, air samplers, and air purifying respirator canisters and cartridges for airborne radioiodine. Volatility of the pure crystals suggested the possibility of significant TEDA desorption in these applications, resulting in toxic levels of amine and/or degradation of sorbent efficiency. Measurements of TEDA desorption rates were made for four commercial charcoals. Temperatures of 70 to 120/sup 0/C were used to give levels detectable with a photoionization detector. Extrapolations to temperatures nearer normal ambient were made by using Clapeyron equation plots. Among three charcoals with the same 5% level of TEDA impregnation, desorption rates varied over factors as great as 10. Slopes of Clapeyron plots were similar, giving an average 25 kcal/mol heat of desorption. This corresponds to a doubling of the TEDA desorption rate with each 5/sup 0/C (9/sup 0/F) rise in temperature. Desorption rates were directly proportional to airflow rates or velocities through the test beds and independent of humidity. Desorption rates per unit weight of charcoal decreased exponentially with bed depth, presumably due to TEDA readsorption. Calculations based on this data and the geometry of a standard adsorber cell showed that at normal ambient temperatures: (1) concentrations of TEDA in effluent air are well below expected toxic levels; and (2) losses of TEDA may be significant. At elevated temperatures TEDA desorption rates are high enough to affect methyl iodide trapping efficiencies and, possibly, charcoal ignition temperatures.

  3. Mg-based compounds for hydrogen and energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivello, J.-C.; Denys, R. V.; Dornheim, M.; Felderhoff, M.; Grant, D. M.; Huot, J.; Jensen, T. R.; de Jongh, P.; Latroche, M.; Walker, G. S.; Webb, C. J.; Yartys, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium-based alloys attract significant interest as cost-efficient hydrogen storage materials allowing the combination of high gravimetric storage capacity of hydrogen with fast rates of hydrogen uptake and release and pronounced destabilization of the metal-hydrogen bonding in comparison with binary Mg-H systems. In this review, various groups of magnesium compounds are considered, including (1) RE-Mg-Ni hydrides (RE = La, Pr, Nd); (2) Mg alloys with p-elements (X = Si, Ge, Sn, and Al); and (3) magnesium alloys with d-elements (Ti, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pd). The hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination process in the Mg-based alloys (LaMg12, LaMg11Ni) and unusually high-pressure hydrides synthesized at pressures exceeding 100 MPa (MgNi2H3) and stabilized by Ni-H bonding are also discussed. The paper reviews interrelations between the properties of the Mg-based hydrides and p- T conditions of the metal-hydrogen interactions, chemical composition of the initial alloys, their crystal structures, and microstructural state.

  4. Selective deposition of a crystalline Si film by a chemical sputtering process in a high pressure hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmi, Hiromasa Yasutake, Kiyoshi; Kakiuchi, Hiroaki

    2015-07-28

    The selective deposition of Si films was demonstrated using a chemical sputtering process induced by a high pressure hydrogen plasma at 52.6 kPa (400 Torr). In this chemical sputtering process, the initial deposition rate (R{sub d}) is dependent upon the substrate type. At the initial stage of Si film formation, R{sub d} on glass substrates increased with elapsed time and reached to a constant value. In contrast, R{sub d} on Si substrates remained constant during the deposition. The selective deposition of Si films can be achieved by adjusting the substrate temperature (T{sub sub}) and hydrogen concentration (C{sub H2}) in the process atmosphere. For any given deposition time, it was found that an optimum C{sub H2} exists for a given T{sub sub} to realize the selective deposition of a Si film, and the optimum T{sub sub} value tends to increase with decreasing C{sub H2}. According to electron diffraction patterns obtained from the samples, the selectively prepared Si films showed epitaxial-like growth, although the Si films contained many defects. It was revealed by Raman scattering spectroscopy that some of the defects in the Si films were platelet defects induced by excess hydrogen incorporated during Si film formation. Raman spectrum also suggested that Si related radicals (SiH{sub 2}, SiH, Si) with high reactivity contribute to the Si film formation. Simple model was derived as the guideline for achieving the selective growth.

  5. Modeling of a CeO2 thermochemistry reduction process for hydrogen production by solar concentrated energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Hernández, Julio; Romero-Paredes, Hernando; Arancibia-Bulnes, Camilo A.; Villafan-Vidales, Heidi I.; Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the simulation of the thermal reduction for hydrogen production through the decomposition of cerium oxide is presented. The thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production consists of the endothermic reduction of CeO2 at high temperature, where concentrated solar energy is used as a source of heat; and of the subsequent steam hydrolysis of the resulting cerium oxide to produce hydrogen. For the thermochemical process, a solar reactor prototype is proposed; consisting of a cubic receptacle made of graphite fiber thermally insulated. Inside the reactor a pyramidal arrangement with nine tungsten pipes is housed. The pyramidal arrangement is made respect to the focal point where the reflected energy is concentrated. The solar energy is concentrated through the solar furnace of high radiative flux. The endothermic step is the reduction of the cerium oxide to lower-valence cerium oxide, at very high temperature. The exothermic step is the hydrolysis of the cerium oxide (III) to form H2 and the corresponding initial cerium oxide made at lower temperature inside the solar reactor. For the modeling, three sections of the pipe where the reaction occurs were considered; the carrier gas inlet, the porous medium and the reaction products outlet. The mathematical model describes the fluid mechanics; mass and energy transfer occurring therein inside the tungsten pipe. Thermochemical process model was simulated in CFD. The results show a temperature distribution in the solar reaction pipe and allow obtaining the fluid dynamics and the heat transfer within the pipe. This work is part of the project "Solar Fuels and Industrial Processes" from the Mexican Center for Innovation in Solar Energy (CEMIE-Sol).

  6. Electron-stimulated desorption of cesium atoms from adlayers on a gold surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu. A.; Lapushkin, M. N.; Potekhina, N. D.

    2016-06-01

    We have studied the process of electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of Cs atoms from a Cs/CsAu/Au/W system. It is established that ESD takes place from a Cs adlayer and the adjacent CsAu layer of this system. A model of Cs atom desorption from the Cs/CsAu/Au/W system is proposed. The results confirm the semiconductor nature of CsAu compounds.

  7. Effect of delivery condition on desorption rate of ZrCo metal hydride bed for fusion fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.G.; Yun, S.H.; Chung, D.; Oh, Y.H.; Chang, M.H.; Cho, S.; Chung, H.; Song, K.M.

    2015-03-15

    For the safety of fusion fuel cycle, hydrogen isotope gases including tritium are stored as metal hydride form. To satisfy fueling requirement of fusion machine, rapid delivery from metal hydride bed is one of major factors for the development of tritium storage and delivery system. Desorption from metal hydride depends on the operation scenario by pressure and temperature control of the bed. The effect of operation scenario and pump performance on desorption rate of metal hydride bed was experimentally investigated using ZrCo bed. The results showed that the condition of pre-heating scenario before actual delivery of gas affected the delivery performance. Different pumps were connected to desorption line from bed and the effect of pump capacity on desorption rate were also found to be significant. (authors)

  8. HGMS: Glasses and Nanocomposites for Hydrogen Storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinska, Kris; Hemmers, Oliver

    2013-02-17

    directly address any hydrogen storage technical barriers or targets in terms of numbers. Specifically, hydrogen sorption and desorption tests or kinetics measurements were not part of the project scope. However, the insights gained from these studies could help to answer fundamental questions necessary for considering glass-based materials as hydrogen storage media and could be applied indirectly towards the DOE hydrogen storage technical targets such as system weight and volume, system cost and energy density. Such questions are: Can specific macro-crystals, proven to attract hydrogen when in a macroscopic form (bulk), be nucleated in glass matrices as nanocrystals to create two-phased materials? What are suitable compositions that enable to synthetize glass-based, two-phase materials with nanocrystals that can attract hydrogen via surface or bulk interactions? What are the limits of controlling the microstructure of these materials, especially limits for nanocrystals density and size? Finally, from a technological point of view, the fabrication of glass-derived nanocomposites that we explore is a very simple, fast and inexpensive process that does not require costly or specialized equipment which is an important factor for practical applications.

  9. AN INTEGRATED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION-CO2 CAPTURE PROCESS FROM FOSSIL FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Wang; K.B. Bota; D. Day

    2004-09-01

    The major project objective is to determine the feasibility of using the char from coal and/or biomass pyrolysis, ammonia and CO{sub 2} emissions at smokestacks to produce clean hydrogen and a sequestered carbon fertilizer. During this work period, literature review has been completed. The project plan, design and test schedules were made on the basis of discussion with partner in experimental issues. Installation of pilot scale units was finished and major units tests were fully performed. Modification of the pyrolyzer, reformer and gas absorption tank have been done. Integration testing is performing recently. Lab scale tests are in operation phase. The experimental installations are discussed in this paper.

  10. An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Wang; K. B. Bota

    2005-03-15

    The major project objective is to determine the feasibility of using the char from coal and/or biomass pyrolysis, ammonia and CO2 emissions at smokestacks to produce clean hydrogen and a sequestered carbon fertilizer. During this work period, literature review has been completed. The project plan, design and test schedules were made on the basis of discussion with partner in experimental issues. Installation of pilot scale units was finished and major units tests were fully performed. Modification of the pyrolyzer, reformer and gas absorption tank have been done. Integration testing is performing recently. Lab scale tests are in operation phase. The experimental installations are discussed in this paper.

  11. Determination of operating parameters of industrial engine fuelled with post processing gases with high hydrogen content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeżański, M.; Mareczek, M.; Marek, W.; Papuga, T.

    2016-09-01

    The results of investigations of SI engine fuelled with hydrogen and mixed n-butanol with isobutanol have been presented in article. The idea of flexible feeding system and the aim and methodology of carried out measurement have been also described. Obtained results have been compared to the results of tests carried out during flexible feeding of the same engine. The proposed control system enables not only application of different liquid and gaseous fuels but also application of the fuels which chemical composition vary within the relatively short time intervals.

  12. An Intergrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Wang; K. B. Bota

    2006-03-15

    The major project objective is to determine the feasibility of using the char from coal and/or biomass pyrolysis, ammonia and CO2 emissions at smokestacks to produce clean hydrogen and a sequestered carbon fertilizer. During this work period, the project plan, design and test schedules were made on the basis of discussion with partner in experimental issues. Installation of pilot scale units was finished and major units tests were fully performed. Modification of the pyrolyzer, reformer and gas absorption tank have been done. Integration testing is performing recently. Lab scale tests have been performed. Field tests of char/fertilizer have been conducted.

  13. Kinetics of neptunium(V) sorption and desorption on goethite: An experimental and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, Ruth M.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Powell, Brian A.; Kersting, Annie B.

    2011-11-01

    Various sorption phenomena, such as aging, hysteresis and irreversible sorption, can cause differences between contaminant (ad)sorption and desorption behavior and lead to apparent sorption 'asymmetry'. We evaluate the relevance of these characteristics for neptunium(V) (Np(V)) sorption/desorption on goethite using a 34-day flow-cell experiment and kinetic modeling. Based on experimental results, the Np(V) desorption rate is much slower than the (ad)sorption rate, and appears to decrease over the course of the experiment. The best model fit with a minimum number of fitting parameters was achieved with a multi-reaction model including (1) an equilibrium Freundlich site (site 1), (2) a kinetically-controlled, consecutive, first-order site (site 2), and (3) a parameter ψ, which characterizes the desorption rate on site 2 based on a concept related to transition state theory (TST). This approach allows us to link differences in adsorption and desorption kinetics to changes in overall reaction pathways, without assuming different adsorption and desorption affinities (hysteresis) or irreversible sorption behavior a priori. Using modeling as a heuristic tool, we determined that aging processes are relevant. However, hysteresis and irreversible sorption behavior can be neglected within the time-frame (desorption over 32 days) and chemical solution conditions evaluated in the flow-cell experiment. In this system, desorption reactions are very slow, but they are not irreversible. Hence, our data do not justify an assumption of irreversible Np(V) sorption to goethite in transport models, which effectively limits the relevance of colloid-facilitated Np(V) transport to near-field environments. However, slow Np(V) desorption behavior may also lead to a continuous contaminant source term when metals are sorbed to bulk mineral phases. Additional long-term experiments are recommended to definitely rule out irreversible Np(V) sorption behavior at very low surface loadings and

  14. Effects of surface coordination on the temperature-programmed desorption of oxalate from goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Boily, Jean F.; Szanyi, Janos; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2007-11-15

    The temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of weakly-bound, hydrogen-bonded and metal-bonded oxalate complexes at the goethite surface was investigated in the 300-900 K range with concerted Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) measurements (TPD-FTIR). These reactions took place with the concomitant dehydroxylation reaction of goethite to hematite and decarbonation of bulk-occluded carbonate. The measurements revealed three important stages of desorption. Stage I (300-440 K) corresponds to the desorption of weakly-and/or un-bound oxalate molecules in the goethite powder with a thermal decomposition reaction pathway characteristic of oxalic acid. Stage II (440-520 K) corresponds to a thermally-driven dehydration of hydrogen-bonded surface complexes, leading to a partial desorption via oxalic acid thermal decomposition pathways and to a partial conversion to metal-bonded surface complexes. This latter mechanism led to the increase in FTIR bands characteristic of these complexes. Finally, Stage III (520-660 K) corresponds to the thermal decomposition of the metal-bonded oxalate complex, proceeding through a 2 electron reduction pathway.

  15. Atomic scale fabrication of dangling bond structures on hydrogen passivated Si(0 0 1) wafers processed and nanopackaged in a clean room environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmer, Marek; Godlewski, Szymon; Zuzak, Rafal; Wojtaszek, Mateusz; Rauer, Caroline; Thuaire, Aurélie; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Moriceau, Hubert; Joachim, Christian; Szymonski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Specific surfaces allowing the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) creation of electronic interconnects and atomic nanostructures are required for the successful development of novel nanoscale electronic devices. Atomically flat and reconstructed Si(0 0 1):H surfaces are serious candidates for that role. In this work such Si:H surfaces were prepared in a cleanroom environment on 200 mm silicon wafers with a hydrogen bake and were subsequently bonded together to ensure the surface protection, and allow their transportation and storage for several months in air. Given the nature of the bonding, which was hydrophobic with weak van der Waals forces, we were then able to de-bond them in UHV. We show that the quality of the de-bonded Si:H surface enables the "at will" construction of sophisticated and complex dangling bond (DB) nanostructures by atomically precise scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip induced desorption of hydrogen atoms. The DB structures created on slightly doped Si:H samples were characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) performed at 4 K. Our results demonstrate that DB nanostructures fabricated on UHV de-bonded Si(0 0 1):H wafers could be directly incorporated in future electronics as interconnects and parts of nanoscale logic circuits.

  16. Adsorption, Desorption, and Clustering H20 on Pt (111)

    SciTech Connect

    Daschbach, John L.; Peden, Brandon M.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2004-01-15

    The adsorption, desorption, and clustering behavior of H20 on Pt(111) has been investigated by specular He scattering. The data show that water adsorbed on a clean Pt(111) surface undergoes a transition from a random to a clustered structure near 60 K. The initial helium scattering cross sections as a function of temperature are found to be insensitive to H20 flux over a range of 0.005 ML/s to 0.55 ML/s indicating the clustering process is more complex than simple surface diffusion. The coarsening process of an initially random distribution of water deposited at 25 K is found to occur over a broad temperature range, 60 K< T <140 K, during thermal annealing. The desorption kinetics for submonolayer water are determined to be zero-order for surface coverages greater than 0.05 ML and temperatures between 150 K and 174 K. The zero-order desorption kinetics are consistent with a two-dimensional two-phase coexistence between H2O condensed phase and a 2-gas phase on the Pt surface

  17. Process and apparatus for reducing the loss of hydrogen from Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, D.L.

    1987-03-24

    A Stirling engine assembly is described which defines a working gas volume therein, the Stirling engine assembly comprising: a working gas reservoir for storing a working gas at a pressure greater than pressure of the working gas in the working volume of the Stirling engine; a trap cell operatively connected between an outlet of the reservoir and the Stirling engine working volume. The trap cell includes an enclosure having porous windows at either end thereof and a sorbent with an affinity for water vapor therein, such that water vapor adsorbed on the sorbent diffuses into the hydrogen passing from the reservoir into the working engine; a compressor means for drawing working gas from the Stirling engine working volume, through the trap cell and pumping the working gas into the hydrogen reservoir. The sorbent in the trap cell at the reduced pressure caused by the compressor adsorbs water vapor from the working gas such that substantially dry working gas is pumped by the compressor into the reservoir. The working gas is doped with water vapor by the tank cell as it passes into the Stirling engine and is dried by the trap cell as it is removed from the working engine for storage in the reservoir to prevent condensation of water vapor in the reservoir.

  18. Study on adsorption and desorption of ammonia on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Xinfang; Luo, Wei; Yang, Hang; He, Yanlan; Liu, Yixing; Zhang, Xueao; Peng, Gang

    2015-09-01

    The gas sensor based on pristine graphene with conductance type was studied theoretically and experimentally. The time response of conductance measurements showed a quickly and largely increased conductivity when the sensor was exposed to ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water. However, the desorption process in vacuum took more than 1 h which indicated that there was a larger number of transferred carriers and a strong adsorption force between ammonia and graphene. The desorption time could be greatly shortened down to about 2 min by adding the flow of water-vapor-enriched air at the beginning of the recovery stage which had been confirmed as a rapid and high-efficiency desorption process. Moreover, the optimum geometries, adsorption energies, and the charge transfer number of the composite systems were studied with first-principle calculations. However, the theoretical results showed that the adsorption energy between NH3 and graphene was too small to fit for the experimental phenomenon, and there were few charges transferred between graphene and NH3 molecules, which was completely different from the experiment measurement. The adsorption energy between NH4 and graphene increased stage by stage which showed NH4 was a strong donor. The calculation suggested that H2O molecule could help a quick desorption of NH4 from graphene by converting NH4 to NH3 or (NH3)n(H2O)m groups, which was consistent with the experimental results. This study demonstrates that the ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water is mainly ammonium groups of NH3 and NH4, and the NH4 moleculars are ideal candidates for the molecular doping of graphene while the interaction between graphene and the NH3 moleculars is weak.

  19. Study on adsorption and desorption of ammonia on graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Xinfang; Luo, Wei; Yang, Hang; He, Yanlan; Liu, Yixing; Zhang, Xueao; Peng, Gang

    2015-12-01

    The gas sensor based on pristine graphene with conductance type was studied theoretically and experimentally. The time response of conductance measurements showed a quickly and largely increased conductivity when the sensor was exposed to ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water. However, the desorption process in vacuum took more than 1 h which indicated that there was a larger number of transferred carriers and a strong adsorption force between ammonia and graphene. The desorption time could be greatly shortened down to about 2 min by adding the flow of water-vapor-enriched air at the beginning of the recovery stage which had been confirmed as a rapid and high-efficiency desorption process. Moreover, the optimum geometries, adsorption energies, and the charge transfer number of the composite systems were studied with first-principle calculations. However, the theoretical results showed that the adsorption energy between NH3 and graphene was too small to fit for the experimental phenomenon, and there were few charges transferred between graphene and NH3 molecules, which was completely different from the experiment measurement. The adsorption energy between NH4 and graphene increased stage by stage which showed NH4 was a strong donor. The calculation suggested that H2O molecule could help a quick desorption of NH4 from graphene by converting NH4 to NH3 or (NH3)n(H2O)m groups, which was consistent with the experimental results. This study demonstrates that the ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water is mainly ammonium groups of NH3 and NH4, and the NH4 moleculars are ideal candidates for the molecular doping of graphene while the interaction between graphene and the NH3 moleculars is weak.

  20. Redox cycle stability of mixed oxides used for hydrogen generation in the cyclic water gas shift process

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Pradyot

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} modified with CaO, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied in cyclic water gas shift reactor. • For the first time stability of such oxides were tested for 100 redox cycles. • Optimally added oxides significantly improved the activity and the stability of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Increased stability was attributed to the impediment of neck formation. - Abstract: Repeated cycles of the reduction of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with reductive gas, e.g. hydrogen and subsequent oxidation of the reduced iron material with water vapor can be harnessed as a process for the production of pure hydrogen. The redox behavior of iron oxide modified with various amounts of SiO{sub 2}, CaO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated in the present study. The total amount of the additional metal oxides was always below 15 wt%. The samples were prepared by co-precipitation using urea hydrolysis method. The influence of various metal oxides on the hydrogen production capacity and the material stability was studied in detail in terms of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET analysis. Furthermore, the activity and the stability of the samples were tested in repeated reduction with diluted H{sub 2} and re-oxidation cycles with H{sub 2}O. The results indicate that combination of several oxides as promoter increases the stability of the iron oxide material by mitigating the sintering process. The positive influence of the oxides in stabilizing the iron oxide material is attributed to the impediment of neck formation responsible for sintering.

  1. Theoretical Design of a Thermosyphon for Efficient Process Heat Removal from Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) for Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Fred Gunnerson; Akira Tokuhiro; Vivek Utgiker; Kevan Weaver; Steven Sherman

    2007-10-01

    The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase Thermosyphon heat transfer performance with various alkali metals. Thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. Heat transport occurs via evaporation and condensation, and the heat transport fluid is re-circulated by gravitational force. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. For process heat, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) are required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant in the most efficient way possible. The production of power at higher efficiency using Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production requires both heat at higher temperatures (up to 1000oC) and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. The purpose for selecting a compact heat exchanger is to maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. The IHX design requirements are governed by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet of the NGNP (900oC, based on the current capabilities of NGNP), and the temperatures in the hydrogen production plant. Spiral Heat Exchangers (SHE’s) have superior heat transfer characteristics, and are less susceptible to fouling. Further, heat losses to surroundings are minimized because of its compact configuration. SHEs have never been examined for phase-change heat transfer applications. The research presented provides useful information for thermosyphon design and Spiral Heat Exchanger.

  2. Impact of activated carbon, biochar and compost on the desorption and mineralization of phenanthrene in soil.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Geoffrey; Smith, Kilian E C; Rein, Arno; Winding, Anne; Wollensen de Jonge, Lis; Trapp, Stefan; Karlson, Ulrich G

    2013-10-01

    Sorption of PAHs to carbonaceous soil amendments reduces their dissolved concentrations, limiting toxicity but also potentially biodegradation. Therefore, the maximum abiotic desorption of freshly sorbed phenanthrene (≤5 mg kg(-1)) was measured in three soils amended with activated carbon (AC), biochar or compost. Total amounts of phenanthrene desorbed were similar between the different soils, but the amendment type had a large influence. Complete desorption was observed in the unamended and compost amended soils, but this reduced for biochar (41% desorbed) and AC (8% desorbed). Cumulative amounts mineralized were 28% for the unamended control, 19% for compost, 13% for biochar and 4% for AC. Therefore, the effects of the amendments in soil in reducing desorption were also reflected in the extents of mineralization. Modeling was used to analyze key processes, indicating that for the AC and charcoal treatments bacterial activity did not limit mineralization, but rather desorption into the dissolved phase.

  3. Computational study of the process of hydrogen bond breaking: the case of the formamide-formic acid complex.

    PubMed

    Pacios, Luis F

    2006-11-15

    MP2/6-311++G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) quantum calculations are used to study the formamide-formic acid complex (FFAC), a system bound by two hydrogen bonds, N--H...O and O--H...O, that forms a bond ring at equilibrium. When the intermolecular separation between monomers R increases, this ring opens at a distance for which the weaker N--H...O bond breaks remaining the stronger O--H...O bond. The computational study characterizes that process addressing changes of interaction energy DeltaE, structure and properties of the electron density rho(r) as well as spatial distributions of rho(r), the electrostatic potential U(r), and the electron localization function eta(r). It is shown that the spatial derivatives of DeltaE, the topology of rho(r), and qualitative changes noticed in U(r) = 0 isocontours allow to identify a precise distance R for which one can say the N--H...O hydrogen bond has broken. Both levels of theory predict essentially the same changes of structure and electron properties associated to the process of breaking and virtually identical distances at which it takes place.

  4. Energy efficient production of hydrogen and syngas from biomass: development of low-temperature catalytic process for cellulose gasification.

    PubMed

    Asadullah, Mohammad; Ito, Shin-ichi; Kunimori, Kimio; Yamada, Muneyoshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2002-10-15

    The Rh/CeO2/M (M = SiO2, Al2O3, and ZrO2) type catalysts with various compositions have been prepared and investigated in the gasification of cellulose, a model compound of biomass, in a fluidized bed reactor at 500-700 degrees C. The conventional nickel and dolomite catalysts have also been investigated. Among the catalysts, Rh/CeO2/SiO2 with 35% CeO2 has been found to be the best catalyst with respect to the carbon conversion to gas and product distribution. The steam addition contributed to the complete conversion of cellulose to gas even at 600 degrees C. Lower steam supply gave the syngas and higher steam supply gave the hydrogen as the major product. Hydrogen and syngas from cellulose or cellulosic biomass gasification are environmentally super clean gaseous fuels for power generation. Moreover, the syngas derived liquid fuels such as methanol, dimethyl ether, and synthetic diesels are also super clean transportation fuels. However, the use of cellulose or cellulosic biomass for energy source through the gasification is challenging because of the formation of tar and char during the gasification process. It is interesting that no tar or char was finally formed in the effluent gas at as low as 500-600 degrees C using Rh/CeO2/SiO2(35) catalyst in this process.

  5. Spectroscopic study of molecular-hydrogen processes in a mirror-confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, T.G. |

    1995-04-01

    Visible and near-ultraviolet molecular hydrogen emission from the Tara Tandem Mirror central cell plasma was investigated in order to determine molecular densities, ionization rates, and continuum dissociation rates. Measurements of H{sub 2} {ital G}{r_arrow}{ital B} band emission were used to infer spatial density and ionization profiles, maximum densities of 4{times}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} at the gas injection port, and a total molecular ionization rate of 254 A. Continuum emission in the near ultraviolet was identified as the H{sub 2} dissociative continuum through its wavelength distribution, time behavior, and intensity. Wavelength-integrated continuum emission measurements were used to obtain the dissociation rate associated with the continuum: 6 A. The power expended in molecular ionization, dissociation, and radiation is estimated to be 8.4 kW out of 300 kW of rf power injected.

  6. An Integrated Hydrogen Producton-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Wang; K.B. Bota; D. Day

    2005-12-01

    The major project objective is to determine the feasibility of using the char from coal and/or biomass pyrolysis, ammonia and CO2 emissions at smokestacks to produce clean hydrogen and a sequestered carbon fertilizer. During this work period, literature review has been completed. The project plan, design and test schedules were made on the basis of discussion with partner in experimental issues. Installation of pilot scale units was finished and major units tests were fully performed. Modification of the pyrolyzer, reformer and gas absorption tank have been done. Integration testing is performing recently. Lab scale tests have been performed. Field tests of char/fertilizer have been conducted. The experimental results are discussed in this paper.

  7. Flash hydrogenation of coal

    DOEpatents

    Manowitz, Bernard; Steinberg, Meyer; Sheehan, Thomas V.; Winsche, Warren E.; Raseman, Chad J.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the hydrogenation of coal comprising the contacting of powdered coal with hydrogen in a rotating fluidized bed reactor. A rotating fluidized bed reactor suitable for use in this process is also disclosed. The coal residence time in the reactor is limited to less than 5 seconds while the hydrogen contact time is not in excess of 0.2 seconds.

  8. Photon-stimulated desorption as a substantial source of sodium in the lunar atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Yakshinskiy, B V; Madey, T E

    1999-08-12

    Mercury and the Moon both have tenuous atmospheres that contain atomic sodium and potassium. These chemicals must be continuously resupplied, as neither body can retain the atoms for more than a few hours. The mechanisms proposed to explain the resupply include sputtering of the surface by the solar wind, micrometeorite impacts, thermal desorption and photon-stimulated desorption. But there are few data and no general agreement about which processes dominate. Here we report laboratory studies of photon-stimulated desorption of sodium from surfaces that simulate lunar silicates. We find that bombardment of such surfaces at temperatures of approximately 250 K by ultraviolet photons (wavelength lambda < 300 nm) causes very efficient desorption of sodium atoms, induced by electronic excitations rather than by thermal processes or momentum transfer. The flux at the lunar surface of ultraviolet photons from the Sun is sufficient to ensure that photon-stimulated desorption of sodium contributes substantially to the Moon's atmosphere. On Mercury, solar heating of the surface implies that thermal desorption will also be an important source of atmospheric sodium. PMID:10458159

  9. Treating high-mercury-containing lamps using full-scale thermal desorption technology.

    PubMed

    Chang, T C; You, S J; Yu, B S; Chen, C M; Chiu, Y C

    2009-03-15

    The mercury content in high-mercury-containing lamps are always between 400 mg/kg and 200,000 mg/kg. This concentration is much higher than the 260 mg/kg lower boundary recommended for the thermal desorption process suggested by the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. According to a Taiwan EPA survey, about 4,833,000 cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs), 486,000 ultraviolet lamps and 25,000 super high pressure mercury lamps (SHPs) have been disposed of in the industrial waste treatment system, producing 80, 92 and 9 kg-mercury/year through domestic treatment, offshore treatment and air emissions, respectively. To deal with this problem we set up a full-scale thermal desorption process to treat and recover the mercury from SHPs, fluorescent tube tailpipes, fluorescent tubes containing mercury-fluorescent powder, and CCFLs containing mercury-fluorescent powder and monitor the use of different pre-heating temperatures and desorption times. The experimental results reveal that the average thermal desorption efficiency of SHPs and fluorescent tube tailpipe were both 99.95%, while the average thermal desorption efficiencies of fluorescent tubes containing mercury-fluorescent powder were between 97% and 99%. In addition, a thermal desorption efficiency of only 69.37-93.39% was obtained after treating the CCFLs containing mercury-fluorescent powder. These differences in thermal desorption efficiency might be due to the complexity of the mercury compounds contained in the lamps. In general, the thermal desorption efficiency of lamps containing mercury-complex compounds increased with higher temperatures.

  10. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of arsenic onto ceria nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The rapid increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles [ENPs] has resulted in an increasing concern over the potential impacts of ENPs on the environmental and human health. ENPs tend to adsorb a large variety of toxic chemicals when they are emitted into the environment, which may enhance the toxicity of ENPs and/or adsorbed chemicals. The study was aimed to investigate the adsorption and desorption behaviors of arsenic on ceria NPs in aqueous solution using batch technique. Results show that the adsorption behavior of arsenic on ceria NPs was strongly dependent on pH and independent of ionic strength, indicating that the electrostatic effect on the adsorption of these elements was relatively not important compared to surface chemical reactions. The adsorption isotherms fitted very well to both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH0, ΔS0, and ΔG0) for the adsorption of arsenic were determined at three different temperatures of 283, 303, and 323 K. The adsorption reaction was endothermic, and the process of adsorption was favored at high temperature. The desorption data showed that desorption hysteresis occurred at the initial concentration studied. High adsorption capacity of arsenic on ceria NPs suggests that the synergistic effects of ceria NPs and arsenic on the environmental systems may exist when they are released into the environment. PMID:22269298

  11. Adsorption-desorption behavior of thiram onto humic acid.

    PubMed

    Filipe, O M S; Vidal, M M; Duarte, A C; Santos, E B H

    2009-06-10

    The adsorption/desorption behavior of pure thiram (Thi-P) and formulated thiram (Thi-F) onto commercial humic acids (HA) was studied using a batch equilibration procedure. Results of adsorption kinetic experiments showed that thiram adsorption is a fast process since 85% of the equilibrium concentration is reached within two hours. Experimental K(D) values between 0.110 to 0.210 L g(-1) were obtained for the adsorption of both Thi-P and Thi-F onto HA, suggesting that thiram is strongly sorbed by humic acids. In general, for both Thi-P and Thi-F, the lower the initial thiram concentration, the stronger is its adsorption (higher K(D) and percentage adsorption values). The adsorption isotherms were found to match the BET model. The results show that thiram adsorption onto condensed humic acids cannot be explained only in terms of specific interactions, such as those identified in studies of adsorption of thiram with humic acids in solution. The comparison of sorption and desorption results allowed the observation of hysteresis phenomena. Desorption K(D) values were consistently higher than those for adsorption at the same equilibrium concentration. Hysteresis was lower for the formulated thiram suggesting that adsorption is more reversible in the presence of the formulation components turning the pesticide more susceptible to be leached.

  12. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.; Powell, Brian A.

    2015-01-28

    Strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time implicates near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption–desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Moreover, following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethitemore » was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.« less

  13. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.; Powell, Brian A.

    2015-01-28

    Strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time implicates near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption–desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Moreover, following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethite was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.

  14. A microscopic theory of desorption induced by electronic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Hideaki; Okiji, Ayao; Tsuchiura, Hiroki

    1996-08-01

    Desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) in two cases is investigated from a microscopic point of view. In case A, where a single electron in a state of the localized kind (localized around adsorbates) is excited into a state of the extended kind (extended into the bosom of the substrate), the shape of the excited-state potential-energy surface (PES) may differ markedly from that of the ground-state PES for adsorbate motion. The Franck-Condon factor then takes a finite value, giving rise to a finite desorption probability. In case B, where a single electron in a state of the extended kind is excited into another state of the extended kind, the shape of the excited-state PES is practically the same as that of the ground-state PES. The Frank-Condon factor is then zero. In such a case, one should take DIET as a single-step (coherent) process and take into account the adsorbate-position dependence of the matrix element for state transitions of the electron system in order to obtain a finite desorption probability.

  15. Unexpected Analyte Oxidation during Desorption Electrospray Ionization - Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    During the analysis of surface spotted analytes using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS), abundant ions are sometimes observed that appear to be the result of oxygen addition reactions. In this investigation, the effect of sample aging, the ambient lab environment, spray voltage, analyte surface concentration, and surface type on this oxidative modification of spotted analytes, exemplified by tamoxifen and reserpine, during analysis by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was studied. Simple exposure of the samples to air and to ambient lighting increased the extent of oxidation. Increased spray voltage lead also to increased analyte oxidation, possibly as a result of oxidative species formed electrochemically at the emitter electrode or in the gas - phase by discharge processes. These oxidative species are carried by the spray and impinge on and react with the sampled analyte during desorption/ionization. The relative abundance of oxidized species was more significant for analysis of deposited analyte having a relatively low surface concentration. Increasing spray solvent flow rate and addition of hydroquinone as a redox buffer to the spray solvent were found to decrease, but not entirely eliminate, analyte oxidation during analysis. The major parameters that both minimize and maximize analyte oxidation were identified and DESI-MS operational recommendations to avoid these unwanted reactions are suggested.

  16. A novel acoustic emission monitoring and signal processing to elucidate the fracture dynamics of hydrogen assisted cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Yasuhisa; Takemoto, Makoto; Takemoto, Mikio

    1994-12-31

    An advanced Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring and signal processing system was developed and applied to elucidate the fracture dynamics of hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) of quenched-tempered low alloy steel. The developed system enables one to monitor an initiation of microcrack correctly and also to elucidate the dynamics of microcracks when multi-channel moment tensor analysis is jointly used. The system consists of 8-channel monitoring. One channel monitors the surface displacement in loading direction excited by the propagation of elastic wave, and gives the source wave by the deconvolution integral of it with the Green`s function of the second kind. Another 7 channels were designed to measure arrival time and relative amplitude of the P-waves, and to determine both the source location and the crack kinematics by tensor analysis. This paper introduces the developed monitoring system and signal processing method, and fracture dynamics of microcracks in HAC.

  17. Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Magmatic Water: Review of Variations due to Source, Igneous Environment, and Degassing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, B. E.

    2001-05-01

    The familiar "magmatic water box" frequently shown on plots of δ D vs. δ 18O both represents and misrepresents the hydrogen isotope composition of magmatic water because of the influences of different source compositions and degassing processes. On the one hand, the hydrogen isotope composition of magma source materials in arcs versus continental tectonic settings contributes to differences in the primary δ D values of magmas. On the other hand, water remaining in magmatic rocks and glass is residual, and may express large variations in δ D due either to active degassing, during depressurization associated with emplacement and/or eruption, or to passive degassing during crystallization. The magnitudes of these variations are governed by hydrogen isotope fractionations involving melts, minerals, and dissolved hydrogen (H2O + OH), by water solubility, and whether the process is dominantly a closed- or open-system one. Estimating the primary δ D value of magmatic water requires extrapolation of isotopic and water content data for a suite of co-magmatic samples to a probable undegassed composition (e.g., 5 wt.% H2O). Island arcs and continental settings comprise two principal tectonic settings in which crustal source materials can differ in their hydrogen isotope composition (and dominate over mantle sources). For example, magmas formed in island arcs derive water from subducted marine clays, metamorphosed, hydrothermally altered, and weathered oceanic crust, from pore waters, and possibly, variably metasomatized mantle. Arc magmatic water, sometimes referred to as "andesitic water", tends to have an average δ D value of ca. -30 +/- 5 ‰ , whereas the average δ D value of water from magmas in continental crust regimes can be slightly lighter (e.g. δ D of ca. -45 +/- 10 ‰ ). This difference may be ascribed largely to the fact that continental crust contains water primarily as metamorphic and igneous minerals, whose average values of δ D reflect, among others

  18. H Scan/AHP decision process planning for evaluating and ranking of proposals submitted to the DOE hydrogen program

    SciTech Connect

    Szoka de Valladares, M.R.; Mack, S.

    1995-09-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Program needs to develop criteria as part of a systematic evaluation process for proposal identification, evaluation and selection. The H Scan component of this process provides a framework in which a project proposer can fully describe their candidate technology system and its components. The H Scan complements traditional methods of capturing cost and technical information. It consists of a special set of survey forms designed to elicit information so expert reviewers can assess the proposal relative to DOE specified selection criteria. The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) component of the decision process assembles the management defined evaluation and selection criteria into a coherent multi-level decision construct by which projects can be evaluated in pair-wise comparisons. The AHP model will reflect management`s objectives and it will assist in the ranking of individual projects based on the extent to which each contributes to management`s objectives. This paper contains a detailed description of the products and activities associated with the planning and evaluation process: The objectives or criteria; the H Scan; and The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP).

  19. Modulation of electrochemical hydrogen evolution rate by araliphatic thiol monolayers on gold

    PubMed Central

    Muglali, Mutlu I.; Erbe, Andreas; Chen, Ying; Barth, Christoph; Koelsch, Patrick; Rohwerder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Electroreductive desorption of a highly ordered self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed by the araliphatic thiol (4-(4-(4-pyridyl)phenyl)phenyl)methanethiol leads to a concurrent rapid hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The desorption process and resulting interfacial structure were investigated by voltammetric techniques, in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, and in situ vibrational sum–frequency–generation (SFG) spectroscopy. Voltammetric experiments on SAM-modified electrodes exhibit extraordinarily high peak currents, which di er between Au(111) and polycrystalline Au substrates. Association of reductive desorption with HER is shown to be the origin of the observed excess cathodic charges. The studied SAM preserves its two–dimensional order near Au surface throughout a fast voltammetric scan even when the vertex potential is set several hundred millivolt beyond the desorption potential. A model is developed for the explanation of the observed rapid HER involving ordering and pre–orientation of water present in the nanometer–sized reaction volume between desorbed SAM and the Au electrode, by the structurally extremely stable monolayer, leading to the observed catalysis of the HER. PMID:24235778

  20. Modulation of electrochemical hydrogen evolution rate by araliphatic thiol monolayers on gold.

    PubMed

    Muglali, Mutlu I; Erbe, Andreas; Chen, Ying; Barth, Christoph; Koelsch, Patrick; Rohwerder, Michael

    2013-02-15

    Electroreductive desorption of a highly ordered self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed by the araliphatic thiol (4-(4-(4-pyridyl)phenyl)phenyl)methanethiol leads to a concurrent rapid hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The desorption process and resulting interfacial structure were investigated by voltammetric techniques, in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, and in situ vibrational sum-frequency-generation (SFG) spectroscopy. Voltammetric experiments on SAM-modified electrodes exhibit extraordinarily high peak currents, which di er between Au(111) and polycrystalline Au substrates. Association of reductive desorption with HER is shown to be the origin of the observed excess cathodic charges. The studied SAM preserves its two-dimensional order near Au surface throughout a fast voltammetric scan even when the vertex potential is set several hundred millivolt beyond the desorption potential. A model is developed for the explanation of the observed rapid HER involving ordering and pre-orientation of water present in the nanometer-sized reaction volume between desorbed SAM and the Au electrode, by the structurally extremely stable monolayer, leading to the observed catalysis of the HER.

  1. Waste activated sludge fermentation for hydrogen production enhanced by anaerobic process improvement and acetobacteria inhibition: the role of fermentation pH.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuxiao; Chen, Yinguang; Zhang, Dong; Zhu, Xiaoyu

    2010-05-01

    In this study an efficient strategy, i.e., controlling the fermentation pH at constant pH 10, for significantly increasing hydrogen yield from waste activated sludge (WAS) via the improvement of anaerobic process (sludge solubilization, hydrolysis, and acidification) and inhibition of hydrogen consumption by acetobacteria was reported. Without addition of pure hydrogen producer and nutrient source, the effect of different constant pH in the range of pH 4-11 on hydrogen production from WAS was compared with that of different initial pH. The maximal hydrogen yield was observed respectively at constant pH 10 and initial pH 10, but the former was 47.8% higher than the latter (26.9 versus 18.2 mL per gram volatile suspended solids) and much greater than that reported in literature. Then, the mechanisms for constant pH 10 resulting in remarkably higher hydrogen production than initial pH 10 were investigated. It was observed that constant pH 10 fermentation showed much higher solubilization of sludge main particulate organic matters, hydrolysis of solubilized organic materials and acidification of hydrolyzed products, which were of benefit to the hydrogen production. Also, there was more acetic but less propionic acid in the constant pH 10 test, which was in correspondence with the theory of fermentation type affecting hydrogen production. Moreover, in the reactor of initial pH 10 the produced hydrogen was readily converted to acetic acid, but no obvious hydrogen consumption was observed in constant pH 10 reactor. Further investigation of microorganisms with enzymes analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that the activity and growth of acetobacteria in the reactor of constant pH 10 was much lower than those in initial pH 10 reactor.

  2. Exploring several different routes to produce Mg- based nanomaterials for Hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, D. R.; Chanchetti, L. F.; Floriano, R.; Ishikawa, T. T.; Botta, W. J.

    2014-08-01

    Severe mechanical processing routes based on high-energy ball milling (HEBM) or severe plastic deformation (SPD) can be used to produce Mg nanomaterials for hydrogen storage applications. In the last few years, we have been exploring in our research group different SPD processing routes in Mg systems to achieve good activation (first hydrogenation) and fast H-absorption/desorption kinetics, combined with enhanced air resistance. In this paper, we compare SPD techniques applied to Mg with HEBM applied to MgH2. Both advanced - melt spinning (MS), high-pressure torsion (HPT) - and more conventional - cold rolling (CR), cold forging (CF)- techniques are evaluated as means of production of bulk samples with very refined microstructures and controlled textures. In the best SPD processing conditions, attractive H-absorption/desorption kinetic properties are obtained, which are comparable to the ones of MgH2 milled powders, even if the needed temperatures are higher - 350°C compared to 300°C.CR and CF stand out as the processes with higher potential for industrial application, considering the level of the attained hydrogen storage properties, its simplicity and low cost.

  3. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  4. Impact of hydrogen peroxide oxygen transfer tests on the performance of the biological nutrient removal process.

    PubMed

    Mahendraker, V; Mavinic, D S; Rabinowitz, B

    2002-02-01

    Knowledge of in-process oxygen transfer is essential to the optimum design and operation of aeration systems in activated sludge processes. In this study, non-steady state H2O2 oxygen transfer tests were performed in a laboratory scale, University of Cape Town configuration biological nutrient removal process (BNR) to measure the in-process oxygen transfer rates. Given the small quantity (about 1 ml @30% concentration) of H2O2 used in the aerobic reactor with a mixed liquor volume of 161 (total system working volume of 33.65 l), no effect on the process performance itself was expected. However, the process performance data obtained indicated results to the contrary. Use of H2O2 in measuring process oxygen transfer rates may not be suitable for BNR processes, as all the major process performance indicators (carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus removal by the system and carbon uptake and phosphorus release in the anaerobic zone) were negatively affected. Evidence in thiswork leads to the conclusion that external addition of H2O2 leads to excessive production of the hydroxyl radical. Since microorganisms do not have enzyme systems capable of acting upon this additional reactive radical, it resulted in loss of process performance. It is also possible that H2O2 could have upset the normal aerobic respiration process by introducing oxidative stress conditions on the catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes that deal with other oxygen radicals generated as part of the overall process of reducing oxygen to water. Any test that interferes with the system in which the test is being performed is suspect. Therefore, in light of these results, the H2O2 method to test in-process oxygen transfer should be re-evaluated.

  5. A simulation study on the hydrogen storage properties of fullerene family molecules Cx(x = 56,60,70) and their hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei; Xiao, Ming; Chen, Mu-Qing; Xu, Jia-Jing; Tang, Yong-Jian

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen storage is a key factor for the application of hydrogen energy. From first principle calculation, we have acquired the energy barrier for hydrogen molecules to pass through the hexagonal rings and pentagonal rings of the fullerene. Then the absorption energy and energy barrier are used to analyze the hydrogen adsorption capacity of the fullerene family and their hydrides. We have also studied the hydrogen storage properties of the fullerene family and their hydrides by grand canonical Monte Carlo method. It is found that the weight density of hydrogen storage at ambient temperature and pressure can reach 7.71 wt.%. The results show that it is difficult for hydrogen to get into the carbon cage of the fullerene because of the high energy barrier, while it is beneficial to destroy the fullerene structure for the processes of absorption and desorption. Meanwhile, fullerene hydrogenation is an effective method to improve the hydrogen storage properties. Our study facilitates the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials, and provides theoretical support to improve the hydrogen storage capability for materials.

  6. A simulation study on the hydrogen storage properties of fullerene family molecules Cx(x = 56,60,70) and their hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei; Xiao, Ming; Chen, Mu-Qing; Xu, Jia-Jing; Tang, Yong-Jian

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen storage is a key factor for the application of hydrogen energy. From first principle calculation, we have acquired the energy barrier for hydrogen molecules to pass through the hexagonal rings and pentagonal rings of the fullerene. Then the absorption energy and energy barrier are used to analyze the hydrogen adsorption capacity of the fullerene family and their hydrides. We have also studied the hydrogen storage properties of the fullerene family and their hydrides by grand canonical Monte Carlo method. It is found that the weight density of hydrogen storage at ambient temperature and pressure can reach 7.71 wt.%. The results show that it is difficult for hydrogen to get into the carbon cage of the fullerene because of the high energy barrier, while it is beneficial to destroy the fullerene structure for the processes of absorption and desorption. Meanwhile, fullerene hydrogenation is an effective method to improve the hydrogen storage properties. Our study facilitates the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials, and provides theoretical support to improve the hydrogen storage capability for materials.

  7. Development & Optimization of Materials and Processes for a Cost Effective Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production System. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, Eric W

    2011-01-17

    The overall project objective was to apply high throughput experimentation and combinatorial methods together with novel syntheses to discover and optimize efficient, practical, and economically sustainable materials for photoelectrochemical production of bulk hydrogen from water. Automated electrochemical synthesis and photoelectrochemical screening systems were designed and constructed and used to study a variety of new photoelectrocatalytic materials. We evaluated photocatalytic performance in the dark and under illumination with or without applied bias in a high-throughput manner and did detailed evaluation on many materials. Significant attention was given to -Fe2O3 based semiconductor materials and thin films with different dopants were synthesized by co-electrodeposition techniques. Approximately 30 dopants including Al, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Mo, Ti, Pt, etc. were investigated. Hematite thin films doped with Al, Ti, Pt, Cr, and Mo exhibited significant improvements in efficiency for photoelectrochemical water splitting compared with undoped hematite. In several cases we collaborated with theorists who used density functional theory to help explain performance trends and suggest new materials. The best materials were investigated in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visual spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photoelectrocatalytic performance of the thin films was evaluated and their incident photon

  8. Bio-hydrolysis and bio-hydrogen production from food waste by thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic process.

    PubMed

    Algapani, Dalal E; Qiao, Wei; Su, Min; di Pumpo, Francesca; Wandera, Simon M; Adani, Fabrizio; Dong, Renjie

    2016-09-01

    High-temperature pretreatment plays a key role in the anaerobic digestion of food waste (FW). However, the suitable temperature is not yet determined. In this work, a long-term experiment was conducted to compare hydrolysis, acidogenesis, acetogenesis, and hydrogen production at 55°C and 70°C, using real FW in CSTR reactors. The results obtained indicated that acidification was the rate-limiting step at both temperatures with similar process kinetics characterizations. However, the thermophilic pretreatment was more advantageous than the hyperthermophilic with suspended solids solubilization of 47.7% and 29.5% and total VFA vs. soluble COD ratio of 15.2% and 4.9%, for thermophilic and hyperthermophilic treatment, respectively, with a hydrolytic reaction time (HRT) of 10days and an OLR of 14kgCOD/m(3)d. Moreover, stable hydrogen yield (70.7ml-H2/gVSin) and content in off gas (58.6%) was achieved at HRT 5days, pH 5.5, and temperature of 55°C, as opposed to 70°C.

  9. Bio-hydrolysis and bio-hydrogen production from food waste by thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic process.

    PubMed

    Algapani, Dalal E; Qiao, Wei; Su, Min; di Pumpo, Francesca; Wandera, Simon M; Adani, Fabrizio; Dong, Renjie

    2016-09-01

    High-temperature pretreatment plays a key role in the anaerobic digestion of food waste (FW). However, the suitable temperature is not yet determined. In this work, a long-term experiment was conducted to compare hydrolysis, acidogenesis, acetogenesis, and hydrogen production at 55°C and 70°C, using real FW in CSTR reactors. The results obtained indicated that acidification was the rate-limiting step at both temperatures with similar process kinetics characterizations. However, the thermophilic pretreatment was more advantageous than the hyperthermophilic with suspended solids solubilization of 47.7% and 29.5% and total VFA vs. soluble COD ratio of 15.2% and 4.9%, for thermophilic and hyperthermophilic treatment, respectively, with a hydrolytic reaction time (HRT) of 10days and an OLR of 14kgCOD/m(3)d. Moreover, stable hydrogen yield (70.7ml-H2/gVSin) and content in off gas (58.6%) was achieved at HRT 5days, pH 5.5, and temperature of 55°C, as opposed to 70°C. PMID:27295255

  10. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H2. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al2O3. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H2, CH4, CO, CO2. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H2O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  11. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Monica Mihet, Maria Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  12. Glycolaldehyde, methyl formate and acetic acid adsorption and thermal desorption from interstellar ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Daren J.; Puletti, Fabrizio; Brown, Wendy A.; Woods, Paul M.; Viti, Serena; Slater, Ben

    2015-02-01

    We have undertaken a detailed investigation of the adsorption, desorption and thermal processing of the astrobiologically significant isomers glycolaldehyde, acetic acid and methyl formate. Here, we present the results of laboratory infrared and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of the three isomers from model interstellar ices adsorbed on a carbonaceous dust grain analogue surface. Laboratory infrared data show that the isomers can be clearly distinguished on the basis of their infrared spectra, which has implications for observations of interstellar ice spectra. Laboratory TPD data also show that the three isomers can be distinguished on the basis of their thermal desorption behaviour. In particular, TPD data show that the isomers cannot be treated the same way in astrophysical models of desorption. The desorption of glycolaldehyde and acetic acid from water-dominated ices is very similar, with desorption being mainly dictated by water ice. However, methyl formate also desorbs from the surface of the ice, as a pure desorption feature, and therefore desorbs at a lower temperature than the other two isomers. This is more clearly indicated by models of the desorption on astrophysical time-scales corresponding to the heating rate of 25 and 5 M⊙ stars. For a 25 M⊙ star, our model shows that a proportion of the methyl formate can be found in the gas phase at earlier times compared to glycolaldehyde and acetic acid. This has implications for the observation and detection of these molecules, and potentially explains why methyl formate has been observed in a wider range of astrophysical environments than the other two isomers.

  13. Laser desorption of explosives as a way to create an effective non-contact sampling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmalov, Artem E.; Chistyakov, Alexander A.; Kotkovskii, Gennadii E.

    2015-10-01

    Comparison of desorption effectiveness of Nd3+:YAG nanosecond laser sources (λ=266, 354, 532 nm) has been carried out to investigate a possibility of creating a non-contact sampling device for detectors of explosives based on principles of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS). The results of mass spectrometric study of laser desorption of nitroamine, nitrate ester and nitroaromatic compounds from a quartz substrate are presented. It is shown that irradiation of adsorbed layers of studied samples by a single pulse of non-resonant laser radiation (λ=532 nm) leads to efficient desorption at laser intensity 107 W/cm2 and above. Excitation of the first singlet state of nitro compounds by resonant radiation (λ=354 nm) provides heating of adsorbed layers and thermal desorption. A strongly non-equilibrium (non-thermal) dissociation process is developed when the second singlet state of nitroaromatic molecules is excited by radiation at λ=266 nm, along with thermal desorption. It is shown that Nd3+: YAG laser with wavelength λ=266 nm, pulse duration 5-10 ns, intensity 107-109 W/cm2 is the most effective source for creation a non-contact sampling device based on desorption of explosives from surfaces.

  14. Electronic Desorption of gas from metals

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M K; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Kramer, A; Kwan, J; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G

    2006-11-02

    During heavy ion operation in several particle accelerators world-wide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE{sub e}/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  15. Laser-induced desorption from sapphire surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, A.V.; Schildbach, M.A.

    1992-03-01

    Laser-induced desorption of energetic ({approximately}7eV) aluminum ions was observed from clean and water-covered sapphire (1102) surfaces using time-of-flight mass spectrometry with laser wavelengths of 1064, 355, and 266 nm. In sharp contrast, O{sup +} (H{sup +} and OH{sup +}) ions were observed in electron-induced desorption measurements with 300 eV electrons from the bare (water- covered) (1102) surface. Sapphire surfaces were characterized with low energy electron diffraction, reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy. 8 refs.

  16. An investigation of the kinetics for hydrogen chemisorption on iron metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    A quasi-isothermal approach was used to study the kinetics of hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide chemisorption onto iron film in an effort to understand the environmental degradation of steels. The coverage of chemisorbed hydrogen or chemisorbed sulfur was observed as a function of time for fixed conditions of substrate temperature. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to observe the sulfur and chemisorption-induced resistance change was employed to monitor hydrogen coverage. To compare the results obtained from studying the kinetics by two different techniques, the kinetics of oxygen chemisorption onto iron films was also studied. A reaction model utilized to interpret the H2/Fe2 chemisorption kinetics was applied to data from an earlier study on the desorption kinetics for H2 chemisorbed onto nicket films in the vicinity of the Curie temperature of the film. This analysis permitted a separation of the gross desorption process into individual components so that the influence of the magnetic phase transition on the rate constants could be determined.

  17. Composite Pd and Pd Alloy Porous Stainless Steel Membranes for Hydrogen Production and Process Intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Hua Ma; Nikolaos Kazantzis; Ivan Mardilovich; Federico Guazzone; Alexander Augustine; Reyyan Koc

    2011-11-06

    The synthesis of composite Pd membranes has been modified by the addition of a Al(OH){sub 3} graded layer and sequential annealing at high temperatures to obtain membranes with high permeance and outstanding selectivity stability for over 4000 hours at 450°C. Most of the membranes achieved in this work showed H{sub 2} flux well above 2010 DOE targets and in some case, also above 2015 DOE targets. Similar composite membranes were tested in water gas shift reaction atmospheres and showed to be stable with high CO conversion and high hydrogen recovery for over 1000 hours. The H{sub 2} permeance of composite Pd-Au membranes was studied as well as its resistance in H{sub 2}S containing atmospheres. H{sub 2}S poisoning of Pd-based membranes was reduced by the addition of Au and the loss undergone by membranes was found to be almost totally recoverable with 10-30 wt%Au. PSA technique was studied to test the possibility of H{sub 2}S and COS removal from feed stream with limited success since the removal of H{sub 2}S also led to the removal of a large fraction of the CO{sub 2}. The economics of a WGS bundle reactor, using the information of the membranes fabricated under this project and integrated into an IGCC plant were studied based on a 2D reactor modeling. The calculations showed that without a government incentive to impose a CO{sub 2} tax, application of WGS membrane reactors in IGCC would be not as economically attractive as regular pulverized coal plants.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen sulfide ; 7783 - 06 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  19. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  20. Process sensitivity studies of the Westinghouse Sulfur Cycle for hydrogen generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carty, R.; Funk, J.; Soliman, M.; Conger, W.; Brecher, L.; Spewock, S.; Cox, K.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of variations of acid concentration, pressure, and temperature on the thermal process efficiency of the Westinghouse Sulfur Cycle was examined using the University of Kentucky's HYDRGN program. Modifications to the original program were made to duplicate the process flow sheet and take into account combined-cycle heat-to-work efficiencies for electrochemical work requirements, aqueous solutions, and heat-of-mixing effects. A total of 125 process variations were considered (acid concentration: 50-90 w/o; pressure: 15-750 psia; temperature: 922-1366 K (2000 F)). The methods of analysis, results, and conclusions are presented.