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Sample records for hydrogen desorption process

  1. Hydrogen desorption kinetics for aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma processed silicon (001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Carter, Richard J.; Schneider, Thomas P.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    The desorption kinetics of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from silicon (001) surfaces exposed to aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasmas were examined using temperature programmed desorption. Multiple H{sub 2} desorption states were observed and attributed to surface monohydride (SiH), di/trihydride (SiH{sub 2/3}), and hydroxide (SiOH) species, subsurface hydrogen trapped at defects, and hydrogen evolved during the desorption of surface oxides. The observed surface hydride species were dependent on the surface temperature during hydrogen plasma exposure with mono, di, and trihydride species being observed after low temperature exposure (150 °C), while predominantly monohydride species were observed after higher temperature exposure (450 °C). The ratio of surface versus subsurface H{sub 2} desorption was also found to be dependent on the substrate temperature with 150 °C remote hydrogen plasma exposure generally leading to more H{sub 2} evolved from subsurface states and 450 °C exposure leading to more H{sub 2} desorption from surface SiH{sub x} species. Additional surface desorption states were observed, which were attributed to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111) facets formed as a result of surface etching by the remote hydrogen plasma or aqueous hydrogen fluoride treatment. The kinetics of surface H{sub 2} desorption were found to be in excellent agreement with prior investigations of silicon surfaces exposed to thermally generated atomic hydrogen.

  2. Enhanced selective hydrogen desorption from metals

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1982-12-01

    The thermal desorption of hydrogen isotopes from a metal is usually a second order process, the rate for which becomes asymptotically slow. We present a method for enhancing the desorption rate of one particular isotope by maintaining a constant pressure of another molecular species. This results in an effective first order desorption and concomitant exponential decay of the concentration of the selected isotope. Data are presented for the enhanced desorption of deuterium from a Zr-Al getter. The results agree well with a theoretical model, which is discussed. This enhanced desorption method should be particularly useful for tritium operation in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor.

  3. Enhanced selective hydrogen desorption from metals

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1983-04-01

    The thermal desorption of hydrogen isotopes from a metal is usually a second order process the rate for which becomes asymptotically slow. We present a method for enhancing the desorption rate of one particular isotope by maintaining a constant pressure of another molecular species. This results in an effective first order desorption and concommitant exponential decay of the concentration of the selected isotope. Data is presented for the enhanced desorption of deuterium from a Zr--Al getter. The results agree well with a theoretical model, which is discussed. This enhanced desorption method should be particularly useful for tritium operation in the tokamak fusion test reactor.

  4. Complex surface analytical investigations on hydrogen absorption and desorption processes of a TiMn2-based alloy.

    PubMed

    Schülke, Mark; Kiss, Gábor; Paulus, Hubert; Lammers, Martin; Ramachandran, Vaidyanath; Sankaran, Kannan; Müller, Karl-Heinz

    2009-04-01

    Metal hydrides are one of the most promising technologies in the field of hydrogen storage due to their high volumetric storage density. Important reaction steps take place at the very surface of the solid during hydrogen absorption. Since these reaction steps are drastically influenced by the properties and potential contamination of the solid, it is very important to understand the characteristics of the surface, and a variety of analytical methods are required to achieve this. In this work, a TiMn(2)-type metal hydride alloy is investigated by means of high-pressure activation measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS). In particular, TDMS is an analytical tool that, in contrast to SIMS or SNMS, allows the hydrogen content in a metal to be quantified. Furthermore, it allows the activation energy for desorption to be determined from TDMS profiles; the method used to achieve this is presented here in detail. In the results section, it is shown that the oxide layer formed during manufacture and long-term storage prevents any hydrogen from being absorbed, and so an activation process is required. XPS measurements show the oxide states of the main alloy elements, and a layer 18 nm thick is determined via SNMS. Furthermore, defined oxide layers are produced and characterized in UHV using XPS. The influence of these thin oxide layers on the hydrogen sorption process is examined using TDMS. Finally, the activation energy of desorption is determined for the investigated alloy using the method presented here, and values of 46 kJ/mol for hydrogen sorbed in UHV and 103 kJ/mol for hydrogen originating from the manufacturing process are obtained.

  5. Diffusion Analysis Of Hydrogen-Desorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1988-01-01

    Distribution of hydrogen in metal explains observed desorption rate. Report describes application of diffusion theory to anaylsis of experimental data on uptake and elimination of hydrogen in high-strength alloys of 25 degree C. Study part of program aimed at understanding embrittlement of metals by hydrogen. Two nickel-base alloys, Rene 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, studied. Desorption of hydrogen explained by distribution of hydrogen in metal. "Fast" hydrogen apparently not due to formation of hydrides on and below surface as proposed.

  6. Magnetization processes in two different types of anisotropic, fully dense NdFeB hydrogenation, disproportionation, desorption, and recombination magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutfleisch, O.; Eckert, D.; Schäfer, R.; Müller, K. H.; Panchanathan, V.

    2000-05-01

    Two types of textured, fully dense NdFeB hydrogenation, disproportionation, desorption, and recombination (HDDR) magnets were produced. The first type was produced by hot pressing isotropic HDDR powder followed by die upsetting; the second, by hot pressing prealigned, anisotropic HDDR powder (MQA-T). Studies of the magnetization processes revealed that for isotropic HDDR powder and its hot pressed and die-upset magnets a much larger initial susceptibility is found after thermal demagnetization than after reverse dc-field demagnetization. Prealigned, hot pressed magnets made from MQA-T material showed a different virgin magnetization curve, indicating a unique coercivity mechanism. Interaction domains larger than the average grain size can be observed in both cases by Kerr microscopy, with the MQA-T type showing significantly broader interaction domains.

  7. Current-Driven Hydrogen Desorption from Graphene: Experiment and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, L.; Pal, Partha P.; Seideman, Tamar; Guisinger, Nathan P.; Guest, Jeffrey R.

    2016-02-04

    Electron-stimulated desorption of hydrogen from the graphene/SiC(0001) surface at room temperature was investigated with ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations in order to elucidate the desorption mechanisms and pathways. Two different desorption processes were observed. In the high electron energy regime (4-8 eV), the desorption yield is independent of both voltage and current, which is attributed to the direct electronic excitation of the C-H bond. In the low electron energy regime (2-4 eV), however, the desorption yield exhibits a threshold dependence on voltage, which is explained by the vibrational excitation of the C-H bond via transient ionization induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. The observed current-independence of the desorption yield suggests that the vibrational excitation is a singleelectron process. We also observed that the curvature of graphene dramatically affects hydrogen desorption. Desorption from concave regions was measured to be much more probable than desorption from convex regions in the low electron energy regime (~ 2 eV), as would be expected from the identified desorption mechanism

  8. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  9. Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material

    SciTech Connect

    Guterl, Jerome Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2015-07-28

    Desorption phase of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments performed on tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion relevant conditions is analyzed using a reaction-diffusion model describing hydrogen retention in material bulk. Two regimes of hydrogen desorption are identified depending on whether hydrogen trapping rate is faster than hydrogen diffusion rate in material during TDS experiments. In both regimes, a majority of hydrogen released from material defects is immediately outgassed instead of diffusing deeply in material bulk when the evolution of hydrogen concentration in material is quasi-static, which is the case during TDS experiments performed with tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion related conditions. In this context, analytical expressions of the hydrogen outgassing flux as a function of the material temperature are obtained with sufficient accuracy to describe main features of thermal desorption spectra (TDSP). These expressions are then used to highlight how characteristic temperatures of TDSP depend on hydrogen retention parameters, such as trap concentration or activation energy of detrapping processes. The use of Arrhenius plots to characterize retention processes is then revisited when hydrogen trapping takes place during TDS experiments. Retention processes are also characterized using the shape of desorption peaks in TDSP, and it is shown that diffusion of hydrogen in material during TDS experiment can induce long desorption tails visible aside desorption peaks at high temperature in TDSP. These desorption tails can be used to estimate activation energy of diffusion of hydrogen in material.

  10. HYDROGEN AND ITS DESORPTION IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH,H.C.

    2002-11-11

    Hydrogen is the dominating gas specie in room temperature, ultrahigh vacuum systems of particle accelerators and storage rings, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven. Rapid pressure increase of a few decades in hydrogen and other residual gases was observed during RHIC's recent high intensity gold and proton runs. The type and magnitude of the pressure increase were analyzed and compared with vacuum conditioning, beam intensity, number of bunches and bunch spacing. Most of these pressure increases were found to be consistent with those induced by beam loss and/or electron stimulated desorption from electron multipacting.

  11. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  12. Hydrogen retention in tungsten materials studied by Laser Induced Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobinski, M.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Huber, A.; Reinhart, M.; Möller, S.; Sergienko, G.; Samm, U.; 't Hoen, M. H. J.; Manhard, A.; Schmid, K.; Textor Team

    2013-07-01

    Development of methods to characterise the first wall in ITER and future fusion devices without removal of wall tiles is important to support safety assessments for tritium retention and dust production and to understand plasma wall processes in general. Laser based techniques are presently under investigation to provide these requirements, among which Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is proposed to measure the deuterium and tritium load of the plasma facing surfaces by thermal desorption and spectroscopic detection of the desorbed fuel in the edge of the fusion plasma. The method relies on its capability to desorb the hydrogen isotopes in a laser heated spot. The application of LID on bulk tungsten targets exposed to a wide range of deuterium fluxes, fluences and impact energies under different surface temperatures is investigated in this paper. The results are compared with Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS), Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) and a diffusion model.

  13. Atomic-level Pd-Pt alloying and largely enhanced hydrogen-storage capacity in bimetallic nanoparticles reconstructed from core/shell structure by a process of hydrogen absorption/desorption.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Yamauchi, Miho; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki

    2010-04-28

    We have achieved the creation of a solid-solution alloy where Pd and Pt are homogeneously mixed at the atomic level, by a process of hydrogen absorption/desorption as a trigger for core (Pd)/shell (Pt) nanoparticles. The structural change from core/shell to solid solution has been confirmed by in situ powder X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectra, solid-state (2)H NMR measurement, and hydrogen pressure-composition isotherms. The successfully obtained Pd-Pt solid-solution nanoparticles with a Pt content of 8-21 atom % had a higher hydrogen-storage capacity than Pd nanoparticles. Moreover, the hydrogen-storage capacity of Pd-Pt solid-solution nanoparticles can be tuned by changing the composition of Pd and Pt.

  14. Texture in a ternary Nd 16.2Fe 78.2B 5.6 powder using a modified hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutfleisch, O.; Gebel, B.; Mattern, N.

    2000-02-01

    A modified hydrogenation-disproportionation desorption-recombination (HDDR) process consisting of (i) solid disproportionation and (ii) slow recombination under partial hydrogen pressure has been applied to a Nd 16.2Fe 78.2B 5.6 alloy. Scanning electron microscopy shows that an initially fine rod-like structure of NdH 2± x and Fe observed after 15 min of hydrogenation at 900°C is transformed into a granular morphology with prolonged annealing. Simultaneously, finely dispersed tetragonal Fe 3B particles of 10-50 nm diameter exist. XRD studies show that this metastable Fe 3B phase is transformed to Fe 2B and Fe on further annealing. Short solid-disproportionation times result in a higher degree of anisotropy after recombination, whereas long annealing times and conventional processing lead to isotropic material. It is concluded that the formation of the intermediate tetragonal Fe 3B phase after solid disproportionation is pivotal for the inducement of texture in HDDR processed ternary NdFeB-type alloys.

  15. Molecular beam-thermal hydrogen desorption from palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, R. F. M.; Berardo, F. M. V.; Ribeiro, J. H. F.

    2010-04-15

    Among the most efficient techniques for hydrogen desorption monitoring, thermal desorption mass spectrometry is a very sensitive one, but in certain cases can give rise to uptake misleading results due to residual hydrogen partial pressure background variations. In this work one develops a novel thermal desorption variant based on the effusive molecular beam technique that represents a significant improvement in the accurate determination of hydrogen mass absorbed on a solid sample. The enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for trace hydrogen is on the order of 20%, and no previous calibration with a chemical standard is required. The kinetic information obtained from the hydrogen desorption mass spectra (at a constant heating rate of 1 deg. C/min) accounts for the consistency of the technique.

  16. Sequential desorption energy of hydrogen from nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Deepika,; Kumar, Rakesh; R, Kamal Raj.; Kumar, T. J. Dhilip

    2015-06-24

    We report reversible Hydrogen adsorption on Nickel clusters, which act as a catalyst for solid state storage of Hydrogen on a substrate. First-principles technique is employed to investigate the maximum number of chemically adsorbed Hydrogen molecules on Nickel cluster. We observe a maximum of four Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom, but the average Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom decrease with cluster size. The dissociative chemisorption energy per Hydrogen molecule and sequential desorption energy per Hydrogen atom on Nickel cluster is found to decrease with number of adsorbed Hydrogen molecules, which on optimization may help in economical storage and regeneration of Hydrogen as a clean energy carrier.

  17. Hydrogen Desorption and Adsorption Measurements on Graphite Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, C. C.; Ye, Y.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Witham, C. K.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Fultz, B.

    1998-01-01

    Graphite nanofibers were synthesized and their hydrogen desorption and adsorption properties are reported for 77 and 300 K. Catalysts were made by several different methods including chemical routes, mechanical alloying and gas condensation.

  18. Hydrogen Desorption and Adsorption Measurements on Graphite Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, C. C.; Ye, Y.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Witham, C. K.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Fultz, B.

    1998-01-01

    Graphite nanofibers were synthesized and their hydrogen desorption and adsorption properties are reported for 77 and 300 K. Catalysts were made by several different methods including chemical routes, mechanical alloying and gas condensation.

  19. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Aluminum Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wanseop; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jaeyong

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3 or alane) is known to store maximum 10.1 wt.% of hydrogen at relatively low temperature (< 100 degrees C), which partially fulfills the U.S. department of energy requirements for gravimetric loading capacity. However, its detailed mechanisms of appearing of different phases, structural stability, and dynamics of hydrogen desorption are still not clear. To understand the desorption properties of hydrogen in alane, thermodynamically stable α-AlH3 was synthesized by employing an ethereal reaction method. The dependence of pathways on phase formation and the properties of hydrogen evolution were investigated, and the results were compared with the ones for γ-AlH3. It was found that γ-AlH3 requires 10 degrees C higher than that of γ-AlH3 to form, and its decomposition rate demonstrated enhanced endothermic stabilities. For desorption, all hydrogen atoms of alane evolved under an isothermal condition at 138 degrees C in less than 1 hour, and the sample completely transformed to pure aluminum. Our results show that the total amount of desorbed hydrogen from α-AlH3 exceeded 9.05 wt.%, with a possibility of further increase. Easy synthesis, thermal stability, and a large amount of hydrogen desorption of alane fulfill the requirements for light-weight hydrogen storage materials once the pathway of hydrogen cycling is provided.

  20. Kinetic Modification on Hydrogen Desorption of Lithium Hydride and Magnesium Amide System.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Hiroki; Wang, Yongming; Hino, Satoshi; Isobe, Shigehito; Tokoyoda, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2015-06-29

    Various synthesis and rehydrogenation processes of lithium hydride (LiH) and magnesium amide (Mg(NH₂)₂) system with 8:3 molar ratio are investigated to understand the kinetic factors and effectively utilize the essential hydrogen desorption properties. For the hydrogen desorption with a solid-solid reaction, it is expected that the kinetic properties become worse by the sintering and phase separation. In fact, it is experimentally found that the low crystalline size and the close contact of LiH and Mg(NH₂)₂ lead to the fast hydrogen desorption. To preserve the potential hydrogen desorption properties, thermochemical and mechanochemical rehydrogenation processes are investigated. Although the only thermochemical process results in slowing the reaction rate due to the crystallization, the ball-milling can recover the original hydrogen desorption properties. Furthermore, the mechanochemical process at 150 °C is useful as the rehydrogenation technique to preserve the suitable crystalline size and mixing state of the reactants. As a result, it is demonstrated that the 8LiH and 3Mg(NH₂)₂ system is recognized as the potential hydrogen storage material to desorb more than 5.5 mass% of H₂ at 150 °C.

  1. Kinetic Modification on Hydrogen Desorption of Lithium Hydride and Magnesium Amide System

    PubMed Central

    Miyaoka, Hiroki; Wang, Yongming; Hino, Satoshi; Isobe, Shigehito; Tokoyoda, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    Various synthesis and rehydrogenation processes of lithium hydride (LiH) and magnesium amide (Mg(NH2)2) system with 8:3 molar ratio are investigated to understand the kinetic factors and effectively utilize the essential hydrogen desorption properties. For the hydrogen desorption with a solid-solid reaction, it is expected that the kinetic properties become worse by the sintering and phase separation. In fact, it is experimentally found that the low crystalline size and the close contact of LiH and Mg(NH2)2 lead to the fast hydrogen desorption. To preserve the potential hydrogen desorption properties, thermochemical and mechanochemical rehydrogenation processes are investigated. Although the only thermochemical process results in slowing the reaction rate due to the crystallization, the ball-milling can recover the original hydrogen desorption properties. Furthermore, the mechanochemical process at 150 °C is useful as the rehydrogenation technique to preserve the suitable crystalline size and mixing state of the reactants. As a result, it is demonstrated that the 8LiH and 3Mg(NH2)2 system is recognized as the potential hydrogen storage material to desorb more than 5.5 mass% of H2 at 150 °C. PMID:28793414

  2. Hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of U 2Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takuya, Yamamoto; Satoru, Tanaka; Michio, Yamawaki

    1990-02-01

    Hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of U 2Ti intermetallic compound was examined over the temperature range of 298 to 973 K and at hydrogen pressures below 10 5 Pa. It absorbs hydrogen up to 7.6 atoms per F.U. (formula unit) by two step reactions and hence each desorption isotherm is separated into two plateau regions. In the first plateau, a newly-found ternary hydride is formed, where the hydrogen concentration, cH, reaches 2.4 H atoms/F.U. In the second plateau, UH 3 is formed and cH reaches 7.6 H atoms/F.U. The specimen is disintegrated into fine powder in the second plateau, while in the first plateau the ternary hydride which was identified to be UTi 2H x, ( x = 4.8 to 6.2) showed high durability against powdering. It is predicted that UTi 2 can be suitable material for tritium storage.

  3. Kinetics of hydrogen desorption from MgH2 and AlH3 hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terent'ev, P. B.; Gerasimov, E. G.; Mushnikov, N. V.; Uimin, M. A.; Maikov, V. V.; Gaviko, V. S.; Golovatenko, V. D.

    2015-12-01

    Kinetic parameters of the process of thermal decomposition of the MgH2 hydride (obtained by the method of the mechanoactivation of magnesium in a hydrogen atmosphere) and of the commercial AlH3 hydride have been studied upon the rapid heating in the range of temperatures of 150-510°C at hydrogen pressures of 0-2 atm. The time dependences of the amount of hydrogen released by the metal hydrides at different temperatures and pressures have been determined. It has been shown that the activation energies of the hydrogen desorption are 135 kJ/mol for MgH2 and 107 kJ/mol for AlH3. The maximum rates of hydrogen desorption from the investigated metal hydrides have been established, and the temperatures and initial pressures that ensure the maximum rate and maximum volume of the hydrogen release have been determined.

  4. Thermal Desorption Analysis of Hydrogen in High Strength Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, M.; Hirakami, D.; Tarui, T.

    2012-02-01

    Thermal desorption analyses (TDA) were conducted in high strength martensitic steels containing carbon from 0.33 to 1.0 mass pct, which were charged with hydrogen at 1223 K (950 °C) under hydrogen of one atmospheric pressure and quenched to room temperature. In 0.33C steel, which had the highest M s temperature, only one desorption peak was observed around 373 K (100 °C), whereas two peaks, one at a similar temperature and the other around and above 573 K (300 °C), were observed in the other steels, the height of the second peak increasing with carbon content. In 0.82C steel, both peaks disappeared during exposure at room temperature in 1 week, whereas the peak heights decreased gradually over 2 weeks in specimens electrolytically charged with hydrogen and aged for varying times at room temperature. From computer simulation, by means of the McNabb-Foster theory coupled with theories of carbon segregation, these peaks are likely to be due to trapping of hydrogen in the strain fields and cores of dislocations, and presumably to a lesser extent in prior austenite grain boundaries. The results also indicate that carbon atoms prevent and even expel hydrogen from trapping sites during quenching and aging in these steels.

  5. Plutonium desorption from mineral surfaces at environmental concentrations of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Begg, James D; Zavarin, Mavrik; Kersting, Annie B

    2014-06-03

    Knowledge of Pu adsorption and desorption behavior on mineral surfaces is crucial for understanding its environmental mobility. Here we demonstrate that environmental concentrations of H2O2 can affect the stability of Pu adsorbed to goethite, montmorillonite, and quartz across a wide range of pH values. In batch experiments where Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite for 21 days at pH 4, 6, and 8, the addition of 5-500 μM H2O2 resulted in significant Pu desorption. At pH 6 and 8 this desorption was transient with readsorption of the Pu to goethite within 30 days. At pH 4, no Pu readsorption was observed. Experiments with both quartz and montmorillonite at 5 μM H2O2 desorbed far less Pu than in the goethite experiments highlighting the contribution of Fe redox couples in controlling Pu desorption at low H2O2 concentrations. Plutonium(IV) adsorbed to quartz and subsequently spiked with 500 μM H2O2 resulted in significant desorption of Pu, demonstrating the complexity of the desorption process. Our results provide the first evidence of H2O2-driven desorption of Pu(IV) from mineral surfaces. We suggest that this reaction pathway coupled with environmental levels of hydrogen peroxide may contribute to Pu mobility in the environment.

  6. Surface changes on AlH3 during the hydrogen desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shunsuke; Bielmann, Michael; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Borgschulte, Andreas; Züttel, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    Surface change of α-AlH3 during the hydrogen desorption was investigated by means of in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy. The surface of AlH3 covered by an oxide layer significantly changes upon hydrogen desorption and the hydrogen desorption rate increases remarkably. In this study, the role of the surface oxide layer on AlH3 in view of the hydrogen desorption kinetics was investigated. AlH3 only decomposes into Al and H2 at the free surface and not in the bulk. Therefore, a closed surface oxide layer prevents the thermodynamically unstable AlH3 from decomposition.

  7. Hydrogen absorption and desorption in rapidly solidified Mg- Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urgnani, J.; Di Chio, M.; Palumbo, M.; Feuerbacher, M.; Fernandez, J. F.; Leardini, F.; Baricco, M.

    2009-01-01

    The addition of Al to Mg has been indicated as a suitable way to destabilise the hydride phase, in order to bring the absorption and desorption reactions close to reasonable temperatures and pressure values for hydrogen storage. Rapid solidification is known to refine the microstructure of Mg-Al alloys and it might improve the H2 absorption/desorption kinetics. In this paper, the interaction of H2 with rapidly solidified Mg-Al alloys have been studied for three different composition: Mg38.5Al61.5, Mg69Al31 and Mg72Al28. For Mg72Al28, no significant changes in the microstructure have been obtained by rapid solidification. In Mg69Al31, a significant grain refinement has been observed, whereas, for Mg38.5Al61.5, the formation of a metastable hexagonal phase has been found. In all cases, a disproportionation reaction has been observed after H2 absorption, leading to MgH2. After heating up to 430 °C the hydrogenated samples, a main desorption reaction from MgH2 has been observed, which brings again to the starting phases. Experimental results have been discussed on the basis of a thermodynamic assessment of the Mg-Al-H system.

  8. Hydrogen forming reaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Marianowski, L.G.; Fleming, D.K.

    1989-03-07

    A hydrogen forming process is described, comprising: conducting in a hydrogen production zone a chemical reaction forming mixed gases comprising molecular hydrogen; contacting one side of a hydrogen ion porous and molecular gas nonporous metallic foil with the mixed gases in the hydrogen production zone; dissociating the molecular hydrogen to ionic hydrogen on the one side of the metallic foil; passing the ionic hydrogen through the metallic foil to its other side; and withdrawing hydrogen from the other side of the metallic foil, thereby removing hydrogen from the hydrogen production zone.

  9. The Influence of Desorption Kinetics on Hydrogen Permeation in Iron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-30

    grains. Because of the allotropic transition of iron at 9144C and the presence of trace impurities in the bulk, the preparation of an atomically clean and...their presence results in the retardation or enhancement of the desorption process. For example, pre-adsorbed subnionolayers of sulfur , oxygen and...electrochemical permeation study (23]. In that investigation it was noticed that sulfur deposition on the membrane surface resulted in reduced permeation flux

  10. Temporal and spatial imaging of hydrogen storage materials: watching solvent and hydrogen desorption from aluminium hydride by transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Shane D; Humphries, Terry; Weaver, Louise; McGrady, G Sean

    2008-10-07

    An in situ thermal desorption study of solvated aluminum hydride (alane) by transmission electron microscopy and selected area diffraction has permitted characterisation of the structural and morphological changes during desorption of solvent and hydrogen in real-time; this powerful technique for studying hydrogen storage materials complements several others already employed.

  11. Molecular Hydrogen Formation on Low Temperature Surfaces in Temperature Programmed Desorption Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidali, G.; Pirronello, V.; Li, L.; Roser, J.; Manico, G.; Mehl, R.; Lederhendler, A.; Perets, H. B.; Brucato, J. R.; Biham, O.

    The study of the formation of molecular hydrogen on low temperature surfaces is of interest both because it allows to explore elementary steps in the heterogeneous catalysis of a simple molecule and because of the applications in astrochemistry. Here we report results of experiments of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate surfaces using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). In these experiments beams of H and D atoms are irradiated on the surface of an amorphous silicate sample. The desorption rate of HD molecules is monitored using a mass spectrometer during a subsequent TPD run. The results are analyzed using rate equations and the activation energies of the processes leading to molecular hydrogen formation are obtained from the TPD data. We show that a model based on a single isotope provides the correct results for the activation energies for diffusion and desorption of H atoms. These results can thus be used to evaluate the formation rate of H_2 on dust grains under the actual conditions present in interstellar clouds.

  12. Measurement of hydrogen solubility and desorption rate in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Erck, R.; Park, E.T.

    1997-04-01

    Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium was measured at a hydrogen pressure of 9.09 x 10{sup {minus}4} torr at temperatures between 250 and 700{degrees}C. Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium decreased with temperature. The measured desorption rate of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti is a thermally activated process; the activation energy is 0.067 eV. Oxygen-charged V-4Cr-4Ti specimens were also investigated to determine the effect of oxygen impurity on hydrogen solubility and desorption in the alloy. Oxygen in V-4Cr-4Ti increases hydrogen solubility and desorption kinetics. To determine the effect of a calcium oxide insulator coating on V-4Cr-4Ti, hydrogen solubility in lithium-calcium alloys that contained 0-8.0 percent calcium was also measured. The distribution ratio R of hydrogen between liquid lithium or lithium-calcium and V-4Cr-4Ti increased as temperature decreased (R {approx} 10 and 100 at 700 and 250{degrees}C, respectively). However at <267{degrees}C, solubility data could not be obtained by this method because of the slow kinetics of hydrogen permeation through the vanadium alloy.

  13. Hydrogenation of CO-bearing species on grains: unexpected chemical desorption of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Moudens, A.; Baouche, S.; Chaabouni, H.; Dulieu, F.

    2016-05-01

    The amount of methanol in the gas phase and the CO depletion from the gas phase are still open problems in astrophysics. In this work, we investigate solid-state hydrogenation of CO-bearing species via H-exposure of carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and methanol-thin films deposited on cold surfaces, paying attention to the possibility of a return to the gas phase. The products are probed via infrared spectroscopy (reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy), and two types of mass spectroscopy protocols: temperature-programmed desorption, and during-exposure desorption techniques. In the case of the [CO+H] reactive system, we have found that chemical desorption of CO is more efficient than H-addition reactions and HCO and H2CO formation; the studies of the [H2CO +H] reactive system show a strong competition between all surface processes, chemical desorption of H2CO, H-addition (CH3OH formation) and H-abstraction (CO formation); finally, [CH3OH + H] seems to be a non-reactive system and chemical desorption of methanol is not efficient. CO-bearing species present a see-saw mechanism between CO and H2CO balanced by the competition of H-addition and H2-abstraction that enhances the CO chemical desorption. The chemical network leading to methanol has to be reconsidered. The methanol formation on the surface of interstellar dust grain is still possible through CO+H reaction; nevertheless, its consumption of adsorbed H atoms should be higher than previously expected.

  14. Protective coatings preventing hydrogen desorption from titanium during ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evsin, A. E.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Dovganyuk, S. S.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Shutikova, M. I.

    2017-05-01

    Effect of yttria and titanium nitride coatings on features of deuterium desorption from titanium layer is investigated. It is shown that both coatings significantly raise the temperature of maximum of deuterium thermal desorption from titanium under linear heating and prevent desorption under prolonged keeping at the operating temperature of a neutron tube target. However, under irradiation with ions of H2 + O2 plasma the barrier properties of titanium nitride appear to degrade.

  15. Modelling of hydrogen thermal desorption spectrum in nonlinear dynamical boundary-value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostikova, E. K.; Zaika, Yu V.

    2016-11-01

    One of the technological challenges for hydrogen materials science (including the ITER project) is the currently active search for structural materials with various potential applications that will have predetermined limits of hydrogen permeability. One of the experimental methods is thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). A hydrogen-saturated sample is degassed under vacuum and monotone heating. The desorption flux is measured by mass spectrometer to determine the character of interactions of hydrogen isotopes with the solid. We are interested in such transfer parameters as the coefficients of diffusion, dissolution, desorption. The paper presents a distributed boundary-value problem of thermal desorption and a numerical method for TDS spectrum simulation, where only integration of a nonlinear system of low order (compared with, e.g., the method of lines) ordinary differential equations (ODE) is required. This work is supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 15-01-00744).

  16. Change in soft magnetic properties of Fe-based metallic glasses during hydrogen absorption and desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, L.; Lovas, A.; Kiss, L.F.

    2005-08-15

    The stress level can be altered in soft magnetic amorphous alloys by hydrogen absorption. The resulting changes in the soft magnetic parameters are reversible or irreversible, depending on the chemical composition. Some of these effects are demonstrated in Fe-B, Fe-W-B, and Fe-V-B glassy ribbons, in which various magnetic parameters are measured mainly during hydrogen desorption. The rate of hydrogen desorption is also monitored by measuring the pressure change in a hermetically closed bomb. The observed phenomena are interpreted on the basis of induced stresses and chemical interactions between the solute metal and hydrogen.

  17. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  18. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  19. Numerical simulation of hydrogen desorption from high-density metal hydride hydrogen storage vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang-Kun, O.; Yi, Kyung-Woo; Cho, Sung-Wook

    2017-07-01

    Metal hydride (MH) alloys are a promising type of material in hydrogen storage applications, allowing for low-pressure, high-density storage. However, while many studies are being performed on enhancing the hydrogen storage properties of such alloys, there has been little research on large-scale storage vessels which make use of the alloys. In particular, large-scale, high-density storage devices must make allowances for the temperature variations caused by the heat of reaction between hydrogen and MH alloys, which may impact the storage characteristics. In this study, we propose a numerical model for the design and evaluation of hydrogen storage devices using MH alloys. Hydrogen desorption reaction behavior for an alloy is observed in terms of temperature and reaction rate. This behavioral correlation is used as the basis for a comprehensive simulation model of the alloy system. Calculated results are found to be in good agreement with experimentally measured data, indicating that the model may be applied to multiple system geometries, scales, and alloy compositions.

  20. GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

    1999-05-26

    Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N15H3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia.

  1. Effect of transition-metal additives on hydrogen desorption kinetics of MgH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anindya; Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2013-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the effect of transition-metal additives (Ti, Fe, Co, and Ni) on the rate of hydrogen desorption in MgH2. The presence of large concentrations of transition-metal impurities causes the Fermi level to shift according to the position of the transition-metal acceptor/donor levels in the band gap. This shift can lower the formation energy of native defects and increase their concentration. The resulting higher rates of hydrogen desorption enhance the prospect of MgH2 as a solid-state hydrogen-storage material.

  2. [Investigation of intermetalloid hydrogen sorption-desorption in physical-chemical life support system].

    PubMed

    Klimarev, S I

    2007-01-01

    A hydrogen accumulating alloy was tested for safe sorption and storage of electrolyzed hydrogen within life support system. The alloy of choice was intermetalloid LaNi5 absorbing and desorbing hydrogen at approximately room temperature and pressure A of 20 atm. Sorption was evaluated at hydrogen pressure A of 0.1; 0.2 and 0.3 atm. The rate of desorption was controlled at 2.0 l/min to maintain the standard carbon dioxide and hydrogen feed into the processor. Results of the investigation lead to the main conclusion that the hydrogen accumulating alloy can be an integral component of a new generation of life support systems.

  3. Theoretical and experimental studies of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Ir surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaghazchi, Payam; Jacob, Timo; Chen, Wenhua; Bartynski, Robert A

    2013-08-21

    We report adsorption and desorption of hydrogen on planar Ir(210) and faceted Ir(210), consisting of nanoscale {311} and (110) facets, by means of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and density functional theory (DFT) in combination with the ab initio atomistic thermodynamics approach. TPD spectra show that only one H2 peak is seen from planar Ir(210) at all coverages whereas a single H2 peak is observed at around 440 K (F1) at fractional monolayer (ML) coverage and an additional H2 peak appears at around 360 K (F2) at 1 ML coverage on faceted Ir(210), implying structure sensitivity in recombination and desorption of hydrogen on faceted Ir(210) versus planar Ir(210), but no evidence is found for size effects in recombination and desorption of hydrogen on faceted Ir(210) for average facet sizes of 5-14 nm. Calculations indicate that H prefers to bind at the two-fold short-bridge sites of the Ir surfaces. In addition, we studied the stability of the Ir surfaces in the presence of hydrogen at different H coverages through surface free energy plots as a function of the chemical potential, which is also converted to a temperature scale. Moreover, the calculations revealed the origin of the two TPD peaks of H2 from faceted Ir(210): F1 from desorption of H2 on {311} facets while F2 from desorption of H2 on (110) facets.

  4. Desorption of hydrogen from light metal hydrides: concerted electronic rearrangement and role of H···H interactions.

    PubMed

    Wolstenholme, David J; Roy, Matthew M D; Thomas, Michael E; McGrady, G Sean

    2014-04-14

    A theoretical study of the desorption of hydrogen from rhombic Group 1 metal hydride dimers reveals a concerted reorganisation of the electron density for the M-H and H-H moieties as the reaction coordinate is traversed and a closed-shell H···H interaction evolves into a covalent H2 bond. The central role played by homopolar dihydrogen bonding in this process is revealed and analysed.

  5. Theoretical and experimental studies of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Ir surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Kaghazchi, Payam; Jacob, Timo; Chen, Wenhua; ...

    2013-06-03

    Here, we report adsorption and desorption of hydrogen on planar Ir(210) and faceted Ir(210), consisting of nanoscale {311} and (110) facets, by means of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and density functional theory (DFT) in combination with the ab initio atomistic thermodynamics approach. TPD spectra show that only one H2 peak is seen from planar Ir(210) at all coverages whereas a single H2 peak is observed at around 440 K (F1) at fractional monolayer (ML) coverage and an additional H2 peak appears at around 360 K (F2) at 1 ML coverage on faceted Ir(210), implying structure sensitivity in recombination and desorptionmore » of hydrogen on faceted Ir(210) versus planar Ir(210), but no evidence is found for size effects in recombination and desorption of hydrogen on faceted Ir(210) for average facet sizes of 5-14 nm. Calculations indicate that H prefers to bind at the two-fold short-bridge sites of the Ir surfaces. In addition, we studied the stability of the Ir surfaces in the presence of hydrogen at different H coverages through surface free energy plots as a function of the chemical potential, which is also converted to a temperature scale. Moreover, the calculations revealed the origin of the two TPD peaks of H2 from faceted Ir(210): F1 from desorption of H2 on {311} facets while F2 from desorption of H2 on (110) facets.« less

  6. Advanced Hydrogen Liquefaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Joseph; Kromer, Brian; Neu, Ben; Jankowiak, Jerome; Barrett, Philip; Drnevich, Raymond

    2011-09-28

    The project identified and quantified ways to reduce the cost of hydrogen liquefaction, and reduce the cost of hydrogen distribution. The goal was to reduce the power consumption by 20% and then to reduce the capital cost. Optimizing the process, improving process equipment, and improving ortho-para conversion significantly reduced the power consumption of liquefaction, but by less than 20%. Because the efficiency improvement was less than the target, the program was stopped before the capital cost was addressed. These efficiency improvements could provide a benefit to the public to improve the design of future hydrogen liquefiers. The project increased the understanding of hydrogen liquefaction by modeling different processes and thoroughly examining ortho-para separation and conversion. The process modeling provided a benefit to the public because the project incorporated para hydrogen into the process modeling software, so liquefaction processes can be modeled more accurately than using only normal hydrogen. Adding catalyst to the first heat exchanger, a simple method to reduce liquefaction power, was identified, analyzed, and quantified. The demonstrated performance of ortho-para separation is sufficient for at least one identified process concept to show reduced power cost when compared to hydrogen liquefaction processes using conventional ortho-para conversion. The impact of improved ortho-para conversion can be significant because ortho para conversion uses about 20-25% of the total liquefaction power, but performance improvement is necessary to realize a substantial benefit. Most of the energy used in liquefaction is for gas compression. Improvements in hydrogen compression will have a significant impact on overall liquefier efficiency. Improvements to turbines, heat exchangers, and other process equipment will have less impact.

  7. Hydrogen recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2000-01-01

    A treatment process for a hydrogen-containing off-gas stream from a refinery, petrochemical plant or the like. The process includes three separation steps: condensation, membrane separation and hydrocarbon fraction separation. The membrane separation step is characterized in that it is carried out under conditions at which the membrane exhibits a selectivity in favor of methane over hydrogen of at least about 2.5.

  8. Numerical comparison of hydrogen desorption behaviors of metal hydride beds based on uranium and on zirconium-cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Kyoung, S.; Yoo, H.; Ju, H.

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, the hydrogen delivery capabilities of uranium (U) and zirconium-cobalt (ZrCo) are compared quantitatively in order to find the optimum getter materials for tritium storage. A three-dimensional hydrogen desorption model is applied to two identically designed cylindrical beds with the different materials, and hydrogen desorption simulations are then conducted. The simulation results show superior hydrogen delivery performance and easier thermal management capability for the U bed. This detailed analysis of the hydrogen desorption behaviors of beds with U and ZrCo will help to identify the optimal bed material, bed design, and operating conditions for the storage and delivery system in ITER. (authors)

  9. Investigation of potential alternative hydrogen carrier, Mg supported zeolite with temperature programmed desorption of NH3.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung June; Kim, Tak Hee; Jang, Young Bae; Lee, Jun

    2007-11-01

    Magnesium ion exchanged zeolite A was subject to the measurement of the temperature programmed desorption of NH3 to explore the possibility of the potential hydrogen carrier. The result suggested that the Mg supported NaA zeolite released a significant amount of ammonia corresponding to 1.4 Hwt% hydrogen at around 373 K. Under the same condition after the NH3 adsorption at ambient temperature, the MgCl2 sample released 1.0 Hwt% hydrogen at around 340 K. The present work suggests that the Mg supported zeolite can also be utilized as hydrogen carrier.

  10. The adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide on bimetallic RePt(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbey, David J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1988-10-01

    Bimetallic surfaces of rhenium on Pt(111) were prepared by vapor depositing rhenium on Pt(111). The adsorption and desorption behavior of CO and H 2 on bimetallic PtRe surfaces were studied using temperature programmed desorption, and compared to the behavior of CO and H 2 on the monometallic Pt(111) and Re(0001) counterparts. Depositing rhenium on a Pt(111) surface decreased the activation energy of desorption of hydrogen, and a surface composed of 0.37 monolayers of rhenium on Pt(111) showed an activation energy of hydrogen desorption that was 2.5 {kcal}/{mol} less than the 19 {kcal}/{mol} displayed by the monometallic Pt(111) surface. In contrast, the activation energy of desorption of CO from bimetallic surfaces depended very little on the bimetallic surface composition, and a value of 27 {kcal}/{mol} was observed for low CO coverages. At saturation exposures of both H 2 and CO, maximum adsorption capacities were obtained for bimetallic surfaces. A surface composed of 0.2 monolayers of rhenium on Pt(111) adsorbed 20% more hydrogen than did Pt(111) alone, while a surface composed of 0.3 monolayers of rhenium on Pt(111) adsorbed 40% more CO than did Pt(111) alone. The results obtained show that surfaces exposing both rhenium and platinum atoms show adsorption/desorption behavior towards hydrogen and CO that is different than the behavior shown by either monometallic platinum or rhenium surfaces. Since the chemisorption behavior cannot be explained as a simple combination of the two metallic components of the surface, it is concluded that an electronic interaction between the two metals at the platinum-rhenium interface modifies the bonding of adsorbates at the mixed metal sites.

  11. Theoretical and experimental studies of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Ir surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kaghazchi, Payam; Jacob, Timo; Chen, Wenhua; Bartynski, Robert A.

    2013-06-03

    Here, we report adsorption and desorption of hydrogen on planar Ir(210) and faceted Ir(210), consisting of nanoscale {311} and (110) facets, by means of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and density functional theory (DFT) in combination with the ab initio atomistic thermodynamics approach. TPD spectra show that only one H2 peak is seen from planar Ir(210) at all coverages whereas a single H2 peak is observed at around 440 K (F1) at fractional monolayer (ML) coverage and an additional H2 peak appears at around 360 K (F2) at 1 ML coverage on faceted Ir(210), implying structure sensitivity in recombination and desorption of hydrogen on faceted Ir(210) versus planar Ir(210), but no evidence is found for size effects in recombination and desorption of hydrogen on faceted Ir(210) for average facet sizes of 5-14 nm. Calculations indicate that H prefers to bind at the two-fold short-bridge sites of the Ir surfaces. In addition, we studied the stability of the Ir surfaces in the presence of hydrogen at different H coverages through surface free energy plots as a function of the chemical potential, which is also converted to a temperature scale. Moreover, the calculations revealed the origin of the two TPD peaks of H2 from faceted Ir(210): F1 from desorption of H2 on {311} facets while F2 from desorption of H2 on (110) facets.

  12. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    SciTech Connect

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F.

    2014-07-07

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O{sub 2}) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N{sub 2} on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  13. Application of diffusion theory to the analysis of hydrogen desorption data at 25 deg C

    SciTech Connect

    Danford, M.D.

    1985-10-01

    The application of diffusion theory to the analysis of hydrogen desorption data (coulombs of H/sub 2/ desorbed versus time) has been studied. From these analyses, important information concerning hydrogen solubilities and the nature of the hydrogen distributions in the metal has been obtained. Two nickel base alloys, Rene' 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, are studied in this work. For the nickel base alloys, it is found that the hydrogen distributions after electrolytic charging conforms closely to those which would be predicted by diffusion theory. For Waspaloy samples charged at 5,000 psi, it is found that the hydrogen distributions are essentially the same as those obtained by electrolytic charging. The hydrogen distributions in electrolytically charged 4340 steel, on the other hand, are essentially uniform in nature, which would not be predicted by diffusion theory. A possible explanation has been proposed. Finally, it is found that the hydrogen desorption is completely explained by the nature of the hydrogen distribution in the metal, and that the fast hydrogen is not due to surface and sub-surface hydride formation, as was originally proposed.

  14. Dust as interstellar catalyst. I. Quantifying the chemical desorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F.; Cazaux, S.; Hocuk, S.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The presence of dust in the interstellar medium has profound consequences on the chemical composition of regions where stars are forming. Recent observations show that many species formed onto dust are populating the gas phase, especially in cold environments where UV- and cosmic-ray-induced photons do not account for such processes. Aims: The aim of this paper is to understand and quantify the process that releases solid species into the gas phase, the so-called chemical desorption process, so that an explicit formula can be derived that can be included in astrochemical models. Methods: We present a collection of experimental results of more than ten reactive systems. For each reaction, different substrates such as oxidized graphite and compact amorphous water ice were used. We derived a formula for reproducing the efficiencies of the chemical desorption process that considers the equipartition of the energy of newly formed products, followed by classical bounce on the surface. In part II of this study we extend these results to astrophysical conditions. Results: The equipartition of energy correctly describes the chemical desorption process on bare surfaces. On icy surfaces, the chemical desorption process is much less efficient, and a better description of the interaction with the surface is still needed. Conclusions: We show that the mechanism that directly transforms solid species into gas phase species is efficient for many reactions.

  15. A thermal desorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen trapping in polycrystalline α-uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R. S.; Forsyth, R. T.

    2015-03-14

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from polycrystalline α-uranium (α-U) was examined using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The goal was to identify the major trap sites for hydrogen and their associated trap energies. In polycrystalline α-U six TDS adsorption peaks were observed at temperatures of 521 K, 556 K, 607 K, 681 K, 793 K and 905 K. In addition, the desorption was determined to be second order based on peak shape. The position of the first three peaks was consistent with desorption from UH3. To identify the trap site corresponding to the high temperature peaks the data were compared to a plastically deformed sample and a high purity single crystal sample. The plastically deformed sample allowed the identification of trapping at dislocations while the single crystal sample allow for the identification of high angle boundaries and impurities. Thus, with respect to the desorption energy associated with each peak, values between 12.9 and 26.5 kJ/mole were measured.

  16. A thermal desorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen trapping in polycrystalline α-uranium

    DOE PAGES

    Lillard, R. S.; Forsyth, R. T.

    2015-03-14

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from polycrystalline α-uranium (α-U) was examined using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The goal was to identify the major trap sites for hydrogen and their associated trap energies. In polycrystalline α-U six TDS adsorption peaks were observed at temperatures of 521 K, 556 K, 607 K, 681 K, 793 K and 905 K. In addition, the desorption was determined to be second order based on peak shape. The position of the first three peaks was consistent with desorption from UH3. To identify the trap site corresponding to the high temperature peaks the data were compared tomore » a plastically deformed sample and a high purity single crystal sample. The plastically deformed sample allowed the identification of trapping at dislocations while the single crystal sample allow for the identification of high angle boundaries and impurities. Thus, with respect to the desorption energy associated with each peak, values between 12.9 and 26.5 kJ/mole were measured.« less

  17. A thermal desorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen trapping in polycrystalline α-uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillard, R. S.; Forsyth, R. T.

    2015-06-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from polycrystalline α-uranium (α-U) was examined using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The goal was to identify the major trap sites for hydrogen and their associated trap energies. In polycrystalline α-U six TDS adsorption peaks were observed at temperatures of 521 K, 556 K, 607 K, 681 K, 793 K and 905 K. In addition, the desorption was determined to be second order based on peak shape. The position of the first three peaks was consistent with desorption from UH3. To identify the trap site corresponding to the high temperature peaks the data were compared to a plastically deformed sample and a high purity single crystal sample. The plastically deformed sample allowed the identification of trapping at dislocations while the single crystal sample allow for the identification of high angle boundaries and impurities. With respect to the desorption energy associated with each peak, values between 12.9 and 26.5 kJ/mole were measured.

  18. Cubic metallic phase of aluminum hydride showing improved hydrogen desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheicher, R. H.; Kim, D. Y.; Lebègue, S.; Arnaud, B.; Alouani, M.; Ahuja, R.

    2008-05-01

    We report on our results calculated from density functional theory and GW of the dehydrogenation properties in a cubic phase of AlH3. The metallic nature of the electronic structure entails a more favorable hydrogen removal energy which is lowered by 75% compared to the insulating hexagonal phase. This remarkable reduction in the Al-H bond strength bears important consequences for feasible applications of AlH3 as an on-board hydrogen storage material for mobile applications. We suggest that the cubic phase could be prepared and stabilized experimentally at ambient pressure by off-board quenching.

  19. Cubic Metallic Phase of Aluminum Hydride Showing Improved Hydrogen Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheicher, Ralph H.; Kim, Duck Young; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2009-03-01

    AlH3 is of great interest for hydrogen storage applications, with a particularly attractive feature being its large hydrogen capacity of 10 wt.%. Here we report the results of our density functional theory study of the dehydrogenation properties in a cubic phase of AlH3. The metallic nature of the electronic structure entails a more favorable hydrogen removal energy which is lowered by 75% compared to the insulating hexagonal phase. This remarkable reduction in the Al--H bond strength might bear important consequences for feasible applications of AlH3 as an on-board hydrogen storage material for mobile applications. Suggestions are made how the cubic phase could be prepared and stabilized at ambient pressure by off-board quenching. See also: R. H. Scheicher, D. Y. Kim, S. Lebègue, B. Arnaud, M.Alouani, and R. Ahuja, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 201903 (2008) and D. Y. Kim, R. H. Scheicher, and R. Ahuja, Phys. Rev. B 78, 100102(R) (2008).

  20. In situ atomic force microscopy observation of hydrogen absorption/desorption by Palladium thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Itoko; Sakaki, Kouji; Nakamura, Yumiko; Akiba, Etsuo

    2011-12-01

    Grain structure changes in Pd thin film during hydrogen absorption and desorption were observed by in situ atomic force microscopy. The as-sputtered film had a smooth flat surface with 20-30 nm grains. Film that absorbed hydrogen showed buckling, caused by the compressive stress due to lattice expansion as Pd metal reacted with hydrogen to form the hydride. Grains on the buckles were agglomerated and deformed unlike those on flat areas beside the buckles. Film that absorbed and then desorbed hydrogen still showed some buckling; however, many buckles shrank and flattened when the compressive stress of lattice expansion was released during desorption. On both the remaining and the shrunken buckles, grain agglomeration was retained; whereas, the deformed grains reverted back to their original form. X-ray diffraction indicated compressive residual stress in the as-sputtered film and tensile residual stress in the film after hydrogen absorption/desorption. These results indicate that irreversible grain agglomeration is related to residual tensile stress in the film although agglomeration occurs only on the buckled areas.

  1. Dynamic Monte Carlo description of thermal desorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinketz, Sieghard

    1994-07-01

    The applicability of the dynamic Monte Carlo method of Fichthorn and Weinberg, in which the time evolution of a system is described in terms of the absolute number of different microscopic possible events and their associated transition rates, is discussed for the case of thermal desorption simulations. It is shown that the definition of the time increment at each successful event leads naturally to the macroscopic differential equation of desorption, in the case of simple first- and second-order processes in which the only possible events are desorption and diffusion. This equivalence is numerically demonstrated for a second-order case. In the sequence, the equivalence of this method with the Monte Carlo method of Sales and Zgrablich for more complex desorption processes, allowing for lateral interactions between adsorbates, is shown, even though the dynamic Monte Carlo method does not bear their limitation of a rapid surface diffusion condition, thus being able to describe a more complex ``kinetics'' of surface reactive processes, and therefore be applied to a wider class of phenomena, such as surface catalysis.

  2. The development of microstructure during hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination treatment of sintered neodymium-iron-boron-type magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, R. S.; Harris, I. R.; Walton, A.

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of the hydrogenation disproportionation desorption and recombination (HDDR) process on scrap sintered neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) type magnets have been investigated. At each stage of the process, the microstructural changes have been studied using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points and then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. This process was accelerated at particle surfaces and at free surfaces produced by any cracks in the powder particles. However, the recombination reaction appeared to initiate randomly throughout the particles with no apparent preference for particle surfaces or internal cracks. During the hydrogenation of the grain boundaries and triple junctions, the disproportionation reaction was, however, affected by the much higher oxygen content of the sintered NdFeB compared with that of the as-cast NdFeB alloys. Throughout the entire HDDR reaction the oxidised triple junctions (from the sintered structure) remained unreacted and hence, remained in their original form in the fine recombined microstructure. This resulted in a very significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure and this could lend to improved consolidation in the recycled magnets.

  3. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Kang, Zhan; Huang, Xiaobo

    2015-08-28

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  4. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Huang, Xiaobo; Kang, Zhan

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  5. Finite-Temperature Hydrogen Adsorption/Desorption Thermodynamics Driven by Soft Vibration Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Sung-Jae; Lee, Eui-Sup; Yoon, Mina; Yong-Hyun, Kim

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that room-temperature hydrogen storage on nanostructured or porous materials requires enhanced dihydrogen adsorption. In this work we reveal that room-temperature hydrogen storage is possible not only by the enhanced adsorption, but also by making use of the vibrational free energy from soft vibration modes. These modes exist for example in the case of metallo-porphyrin-incorporated graphenes (M-PIGs) with out-of-plane ( buckled ) metal centers. There, the in-plane potential surfaces are flat because of multiple-orbital-coupling between hydrogen molecules and the buckled-metal centers. This study investigates the finite-temperature adsorption/desorption thermodynamics of hydrogen molecules adsorbed on M-PIGs by employing first-principles total energy and vibrational spectrum calculations. Our results suggest that the current design strategy for room-temperature hydrogen storage materials should be modified by explicitly taking finite-temperature vibration thermodynamics into account.

  6. Absorption and desorption of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium for Zr--V--Fe getter

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimura, K.; Inoue, N.; Watanabe, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    1984-07-01

    Nonevaporable getters have wide applicability for developing the tritium handling techniques for thermonuclear fusion devices. From this viewpoint, mechanisms of the absorption and desorption of hydrogen isotopes and the isotope effects were investigated for a Zr--V--Fe alloy (St-707) by means of the mass analyzed thermal desorption spectroscopy. It was observed that the absorption rate was proportional to the first power of the pressure, indicating that the rate limiting step is the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen isotopes on the surface. The activation energy was very small, in the order of magnitude of a few tens of calories per mole in a temperature range from -196 to 200 /sup 0/C. The desorption rate was proportional to the square of the amount of absorption, indicating that the rate limiting step is the associative desorption reaction of hydrogen atoms or ions diffused to the surface from the bulk. The rate constants for hydrogen and deuterium were determined as k/sub d/(H/sub 2/) = (5.3/sup +2.6//sub -1.7/)exp(-(28.0 +- 0.7) x 10/sup 3//RT) and k/sub d/(D/sub 2/) = (5.0/sup +2.7//sub -1.7/)exp(-(28.6 +- 0.8) x 10/sup 3//RT) in (1/Pa 1 s), respectively, where R is in (cal/mol deg). With regard to tritium, the rate constant was evaluated as k/sub d/(T/sub 2/) = (5.0/sup +20//sub -4.0/)exp(-(29.3 +- 3) x 10/sup 3//RT), however, the frequency factor will have to be corrected by knowing the relative sensitivity factor of the mass spectrometer for tritium (T/sub 2/).

  7. Properties of hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination NdFeB powders prepared from recycled sintered magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périgo, E. A.; da Silva, S. C.; Martin, R. V.; Takiishi, H.; Landgraf, F. J. G.

    2012-04-01

    The effects of the hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination (HDDR) processing conditions on the microstructure and magnetic properties of NdFeB powders prepared from recycling sintered N42 grade magnets were evaluated. Temperatures below 840 oC and above 900 oC are deleterious to HDDR powders' properties. The hydrogen pressure, ranging from 60 to 135 kPa, has a major influence on the remanence compared to that on the intrinsic coercivity. The best magnetic properties (Jr = 0.58 T and μ0Hc = 1.15 T) were obtained with Trecomb = 860 °C, PH2 = 135 kPa, and trecomb = 330 s. Such coercivity value corresponds to 93% of the starting material, not achieved yet by optimizing the HDDR process and without using Dy.

  8. Desorption of Hydrogen from Si(111) by Resonant Excitation of the Si-H Vibrational Stretch Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhiheng; Feldman, Leonard C.; Tolk, Norman; Zhang, Zhenyu; Cohen, Philip I

    2006-01-01

    Past efforts to achieve selective bond scission by vibrational excitation have been thwarted by energy thermalization. Here we report resonant photodesorption of hydrogen from a Si(111) surface using tunable infrared radiation. The wavelength dependence of the desorption yield peaks at 0.26 electron volt: the energy of the Si-H vibrational stretch mode. The desorption yield is quadratic in the infrared intensity. A strong H/D isotope effect rules out thermal desorption mechanisms, and electronic effects are not applicable in this low-energy regime. A molecular mechanism accounting for the desorption event remains elusive.

  9. Reaction pathways for hydrogen desorption from magnesium hydride/hydroxide composites: bulk and interface effects.

    PubMed

    Leardini, F; Ares, J R; Bodega, J; Fernández, J F; Ferrer, I J; Sánchez, C

    2010-01-21

    This manuscript investigates the thermal desorption behaviour of MgH(2)/Mg(OH)(2) composites by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy. Besides the H(2)O and H(2) desorption events due to Mg(OH)(2) dehydration and MgH(2) decomposition reactions, respectively, two additional H(2) desorption peaks arise at lower temperatures. These peaks are related to solid-state reactions between magnesium hydride and magnesium hydroxide through different channels. The low temperature H(2) peak ( approximately 150 degrees C) is related to reaction between a H atom diffusing from MgH(2) and a surface OH group, whereas the intermediate temperature H(2) peak ( approximately 350 degrees C) is due to an interface reaction between the hydride and the hydroxide. The present work supports the theory that the onset of the H(2) desorption coming from MgH(2) decomposition is controlled by an incubation process, consisting in the formation of catalytically active vacancies at the MgO/Mg(OH)(2) surface by dehydration. Possible ways to improve the H(2) desorption kinetics from MgH(2) are discussed in the light of the results obtained.

  10. Size-dependent kinetic enhancement in hydrogen absorption and desorption of the Li-Mg-N-H system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongfeng; Zhong, Kai; Luo, Kun; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge; Wang, Qidong

    2009-02-11

    High operating temperature and slow kinetics retard the practical applications of the Li-Mg-N-H system for hydrogen storage. To alleviate these problems, a first attempt was carried out by synthesizing Li(2)MgN(2)H(2) through sintering a mixture of Mg(NH(2))(2)-2LiNH(2) and investigating its size-dependent hydrogen storage performance. A dramatically enhanced kinetics for hydrogen absorption/desorption was achieved with a reduction in the particle size. For the dehydrogenation reaction, a three-dimensional diffusion-controlled kinetic mechanism was identified for the first time by analyzing isothermal hydrogen desorption curves with a linear plot method. The experimental improvement and mechanistic understanding on the dehydrogenation kinetics of the Li-Mg-N-H system shed light on how to further decrease the operating temperature and enhance the hydrogen absorption/desorption rate of the amide/hydride combined materials.

  11. Effects and Mechanisms of Mechanical Activation on Hydrogen Sorption/ Desorption of Nanoscale Lithium Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Leon, L.; Yang, Gary, Z.; Crosby, Kyle; Wwan, Xufei. Zhong, Yang; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Osborn, William; Hu, Jianzhi; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2012-04-26

    The objective of this project is to investigate and develop novel, mechanically activated, nanoscale Li3N-based and LiBH4-based materials that are able to store and release {approx}10 wt% hydrogen at temperatures near 100 C with a plateau hydrogen pressure of less than 10 bar. Four (4) material systems have been investigated in the course of this project in order to achieve the project objective. These 4 systems are (i) LiNH2+LiH, (ii) LiNH2+MgH2, (iii) LiBH4, and (iv) LiBH4+MgH2. The key findings we have obtained from these 4 systems are summarized below. *The thermodynamic driving forces for LiNH2+LiH and LiBH4 systems are not adequate to enable H2 release at temperatures < 100 C. *Hydrogen release in the solid state for all of the four systems is controlled by diffusion, and thus is a slow process. *LiNH2+MgH2 and LiBH4+MgH2 systems, although possessing proper thermodynamic driving forces to allow for H2 release at temperatures < 100 C, have sluggish reaction kinetics because of their diffusion-controlled rate-limiting steps. *Reducing particles to the nanometer length scale (< 50 nm) can improve the thermodynamic driving force to enable H2 release at near ambient temperature, while simultaneously enhancing the reaction kinetics as well as changing the diffusion-controlled rate-limiting step to gas desorption-controlled rate-limiting step. This phenomenon has been demonstrated with LiBH4 and offers the hope that further work along this direction will make one of the material systems, i.e., LiBH4, LiBH4+MgH2 and LiNH2+MgH2, possess the desired thermodynamic properties and rapid H2 uptake/release kinetics for on-board applications. Many of the findings and knowledge gained from this project have been published in archival refereed journal articles [1-15] and are accessible by general public. Thus, to avoid a bulky final report, the key findings and knowledge gained from this project will be succinctly summarized, particularly for those findings and knowledge

  12. Hydrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael; Xie, Xiaobing; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul; Wright, Harold

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  13. Synthesis and crystal structure of a Pr5Ni19 superlattice alloy and its hydrogen absorption-desorption property.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Kenji; Sakaki, Kouji; Matsuda, Junko; Nakamura, Yumiko; Ishigaki, Toru; Akiba, Etsuo

    2011-05-16

    The intermetallic compound Pr(5)Ni(19), which is not shown in the Pr-Ni binary phase diagram, was synthesized, and the crystal structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two superlattice reflections with the Sm(5)Co(19)-type structure (002 and 004) and the Pr(5)Co(19)-type structure (003 and 006) were observed in the 2θ region between 2° and 15° in the XRD pattern using Cu Kα radiation. Rietveld refinement provided the goodness-of-fit parameter S = 6.7 for the Pr(5)Co(19)-type (3R) structure model and S = 1.7 for the Sm(5)Co(19)-type (2H) structure model, indicating that the synthesized compound has a Sm(5)Co(19) structure. The refined lattice parameters were a = 0.50010(9) nm and c = 3.2420(4) nm. The high-resolution TEM image also clearly revealed that the crystal structure of Pr(5)Ni(19) is of the Sm(5)Co(19) type, which agrees with the results from Rietveld refinement of the XRD data. The P-C isotherm of Pr(5)Ni(19) in the first absorption was clearly different from that in the first desorption. A single plateau in absorption and three plateaus in desorption were observed. The maximum hydrogen storage capacity of the first cycle reached 1.1 H/M, and that of the second cycle was 0.8 H/M. The 0.3 H/M of hydrogen remained in the metal lattice after the first desorption process.

  14. Effects of cerium on the hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of rare earth-Mg-Ni hydrogen-absorbing alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Shigekazu; Ishida, Jun; Kishida, Kyosuke; Inui, Haruyuki

    2017-04-01

    The influence of Ce addition on the phase constitution, microstructure, hydrogen absorption/desorption properties and battery performances of newly developed rare earth (RE)-Mg-Ni hydrogen-absorbing superlattice alloys for negative electrode materials in Ni-metal hydride (MH) batteries were investigated. The partial substitution of RE (La and Nd) with Ce results in a higher discharge performance and a lower cycle life in the battery. The Ce addition greatly affects the phase constitution, which is mainly characterized by increased formation of the AB2 phase (A = RE or Mg and B = Ni or Al). The existence of the AB2 phase is found to accelerate alloy pulverization and oxidation when the alloys are used as negative electrode materials in Ni-MH model cells. The accelerated pulverization and oxidation are considered to be responsible for the observed higher discharge performance and lower cycle life in the batteries, respectively.

  15. Gas Diffusion in Metals: Fundamental Study of Helium-Point Defect Interactions in Iron and Kinetics of Hydrogen Desorption from Zirconium Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang

    influence of pre-existing defects on helium behavior in iron is studied by applying a hybrid model, which includes the defect evolution during neutron irradiation and the subsequent He ion implantation and THDS. These modeling predictions will be assessed in future experiments. The hydrogen desorption process from zirconium hydride and zirconium in vacuum is also studied by coordinated experimental and modeling methods. The production and verification of the desired delta-zirconium hydride is discussed while thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is employed to obtain the hydrogen desorption spectra directly. In addition, a one-dimensional two-phase moving boundary model coupled with a kinetic description of hydrogen desorption from a two-phase region of delta-ZrH1.6+/-n and α-Zr is developed to compare with the TDS experimental results.

  16. Vacancy-mediated hydrogen desorption in NaAl H4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, C. Moysés; Li, S.; Ahuja, R.; Jena, P.

    2005-10-01

    First-principles calculations based on density functional theory are carried out to understand the mechanisms responsible for hydrogen desorption from Ti-doped sodium-alanate (NaAlH4) . While the energy needed to remove a hydrogen atom from NaAlH4 with Ti substituted either at the Na site or at Al site is found to be significantly lower than that from the pristine NaAlH4 , the presence of Na vacancies is shown to play an even larger role: It is not only an order of magnitude smaller than that from Ti-doped sodium-alanate, but the removal of hydrogen associated with a Na vacancy is exothermic with respect to formation of H2 molecule. Furthermore, we show that the unusual stabilization of the magic AlH3 cluster in the vacancy containing sodium-alanate is responsible for this diminished value of the hydrogen-removal energy. It is suggested that this role of vacancies can be exploited in the design and synthesis of complex light-metal hydrides suitable for hydrogen storage.

  17. Enhanced hydrogen desorption properties of magnesium hydride by coupling non-metal doping and nano-confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Daliang; Wang, Yulong; Wu, Chengzhang; Li, Qian; Ding, Weizhong; Sun, Chenghua

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium hydride (MgH2) offers excellent capacity to store hydrogen, but it suffers from the high desorption temperature (>283 °C for starting release hydrogen). In this work, we calculated the hydrogen desorption energy of Mg76H152 clusters with/without non-metal dopants by density functional theory method. Phosphorus (P), as identified as the best dopant, can reduce the reaction energy for releasing one hydrogen molecule from 0.75 eV (bulk MgH2) to 0.20 eV. Inspired by the calculation, P-doped ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) was synthesized by one-step method and employed as the scaffold for loading MgH2 nanoparticles, forming MgH2@P/CMK-3. Element analysis shows that phosphorus dopants have been incorporated into the CMK-3 scaffold and magnesium and phosphorus elements are well-distributed in carbon scaffold hosts. Tests of hydrogen desorption confirmed that P-doping can remarkably enhance the hydrogen release properties of nanoconfined MgH2 at low temperature, specifically ˜1.5 wt. % H2 released from MgH2@P/CMK-3 below 200 °C. This work, based on the combination of computational calculations and experimental studies, demonstrated that the combined approach of non-metal doping and nano-confinement is promising for enhancing the hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2, which provides a strategy to address the challenge of hydrogen desorption from MgH2 at mild operational conditions.

  18. An investigation of the desorption of hydrogen from lithium oxide using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kopasz, J.P.; Johnson, C.E.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1995-04-01

    The addition of hydrogen to the purge stream has been shown to enhance tritium release from ceramic breeder materials; however, this added hydrogen can lead to increased costs in the tritium purification system. The objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the interactions between hydrogen and lithium oxide surfaces so that the authors can take full advantage of the observed enhancement of tritium release caused by hydrogen addition without incurring high costs in the tritium purification plant.

  19. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of vacuum UV photo-processed methanol ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, D. M.; Bossa, J.-B.; Linnartz, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Methanol in the interstellar medium mainly forms upon sequential hydrogenation of solid CO. With typical abundances of up to 15% (with respect to water) it is an important constituent of interstellar ices where it is considered as a precursor in the formation of large and complex organic molecules (COMs), e.g. upon vacuum UV (VUV) photo-processing or exposure to cosmic rays. Aims: This study aims at detecting novel complex organic molecules formed during the VUV photo-processing of methanol ice in the laboratory using a technique more sensitive than regular surface diagnostic tools. In addition, the formation kinetics of the main photo-products of methanol are unravelled for an astronomically relevant temperature (20 K) and radiation dose. Methods: The VUV photo-processing of CH3OH ice is studied by applying laser desorption post-ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDPI TOF-MS), and analysed by combining molecule-specific fragmentation and desorption features. Results: The mass spectra correspond to fragment ions originating from a number of previously recorded molecules and from new COMs, such as the series (CO)xH, with x = 3 and y < 3x-1, to which prebiotic glycerin belongs. The formation of these large COMs has not been reported in earlier photolysis studies and suggests that such complex species may form in the solid state under interstellar conditions.

  20. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    SciTech Connect

    Hindin, Saul G.; Roberts, George W.

    1980-08-12

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

  1. Biological Processes for Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    van Niel, Ed W J

    Methane is produced usually from organic waste in a straightforward anaerobic digestion process. However, hydrogen production is technically more challenging as more stages are needed to convert all biomass to hydrogen because of thermodynamic constraints. Nevertheless, the benefit of hydrogen is that it can be produced, both biologically and thermochemically, in more than one way from either organic compounds or water. Research in biological hydrogen production is booming, as reflected by the myriad of recently published reviews on the topic. This overview is written from the perspective of how to transfer as much energy as possible from the feedstock into the gaseous products hydrogen, and to a lesser extent, methane. The status and remaining challenges of all the biological processes are concisely discussed.

  2. Principles of hydrogen radical mediated peptide/protein fragmentation during matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki

    2016-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) is a very easy way to obtain large sequence tags and, thereby, reliable identification of peptides and proteins. Recently discovered new matrices have enhanced the MALDI-ISD yield and opened new research avenues. The use of reducing and oxidizing matrices for MALDI-ISD of peptides and proteins favors the production of fragmentation pathways involving "hydrogen-abundant" and "hydrogen-deficient" radical precursors, respectively. Since an oxidizing matrix provides information on peptide/protein sequences complementary to that obtained with a reducing matrix, MALDI-ISD employing both reducing and oxidizing matrices is a potentially useful strategy for de novo peptide sequencing. Moreover, a pseudo-MS(3) method provides sequence information about N- and C-terminus extremities in proteins and allows N- and C-terminal side fragments to be discriminated within the complex MALDI-ISD mass spectrum. The combination of high mass resolution of a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) analyzer and the software suitable for MALDI-ISD facilitates the interpretation of MALDI-ISD mass spectra. A deeper understanding of the MALDI-ISD process is necessary to fully exploit this method. Thus, this review focuses first on the mechanisms underlying MALDI-ISD processes, followed by a discussion of MALDI-ISD applications in the field of proteomics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Mass Spec Rev 35:535-556, 2016. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Absorption/desorption of hydrogen isotopes and isotopic waters by Zr-alloy getters

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimura, K.; Matsuyama, M.; Watanabe, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    1988-07-01

    Zr-alloy getters have been applied to tritium handling and vacuum conditioning for fusion devices. Some of their properties, however, should be improved to apply them in future devices. From this viewpoint, we have studied the effects of alloying on the getter properties of Zr alloys. We found that the activation energy of absorption and desorption of hydrogen varied considerably with alloying. The activation energy for hydrogen absorption was 0.74 for Zr/sub 61/Al/sub 39/, 0.01 for Zr/sub 57/V/sub 36/Fe/sub 7/, 0.63 for Zr/sub 67/Ni/sub 33/, and 2.8 kcal/mol for Zr/sub 85/Ni/sub 15/, whereas that for Zr was 2.6 kcal/mol. The heat of hydrogen absorption was 27.8 kcal/mol for Zr: it changed with alloying as 32.0--33.4 (Zr/sub 61/Al/sub 39/), 27.8--28.4 (Zr/sub 57/V/sub 36/Fe/sub 7/), 29.0 (Zr/sub 67/Ni/sub 33/), and 28.0 (Zr/sub 85/Ni/sub 15/). In addition, the ratio of the pumping speed of water vapor to that of hydrogen at room temperature varied with alloying element: for example, 1/40 for Zr/sub 57/V/sub 36/Fe/sub 7/ and 1/4 for Zr/sub 67/Ni/sub 33/. The alloying effects mentioned above are considered due to modification of the electronic and/or geometric structure of Zr with alloying.

  4. The effects of added hydrogen on a helium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet ambient desorption/ionization source.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jonathan P; Heywood, Matthew S; Thurston, Glen K; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2013-03-01

    We present mass spectrometric data demonstrating the effect that hydrogen has on a helium-based dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) atmospheric-pressure plasma jet used as an ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source. The addition of 0.9 % hydrogen to the helium support gas in a 35-W plasma jet increased signals for a range of test analytes, with enhancement factors of up to 68, without proportional increases in background levels. The changes in signal levels result from a combination of changes in the desorption kinetics from the surface and increased ion production in the gas phase. The enhancement in ADI-MS performance despite the quenching of key plasma species reported in earlier studies suggests that ionization with a H2/He plasma jet is the result of an alternate mechanism involving the direct generation of ionized hydrogen.

  5. Catalytic reduction of CO with hydrogen sulfide. 4. Temperature-programmed desorption of methanethiol on anatase, rutile, and sulfided rutile

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.D.; White, J.M.; Ratcliffe, C.T.

    1986-07-03

    The interaction of methanethiol with anatase, rutile, and sulfided rutile was studied by temperature-programmed desorption. Dissociative adsorption occurs on rutile but is insignificant on anatase. Decomposition products are dominated by H/sub 2/ on rutile and by CH/sub 4/ on sulfided rutile. In both cases desorption occurs between 500 and 775 K. The 5- and 4-coordinate sites on the (110) face of rutile are proposed as the active sites for decomposition. The dominance of methane on a sulfided surface is attributed to the relatively large supply of highly mobile surface hydrogen atoms.

  6. Hydride formation and thermal desorption spectra of hydrogen of cathodically charged single-phase gamma titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Takasaki, Akito; Furuya, Yoshio

    1999-02-05

    The authors have previously reported thermal desorption spectra of hydrogen obtained from cathodically charged two-phase (Ti{sub 3}Al ({alpha}{sub 2}) + TiAl ({gamma})) titanium aluminides by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), in which hydrogen ion current (H{sub 2}{sup +}) corresponding to hydrogen evolution rate during heating was measured by a quadrupole mass spectrometer in an ultra-high vacuum condition. Several accelerated hydrogen evolutions (TDS peak temperatures) have been observed in a series of TDS measurement, and then the authors have suggested that these peaks were dependent on the microstructures ({alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma} phases) as well as dissociation of the hydride phase which formed during cathodic charging. A comparison with the TDS spectra from other series of titanium aluminides, such as a single-phase {gamma} alloy, might give clearer views of the microstructural dependence on hydrogen evolution kinetics. In this paper, hydride formation, hydrogen uptake and hydrogen evolution kinetic of a cathodically charged single-phase {gamma} titanium aluminide are investigated, and these results are compared with the previous ones obtained in two-phase ({alpha}{sub 2} + {gamma}) titanium aluminides.

  7. Effects of SWNT and metallic catalyst on hydrogen absorption/desorption performance of MgH2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengzhang; Wang, Ping; Yao, Xiangdong; Liu, Chang; Chen, Demin; Lu, Gao Qing; Cheng, Huiming

    2005-12-01

    The microstructure and absorption/desorption characteristics of composite MgH2 and 5 wt % as-prepared single-walled carbon nanotubes (MgH2-5ap) obtained by the mechanical grinding method were investigated. Experimental results show that the MgH2-5ap sample exhibits faster absorption kinetics and relatively lower desorption temperature than pure MgH2 or MgH2-purified single-walled carbon nanotube composite. Storage capacities of 6.0 and 4.2 wt % hydrogen for the MgH2-5ap composite were achieved in 60 min at 423 and 373 K, respectively. Furthermore, its desorption temperature was reduced by 70 K due to the introduction of as-prepared single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In addition, the different effects of SWNTs and metallic catalysts contained in the as-prepared SWNTs were also investigated and a hydrogenation mechanism was proposed. It is suggested that metallic particles may be mainly responsible for the improvement of the hydrogen absorption kinetics, and SWNTs for the enhancement of hydrogen absorption capacity of MgH2.

  8. Molecular Beam-Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (MB-TDS) Monitoring of Hydrogen Desorbed from Storage Fuel Cell Anodes.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Rui F M; Santos, Diogo M F; Sequeira, Cesar A C; Ribeiro, Jorge H F

    2012-02-06

    Different types of experimental studies are performed using the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA) MlNi3.6Co0.85Al0.3Mn0.3 (Ml: La-rich mischmetal), chemically surface treated, as the anode active material for application in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The recently developed molecular beam-thermal desorption spectrometry (MB-TDS) technique is here reported for detecting the electrochemical hydrogen uptake and release by the treated HSA. The MB-TDS allows an accurate determination of the hydrogen mass absorbed into the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA), and has significant advantages in comparison with the conventional TDS method. Experimental data has revealed that the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) using such chemically treated alloy presents an enhanced surface capability for hydrogen adsorption.

  9. Molecular Beam-Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (MB-TDS) Monitoring of Hydrogen Desorbed from Storage Fuel Cell Anodes

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Rui F. M.; Santos, Diogo M. F.; Sequeira, Cesar A. C.; Ribeiro, Jorge H. F.

    2012-01-01

    Different types of experimental studies are performed using the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA) MlNi3.6Co0.85Al0.3Mn0.3 (Ml: La-rich mischmetal), chemically surface treated, as the anode active material for application in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The recently developed molecular beam—thermal desorption spectrometry (MB-TDS) technique is here reported for detecting the electrochemical hydrogen uptake and release by the treated HSA. The MB-TDS allows an accurate determination of the hydrogen mass absorbed into the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA), and has significant advantages in comparison with the conventional TDS method. Experimental data has revealed that the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) using such chemically treated alloy presents an enhanced surface capability for hydrogen adsorption. PMID:28817043

  10. Ti-based catalytic effect on hydrogen desorption in crystalline NaBH4: an ab initio investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moysés Araújo, C.; Jena, Puru

    2005-03-01

    The application of hydrogen fuel cell technology in portable electronic devices and transportation vehicles has led to a great deal of interest in the study of complex alkali hydrides (MXH4 with M=Na, Li and X=Al,B) primarily due to their high gravimetric hydrogen density (eg.18.5% in LiBH4). In particular, NaBH4 slurry has been suggested as the most promising system for applications in fuel cell technology (1) as it provides one of the simplest ways of generating hydrogen. Additionally, the NaBH4 itself is also a promising hydrogen storage material since it has one of the highest gravimetric hydrogen density (13.0 wt%) among the alkali metal hydrides. However, its irreversibility with respect to hydrogen absorpton/desorption cycle limits its practical application for hydrogen storage. To overcome this limitation we have explored the role of Ti on the electronic and crystalline structures of NaBH4. Using density functional calculations we show that Ti prefers to occupy the Na site in sodium borohydride. In addition, Ti weakens the strength of the covalent bond between B and H atoms and the hydrogen removal energy is reduced from 5.64 eV in pure sodium borohydride to 4.70 eV when doped with Ti. Thus, Ti might work as a catalytic agent allowing hydrogen to desorb at a lower temperature. Calculations are underway to examine if other dopants may be even better candidates for hydrogen desorption from sodium borohydride. 1. Z. P. Li, B. H. Liu, K. Arai, K. Asaba and S. Suda Journal of Power Sources 126, 28 (2004).

  11. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Ritter, James A.; Ebner, Armin D.; Wang, Jun; Holland, Charles E.

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  12. Thermodynamic and kinetic size effects for hydrogen-desorption in catalytically-doped magnesium hydride: Nanoparticle versus bulk surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Jason; Wang, L.-L.; Johnson, D. D.

    2010-03-01

    Using density-functional methods with simulated annealing, we show that there are no size effects for hydrogen desorption energies in nanoparticles (NPs) of MgH2. Recently reported exothermic desorption energies in MgH2-doped NP (Mg30XH62) are shown to be spurious, resulting from metastable NP configurations before dehyrogenation. We confirm that the 93-atom NPs are amorphous, with structures that are sensitive to the presence of dopants, found via simulated annealing techniques. We find that dehydrogenation energies are similar between bulk surfaces and nanoparticles, showing that the thermodynamics is unchanged by particle size as desorption is determined only by the local hydrogen-metal bond. We then discuss the effects of nanoparticle size and presence of dopants on the kinetic barriers between NPs and bulk surfaces. The takehome message is: In modeling desorption events, especially within amorphous NPs, metastable, local minimum must be carefully avoided, and, in doing so, an accurate and physically reasonable picture emerges for the thermodynamic and kinetic behavior.

  13. Hydrogen in the Methanol Production Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralj, Anita Kovac; Glavic, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very important industrial gas in chemical processes. It is very volatile; therefore, it can escape from the process units and its mass balance is not always correct. In many industrial processes where hydrogen is reacted, kinetics are often related to hydrogen pressure. The right thermodynamic properties of hydrogen can be found for…

  14. Hydrogen in the Methanol Production Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralj, Anita Kovac; Glavic, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very important industrial gas in chemical processes. It is very volatile; therefore, it can escape from the process units and its mass balance is not always correct. In many industrial processes where hydrogen is reacted, kinetics are often related to hydrogen pressure. The right thermodynamic properties of hydrogen can be found for…

  15. Hydrogen-exchange reactions via hot hydrogen atoms produced in the dissociation process of molecular hydrogen on Ir{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritani, Kousuke; Okada, Michio; Nakamura, Mamiko; Kasai, Toshio; Murata, Yoshitada

    2001-12-01

    Adsorption and reaction of hydrogen (deuterium) on the Ir{111} surface has been studied with temperature-programmed desorption and direct measurements of desorbing molecules using a quadrupole mass spectrometer at ˜100 K. H2 exposure of the D-precovered Ir{111} surface was found to induce the desorption of HD and D2 molecules. This result suggests that energetic H atoms (hot H atoms) produced in the dissociation process of incident H2 molecules react with preadsorbed D atoms and desorb as HD molecules or produce secondary energetic D atoms via energy transfer. Secondary energetic D atoms (secondary hot D atoms) also induce the associative reactions with preadsorbed D atoms and desorb as D2 molecules. We will discuss the hot-H-atom-mediated reaction based on both empirical and steady-state approximation models for interpreting the present experimental results.

  16. Quantum study of Eley-Rideal reaction and collision induced desorption of hydrogen atoms on a graphite surface. II. H-physisorbed case.

    PubMed

    Martinazzo, Rocco; Tantardini, Gian Franco

    2006-03-28

    Following previous investigation of collision induced (CI) processes involving hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphite [R. Martinazzo and G. F. Tantardini, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 124702 (2006)], the case in which the target hydrogen atom is initially physisorbed on the surface is considered here. Several adsorbate-substrate initial states of the target H atom in the physisorption well are considered, and CI processes are studied for projectile energies up to 1 eV. Results show that (i) Eley-Rideal cross sections at low collision energies may be larger than those found in the H-chemisorbed case but they rapidly decrease as the collision energy increases; (ii) product hydrogen molecules are vibrationally very excited; (iii) collision induced desorption cross sections rapidly increase, reaching saturation values greater than 10 A2; (iv) trapping of the incident atoms is found to be as efficient as the Eley-Rideal reaction at low energies and remains sizable (3-4 A2) at high energies. The latter adsorbate-induced trapping results mainly in formation of metastable hot hydrogen atoms, i.e., atoms with an excess energy channeled in the motion parallel to the surface. These atoms might contribute in explaining hydrogen formation on graphite.

  17. Hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics in fullerite C60 single crystals. Low-temperature micromechanical and structural characteristics of the interstitial solid solution C60(H2)x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomenko, L. S.; Lubenets, S. V.; Natsik, V. D.; Stetsenko, Yu. E.; Yagotintsev, K. A.; Strzhemechny, M. A.; Prokhvatilov, A. I.; Osipyan, Yu. A.; Izotov, A. N.; Sidorov, N. S.

    2008-01-01

    The microhardness HV and lattice parameter a of C60 single crystals are measured at room temperature as functions of the hydrogen saturation time t for several values of the saturation temperature (250, 300, and 350°C) at a fixed hydrogen pressure p =30atm. According to the measurements of HV and a, the kinetics of hydrogen absorption is described by a simple exponential law with a single, temperature-dependent characteristic time. In highly saturated samples the microhardness is 4 times greater than for the initial C60 crystal, while the lattice parameter is 0.2% larger. The temperature dependence of the microhardness HV and lattice parameter a of C60(H2)x crystals is investigated in the temperature interval 77-300K. The introduction of hydrogen lowers the temperature of the fcc-sc phase transition, and the transition becomes strongly broadened in temperature. The dependence of the microhardness of the saturated sample on the hold time in air at room temperature is described by the sum of two exponentials with different characteristic times. Kinetics of this kind is presumably due to two processes: desorption of hydrogen from the sample, which causes a decrease of the microhardness, and a simultaneous penetration of gaseous impurities into the sample from the surrounding air, which is accompanied by hardening. The influence of the H2 molecules on the characteristic of the intermolecular interaction in fullerite C60 is discussed and the intercalation-induced processes of dislocation slip and microfracture.

  18. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    DOEpatents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  19. Hydrogen production and catalyst demetallization process

    SciTech Connect

    Elvin, F.J.

    1989-05-09

    A process is described for the production of molecular hydrogen and demetallization of solid particles comprising: (a) contacting hydrogen sulfide with solid particles at conditions effective to convert the hydrogen sulfide into molecular hydrogen, the solid particles comprising at least one metallic component effective to promote the hydrogen sulfide conversion; (b) separating the molecular hydrogen from elemental sulfur formed in step (a) and unconverted hydrogen sulfide and recovering a product enriched in molecular hydrogen; and (c) demetallizing at least a portion of the solid particles from step (a) to produce demetallized solid particles having a reduced content of the metallic component.

  20. Role of desorption processes in the formation of K in tenuous planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madey, T. E.; Yakshinskiy, B. V.

    2001-11-01

    We will discuss recent laboratory data indicating that DIET processes (desorption induced by electronic transitions) may affect planetary atmospheres. We focus on the origins of neutral potassium vapor in the atmospheres of the planet Mercury, the Moon, and the icy satellites of Jupiter. We are conducting ultrahigh-vacuum studies of adsorption and desorption of atomic potassium on model mineral systems (SiO2 thin films), as well as on models of icy satellite surfaces (condensed water ice films). We found evidence previously that non-thermal processes - mainly photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) by UV photons - may play a dominant role in desorption of Na atoms from the lunar surface[1], and the present results indicate that K can be desorbed by PSD. The desorption mechanism involves a photon-excited charge-exchange process, in which adsorbed ionic K is converted to neutral K, which desorbs. Recent data on desorption from a lunar sample will be discussed. [1] B. V. Yakshinskiy and T. E. Madey, Nature 400(1999) 642; Surface Science 451 (2000) 160. This work has been supported in part by NASA

  1. Highly hydrogen-sensitive thermal desorption spectroscopy system for quantitative analysis of low hydrogen concentration (˜1 × 1016 atoms/cm3) in thin-film samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Taku; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Sakaguchi, Isao; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-05-01

    We developed a highly hydrogen-sensitive thermal desorption spectroscopy (HHS-TDS) system to detect and quantitatively analyze low hydrogen concentrations in thin films. The system was connected to an in situ sample-transfer chamber system, manipulators, and an rf magnetron sputtering thin-film deposition chamber under an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) atmosphere of ˜10-8 Pa. The following key requirements were proposed in developing the HHS-TDS: (i) a low hydrogen residual partial pressure, (ii) a low hydrogen exhaust velocity, and (iii) minimization of hydrogen thermal desorption except from the bulk region of the thin films. To satisfy these requirements, appropriate materials and components were selected, and the system was constructed to extract the maximum performance from each component. Consequently, ˜2000 times higher sensitivity to hydrogen than that of a commercially available UHV-TDS system was achieved using H+-implanted Si samples. Quantitative analysis of an amorphous oxide semiconductor InGaZnO4 thin film (1 cm × 1 cm × 1 μm thickness, hydrogen concentration of 4.5 × 1017 atoms/cm3) was demonstrated using the HHS-TDS system. This concentration level cannot be detected using UHV-TDS or secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) systems. The hydrogen detection limit of the HHS-TDS system was estimated to be ˜1 × 1016 atoms/cm3, which implies ˜2 orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than that of SIMS and resonance nuclear reaction systems (˜1018 atoms/cm3).

  2. Desorption of hydrogen from Ni—Cu—Cr catalyst on (θ + α-Al2O3 sorbent modified with cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossumov, K.; Popova, N. M.; Salakhova, R. Kh.; Tungatarova, S. A.; Shapovalov, A. A.; Umbetkaliev, A. K.

    2010-03-01

    We present the results of thermal desorption studies of H2 interactions with 8.9% Ni—Cu—Cr (1:3:0.1)/(θ+α)-Al2O3+2% Ce. It was demonstrated that three forms of hydrogen with different desorption temperatures and Tmax peak values are formed in the catalyst at 673 K: H2(ads), H(ads), and dissolved hydrogen. It was found that upon an increase in the adsorption temperature from 673 to 1173 K, H2(ads) and H(ads) remain on the surface (Edes = 14.4 kcal/mol, first order desorption reaction, H: Ni = 1.6—1.88) while hydrogen dissolution in the Ni lattice and its copper alloy increases (Edes= 32.9 kcal/mol, second order desorption reaction, H: Ni = 2.0).

  3. Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

    2013-06-25

    The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

  4. Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, M.; Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.

    1996-10-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The key consequences of SERP are: (i) reformation reaction is carried out at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than that in a conventional SMR reactor (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (ii) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 98+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (iii) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The first phase of the program has focused on the development of a sorbent for CO{sub 2} which has (a) reversible CO{sub 2} capacity >0.3 mmol/g at low partial pressures of CO{sub 2} (0.1 - 1.0 atm) in the presence of excess steam (pH{sub 2}O/pCO{sub 2}>20) at 400-500{degrees}C and (b) fast sorption-desorption kinetics for CO{sub 2}, at 400-500{degrees}C. Several families of supported sorbents have been identified that meet the target CO{sub 2} capacity. A few of these sorbents have been tested under repeated sorption/desorption cycles and extended exposure to high pressure steam at 400-500{degrees}C. One sorbent has been scaled up to larger quantities (2-3 kg) and tested in the laboratory process equipment for sorption and desorption kinetics of CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2}, sorption and desorption kinetics are desirably fast. This was a critical path item for the first phase of the program and now has been successfully demonstrated. A reactor has been designed that will allow nearly isothermal operation for SERP-SMR. This reactor was integrated into an overall process flow diagram for the SERP-SMR process.

  5. Improvement in hydrogen desorption from β- and γ-MgH2 upon transition-metal doping.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tanveer; Maark, Tuhina Adit; Chakraborty, Sudip; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-08-24

    A thorough study of the structural, electronic, and hydrogen-desorption properties of β- and γ-MgH2 phases substituted by selected transition metals (TMs) is performed through first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The TMs considered herein include Sc, V, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Y, Zr, and Nb, which substitute for Mg at a doping concentration of 3.125 % in both the hydrides. This insertion of TMs causes a variation in the cell volumes of β- and γ-MgH2 . The majority of the TM dopants decrease the lattice constants, with Ni resulting in the largest reduction. From the formation-energy calculations, it is predicted that except for Cu and Ni, the mixing of all the selected TM dopants with the MgH2 phases is exothermic. The selected TMs also influence the stability of both β- and γ-MgH2 and cause destabilization by weakening the MgH bonds. Our results show that doping with certain TMs can facilitate desorption of hydrogen from β- and γ-MgH2 at much lower temperatures than from their pure forms. The hydrogen adsorption strengths are also studied by density-of-states analysis.

  6. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Wade C.; Lewis, Charlotte R.; Openshaw, Anna P.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration.

  7. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wade C; Lewis, Charlotte R; Openshaw, Anna P; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Evaluation of sorption-desorption processes for metalaxyl in natural and artificial soils.

    PubMed

    Sukul, Premasis; Lamshöft, Marc; Zühlke, Sebastian; Spiteller, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The main process controlling soil-pesticide interaction is the sorption-desorption as influenced by active soil surfaces. The sorption phenomena can influence translocation, volatility, persistence and bioactivity of a pesticide in soil. The present investigation was conducted on natural and artificial soils in order to enumerate the effect of soil components such as montmorillonite and ferrihydrite on the sorption behaviour of the fungicide metalaxyl and if sorption-desorption of the chiral pesticide affects the enantiomeric ratio. The sorption-desorption characteristics of metalaxyl were investigated by batch equilibration technique in a natural soil, two artificial soils, and in pure montmorillonite and ferrihydrite. After extraction, pesticide residues were analyzed by conventional and chiral chromatography using tandem mass spectrometry. A KdSorp (2.3-6.5) suggests low level sorption of metalaxyl with an appreciable risk of run-off and leaching. Thus, metalaxyl poses a threat to surface and ground water contamination. Furthermore, desorption tests revealed a hysteretic effect (H ≤ 0.8) in natural and artificial soils. Significant amount of metalaxyl was found tightly bound to the adsorbents without desorbing readily after desorption cycle. Desorption of 22-56% of the total amount of the retained metalaxyl was determined. This study reveals that an artificial soil derived from different soil constituents can be used to assess their influence on sorption/desorption processes. The present investigation showed that both montmorillonite and ferrihydrite play a significant role in the sorption of metalaxyl. The sorption doesn't influence the enantiomeric ratio of racemic metalaxyl.

  9. Process for thermochemically producing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, Donald M.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen is produced by the reaction of water with chromium sesquioxide and strontium oxide. The hydrogen producing reaction is combined with other reactions to produce a closed chemical cycle for the thermal decomposition of water.

  10. Effectiveness of passivation techniques on hydrogen desorption in a tritium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodall, Steven Michael

    2009-11-01

    Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. It is used as a fuel in fusion reactors, a booster material in nuclear weapons and as a light source in commercial applications. When tritium is used in fusion reactors, and especially when used in the manufacture of nuclear weapons, purity is critical. For U.S. Department of Energy use, tritium is recycled by Savannah River Site in South Carolina and is processed to a minimum purity of 99.5%. For use elsewhere in the country, it must be shipped and stored, while maintaining the highest purity possible. As an isotope of hydrogen it exchanges easily with the most common isotope of hydrogen, protium. Stainless steel bottles are used to transport and store tritium. Protium, present in air, becomes associated in and on the surface of stainless steel during and after the manufacture of the steel. When filled, the tritium within the bottle exchanges with the protium in and on the surface of the stainless steel, slowly contaminating the pure tritium with protium. The stainless steel is therefore passivated to minimize the protium outgrowth of the bottles into the pure tritium. This research is to determine how effective different passivation techniques are in minimizing the contamination of tritium with protium. Additionally, this research will attempt to determine a relationship between surface chemistry of passivated steels and protium contamination of tritium. The conclusions of this research found that passivated bottles by two companies which routinely provide passivated materials to the US Department of Energy provide low levels of protium outgrowth into pure tritium. A bottle passivated with a material to prevent excessive corrosion in a highly corrosive environment, and a clean and polished bottle provided outgrowth rates roughly twice those of the passivated bottles above. Beyond generally high levels of chromium, oxygen, iron and nickel in the passivated bottles, there did not appear to be a strong correlation

  11. Hydrogen desorption from MgH2(110) surface with transition-metal catalyst: a DFT study of energetics and barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Johnson, Duane D.

    2011-03-01

    Transition-metal (TM) catalysts are widely used in hydrogen-storage materials to increase hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics. Using density functional theory calculations, we elucidate the catalytic effect of Ti on H-desorption from Mg H2 (110) surface. Kinetic energy barriers of different reaction pathways of hydrogen desorption are calculated via nudged-elastic-band method. We find that Ti dopant is effective in reducing kinetic barriers, in agreement with experimental observations. We also find that magnetic degrees of freedom must be carefully included to describe the change of magnetic states during catalytic-enhanced desorption. As vacancy migration barriers are lower than desorption barrier, bulk diffusion of H inherently feeds into the favorable surface desorption mechanism. Supported by the DOE/BES under DE-FG02-03ER15476 (Catalysis), DEFC36-05GO15064 (Sandia Metal-Hydride Center of Excellence), DE-FG02-03ER46026 (Materials), and DE-AC02-07CH11358 at the Ames Laboratory operated by Iowa State University.

  12. Synergy on catalytic effect of Fe-Zr additives mixed in different proportions on the hydrogen desorption from MgH{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, A.; Bazzanella, N.; Checchetto, R.; Miotello, A.

    2009-05-18

    Mg films with mixed Fe and Zr metallic additives were prepared by rf magnetron sputtering keeping the total metal content constant, about 7 at. %, and changing the [Fe]/[Zr] ratio. Isothermal hydrogen desorption curves showed that the kinetics depends on [Fe]/[Zr] ratio and is fastest when the [Fe]/[Zr] ratio is {approx}1.8. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed formation of Fe nanoclusters and Mg grain refinement. The improvement of the hydrogen desorption kinetics can be explained by the presence of atomically dispersed Zr and Fe nanoclusters acting as nucleation centers, as well as Mg grain refinement.

  13. Fate and transport with material response characterization of green sorption media for copper removal via desorption process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Lin, Kuen-Song; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple adsorption and desorption cycles are required to achieve the reliable operation of copper removal and recovery. A green sorption media mixture composed of recycled tire chunk, expanded clay aggregate, and coconut coir was evaluated in this study for its desorptive characteristics as a companion study of the corresponding adsorption process in an earlier publication. We conducted a screening of potential desorbing agents, batch desorption equilibrium and kinetic studies, and batch tests through 3 adsorption/desorption cycles. The desorbing agent screening revealed that hydrochloric acid has good potential for copper desorption. Equilibrium data fit the Freundlich isotherm, whereas kinetic data had high correlation with the Lagergren pseudo second-order model and revealed a rapid desorption reaction. Batch equilibrium data over 3 adsorption/desorption cycles showed that the coconut coir and media mixture were the most resilient, demonstrating they could be used through 3 or more adsorption/desorption cycles. FE-SEM imaging, XRD, and EDS analyses supported the batch adsorption and desorption results showing significant surface sorption of CuO species in the media mixture and coconut coir, followed by partial desorption using 0.1 M HCl as a desorbing agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultra high vacuum high precision low background setup with temperature control for thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDA-MS) of hydrogen in metals.

    PubMed

    Merzlikin, Sergiy V; Borodin, S; Vogel, D; Rohwerder, M

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a newly developed UHV-based high precision low background setup for hydrogen thermal desorption analysis (TDA) of metallic samples is presented. Using an infrared heating with a low thermal capacity enables a precise control of the temperature and rapid cool down of the measurement chamber. This novel TDA-set up is superior in sensitivity to almost every standard hydrogen analyzer available commercially due to the special design of the measurement chamber, resulting in a very low hydrogen background. No effects of background drift characteristic as for carrier gas based TDA instruments were observed, ensuring linearity and reproducibility of the analysis. This setup will prove to be valuable for detailed investigations of hydrogen trapping sites in steels and other alloys. With a determined limit of detection of 5.9×10(-3)µg g(-1) hydrogen the developed instrument is able to determine extremely low hydrogen amounts even at very low hydrogen desorption rates. This work clearly demonstrates the great potential of ultra-high vacuum thermal desorption mass spectroscopy instrumentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this mission-oriented research program is the production of renewable hydrogen for fossil fuel processing. This program will build upon promising results that have been obtained in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the utilization of intact microalgae for photosynthetic water splitting. In this process, specially adapted algae are used to perform the light-activated cleavage of water into its elemental constituents, molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of their hydrogen-producing capability. These are: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the original development of an evacuated photobiological reactor for real-world engineering applications; (6) the potential for using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. The significance of each of these points in the context of a practical system for hydrogen production is discussed. This program will be enhanced by collaborative research between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and senior faculty members at Duke University, the University of Chicago, and Iowa State University. The special contribution that these organizations and faculty members will make is access to strains and mutants of unicellular algae that will potentially have useful properties for hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting.

  16. The desorption and reactivity of butanol adsorbed on lithium iron phosphate (LISICON) activated in a hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylinina, A. I.; Mikhalenko, I. I.; Yagodovskaya, T. V.; Yagodovskii, V. D.

    2010-12-01

    The reactivity and desorption of butanol-2 adsorbed on Li3Fe2(PO4)3 not subjected and subjected to treatment in a glow discharge hydrogen plasma were studied under flow conditions with a gas chromatographic analysis of products. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data showed that the number of phosphate groups on the surface of the phosphate was two times larger than the stoichiometric number and increased after plasma chemical treatment. The strength of butanol-phosphate bonds also increased, and the selectivity of alcohol decomposition with the formation of an olefin (dehydration) and ketone (dehydrogenation) changed. After plasma treatment, dehydrogenation centers were deactivated. The selectivities of alcohol transformations in the adsorbed state and under vapor phase conditions were different. Ketone was formed from adsorbed alcohol because the activation energies of dehydrogenation were equal for the two reaction variants.

  17. MODEL OF DIFFUSERS / PERMEATORS FOR HYDROGEN PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T; William Jacobs, W

    2007-08-27

    Palladium-silver (Pd-Ag) diffusers are mainstays of hydrogen processing. Diffusers separate hydrogen from inert species such as nitrogen, argon or helium. The tubing becomes permeable to hydrogen when heated to more than 250 C and a differential pressure is created across the membrane. The hydrogen diffuses better at higher temperatures. Experimental or experiential results have been the basis for determining or predicting a diffuser's performance. However, the process can be mathematically modeled, and comparison to experimental or other operating data can be utilized to improve the fit of the model. A reliable model-based diffuser system design is the goal which will have impacts on tritium and hydrogen processing. A computer model has been developed to solve the differential equations for diffusion given the operating boundary conditions. The model was compared to operating data for a low pressure diffuser system. The modeling approach and the results are presented in this paper.

  18. Switching off hydrogen peroxide hydrogenation in the direct synthesis process.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jennifer K; Solsona, Benjamin; N, Edwin Ntainjua; Carley, Albert F; Herzing, Andrew A; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2009-02-20

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important disinfectant and bleach and is currently manufactured from an indirect process involving sequential hydrogenation/oxidation of anthaquinones. However, a direct process in which H2 and O2 are reacted would be preferable. Unfortunately, catalysts for the direct synthesis of H2O2 are also effective for its subsequent decomposition, and this has limited their development. We show that acid pretreatment of a carbon support for gold-palladium alloy catalysts switches off the decomposition of H2O2. This treatment decreases the size of the alloy nanoparticles, and these smaller nanoparticles presumably decorate and inhibit the sites for the decomposition reaction. Hence, when used in the direct synthesis of H2O2, the acid-pretreated catalysts give high yields of H2O2 with hydrogen selectivities greater than 95%.

  19. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, R.; Randhava, S.S.; Tsai, S.P.

    1997-09-02

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} laden permeate. 1 fig.

  20. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Rathin; Randhava, Sarabjit S.; Tsai, Shih-Perng

    1997-01-01

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H.sub.2 O.sub.2 laden permeate.

  1. Hydrogen Plasma Processing of Iron Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabat, Kali Charan; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-03-01

    Iron is currently produced by carbothermic reduction of oxide ores. This is a multiple-stage process that requires large-scale equipment and high capital investment, and produces large amounts of CO2. An alternative to carbothermic reduction is reduction using a hydrogen plasma, which comprises vibrationally excited molecular, atomic, and ionic states of hydrogen, all of which can reduce iron oxides, even at low temperatures. Besides the thermodynamic and kinetic advantages of a hydrogen plasma, the byproduct of the reaction is water, which does not pose any environmental problems. A review of the theory and practice of iron ore reduction using a hydrogen plasma is presented. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects are considered, with molecular, atomic and ionic hydrogen considered separately. The importance of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in overcoming the activation energy barriers, and in transferring energy to the iron oxide, is emphasized. Both thermal and nonthermal plasmas are considered. The thermophysical properties of hydrogen and argon-hydrogen plasmas are discussed, and their influence on the constriction and flow in the of arc plasmas is considered. The published R&D on hydrogen plasma reduction of iron oxide is reviewed, with both the reduction of molten iron ore and in-flight reduction of iron ore particles being considered. Finally, the technical and economic feasibility of the process are discussed. It is shown that hydrogen plasma processing requires less energy than carbothermic reduction, mainly because pelletization, sintering, and cokemaking are not required. Moreover, the formation of the greenhouse gas CO2 as a byproduct is avoided. In-flight reduction has the potential for a throughput at least equivalent to the blast furnace process. It is concluded that hydrogen plasma reduction of iron ore is a potentially attractive alternative to standard methods.

  2. Hydrogen Plasma Processing of Iron Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabat, Kali Charan; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-06-01

    Iron is currently produced by carbothermic reduction of oxide ores. This is a multiple-stage process that requires large-scale equipment and high capital investment, and produces large amounts of CO2. An alternative to carbothermic reduction is reduction using a hydrogen plasma, which comprises vibrationally excited molecular, atomic, and ionic states of hydrogen, all of which can reduce iron oxides, even at low temperatures. Besides the thermodynamic and kinetic advantages of a hydrogen plasma, the byproduct of the reaction is water, which does not pose any environmental problems. A review of the theory and practice of iron ore reduction using a hydrogen plasma is presented. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects are considered, with molecular, atomic and ionic hydrogen considered separately. The importance of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in overcoming the activation energy barriers, and in transferring energy to the iron oxide, is emphasized. Both thermal and nonthermal plasmas are considered. The thermophysical properties of hydrogen and argon-hydrogen plasmas are discussed, and their influence on the constriction and flow in the of arc plasmas is considered. The published R&D on hydrogen plasma reduction of iron oxide is reviewed, with both the reduction of molten iron ore and in-flight reduction of iron ore particles being considered. Finally, the technical and economic feasibility of the process are discussed. It is shown that hydrogen plasma processing requires less energy than carbothermic reduction, mainly because pelletization, sintering, and cokemaking are not required. Moreover, the formation of the greenhouse gas CO2 as a byproduct is avoided. In-flight reduction has the potential for a throughput at least equivalent to the blast furnace process. It is concluded that hydrogen plasma reduction of iron ore is a potentially attractive alternative to standard methods.

  3. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  4. Process for the production of hydrogen cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwin, M.B.; Su, J.L.

    1989-09-26

    This patent describes a process for the preparation of hydrogen cyanide. It comprises passing a gaseous reaction mixture of methanol or formaldehyde or a mixture thereof, formamide, ammonia and oxygen under reactive conditions over a metal oxide catalyst.

  5. The effect of chars and their water extractable organic carbon (WEOC) fractions on atrazine adsorption-desorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoski, I.; Jablonowski, N.; Burauel, P.; Miano, T.

    2012-04-01

    Chars are carbonaceous material produced from different type of biomass by pyrolysis. They are known as highly effective adsorbents for atrazine therefore limiting its degradation and its diffusion into the aqueous phase. The aim of the present work is to study the effects of different chars and char's derived WEOC on atrazine sorption-desorption processes. The five chars been used in this study derived from: 1) fast pyrolysis from hard wood (FP1); 2) flash pyrolysis from soft wood (FP2); 3) slow pyrolysis from deciduous wood (CC); 4) gasification from deciduous wood (GC) and 5) the market, purchased as activated charcoal standard (AC). Short-term batch equilibration tests were conducted to assess the sorption-desorption behavior of 14C-labeled atrazine on the chars, with a special focus on the desorption behavior using successive dilution method with six consecutive desorption step. Chars and their WEOC were physically and chemically characterized. Results demonstrate that biomass and pyrolysis process used to produce chars affect their physical and chemical properties, and atrazine adsorption-desorption behavior. Atrazine desorption resulted from the positive and competitive interactions between WEOC and chars surfaces. WEOC pool play important role in atrazine adsorption-desorption behavior. FP1 and FP2 with higher concentration of WEOC showed higher desorption rates, whereas GC, CC and AC with insignificant WEOC concentration strongly adsorb atrazine with low desorption rates. According to our results, when high WEOC pools chars are concerned, an increase in atrazine desorption can be observed but further studies would help in confirming the present results.

  6. Activation process and absorption/desorption of D2O for Zr-V-Fe getter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, K.; Inoue, N.; Ashida, K.; Watanabe, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    1984-12-01

    Nonevaporable getters have wide applicability for tritium handling systems. From this view point, the activation process of the Zr-V-Fe getter (St-707) and absorption/desorption of D2O on the getter surface were investigated, by means of XPS-SIMS and mass analyzed thermal desorption spectroscopy. XPS-SIMS measurements revealed that the getter surface exposed to air was covered with adsorbed H2O, CO and small amounts of hydrocarbons and that the getter components are oxidized. Upon heating of the getter above 500 °C, the adsorbed species disappeared from the surface, partly due to desorption and partly due to migration into the bulk. Consequently, metallic Zr and V appeared on the surface, whereas Fe disappeared. The surface composition was evaluated to be 87 at% Zr-13 at% V. After the activation, water (D2O ) was readily absorbed into the getter at 300 °C in the form of deuterium atoms. The absorption rate was proportional to the partial pressure of water, indicating that the rate determining step for the absorption is the dissociation of water molecules on the surface. The absorption rate constant was 0.009 and 0.24 cc/s/cm2 (net surface area) [or 1.5 and 39 cc/s/cm2 (projected area)] at 25 and 300°C, respectively. Only D2 was desorbed from the getter exposed to D2O at 25 and 300 °C. The rate determining step for the desorption is association of deuterium atoms on the surface diffused from the bulk.

  7. Process for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Balinsky, G.J.; Biceroglu, O.; Lin, J.S.

    1986-08-12

    A process is described for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons, which comprises contacting a hydrocarbonaceous feed comprising aromatic hydrocarbons and less than about 5 wppm organic nitrogen at hydrogenation conditions with added hydrogen and a hydrogen sulfide partial pressure of less than about 0.5 psia with a catalyst which has been pretreated by a method which comprises the steps of: (a) contacting a catalyst having cracking activity and hydrogenation activity with a nitrogen-containing compound at conditions and for a time sufficient to decrease the cracking activity of the catalyst, whereby the hydrogenation activity of the catalyst is also decreased. The catalyst consists of at least one noble metal component of Group VIII of the Periodic Table of Elements composited with a Y-type crystalline aluminosilicate zeolite and a non-zeolitic inorganic oxide, and (b) contacting the nitrogen-contacted catalyst resulting from step (a) with a hydrogen-containing gas at conditions and for a time sufficient to increase the hydrogenation activity of the nitrogen-contacted catalyst.

  8. Trapping state of hydrogen isotopes in carbon and graphite investigated by thermal desorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, H.; Tanabe, T.; Shikama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) has been investigated to obtain fundamental information of tritium behavior in graphite and carbon materials especially at high temperatures. 29 brands of graphite, HOPG, glassy carbon and CFC materials charged with deuterium gas are tested up to the temperature of 1735 K with a heating rate of 0.1 K/s. TDS spectra have five peaks at 600-700 K, around 900 K, 1200 K, 1300-1450 K and 1600-1650 K. The amounts of released deuterium have been compared with crystallographic parameters derived from XRD analysis. The results can be summarized as follows. First, TDS spectra of deuterium were quite varied among the samples tested, such as existence of peaks, peak temperatures and release amounts of deuterium. Secondly, TDS spectra may consist of five peaks, which are peak 1 (600-700 K), peak 2 (around 900 K), peak 3 (around 1200 K), peak 4 (1300-1450 K) and peak 5 (1600-1650 K). Thirdly, the correlations between the estimated surface area of edge surface and the total amount of released deuterium could be observed for peaks 4 and 5. Fourthly, high energy trapping site (peak 5) may exist even at edge surface or a near surface region, not only for intercalary. And fifth, in order to obtain the lower tritium retention for graphite and CFC materials, the material should be composed of a filler grain with a smaller crystallite size or having the smaller net edge surface in its structure. It is shown that heat treatment does not reduce originally existing trapping sites but trapping sites generated by neutron irradiation for instance can be reduced in some degree.

  9. Hydrogen-methane separation processes and related phenomena. [112 references

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J.T.; Wang, S.S.; Yang, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    A thorough and up-dated literature survey has been conducted on processes for separating hydrogen and methane. This was done in conjunction with our work of developing a more energy-efficient and lower-cost process based on cyclic, fixed-bed processes using coal chars as the sorbents. Although the review has covered all hydrocarbon separation processes, the focuses were on physical adsorption phenomena and theories (for both single and mixed gases), surface and pore characteristics of coals and heat-treated coals, and the continuous or semi-continuous chromatographic separation methods. There has been a sharply increasing interest in the past 10 to 15 years in developing processes for hydrocarbon separation based on adsorption/desorption; this is particularly true since the energy costs became increasingly higher recently. The rigorous work on competitive adsorption and on the cyclic (including parametric pumping) processes has all been done in the past 13 years. On the other hand, it is disappointing to find the absence of knowledge on adsorption on coal chars and the lack of it on adsorption on raw coals as well.

  10. Nature of the sites involved in the process of cesium desorption from vermiculite.

    PubMed

    Dzene, Liva; Tertre, Emmanuel; Hubert, Fabien; Ferrage, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Three particle size fractions of sodium-saturated vermiculite (10-20, 1-2 and 0.1-0.2 μm), differing only in their ratios of external-to-total sorption sites, were used to probe the nature of the sites involved in desorption of cesium ions. The sorption was investigated for initial aqueous concentrations of cesium ranging from 5.6×10(-4) to 1.3×10(-2) mol/L, and the cesium desorption was probed by exchange with ammonium ions. The results showed that (1) the amounts of desorbed cesium were strongly dependent on the particle size for a given initial aqueous cesium concentration and (2) the amounts of desorbed cations (Na(+) and Cs(+)) strongly decreased with increasing initial cesium aqueous concentration, irrespective of the particle size investigated. Quantitative analysis of these results suggested that cesium ions sorbed on external (edge+basal) sorption sites can be desorbed by ammonium ions. As a contrast, most of cesium ions sorbed on interlayer sites remain fixed due to the collapse of the structure under aqueous conditions. This study provides important information, such as the nature of the sites involved in the exchange process, when the thermodynamic formalism is considered to describe the ion-exchange process involving cesium and high-charge swelling clay minerals in polluted soil environments.

  11. Adsorption-desorption processes of polydisperse mixtures on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujak, D.; Lončarević, I.; Budinski-Petković, Lj.; Vrhovac, S. B.; Karač, A.

    2015-03-01

    Adsorption-desorption processes of polydisperse mixtures on a triangular lattice are studied by numerical simulations. Mixtures are composed of the shapes of different numbers of segments and rotational symmetries. Numerical simulations are performed to determine the influence of the number of mixture components and the length of the shapes making the mixture on the kinetics of the deposition process. We find that, above the jamming limit, the time evolution of the total coverage of a mixture can be described by the Mittag-Leffler function θ (t ) =θ∞-Δ θ Eβ[-(t/τ ) β] for all the mixtures we have examined. Our results show that the equilibrium coverage decreases with the number of components making the mixture and also with the desorption probability, via corresponding stretched exponential laws. For the mixtures of equal-sized objects, we propose a simple formula for predicting the value of the steady-state coverage fraction of a mixture from the values of the steady-state coverage fractions of pure component shapes.

  12. Hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2-TiCr1.2Fe0.6 nanocomposite prepared by high-energy mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Nafiseh; Kaflou, A.; Simchi, A.

    2011-05-01

    In the present work, high-energy mechanical alloying (MA) was employed to synthesize a nanostructured magnesium-based composite for hydrogen storage. The preparation of the composite material with composition of MgH2-5 at% (TiCr1.2Fe0.6) was performed by co-milling of commercial available MgH2 powder with the body-centered cubic (bcc) alloy either in the form of Ti-Cr-Fe powder mixture with the proper mass fraction (sample A) or prealloyed TiCr1.2Fe0.6 powder (sample B). The prealloyed powder with an average crystallite size of 14 nm and particle size of 384 nm was prepared by the mechanical alloying process. It is shown that the addition of the Ti-based bcc alloy to magnesium hydride yields a finer particle size and grain structure after mechanical alloying. As a result, the desorption temperature of mechanically activated MgH2 for 4 h decreased from 327 °C to 262 °C for sample A and 241 °C for sample B. A high dehydrogenation capacity (∼5 wt%) at 300 °C is also obtained. The effect of the Ti-based alloy on improvement of the dehydrogenation is discussed.

  13. Visualization and Measurement of Adsorption/Desorption Process of Ethanol in Activated Carbon Adsorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hitoshi; Murata, Kenta; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yasushi

    Adsorption refrigerator is one of the efficient tools for waste heat recovery, because the system is driven by heat at relative low temperature. However, the coefficient of performance is low due to its batch operation and the heat capacity of the adsorber. In order to improve the performance, it is important to optimize the configuration to minimize the amount of driving heat, and to clarify adsorption/desorption phenomena in transient conditions. Neutron radiography was applied to visualize and measure the adsorption amount distribution in an adsorber. The visualization experiments had been performed at the neutron radiography facility of E-2 port of Kyoto University Research Reactor. Activated carbon and ethanol were used as the adsorbent and refrigerant. From the acquired radiographs, adsorption amount was quantitatively measured by applying the umbra method using a checkered neutron absorber with boron powder. Then, transient adsorption and desorption processes of a rectangular adsorber with 84 mm in width, 50 mm in height and 20 mm in depth were visualized. As the result, the effect of fins in the adsorbent layer on the adsorption amount distribution was clearly visualized.

  14. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.; Tevault, C.V.

    1995-06-01

    In the fundamental biological process of photosynthesis, atmospheric carbon dioxide is reduced to carbohydrate using water as the source of electrons with simultaneous evolution of molecular oxygen: H{sub 2}O + CO{sub 2} + light {yields} O{sub 2} + (CH{sub 2}O). It is well established that two light reactions, Photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) working in series, are required to perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Experimental data supporting the two-light reaction model are based on the quantum requirement for complete photosynthesis, spectroscopy, and direct biochemical analysis. Some algae also have the capability to evolve molecular hydrogen in a reaction energized by the light reactions of photosynthesis. This process, now known as biophotolysis, can use water as the electron donor and lead to simultaneous evolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen. In green algae, hydrogen evolution requires prior incubation under anaerobic conditions. Atmospheric oxygen inhibits hydrogen evolution and also represses the synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme. CO{sub 2} fixation competes with proton reduction for electrons relased from the photosystems. Interest in biophotolysis arises from both the questions that it raises concerning photosynthesis and its potential practical application as a process for converting solar energy to a non-carbon-based fuel. Prior data supported the requirement for both Photosystem I and Photosystem II in spanning the energy gap necessary for biophotolysis of water to oxygen and hydrogen. In this paper we report the at PSII alone is capable of driving sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen in an anaerobically adapted PSI-deficient strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, mutant B4, and that CO{sub 2} competes as an electron acceptor.

  15. Process for recovery of hydrogen and

    DOEpatents

    James, Brian R.; Li-Lee, Chung; Lilga, Michael A.; Nelson, David A.

    1987-01-01

    on of sulfur Abstract A process of abstracting sulfur from H.sub.2 S and generating hydrogen is disclosed comprising dissolving Pd.sub.2 X.sub.2 (.mu.-dppm).sub.2 in a solvent and then introducing H.sub.2 S. The palladium complex abstracts sulfur, forming hydrogen and a (.mu.-S) complex. The (.mu.-S) complex is readily oxidizable to a (.mu.-SO.sub.2) adduct which spontaneously loses SO.sub.2 and regenerates the palladium complex.

  16. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    SciTech Connect

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-21

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53–75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  17. Calibration of Thermal Desorption System (TDS) Response to Hydrogen for Analysis of Titanium Subhydride and Titanium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2013-07-01

    The equipment and method for and results of calibration of the Sandia/CA TDS system for hydrogen quantification is presented. This technique for calibration can be used to quantify the hydrogen content titanium subhydride, titanium hydride, and any other hydrogen-containing material that desorbs its hydrogen in the form of molecular hydrogen below 1450°C.

  18. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION OF A THERMAL DESORPTION/UV PHOTOLYSIS PROCESS FOR DECONTAMINATING SOILS CONTAINING HERBICIDE ORANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This treatability study report presents the results of laboratory and field tests on the effectiveness of a new decontamination process for soils containing 2,4-D/2,4,5-T and traces of dioxin. The process employs three operations, thermal desorption, condensation and absorp...

  19. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION OF A THERMAL DESORPTION/UV PHOTOLYSIS PROCESS FOR DECONTAMINATING SOILS CONTAINING HERBICIDE ORANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This treatability study report presents the results of laboratory and field tests on the effectiveness of a new decontamination process for soils containing 2,4-D/2,4,5-T and traces of dioxin. The process employs three operations, thermal desorption, condensation and absorp...

  20. Hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured Pd–10Rh processed by cryomilling

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, Joshua K.; Zhang, Zhihui; ...

    2014-10-03

    Palladium and its alloys are model systems for studying solid-state storage of hydrogen. Mechanical milling is commonly used to process complex powder systems for solid-state hydrogen storage; however, milling can also be used to evolve nanostructured powder to modify hydrogen sorption characteristics. In the present study, cryomilling (mechanical attrition milling in a cryogenic liquid) is used to produce nanostructured palladium-rhodium alloy powder. Characterization of the cryomilled Pd-10Rh using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and surface area analysis reveals that (i) particle morphology evolves from spherical to flattened disk-like particles; while the (ii) crystallite size decreases from several microns to less thanmore » 100 nm and (iii) dislocation density increases with increased cryomilling time. Hydrogen absorption and desorption isotherms as well as the time scales for absorption were measured for cryomilled Pd-10Rh, and correlated with observed microstructural changes induced by the cryomilling process. In short, as the microstructure of the Pd-10Rh alloy is refined by cryomilling: (i) the maximum hydrogen concentration in the α-phase increases, (ii) the pressure plateau becomes flatter, and (iii) the equilibrium hydrogen capacity at 760 Torr increases. In addition, the rate of hydrogen absorption was reduced by an order of magnitude compared to non-cryomilled (atomized) powder.« less

  1. Hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured Pd–10Rh processed by cryomilling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, Joshua K.; Zhang, Zhihui; Kurmanaeva, Lilia; Cappillino, Patrick; Stavila, Vitalie; Lavernia, Enrique J.; San Marchi, Chris

    2014-10-03

    Palladium and its alloys are model systems for studying solid-state storage of hydrogen. Mechanical milling is commonly used to process complex powder systems for solid-state hydrogen storage; however, milling can also be used to evolve nanostructured powder to modify hydrogen sorption characteristics. In the present study, cryomilling (mechanical attrition milling in a cryogenic liquid) is used to produce nanostructured palladium-rhodium alloy powder. Characterization of the cryomilled Pd-10Rh using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and surface area analysis reveals that (i) particle morphology evolves from spherical to flattened disk-like particles; while the (ii) crystallite size decreases from several microns to less than 100 nm and (iii) dislocation density increases with increased cryomilling time. Hydrogen absorption and desorption isotherms as well as the time scales for absorption were measured for cryomilled Pd-10Rh, and correlated with observed microstructural changes induced by the cryomilling process. In short, as the microstructure of the Pd-10Rh alloy is refined by cryomilling: (i) the maximum hydrogen concentration in the α-phase increases, (ii) the pressure plateau becomes flatter, and (iii) the equilibrium hydrogen capacity at 760 Torr increases. In addition, the rate of hydrogen absorption was reduced by an order of magnitude compared to non-cryomilled (atomized) powder.

  2. IN-SITU PROBING OF RADIATION-INDUCED PROCESSING OF ORGANICS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ICE ANALOGS-NOVEL LASER DESORPTION LASER IONIZATION TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Yang Rui E-mail: ryang73@ustc.edu

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the evolution of organic molecules in ice grains in the interstellar medium (ISM) under cosmic rays, stellar radiation, and local electrons and ions is critical to our understanding of the connection between ISM and solar systems. Our study is aimed at reaching this goal of looking directly into radiation-induced processing in these ice grains. We developed a two-color laser-desorption laser-ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopic method (2C-MALDI-TOF), similar to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy. Results presented here with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) probe molecules embedded in water-ice at 5 K show for the first time that hydrogenation and oxygenation are the primary chemical reactions that occur in astrophysical ice analogs when subjected to Ly{alpha} radiation. We found that hydrogenation can occur over several unsaturated bonds and the product distribution corresponds to their stabilities. Multiple hydrogenation efficiency is found to be higher at higher temperatures (100 K) compared to 5 K-close to the interstellar ice temperatures. Hydroxylation is shown to have similar efficiencies at 5 K or 100 K, indicating that addition of O atoms or OH radicals to pre-ionized PAHs is a barrierless process. These studies-the first glimpses into interstellar ice chemistry through analog studies-show that once accreted onto ice grains PAHs lose their PAH spectroscopic signatures through radiation chemistry, which could be one of the reason for the lack of PAH detection in interstellar ice grains, particularly the outer regions of cold, dense clouds or the upper molecular layers of protoplanetary disks.

  3. Insight to the Thermal Decomposition and Hydrogen Desorption Behaviors of NaNH2-NaBH4 Hydrogen Storage Composite.

    PubMed

    Pei, Ziwei; Bai, Ying; Wang, Yue; Wu, Feng; Wu, Chuan

    2017-09-20

    The lightweight compound material NaNH2-NaBH4 is regarded as a promising hydrogen storage composite due to the high hydrogen density. Mechanical ball milling was employed to synthesize the composite NaNH2-NaBH4 (2/1 molar ratio), and the samples were investigated utilizing thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis-mass spectroscopy (TG-DTA-MS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses. The full-spectrum test (range of the ratio of mass to charge: 0-200) shows that the released gaseous species contain H2, NH3, B2H6, and N2 in the heating process from room temperature to 400 °C, and possibly the impurity gas B6H12 also exists. The TG/DTA analyses show that the composite NaNH2-NaBH4 (2/1 molar ratio) is conductive to generate hydrogen so that the dehydrogenation process can be finished before 400 °C. Moreover, the thermal decomposition process from 200 to 400 °C involves two-step dehydrogenation reactions: (1) Na3(NH2)2BH4 hydride decomposes into Na3BN2 and H2 (200-350 °C); (2) remaining Na3(NH2)2BH4 reacts with NaBH4 and Na3BN2, generating Na, BN, NH3, N2, and H2 (350-400 °C). The better mechanism understanding of the thermal decomposition pathway lays a foundation for tailoring the hydrogen storage performance of the composite complex hydrides system.

  4. Highly hydrogen-sensitive thermal desorption spectroscopy system for quantitative analysis of low hydrogen concentration (∼1 × 10(16) atoms/cm(3)) in thin-film samples.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Taku; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Sakaguchi, Isao; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-05-01

    We developed a highly hydrogen-sensitive thermal desorption spectroscopy (HHS-TDS) system to detect and quantitatively analyze low hydrogen concentrations in thin films. The system was connected to an in situ sample-transfer chamber system, manipulators, and an rf magnetron sputtering thin-film deposition chamber under an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) atmosphere of ∼10(-8) Pa. The following key requirements were proposed in developing the HHS-TDS: (i) a low hydrogen residual partial pressure, (ii) a low hydrogen exhaust velocity, and (iii) minimization of hydrogen thermal desorption except from the bulk region of the thin films. To satisfy these requirements, appropriate materials and components were selected, and the system was constructed to extract the maximum performance from each component. Consequently, ∼2000 times higher sensitivity to hydrogen than that of a commercially available UHV-TDS system was achieved using H(+)-implanted Si samples. Quantitative analysis of an amorphous oxide semiconductor InGaZnO4 thin film (1 cm × 1 cm × 1 μm thickness, hydrogen concentration of 4.5 × 10(17) atoms/cm(3)) was demonstrated using the HHS-TDS system. This concentration level cannot be detected using UHV-TDS or secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) systems. The hydrogen detection limit of the HHS-TDS system was estimated to be ∼1 × 10(16) atoms/cm(3), which implies ∼2 orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than that of SIMS and resonance nuclear reaction systems (∼10(18) atoms/cm(3)).

  5. Assessment of biological Hydrogen production processes: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafpour, G. D.; Shahavi, M. H.; Neshat, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Energy crisis created a special attention on renewable energy sources. Among these sources; hydrogen through biological processes is well-known as the most suitable and renewable energy sources. In terms of process yield, hydrogen production from various sources was evaluated. A summary of microorganisms as potential hydrogen producers discussed along with advantages and disadvantages of several bioprocesses. The pathway of photo-synthetic and dark fermentative organisms was discussed. In fact, the active enzymes involved in performance of biological processes for hydrogen generation were identified and their special functionalities were discussed. The influential factors affecting on hydrogen production were known as enzymes assisting liberation specific enzymes such as nitrogenase, hydrogenase and uptake hydrogenase. These enzymes were quite effective in reduction of proton and form active molecular hydrogen. Several types of photosynthetic systems were evaluated with intension of maximum hydrogen productivities. In addition dark fermentative and light intensities on hydrogen productions were evaluated. The hydrogen productivities of efficient hydrogen producing strains were evaluated.

  6. Process and apparatus for coal hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Ruether, John A.; Simpson, Theodore B.

    1991-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process an aqueous slurry of coal is prepared containing a dissolved liquefaction catalyst. A small quantity of oil is added to the slurry and then coal-oil agglomerates are prepared by agitation of the slurry at atmospheric pressure. The resulting mixture is drained of excess water and dried at atmospheric pressure leaving catalyst deposited on the agglomerates. The agglomerates then are fed to an extrusion device where they are formed into a continuous ribbon of extrudate and fed into a hydrogenation reactor at elevated pressure and temperature. The catalytic hydrogenation converts the extrudate primarily to liquid hydrocarbons in the reactor. The liquid drained in recovering the agglomerates is recycled.

  7. Influence of sorption/desorption processes on the bioavailability of organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, W.F.; Boyd, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Many of the problem contaminants found in soils and groundwaters are non-ionic and relatively insoluble. Under appropriate conditions, many of these compounds are degradable by bacteria provided nutrients, electron acceptors and the compounds themselves are biologically available. However, non-ionic organic compounds (NOCs) bind tenaciously to soil particles potentially limiting their bioavailability. While the individual processes of sorption and biodegradation have received much attention in recent years, little is known about the interactions of these processes. The primary objective of our DOE-funded research project has been to elucidate the influences of sorption and desorption processes on the bioavailability of NOCs. Conflicting reports in the literature suggest that sorption may increase, decrease, or have no effect on bioavailability although the majority of published work has studied proteins, fatty acids, and other normal bacterial growth substrates as sorbates. Some of this variability arises because sorbed solutes interact with sorbents via different mechanisms including cation and anion exchange, adsorption, complexation with surface-associated metals and partitioning. Also, bacterial activities may be altered upon attachment of the cells to the sorbent surface. Clearly, resolution of this problem requires detailed knowledge of a system with multiple components. We are, therefore, approaching this problem on a fundamental level. 20 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-10-12

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of "local equilibrium" assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of U

  9. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of ultraviolet photo-processed ices

    SciTech Connect

    Paardekooper, D. M. Bossa, J.-B.; Isokoski, K.; Linnartz, H.

    2014-10-01

    A new ultra-high vacuum experiment is described that allows studying photo-induced chemical processes in interstellar ice analogues. MATRI²CES - a Mass Analytical Tool to study Reactions in Interstellar ICES applies a new concept by combining laser desorption and time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the ultimate goal to characterize in situ and in real time the solid state evolution of organic compounds upon UV photolysis for astronomically relevant ice mixtures and temperatures. The performance of the experimental setup is demonstrated by the kinetic analysis of the different photoproducts of pure methane (CH₄) ice at 20 K. A quantitative approach provides formation yields of several new species with up to four carbon atoms. Convincing evidence is found for the formation of even larger species. Typical mass resolutions obtained range from M/ΔM ~320 to ~400 for CH₄ and argon, respectively. Additional tests show that the typical detection limit (in monolayers) is ⩽0.02 ML, substantially more sensitive than the regular techniques used to investigate chemical processes in interstellar ices.

  10. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  11. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  12. Uranyl-chlorite sorption/desorption: Evaluation of different U(VI) sequestration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, David M.; Maher, Kate; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    2009-10-01

    Sequestration of soluble uranium(VI) in the form of uranyl UO22+ by clay minerals such as chlorite is potentially a major sink for U in U-contaminated environments. We have used batch sorption/desorption experiments combined with U L III-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, synchrotron-based microdiffraction, and surface complexation modeling to investigate the dominant sorption process(es) governing uranyl uptake by chlorite. Uranium(VI) sorption is independent of ionic strength, suggesting dominantly inner-sphere sorption, which was supported by selective chemical extraction results. The maximum sorption loadings were 0.28 μmol U g -1 chlorite (at pH 4) and 6.3 μmol U g -1 chlorite (at pH 6.5 and 10). Uranium(VI) uptake as a function of solution composition followed the trends (at pH 6.5): CO 3-Ca-free system >CO 3-Ca-bearing system >CO 3-bearing system; (at pH 10): CO 3-Ca-bearing system >CO 3-Ca-free system ≈CO 3-bearing system. Desorption experiments based on selective chemical extractions indicated that (1) there is little or no weakly bound U(VI) or U(VI)-bearing precipitates, (2) 60-80% of U(VI) inner-sphere sorption complexes are desorbed following a 0.1 M HCl step over 1 week, and (3) 100% desorption of adsorbed U(VI) is accomplished by a 1.0 M HCl step over 1 week. Fits of the EXAFS spectra of the short-term sorption samples indicate that UO22+ forms inner-sphere sorption complexes with carbonate (when present) at [Fe(O,OH) 6] octahedral sites in a bidentate, edge-sharing manner. EXAFS-derived structural parameters were used to constrain the type(s) of U(VI)-bearing surface species and were combined with observed batch sorption trends as input for a diffuse double-layer surface complexation model (SCM). This model successfully predicts U(VI) sorption over a range of U(VI) concentrations, pH values, and solution

  13. Unresolved problems in cesiation processes of negative hydrogen ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Motoi

    2013-09-01

    Attempts are being made to optimize negative hydrogen (H-) ion current by introducing Cs into an ion source, but there are some unanswered questions in properly handling Cs to realize stable extraction of H- ion beams. For example, Cs amount to optimize H- production often becomes much larger than the amount predicted to realize partial monolayer of Cs on the source wall. Additional charge of Cs into a source to recover reduced H- current by continuous operation does not necessarily realize the original value. Beam intensity of H- changes with the impurity content in the ion source. The purpose of the present paper is to list up these uncertainties and unknown factors in negative ion source performance operated with Cs. The paper tries to identify possible mechanisms causing these problems by running a simulation code ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target). The code predicts that glancing injection of hydrogen ions doubles the numbers of both reflection coefficients and ion induced desorption yields from those for the normal incidence. It also indicates smaller hydrogen desorption yields for thick layer of adsorbed hydrogen on the surface. These results are compared with experimental data obtained in UHV conditions.

  14. Near-infrared spectroscopic monitoring of the water adsorption/desorption process in modern and archaeological wood.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Tetsuya; Yonenobu, Hitoshi; Tsuchikawa, Satoru

    2008-08-01

    We investigated the adsorption/desorption mechanism of water and the variation of water adsorption for modern and archaeological wood using near-infrared spectroscopy. A mixture model of water was used to decompose the near-infrared difference spectra into three components (free water molecules (S 0), those with one OH group engaged in hydrogen bonding (S1), and those with two OH groups engaged in hydrogen bonding (S2)) based on a principal component analysis. The variations of each water component with relative humidity could be explained by proposing a model that describes water absorption in three stages. It was concluded that the aging phenomenon in wood is due to the decrease of adsorption sites on hemicellulose and amorphous cellulose.

  15. Study of metal sorption/desorption processes on competing sediment components with a multichamber device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmano, Wolfgang; Ahlf, Wolfgang; Förstner, Ulrich

    1988-02-01

    A new multichamber device was developed to study sorption/desorption reactions of metals on different competing sediment components and the influence of environmental factors on these reactions. The system consists of a central chamber connected with six external chambers and separated by 0.45-μm-diameter membranes. The diffusion kinetics of metals between the single chambers were determined. Equilibrium was attained within 24 h. Algal cell walls ( Scenedesmus quadricauda), bentonite, aluminium oxide, managese oxide, quartz powder, and goethite were used as model sediment components. Determination of metal sorption on the solid phases resulted in a significant enrichment on the algal cell walls, particularly for Cu and Cd. It was concluded that sorption depends not only on ion exchange but also on complexing reactions which lead to relatively stable surface binding. A second series of experiments investigated the effect of seawater on sediment components and dredged mud. Cadmium was remobilized from all solid components, but Cu was not remobilized from algal cell walls and bentonite. The dominant role of organic substrates in the binding of metals such as Cd andCu is of particular relevance for the transfer of these elements into biological systems. Even relatively small percentages of organic substrates, if involved in metabolic processes, may constitute a major pathway by which metals are transferred within the food chain.

  16. Study of metal sorption/desorption processes on competing sediment components with a multichamber device

    SciTech Connect

    Calmano, W.; Ahlf, W.; Foerstner, U. )

    1988-02-01

    A new multichamber device was developed to study sorption/desorption reactions of metals on different competing sediment components and the influence of environmental factors on these reactions. The system consists of a central chamber connected with six external chambers and separated by 0.45-{mu}m-diameter membranes. The diffusion kinetics of metals between the single chambers were determined. Equilibrium was attained within 24 h. Algal cell walls (Scenedesmus quadricauda), bentonite, aluminum oxide, manganese oxide, quartz powder, and goethite were used as model sediment components. Determination of metal sorption on the solid phases resulted in a significant enrichment on the algal cell walls, particularly for Cu and Cd. it was concluded that sorption depends not only on ion exchange but also on complexing reactions which lead to relatively stable surface binding. A second series of experiments investigated the effect of seawater on sediment components and dredged mud. Cadmium was remobilized from all solid components, but Cu was not remobilized from algal cell walls and bentonite. The dominant role of organic substrates in the binding of metals such as Cd and Cu is of particular relevance for the transfer of these elements into biological systems. Even relatively small percentages of organic substrates, if involved in metabolic processes, may constitute a major pathway by which metals are transferred within the food chain.

  17. Process, including membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2001-01-01

    Processes for providing improved methane removal and hydrogen reuse in reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved methane removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the reactor recycle loop across membranes selective in favor of methane over hydrogen, and capable of exhibiting a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the process conditions.

  18. U-GAS process for production of hydrogen from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Dihu, R.J.; Patel, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Today, hydrogen is produced mainly from natural gas and petroleum fractions. Tomorrow, because reserves of natural gas and oil are declining while demand continues to increase, they cannot be considered available for long-term, large-scale production of hydrogen. Hydrogen obtained from coal is expected to be the lowest cost, large-scale source of hydrogen in the future. The U-GAS coal gasification process and its potential application to the manufacture of hydrogen is discussed. Pilot plant results, the current status of the process, and economic projections for the cost of hydrogen manufactured are presented.

  19. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Monomer Adsorption-Desorption Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jian-Hong; Lin, Zhen-Quan; Chen, Xiao-Shuang

    2009-05-01

    We propose an adsorption-desorption model for a deposit growth system, in which the adsorption and desorption of particles coexist. By means of the generalized rate equation we investigate the cluster (island) size distribution in the dynamic equilibrium state. The results show that the evolution behaviour of the system depends crucially on the details of the rate kernels. The cluster size distribution can take the scale-free power-law form in some cases, while it grows exponentially with size in other cases.

  20. The HYSULF{sup SM} process: A valuable hydrogen resource from hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    The increasing demand for hydrogen to reduce the sulfur content in standard refinery fuels is a very familiar problem to everyone in the industry. This problem could be partially offset by the continuous recycling of the hydrogen portion of hydrogen sulfide. In this regard, Marathon has been developing the HYSULF process. This process uses Redox chemistry under mild operating conditions to convert hydrogen sulfide into hydrogen and sulfur. The process employs two basic steps, i.e., a sulfur production and recovery step and a hydrogen production step. All chemicals and the catalyst used in the HYSULF process are either commercially available or are slight modifications of available materials. Also, the chemistry used in the HYSULF process is similar to that used in commercial desulfurization and gas sweetening processes.

  1. Process and apparatus for coal hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Ruether, John A.

    1988-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process an aqueous slurry of coal is prepared containing a dissolved liquefaction catalyst. A small quantity of oil is added to the slurry and then coal-oil agglomerates are prepared by agitation of the slurry at atmospheric pressure. The resulting mixture of agglomerates, excess water, dissolved catalyst, and unagglomerated solids is pumped to reaction pressure and then passed through a drainage device where all but a small amount of surface water is removed from the agglomerates. Sufficient catalyst for the reaction is contained in surface water remaining on the agglomerates. The agglomerates fall into the liquefaction reactor countercurrently to a stream of hot gas which is utilized to dry and preheat the agglomerates as well as deposit catalyst on the agglomerates before they enter the reactor where they are converted to primarily liquid products under hydrogen pressure.

  2. Process and catalyst for the hydrogenation of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Wernicke, H.J.; Zimmerman, H.

    1985-05-07

    Blast furnace flue dust is used as a catalyst in a process for the hydrogenation of coal. A flowable mixture of finely divided coal particles and liquid hydrocarbons is brought to high pressure and to reaction temperature. The mixture is hydrogenated with hydrogen in the presence of blast furnace dust as a hydrogenation catalyst. The cost-effective hydrogenation catalyst is reused profitably subsequent to application in the coal hydrogenation process. Gaseous products are separated from liquid and solid reaction products. Liquid products are vaporized and are fractionated under atmospheric pressure and under vacuum. Hydrogen for use in the hydrogenation is produced by partial oxidation of the residue, and the catalyst is deposited as slag, which is returned to the blast furnace.

  3. Mechanisms of CO2 Capture into Monoethanolamine Solution with Different CO2 Loading during the Absorption/Desorption Processes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bihong; Guo, Bingsong; Zhou, Zuoming; Jing, Guohua

    2015-09-01

    Though the mechanism of MEA-CO2 system has been widely studied, there is few literature on the detailed mechanism of CO2 capture into MEA solution with different CO2 loading during absorption/desorption processes. To get a clear picture of the process mechanism, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to analyze the reaction intermediates under different CO2 loadings and detailed mechanism on CO2 absorption and desorption in MEA was evaluated in this work. The results demonstrated that the CO2 absorption in MEA started with the formation of carbamate according to the zwitterion mechanism, followed by the hydration of CO2 to form HCO3(-)/CO3(2-), and accompanied by the hydrolysis of carbamate. It is interesting to find that the existence of carbamate will be influenced by CO2 loading and that it is rather unstable at high CO2 loading. At low CO2 loading, carbamate is formed fast by the reaction between CO2 and MEA. At high CO2 loading, it is formed by the reaction of CO3(-)/CO3(2-) with MEA, and the formed carbamate can be easily hydrolyzed by H(+). Moreover, CO2 desorption from the CO2-saturated MEA solution was proved to be a reverse process of absorption. Initially, some HCO3(-) were heated to release CO2 and other HCO3(-) were reacted with carbamic acid (MEAH(+)) to form carbamate, and the carbamate was then decomposed to MEA and CO2.

  4. Hydrogenation catalyst and hydrogenation process wherein the catalyst is used

    SciTech Connect

    Hoxmeier, R.J.; Slaugh, L.H.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a method for hydrogenating a compound containing ethylenic and/or aromatic unsaturated. It comprises contacting the compound with hydrogen in a suitable solvent and in the presence of a catalyst prepared by combining one or more Group VIII metal compounds with one or more alkylalumoxanes and one or more alkyls or hydrides of a metal selected from Groups Ia, IIa and IIIa of the Periodic Table of Elements in a ratio sufficient to provide an aluminum from (from alkylalumoxanes) to Group VIII metal atomic ratio within the range from about 1.5:1 to about 20:1 and an aluminum (from alkyl and hydride) to Group VIII metal atomic ratio within the range from about 0.1:1 to about 20:1; maintaining the contact for a sufficient period of time to permit conversion of at least a portion of the ethylenic and/or aromatic unsaturation contained in the compound; and recovering a hydrogenated compound.

  5. Glyphosate sorption/desorption on biochars – Interactions of physical and chemical processes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: Biochar, a carbon-rich product of biomass pyrolysis, could limit glyphosate transport in soil and remediate contaminated water. The present study investigates the sorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on biochars prepared from different hardwoods at temperatures ranging from 350°C t...

  6. ADSORPTION, DESORPTION AND OXIDATION OF ARSENIC AFFECTED BY CLAY MINERALS AND AGING PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption/desorption and oxidation/reduction of arsenic at clay surfaces are very important to the natural attenuation of arsenic in the subsurface environment. Although numerous studies have concluded that iron oxides have high affinities for the adsorption of As(V), very litt...

  7. ADSORPTION, DESORPTION AND OXIDATION OF ARSENIC AFFECTED BY CLAY MINERALS AND AGING PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption/desorption and oxidation/reduction of arsenic at clay surfaces are very important to the natural attenuation of arsenic in the subsurface environment. Although numerous studies have concluded that iron oxides have high affinities for the adsorption of As(V), very litt...

  8. Ultraviolet/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric characterization of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid-induced reductive hydrogenation of oligonucleotides on cytosine residues.

    PubMed

    Koomen, J M; Russell, D H

    2000-08-01

    The changes in the ion signals in the isotope cluster, mass resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and mass accuracy for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) of DNA oligonucleotides (dGGATC, dCAGCt, and dAACCGTT) and their fragment ions were evaluated, and these data were compared with those obtained using 3-hydroxypicolinic acid. Mass spectra obtained by using 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB) appear to have differences from the theoretical isotopic clusters, which arise by reductive hydrogenation producing a second peak at the M + 2 isotope of the native oligonucleotide. Based on the patterns of the isotopic envelope observed in the in-source decay fragments, we propose that cytosine is the site of reduction. We do not find evidence of reduction of oligonucleotides, viz. dTGGGGTT, that do not contain cytosine; however, 2'-deoxycytidine and 2'-deoxycytidine-5'-monophosphate undergo reductive hydrogenation. Several experiments were carried out in an effort to determine whether the reductive hydrogenation occurs during sample preparation or as a result of laser irradiation. The results of these experiments suggest that it occurs during sample preparation. The relative intensities of ion signals corresponding to the reduced base can be altered by using different matrix additives (aminonaphthalenes) or a different substrate (copper). Also, the oxidized form of 2,5-DHB is trapped by reaction with the side chain of cysteine in glutathione, providing evidence that the reaction occurs in solution as the matrix crystallizes.

  9. Superior hydrogen desorption kinetics of Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} hollow nanospheres mixed with MgH{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Lei; Li Yaoqi; Yang Rong; Liu Yang; Li Xingguo

    2008-06-09

    Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} nanocubes were prepared by vaporized bulk magnesium in ammonia atmosphere associated with plasma metal reaction. Then the product transformed to Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} hollow nanospheres after it was reacted with NH{sub 3} based on the Kirkendall effect. The electron microscopy results suggested that the obtained hollow nanospheres were around 100 nm and the shell thickness was about 10 nm. Because of its short distance for Mg{sup 2+} diffusion and large specific surface area for interaction between Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} and MgH{sub 2}, the structure dramatically enhanced the hydrogen desorption kinetics of Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-2MgH{sub 2}.

  10. Process for the thermochemical production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.; Russell, Jr., John L.; Porter, II, John T.; McCorkle, Kenneth H.; Roemer, Thomas S.; Sharp, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen is thermochemically produced from water in a cycle wherein a first reaction produces hydrogen iodide and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 by the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water under conditions which cause two distinct aqueous phases to be formed, i.e., a lighter sulfuric acid-bearing phase and a heavier hydrogen iodide-bearing phase. After separation of the two phases, the heavier phase containing most of the hydrogen iodide is treated, e.g., at a high temperature, to decompose the hydrogen iodide and recover hydrogen and iodine. The H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is pyrolyzed to recover sulfur dioxide and produce oxygen.

  11. Process for hydrogenation of hydrocarbon tars

    DOEpatents

    Dolbear, Geoffrey E.

    1978-07-18

    Hydrocarbon tars of high asphaltene content such as tars obtained from pyrolysis of coal are dissolved in a solvent formed from the hydrogenation of the coal tars, and the resultant mixture hydrogenated in the presence of a catalyst at a pressure from about 1500 to 5000 psig at a temperature from about 500.degree. F to about the critical temperature of the solvent to form a light hydrocarbon as a solvent for the tars. Hydrogen content is at least three times the amount of hydrogen consumed.

  12. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed.

  13. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed. PMID:28337398

  14. Hydrogenation process for solid carbonaceous materials

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L.; Wilcox, Wayne A.

    1979-01-01

    Coal or other solid carbonaceous material is contacted with an organic solvent containing both hydrogen and a transition metal catalyst in solution to hydrogenate unsaturated bonds within the carbonaceous material. This benefaction step permits subsequent pyrolysis or hydrogenolysis of the carbonaceous fuel to form gaseous and liquid hydrocarbon products of increased yield and quality.

  15. Catalyst and process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.; Ward, J.W.

    1984-04-24

    Catalysts comprising bismuth and vanadium components are highly active and stable, especially in the presence of water vapor, for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to sulfur or SO/sub 2/. Such catalysts have been found to be especially active for the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur by reaction with oxygen or SO/sub 2/.

  16. Hydrogen-donor coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Jr., Edward L.; Mitchell, Willard N.

    1980-01-01

    Improved liquid yields are obtained during the hydrogen-donor solvent liquefaction of coal and similar carbonaceous solids by maintaining a higher concentration of material having hydrogenation catalytic activity in the downstream section of the liquefaction reactor system than in the upstream section of the system.

  17. Simultaneous Online Measurement of H2O and CO2 in the Humid CO2 Adsorption/Desorption Process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qingni; Ye, Sha; Zhu, Jingke; Lei, Lecheng; Yang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    A dew point meter (DP) and an infrared (IR) CO2 analyzer were assembled in a humid CO2 adsorption/desorption system in series for simultaneous online measurements of H2O and CO2, respectively. The humidifier, by using surface-flushing on a saturated brine solution was self-made for the generation of humid air flow. It was found that by this method it became relatively easy to obtain a low H2O content in air flow and that its fluctuation could be reduced compared to the bubbling method. Water calibration for the DP-IR detector is necessary to be conducted for minimizing the measurement error of H2O. It demonstrated that the relative error (RA) for simultaneous online measurements H2O and CO2 in the desorption process is lower than 0.1%. The high RA in the adsorption of H2O is attributed to H2O adsorption on the transfer pipe and amplification of the measurement error. The high accuracy of simultaneous online measurements of H2O and CO2 is promising for investigating their co-adsorption/desorption behaviors, especially for direct CO2 capture from ambient air.

  18. High temperature solar thermochemical processing - Hydrogen and sulfur from hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noring, J. E.; Fletcher, E. A.

    1982-08-01

    Sunlight, concentrated to high intensities, has a rarely recognized potential for adding process heat to reactors at high temperatures. Hydrogen sulfide is a by-product of the sweetening of fossil fuels. In this paper, by way of example, the production of hydrogen and sulfur from hydrogen sulfide is used as a device for showing how solar processing might be considered as a successor to a currently used industrial process, the Claus process. It is concluded that this and other processes should be explored as means of using as well as storing solar energy.

  19. Comparison of electrolytic, thermochemical, and other hydrogen-production processes

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, R.; Whaley, T.

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of the following six hydrogen production process categories: catalytic steam reforming of light hydrocarbons; partial oxidation of less-reactive feedstocks such as coal and heavy oil; reaction of active metals or metal hydrides with water or acids; electrolysis of water; thermochemical hydrogen cycles; and photolysis of water. These processes are compared technically, and to the extent possible, economically.

  20. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.H.; Bauer, H.F.; Grimes, R.W.

    1993-03-30

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  1. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.; Bauer, Hans F.; Grimes, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen an carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  2. Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors

    DOEpatents

    Perdieu, Louisa H.

    2000-09-09

    A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

  3. A new process for removing hydrogen sulfide from gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, K.; Allford, K.T.

    1986-01-01

    A novel, patented sour gas sweetening process was introduced to the gas processing industry in September, 1984. This new process is referred to as the one-step process in this paper. The one-step process selectively removes hydrogen sulfide from sour gases and converts dissolved hydrogen sulfide directly to sulfur in a bubble tower filled with the sweetener solution. The sweetener, a proprietary formulation, is an alkaline solution of oxidizing and buffering agents. Oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur is achieved by a liquid phase oxidation technique.

  4. Novel simple process for tocopherols selective recovery from vegetable oils by adsorption and desorption with an anion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Hiromori, Kousuke; Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Nakashima, Kazunori; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2016-03-01

    A novel and simple low-temperature process was used to recover tocopherols from a deodorizer distillate, which is a by-product of edible oil refining. The process consists of three operations: the esterification of free fatty acids with a cation-exchange resin catalyst, the adsorption of tocopherols onto an anion-exchange resin, and tocopherol desorption from the resin. No degradation of tocopherols occurred during these processes. In the tocopherol-rich fraction, no impurities such as sterols or glycerides were present. These impurities are commonly found in the product of the conventional process. This novel process improves the overall recovery ratio and the mass fraction of the product (75.9% and 51.0wt%) compared with those in the conventional process (50% and 35wt%).

  5. Oxygen isotopic fractionation of O₂ during adsorption and desorption processes using molecular sieve at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Insu; Kusakabe, Minoru; Lee, Jong Ik

    2014-06-15

    Cryogenic trapping using molecular sieves is commonly used to collect O2 extracted from silicates for (17)O/(16)O and (18)O/(16)O analyses. However, gases which interfere with (17)O/(16)O analysis, notably NF3, are also trapped and their removal is essential for accurate direct measurement of the (17)O/(16)O ratio. It is also necessary to identify and quantify any isotopic fractionation associated with the use of cryogenic trapping using molecular sieves. The oxygen isotopic compositions of O2 before and after desorption from, and adsorption onto, 13X and 5A molecular sieves (MS13X and MS5A) at 0°C, -78°C, -114°C, and -130°C were measured in order to determine the oxygen isotopic fractionation at these temperatures. We also investigated whether isotopic fractionation occurred when O2 gas was transferred sequentially into a second cold finger, also containing molecular sieve. It was confirmed that significant oxygen isotopic fractionation occurs between the gaseous O2 and that adsorbed onto molecular sieve, if desorption and adsorption are incomplete. As the fraction of released or untrapped O2 becomes smaller with decreasing trapping temperature (from 0 to -130°C), the isotopic fractionation becomes larger. Approximately half of the total adsorbed O2 is released from the molecular sieve during desorption at -114°C, which is the temperature recommended for separation from NF3 (retained on the molecular sieve), and this will interfere with (17)O/(16)O measurements. The use of a single cold finger should be avoided, because partial desorption is accompanied by oxygen isotopic fractionation, thereby resulting in inaccurate isotopic data. The use of a dual cold finger arrangement is recommended because, as we have confirmed, the transfer of O2 from the first trap to the second is almost 100%. However, even under these conditions, a small isotopic fractionation (0.18 ± 0.05‰ in δ(17)O values and 0.26 ± 0.06‰ in δ(18)O values) occurred, with O2 in

  6. Process for the production of hydrogen from water

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Maroni, Victor A.; Willit, James L.

    2010-05-25

    A method and device for the production of hydrogen from water and electricity using an active metal alloy. The active metal alloy reacts with water producing hydrogen and a metal hydroxide. The metal hydroxide is consumed, restoring the active metal alloy, by applying a voltage between the active metal alloy and the metal hydroxide. As the process is sustainable, only water and electricity is required to sustain the reaction generating hydrogen.

  7. Exploring adsorption and desorption characteristics of molecular hydrogen on neutral and charged Mg nanoclusters: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Paramita; Chandrakumar, K. R. S.; Das, G. P.

    2016-05-01

    To surmount the limitations of bulk MgH2 for the purpose of hydrogen storage, we report here, a detailed first principles density functional theory (DFT) based study on the structure and stability of neutral (Mgm) and positively charged (Mgm+) Mg nanoclusters of different sizes (m = 2, 4, 8 and 12) and their interaction with molecular hydrogen (H2). Our results demonstrate that H2 is weakly bound to the Mg nanoclusters through van der Waals interactions. Incorporation of Grimme's dispersion correction (D3) in the DFT based exchange-correlation functionals leads to improved accuracy of H2 interaction energy (IE) values that fall within an energy window (between physisorption and chemisorption) desirable for hydrogen storage. Energy decomposition analysis reveals the significance of polarization energy for these Mg-H2 binding. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation shows that complete dehydrogenation from these Mg nanoclusters occur at ∼100 °C which is a significant improvement over bulk MgH2 (∼300 °C).

  8. Metal-hydride energy-technological processing of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovei, V. V.

    1983-03-01

    The external and internal irreversibility of the thermochemical hydrogen compression cycle is analyzed in relation to the efficiency of heat utilization in a metal-hydride energy system. The properties of the working fluid and the design of the metal-hydride elements are shown to have a considerable effect on the thermodynamic performance of a heat-utilizing installation for hydrogen processing.

  9. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  10. Si(100) surfaces in a hydrogen-based process ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döscher, Henning; Dobrich, Anja; Brückner, Sebastian; Kleinschmidt, Peter; Hannappel, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    We studied the atomic surface properties of Si(100) during preparation in a (metal-organic) vapor phase epitaxy (VPE) reactor and the impact of the hydrogen ambient. Absorption lines in Fourier-transform infrared spectra were identified as stretch modes of coupled Si-H monohydrides, in agreement with Si-dimers observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. The polarization dependence of the antisymmetric stretch mode distinguished different dimer orientations and verified a clear preference for one of the (2×1)/(1×2) surface reconstruction domains. Tip-induced H-desorption proved the complete saturation of dangling bonds after VPE-preparation. In situ reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy showed the absence of Si-H bonds at elevated annealing temperature.

  11. A superior process for forming titanium hydrogen isotopic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Process forms stoichiometric, continuous, strongly bonded titanium hydrogen isotopic films. Films have thermal and electrical conductivities approximately the same as bulk pure titanium, ten times greater than those of usual thin films.

  12. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation and hydroconversion process

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, James B.; McLean, Joseph B.; Comolli, Alfred G.

    1989-01-01

    A process for two-stage catalytic hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent and fed at temperature below about 650.degree. F. into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils at conditions favoring hydrogenation reactions. The first stage reactor is maintained at 650.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-60 lb coal/hr/ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The partially hydrogenated material from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the close-coupled second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at a temperature at least about 25.degree. F. higher than for the first stage reactor and within a range of 750.degree.-875.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and thermal hydroconversion reactions. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, which results in significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of undesirable residuum and unconverted coal and hydrocarbon gases, with use of less energy to obtain the low molecular weight products, while catalyst life is substantially increased.

  13. On plate graphite supported sample processing for simultaneous lipid and protein identification by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; van der Werf, Inez Dorothé; Sabbatini, Luigia; Palmisano, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous identification of lipids and proteins by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) after direct on-plate processing of micro-samples supported on colloidal graphite is demonstrated. Taking advantages of large surface area and thermal conductivity, graphite provided an ideal substrate for on-plate proteolysis and lipid extraction. Indeed proteins could be efficiently digested on-plate within 15 min, providing sequence coverages comparable to those obtained by conventional in-solution overnight digestion. Interestingly, detection of hydrophilic phosphorylated peptides could be easily achieved without any further enrichment step. Furthermore, lipids could be simultaneously extracted/identified without any additional treatment/processing step as demonstrated for model complex samples such as milk and egg. The present approach is simple, efficient, of large applicability and offers great promise for protein and lipid identification in very small samples.

  14. Hydrogen from algal biomass: A review of production process.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Archita; Arya, Shailendra Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Multifariousness of biofuel sources has marked an edge to an imperative energy issue. Production of hydrogen from microalgae has been gathering much contemplation right away. But, mercantile production of microalgae biofuels considering bio-hydrogen is still not practicable because of low biomass concentration and costly down streaming processes. This review has taken up the hydrogen production by microalgae. Biofuels are the up and coming alternative to exhaustible, environmentally and unsafe fossil fuels. Algal biomass has been considered as an enticing raw material for biofuel production, these days photobioreactors and open-air systems are being used for hydrogen production from algal biomass. The formers allow the careful cultivation control whereas the latter ones are cheaper and simpler. A contemporary, encouraging optimization access has been included called algal cell immobilization on various matrixes which has resulted in marked increase in the productivity per volume of a reactor and addition of the hydrogen-production phase.

  15. On gas desorption from the tokamak first wall during edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Marenkov, E. D.; Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2013-11-15

    The effect of gas desorption from the tokamak first wall on the pedestal recovery in the H-mode after an edge-localized-mode burst is considered. Results of FACE code simulations of hydrogen desorption from a beryllium wall are presented. It is found that the wall has a significant effect on plasma processes only at sufficiently low temperatures (of about 400 K), which agrees with qualitative estimates obtained earlier in the zero-dimensional approximation.

  16. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  17. Process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, I.

    1981-01-20

    A process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases utilizes iron oxide particles of unique chemical and physical properties. These particles have large surface area, and are comprised substantially of amorphous Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ containing a crystalline phase of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ and combinations thereof. In scavenging hydrogen sulfide, the iron oxide particles are suspended in a liquid which enters into intimate mixing contact with hydrocarbon gases; the hydrogen sulfide is reacted at an exceptional rate and only acid-stable reaction products are formed. Thereafter, the sweetened hydrocarbon gases are collected.

  18. Process for removing hydrogen sulfide from waste water

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiecki, J.L.; Wolfe, R.G.

    1989-08-01

    The patent describes a process for removing hydrogen sulfide from a water stream, derived by separating water from crude oil at the production well. The water stream comprising hydrogen sulfide or a hydrogen sulfide precursor and a concentration of at least about 1000 mg/L of a Group IIA metal component of the Periodic Table of Elements. The process comprises the steps of: maintaining the water stream at a temperature ranging from about 150{sup 0}F. to about 200{sup 0}F. and at a pH ranging from about 5 to about 6; subjecting the water stream resulting in the absence of a stripping gas, to a pressure ranging from about 3 to about 10 psia, whereby at least a portion of the hydrogen sulfide is removed by volatilization from the water stream and whereby salt deposition is minimized.

  19. Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    contribute to understanding of some basic surface physics problems such as adsorption , atomic scattering, desorption mechanisms * and electron transfer in atom...atomic hydrogen and insensitive to molecular hydrogen. Its cisadvantage is easy saturation with hydrogen occurring at higher hydrogen fluxes. It is...should be able to model the dynamic process, and we plan to study this in the future. When the surface is exposed to the cesium beam for a long enough

  20. NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V Park

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

  1. Process for producing cracked distillate and hydrogen from heavy oil

    SciTech Connect

    Aizawa, S.; Fujimori, K.; Satomi, Y.; Suzuka, T.

    1980-09-23

    A process is disclosed for producing a cracked distillate and hydrogen from a heavy oil which comprises cracking the heavy oil in the presence of laterite or a laterite-containing catalyst while simultaneously depositing coke on said laterite or laterite-containing catalysts, reducing the laterite or laterote-containing catalyst on which the coke is deposited, and forming a hydrogen-rich gas by contacting the reduced laterite or laterite-containing catalyst with steam.

  2. Hydrogen incorporation into III-V nitrides during processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Vartuli, C.B.

    1995-10-01

    Hydrogen is readily incorporated into GaN and related alloys during wet and dry etching, chemical vapor deposition of dielectric overlayers, boiling in water and other process steps, in addition to its effects during MOCVD or MOMBE growth. The hydrogen is bound at defects or impurities and passivates their electrical activity. Reactivation occurs at 450-550{degrees}C, but evolution from the crystal requires much higher temperatures ({ge} 800{degrees}C).

  3. Process for hydrogen isotope concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, William H.

    1976-09-21

    A process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas, wherein liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted, in an exchange section, with one another and with at least one catalyst body comprising at least one metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table and preferably a support therefor, the catalyst body has a liquid-water-repellent, gas permeable polymer or organic resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone coating, so that the isotope concentration takes place by two simultaneously occurring steps, namely, ##EQU1## WHILE THE HYDROGEN GAS FED TO THE EXCHANGE SECTION IS DERIVED IN A REACTOR VESSEL FROM LIQUID WATER THAT HAS PASSED THROUGH THE EXCHANGE SECTION.

  4. Reaction pathways determined by mechanical milling process for dehydrogenation/hydrogenation of the LiNH(2)/MgH(2) system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chu; Liu, Yongfeng; Luo, Kun; Li, Bo; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge; Wang, Qidong

    2010-01-11

    The dehydrogenation/hydrogenation processes of the LiNH(2)/MgH(2) (1:1) system were systematically investigated with respect to balller milling and the subsequent heating process. The reaction pathways for hydrogen desorption/absorption of the LiNH(2)/MgH(2) (1:1) system were found to depend strongly on the milling duration due to the presence of two competing reactions in different stages (i.e., the reaction between Mg(NH(2))(2) and MgH(2) and that between Mg(NH(2))(2) and LiH), caused by a metathesis reaction between LiNH(2) and MgH(2), which exhibits more the nature of solid-solid reactions. The study provides us with a new approach for the design of novel hydrogen storage systems and the improvement of hydrogen-storage performance of the amide/hydride systems.

  5. Electrochemical hydrogen evolution of multi-walled carbon nanotube/micro-hybrid composite decorated with Ni nanoparticles as catalyst through electroless deposition process.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Nazanin; Doroodmand, Mohammad Mahdi; Sabbaghi, Samad; Sheikhi, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-08-01

    Hydrogen evolution of multi-walled nanotube (MWCNT)/micro-hybrid polymer composite, decorated with Ni nanoparticles through electroless deposition process is studied by the electrochemical method. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is utilized to clearly study the electrochemical hydrogen storage/evolution behavior of the composite through a potential window ranging from -1.60 to +0.60 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). Hydrogen adsorption/desorption peaks are positioned at -1.52 and -0.05 V, respectively. Chronoamperometry is also applied to estimate active surface area (0.145 m(2)g(-1)) of the composite as well as the diffusion coefficient (3.4×10(-11) m(2) s(-1)) of adsorbed hydrogen process. According to the chrono-charge/discharge technique, the capacity of fabricated Ni-MWCNT/micro-hybrid composite is estimated to be 2.98 wt.% during charging for a certain time (40 min).

  6. Hydrogen donor solvent coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Plumlee, Karl W.

    1978-01-01

    An indigenous hydrocarbon product stream boiling within a range of from about C.sub.1 -700.degree. F., preferably C.sub.1 -400.degree. F., is treated to produce an upgraded hydrocarbon fuel component and a component which can be recycled, with a suitable donor solvent, to a coal liquefaction zone to catalyze the reaction. In accordance therewith, a liquid hydrocarbon fraction with a high end boiling point range up to about 700.degree. F., preferably up to about 400.degree. F., is separated from a coal liquefaction zone effluent, the separated fraction is contacted with an alkaline medium to provide a hydrocarbon phase and an aqueous extract phase, the aqueous phase is neutralized, and contacted with a peroxygen compound to convert indigenous components of the aqueous phase of said hydrocarbon fraction into catalytic components, such that the aqueous stream is suitable for recycle to the coal liquefaction zone. Naturally occurring phenols and alkyl substituted phenols, found in the aqueous phase, are converted, by the addition of hydroxyl constituents to phenols, to dihydroxy benzenes which, as disclosed in copending Application Ser. Nos. 686,813 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,536; 686,814 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,537; 686,827 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,051,012 and 686,828, K. W. Plumlee et al, filed May 17, 1976, are suitable hydrogen transfer catalysts.

  7. Plasma processing methods for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Jasiński, Mariusz

    2016-08-01

    In the future a transfer from the fossil fuel-based economy to hydrogen-based economy is expected. Therefore the development of systems for efficient H2 production becomes important. The several conventional methods of mass-scale (or central) H2 production (methane, natural gas and higher hydrocarbons reforming, coal gasification reforming) are well developed and their costs of H2 production are acceptable. However, due to the H2 transport and storage problems the small-scale (distributed) technologies for H2 production are demanded. However, these new technologies have to meet the requirement of producing H2 at a production cost of (1-2)/kg(H2) (or 60 g(H2)/kWh) by 2020 (the U.S. Department of Energy's target). Recently several plasma methods have been proposed for the small-scale H2 production. The most promising plasmas for this purpose seems to be those generated by gliding, plasmatron and nozzle arcs, and microwave discharges. In this paper plasma methods proposed for H2 production are briefly described and critically evaluated from the view point of H2 production efficiency. The paper is aiming at answering a question if any plasma method for the small-scale H2 production approaches such challenges as the production energy yield of 60 g(H2)/kWh, high production rate, high reliability and low investment cost. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  8. Absorption-Desorption Compressor for Spaceborne/Airborne Cryogenic Refrigerators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Refrigerant compressors, *Refrigeration systems), Spaceborne, Airborne, Cryogenics, Gases, Absorption, Desorption, Hydrogen, Hydrides, Lanthanum compounds, Nickel alloys, Joule Thomson effect , Heat transfer

  9. Structural and microscopic relaxation processes in liquid hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    Angelini, R; Giura, P; Monaco, G; Ruocco, G; Sette, F; Verbeni, R

    2002-06-24

    The high frequency collective dynamics of liquid hydrogen fluoride is studied by inelastic x-ray scattering on the coexistence curve at T = 239 K. The comparison with existing molecular dynamics simulations shows the existence of two active relaxation processes with characteristic time scales in the subpicosecond range. The observed scenario is very similar to that found in liquid water. This suggests that hydrogen bonded liquids behave similarly to other very different systems as simple and glass forming liquids, thus indicating that these two relaxation processes are universal features of the liquid state.

  10. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrogen. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquids. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  11. Chill Down Process of Hydrogen Transport Pipelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Renwei; Klausner, James

    2006-01-01

    A pseudo-steady model has been developed to predict the chilldown history of pipe wall temperature in the horizontal transport pipeline for cryogenic fluids. A new film boiling heat transfer model is developed by incorporating the stratified flow structure for cryogenic chilldown. A modified nucleate boiling heat transfer correlation for cryogenic chilldown process inside a horizontal pipe is proposed. The efficacy of the correlations is assessed by comparing the model predictions with measured values of wall temperature in several azimuthal positions in a well controlled experiment by Chung et al. (2004). The computed pipe wall temperature histories match well with the measured results. The present model captures important features of thermal interaction between the pipe wall and the cryogenic fluid, provides a simple and robust platform for predicting pipe wall chilldown history in long horizontal pipe at relatively low computational cost, and builds a foundation to incorporate the two-phase hydrodynamic interaction in the chilldown process.

  12. The ferrosilicon process for the generation of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, E R; Berry, W M; Bohnson, V L; Gordon, B D

    1920-01-01

    Report describes the generation of hydrogen by the reaction between ferrosilicon, sodium hydroxide, and water. This method known as the ferrosilicon method is especially adapted for use in the military field because of the relatively small size and low cost of the generator required to produce hydrogen at a rapid rate, the small operating force required, and the fact that no power is used except the small amount required to operate the stirring and pumping machinery. These advantages make it possible to quickly generate sufficient hydrogen to fill a balloon with a generator which can be transported on a motor truck. This report gives a summary of the details of the ferrosilicon process and a critical examination of the means which are necessary in order to make the process successful.

  13. A Hydrogen Containment Process for Nuclear Thermal Engine Ground testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric; Canabal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose a new total hydrogen containment process to enable the testing required for NTP engine development. This H2 removal process comprises of two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a shell-and-tube type of heat exchanger. This new process is demonstrated by simulation of the steady state operation of the engine firing at nominal conditions.

  14. Hydrogen Transport to Mars Enables the Sabatier/Electrolysis Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, P. J.; Rapp, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Sabatier/Electrolysis (S/E) process is an attractive approach to in situ propellant production (ISPP), and a breadboard demonstration of this process at Lockheed Martin Astronautics funded by JPL performed very well, with high conversion efficiency, and reliable diurnal operation. There is a net usage of hydrogen in the S/E process, and this has been the principal problem for this approach to ISPP.

  15. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, S.; Anand, M.; Carvill, B.

    1995-09-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process, the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The consequences of SER are: (1) reformation reaction at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than conventional SMR (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (2) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 99+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (3) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The early focus of the program will be on the identification of an adsorbent/chemisorbent for CO{sub 2} and on the demonstration of the SER concept for SMR in our state-of-the-art bench scale process. In the latter stages, a pilot plant will be built to scale-up the technology and to develop engineering data. The program has just been initiated and no significant results for SMR will be reported. However, results demonstrating the basic principles and process schemes of SER technology will be presented for reverse water gas shift reaction as the model reaction. If successful, this technology will be commercialized by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) and used in its existing hydrogen business. APCI is the world leader in merchant hydrogen production for a wide range of industrial applications.

  16. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  17. Changes induced on the surfaces of small Pd clusters by the thermal desorption of CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doering, D. L.; Poppa, H.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The stability and adsorption/desorption properties of supported Pd crystallites less than 5 nm in size were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and repeated flash thermal desorption of CO. The Pd particles were grown epitaxially on heat-treated, UHV-cleaved mica at a substrate temperature of 300 C and a Pd impingement flux of 10 to the 13th atoms/sq cm s. Auger analysis allowed in situ measurement of relative particle dispersion and contamination, while FTD monitored the CO desorption properties. The results show that significant changes in the adsorption properties can be detected. Changes in the Pd Auger signal and the desorption spectrum during the first few thermal cycles are due to particle coalescence and facetting and the rate of this change is dependent on the temperature and duration of the desorption. Significant reductions in the amplitude of the desorptions peak occur during successive CO desorptions which are attributed to increases of surface carbon, induced by the desorption of CO. The contamination process could be reversed by heat treatment in oxygen or hydrogen

  18. Hydrogen production via the KBW gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, H.J.; Cannon, J.F.; Probert, P.B.

    1982-03-01

    In October, 1981, Koppers Company, Inc. and the Babcock and Wilcox Company (an operating unit of McDermott, Inc.) formed a joint venture, KBW Gasification Systems, Inc. to serve the expanding synthetic fuels market. KBW is offering commercially an atmospheric pressure, oxygen blown, slagging type entrained flow gasification system. The KBW coal gasification system was designed to offer the synthetic fuels industry an efficient, reliable and advanced system that uses proven modern technology. It can gasify any rank of coal. This includes both Eastern and Western U.S. Coals. Caking properties of the coal do not affect the gasification process. The KBW gasifier can handle wide variations in ash quantity, ash fusion temperature, and sulfur content. It can gasify 100 percent of the mine output. It has major environmental advantages. Tar, phenols, and heavy hydrocarbons are not produced in the KBW gasifier because of the high gasification temperature. It does not produce methane. This eliminates the need for costly and energy intensive steam reforming. It is based on design data, knowledge, and experience possessed by Koppers and Babcock and Wilcox in the areas of coal preparation and handling, mass transfer, heat transfer equipment fabrication, and plant construction. The KBW gasifier has a larger internal volume than existing entrained flow gasifiers. This results in high throughput rates. Both the KBW gasifier and heat recovery boiler use components that have been proven through years of fabrication and service. Membrane walls constructed of vertical, water cooled tubes (which have been widely used in boilers) are used in the KBW gasifier and heat recovery boiler. This feature enables the gasifier to produce high pressure saturated steam that is subsequently superheated in the heat recovery boiler. The water cooled tubes can withstand much higher heat fluxes than jacket type cooling systems while assuring nucleate boiling.

  19. Hydrogen production: two stage processes for waste degradation.

    PubMed

    Gómez, X; Fernández, C; Fierro, J; Sánchez, M E; Escapa, A; Morán, A

    2011-09-01

    The dark fermentation process generates hydrogen by biological means. It presents two main advantages: fulfilling requirements for mild operational conditions and gaining benefit from the residual biomass. The process itself may be seen as a pre-treatment step in a complete stabilisation chain, with the aim of attaining the valorisation of residual biomass. However, increasing the yield of H2 production is an imperative task. In this manuscript, a review of recent work in the field of fermentative hydrogen production is presented. As dark fermentation has a maximum yield of 33% (on sugars), a description is also presented of possible second stage processes for the degradation of dark fermentation effluents. Alternatives considered were photofermentation and bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as processes capable of converting fermentation sub-products into H2. Anaerobic digestion as a final stabilisation stage was also considered owing to the wide application of this technology in the treatment of bio-wastes.

  20. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOEpatents

    Lyke, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  1. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Linne, Diane L.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrocarbons. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquid. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  2. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Linne, Diane L.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrocarbons. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquid. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  3. PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

    1960-09-27

    A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

  4. Sulfur Iodine Process Summary for the Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection: Process Performance Package

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Russ

    2009-06-01

    This document describes the details of implementing a Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) hydrogen production plant to deploy with the Next General Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP). Technical requirements and specifications are included, and a conceptual plant design is presented. The following areas of interest are outlined in particular as a baseline for the various technology comparisons: (1) Performance Criteria - (a) Quantity of hydrogen produced, (b) Purity of hydrogen produced, (c) Flexibility to serve various applications, (d) Waste management; (2) Economic Considerations - (a) Cost of hydrogen, (b) Development costs; and (3) Risk - (a) Technical maturity of the S-I process, (b) Development risk, (c) Scale up options.

  5. Powder metallurgical processing of Tb sub 0. 27 Dy sub 0. 73 Fe sub 2 minus x (0 lt x le 0. 5) by hydrogen decrepitation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.G.R.; Fairclough, J.P.; Abell, J.S.; Harris, I.R. )

    1991-04-15

    This paper reports on the characterization of giant magnetostrictive alloys, of the general formula Tb{sub 0.27}Dy{sub 0.73}Fe{sub 2{minus}{ital x}} (0{lt}{ital x}{le}0.5), at various stages during their powder processing by hydrogen decrepitation, in order to try to optimize the process. Mass spectrometer degassing studies on hydrogenated material have shown that disproportionated material exhibits two desorption peaks and is not degassed completely with respect to hydrogen until above 600 {degree}C. The RFe{sub 2} (R=Tb{sub 0.27}Dy{sub 0.73}) hydride powder appears to degas at a lower temperature; however, it is thought that a high-temperature desorption peak is not present due to oxidation. Metallographic studies have shown that there is much less rare-earth-rich grain-boundary phases in sintered compacts of initial composition RFe{sub 1.5} than in cast RFe{sub 1.5} and also reveal the microstructure of hydrogenated and disproportionated RFe{sub 1.5}. Wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis seems to indicate preferential loss of Dy during sintering.

  6. Mechanistic study of lead desorption during the leaching process of ion-absorbed rare earths: pH effect and the column experiment.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Xue, Qiang; Chen, Honghan; Li, Wenting

    2017-05-01

    High concentrations of ammonium sulfate, often used in the in situ mining process, can result in a decrease of pH in the environment and dissolution of rare earth metals. Ammonium sulfate can also cause desorption of toxic heavy metals, leading to environmental and human health implications. In this study, the desorption behavior and fraction changes of lead in the ion-absorbed rare earth ore were studied using batch desorption experiments and column leaching tests. Results from batch desorption experiments showed that the desorption process of lead included fast and slow stages and followed an Elovich model well. The desorption rate and the proportion of lead content in the solution to the total lead in the soil were observed to increase with a decrease in the initial pH of the ammonium sulfate solution. The lead in soil included an acid-extractable fraction, reducible fraction, oxidizable fraction, and a residual fraction, with the predominant fractions being the reducible and acid-extractable fractions. Ninety-six percent of the extractable fraction in soil was desorbed into solution at pH = 3.0, and the content of the reducible fraction was observed to initially increase (when pH >4.0) and then decrease (when pH <4.0) with a decrease in pH. Column leaching tests indicated that the content of lead in the different fractions of soil followed the trend of reducible fraction > oxidizable fraction > acid-extractable fraction > residual fraction after the simulating leaching mining process. The change in pH was also found to have a larger influence on the acid-extractable and reducible fractions than the other two fractions. The proportion of the extractable fraction being leached was ca. 86%, and the reducible fraction was enriched along the migration direction of the leaching liquid. These results suggest that certain lead fractions may desorb again and contaminate the environment via acid rain, which provides significant information for environmental assessment

  7. Studies of the use of heat from high temperature nuclear sources for hydrogen production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    Future uses of hydrogen and hydrogen production processes that can meet the demand for hydrogen in the coming decades were considered. To do this, a projection was made of the market for hydrogen through the year 2000. Four hydrogen production processes were selected, from among water electrolysis, fossil based and thermochemical water decomposition systems, and evaluated, using a consistent set of ground rules, in terms of relative performance, economics, resource requirements, and technology status.

  8. Cobalt-based nanocatalysts for green oxidation and hydrogenation processes.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesh, Rajenahally V; Stemmler, Tobias; Surkus, Annette-Enrica; Bauer, Matthias; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Radnik, Jörg; Junge, Kathrin; Junge, Henrik; Brückner, Angelika; Beller, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    This protocol describes the preparation of cobalt-based nanocatalysts and their applications in environmentally benign redox processes for fine chemical synthesis. The catalytically active material consists of nanoscale Co3O4 particles surrounded by nitrogen-doped graphene layers (NGrs), which have been prepared by pyrolysis of phenanthroline-ligated cobalt acetate on carbon. The resulting materials have been found to be excellent catalysts for the activation of both molecular oxygen and hydrogen; in all tested reactions, water was the only by-product. By applying these catalysts, green oxidations of alcohols and hydrogenation of nitroarenes for the synthesis of nitriles, esters and amines are demonstrated. The overall time required for catalyst preparation and for redox reactions is 35 h and 10-30 h, respectively.

  9. Sorption-desorption of fipronil in some soils, as influenced by ionic strength, pH and temperature.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand; Srivastava, Anjana; Srivastava, Prakash C

    2016-08-01

    The sorption-desorpion of fipronil insecticide is influenced by soil properties and variables such as pH, ionic strength, temperature, etc. A better understanding of soil properties and these variables in sorption-desorption processes by quantification of fipronil using liquid chromatography may help to optimise suitable soil management to reduce contamination of surface and groundwaters. In the present investigation, the sorption-desorption of fipronil was studied in some soils at varying concentrations, ionic strengths, temperatures and pH values, and IR specta of fipronil sorbed onto soils were studied. The sorption of fipronil onto soils conformed to the Freundlich isotherm model. The sorption-desorption of fipronil varied with ionic strength in each of the soils. Sorption decreased but desorption increased with temperature. Sorption did not change with increasing pH, but for desorption there was no correlation. The cumulative desorption of fipronil from soil was significantly and inversely related to soil organic carbon content. IR spectra of sorbed fipronil showed the involvement of amino, nitrile, sulfone, chloro and fluoro groups and the pyrazole nucleus of the fipronil molecule. The sorption of fipronil onto soils appeared to be a physical process with the involvement of hydrogen bonding. An increase in soil organic carbon may help to reduce desorption of fipronil. High-temperature regimes are more conducive to the desorption. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Reversible change of the electrical characteristics of a metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor structure under the effect of hydrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliev, B. B.

    1990-12-01

    The effect of hydrogen adsorption-desorption on the volt-farad characteristics of a gas-sensitive Pt-Si3N4-SiO2-Si MNOS structure was investigated experimentally. Transient processes in this structure under H2 adsorption and desorption were also studied. The results indicate that this structure is sensitive to the presence of hydrogen in the ambient atmosphere. Its electrical characteristics change strongly and reversibly during the hydrogen adsorption and desorption. It is concluded that this structure can be used as a hydrogen sensor.

  11. Process and composition for drying of gaseous hydrogen halides

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1989-08-01

    A process for drying a gaseous hydrogen halide of the formula HX, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine, to remove water impurity therefrom, comprising: contacting the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide with a scavenger including a support having associated therewith one or more members of the group consisting of: (a) an active scavenging moiety selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) metal halide compounds dispersed in the support, of the formula MX.sub.y ; and (ii) metal halide pendant functional groups of the formula -MX.sub.y-1 covalently bonded to the support, wherein M is a y-valent metal, and y is an integer whose value is from 1 to 3; (b) corresponding partially or fully alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, of the metal halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); wherein the alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, when present, are reactive with the gaseous hydrogen halide to form the corresponding halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); and M being selected such that the heat of formation, .DELTA.H.sub.f of its hydrated halide, MX.sub.y.(H.sub.2 O).sub.n, is governed by the relationship: .DELTA.H.sub.f .gtoreq.n.times.10.1 kilocalories/mole of such hydrated halide compound wherein n is the number of water molecules bound to the metal halide in the metal halide hydrate. Also disclosed is an appertaining scavenger composition and a contacting apparatus wherein the scavenger is deployed in a bed for contacting with the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide.

  12. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -454.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent (83) and recycled as process solvent (16). The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance.

  13. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone, the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1,500 psig (105 kg/cm[sup 2]), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone at a temperature in the range of between about 455 and about 500 C to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425 C to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C[sub 5]-454 C is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent. The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance. 6 figs.

  14. Glyphosate sorption/desorption on biochars - interactions of physical and chemical processes.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kathleen E; Spokas, Kurt A; Gamiz, Beatriz; Cox, Lucia; Papiernik, Sharon K; Koskinen, William C

    2017-01-23

    Biochar, a carbon-rich product of biomass pyrolysis, could limit glyphosate transport in soil and remediate contaminated water. The present study investigates the sorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on biochars prepared from different hardwoods at temperatures ranging from 350 to 900 °C to elucidate fundamental mechanisms. Glyphosate (1 mg L(-1) ) sorption on biochars increased with pyrolysis temperature and was highest on 900 °C biochars; however, total sorption was low on a mass basis (<0.1 mg g(-1) ). Sorption varied across feedstock materials, and isotherms indicated concentration dependence. Biochars with a greater fraction of micropores exhibited lower sorption capacities, and specific surface groups were also found to be influential. Prepyrolysis treatments with iron and copper, which complex glyphosate in soils, did not alter biochar sorption capacities. Glyphosate did not desorb from biochar with CaCl2 solution; however, up to 86% of the bound glyphosate was released with a K2 HPO4 solution. Results from this study suggest a combined impact of surface chemistry and physical constraints on glyphosate sorption/desorption on biochar. Based on the observed phosphate-induced desorption of glyphosate, the addition of P-fertilizer to biochar-amended soils can remobilize the herbicide and damage non-target plants; therefore, improved understanding of this risk is necessary. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Use of biofuels to produce hydrogen (reformation processes).

    PubMed

    Ramírez de la Piscina, Pilar; Homs, Narcís

    2008-11-01

    This tutorial review deals with the catalytic reformation of ethanol and glycerol to produce hydrogen that can be used as an energy carrier in a fuel cell. Both the worldwide production of ethanol in large amounts to be used as a biofuel and that of glycerol as a by-product in biodiesel manufacture are presented. The catalytic reformation processes of both ethanol and glycerol are contemplated, including thermodynamic and kinetic aspects. Catalysts are analyzed as a function of operation conditions, selectivity and stability.

  16. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption and desorption of halogen and other gaseous species from surfaces is a key fundamental process for both wet chemical and dry plasma etch and clean processes utilized in nanoelectronic fabrication processes. Therefore, to increase the fundamental understanding of these processes with regard to aluminum nitride (AlN) surfaces, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been utilized to investigate the desorption kinetics of water (H{sub 2}O), fluorine (F{sub 2}), hydrogen (H{sub 2}), hydrogen fluoride (HF), and other related species from aluminum nitride thin film surfaces treated with an aqueous solution of buffered hydrogen fluoride (BHF) diluted in methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). Pre-TPD XPS measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH:BHF treated AlN surfaces showed the presence of a variety of Al-F, N-F, Al-O, Al-OH, C-H, and C-O surfaces species in addition to Al-N bonding from the AlN thin film. The primary species observed desorbing from these same surfaces during TPD measurements included H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, HF, F{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH with some evidence for nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) desorption as well. For H{sub 2}O, two desorption peaks with second order kinetics were observed at 195 and 460 °C with activation energies (E{sub d}) of 51 ± 3 and 87 ± 5 kJ/mol, respectively. Desorption of HF similarly exhibited second order kinetics with a peak temperature of 475 °C and E{sub d} of 110 ± 5 kJ/mol. The TPD spectra for F{sub 2} exhibited two peaks at 485 and 585 °C with second order kinetics and E{sub d} of 62 ± 3 and 270 ± 10 kJ/mol, respectively. These values are in excellent agreement with previous E{sub d} measurements for desorption of H{sub 2}O from SiO{sub 2} and AlF{sub x} from AlN surfaces, respectively. The F{sub 2} desorption is therefore attributed to fragmentation of AlF{sub x} species in the mass spectrometer ionizer. H{sub 2} desorption exhibited

  17. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2004-12-31

    This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a discussion of proposed

  18. Hydrogen Technology Validation as a "Learning Demonstration" that Feeds the R&D Process (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Gronich, S.; Hooker, D.

    2004-04-01

    This presentation, which provides information about how hydrogen technology validation is used as a learning demonstration that feeds the research and development process, was given at a National Hydrogen Association meeting in April 2004.

  19. Investigation of heat and mass transfer process in metal hydride hydrogen storage reactors, suitable for a solar powered water pump system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldea, I.; Popeneciu, G.; Lupu, D.; Misan, I.; Blanita, G.; Ardelean, O.

    2012-02-01

    The paper analyzes heat and mass transfer process in metal hydride hydrogen storage systems as key element in the development of a solar powered pump system. Hydrogen storage and compression performance of the developed reactors are investigated according to the type of metal alloys, the metal hydride bed parameters and system operating conditions. To reach the desired goal, some metal hydride from groups AB5 and AB2 were synthesized and characterized using elements substitution for tailoring their properties: reversible hydrogen absorption capacity between the hydrogen absorption and desorption pressures at equilibrium at small temperature differences. For the designed hydrogen storage reactors, a new technical solution which combines the effective increase of the thermal conductivity of MH bed and good permeability to hydrogen gas circulation, was implemented and tested. The results permitted us to develop a heat engine with metal hydride, the main element of the functional model of a heat operated metal hydride based water pumping system using solar energy. This is a free energy system able to deliver water, at a convenience flow and pressure, in remote places without conventional energy access.

  20. Role of vacancies in the relaxation of Pd-5.3 at % In-0.5 at % Ru alloy foil after hydrogen desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimova, O. V.; Avdyukhina, V. M.; Shchetinin, I. V.

    2016-02-01

    The Pd-5.3 at % In-0.5 at % Ru foil subjected to electrolytic hydrogenation and subsequent prolonged relaxation (for 55 000 h) has been studied by X-ray diffraction analysis. Diffraction reflections belonging to phases with different indium concentrations and palladium phases enriched in vacancies were found. Phase transformations observed in the absence of hydrogen occur mainly due to the vacancy migration; the vacancies formed during hydrogenation and remained in vacancy complexes and alloy matrix up to the moment of the study.

  1. Beryllium Desorption from Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, V.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Beryllium isotopes have provided a useful tool in the field of geochronology and geomorphology over the last 25 years. The amount of cosmogenic meteoric 10Be and native 9Be absorbed to soils often scales with the residence time and chemical weathering of sediments in a landscape, respectively. Thus, the concentrations in river sediment may be used to quantify the denudation of specific watersheds. When deposited in ocean sediment, these concentrations are thought to record the history of denudation on Earth over the last ~10 Ma. The use of both isotopes often relies on the premise of beryllium retention to sediment surfaces in order to preserve a landscape's erosion and weathering signature. Changes in setting, en route from the soil to fluvial system to the ocean, can cause beryllium desorption and may preclude some applications of the 10Be/9Be system. Four mechanisms were tested to determine the desorption potential of beryllium including a reduction in pH, an increase in ionic strength and complexation with soluble organic and inorganic species. These processes have the potential to mobilize beryllium into solution. For example, by both reducing the pH and increasing the ionic strength, competition for adsorption sites increases, potentially liberating beryllium from the sediment surface. In addition, organic and inorganic ligands can complex beryllium causing it to become mobilized. To determine which of these alterations influence beryllium desorption and to quantify the effect, we prepared separate solutions of beryllium bound to minerals and organic compounds and measured beryllium concentrations in solution before and after adjusting the pH, ionic strength, and changing inorganic and organic ligand concentrations. We conclude from our observations that overall, beryllium sorbed to organic compounds was more resistant to desorption relative to mineral-associated beryllium. Among the methods tested, a reduction in pH resulted in the greatest amount of

  2. A Compact, Solid-State UV (266 nm) Laser System Capable of Burst-Mode Operation for Laser Ablation Desorption Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arevalo, Ricardo, Jr.; Coyle, Barry; Paulios, Demetrios; Stysley, Paul; Feng, Steve; Getty, Stephanie; Binkerhoff, William

    2015-01-01

    Compared to wet chemistry and pyrolysis techniques, in situ laser-based methods of chemical analysis provide an ideal way to characterize precious planetary materials without requiring extensive sample processing. In particular, laser desorption and ablation techniques allow for rapid, reproducible and robust data acquisition over a wide mass range, plus: Quantitative, spatially-resolved measurements of elemental and molecular (organic and inorganic) abundances; Low analytical blanks and limits-of-detection ( ng g-1); and, the destruction of minimal quantities of sample ( g) compared to traditional solution and/or pyrolysis analyses (mg).

  3. Production of hydrogen using an anaerobic biological process

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, Robert; Pelter, Libbie S.; Patterson, John A.

    2016-11-29

    Various embodiments of the present invention pertain to methods for biological production of hydrogen. More specifically, embodiments of the present invention pertain to a modular energy system and related methods for producing hydrogen using organic waste as a feed stock.

  4. Processing Raman Spectra of High-Pressure Hydrogen Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    The Raman Code automates the analysis of laser-Raman-spectroscopy data for diagnosis of combustion at high pressure. On the basis of the theory of molecular spectroscopy, the software calculates the rovibrational and pure rotational Raman spectra of H2, O2, N2, and H2O in hydrogen/air flames at given temperatures and pressures. Given a set of Raman spectral data from measurements on a given flame and results from the aforementioned calculations, the software calculates the thermodynamic temperature and number densities of the aforementioned species. The software accounts for collisional spectral-line-broadening effects at pressures up to 60 bar (6 MPa). The line-broadening effects increase with pressure and thereby complicate the analysis. The software also corrects for spectral interference ("cross-talk") among the various chemical species. In the absence of such correction, the cross-talk is a significant source of error in temperatures and number densities. This is the first known comprehensive computer code that, when used in conjunction with a spectral calibration database, can process Raman-scattering spectral data from high-pressure hydrogen/air flames to obtain temperatures accurate to within 10 K and chemical-species number densities accurate to within 2 percent.

  5. Concept study of a hydrogen containment process during nuclear thermal engine ground testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric T.; Canabal, Francisco

    A new hydrogen containment process was proposed for ground testing of a nuclear thermal engine. It utilizes two thermophysical steps to contain the hydrogen exhaust. First, the decomposition of hydrogen through oxygen-rich combustion at higher temperature; second, the recombination of remaining hydrogen with radicals at low temperature. This is achieved with two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a tubular heat exchanger. A computational fluid dynamics methodology was used to analyze the entire process on a three-dimensional domain. The computed flammability at the exit of the heat exchanger was less than the lower flammability limit, confirming the hydrogen containment capability of the proposed process.

  6. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for the production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.; Gaffney, T.; Nataraj, S.; Rao, M.; Sircar, S.

    1998-08-01

    The novel Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process has the potential to decrease the cost of hydrogen production by steam methane reforming. Current effort for development of this technology has focused on adsorbent development, experimental process concept testing, and process development and design. A preferred CO{sub 2} adsorbent, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted hydrotalcite, satisfies all of the performance targets and it has been scaled up for process testing. A separate class of adsorbents has been identified which could potentially improve the performance of the H{sub 2}-SER process. Although this material exhibits improved CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the HTC adsorbent, its hydrothermal stability must be improved. Single-step process experiments (not cyclic) indicate that the H{sub 2}-SER reactor performance during the reaction step improves with decreasing pressure and increasing temperature and steam to methane ratio in the feed. Methane conversion in the H{sub 2}-SER reactor is higher than for a conventional catalyst-only reactor operated at similar temperature and pressure. The reactor effluent gas consists of 90+% H{sub 2}, balance CH{sub 4}, with only trace levels (< 50 ppm) of carbon oxides. A best-case process design (2.5 MMSCFD of 99.9+% H{sub 2}) based on the HTC adsorbent properties and a revised SER process cycle has been generated. Economic analysis of this design indicates the process has the potential to reduce the H{sub 2} product cost by 25--31% compared to conventional steam methane reforming.

  7. Adsorption/desorption process of formaldehyde onto iron doped graphene: a theoretical exploration from density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Arriagada, Diego; Villegas-Escobar, Nery; Miranda-Rojas, Sebastián; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2017-02-08

    The interaction of formaldehyde (H2CO) onto Fe-doped graphene (FeG) was studied in detail from density functional theory calculations and electronic structure analyses. Our aim was to obtain insights into the adsorption, desorption and sensing properties of FeG towards H2CO, a hazardous organic compound. The adsorption of H2CO was shown to be energetically stable onto FeG, with adsorption energies of up to 1.45 eV and favored in different conformations. This interaction was determined to be mostly electrostatic in nature, where the oxygen plays an important role in this contribution; besides, our quantum molecular dynamics results showed the high stability of the FeG-H2CO interaction at ambient temperature (300 K). All the interactions were determined to be accompanied by an increase in the HOMO-LUMO energy gap with respect to the isolated adsorbent, indicating that FeG is highly sensitive to H2CO with respect to pristine graphene. Finally, it was found that external electric fields of 0.04-0.05 a.u. were able to induce the pollutant desorption from the adsorbent, allowing the adsorbent reactivation for repetitive applications. These results indicate that FeG could be a promising candidate for adsorption/sensing platforms of H2CO.

  8. Hydrogen gettering packing material, and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.; Thompson, Lisa M.; Smith, Henry Michael; Schicker, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  9. Application of electron stimulated desorption techniques to measure the isotherm and the mean residence time of hydrogen physisorbed on a metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Ichiro Shimizu, Hideyuki; Kawarabuki, Taku; Yamakawa, Koichiro; Miura, Takashi

    2015-03-15

    Electron stimulated desorption techniques were applied to probe the density of H{sub 2} physisorbed on a cold surface. The adsorption isotherm of H{sub 2} on a copper surface was measured in the equilibrium pressure range between 10{sup −9} and 10{sup −4} Pa at surface temperatures of 6.5 and 4.2 K. The mean residence times of H{sub 2} on copper were obtained from the observation of the time development of the surface density in a transitional state approaching equilibrium, and are 50–500 s for the coverage between 1 and 0.18 at 4.2 K of the substrate temperature. The adsorption energies of 1.18–1.27 kJ/mol, and the condensation coefficient of 0.074–0.018 were also deduced.

  10. Shock-wave processing of C60 in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biennier, L.; Jayaram, V.; Suas-David, N.; Georges, R.; Singh, M. Kiran; Arunan, E.; Kassi, S.; Dartois, E.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Interstellar carbonaceous particles and molecules are subject to intense shocks in astrophysical environments. Shocks induce a rapid raise in temperature and density which strongly affects the chemical and physical properties of both the gas and solid phases of the interstellar matter. Aims: The shock-induced thermal processing of C60 particles in hydrogen has been investigated in the laboratory under controlled conditions up to 3900 K with the help of a material shock-tube. Methods: The solid residues generated by the exposure of a C60/H2 mixture to a millisecond shock wave were collected and analyzed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman micro-spectroscopy, and infrared micro-spectroscopy. The gaseous products were analyzed by Gas Chromatography and Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy. Results: Volatile end-products appear above reflected shock gas temperatures of 2540 K and reveal the substantial presence of small molecules with one or two C atoms. These observations confirm the role played by the C2 radical as a major product of C60 fragmentation and less expectedly highlight the existence of a single C atom loss channel. Molecules with more than two carbon atoms are not observed in the post-shock gas. The analysis of the solid component shows that C60 particles are rapidly converted into amorphous carbon with a number of aliphatic bridges. Conclusions: The absence of aromatic CH stretches on the IR spectra indicates that H atoms do not link directly to aromatic cycles. The fast thermal processing of C60 in H2 over the 800-3400 K temperature range leads to amorphous carbon. The analysis hints at a collapse of the cage with the formation of a few aliphatic connections. A low amount of hydrogen is incorporated into the carbon material. This work extends the range of applications of shock tubes to studies of astrophysical interest.

  11. Process for recovering evolved hydrogen enriched with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope

    DOEpatents

    Tanaka, John; Reilly, Jr., James J.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a separation means and method for enriching a hydrogen atmosphere with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope by using a solid titaniun alloy hydride. To this end, the titanium alloy hydride containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of vanadium, chromium, manganese, molybdenum, iron, cobalt and nickel is contacted with a circulating gaseous flow of hydrogen containing at least one heavy hydrogen isotope at a temperature in the range of -20.degree. to +40.degree. C and at a pressure above the dissociation pressure of the hydrided alloy selectively to concentrate at least one of the isotopes of hydrogen in the hydrided metal alloy. The contacting is continued until equilibrium is reached, and then the gaseous flow is isolated while the temperature and pressure of the enriched hydride remain undisturbed selectively to isolate the hydride. Thereafter, the enriched hydrogen is selectively recovered in accordance with the separation factor (S.F.) of the alloy hydride employed.

  12. A kinetics study on promising hydrogen storage properties of Mg-based thin films at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianglan; Liu, Yang; Xin, Gongbiao; Zheng, Jie; Li, Xingguo

    2014-04-21

    Pd-Mg-Pd thin films with variable thickness of Mg layers were prepared. Their optical and electrical changes in both gasochromic and chemochromic processes were compared to investigate the kinetics of Mg-based thin films at room temperature. Hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of Pd-Mg-Pd thin films were strongly dependent on the thickness of the Mg layer. Especially, when the thickness was lowered to 60 nm, a MgH2 layer formed immediately after exposure to H2 at room temperature, while a Mg layer was rapidly generated during hydrogen desorption in ambient air. By means of optical and electrical resistance measurements, we found that the diffusion process contributed significantly to hydrogen absorption and desorption. The remarkable absorption and desorption kinetics at room temperature reported here suggested promising applications in Mg-based energy-efficient devices and hydrogen sensors.

  13. Non-Debye relaxation in the dielectric response of nematic liquid crystals: Surface and memory effects in the adsorption-desorption process of ionic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, J. L.; Santoro, P. A.; Zola, R. S.; Lenzi, E. K.; Evangelista, L. R.; Ciuchi, F.; Mazzulla, A.; Scaramuzza, N.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that the presence of ions in insulating materials such as nematic liquid crystals may be responsible for the dielectric spectroscopy behavior observed experimentally. It is shown that, at low frequencies, an essentially non-Debye relaxation process takes place due to surface effects. This is accomplished by investigating the effects of the adsorption-desorption process on the electrical response of an electrolytic cell when the generation and recombination of ions is present. The adsorption-desorption is governed by a non-usual kinetic equation in order to incorporate memory effects related to a non-Debye relaxation and the roughness of the surface. The analysis is carried out by searching for solutions to the drift-diffusion equation that satisfy the Poisson equation relating the effective electric field to the net charge density. We also discuss the effect of the mobility of the ions, i.e., situations with equal and different diffusion coefficients for positive and negative ions, on the impedance and obtain an exact expression for the admittance. The model is compared with experimental results measured for the impedance of a nematic liquid crystal sample and a very good agreement is obtained.

  14. Non-Debye relaxation in the dielectric response of nematic liquid crystals: surface and memory effects in the adsorption-desorption process of ionic impurities.

    PubMed

    de Paula, J L; Santoro, P A; Zola, R S; Lenzi, E K; Evangelista, L R; Ciuchi, F; Mazzulla, A; Scaramuzza, N

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that the presence of ions in insulating materials such as nematic liquid crystals may be responsible for the dielectric spectroscopy behavior observed experimentally. It is shown that, at low frequencies, an essentially non-Debye relaxation process takes place due to surface effects. This is accomplished by investigating the effects of the adsorption-desorption process on the electrical response of an electrolytic cell when the generation and recombination of ions is present. The adsorption-desorption is governed by a non-usual kinetic equation in order to incorporate memory effects related to a non-Debye relaxation and the roughness of the surface. The analysis is carried out by searching for solutions to the drift-diffusion equation that satisfy the Poisson equation relating the effective electric field to the net charge density. We also discuss the effect of the mobility of the ions, i.e., situations with equal and different diffusion coefficients for positive and negative ions, on the impedance and obtain an exact expression for the admittance. The model is compared with experimental results measured for the impedance of a nematic liquid crystal sample and a very good agreement is obtained.

  15. Access of hydrogen-radicals to the peptide-backbone as a measure for estimating the flexibility of proteins using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Mitsuo; Nagoshi, Keishiro; Iimuro, Ryunosuke; Inatomi, Kazuma

    2014-05-13

    A factor for estimating the flexibility of proteins is described that uses a cleavage method of "in-source decay (ISD)" coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). The MALDI-ISD spectra of bovine serum albumin (BSA), myoglobin and thioredoxin show discontinuous intense ion peaks originating from one-side preferential cleavage at the N-Cα bond of Xxx-Asp, Xxx-Asn, Xxx-Cys and Gly-Xxx residues. Consistent with these observations, Asp, Asn and Gly residues are also identified by other flexibility measures such as B-factor, turn preference, protection and fluorescence decay factors, while Asp, Asn, Cys and Gly residues are identified by turn preference factor based on X-ray crystallography. The results suggest that protein molecules embedded in/on MALDI matrix crystals partly maintain α-helix and that the reason some of the residues are more susceptible to ISD (Asp, Asn, Cys and Gly) and others less so (Ile and Val) is because of accessibility of the peptide backbone to hydrogen-radicals from matrix molecules. The hydrogen-radical accessibility in MALDI-ISD could therefore be adopted as a factor for measuring protein flexibility.

  16. Access of Hydrogen-Radicals to the Peptide-Backbone as a Measure for Estimating the Flexibility of Proteins Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Mitsuo; Nagoshi, Keishiro; Iimuro, Ryunosuke; Inatomi, Kazuma

    2014-01-01

    A factor for estimating the flexibility of proteins is described that uses a cleavage method of “in-source decay (ISD)” coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). The MALDI-ISD spectra of bovine serum albumin (BSA), myoglobin and thioredoxin show discontinuous intense ion peaks originating from one-side preferential cleavage at the N-Cα bond of Xxx-Asp, Xxx-Asn, Xxx-Cys and Gly-Xxx residues. Consistent with these observations, Asp, Asn and Gly residues are also identified by other flexibility measures such as B-factor, turn preference, protection and fluorescence decay factors, while Asp, Asn, Cys and Gly residues are identified by turn preference factor based on X-ray crystallography. The results suggest that protein molecules embedded in/on MALDI matrix crystals partly maintain α-helix and that the reason some of the residues are more susceptible to ISD (Asp, Asn, Cys and Gly) and others less so (Ile and Val) is because of accessibility of the peptide backbone to hydrogen-radicals from matrix molecules. The hydrogen-radical accessibility in MALDI-ISD could therefore be adopted as a factor for measuring protein flexibility. PMID:24828203

  17. APPLICATION OF THERMAL DESORPTION TECHNOLOGIES TO HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is a separation process frequently used to remediate many Superfund sites. Thermal desorption technologies are recommended and used because of (1) the wide range of organic contaminants effectively treated, (2) availability and mobility of commercial systems, ...

  18. APPLICATION OF THERMAL DESORPTION TECHNOLOGIES TO HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is a separation process frequently used to remediate many Superfund sites. Thermal desorption technologies are recommended and used because of (1) the wide range of organic contaminants effectively treated, (2) availability and mobility of commercial systems, ...

  19. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation: Processes and equipment. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning methods, processes, and apparatus for coal liquefaction and hydrogenation. Included are patents for catalytic two-stage, catalytic single-step, fixed-bed, hydrogen-donor, internal heat transfer, and multi-phase processes. Topics also include catalyst production, catalyst recovery, desulfurization, pretreatment of coals, energy recovery processes, solvent product separation, hydrogenating gases, and pollution control. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Kevin; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2008-08-24

    The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle.

  1. Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at nonpolar GaN (1 1 ¯ 00 ) surfaces: Kinetics and impact on surface vibrational and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J.; Himmerlich, M.; Krischok, S.; Rink, M.; Kröger, J.; Polyakov, V. M.

    2017-05-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen at nonpolar GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surfaces and its impact on the electronic and vibrational properties is investigated using surface electron spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the surface mediated dissociation of H2 and the subsequent adsorption of H, an energy barrier of 0.55 eV has to be overcome. The calculated kinetic surface phase diagram indicates that the reaction is kinetically hindered at low pressures and low temperatures. At higher temperatures ab initio thermodynamics show, that the H-free surface is energetically favored. To validate these theoretical predictions experiments at room temperature and under ultrahigh vacuum conditions were performed. They reveal that molecular hydrogen does not dissociatively adsorb at the GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface. Only activated atomic hydrogen atoms attach to the surface. At temperatures above 820 K, the attached hydrogen gets desorbed. The adsorbed hydrogen atoms saturate the dangling bonds of the gallium and nitrogen surface atoms and result in an inversion of the Ga-N surface dimer buckling. The signatures of the Ga-H and N-H vibrational modes on the H-covered surface have experimentally been identified and are in good agreement with the DFT calculations of the surface phonon modes. Both theory and experiment show that H adsorption results in a removal of occupied and unoccupied intragap electron states of the clean GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface and a reduction of the surface upward band bending by 0.4 eV. The latter mechanism largely reduces surface electron depletion.

  2. Molecular processes in astrophysics: Calculations of hydrogen + hydrogen gas excitation, de-excitation, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Matthew Thomas

    The implications of H+H2 cooling in astrophysics is important to several applications. One of the most significant and pure applications is its role in cooling in the early universe. Other applications would include molecular dynamics in nebulae and their collapse into stars and astrophysical shocks. Shortly after the big bang, the universe was a hot primordial gas of photons, electrons, and nuclei among other ingredients. By far the most dominant nuclei in the early universe was hydrogen. In fact, in the early universe the matter density was 90 percent hydrogen and only 10 percent helium with small amounts of lithium and deuterium. In order for structure to form in the universe, this primordial gas must form atoms and cool. One of the significant cooling mechanisms is the collision of neutral atomic hydrogen with a neutral diatomic hydrogen molecule. This work performs calculations to determine collisional cooling rates of hydrogen using two potential surfaces.

  3. Process conditions for the mineralization of a biorefractory polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in soils using catalyzed hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, P.C.; Watts, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and soluble iron or mineral catalysts) was investigated as a basis for mineralizing benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a hydrophobic and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, in two soils of varied complexity. The process is based on Fenton`s reagent, which can be implemented in soils to generate hydroxyl radicals. This short-lived species reacts with most organic contaminants at near diffusion-controlled rates, providing a mechanism for potential rapid soil remediation. Benzo[a]pyrene labeled with {sup 14}C was added to silica sand and a silt loam loess soil; mineralization processes were then optimized using central composite rotatable experimental designs. Variables investigated during the optimization included H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, slurry volume, iron (II) amendment, and pH. Experimental data were evaluated by linear regression to develop empirical relationships and interactions between the variables. The equations were then used to develop three-dimensional response surfaces to describe BaP mineralization. The results from the response surfaces showed that 74% and 78% BaP mineralization was achieved in the silica sand and loess soils, respectively. The balance of the contaminant carbon remained with the soil fraction and was probably irreversibly sorbed. Desorption measurements over 5 d confirmed negligible desorption; however, oxidation reactions, which were complete within 24 h, documented >78% BaP mineralization, suggesting that the contaminant was oxidized, at least in part, in the sorbed phase. The results show that catalyzed H{sub 2}O{sub 2} has the ability to rapidly mineralize BaP that is not irreversibly sorbed.

  4. Development of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schubert, W.; Knight, J.; Quigley, M.; Forsberg, G.; Ganapathi, G.; Yarbrough, C.; Koukol, R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will present test data and discussion on the work we are conducting at JPL to address the following issues: 1) efficacy of sterilization process; 2) diffusion of hydrogen peroxide under sterilization process conditions into hard to reach places; 3) materials and components compatibility with the sterilization process and 4) development of methodology to protect sensitive components from hydrogen peroxide vapor.

  5. Process, including PSA and membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2001-01-01

    An improved process for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons. The process includes a pressure swing adsorption step, a compression/cooling step and a membrane separation step. The membrane step relies on achieving a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the conditions of the process.

  6. Development of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schubert, W.; Knight, J.; Quigley, M.; Forsberg, G.; Ganapathi, G.; Yarbrough, C.; Koukol, R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will present test data and discussion on the work we are conducting at JPL to address the following issues: 1) efficacy of sterilization process; 2) diffusion of hydrogen peroxide under sterilization process conditions into hard to reach places; 3) materials and components compatibility with the sterilization process and 4) development of methodology to protect sensitive components from hydrogen peroxide vapor.

  7. The influence of the potassium promoter on the kinetics and thermodynamics of CO adsorption on a bulk iron catalyst applied in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: a quantitative adsorption calorimetry, temperature-programmed desorption, and surface hydrogenation study.

    PubMed

    Graf, Barbara; Muhler, Martin

    2011-03-07

    The adsorption of carbon monoxide on an either unpromoted or potassium-promoted bulk iron catalyst was investigated at 303 K and 613 K by means of pulse chemisorption, adsorption calorimetry, temperature-programmed desorption and temperature-programmed surface reaction in hydrogen. CO was found to adsorb mainly molecularly in the absence of H(2) at 303 K, whereas the presence of H(2) induced CO dissociation at higher temperatures leading to the formation of CH(4) and H(2)O. The hydrogenation of atomic oxygen chemisorbed on metallic iron was found to occur faster than the hydrogenation of atomically adsorbed carbon. At 613 K CO adsorption occurred only dissociatively followed by recombinative CO(2) formation according to C(ads) + 2O(ads)→ CO(2(g)). The presence of the potassium promoter on the catalyst surface led to an increasing strength of the Fe-C bond both at 303 K and 613 K: the initial differential heat of molecular CO adsorption on the pure iron catalyst at 303 K amounted to 102 kJ mol(-1), whereas it increased to 110 kJ mol(-1) on the potassium-promoted sample, and the initial differential heat of dissociative CO adsorption on the unpromoted iron catalyst at 613 K amounted to 165 kJ mol(-1), which increased to 225 kJ mol(-1) in the presence of potassium. The calorimetric CO adsorption experiments also reveal a change of the energetic distribution of the CO adsorption sites present on the catalyst surface induced by the potassium promoter, which was found to block a fraction of the CO adsorption sites.

  8. Simultaneous surface-adsorbed organic matter desorption and cell integrity maintenance by moderate prechlorination to enhance Microcystis aeruginosa removal in KMnO4Fe(II) process.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Lan, Huachun; Liu, Huijuan; Liu, Ruiping; Miao, Shiyu; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-11-15

    The KMnO4Fe(II) process was proved to have good application potential in Microcystis aeruginosa removal, although at relatively high doses. This study aims to improve the algae removal in KMnO4Fe(II) process by moderate prechlorination, which can realize the desorption of surface-adsorbed organic matter (S-AOM) from algae cells without damaging cell integrity. S-AOM was proved to not only inhibit algae removal but also maintain cell integrity, using various dilution methods for algal suspension preparation. The dilution after filtration method mainly removed the dissolved organics in cultured M. aeruginosa, while the dilution after centrifugal cleaning method could also remove the S-AOM on algae cells. Compared with the S-AOM-removed algal suspension, the lower algae removal in KMnO4Fe(II) process and the reduced proportion of damaged cells during prechlorination of algal suspension without S-AOM removed indicated the inhibitory role of S-AOM in algae removal and the protective function of S-AOM toward cell integrity, respectively. Moderate prechlorination of directly diluted M. aeruginosa could be realized at chlorine doses of below 0.5 mg/L, and the damaged cell ratios were below 4% after 5-min prechlorination. The ability of the KMnO4Fe(II) process to remove algae was dramatically enhanced by the elevation of chlorine dose from 0 to 0.5 mg/L, as more S-AOM was desorbed during prechlorination. Additionally, algae cells were easily captured by flocs after moderate prechlorination, which benefited the floc aggregation for formation of tightly bounded algae flocs. Therefore, the desorption of S-AOM without damaging cell integrity is the key feature of moderate prechlorination, which can be applied in improving the algae removal of KMnO4Fe(II) process. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Thermal decomposition pathway and desorption study of isopropanol and tert-butanol on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Kim, Kwansoo; Yong, Kijung

    2002-09-01

    Thermal decomposition pathway and desorption of isopropanol (IPA) and tert-butanol on Si(100) were studied using temperature programed desorption. Adsorbed alcohols studied were decomposed into atomic hydrogen and alkoxy on the surface. During heating the sample up to 1000 K, acetone, propylene, and hydrogen were desorbed as decomposition products of IPA on Si(100). Desorption pathways of IPA on Si(100) were largely consistent with those on metal surfaces: beta-hydride elimination reaction to acetone and C-O scission to propylene. For tert-butanol, which has no beta-hydrogen, isobutene and hydrogen were observed as main desorption products. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  10. Destabilization of Mg-H bonding through nano-interfacial confinement by unsaturated carbon for hydrogen desorption from MgH2.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yi; Sun, Chenghua; Cheng, Lina; Abdul Wahab, Md; Cui, Jie; Zou, Jin; Zhu, Min; Yao, Xiangdong

    2013-04-28

    We propose a new mechanism for destabilizing Mg-H bonding by means of a combination of the size effect and MgH2-carbon scaffold interfacial bonding, and experimentally realize low temperature hydrogen release starting from 50 °C using an MgH2@CMK-3 nanoconfinement system (37.5 wt% MgH2 loading amount). Based on computational calculations, it is found that the charge transfer from MgH2 to the carbon scaffold plays a critical role in the significant reduction of thermodynamics of MgH2 dehydrogenation. Our results suggest how to explore an alternative route for the enhancement of nano-interfacial confinement to destabilize the Mg-H hydrogen storage system.

  11. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO2.

    PubMed

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2014-05-14

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  12. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Scherwitzl, Boris Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2014-05-14

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  13. Process for forming hydrogen and other fuels utilizing magma

    DOEpatents

    Galt, John K.; Gerlach, Terrence M.; Modreski, Peter J.; Northrup, Jr., Clyde J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a method for extracting hydrogen from magma and water by injecting water from above the earth's surface into a pocket of magma and extracting hydrogen produced by the water-magma reaction from the vicinity of the magma.

  14. Bio-hydrogen production from tempeh and tofu processing wastes via fermentation process using microbial consortium: A mini-review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengga, Wara Dyah Pita; Wati, Diyah Saras; Siregar, Riska Yuliana; Wulandari, Ajeng Riswanti; Lestari, Adela Ayu; Chafidz, Achmad

    2017-03-01

    One of alternative energies that can replace fossil fuels is hydrogen. Hydrogen can be used to generate electricity and to power combustion engines for transportation. Bio-hydrogen produced from tempeh and tofu processing waste can be considered as a renewable energy. Bio-hydrogen produced from tempeh and tofu processing waste is beneficial because the waste of soybean straw and tofu processing waste is plentiful, cheap, renewable and biodegradable. Specification of tempeh and tofu processing waste were soybean straw and sludge of tofu processing. They contain carbohydrates (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) and methane. This paper reviews the optimal condition to produce bio-hydrogen from tempeh and tofu processing waste. The production of bio-hydrogen used microbial consortium which were enriched from cracked cereals and mainly dominated by Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium roseum. The production process of bio-hydrogen from tempeh and tofu processing waste used acid pre-treatment with acid catalyzed hydrolysis to cleave the bond of hemicellulose and cellulose chains contained in biomass. The optimal production of bio-hydrogen has a yield of 6-6.8 mL/g at 35-60 °C, pH 5.5-7 in hydraulic retention time (HRT) less than 16 h. The production used a continuous system in an anaerobic digester. This condition can be used as a reference for the future research.

  15. Nanostructuring of Aluminum Alloy Powders by Cryogenic Attrition with Hydrogen-Free Process Control Agent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Nanostructuring of Aluminum Alloy Powders by Cryogenic Attrition with Hydrogen-Free Process Control Agent by Frank Kellogg, Clara Hofmeister...Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-TR-7208 February 2015 Nanostructuring of Aluminum Alloy Powders by Cryogenic Attrition with Hydrogen-Free...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nanostructuring of Aluminum Alloy Powders by Cryogenic Attrition with Hydrogen-Free Process Control Agent 5a. CONTRACT

  16. Sorption enhanced reaction process for production of hydrogen. Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayorga, S.G.; Hufton, J.R.; Sircar, S.; Gaffney, T.R.

    1997-07-01

    Hydrogen is one of the most suitable energy sources from both technological and environmental perspectives for the next century, especially in the context of a sustainable global energy economy. The most common industrial process to produce high-purity (99.99+ mol%) hydrogen is to reform natural gas by a catalytic reaction with steam at a high temperature. Conventional steam-methane reforming (SMR) contributed to approximately 2.4 billion standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of hydrogen production in the US. By 1998, the growth of SMR-produced hydrogen in the US is expected to reach 3.4 billion SCFD, with the increased demand attributed to hydrogen`s use in reformulated gasolines required by the Clean Air Act. The goal of this work is to develop an even more efficient process for reforming steam and methane to hydrogen product than the conventional SMR process. The application of Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) technology to SMR has the potential to markedly reduce the cost of hydrogen through lower capital and energy requirements. The development of a more cost-effective route to hydrogen production based on natural gas as the primary energy source will accelerate the transition to a more hydrogen-based economy in the future. The paper describes the process, which includes a sorbent for CO{sub 2} removal, and the various tasks involved in its development.

  17. Applications of light-induced electron-transfer and hydrogen-abstraction processes: photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen from reducing radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, K.; Whitten, D.G.

    1980-07-16

    A study of several photoprocesses which generate reducing radicals in similar photoelectrochemical cells was reported. Coupling of a light-induced reaction to produce a photocurrent concurrent with hydrogen generation in a second compartment can occur for a number of electron transfers and hydrogen abstractions in what appears to be a fairly general process. Irradiation of the RuL/sub 3//sup +2//Et/sub 3/N: photoanode compartment leads to production of a photocurrent together with generation of hydrogen at the cathode. A rather different type of reaction that also results in formation of two reducing radicals as primary photoproducts if the photoreduction of ketones and H-heteroaromatics by alcohols and other hydrogen atom donors. Irradiation of benzophenone/2-propanol/MV/sup +2/ solutions in the photoanode compartment (intensity 1.4 x 10/sup -8/ einstein/s) leads to a buildup of moderate levels of MV/sup +/ and to a steady photocurrent of 320 ..mu..A. The MV/sup +/ is oxidized at the anode of the photolyzed compartment with concomitant reduction of H/sup +/ in the cathode compartment. There was no decrease in benzophenone concentration over moderate periods of irradiation, and a steady production of hydrogen in the cathode compartment was observed. The photocurrent produced was linear with the square of absorbed light intensity. The quantum efficiency at the above-indicated intensity is 22%; quantitative analysis of the hydrogen produced gives good agreement with this value. 1 figure, 1 table. (DP)

  18. A study of hydrogenated carbon fibers by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    de la Cal, Antonio Madroñero; Aguado-Serrano, Juan; Rojas-Cervantes, Maria Luisa; Adame, Elena V Rosa; Marron, Belen Sarmiento; Rosende, Africa Castro; Nevshupa, Roman

    2009-06-01

    The hydrogen absorption process is studied in carbonaceous fibers produced from a mixture of methane and hydrogen. The absorption of the hydrogen was examined in two types of fibers, in "as-grown" state and after a process of desorption during an annealing to 1.473 K under vacuum. Later to its production process, the fibers withstand an oxidation in air to 973 K. The fibers were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy by reflection. Differences in the behavior during the oxidation were observed between the fibers in as-grown state and those subjected to a further annealing. It could be verified that the fibers were really constituted by two different phases. In one of the phases, the storage of the hydrogen absorbed took place, whereas in the other phase there was no alteration. The process of annealing prior to the absorption of the hydrogen has an appreciable effect on the desorption rate of the hydrogen.

  19. Comparative study of thermochemical processes for hydrogen production from biomass fuels.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Enrico; Masoni, Lorenzo; Tognotti, Leonardo

    2010-08-01

    Different thermochemical configurations (gasification, combustion, electrolysis and syngas separation) are studied for producing hydrogen from biomass fuels. The aim is to provide data for the production unit and the following optimization of the "hydrogen chain" (from energy source selection to hydrogen utilization) in the frame of the Italian project "Filiera Idrogeno". The project focuses on a regional scale (Tuscany, Italy), renewable energies and automotive hydrogen. Decentred and small production plants are required to solve the logistic problems of biomass supply and meet the limited hydrogen infrastructures. Different options (gasification with air, oxygen or steam/oxygen mixtures, combustion, electrolysis) and conditions (varying the ratios of biomass and gas input) are studied by developing process models with uniform hypothesis to compare the results. Results obtained in this work concern the operating parameters, process efficiencies, material and energetic needs and are fundamental to optimize the entire hydrogen chain. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modular advanced oxidation process enabled by cathodic hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Barazesh, James M; Hennebel, Tom; Jasper, Justin T; Sedlak, David L

    2015-06-16

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d(-1). The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO(•) scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m(-3), with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices.

  1. Modular Advanced Oxidation Process Enabled by Cathodic Hydrogen Peroxide Production

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO•) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d–1. The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO• scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m–3, with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  2. Evaluation of novel process indicators for rapid monitoring of hydrogen peroxide decontamination processes.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Neil P; Clifford, Melanie; Sutton, J Mark

    2017-05-15

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on stainless steel discs are routinely used as Biological Indicators (BIs) for the validation of hydrogen peroxide bio-decontamination processes. Given ongoing concerns about the reliability and response time of BIs, we explored the potential for an enzyme-based approach decontamination process evaluation. Thermostable adenylate kinase (tAK) enzyme was coated onto a solid support and exposed to hydrogen peroxide vapour, in parallel with standard commercial 6-log BIs, during a series of vapour-phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP) cycles in a flexible film isolator. The exposed BIs were enumerated to define the degree of kill at different time intervals and the results compared to the tAK values, as determined by measuring ATP produced by residual active enzyme. Both BIs and the tAK indicators exhibited a biphasic inactivation profile during the process. There was significant variance between individual cycles, with some cycles showing complete inactivation of the BIs to the limit of detection of the assay, within 6 minutes, whilst BIs in some cycles were inactivated at a time greater than 12 minutes. The log-kill of the BIs at intermediate time points were plotted and compared to the fully quantifiable measurements derived from the tAK indicators at the same time points. The results demonstrated very similar inactivation profiles for the enzyme and for the BIs, thus it was possible to define a relationship between relative light units (RLU) measurement and BI kill. This indicates that it is possible to use tAK measurement as a direct measure of VPHP bio-decontamination performance, expressed in terms of log reduction. Since tAK measurement can be achieved within a few minutes of VPHP cycle completion, compared with a minimum of 7 days for the evaluation of BI growth, this offers a potentially valuable tool for rapid VPHP bio-decontamination cycle development and subsequent re-qualification. Copyright © 2017, Parenteral Drug

  3. Study on hydrogen removal of AZ91 alloys using ultrasonic argon degassing process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Wenyi; Le, Qichi; Bao, Lei; Cui, Jianzhong; Jiang, Jiajia

    2015-09-01

    Argon degassing, ultrasonic degassing and a novel ultrasonic argon degassing treatment were applied for the hydrogen removal of AZ91 magnesium alloy. The hydrogen concentration, microstructures and mechanical properties have also been investigated. AZ91 alloys contains a high hydrogen concentration. The mechanical properties of the as-cast alloy are much improved using degassing process, which should be mainly attributed to the hydrogen removal. Among the three degassing process, the ultrasonic argon treatment is a high efficient process both for hydrogen removal and microstructure refining. One hand, ultrasonic wave could break up the purged argon bubble to improve the degassing efficiency of these bubbles. On the other hand, ultrasound could also generate many cavitation bubbles in the melt, which should account for the microstructure refinement. The ultrasonic argon treatment involves dynamics between the ascending argon bubbles and ultrasonic effects, such as cavitation and streaming, etc.

  4. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

  5. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1980-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  6. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  7. The use of non-fossil derived hydrogen in coal conversion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, J. S.; Merrick, D.; Smith, M.; Rasmussen, G.

    The National Coal Board, UK, carried out a technical and economic study of the use of non-fossil derived (NFD) hydrogen on three coal conversion processes: methanol synthesis, solid phase hydrogenation (hydrogasification) for substitute natural gas production, and liquid phase hydrogenation (liquifaction) for the manufacture of liquid fuels. Use of NFD hydrogen generally resulted in an increase in the conversion efficiency and carbon utilization, and a reduction in the number of component stages of the process. It was also shown that market conditions could exist in which the use of NFD hydrogen in coal conversion would be preferable to both conventional coal conversion and the direct use of hydrogen, irrespective of the coal price. Substitute natural gas production from synthesis gas (methanation) and the production of liquid fuels from synthesis gas by a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis route were also evaluated and showed similar technical and economic results. Preliminary results of the overall costs of using NFD hydrogen from a nuclear power/electrolysis plant showed that at present fuel prices, coal conversion processes using NFD hydrogen are not competitive with conventional processes, but would be if the price of coal were to double.

  8. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO2

    PubMed Central

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2015-01-01

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer des orption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. PMID:24832297

  9. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  10. Methods of controlling hydrogen fluoride pressure during chemical fabrication processes

    DOEpatents

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav [Rocky Point, NY; Wiesmann, Harold [Stony Brook, NY

    2009-11-24

    The present invention is a method for producing a crystalline end-product. The method comprising exposing a fluoride-containing precursor to a hydrogen fluoride absorber under conditions suitable for the conversion of the precursor into the crystalline end-product.

  11. Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Bockris, John O’M.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech. PMID:28824125

  12. Desorption kinetics of benzene in a sandy soil in the presence of powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Choi, J-W; Kim, S-B; Kim, D-J

    2007-02-01

    Desorption kinetics of benzene was investigated with a modified biphasic desorption model in a sandy soil with five different powdered activated carbon (PAC) contents (0, 1, 2, 5, 10% w/w) as sorbents. Sorption experiments followed by series dilution desorption were conducted for each sorbent. Desorption of benzene was successively performed at two stages using deionized water and hexane. Modeling was performed on both desorption isotherm and desorption rate for water-induced desorption to elucidate the presence of sorption-desorption hysteresis and biphasic desorption and if present to quantify the desorption-resistant fraction (q (irr)) and labile fraction (F) of desorption site responsible for rapid process. Desorption isotherms revealed that sorption-desorption exhibited a severe hysteresis with a significant fraction of benzene being irreversibly adsorbed onto both pure sand and PAC, and that desorption-resistant fraction (q (irr)) increased with PAC content. Desorption kinetic modeling showed that desorption of benzene was biphasic with much higher (4-40 times) rate constant for rapid process (k (1)) than that for slow process (k (2)), and that the difference in the rate constant increased with PAC content. The labile fraction (F) of desorption site showed a decreasing tendency with PAC. The experimental results would provide valuable information on remediation methods for soils and groundwater contaminated with BTEX.

  13. Techno-economic evaluation of a two-step biological process for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Ljunggren, Mattias; Zacchi, Guido

    2010-01-01

    An integrated biological process for the production of hydrogen based on thermophilic and photo-heterotrophic fermentation was evaluated from a technical and economic standpoint. Besides the two fermentation steps the process also includes pretreatment of the raw material (potato steam peels) and purification of hydrogen using amine absorption. The study aimed neither at determining the absolute cost of biohydrogen nor at an economic optimization of the production process, but rather at studying the effects of different parameters on the production costs of biohydrogen as a guideline for future improvements. The effect of the key parameters, hydrogen productivity and yield and substrate concentration in the two fermentations on the cost of the hydrogen produced was studied. The selection of the process conditions was based mainly on laboratory data. The process was simulated by use of the software Aspen Plus and the capital costs were estimated using the program Aspen Icarus Process Evaluator. The study shows that the photo-fermentation is the main contributor to the hydrogen production cost mainly because of the cost of plastic tubing, for the photo-fermentors, which represents 40.5% of the hydrogen production cost. The costs of the capital investment and chemicals were also notable contributors to the hydrogen production cost. Major economic improvements could be achieved by increasing the productivity of the two fermentation steps on a medium-term to long-term scale.

  14. Hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  15. Hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  16. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Alex J.; Ren, Shoujie; Ye, Philip; Kim, Pyoungchung; Labbe, Niki; Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2015-06-30

    A new approach to hydrogen production using a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50 3.2% to76 0.5% while anode coulombic efficiency ranged from 54 6.5% to 96 0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%, respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass.

  17. Damage cross-sections for MeV energy He ion induced hydrogen ejection in polymers-material structure effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, H.; Touchrift, B.

    2004-03-01

    Using the elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) method for hydrogen analysis, a He-4(+) ion beam was used simultaneously for irradiating samples and as a tool to measure the hydrogen desorption yield as a function of irradiation dose. The influence of molecular structure on helium-induced desorption is studied for different polymers. The dose-response curves of hydrogen released from irradiated structures are presented and used to determine the damage cross-sections. The deduced desorption extent for a single impact is of the order of a few Angstroms, revealing localized regions of desorption. Hydrogen desorption is found to be sensitive to chemical composition of the target. The overall experimental data of the hydrogen desorption yield are described by the same function of the type Y(phi) = (C/phi(n) ) exp (-sigma phi) where phi is the irradiation dose and C and n are a fitting parameter. The first part of the function describes 'prompt ejection', predominant at lower irradiation dose where the created latent tracks remain separated. The exponential term accounts for the 'thermal ejection' process activated by ion-track overlapping involved at higher irradiation doses. A threshold dose is found that separates the two regimes and above which the overlapping tracks form a highly heated condensed gas and activate chemical processes. Chemical modifications have been studied using infrared-absorption spectroscopy, which reveal the formation of stable molecules that could desorb intact.

  18. Process for synthesis of ammonia borane for bulk hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, S Thomas [West Richland, WA; Heldebrant, David J [Richland, WA; Linehan, John C [Richland, WA; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J [Richland, WA; Zheng, Feng [Richland, WA

    2011-03-01

    The present invention discloses new methods for synthesizing ammonia borane (NH.sub.3BH.sub.3, or AB). Ammonium borohydride (NH.sub.4BH.sub.4) is formed from the reaction of borohydride salts and ammonium salts in liquid ammonia. Ammonium borohydride is decomposed in an ether-based solvent that yields AB at a near quantitative yield. The AB product shows promise as a chemical hydrogen storage material for fuel cell powered applications.

  19. Micro structure processing on plastics by accelerated hydrogen molecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Nishikawa, H.

    2017-08-01

    A proton has 1836 times the mass of an electron and is the lightest nucleus to be used for accelerator in material modification. We can setup accelerator with the lowest acceleration voltage. It is preferable characteristics of Proton Beam Writer (PBW) for industrial applications. On the contrary ;proton; has the lowest charge among all nuclei and the potential impact to material is lowest. The object of this research is to improve productivity of the PBW for industry application focusing on hydrogen molecular ions. These ions are generated in the same ion source by ionizing hydrogen molecule. There is no specific ion source requested and it is suitable for industrial use. We demonstrated three dimensional (3D) multilevel micro structures on polyester base FPC (Flexible Printed Circuits) using proton, H2+ and H3+. The reactivity of hydrogen molecular ions is much higher than that of proton and coincident with the level of expectation. We can apply this result to make micro devices of 3D multilevel structures on FPC.

  20. Reactivity of coal in direct hydrogenation processes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R. M.; Miller, R. L.

    1989-07-01

    This research program consisted of two facets dealing with fundamental and applied studies on coal reactivity under direct hydroliquefaction conditions. The first facet was concerned with an investigation of the relationship between coal reactivity and coal properties. Data on the rate and extent of direct coal hydroliquefaction for 5 bituminous coals from the Argonne Premium Sample Bank were measured. Data on rate of conversion of coal to THF and toluene solubles were modeled with a simple reversible rate expression, and activation energies for conversion to each solvent solubility class determined. Data on carbon and proton distribution in the coals were obtained by /sup 1/H-NMR and /sup 13/C-NMR. A strong correlation of activation energy with the aliphatic hydrogen content of the coal was found for conversion to THF solubles. The second facet of the program dealt with a mechanistic study of the effect of hydrogen on the rate and extent of coal liquefaction. The objective was to investigate the effect of radical quenching by aromatic and hydroaromatic vehicles on the activity and selectivity of hydrogen under conditions relevant to direct coal hydroliquefaction. The experimental portion of the program consisted of a series of runs on a model compound system, followed by experiments utilizing 5 bituminous coals from the Argonne Premium Coal sample bank. 45 refs., 14 figs., 17 tabs.

  1. Activation processes and polyethylene formation on a phillips model catalyst studied by laser ablation, laser desorption, and static secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aubriet, Frédéric; Muller, Jean-François; Poleunis, Claude; Bertrand, Patrick; Di Croce, Pascal G; Grange, Paul

    2006-03-01

    Since the discovery of the Phillips catalysts, there still is much uncertainty concerning their activation, their molecular structure, the nature of the active chromium sites, and the polymerization mechanisms. Surface techniques are not easy to be used for such study according to the nonconductive behavior of the support. Therefore, model Phillips catalyst is elaborated by spin coating a trivalent chromium precursor on a silicon wafer. The surface characterization of this model catalyst is conducted by laser ablation mass spectrometry (LA-MS), laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), and static secondary ion mass spectrometry (s-SIMS), at different steps of its preparation. To validate our approach, a comparison is also made between the model and the real Philips catalyst. Moreover, the model catalyst efficiency for polyethylene synthesis is evaluated and allows us to discuss the validity of the mechanisms previously proposed to explain the catalytic process. The characterization of Phillips model catalyst by mass spectrometry allows us to better understand the activation processes of such catalyst. Depending on the activation temperature, chromium oxide species are formed and anchored at the support surface. They consist mainly in mono-chromium sites at high temperature. The chromium valence is hexavalent. This model catalyst is active for the polymerization of ethylene. A pseudo-oligomer molecular weight distribution is observed by LA-MS, whereas s-SIMS allows us to elucidate the anchorage of the polymer at activate chromium surface sites.

  2. Effects of aging process on adsorption-desorption and bioavailability of fomesafen in an agricultural soil amended with rice hull biochar.

    PubMed

    Khorram, Mahdi Safaei; Lin, Dunli; Zhang, Qian; Zheng, Yuan; Fang, Hua; Yu, Yunlong

    2017-06-01

    Biochar has been introduced as an acceptable soil amendment due to its environmental benefits such as sequestering soil contaminants. However, the aging process in biochar amended soil probably decreases the adsorption capacity of biochar through changing its physico-chemical properties. Adsorption, leaching and bioavailability of fomesafen to corn in a Chinese soil amended by rice hull biochar after 0, 30, 90 and 180days were investigated. Results showed that the addition of 0.5%-2% fresh biochar significantly increases the adsorption of fomesafen 4-26 times compare to unamended soil due to higher SSA of biochar. Biochar amendment also decreases fomesafen concentration in soil pore water by 5%-23% resulting lower risk of the herbicide for cultivated plants. However, the aging process decreased the adsorption capacity of biochar since the adsorption coefficient values which was 1.9-12.4 in 0.5%-2% fresh biochar amended soil, declined to 1.36-4.16, 1.13-2.78 and 0.95-2.31 in 1, 3 and 6-month aged treatments, respectively. Consequently, higher desorption, leaching and bioavailable fraction of fomesafen belonged to 6-month aged treatment. Nevertheless, rice hull biochar was effective for sequestering fomesafen as the adsorption capacity of biochar amended soil after 6months of aging was still 2.5-5 times higher compared to that of unamended soil. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Certification of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schubert, W.; Koukol, R.; Foster, T. L.; Stabekis, P. D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the selection process and research activities JPL is planning to conduct for certification of hydrogen peroxide as a NASA approved technique for sterilization of various spacecraft parts/components and entire modern spacecraft.

  4. Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Muradov, Nazim Z [Melbourne, FL

    2011-08-23

    A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

  5. Certification of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schubert, W.; Koukol, R.; Foster, T. L.; Stabekis, P. D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the selection process and research activities JPL is planning to conduct for certification of hydrogen peroxide as a NASA approved technique for sterilization of various spacecraft parts/components and entire modern spacecraft.

  6. Hydrogen uptake in single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by the hydrogen arc plasma jet method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Ruiz, L. A.; Ortiz-Lopez, J.; de Ita de La Torre, A.; Arellano-Peraza, J. S.; Flores-Díaz, G.

    2006-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by a modified electric arc discharge method under hydrogen atmosphere using a catalytic mixture of powders with composition C/Ni/Co/Fe/FeS. The samples were characterized with transmission and scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Unpurified samples contain 20 wt% of carbon nanotubes, 2 wt% of other forms of carbon and 78 wt% of catalytic metals. Adsorption/desorption of hydrogen in unpurified samples at atmospheric pressure measured with gravimetric methods was of the order of 2 wt%. Samples for these measurements were prepared with a three-step treatment: (i) oxidation in air for 30 min at 500 ^oC, (ii) ball- milling for 1 hr, and (iii) second oxidation in air for 30 min at 500 ^oC. This treatment was applied to eliminate other forms of carbon as well as to shorten the tubes and open their caps. Hydrogen desorption was also measured in degassed samples (400 ^oC for 20 min in vacuum) which adsorbed H2 while cooling to room temperature. Desorption in degassed/hydrogenated samples is a two-step process which we attribute to distinct desorption characteristics of nanotubes and of residual oxidized metal catalysts.

  7. Hydrogen storage development

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.

    1998-08-01

    A summary of the hydride development efforts for the current program year (FY98) are presented here. The Mg-Al-Zn alloy system was studied at low Zn levels (2--4 wt%) and midrange Al contents (40--60 wt%). Higher plateau pressures were found with Al and Zn alloying in Mg and, furthermore, it was found that the hydrogen desorption kinetics were significantly improved with small additions of Zn. Results are also shown here for a detailed study of the low temperature properties of Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}, and a comparison made between conventional melt cast alloy and the vapor process material.

  8. Influence of aluminum location on hydrogen sorption kinetics of magnesium-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shixue; Zhang, Tonghuan; Wang, Naifei; Li, Tao; Niu, Haili; Yu, Hao; Liu, Di

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen storage materials from Mg-Al alloy and Mg+Al mixture were prepared by reactive milling under H2 atmosphere with carbonized anthracite as milling aid. The crystal structure of the materials and influence of Al location on hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics were investigated. Results show that Mg partly got hydrided into β-MgH2 and γ-MgH2 during reactive milling. The average crystallite sizes of β-MgH2 in the as-milled Mg-Al alloy and Mg+Al mixture were calculated by Scherrer equation to be 10 nm and 17 nm, respectively. In the process of hydrogen desorption, the catalytic ability of Al in Mg crystal lattice was not as effective as that on particle surface. The apparent activation energies for hydrogen desorption of the two materials were estimated by Kissinger equation to be 112.2 kJ/mol and 63.7 kJ/mol, respectively. Mg17Al12 reacted with H2 to convert into MgH2 and elemental Al during static hydrogenation at 300°C. For the hydrogenated Mg+Al mixture, the obvious increase of crystallite size resulted in a low rate of hydrogen absorption and a high temperature for hydrogen desorption.

  9. Electrochemical synthesis of hydrogen with depolarization of the anodic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulskiy, Gennadiy; Tulskaya, Alena; Skatkov, Leonid; Gomozov, Valeriy; Deribo, Svetlana

    2016-05-01

    A new active composite coating for graphite gas diffusion electrode for hybrid sulfur cycle was proposed. The kinetics of oxidation of SO2 were studied on porous graphite anodes with different catalytic coatings. It was shown that the most efficient composite coating is based on activated carbon and platinum supported on graphite gas diffusion substrate. The voltage drop in the laboratory electrochemical cell was 1.3 V at a current density of 1000 A·m-2. This corresponds to a specific consumption of 3.1 kWh electric energy per 1 m3 of hydrogen.

  10. Process development for hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on growth and product formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Florian; Morweiser, Michael; Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Kruse, Olaf; Posten, Clemens

    2012-11-30

    Certain strains of microalgae are long known to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase enzyme recombines electrons from the chloroplast electron transport chain with protons to form molecular hydrogen directly inside the chloroplast. A sustained hydrogen production can be obtained under low sulfur conditions in C. reinhardtii, reducing the net oxygen evolution by reducing the photosystem II activity and thereby overcoming the inhibition of the hydrogenases. The development of specially adapted hydrogen production strains led to higher yields and optimized biological process preconditions. So far sustainable hydrogen production required a complete exchange of the growth medium to establish sulfur-deprived conditions after biomass growth. In this work we demonstrate the transition from the biomass growth phase to the hydrogen production phase in a single batch culture only by exact dosage of sulfur. This eliminates the elaborate and energy intensive solid-liquid separation step and establishes a process strategy to proceed further versus large scale production. This strategy has been applied to determine light dependent biomass growth and hydrogen production kinetics to assess the potential of H₂ production with C. reinhardtii as a basis for scale up and further process optimization.

  11. Hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste in the two-stage fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dawei; Liu, Dapeng; Zeng, Raymond J; Angelidaki, Irini

    2006-06-01

    A two-stage process combined hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste was demonstrated working successfully. The yield of 43 mL H(2)/g volatile solid (VS) added was generated in the first hydrogen production stage and the methane production in the second stage was 500 mL CH(4)/g VS added. This figure was 21% higher than the methane yield from the one-stage process, which was run as control. Sparging of the hydrogen reactor with methane gas resulted in doubling of the hydrogen production. pH was observed as a key factor affecting fermentation pathway in hydrogen production stage. The optimum pH range for hydrogen production in this system was in the range from 5 to 5.5. The short hydraulic retention time (2 days) applied in the first stage was enough to separate acidogenesis from methanogenesis. No additional control for preventing methanogenesis in the first stage was necessary. Furthermore, this study also provided direct evidence in the dynamic fermentation process that, hydrogen production increase was reflected by acetate to butyrate ratio increase in liquid phase.

  12. Methane Post-Processing and Hydrogen Separation for Spacecraft Oxygen Loop Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Zachary W.; Abeny, Morgan B.; Wall, Terry; Miller, Lee A.; Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    State-of-the-art life support oxygen recovery technology on the International Space Station is based on the Sabatier reaction where only about half of the oxygen required for the crew is recovered from metabolic carbon dioxide (CO2). The Sabatier reaction produces water as the primary product and methane as a byproduct. Oxygen recovery is constrained by both the limited availability of reactant hydrogen from water electrolysis and Sabatier methane (CH4) being vented as a waste product resulting in a continuous loss of reactant hydrogen. Post-processing methane with the Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) to recover this hydrogen has the potential to substantially increase oxygen recovery and thus dramatically reduce the logistical challenges associated with oxygen resupply. The PPA decomposes methane into predominantly hydrogen and acetylene. A purification system is necessary to purify hydrogen before it is recycled back to the Sabatier reactor. Testing and evaluation of acetylene removal systems and PPA system architectures are presented and discussed.

  13. Cassini finds molecular hydrogen in the Enceladus plume: Evidence for hydrothermal processes.

    PubMed

    Waite, J Hunter; Glein, Christopher R; Perryman, Rebecca S; Teolis, Ben D; Magee, Brian A; Miller, Greg; Grimes, Jacob; Perry, Mark E; Miller, Kelly E; Bouquet, Alexis; Lunine, Jonathan I; Brockwell, Tim; Bolton, Scott J

    2017-04-14

    Saturn's moon Enceladus has an ice-covered ocean; a plume of material erupts from cracks in the ice. The plume contains chemical signatures of water-rock interaction between the ocean and a rocky core. We used the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft to detect molecular hydrogen in the plume. By using the instrument's open-source mode, background processes of hydrogen production in the instrument were minimized and quantified, enabling the identification of a statistically significant signal of hydrogen native to Enceladus. We find that the most plausible source of this hydrogen is ongoing hydrothermal reactions of rock containing reduced minerals and organic materials. The relatively high hydrogen abundance in the plume signals thermodynamic disequilibrium that favors the formation of methane from CO2 in Enceladus' ocean. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Cassini finds molecular hydrogen in the Enceladus plume: Evidence for hydrothermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, J. Hunter; Glein, Christopher R.; Perryman, Rebecca S.; Teolis, Ben D.; Magee, Brian A.; Miller, Greg; Grimes, Jacob; Perry, Mark E.; Miller, Kelly E.; Bouquet, Alexis; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Brockwell, Tim; Bolton, Scott J.

    2017-04-01

    Saturn’s moon Enceladus has an ice-covered ocean; a plume of material erupts from cracks in the ice. The plume contains chemical signatures of water-rock interaction between the ocean and a rocky core. We used the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft to detect molecular hydrogen in the plume. By using the instrument’s open-source mode, background processes of hydrogen production in the instrument were minimized and quantified, enabling the identification of a statistically significant signal of hydrogen native to Enceladus. We find that the most plausible source of this hydrogen is ongoing hydrothermal reactions of rock containing reduced minerals and organic materials. The relatively high hydrogen abundance in the plume signals thermodynamic disequilibrium that favors the formation of methane from CO2 in Enceladus’ ocean.

  15. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

  16. Experimental and modeling study of adsorption-desorption processes with application to a deep-well injection radioactive waste disposal site.

    PubMed

    Rumynin, V G; Konosavsky, P K; Hoehn, E

    2005-01-01

    Radionuclide (Sr-90 and Cs-137) behavior in the subsurface environment was evaluated with respect to natural attenuation, sorption and desorption kinetics, and equilibrium. Batch experiments were conducted with synthesized groundwater or acid (NaNO3; pH approximately 3) solutions under different temperature (T=20 and 70 degrees C) and pressure (P=Patm and P=3 MPa) conditions. Samples of sedimentary rock were selected as the solid phase from a radioactively contaminated site associated with deep-well injection of the radioactive waste. Groundwater and a NaNO3 waste-brine solution were used as the liquid phase. All experiments revealed hysteresis in radionuclide adsorption. Moreover, some of the experiments indicated that the adsorption process may be irreversible. A simultaneous temperature and pressure increase leads to anomalous behavior of the adsorption kinetics: a period of a rapid concentration drop of the radionuclides in solution, which is caused by their sorption uptake, is changed by a stage of a gradual increase in the corresponding concentrations. To explain the observed phenomena, several hypotheses were examined. Thus, an analytical model describing the mutual interference of adsorption kinetics and dissolution of carbonate minerals was developed resulting in a nonmonotonic behavior of the concentration curves obtained at the adsorption stage. For the description of the batch experiments with radionuclides at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, a dual-site adsorption model has been used.

  17. Mössbauer study of Mg Ni(Fe) alloys processed as materials for solid state hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palade, P.; Principi, G.; Sartori, S.; Maddalena, A.; Lo Russo, S.; Schinteie, G.; Kuncser, V.; Filoti, G.

    2006-02-01

    Mg Ni Fe magnesium-rich intermetallic compounds were prepared following two distinct routes. A Mg88Ni11Fe1 sample (A) was prepared by melt spinning Mg Ni Fe pellets and then by high-energy ball milling for 6 h the obtained ribbons. A (MgH2)88Ni11Fe1 sample (B) was obtained by high-energy ball milling for 20 h a mixture of Ni, Fe and MgH2 powders in the due proportions. A SPEX8000 shaker mill with a 10:1 ball to powder ratio was used for milling in argon atmosphere. The samples were submitted to repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles in a Sievert type gas solid reaction controller at temperatures in the range 520 ÷ 590 K and a maximum pressure of 2.5 MPa during absorption. The samples were analysed before and after the hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles by X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The results concerning the hydrogen storage properties of the studied compounds are discussed in connection with the micro-structural characteristics found by means of the used analytical techniques. The improved kinetics of hydrogen desorption for sample A, in comparison to sample B, has been ascribed to the different behaviour of iron atoms in the two cases, as proved by Mössbauer spectroscopy. In fact, iron results homogeneously distributed in sample A, partly at the Mg2Ni grain boundaries, with catalytic effect on the gas solid reaction; in sample B, instead, iron is dispersed inside the hydride powder as metallic iron or superparamagnetic iron.

  18. Mössbauer study of Mg-Ni(Fe) alloys processed as materials for solid state hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palade, P.; Principi, G.; Sartori, S.; Maddalena, A.; Lo Russo, S.; Schinteie, G.; Kuncser, V.; Filoti, G.

    Mg-Ni-Fe magnesium-rich intermetallic compounds were prepared following two distinct routes. A Mg88Ni11Fe1 sample (A) was prepared by melt spinning Mg-Ni-Fe pellets and then by high-energy ball milling for 6 h the obtained ribbons. A (MgH2)88Ni11Fe1 sample (B) was obtained by high-energy ball milling for 20 h a mixture ofNi, Fe and MgH2 powders in the due proportions. A SPEX8000 shaker mill with a 10∶1 ball to powder ratio was used for milling in argon atmosphere. The samples were submitted to repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles in a Sievert type gas-solid reaction controller at temperatures in the range 520÷590 K and a maximum pressure of 2.5 MPa during absorption. The samples were analysed before and after the hydrogen absorption/ desorption cycles by X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The results concerning the hydrogen storage properties of the studied compounds are discussed in connection with the micro-structural characteristics found by means of the used analytical techniques. The improved kinetics of hydrogen desorption for sample A, in comparison to sample B, has been ascribed to the different behaviour of iron atoms in the two cases, as proved by Mössbauer spectroscopy. In fact, iron results homogeneously distributed in sample A, partly at the Mg2Ni grain boundaries, with catalytic effect on the gas-solid reaction; in sample B, instead, iron is dispersed inside the hydride powder as metallic iron or superparamagnetic iron.

  19. Laser desorption from a room temperature ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Peter Ronald

    We report laser desorption from a Room Temperature Ionic Liquid (RTIL) as a novel source for time of flight mass spectrometry. We use the 2nd harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser to deposit intensities of 1-50 MW/cm2 via backside illumination onto our RTIL desorption sample. A microstructured metal grid situated on top of a glass microscope slide coated with RTIL serves as our desorption sample. The RTIL we use, 1-Butyl, 3-Methylimidazolium Hexafluorophosphate, remains liquid at pressures below 10-8 torr. The use of liquid desorption sample allows for improved surface conditions, homogeneity and sample life as compared to Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) techniques. Our desorption technique is also unique as it allows the study of both multiphoton and acoustic desorption processes within the same time of flight spectra. Our technique yields intrinsically high resolution, low noise data. We observe differences between ion species in their preference for desorption by a particular desorption method. Specifically, we observe desorption solely by acoustic means of an entire RTIL molecule adducted with an RTIL cation. Finally, we report the applicability of this technique for the desorption of biomolecules.

  20. Thermodynamics of the hybrid interaction of hydrogen with palladium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Griessen, Ronald; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Giessen, Harald

    2016-03-01

    Palladium-hydrogen is a prototypical metal-hydrogen system. It is therefore not at all surprising that a lot of attention has been devoted to the absorption and desorption of hydrogen in nanosized palladium particles. Several seminal articles on the interaction of H with Pd nanocubes and nanoparticles have recently been published. Although each article provides for the first time detailed data on specific aspects of hydrogen in nanoparticles, they individually do not contain enough information to draw firm conclusions about the involved mechanisms. Here, we show that the large body of data available so far in literature exhibits general patterns that lead to unambiguous conclusions about the processes involved in H absorption and desorption in Pd nanoparticles. On the basis of a remarkably robust scaling law for the hysteresis in absorption-desorption isotherms, we show that hydrogen absorption in palladium nanoparticles is consistent with a coherent interface model and is thus clearly different from bulk Pd behaviour. However, H desorption occurs fully coherently only for small nanoparticles (typically smaller than 50 nm) at temperatures sufficiently close to the critical temperature. For larger particles it is partially incoherent, as in bulk, where dilute α-PdHx and high concentration β-PdHx phases coexist.

  1. Thermodynamics of the hybrid interaction of hydrogen with palladium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griessen, Ronald; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Giessen, Harald

    2016-03-01

    Palladium-hydrogen is a prototypical metal-hydrogen system. It is therefore not at all surprising that a lot of attention has been devoted to the absorption and desorption of hydrogen in nanosized palladium particles. Several seminal articles on the interaction of H with Pd nanocubes and nanoparticles have recently been published. Although each article provides for the first time detailed data on specific aspects of hydrogen in nanoparticles, they individually do not contain enough information to draw firm conclusions about the involved mechanisms. Here, we show that the large body of data available so far in literature exhibits general patterns that lead to unambiguous conclusions about the processes involved in H absorption and desorption in Pd nanoparticles. On the basis of a remarkably robust scaling law for the hysteresis in absorption-desorption isotherms, we show that hydrogen absorption in palladium nanoparticles is consistent with a coherent interface model and is thus clearly different from bulk Pd behaviour. However, H desorption occurs fully coherently only for small nanoparticles (typically smaller than 50 nm) at temperatures sufficiently close to the critical temperature. For larger particles it is partially incoherent, as in bulk, where dilute α-PdHx and high concentration β-PdHx phases coexist.

  2. Ultrasonic irradiation as a tool to modify the H-desorption from hydrides: MgH(2) suspended in decane.

    PubMed

    Ares, J R; Leardini, F; Díaz-Chao, P; Bodega, J; Fernández, J F; Ferrer, I J; Sánchez, C

    2009-08-01

    Effects of ultrasonic irradiation on magnesium hydride (MgH(2)) suspended in decane were investigated with the purpose of improving its hydrogen desorption process. Firstly, we have found that the presence of MgH(2) improves the sonolysis of decane enhancing the amount of hydrogen evolved during the sonication process. The sonicated-MgH(2) maintains its microstructural properties practically unaltered but a drastic reduction of the particle size of MgH(2) (down to approximately 20mum) as well as a high pressure MgH(2) phase are observed. However, no substantial modifications of H-kinetic properties of hydride occur as is determined by thermal desorption measurements. This could be attributed to decomposition of decane during sonication which leads to the formation of carbon compounds that hinder the thermal decomposition of MgH(2).

  3. Prospects for hydrogen storage in graphene.

    PubMed

    Tozzini, Valentina; Pellegrini, Vittorio

    2013-01-07

    Hydrogen-based fuel cells are promising solutions for the efficient and clean delivery of electricity. Since hydrogen is an energy carrier, a key step for the development of a reliable hydrogen-based technology requires solving the issue of storage and transport of hydrogen. Several proposals based on the design of advanced materials such as metal hydrides and carbon structures have been made to overcome the limitations of the conventional solution of compressing or liquefying hydrogen in tanks. Nevertheless none of these systems are currently offering the required performances in terms of hydrogen storage capacity and control of adsorption/desorption processes. Therefore the problem of hydrogen storage remains so far unsolved and it continues to represent a significant bottleneck to the advancement and proliferation of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Recently, however, several studies on graphene, the one-atom-thick membrane of carbon atoms packed in a honeycomb lattice, have highlighted the potentialities of this material for hydrogen storage and raise new hopes for the development of an efficient solid-state hydrogen storage device. Here we review on-going efforts and studies on functionalized and nanostructured graphene for hydrogen storage and suggest possible developments for efficient storage/release of hydrogen under ambient conditions.

  4. Solubility of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti and lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Dragel, G.; Erck, R.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    The solubility of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium was determined at 400-675{degrees}C and a hydrogen pressure of 1.76x10{sup -4} torr (2.35 x 10{sup -2}Pa). Hydrogen concentration in both materials decreased as temperature increased, and the ratio of the hydrogen concentration in liquid lithium and V-4Cr-4Ti (hydrogen distribution ratio R) increased with temperature, e.g., R was {approx} 17 at 400{degrees}C and {approx} 80 at 700{degrees}C. Desorption of hydrogen from V-4Cr-4Ti is a thermally activated process and the activation energy of the desorption rate is 0.405 eV.

  5. Measurement of hydrogen peroxide in an advanced oxidation process using an automated biosensor.

    PubMed

    Modrzejewska, B; Guwy, A J; Dinsdale, R; Hawkes, D L

    2007-01-01

    A hydrogen peroxide biosensor was used to monitor hydrogen peroxide concentrations in a UV/hydrogen peroxide immobilised Fenton advanced oxidation process (AOP). The biosensor is based on gas phase monitoring and thus is more resistant to fouling from the liquid phase constituents of industrial processes. The biosensor is supplied with catalase continually, therefore overcoming any problems with enzyme degradation, which would occur in an immobilised enzyme biosensor. The biosensors response was linear within the experimental range 30-400mg H(2)O(2)l(-1) with a R(2) correlation of 0.99. The hydrogen peroxide monitor was used to monitor residual peroxide in an AOP, operated with a step overload of hydrogen peroxide, with correlation factors of 0.96-0.99 compared to offline hydrogen peroxide determinations by UV spectroscopy. Sparging the sample with nitrogen was found to be effective in reducing the interference from dissolved gases produced with the AOP itself. It is proposed that this biosensor could be used to improve the effectiveness of AOPs via hydrogen peroxide control.

  6. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, James B.; Comolli, Alfred G.; McLean, Joseph B.

    1989-01-01

    A process for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600.degree.-750.degree. F. to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650.degree. F. and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft.sup.3 catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760.degree.-860.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600.degree.-750.degree. F..sup.+ fraction containing 0-20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials.

  7. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

    1989-10-17

    A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

  8. Role of nano in catalysis: Pd catalyzed H desorption from MgH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Weiyu; West, Damien; Sun, Yiyang; Zhang, Shengbai

    2012-02-01

    Magnesium hydride (MgH2) is promising for on-board hydrogen (H) storage with the major hurdle being the slow desorption kinetics. H desorption from ball-milled MgH2 peaks at two slightly different temperatures, which further split in the presence of palladium catalyst. It has been experimentally demonstrated that nanostructuring can eliminate the high temperature peak. However, the effect of nanostructuring cannot be explained by thermodynamic destabilization due to quantum size effect. Our first-principles calculation reveals that there exist two reaction pathways for H desorption from MgH2. One involves H vacancy (SV) diffusion at surface, while the other one involves H atom diffusion in bulk. The SV pathway self-terminates as dehydrogenation eventually eliminates the exposed MgH2 region. Therefore, it is size-sensitive and fully functions only when the surface-to-bulk ratio is large, which is available only in nanostructures. Our calculation further shows that the SV pathway significantly lowers the desorption barrier, because it decouples the H transport process with the surface liftoff process and benefits from a fact that diffusion of vacancies at surface can have significantly lower barrier than that in bulk.

  9. Processing of hydrocarbon-containing ices by cosmic ray analogs: Unsaturated compounds production, cross sections and desorption rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilling, Sergio; Andrade, Diana; Domaracka, Alicja; Rothard, Hermann; Boduch, Philippe; Da Silveira, Enio

    2012-07-01

    The formation of C=C and C\\equivC bonds from the processing of pure c-C_6H_{12} (cyclohexane) and mixed H_2O:NH_3:c-C_6H_{12} (1:0.3:0.7) ices by highly-charged, and energetic ions (219 MeV ^{16}O^{7+} and 632 MeV ^{58}Ni^{24+}) is studied. The experiments simulate the physical chemistry induced by medium-mass and heavy-ion cosmic rays in interstellar ices. The measurements were performed inside a high vacuum chamber at the heavy-ion accelerator GANIL (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds) in Caen, France. The gas samples were deposited onto a polished CsI substrate previously cooled to 13 K. In-situ analysis was performed by a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry at different ion fluences. Dissociation cross section of cyclohexane and its halflife in astrophysical environments were determined. A comparison between spectra of bombarded ices and young stellar sources indicates that the initial composition of grains in theses environments should contain a mixture of H_2O, NH_3, CO (or CO_2), simple alkanes, and CH_3OH. Several species containing double or triple bounds were identified in the radiochemical products, such as hexene, cyclohexene, benzene, OCN^-, CO, CO_2, as well as several aliphatic and aromatic alkanes and alkynes. The results suggest an alternative scenario for the production of unsaturated carbon chain species (and dehydrogenation) in interstellar ices induced by cosmic ray bombardment.

  10. Interaction of hydrogen with ZnO: surface adsorption versus bulk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Doh, W H; Roy, P C; Kim, C M

    2010-11-02

    The interaction of hydrogen (H) and a ZnO(0001)-O surface has been investigated using a temperature programmed desorption (TPD) technique. When the surface is exposed to atomic hydrogen below 400 K, hydrogen is adsorbed on the surface. As the hydrogen exposure increases, bulk diffusion of hydrogen takes place. The existence of surface and bulk hydrogen has been confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). When the ZnO surface dosed with hydrogen is heated, surface hydrogen is desorbed at 432 K and bulk hydrogen is evolved at ∼539 K. Diffusion of hydrogen into the ZnO bulk is an activated process, and the activation energy is estimated to be 0.19 eV.

  11. Radiolytic hydrogen production from process vessels in HB line - production rates compared to evolution rates and discussion of LASL reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.

    1992-11-12

    Hydrogen production from radiolysis of aqueous solutions can create a safety hazard since hydrogen is flammable. At times this production can be significant, especially in HB line where nitric acid solutions containing high concentrations of Pu-238, an intense alpha emitter, are processed. The hydrogen production rates from these solutions are necessary for safety analyses of these process systems. The methods and conclusions of hydrogen production rate tests are provided in this report.

  12. Hydrogenation of chemisorbed ethylene on clean, hydrogen, and ethylidyne covered platinum (111) crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbey, David; Zaera, Francisco; Yeates, Randall; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1986-03-01

    The hydrogenation of chemisorbed ethylene was examined on platinum (111) single crystals under ultra-high vacuum using temperature programmed desorption. Ethane was formed in a self-hydrogenation process with an activation energy of 18 kcal/mol, while in the presence of preadsorbed hydrogen, ethane was formed with an activation energy of 6 kcal/mol. A mechanism is proposed for the low pressure hydrogenation which is supported by a computer simulation. At temperatures below 320 K, an ethylidyne saturated Pt(111) surface requires hydrogen pressures greater than 10 -5 Torr for coadsorption. Ethylene binds to this surface very weakly or not at all, and consequently no ethane was observed to desorb from this surface during TPD. The results obtained support the model of direct participation of a carbonaceous layer during the steady state catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene on Pt(111) at atmospheric pressures and room temperature, as previously reported.

  13. Water desorption from nanostructured graphite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Anna; Hellberg, Lars; Grönbeck, Henrik; Chakarov, Dinko

    2013-12-21

    Water interaction with nanostructured graphite surfaces is strongly dependent on the surface morphology. In this work, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) in combination with quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) has been used to study water ice desorption from a nanostructured graphite surface. This model surface was fabricated by hole-mask colloidal lithography (HCL) along with oxygen plasma etching and consists of a rough carbon surface covered by well defined structures of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The results are compared with those from pristine HOPG and a rough (oxygen plasma etched) carbon surface without graphite nanostructures. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The TPD experiments were conducted for H2O coverages obtained after exposures between 0.2 and 55 langmuir (L) and reveal a complex desorption behaviour. The spectra from the nanostructured surface show additional, coverage dependent desorption peaks. They are assigned to water bound in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen-bonded networks, defect-bound water, and to water intercalated into the graphite structures. The intercalation is more pronounced for the nanostructured graphite surface in comparison to HOPG surfaces because of a higher concentration of intersheet openings. From the TPD spectra, the desorption energies for water bound in 2D and 3D (multilayer) networks were determined to be 0.32 ± 0.06 and 0.41 ± 0.03 eV per molecule, respectively. An upper limit for the desorption energy for defect-bound water was estimated to be 1 eV per molecule.

  14. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

    2004-02-01

    This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space

  15. Thermochemical production of hydrogen via multistage water splitting processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents and reviews the fundamental thermodynamic principles underlying thermochemical water splitting processes. The overall system is considered first and the temperature limitation in process thermal efficiency is developed. The relationship to an ideal water electrolysis cell is described and the nature of efficient multistage reaction processes is discussed. The importance of the reaction entropy change and the relation of the reaction free energy change to the work of separation is described. A procedure for analyzing thermochemical water splitting processes is presented and its use to calculate individual stage efficiency is demonstrated. A number of processes are used to illustrate the concepts and procedures.

  16. A Process Model for the Production of Hydrogen Using High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. Mc Kellar; E. A. Harvego; M. Richards; A. Shenoy

    2006-07-01

    High temperature electrolysis (HTE) involves the splitting of stream into hydrogen and oxygen at high temperatures. The primary advantage of HTE over conventional low temperature electrolysis is that considerably higher hydrogen production efficiencies can be achieved. Performing the electrolysis process at high temperatures results in more favorable thermodynamics for electrolysis, more efficient production of electricity, and allows direct use of process heat to generate steam. This paper presents the results of process analyses performed to evaluate the hydrogen production efficiencies of an HTE plant coupled to a 600 MWt Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) that supplies both the electricity and process heat needed to drive the process. The MHR operates with a coolant outlet temperature of 950 C. Approximately 87% of the high-temperature heat is used to generate electricity at high efficiency using a direct, Brayton-cycle power conversion system. The remaining high-temperature heat is used to generate a superheated steam / hydrogen mixture that is supplied to the electrolyzers. The analyses were performed using the HYSYS process modeling software. The model used to perform the analyses consisted of three loops; a primary high temperature helium loop, a secondary helium loop and the HTE process loop. The detailed model included realistic representations of all major components in the system, including pumps, compressors, heat exchange equipment, and the electrolysis stack. The design of the hydrogen production process loop also included a steam-sweep gas system to remove oxygen from the electrolysis stack so that it can be recovered and used for other applications. Results of the process analyses showed that hydrogen production efficiencies in the range of 45% to 50% are achievable with this system.

  17. Computer simulation of the water and hydrogen distillation and CECE process and its experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Alekseev, I.A.; Trenin, V.D.; Uborski, V.V.

    1995-10-01

    Mathematical simulation procedures have been developed for three processes of hydrogen isotopes separation: (1) a non steady-state water distillation; (2) a cryogenic distillation; and (3) a combined electrolysis and multistage water/hydrogen catalytic exchange (CECE) process. The simulation procedures possess some special features. Thus, the comparatively large step of integration and as a result of this high fast-acting is the peculiarity of the model for the dynamic behaviour of water distillation column operating at total reflux. The simulation procedure for CECE process considers six components and three phases (liquid water, water vapour, and hydrogen gas) and allows one to carry out computations for any mole fraction stock. This procedure, as the one for cryogenic distillation process, is not based on the Newton-Raphson method, and, in spite of this, convergence is reached by a small number of iterations (4 - 11). 8 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. MEASUREMENT AND PREDICTION OF RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN PRODUCTION IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING SLURRIES AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N; John Pareizs, J; Terri Fellinger, T; Cj Bannochie, C

    2007-01-10

    This paper presents results of measurements and predictions of radiolytic hydrogen production rates from two actual process slurries in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Hydrogen is a flammable gas and its production in nuclear facilities can be a safety hazard if not mitigated. Measurements were made in the Shielded Cells of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a sample of Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) currently being processed by the DWPF. Predictions were made using published values for rates of radiolytic reactions producing H{sub 2} in aqueous solutions and the measured radionuclide and chemical compositions of the two slurries. The agreement between measured and predicted results for nine experiments ranged from complete agreement to 24% difference. This agreement indicates that if the composition of the slurry being processed is known, the rate of radiolytic hydrogen production can be reasonably estimated.

  19. A Micro-fabricated Hydrogen Storage Module with Sub-atmospheric Activation and Durability in Air Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xi; Payer, Joe H.; Wainright, Jesse S; Dudik, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a hydrogen storage module for onboard electrical power sources suitable for use in micro power systems and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Hydrogen storage materials were developed as thin-film inks to be compatible with an integrated manufacturing process. Important design aspects were (a) ready activation at sub-atmospheric hydrogen pressure and room temperature and (b) durability, i.e. capable of hundreds of absorption/desorption cycles and resistance to deactivation on exposure to air. Inks with palladium-treated intermetallic hydrogen storage alloys were developed and are shown here to be compatible with a thin-film micro-fabrication process. These hydrogen storage modules absorb hydrogen readily at atmospheric pressure, and the absorption/desorption rates remained fast even after the ink was exposed to air for 47 weeks. PMID:20967132

  20. Operation of a two-stage fermentation process producing hydrogen and methane from organic waste.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Fukui, Hisatomo; Goto, Masafumi

    2007-02-15

    A pilot-scale experimental plant for the production of hydrogen and methane by a two-stage fermentation process was constructed and operated using a mixture of pulverized garbage and shredded paper wastes. Thermophilic hydrogen fermentation was established at 60 degrees C in the first bioreactor by inoculating with seed microflora. Following the hydrogenogenic process, methanogenesis in the second bioreactor was conducted at 55 degrees C using an internal recirculation packed-bed reactor (IRPR). After conducting steady-state operations under a few selected conditions, the overall hydraulic retention time was optimized at 8 d (hydrogenogenesis, 1.2 d; methanogenesis, 6.8 d), producing 5.4 m3/m3/d of hydrogen and 6.1 m3/m3/d of methane with chemical oxygen demand and volatile suspended solid removal efficiencies of 79.3% and 87.8%, respectively. Maximum hydrogen production yield was calculated to be 2.4 mol/mol hexose and 56 L/kg COD loaded. The methanogenic performance of the IRPR was stable, although the organic loading rate and the composition of the effluent from the hydrogenogenic process fluctuated substantially. A clone library analysis of the microflora in the hydrogenogenic reactor indicated that hydrogen-producing Thermoanaerobacterium-related organisms in the inoculum were active in the hydrogen fermentation of garbage and paper wastes, although no aseptic operations were applied. We speculate that the operation at high temperature and the inoculation of thermophiles enabled the selective growth of the introduced microorganisms and gave hydrogen fermentation efficiencies comparable to laboratory experiments. This is the first report on fermentative production of hydrogen and methane from organic waste at an actual level.

  1. A study of the processes in the RF hydrogen gas dissociator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.

    1980-01-01

    The role of the RF gas dissociator in the hydrogen maser is examined. Based on collisional and plasma transport processes, the performance of the source is investigated. It is found that while the complexity of the collisional processes in the RF dissociator prohibits an easily obtained quantitative expression for the performance of the source, it is nevertheless possible to make general inferences concerning the qualitative performance based on collisional effects. An analytical expression for the efficiency of the source in atom production is obtained based on plasma transport processes. On the basis of this study some recommendations are made for the development of more efficient RF hydrogen gas dissociators for use in masers.

  2. Numerical and Experimental Study of Mixing Processes Associated with Hydrogen and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, Vincent; Hill, Scott; Akbari, Amin; McDonell, Vincent

    2011-09-30

    As simulation capability improves exponentially with increasingly more cost effective CPUs and hardware, it can be used ?routinely? for engineering applications. Many commercial products are available and they are marketed as increasingly powerful and easy to use. The question remains as to the overall accuracy of results obtained. To support the validation of the CFD, a hierarchical experiment was established in which the type of fuel injection (radial, axial) as well as level of swirl (non-swirling, swirling) could be systematically varied. The effort was limited to time efficient approaches (i.e., generally RANS approaches) although limited assessment of time resolved methods (i.e., unsteady RANS and LES) were considered. Careful measurements of the flowfield velocity and fuel concentration were made using both intrusive and non-intrusive methods. This database was then used as the basis for the assessment of the CFD approach. The numerical studies were carried out with a statistically based matrix. As a result, the effect of turbulence model, fuel type, axial plane, turbulent Schmidt number, and injection type could be studied using analysis of variance. The results for the non-swirling cases could be analyzed as planned, and demonstrate that turbulence model selection, turbulence Schmidt number, and the type of injection will strongly influence the agreement with measured values. Interestingly, the type of fuel used (either hydrogen or methane) has no influence on the accuracy of the simulations. For axial injection, the selection of proper turbulence Schmidt number is important, whereas for radial injection, the results are relatively insensitive to this parameter. In general, it was found that the nature of the flowfield influences the performance of the predictions. This result implies that it is difficult to establish a priori the ?best? simulation approach to use. However, the insights from the relative orientation of the jet and flow do offer some

  3. Assessing the Interplay between the Physicochemical Parameters of Ion-Pairing Reagents and the Analyte Sequence on the Electrospray Desorption Process for Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiri, Babak; Murph, Mandi M.; Bartlett, Michael G.

    2017-08-01

    Alkylamines are widely used as ion-pairing agents during LC-MS of oligonucleotides. In addition to a better chromatographic separation, they also assist with the desorption of oligonucleotide ions into the gas phase, cause charge state reduction, and decrease cation adduction. However, the choice of such ion-pairing agents has considerable influence on the MS signal intensity of oligonucleotides as they can also cause significant ion suppression. Interestingly, optimal ion-pairing agents should be selected on a case by case basis as their choice is strongly influenced by the sequence of the oligonucleotide under investigation. Despite imposing major practical difficulties to analytical method development, such a highly variable system that responds very strongly to the nuances of the electrospray composition provides an excellent opportunity for a fundamental study of the electrospray ionization process. Our investigations using this system quantitatively revealed the major factors that influenced the ESI ionization efficiency of oligonucleotides. Parameters such as boiling point, proton affinity, partition coefficient, water solubility, and Henry's law constants for the ion-pairing reagents and the hydrophobic thymine content of the oligonucleotides were found to be the most significant contributors. Identification of these parameters also allowed for the development of a statistical predictive algorithm that can assist with the choice of an optimum IP agent for each particular oligonucleotide sequence. We believe that research in the field of oligonucleotide bioanalysis will significantly benefit from this algorithm (included in Supplementary Material) as it advocates for the use of lesser-known but more suitable ion-pair alternatives to TEA for many oligonucleotide sequences.

  4. Physics and Chemistry of the Hydrogen Fluoride Production Process from Fluorine Containing Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, A. N.; Kraydenko, R. I.; Lesnikova, M. S.; Malyutin, L. N.; Petlin, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the aluminum industry wastes on the environment is established. The resource efficient method of aluminum industry fluorine-containing wastes processing, which includes wastes oxidizing roasting to remove carbon component and the interaction of fluorine- containing particles with sulfuric acid in order to produce hydrogen fluoride, is considered. The economic and environmental effect of the proposed processing method is substantiated.

  5. Process for recycling waste aluminum with generation of high-pressure hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Takehito; Yamauchi, Satoru; Iida, Masayasu; Uesugi, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2007-06-15

    An innovative environmently friendly hydrolysis process for recycling waste aluminum with the generation of high-pressure hydrogen has been proposed and experimentally validated. The effect of the concentration of sodium hydroxide solution on hydrogen generation rate was the main focus of the study. In the experiments, distilled water and aluminum powder were placed in the pressure-resistance reactor made of Hastelloy, and was compressed to a desired constant water pressure using a liquid pump. The sodium hydroxide solution was supplied by liquid pump with different concentrations (from 1.0 to 5.0 mol/dm3) at a constant flow rate into the reactor by replacing the distilled water, and the rate of hydrogen generated was measured simultaneously. The liquid temperature in the reactor increased due to the exothermic reaction given by Al + OH(-) + 3H2O = 1.5H2 + Al(OH)4(-) + 415.6 kJ. Therefore, a high-pressure hydrogen was generated at room temperature by mixing waste aluminum and sodium hydroxide solution. As the hydrogen compressor used in this process consumes less energy than the conventional one, the generation of hydrogen having a pressure of almost 30 MPa was experimentally validated together with Al(OH)3, a useful byproduct.

  6. Heterogeneous Ice Processes Important for Odd Hydrogen and Ozone on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostko, Oleg; Marschall, J.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2012-10-01

    Odd-hydrogen chemistry plays an important role in the ozone budget and the stabilization of carbon dioxide in the Martian atmosphere. In the lower atmosphere, heterogeneous processes influence the fate of odd-hydrogen species. The quantitative details of these heterogeneous physicochemical processes are poorly understood, leading to discrepancies between models and observations of the Martian atmosphere. Atmospheric models consistently underestimate the ozone abundances and overestimate the hydrogen peroxide densities. Heterogeneous loss of odd-hydrogen species has been suggested as a possible explanation. Relevant laboratory results are scarce in the literature, especially at the temperature range appropriate for the Martian atmosphere. We are conducting laboratory experiments to determine the uptake of various odd-hydrogen species by water ice and other substrates. We use a Knudsen cell apparatus, which is a low-pressure stirred-flow reactor in a configuration that allows heterogeneous uptake effects to be quantified by the change in the concentration of a gas phase species mixture flowing over a condensed matter substrate. We will present our recent results and discuss their relevance to the Martian odd-hydrogen and ozone chemistry. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant NNX10AM85G issued through the Mars Fundamental Research Program.

  7. Heterogeneous Ice Processes Important for Odd Hydrogen and Ozone on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostko, O.; Marschall, J.; Kalogerakis, K.

    2012-12-01

    Odd-hydrogen chemistry plays an important role in the ozone budget and the stabilization of carbon dioxide in the Martian atmosphere. In the lower atmosphere, heterogeneous processes influence the fate of odd-hydrogen species. The quantitative details of these heterogeneous physicochemical processes are poorly understood, leading to discrepancies between models and observations of the Martian atmosphere. Atmospheric models consistently underestimate the ozone abundances and overestimate the hydrogen peroxide densities. Heterogeneous loss of odd-hydrogen species has been suggested as a possible explanation. Relevant laboratory results are scarce in the literature, especially at the temperature range appropriate for the Martian atmosphere. We are conducting laboratory experiments to determine the uptake of various odd-hydrogen species by water ice and other substrates. We use a Knudsen cell apparatus, which is a low-pressure stirred-flow reactor in a configuration that allows heterogeneous uptake effects to be quantified by the change in the concentration of a gas phase species mixture flowing over a condensed matter substrate. We will present our recent results and discuss their relevance to the Martian odd-hydrogen and ozone chemistry. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant NNX10AM85G issued through the Mars Fundamental Research Program.

  8. Heterogeneous Ice Processes Important for Odd Hydrogen and Ozone on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostko, Oleg; Marschall, Jochen; Kalogerakis, Konstantinos S.

    2013-04-01

    Odd-hydrogen chemistry plays an important role in the ozone budget and the stabilization of carbon dioxide in the Martian atmosphere. In the lower atmosphere, heterogeneous processes influence the fate of odd-hydrogen species. The quantitative details of these heterogeneous physicochemical processes are poorly understood, leading to discrepancies between models and observations of the Martian atmosphere. Atmospheric models consistently underestimate the ozone abundances and overestimate the hydrogen peroxide densities. Heterogeneous loss of odd-hydrogen species has been suggested as a possible explanation. Relevant laboratory results are scarce in the literature, especially at the temperature range appropriate for the Martian atmosphere. We are conducting laboratory experiments to determine the uptake of various odd-hydrogen species by water ice and other substrates. We use a Knudsen cell apparatus, which is a low-pressure stirred-flow reactor in a configuration that allows heterogeneous uptake effects to be quantified by the change in the concentration of a gas phase species mixture flowing over a condensed matter substrate. We will present our recent results and discuss their relevance to the Martian odd-hydrogen and ozone chemistry. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant NNX10AM85G issued through the Mars Fundamental Research Program.

  9. An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhicheng Wang

    2007-03-15

    The new technology concept integrates two significant complementary hydrogen production and CO{sub 2}-sequestration approaches that have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Clark Atlanta University. The process can convert biomass into hydrogen and char. Hydrogen can be efficiently used for stationary power and mobile applications, or it can be synthesized into Ammonia which can be used for CO{sub 2}-sequestration, while char can be used for making time-release fertilizers (NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) by absorption of CO{sub 2} and other acid gases from exhaust flows. Fertilizers are then used for the growth of biomass back to fields. This project includes bench scale experiments and pilot scale tests. The Combustion and Emission Lab at Clark Atlanta University has conducted the bench scale experiments. The facility used for pilot scale tests was built in Athens, GA. The overall yield from this process is 7 wt% hydrogen and 32 wt% charcoal/activated carbon of feedstock (peanut shell). The value of co-product activated carbon is about $1.1/GJ and this coproduct reduced the selling price of hydrogen. And the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $6.95/GJ. The green house experimental results show that the samples added carbon-fertilizers have effectively growth increase of three different types of plants and improvement ability of keeping fertilizer in soil to avoid the fertilizer leaching with water.

  10. Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

    2012-09-14

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

  11. Sensitivity Studies of Advanced Reactors Coupled to High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) Hydrogen Production Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-04-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the steam or air sweep loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycle producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered.

  12. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam degradates in several agricultural soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Processes regulating pesticide fate in the environment are influenced by the physicochemical properties of pesticides and soils. Sorption-desorption are important processes as they regulate movement of pesticides in soil. Although sorption-desorption is widely studied for herbicides, studies involvi...

  13. Sulfur Iodine Process Summary for the Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Russ

    2009-05-01

    This report summarizes the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting process for the purpose of supporting the process for evaluating and recommending a hydrogen production technology to deploy with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). This package provides the baseline process description as well as a comparison with the process as it was implemented in the Integrated Lab Scale (ILS) experiment conducted at General Atomics from 2006-2009.

  14. Enhanced bio-energy recovery in a two-stage hydrogen/methane fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Song, J H; Hwang, S J

    2009-01-01

    A two-stage hydrogen/methane fermentation process has emerged as a feasible engineering system to recover bio-energy from wastewater. Hydrogen-producing bacteria (HPB) generate hydrogen from readily available carbohydrates, and organic acids produced during the hydrogen fermentation step can be degraded to generate methane in the following step. Three strong acids, HCl, H(2)SO(4), and HNO(3), were tested to determine the appropriate pre-treatment method for enhanced hydrogen production. The hydrogen production rates of 230, 290, and 20 L/kg(-glucose)/day was observed for the sludge treated with HCl, H(2)SO(4), and HNO(3), respectively, indicating that the acid pre-treatment using either HCl or H(2)SO(4) resulted in a significant increase in hydrogen production. The fluorescent in situ hybridization method indicated that the acid pre-treatment selectively enriched HPB including Clostridium sp. of cluster I from inoculum sludge. After hydrogen fermentation was terminated, the sludge was introduced to a methane fermentation reactor. This experiment showed methane production rates of 100, 30, and 13 L/kg(-glucose)/day for the sludge pre-treated with HCl, H(2)SO(4), and HNO(3), respectively, implying that both sulfate and nitrate inhibited the activity of methane-producing bacteria. Consequently, the acid pre-treatment might be a feasible option to enhance biogas recovery in the two-stage fermentation process, and HCl was selected as the optimal strong acid for the enrichment of HPB and the continuous production of methane.

  15. Direct Chlorination Process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5% hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90% excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

  16. Threshold character of temperatures on deuterium thermal desorption in Mg-V composite grown atom-by-atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neklyudov, I. M.; Morozov, O. M.; Kulish, V. G.; Zhurba, V. I.; Galitskiy, A. G.; Lomino, N. S.; Kuprin, A. S.; Ovcharenko, V. D.; Reshetnyak, E. N.

    2012-08-01

    The plasma evaporation-sputtering method was applied to make composite materials of the Mg-V system. The ion-implanted deuterium desorption temperature variations as a function of the component concentration were studied. It has been established that, by introducing vanadium into magnesium, the deuterium desorption temperature can be appreciably decreased (to 300-330 K) in comparison with the case of deuterium desorption from magnesium (~800 K). A step-like form of the curve of deuterium desorption temperature evidences on the presence of two different structure states of the Mg-V system depending on the ratio of components. The deuterium temperature decrease can be caused by filamentary inclusions formed, in the process of composite making and annealing, by the insoluble component (vanadium) atoms providing the deuterium diffusion from the sample at a lower temperature (channels for deuterium diffusion through the surface barrier). A necessary high diffusion mobility of deuterium is provided by the amorphous state of Mg83+xVx samples. The deuterium desorption data obtained on the example of Mg-V and Mg-Zr composites provide support for further research into hydrogen storage materials containing low-soluble chemical elements in the alloy components.

  17. Role of deuterium desorption kinetics on the thermionic emission properties of polycrystalline diamond films with respect to kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, W. F. Howell, M.; Kang, W. P.; Davidson, J. L.; Brooks, M. M.; Tolk, N.

    2014-06-21

    The desorption kinetics of deuterium from polycrystalline chemical vapor deposited diamond films were characterized by monitoring the isothermal thermionic emission current behavior. The reaction was observed to follow a first-order trend as evidenced by the decay rate of the thermionic emission current over time which is in agreement with previously reported studies. However, an Arrhenius plot of the reaction rates at each tested temperature did not exhibit the typical linear behavior which appears to contradict past observations of the hydrogen (or deuterium) desorption reaction from diamond. This observed deviation from linearity, specifically at lower temperatures, has been attributed to non-classical processes. Though no known previous studies reported similar deviations, a reanalysis of the data obtained in the present study was performed to account for tunneling which appeared to add merit to this hypothesis. Additional investigations were performed by reevaluating previously reported data involving the desorption of hydrogen (as opposed to deuterium) from diamond which further indicated this reaction to be dominated by tunneling at the temperatures tested in this study (<775 °C). An activation energy of 3.19 eV and a pre-exponential constant of 2.3 × 10{sup 12} s{sup −1} were determined for the desorption reaction of deuterium from diamond which is in agreement with previously reported studies.

  18. New amine-solvent process for selective hydrogen sulphide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Gazzi, L.; Rescalli, C.; Sguera, O.

    1986-01-01

    The absorbent solution of the Selefining process - a new process for selective H/sub 2/S removal - contains a tertiary amine, an organic solvent and little water. In these reasonably anhydrous conditions the amine cannot react with CO/sub 2/ either to form carbamate because it is tertiary, or to form carbonate because CO/sub 2/ cannot be hydrated to carbonic acid to a sufficient extent. On the contrary, the amine can react with H/sub 2/S according to a neutralization reaction because H/sub 2/S is an acid in itself. The process removes COS, CS/sub 2/ and mercaptans incidental to H/sub 2/S removal. A new unit will go on stream in the summer of 1986; the retrofitting of an old MEA-DEG plant to Selefining is presently under progress.

  19. Hydrogen isotope analysis of amino acids and whole cells reflects biosynthetic processing of nutrient- and water-derived hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, P.; Newsome, S.; Steele, A.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen (H) isotopes serve as sensitive tracers of biochemical processes that can be exploited to answer critical questions in biogeochemistry, ecology, and microbiology. Despite this apparent utility, relatively little is known about the specific mechanisms of H isotope fractionation involved in biosynthesis. In order to understand how organisms incorporate hydrogen from their chemical milieu into biomass, we have cultured the model bacterium E. coli MG1655 in a variety of media composed of deuterium-labeled nutrients and waters. Isotopic analysis of bulk cell mass reveals that the H fractionation between media water and cell material varies as a function of the nutrient source, with commonly used organic food sources (glucose and tryptone) leading to far smaller fractionation signals than non-standard ones (such as formamide, adenine, and urea). In addition, we have completed compound specific isotope analysis of amino acids using combined GC-IRMS. Amino acids harvested from E. coli cultured on glucose in water of varied D/H composition posses an extraordinary range of isotopic compositions (400-600 %). Furthermore, these amino acids follow a systematic distribution of D/H where proline is always heaviest and glycine is always lightest. However, when the short-chain peptide tryptone is used in place of glucose, only the non-essential amino acids reflect media water D/H values, suggesting the direct incorporation of some media-borne amino acids into cellular protein. These observations provide a foundation for understanding the cellular routing of hydrogen obtained from food and water sources and indicate that D/H analysis can serve as a powerful probe of biological function.

  20. The contribution of dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines in hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The contribution of molecular dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines is considered for a steady-state hydrogen plasma. If the contribution of dissociative processes is dominant, a substantial simplification in plasma diagnostics can be achieved. Numerical calculations have been performed for the production of Balmer alpha, beta, and gamma lines in hydrogen plasmas with medium and large degrees of ionization (x greater than about 0.0001) and for electron temperatures of 5000-45,000 K and electron densities of 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 16th/cu cm.

  1. Process for the production of hydrogen utilizing a photogalvanic effect of a polyacid ion

    SciTech Connect

    Ikawa, T.; Yamase, T.

    1982-08-24

    A process for the production of hydrogen is disclosed. This process utilizes a photogalvanic effect of a polyacid ion and comprises immersing an anode into an aqueous solution of an alkylammonium salt of polytungstic acid or polyvanadic acid as an anode electrolyte, immersing a cathode into an aqueous solution of an acid as a cathode electrolyte, isolating both said aqueous solutions to each other, electrically connecting both said electrodes to each other, and irradiating a light onto said anode electrolyte, whereby hydrogen is evoluted at said cathode.

  2. The contribution of dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines in hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The contribution of molecular dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines is considered for a steady-state hydrogen plasma. If the contribution of dissociative processes is dominant, a substantial simplification in plasma diagnostics can be achieved. Numerical calculations have been performed for the production of Balmer alpha, beta, and gamma lines in hydrogen plasmas with medium and large degrees of ionization (x greater than about 0.0001) and for electron temperatures of 5000-45,000 K and electron densities of 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 16th/cu cm.

  3. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-08-17

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I discussed the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  4. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART I.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-07-10

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I will discuss the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  5. Evaluation of low hydrogen welding processes for pipeline construction in high strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Howse, D S; Jones, R L

    1996-08-01

    Low hydrogen manual welding processes, suitable for pipeline girth welding, have been available for some time for the lower strength pipe grades, and latterly, for high strength pipelines (up to and including X80). Despite their availability and advantages in terms of reduced crack susceptibility, they have been rarely used in production up to the present time. Basic coated shielded metal arc (SMA) electrodes, suitable for vertical-down welding, are produced by some manufacturers at the strength level required for both the root welding and filling of pipeline girth welds. Self-shielded flux-cored wires (SSFCA) are also available for both root and fill welding, and in addition to the low hydrogen levels, these have the advantage of increased productivity. Both of these processes require different methods of deposition compared to welding using cellulosic electrodes, which necessitates specialized training of welders. It is thought that this, along with doubts concerning the reliability and speed of the processes in site conditions, has made contractors reluctant to adopt them. Furthermore, there was a dearth of independently produced information on the welding production performance of low hydrogen processes. Therefore, the primary aim of the present work was to generate data to enable users to make an informed judgment regarding the practical application of low hydrogen processes. Furthermore, it was intended to develop improved root welding procedures, which had been recognized as being significant process limitation. The conclusions and recommendations from this work are discussed.

  6. The nature of collision-induced dissociation processes of doubly protonated peptides: comparative study for the future use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization on a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Cramer, R; Corless, S

    2001-01-01

    Comparative MS/MS studies of singly and doubly charged electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) precursor peptide ions are described. The spectra from these experiments have been evaluated with particular emphasis on the data quality for subsequent data processing and protein/amino acid sequence identification. It is shown that, once peptide ions are formed by ESI or MALDI, their charge state, as well as the collision energy, is the main parameter determining the quality of collision-induced dissociation (CID) MS/MS fragmentation spectra of a given peptide. CID-MS/MS spectra of singly charged peptides obtained on a hybrid quadrupole orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer resemble very closely spectra obtained by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization post-source decay time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-PSD-TOFMS). On the other hand, comparison of CID-MS/MS spectra of either singly or doubly charged ion species shows no dependence on whether ions have been formed by ESI or MALDI. This observation confirms that, at the time of precursor ion selection, further mass analysis is effectively decoupled from the desorption/ionization event. Since MALDI ions are predominantly formed as singly charged species and ESI ions as doubly charged, the associated difference in the spectral quality of MS/MS spectra as described here imposes direct consequences on data processing, database searching using ion fragmentation data, and de novo sequencing when ionization techniques are changed.

  7. The processing of alcohols, hydrocarbons and ethers to produce hydrogen for a PEMFC for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dams, R.A.J.; Hayter, P.R.; Moore, S.C.

    1997-12-31

    Wellman CJB Limited is involved in a number of projects to develop fuel processors to provide a hydrogen-rich fuel in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) systems for transportation applications. This work started in 1990 which resulted in the demonstration of 10kW PEMFC system incorporating a methanol reformer and catalytic gas clean-up system. Current projects include: The development of a compact fast response methanol reformer and gas clean-up system for a motor vehicle; Reforming of infrastructure fuels including gasoline, diesel, reformulated fuel gas and LPG to produce a hydrogen rich gas for PEMFC; Investigating the potential of dimethylether (DME) as source of hydrogen rich gas for PEMFCs; The use of thin film palladium diffusers to produce a pure hydrogen stream from the hydrogen rich gas from a reformer; and Processing of naval logistic fuels to produce a hydrogen rich gas stream for PEMFC power system to replace diesel generators in surface ships. This paper outlines the background to these projects and reports their current status.

  8. The plasma membrane sodium-hydrogen exchanger and its role in physiological and pathophysiological processes.

    PubMed

    Mahnensmith, R L; Aronson, P S

    1985-06-01

    The plasma membranes of most if not all vertebrate cells contain a transport system that mediates the transmembrane exchange of sodium for hydrogen. The kinetic properties of this transport system include a 1:1 stoichiometry, affinity for lithium and ammonium ion in addition to sodium and hydrogen, the ability to function in multiple 1:1 exchange modes involving these four cations, sensitivity to inhibition by amiloride and its analogues, and allosteric regulation by intracellular protons. The plasma membrane sodium-hydrogen exchanger plays a physiological role in the regulation of intracellular pH, the control of cell growth and proliferation, stimulus-response coupling in white cells and platelets, the metabolic response to hormones such as insulin and glucocorticoids, the regulation of cell volume, and the transepithelial absorption and secretion of sodium, hydrogen, bicarbonate and chloride ions, and organic anions. Preliminary evidence raises the possibility that the sodium-hydrogen exchanger may play a pathophysiological role in such diverse conditions as renal acid-base disorders, essential hypertension, cancer, and tissue or organ hypertrophy. Thus, future research on cellular acid-base homeostasis in general, and on plasma membrane sodium-hydrogen exchange in particular, will enhance our understanding of a great variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes.

  9. Field desorption of Na and Cs from graphene on iridium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskii, D. P.; Pavlov, V. G.

    2015-08-01

    Field electron and desorption microscopy has been used to study specific features of the field desorption of sodium and cesium ions adsorbed on the surface of iridium with graphene. It was found that adsorbed sodium atoms most strongly reduce the work function on graphene islands situated over densely packed faces of iridium. A strong electric field qualitatively similarly affects the sodium and cesium desorption processes from a field emitter to give two desorption phases and has no noticeable effect on the disintegration of the graphene layer.

  10. Hydrogen-inclusion-induced variation of critical current in Nb-AlOx-Nb Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinode, Kenji; Satoh, Tetsuro; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2008-07-01

    The critical current density (Jc) of Nb-AlOx-Nb Josephson-junction (JJ) arrays was found to depend on their wiring structure. The Jc values of all JJs wired with a niobium electrode covered with a palladium layer increased by about 20%, while the Jc values of those with electrodes without palladium coverage stayed unchanged (except for that of the two junctions directly connected to the pads of an electrical probe covered with palladium.) To explain this Jc increase, we propose a "hydrogen mechanism," that is, the hydrogen inclusion into niobium electrodes occurs during fabrication, and its desorption occurs after fabrication. Hydrogen atoms incorporated in the electrodes are thought to influence the mechanical and the electronical properties of niobium, resulting in the deviation of critical current density. Hydrogen desorption analysis and measurements on niobium-film properties verified the occurrence of hydrogen incorporation into the niobium films during the fabrication process for superconducting JJ circuits. The incorporation and desorption processes were confirmed to proceed, even in air, if the niobium film is covered with palladium. As hydrogen diffuses quickly in niobium but stops in aluminum or aluminum oxide, differences in hydrogen concentration can happen within a circuit consisting of electrically connected multiple junctions. This hydrogen concentration difference can explain the observation that two junctions with increased Jc exist in the serial junction array without palladium coverage.

  11. Aqueous process for recovering sulfur from hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Arunabha

    2015-05-05

    A process for recovering sulfur from a hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas utilizes an aqueous reaction medium, a temperature of about 110-150.degree. C., and a high enough pressure to maintain the aqueous reaction medium in a liquid state. The process reduces material and equipment costs and addresses the environmental disadvantages associated with known processes that rely on high boiling point organic solvents.

  12. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, David C.; Lambert, Daniel P.; Baich, Mark A.

    2005-08-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is in the process of investigating factors suspected of impacting catalytic hydrogen generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, Chemical Process Cell, CPC. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation in simulation work constrains the allowable acid addition operating window in DWPF. This constraint potentially impacts washing strategies during sludge batch preparation. It can also influence decisions related to the addition of secondary waste streams to a sludge batch. Catalytic hydrogen generation data from 2002-2005 were reviewed. The data came from process simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, and Slurry Mix Evaporator, SME. Most of the data was from the development work for the Sludge Batch 3 process flowsheet. This included simulant and radioactive waste testing. Preliminary Sludge Batch 4 data were also reviewed. A statistical analysis of SB3 simulant hydrogen generation data was performed. One factor considered in the statistical analysis was excess acid. Excess acid was determined experimentally as the acid added beyond that required to achieve satisfactory nitrite destruction.

  13. The kinetics of catalytic hydrogenation of pyrene-implications for direct coal liquefaction processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, H.P.; Chapman, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Although recycling heavy solvents has recently re-emerged as a key to cutting the cost of direct coal liquefaction, little data for the hydrogenation of heavy solvent donors have been reported. This study addresses the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of catalytic hydrogenation of pyrene, a donor solvent precursor thought to play an important role in coal liquefaction processes that use heavy recycle solvents. In the presence of a catalyst, pyrene (Py) is hydrogenated to di- (H/sub 2/Py), tetra- (H/sub 4/Py), hexa- (H/sub 6/Py), deca- (H/sub 10/Py) and perhydro- (H/sub 16/Py) species via a complex mechanism involving a network of reversible parallel and series reactions. Though several studies have dealt with aspects of pyrene hydrogenation, including hydrocracking reactions, reaction product distributions and thermodynamic properties, the kinetics of hydrogenation have not been previously reported. Ultimate application of kinetic and thermodynamic data to direct coal liquefaction must take into consideration the conditions imposed by the particular process used. However, two generalizations may be made regarding hydrogen supplied by the dihydropyrene component of donor solvents: (1) Increasing hydrogen partial pressure increases both the rate at which H/sub 2/Py is formed and the equilibrium concentration of H/sub 2/Py. Therefore, pyrene rehydrogenation should be done at as high a pressure as is cost effective. Although an increase in temperature favors the rate of attainment of equilibrium between Py and H/sub 2/Py, the position of the equilibrium is shifted toward pyrene. Temperature must therefore be adjusted to achieve an optimum trade-off between rate of formation and maximum possible concentration of H/sub 2/Py.

  14. Aasgard B process selection of hydrogen sulfide removal and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Son, K.J. van; Chludzinski, G.; Charles, P.R.

    1999-07-01

    The Aasgard offshore project consists of a 2-stage development to produce the oil and gas reserves from three fields in the Norwegian Sea. The three fields Midgard, Smoerbukk and Smoerbukk Soer have reserves of approximately 220 Gia standard cubic meters (Gsm{sup 3}, 8 Tcf) and 120 (Mm{sup 3}, 750 MMbbls) of crude oil and condensate. The Aasgard unit will be jointly developed by Statoil and Saga, and operated by Statoil. Other partners are Neste Petroleum, Mobil, Total, Agip and Norsk Hydro. This paper will focus on the process selection and preliminary design of the gas treating system.

  15. Impact of pH on hydrogen oxidizing redox processes in aquifers due to gas intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzgen, Adrian; Berta, Marton; Dethlefsen, Frank; Ebert, Markus; Dahmke, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen production from excess energy and its storage can help increasing the efficiency of solar and wind in the energy mix. Therefore, hydrogen needs large-scale intermediate storage independent of the intended later use as hydrogen gas or as reactant to produce methane in the Sabatier process. A possible storage solution is using the geological subsurface such as caverns built in salt deposits or aquifers that are not used for drinking water production. However, underground storage of hydrogen gas potentially leads to accidental gas leakages into near-surface potable aquifers triggering subsequent geochemical processes. These leakages pose potential risks that are currently not sufficiently understood. To close this gap in knowledge, a high-pressure laboratory column system was used to simulate a hydrogen gas intrusion into a shallow aquifer. Water and sediment were gained from a sandy Pleistocene aquifer near Neumünster, Germany. In the first stage of the experiment, 100% hydrogen gas was used to simulate dissolved hydrogen concentrations between 800 and 4000 µM by varying pH2 between 2 and 15 bars. pH values rose to between 7.9 and 10.4, partly due to stripping CO2 from the groundwater used during H2 gas addition. In a second stage, the pH was regulated in a range of 6.7 to 7.9 by using a gas mixture of 99% H2 and 1% CO2 at 5 bars of total gas pressure. Observed processes included hydrogen oxidation, sulfate reduction, acetogenesis, formate production, and methanogenesis, which were independent of the hydrogen concentration. Hydrogen oxidation and sulfate reduction showed zeroth order reaction rates and rate constants (106 to 412 µM/h and 12 to 33 µM/h, respectively) in the pH range between 8 and 10. At pH levels between 7 and 8, both reactions started out faster near the column's inflow but then seemed limited towards the columns outflow, suggesting the dependence of sulfate reduction on the pH-value. Acetogenesis dominated the pH range between 8 and 10

  16. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via an integrated pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J; Ren, S; Ye, X; Kim, P; Labbe, N; Borole, A P

    2015-11-01

    A new approach to hydrogen production using an integrated pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L anode-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50±3.2% to 76±0.5% while anode Coulombic efficiency ranged from 54±6.5% to 96±0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%, respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process

    DOE PAGES

    Lewis, Alex J.; Ren, Shoujie; Ye, Philip; ...

    2015-06-30

    A new approach to hydrogen production using a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50 3.2% to76 0.5% while anode coulombic efficiency ranged from 54 6.5% to 96 0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%,more » respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass.« less

  18. Compound specific carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses of volatile organic compounds in various emissions of combustion processes.

    PubMed

    Vitzthum von Eckstaedt, Christiane D; Grice, Kliti; Ioppolo-Armanios, Marisa; Kelly, David; Gibberd, Mark

    2012-11-01

    This study presents carbon (δ(13)C) and hydrogen (δD) isotope values of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in various emission sources using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TD-GC-irMS). The investigated VOCs ranged from C6 to C10. Samples were taken from (i) car exhaust emissions as well as from plant combustion experiments of (ii) various C3 and (iii) various C4 plants. We found significant differences in δ values of analysed VOCs between these sources, e.g. δ(13)C of benzene ranged between (i) -21.7 ± 0.2 ‰, (ii) -27.6 ± 1.6 ‰ and (iii) -16.3 ± 2.2 ‰, respectively and δD of benzene ranged between (i) -73 ± 13 ‰, (ii) -111 ± 10 ‰ and (iii) -70 ± 24 ‰, respectively. Results of VOCs present in investigated emission sources were compared to values from the literature (aluminium refinery emission). All source groups could be clearly distinguished using the dual approach of δ(13)C and δD analysis. The results of this study indicate that the correlation of compound specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis provides the potential for future research to trace the fate and to determine the origin of VOCs in the atmosphere using thermal desorption compound specific isotope analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Recovery of hydrogen and removal of nitrate from water by electrocoagulation process.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Jothinathan; Sozhan, Ganapathy; Vasudevan, Subramanyan

    2013-04-01

    The present study provides an optimization of electrocoagulation process for the recovery of hydrogen and removal of nitrate from water. In doing so, the thermodynamic, adsorption isotherm, and kinetic studies were also carried out. Aluminum alloy of size 2 dm(2) was used as anode and as cathode. To optimize the maximum removal efficiency, different parameters like effect of initial concentration, effect of temperature, pH, and effect of current density were studied. The results show that a significant amount of hydrogen can be generated by this process during the removal of nitrate from water. The energy yield calculated from the hydrogen generated is 3.3778 kWh/m(3). The results also showed that the maximum removal efficiency of 95.9% was achieved at a current density of 0.25 A/dm(2), at a pH of 7.0. The adsorption process followed second-order kinetics model. The adsorption of NO3(-) preferably fitting the Langmuir adsorption isotherm suggests monolayer coverage of adsorbed molecules. Thermodynamic studies showed that adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The energy yield of generated hydrogen was ~54% of the electrical energy demand of the electrocoagulation process. With the reduction of the net energy demand, electrocoagulation may become a useful technology to treat water associated with power production. The aluminum hydroxide generated in the cell removes the nitrate present in the water and reduced it to a permissible level making the water drinkable.

  20. Thermochemical process for the production of hydrogen using chromium and barium compound

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, Donald M.

    1977-01-25

    Hydrogen is produced by a closed cyclic process involving the reduction and oxidation of chromium compounds by barium hydroxide and the hydrolytic disproportionation of Ba.sub.2 CrO.sub.4 and Ba.sub.3 (CrO.sub.4).sub.2.

  1. NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  2. Study of Adsorption and Desorption Performances of Zr-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks Using Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Chen, Ying; Zheng, Yajun; Zhang, Zhiping

    2017-07-08

    The dynamic pore systems and high surface areas of flexible metal-organic framework materials make them excellent candidates to be used in different kinds of adsorption processes. However, the adsorption and desorption behaviors of therapeutic drugs on metal-organic frameworks in solution are not fully developed. Here, we systematically investigated the adsorption and desorption behaviors of a typical therapeutic drug, verapamil, over several Zr-based metal-organic frameworks [e.g., Zr-FUM, UiO-66(Zr), UiO-66(Zr)-NH₂ and UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH] as well as ZrO₂ in an acetonitrile solution by using paper spray mass spectrometry. In contrast to other materials, UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH demonstrated a superior adsorption performance to verapamil due to their strong acid-base and/or hydrogen-bond interactions, and the adsorption process fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. As verapamil-adsorbed materials were used for desorption experiments, ZrO₂ demonstrated the most favorable desorption performance, whereas UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH yielded the poorest desorption capability. These Zr-based materials had also been coated at the surface with filter papers for the analysis of various drugs and proteins in the process of paper spray mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated that among the studied materials, ZrO₂-coated paper gave the most favorable desorption performance as a pure drug solution, whereas the paper from UiO-66(Zr) demonstrated the optimal capability in the analyses of therapeutic drugs in a complex matrix (e.g., blood) and a protein (e.g., myoglobin).

  3. Study of Adsorption and Desorption Performances of Zr-Based Metal–Organic Frameworks Using Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoting; Chen, Ying; Zheng, Yajun

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic pore systems and high surface areas of flexible metal–organic framework materials make them excellent candidates to be used in different kinds of adsorption processes. However, the adsorption and desorption behaviors of therapeutic drugs on metal–organic frameworks in solution are not fully developed. Here, we systematically investigated the adsorption and desorption behaviors of a typical therapeutic drug, verapamil, over several Zr-based metal–organic frameworks [e.g., Zr-FUM, UiO-66(Zr), UiO-66(Zr)-NH2 and UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH] as well as ZrO2 in an acetonitrile solution by using paper spray mass spectrometry. In contrast to other materials, UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH demonstrated a superior adsorption performance to verapamil due to their strong acid-base and/or hydrogen-bond interactions, and the adsorption process fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. As verapamil-adsorbed materials were used for desorption experiments, ZrO2 demonstrated the most favorable desorption performance, whereas UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH yielded the poorest desorption capability. These Zr-based materials had also been coated at the surface with filter papers for the analysis of various drugs and proteins in the process of paper spray mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated that among the studied materials, ZrO2-coated paper gave the most favorable desorption performance as a pure drug solution, whereas the paper from UiO-66(Zr) demonstrated the optimal capability in the analyses of therapeutic drugs in a complex matrix (e.g., blood) and a protein (e.g., myoglobin). PMID:28773131

  4. Integrated numerical prediction of atomization process of liquid hydrogen jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Ohira, Katsuhide; Okabayashi, Kazuki; Chitose, Keiko

    2008-05-01

    The 3-D structure of the liquid atomization behavior of an LH jet flow through a pinhole nozzle is numerically investigated and visualized by a new type of integrated simulation technique. The present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis focuses on the thermodynamic effect on the consecutive breakup of a cryogenic liquid column, the formation of a liquid film, and the generation of droplets in the outlet section of the pinhole nozzle. Utilizing the governing equations for a high-speed turbulent cryogenic jet flow through a pinhole nozzle based on the thermal nonequilibrium LES-VOF model in conjunction with the CSF model, an integrated parallel computation is performed to clarify the detailed atomization process of a high-speed LH2 jet flow through a pinhole nozzle and to acquire data, which is difficult to confirm by experiment, such as atomization length, liquid core shape, droplet-size distribution, spray angle, droplet velocity profiles, and thermal field surrounding the atomizing jet flow. According to the present computation, the cryogenic atomization rate and the LH2 droplets-gas two-phase flow characteristics are found to be controlled by the turbulence perturbation upstream of the pinhole nozzle, hydrodynamic instabilities at the gas-liquid interface and shear stress between the liquid core and the periphery of the LH2 jet. Furthermore, calculation of the effect of cryogenic atomization on the jet thermal field shows that such atomization extensively enhances the thermal diffusion surrounding the LH2 jet flow.

  5. CATALYTIC INTERACTIONS OF RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM, AND MERCURY DURING SIMULATED DWPF CPC PROCESSING WITH HYDROGEN GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D

    2008-10-09

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels were performed as part of the ongoing investigation into catalytic hydrogen generation. Rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury have been identified as the principal elemental factors affecting the peak hydrogen generation rate in the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) for a given acid addition. The primary goal of this study is to identify any significant interactions between the three factors. Noble metal concentrations were similar to recent sludge batches. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%. An experimental matrix was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), two duplicate midpoint runs, and two additional replicate runs to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing can identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. Six Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed to supplement the SME hydrogen generation database. Some of the preliminary findings from this study include: (1) Rh was linked to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the first two hours after acid addition in preliminary statistical modeling. (2) Ru was linked conclusively to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the last four hours of reflux in preliminary statistical modeling. (3) Increasing the ratio of Hg/Rh shifted the noble metal controlling the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate from

  6. Hydrogen and electricity production from a food processing wastewater using fermentation and microbial fuel cell technologies.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang Eun; Logan, Bruce E

    2005-11-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from fermentation of sugars in wastewaters, but much of the organic matter remains in solution. We demonstrate here that hydrogen production from a food processing wastewater high in sugar can be linked to electricity generation using a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to achieve more effective wastewater treatment. Grab samples were taken from: plant effluent at two different times during the day (Effluents 1 and 2; 735+/-15 and 3250+/-90 mg-COD/L), an equalization tank (Lagoon; 1670+/-50mg-COD/L), and waste stream containing a high concentration of organic matter (Cereal; 8920+/-150 mg-COD/L). Hydrogen production from the Lagoon and effluent samples was low, with 64+/-16 mL of hydrogen per liter of wastewater (mL/L) for Effluent 1, 21+/-18 mL/L for Effluent 2, and 16+/-2 mL/L for the Lagoon sample. There was substantially greater hydrogen production using the Cereal wastewater (210+/-56 mL/L). Assuming a theoretical maximum yield of 4 mol of hydrogen per mol of glucose, hydrogen yields were 0.61-0.79 mol/mol for the Cereal wastewater, and ranged from 1 to 2.52 mol/mol for the other samples. This suggests a strategy for hydrogen recovery from wastewater based on targeting high-COD and high-sugar wastewaters, recognizing that sugar content alone is an insufficient predictor of hydrogen yields. Preliminary tests with the Cereal wastewater (diluted to 595 mg-COD/L) in a two-chambered MFC demonstrated a maximum of 81+/-7 mW/m(2) (normalized to the anode surface area), or 25+/-2 mA per liter of wastewater, and a final COD of <30 mg/L (95% removal). Using a one-chambered MFC and pre-fermented wastewater, the maximum power density was 371+/-10 mW/m(2) (53.5+/-1.4 mA per liter of wastewater). These results suggest that it is feasible to link biological hydrogen production and electricity producing using MFCs in order to achieve both wastewater treatment and bioenergy production.

  7. Assuring process safety in the transfer of hydrogen cyanide manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Gary R; Edwards, Victor H; Robertson, Mark; Shah, Kamal

    2007-04-11

    This paper outlines the critical issues to be addressed in the transfer of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) manufacturing technology to a licensee. Process safety management (PSM) is of critical importance because of the toxicity, flammability and reactivity of HCN. The critical issues are based on experience that DuPont has gained (1) while safely manufacturing hydrogen cyanide for over 50 years, and (2) while DuPont has safely licensed HCN technology to other firms at locations around the world. DuPont's HCN experience has been combined with Aker Kvaerner's project engineering experience to insure the safe transfer of HCN technology to a licensee.

  8. Domination of thermodynamically demanding oxidative processes in reaction of iodine with hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevanović, Kristina Z.; Bubanja, Itana Nuša M.; Stanisavljev, Dragomir R.

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the degree of isothermal iodine conversion to iodate as one of the most intriguing steps of the Bray-Liebhafsky oscillator. The amount of the produced iodate, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, was determined by the stopped-flow titration with iodide ions. From five different experiments, high degree of iodine conversion to iodate (95.4 ± 0.6)% is obtained. It confirmed that, after the induction period of spontaneous hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition, reaction dynamics is dominated by thermodynamically demanding oxidative processes. Isothermal change of the reaction dynamics introduces some specific energy redistribution as a possible initiator of oxidizing radicals.

  9. Scattering, Adsorption, and Langmuir-Hinshelwood Desorption Models for Physisorptive and Chemisorptive Gas-Surface Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Michelsen, D. J. Auerbach, and C. B. Mullins. “Dynamics of recombinative desorption: Angular distributions of H2, HD , and D2 desorbing from Cu(111),” J...desorption of hydrogen from polycrystalline copper catalysts ,” Catal. Lett., 59: 143–149 (June 1999). 167. Vach, H. and M. Châtelet. “Classical versus

  10. Application of hydrogen injection and oxidation to low temperature solution-processed oxide semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Masashi; Nakata, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Fujisaki, Yoshihide; Yamamoto, Toshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Solution-processed oxide semiconductors are promising candidates for the low cost, large scale fabrication of oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs). In this work, a method using hydrogen injection and oxidation (HIO) that allows the low temperature solution processing of oxide semiconductors was demonstrated. We found that this method significantly decreases the concentration of residual species while improving the film densification. Additionally, enhanced TFT performance was confirmed following the use of processing temperatures as low as 300 °C. The proposed process is potentially applicable to the fabrication of a wide variety of solution-processed oxide semiconductors.

  11. Ionic Adsorption and Desorption of CNT Nanoropes

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jun-Jun; Yang, Qing-Sheng; Yan, Xiao-Hui; He, Xiao-Qiao; Liew, Kim-Meow

    2016-01-01

    A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method based on classical electrostatic theory. The electrostatic interactions among charged carbon atoms are calculated by using the Coulomb law. It was found here that the charged nanorope can adsorb heavy metal ions, and the adsorption and desorption can be realized by controlling the strength of applied electric field. The distance between the ions and the nanorope as well as the amount of ions have an effect on the adsorption capacity of the nanorope. The desorption process takes less time than that of adsorption. The study indicates that the CNT nanorope can be used as a core element of devices for sewage treatment. PMID:28335306

  12. Ionic Adsorption and Desorption of CNT Nanoropes.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jun-Jun; Yang, Qing-Sheng; Yan, Xiao-Hui; He, Xiao-Qiao; Liew, Kim-Meow

    2016-09-28

    A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method based on classical electrostatic theory. The electrostatic interactions among charged carbon atoms are calculated by using the Coulomb law. It was found here that the charged nanorope can adsorb heavy metal ions, and the adsorption and desorption can be realized by controlling the strength of applied electric field. The distance between the ions and the nanorope as well as the amount of ions have an effect on the adsorption capacity of the nanorope. The desorption process takes less time than that of adsorption. The study indicates that the CNT nanorope can be used as a core element of devices for sewage treatment.

  13. Temperature of hydrogen radio frequency plasma under dechlorination process of polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Y. Abe, K.; Kumada, A.; Hidaka, K.; Amano, K.; Itoh, K.; Oono, T.

    2014-10-27

    It has been reported that RF (radio frequency) hydrogen plasmas promote the dechlorination process of PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) under irradiation of MW (microwave). A relative emission intensity spectroscope system was used for single-shot imaging of two-dimensional temperature distributions of RF hydrogen plasmas generated in chemical solutions with several mixing ratios of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and insulation oil under MW irradiation. Our experimental results showed that the plasma generation frequencies for the oil-contaminating solutions were higher than that for the pure IPA solution. In addition, the plasma temperature in the compound liquids including both oil and IPA was higher than that in the pure IPA and oil solutions. A combination of the plasma temperature measurements and plasma composition analysis indicated that the hydrogen radicals generated in a chemical solution containing the equal volumes of IPA and oil were almost the same amounts of H and H{sup +}, while those produced in the other solutions were mainly H.

  14. Perlite as a potential support for nickel catalyst in the process of sunflower oil hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radonjić, V.; Krstić, J.; Lončarević, D.; Jovanović, D.; Vukelić, N.; Stanković, M.; Nikolova, D.; Gabrovska, M.

    2015-12-01

    Investigation was conducted in order to elucidate the possibility of using perlite as support for preparation of nickel based precursor catalyst, potentially applicable in vegetable oil hydrogenation process. On three differently prepared expanded perlite, nickel catalyst precursors with identical Ni/SiO2 = 1.1 and Ni/Mg = 10/1 ratios were synthesized by precipitation-deposition method. Different techniques, SEM micrography, He-pycnometry, calcimetry, Hg-porosimetry, N2-physisorption, H2-chemisorption and temperature programmed reduction, were used for characterization of obtained samples. Determining the precursor texture, morphology and reducibility shows a successfully deposited nickel phase on perlite support with promising properties for vegetable oil hydrogenation. Chosen precursor was reduced and passivated in paraffin oil and the obtained catalyst showed significant catalytic activity in the test of sunflower oil hydrogenation.

  15. Temperature of hydrogen radio frequency plasma under dechlorination process of polychlorinated biphenyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Y.; Abe, K.; Kumada, A.; Hidaka, K.; Amano, K.; Itoh, K.; Oono, T.

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that RF (radio frequency) hydrogen plasmas promote the dechlorination process of PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) under irradiation of MW (microwave). A relative emission intensity spectroscope system was used for single-shot imaging of two-dimensional temperature distributions of RF hydrogen plasmas generated in chemical solutions with several mixing ratios of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and insulation oil under MW irradiation. Our experimental results showed that the plasma generation frequencies for the oil-contaminating solutions were higher than that for the pure IPA solution. In addition, the plasma temperature in the compound liquids including both oil and IPA was higher than that in the pure IPA and oil solutions. A combination of the plasma temperature measurements and plasma composition analysis indicated that the hydrogen radicals generated in a chemical solution containing the equal volumes of IPA and oil were almost the same amounts of H and H+, while those produced in the other solutions were mainly H.

  16. Processing fly ash stabilized hydrogen titanate nano-sheets for industrial dye-removal application.

    PubMed

    Hareesh, P; Babitha, K B; Shukla, S

    2012-08-30

    We report a new method for the processing of fly ash (FA) stabilized hydrogen titanate nano-sheets in the form of aggregated microspheres. The industrial silica-based FA has been utilized for this purpose which has been surface-modified by coating with the anatase-titania (TiO(2)) via sol-gel. The anatase-TiO(2) coated FA particles are subjected to the hydrothermal treatment in an autoclave under high temperature and pressure conditions in a highly alkaline solution. The hydrothermal conditions cause dissolution of silica resulting in the disintegration of other constituents of FA which are adsorbed in ionic and/or oxidized form on the surface of intermediate product of the hydrothermal treatment of anatase-TiO(2), specifically the hydrogen titanate. The adsorption of FA constituents has resulted in the stabilization of hydrogen titanate in the nano-sheet morphology instead of nanotubes. The FA stabilized hydrogen titanate nano-sheets exhibit higher specific surface-area than that of the hydrogen titanate nanotubes and have been successfully utilized for the removal of an organic synthetic-dye from an aqueous solution via surface-adsorption, involving the electrostatic-attraction and ion-exchange mechanisms operating, in the dark-condition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of plasma arc welding process to combat hydrogen metallic disbonding of austenitic stainless steel claddings

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, O.A. ); Steklov, O.I.; Alexeev, A.V. )

    1993-11-01

    A separation type crack, metallic disbonding, occurred between austenitic stainless steel weld metal cladding and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo base metal in the hydrodesulfurizing reactor of an oil refining plant. For stainless steel cladding, the submerged arc welding (SAW) process with a strip electrode is usually applied, but the authors experimented with the plasma arc welding (PAW) process with hot wire electrode for the cladding. The metallic disbonding is considered to be attributed to hydrogen accumulation at the transition zone and has been generally studied on a laboratory scale using an autoclave. The authors used a electrolytic hydrogen charging technique for the sake of experimental simplicity and made a comparison with the results for gaseous hydrogen charging. The main conclusions obtained were follows: The PAW stainless steel weld metal cladding is more resistant to metallic disbonding with the PAW process is explained by the desirable microstructure and properties of the first layer of weld metal at the transition zone. Electrolytic hydrogen charging pretty well reproduces the results of autoclave gas phase charging.

  18. Continuous-flow processes for the catalytic partial hydrogenation reaction of alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Marrodan, Carmen; Liguori, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    The catalytic partial hydrogenation of substituted alkynes to alkenes is a process of high importance in the manufacture of several market chemicals. The present paper shortly reviews the heterogeneous catalytic systems engineered for this reaction under continuous flow and in the liquid phase. The main contributions appeared in the literature from 1997 up to August 2016 are discussed in terms of reactor design. A comparison with batch and industrial processes is provided whenever possible. PMID:28503209

  19. CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-04-28

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface.

  20. Desorption of intrinsic cesium from smectite: inhibitive effects of clay particle organization on cesium desorption.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Sakai, Haruka; Itono, Taeko; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji

    2014-09-16

    Fine clay particles have functioned as transport media for radiocesium in terrestrial environments after nuclear accidents. Because radiocesium is expected to be retained in clay minerals by a cation-exchange reaction, ascertaining trace cesium desorption behavior in response to changing solution conditions is crucially important. This study systematically investigated the desorption behavior of intrinsic Cs (13 nmol/g) in well-characterized Na-montmorillonite in electrolyte solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) under widely differing cation concentrations (0.2 mM to 0.2 M). Batch desorption experiments demonstrated that Cs(+) desorption was inhibited significantly in the presence of the environmental relevant concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (>0.5 mM) and high concentrations of K(+). The order of ability for Cs desorption was Na(+) = K(+) > Ca(2+) = Mg(2+) at the highest cation concentration (0.2 M), which is opposite to the theoretical prediction based on the cation-exchange selectivity. Laser diffraction grain-size analyses revealed that the inhibition of Cs(+) desorption coincided with the increase of the clay tactoid size. Results suggest that radiocesium in the dispersed fine clay particles adheres on the solid phase when the organization of swelling clay particles occurs because of changes in solution conditions caused by both natural processes and artificial treatments.

  1. An exergetic/energetic/economic analysis of three hydrogen production processes - Electrolysis, hybrid, and thermochemical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, J. E.; Eisermann, W.

    This paper presents the results of a combined first and second law analysis, along with capital and operating costs, for hydrogen production from water by means of electrolytic, hybrid, and thermochemical processes. The processes are SPE and Lurgi electrolysis with light water reactor power generation and sulfur cycle hybrid, thermochemical and SPE electrolysis with a very high temperature reactor primary energy source. Energy and Exergy (2nd law) flow diagrams for the process are shown along with the location and magnitude of the process irreversibilities. The overall process thermal (1st law) efficiencies vary from 25 to 51% and the exergetic (2nd law) efficiencies, referred to the fuel for the primary energy source, vary from 22 to 45%. Capital and operating costs, escalated to 1979 dollars, are shown for each process for both the primary energy source and the hydrogen production plant. All costs were taken from information available in the open literature and are for a plant capacity of 100 x 10 to the 6th SCF/day. Production costs vary from 10 to 18 $/GJ, based on the higher heating value of hydrogen, and are based on a 90% plant operating factor with a 21% annual charge on total capital costs.

  2. Use of once-through treat gas to remove the heat of reaction in solvent hydrogenation processes

    DOEpatents

    Nizamoff, Alan J.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process wherein feed coal is contacted with molecular hydrogen and a hydrogen-donor solvent in a liquefaction zone to form coal liquids and vapors and coal liquids in the solvent boiling range are thereafter hydrogenated to produce recycle solvent and liquid products, the improvement which comprises separating the effluent from the liquefaction zone into a hot vapor stream and a liquid stream; cooling the entire hot vapor stream sufficiently to condense vaporized liquid hydrocarbons; separating condensed liquid hydrocarbons from the cooled vapor; fractionating the liquid stream to produce coal liquids in the solvent boiling range; dividing the cooled vapor into at least two streams; passing the cooling vapors from one of the streams, the coal liquids in the solvent boiling range, and makeup hydrogen to a solvent hydrogenation zone, catalytically hydrogenating the coal liquids in the solvent boiling range and quenching the hydrogenation zone with cooled vapors from the other cooled vapor stream.

  3. Process for the production of 1:4 butanediol from maleic anhydride via ester hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Towers, R.G.; Harris, N.; McKee, D.

    1986-01-01

    A process has been developed for the production of 1:4 butanediol (1:4 BDO from maleic anhydride (MA). The three process steps are:- a) Esterifiction of MA to produce a dialkyl maleate ester based on a modification of commercially proven esterification technology; b) Hydrogenation of the ester, at moderate temperatures and pressures, to 1:4 BD using novel low pressure ester hydrogenation technology. Gamma-Butyrolactone (gamma-BL) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) are produced as co-products. The 1:4 BD/Gamma-BL product ratio can be adjusted to respond to market requirements by recycle of the less desirable product, and THF productivity controlled over wide limits by variation of process parameters; c) Product separation by distillation.

  4. Reaction engineering for materials processing in space: Reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shadman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is a consumable material which needs to be produced continuously in most space missions. Its use for propulsion as well as life support makes oxygen one of the largest volume chemicals to be produced in space. Production of oxygen from lunar materials is of particular interest and is very attractive possibility. The kinetics and mechanism of reduction of ilmenite by carbon monoxide and hydrogen at 800 to 1100 C were investigated. The temporal profiles of conversion for carbon monoxide have a sigmoidal shape and indicate the presence of three different stages (induction, acceleration, and deceleration) during the reduction reaction. The apparent activation energy decreases from 18 kcal/mole at 10 percent conversion to 10 kcal/mole at 50 percent conversion. The reaction is first order with respect to carbon monoxide under the experimental conditions studied. Both SEM and EDX analysis show that the diffusion of Fe product away from the reaction front and through the TiO2 phase, followed by the nucleation and growth of a separate Fe phase are important steps affecting the process kinetics. The results from hydrogen reduction show that the mechanism of ilmenite reduction by hydrogen is similar to that by carbon monoxide. However, the titanium dioxide can be further reduced by hydrogen at 800 to 1000 C. The detailed comparison and theoretical modeling of both reduction processes is presented.

  5. Reaction engineering for materials processing in space: Reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shadman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is a consumable material which needs to be produced continuously in most space missions. Its use for propulsion as well as life support makes oxygen one of the largest volume chemicals to be produced in space. Production of oxygen from lunar materials is of particular interest and is very attractive possibility. The kinetics and mechanism of reduction of ilmenite by carbon monoxide and hydrogen at 800 to 1100 C were investigated. The temporal profiles of conversion for carbon monoxide have a sigmoidal shape and indicate the presence of three different stages (induction, acceleration, and deceleration) during the reduction reaction. The apparent activation energy decreases from 18 kcal/mole at 10 percent conversion to 10 kcal/mole at 50 percent conversion. The reaction is first order with respect to carbon monoxide under the experimental conditions studied. Both SEM and EDX analysis show that the diffusion of Fe product away from the reaction front and through the TiO2 phase, followed by the nucleation and growth of a separate Fe phase are important steps affecting the process kinetics. The results from hydrogen reduction show that the mechanism of ilmenite reduction by hydrogen is similar to that by carbon monoxide. However, the titanium dioxide can be further reduced by hydrogen at 800 to 1000 C. The detailed comparison and theoretical modeling of both reduction processes is presented.

  6. RECENT ADVANCES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.

    2010-07-22

    Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process, which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. In the HyS Process, sulfur dioxide is oxidized in the presence of water at the electrolyzer anode to produce sulfuric acid and protons. The protons are transported through a cation-exchange membrane electrolyte to the cathode and are reduced to form hydrogen. In the second stage of the process, the sulfuric acid by-product from the electrolyzer is thermally decomposed at high temperature to produce sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The two gases are separated and the sulfur dioxide recycled to the electrolyzer for oxidation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been exploring a fuel-cell design concept for the SDE using an anolyte feed comprised of concentrated sulfuric acid saturated with sulfur dioxide. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency and small footprint compared to a parallel-plate electrolyzer design. This paper will provide a summary of recent advances in the development of the SDE for the HyS process.

  7. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 2: Microscopic hydrogen cracking processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    Based on a fractographic analysis of fatigue crack propagation (FCP) in Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 stressed in a variety of inert and embrittling environments, microscopic crack paths are identified and correlated with intrinsic da/dN-delta K kinetics. FCP rates in 2090 are accelerated by hydrogen producing environments (pure water vapor, moist air, and aqueous NaCl), as defined in Part 1. For these cases, subgrain boundary fatigue cracking (SGC) dominates for delta K values where the crack tip process zone, a significant fraction of the cyclic plastic zone, is sufficiently large to envelop 5 micron subgrains in the unrecrystallized microstructure. SGC may be due to strong hydrogen trapping at T1 precipitates concentrated at sub-boundaries. At low delta K, the plastic zone diameter is smaller than the subgrain size and FCP progresses along (100) planes due to either local lattice decohesion or aluminum-lithium hydride cracking. For inert environments (vacuum, helium, and oxygen), or at high delta K where the hydrogen effect on da/dN is small, FCP is along (111) slip planes; this mode does not transition with increasing delta K and plastic zone size. The SGC and (100) crystallographic cracking modes, and the governing influence of the crack tip process zone volume (delta K), support hydrogen embrittlement rather than a surface film rupture and anodic dissolution mechanism for environmental FCP. Multi-sloped log da/dN-log delta K behavior is produced by changes in process zone hydrogen-microstructure interactions, and not by purely micromechanical-microstructure interactions, in contradiction to microstructural distance-based fatigue models.

  8. A survey of processes for producing hydrogen fuel from different sources for automotive-propulsion fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F.

    1996-03-01

    Seven common fuels are compared for their utility as hydrogen sources for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells used in automotive propulsion. Methanol, natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, ethanol, and hydrogen are the fuels considered. Except for the steam reforming of methanol and using pure hydrogen, all processes for generating hydrogen from these fuels require temperatures over 1000 K at some point. With the same two exceptions, all processes require water-gas shift reactors of significant size. All processes require low-sulfur or zero-sulfur fuels, and this may add cost to some of them. Fuels produced by steam reforming contain {approximately}70-80% hydrogen, those by partial oxidation {approximately}35-45%. The lower percentages may adversely affect cell performance. Theoretical input energies do not differ markedly among the various processes for generating hydrogen from organic-chemical fuels. Pure hydrogen has severe distribution and storage problems. As a result, the steam reforming of methanol is the leading candidate process for on-board generation of hydrogen for automotive propulsion. If methanol unavailability or a high price demands an alternative process, steam reforming appears preferable to partial oxidation for this purpose.

  9. Enhanced coproduction of hydrogen and methane from cornstalks by a three-stage anaerobic fermentation process integrated with alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi-Yu; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A three-stage anaerobic fermentation process including H(2) fermentation I, H(2) fermentation II, methane fermentation was developed for the coproduction of hydrogen and methane from cornstalks. Hydrogen production from cornstalks using direct microbial conversion by Clostridium thermocellum 7072 was markedly enhanced in the two-stage thermophilic hydrogen fermentation process integrated with alkaline treatment. The highest total hydrogen yield from cornstalks in the two-stage fermentation process reached 74.4 mL/g-cornstalk. The hydrogen fermentation effluents and alkaline hydrolyzate were further used for methane fermentation by anaerobic granular sludge, and the total methane yield reached 205.8 mL/g-cornstalk. The total energy recovery in the three-stage anaerobic fermentation process integrated with alkaline hydrolysis reached 70.0%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Low Hydrogen Embrittlement (LHE) Zinc-Nickel (Zn-Ni) Qualification Test Result and Process Parameters Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-09

    Low Hydrogen Embrittlement (LHE) Zinc-Nickel (Zn-Ni) Qualification Test Result and Process Parameters Development Dave Frederick, USAF Craig...Option 1: Develop an accelerated hydrogen embrittlement test procedure : Prototype Tank Implementation www.ES3inc.com ● 1669 E. 1400 S ● Clearfield...801) 926-1150 ● fax (801) 926-1155 8 LHE Zn-Ni Hydrogen Embrittlement Testing • Coupons manufactured per ASTM F519

  11. Light-induced hydrogen evolution from hydrogenated amorphous silicon: Hydrogen diffusion by formation of bond centered hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, H.; Arai, H.; Mizubayashi, H.; Yamanaka, M.; Sakata, I.

    2014-02-01

    The light-induced hydrogen evolution (LIHE) from amorphous (a-) Si:H by the order of at. % is observed during white light soaking (WLS) of 100-400 mW/cm2 at 350-500 K or ultra violet light soaking (UVLS) of 30-120 mW/cm2 at 305-320 K in a vacuum. The thermal desorption spectroscopy indicates that LIHE originated from bonded hydrogen takes place through the diffusion of light-induced mobile hydrogen (LIMH) with the activation energy of 0.5 eV. LIMH is assigned to bond centered hydrogen and the hydrogen diffusion process becomes prominent when LIMH can leave from a-Si:H such under light soaking in a vacuum above room temperature. For H2 in microvoids, the hydrogen evolution rate is governed by the surface barrier and its activation energy of 1.0 eV in dark decreases to 0.4 eV under WLS or UVLS.

  12. Repeatable Hydrogen Storage using Nano-structured Graphite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiura, Hisashi; Kadono, Koji; Tsutsui, Shigemitsu; Murakami, Yousuke

    2004-03-01

    Repeatable hydrogen adsorption and desorption with nano-structured graphite material (NSG) was confirmed using a high-accuracy volumetric measuring apparatus at room temperature [1]. The NSG was prepared from commercially obtained graphite powder with a purity of 99.997% (GoodFellow Cambridge Ltd.) using a mechanical milling process at a pressure of 2.0 x 10-4 Pa. The untreated graphite adsorbed 0.02wt% of hydrogen, while 0.20 - 0.25wt% of hydrogen can be repeatedly adsorbed by the NSG. Measurements of the hydrogen adsorption rate at constant pressure and pore-size distribution suggest that the hydrogen molecules are adsorbed through a diffusion process into pores with a diameter less than 1 nm. [1] H.Kajiura et al., APL82(2003)1929.

  13. Quantitative determination of hydrogen in solids by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Addach, H; Berçot, P; Wery, M; Rezrazi, M

    2004-11-19

    Processes such as electroplating or acid cleaning are notorious causes of post-processing failure through hydrogen embrittlement. So, the determination of amounts of hydrogen in metals is of great importance. An analysis method for investigation of H content in solids has been established based on hot extraction and gas chromatography system. Hot extraction in inert gas enables complete and/or partial removal of the hydrogen from the samples. A gas chromatography system is used to determine quantitatively the amount of thermally desorbed hydrogen. An investigation of the baking operating conditions is made of the hydrogen desorption rate of zinc-plated steel parts. Then, an analysis of the polarisation conditions upon chromium electroplating is given.

  14. Hydrogen effusion from tritiated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kherani, N. P.; Liu, B.; Virk, K.; Kosteski, T.; Gaspari, F.; Shmayda, W. T.; Zukotynski, S.; Chen, K. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the effusion and outgassing of tritium from tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) films are presented. The samples were grown by dc-saddle field glow discharge at various substrate temperatures between 150 and 300°C. The tracer property of radioactive tritium is used to detect tritium release. Tritium effusion measurements are performed in a nonvacuum ion chamber and are found to yield similar results as reported for standard high vacuum technique. The results suggest for decreasing substrate temperature the growth of material with an increasing concentration of voids. These data are corroborated by analysis of infrared absorption data in terms of microstructure parameters. For material of low substrate temperature (and high void concentration) tritium outgassing in air at room temperature was studied, and it was found that after 600h about 0.2% of the total hydrogen (hydrogen+tritium) content is released. Two rate limiting processes are identified. The first process, fast tritium outgassing with a time constant of 15h, seems to be related to surface desorption of tritiated water (HTO) with a free energy of desorption of 1.04eV. The second process, slow tritium outgassing with a time constant of 200-300h, appears to be limited by oxygen diffusivity in a growing oxide layer. This material of lowest H stability would lose half of the hydrogen after 60years.

  15. Techno-economic analysis of a two-step biological process producing hydrogen and methane.

    PubMed

    Ljunggren, Mattias; Zacchi, Guido

    2010-10-01

    Biological hydrogen production using dark fermentation has been proposed as an alternative and renewable way of producing hydrogen from biomass. However, theoretically, the conversion of biomass to biohydrogen using dark fermentation only utilizes one third of the energy content of the sugars derived from starch or cellulose; the rest being in the form of organic acids also produced by the microorganisms. To provide a viable alternative, the energy contained in the organic acids produced in dark fermentation must also be utilized. This can be done in several ways, one of which is to produce methane in an anaerobic digestion step. The technical and economical feasibility of this two-step biological process is investigated in the present study employing three base cases reflecting the different strategies that can be used when performing dark fermentation: high productivity, high yield, and low productivity-low yield. The glucose concentrations, hydrogen productivities and yields studied herein ranges from 4-20 g/L, 7.25-45.75 mmol H₂/(lh) and 1.37-3.48 mmol H₂/mole glucose, respectively. The production of pure methane was included as a reference case to investigate how the production of hydrogen affects the production cost. The cost estimates ranged from 50 to 340 €/GJ for the three base cases and the reference case for the process alternatives investigated. The results show that the capital costs and the nutrients used in the two biological steps are the main contributors to the cost in all base cases and the reference case. Furthermore, increasing the substrate concentration and, surprisingly, decreasing the hydrogen yield, reduces the production cost.

  16. Process for forming a nickel foil with controlled and predetermined permeability to hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Engelhaupt, Darell E.

    1981-09-22

    The present invention provides a novel process for forming a nickel foil having a controlled and predetermined hydrogen permeability. This process includes the steps of passing a nickel plating bath through a suitable cation exchange resin to provide a purified nickel plating bath free of copper and gold cations, immersing a nickel anode and a suitable cathode in the purified nickel plating bath containing a selected concentration of an organic sulfonic acid such as a napthalene-trisulfonic acid, electrodepositing a nickel layer having the thickness of a foil onto the cathode, and separating the nickel layer from the cathode to provide a nickel foil. The anode is a readily-corrodible nickel anode. The present invention also provides a novel nickel foil having a greater hydrogen permeability than palladium at room temperature.

  17. The role of ultrasound in hydrogen removal and microstructure refinement by ultrasonic argon degassing process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xue, Jilai; Le, Qichi

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the role of ultrasound in hydrogen removal and microstructure refinement by the ultrasonic argon degassing has been fully investigated by the experimental work in water and AZ91-0.4Ca magnesium melt, respectively. Ultrasound is able to break up argon gas into numbers of small bubbles and drive them diving deeply to the bottom of water, which are responsible for the efficient degassing regime of ultrasonic argon process. The argon flowrate plays a dominant role in promoting hydrogen removal effect. Meanwhile, the increasing argon flowrate can suppress the microstructure refinement, due to the subdued ultrasonic cavitation under a large argon flowrate. Mechanical properties of AZ91-0.4Ca alloy can be much promoted by the ultrasonic argon degassing process. Ultrasound is the key to achieve not only efficient degassing regime, but also microstructure refinement as well as mechanical properties promotion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Analysis of the HBr-based hydrogen production process as being developed by the SRT Group, Inc. Process study

    SciTech Connect

    DiPietro, J.P.; Skolnik, E.G.

    1997-10-01

    The SRT Group is developing a process that produces hydrogen from the electrolysis of hydrobromic acid. Compared to conventional water electrolysis, HBr electrolysis requires about 25% less electricity per unit of hydrogen produced. The capital and O and M costs are higher though, because of equipment that is required to regenerate HBr from the bromine formed in the electrolyzer (as a comparison a water electrolyzer discards the oxygen product and imports new water feedstock). Exhibit 1 presents summary statistics for the HBr and water electrolysis systems. All else equal, the HBr electrolysis process will be favorable to water electrolysis in situations where electricity is more expensive. A cost model is developed for water and HBr electrolysis systems. It indicates that HBr electrolysis is favored when the average cost of electricity exceeds 5.9 cents/kWh, at which price the cost of hydrogen 2.8 $/kg (20 $/MMBtu). In most cases steam methane reforming would be preferred if electricity costs are higher than 4 cents/kWh, indicating little commercial viability for HBr electrolysis. In 1996, SRT Group proposed a revised concept that addressed the issues associated with the solar-based process. Their idea is to add methane to the reactor with the bromine and water. The methane scavenges the oxygen produced in reaction (1) thus driving a higher conversion of bromine to HBr. Also, the reaction of methane and oxygen provides needed heat. The SRT Group has tested this concept in the laboratory and has demonstrated hydrogen production. The purpose of this analysis is to assess the economic potential of SRT Group`s innovation.

  19. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schwartz

    2003-07-01

    ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of

  20. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schwartz

    2003-10-01

    ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of

  1. Hydrogen as the solar energy translator. [in photochemical and photovoltaic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Many concepts are being investigated to convert sunlight to workable energy forms with emphasis on electricity and thermal energy. The electrical alternatives include direct conversion of photons to electricity via photovoltaic solar cells and solar/thermal production of electricity via heat-energy cycles. Solar cells, when commercialized, are expected to have efficiencies of about 12 to 14 percent. The cells would be active about eight hours per day. However, solar-operated water-splitting process research, initiated through JPL, shows promise for direct production of hydrogen from sunlight with efficiencies of up to 35 to 40 percent. The hydrogen, a valuable commodity in itself, can also serve as a storable energy form, easily and efficiently converted to electricity by fuel cells and other advanced-technology devices on a 24-hour basis or on demand with an overall efficiency of 25 to 30 percent. Thus, hydrogen serves as the fundamental translator of energy from its solar form to electrical form more effectively, and possibly more efficiently, than direct conversion. Hydrogen also can produce other chemical energy forms using solar energy.

  2. An integrated MEMS infrastructure for fuel processing: hydrogen generation and separation for portable power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varady, M. J.; McLeod, L.; Meacham, J. M.; Degertekin, F. L.; Fedorov, A. G.

    2007-09-01

    Portable fuel cells are an enabling technology for high efficiency and ultra-high density distributed power generation, which is essential for many terrestrial and aerospace applications. A key element of fuel cell power sources is the fuel processor, which should have the capability to efficiently reform liquid fuels and produce high purity hydrogen that is consumed by the fuel cells. To this end, we are reporting on the development of two novel MEMS hydrogen generators with improved functionality achieved through an innovative process organization and system integration approach that exploits the advantages of transport and catalysis on the micro/nano scale. One fuel processor design utilizes transient, reverse-flow operation of an autothermal MEMS microreactor with an intimately integrated, micromachined ultrasonic fuel atomizer and a Pd/Ag membrane for in situ hydrogen separation from the product stream. The other design features a simpler, more compact planar structure with the atomized fuel ejected directly onto the catalyst layer, which is coupled to an integrated hydrogen selective membrane.

  3. Facile Synthesis of Nb3Sn Via a Hydrogen Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Jiao, Shuqiang; Zhang, Long; Li, Yanxiang; Zhu, Hongmin

    2017-02-01

    A controllable and facile process for the preparation of Nb3Sn intermetallic compound nanopowders using NbCl5 and SnCl2 vapors reduced by hydrogen has been developed. The vaporizing rates of the two chlorides are controlled by measuring their mass loss as a function of carrier gas (argon) flow rate at certain vaporization temperatures, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicate that hydrogenous Nb3Sn products are obtained under the vaporizing rate of 0.155 g min-1 for NbCl5 and 0.036 g min-1 for SnCl2 with the hydrogen flow rate of 2100 ml min-1 at 1273 K (1000 °C). Results of semi-quantitative analysis by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) demonstrate that the atomic ratio of Nb to Sn in the as-synthesized products is 3.48:1, and the content of (Nb + Sn) is taken up to 89.61 wt pct from the total weight of the products. The products can be purified by vacuum heat treatment. Images of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show that the products are homogenous particles with a mean diameter of 31 nm. In addition, the reaction ratio of the chlorides and the powder yield are controllable by hydrogen flow rate.

  4. Catalytic process for control of NO.sub.x emissions using hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2010-05-18

    A selective catalytic reduction process with a palladium catalyst for reducing NOx in a gas, using hydrogen as a reducing agent. A zirconium sulfate (ZrO.sub.2)SO.sub.4 catalyst support material with about 0.01-2.0 wt. % Pd is applied to a catalytic bed positioned in a flow of exhaust gas at about 70-200.degree. C. The support material may be (ZrO.sub.2--SiO.sub.2)SO.sub.4. H.sub.2O and hydrogen may be injected into the exhaust gas upstream of the catalyst to a concentration of about 15-23 vol. % H.sub.2O and a molar ratio for H.sub.2/NO.sub.x in the range of 10-100. A hydrogen-containing fuel may be synthesized in an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle power plant for combustion in a gas turbine to produce the exhaust gas flow. A portion of the fuel may be diverted for the hydrogen injection.

  5. Hydrogen as the solar energy translator. [in photochemical and photovoltaic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Many concepts are being investigated to convert sunlight to workable energy forms with emphasis on electricity and thermal energy. The electrical alternatives include direct conversion of photons to electricity via photovoltaic solar cells and solar/thermal production of electricity via heat-energy cycles. Solar cells, when commercialized, are expected to have efficiencies of about 12 to 14 percent. The cells would be active about eight hours per day. However, solar-operated water-splitting process research, initiated through JPL, shows promise for direct production of hydrogen from sunlight with efficiencies of up to 35 to 40 percent. The hydrogen, a valuable commodity in itself, can also serve as a storable energy form, easily and efficiently converted to electricity by fuel cells and other advanced-technology devices on a 24-hour basis or on demand with an overall efficiency of 25 to 30 percent. Thus, hydrogen serves as the fundamental translator of energy from its solar form to electrical form more effectively, and possibly more efficiently, than direct conversion. Hydrogen also can produce other chemical energy forms using solar energy.

  6. An analysis of hydrogen production via closed-cycle schemes. [thermochemical processings from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, R. E.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis and state-of-the-art review of three basic schemes for production of hydrogen from water: electrolysis, thermal water-splitting, and multi-step thermochemical closed cycles is presented. Criteria for work-saving thermochemical closed-cycle processes are established, and several schemes are reviewed in light of such criteria. An economic analysis is also presented in the context of energy costs.

  7. An analysis of hydrogen production via closed-cycle schemes. [thermochemical processings from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, R. E.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis and state-of-the-art review of three basic schemes for production of hydrogen from water: electrolysis, thermal water-splitting, and multi-step thermochemical closed cycles is presented. Criteria for work-saving thermochemical closed-cycle processes are established, and several schemes are reviewed in light of such criteria. An economic analysis is also presented in the context of energy costs.

  8. PEPTIDE FORMATION MEDIATED BY HYDROGEN CYANIDE TETRAMER: A POSSIBLE PREBIOTIC PROCESS

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sherwood; Flores, Jose; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1969-01-01

    Chemical evolution on the primitive earth must have involved condensation of α-amino acids to peptides. Under aqueous conditions consistent with current conceptions of primordial waters, heating glycerine with the hydrogen cyanide tetramer, diaminomaleonitrile, yields dipeptide. If nitrogen was cycled through primordial waters as cyanide, peptide synthesis by stepwise tetramer-mediated condensation of α-amino acids would have been a plausible process. PMID:5264133

  9. VUV diagnostics of electron impact processes in low temperature molecular hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komppula, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-08-01

    Novel methods for diagnostics of molecular hydrogen plasma processes, such as ionization, production of high vibrational levels, dissociation of molecules via excitation to singlet and triplet states and production of metastable states, are presented for molecular hydrogen plasmas in corona equilibrium. The methods are based on comparison of rate coefficients of plasma processes and optical emission spectroscopy of lowest singlet and triplet transitions, i.e. Lyman band ({{B}1}Σ\\text{u}+\\to {{X}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) and molecular continuum ({{a}3}Σ\\text{g}+\\to {{b}3}Σ\\text{u}+ ), of the hydrogen molecule in the VUV wavelength range. Comparison of rate coefficients of spin-allowed and/or spin-forbidden excitations reduces the uncertainty caused by the non-equilibrium distributions of electron energy and molecular vibrational level, which are typically known poorly in plasma sources. The described methods are applied to estimate the rates of various plasma processes in a filament arc discharge.

  10. NEW MATERIAL NEEDS FOR HYDROCARBON FUEL PROCESSING: Generating Hydrogen for the PEM Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrauto, R.; Hwang, S.; Shore, L.; Ruettinger, W.; Lampert, J.; Giroux, T.; Liu, Y.; Ilinich, O.

    2003-08-01

    The hydrogen economy is fast approaching as petroleum reserves are rapidly consumed. The fuel cell promises to deliver clean and efficient power by combining hydrogen and oxygen in a simple electrochemical device that directly converts chemical energy to electrical energy. Hydrogen, the most plentiful element available, can be extracted from water by electrolysis. One can imagine capturing energy from the sun and wind and/or from the depths of the earth to provide the necessary power for electrolysis. Alternative energy sources such as these are the promise for the future, but for now they are not feasible for power needs across the globe. A transitional solution is required to convert certain hydrocarbon fuels to hydrogen. These fuels must be available through existing infrastructures such as the natural gas pipeline. The present review discusses the catalyst and adsorbent technologies under development for the extraction of hydrogen from natural gas to meet the requirements for the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The primary market is for residential applications, where pipeline natural gas will be the source of H2 used to power the home. Other applications including the reforming of methanol for portable power applications such as laptop computers, cellular phones, and personnel digital equipment are also discussed. Processing natural gas containing sulfur requires many materials, for example, adsorbents for desulfurization, and heterogeneous catalysts for reforming (either autothermal or steam reforming) water gas shift, preferential oxidation of CO, and anode tail gas combustion. All these technologies are discussed for natural gas and to a limited extent for reforming methanol.

  11. Advanced oxidation process using hydrogen peroxide/microwave system for solubilization of phosphate.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ping Huang; Wong, Wayne T; Lo, Kwang Victor

    2005-01-01

    An advanced oxidation process (AOP) combining hydrogen peroxide and microwave heating was used for the solubilization of phosphate from secondary municipal sludge from an enhanced biological phosphorus removal process. The microwave irradiation is used as a generator agent of oxidizing radicals as well as a heating source in the process. This AOP process could facilitate the release of a large amount of the sludge-bound phosphorus from the sewage sludge. More than 84% of the total phosphorous could be released at a microwave heating time of 5 min at 170 degrees C. This innovative process has the potential of being applied to simple sludge treatment processes in domestic wastewater treatment and to the recovery of phosphorus from the wastewater.

  12. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Adlhart, O. J.

    1985-04-23

    This disclosure relates to a replaceable cartridge hydrogen generator of the type which relies at least partially on the process of anodic corrosion to produce hydrogen. A drum contains a plurality of the cartridges.

  13. Process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein nitrogen is separated from hydrogen via ammonia synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Stetka, Steven S.; Nazario, Francisco N.

    1982-01-01

    In a process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein bottoms residues are upgraded with a process wherein air is employed, the improvement wherein nitrogen buildup in the system is avoided by ammonia synthesis. In a preferred embodiment hydrogen from other portions of the liquefaction process will be combined with hydrogen produced as a result of the bottoms upgrading to increase the H.sub.2 :N.sub.2 ratio in the ammonia reactor.

  14. Fast hydrogen sorption from MgH2-VO2(B) composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, Sanja; Kurko, Sandra; Pasquini, Luca; Matović, Ljiljana; Vujasin, Radojka; Novaković, Nikola; Novaković, Jasmina Grbović

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH2‒VO2(B) composites synthesised by mechanical milling have been studied. The microstructural properties of composites were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Particle size analysis (PSD), while sorption behaviour was followed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Sievert measurements. Results have shown that although desorption temperature reduction is moderate; there is a substantial improvement in hydrogen sorption kinetics. The complete desorption of pure MgH2 at elevated temperature takes place in more than 30 min while the composite fully desorbs in less than 2 min even at lower temperatures. It has been shown that the metastable γ-MgH2 phase and the point defects have a decisive role in desorption process only in the first sorption cycle, while the second and the subsequent sorption cycles are affected by microstructural and morphological characteristics of the composite.

  15. Experimental study on a new process of producing hydrogen in consumption of water and coal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.P.; Jia, C.X.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, C.F.; Huang, D.S.; Sun, Y.; Zhou, L.

    2008-05-15

    A new process of producing pure H{sub 2} in consumption of H{sub 2}O and carbon is presented. It contains three reactions: (1) Steam reacts with FeO at 800{sup o}C generating pure H{sub 2} and Fe3O{sub 4}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}; (2) Fe3O{sub 4}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} are reduced to FeO by CO at same temperature while CO changes to CO{sub 2}; (3) The produced CO{sub 2} reacts with carbon generating CO at 900{sup o}C. The net product of the process is H{sub 2} and CO. Theoretical energy gain of the new process is much higher than 1.0 and is energetically more than autarky. Some CO satisfies the process energy requirement and the surplus CO outputs as by-product. Experiments proved the feasibility of the process with indication of the importance to control the extent of reduction. The prominent advantages embedded allow the process applied in large-scale to trade coal for hydrogen. As such, instead of burning coal, hydrogen is burnt wherever energy is consumed.

  16. Lignin isolation process from rice husk by alkaline hydrogen peroxide: Lignin and silica extracted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma'ruf, Anwar; Pramudono, Bambang; Aryanti, Nita

    2017-03-01

    Biomass is one of abundance resources in the world. Biomass consists of three main materials such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin. Therefore, biomass can be referred to lignocellulosic material. Both the cellulose and hemicelluloses fractions are polymers of sugars, and thereby a potential source of fermentable sugars, or other processes that convert sugars into products. Lignin is a polymer compound which contains of phenolic compounds. Rice husk is one of biomass, which has high contain of lignin. Rice husk has special characteristics because of silica content. The aim of this paper is to analyze lignin and silica extracted during lignin isolation process of rice husk using alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Three main variables such as solvent/solid ratio, concentration of hydrogen peroxide and pH of the mixture are studied. The optimum conditions for lignin isolation are at solvent/solid ratio 9:1 ml/gr, hydrogen peroxide concentration of 1.5%v and pH of the mixture of 11.

  17. Influence of Nano Aluminium Powder Produced by Wire Explosion Process at Different Ambience on Hydrogen Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarathi, Ramanujam; Sankar, Binu; Chakravarthy, Satyanarayanan R.

    2010-07-01

    Nano-aluminium particles are produced through the wire explosion process in different gas medium. The particles produced by wire explosion process, in helium medium are of smaller size compared to argon/nitrogen medium. The nano aluminium powder on reaction with water forms oxides having bayerite and boehmite structure. It is observed that nano aluminium on reaction with KOH solution at room temperature it forms bayerite. The results of the study were confirmed through Wide Angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) studies. The reaction of nano aluminium powder with KOH solution/water indicates that the rate of hydrogen generation is high when nano aluminium powder reacts with KOH solution than with water. The rate of hydrogen generation gets reduced drastically when the nano aluminium powder which is exposed to air medium for some period is used for reaction with KOH/water. It is also observed that the rate of hydrogen generation is high with nano size aluminium particles compared with ultrafine particles.

  18. Plasma processing of ? in a hydrogen/oxygen radio-frequency discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcicová, H.; Perina, V.; Vacík, J.; Cervená, J.; Zemek, J.; Zelezný, V.; Arend, H.

    1998-05-01

    Monocrystalline 0022-3727/31/9/004/img10 was processed in a radio-frequency (27.12 MHz) discharge in hydrogen and subsequently in oxygen and the composition of the thus produced surface layers evaluated. The hydrogen plasma treatment caused a heavy blackening of the sample due to chemical reduction. At low 0022-3727/31/9/004/img11 pressures (0022-3727/31/9/004/img12 Torr) the niobate structure on the sample surface was completely destroyed; only niobium and its oxides remained on the surface. At higher pressures (0022-3727/31/9/004/img13 Torr) the niobate structure was preserved. Hydrogenation of the surface layer was found which persisted up to 5000022-3727/31/9/004/img14C. Subsequent treatment in an oxygen plasma under similar processing conditions brought about the restoration of the transparency of the sample. The following methods were used for the modified surface structure analysis: neutron depth profiling, Rutherford backscattering, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and VIS and IR spectrometry.

  19. Negative hydrogen ion yields at plasma grid surface in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2015-04-08

    Negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion yield from the plasma grid due to incident hydrogen ions and neutrals has been evaluated with the surface collision cascade model, ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) coupled to a negative surface ionization models. Dependence of negative ion fractions upon the velocity component normal to the surface largely affect the calculation results of the final energy and angular distributions of the H{sup −} ions. The influence is particularly large for H{sup −} ions desorbed from the surface due to less than several eV hydrogen particle implact. The present calculation predicts that H{sup −} ion yield can be maximized by setting the incident angle of hydrogen ions and neutrals to be 65 degree. The Cs thickness on the plasma grid should also affect the yields and mean energies of surface produced H{sup −} ions by back scattering and ion induced desorption processes.

  20. Negative hydrogen ion yields at plasma grid surface in a negative hydrogen ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2015-04-01

    Negative hydrogen (H-) ion yield from the plasma grid due to incident hydrogen ions and neutrals has been evaluated with the surface collision cascade model, ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) coupled to a negative surface ionization models. Dependence of negative ion fractions upon the velocity component normal to the surface largely affect the calculation results of the final energy and angular distributions of the H- ions. The influence is particularly large for H- ions desorbed from the surface due to less than several eV hydrogen particle implact. The present calculation predicts that H- ion yield can be maximized by setting the incident angle of hydrogen ions and neutrals to be 65 degree. The Cs thickness on the plasma grid should also affect the yields and mean energies of surface produced H- ions by back scattering and ion induced desorption processes.

  1. Process and apparatus for the production of hydrogen by steam reforming of hydrocarbon

    DOEpatents

    Sircar, Shivaji; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Nataraj, Shankar

    2000-01-01

    In the steam reforming of hydrocarbon, particularly methane, under elevated temperature and pressure to produce hydrogen, a feed of steam and hydrocarbon is fed into a first reaction volume containing essentially only reforming catalyst to partially reform the feed. The balance of the feed and the reaction products of carbon dioxide and hydrogen are then fed into a second reaction volume containing a mixture of catalyst and adsorbent which removes the carbon dioxide from the reaction zone as it is formed. The process is conducted in a cycle which includes these reactions followed by countercurrent depressurization and purge of the adsorbent to regenerate it and repressurization of the reaction volumes preparatory to repeating the reaction-sorption phase of the cycle.

  2. Microbial responses to various process disturbances in a continuous hydrogen reactor fed with galactose.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Hee-Deung; Kim, Sang-Hyoun

    2017-02-01

    In this study, microbial responses of a continuous hydrogen reactor fed with galactose have been investigated. Process disturbances reduced H2 production performance as well as large fluctuations in microbial diversity. The peak values of the hydrogen yield (HY) was not influenced greatly during the steady state period, and accounted as 2.01 ± 0.05 and 2.14 ± 0.03 mol/mol galactoseadded, while hydraulic retention time (HRT) was at 12 and 8 h, respectively. Microbial community analysis via 454 pyrosequencing revealed that functional redundancy following changes in the microbial community distribution led to the stability of the fermentation performance. The butyrate to acetate (B/A) ratio well correlated with changes in the microbial community. The energy generation rate and energy yield resulted in the peak values of 134 kJ/L-d and 612 kJ/moladded.

  3. Hydrogen and oxygen from water. III - Evaluation of a hybrid process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diver, R. B.; Fletcher, E. A.

    1980-07-01

    The paper presents a hybrid process which produces simultaneously mechanical power and hydrogen from water by the use of solar energy. Solar energy in this model is collected at very high and at near ambient temperatures. This model uses heat rejected from the high-temperature heat exchanger in a Rankine or other conventional heat engine to operate the pumps and to produce mechanical power; the heat pump is eliminated and flat solar collectors are used to vaporize the water. It was found that reactor-separators will require membranes with Knudsen numbers of 25; the heat exchanger specifications, the heat engine, and pumps where hydrogen is compressed to 50 atm for long-range pipeline transport are discussed. It was concluded that the results given here for a device which operated at 2800 K with an upstream pressure of 0.2 atm, and which receives a net solar energy input from the collector of 1824 kW is feasible.

  4. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes - May 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Kevin C.; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Christopher, Aardahl L.

    2008-05-12

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report: Technical report describing assessment of hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOE’s hydrogen storage targets.

  5. Developing an energy efficient steam reforming process to produce hydrogen from sulfur-containing fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simson, Amanda

    Hydrogen powered fuel cells have the potential to produce electricity with higher efficiency and lower emissions than conventional combustion technology. In order to realize the benefits of a hydrogen fuel cell an efficient method to produce hydrogen is needed. Currently, over 90% of hydrogen is produced from the steam reforming of natural gas. However, for many applications including fuel cell vehicles, the use of a liquid fuel rather than natural gas is desirable. This work investigates the feasibility of producing hydrogen efficiently by steam reforming E85 (85% ethanol/15% gasoline), a commercially available sulfur-containing transportation fuel. A Rh-Pt/SiO2-ZrO2 catalyst has demonstrated good activity for the E85 steam reforming reaction. An industrial steam reforming process is often run less efficiently, with more water and at higher temperatures, in order to prevent catalyst deactivation. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a process that can operate without catalyst deactivation at more energy efficient conditions. In this study, the steam reforming of a sulfur-containing fuel (E85) was studied at near stoichiometric steam/carbon ratios and at 650C, conditions at which catalyst deactivation is normally measured. At these conditions the catalyst was found to be stable steam reforming a sulfur-free E85. However, the addition of low concentrations of sulfur significantly deactivated the catalyst. The presence of sulfur in the fuel caused catalyst deactivation by promoting ethylene which generates surface carbon species (coke) that mask catalytic sites. The amount of coke increased during time on stream and became increasingly graphitic. However, the deactivation due to both sulfur adsorption and coke formation was reversible with air treatment at 650°C. However, regenerations were found to reduce the catalyst life. Air regenerations produce exotherms on the catalyst surface that cause structural changes to the catalyst. During regenerations the

  6. Effect of organic matter and calcium carbonate on behaviors of cadmium adsorption-desorption on/from purple paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiulan; Jiang, Tao; Du, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Batch experiments and sequential extraction analysis were employed to investigate the effects of soil organic matter and CaCO3 on the adsorption and desorption of cadmium (Cd(2+)) onto and from two purple paddy soils, an acidic purple paddy soil (APPS) and a calcareous purple paddy soil (CPPS). The Cd(2+) adsorption isotherms on both soils could be well-described by the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. CPPS had a higher capacity and a stronger affinity for Cd(2+) adsorption compared with APPS. The adsorption process of Cd(2+) on APPS was dominated by electrostatic attractions, whereas the adsorption mechanism varied depending on the Cd(2+) concentrations in equilibrium solutions on CPPS. At low equilibrium concentrations, the adsorption process was primarily specific adsorption, but nonspecific adsorption dominated at high equilibrium concentrations. Removal of organic matter decreased the amount of Cd(2+) adsorption on both of the soils, slightly affected the Cd(2+) desorption rate and exchangeable Cd (EXC-Cd) in APPS and increased the desorption rate and EXC-Cd in CPPS, suggesting that the effect of organic matter on Cd(2+) adsorption-desorption depends on the soils. CPPS and APPS containing CaCO3 exhibited higher adsorption amounts but lower desorption rates and lower proportions of EXC-Cd than those of their corresponding soils without CaCO3, demonstrating that CaCO3 played an important role in Cd(2+) specific adsorption on soil. The changes in the thermodynamic parameters, including free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)) and entropy (ΔS(0)), as evaluated by the Van't Hoff equations, indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process with the primary interaction forces of dipole interactions and hydrogen bonds on APPS, whereas both physical and chemical interactions dominated the adsorption on CPPS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Energy efficacy used to score organic refuse pretreatment processes for hydrogen anaerobic production.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Bernardo; Luongo Malave, Andrea C; Bernardi, Milena; Fino, Debora

    2013-11-01

    The production of hydrogen through Anaerobic Digestion (AD) has been investigated to verify the efficacy of several pretreatment processes. Three types of waste with different carbon structures have been tested to obtain an extensive representation of the behavior of the materials present in Organic Waste (OW). The following types of waste were selected: Sweet Product Residue (SPR), i.e., confectionary residue removed from the market after the expiration date, Organic Waste Market (OWM) refuse from a local fruit and vegetable market, and Coffee Seed Skin (CSS) waste from a coffee production plant. Several pretreatment processes have been applied, including physical, chemical, thermal, and ultrasonic processes and a combination of these processes. Two methods have been used for the SPR to remove the packaging, manual (SPR) and mechanical (SPRex). A pilot plant that is able to extrude the refuse to 200atm was utilized. Two parameters have been used to score the different pretreatment processes: efficiency (ξ), which takes into account the amount of energy produced in the form of hydrogen compared with the available energy embedded in the refuse, and efficacy (η), which compares the efficiency obtained using the pretreated refuse with that obtained using the untreated refuse. The best result obtained for the SPR was the basic pretreatment, with η=6.4, whereas the thermal basic pretreatment gave the highest value, η=17.0 for SPRex. The best result for the OWM was obtained through a combination of basic/thermal pretreatments with η=9.9; lastly, the CSS residue with ultrasonic pretreatment produced the highest quantity of hydrogen, η=5.2.

  8. A regenerative process for carbon dioxide removal and hydrogen production in IGCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh Khayyat, Armin

    Advanced power generation technologies, such as Integrated Gasification-Combined Cycles (IGCC) processes, are among the leading contenders for power generation conversion because of their significantly higher efficiencies and potential environmental advantages, compared to conventional coal combustion processes. Although the increased in efficiency in the IGCC processes will reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide per unit of power generated, further reduction in CO2 emissions is crucial due to enforcement of green house gases (GHG) regulations. In IGCC processes to avoid efficiency losses, it is desirable to remove CO2 in the temperature range of 300° to 500°C, which makes regenerable MgO-based sorbents ideal for such operations. In this temperature range, CO2 removal results in the shifting of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction towards significant reduction in carbon monoxide (CO), and enhancement in hydrogen production. However, regenerable, reactive and attrition resistant sorbents are required for such application. In this work, a highly reactive and attrition resistant regenerable MgO-based sorbent is prepared through dolomite modification, which can simultaneously remove carbon dioxide and enhance hydrogen production in a single reactor. The results of the experimental tests conducted in High-Pressure Thermogravimetric Analyzer (HP-TGA) and high-pressure packed-bed units indicate that in the temperature range of 300° to 500°C at 20 atm more than 95 molar percent of CO2 can be removed from the simulated coal gas, and the hydrogen concentration can be increased to above 70 percent. However, a declining trend is observed in the capacity of the sorbent exposed to long-term durability analysis, which appears to level off after about 20 cycles. Based on the physical and chemical analysis of the sorbent, a two-zone expanding grain model was applied to obtain an excellent fit to the carbonation reaction rate data at various operating conditions. The modeling

  9. 40 CFR 63.2465 - What requirements must I meet for process vents that emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... process vents that emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP metals? 63.2465 Section 63.2465 Protection... hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP metals? (a) You must meet each emission limit in Table 3 to this...) of this section. (b) If any process vents within a process emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP,...

  10. 40 CFR 63.2465 - What requirements must I meet for process vents that emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... process vents that emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP metals? 63.2465 Section 63.2465 Protection... hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP metals? (a) You must meet each emission limit in Table 3 to this...) of this section. (b) If any process vents within a process emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP,...

  11. 40 CFR 63.2465 - What requirements must I meet for process vents that emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... process vents that emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP metals? 63.2465 Section 63.2465 Protection... hydrogen halide and halogen HAP or HAP metals? (a) You must meet each emission limit in Table 3 to this...) of this section. (b) If any process vents within a process emit hydrogen halide and halogen HAP,...

  12. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Phase Transformations in Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-08-31

    The aim of this project is to develop and apply computational materials science tools to determine and predict critical properties of hydrogen storage materials. By better understanding the absorption/desorption mechanisms and characterizing their physical properties it is possible to explore and evaluate new directions for hydrogen storage materials. Particular emphasis is on the determination of the structure and thermodynamics of hydrogen storage materials, the investigation of microscopic mechanisms of hydrogen uptake and release in various materials and the role of catalysts in this process. As a team we have decided to focus on a single material, NaAlH{sub 4}, in order to fully be able to study the many aspects of hydrogen storage. We have focused on phase stability, mass transport and size-dependent reaction mechanisms in this material.

  13. Trapping of hydrogen atoms in X-irradiated salts at room temperature and the decay kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    The salts (hypophosphites, formates, a phosphite, a phosphate, and an oxalate) were X-irradiated, whereby hydrogen formed chemically by a radiolytic process becomes trapped in the solid. By room temperature vacuum extraction, the kinetics for the evolution of this trapped hydrogen was studied mass spectrometrically. All salts except two exhibited second-order kinetics. The two exceptions (NaH2PO2(H2O) and K2HPO4) showed first-order kinetics. Based on experimental results, the escape of hydrogen involves three steps: the diffusion of hydrogen atoms from the bulk to the surface, association of these atoms on the surface (rate controlling step for second-order hydrogen evolution), and the desorption of molecular hydrogen from the surface. The hydrogen does not escape if the irradiated salt is stored in air, apparently because adsorbed air molecules occupy surface sites required in the escape mechanism.

  14. [Assessment of exposure to hydrogen cyanide in fire fatalities in the aspects of endogenous hydrogen cyanide production as a result of putrefaction processes in the deceased].

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Teresa; Nowicka, Joanna; Kulikowska, Joanna; Kabiesz-Neniczka, Stanisława

    2011-01-01

    On account of endogenous hydrogen cyanide (HCN) production in the deceased, it is not easy to assess exposure to HCN in people who died in fire involving closed rooms (flats, garages, cellars, etc). In the paper, the authors present the results of blood determinations of hydrogen cyanide in fatalities of explosions and fires occurring in coal-mines, as well as fires in closed rooms. It has been demonstrated that the time of exposure to a high temperature and the temperature itself hamper autolysis processes that lead to production of endogenous HCN in fire fatalities.

  15. Plasma-chemical treatment of hydrogen sulfide in natural gas processing. Final report, May 1991--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

    1993-05-01

    A new process for the treatment of hydrogen sulfide waste that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology has been under development in Russia and the United States. Whereas the present waste-treatment technology, at best, only recovers sulfur, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur by dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a plasma by means of a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. A research project has been undertaken to determine the suitability of the plasma process in natural gas processing applications. The experiments tested acid-gas compositions with 30--65% carbon dioxide, 0--7% water, and 0--0.2% of a standard mixture of pipeline gas. The balance gas in all cases was hydrogen sulfide. The reactor pressure for the experiments was 50 torr, and the microwave power was 1.0 kW. Conversions of hydrogen sulfide ranged from 80 to 100%, while 35--50% of the carbon dioxide was converted to carbon monoxide. This conversion of carbon dioxide resulted in a loss of hydrogen production and an energy loss from a hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment perspective. Tests of a direct natural gas treatment concept showed that hydrocarbon losses were unacceptably high; consequently, the concept would not be economically viable.

  16. A green lead hydrometallurgical process based on a hydrogen-lead oxide fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Pan, Junqing; Sun, Yanzhi; Li, Wei; Knight, James; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    The automobile industry consumed 9 million metric tons of lead in 2012 for lead-acid batteries. Recycling lead from spent lead-acid batteries is not only related to the sustainable development of the lead industry, but also to the reduction of lead pollution in the environment. The existing lead pyrometallurgical processes have two main issues, toxic lead emission into the environment and high energy consumption; the developing hydrometallurgical processes have the disadvantages of high electricity consumption, use of toxic chemicals and severe corrosion of metallic components. Here we demonstrate a new green hydrometallurgical process to recover lead based on a hydrogen-lead oxide fuel cell. High-purity lead, along with electricity, is produced with only water as the by-product. It has a >99.5% lead yield, which is higher than that of the existing pyrometallurgical processes (95-97%). This greatly reduces lead pollution to the environment.

  17. EFFECT OF MINOR ADDITIONS OF HYDROGEN TO ARGON SHIELDING GAS WHEN WELDING AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WITH THE GTAW PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2004-12-15

    This paper provides the technical basis to conclude that the use of hydrogen containing shielding gases during welding of austenitic stainless steels will not lead to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) of the weld or weld heat affected zone. Argon-hydrogen gas mixtures, with hydrogen additions up to 35% [1], have been successfully used as the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of austenitic stainless steels. The addition of hydrogen improves weld pool wettability, bead shape control, surface cleanliness and heat input. The GTAW process is used extensively for welding various grades of stainless steel and is preferred when a very high weld quality is desired, such as that required for closure welding of nuclear materials packages. The use of argon-hydrogen gas mixtures for high-quality welding is occasionally questioned, primarily because of concern over the potential for HIC. This paper was written specifically to provide a technical basis for using an argon-hydrogen shielding gas in conjunction with the development, at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), of an ''optimized'' closure welding process for the DOE standardized spent nuclear fuel canister [2]. However, the basis developed here can be applied to other applications in which the use of an argon-hydrogen shielding gas for GTAW welding of austenitic stainless steels is desired.

  18. Characterization of the surface changes during the activation process of erbium/erbium oxide for hydrogen storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Snow, Clark Sheldon; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Brumbach, Michael Todd

    2010-10-01

    Erbium is known to effectively load with hydrogen when held at high temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere. To make the storage of hydrogen kinetically feasible, a thermal activation step is required. Activation is a routine practice, but very little is known about the physical, chemical, and/or electronic processes that occur during Activation. This work presents in situ characterization of erbium Activation using variable energy photoelectron spectroscopy at various stages of the Activation process. Modification of the passive surface oxide plays a significant role in Activation. The chemical and electronic changes observed from core-level and valence band spectra will be discussed along with corroborating ion scattering spectroscopy measurements.

  19. Pt promotion and spill-over processes during deposition and desorption of upd-H(ad) and OH(ad) on Pt(x)Ru(1-x)/Ru(0001) surface alloys.

    PubMed

    Hoster, Harry E; Janik, Michael J; Neurock, Matthew; Behm, R Jürgen

    2010-09-21

    The electrochemical adsorption of underpotential deposited hydrogen (upd-H(ad)) and OH(ad) on structurally well-defined Pt(x)Ru(1-x)/Ru(0001) surface alloys was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The adsorption energies of both upd-H(ad) and OH(ad) decrease with increasing Pt content in the adsorption ensemble, shifting the onset of upd-H(ad) and OH(ad) formation to increasingly cathodic and anodic potentials, respectively. For bare Ru(0001) and for Ru(3) sites in the surface alloy, the stability regions of these two species overlap or almost overlap, respectively. Similar to previous findings for upd-H(ad) adsorption/desorption on partly Pt monolayer island covered Ru(0001) surfaces (J. Phys. Chem. B 2004, 108, 14780), we find a sharp peak at approximately 100 mV vs. RHE in each scan direction, which is attributed to a Pt catalyzed OH(ad)<--> upd-H(ad) replacement on Ru(3) sites, via adsorption on Pt rich sites and spill-over to Ru(3) sites. The decrease of the integrated charge in these peaks with the third power of the Ru surface concentration, which for a random distribution of surface atoms reflects the availability of Ru(3) sites, supports the above assignment.

  20. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schwartz

    2004-12-01

    This report describes the work performed, accomplishments and conclusion obtained from the project entitled ''Novel Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation in Gasification Processes in Vision 21 Energy Plants'' under the United States Department of Energy Contract DE-FC26-01NT40973. ITN Energy Systems was the prime contractor. Team members included: the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory; Nexant Consulting; Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair. The objective of the program was to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The separation technology module is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The program developed and evaluated composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules were fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed Ion Conducting Ceramic Membrane (ICCM) approach, including system integration issues, were also assessed. This resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of integration schemes of ICCM hydrogen separation technology within Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Several results and conclusion were obtained during this program. In the area of materials synthesis, novel

  1. Recovery of C/sub 3/. sqrt. hydrocarbon conversion products and net excess hydrogen in a catalytic reforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Degraff, R.R.; Peters, K.D.

    1982-12-21

    This invention relates to a hydrocarbon conversion process effected in the presence of hydrogen, especially a hydrogenproducing hydrocarbon conversion process. More particularly, this invention relates to the catalytic reforming of a naphtha feedstock, and is especially directed to an improved recovery of the net excess hydrogen, and to an improved recovery of a C/sub 3/..sqrt.. normally gaseous hydrocarbon conversion product and a C/sub 5/..sqrt.. hydrocarbon conversion product boiling in the gasoline range.

  2. Methanol from CO2 by organo-cocatalysis: CO2 capture and hydrogenation in one process step.

    PubMed

    Reller, Christian; Pöge, Matthias; Lißner, Andreas; Mertens, Florian O R L

    2014-12-16

    Carbon dioxide chemically bound to alcohol-amines was hydrogenated to methanol under retrieval of these industrially used CO2 capturing reagents. The energetics of the process can be seen as a partial cancellation of the exothermic heat of reaction of the hydrogenation with the endothermic one of the CO2 release from the capturing reagent. The process provides a means to significantly improve the energy efficiency of CO2 to methanol conversions.

  3. Sorption and desorption properties of a CaH{sub 2}/MgB{sub 2}/CaF{sub 2} reactive hydride composite as potential hydrogen storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez Alcantara, K.; Boesenberg, U.; Zavorotynska, O.; Bellosta von Colbe, J.; Taube, K.; Baricco, M.; Klassen, T.; Dornheim, M.

    2011-11-15

    The hydrogenation behavior of 3CaH{sub 2}+4MgB{sub 2}+CaF{sub 2} composite was studied by manometric measurements, powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. The maximum observed quantity of hydrogen loaded in the composite was 7.0 wt%. X-ray diffraction showed the formation of Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} after hydrogenation. The activation energy for the dehydrogenation reaction was evaluated by DSC measurements and turns out to be 162{+-}15 kJ mol{sup -1} H{sub 2}. This value decreases due to cycling to 116{+-}5 kJ mol{sup -1} H{sub 2} for the third dehydrogenation step. A decrease of ca. 25-50 deg. C in dehydrogenation temperature was observed with cycling. Due to its high capacity and reversibility, this composite is a promising candidate as a potential hydrogen storage material. - Graphical abstract: PCI of 3CaH{sub 2}+4MgB{sub 2}+CaF{sub 2} reactive hydride composite at 325 deg. C and 350 deg. C. Open marks: dehydrogenation, closed marks: hydrogenation. Highlights: > The hydrogenation and dehydrogenation behavior of CaF{sub 2} doped CaH{sub 2}/MgB{sub 2} RHC is presented. > The new composite presents a superior hydrogen uptake compared with the non-doped composite.. > A reduction in the E{sub a} and the dehydrogenation temperature was observed by CaF{sub 2} doping and cycling.

  4. Application of a diffusion-desorption rate equation model in astrochemistry.

    PubMed

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Desorption and diffusion are two of the most important processes on interstellar grain surfaces; knowledge of them is critical for the understanding of chemical reaction networks in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, a lack of information on desorption and diffusion is preventing further progress in astrochemistry. To obtain desorption energy distributions of molecules from the surfaces of ISM-related materials, one usually carries out adsorption-desorption temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments, and uses rate equation models to extract desorption energy distributions. However, the often-used rate equation models fail to adequately take into account diffusion processes and thus are only valid in situations where adsorption is strongly localized. As adsorption-desorption experiments show that adsorbate molecules tend to occupy deep adsorption sites before occupying shallow ones, a diffusion process must be involved. Thus, it is necessary to include a diffusion term in the model that takes into account the morphology of the surface as obtained from analyses of TPD experiments. We take the experimental data of CO desorption from the MgO(100) surface and of D2 desorption from amorphous solid water ice as examples to show how a diffusion-desorption rate equation model explains the redistribution of adsorbate molecules among different adsorption sites. We extract distributions of desorption energies and diffusion energy barriers from TPD profiles. These examples are contrasted with a system where adsorption is strongly localized--HD from an amorphous silicate surface. Suggestions for experimental investigations are provided.

  5. Elimination Of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In Defense Waste Processing Facility Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2013-01-22

    Based on lab-scale simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) slurry chemistry, the addition of sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide to waste slurries at concentrations sufficient to take the aqueous phase into the alkaline region (pH > 7) with approximately 500 mg nitrite ion/kg slurry (assuming <25 wt% total solids, or equivalently 2,000 mg nitrite/kg total solids) is sufficient to effectively deactivate the noble metal catalysts at temperatures between room temperature and boiling. This is a potential strategy for eliminating catalytic hydrogen generation from the list of concerns for sludge carried over into the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) or Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). These conclusions are drawn in large part from the various phases of the DWPF catalytic hydrogen generation program conducted between 2005 and 2009. The findings could apply to various situations, including a solids carry-over from either the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) into the SMECT with subsequent transfer to the RCT, as well as a spill of formic acid into the sump system and transfer into an RCT that already contains sludge solids. There are other potential mitigating factors for the SMECT and RCT, since these vessels are typically operated at temperatures close to the minimum temperatures that catalytic hydrogen has been observed to occur in either the SRAT or SME (pure slurry case), and these vessels are also likely to be considerably more dilute in both noble metals and formate ion (the two essential components to catalytic hydrogen generation) than the two primary process vessels. Rhodium certainly, and ruthenium likely, are present as metal-ligand complexes that are favored under certain concentrations of the surrounding species. Therefore, in the SMECT or RCT, where a small volume of SRAT or SME material would be significantly diluted, conditions would be less optimal for forming or sustaining the

  6. Lowering the desorption temperature of Mg(BH4)2 through doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, D.; Thonhauser, T.

    2014-03-01

    Magnesium borohydride Mg(BH4)2 is a very promising hydrogen storage material due to its high gravimetric (14.9 mass%) and volumetric density. However, it is limited for practical storage applications by its high hydrogen desorption temperature of 270°C. Arguments have been made for both high thermodynamic stability and slow kinetics to be responsible for this high desorption temperature. In our study we show that doping of Mg(BH4)2 can address the thermodynamic stability issue and predictably lower its desorption enthalpy. We use ab initio calculations at the DFT level (utilizing vdW-DF) and calculate the change in desorption enthalpy from ground state energy and phonon contributions for several possible hydrogen release reactions. Note that van der Waals interactions are crucial to correctly describe the ground state of this complex hydride. We find that, depending on the reaction, the undoped phase has a desorption enthalpy of 50-75 kJ/mol H2 and doping can lower this number by approximately 5 kJ/mol per 10% doping at 300 K, making the desired range of 40 kJ/mol easily accessible. We argue that this lowering of desorption enthalpy will correspond to a lowering of the desorption temperature. Supported by NSF DMR-1145968.

  7. Photon- and electron-stimulated desorption from laboratory models of interstellar ice grains

    SciTech Connect

    Thrower, J. D.; Abdulgalil, A. G. M.; Collings, M. P.; McCoustra, M. R. S.; Burke, D. J.; Brown, W. A.; Dawes, A.; Holtom, P. J.; Kendall, P.; Mason, N. J.; Jamme, F.; Fraser, H. J.; Rutten, F. J. M.

    2010-07-15

    The nonthermal desorption of water from ice films induced by photon and low energy electron irradiation has been studied under conditions mimicking those found in dense interstellar clouds. Water desorption following photon irradiation at 250 nm relies on the presence of an absorbing species within the H{sub 2}O ice, in this case benzene. Desorption cross sections are obtained and used to derive first order rate coefficients for the desorption processes. Kinetic modeling has been used to compare the efficiencies of these desorption mechanisms with others known to be in operation in dense clouds.

  8. Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  9. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  10. Thermal Desorption/Ultraviolet Photolysis Process Technology Research, Test, and Evaluation Performed at the Naval Construction Battalion Center, Gulfport, Mississippi, for the USAF Installation Restoration Program. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Genratous US EPA to No. Mn ooufmfe 2. Pp, IW, I WASTE MANIFEST MS 2170022626 ] EG1050-3 at iWs We •.a by w ’aw. 3. GeI Nu•Nmss Mailing Address A...weight, oxygen (02), carbon dioxide (C02 ), N2 , hydrogen chloride (HCI), total organic carbon (TOC), nitrogen oxides (NO X), and particulates. Flow

  11. The electronic structure and catalytic properties of molybdenum sulfides in the coal hydrogenation process

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Gyul'maliev; M.A. Gyul'malieva; A.S. Maloletnev; M.Ya. Shpirt

    2008-08-15

    Comparative analysis of the electronic structure of molybdenum sulfides and their catalytic activity in hydrogenation reactions was performed from the results of Hartree-Fock ab initio quantum-chemical calculations using the STO 3-21G and 6-311G basis sets with geometry optimization. The model reactions of hydrogenation of aromatic and saturated hydrocarbons with hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide were studied. It was shown that the hydrogenation reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons with hydrogen sulfide must occur at a higher rate (with lower activation energy) as compared to those with molecular hydrogen.

  12. Production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, and chemicals from catalytic processing of bio-oils

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, George W; Vispute, Tushar P; Routray, Kamalakanta

    2014-06-03

    Disclosed herein is a method of generating hydrogen from a bio-oil, comprising hydrogenating a water-soluble fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, and reforming the water-soluble fraction by aqueous-phase reforming in the presence of a reforming catalyst, wherein hydrogen is generated by the reforming, and the amount of hydrogen generated is greater than that consumed by the hydrogenating. The method can further comprise hydrocracking or hydrotreating a lignin fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrocracking catalyst wherein the lignin fraction of bio-oil is obtained as a water-insoluble fraction from aqueous extraction of bio-oil. The hydrogen used in the hydrogenating and in the hydrocracking or hydrotreating can be generated by reforming the water-soluble fraction of bio-oil.

  13. Solar thermal hydrogen production process: Final report, January 1978-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Under sponsorship by the United States Department of Energy, Westinghouse Advanced Energy-Systems Division has investigated the potential for using solar thermal energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. A hybrid thermochemical/electrochemical process, known as the Sulfur Cycle, has been the focus of these investigations. Process studies have indicated that, with adequate and ongoing research and development, the Sulfur Cycle can be effectively driven with solar heat. Also, economic analyses have indicated that the cycle has the potential to produce hydrogen in economic competitiveness with conventional methods (e.g. methane/steam reforming) by the turn of the century. A first generation developmental system has been defined along with its critical components, i.e. those components that need substantial engineering development. Designs for those high temperature components that concentrate, vaporize and decompose the process circulating fluid, sulfuric acid, have been prepared. Extensive experimental investigations have been conducted with regard to the selection of construction materials for these components. From these experiments, which included materials endurance tests for corrosion resistance for periods up to 6000 hours, promising materials and catalysts have been identified.

  14. Processing of Amorphous Carbon Grains Produced in Hydrogen-Rich Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, A.; Cappello, D.; Fonti, S.; Ientile, A.; Orofino, V.

    1999-01-01

    Recent laboratory experiments, compared with observations, have strongly suggested that the amount of hydrogen, present in the grain formation regions, around C-rich stars, can play a major role in the definition of the spectral characteristics of the freshly formed carbon dust particles. Such spectral characteristics could also be modified, during the thermal processing, due to the shock waves and/or the strong radiation field, that the grains undergo after their formation. In this work we report about a series of laboratory tests, during which submicronic dust particles of amorphous carbon, condensed in an hydrogen-rich atmosphere, have been processed, by means of two different methods. Some samples have been annealed into an oven at different temperatures, while others have been exposed to strong ultraviolet radiation. Their spectra have been obtained before and after the processing in the full range from ultraviolet (200 nm) to far infrared (0.1 mm). The results of the experiment are presented and discussed, together with their astrophysical implications

  15. One-pot process combining transesterification and selective hydrogenation for biodiesel production from starting material of high degree of unsaturation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ru; Su, Mengxing; Li, Min; Zhang, Jianchun; Hao, Xinmin; Zhang, Hua

    2010-08-01

    A one-pot process combining transesterification and selective hydrogenation was established to produce biodiesel from hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) seed oil which is eliminated as a potential feedstock by a specification of iodine value (IV; 120 g I(2)/100g maximum) contained in EN 14214. A series of alkaline earth metal oxides and alkaline earth metal supported copper oxide were prepared and tested as catalysts. SrO supported 10 wt.% CuO showed the superior catalytic activity for transesterification with a biodiesel yield of 96% and hydrogenation with a reduced iodine value of 113 and also exhibited a promising selectivity for eliminating methyl linolenate and increasing methyl oleate without rising methyl stearate in the selective hydrogenation. The fuel properties of the selective hydrogenated methyl esters are within biodiesel specifications. Furthermore, cetane numbers and iodine values were well correlated with the compositions of the hydrogenated methyl esters according to degrees of unsaturation. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Michael W. Patterson

    2008-05-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible

  17. Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

    2008-11-30

    We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION TCAP HYDROGEN ISOTOPE SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L; Henry Sessions, H; Steve Xiao, S; Heather Mentzer, H

    2009-01-09

    The first generation of TCAP hydrogen isotope separation process has been in service for tritium separation at the Savannah River Site since 1994. To prepare for replacement, a next-generation TCAP process has been developed. This new process simplifies the column design and reduces the equipment requirements of the thermal cycling system. An experimental twelve-meter column was fabricated and installed in the laboratory to demonstrate its performance. This new design and its initial test results were presented at the 8th International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology and published in the proceedings. We have since completed the startup and demonstration the separation of protium and deuterium in the experimental unit. The unit has been operated for more than 200 cycles. A feed of 25% deuterium in protium was separated into two streams each better than 99.7% purity.

  19. Chemical treatment of plutonium with hydrogen peroxide before nitrate anion exchange processing. [Reduction to (IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Gallegos, T.D.

    1987-05-01

    The major aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility is anion exchange in nitric acid. This process is highly selective for plutonium; however, all plutonium must be as Pu(IV) to form the strongly sorbed anionic nitrato complex. The previous ''full-reduction treatment'' used at Los Alamos to obtain Pu(IV) results in a three- to fourfold increase in the feed solution volume and the introduction of kilogram quantities of extraneous salts immediately before a process whose function is to remove such impurities. That treatment has been successfully replaced by a single reagent, hydrogen peroxide, which converts all plutonium to Pu(IV), minimally increases the feed volume, and introduces no residual impurities. Safety aspects of this revised chemical treatment are addressed.

  20. The production of hydrogen by dark fermentation of municipal solid wastes and slaughterhouse waste: A two-phase process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, X.; Morán, A.; Cuetos, M. J.; Sánchez, M. E.

    A two-phase fermentation process for the treatment of waste, intended for the recovery of hydrogen for energy use, was investigated in its initial fermentation phase. Hydrogen production was obtained from a mixed culture based on an active mesophilic inoculum without any selective treatment being applied. The liquid stream generated by the hydrogen fermentation process was stabilized in the following, methanogenic, phase for the recovery of methane and further breaking down of the waste stream. The whole process was carried out at a temperature in the mesophilic range (34 °C). The substrate used was an unsterilized mixture of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) and slaughterhouse waste from a poultry-processing plant. The hydrogen-producing phase was capable of stable performance under the hydraulic retention times (HRTs) evaluated (3 and 5 days). No methane was detected in the first phase at any point during the whole period of the experiment and the hydrogen yield showed no symptoms of declining as time elapsed. The amount of hydrogen obtained from the fermentation process was in the range of 52.5-71.3 N L kg -1 VS rem.

  1. Dynamics of hydrogen-producing bacteria in a repeated batch fermentation process using lake sediment as inoculum.

    PubMed

    Romano, Stefano; Paganin, Patrizia; Varrone, Cristiano; Tabacchioni, Silvia; Chiarini, Luigi

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of lake sediment as inoculum for hydrogen production through dark fermentation in a repeated batch process. In addition, we investigated the effect of heat treatment, applied to enrich hydrogen-producing bacteria, on the bacterial composition and metabolism. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and molecular cloning, both performed using the 16S rDNA gene as target gene, were used to monitor the structure of the bacterial community. Hydrogen production and bacterial metabolism were analysed via gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. Both treated and non-treated inocula were able to produce high amounts of hydrogen. However, statistical analysis showed a clear difference in their bacterial composition and metabolism. The heat treatment favoured the growth of different Clostridia sp., in particular of Clostridium bifermentans, allowing the production of a constant amount of hydrogen over prolonged time. These cultures showed both butyrate and ethanol fermentation types. Absence of heat treatment allowed species belonging to the genera Bacillus, Sporolactobacillus and Massilia to outgrow Clostridia sp. with a reduction in hydrogen production and a significant metabolic change. Our data indicate that lake sediment harbours bacteria that can efficiently produce hydrogen over prolonged fermentation time. Moreover, we could show that the heat treatment stabilizes the bacterial community composition and the hydrogen production.

  2. Quantum-chemical ab initio investigation of the two-step charge transfer process of hydrogen reaction: approach of reaction pathways via hydrogen intermediate on Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, An. M.; Lorenz, W.

    1994-08-01

    Local reaction events in the course of the electrochemical two-step hydrogen evolution reaction have been investigated by means of quantum-chemical all-electron ab initio calculations on interfacial supermolecular cluster models including a hydrated hydrogen intermediate on Cu(100). Expanding on preceding study to larger hydration clusters, an approach to relevant reaction path characteristics has been pursued for two processes: (i) the transfer of hydrated hydronium ion into a chemisorbed hydrogen intermediate: (ii) the reaction of hydronium ion with the intermediate to molecular hydrogen. Computations were carried out on RHF level, using contracted (12,8,4)/[8,6,2,] and/or 6-31G * or G ** pol-O bases for the metal and adsorbate part, respectively. Destruction of the hydronium configuration in process (i) has been confirmed. Electronic partial charge transfer dut to chemical bond conversions in both steps (i) and (ii) has been displayed along relevant cuts of adiabatic potential surfaces, proving significantly different amounts of charge transfer in both steps, λ 1 > 1, λ 2≡(2-λ 1) < 1. In advance of consideration of macroscopic double layer effects, first insight has been gained into coupled nuclear motions and into the origin of reaction barriers

  3. General Thermal Texturization Process of MoS2 for Efficient Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kiriya, Daisuke; Lobaccaro, Peter; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Taheri, Peyman; Hettick, Mark; Shiraki, Hiroshi; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M; Zhao, Peida; Gao, Wei; Maboudian, Roya; Ager, Joel W; Javey, Ali

    2016-07-13

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been widely examined as a catalyst containing no precious metals for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER); however, these examinations have utilized synthesized MoS2 because the pristine MoS2 mineral is known to be a poor catalyst. The fundamental challenge with pristine MoS2 is the inert HER activity of the predominant (0001) basal surface plane. In order to achieve high HER performance with pristine MoS2, it is essential to activate the basal plane. Here, we report a general thermal process in which the basal plane is texturized to increase the density of HER-active edge sites. This texturization is achieved through a simple thermal annealing procedure in a hydrogen environment, removing sulfur from the MoS2 surface to form edge sites. As a result, the process generates high HER catalytic performance in pristine MoS2 across various morphologies such as the bulk mineral, films composed of micron-scale flakes, and even films of a commercially available spray of nanoflake MoS2. The lowest overpotential (η) observed for these samples was η = 170 mV to obtain 10 mA/cm(2) of HER current density.

  4. Desorption rate of volatile compounds in polishing ponds.

    PubMed

    Alves, Eudes M; Cavalcanti, Paula F C; van Haandel, Adrianus

    2011-01-01

    Increase of pH in polishing ponds can be predicted quantitatively from variations in alkalinity and acidity. These variables are affected by processes that develop simultaneously in ponds: (1) CO(2) desorption, (2) biological CO(2) removal by photosynthesis and (3) NH(3) desorption. An experimental investigation was carried out to determine the desorption rate of carbon dioxide and ammonium. It is shown that CO(2) and NH(3) desorption can be described by Fick's law, which describes desorption of a gaseous compounds from water as a first order process with respect to the degree of oversaturation, which is the driving force of the process. An experimental investigation was carried out to determine the desorption rate constants. The value of the constant proved to be inversely proportional to the depth of the pond (H) and its value for H=1 m and at 26°C was established as K(CO2)=0.34/H d(-1) for carbon dioxide and K(NH3)=0.33/H d(-1) for ammonium.

  5. [Sorption-desorption of phosphate in wastewater by hydrous iron oxide].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xue-Min; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Ji-Ti; Wang, Ren

    2008-11-01

    FeCl3 was used t o prepare hydrous iron oxide (HIO) as a n absorbent for phosphate (P) sorption and desorption study. The results showed that as pH decreased, the sorption capacity of HIO increased, and the sorption kinetics followed the second-order model, and the sorption isotherm could be fitted by the Langmuir equation. A 50 g/L NaOH solution was used for desorption of P from HIO, and the desorption rate could be reached over 98% . No relation was found between desorption rate and adsorption capacity. Based on above results, HIO was applied to adsorption of P from supernatant of sludge thickener, and after desorption, more than 90% of P was recovered. According to the results obtained, an effective system for P removal and recovery from municipal wastewater was suggested, which includes the following processes: adsorption, desorption, regeneration of HIO, and of recovery of P from P-rich desorption solution.

  6. Multiple Uses of Hydrogen Isotopes as a Tracer of Rehydration Processes in Glassy Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, B. I.; Fink, J. H.; Guan, Y.; Leshin, L. A.

    2001-12-01

    Silicic lava flows contain zones of enhanced vesicularity with high total H2O contents. This relationship between volatile content and vesicularity has promoted the monitoring of active lava domes using remote sensing techniques in an effort to forecast explosive activity. A persistent complication in attempts to relate surface texture to H2O content and explosivity was the confounding effect of meteoric H2O. Glassy and vesicular lavas exposed at the surface of the Earth for prolonged periods readily interact with meteoric H2O. Rehydration is a time-, temperature-, and porosity-dependent process governed by the slow diffusion of molecular H2O into the glass. This inevitable addition of secondary H2O obscures the spatial distribution of juvenile H2O in lava flows. The ability to distinguish magmatic from meteoric H2O in glassy lavas would help identify regions of overpressure on active domes and thereby improve hazard assessment. Three types of hydrogen isotopic studies of glassy lavas have been utilized to disentangle rehydration processes from primary magmatic ones. First, bulk hydrogen isotopic data on variably textured lava flows reveal enrichments in both δ D and total H2O as vesicularity increases. Mixing between a degassed magmatic and a partially evaporated meteoric H2O best explains the observed trend from lower δ D values in the interior massive obsidian samples to higher δ D in the most surficial vesicular pumice. Second, step-heated hydrogen isotopic analyses further prove that the vesicular samples contain a high percentage of meteoric H2O. Whereas dense massive obsidian samples release a large fraction of deuterium-depleted H2O at temperatures above 600° C, the bubble-rich pumiceous samples lose a majority of their H2O at temperatures below 400° C. Lastly, the Cameca 6f ion microprobe at ASU was used to measure hydrogen isotope transects into the vesicle-melt interface. The gradation from depleted δ D values in the glassy interstices to more

  7. Hydrogen production from sugar beet juice using an integrated biohydrogen process of dark fermentation and microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Hafez, Hisham; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-12-01

    An integrated dark fermentation and microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) process was evaluated for hydrogen production from sugar beet juice. Different substrate to inoculum (S/X) ratios were tested for dark fermentation, and the maximum hydrogen yield was 13% of initial COD at the S/X ratio of 2 and 4 for dark fermentation. Hydrogen yield was 12% of initial COD in the MEC using fermentation liquid end products as substrate, and butyrate only accumulated in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production from the integrated biohydrogen process was 25% of initial COD (equivalent to 6 mol H2/mol hexoseadded), and the energy recovery from sugar beet juice was 57% using the combined biohydrogen.

  8. A single-step growth process of graphane using hydrogen plasma and observation of an induced bandgap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, M. L.; Boyd, D. A.; Teng, W.-S.; Hsu, C.-C.; Yeh, N.-C.; Gharib, M.

    There has been considerable interest in reliably opening up a bandgap in graphene for electronic applications. One promising method is the hydrogenation of graphene into graphane. We present Raman spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) studies of hydrogenated multilayer graphene on Cu as a function of hydrogen exposure time (t) . Our growth process for hydrogenated graphene involved in-situ exposure of PECVD-grown graphene on Cu to hydrogen plasma. Raman measurements revealed an increase in intensity of a pronounced and narrow D-band with t when compared to pristine graphene. FTIR studies revealed the presence of C-H bonds on the surface of our samples post hydrogenation. STM topographic studies revealed a nanoscale Moiré pattern resulting from the hydrogenated graphene. For t = 120s, STS studies revealed an average gap of Δ ~(0.275+/-0.050) eV, which increased to average value of Δ ~(0.315+/-0.050) eV for t = 600s. Topographic and spectroscopic studies showed approximate hydrogen coverage of 20%, 50% and 80% for t = 30s, 60s and 120s, respectively. XPS studies of the C-1s state revealed an energy shift from the C-C peak (284.6 nm) towards a C-H peak (285.8 nm), consistent with the formation of carbon-hydrogen bonds. Our results have demonstrated the existence of a bandgap opening in graphene, induced by the adsorption of atomic hydrogen onto graphene.

  9. Round-the-clock power supply and a sustainable economy via synergistic integration of solar thermal power and hydrogen processes

    PubMed Central

    Gençer, Emre; Mallapragada, Dharik S.; Maréchal, François; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a paradigm—“hydricity”—that involves the coproduction of hydrogen and electricity from solar thermal energy and their judicious use to enable a sustainable economy. We identify and implement synergistic integrations while improving each of the two individual processes. When the proposed integrated process is operated in a standalone, solely power production mode, the resulting solar water power cycle can generate electricity with unprecedented efficiencies of 40–46%. Similarly, in standalone hydrogen mode, pressurized hydrogen is produced at efficiencies approaching ∼50%. In the coproduction mode, the coproduced hydrogen is stored for uninterrupted solar power production. When sunlight is unavailable, we envision that the stored hydrogen is used in a “turbine”-based hydrogen water power (H2WP) cycle with the calculated hydrogen-to-electricity efficiency of 65–70%, which is comparable to the fuel cell efficiencies. The H2WP cycle uses much of the same equipment as the solar water power cycle, reducing capital outlays. The overall sun-to-electricity efficiency of the hydricity process, averaged over a 24-h cycle, is shown to approach ∼35%, which is nearly the efficiency attained by using the best multijunction photovoltaic cells along with batteries. In comparison, our proposed process has the following advantages: (i) It stores energy thermochemically with a two- to threefold higher density, (ii) coproduced hydrogen has alternate uses in transportation/chemical/petrochemical industries, and (iii) unlike batteries, the stored energy does not discharge over time and the storage medium does not degrade with repeated uses. PMID:26668380

  10. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  11. Round-the-clock power supply and a sustainable economy via synergistic integration of solar thermal power and hydrogen processes.

    PubMed

    Gençer, Emre; Mallapragada, Dharik S; Maréchal, François; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-12-29

    We introduce a paradigm-"hydricity"-that involves the coproduction of hydrogen and electricity from solar thermal energy and their judicious use to enable a sustainable economy. We identify and implement synergistic integrations while improving each of the two individual processes. When the proposed integrated process is operated in a standalone, solely power production mode, the resulting solar water power cycle can generate electricity with unprecedented efficiencies of 40-46%. Similarly, in standalone hydrogen mode, pressurized hydrogen is produced at efficiencies approaching ∼50%. In the coproduction mode, the coproduced hydrogen is stored for uninterrupted solar power production. When sunlight is unavailable, we envision that the stored hydrogen is used in a "turbine"-based hydrogen water power (H2WP) cycle with the calculated hydrogen-to-electricity efficiency of 65-70%, which is comparable to the fuel cell efficiencies. The H2WP cycle uses much of the same equipment as the solar water power cycle, reducing capital outlays. The overall sun-to-electricity efficiency of the hydricity process, averaged over a 24-h cycle, is shown to approach ∼35%, which is nearly the efficiency attained by using the best multijunction photovoltaic cells along with batteries. In comparison, our proposed process has the following advantages: (i) It stores energy thermochemically with a two- to threefold higher density, (ii) coproduced hydrogen has alternate uses in transportation/chemical/petrochemical industries, and (iii) unlike batteries, the stored energy does not discharge over time and the storage medium does not degrade with repeated uses.

  12. Irreversible adsorption/desorption of PAHs in sediment/water

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.; Kan, A.T.; Tomson, M.B.

    1996-10-01

    Successive adsorption isotherm of phenanthrene on soil corresponds to a constant partition of phenanthrene between the bulk solution and solid phase. This shows that the hydrophobic reaction is a dominant mechanism in adsorption process. However, desorption of PAHs appears irreversibility. Cyclic and multiple adsorption and desorption experiments indicated that there is an irreversibly adsorbed intrinsic capacity in the interaction of PAHs (naphthalene and phenanthrene) and soil in aqueous solution. This irreversible fraction for PAHs (naphthalene and phenanthrene) is about 1000-5000 {mu}g/g normalized on the basis of soil organic carbon. The desorption of PAHs from soil appears biphasic when the total adsorbed capacity is greater than the intrinsic irreversibly adsorbed value. In phase, the partitioning coefficient of desorption of PAHs is similar to that of adsorption. However, the other mechanism may be responsible to control the release of PAHs in phase 2.

  13. Threshold character of temperatures on deuterium desorption from the Mg-Zr composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neklyudov, I. M.; Morozov, O. M.; Kulish, V. G.; Zhurba, V. I.; Lomino, N. S.; Ovcharenko, V. D.; Kuprin, O. S.

    2011-06-01

    The plasma evaporation-sputtering method was used to manufacture composite materials of the Mg-Zr system. The ion-implanted deuterium desorption temperature variations depending on the component concentrations were studied. It has been established that the introduction of a Zr impurity to magnesium leads to the significant decrease of the deuterium desorption temperature (~400K) as compared to the release from Mg samples. A step-like form of the curve of the deuterium desorption temperature testifies to presence of two various structural conditions at composite Mg-Zr depending on the relation of components. The hydrogen desorption data obtained using Mg-Zr composites can be used for the further invrstigations into the hydrogen storage materials containing chemical elements with a low solubility in the alloy components.

  14. Activatino of Erbium Films for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    M Brumbach; j Ohlhausen; K Zavadil; C Snow; J Woicik

    2011-12-31

    Hydriding of metals can be routinely performed at high temperature in a rich hydrogen atmosphere. Prior to the hydrogen loading process, a thermal activation procedure is required to promote facile hydrogen sorption into the metal. Despite the wide spread utilization of this activation procedure, little is known about the chemical and electronic changes that occur during activation and how this thermal pretreatment leads to increased rates of hydrogen uptake. This study utilized variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to interrogate the changes during in situ thermal annealing of erbium films, with results confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and low energy ion scattering. Activation can be identified by a large increase in photoemission between the valence band edge and the Fermi level and appears to occur over a two stage process. The first stage involves desorption of contaminants and recrystallization of the oxide, initially impeding hydrogen loading. Further heating overcomes the first stage and leads to degradation of the passive surface oxide leading to a bulk film more accessible for hydrogen loading.

  15. Sodium hypochlorite as an alternative to hydrogen peroxide in Fenton process for industrial scale.

    PubMed

    Behin, Jamshid; Akbari, Abbas; Mahmoudi, Mohsen; Khajeh, Mehdi

    2017-09-15

    In present work, the treatment of aromatic compounds of simulated wastewater was performed by Fenton and NaOCl/Fe(2+) processes. The model solution was prepared based on the wastewater composition of Diisocyanate unit of Karoon Petrochemical Company/Iran containing Diamino-toluenes, Nitro-phenol, Mononitro-toluene, Nitro-cresol, and Dinitro-toluene. Experiments were conducted in a batch mode to examine the effects of operating variables such as pH, oxidant dosages, ferrous ion concentration and numbers of feeding on COD removal. Taguchi experimental design was used to determine the optimum conditions. The COD removal efficiency under optimum conditions (suggested by Taguchi design) in Fenton and NaOCl/Fe(2+) processes was 88.7% and 83.4%, respectively. The highest contribution factor in Fenton process belongs to pH (47.47%) and in NaOCl/Fe(2+) process belongs to NaOCl/pollutants (50.26%). High regression coefficient (R(2): 0.98) obtained for Taguchi method, indicates that models are statistically significant and are in well agreement with each other. The NaOCl/Fe(2+) process utilizing a conventional oxidant, in comparison to hydrogen peroxide, is an efficient cost effective process for COD removal from real wastewater, although the removal efficiency is not as high as in Fenton process; however it is a suitable process to replace Fenton process in industrial scale for wastewater involved aromatic compounds with high COD. This process was successfully applied in Karoon Petrochemical Company/Iran. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of hydrogenation to low-temperature cleaning of the Si(001) surface in the processes of molecular-beam epitaxy: Investigation by scanning tunneling microscopy, reflected high-energy electron diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapkina, L. V.; Krylova, L. A.; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V. A.; Uvarov, O. V.; Yuryev, V. A.

    2012-07-01

    Structural properties of the clean Si(001) surface obtained as a result of low-temperature (470-650 °C) pre-growth annealings of silicon wafers in a molecular-beam epitaxy chamber have been investigated. To decrease the cleaning temperature, a silicon surface was hydrogenated in the process of a preliminary chemical treatment in HF and NH4F aqueous solutions. It has been shown that smooth surfaces composed of wide terraces separated by monoatomic steps can be obtained by dehydrogenation at the temperatures ≳600 °C, whereas clean surfaces obtained at the temperatures <600 °C are rough. It has been found that there exists a dependence of structural properties of clean surfaces on the temperature of hydrogen thermal desorption and the process of the preliminary chemical treatment. The frequency of detachment/attachment of Si dimers from/to the steps and effect of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on ad-dimer migration across steps have been found to be the most probable factors determining a degree of the resultant surface roughness.

  17. High-sensitivity detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed onto soot particles using laser desorption/laser ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry: An approach to studying the soot inception process in low-pressure flames

    SciTech Connect

    Faccinetto, Alessandro; Desgroux, Pascale; Therssen, Eric; Ziskind, Michael; Focsa, Cristian

    2011-02-15

    Species adsorbed at the surfaces of soot particles sampled at different locations in a low-pressure methane flame have been analyzed. The analysis method is laser desorption/laser ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD/LI/TOF-MS) applied to soot particles deposited on a filter after probe extraction in the flame. In order to fully characterize the experimental apparatus, a strategy of systematic investigations has been adopted, beginning with the study of less complex systems constituted by model soot (standard polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs, adsorbed on black carbon), and then natural soot sampled from a literature reference ethylene flame. This characterization allowed a good understanding of the analytical response of PAHs to the desorption and ionization processes and the definition of the optimal experimental conditions. The soot PAH content was then investigated on a low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen premixed flat flame ({phi} = 2.32) as a function of the sampling height above the burner (HAB). The obtained mass spectra are reproducible, fragment-free, well resolved in the analyzed m/z range and they are characterized by an excellent signal-to-noise ratio. They all feature regular peak sequences, where each signal peak has been assigned to the most stable high-temperature-formed PAHs. The structure of the mass spectra depends on the sampling HAB into the flame, i.e., on the reaction time. An original contribution to the data interpretation comes from the development of a new sampling method that makes it possible to infer hypotheses about the PAH partition between the gas phase and the soot particles. This method highlights the presence of high-mass PAHs in the soot nucleation zone, and it suggests the importance of heterogeneous reactions occurring between flame PAHs and soot particles. (author)

  18. Mesons from Laser-Induced Processes in Ultra-Dense Hydrogen H(0)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Large signals of charged light mesons are observed in the laser-induced particle flux from ultra-dense hydrogen H(0) layers. The mesons are formed in such layers on metal surfaces using < 200 mJ laser pulse-energy. The time variation of the signal to metal foil collectors and the magnetic deflection to a movable pin collector are now studied. Relativistic charged particles with velocity up to 500 MeV u-1 thus 0.75 c are observed. Characteristic decay time constants for meson decay are observed, for charged and neutral kaons and also for charged pions. Magnetic deflections agree with charged pions and kaons. Theoretical predictions of the decay chains from kaons to muons in the particle beam agree with the results. Muons are detected separately by standard scintillation detectors in laser-induced processes in ultra-dense hydrogen H(0) as published previously. The muons formed do not decay appreciably within the flight distances used here. Most of the laser-ejected particle flux with MeV energy is not deflected by the magnetic fields and is thus neutral, either being neutral kaons or the ultra-dense HN(0) precursor clusters. Photons give only a minor part of the detected signals. PACS: 67.63.Gh, 14.40.-n, 79.20.Ds, 52.57.-z. PMID:28081199

  19. Mesons from Laser-Induced Processes in Ultra-Dense Hydrogen H(0).

    PubMed

    Holmlid, Leif

    2017-01-01

    Large signals of charged light mesons are observed in the laser-induced particle flux from ultra-dense hydrogen H(0) layers. The mesons are formed in such layers on metal surfaces using < 200 mJ laser pulse-energy. The time variation of the signal to metal foil collectors and the magnetic deflection to a movable pin collector are now studied. Relativistic charged particles with velocity up to 500 MeV u-1 thus 0.75 c are observed. Characteristic decay time constants for meson decay are observed, for charged and neutral kaons and also for charged pions. Magnetic deflections agree with charged pions and kaons. Theoretical predictions of the decay chains from kaons to muons in the particle beam agree with the results. Muons are detected separately by standard scintillation detectors in laser-induced processes in ultra-dense hydrogen H(0) as published previously. The muons formed do not decay appreciably within the flight distances used here. Most of the laser-ejected particle flux with MeV energy is not deflected by the magnetic fields and is thus neutral, either being neutral kaons or the ultra-dense HN(0) precursor clusters. Photons give only a minor part of the detected signals. PACS: 67.63.Gh, 14.40.-n, 79.20.Ds, 52.57.-z.

  20. Catalytic lignin valorization process for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zakzeski, Joseph; Jongerius, Anna L; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2012-08-01

    With dwindling reserves of fossil feedstock as a resource for chemicals production, the fraction of chemicals and energy supplied by alternative, renewable resources, such as lignin, can be expected to increase in the foreseeable future. Here, we demonstrate a catalytic process to valorize lignin (exemplified with kraft, organosolv, and sugarcane bagasse lignin) using a mixture of cheap, bio-renewable ethanol and water as solvent. Ethanol/water mixtures readily solubilize lignin under moderate temperatures and pressures with little residual solids. The molecular weight of the dissolved lignins was shown to be reduced by gel permeation chromatography and quantitative HSQC NMR methods. The use of liquid-phase reforming of the solubilized lignin over a Pt/Al(2)O(3) catalyst at 498 K and 58 bar is introduced to yield up to 17 % combined yield of monomeric aromatic oxygenates such as guaiacol and substituted guaiacols generating hydrogen as a useful by-product. Reduction of the lignin dissolved in ethanol/water using a supported transition metal catalyst at 473 K and 30 bar hydrogen yields up to 6 % of cyclic hydrocarbons and aromatics.