Science.gov

Sample records for hydrogen fluoride samples

  1. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  2. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  3. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  4. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  5. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... the cylinder's water weight capacity. In place of the periodic volumetric expansion test, cylinders...

  6. Electron Collisions with Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2017-03-01

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with hydrogen fluoride. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature, recommended values of the cross sections are determined, as far as possible.

  7. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1972-06-26

    It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

  8. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Bonari, Alessandro; Pompilio, Ilenia; Monti, Alessandro; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS). After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90). In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n = 10, 4.3%), sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter), and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913) were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day) and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation. PMID:27829835

  9. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of about 3 x 10 (exp -10) relative to H, If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for about 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (about 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 mm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H, that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  10. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  11. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  12. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of about 3 x 10 (exp -10) relative to H, If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for about 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (about 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 mm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H, that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  13. Acute toxicity of uranium hexafluoride, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Just, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) released into the atmosphere will react rapidly with moisture in the air to form the hydrolysis products uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Uranium compounds such as UF/sub 6/ and UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ exhibit both chemical toxicity and radiological effects, while HF exhibits only chemical toxicity. This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing the human health consequences of a known acute exposure to a mixture of UF/sub 6/, UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/, and HF. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Determination of Stability Constants of Hydrogen and Aluminum Fluorides with a Fluoride-Selective Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.

    2003-01-06

    The ability to directly determine free fluoride ion concentration (or mean activity) simplifies gathering and interpretation of experimental data for studies of metal complexes. In this work, the new lanthanum fluoride electrode was used to measure free fluoride ion in an investigation of the hydrogen-fluoride and aluminum-fluoride systems in NH4NO3.

  15. Atmospheric chemistry of hydrogen fluoride

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Meng -Dawn

    2017-04-11

    In this study, the atmospheric chemistry, emissions, and surface boundary layer transport of hydrogen fluoride (HF) is summarized. Although HF is known to be chemically reactive and highly soluble, both factors affect transport and removal in the atmosphere, we suggest that the chemistry can be ignored when the HF concentration is at a sufficiently low level (e.g., 10 ppmv). At a low concentration, the capability for HF to react in the atmosphere is diminished and therefore the species can be mathematically treated as inert during the transport. At a sufficiently high concentration of HF (e.g., kg/s release rate and thousandsmore » of ppm), however, HF can go through a series of rigorous chemical reactions including polymerization, depolymerization, and reaction with water to form molecular complex. As such, the HF species cannot be considered as inert because the reactions could intimately influence the plume s thermodynamic properties affecting the changes in plume temperature and density. The atmospheric residence time of HF was found to be less than four (4) days, and deposition (i.e., atmosphere to surface transport) is the dominant mechanism that controls the removal of HF and its oligomers from the atmosphere. The literature data on HF dry deposition velocity was relatively high compared to many commonly found atmospheric species such as ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, etc. The global average of wet deposition velocity of HF was found to be zero based on one literature source. Uptake of HF by rain drops is limited by the acidity of the rain drops, and atmospheric particulate matter contributes negligibly to HF uptake. Finally, given that the reactivity of HF at a high release rate and elevated mole concentration cannot be ignored, it is important to incorporate the reaction chemistry in the near-field dispersion close to the proximity of the release source, and to incorporate the deposition mechanism in the far-field dispersion away from the

  16. Diffusion of hydrogen fluoride in solid parahydrogen.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Yuki; Kuma, Susumu; Kawaguchi, Kentarou; Nakajima, Kyo; Nakano, Itsuo; Sasao, Noboru; Tang, Jian; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2013-06-07

    We studied diffusion of hydrogen fluoride (HF) in solid parahydrogen (pH2) around 4 K. Diffusion rates were determined from time dependence of FT-IR spectra of HF monomers. The absorption of HF monomers shows temporal decay due to dimerization reaction via diffusion. It was found that the rates are affected by the sample temperature, the initial HF concentration, and annealing of samples. The observed non-Arrhenius-type temperature dependence suggests that the diffusion is dominated by a quantum tunneling process, that is, "quantum diffusion." Deceleration of the diffusion in condensed samples and acceleration in annealed samples were also observed. These results can be attributed to the fact that lower periodicity of samples due to impurities or defects suppresses the quantum tunneling. It seems to be difficult to explain the observed dependences by three possible diffusion mechanisms, exchange of chemical bonds, direct cyclic exchange, and exchange with mobile vacancy. Therefore, we propose a hypothetical mechanism by exchange of vacancies originating from quantum effect.

  17. Unusual hydrogen bonding in L-cysteine hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    Minkov, V S; Ghazaryan, V V; Boldyreva, E V; Petrosyan, A M

    2015-08-01

    L-Cysteine hydrogen fluoride, or bis(L-cysteinium) difluoride-L-cysteine-hydrogen fluoride (1/1/1), 2C3H8NO2S(+)·2F(-)·C3H7NO2S·HF or L-Cys(+)(L-Cys···L-Cys(+))F(-)(F(-)...H-F), provides the first example of a structure with cations of the 'triglycine sulfate' type, i.e. A(+)(A···A(+)) (where A and A(+) are the zwitterionic and cationic states of an amino acid, respectively), without a doubly charged counter-ion. The salt crystallizes in the monoclinic system with the space group P2(1). The dimeric (L-Cys···L-Cys(+)) cation and the dimeric (F(-)···H-F) anion are formed via strong O-H···O or F-H···F hydrogen bonds, respectively, with very short O···O [2.4438 (19) Å] and F···F distances [2.2676 (17) Å]. The F···F distance is significantly shorter than in solid hydrogen fluoride. Additionally, there is another very short hydrogen bond, of O-H···F type, formed by a L-cysteinium cation and a fluoride ion. The corresponding O···F distance of 2.3412 (19) Å seems to be the shortest among O-H···F and F-H···O hydrogen bonds known to date. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction study was complemented by IR spectroscopy. Of special interest was the spectral region of vibrations related to the above-mentioned hydrogen bonds.

  18. Intercomparison of measurements of stratospheric hydrogen fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankin, William G.; Coffey, M. T.; Chance, K. V.; Traub, W. A.; Carli, B.; Mencaraglia, F.; Piccioli, S.; Farmer, C. B.; Seals, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the vertical profile of hydrogen fluoride (HF) vapor in the stratosphere and of the vertical column amounts of HF above certain altitudes were made using a variety of spectroscopic instruments in the 1982 and 1983 Balloon Intercomparison Campaigns. Both emission instruments working in the far-infrared spectral region and absorption instruments using solar occultation in the 2.5-micron region were employed. No systematic differences were seen in results from the two spectral regions. A mean profile from 20 - 45 km is presented, with uncertainties ranging from 20 to 50 percent. Total columns measured from ground and from 12 km are consistent with the profile if the mixing ratio for HF is small in the troposphere and low stratosphere.

  19. Intercomparison of measurements of stratospheric hydrogen fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankin, William G.; Coffey, M. T.; Chance, K. V.; Traub, W. A.; Carli, B.; Mencaraglia, F.; Piccioli, S.; Farmer, C. B.; Seals, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the vertical profile of hydrogen fluoride (HF) vapor in the stratosphere and of the vertical column amounts of HF above certain altitudes were made using a variety of spectroscopic instruments in the 1982 and 1983 Balloon Intercomparison Campaigns. Both emission instruments working in the far-infrared spectral region and absorption instruments using solar occultation in the 2.5-micron region were employed. No systematic differences were seen in results from the two spectral regions. A mean profile from 20 - 45 km is presented, with uncertainties ranging from 20 to 50 percent. Total columns measured from ground and from 12 km are consistent with the profile if the mixing ratio for HF is small in the troposphere and low stratosphere.

  20. Hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Research cited from the international literature adresses various aspects of hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Topics covered include flows, laser outputs, molecular relaxation, molecular rotation, energy conversion efficiency, reaction kinetics, and laser materials. Continous wave and pulsed laser are considered. This updated bibliography contains 283 citations, 53 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  1. Hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Research cited from the international literature adresses various aspects of hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Topics covered include flows, laser outputs, molecular relaxation, molecular rotation, energy conversion efficiency, reaction kinetics, and laser materials. Continous wave and pulsed laser are considered. This updated bibliography contains 283 citations, 53 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  2. Methods of controlling hydrogen fluoride pressure during chemical fabrication processes

    DOEpatents

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav [Rocky Point, NY; Wiesmann, Harold [Stony Brook, NY

    2009-11-24

    The present invention is a method for producing a crystalline end-product. The method comprising exposing a fluoride-containing precursor to a hydrogen fluoride absorber under conditions suitable for the conversion of the precursor into the crystalline end-product.

  3. Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention Advisory: Hydrogen Fluoride

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This advisory recommends ways Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs) and chemical facilities can reduce risks posed by the presence of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a strong inorganic acid used to manufacture CFCs, in their communities.

  4. Quantitative infrared analysis of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Manuta, D.M.

    1997-04-01

    This work was performed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant where hydrogen fluoride is produced upon the hydrolysis of UF{sub 6}. This poses a problem for in this setting and a method for determining the mole percent concentration was desired. HF has been considered to be a non-ideal gas for many years. D. F. Smith utilized complex equations in his HF studies in the 1950s. We have evaluated HF behavior as a function of pressure from three different perspectives. (1) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} as a function of pressure for 100% HF. (2) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} as a function of increasing partial pressure HF. Total pressure = 300 mm HgA maintained with nitrogen. (3) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} for constant partial pressure HF. Total pressure is increased to greater than 800 mm HgA with nitrogen. These experiments have shown that at partial pressures up to 35mm HgA, HIF follows the ideal gas law. The absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} can be quantitatively analyzed via infrared methods.

  5. Hydrogen desorption kinetics for aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma processed silicon (001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Carter, Richard J.; Schneider, Thomas P.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    The desorption kinetics of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from silicon (001) surfaces exposed to aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasmas were examined using temperature programmed desorption. Multiple H{sub 2} desorption states were observed and attributed to surface monohydride (SiH), di/trihydride (SiH{sub 2/3}), and hydroxide (SiOH) species, subsurface hydrogen trapped at defects, and hydrogen evolved during the desorption of surface oxides. The observed surface hydride species were dependent on the surface temperature during hydrogen plasma exposure with mono, di, and trihydride species being observed after low temperature exposure (150 °C), while predominantly monohydride species were observed after higher temperature exposure (450 °C). The ratio of surface versus subsurface H{sub 2} desorption was also found to be dependent on the substrate temperature with 150 °C remote hydrogen plasma exposure generally leading to more H{sub 2} evolved from subsurface states and 450 °C exposure leading to more H{sub 2} desorption from surface SiH{sub x} species. Additional surface desorption states were observed, which were attributed to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111) facets formed as a result of surface etching by the remote hydrogen plasma or aqueous hydrogen fluoride treatment. The kinetics of surface H{sub 2} desorption were found to be in excellent agreement with prior investigations of silicon surfaces exposed to thermally generated atomic hydrogen.

  6. Pictorial keys to evaluate foliar injury caused by hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Granett, A.L.

    1982-08-01

    Pictorial keys were developed to aid graders in quantifying leaf injury on plants exposed to high concentrations of hydrogen fluoride gas. The keys were based on a pretransformed rating scale of 1 (no injury) to 12 (death of leaf). 5 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  7. Effects of a documented hydrogen fluoride leak

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    At about 6 a.m. on June 19, 1984, 1037 liters of pressurized HF liquid escaped from a storage tank through a 2 mm diameter hole. 48 hours after the leak was discovered and sealed, visible injury to vegetation was observed 2 miles downwind of the source in a tear drop pattern. Injury symptoms ranged from a slight browning of leaves and needles to death of twigs and leaves and needles. Poplar, white pine, spruce, oak, red maple and several herbaceous plant species were injured. Ragweed was not injured but sensitive fern was severely injured. Goldenrod was also injured but recovered within 3 weeks after exposure. White pine trees within 1/4 of a mile from the source were killed. Fluoride analysis of tissues from upwind and downwind trees and herbaceous plants revealed fluoride tissue levels ranging from 5 to 34,000 ppm. Examples of distance/concentration are given. Soils revealed fluoride levels of about 1 ppm at all locations.

  8. Structural and microscopic relaxation processes in liquid hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    Angelini, R; Giura, P; Monaco, G; Ruocco, G; Sette, F; Verbeni, R

    2002-06-24

    The high frequency collective dynamics of liquid hydrogen fluoride is studied by inelastic x-ray scattering on the coexistence curve at T = 239 K. The comparison with existing molecular dynamics simulations shows the existence of two active relaxation processes with characteristic time scales in the subpicosecond range. The observed scenario is very similar to that found in liquid water. This suggests that hydrogen bonded liquids behave similarly to other very different systems as simple and glass forming liquids, thus indicating that these two relaxation processes are universal features of the liquid state.

  9. Thermodynamic modeling of hydrogen fluoride production relevant to actinide residue treatment

    SciTech Connect

    West, M.H.; Axler, K.M.

    1995-02-01

    This report addresses issues specific to generation of hydrogen fluoride via reaction of calcium fluoride with sulfuric acid. This process has been established on a commercial scale and is under consideration for treatment of calcium fluoride residues from uranium processing. Magnesium fluoride slags are also available as a product of uranium processing. The technique of using sulfuric acid for the production of hydrogen fluoride from magnesium fluoride is also under consideration as a residue processing scheme. In the current study, thermodynamic modeling was used to investigate these chemical processing systems. Results presented herein reveal information relevant to selection of processing temperatures and conditions. Details include predicted effects in system composition based on operating temperatures for both the calcium fluoride and the magnesium fluoride systems.

  10. Atomic layer deposition of magnesium fluoride via bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)magnesium and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Hennessy, John Jewell, April D.; Greer, Frank; Lee, Michael C.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2015-01-15

    A new process has been developed to deposit magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) thin films via atomic layer deposition (ALD) for use as optical coatings in the ultraviolet. MgF{sub 2} was deposited in a showerhead style ALD reactor using bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)magnesium and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) as precursors at substrate temperatures from 100 to 250 °C. The use of HF was observed to result in improved morphology and reduced impurity content compared to other reported MgF{sub 2} ALD approaches that use metal fluoride precursors as the fluorine-containing chemistry. Characterization of these films has been performed using spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for material deposited on silicon substrates. Films at all substrate temperatures were transparent at wavelengths down to 190 nm and the low deposition temperature combined with low surface roughness makes these coatings good candidates for a variety of optical applications in the far ultraviolet.

  11. Development and demonstration of a personal monitoring system for exposure to hydrogen fluoride. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.S.; Monat, J.P.

    1993-09-01

    A good, functional Hydrogen Fluoride Gasbadge dosimeter has been developed for sampling of airborne HF vapor. The device is small (7.7 cm {times} 5.4 cm {times} 1.9 cm) and can easily and conveniently be worn on one`s lapel. It consists of polyethylene and polypropylene parts and a triethanolamine-impregnated polyproylene collection element. It is completely self contained, requiring no pumps, impingers, or sampling tubes. Subsequent to sampling, the collection element is analyzed quickly and easily with a fluoride selective-ion electrode. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine precision, linearity, interference effects, influences of temperature and humidity, and collection element stability over time. Results of the tests indicate that the Abcor Gasbadge HF dosimeter is an excellent passive HF monitor for work spaces, and that results obtained with it are accurate within {plus_minus}25%. These results have been corroborated in a field study.

  12. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Levin, Saurabh; Krishnan, Sunderrajan; Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep

    2016-05-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0-2mgl(-1). Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute Symptoms after a Community Hydrogen Fluoride Spill

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to describe the demographic characteristics, and clinical signs and symptoms of patients who visited a general hospital because of the release of chemically hazardous hydrogen fluoride that occurred on September 27, 2012 in Gumi City, Korea. Methods The medical records at 1 general hospital 9 km from the accident site were reviewed using a standardized survey format. There were 1,890 non-hospitalized and 12 hospitalized patients exposed to hydrogen fluoride between September 27 and October 13 2012. Results Among the 12 hospitalized patients, 11 were discharged within 1 week and the other was hospitalized for 10 days. The chief complaints were respiratory symptoms such as hemoptysis and shortness of breath, gastrointestinal symptoms, neurologic symptoms, sore throat, and lip burn. The number of non-hospitalized patients exhibited a bimodal distribution, peaking on the first and twelfth days after the accident. Their chief complaints were sore throat (24.1%), headache (19.1%), cough (13.1%), and eye irritation (9.2%); some patients were asymptomatic (6.2%). Patients who visited the hospital within 3 days (early patients) of the spill more often had shortness of breath (27.0%) and nausea (6.3%) as the chief complaints than patients who visited after 3 days (late patients) (3.5% and 2.6%, respectively). However, cough and rhinorrhea were more common in the late patients (14.0% and 3.3%, respectively) than in the early patients (5.0% and 0.0%, respectively). Patients who were closer to the accident site more often had shortness of breath and sputum as the chief complaints than patients who were farther away. The mean serum calcium concentration was 9.37 mg/dL (range: 8.4–11.0 mg/dL); none of the patients had a decreased serum calcium level. Among 48 pulmonary function test results, 4 showed decreased lung function. None of the patients had abnormal urine fluoride levels on the eighth day after exposure. Conclusions Patients

  14. First principles Monte Carlo simulations of aggregation in the vapor phase of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, Matthew J.; Ghogomu, Julius. N.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Kuo, I-F. Will; Siepmann, J. Ilja

    2010-01-01

    The aggregation of superheated hydrogen fluoride vapor is explored through the use of Monte Carlo simulations employing Kohn-Sham density functional theory with the exchange/correlation functional of Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr to describe the molecular interactions. Simulations were carried out in the canonical ensemble for a system consisting of ten molecules at constant density (2700 Å3/molecule) and at three different temperatures (T = 310, 350, and 390 K). Aggregation-volume-bias and configurational-bias Monte Carlo approaches (along with pre-sampling with an approximate potential) were employed to increase the sampling efficiency of cluster formation and destruction.

  15. Hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Ti superelastic alloy in fluoride solution.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Nagumo, Michihiko

    2003-05-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Ti superelastic alloy in a fluoride solution (0.2% APF) has been investigated by means of a tensile test (after immersion) and hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. Upon immersion, the tensile strength of the alloy decreased to the critical stress level of martensite transformation. Hydrogen desorption of the immersed specimens appeared with a peak at around 500 degrees C. The amount of absorbed hydrogen in the alloy ranged from 100 to 1000 mass ppm when immersed in the fluoride solution for 2 to 24 h. The immersion in the fluoride solution led to the degradation of mechanical properties due to hydrogen embrittlement. The results of the present study imply that one reason that Ti and its alloys fracture in the oral cavity is the fact that hydrogen is absorbed in a fluoride solution, such as prophylactic agents.

  16. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  17. Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    ... by teeth and helps to strengthen teeth, resist acid, and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose homes have water that is not fluoridated (already has fluoride added). ...

  18. HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Emprechtinger, M.; Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G.; Van der Tak, F. F. S.; Van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Neufeld, D.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2012-09-10

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J = 1-0 toward two high-mass star formation sites, NGC 6334 I and AFGL 2591. In NGC 6334 I the HF line is seen in absorption in foreground clouds and the source itself, while in AFGL 2591 HF is partially in emission. We find an HF abundance with respect to H{sub 2} of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} in the diffuse foreground clouds, whereas in the denser parts of NGC 6334 I we derive a lower limit on the HF abundance of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}. Lower HF abundances in dense clouds are most likely caused by freezeout of HF molecules onto dust grains in high-density gas. In AFGL 2591, the view of the hot core is obstructed by absorption in the massive outflow, in which HF is also very abundant (3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}) due to the desorption by sputtering. These observations provide further evidence that the chemistry of interstellar fluorine is controlled by freezeout onto gas grains.

  19. Saturated Vapor Pressure of Hydrogen Fluoride in the Region of Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, S. M.; Durnovtsev, M. I.; Krainov, A. Yu.

    2017-05-01

    The results of measuring the saturated vapor pressure of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride in the temperature interval 140-190 K are presented. The schematic diagram of a test rig, instrumentation, and the technique of measurements are described.

  20. Analysis of the change in the concentration of fluorine and hydrogen as a result of chemical dehydrofluorination of polyvinylidene fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhivulin, V. E.; Chernov, V. M.; Osipov, A. A.; Shtenberg, M. V.; Evsyukov, S. E.; Pesin, L. A.

    2017-07-01

    Chemical carbonization of polyvinylidene fluoride is necessary for the synthesis on its basis of quasi-one-dimensional carbon structures having a prospect of use in microelectronics. To determine the details of the carbonization process, the concentrations of 19F and 1H nuclei were measured and the changes in the concentration of CF2, CH2, and OH groups in partially dehydrofluorinated polyvinylidene fluoride samples were studied using nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. The efficiency of substitution of fluorine and hydrogen atoms by OH groups in the process of dehydrofluorination of polymer chains is estimated.

  1. Chemical emergency preparedness and prevention advisory: Hydrogen fluoride, series 8, No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The advisory recommends ways Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs) and chemical facilities can reduce risks posed by the presence of hydrogen fluoride (HF) in their communities. Hydrogen fluoride, a strong inorganic acid, is produced and used as a gas or liquid without water (i.e., in anhydrous form), or in a water (aqueous) solution. Inhalation of hydrogen fluoride vapor, either in anhydrous form or from water solutions, can cause irritation if the exposure is mild (i.e., low concentration in air for a short time), or severe damage to the respiratory system or death in the case of exposure to high concentrations. Contact with the liquid or vapor can severely burn the skin, eyes, and other tissue. The largest use of hydrogen fluoride is in the manufacture of fluorine-containing chemicals, particularly chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Hydrogen fluoride may be used in some petroleum refinery operations, aluminum production, nuclear applications, glass etching and polishing, and metal treating and cleaning. Hydrogen fluoride's acute toxicity prompted EPA to list it as an extremely hazardous substance (EHS), with a threshold planning quantity (TPQ) of 100 pounds, under Section 302 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (commonly known as SARA Title III).

  2. Displacement of the proton in hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride by beryllium and magnesium ions

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Sean A. C.

    2009-05-14

    The displacement of the proton by a beryllium ion and by a magnesium ion from hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride, of varying hydrogen bond strengths, was investigated theoretically using ab initio methods. Stable metal-containing species were obtained from all of the hydrogen-bonded complexes regardless of the strength of the hydrogen bond. It was found that the beryllium ion was energetically very effective in displacing the proton from hydrogen bonds, whereas the magnesium ion was unable to do so. The high stability of the beryllium-containing complexes is mainly due to the strong electrostatic bonding between the beryllium and fluoride atoms. This work supports the recent finding from a multidisciplinary bioinorganic study that beryllium displaces the proton in many strong hydrogen bonds.

  3. Displacement of the proton in hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride by beryllium and magnesium ions.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Sean A C

    2009-05-14

    The displacement of the proton by a beryllium ion and by a magnesium ion from hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride, of varying hydrogen bond strengths, was investigated theoretically using ab initio methods. Stable metal-containing species were obtained from all of the hydrogen-bonded complexes regardless of the strength of the hydrogen bond. It was found that the beryllium ion was energetically very effective in displacing the proton from hydrogen bonds, whereas the magnesium ion was unable to do so. The high stability of the beryllium-containing complexes is mainly due to the strong electrostatic bonding between the beryllium and fluoride atoms. This work supports the recent finding from a multidisciplinary bioinorganic study that beryllium displaces the proton in many strong hydrogen bonds.

  4. Epistaxis in a low level hydrogen fluoride exposed industrial staff.

    PubMed

    Graff, Pål; Bozhkov, Georgi; Hedenlöf, Karin; Johannesson, Olof; Flodin, Ulf

    2009-03-01

    To assess the effect of exposure to hydrogen fluoride (HF) on the airway mucosa in an industrial setting. A cross-sectional study encompassing 33 industrial workers in a flame soldering plant and 44 assembly workers unexposed to HF was performed by means of a questionnaire on symptoms and diagnosis regarding upper and lower airways as well as through conduct of a clinical examination of the exposed group. Air concentrations of HF that were monitored in winter amounted to 1.0 mg/m(3) and in summer time to 0.15 mg/m(3). A threefold risk for epistaxis (RR = 3.6, 95% confidence interval 1.1-11.0) was observed in the exposed group. Time from the start of exposure to HF until debut of a nose bleeding period varied from 1 month to 6 years. Mean induction (latency) time was 42 months. Mean duration of symptoms was 26 months, range 3-72 months, indicating that the exposure level in summer time was sufficient to maintain the propensity of almost daily nose bleeding. HF is an irritating vapor, even at relatively low air concentrations. We recommend an 8 hr TLV lower than 1.0 mg/m(3).

  5. Observations of stratospheric hydrogen fluoride by halogen occultation experiment (HALOE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, M.; Cicerone, R. J.; Russel, J. M., III; Huang, T. Y. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) channel on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) is providing the first global measurements of stratospheric HF, the dominant flourine reservoir in the atmosphere. This paper describes the latitudinal and seasonal variations of HALOE-observed HF in terms of vertical profiles, altitude/latitude cross sections, and column abundances. The HF global distribution shows a 'tracerlike' structure and its column amount increases with latitude, in agreement with previous aircraft measurements of the HF column amount. A comparison between the HALOE HF column above 20 km and the ATMOS 1985 measurements is used to estimate the annual rate of increase of stratospheric HF. Exponential rates of 4.9-6.6%/yr and linear growth rates of 6-8.6%/yr in 1985 and 4.3-5.5%/yr in 1992-1993 are found. HALOE HF measurements during the 1993 Antarctic spring are briefly described. This species behaves like a conserved tracer and its distribution shows an area of enhanced mixing ratios correlated with the polar vortex that has a clear latitude boundary. Finally, simulated HF distributions by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) two-dimensional model are used to compare with HALOE observations of HF. Reasonable agreements in the global structure and the absolute amount of HF are found. The differences between the model and the observed results indicate the need for improving treatment of atmospheric dynamics and fluorine-related chemical parameters in the model simulations.

  6. Observations of stratospheric hydrogen fluoride by halogen occultation experiment (HALOE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, M.; Cicerone, R. J.; Russel, J. M., III; Huang, T. Y. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) channel on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) is providing the first global measurements of stratospheric HF, the dominant flourine reservoir in the atmosphere. This paper describes the latitudinal and seasonal variations of HALOE-observed HF in terms of vertical profiles, altitude/latitude cross sections, and column abundances. The HF global distribution shows a 'tracerlike' structure and its column amount increases with latitude, in agreement with previous aircraft measurements of the HF column amount. A comparison between the HALOE HF column above 20 km and the ATMOS 1985 measurements is used to estimate the annual rate of increase of stratospheric HF. Exponential rates of 4.9-6.6%/yr and linear growth rates of 6-8.6%/yr in 1985 and 4.3-5.5%/yr in 1992-1993 are found. HALOE HF measurements during the 1993 Antarctic spring are briefly described. This species behaves like a conserved tracer and its distribution shows an area of enhanced mixing ratios correlated with the polar vortex that has a clear latitude boundary. Finally, simulated HF distributions by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) two-dimensional model are used to compare with HALOE observations of HF. Reasonable agreements in the global structure and the absolute amount of HF are found. The differences between the model and the observed results indicate the need for improving treatment of atmospheric dynamics and fluorine-related chemical parameters in the model simulations.

  7. Three dimensional simulation of hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, Jack A.; Rood, Richard B.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Allen, Dale J.; Larson, Edmund M.; Coffey, Michael T.; Mankin, William G.; Toon, Geoffrey C.

    1990-01-01

    Simulations of the evolution of stratospheric distributions of hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) have been carried out for the period of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) with a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model. Simulations were performed assuming only homogeneous gas phase chemistry for HF and both homogeneous gas phase and heterogeneous chemistry for HCl. Results show heterogeneous loss of HCl is needed to provide agreement with infrared column measurements. Estimates of the impact of heterogeneous loss on the global HCl distribution are obtained from the model. Reductions of HCl due to heterogeneous loss are calculated to be localized to regions of high vorticity, even after more than a month of integration.

  8. Three dimensional simulation of hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, Jack A.; Rood, Richard B.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Allen, Dale J.; Larson, Edmund M.; Coffey, Michael T.; Mankin, William G.; Toon, Geoffrey C.

    1990-01-01

    Simulations of the evolution of stratospheric distributions of hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) have been carried out for the period of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) with a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model. Simulations were performed assuming only homogeneous gas phase chemistry for HF and both homogeneous gas phase and heterogeneous chemistry for HCl. Results show heterogeneous loss of HCl is needed to provide agreement with infrared column measurements. Estimates of the impact of heterogeneous loss on the global HCl distribution are obtained from the model. Reductions of HCl due to heterogeneous loss are calculated to be localized to regions of high vorticity, even after more than a month of integration.

  9. Hydrogen fluoride saccharification of wood: lignin fluoride content, isolation of. cap alpha. -D-glucopyranosyl fluoride and posthydrolysis of reversion products

    SciTech Connect

    Hardt, H.; Lamport, D.J.A.

    1982-04-01

    Wood chips from bigtooth aspen (Populus grandidentata Michx.) were saccharified by reaction with hydrogen fluoride either anhydrous or containing up to 10% v/v water. The reaction products were separated into a solid lignin fraction and a water-soluble saccharide fraction. The fluoride content of the lignin (determined after alkaline fusion) was initially about 1 mg/g wood, but was lowered to 0.1 mg/g wood by grinding and washing. Thus little or no chemical binding of fluoride to lignin occurred during hydrogen fluoride (HF) solvolysis. Analysis of the water-soluble fraction by gel filtration on Biogel P2 columns showed a range of low-molecular-weight oligosaccharides an only 10-20% sugar monomers. Thus considerable reversion occurred during HF evacuation. Posthydrolysis conditions were optimized for these reversion products by varying temperature and acid concentration. Optimal conditions at 1 h were 140/sup 0/C with 100mN sulfuric acid or 225mN hydrofluoric acid resulting in monomer yields of > 90% for 0.5% sugar solutions and > 80% for 10% sugar solutions. After reaction of pure cellulose (filter paper) with hydrogen fluoride in the absence of water, and terminating the reaction with calcium carbonate, the reaction intermediate ..cap alpha..-D-glucopyranosylfluride was isolated with a maximal yield of 0.2 g/g paper. Upon purification via paper chromatography glucosyfluoride was identified by its specific rotation and also by gas chromotography-mass spectrometer of its tetra-O-trimethylsilyl derivative.

  10. Exposure to hydrogen fluoride: an experimental study in humans of concentrations of fluoride in plasma, symptoms, and lung function.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, K; Ekstrand, J; Boe, J; Søstrand, P; Kongerud, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the absorption of inhaled hydrogen fluoride (HF) by measuring plasma fluorides and HF concentrations in the breathing zone during exposure to HF. A possible dose-effect relation was investigated by following airway symptoms and lung function-that is, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC)-during and after exposure to HF. METHODS: 20 healthy, male volunteers were exposed for one hour to constant HF concentrations that ranged from 0.2 to 5.2 mg/m3; these concentrations are known to occur among potroom workers in the primary aluminium industry. Plasma fluorides were analysed before, during, and after exposure. Symptoms from the eyes and the upper and lower airways were registered and graded from 1 to 5 with a standardised questionnaire. RESULTS: The total symptom score was significantly increased at the end of exposure for all the subjects as a group (P < 0.01) and for the group exposed to HF below the present Norwegian standard for total fluorides 0.6 mg/m3 (P = 0.05). No change was detected in FEV15 although a significant decrease was found in FVC in the group exposed to fluorides below the hygienic standard (n = 9) and for the entire group (n = 23). Almost all the symptoms had disappeared four hours after the end of exposure. Symptom scores from the upper airways were significantly correlated with the HF concentration (r = 0.62, P = 0.002), the change in plasma fluoride concentration (delta C) (r = 0.51, P = 0.01), and the maximum plasma fluoride concentration (Cmax) (r = 0.42, P = 0.05). A significant correlation was also found between the total symptom score for airways and the HF concentration. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed a strong relation between inhaled HF and concentrations of fluoride in plasma. Upper airway and eye symptoms occurred after one hour of exposure to HF even when below the Norwegian hygienic standard for fluorides. PMID:9072031

  11. Observations of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride and Hydrogen Chloride in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monje, Raquel R.; Lis, Darek C.; Phillips, Thomas G.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Emprechtinger, Martin; Neufeld, David A.

    2011-06-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of interstellar hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) along the line-of-sight towards Galactic sources with strong submillimeter continuum emission from the PRISMAS and HEXOS GT KP. The halogen-containing molecules are of special interest because of their unique thermochemistry and their important role as tracers of the neutral ISM. The detection of foreground absorption by HF J = 1--0 transition line in each source probes the distribution of HF throughout the Milky Way, in diffuse clouds with varying values of the visual extinction, as a potential valuable surrogate for molecular hydrogen. For the optically thin absorption components we calculate the column densities of HF. We find that, in many of the background clouds, the abundances of HF with respect to H_2 is consistent with the theoretical prediction that HF is the main reservoir of gas-phase fluorine for these clouds. Observations of hydrogen chloride isotopologues, H35Cl and H37Cl J = 1--0 transition line at different galactocentric distances provide insights of how elemental abundances change with location in the Galaxy. We model the HCl observations with a non-LTE radiative transfer model to derive gas densities and HCl column densities for sources with HCl emission. Interstellar HCl abundances and isotopic ratios [Cl35/Cl37] are essential for improving our understanding of stellar nucleosynthesis and global chemical enrichment and evolution in the Galaxy.

  12. Effect of hydrogen fluoride inhalation on lipid metabolism in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Philibert, C.; Dousset, J.C.; Rioufol, C.; Bourbon, P. )

    1991-01-01

    The action of fluoride in vivo (exposure 96 hrs to 7 mg/m3) on the metabolism of cyclic AMP and relationship between cAMP and lipid metabolism was investigated. The mean values for cAMP, non esterified fatty acids and cholesterol were significantly increased after hydrogen fluoride exposure. cAMP is directly responsible for the increased lipolysis. In animals exposed to HF, theophylline injection causes increases of non esterified fatty acids and not produces modification of cholesterol level.

  13. A novel colorimetric fluoride sensor based on a semi-rigid chromophore controlled by hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiling; Xu, Xiaoyong; Shao, Xusheng; Li, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    A novel semi-rigid latent chromophore E1, containing an amide subunit activated by an adjacent semi-rigid intramolecular hydrogen-bonding (IHB) unit, was designed for the detection of fluoride ion by the 'naked-eye' in CH3CN. Comparative studies on structural analogs (E2, E3, and E4) provided significant insight into the structural and functional role of the amide N-H and IHB segment in the selective recognition of fluoride ions. The deprotonation of the amide N-H followed by the enhancement of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) induced the colorimetric detection of E1 for fluoride ion.

  14. Short-term effects of hydrogen fluoride on Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Döğeroğlu, Tuncay; Ciçek, Arzu; Kara, Serap

    2003-09-01

    Data on the short-term effects of fumigation with hydrogen fluoride (HF) on the response behavior of the Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. St. Karabalar 6265 are being presented. Growth rate, fluoride accumulation in leaves and soils, and degradation in chlorophyll and nicotine contents of the plant species against the variations in two experimental factors, namely the exposure concentration and exposure time parameters, were investigated. Resulting data reveals that the variety selected for this study is not so tolerant to fluoride as generally reported in the literature, if only the individual effects of the pollutant is considered.

  15. Evaluation of hydrogenation properties on MgHx-transition metal fluoride composites by planetary ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Min-Hyuk; Park, So-Hyun; Kim, Whan-Gi; Hong, Tae-Whan

    2015-11-01

    To improve the disadvantages of Mg hydrides, a few studies were conducted for MgHx intermixed with transition metal fluorides. MgF2 formed from the MgHx-transition metal fluoride system can be replaces the initial surface oxide layer and provides a reactive and protective fluorinated surface for for hydrogen uptake. Thus, the absorption/desorption kinetics will be enhanced. In this research, MgHx-transition metal fluoride composites mixture has been prepared by hydrogen induced planetary ball milling. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy and simultaneous thermogravimetric, differential scanning calorimetric analysis. The hydrogenation behaviors were evaluated by using a sievert's type automatic pressure-composition-temperature apparatus without any activation treatment. From the characteristics of the absorption kinetics and curves observed, the role of transition metal fluoride was catalyst in hydrogen absorption. The results of Pressure-Composition Isotherm curve, available hydrogen storage amount for MgHx-5 vol% CoF2 composites were 4.85 wt%, for MgHx-5 vol%TiF3 composites were 4.88 wt%. at 623K in the 5th cycle.

  16. Thermodynamics of the conversion of calcium and magnesium fluorides to the parent metal oxides and hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    West, M.H.; Axler, K.M.

    1997-02-01

    The authors have used thermodynamic modeling to examine the reaction of calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) and magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) with water (H{sub 2}O) at elevated temperatures. The calculated, equilibrium composition corresponds to the global free-energy minimum for the system. Optimum, predicted reaction temperatures and reactant mole ratios are reported for the recovery of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a valuable industrial feedstock. Complete conversion of MgF{sub 2} is found at 1,000 C and a ratio of 40 moles of H{sub 2}O per 1 mole of MgF{sub 2}. For CaF{sub 2}, temperatures as high as 1,400 C are required for complete conversion at a corresponding mole ratio of 40 moles of H{sub 2}O per 1 mole of CaF{sub 2}. The authors discuss the presence of minor chemical constituents as well as the stability of various potential container materials for the pyrohydrolysis reactions at elevated temperatures. CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} slags are available as wastes at former uranium production facilities within the Department of Energy Complex and other facilities regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Recovery of HF from these wastes is an example of environmental remediation at such facilities.

  17. The Contrasting Character of Early and Late Transition Metal Fluorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dan A; Beweries, Torsten; Blasius, Clemens; Jasim, Naseralla; Nazir, Ruqia; Nazir, Sadia; Robertson, Craig C; Whitwood, Adrian C; Hunter, Christopher A; Brammer, Lee; Perutz, Robin N

    2015-09-16

    The association constants and enthalpies for the binding of hydrogen bond donors to group 10 transition metal complexes featuring a single fluoride ligand (trans-[Ni(F)(2-C5NF4)(PR3)2], R = Et 1a, Cy 1b, trans-[Pd(F)(4-C5NF4)(PCy3)2] 2, trans-[Pt(F){2-C5NF2H(CF3)}(PCy3)2] 3 and of group 4 difluorides (Cp2MF2, M = Ti 4a, Zr 5a, Hf 6a; Cp*2MF2, M = Ti 4b, Zr 5b, Hf 6b) are reported. These measurements allow placement of these fluoride ligands on the scales of organic H-bond acceptor strength. The H-bond acceptor capability β (Hunter scale) for the group 10 metal fluorides is far greater (1a 12.1, 1b 9.7, 2 11.6, 3 11.0) than that for group 4 metal fluorides (4a 5.8, 5a 4.7, 6a 4.7, 4b 6.9, 5b 5.6, 6b 5.4), demonstrating that the group 10 fluorides are comparable to the strongest organic H-bond acceptors, such as Me3NO, whereas group 4 fluorides fall in the same range as N-bases aniline through pyridine. Additionally, the measurement of the binding enthalpy of 4-fluorophenol to 1a in carbon tetrachloride (-23.5 ± 0.3 kJ mol(-1)) interlocks our study with Laurence's scale of H-bond basicity of organic molecules. The much greater polarity of group 10 metal fluorides than that of the group 4 metal fluorides is consistent with the importance of pπ-dπ bonding in the latter. The polarity of the group 10 metal fluorides indicates their potential as building blocks for hydrogen-bonded assemblies. The synthesis of trans-[Ni(F){2-C5NF3(NH2)}(PEt3)2], which exhibits an extended chain structure assembled by hydrogen bonds between the amine and metal-fluoride groups, confirms this hypothesis.

  18. Physics and Chemistry of the Hydrogen Fluoride Production Process from Fluorine Containing Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, A. N.; Kraydenko, R. I.; Lesnikova, M. S.; Malyutin, L. N.; Petlin, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the aluminum industry wastes on the environment is established. The resource efficient method of aluminum industry fluorine-containing wastes processing, which includes wastes oxidizing roasting to remove carbon component and the interaction of fluorine- containing particles with sulfuric acid in order to produce hydrogen fluoride, is considered. The economic and environmental effect of the proposed processing method is substantiated.

  19. Inhibition of hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Ti superelastic alloy in acid fluoride solution by hydrogen peroxide addition.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Yazaki, Yushin; Sakai, Jun'ichi

    2011-09-01

    Inhibition of the hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Ti superelastic alloy in an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) solution has been attempted by adding various amounts of H(2)O(2). In a 0.2% APF solution, hydrogen absorption is markedly inhibited by adding H(2)O(2), although corrosion is slightly enhanced by increasing the amount of added H(2)O(2). By adding a small amount of H(2)O(2) (0.001 M), in the early stage of immersion, hydrogen embrittlement is inhibited and corrosion is only slightly enhanced. Upon adding H(2)O(2), it appears that the dominant cathodic reactions change from hydrogen evolution to H(2)O(2) reduction reactions, or the surface conditions of the alloy are changed by H(2)O(2) with a high oxidation capability, thereby inhibiting hydrogen absorption. The present study clearly indicates that infinitesimal addition of H(2)O(2) into acid fluoride solutions is effective for the inhibition of the hydrogen embrittlement of the alloy.

  20. Structural and dynamical properties of hydrogen fluoride in aqueous solution: an ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Kritayakornupong, Chinapong; Vchirawongkwin, Viwat; Hofer, Thomas S; Rode, Bernd M

    2008-09-25

    The novel ab initio quantum mechanical charge field (QMCF) molecular dynamics simulation at the Hartree-Fock level has been employed to investigate hydration structure and dynamics of hydrogen fluoride in aqueous solution. The average H-F bond length of 0.93 A obtained from the QMCF MD simulation is in good agreement with the experimental data. The HHF...Ow distance of 1.62 A was evaluated for the first hydration shell, and 2.00 A was observed for the FHF...Hw distance. The stability of hydrogen bonding is more pronounced in the hydrogen site of hydrogen fluoride, with a single water molecule in this part of the first hydration shell. A wide range of coordination numbers between 3 and 9 with an average value of 5.6 was obtained for the fluorine site. The force constants of 819.1 and 5.9 N/m were obtained for the HHF-FHF and HHF...Ow interactions, respectively, proving the stability of the nondissociated form of hydrogen fluoride in aqueous solution. The mean residence times of 2.1 and 2.5 ps were determined for ligand exchange processes in the neighborhood of fluorine and hydrogen atoms of hydrogen fluoride, respectively, indicating a weak structure-making effect of hydrogen fluoride in water. The corresponding H-bond lifetimes attribute this effect to the H atom site of HF.

  1. Acute Symptoms in Firefighters who Participated in Collection Work after the Community Hydrogen Fluoride Spill Accident

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to analyze the relationship between clinical status and work characteristics of firefighters and other public officers who engaged on collection duties in the site of the hydrogen fluoride spill that occurred on September 27, 2012, in Gumi City, South Korea. Methods We investigated the clinical status, personal history, and work characteristics of the study subjects and performed physical examination and several clinical examinations, including chest radiography, echocardiography, pulmonary function test, and blood testing in 348 firefighters, police officers, volunteer firefighters, and special warfare reserved force who worked at the hydrogen fluoride spill area. Results The subjects who worked near the accident site more frequently experienced eye symptoms (p = 0.026), cough (p = 0.017), and headache (p = 0.003) than the subjects who worked farther from the accident site. The longer the working hours at the accident area, the more frequently the subjects experienced pulmonary (p = 0.027), sputum (p = 0.043), and vomiting symptoms (p = 0.003). The subjects who did not wear respiratory protective devices more frequently experienced dyspnea than those who wore respiratory protective devices (p = 0.013). In the pulmonary function test, the subjects who worked near the accident site had a higher decease in forced vital capacity than the subjects who worked farther from the site (p = 0.019); however, no statistical association was found between serum calcium/phosphate level, echocardiography result, chest radiographic result, and probation work characteristics. Conclusions The subjects who worked near the site of the hydrogen fluoride spill, worked for an extended period, or worked without wearing respiratory protective devices more frequently experienced upper/lower respiratory, gastrointestinal, and neurological symptoms. Further follow-up examination is needed for the workers who were exposed to hydrogen

  2. Environmental monitoring of fluoride emissions using precipitation, dust, plant and soil samples.

    PubMed

    Franzaring, J; Hrenn, H; Schumm, C; Klumpp, A; Fangmeier, A

    2006-11-01

    A pollution gradient was observed in precipitation, plants and soils sampled at different locations around a fluoride producing chemical plant in Germany. In all samples the influence of emissions was discernible up to a distance of 500 m from the plant. However, fluoride concentrations in plant bioindicators (leaves of birch and black berry) and in bulk precipitation showed a more pronounced relationship with the distance from the source than fluoride concentrations in soil. Vegetables sampled in the vicinity of the plant also had elevated concentrations of fluoride, but only the consumption of larger quantities of this material would lead to exceedances of recommended daily F-intake. The present study did not indicate the existence of low phytotoxicity thresholds for fluoride in the plant species used in the study. Even at very high fluoride concentrations in leaf tissue (963 ppm) plants did not show injury due to HF. Dust sampling downwind of the chemical plant confirmed that particulate fluoride was of minor importance in the study area.

  3. First principles simulation of a superionic phase of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N; Fried, L E

    2006-04-10

    The authors have conducted Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at pressures of 5-66 GPa along the 900 K isotherm. They predict a superionic phase at 33 GPa, where the fluorine atoms are fixed in a bcc lattice while the hydrogen atoms diffuse rapidly with a diffusion constant of between 2 x 10{sup -5} and 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s. They find that a transformation from asymmetric to symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs in HF at 66 GPa and 900 K. With superionic HF they have discovered a model system where symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs at experimentally achievable conditions. Given previous results on superionic H{sub 2}O[1,2,3] and NH{sub 3}[1], they conclude that high P,T superionic phases of electronegative element hydrides could be common.

  4. Determination of Fluoride and Chloride in NU Sample Matrices by Ion Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.

    2003-05-21

    This study is a demonstration of fluoride and chloride determinations in natural uranium (NU) sample matrices as part of technical task request FSS-ALD-2002-00025 deliverable from Central Laboratory Services.

  5. Determination of Fluoride and Chloride in LEU Sample Matrices by Ion Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.

    2002-12-06

    This study is a demonstration of fluoride and chloride determinations in Low Enriched Uranium sample matrices as part of technical task request FSS-ALD-2002-00025 deliverable from Central Laboratory Services.

  6. Ion chromatographic measurement of fluoride and sulfur dioxide in samples collected at aluminum smelters

    SciTech Connect

    Balya, D.R. )

    1991-08-01

    Measurement of airborne fluoride and sulfur dioxide in aluminum smelting plants is important for both industrial hygiene and environmental reasons. The traditional analytical techniques employed have been ion-selective electrodes (ISE) for fluoride and barium/thorin titration for SO2. In this study, ion chromatography (IC) was evaluated as a substitute for these two techniques. Dust for particulate fluoride was collected on membrane filters with carbonate-treated backup pads to collect HF and SO2. Gaseous fluoride and SO2 were ultrasonically extracted from the treated pad, but particulate fluoride required a borate/carbonate fusion. Collection efficiency and recovery of the analytes, along with the acceptable working ranges and instrument conditions used with IC, are discussed. IC is a desirable substitute for the electrode and titration methods because it is easily automated and the two determinations may be performed simultaneously. Organic compounds may cause interference in low-level fluoride measurement. Comparison of the techniques for field samples indicates that IC is an adequate substitute for the traditional measurement methods for full-shift samples of fluoride.

  7. Solid phase extraction-spectrophotometric determination of fluoride in water samples using magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Parham, H; Rahbar, N

    2009-12-15

    A new, sensitive, fast and simple method using magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs), as an adsorbent has been developed for extraction, preconcentration and determination of traces of fluoride ions. The determination method is based on the discoloration of Fe(III)-SCN complex with extracted fluoride ions which was subsequently monitored spectrophotometrically at lambda(max)=458 nm. Various parameters affecting the adsorption of fluoride by the MIONs have been investigated, such as pH of the solution, type, volume and concentration of desorbing reagent, amount of adsorbent and interference effects. A linear response for the determination of fluoride was achieved in the concentration range of 0.040-1.250 microg mL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) for fluoride based on 3 times and 10 times the standard deviation of the blank (3S(b), 10S(b)) were 0.015 and 0.042 microg mL(-1) (n=20) for fluoride ion, respectively. A preconcentration factor of 50 was achieved in this method. The proposed procedure has been applied for determination of fluoride concentration in various water samples. The results obtained from this method were successfully compared with those provided by standard SPADNS method.

  8. Quantum monte carlo study of the energetics of small hydrogenated and fluoride lithium clusters.

    PubMed

    Moreira, N L; Brito, B G A; Rabelo, J N Teixeira; Cândido, Ladir

    2016-06-30

    An investigation of the energetics of small lithium clusters doped either with a hydrogen or with a fluorine atom as a function of the number of lithium atoms using fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) simulation is reported. It is found that the binding energy (BE) for the doped clusters increases in absolute values leading to a more stable system than for the pure ones in excellent agreement with available experimental measurements. The BE increases for pure, remains almost constant for hydrogenated, and decreases rapidly toward the bulk lithium for the fluoride as a function of the number of lithium atoms in the clusters. The BE, dissociation energy as well as the second difference in energy display a pronounced odd-even oscillation with the number of lithium atoms. The electron correlation inverts the odd-even oscillation pattern for the doped in comparison with the pure clusters and has an impact of 29%-83% to the BE being higher in the pure cluster followed by the hydrogenated and then by the fluoride. The dissociation energy and the second difference in energy indicate that the doped cluster Li3 H is the most stable whereas among the pure ones the more stable are Li2 , Li4 , and Li6 . The electron correlation energy is crucial for the stabilization of Li3 H. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Rugged, Portable, Real-Time Optical Gaseous Analyzer for Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey; Gonzales, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a primary evolved combustion product of fluorinated and perfluorinated hydrocarbons. HF is produced during combustion by the presence of impurities and hydrogen- containing polymers including polyimides. This effect is especially dangerous in closed occupied volumes like spacecraft and submarines. In these systems, combinations of perfluorinated hydrocarbons and polyimides are used for insulating wiring. HF is both highly toxic and short-lived in closed environments due to its reactivity. The high reactivity also makes HF sampling problematic. An infrared optical sensor can detect promptly evolving HF with minimal sampling requirements, while providing both high sensitivity and high specificity. A rugged optical path length enhancement architecture enables both high HF sensitivity and rapid environmental sampling with minimal gaseous contact with the low-reactivity sensor surfaces. The inert optical sample cell, combined with infrared semiconductor lasers, is joined with an analog and digital electronic control architecture that allows for ruggedness and compactness. The combination provides both portability and battery operation on a simple camcorder battery for up to eight hours. Optical detection of gaseous HF is confounded by the need for rapid sampling with minimal contact between the sensor and the environmental sample. A sensor is required that must simultaneously provide the required sub-parts-permillion detection limits, but with the high specificity and selectivity expected of optical absorption techniques. It should also be rugged and compact for compatibility with operation onboard spacecraft and submarines. A new optical cell has been developed for which environmental sampling is accomplished by simply traversing the few mm-thick cell walls into an open volume where the measurement is made. A small, low-power fan or vacuum pump may be used to push or pull the gaseous sample into the sample volume for a response time of a few

  10. Hydrogen embrittlement of work-hardened Ni-Ti alloy in fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Ogawa, Toshio; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of work-hardened Ni-Ti alloy has been examined in acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) solutions. Upon immersion in a 2.0% APF solution with a pH of 5.0, tensile strength decreased markedly with immersion time. Moreover, the fracture mode changed from ductile to brittle due to brittle layer formation at the peripheral part of the cross section of the specimen. The amount of absorbed hydrogen increased linearly with immersion time, and it reached above 5000 mass ppm after 24 h. The hydrogen desorption temperature of the immersed specimens shifted from 450 degrees C to a lower temperature with immersion time. As the amount of absorbed hydrogen was larger than 500 mass ppm, the degradation of mechanical properties was recognized. Although the tensile properties and fracture mode scarcely change in a 0.2% APF solution, the slight reduction in hardness and hydrogen absorption of several hundreds mass ppm were observed. The results of the present study imply that work-hardened Ni-Ti alloy is less sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement compared with Ni-Ti superelastic alloy.

  11. Test-strip-based fluorometric detection of fluoride in aqueous media with a BODIPY-linked hydrogen-bonding receptor.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, Pichandi; Weißhoff, Hardy; Kraus, Werner; Rurack, Knut

    2014-02-17

    The measurement of biologically relevant anions, such as fluoride, is an important task in analytical chemistry, in particular, for dental health and osteoporosis. Although a large number of fluoride probes are known, the applicability under relevant conditions is limited to a few examples. To improve this situation, BODIPY-amidothiourea dyes with varying hydrogen-bond donating strengths were developed, the most H-acidic of which (1 c) could detect F(-) from an inorganic source (NaF) in 50 % aqueous solution (DMSO/water 1:1, v/v) with 0.01 ppm sensitivity through selective fluorescence quenching by a photoinduced electron-transfer (PET) process. Use of the probe and a reference dye with a test-strip assay and a portable and rapidly recording lateral-flow fluorescence reader made determination of F(-) in neat aqueous solutions, such as spiked water samples and toothpaste extracts, possible in a self-referenced manner, achieving a detection limit of 0.2 ppm.

  12. HERSCHEL/HIFI OBSERVATIONS OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE TOWARD SAGITTARIUS B2(M)

    SciTech Connect

    Monje, R. R.; Emprechtinger, M.; Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Bergin, E. A.; Bell, T. A.; Neufeld, D. A.; Sonnentrucker, P.

    2011-06-10

    Herschel/HIFI observations have revealed the presence of widespread absorption by hydrogen fluoride (HF) J = 1-0 rotational transition, toward a number of Galactic sources. We present observations of HF J = 1-0 toward the high-mass star-forming region Sagittarius B2(M). The spectrum obtained shows a complex pattern of absorption, with numerous features covering a wide range of local standard of rest velocities (-130 to 100 km {sup -1}). An analysis of this absorption yields HF abundances relative to H{sub 2} of {approx}1.3 x 10{sup -8}, in most velocity intervals. This result is in good agreement with estimates from chemical models, which predict that HF should be the main reservoir of gas-phase fluorine under a wide variety of interstellar conditions. Interestingly, we also find velocity intervals in which the HF spectrum shows strong absorption features that are not present, or are very weak, in spectra of other molecules, such as {sup 13}CO (1-0) and CS (2-1). HF absorption reveals components of diffuse clouds with small extinction that can be studied for the first time. Another interesting observation is that water is significantly more abundant than hydrogen fluoride over a wide range of velocities toward Sagittarius B2(M), in contrast to the remarkably constant H{sub 2}O/HF abundance ratio with average value close to unity measured toward other Galactic sources.

  13. Formation of H a - hydrogen centers upon additive coloration of alkaline-earth fluoride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzhabov, E. A.; Egranov, A. V.; Shendrik, R. Yu.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanism of coloration of alkaline-earth fluoride crystals CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2 in calcium vapors in an autoclave with a cold zone is studied. It was found that the pressure in the autoclave upon constant evacuation by a vacuum pump within the temperature range of 500-800°C increases due to evaporation of metal calcium. In addition to the optical-absorption bands of color centers in the additively colored undoped crystals or to the bands of divalent ions in the crystals doped with rare-earth Sm, Yb, and Tm elements, there appear intense bands in the vacuum ultraviolet region at 7.7, 7.0, and 6.025 eV in CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2, respectively. These bands belong to the Ha - hydrogen centers. The formation of hydrogen centers is also confirmed by the appearance of the EPR signal of interstitial hydrogen atoms after X-ray irradiation of the additively colored crystals. Grinding of the outer edges of the colored crystals leads to a decrease in the hydrogen absorption-band intensity with depth to complete disappearance. The rate of hydrogen penetration inside the crystal is lower than the corresponding rate of color centers (anion vacancies) by a factor of tens. The visible color density of the outer regions of the hydrogen-containing crystals is several times lower than that of the inner region due to the competition between the color centers and hydrogen centers.

  14. Intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in pyrrolylindandione derivatives and their interaction with fluoride and acetate: possible anion sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Sigalov, Mark V; Shainyan, Bagrat A; Chipanina, Nina N; Oznobikhina, Larisa P

    2013-11-07

    The series of push-pull compounds containing the pyrrole ring as a donor and the 1,3-indandione derived moieties as the acceptor unit were synthesized, and strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding in their molecules was studied. In the presence of fluoride and acetate anions their solutions undergo color changes. It was shown by NMR, UV-vis, and quantum chemical calculations including AIM analysis that all these compounds undergo solvent-assisted rupture of the intramolecular hydrogen bond followed by the formation of a strong intermolecular hydrogen bond with fluoride and acetate anions which finally abstract a proton from the pyrrole ring. The insensitivity of the studied compounds to other anions (Cl, Br, HSO4, PF6) is consequence of the instability of the corresponding hydrogen-bonded complexes.

  15. Hydrogen absorption of titanium and nickel-titanium alloys during long-term immersion in neutral fluoride solution.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Ogawa, Toshio; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi

    2006-07-01

    Hydrogen absorption of biomedical titanium and Ni-Ti alloys in a neutral fluoride (2.0% NaF) solution for up to 10,000 h at 37 degrees C has been evaluated by means of hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. For alpha titanium (commercial pure titanium), the amount of absorbed hydrogen was, at most, 10-30 mass ppm, and the corrosion product and hydride formation were revealed on the surface of the specimen by X-ray diffraction analysis. Ni-Ti superelastic alloy absorbed approximately 150 mass ppm of hydrogen, which was probably sufficient to result in the pronounced degradation of the mechanical properties, although corrosion was hardly observed. In contrast, hydrogen absorption of alpha-beta titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) and beta titanium (Ti-11.3Mo-6.6Zr-4.3Sn) alloys was negligible, although general corrosion was observed. The results of the present study indicate that the susceptibility of titanium and Ni-Ti alloys to hydrogen absorption in the neutral fluoride solution is different from that in the acidic fluoride solution reported previously.

  16. Liquid structures of water, methanol, and hydrogen fluoride at ambient conditions from first principles molecular dynamics simulations with a dispersion corrected density functional.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Matthew J; Kuo, I-Feng William; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2011-11-28

    Using first principles molecular dynamics simulations in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble (T = 300 K, p = 1 atm) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr exchange/correlation functional and a dispersion correction due to Grimme, the hydrogen bonding networks of pure liquid water, methanol, and hydrogen fluoride are probed. Although an accurate density is found for water with this level of electronic structure theory, the average liquid densities for both hydrogen fluoride and methanol are overpredicted by 50 and 25%, respectively. The radial distribution functions indicate somewhat overstructured liquid phases for all three compounds. The number of hydrogen bonds per molecule in water is about twice as high as for methanol and hydrogen fluoride, though the ratio of cohesive energy over number of hydrogen bonds is lower for water. An analysis of the hydrogen-bonded aggregates revealed the presence of mostly linear chains in both hydrogen fluoride and methanol, with a few stable rings and chains spanning the simulation box in the case of hydrogen fluoride. Only an extremely small fraction of smaller clusters was found for water, indicating that its hydrogen bond network is significantly more extensive. A special form of water with on average about two hydrogen bonds per molecule yields a hydrogen-bonding environment significantly different from the other two compounds.

  17. Development of Methods for Sampling and Analysis of Particulate and Gaseous Fluorides from Stationary Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, E. T.; And Others

    A study was conducted which has resulted in the development of tentative sampling and analysis of fluorides emitted from various stationary sources. The study was directed toward developing and understanding the kinds of species which are present in each source emission. The report presents the following information: review of the various unit…

  18. Development of Methods for Sampling and Analysis of Particulate and Gaseous Fluorides from Stationary Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, E. T.; And Others

    A study was conducted which has resulted in the development of tentative sampling and analysis of fluorides emitted from various stationary sources. The study was directed toward developing and understanding the kinds of species which are present in each source emission. The report presents the following information: review of the various unit…

  19. A new vapor-liquid equilibrium apparatus for hydrogen fluoride containing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jongcheon Lee; Hwayong Kim; Jong Sung Lim; Jae-Duck Kim; Youn Yong Lee

    1996-12-31

    A new circulating type apparatus has been constructed to obtain reliable equilibrium PTxy data for hydrogen fluoride (HF) containing system. Equilibrium cell with Pyrex windows protected by Teflon PFA sheets to prevent the corrosion was used. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a) + HF system at 288.23 and 298.35 K were obtained, and compared with PTx measurement results. Experimental data were correlated using Lencka and Anderko equation of state for HF with the Wong-Sandler mixing rule as well as the van der Waals one fluid mixing rule. The Wong-Sandler mixing rule gives better results. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Hydrogen fluoride (HF) substance flow analysis for safe and sustainable chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junbeum; Hwang, Yongwoo; Yoo, Mijin; Chen, Sha; Lee, Ik-Mo

    2017-09-18

    In this study, the chemical substance flow of hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, HF) in domestic chemical industries in 2014 was analyzed in order to provide a basic material and information for the establishment of organized management system to ensure safety during HF applications. A total of 44,751 tons of HF was made by four domestic companies (in 2014); import amount was 95,984 tons in 2014 while 21,579 tons of HF was imported in 2005. The export amount of HF was 2180 tons, of which 2074 ton (China, 1422 tons, U.S. 524 tons, and Malaysia, 128 tons) was exported for the manufacturing of semiconductors. Based on the export and import amounts, it can be inferred that HF was used for manufacturing semiconductors. The industries applications of 161,123 tons of HF were as follows: manufacturing of basic inorganic chemical substance (27,937 tons), manufacturing of other chemical products such as detergents (28,208 tons), manufacturing of flat display (24,896 tons), and manufacturing of glass container package (22,002 tons). In this study, an analysis of the chemical substance flow showed that HF was mainly used in the semiconductor industry as well as glass container manufacturing. Combined with other risk management tools and approaches in the chemical industry, the chemical substance flow analysis (CSFA) can be a useful tool and method for assessment and management. The current CSFA results provide useful information for policy making in the chemical industry and national systems. Graphical abstract Hydrogen fluoride chemical substance flows in 2014 in South Korea.

  1. Hydrogen fluoride damage to vegetation from peri-urban brick kilns in Asia: a growing but unrecognised problem?

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muhammad Nauman; van den Berg, Leon J L; Shah, Hamid Ullah; Masood, Tariq; Büker, Patrick; Emberson, Lisa; Ashmore, Mike

    2012-03-01

    The rapid urbanisation of many cities in south and south-east Asia has increased the demand for bricks, which are typically supplied from brick kilns in peri-urban areas. We report visible foliar damage to mango, apricot and plum trees in the vicinity of traditional Bull's Trench brick kilns in Peshawar, Pakistan. Visible injury symptoms, hydrogen fluoride concentrations in air, and foliar fluoride concentrations were all greater in the vicinity of brick kilns than at more distant sites, indicating that fluoride emissions from brick kilns were the main cause of damage. Interviews with local farmers established the significant impact of this damage on their livelihoods. Since poorly regulated brick kilns are often found close to important peri-urban agricultural areas, we suggest that this may be a growing but unrecognised environmental problem in regions of Asia where emission control in brick kilns has not been improved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrogen bonding. Part 19. IR and NMR study of the lower hydrates of choline fluoride and acetylcholine chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Kenneth M.; Avci, Günsel F.; Desantis, Nancy J.; Thiel, Anne C.

    1985-05-01

    Acetylcholine chloride, like choline chloride, forms a liquid salt dihydrate, and a crystalline monohydrate that only exists at reduced pressure; at atmospheric pressure the monohydrate disproportionates into liquid dihydrate and anhydrous acetylcholine chloride. Both choline and acetylcholine chlorides give endothermic dissolution in water. In contrast, choline fluoride gives exothermic dissclution in water, and forms an extra-ordinarily stable monohydrate in which choline cation hydroxyls form strong hydrogen bonds to an H 4O 2F 2-2 cluster anion. Since the hydration behavior of choline fluoride is like that of unsubstituted tetraalkylammonium fluorides, the unusual hydration behavior of choline and acetyline chlorides results from the presence of chloride ion, and is not an intrinsic property of cholinergic cations.

  3. DISCOVERY OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN THE CLOVERLEAF QUASAR AT z = 2.56

    SciTech Connect

    Monje, R. R.; Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C.; Emprechtinger, M.; Peng, R.; Neufeld, D. A.

    2011-12-15

    We report the first detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) toward a high-redshift quasar. Using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, we detect the HF J = 1-0 transition in absorption toward the Cloverleaf, a broad absorption line quasi-stellar object at z = 2.56. The detection is statistically significant at the {approx}6{sigma} level. We estimate a lower limit of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} for the HF column density and using a previous estimate of the hydrogen column density, we obtain a lower limit of 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} for the HF abundance. This value suggests that, assuming a Galactic N(HF)/N{sub H} ratio, HF accounts for at least {approx}10% of the fluorine in the gas phase along the line of sight to the Cloverleaf quasar. This observation corroborates the prediction that HF should be a good probe of the molecular gas at high redshift. Measurements of the HF abundance as a function of redshift are urgently needed to better constrain the fluorine nucleosynthesis mechanism(s).

  4. Friedel-Crafts reaction of benzyl fluorides: selective activation of C-F bonds as enabled by hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Pier Alexandre; Benhassine, Yasmine; Desroches, Justine; Paquin, Jean-François

    2014-12-08

    A Friedel-Crafts benzylation of arenes with benzyl fluorides has been developed. The reaction produces 1,1-diaryl alkanes in good yield under mild conditions without the need for a transition metal or a strong Lewis acid. A mechanism involving activation of the C-F bond through hydrogen bonding is proposed. This mode of activation enables the selective reaction of benzylic C-F bonds in the presence of other benzylic leaving groups.

  5. Sampling Stoichiometry: The Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide an interesting, quantitative illustration of the stoichiometric relationship between the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and the formation of oxygen gas. This 10-minute demonstration uses ordinary hydrogen peroxide and yeast that can be purchased in a supermarket.…

  6. Sampling Stoichiometry: The Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide an interesting, quantitative illustration of the stoichiometric relationship between the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and the formation of oxygen gas. This 10-minute demonstration uses ordinary hydrogen peroxide and yeast that can be purchased in a supermarket.…

  7. Methods, setup and safe handling for anhydrous hydrogen fluoride cleavage in Boc solid-phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Muttenthaler, Markus; Albericio, Fernando; Dawson, Philip E

    2015-07-01

    Solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) using tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc)/benzyl (Bzl) chemistry is an indispensable technique in many laboratories around the globe, and it provides peptides to the pharmaceutical industry and to thousands of scientists working in basic research. The Boc/Bzl strategy has several advantages, including reliability in the synthesis of long and difficult polypeptides, alternative orthogonality regarding protecting groups and ease of producing C-terminal thioesters for native chemical ligation applications. In this process, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) is used to remove the side chain protecting groups of the assembled peptide and to release the peptide from the resin, a process typically described as 'HF cleavage'. This protocol describes the general methodology, apparatus setup and safe handling of HF, with the aim of providing comprehensive information on the safe use of this valuable, well-studied and validated cleavage technique. We explain the cleavage mechanism, the physicochemical properties and risks of HF, first aid measures and the correct use of the apparatus. In addition, we provide advice on scavenger selection, as well as a troubleshooting section and video material illustrating key steps of the procedure. The protocol comprises precleavage sample preparation (30 min-2.5 h), complete HF cleavage procedure (2 h) and reaction workup (30 min).

  8. Quantum mechanical force field for hydrogen fluoride with explicit electronic polarization.

    PubMed

    Mazack, Michael J M; Gao, Jiali

    2014-05-28

    The explicit polarization (X-Pol) theory is a fragment-based quantum chemical method that explicitly models the internal electronic polarization and intermolecular interactions of a chemical system. X-Pol theory provides a framework to construct a quantum mechanical force field, which we have extended to liquid hydrogen fluoride (HF) in this work. The parameterization, called XPHF, is built upon the same formalism introduced for the XP3P model of liquid water, which is based on the polarized molecular orbital (PMO) semiempirical quantum chemistry method and the dipole-preserving polarization consistent point charge model. We introduce a fluorine parameter set for PMO, and find good agreement for various gas-phase results of small HF clusters compared to experiments and ab initio calculations at the M06-2X/MG3S level of theory. In addition, the XPHF model shows reasonable agreement with experiments for a variety of structural and thermodynamic properties in the liquid state, including radial distribution functions, interaction energies, diffusion coefficients, and densities at various state points.

  9. Quantum mechanical force field for hydrogen fluoride with explicit electronic polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazack, Michael J. M.; Gao, Jiali

    2014-05-01

    The explicit polarization (X-Pol) theory is a fragment-based quantum chemical method that explicitly models the internal electronic polarization and intermolecular interactions of a chemical system. X-Pol theory provides a framework to construct a quantum mechanical force field, which we have extended to liquid hydrogen fluoride (HF) in this work. The parameterization, called XPHF, is built upon the same formalism introduced for the XP3P model of liquid water, which is based on the polarized molecular orbital (PMO) semiempirical quantum chemistry method and the dipole-preserving polarization consistent point charge model. We introduce a fluorine parameter set for PMO, and find good agreement for various gas-phase results of small HF clusters compared to experiments and ab initio calculations at the M06-2X/MG3S level of theory. In addition, the XPHF model shows reasonable agreement with experiments for a variety of structural and thermodynamic properties in the liquid state, including radial distribution functions, interaction energies, diffusion coefficients, and densities at various state points.

  10. Hydrogen fluoride toward luminous nearby galaxies: NGC 253 and NGC 4945

    SciTech Connect

    Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G.; Lord, S.; Falgarone, E.; Güsten, R.

    2014-04-10

    We present the detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) in two luminous nearby galaxies, NGC 253 and NGC 4945 using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The HF line toward NGC 253 has a P-Cygni profile, while an asymmetric absorption profile is seen toward NGC 4945. The P-Cygni profile in NGC 253 suggests an outflow of molecular gas with a mass of M(H{sub 2}){sub out} ∼ 1 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} and an outflow rate as large as M-dot ∼6.4 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In the case of NGC 4945, the axisymmetric velocity components in the HF line profile are compatible with the interpretation of a fast-rotating nuclear ring surrounding the nucleus and the presence of inflowing gas. The gas falls into the nucleus with an inflow rate of ≤1.2 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, inside an inner radius of ≤200 pc. The gas accretion rate to the central active galactic nucleus is much smaller, suggesting that the inflow may be triggering a nuclear starburst. From these results, the HF J = 1-0 line is seen to provide an important probe of the kinematics of absorbing material along the sight-line to nearby galaxies with bright dust continuum and a promising new tracer of molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies.

  11. Quantum mechanical force field for hydrogen fluoride with explicit electronic polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Mazack, Michael J. M.; Gao, Jiali

    2014-05-28

    The explicit polarization (X-Pol) theory is a fragment-based quantum chemical method that explicitly models the internal electronic polarization and intermolecular interactions of a chemical system. X-Pol theory provides a framework to construct a quantum mechanical force field, which we have extended to liquid hydrogen fluoride (HF) in this work. The parameterization, called XPHF, is built upon the same formalism introduced for the XP3P model of liquid water, which is based on the polarized molecular orbital (PMO) semiempirical quantum chemistry method and the dipole-preserving polarization consistent point charge model. We introduce a fluorine parameter set for PMO, and find good agreement for various gas-phase results of small HF clusters compared to experiments and ab initio calculations at the M06-2X/MG3S level of theory. In addition, the XPHF model shows reasonable agreement with experiments for a variety of structural and thermodynamic properties in the liquid state, including radial distribution functions, interaction energies, diffusion coefficients, and densities at various state points.

  12. Gain generator optimization for hydrogen fluoride overtone and fundamental chemical lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, William A.; Patterson, Stanley P.; Graves, Bruce R.; Sollee, Jeffrey L.; Yonehara, Gordon N.; Dering, John P.

    1993-06-01

    The hydrogen fluoride (HF) chemical laser is the baseline concept for SDIO space based laser (SBL) weapons systems. Ground based tests at power levels appropriate for this application have been demonstrated. Because the brightness of a laser beam projected to the far field is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength, shorter wavelengths are desirable to enhance brightness on target. Development of the HF overtone chemical laser ((lambda) equals 1.3 - 1.4 micrometers ) as a growth technology for SBL applications has proceeded rapidly during the past several years. This paper reviews the parametric characterization and optimization of the Hypersonic, Low-Temperature (HYLTE) nozzle concept for HF overtone and HF fundamental performance. The experiments utilize advanced multilayer dielectric coatings on uncooled silicon substrates. The experimental results reported include laser power, small signal gain, mode footprint, and spectral content. The design of a multiple nozzle HYLTE module as a building block to an advanced high power HF chemical laser device is presented. Design philosophy emphasizes traceability from an intermediate size linear module to a full scale cylindrical gain generator for SBL applications. The key issues addressed are power scalability, fabricability, regenerative cooling capability, and thermal/structural performance.

  13. Quantum mechanical force field for hydrogen fluoride with explicit electronic polarization

    PubMed Central

    Mazack, Michael J. M.; Gao, Jiali

    2014-01-01

    The explicit polarization (X-Pol) theory is a fragment-based quantum chemical method that explicitly models the internal electronic polarization and intermolecular interactions of a chemical system. X-Pol theory provides a framework to construct a quantum mechanical force field, which we have extended to liquid hydrogen fluoride (HF) in this work. The parameterization, called XPHF, is built upon the same formalism introduced for the XP3P model of liquid water, which is based on the polarized molecular orbital (PMO) semiempirical quantum chemistry method and the dipole-preserving polarization consistent point charge model. We introduce a fluorine parameter set for PMO, and find good agreement for various gas-phase results of small HF clusters compared to experiments and ab initio calculations at the M06-2X/MG3S level of theory. In addition, the XPHF model shows reasonable agreement with experiments for a variety of structural and thermodynamic properties in the liquid state, including radial distribution functions, interaction energies, diffusion coefficients, and densities at various state points. PMID:24880295

  14. LOCAL INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL HYDROGEN SAMPLED IN SITU BY IBEX

    SciTech Connect

    Saul, Lukas; Wurz, Peter; Rodriguez, Diego; Scheer, Juergen; Moebius, Eberhard; Schwadron, Nathan; Kucharek, Harald; Leonard, Trevor; Bzowski, Maciej; Fuselier, Stephen; Crew, Geoff; McComas, Dave

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen gas is the dominant component of the local interstellar medium. However, owing to ionization and interaction with the heliosphere, direct sampling of neutral hydrogen in the inner heliosphere is more difficult than sampling the local interstellar neutral helium, which penetrates deep into the heliosphere. In this paper, we report on the first detailed analysis of the direct sampling of neutral hydrogen from the local interstellar medium. We confirm that the arrival direction of hydrogen is offset from that of the local helium component. We further report the discovery of a variation of the penetrating hydrogen over the first two years of Interstellar Boundary Explorer observations. Observations are consistent with hydrogen experiencing an effective ratio of outward solar radiation pressure to inward gravitational force greater than unity ({mu} > 1); the temporal change observed in the local interstellar hydrogen flux can be explained with solar variability.

  15. The effect of sodium fluoride on the stability of cyanide in postmortem blood samples from fire victims.

    PubMed

    McAllister, J L; Roby, R J; Levine, Barry; Purser, David

    2011-06-15

    Assigning a level of significance to cyanide concentrations found in the blood of fire victims is often hampered by the fact that cyanide is inherently unstable in cadavers and in stored blood samples. A few researchers have proposed that sodium fluoride can be used to minimize the instability of cyanide in blood samples; however, controlled studies have not been performed to support validation of this hypothesis. To test the sodium fluoride hypothesis, both treated and control blood samples from 14 autopsied fire victims were tested over a 25-30 day period. A 2% concentration of sodium fluoride was added to the blood samples at the start of testing and the samples were refrigerated between testing intervals. Cyanide concentrations in the treated and control samples were measured between 9 and 11 days post treatment and between 25 and 30 days post treatment. A statistically significant difference was not present between blood cyanide concentrations in treated and control samples between 9 and 11 days. During this time period, although there were small statistically significant increases in both treated and untreated samples the fluctuations were minor. Since the treated and control samples did not exhibit instability between 9 and 11 days, it is not surprising that the sodium fluoride appeared to have no effect. However, a statistically significant difference between blood cyanide concentrations in treated and control samples was observed between 25 and 30 days. Those samples treated with sodium fluoride showed a reduction in blood cyanide variability with virtually no overall change, over a 25-30 day period when compared to control samples, while unconditioned samples showed a significant, average increase of 35%. Based on the findings of this study, it is recommended that 2% sodium fluoride be added to blood samples obtained from fire victims to reduce cyanide instability due to bacteriological activity.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    PubMed

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3 < 7 mm) and 35% had severe periodontal breakdown (CAL > 7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket.

  17. Herschel Legacy Survey of Hydrogen Fluoride and Water Towards Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Monje, Raquel

    Hydride molecules, molecules containing just one heavy element atom with one or more hydrogen atoms, play an importance role in interstellar chemistry, as they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains theorized to form gas phase molecules. This makes hydride molecules a sensitive test of these chemical models, as well as potential tracers of molecular hydrogen. Due to the low moment of inertia, hydrides have their fundamental rotational transitions in the submillimeter band, blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and in most cases, only accessible with the past NASA mission, Herschel Space Observatory. Two of the key results from Herschel observations are: the first detection of the fundamental J = 1 - 0 rotational transition of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at 1.232 THz (243 μm) and the discovery of HF's ubiquitous nature in the Milky Way. HF has not only been observed toward almost every bright continuum source in the Galactic plane, but also in some nearby ultra luminous galaxies, establishing its importance outside the Milky Way as well. Despite fluorine's (F) relative low abundance in the interstellar medium (ISM) (about four times lower than carbon), F plays an important role in the interstellar chemistry due to the unique thermochemistry of the reaction between F and molecular hydrogen (H2). F is the only atom that reacts exothermically with H2, to form the compound HF. Once formed, HF becomes the main reservoir of fluorine in the ISM, with a strong bond only destroyed by reactions with low abundance ions H3+, C+ and He+, or photodissociation. This unusual stability allows the build up of large amounts of HF in the ISM, which has now been confirmed by Herschel. Chemical model predicted that the ground state rotational transition line of HF J = 1 - 0 would yield an extremely sensitive probe of the diffuse molecular gas along the line-of-sight to background far-infrared continuum sources and a

  18. Prevention reference manual: chemical specific. Volume 1. Control of accidental releases of hydrogen fluoride (SCAQMD) (South Coast Air Quality Management District). Final report, May 1986-March 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.S.; DeWolf, G.B.; Quass, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    This manual summarizes technical information that will assist in identifying and controlling hydrogen fluoride release hazards specific to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) of southern California. The SCAQMD has considered a strategy for reducing the risk of a major accidental air release of toxic chemicals. The strategy includes monitoring the storage, handling, and use of certain chemicals and provides guidance to industry and communities. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, a corrosive liquid that boils at room temperature, rapidly absorbs moisture to form highly corrosive hydrofluoric acid. Hydrogen fluoride gas has an IDLH (immediately dangerous to life and health) concentration of 20 ppm, which makes it a substantial acute toxic hazard. Reducing the risk associated with an accidental release of hydrogen fluoride involves identifying some of the potential causes of accidental releases that apply to the processes that use hydrogen fluoride in the SCAQMD. The manual identifies examples of potential causes as well as measures that may be taken to reduce the accidental-release risk.

  19. Flotation of Metallurgical Grade Silicon and Silicon Metal from Slag by Selective Hydrogen Fluoride-Assisted Flotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, E.; Kleiv, R. A.

    2017-08-01

    Flotation experiments performed on metallurgical grade silicon have demonstrated that silicon (Si) can be floated in diluted solutions of hydrogen fluoride (HF) and a frother. The recovery was found to depend on HF conditioning time, frother type, and the concentration of both HF and frother. Although Brij 58 produced the highest recoveries of the frothers that was tested, good recoveries were also obtained for Flotanol C07. Chemical analyses showed that the flotation products were purer than the corresponding feed materials, and that most impurity elements were concentrated in the tailings. A case study on cleaning of slag containing 36 pct metallurgical silicon showed promising results concerning the recovery of silicon by flotation.

  20. Hydrogen fluoride study: Report to Congress, Section 112(n)(6) Clean Air Act as amended. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Under section 112(n)(6) of the Clean Air Act of 1990, as amended, Congress required EPA to carry out a study of hydrofluoric acid (also called hydrogen fluoride (HF)), to identify potential hazards to public health and the environment considering a range of events including worst-case accidental releases, and to make recommendations for reducing the hazards, if appropriate. The report, developed in response to the Congressional mandate, identifies and evaluates the hazards to the public posed by the production and use of HF. It is not intended to quantify risk to the public from HF.

  1. New insights about the hydrogen bonds formed between acetylene and hydrogen fluoride: π ⋯ H, C ⋯ H and F ⋯ H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Denize S.; Oliveira, Boaz G.

    2017-02-01

    A theoretical study of hydrogen bond strength and bond properties in the C2H2 ⋯(HF)-T, C2H2 ⋯ 2(HF)-T, C2H2 ⋯ 2(HF), C2H2 ⋯ 3(HF) and C2H2 ⋯ 4(HF) complexes was carried out at the B3LYP/6-311 ++G(d,p) theory level. In these systems, a strength competition between the π ⋯ H and C ⋯ H interactions was examined. Specifically the F ⋯ H hydrogen bond, its properties were studied through a comparison between the hydrogen fluoride and the higher-order complexes (trimer, tetramer and pentamer). Regarding the electronic properties, the hydrogen bond strength could not be determined by the supermolecule approach. Thus, the hydrogen bond energies were computed via NBO calculations. Additionally to NBO, the ChelpG charge calculations were used to interpret the intermolecular charge transfer. The QTAIM integrations were useful to predict the covalent character of the π ⋯ H, C ⋯ H and F ⋯ H hydrogen bonds. Moreover, values of hybrid orbitals (s and p) and atomic radii were also determined in order to justify the red shifts in the stretch frequencies of the Hsbnd F bonds.

  2. Polarization and bonding of the intrinsic characteristic contours of hydrogen and fluorine atoms of forming a hydrogen fluoride molecule based on an ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhong-Zhi; Zhao, Dong-Xia; Wu, Yang

    2004-08-01

    The spatial changing feature of the shapes and sizes of the system consisted of one hydrogen atom and one fluorine atom of forming a hydrogen fluoride molecule is investigated. We give formalism of the potential acting on an electron in a molecule and derive its concrete expression in Hartree-Fock self-consistent molecular orbital theory including configuration interaction. The program of calculating the potential acting on an electron in a molecule is programmed and compiled in the framework of the MELD program package. We formulate briefly the approach of the molecular intrinsic characteristic contour (MICC) which is defined in terms of the classical turning points of electronic motion. The MICC for a molecular system is intrinsic and can be calculated by means of an ab initio CI method. Then, the polarization and bonding features of the intrinsic characteristic contours of hydrogen and fluorine atoms forming a hydrogen fluoride molecule are presented and discussed from ab initio calculations. Furthermore, electron density distribution as an added dimension has been demonstrated on the changing MICC and thus the vivid polarization and bonding features for a chemical process have been shown. It seems that at the early stage (internuclear distance Ind=5.0-20.0 a.u.) the fluorine atom gives more enthusiastic with the sensitive and expanded polarization to welcome coupling with the hydrogen atom while the latter has little response even "shy" with shrinking a bit its size at the beginning of putting the two atoms into a system and it is only around the critical point, the contact point (Ind=4.73 a.u.), that both of them stretch their hands and arms to meet and then fuse together.

  3. Ab Initio Calculations of Anharmonic Vibrational Spectroscopy for Hydrogen Fluoride (HF)n (n=3,4) and Mixed Hydrogen Fluoride/Water (HF)n(H20)n (n=1,2,4) Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Anharmonic vibrational frequencies and intensities are computed for hydrogen fluoride clusters (HF)n with n=3,4 and mixed clusters of hydrogen fluoride with water (HF)n(H2O)n where n=1,2. For the (HF)4(H2O)4 complex, the vibrational spectra are calculated at the harmonic level, and anharmonic effects are estimated. Potential energy surfaces for these systems are obtained at the MP2/TZP level of electronic structure theory. Vibrational states are calculated from the potential surface points using the correlation-corrected vibrational self-consistent field (CC-VSCF) method. The method accounts for the anharmonicities and couplings between all vibrational modes and provides fairly accurate anharmonic vibrational spectra that can be directly compared with experimental results without a need for empirical scaling. For (HF)n, good agreement is found with experimental data. This agreement shows that the MP2 potential surfaces for these systems are reasonably reliable. The accuracy is best for the stiff intramolecular modes, which indicates the validity of MP2 in describing coupling between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom. For (HF)n(H2O)n experimental results are unavailable. The computed intramolecular frequencies show a strong dependence on cluster size. Intensity features are predicted for future experiments.

  4. Ab initio calculations of anharmonic vibrational spectroscopy for hydrogen fluoride (HF)n (n = 3, 4) and mixed hydrogen fluoride/water (HF)n(H2O)n (n = 1, 2, 4) clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Gerber, R. Benny

    2002-01-01

    Anharmonic vibrational frequencies and intensities are computed for hydrogen fluoride clusters (HF)n, with n = 3, 4 and mixed clusters of hydrogen fluoride with water (HF)n(H2O)n where n = 1, 2. For the (HF)4(H2O)4 complex, the vibrational spectra are calculated at the harmonic level, and anharmonic effects are estimated. Potential energy surfaces for these systems are obtained at the MP2/TZP level of electronic structure theory. Vibrational states are calculated from the potential surface points using the correlation-corrected vibrational self-consistent field method. The method accounts for the anharmonicities and couplings between all vibrational modes and provides fairly accurate anharmonic vibrational spectra that can be directly compared with experimental results without a need for empirical scaling. For (HF)n, good agreement is found with experimental data. This agreement shows that the Moller-Plesset (MP2) potential surfaces for these systems are reasonably reliable. The accuracy is best for the stiff intramolecular modes, which indicates the validity of MP2 in describing coupling between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom. For (HF)n(H2O)n experimental results are unavailable. The computed intramolecular frequencies show a strong dependence on cluster size. Intensity features are predicted for future experiments.

  5. Ab initio calculations of anharmonic vibrational spectroscopy for hydrogen fluoride (HF)n (n = 3, 4) and mixed hydrogen fluoride/water (HF)n(H2O)n (n = 1, 2, 4) clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Gerber, R. Benny

    2002-01-01

    Anharmonic vibrational frequencies and intensities are computed for hydrogen fluoride clusters (HF)n, with n = 3, 4 and mixed clusters of hydrogen fluoride with water (HF)n(H2O)n where n = 1, 2. For the (HF)4(H2O)4 complex, the vibrational spectra are calculated at the harmonic level, and anharmonic effects are estimated. Potential energy surfaces for these systems are obtained at the MP2/TZP level of electronic structure theory. Vibrational states are calculated from the potential surface points using the correlation-corrected vibrational self-consistent field method. The method accounts for the anharmonicities and couplings between all vibrational modes and provides fairly accurate anharmonic vibrational spectra that can be directly compared with experimental results without a need for empirical scaling. For (HF)n, good agreement is found with experimental data. This agreement shows that the Moller-Plesset (MP2) potential surfaces for these systems are reasonably reliable. The accuracy is best for the stiff intramolecular modes, which indicates the validity of MP2 in describing coupling between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom. For (HF)n(H2O)n experimental results are unavailable. The computed intramolecular frequencies show a strong dependence on cluster size. Intensity features are predicted for future experiments.

  6. Satellite observations of stratospheric hydrogen fluoride and comparisons with SLIMCAT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Boone, Christopher D.; Dhomse, Sandip S.; Bernath, Peter F.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Anderson, John; Russell, James, III

    2016-08-01

    The vast majority of emissions of fluorine-containing molecules are anthropogenic in nature, e.g. chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Many of these fluorine-containing species deplete stratospheric ozone and are regulated by the Montreal Protocol. Once in the atmosphere they slowly degrade, ultimately leading to the formation of hydrogen fluoride (HF), the dominant reservoir of stratospheric fluorine due to its extreme stability. Monitoring the growth of stratospheric HF is therefore an important marker for the success of the Montreal Protocol. We report the comparison of global distributions and trends of HF measured in the Earth's atmosphere by the satellite remote-sensing instruments ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer), which has been recording atmospheric spectra since 2004, and HALOE (HALogen Occultation Experiment), which recorded atmospheric spectra between 1991 and 2005, with the output of SLIMCAT, a state-of-the-art three-dimensional chemical transport model. In general the agreement between observation and model is good, although the ACE-FTS measurements are biased high by ˜ 10 % relative to HALOE. The observed global HF trends reveal a substantial slowing down in the rate of increase of HF since the 1990s: 4.97 ± 0.12 % year-1 (1991-1997; HALOE), 1.12 ± 0.08 % year-1 (1998-2005; HALOE), and 0.52 ± 0.03 % year-1 (2004-2012; ACE-FTS). In comparison, SLIMCAT calculates trends of 4.01, 1.10, and 0.48 % year-1, respectively, for the same periods; the agreement is very good for all but the earlier of the two HALOE periods. Furthermore, the observations reveal variations in the HF trends with latitude and altitude; for example, between 2004 and 2012 HF actually decreased in the Southern Hemisphere below ˜ 35 km. An additional SLIMCAT simulation with repeating meteorology for the year 2000 produces much cleaner trends in HF with minimal variations with latitude

  7. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pokorna, Sarka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Vazdar, Mario; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hof, Martin

    2014-12-14

    Time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan embedded in phospholipid bilayers reports on hydration and mobility of the phospholipid acylgroups. Exchange of H2O with D2O prolongs the lifetime of lipid-water and lipid-water-lipid interactions, which is reflected in a significantly slower TDFS kinetics. Combining TDFS measurements in H2O and D2O hydrated bilayers with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a unique tool for characterization of the hydrogen bonding at the acylgroup level of lipid bilayers. In this work, we use this approach to study the influence of fluoride anions on the properties of cationic bilayers composed of trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP). The results obtained for DOTAP are confronted with those for neutral phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Both in DOTAP and DOPC H2O/D2O exchange prolongs hydrogen-bonding lifetime and does not disturb bilayer structure. These results are confirmed by MD simulations. TDFS experiments show, however, that for DOTAP this effect is cancelled in the presence of fluoride ions. We interpret these results as evidence that strongly hydrated fluoride is able to steal water molecules that bridge lipid carbonyls. Consequently, when attracted to DOTAP bilayer, fluoride disrupts the local hydrogen-bonding network, and the differences in TDFS kinetics between H2O and D2O hydrated bilayers are no longer observed. A distinct behavior of fluoride is also evidenced by MD simulations, which show different lipid-ion binding for Cl(-) and F(-).

  8. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorna, Sarka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Vazdar, Mario; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hof, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan embedded in phospholipid bilayers reports on hydration and mobility of the phospholipid acylgroups. Exchange of H2O with D2O prolongs the lifetime of lipid-water and lipid-water-lipid interactions, which is reflected in a significantly slower TDFS kinetics. Combining TDFS measurements in H2O and D2O hydrated bilayers with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a unique tool for characterization of the hydrogen bonding at the acylgroup level of lipid bilayers. In this work, we use this approach to study the influence of fluoride anions on the properties of cationic bilayers composed of trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP). The results obtained for DOTAP are confronted with those for neutral phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Both in DOTAP and DOPC H2O/D2O exchange prolongs hydrogen-bonding lifetime and does not disturb bilayer structure. These results are confirmed by MD simulations. TDFS experiments show, however, that for DOTAP this effect is cancelled in the presence of fluoride ions. We interpret these results as evidence that strongly hydrated fluoride is able to steal water molecules that bridge lipid carbonyls. Consequently, when attracted to DOTAP bilayer, fluoride disrupts the local hydrogen-bonding network, and the differences in TDFS kinetics between H2O and D2O hydrated bilayers are no longer observed. A distinct behavior of fluoride is also evidenced by MD simulations, which show different lipid-ion binding for Cl- and F-.

  9. HYDROGEN CONCENTRATIONS DURING STORAGE OF 3013 OXIDE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hensel, S.; Askew, N.; Laurinat, J.

    2011-03-14

    As part of a surveillance program intended to ensure the safe storage of plutonium bearing nuclear materials in the Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS), samples of these materials are shipped to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. These samples are in the form of solids or powders which will have absorbed moisture. Potentially flammable hydrogen gas is generated due to radiolysis of the moisture. The samples are shipped for processing after chemical analysis. To preclude the possibility of a hydrogen deflagration or detonation inside the shipping containers, the shipping times are limited to ensure that hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of every layer of confinement is below the lower flammability limit of 4 volume percent (vol%). This study presents an analysis of the rate of hydrogen accumulation due to radiolysis and calculation of allowable shipping times for typical KAMS materials.

  10. Fluoride varnish effect on preventing dental caries in a sample of 3-6 years old children.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Tayebeh Malek; Hajizamani, Abolghasem; Hajizamani, Hamid Reza; Abolghasemi, Batol

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood caries is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of children that affect their life and their family in different aspects. Using different types of fluoride is one of the most effective ways for preventing the disease. Fluoride varnish is a topical fluoride product which could use in the community even by non-professional. This study aimed to assess the effect of fluoride varnish on dental caries in a group of children aged 3-6 years old in Kerman kindergarten during 6 month's period. This community interventional study recruited a sample of volunteer children from 12 kindergartens through a cluster sampling. Kindergarten randomly allocated to test and control group after matching. Dental examination was performed in three phases of the study by a trained dentist using criteria of Intentional Caries Detection and Assessment System. Fluoride varnish was applied for test group in the first phase after dental examination and also 3 and 6 months after this phase. Control group has received varnish product just after 3 and 6 months after the first dental exam. Mean decayed, missed and filled teeth (dmft) were compared between and within groups using T-test. From 476 children who participated in the study 55% were boys and the 6 years group was the most frequent group with 35% (166). Mean dmft difference was significant between Phase 1 and 2 (P = 0.05) in the test group but there was no significant difference between Phase 2 and 3 (P = 0.07). The difference was not significant between Phase 1 and 2 (P = 0.09) but it was significant between Phase 1 and 3 (P = 0.03) in the control group. The study results showed a decrease in mean dmft after applying the fluoride varnish which confirms previous studies.

  11. Fluoride Varnish Effect on Preventing Dental Caries in a Sample of 3-6 Years Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Tayebeh Malek; Hajizamani, Abolghasem; Hajizamani, Hamid Reza; Abolghasemi, Batol

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early childhood caries is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of children that affect their life and their family in different aspects. Using different types of fluoride is one of the most effective ways for preventing the disease. Fluoride varnish is a topical fluoride product which could use in the community even by non-professional. This study aimed to assess the effect of fluoride varnish on dental caries in a group of children aged 3-6 years old in Kerman kindergarten during 6 month’s period. Materials and Methods: This community interventional study recruited a sample of volunteer children from 12 kindergartens through a cluster sampling. Kindergarten randomly allocated to test and control group after matching. Dental examination was performed in three phases of the study by a trained dentist using criteria of Intentional Caries Detection and Assessment System. Fluoride varnish was applied for test group in the first phase after dental examination and also 3 and 6 months after this phase. Control group has received varnish product just after 3 and 6 months after the first dental exam. Mean decayed, missed and filled teeth (dmft) were compared between and within groups using T-test. Results: From 476 children who participated in the study 55% were boys and the 6 years group was the most frequent group with 35% (166). Mean dmft difference was significant between Phase 1 and 2 (P = 0.05) in the test group but there was no significant difference between Phase 2 and 3 (P = 0.07). The difference was not significant between Phase 1 and 2 (P = 0.09) but it was significant between Phase 1 and 3 (P = 0.03) in the control group. Conclusion: The study results showed a decrease in mean dmft after applying the fluoride varnish which confirms previous studies. PMID:25709364

  12. Effects of hydrogen fluoride on water relations and photosynthesis in White Pine (Pinus strobus) seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, K.J.; Zwiazek, J.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Transpiration, photosynthesis, water potential components and tissue fluoride concentrations were determined in mildly drought stressed 9-week-old seedlings fumigated with HF. Only those seedlings which showed no visible signs of fluoride injury were selected for the measurements. Photosynthesis decreased after 1 and 7 days of fumigation with 2, 4 and 20 ppb HF. A decrease in the transpiration rates has been observed after 2, 7 and 22 days of 0.5 ppb HF treatment and after 2 days of 2 ppb HF treatment. The same treatments which reduced transpiration rates resulted in an increase in osmotic potentials and water potentials. Possible mechanism of HF-induced alterations in seedling water relations by altering stomatal movements is discussed.

  13. Electronic solution spectra for uranium and neptunium in oxidation states (III) to (VI) in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Baluka, M.; Edelstein, N.; O'Donnell, T. A.

    1981-10-01

    In this paper, spectra have been recorded for solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium and neptunium in oxidation states III to VI. The spectra for U(III), Np(III), and Np(IV) in AHF are very similar to those in acidified aqueous solution, but that for U(IV) suggests that the cationic species is UF22+. The AHF spectra for the elements in oxidation states V and VI are not comparable with those of the formally analogous aqueous solutions, where the elements exist as well-defined dioxo cations. Nonetheless, the AHF spectra can be related to spectra in the gas phase, in the solid state or in nonaqueous solvents for each element in its appropriate oxidation state.

  14. Continuous measurement of peak hydrogen fluoride exposures in aluminum smelter potrooms: instrument development and in-plant evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dando, Neal; Xu, Weizong; Peace, Jon Nathaniel

    2008-02-01

    The aluminum smelting process continuously evolves both sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) gases. The vast majority of these evolved gases are captured by local exhaust ventilation systems and transported to fume treatment centers. Any gas escaping the ventilation systems could create the potential for workplace exposures. Currently, there are no commercially available sensors that are capable of selectively measuring peak concentrations (< 10 sec) of HF in the presence of SO2. This measurement capability is critical for facilitating a better understanding of the etiology of respiratory health effects. This article presents the development and in-plant testing of a portable, tunable diode-based HF sensor that shows equivalent or improved performance relative to NIOSH Method 7902 and is capable of measuring short-term personal peak HF exposure potentials in operating aluminum smelters.

  15. Infrared spectra of UF sub 6 , WF sub 6 , MoF sub 6 , and SF sub 6 complexes with hydrogen fluoride in solid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.D.; Andrews, L. ); Mac Toth, L. )

    1991-02-07

    UF{sub 6}, WF{sub 6}, MoF{sub 6}, and SF{sub 6} have been codeposited with hydrogen fluoride in excess argon at 12 K. The FTIR spectra of UF{sub 6} and HF revealed a strong UF{sub 6}-HF complex absorption at 3,848 cm{sup {minus}1} along with a weak, broad band at 3,903 cm{sup {minus}1} due to the UF{sub 6}-FH complex. Only one 1:2 complex with a UF{sub 6}-H{sub a}F-H{sub b}F arrangement was detected at higher HF concentrations and sample annealings. Similarly, the HF interaction with tungsten hexafluoride formed two 1:1 complexes. However, the 3,884-cm{sup {minus}1} band due to the anti-hydrogen-bonded complex WF{sub 6}-FH was considerably stronger than the WF{sub 6}-FH{sub b}-FH{sub a} structure. The band positions and relative intensities for the MoF{sub 6} complexes with HF and DF were very comparable to their WF{sub 6} counterparts.

  16. Sensitive determination of fluoride in biological samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after derivatization with 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sun-Myung; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2014-12-10

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method was developed in this study in order to determine fluoride in plasma and urine after derivatization with 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene. 2-Fluoronaphthalene was chosen as the internal standard. The derivatization of fluoride was performed in the biological sample and the best reaction conditions (10.0 mg mL(-1) of 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene, 1.0 mg mL(-1) of 15-crown-5-ether as a phase transfer catalyst, pH of 7.0, reaction temperature of 70°C, and heating time of 70 min) were established. The organic derivative was extracted with dichloromethane and then measured by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Under the established condition, the detection limits were 11 μg L(-1) and 7 μg L(-1) by using 0.2 mL of plasma or urine, respectively. The accuracy was in a range of 100.8-107.6%, and the precision of the assay was less than 4.3% in plasma or urine. Fluoride was detected in a concentration range of 0.12-0.53 mg L(-1) in six urine samples after intake of natural mineral water containing 0.7 mg L(-1) of fluoride. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Time and temperature affect glycolysis in blood samples regardless of fluoride-based preservatives: a potential underestimation of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Mary; Daly, Niamh; O'Kelly, Ruth; Turner, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Background The inhibition of glycolysis prior to glucose measurement is an important consideration when interpreting glucose tolerance tests. This is particularly important in gestational diabetes mellitus where prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential. A study was planned to investigate the effect of preservatives and temperature on glycolysis. Methods Blood samples for glucose were obtained from consented females. Lithium heparin and fluoride-EDTA samples transported rapidly in ice slurry to the laboratory were analysed for glucose concentration and then held either in ice slurry or at room temperature for varying time intervals. Paired fluoride-citrate samples were received at room temperature and held at room temperature, with analysis at similar time intervals. Results No significant difference was noted between mean glucose concentrations when comparing different sample types received in ice slurry. The mean glucose concentrations decreased significantly for both sets of samples when held at room temperature (0.4 mmol/L) and in ice slurry (0.2 mmol/L). A review of patient glucose tolerance tests reported in our hospital indicated that 17.8% exceeded the recommended diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus. It was predicted that if the results of fasting samples were revised to reflect the effect of glycolysis at room temperature, the adjusted diagnostic rate could increase to 35.3%. Conclusion Preanalytical handling of blood samples for glucose analysis is vital. Fluoride-EDTA is an imperfect antiglycolytic, even when the samples are transported and analysed rapidly provides such optimal conditions. The use of fluoride-citrate tubes may offer a viable alternative in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus.

  18. Head-to-tail intermolecular hydrogen bonding of OH and NH groups with fluoride.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, Pichandi; Ramakrishnan, Vayalakkavoor T; Ramamurthy, Perumal

    2011-02-07

    To explore the anion-recognition ability of the phenolic hydroxyl group and the amino hydrogen, we synthesized three different acridinedione (ADD) based anion receptors, 1, 2 and 3, having OH, NH, and combination of OH and NH groups, respectively. Absorption, emission and (1)H NMR spectral studies revealed that receptor 1, having only a phenolic OH group, shows selective deprotonation of the hydroxyl proton towards F(-), which results in an "ON-OFF"-type signal in the fluorescence spectral studies. Receptor 2, which only has an amino hydrogen, also shows deprotonation of the amino hydrogen with F(-), whereas receptor 3 (having both OH and NH groups) shows head-to-tail intermolecular hydrogen bonding of OH and NH groups with F(-) prior to deprotonation. The observation of hydrogen bonding of the OH and NH groups in a combined solution of 1 and 2 with F(-) in a head-to-tail hetero-intermolecular fashion, and the absence of head-to-head and tail-to-tail intermolecular hydrogen bonding in 1 and 2 with F(-), prove that the difference in the acidity of the OH and NH protons leads to the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen-bonding complex with F(-) prior to deprotonation. The presence of this hydrogen-bonding complex was confirmed by absorption spectroscopy, 3D emission contour studies, and (1)H NMR titration.

  19. Rotational spectroscopy and molecular structure of 1,1,2-trifluoroethylene and the 1,1,2-trifluoroethylene-hydrogen fluoride complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Helen O.; Marshall, Mark D.

    2007-03-01

    Fourier transform microwave rotational spectra in the 6-22GHz region are obtained for the complex formed between 1,1,2-trifluoroethylene and hydrogen fluoride, including the normal isotopomer, the two singly substituted C13 species, and the complex obtained with DF. A unique planar structure for the complex is determined from a combined analysis of the rotational constants derived from the spectra and atomic positions obtained using Kraitchman [Am. J. Phys. 21, 17 (1953)] substitution coordinates. Consistent with this structure, no hyperfine splitting of rotational lines due to the nuclear quadrupole coupling interaction is observed for the D-containing species. Although the primary interaction in the complex is a hydrogen-fluorine hydrogen bond, as is the case for all previously studied Lewis acid-fluoroethylene complexes, the CF2CHF -HF complex adopts a distinctly different geometry in which both the primary and secondary interactions occur between the HF molecule and a F atom and a H atom, respectively, bonded to the same carbon of CF2CHF. The 2.020(41)Å hydrogen bond has hydrogen fluoride as the donor and 1,1,2-trifluoroethylene as the acceptor and forms a 109.0(13)° C-F⋯H angle. The secondary interaction between the hydrogen fluoride F atom and the H atom geminal to the acceptor F atom causes the hydrogen bond to deviate 41.6(51)° from linearity. Structural comparisons with analogous complexes formed with mono- and difluorinated ethylenes suggest that the primary hydrogen bond strength and the fluoroethylene fluorine atom basicity both decrease with increasing fluorine substitution. In the course of this work, it was necessary to obtain additional rotational spectra for the 1,1,2-trifluroethylene monomer and to improve the precision of the values of the structural parameters for this molecule.

  20. Electronic structure of H2S, SF2, and HSF and implications for hydrogen-substituted hypervalent sulfur fluorides.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Beth A; Woon, David E; Dunning, Thom H

    2014-02-20

    It is well known that hypervalent molecules are more stable with very electronegative ligands such as fluorine. For example, while SF6 is uniquely stable and experimentally well characterized and many of the features of SF4 have been characterized, neither H4S nor H6S has been observed. Furthermore, no hypervalent sulfur species with mixed hydrogen and fluorine ligands have been experimentally characterized to date. In this work, we present detailed calculations of the electronic structure of H2S, SF2, and HSF. While all three compounds have similar bent singlet ground states, the potential energy surfaces of various low lying electronic states as a function of bond angle reveal very different behaviors, in particular for linear geometries. We use the disparate bonding motifs of the low-lying triplet states to rationalize the differences between SF4 and the hypothetical H4S molecule. We also make predictions about the effects of hydrogen substitution on the energetics and geometries of hypervalent sulfur fluoride compounds.

  1. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorna, Sarka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Vazdar, Mario; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-12-14

    Time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan embedded in phospholipid bilayers reports on hydration and mobility of the phospholipid acylgroups. Exchange of H{sub 2}O with D{sub 2}O prolongs the lifetime of lipid-water and lipid-water-lipid interactions, which is reflected in a significantly slower TDFS kinetics. Combining TDFS measurements in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a unique tool for characterization of the hydrogen bonding at the acylgroup level of lipid bilayers. In this work, we use this approach to study the influence of fluoride anions on the properties of cationic bilayers composed of trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP). The results obtained for DOTAP are confronted with those for neutral phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Both in DOTAP and DOPC H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O exchange prolongs hydrogen-bonding lifetime and does not disturb bilayer structure. These results are confirmed by MD simulations. TDFS experiments show, however, that for DOTAP this effect is cancelled in the presence of fluoride ions. We interpret these results as evidence that strongly hydrated fluoride is able to steal water molecules that bridge lipid carbonyls. Consequently, when attracted to DOTAP bilayer, fluoride disrupts the local hydrogen-bonding network, and the differences in TDFS kinetics between H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers are no longer observed. A distinct behavior of fluoride is also evidenced by MD simulations, which show different lipid-ion binding for Cl{sup −} and F{sup −}.

  2. Optimized method for dissolved hydrogen sampling in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Alter, Marcus D; Steiof, Martin

    2005-06-01

    Dissolved hydrogen concentrations are used to characterize redox conditions of contaminated aquifers. The currently accepted and recommended bubble strip method for hydrogen sampling (Wiedemeier et al., 1998) requires relatively long sampling times and immediate field analysis. In this study we present methods for optimized sampling and for sample storage. The bubble strip sampling method was examined for various flow rates, bubble sizes (headspace volume in the sampling bulb) and two different H2 concentrations. The results were compared to a theoretical equilibration model. Turbulent flow in the sampling bulb was optimized for gas transfer by reducing the inlet diameter. Extraction with a 5 mL headspace volume and flow rates higher than 100 mL/min resulted in 95-100% equilibrium within 10-15 min. In order to investigate the storage of samples from the gas sampling bulb gas samples were kept in headspace vials for varying periods. Hydrogen samples (4.5 ppmv, corresponding to 3.5 nM in liquid phase) could be stored up to 48 h and 72 h with a recovery rate of 100.1+/-2.6% and 94.6+/-3.2%, respectively. These results are promising and prove the possibility of storage for 2-3 days before laboratory analysis. The optimized method was tested at a field site contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Duplicate gas samples were stored in headspace vials and analyzed after 24 h. Concentrations were measured in the range of 2.5-8.0 nM corresponding to known concentrations in reduced aquifers.

  3. Process for converting magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Kreuzmann, A.B.; Palmer, D.A.

    1984-12-21

    This invention is a process for the conversion of magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride whereby magnesium fluoride is decomposed by heating in the presence of calcium carbonate, calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide. Magnesium fluoride is a by-product of the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride to form uranium metal and has no known commercial use, thus its production creates a significant storage problem. The advantage of this invention is that the quality of calcium fluoride produced is sufficient to be used in the industrial manufacture of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, steel mill flux or ceramic applications.

  4. Interaction between nuclear graphite and molten fluoride salts: a synchrotron radiation study of the substitution of graphitic hydrogen by fluoride ion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmei; Feng, Shanglei; Zhou, Xingtai; Xu, Hongjie; Sham, T K

    2012-01-26

    The interaction between nuclear graphite and molten fluoride salts (46.5 mol % LiF/11.5 mol % NaF/42 mol % KF) is investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and C K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). It is found that there are a large number of H atoms in IG-110 nuclear graphite, which is attributed to the residual C-H bond after the graphitization process of petroleum coke and pitch binder. The elastic recoil detection analysis indicates that H atoms are uniformly distributed in IG-110 nuclear graphite, in excellent agreement with the XANES results. The XANES results indicate that the immersion in molten fluoride salts at 500 °C led to H atoms in nuclear graphite partly substituted by the fluorine from fluoride salts to form C-F bond. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Norharmane: old yet highly selective dual channel ratiometric fluoride and hydrogen sulfate ion sensor.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Arabinda; Katayama, Tetsuro; Ishibasi, Yukihide; Yasuda, Masakazu; Miyasaka, Hiroshi

    2011-01-21

    Norharmane provides a simple unexplored class of anion receptor, that allows for the ratiometric selective detection of F(-) and HSO(4)(-) ions. The presence of a strong base can easily form hydrogen bonds with the acidic hydrogen bond donor moiety and the relatively strong acid can easily protonate the basic hydrogen bond acceptor moiety, which can modulate the optical response and can detect the anions efficiently with high selectivity. In view of that, it is promising to conceive the use of these systems in various sensing applications as well as in other situations, such as anion transport and purification, where the availability of cheap and easy-to-make anion receptors, would be advantageous.

  6. Visualisation and identification of peak exposure events in aluminium smelter pot rooms using hydrogen fluoride and aerosol real-time portable spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Skaugset, Nils Petter; Berlinger, Balázs; Radziuk, Bernhard; Tørring, Håvard; Synnes, Ole; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2014-05-01

    A recently developed novel portable real-time hydrogen fluoride spectrometer was used with an aerosol PM10 spectrometer under a PIMEX telemetric measurement strategy to visualize and identify simultaneous occupational air peak exposure events to hydrogen fluoride and PM10 aerosol sub-fractions in aluminium smelter pot rooms using Søderberg or Prebake anode technologies. The hydrogen fluoride and the aerosol concentration data measured during different work operations are plotted and evaluated applying the synchronised videos and air concentrations measured by the spectrometers. The main point-emission sources of HF and PM10 were identified and assessed. The major finding in the study was that the main source of PM10 and HF was partly open cells in a Søderberg pot room, whereas in a Prebake pot room, the point emissions of the two contaminants were associated with hot bath residues and hot replaced anodes. In order to prevent the simultaneous exposure to HF and PM10 among pot room workers it is important to prevent workers from being close to these point-sources under unfavourable ventilation. Storage of hot residues outside electrolytic cells without any point source ventilation should not occur.

  7. Redox-induced fluoride ligand dissociation stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Moore, Cameron M; Szymczak, Nathaniel K

    2015-03-28

    Chemical reduction of a tripodal Cu(II)-F complex containing pendent hydroxyl groups results in the partial dissociation of a F(-) ligand from Cu. The resulting Cu(I) complex is characterized as containing an outer sphere F(-) anion 'captured' by hydrogen bonds. The pendent hydroxyl groups were found to be crucial for reductive stability.

  8. Fluoridation Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... because of tooth decay. History of Fluoride in Water In the 1930s, scientists examined the relationship between ...

  9. Novel heterocyclic thiosemicarbazones derivatives as colorimetric and "turn on" fluorescent sensors for fluoride anion sensing employing hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Ashok Kumar, S L; Saravana Kumar, M; Sreeja, P B; Sreekanth, A

    2013-09-01

    Two novel heterocyclic thiosemicarbazone derivatives have been synthesized, and characterized, by means of spectroscopic and single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Their chromophoric-fluorogenic response towards anions in competing solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was studied. The receptor shows selective recognition towards fluoride anion. The binding affinity of the receptors with fluoride anion was calculated using UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques.

  10. Effectiveness of water spray mitigation systems for accidental releases of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Accidental releases of Hydrogen Flouride (HF) can result in initally dense, highly reactive and corrosive clouds. These clouds will typically contain a mixture of HF vapor, aerosol and droplets which can be transported significant distances downwind before lower hazard levels of HF concentration are reached. Previous experiments were performed to study atmospheric dispersion of these HF clouds. The present study examines the effect of water application on the mitigation of these clouds. To assess the effectiveness of water application (via either sprays or monitor) in mitigating HF clouds two series of tests were conducted in separate flow chambers. Bench scale experiments identified key variables for testing in a larger facility. The larger scale field tests demonstrated that HF releases can be mitigated with water. The impact of numerous design variables on mitigation effectiveness has also been quantified. HF removal efficiencies of 25 to 90+% have been demonstrated at water to HF liquid ratios of 6/1 to 40/1 and higher. 8 refs., 69 figs., 49 tabs.

  11. High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry compared with ion chromatography for quantitative determination of dissolved fluoride in river water samples.

    PubMed

    Ley, Philip; Sturm, Manfred; Ternes, Thomas A; Meermann, Björn

    2017-10-03

    In addition to beneficial health effects, fluoride can also have adverse effects on humans, animals, and plants if the daily intake is strongly elevated. One main source of fluoride uptake is water, and thus several ordinances exist in Germany that declare permissible concentrations of fluoride in, for example, drinking water, mineral water, and landfill seepage water. Controlling the fluoride concentrations in aqueous matrices necessitate valid and fast analytical methods. In this work an alternative method for the determination of fluoride in surface waters based on high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFMAS) was applied. Fluoride detection was made possible by the formation of a diatomic molecule, GaF, and detection of characteristic molecular absorption. On HR-CS-GFMAS parameter optimization, the method was adapted to surface water sample analysis. The influence of potential main matrix constituents such as Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Cl(-) as well as surface water sampling/storage conditions on the molecular absorption signal of GaF was investigated. Method validation demonstrated a low limit of detection (8.1 μg L(-1)) and a low limit of quantification (26.9 μg L(-1)), both sufficient for direct river water sample analysis after 0.45-μm filtration. The optimized HR-CS-GFMAS method was applied for the analysis of real water samples from the rivers Rhine and Moselle. For method validation, samples were also analyzed by an ion chromatography (IC) method. IC and HR-CS-GFMAS results both agreed well. In comparison with IC, HR-CS-GFMAS has higher sample throughput, a lower limit of detection and a lower limit of quantification, and higher selectivity, and is a very suitable method for the analysis of dissolved fluoride in river water. Graphical abstract High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFMAS) was applied for the quantitative analysis of dissolved

  12. Effectivity of fluoride treatment on hydrogen and corrosion product generation in temporal implants for different magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Trinidad, Javier; Arruebarrena, Gurutze; Marco, Iñigo; Hurtado, Iñaki; Sáenz de Argandoña, Eneko

    2013-12-01

    The increasing interest on magnesium alloys relies on their biocompatibility, bioabsorbility and especially on their mechanical properties. Due to these characteristics, magnesium alloys are becoming a promising solution to be used, as temporary implants. However, magnesium alloys must overcome their poor corrosion resistance. This article analyses the corrosion behaviour in phosphate-buffered saline solution of three commercial magnesium alloys (AZ31B, WE43 and ZM21) as well as the influence of fluoride treatment on their corrosion behaviour. It is shown that the corrosion rate of all the alloys is decreased by fluoride treatment. However, fluoride treatment affects each alloy differently.

  13. Ab initio path integral simulations for the fluoride ion-water clusters: competitive nuclear quantum effect between F(-)-water and water-water hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yukio; Suzuki, Kimichi; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2013-06-20

    Small hydrated fluoride ion complexes, F(-)(H2O)n (n = 1-3), have been studied by ab initio hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) and ab initio path integral hybrid Monte Carlo (PIHMC) simulations. Because of the quantum effect, our simulation shows that the average hydrogen-bonded F(-)···HO distance in the quantum F(-)(H2O) is shorter than that in the classical one, while the relation inverts at the three water molecular F(-)(H2O)3 cluster. In the case of F(-)(H2O)3, we have found that the nuclear quantum effect enhances the formation of hydrogen bonds between two water molecules. In F(-)(H2O)2 and F(-)(H2O)3, the nuclear quantum effect on two different kinds of hydrogen bonds, F(-)-water and water-water hydrogen bonds, competes against each other. In F(-)(H2O)3, thus, the nuclear quantum effect on the water-water hydrogen bond leads to the elongation of hydrogen-bonded F(-)···HO distance, which we suggest this as the possible origin of the structural inversion from F(-)(H2O) to F(-)(H2O)3.

  14. Evaluation of sorbent materials for the sampling and analysis of phosphine, sulfuryl fluoride and methyl bromide in air.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, R; Rittfeldt, L; Åstot, C

    2015-01-02

    Phosphine (PH3), sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) are highly toxic chemical substances commonly used for fumigation, i.e., pest control with gaseous pesticides. Residues of fumigation agents constitute a health risk for workers affected, and therefore accurate methods for air sampling and analysis are needed. In this study, three commercial adsorbent tubes; Carbosieve SIII™, Air Toxics™ and Tenax TA™, were evaluated for sampling these highly volatile chemicals in air and their subsequent analysis by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). The breakthrough volume (BTV) of each fumigant was experimentally determined on the different adsorbents at concentrations at or above their permissible exposure limits, using a method based on frontal chromatography of generated fumigant atmospheres. Carbosieve SIII™, a molecular sieve possessing a very high specific area, proved to be a better adsorbent than both Air Toxics™ and Tenax TA™, resulting in at least a 4-fold increase of the BTV50%. BTV50% for Carbosieve SIII™ at 20°C was measured as 4.7L/g, 5.5L/g and 126L/g for phosphine, sulfuryl fluoride and methyl bromide, respectively, implying safe sampling volumes of 1.9L, 2.2L and 50L, respectively, for a commercial tube packed with 800mg Carbosieve SIII™. The temperature dependence of BTV was strong for Carbosieve SIII™, showing a reduction of 3-5%/°C in breakthrough volume within the range -20 to 40°C. Furthermore, although Carbosieve SIII™ reportedly has a higher affinity for water than most other adsorbents, relative humidity had only a moderate influence on the retention capacity of phosphine. Overall, the applicability of Carbosieve SIII™ adsorbent sampling in combination with TD-GC-MS analysis was demonstrated for highly volatile fumigants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrogen and fluorine in the surfaces of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leich, D. A.; Goldberg, R. H.; Burnett, D. S.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    The resonant nuclear reaction F-19 (p, alpha gamma)0-16 has been used to perform depth sensitive analyses for both fluorine and hydrogen in lunar samples. The resonance at 0.83 MeV (center-of-mass) in this reaction has been applied to the measurement of the distribution of trapped solar protons in lunar samples to depths of about 1/2 micrometer. These results are interpreted in terms of terrestrial H2O surface contamination and a redistribution of the implanted solar H which has been influenced by heavy radiation damage in the surface region. Results are also presented for an experiment to test the penetration of H2O into laboratory glass samples which have been irradiated with 0-16 to simulate the radiation damaged surfaces of lunar glasses. Fluorine determinations have been performed in a 1 pm surface layer on lunar samples using the same F-19 alpha gamma)0-16 resonance. The data are discussed from the standpoint of lunar fluorine and Teflon contamination.

  16. Hydrogen and fluorine in the surfaces of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leich, D. A.; Goldberg, R. H.; Burnett, D. S.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    The resonant nuclear reaction F-19(p, alpha gamma)O-16 has been used to perform depth-sensitive analyses for both fluorine and hydrogen in lunar samples. The resonance at 0.83 MeV (center-of-mass) in this reaction has been applied to the measurement of the distribution of trapped solar protons in lunar samples to depths up to 0.45 microns. These results are interpreted in terms of terrestrial H2O surface contamination and of a redistribution of the implanted solar H which has been influenced by heavy radiation damage in the surface region. Results are also presented for an experiment to test the penetration of H2O into laboratory glass samples which have been irradiated with O-16 to simulate the radiation-damaged surfaces of lunar glasses. Fluorine determinations have been performed in a 1-micron surface layer on lunar samples using the same F-19(p, alpha gamma)O-16 resonance. The data are discussed from the standpoint that observed fluorine concentrations are a mixture of true lunar fluorine and Teflon contamination.

  17. Optimal Fluoridation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John R.

    1975-01-01

    Optimal fluoridation has been defined as that fluoride exposure which confers maximal cariostasis with minimal toxicity and its values have been previously determined to be 0.5 to 1 mg per day for infants and 1 to 1.5 mg per day for an average child. Total fluoride ingestion and urine excretion were studied in Marin County, California, children in 1973 before municipal water fluoridation. Results showed fluoride exposure to be higher than anticipated and fulfilled previously accepted criteria for optimal fluoridation. Present and future water fluoridation plans need to be reevaluated in light of total environmental fluoride exposure. PMID:1130041

  18. Three-dimensional distribution of hydrogen fluoride gas toward NGC 6334 I and I(N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Naylor, D. A.; Makiwa, G.; Satta, M.; Abergel, A.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The HF molecule has been proposed as a sensitive tracer of diffuse interstellar gas, while at higher densities its abundance could be influenced heavily by freeze-out onto dust grains. Aims: We investigate the spatial distribution of a collection of absorbing gas clouds, some associated with the dense, massive star-forming core NGC 6334 I, and others with diffuse foreground clouds elsewhere along the line of sight. For the former category, we aim to study the dynamical properties of the clouds in order to assess their potential to feed the accreting protostellar cores. Methods: We use far-infrared spectral imaging from the Herschel SPIRE iFTS to construct a map of HF absorption at 243 μm in a 6'× 3.´5 region surrounding NGC 6334 I and I(N). Results: The combination of new mapping that is fully sampled spatially, but is spectrally unresolved with a previous, single-pointing, spectrally resolved HF signature yields a three-dimensional picture of absorbing gas clouds in the direction of NGC 6334. Toward core I, the HF equivalent width matches that of the spectrally resolved observation. At angular separations ≳20'' from core I, the HF absorption becomes weaker, which is consistent with three of the seven components being associated with this dense star-forming envelope. Of the remaining four components, two disappear beyond ~1' distance from the NGC 6334 filament, suggesting that these clouds are spatially associated with the star-forming complex. Our data also implies a lack of gas-phase HF in the envelope of core I(N). Using a simple description of adsorption onto and desorption from dust grain surfaces, we show that the overall lower temperature of the envelope of source I(N) is consistent with freeze-out of HF, while it remains in the gas phase in source I. Conclusions: We use the HF molecule as a tracer of column density in diffuse gas (nH ≈ 102-103cm-3), and find that it may uniquely trace a relatively low-density portion of the gas reservoir

  19. Long-term stability of GHB in post-mortem samples and samples from living persons, stored at -20°C, using fluoride preservatives.

    PubMed

    Fjeld, Bente; Burns, Margrete L; Karinen, Ritva; Larssen, Bente; Smith-Kielland, Anne; Vindenes, Vigdis

    2012-10-10

    Reanalyses are frequently requested in forensic toxicology, and knowledge of the stability of drugs in biological samples is of major importance for the interpretation of the toxicological findings. Currently, the literature on stability of gammahydroxybutyrate (GHB) in blood samples from living subjects and in post-mortem blood is limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term stability of GHB in both blood samples from persons suspected of drug use and post-mortem blood samples. A total of 59 reanalyses were performed in whole blood samples, 27 samples from living subjects and 32 samples taken at autopsies. The samples were stored in the freezer between 0.4 and 7.2 years at -20°C in vials containing preservatives. Analyses were performed by GC-FID, and cut-off level was 10.3 mg/L. The concentrations in 22 of the samples were below cut-off. The mean change in concentration between initial analysis and reanalysis was -0.8% for the positive samples from living persons and -7.1% for the positive post-mortem samples. Changes ranged from -32.4% to 21.0% for samples from living and from -30.4% to 34.4% for post-mortem samples. All negative samples were still negative at the time of reanalysis. Reanalysis of these forensic whole blood samples stored several years at -20°C with fluoride preservation did not exhibit changes in GHB concentrations of practical significance for the interpretation of toxicological findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fluoride content of infant foods.

    PubMed

    Steele, Jaime L; Martinez-Mier, E Angeles; Sanders, Brian J; Jones, James E; Jackson, Richard D; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Tomlin, Angela M; Eckert, George J

    2014-01-01

    Excessive fluoride consumption during the first 2 years of life is associated with an increased risk of dental fluorosis. Estimates of fluoride intake from various sources may aid in determining a child's risk for developing fluorosis. This study sought to assess the fluoride content of commercially available foods for infants, and to guide dentists who are advising parents of young children about fluoride intake. Three samples each of 20 different foods (including fruits and vegetables, as well as chicken, turkey, beef/ham, and vegetarian dinners) from 3 manufacturers were analyzed (in duplicate) for their fluoride content. Among the 360 samples tested, fluoride concentration ranged from 0.007-4.13 μg fluoride/g food. All foods tested had detectable amounts of fluoride. Chicken products had the highest mean levels of fluoride, followed by turkey products. Consuming >1 serving per day of the high fluoride concentration products in this study would place children over the recommended daily fluoride intake. Fluoride from infant foods should be taken into account when determining total daily fluoride intake.

  1. Standard addition flow method for potentiometric measurements at low concentration levels: application to the determination of fluoride in food samples.

    PubMed

    Galvis-Sánchez, Andrea C; Santos, João Rodrigo; Rangel, António O S S

    2015-02-01

    A standard addition method was implemented by using a flow manifold able to perform automatically multiple standard additions and in-line sample treatment. This analytical strategy was based on the in-line mixing of sample and standard addition solutions, using a merging zone approach. The flow system aimed to exploit the standard addition method to quantify the target analyte particularly in cases where the analyte concentration in the matrix is below the lower limit of linear response of the detector. The feasibility of the proposed flow configuration was assessed through the potentiometric determination of fluoride in sea salts of different origins and different types of coffee infusions. The limit of quantification of the proposed manifold was 5×10(-6) mol L(-1), 10-fold lower than the lower limit of linear response of the potentiometric detector used. A determination rate of 8 samples h(-1) was achieved considering an experimental procedure based on three standard additions per sample. The main advantage of the proposed strategy is the simple approach to perform multiple standard additions, which can be implemented with other ion selective electrodes, especially in cases when the primary ion is below the lower limit of linear response of the detector. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Systemic fluoride.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Levy, Steven Marc

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that fluoride, through different applications and formulas, works to control caries development. The first observations of fluoride's effects on dental caries were linked to fluoride naturally present in the drinking water, and then from controlled water fluoridation programs. Other systemic methods to deliver fluoride were later suggested, including dietary fluoride supplements such as salt and milk. These systemic methods are now being questioned due to the fact that many studies have indicated that fluoride's action relies mainly on its post-eruptive effect from topical contact with the tooth structure. It is known that even the methods of delivering fluoride known as 'systemic' act mainly through a topical effect when they are in contact with the teeth. The effectiveness of water fluoridation in many geographic areas is lower than in previous eras due to the widespread use of other fluoride modalities. Nevertheless, this evidence should not be interpreted as an indication that systemic methods are no longer relevant ways to deliver fluoride on an individual basis or for collective health programs. Caution must be taken to avoid excess ingestion of fluoride when prescribing dietary fluoride supplements for children in order to minimize the risk of dental fluorosis, particularly if there are other relevant sources of fluoride intake - such as drinking water, salt or milk and/or dentifrice. Safe and effective doses of fluoride can be achieved when combining topical and systemic methods.

  3. Geochemical characterization of fluoride in water, table salt, active sediment, rock and soil samples, and its possible relationship with the prevalence of enamel fluorosis in children in four municipalities of the department of Huila (Colombia).

    PubMed

    Martignon, Stefania; Opazo-Gutiérrez, Mario Omar; Velásquez-Riaño, Möritz; Orjuela-Osorio, Iván Rodrigo; Avila, Viviana; Martinez-Mier, Esperanza Angeles; González-Carrera, María Clara; Ruiz-Carrizosa, Jaime Alberto; Silva-Hermida, Blanca Cecilia

    2017-06-01

    Fluoride is an element that affects teeth and bone formation in animals and humans. Though the use of systemic fluoride is an evidence-based caries preventive measure, excessive ingestion can impair tooth development, mainly the mineralization of tooth enamel, leading to a condition known as enamel fluorosis. In this study, we investigated the geochemical characterization of fluoride in water, table salt, active sediment, rock and soil samples in four endemic enamel fluorosis sentinel municipalities of the department of Huila, Colombia (Pitalito, Altamira, El Agrado and Rivera), and its possible relationship with the prevalence of enamel fluorosis in children. The concentration of fluoride in drinking water, table salt, active sediment, rock, and soil was evaluated by means of an ion selective electrode and the geochemical analyses were performed using X-ray fluorescence. Geochemical analysis revealed fluoride concentrations under 15 mg/kg in active sediment, rock and soil samples, not indicative of a significant delivery to the watersheds studied. The concentration of fluoride in table salt was found to be under the inferior limit (less than 180 μg/g) established by the Colombian regulations. Likewise, exposure doses for fluoride water intake did not exceed the recommended total dose for all ages from 6 months. Although the evidence does not point out at rocks, soils, fluoride-bearing minerals, fluoridated salt and water, the hypothesis of these elements as responsible of the current prevalence of enamel fluorosis cannot be discarded since, aqueducts might have undergone significant changes overtime.

  4. A pyrolysis/gas chromatographic method for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, R. H.; Bustin, R.; Gibson, E. K.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples. The sample is heated under vacuum after which the evolved gases are separated by gas chromatography with a helium ionization detector. The system is calibrated by injecting known amounts of hydrogen, as determined manometrically. The method, which is rapid and reliable, was checked for a variety of lunar soils; the limit of detection is about 10 ng of hydrogen.

  5. Fluoride-containing restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Burke, F M; Ray, N J; McConnell, R J

    2006-02-01

    Dental practitioners are exposed to an increasing number of dental materials, which claim the benefits of fluoride release. The purpose of this paper is to critically review the literature of these materials. Glass ionomers, resin modified glass ionomers, compomers, resin composites, fissure sealants and amalgam are discussed. It is clear that a long-term measurable release of fluoride can be observed from certain restorative materials, in vitro, particularly glass ionomer cement, resin modified glass ionomer cement, fluoridated cements, fluoridated dental amalgam and certain fissure sealants. In general, the rate of fluoride release is not constant but exhibits a relatively rapid initial rate, which decreases with time. However, the fluoride release profiles may be dependent on specific formulation and on experimental design and sampling methods. These materials may feature greater longevity, a reduced incidence of marginal failure, an elevated concentration of fluoride in contingent plaque, together with an antibacterial action when compared with non-fluoride releasing materials. In addition, fluoride-releasing materials may perform better in caries inhibition in artificial caries model studies than non-fluoridated materials. While any, or all, of these anti-cariogenic effects may be associated with fluoride release, a direct relationship between fluoride release profiles and such effects has not been determined in vivo.

  6. Simple determination of fluoride in biological samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sun-Myung; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2015-08-14

    A simple and convenient method to detect fluoride in biological samples was developed. This method was based on derivatization with 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene, headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) in a vial, and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric detection. The HS-SPME parameters were optimized as follows: selection of CAR/PDMS fiber, 0.5% 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene, 250 mg/L 15-crown-5-ether as a phase transfer catalyst, extraction and derivatization temperature of 95 °C, heating time of 20 min and pH of 7.0. Under the established conditions, the lowest limits of detection were 9 and 11 μg/L in 1.0 ml of plasma and urine, respectively, and the intra- and inter-day relative standard deviation was less than 7.7% at concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/L. The calibration curve showed good linearity of plasma and urine with r=0.9990 and r=0.9992, respectively. This method is simple, amenable to automation and environmentally friendly.

  7. Fluoride mouthrinses and fluoride varnishes.

    PubMed

    Petersson, L G

    1993-01-01

    The cariostatic efficacy of rinsing with a 0.05-0.2% neutral sodium fluoride solution has been clearly demonstrated, especially in supervised school-based programmes in moderate and high caries risk children. The cost-benefit effect, however, is questionable in populations with low caries prevalence, and fluoride rinsing programmes are gradually being replaced by more individual fluoride therapy comprising combinations of fluoride toothpastes, tablets, or varnishes. Fluoride varnishes were developed as individual alternatives to conventional topical fluoride application and are today gaining acceptance for clinical application. Two varnishes, Duraphat containing 5% wt NaF and Fluor Protector with 0.9% wt fluor silane, are available commercially. The clinical effects seem to depend mainly on application frequency, especially in high caries risk groups. The cost-benefit effect is high, but can be increased by delegating application to auxiliary personnel in conjunction with regular dental visits. Toxicologically both fluoride mouthrinses and fluoride varnishes are safe if used as directed.

  8. Development and evaluation of a source sampling and analysis method for hydrogen cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Steger, J.L.; Merrill, R.G.; Fuerst, R.G.

    1997-12-31

    Laboratory studies were carried out to develop a method for the sampling and analysis of hydrogen cyanide from stationary source air emissions using a dilute NAOH solution as the collection medium. The method evaluated extracts stack gas from the emission sources and stabilizes the reactive gas for subsequent analysis in dilute sodium hydroxide solution. A modified Method 0050 sampling train was evaluated by dynamically spiking hydrogen cyanide into the heated probe while sampling simulated or actual source gas.

  9. Device for sampling and enriching impurities in hydrogen comprising hydrogen-permeable membrane

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Papadias, Dionissios D.; Lee, Sheldon D. H.; Kumar, Romesh

    2017-01-31

    Provided herein are methods and devices to enrich trace quantities of impurities in gaseous mixtures, such as hydrogen fuel. The methods and devices rely on concentration of impurities so as to allow the detection of the impurities using commonly-available detection methods.

  10. Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Neil; Whalen, J. Marc; Chacon, Lisa

    2000-12-12

    A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

  11. Deposition of fluoride on enamel surfaces released from varnishes is limited to vicinity of fluoridation site.

    PubMed

    Attin, T; Lennon, A M; Yakin, M; Becker, K; Buchalla, W; Attin, R; Wiegand, A

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the in-situ study was to determine fluoride uptake in non-fluoridated, demineralized enamel after application of fluoride varnishes on enamel samples located at various distances from the non-fluoridated samples. All enamel samples used were demineralized with acidic hydroxyethylcellulose before the experiment. Intra-oral appliances were worn by ten volunteers in three series: (1, Mirafluorid, 0.15% F; 2, Duraphat, 2.3% F and 3, unfluoridated controls) of 6 days each. Each two enamel samples were prepared from 30 bovine incisors. One sample was used for the determination of baseline fluoride content (BFC); the other was treated according to the respective series and fixed in the intra-oral appliance for 6 days. Additionally, from 120 incisors, each four enamel samples were prepared (one for BFC). Three samples (a-c) were placed into each appliance at different sites: (a) directly neighboured to the fluoridated specimen (=next), (b) at 1-cm distance (=1 cm) and (c) in the opposite buccal aspect of the appliance (=opposite). At these sites, new unfluoridated samples were placed at days 1, 3 and 5, which were left in place for 1 day. The volunteers brushed their teeth and the samples with fluoridated toothpaste twice per day. Both the KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride were determined in all samples to determine fluoride uptake and were statistically analyzed. One day, after fluoridation with Duraphat, KOH-soluble fluoride uptake in specimen a (=next) was significantly higher compared to the corresponding samples of both the control and Mirafluorid series, which in turn were not significantly different from each other. At all other sites and time points, fluoride uptake in the enamel samples were not different from controls for both fluoride varnishes. Within the first day after application, intra-oral-fluoride release from the tested fluoride varnish Duraphat leads to KOH-soluble fluoride uptake only in enamel samples located in close vicinity to

  12. Dentifrice Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakita, Philip E.

    2004-05-01

    The effectiveness of the fluoride ion in lowering the incidence of dental caries is a major factor in the field of dental health. Observations and research studies in the first half of the 20th century have lead to the widespread adoption of fluoridated water and the use of inorganic fluoride compounds in oral care products, such as toothpaste and dental rinses. This article provides a brief review of the types of compounds used and the chemistry involved.

  13. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Bottled Water Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Consumers drink ... questions about bottled water and fluoride. Does bottled water contain fluoride? Bottled water products may contain fluoride, ...

  14. Water fluoridation.

    PubMed

    Parnell, C; Whelton, H; O'Mullane, D

    2009-09-01

    This was to present a summary of the evidence from systematic reviews of the effectiveness and safety of water fluoridation. A search for relevant systematic reviews was conducted using the terms Fluoridation [Mesh] OR "water fluoridation" OR fluoridation OR (water AND fluoride) and was run from 01/01/2000 to 17/10/2008 in Pubmed, Embase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects in the Cochrane Library. The quality of the systematic reviews was assessed using Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (SIGN) methodology checklists for systematic reviews. Websites of guideline organisations were also searched for relevant evidence-based guidelines, which were appraised using the AGREE instrument. Of the 59 publications identified, 3 systematic reviews and 3 guidelines were included in this review. While the reviews themselves were of good methodological quality, the studies included in the reviews were generally of moderate to low quality. The results of the three reviews showed that water fluoridation is effective at reducing caries in children and adults. With the exception of dental fluorosis, no association between adverse effects and water fluoridation has been established. Water fluoridation reduces caries for all social classes, and there is some evidence that it may reduce the oral health gap between social classes. Water fluoridation, where technically feasible and culturally acceptable, remains a relevant and valid choice as a population measure for the prevention of dental caries.

  15. Test beam results with a sampling calorimeter of cerium fluoride scintillating crystals and tungsten absorber plates for calorimetry at the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.; Dissertori, G.; Djambazov, L.; Donegà, M.; Dröge, M.; Haller, C.; Horisberger, U.; Lustermann, W.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Quittnat, M.; Pandolfi, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Cavallari, F.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, M.; D`Imperio, G.; del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Jorda Lope, C.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nuccetelli, M.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pellegrino, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Martelli, A.; Monti, V.; Pastrone, N.; Trapani, P. P.; Candelise, V.; Della Ricca, G.

    2016-07-01

    A sampling calorimeter using cerium fluoride scintillating crystals as active material, interleaved with absorber plates made of tungsten, and read out by wavelength-shifting fibres has been tested with high-energy electron beams at the CERN SPS H4 beam line, as well as with lower-energy beams at the INFN Frascati Beam Test Facility in Italy. Energy resolution studies revealed a low stochastic term (< 10 % /√{ E }). This result, combined with high radiation hardness of the material used, marks this sampling calorimeter as a good candidate for the detectors' forward regions during the high luminosity phase of LHC.

  16. Total fluoride intake and excretion in children up to 4 years of age living in fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas.

    PubMed

    Zohoori, F V; Buzalaf, M A R; Cardoso, C A B; Olympio, K P K; Levy, F M; Grizzo, L T; Mangueira, D F B; Sampaio, F C; Maguire, A

    2013-10-01

    Fractional fluoride retention is important during the early years of life when considering the risk of development of dental fluorosis. This study aimed to measure fractional fluoride retention in young children. The objectives were to investigate the relationships between fractional fluoride retention and total daily fluoride intake, age, and body mass index (BMI). Twenty-nine healthy children, up to 4 yr of age, participated; 14 lived in a fluoridated area (0.64 μg ml(-1) of fluoride in drinking water) and 15 lived in a non-fluoridated area (0.04 μg ml(-1) of fluoride in drinking water). The total daily fluoride intake of each child was calculated from the daily dietary fluoride intake and toothpaste ingestion (if fluoride toothpaste was used). Total daily fluoride excretion was measured by collecting voided urine and faeces over a 24-h period, and fractional fluoride retention was calculated by dividing the amount of fluoride retained in the body (total daily fluoride intake minus total daily fluoride excretion) by the total daily fluoride intake. Nine children were excluded from data analysis because of suspected invalid samples. Mean (range) fractional fluoride retention for the remaining 20 children was 0.61 (0.06-0.98). There were no statistically significant correlations between fractional fluoride retention and either age or BMI. However, fractional fluoride retention was correlated with total daily fluoride intake: fractional fluoride retention = 1 - exp (-C × total daily fluoride intake), where C = 28.75 (95% CI = 19.75-37.75). The wide variation in fluoride retention in young children could have important implications when recommendations for fluoride use are being considered. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  17. NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  18. Fluoride concentration of bottled water, tap water, and fluoridated salt from two communities in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Mier, E Angeles; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Buckley, Christine M; Zero, Domenick T; Margineda, Jorge

    2005-04-01

    To determine fluoride levels in bottled water, tap water, and fluoridated salt from two communities in Mexico. Stratified random collection of water and salt samples from Mexico City and Veracruz, Mexico for fluoride analysis. Samples were analysed using a combination fluoride ion-specific electrode. Results were compared using Student's t-test and mixed-model ANOVA. Water fluoride values were compared by type, community and collection area; salt fluoride values were compared by community and collection area. 197 tap water samples, 133 bottled water samples and 20 fluoridated salt samples were collected. The mean (+/- SD) fluoride content for all tap water was 0.20 +/- 0.17 microg F/g (ranging from 0.01 to 0.88 microg F/g) and 0.24 +/- 0.24 microg F/g for all bottled water (ranging from 0.01 to 2.80 microg F/g). This difference was not statistically significant. When results were analysed by city, the difference between tap water samples was statistically significant. Ten bottled water samples contained more than negligible fluoride (ranging from 0.7-2.8 microg F/g). Mean salt fluoride content was 230.0 +/- 49.8 microg F/g, which was within governmental regulation levels. Some water samples had amounts of fluoride exceeding the maximum recommended levels. Salt fluoride levels were within regulation limits. Monitoring of fluoride content of both bottled and tap water is strongly advised.

  19. The application of the fluoride reactivation process to the detection of sarin and soman nerve agent exposures in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Adams, T K; Capacio, B R; Smith, J R; Whalley, C E; Korte, W D

    2004-02-01

    The fluoride reactivation process was evaluated for measuring the level of sarin or soman nerve agents reactivated from substrates in plasma and tissue from in vivo exposed guinea pigs (Cava porcellus), in blood from in vivo exposed rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), and in spiked human plasma and purified human albumin. Guinea pig exposures ranged from 0.05 to 44 LD50, and reactivated nerve agent levels ranged from 1.0 ng/mL in plasma obtained from 0.05 LD50 sarin-exposed guinea pigs to an average of 147 ng/g in kidney tissue obtained from two 2.0 LD50 soman-exposed guinea pigs. Positive dose-response relationships were observed in all low-level, 0.05 to 0.4 LD50, exposure studies. An average value of 2.4 ng/mL for reactivated soman was determined in plasma obtained from two rhesus monkeys three days after a 2 LD50 exposure. Of the five types of guinea pig tissue studied, plasma, heart, liver, kidney and lung, the lung and kidney tissue yielded the highest amounts of reactivated agent. In similar tissue and with similar exposure procedures, reactivated soman levels were greater than reactivated sarin levels. Levels of reactivated agents decreased rapidly with time while the guinea pig was alive, but decreased much more slowly after death. This latter chemical stability should facilitate forensic retrospective identification. The high level of reactivated agents in guinea pig samples led to the hypothesis that the principal source of reactivated agent came from the agent-carboxylesterase adduct. However, there could be contributions from adducts of the cholinesterases, albumin and fibrous tissue, as well. Quantitative analysis was performed with a GC-MS system using selected ion monitoring of the 99 and 125 ions for sarin and the 99 and 126 ions for soman. Detection levels were as low as 0.5 ng/mL. The assay was precise and easy to perform, and has potential for exposure analysis from organophosphate nerve agents and pesticides in other animal species.

  20. Health effects of groundwater fluoride contamination.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Bishwajit; Roy, Madan Mohan; Das, Bhaskar; Pal, Arup; Sengupta, Mrinal Kumar; De, Shankar Prasad; Chakraborti, Dipankar

    2009-04-01

    The people in Berhait block, Sahibganj district, Jharkhand state, India, have been exposed chronically to fluoridecontaminated groundwater. Hereby, we report the clinical effects of chronic exposure to fluoride. The study population was a convenience sample of 342 adults and 258 children living in the affected area. All volunteers filled out questionnaires and were examined. Well water from the six affected villages and urine samples were analyzed for fluoride using an ion-sensitive electrode. Twenty nine percent of 89 well water samples had fluoride concentrations above the Indian permissible limit of fluoride in drinking water. Eighty-five children and 72 adults had clinical fluorosis. Urine fluoride concentrations in children were 0.758-2.88 mg/L whereas in adults they were 0.331-10.36 mg/L. Clinical effects of fluoride included abnormal tooth enamel in children; adults had joint pain and deformity of the limbs and spine, along with ligamentous calcifications and exostosis formations in seven patients. Elevated urine fluoride concentrations supported the clinical diagnosis of fluorosis. Owing to insufficient fluoride-safe wells and lack of awareness of the danger of fluoride toxicity, villagers often drink fluoride-contaminated water. Villagers of Berhait block, including children, are at risk from chronic fluoride toxicity. To combat the situation, villagers need fluoride-safe water, education, and awareness of the danger about fluoride toxicity.

  1. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed reactor system at Building 9212. Draft environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is Iocated within the Y-12 Plant on DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The current AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems were designed and constructed more than 40 years ago. Because of their deteriorating condition, the corrosive nature of the materials processed, and the antiquated design philosophy upon which they are based, their long-term reliability cannot be assured. The current AHF supply system cannot mitigate an accidental release of AHF and vents fugitive AHF directly to the atmosphere during operations. the proposed action would reduce the risk of exposing the Y-12 Plant work force, the public, and the environment to an accidental release of AHF and would ensure the continuing ability of the Y-12 Plant to manufacture highly enriched uranium metal and process uranium from retired weapons for storage.

  2. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed chemical processing systems at Building 9212, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is located within the Y-12 Plant on DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The proposed replacement system would be based upon modern design criteria and safety analyses. The replacement AHF supply and distribution system equipment would be located on the existing Dock 8/8A at Building 9212. Utilities would be extended to the dock to service the process equipment. The following process equipment modules would be prefabricated for installation at the modified dock: an AHF cylinder enclosure, an AHF supply manifold and vaporizer module, an AHF sump tank and transfer skid, and an AHF supply off-gas scrubber assembly module. The fluidized-bed reactor system would be constructed in an area adjacent to the existing system in Building 9212. The replacement equipment would consist of a new reduction fluidized-bed reactor, a hydrofluorination fluidized-bed reactor, and associated air emission control equipment. The no-action alternative, which is the continued operation of the existing AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems, was also evaluated.

  3. Ultrastructural changes in the cemento-enamel junction after vital tooth bleaching with fluoride and fluoride-free agents - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gasic, Jovanka; Kesic, Ljiljana; Popovic, Jelena; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolic, Marija; Stankovic, Sasa; Barac, Radomir

    2012-03-01

    The impact of bleaching on the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) is not well known. Due to frequent sensitivity of the cervical region of teeth after the vital bleaching, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphological features of the CEJ of human teeth after application of fluoridated and fluoride-free bleaching agents, as well as post-bleaching fluoridation treatment, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Thirty-five extracted permanent human teeth were longitudinally cut, yielding 70 specimens. Thirty specimens were randomly divided into the 3 experimental groups, and 20 specimens, were used as (2) control groups, each: negative (untreated) control group; positive control group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide; experimental group 1, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP); experimental group 2, treatment with a mixture of 10% CP and fluoride; and experimental group 3, treatment with 10% CP and 2% sodium fluoride gel applied 30 minutes after bleaching. Experimental groups were treated 8 h per day for 14 days. The samples were examined by SEM. The bleaching materials tested caused morphological changes to the surface of the CEJ. There was a statistically significant difference between experimental groups (Kruskal Wallis Test chi-square=11,668; p<0.005). Mean value of experimental group 2 scores showed statistically significant difference from groups 1 and 3. Bleaching gel with fluorides does not significantly change morphological appearance of the CEJ and represents a better choice than the hard tissue fluoridation process after bleaching.

  4. Fluoride concentration in drinking water of Karachi city (Pakistan).

    PubMed

    Siddique, Azhar; Mumtaz, Majid; Saied, Sumayya; Karim, Zahida; Zaigham, Nayyer A

    2006-09-01

    The ground and municipal water supply samples of Karachi city were analyzed for their fluoride contents. The fluoride contents in water samples collected from the subsurface and river sources were found below the WHO recommended value for the general health of the people. However, in some industrial areas the groundwater sample showed higher level of fluoride concentration. Continuous monitoring of water resources and cautious fluoridation is suggested to maintain proper status of fluoride concentration in the drinking water.

  5. H/D isotope effects on NMR chemical shifts of nuclei involved in a hydrogen bridge of hydrogen isocyanide complexes with fluoride anion.

    PubMed

    Golubev, Nikolai S; Detering, Carsten; Smirnov, Sergei N; Shenderovich, Ilja G; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Tolstoy, Peter M

    2009-07-07

    (1)H, (2)H, (19)F and (15)N NMR spectra of a strongly hydrogen-bonded anionic cluster, CNHF(-), as an ion pair with a tetrabutylammonium cation dissolved in CDF(3)-CDF(2)Cl mixture were recorded in the slow exchange regime at temperatures down to 110 K. The fine structure due to spin-spin coupling of all nuclei involved in the hydrogen bridge was resolved. H/D isotope effects on the chemical shifts were measured. The results were compared with those obtained earlier for a similar anion, FHF(-), and interpreted via ab initio calculations of magnetic shielding as functions of internal vibrational coordinates, namely an anti-symmetric proton stretching and a doubly-degenerate bending. The values of primary and secondary isotope effects on NMR chemical shifts were estimated using a power expansion of the shielding surface as a function of vibrational coordinates. A positive primary isotope effect was explained as a result of the decrease of the hydron stretching amplitude upon deuteration. We show that the proton shielding surface has a minimum close to the equilibrium geometry of the CNHF(-) anion, leading to the positive primary H/D isotope effect in a rather asymmetric hydrogen bond. We conclude that caution should be used when making geometric estimations on the basis of NMR data, since the shapes of the shielding functions of the internal vibrational coordinates can be rather exclusive for each complex.

  6. Fluoride content of tank water in Australia.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, N J; Hopcraft, M S; Tong, A C; Thean, H l; Thum, Y S; Tong, D E; Wen, J; Zhao, S C; Stanton, D P; Yuan, Y; Shen, P; Reynolds, E C

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) analyse the fluoride content of tank water; (2) determine whether the method of water collection or storage influenced fluoride content; and (3) survey participant attitudes towards water fluoridation. Plastic tubes and a questionnaire were distributed through dentists to households with water tanks in Victoria. A midstream tank water sample was collected and fluoride analysed in triplicate using ion chromatography All samples (n = 123) contained negligible amounts of fluoride, with a mean fluoride concentration of <0.01 ppm (range: <0.01-0.18 ppm). No statistically significant association was found between fluoride content and variables investigated such as tank material, tank age, roof material and gutter material. Most people did not know whether their tank water contained fluoride and 40.8% preferred to have access to fluoridated water. The majority thought fluoride was safe and more than half of the respondents supported fluoridation. Fluoride content of tank water was well below the optimal levels for caries prevention. People who rely solely on tank water for drinking may require additional exposure to fluoride for optimal caries prevention. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  7. Multi-saline sample distillation apparatus for hydrogen isotope analyses : design and accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hassan, Afifa Afifi

    1981-01-01

    A distillation apparatus for saline water samples was designed and tested. Six samples may be distilled simultaneously. The temperature was maintained at 400 C to ensure complete dehydration of the precipitating salts. Consequently, the error in the measured ratio of stable hydrogen isotopes resulting from incomplete dehydration of hydrated salts during distillation was eliminated. (USGS)

  8. Growth of hollow nickel fluoride whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S. V.; Orekhov, Yu. F.; Fedorov, P. P.

    2009-07-15

    Hollow nickel fluoride whiskers have been obtained by condensation from the vapor phase onto a platinum substrate in a flow of hydrogen fluoride. Crystals up to 5 mm in length have a square cross section with a 300 {+-} 30-{mu}m side. The wall thickness is 85 {+-} 20 {mu}m.

  9. Xenon fluoride solutions effective as fluorinating agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, H. H.; Quarterman, L. A.; Sheft, I.

    1967-01-01

    Solutions of xenon fluorides in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride have few disruptive effects and leave a residue consisting of gaseous xenon, which can be recovered and refluorinated. This mild agent can be used with materials which normally must be fluorinated with fluorine alone at high temperatures.

  10. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  11. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  12. Quantitation of fluoride ion released sarin in red blood cell samples by gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry using isotope dilution and large-volume injection.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, E M; McGuire, J M; Evans, R A; Edwards, J L; Hulet, S W; Benton, B J; Forster, J S; Burnett, D C; Muse, W T; Matson, K; Crouse, C L; Mioduszewski, R J; Thomson, S A

    2004-01-01

    A new method for measuring fluoride ion released isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (sarin, GB) in the red blood cell fraction was developed that utilizes an autoinjector, a large-volume injector port (LVI), positive ion ammonia chemical ionization detection in the SIM mode, and a deuterated stable isotope internal standard. This method was applied to red blood cell (RBC) and plasma ethyl acetate extracts from spiked human and animal whole blood samples and from whole blood of minipigs, guinea pigs, and rats exposed by whole-body sarin inhalation. Evidence of nerve agent exposure was detected in plasma and red blood cells at low levels of exposure. The linear method range of quantitation was 10-1000 pg on-column with a detection limit of approximately 2-pg on-column. In the course of method development, several conditions were optimized for the LVI, including type of injector insert, injection volume, initial temperature, pressure, and flow rate. RBC fractions had advantages over the plasma with respect to assessing nerve agent exposure using the fluoride ion method especially in samples with low serum butyrylcholinesterase activity.

  13. The Determination of Atmospheric Fluoride with a Specific Ion Electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, M.; Levaggi, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    Atmospheric fluoride is collected on lime-coated filter paper exposed to the ambient atmosphere for 30-day periods. The fluoride is eluted from the paper and analyzed with the use of a fluoride specific ion electrode. The technique permits evaluation of potential fluoride sources in terms of downwind concentrations and provides a simple, rapid procedure for the analysis of large numbers of samples.

  14. Estimation of uranium in columbite-tantalite samples: A method for sample solution preparation for fluorimetric estimation.

    PubMed

    Balaji, B K; Premadas, A; Ramanaiah, G V

    1984-10-01

    A method has been developed for obtaining a clear solution of columbite-tantalite samples in nitric acid medium before the fluorimetric estimation of uranium. Ammonium hydrogen fluoride is used to keep tantalum, niobium and titanium dissolved in the acid medium. The excess of fluoride is complexed with boric acid. The method has been successfully applied to a number of synthetic and natural columbite-tantalite samples.

  15. Corresponding-states behavior of a dipolar model fluid with variable dispersion interactions and its relevance to the anomalies of hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Volker C; Leroy, Frédéric

    2016-06-14

    More than two decades ago, the elusiveness of a liquid-vapor equilibrium and a corresponding critical point in simulations of the supposedly simple model of dipolar hard spheres came as a surprise to many liquid matter theorists. van Leeuwen and Smit [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 3991 (1993)] showed that a minimum of attractive dispersion interactions among the dipolar particles may be needed to observe regular fluid behavior. Here, we adopt their approach and use an only slightly modified model, in which the original point dipole is replaced by a dipole moment produced by charges that are separated in space, to study the influence of dispersion interactions of variable strength on the coexistence and interfacial properties of a polar fluid. The thermophysical properties are discussed in terms of Guggenheim's corresponding-states approach. In this way, the coexistence curve, the critical compressibility factor, the surface tension, Guggenheim's ratio, and modifications of Guldberg's and Trouton's rules (related to the vapor pressure and the enthalpy of vaporization) are analyzed. As the importance of dispersion is decreased, a crossover from simple-fluid behavior to that characteristic of strongly dipolar systems takes place; for some properties, this transition is monotonic, but for others it occurs non-monotonically. For strongly dipolar systems, the reduced surface tension is very low, whereas Guggenheim's ratio and Guldberg's ratio are found to be high. The critical compressibility factor is smaller, and the coexistence curve is wider and more skewed than for simple fluids. For very weak dispersion, liquid-vapor equilibrium is still observable, but the interfacial tension is extremely low and may, eventually, vanish marking the end of the existence of a liquid phase. We discuss the implications of our findings for real fluids, in particular, for hydrogen fluoride.

  16. Corresponding-states behavior of a dipolar model fluid with variable dispersion interactions and its relevance to the anomalies of hydrogen fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Volker C.; Leroy, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    More than two decades ago, the elusiveness of a liquid-vapor equilibrium and a corresponding critical point in simulations of the supposedly simple model of dipolar hard spheres came as a surprise to many liquid matter theorists. van Leeuwen and Smit [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 3991 (1993)] showed that a minimum of attractive dispersion interactions among the dipolar particles may be needed to observe regular fluid behavior. Here, we adopt their approach and use an only slightly modified model, in which the original point dipole is replaced by a dipole moment produced by charges that are separated in space, to study the influence of dispersion interactions of variable strength on the coexistence and interfacial properties of a polar fluid. The thermophysical properties are discussed in terms of Guggenheim's corresponding-states approach. In this way, the coexistence curve, the critical compressibility factor, the surface tension, Guggenheim's ratio, and modifications of Guldberg's and Trouton's rules (related to the vapor pressure and the enthalpy of vaporization) are analyzed. As the importance of dispersion is decreased, a crossover from simple-fluid behavior to that characteristic of strongly dipolar systems takes place; for some properties, this transition is monotonic, but for others it occurs non-monotonically. For strongly dipolar systems, the reduced surface tension is very low, whereas Guggenheim's ratio and Guldberg's ratio are found to be high. The critical compressibility factor is smaller, and the coexistence curve is wider and more skewed than for simple fluids. For very weak dispersion, liquid-vapor equilibrium is still observable, but the interfacial tension is extremely low and may, eventually, vanish marking the end of the existence of a liquid phase. We discuss the implications of our findings for real fluids, in particular, for hydrogen fluoride.

  17. Other Fluoride Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Other Fluoride Products Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... August 17, 2001;50(RR-14):1–42. Fluoride Products Fluoride Toothpaste Form Concentrations of fluoride in ...

  18. Drinking water fluoridation and bone.

    PubMed

    Allolio, B; Lehmann, R

    1999-01-01

    Drinking water fluoridation has an established role in the prevention of dental caries, but may also positively or negatively affect bone. In bone fluoride is incorporated into hydroxylapatite to form the less soluble fluoroapatite. In higher concentrations fluoride stimulates osteoblast activity leading to an increase in cancellous bone mass. As optimal drinking water fluoridation (1 mg/l) is widely used, it is of great interest, whether long-term exposition to artificial water fluoridation has any impact on bone strength, bone mass, and -- most importantly -- fracture rate. Animal studies suggest a biphasic pattern of the effect of drinking water fluoridation on bone strength with a peak strength at a bone fluoride content of 1200 ppm followed by a decline at higher concentrations eventually leading to impaired bone quality. These changes are not paralleled by changes in bone mass suggesting that fluoride concentrations remain below the threshold level required for activation of osteoblast activity. Accordingly, in most epidemiological studies in humans bone mass was not altered by optimal drinking water fluoridation. In contrast, studies on the effect on hip fracture rate gave conflicting results ranging from an increased fracture incidence to no effect, and to a decreased fracture rate. As only ecological studies have been performed, they may be biased by unknown confounding factors -- the so-called ecological fallacy. However, the combined results of these studies indicate that any increase or decrease in fracture rate is likely to be small. It has been calculated that appropriately designed cohort studies to solve the problem require a sample size of >400,000 subjects. Such studies will not be performed in the foreseeable future. Future investigations in humans should, therefore, concentrate on the effect of long-term drinking water fluoridation on bone fluoride content and bone strength.

  19. Effectiveness of water spray mitigation systems for accidental releases of hydrogen fluoride. Volume 9. Wind tunnel modeling of fire monitors for HF vapor cloud mitigation, volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, R.L.; Ratcliff, M.A.; Heskestad, G.; Parce, D.K.

    1992-05-01

    The hazards of hydrogen fluoride (HF) have long been recognized. Standard operating practices have been aimed at on minimizing the possibility of a release and mitigating the effects if a release should occur. These practices are continually monitored and improved to maximize safety protection based on the available technical data. The recent program targeted further improvements based on new technical data. The volume presents the results of wind tunnel simulations of water monitors and a surrogate gas for HF to quantify the effect of water spray/HF release configuration variables on the performance of multiple water monitors.

  20. Sources of dietary fluoride intake in 6-7-year-old English children receiving optimally, sub-optimally, and non-fluoridated water.

    PubMed

    Zohouri, Fatemeh V; Maguire, Anne; Moynihan, Paula J

    2006-01-01

    Due to increased consumption of pre-packaged drinks, tap water may no longer be the principal source of water intake and consequently fluoride intake. Little is known about the importance of solid foods as fluoride sources and how the relative contribution of foods/drinks to fluoride intake is affected by residing in fluoridated or non-fluoridated areas. This study investigated the relative contributions of different dietary sources to dietary fluoride intake and compared this in children residing in optimally artificially fluoridated, sub-optimally artificially fluoridated, and non-fluoridated areas. Thirty-three healthy children aged 6 years were recruited from fluoridated and non-fluoridated communities and categorised into three groups based on fluoride content of home tap water: optimally fluoridated (< or =0.7 mgF/L), sub-optimally fluoridated (> or =0.3 to < or =0.7 mgF/L) and non-fluoridated (50.3 mgF/L) drinking water. A 3-day dietary diary collected dietary information. Samples of foods/drinks consumed were collected and analyzed for fluoride content. Drinks provided 59%, 55% and 32% of dietary fluoride intake in optimally, sub-optimally and non-fluoridated areas respectively. Tap water, fruit squashes and cordials (extremely sweet non-alcoholic fruit flavoured drink concentrates) prepared with tap water, as well as cooked rice, pasta and vegetables were important sources of fluoride in optimally and sub-optimally fluoridated areas. Carbonated soft drinks and bread were the most important contributors to dietary fluoride intake in the non-fluoridated area. The main contributory sources to dietary fluoride differ between fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas. Estimating total fluoride intake from levels of fluoride in tap water alone is unlikely to provide a reliable quantitative measure of intake. Studies monitoring dietary fluoride exposure should consider intake from all foods and drinks.

  1. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  2. Fluoride Content in Alcoholic Drinks.

    PubMed

    Goschorska, Marta; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Rać, Monika Ewa; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of alcoholic drinks as a potential source of dietary fluoride by means of measuring fluoride levels in selected alcoholic drinks available on the Polish market that are also diverse in terms of the percentage content of ethanol. The study was conducted on 48 types of drinks with low, medium, and high alcohol content available on the Polish market and offered by various manufacturers, both Polish and foreign. Fluoride concentrations in individual samples were measured by potentiometric method with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. The highest fluoride levels were determined in the lowest percentage drinks (less than 10 % v/v ethanol), with the lowest fluoride levels observed in the highest percentage drinks (above 40 % v/v ethanol). In terms of types of alcoholic drinks, the highest fluoride levels were determined in beers and wines, while the lowest levels were observed in vodkas. These data confirm the fact that alcoholic beverages need to be considered as a significant source of fluoride delivered into the body.

  3. Development of a reaxff reactive force field for silicon/oxygen/hydrogen/fluoride interactions and applications to hydroxylation and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeon, Jejoon

    higher strain energy. In addition, we found three distinct hydroxylation paths -- H3O+ formation reaction from the adsorbed water, proton donation from H3O+, and the direct dissociation of the adsorbed water molecule. Because water molecules and their hydrogen bond network behave differently with respect to temperature ranges, silanol formation is also affected by temperature. The formation of surface hydroxyl in an amorphous silica double slit displays a similar tendency: SiOH formation prefers high-strain sites. Silanol formation related with H3O + formation and dissociation is observed in hydroxylation of amorphous SiO2, similar with the results from silica nano wire simulation. These results are particularly relevant to the tribological characteristics of surfaces, enabling the prediction of the attachment site of the lubrication film on silica surfaces with a locally strained geometry.

  4. Alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The knowledge of background alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children is of utmost importance for introducing optimal and safe caries preventive measures for both individuals and communities. The aim of this study was to assess the daily fluoride intake analyzing duplicate samples of food and beverages. An attempt was made to calculate the daily intake of fluoride from food and swallowed toothpaste. Methods Daily alimentary fluoride intake was measured in a group of 36 children with an average age of 4.75 years and an average weight of 20.69 kg at baseline, by means of a double plate method. This was repeated after six months. Parents recorded their child's diet over 24 hours and collected duplicated portions of food and beverages received by children during this period. Pooled samples of food and beverages were weighed and solid food samples were homogenized. Fluoride was quantitatively extracted from solid food samples by a microdiffusion method using hexadecyldisiloxane and perchloric acid. The content of fluoride extracted from solid food samples, as well as fluoride in beverages, was measured potentiometrically by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results Average daily fluoride intake at baseline was 0.389 (SD 0.054) mg per day. Six months later it was 0.378 (SD 0.084) mg per day which represents 0.020 (SD 0.010) and 0.018 (SD 0.008) mg of fluoride respectively calculated per kg bw/day. When adding the values of unwanted fluoride intake from the toothpaste shown in the literature (0.17-1.21 mg per day) the estimate of the total daily intake of fluoride amounted to 0.554-1.594 mg/day and recalculated to the child's body weight to 0.027-0.077 mg/kg bw/day. Conclusions In the children studied, observed daily fluoride intake reached the threshold for safe fluoride intake. When adding the potential fluoride intake from swallowed toothpaste, alimentary intake reached the optimum range for daily fluoride intake. These results showed that

  5. Magnesium hydrogen breath test using end expiratory sampling to assess achlorhydria in pernicious anaemia patients.

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, P; López de Soria, P; Fernández-Bañares, F; Juncá, J; Boix, J; Planas, R; Quer, J C; Domenech, E; Gassull, M A

    1994-01-01

    A modified magnesium hydrogen breath test, using end expiratory breath sampling, is described to investigate achlorhydria. The efficacy of this test in the diagnostic investigation of pernicious anaemia was compared with that of serum pepsinogen I. Twenty one patients with pernicious anaemia--that is, patients with achlorhydria--and 22 with healed duodenal ulcer and normal chlorhydria were studied. Magnesium hydrogen breath test, serum pepsinogen I, serum gastrin, and standard gastric acid secretory tests were performed in all subjects. The mean (SEM) hydrogen peak value was lower in patients with pernicious anaemia than in the duodenal ulcer group (21.7 (1.9) v 71.3 (5.2) ppm; p = 0.00005). The hydrogen peak value had a 95.2% sensitivity and a 100% specificity to detect pentagastrin resistant achlorhydria. Mean serum pepsinogen I concentrations were also significantly lower in patients with pernicious anaemia than in the duodenal ulcer group (10.7 (2.7) v 123.6 (11.8) micrograms/l p = 0.00005). Sensitivity and specificity to detect pernicious anaemia were both 100% for pepsinogen I. It is concluded that this modified magnesium hydrogen breath test is a simple, noninvasive, cost effective, and accurate method to assess achlorhydria and may be useful in the diagnostic investigation of patients with suspected pernicious anaemia. PMID:7959224

  6. Determination of Fluoride in Toothpaste Using an Ion-Selective Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Truman S.; Cappuccino, Carleton C.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the theory of chemical potentiometry, describes the experimental procedure for free fluoride determination, and presents sample data of fluoride concentration for various brands of toothpaste. (GS)

  7. Determination of Fluoride in Toothpaste Using an Ion-Selective Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Truman S.; Cappuccino, Carleton C.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the theory of chemical potentiometry, describes the experimental procedure for free fluoride determination, and presents sample data of fluoride concentration for various brands of toothpaste. (GS)

  8. Thermal Atomic Layer Etching of SiO2 by a "Conversion-Etch" Mechanism Using Sequential Reactions of Trimethylaluminum and Hydrogen Fluoride.

    PubMed

    DuMont, Jaime W; Marquardt, Amy E; Cano, Austin M; George, Steven M

    2017-03-22

    The thermal atomic layer etching (ALE) of SiO2 was performed using sequential reactions of trimethylaluminum (TMA) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) at 300 °C. Ex situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements revealed that the etch rate during SiO2 ALE was dependent on reactant pressure. SiO2 etch rates of 0.027, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.31 Å/cycle were observed at static reactant pressures of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 4.0 Torr, respectively. Ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were in agreement with these etch rates versus reactant pressure. In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy investigations also observed SiO2 etching that was dependent on the static reactant pressures. The FTIR studies showed that the TMA and HF reactions displayed self-limiting behavior at the various reactant pressures. In addition, the FTIR spectra revealed that an Al2O3/aluminosilicate intermediate was present after the TMA exposures. The Al2O3/aluminosilicate intermediate is consistent with a "conversion-etch" mechanism where SiO2 is converted by TMA to Al2O3, aluminosilicates, and reduced silicon species following a family of reactions represented by 3SiO2 + 4Al(CH3)3 → 2Al2O3 + 3Si(CH3)4. Ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies confirmed the reduction of silicon species after TMA exposures. Following the conversion reactions, HF can fluorinate the Al2O3 and aluminosilicates to species such as AlF3 and SiOxFy. Subsequently, TMA can remove the AlF3 and SiOxFy species by ligand-exchange transmetalation reactions and then convert additional SiO2 to Al2O3. The pressure-dependent conversion reaction of SiO2 to Al2O3 and aluminosilicates by TMA is critical for thermal SiO2 ALE. The "conversion-etch" mechanism may also provide pathways for additional materials to be etched using thermal ALE.

  9. Competition between Al2O3 atomic layer etching and AlF3 atomic layer deposition using sequential exposures of trimethylaluminum and hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    DuMont, Jaime W; George, Steven M

    2017-02-07

    The thermal atomic layer etching (ALE) of Al2O3 can be performed using sequential and self-limiting reactions with trimethylaluminum (TMA) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) as the reactants. The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of AlF3 can also be accomplished using the same reactants. This paper examined the competition between Al2O3 ALE and AlF3 ALD using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) vibrational spectroscopy measurements on Al2O3 ALD-coated SiO2 nanoparticles. The FTIR spectra could observe an absorbance loss of the Al-O stretching vibrations during Al2O3 ALE or an absorbance gain of the Al-F stretching vibrations during AlF3 ALD. The transition from AlF3 ALD to Al2O3 ALE occurred versus reaction temperature and was also influenced by the N2 or He background gas pressure. Higher temperatures and lower background gas pressures led to Al2O3 ALE. Lower temperatures and higher background gas pressures led to AlF3 ALD. The FTIR measurements also monitored AlCH3* and HF(*) species on the surface after the TMA and HF reactant exposures. The loss of AlCH3* and HF(*) species at higher temperatures is believed to play a vital role in the transition between AlF3 ALD at lower temperatures and Al2O3 ALE at higher temperatures. The change between AlF3 ALD and Al2O3 ALE was defined by the transition temperature. Higher transition temperatures were observed using larger N2 or He background gas pressures. This correlation was associated with variations in the N2 or He gas thermal conductivity versus pressure. The fluorination reaction during Al2O3 ALE is very exothermic and leads to temperature rises in the SiO2 nanoparticles. These temperature transients influence the Al2O3 etching. The higher N2 and He gas thermal conductivities are able to cool the SiO2 nanoparticles more efficiently and minimize the size of the temperature rises. The competition between Al2O3 ALE and AlF3 ALD using TMA and HF illustrates the interplay between etching and growth and the importance of

  10. Competition between Al2O3 atomic layer etching and AlF3 atomic layer deposition using sequential exposures of trimethylaluminum and hydrogen fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuMont, Jaime W.; George, Steven M.

    2017-02-01

    The thermal atomic layer etching (ALE) of Al2O3 can be performed using sequential and self-limiting reactions with trimethylaluminum (TMA) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) as the reactants. The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of AlF3 can also be accomplished using the same reactants. This paper examined the competition between Al2O3 ALE and AlF3 ALD using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) vibrational spectroscopy measurements on Al2O3 ALD-coated SiO2 nanoparticles. The FTIR spectra could observe an absorbance loss of the Al-O stretching vibrations during Al2O3 ALE or an absorbance gain of the Al-F stretching vibrations during AlF3 ALD. The transition from AlF3 ALD to Al2O3 ALE occurred versus reaction temperature and was also influenced by the N2 or He background gas pressure. Higher temperatures and lower background gas pressures led to Al2O3 ALE. Lower temperatures and higher background gas pressures led to AlF3 ALD. The FTIR measurements also monitored AlCH3* and HF* species on the surface after the TMA and HF reactant exposures. The loss of AlCH3* and HF* species at higher temperatures is believed to play a vital role in the transition between AlF3 ALD at lower temperatures and Al2O3 ALE at higher temperatures. The change between AlF3 ALD and Al2O3 ALE was defined by the transition temperature. Higher transition temperatures were observed using larger N2 or He background gas pressures. This correlation was associated with variations in the N2 or He gas thermal conductivity versus pressure. The fluorination reaction during Al2O3 ALE is very exothermic and leads to temperature rises in the SiO2 nanoparticles. These temperature transients influence the Al2O3 etching. The higher N2 and He gas thermal conductivities are able to cool the SiO2 nanoparticles more efficiently and minimize the size of the temperature rises. The competition between Al2O3 ALE and AlF3 ALD using TMA and HF illustrates the interplay between etching and growth and the importance of substrate

  11. Fluoride assay methodology for carbonated beverages.

    PubMed

    Heilman, Judith R; Levy, Steven M; Wefel, James S; Patterson, Kristine Y; Cutrufelli, Rena; Pehrsson, Pamela R; Holden, Joanne M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review different methodological techniques used for the assessment of fluoride in carbonated beverages, and compare results using a fluoride ion electrode direct read method with and without a prior decarbonation treatment. The carbonated beverages in this study were either purchased locally at grocery stores in Iowa City, Iowa, or purchased as part of a national representative sampling approach included in the National Fluoride Database and Intake Assessment Study (NFDIAS). The samples were compared with and without a decarbonating process. Soda pop and beer samples were analyzed by removing a 1-ml sample and adding a 1-ml buffer solution. The fluoride concentration of the sample and buffer combination was then determined using a fluoride ion specific electrode. There was no significant difference in the fluoride concentration of the samples with or without prior decarbonation. The mean absolute difference between the soda pop group with and without decarbonation was 0.01 ppm F, while results from the beer samples showed variation of 0.00 to 0.02 parts per million fluoride (ppm F). These differences were not statistically significant for the soda pop or beer groups (P=.50 and P=.74, respectively). Whether or not decarbonation was conducted prior to analysis, the fluoride assay results were the same. Therefore, decarbonation of soda pop and beer was deemed unnecessary prior to fluoride analysis.

  12. Fluoridated Water

    MedlinePlus

    ... based on a review of more than 50 human epidemiological (population) studies produced over the past 40 years, concluded that optimal fluoridation of drinking water “does not pose a detectable cancer risk to humans” as evidenced by extensive human epidemiological data reported ...

  13. Interval sampling of breath hydrogen (H2) as an index of lactose malabsorption in lactase-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Welsh, J D; Payne, D L; Manion, C; Morrison, R D; Nichols, M A

    1981-08-01

    Interval sampling of breath hydrogen content was used in lactose malabsorbers: (1) to compare hydrogen responses following increasing oral doses of lactose in milk and aqueous solutions; (2) to determine the reproducibility of interval breath sampling, and (3) to compare carbohydrate malabsorption following ingestion of either regular milk or milk containing Lactobacillus acidophilus. Significant differences in breath hydrogen responses due to increasing amounts of lactose in milk and aqueous solutions were observed. The individual breath hydrogen responses were reproducible using the same lactose dose on different days. There was no significant difference in breath hydrogen responses or symptoms following administration of either regular milk or milk containing Lactobacillus acidophilus. Breath hydrogen sampling at intervals, as performed in these studies, provides a sensitive and reproducible index of lactose malabsorption.

  14. Silicon oxidation in fluoride solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.; Kapur, V.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon is produced in a NaF, Na2SiF6, and Na matrix when SiF4 is reduced by metallic sodium. Hydrogen is evolved during acid leaching to separate the silicon from the accompanying reaction products, NaF and Na2SiF6. The hydrogen evolution reaction was studied under conditions simulating leaching conditions by making suspensions of the dry silicon powder in aqueous fluoride solutions. The mechanism for the hydrogen evolution is discussed in terms of spontaneous oxidation of silicon resulting from the cooperative effects of (1) elemental sodium in the silicon that reacts with water to remove a protective silica layer, leaving clean reactive silicon, and (2) fluoride in solution that complexes with the oxidized silicon in solution and retards formation of a protective hydrous oxide gel.

  15. A path sampling study of Ru-hydride-catalyzed H2 hydrogenation of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Christopher N; Woo, Tom K

    2008-06-11

    Ab initio molecular dynamics and transition path sampling were used to examine the dynamics of the H2 hydrogenation of ethylene with the catalyst RuHCl(CO)(PR3)2. The simulations showed H2 is coordinated very weakly to the metal until ethylene insertion, where it is cleaved into a dihydride intermediate. The dihydride has a shorter lifetime than RRKM theory predicts, due to the localization of kinetic energy into Ru-H vibrational modes after the insertion step.

  16. Long-term in vitro fluoride release and rerelease from orthodontic bonding materials containing fluoride.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Warren J; Wiltshire, William A; Dawes, Colin; Lavelle, Chris L B

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare in vitro long-term (30 month) fluoride release and rerelease rates (after fluoride exposure) from 3 orthodontic bonding materials containing fluoride and 1 without fluoride. Ten samples of each material (Python, TP Orthodontics, LaPorte, Ind; Assure, Reliance Orthodontic Products, Itasca, Ill; Fuji Ortho LC, GC America, Alsip, Ill; and Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) were fabricated and stored in deionized distilled water at 37 degrees C. Five samples had fluoride-release rates measured at days 546, 637, 730, 821, and 913 after initial fabrication, and 5 samples were exposed to fluoride (Nupro 2% NaF gel, Dentsply Canada, Woodbridge, Ontario, Canada) for 4 minutes at day 535 and had measurements taken on days 546, 548, 552, 575, 637, 730, 821, and 913. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed 24 hours before measurement. Statistically significant differences were found in fluoride-release rates (P <.0001), with Fuji Ortho LC releasing the most fluoride, followed by Python and Assure at all time points in the nonfluoride exposed group. In the fluoride-exposed group, there were significant differences in fluoride release (P <.0001), with Fuji Ortho LC releasing the most fluoride. A "burst-effect" pattern of fluoride release was seen after fluoride exposure for all materials. It was concluded that Fuji Ortho LC, Assure, and Python might have sufficient long-term fluoride-release rates to reduce white spot formation, and all are recommended as suitable fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding materials.

  17. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit shell carbon: A calcium-rich promising adsorbent for fluoride removal from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, V; Rajkumar, S; Murugesh, S; Darchen, A

    2012-07-30

    Tamarindus indica fruit shells (TIFSs) are naturally calcium rich compounds. They were impregnated with ammonium carbonate and then carbonized, leading to ammonium carbonate activated ACA-TIFS carbon. The resulting materials and carbon arising from virgin fruit shells V-TIFS were characterized and assayed as adsorbent for the removal of fluoride anions from groundwater. The fluoride scavenging ability of TIFS carbons was due to naturally dispersed calcium compounds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that TIFS carbon contained a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate. Batch studies on the fluoride removal efficiency of TIFS carbons with respect to contact time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, and co-ion interference were conducted. Applicability of various kinetic models (viz., pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich) and sorption isotherms were tested for batch techniques. The fluoride removal capacity of TIFS carbons was found to be 91% and 83% at a pH of 7.05 for V-TIFS and ACA-TIFS carbons, respectively. The practical applicability of TIFS carbons using groundwater samples was approved. The fluoride removal was greater in groundwater without hydrogen carbonate ions than those containing these ions. The characterizations of fluoride unloaded and loaded TIFS carbons were done by SEM and XRD studies.

  18. Comprehensive gas chromatography with Time of Flight MS and large volume introduction for the detection of fluoride-induced regenerated nerve agent in biological samples.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, J A; Trap, H C; Noort, D; van der Schans, M J

    2010-05-15

    Recently, several methods have been developed to verify exposure to nerve agents. Most of these methods, such as the fluoride reactivation technique and the analysis of inhibited phosphonylated butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), are based on mass spectrometry. The high specificity of the mass spectrometer might also imply a disadvantage, because the acquisition mass, i.e. the identity of the analyte must be known beforehand in order to direct the MS analysis in the most sensitive mode. In real cases, the identity of the nerve agent is not always known beforehand and the mass spectrometer should be operated in a scanning mode, with the consequence that sensitivity of the method will be lower. Comprehensive GC, or GC x GC, is a technique which offers enhanced separation. The implied larger selectivity of the GC separation allows mass spectrometry to be conducted in a less specific, scanning, mode. By the use of this configuration, the identity of the nerve agent does not have to be known beforehand but can be traced. In order to be able to detect lower concentrations and assess lower exposure levels, a large volume injection technique was developed allowing sample sizes up to 100 microL. The technique was tested with plasma samples that had been inhibited with various nerve agents. Subsequently, the cholinesterase-bound nerve agent was regenerated by the fluoride reactivation technique. Using the newly developed comprehensive GC-MS method it was possible to detect nerve agent at an exposure level of 1% BuChE inhibition, which is approximately 70 pg nerve agent/mL. These low exposure levels cannot be verified with a cholinesterase (ChE) activity assay. Moreover, the identity of the regenerated nerve agent was verified by the mass spectrum that was generated by the TOF mass spectrometer. This paper presents a technique able to deliver full-scan data on the analysis of nerve agents in biomedical samples at relevant exposure levels (1% BuChE inhibition). This full-scan data

  19. The quantification of hydrogen and methane in contaminated groundwater: validation of robust procedures for sampling and quantification.

    PubMed

    Dorgerloh, Ute; Becker, Roland; Theissen, Hubert; Nehls, Irene

    2010-10-06

    A number of currently recommended sampling techniques for the determination of hydrogen in contaminated groundwater were compared regarding the practical proficiency in field campaigns. Key characteristics of appropriate sampling procedures are reproducibility of results, robustness against varying field conditions such as hydrostatic pressure, aquifer flow, and biological activity. Laboratory set-ups were used to investigate the most promising techniques. Bubble stripping with gas sampling bulbs yielded reproducible recovery of hydrogen and methane which could be verified for groundwater sampled in two field campaigns. The methane content of the groundwater was confirmed by analysis of directly pumped samples thus supporting the trueness of the stripping results. Laboratory set-ups and field campaigns revealed that bubble stripping of hydrogen may be restricted to the type of used pump. Concentrations of dissolved hydrogen after bubble stripping with an electrically driven submersible pump were about one order of magnitude higher than those obtained from diffusion sampling. The gas chromatographic determination for hydrogen and methane requires manual injection of gas samples and detection by a pulsed discharge detector (PDD) and allows limits of quantification of 3 nM dissolved hydrogen and 1 µg L⁻¹ dissolved methane in groundwater. The combined standard uncertainty of the bubble stripping and GC/PDD quantification of hydrogen in field samples was 7% at 7.8 nM and 18% for 78 nM.

  20. Deposition of fluoride on enamel surfaces released from varnishes is limited to vicinity of fluoridation site

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, A. M.; Yakin, M.; Becker, K.; Buchalla, W.; Attin, R.; Wiegand, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the in-situ study was to determine fluoride uptake in non-fluoridated, demineralized enamel after application of fluoride varnishes on enamel samples located at various distances from the non-fluoridated samples. All enamel samples used were demineralized with acidic hydroxyethylcellulose before the experiment. Intra-oral appliances were worn by ten volunteers in three series: (1, Mirafluorid, 0.15% F; 2, Duraphat, 2.3% F and 3, unfluoridated controls) of 6 days each. Each two enamel samples were prepared from 30 bovine incisors. One sample was used for the determination of baseline fluoride content (BFC); the other was treated according to the respective series and fixed in the intra-oral appliance for 6 days. Additionally, from 120 incisors, each four enamel samples were prepared (one for BFC). Three samples (a–c) were placed into each appliance at different sites: (a) directly neighboured to the fluoridated specimen (=next), (b) at 1-cm distance (=1 cm) and (c) in the opposite buccal aspect of the appliance (=opposite). At these sites, new unfluoridated samples were placed at days 1, 3 and 5, which were left in place for 1 day. The volunteers brushed their teeth and the samples with fluoridated toothpaste twice per day. Both the KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride were determined in all samples to determine fluoride uptake and were statistically analyzed. One day, after fluoridation with Duraphat, KOH-soluble fluoride uptake in specimen a (=next) was significantly higher compared to the corresponding samples of both the control and Mirafluorid series, which in turn were not significantly different from each other. At all other sites and time points, fluoride uptake in the enamel samples were not different from controls for both fluoride varnishes. Within the first day after application, intra-oral-fluoride release from the tested fluoride varnish Duraphat leads to KOH-soluble fluoride uptake only in enamel samples located in close

  1. Plaque and saliva fluoride levels after placement of fluoride releasing pit and fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Rajtboriraks, Daranee; Nakornchai, Siriruk; Bunditsing, Panit; Surarit, Rudee; Iemjarern, Piyarat

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the fluoride levels in plaque and saliva before and after applying fluoride-containing pit and fissure sealants, and compare the fluoride release of 2 types of sealants at the different time intervals. Eighteen children ages 6 to 9 years were randomly divided into 2 groups: Group 1--sealant containing fluorosilicate glass (Helioseal-F); and group 2--sealant containing methacryloyl fluoride-methyl methacrylate copolymer (Teethmate-F). Saliva and plaque samples were collected before and after the sealants were placed on their 4 first permanent molars. Fluoride levels were determined using the microdiffusion method. Fluoride concentrations before and after placing the sealants were analyzed by paired t test, and the fluoride concentrations between the 2 sealants were compared by t test, with the level of significance at 0.05. There was no significant difference between salivary fluoride levels before and after sealant placement application in both groups. The plaque fluoride level of Helioseal-F group at 24 hours was significantly higher than the baseline level (P = .03), and was not different afterwards. The plaque fluoride levels after sealant with Teethmate-F were not significantly different when compared to the baseline. However, there were no significant differences between salivary and plaque fluoride levels of the 2 groups at different time intervals. The groups sealed with sealant containing fluorosilicate glass showed significant increase of plaque fluoride level only at 24 hours after sealant placement.

  2. A heterogeneous lunar interior for hydrogen isotopes as revealed by the lunar highlands samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Zhang, Youxue; Liu, Yang; Flemming, Roberta L.; Rossman, George R.; Eiler, John M.; Neal, Clive R.; Osinski, Gordon R.

    2017-09-01

    Knowing the amount and timing of water incorporation into the Moon has fundamental implications for our understanding of how the Earth-Moon system formed. Water has been detected in lunar samples but its abundance, distribution and origin are debated. To address these issues, we report water concentrations and hydrogen isotope ratios obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) of plagioclase from ferroan anorthosites (FANs), the only available lithology thought to have crystallized directly from the lunar magma ocean (LMO). The measured water contents are consistent with previous results by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Combined with literature data, δD values of lunar igneous materials least-degassed at the time of their crystallization range from -280 to + 310 ‰, the latter value being that of FAN 60015 corrected for cosmic ray exposure. We interpret these results as hydrogen isotopes being fractionated during degassing of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the LMO, starting with the magmatic δD value of primordial water at the beginning of LMO being about - 280 ‰, evolving to about + 310 ‰ at the time of anorthite crystallization, i.e. during the formation of the primary lunar crust. The degassing of hydrogen in the LMO is consistent with those of other volatile elements. The wide range of δD values observed in lunar igneous rocks could be due to either various degrees of mixing of the different mantle end members, or from a range of mantle sources that were degassed to different degrees during magma evolution. Degassing of the LMO is a viable mechanism that resulted in a heterogeneous lunar interior for hydrogen isotopes.

  3. Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces after Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Ella A; Dickten, Christoph; Jung, Rico; Krauss, Florian; Rübesamen, Henrik; Schmütsch, Katharina; Sandulescu, Tudor; Zimmer, Stefan; Arnold, Wolfgang H

    2016-01-05

    It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately after and at 30 and 120 minutes after tooth brushing. The fluoride concentration was determined. The area under the curve was calculated for each location and compared statistically. In the tongue coating, fluoride concentration increased faster after NaF application than after AmF application. After 30 minutes, the fluoride concentration decreased and remained stable until 120 minutes after AmF application and returned to baseline after NaF application. The difference between the baseline and the endpoint measurements was statistically significant. The fluoride concentration in the tongue coating remained at a higher level compared with the baseline for up to 120 minutes post-brushing. This may indicate that the tongue coating is a major reservoir for fluoride bioavailability. The results also indicate an unequal fluoride distribution in the oral cavity.

  4. Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces after Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application

    PubMed Central

    Naumova, Ella A.; Dickten, Christoph; Jung, Rico; Krauss, Florian; Rübesamen, Henrik; Schmütsch, Katharina; Sandulescu, Tudor; Zimmer, Stefan; Arnold, Wolfgang H.

    2016-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately after and at 30 and 120 minutes after tooth brushing. The fluoride concentration was determined. The area under the curve was calculated for each location and compared statistically. In the tongue coating, fluoride concentration increased faster after NaF application than after AmF application. After 30 minutes, the fluoride concentration decreased and remained stable until 120 minutes after AmF application and returned to baseline after NaF application. The difference between the baseline and the endpoint measurements was statistically significant. The fluoride concentration in the tongue coating remained at a higher level compared with the baseline for up to 120 minutes post-brushing. This may indicate that the tongue coating is a major reservoir for fluoride bioavailability. The results also indicate an unequal fluoride distribution in the oral cavity. PMID:26727989

  5. Hydrogen-isotope fractionation in aluminum hydroxides: Synthesis products versus natural samples from bauxites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitali, Frédéric; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Bird, Michael I.; Gage, Karie Lyne; Caldwell, W. Glen E.

    2001-05-01

    - Hydrogen-isotope data have been gathered for synthetic aluminum hydroxides precipitated over 3 to 121 months at temperatures varying between 8 and 51°C. All three Al(OH) 3 polymorphs, gibbsite, nordstrandite, and bayerite, were generated during the synthesis, but gibbsite was dominant in most samples and commonly the only phase present. At <10°C, hydrogen-isotope equilibrium between the synthetic Al-hydroxides and water was not achieved until more than 2 years had elapsed. Using pure gibbsite samples, an average α gibbsite-waterH value of 0.998 ± 0.006 was obtained between 9 and 51°C after 10 years of synthesis. Based on these results plus data for naturally occurring gibbsite from bauxite deposits, an α gibbsite-waterH value of 0.995 ± 0.003 was obtained for surficial temperatures. Using this value and oxygen-isotope results, the following "gibbsite line" is proposed for its formation from meteoric water at 20°C: δD = 7.84 δ 18O - 114.2. Most naturally occurring gibbsite samples plot about this line, which indicates their direct precipitation from solution. However, a few samples of gibbsite, especially those from Hawaii, plot to the right of the "gibbsite line" and likely inherited part of their isotopic composition from precursor kaolinite.

  6. Fluoride absorption: independence from plasma fluoride levels

    SciTech Connect

    Whitford, G.M.; Williams, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    The concept that there are physiologic mechanisms to homeostatically regulate plasma fluoride concentrations has been supported by results in the literature suggesting an inverse relationship between plasma fluoride levels and the absorption of the ion from the gastrointestinal tract of the rat. The validity of the relationship was questioned because of possible problems in the experimental design. The present work used four different methods to evaluate the effect of plasma fluoride levels on the absorption of the ion in rats: (i) the percentage of the daily fluoride intake that was excreted in the urine; (ii) the concentration of fluoride in femur epiphyses; (iii) the net areas under the time-plasma fluoride concentration curves after intragastric fluoride doses; and (iv) the residual amounts or fluoride in the gastrointestinal tracts after the intragastric fluoride doses. None of these methods indicated that plasma fluoride levels influence the rate or the degree or fluoride absorption. It was concluded that, unless extremely high plasma fluoride levels are involved (pharmacologic or toxic doses), the absorption of the ion is independent of plasma levels. The results provide further evidence that plasma fluoride concentrations are not homeostatically regulated.

  7. Prompt gamma analysis of hydrogen, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen in bulk samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Matouq, Fares Ahmed

    In this study, a PGNAA setup was developed using KFUPM 350 keV accelerator to detect H, C and O via inelastic scattering of neutrons in bulk samples of proxy materials of explosives and narcotics. Due to the interference of oxygen prompt gamma rays in NIS, nitrogen concentration was measured in bulk samples through Thermal Neutron Capture (TNC) using 350 keV accelerator-based PGNAA setup, as well as MP320 portable neutron generator-based PGNAA setup. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to calculate optimum geometry of the setups including experimental geometry, moderator size and detector as well as accelerator shielding. For prompt gamma rays detection, lanthanum halide (LaBr3:Ce or LaCl3:Ce) and BGO detectors were tested for gamma ray detection. Best performance was observed for the LaBr3: Ce detector. While the LaCl3:Ce detector response was sensitive to neutron moderation effects in bulk sample. This enhanced chlorine prompt gamma ray background from LaCl3:Ce detector for sample with increasing hydrogen contents. Due to the interference of prompt gamma ray from chlorine in LaCl 3:Ce detector and oxygen in bulk sample, LaCl3:Ce detector is not suitable for oxygen determination from bulk hydrogenous samples. Finally, the PGNAA setups were tested by determining C, O, N, and H concentrations in proxy material samples for explosives and narcotics using LaBr3:Ce detector. Excellent agreement was observed in experimental results and results of the Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Hydrogen isotopes from source water to leaf lipid in a continental-scale sample network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Daniel; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentary plant waxes are useful paleoclimate proxies because they are preserved in depositional settings on geologic timescales and the isotopic composition of the hydrogen in these molecules reflects that of the source water available during biosynthesis. This application is based largely on empirical calibrations that have demonstrated continental-scale correlations between source water and lipid hydrogen isotope values. However, the importance of variable net isotopic fractionation between source water and lipid for different species and environmental conditions is increasingly recognized. Isotopic enrichment of leaf water during transpiration is key among these secondary factors, and is itself sensitive to changes in hydroclimate. Leaf water enrichment also occurs prior to photosynthetic water uptake, and is therefore independent from cellular-level biomarker synthesis. Mechanistic models can predict the mean leaf water hydrogen isotope composition from readily available meteorological variables. This permits global-scale isoscape maps of leaf water isotopic composition and enrichment above source water to be generated, but these models have not been widely validated at continental spatial scales. We have established a network of twenty-one sites across Europe where we are sampling for leaf-, xylem-, and soil-water isotopes (H and O) at approximately 5-week intervals over the summer growing season. We augment the sample set with weekly to monthly precipitation samples and early- and late-season plant wax lipid samples. Collaborators at each site are conducting the sampling, and most sites are members of the FLUXNET tower network that also record high-resolution meteorological data. We present information on the implementation of the network and preliminary results from the 2014 summer season. The complete dataset will be used to track the evolution of water isotopes from source to leaf water and from leaf water to lipid hydrogen across diverse environments

  9. Fluorescent Sensing of Fluoride in Cellular System

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F- detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F- including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F- are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F-, mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be developed

  10. Fluorescent sensing of fluoride in cellular system.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F(-) detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F(-) including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F(-) are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F(-), mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be

  11. URINARY FLUORIDE OUTPUT IN CHILDREN FOLLOWING THE USE OF A DUAL-FLUORIDE VARNISH FORMULATION

    PubMed Central

    Olympio, Kelly Polido Kaneshiro; Cardoso, Vanessa Eid da Silva; Bijella, Maria Fernanda Borro; Pessan, Juliano Pelim; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the bioavailability of fluoride after topical application of a dual-fluoride varnish commercially available in Brazil, when compared to Duraphat™. Material and methods: The urinary fluoride output was evaluated in seven 5-year-old children after application of the fluoride varnishes, in two different phases. In the first phase (I), children received topical application of the fluoride varnish Duofluorid XII (2.92% fluorine, calcium fluoride + 2.71% fluorine, sodium fluoride, FGM™). After 1-month interval (phase II), the same amount (0.2 mL) of the fluoride varnish Duraphat (2.26% fluorine, sodium fluoride, Colgate™) was applied. Before each application all the volunteers brushed their teeth with placebo dentifrice for 7 days. Urinary collections were carried out 24 h prior up to 48 h after the applications. Fluoride intake from the diet was also estimated. Fluoride concentration in diet samples and urine was analyzed with the fluoride ion-specific electrode and a miniature calomel reference electrode coupled to a potentiometer. Data were tested by ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (p<0.05). Results: There were significant differences in the urinary fluoride output between phases I and II. The use of Duofluorid XII did not significantly increase the urinary fluoride output, when compared to baseline levels. The application of Duraphat caused a transitory increase in the urinary fluoride output, returning to baseline levels 48 h after its use. Conclusions: The tested varnish formulation, which has been shown to be effective in in vitro studies, also can be considered safe. PMID:19466247

  12. MStern Blotting–High Throughput Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Membrane-Based Proteomic Sample Preparation for 96-Well Plates*

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Sebastian T.; Ahmed, Saima; Muntel, Jan; Cuevas Polo, Nerea; Bachur, Richard; Kentsis, Alex; Steen, Judith; Steen, Hanno

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 96-well plate compatible membrane-based proteomic sample processing method, which enables the complete processing of 96 samples (or multiples thereof) within a single workday. This method uses a large-pore hydrophobic PVDF membrane that efficiently adsorbs proteins, resulting in fast liquid transfer through the membrane and significantly reduced sample processing times. Low liquid transfer speeds have prevented the useful 96-well plate implementation of FASP as a widely used membrane-based proteomic sample processing method. We validated our approach on whole-cell lysate and urine and cerebrospinal fluid as clinically relevant body fluids. Without compromising peptide and protein identification, our method uses a vacuum manifold and circumvents the need for digest desalting, making our processing method compatible with standard liquid handling robots. In summary, our new method maintains the strengths of FASP and simultaneously overcomes one of the major limitations of FASP without compromising protein identification and quantification. PMID:26223766

  13. Properties of aluminum-fluoride catalysts prepared by the fluoridation of aluminum oxide with trifluoromethane

    SciTech Connect

    McVicker, G.B.; Kim, C.J.; Eggert, J.J.

    1983-04-01

    High-purity AlF/sub 3/ has been prepared by allowing ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ to react with gaseous trifluoromethane at 670-770 K under 101 kPa total pressure. The use of gaseous trifluoromethane is a new, general method for preparing metal fluorides from metal oxides. AlF/sub 3/ prepared using this procedure retained the physical form of the starting ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. A 1/16-in. ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ extrudate, for example, yielded an AlF/sub 3/ extrudate with comparable physical dimensions and crush strengths. X-Ray diffraction, BET surface area, pore volume, and surface acidity measurements were employed to characterize various AlF/sub 3/ samples. Significant decreases in surface area and pore volume as well as surface acidity occurred upon increasing the concentration of AlF/sub 3/ from 90 to 100%. This behavior presumably results from the fluoridation of residual ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. AlF/sub 3/ extrudates were utilized as supports for Pt and Pd catalysts. Specific benzene hydrogenation activities of these catalysts are comparable to those of Pt and Pd on ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. In a unique application, Pd/AlF/sub 3/ was used to hydrogenate m-diethylbenzene in superacid (HF/TaF/sub 5/) solution.

  14. Optimization of source-sample-detector geometries for bulk hydrogen analysis using epithermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    Csikai, J; Dóczi, R

    2009-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of epithermal neutrons in qualification of hydrocarbons via their H contents and C/H atomic ratios have been investigated systematically. Sensitivity of this method and the dimensions of the interrogated regions were determined for various types of hydrogenous samples. Results clearly demonstrate the advantages of direct neutron detection, e.g. by BF(3) counters as compared to the foil activation method in addition to using the hardness of the spectral shape of Pu-Be neutrons to that from a (252)Cf source.

  15. Fluoride anion sensing mechanism of 2-ureido-4[1H]-pyrimidinone quadruple hydrogen-bonded supramolecular assembly: photoinduced electron transfer and partial configuration change.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Sheng; Zhou, Pan-Wang; Li, Guang-Yue; Chu, Tian-Shu; He, Guo-Zhong

    2013-05-02

    The fluoride anion sensing mechanism of 6-methyl-5-(9-methylene-anthracene)-(2-butylureido-4[1H]-pyrimidinone) (AnUP) has been investigated using the DFT/TDDFT method. The theoretical results indicate that the proton of the N3-H3 group in pyrimidine moiety is captured by the added fluoride anion and then deprotonated. The calculated vertical excitation energies of AnUP-dimer and its deprotonated form agree well with the experimental results. The molecular orbital analysis demonstrates that the first excited state (S1) of AnUP-dimer is a local excited state with a π-π* transition, whereas for the deprotonated form, S1 is a completely charge-separation state and is responsible for the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process. The PET process from anthracene to the pyrimidine moiety leads to the fluorescence quenching.

  16. Reproducibility of expired breath hydrogen levels in the neonate: a comparison of two methods for sample collection.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, R; Robb, T A; Davidson, G P

    1983-02-07

    We have compared a nasopharyngeal catheter method for breath sampling and a valved collection device. Sample quality was assessed by simultaneous oxygen measurement and reproducibility was checked by the analysis of 50 pairs of samples from four premature neonates. Both collection methods produced samples of highly variable quality suggesting a variable mixture of alveolar and non-alveolar air as well as differences in expired oxygen levels between babies. The mean oxygen levels were similar for both sampling techniques. Linear regression analysis of paired hydrogen results showed a highly significant correlation coefficient r = 0.73. This was improved markedly to r = 0.94 by normalization of hydrogen values based on observed oxygen levels, and so supports the earlier article by Robb and Davidson [1]. All breath hydrogen analyses require a measure of sample quality. Reproducible results and meaningful changes in hydrogen concentration in breath samples can only be achieved by correction according to sample quality. Correction to a common oxygen value should allow quantitative comparisons between patients. Samples were best collected from neonates by the nasopharyngeal catheter method, which least disturbed the patient, allowed multiple sample collection and gave lower oxygen and higher hydrogen values where large differences between pairs occurred.

  17. Ultrastructural changes in the cemento-enamel junction after vital tooth bleaching with fluoride and fluoride-free agents – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Gasic, Jovanka; Kesic, Ljiljana; Popovic, Jelena; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolic, Marija; Stankovic, Sasa; Barac, Radomir

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The impact of bleaching on the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) is not well known. Due to frequent sensitivity of the cervical region of teeth after the vital bleaching, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphological features of the CEJ of human teeth after application of fluoridated and fluoride-free bleaching agents, as well as post-bleaching fluoridation treatment, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Material/Methods Thirty-five extracted permanent human teeth were longitudinally cut, yielding 70 specimens. Thirty specimens were randomly divided into the 3 experimental groups, and 20 specimens, were used as (2) control groups, each: negative (untreated) control group; positive control group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide; experimental group 1, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP); experimental group 2, treatment with a mixture of 10% CP and fluoride; and experimental group 3, treatment with 10% CP and 2% sodium fluoride gel applied 30 minutes after bleaching. Experimental groups were treated 8 h per day for 14 days. The samples were examined by SEM. Results The bleaching materials tested caused morphological changes to the surface of the CEJ. There was a statistically significant difference between experimental groups (Kruskal Wallis Test chi-square=11,668; p<0.005). Mean value of experimental group 2 scores showed statistically significant difference from groups 1 and 3. Conclusions Bleaching gel with fluorides does not significantly change morphological appearance of the CEJ and represents a better choice than the hard tissue fluoridation process after bleaching. PMID:22367139

  18. Highly hydrogen-sensitive thermal desorption spectroscopy system for quantitative analysis of low hydrogen concentration (˜1 × 1016 atoms/cm3) in thin-film samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Taku; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Sakaguchi, Isao; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-05-01

    We developed a highly hydrogen-sensitive thermal desorption spectroscopy (HHS-TDS) system to detect and quantitatively analyze low hydrogen concentrations in thin films. The system was connected to an in situ sample-transfer chamber system, manipulators, and an rf magnetron sputtering thin-film deposition chamber under an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) atmosphere of ˜10-8 Pa. The following key requirements were proposed in developing the HHS-TDS: (i) a low hydrogen residual partial pressure, (ii) a low hydrogen exhaust velocity, and (iii) minimization of hydrogen thermal desorption except from the bulk region of the thin films. To satisfy these requirements, appropriate materials and components were selected, and the system was constructed to extract the maximum performance from each component. Consequently, ˜2000 times higher sensitivity to hydrogen than that of a commercially available UHV-TDS system was achieved using H+-implanted Si samples. Quantitative analysis of an amorphous oxide semiconductor InGaZnO4 thin film (1 cm × 1 cm × 1 μm thickness, hydrogen concentration of 4.5 × 1017 atoms/cm3) was demonstrated using the HHS-TDS system. This concentration level cannot be detected using UHV-TDS or secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) systems. The hydrogen detection limit of the HHS-TDS system was estimated to be ˜1 × 1016 atoms/cm3, which implies ˜2 orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than that of SIMS and resonance nuclear reaction systems (˜1018 atoms/cm3).

  19. Fluoride in saliva and dental biofilm after 1500 and 5000 ppm fluoride exposure.

    PubMed

    Staun Larsen, Line; Baelum, Vibeke; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Richards, Alan; Nyvad, Bente

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this randomized, double-blind, crossover study was to measure fluoride in saliva and 7-day-old biofilm fluid and biofilm solids after rinsing three times per day for 3 weeks with 0, 1500, or 5000 ppm fluoride (NaF). Following the 3-week wash-in/wash-out period, including 1 week of biofilm accumulation, saliva and biofilm samples were collected from 12 participants immediately before (background fluoride), and 10, 30, and 60 min after a single rinse. Biofilm samples were separated into fluid and solids, and samples were analyzed using a fluoride electrode (microanalysis). The background fluoride concentration was statistically significantly higher in the 5000 compared to the 1500 ppm F rinse group in all three compartments (22.3 and 8.1 μM in saliva, 126.8 and 58.5 μM in biofilm fluid, and 10,940 and 4837 μmol/kg in biofilm solids). The 1-h fluoride accumulation for the 5000 ppm F rinse was higher than for the 1500 ppm F rinse in all three compartments, although not statistically significant for saliva and biofilm solids. Regular exposure to 5000 ppm fluoride elevates background fluoride concentrations in saliva, biofilm fluid, and biofilm solids compared to 1500 ppm fluoride. Increasing the fluoride concentration almost 3.5 times (from 1500 to 5000 ppm) only elevates the background fluoride concentrations in saliva, biofilm fluid, and biofilm solids twofold. Even though fluoride toothpaste may be diluted by saliva, the results of the present study indicate that use of 5000 ppm fluoride toothpaste might lead to improved caries control.

  20. Quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux models for fundamental vibrational intensity changes on H-bond formation of water and hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Arnaldo F.; Richter, Wagner E.; Bruns, Roy E.; Terrabuio, Luiz A.; Haiduke, Roberto L. A.

    2014-02-28

    The Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules/Charge-Charge Flux-Dipole Flux (QTAIM/CCFDF) model has been used to investigate the electronic structure variations associated with intensity changes on dimerization for the vibrations of the water and hydrogen fluoride dimers as well as in the water-hydrogen fluoride complex. QCISD/cc-pVTZ wave functions applied in the QTAIM/CCFDF model accurately provide the fundamental band intensities of water and its dimer predicting symmetric and antisymmetric stretching intensity increases for the donor unit of 159 and 47 km mol{sup −1} on H-bond formation compared with the experimental values of 141 and 53 km mol{sup −1}. The symmetric stretching of the proton donor water in the dimer has intensity contributions parallel and perpendicular to its C{sub 2v} axis. The largest calculated increase of 107 km mol{sup −1} is perpendicular to this axis and owes to equilibrium atomic charge displacements on vibration. Charge flux decreases occurring parallel and perpendicular to this axis result in 42 and 40 km mol{sup −1} total intensity increases for the symmetric and antisymmetric stretches, respectively. These decreases in charge flux result in intensity enhancements because of the interaction contributions to the intensities between charge flux and the other quantities. Even though dipole flux contributions are much smaller than the charge and charge flux ones in both monomer and dimer water they are important for calculating the total intensity values for their stretching vibrations since the charge-charge flux interaction term cancels the charge and charge flux contributions. The QTAIM/CCFDF hydrogen-bonded stretching intensity strengthening of 321 km mol{sup −1} on HF dimerization and 592 km mol{sup −1} on HF:H{sub 2}O complexation can essentially be explained by charge, charge flux and their interaction cross term. Atomic contributions to the intensities are also calculated. The bridge hydrogen atomic contributions alone

  1. The effect on human salivary fluoride concentration of consuming fluoridated salt-containing baked food items.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, L M; Stephen, K W

    2001-10-01

    Salt fluoridation is recognised world-wide as a proven and viable alternative means of consumer choice-related, community-based fluoridation where water fluoridation is either technically or politically impossible. However, as most salt consumed is contained within cooked food products, rather than sprinkled over prepared food at the table, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on salivary fluoride concentration of consuming baked food products prepared with 250 and 350 ppm fluoridated salt (as KF). Six food items were baked with (a) normal non-fluoridated salt, (b) 250 mg F/kg salt and (c) 350 mg F/kg salt. Eleven adult volunteers consumed these foodstuffs on separate occasions and salivary samples were collected for fluoride analyses before and at various time points (1-30 min) after eating. For most foodstuffs, small but significant increases in salivary fluoride concentration occurred for at least 5 min after ingestion of the fluoridated salt-containing items. Salivary fluoride concentrations peaked 1 or 2 min after eating, with highest values for the six test foods ranging from 0.16 to 0.25 ppm F, and from 0.18 to 0.44 ppm F for the 250 and 350 mg F/kg salt products, respectively. In all cases, salivary fluoride concentrations had returned to baseline by 20 min. The clinical significance of such small, short-term increases in salivary fluoride is uncertain, but the findings suggest that a more frequent intake of foods with fluoridated salt substituted for normal salt could help sustain slightly elevated salivary fluoride concentrations for more prolonged periods of the day, and might thus potentiate the cariostatic effects of saliva on tooth mineral.

  2. Salt fluoridation: a review.

    PubMed

    Pollick, Howard F

    2013-06-01

    Salt fluoridation is sometimes suggested as a prospect for communities that have a low water fluoride concentration and have no possibility of implementing community water fluoridation. School-based milk fluoridation programs also are practiced in some countries as an alternative. This paper reviews the evidence of effectiveness in dental caries prevention and risks of dental fluorosis in countries where salt or milk fluoridation is practiced.

  3. Relationship of naturally occurring fluoride in Carroll County, Maryland to aquifers, well depths, and fluoride supplementation prescribing behaviors.

    PubMed

    Osso, Diane; Tinanoff, Norman; Romberg, Elaine; Syme, Sheryl; Roberts, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Systemic fluorides are effective in the prevention of dental caries but over ingestion can lead to dental fluorosis. Fluoride supplements may be under-prescribed for children residing in areas where drinking water is derived from wells, because of a lack of knowledge of dental providers or the effort required to test wells for fluoride before prescribing supplements. The purpose of this study was to determine the possible factors associated with fluoride content of well water in a specific county in Maryland, and to determine whether there is a relationship between the amount of naturally occurring fluoride in the well water and the child's fluoride supplementation use. This study analyzed the fluoride prescribing behavior and the fluoride content of wells from a sample of 197 Carroll County, Md residents. Those individuals that answered a questionnaire about well depth and use of fluoride supplements subsequently were mailed a water testing kit. Water samples were tested for fluoride using a fluoride specific ion electrode. Derivations of well water supplies (aquifers) were obtained from a county geologist. Variance in well depth and aquifer type were correlated to the levels of naturally occurring fluoride. Supplementation practices of children residing in the participating sampled households were compared to results of fluoride analyses of individual wells. Results showed that Carroll County well water contains negligible to low levels of fluoride (0.08-0.24 ppm). Pearson r testing showed a positive relationship between well depth and fluoride, r = 0.23 (p < or = .01). ANOVA results showed no significant difference between the 3 aquifers fluoride, p = 0.23. Analysis of the supplementation behavior indicated that the majority (58%) of the children that should have received fluoride supplements were receiving the incorrect dosage or not being supplemented. Fluoride content of well water may be related to well depths. Fluoride supplementation practices generally

  4. Fluoride intake from fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by young children in Kuwait: a non-fluoridated community.

    PubMed

    Akpata, Enosakhare S; Behbehani, Jawad; Akbar, Jaber; Thalib, Lukman; Mojiminiyi, Olusegun

    2014-06-01

    To determine the pattern of fluid consumption, fluoride intake from the fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by children aged 1-9 years in Kuwait, a nonfluoridated community. Using the cluster sampling technique, children aged 1-9 years were chosen from 2000 randomly selected households in Kuwait. Questionnaires were then administered to their mothers to determine the children's daily fluid intake. Fluoride concentrations in tap water as well as all brands of bottled water and beverages consumed by the children were measured, using the fluoride ion-specific electrode. Fluoride excretion was determined in 400 randomly selected children, based on fluoride/creatinine ratio. The mean daily fluid consumption by the children was high, being 1115-1545 ml. About 40% of the fluid intake was plain (tap and bottled) water and approximately 10% of the children drank bottled water exclusively. Fluoride concentration in tap water was low (0.04±SD 0.02 ppm), but was higher in bottled water (0.28±SD 0.40 ppm). Mean daily fluoride ingestion from fluids was 0.013-0.018 mg/kg body weight (bw). Even after allowing for fluoride ingestion from other sources, mean daily fluoride ingestion was still below 0.1 mg/kg bw set by the United States of America Institute of Medicine as the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level for moderate enamel fluorosis in children aged up to 8 years. Furthermore, the mean daily urinary fluoride excretion of 128-220 μg was below the provisional standard of 360-480 μg for optimal fluoride usage by children aged 3-5 years. Fluoride ingestion from fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by the children were below the recommendations for optimal fluoride usage. Thus, there is room for an upward adjustment of fluoride level in public drinking water supplies in Kuwait, as a caries preventive measure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Bockris, John O’M.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech. PMID:28824125

  6. PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM FLUORIDE FROM BISMUTH PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATE CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Brown, H.S.; Bohlmann, E.G.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating plutonium from fission products present on a bismuth phosphate carrier. The dried carrier is first treated with hydrogen fluoride at between 500 and 600 deg C whereby some fission product fluorides volatilize away from plutonium tetrafluoride, and nonvolatile fission product fluorides are formed then with anhydrous fluorine at between 400 and 500 deg C. Bismuth and plutonium distill in the form of volatile fluorides away from the nonvolatile fission product fluorides. The bismuth and plutonium fluorides are condensed at below 290 deg C.

  7. Fluoride in drinking water and dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Mandinic, Zoran; Curcic, Marijana; Antonijevic, Biljana; Carevic, Momir; Mandic, Jelena; Djukic-Cosic, Danijela; Lekic, Charles P

    2010-08-01

    In this study we determined the fluoride content in drinking water and hair of 12-year-old schoolchildren from different Serbian municipalities, i.e. Valjevo, Veliko Gradiste, Kacarevo and Vranjska Banja. The analyses were performed using composite fluoride ion-selective electrode. Average fluoride levels were 0.10, 0.15, 0.79 and 11 ppm in well water, 0.07, 0.10, 0.17 and 0.15 ppm in tap water, 19.3, 21.5, 25.4, and 32.5 ppm in hair samples, in Valjevo, Veliko Gradiste, Kacarevo and Vranjska Banja, respectively. Correlation analysis indicated statistically significant positive relationship between fluoride in wells water and fluoride in hair, for all municipalities: correlation coefficients were 0.54 (p < 0.05), 0.89, 0.97 and 0.99 (p < 0.001), in Vranjska Banja, Valjevo, Veliko Gradiste, and Kacarevo, respectively. Positive correlation was obtained also between fluoride in tap water and hair samples in all regions under the study, with statistical significance only in Valjevo municipality, p < 0.05. Dental examination of schoolchildren confirmed dental fluorosis only in the region of Vranjska Banja. Moreover, in endemic fluorotic region of Vranjska Banja, positive and statistically significant correlations were confirmed between fluoride in well water and dental fluorosis level (r = 0.61; p < 0.01) and additionally between fluoride in hair and dental fluorosis level (0.62; p < 0.01). The primary findings from this study have shown that fluoride content in hair is highly correlated with fluoride content in drinking water and dental fluorosis level, indicating that hair may be regarded as biomaterial of high informative potential in evaluating prolonged exposure to fluorides and to individuate children at risk of fluorosis regardless of the phase of teeth eruption.

  8. Effects of a stannous fluoride-impregnated dental floss on in vivo salivary fluoride levels.

    PubMed

    Flatt, Casey C; Warren-Morris, Donna; Turner, Steward D; Chan, Jarvis T

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this in vivo pilot study was to determine the concentration of fluoride retained intra-orally in saliva after flossing with dental floss impregnated with stannous fluoride (SnF(2)). Participants flossed their teeth ad libitum with 2 premeasured lengths of fluoridated dental floss. Expectorated saliva samples were collected in vials before flossing (PF), immediately postflossing(IPF), at 30 minutes (30), and 1 hour (60) after flossing for analysis with a fluoride-specific electrode and an Orion millivoltmeter. Postflossing samples were compared to the preflossing samples using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD. Differences between the PF and IPF group means were found to be statistically significant at p<0.01. No other significant differences were found between or among any of the groups. Salivary fluoride levels at 60 minutes (60) were similar to those prior to flossing (PF). It can be concluded that fluoride can be released from flossing with the tested SnF(2)-impregnated dental floss elevating salivary fluoride levels for at least 30 minutes. Use of this fluoride-containing dental floss offers an option for delivery of fluoride to individuals at risk for dental caries.

  9. Hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  10. Fluoride exposure and indicators of thyroid functioning in the Canadian population: implications for community water fluoridation.

    PubMed

    Barberio, Amanda M; Hosein, F Shaun; Quiñonez, Carlos; McLaren, Lindsay

    2017-10-01

    There are concerns that altered thyroid functioning could be the result of ingesting too much fluoride. Community water fluoridation (CWF) is an important source of fluoride exposure. Our objectives were to examine the association between fluoride exposure and (1) diagnosis of a thyroid condition and (2) indicators of thyroid functioning among a national population-based sample of Canadians. We analysed data from Cycles 2 and 3 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). Logistic regression was used to assess associations between fluoride from urine and tap water samples and the diagnosis of a thyroid condition. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between fluoride exposure and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level (low/normal/high). Other available variables permitted additional exploratory analyses among the subset of participants for whom we could discern some fluoride exposure from drinking water and/or dental products. There was no evidence of a relationship between fluoride exposure (from urine and tap water) and the diagnosis of a thyroid condition. There was no statistically significant association between fluoride exposure and abnormal (low or high) TSH levels relative to normal TSH levels. Rerunning the models with the sample constrained to the subset of participants for whom we could discern some source(s) of fluoride exposure from drinking water and/or dental products revealed no significant associations. These analyses suggest that, at the population level, fluoride exposure is not associated with impaired thyroid functioning in a time and place where multiple sources of fluoride exposure, including CWF, exist. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Water fluoridation in 40 Brazilian cities: 7 year analysis

    PubMed Central

    MOIMAZ, Suzely Adas Saliba; SALIBA, Nemre Adas; SALIBA, Orlando; SUMIDA, Doris Hissako; de SOUZA, Neila Paula; CHIBA, Fernando Yamamoto; GARBIN, Cléa Adas Saliba

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Fluoride levels in the public water supplies of 40 Brazilian cities were analyzed and classified on the basis of risk/benefit balance. Material and Methods: Samples were collected monthly over a seven-year period from three sites for each water supply source. The samples were analyzed in duplicate in the laboratory of the Center for Research in Public Health - UNESP using an ion analyzer coupled to a fluoride-specific electrode. Results: A total of 19,533 samples were analyzed, of which 18,847 were artificially fluoridated and 686 were not artificially fluoridated. In samples from cities performing water fluoridation, 51.57% (n=9,720) had fluoride levels in the range of 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L; 30.53% (n=5,754) were below 0.55 mg F/L and 17.90% (n=3,373) were above 0.84 mg F/L (maximum concentration=6.96 mg F/L). Most of the cities performing fluoridation that had a majority of samples with fluoride levels above the recommended parameter had deep wells and more than one source of water supply. There was some variability in the fluoride levels of samples from the same site and between collection sites in the same city. Conclusions: The majority of samples from cities performing fluoridation had fluoride levels within the range that provides the best combination of risks and benefits, minimizing the risk of dental fluorosis while preventing dental caries. The conduction of studies about water distribution systems is suggested in cities with high natural fluoride concentrations in order to optimize the use of natural fluoride for fluoridation costs and avoid the risk of dental fluorosis. PMID:23559106

  12. Water fluoridation in 40 Brazilian cities: 7 year analysis.

    PubMed

    Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba; Saliba, Nemre Adas; Saliba, Orlando; Sumida, Doris Hissako; Souza, Neila Paula de; Chiba, Fernando Yamamoto; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride levels in the public water supplies of 40 Brazilian cities were analyzed and classified on the basis of risk/benefit balance. Samples were collected monthly over a seven-year period from three sites for each water supply source. The samples were analyzed in duplicate in the laboratory of the Center for Research in Public Health - UNESP using an ion analyzer coupled to a fluoride-specific electrode. A total of 19,533 samples were analyzed, of which 18,847 were artificially fluoridated and 686 were not artificially fluoridated. In samples from cities performing water fluoridation, 51.57% (n=9,720) had fluoride levels in the range of 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L; 30.53% (n=5,754) were below 0.55 mg F/L and 17.90% (n=3,373) were above 0.84 mg F/L (maximum concentration=6.96 mg F/L). Most of the cities performing fluoridation that had a majority of samples with fluoride levels above the recommended parameter had deep wells and more than one source of water supply. There was some variability in the fluoride levels of samples from the same site and between collection sites in the same city. The majority of samples from cities performing fluoridation had fluoride levels within the range that provides the best combination of risks and benefits, minimizing the risk of dental fluorosis while preventing dental caries. The conduction of studies about water distribution systems is suggested in cities with high natural fluoride concentrations in order to optimize the use of natural fluoride for fluoridation costs and avoid the risk of dental fluorosis.

  13. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Fluoride and Water KidsHealth > For Parents > Fluoride and Water A A ... to 19-year-olds continue Fluoride and the Water Supply For more than 60 years, water fluoridation ...

  14. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    ... well. What do I need to know about fluoride and groundwater from a well? Fluoride is present ... well has less than the recommended level of fluoride for preventing tooth decay? The recommended fluoride level ...

  15. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Fluoride and Water KidsHealth > For Parents > Fluoride and Water Print A ... to 19-year-olds continue Fluoride and the Water Supply For more than 60 years, water fluoridation ...

  16. Potentiometric Determination of Fluoride Concentration in Beers.

    PubMed

    Jaudenes, Juan Ramón; Hardisson, Arturo; Paz, Soraya; Rubio, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Angel José; Burgos, Antonio; Revert, Consuelo

    2017-04-26

    Beer is a widely consumed drink throughout the world, and because its manufacture involves the use of water, beer can be, in some cases, a source of fluorides. For this reason, the objective of this study was to determine the concentration of fluorides in 50 samples of beers from different sources sold in two different types of container (aluminum can and glass bottle). The possible significant differences between the different types of packaging and the intake of fluoride from the consumption of these beers were evaluated. The concentration of fluoride in beers has been determined using the potentiometric method of fluoride determination by standard addition. The concentration of fluoride ranged between 0.06 and 1.77 mg/L. In general, the concentration was below 1 mg/L, except for three beer samples from Ireland and the USA, whose concentration was over 1.5 mg/L. No significant differences were found between the types of packaging. The contribution of fluoride to the diet from beer consumption is not high (<27%); however, it is necessary to warn consumers whenever they are in areas of high concentrations of fluoride in the water supply.

  17. Biomonitoring Equivalents for interpretation of urinary fluoride.

    PubMed

    Aylward, L L; Hays, S M; Vezina, A; Deveau, M; St-Amand, A; Nong, A

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to fluoride is widespread due to its natural occurrence in the environment and addition to drinking water and dental products for the prevention of dental caries. The potential health risks of excess fluoride exposure include aesthetically unacceptable dental fluorosis (tooth mottling) and increased skeletal fragility. Numerous organizations have conducted risk assessments and set guidance values to represent maximum recommended exposure levels as well as recommended adequate intake levels based on potential public health benefits of fluoride exposure. Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) are estimates of the average biomarker concentrations corresponding to such exposure guidance values. The literature on daily urinary fluoride excretion rates as a function of daily fluoride exposure was reviewed and BE values corresponding to the available US and Canadian exposure guidance values were derived for fluoride in urine. The derived BE values range from 1.1 to 2.1mg/L (1.2-2.5μg/g creatinine). Concentrations of fluoride in single urinary spot samples from individuals, even under exposure conditions consistent with the exposure guidance values, may vary from the predicted average concentrations by several-fold due to within- and across-individual variation in urinary flow and creatinine excretion rates and due to the rapid elimination kinetics of fluoride. Thus, the BE values are most appropriately applied to screen population central tendency estimates for biomarker concentrations rather than interpretation of individual spot sample concentrations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Fluoride concentration from dental sealants: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Campus, G; Carta, G; Cagetti, M G; Bossù, M; Sale, S; Cocco, F; Conti, G; Nardone, M; Sanna, G; Strohmenger, L; Lingström, P

    2013-07-01

    A randomized clinical trial was performed in schoolchildren (6-7 yrs) to evaluate fluoride concentration in interproximal fluid after the placement of 3 different sealants. The sample consisted of 2,776 children randomly divided: 926 in the high-viscosity Glass-ionomer Cement group (GIC group), 923 in the fluoride Resin-based group (fluoride-RB group), and 927 in the no-fluoride Resin-based group (RB group). In total, 2,640 children completed the trial. Sealants were applied following manufacturer's instructions. Interproximal fluid samples were collected at baseline and 2, 7, and 21 days after application of sealants, by insertion of a standardized paperpoint into the interproximal mesial space of the sealed tooth for 15 seconds. Fluoride concentration was evaluated by means of a fluoride ion-selective electrode. At 2 days after sealant application, fluoride concentration was significantly higher in GIC and fluoride-RB groups compared with that in the RB group (p < .01). Mean fluoride concentrations after 7 days were 2.54 (SE 0.68) ppm, 0.85 (SE 0.26) ppm, and 0.53 (SE 0.11) ppm for the three groups, respectively. After 21 days, fluoride concentration in the GIC group remained higher than that in the other two groups. High-viscosity GIC sealants increased the fluoride concentrations in interproximal fluid more than did a Resin-based sealant containing fluoride.

  19. A study of fluoride groundwater occurrence in Nathenje, Lilongwe, Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msonda, K. W. M.; Masamba, W. R. L.; Fabiano, E.

    A study was carried out to determine fluoride concentration in groundwaters of Nathenje area situated in Lilongwe District in the central region of Malawi. Water samples were collected from 176 boreholes and shallow wells during different months in 2001 and 2002. Samples were then analysed for fluoride by using a fluoride electrode and an ion selective meter. The results showed that fluoride concentrations for the rainy season varied from <0.5 to 6.98 ± 0.01 mg/l with 52.9% of the boreholes above the World Health Organisation (WHO) maximum permissible limit of 1.5 mg/l. Fluoride concentrations for dry season ranged from <0.5 to 7.02 ± 0.02 mg/l with 50.8% of boreholes above 1.5 mg/l. Fluoride concentrations for the two seasons were significantly different from each other ( p < 0.05). Fluoride data was used to produce a fluoride distribution map. From the map, it was observed that fluoride concentrations in this area followed a pattern. The central part of Nathenje had high fluoride concentration of between 2 and 7.02 mg/l and these high fluoride values seemed to extend eastwards beyond the boundary of the study area. However, the southern and western parts had <1 mg/l of fluoride. The high groundwater fluoride values seem to be associated with the weathered basement complex containing biotite that is a probable source of fluoride. The other suspected sources of fluoride in Nathenje groundwater could be due to the dissolution of hornblende, fluorite and amphibole, which are reported to occur in rocks and soils in this area. There was evidence of dental fluorosis in areas where the fluoride concentration was high.

  20. Practitioner's guide to fluoride.

    PubMed

    Scheifele, Erik; Studen-Pavlovich, Deborah; Markovic, Nina

    2002-10-01

    The current health care trend is to provide evidence-based recommendations and treatment. Many literature reviews have shown fluoride's effectiveness against caries. The current use of fluoride in the prevention of dental caries is based on community, professional, and individual strategies. Personalized fluoride regimens should include a risk analysis and a review of the patient's current fluoride exposure. The future of fluoride may be found in its slow release and retention in the oral cavity through various modalities. Because of the many uncertainties still associated with fluoride, further research is needed.

  1. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    This research work aimed at characterising composition, hydration and physical properties of fluoride cement, by studying samples of the cement obtained from Malawi, and comparing them to ordinary Portland cement. By confirming the suitable characteristics of fluoride cement through this work, the results of the research work provide a good basis for the wider adoption of fluoride cement as an alternative to ordinary Portland cement, especially in developing economies. Numerous accounts have been cited regarding the production and use of fluoride cement. Since there have not been conclusive agreement as to its properties, this study was limited to the theories of successful incorporation of fluoride compounds in the manufacture of fluoride cement. Hence, the properties and characteristics reported in this study relate to the cement currently manufactured in Malawi, and, on a comparative basis only, to that manufactured in other parts of the world. Samples of the fluoride cement used in the study were obtained by synthetic manufacture of the cement using common raw materials for the manufacture of fluoride cement that is limestone, silica sand, and fluorspar. These samples were subjected to several comparative tests used to characterise cements including examination under x-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and tests for setting time and compressive strength. Under similar laboratory conditions, it was possible to prove that fluoride cement hardens more rapidly than ordinary Portland cement. Also observed during the experimental work is that fluoride cement develops higher compressive strengths than ordinary Portland cement. The hardening and setting times are significantly different between the two cements. Also the nature of the hydration products, that is the microstructural development is significantly different in the two cements. The differences brought about between the two cements are because of the presence of fluorine during the clinkering

  2. Analysis of diffential absorption lidar technique for measurements of anhydrous hydrogen chloride from solid rocket motors using a deuterium fluoride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, C. H.; Allario, F.

    1977-01-01

    An active optical technique (differential absorption lidar (DIAL)) for detecting, ranging, and quantifying the concentration of anhydrous HCl contained in the ground cloud emitted by solid rocket motors (SRM) is evaluated. Results are presented of an experiment in which absorption coefficients of HCl were measured for several deuterium fluoride (DF) laser transitions demonstrating for the first time that a close overlap exists between the 2-1 P(3) vibrational transition of the DF laser and the 1-0 P(6) absorption line of HCl, with an absorption coefficient of 5.64 (atm-cm) to the -1 power. These measurements show that the DF laser can be an appropriate radiation source for detecting HCl in a DIAL technique. Development of a mathematical computer model to predict the sensitivity of DIAL for detecting anhydrous HCl in the ground cloud is outlined, and results that assume a commercially available DF laser as the radiation source are presented.

  3. DPB progress report: Hydrogen uptake capacity for a particular sample of DPB

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Maxwell, R S; Balazs, B; McLean II, W

    2004-11-09

    The authors have performed hydrogen uptake to measure the remaining capacity for two DPB pellet samples. The measurements were made with a Cahn microbalance operating at room temperature. The DPB samples were placed inside a quartz boat and the microbalance was then evacuated to a base pressure of 10{sup -4} Torr overnight. This overnight pumping removed volatile contaminants from the DPB pellets prior to the introduction of 600 Torr of N{sub 2} into the microbalance chamber. Next, a leak valve connecting the microbalance with a research grade source of H{sub 2} was opened to add 100 Torr of H{sub 2} on top of the 600 Torr of N{sub 2} already in the microbalance. When the total pressure in the microbalance reached 700 Torr, the H{sub 2} leak valve was not completely shut off but reduced to a very small positive rate. An automatic gate valve connecting the microbalance to a turbo molecular pump was programmed by a controller to keep the total pressure in the microbalance at 700 {+-} 3 Torr. The balance between H{sub 2} consumption due to DPB uptake and H{sub 2} leak rate into the microbalance was such that the gate valve to the turbo molecular pump was only slightly opened by the controller once in a while (a few seconds per few hours) to keep the total pressure constant at 700 Torr.

  4. How Does Fluoride Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work? A A A There's fluoride in your toothpaste and even in your water. But how does ... enamel from plaque and sugars. By using fluoride toothpaste, for instance, everyone can enjoy some cavity protection. ...

  5. Characterisation of a new adsorbent (beta cyclodextrin modified hybrid hydrous iron-zirconium oxide) to remove fluoride from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Indranil

    2017-04-01

    Prolonged use of fluoride contaminated water (>1.5mg L -1) causes serious problems to public health and ultimately leads to skeletal fluorosis. There is an urgent need to develop more efficient fluoride scavenging materials for designing water filters. A simple and efficient adsorbent (CHIZO, beta-Cyclodextrin (b-CD) amended hydrous iron-zirconium hybrid oxide), has been developed, characterised and tested. The results indicate the efficacy of CHIZO on fluoride removal from an aqueous solution. The agglomerated micro structured composite material has several new features such as very poor crystallinity confirmed from TEM images. BET experiment reveals a surface area of 0.2070 m2 g- 1 and pore volume of 0.0476 cm3 g -1. The findings also indicate the highly pH dependent fluoride adsorption by CHIZO which decreases with an increase in pH, and pseudo-second order kinetics control the reaction.Isotherm study indicates Langmuir isotherm was the best fit model to describe the adsorption equilibrium. Significantly higher monolayer adsorption capacity of fluoride (31.35 mg g -1) than the host hydrous Fe-Zr oxide (8.21 mg g -1) at pH 7.0 and 303 K was observed. Thermodynamic parameter indicates spontaneous nature of CHIZO which is due to the exothermic nature of the reaction. Apart from this phosphate and sulphate have some impact (interference) on fluoride adsorption. b-CD forms inclusion complexes by taking up fluoride ions from water into its central cavity. Several factors are involved regarding high efficacy of the system such as the release of enthalpy-rich water molecules from its cavity, electrostatic interactions, hydrogen bonding and release of conformational strain. However, the regeneration is difficult because of probable entrapping of fluoride inside the cavity of b-CD with hydrogen bonding. It has been found that only 0.9 g of CHIZO is able to reduce the fluoride level to below 1.0 mg L -1 in one-litre of fluoride spiked (5.0 mg L- 1) natural water sample

  6. Fluoridation update 2014.

    PubMed

    Allukian, Myron; Wong, Chloe

    2014-01-01

    This year more than 4 million people living in 140 communities in Massachusetts will have the health and economic benefits of community water fluoridation. However Massachusetts is ranked only 37th in the country for fluoridation, with just 62 percent of the population on a public water supply living in fluoridated communities. Nationally, more than 210 million Americans, about 74.6 percent of the U.S. population on a community water supply live in fluoridated communities.

  7. Evaluation and calibration of a pulsed neutron method for total hydrogen determination in mineral and concrete samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennun, L.; Santibañez, M.; Gomez, J.; Santisteban, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    We studied the feasibility of a nondestructive method to determine hydrogen concentrations in concrete and mineral samples. The amount of total hydrogen in the sample is directly related to the proportion of water included in the paste preparation; and also considers all subsequent processes which can add or remove hydrogen in a real sample (like rain, evaporation, etc.). The hydrogen proportion is a critical variable in the curing concrete process; its excess or deficiency impacts negatively in the quality of the final product. The proposed technique is based on a pulsed neutron source and the technical support of the time of flight, which allow discriminating epithermal neutrons interacting with hydrogen (inelastic scattering) from the elastic and quasi-isotropic scattering produced by other kinds of atoms. The method was externally calibrated in limestone rocks fragments (CaCO3-main material used in cement fabrication) and in steel, allowing an easy retrieval of the required information. The technique's simplicity may facilitate the development of a mobile measuring device in order to make determinations "in situ." In this paper, we describe the foundations of the proposed method and various analysis results.

  8. Weekly monitoring of the water fluoride content in a fluoridated metropolitan city--results after 1 year.

    PubMed

    Quock, Ryan L; Chan, Jarvis T

    2010-07-01

    It continues to be the goal of the United States Department of Health and Human Services to fluoridate community water supplies to prevent dental caries. In Houston, Texas, where community water is assumed to contain in the range of 0.7-1.2 ppm fluoride, water samples were taken from the same source on approximately a weekly basis over a period of 52 weeks. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of fluctuation of water fluoride concentration in these samples. Water fluoride analysis with an ion-specific electrode and millivolt meter of the data set showed a range of 0.33 to 1.00 ppm fluoride, with a mean of 0.70 ppm and a standard deviation of 0.15. This wide range of fluoride concentrations may create a risk for fluorosis in pediatric patients who are prescribed dietary fluoride supplements.

  9. Fluoride release, recharge and flexural properties of polymethylmethacrylate containing fluoridated glass fillers.

    PubMed

    Al-Bakri, I A; Swain, M V; Naoum, S J; Al-Omari, W M; Martin, E; Ellakwa, A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fluoridated glass fillers on fluoride release, recharge and the flexural properties of modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Specimens of PMMA denture base material with various loading of fluoridated glass fillers (0%, 1%, 2.5%, 5% and 10% by weight) were prepared. Flexural properties were evaluated on rectangular specimens (n = 10) aged in deionized water after 24 hours, 1 and 3 months. Disc specimens (n = 10) were aged for 43 days in deionized water and lactic acid (pH 4.0) and fluoride release was measured at numerous intervals. After ageing, specimens were recharged and fluoride re-release was recorded at 1, 3 and 7 days after recharge. Samples containing 2.5%, 5% and 10% glass fillers showed significantly (p < 0.05) greater levels of fluoride release compared with the control and 1% glass fillers specimens. All experimental specimens exhibited fluoride release in both media. The flexural strength of specimens decreased in proportion to the percentage filler inclusion with the modulus of elasticity values remaining within ISO Standard 1567. The modified PMMA with fluoridated glass fillers has the ability to release and re-release fluoride ion. Flexural strength decreased as glass filler uploading increased. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  10. Fluoride content in plaque solids and fluid after ingestion of fluoridated milk.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Mier, Esperanza A; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Buckley, Christine; Weitz, Andrea; Villa, Alberto; Zero, Domenick T

    2013-09-01

    This study explored differences in dental biofilm solids and fluid fluoride after ingestion of NaF or Na2FPO3 in milk or non-fluoridated milk. Eighteen volunteers ingested 1 mg fluoride in 200 mL of milk or 200 mL of non-fluoridated milk. Biofilm samples were collected at baseline, 30, 60, and 240 min and biofilm solids and fluid were micro-analyzed for fluoride. Analysis of variance was performed and the total delivery, retention, and clearance of fluoride to biofilm solids and fluid were estimated as the area under the curve between 0 and 240 min. No statistically significant differences were found for baseline values. Biofilm fluid fluoride values ranged from 0.11 ± 0.05 to 0.21 ± 0.08 µg F/mL while biofilm solid values ranged from 0.62 ± 0.39 to 1.75 ± 1.16 µg F/g. Biofilm fluid values were significantly lower at 60 min for Na2FPO3 in milk. Clearance profiles for biofilm fluid diverged after the initial 60 min. Na2FPO3 had a smaller area under the curve from 60 to 240 min than NaF. Results of this study indicate that the release and clearance of fluoride in biofilm vary among fluoridation compounds and that the concentrations in biofilm solids and fluid also vary and are not correlated to each other in many cases.

  11. Atomic hydrogen emission induced by TEA CO(2) laser bombardment on solid samples at low pressure and its analytical application.

    PubMed

    Idris, Nasrullah; Terai, Sumito; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Hendrik; Kobayashi, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen emission has been studied in laser plasmas by focusing a TEA CO(2) laser (10.6 microm, 500 mJ, 200 ns) on various types of samples, such as glass, quartz, black plastic sheet, and oil on copper plate sub-target. It was found that H(alpha) emission with a narrow spectral width occurs with high efficiency when the laser plasma is produced in the low-pressure region. On the contrary, the conventional well-known laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), which is usually carried out at atmospheric air pressure, cannot be applied to the analysis of hydrogen as an impurity. By combining low-pressure laser-induced plasma spectroscopy with laser surface cleaning, a preliminary quantitative analysis was made on zircaloy pipe samples intentionally doped with hydrogen. As a result, a good linear relationship was obtained between H(alpha) emission intensity and its concentration.

  12. Nonlinear behavior during NO2 hydrogenation on a nanosized Pt-Rh catalyst sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroo, Cédric; De Decker, Yannick; Jacobs, Luc; de Bocarmé, Thierry Visart

    2017-08-01

    Automotive pollution control crucially relies on the reactivity of metal alloy catalysts. Understanding how the chemistry of an alloy compares with that of pure metals forms a decisive step towards the rational development of applied formulations of such catalysts. In this context, we studied the hydrogenation of NO2 on Pt-Rh catalysts at the nanoscale with field emission microscopy (FEM). Previous studies have shown the presence of complex reaction kinetics at the surface of Pt for this reaction, including periodic oscillations at 390 K. As we briefly show here, similar kinetics can also be observed on Rh at higher temperatures. The alloy samples (Pt-17.4 at.%Rh) show signs of important reactivity and associated nonlinear dynamics in an intermediate temperature range. In particular, at 425 K isothermal oscillations are observed on this specific alloy catalyst. The role of the alloy composition on the window of reactivity is explained with a simple theoretical model for the kinetics of the reaction.

  13. Analysis of Material Sample Heated by Impinging Hot Hydrogen Jet in a Non-Nuclear Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron

    2006-01-01

    A computational conjugate heat transfer methodology was developed and anchored with data obtained from a hot-hydrogen jet heated, non-nuclear materials tester, as a first step towards developing an efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective and thermal radiative, and conjugate heat transfers. Predicted hot hydrogen jet and material surface temperatures were compared with those of measurement. Predicted solid temperatures were compared with those obtained with a standard heat transfer code. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

  14. Progress toward developing a monitoring method for hydrogen cyanide in air

    SciTech Connect

    Cassinelli, M.E.

    1986-05-15

    The development of an analytical procedure for measuring free cyanide, the various solid and liquid sorbents tested, and the instability problems encountered during research to establish a monitoring method for hydrogen-cyanide (HCN) in air are described. The original goals of the project were the development of improved sampling and analytical methods for hydrogen fluoride, HCN, and particulate cyanides by replacing liquid-impinger samplers with solid sorbent samplers and using an ion-chromatographic analytical technique.

  15. Identification of V-type nerve agents in vapor samples using a field-portable capillary gas chromatography/membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry instrument with Tri-Bed concentrator and fluoridating conversion tube.

    PubMed

    Ohrui, Y; Nagoya, T; Kurimata, N; Sodeyama, M; Seto, Y

    2017-07-01

    A field-portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system (Hapsite ER) was evaluated for the detection of nonvolatile V-type nerve agents (VX and Russian VX (RVX)) in the vapor phase. The Hapsite ER system consists of a Tri-Bed concentrator gas sampler, a nonpolar low thermal-mass capillary GC column and a hydrophobic membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer evacuated by a non-evaporative getter pump. The GC-MS system was attached to a VX-G fluoridating conversion tube containing silver nitrate and potassium fluoride. Sample vapors of VX and RVX were converted into O-ethyl methylphosphonofluoridate (EtGB) and O-isobutyl methylphosphonofluoridate (iBuGB), respectively. These fluoridated derivatives were detected within 10 min. No compounds were detected when the VX and RVX samples were analyzed without the conversion tube. A vapor sample of tabun (GA) was analyzed, in which GA and O-ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidofluoridate were detected. The molar recovery percentages of EtGB and iBuGB from VX and RVX vapors varied from 0.3 to 17%, which was attributed to variations in the vaporization efficiency of the glass vapor container. The conversion efficiencies of the VX-G conversion tube for VX and RVX to their phosphonate derivatives were estimated to be 40%. VX and RVX vapors were detected at concentrations as low as 0.3 mg m(-3) . Gasoline vapor was found to interfere with the analyses of VX and RVX. In the presence of 160 mg m(-3) gasoline, the detection limits of VX and RVX vapor were increased to 20 mg m(-3) . Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. An exclusive fluoride receptor: Fluoride-induced proton transfer to a quinoline-based thiourea

    PubMed Central

    Basaran, Ismet; Khansari, Maryam Emami; Pramanik, Avijit; Wong, Bryan M.; Hossain, Alamgir

    2014-01-01

    A new quinoline-based tripodal thiourea has been synthesized, which exclusively binds fluoride anion in DMSO, showing no affinity for other anions including, chloride, bromide, iodide, perchlorate, nitrate and hydrogen sulfate. As investigated by 1H NMR, the receptor forms both 1:1 and 1:2 complex yielding the binding constants of 2.32(3) (in log β1) and 4.39(4) (in log β2), respectively; where quinoline groups are protonated by the fluoride-induced proton transfer from the solution to the host molecule. The 1:2 binding is due to the interactions of one fluoride with NH binding sites of urea sites and another fluoride with secondary +NH binding sites within the tripodal pocket. The formation of both 1:1 and 1:2 complexes has been confirmed by the theoretical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). PMID:24753636

  17. An exclusive fluoride receptor: Fluoride-induced proton transfer to a quinoline-based thiourea.

    PubMed

    Basaran, Ismet; Khansari, Maryam Emami; Pramanik, Avijit; Wong, Bryan M; Hossain, Alamgir

    2014-02-19

    A new quinoline-based tripodal thiourea has been synthesized, which exclusively binds fluoride anion in DMSO, showing no affinity for other anions including, chloride, bromide, iodide, perchlorate, nitrate and hydrogen sulfate. As investigated by (1)H NMR, the receptor forms both 1:1 and 1:2 complex yielding the binding constants of 2.32(3) (in log β1 ) and 4.39(4) (in log β2 ), respectively; where quinoline groups are protonated by the fluoride-induced proton transfer from the solution to the host molecule. The 1:2 binding is due to the interactions of one fluoride with NH binding sites of urea sites and another fluoride with secondary (+)NH binding sites within the tripodal pocket. The formation of both 1:1 and 1:2 complexes has been confirmed by the theoretical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT).

  18. Renal fluoride excretion in children following topical application of fluoride varnish.

    PubMed

    García-Hoyos, F; Barbería, E; García-Camba, P; Varela, M

    2012-12-01

    To demonstrate that the application of dental fluoride varnishes in children increases urinary fluoride excretion. From a randomly assembled group of 42 children aged between 5 and 8 years, residing in a community with non-fluoridated water, spot urinary samples were taken before the topical application of dental fluoride varnish and 2 hours afterwards. In an age-matched control group of 16 children from the same community, who received no treatment, samples were taken the same way. The urinary excretion of fluoride was analysed by determining fluoride ion (F-) level and fluoride/creatinine (F/Cr) ratio in the urine. In the study group, the average pre- and post-treatment F/Cr ratios were 0.42 and 1.38 mg/g, respectively (p < .001). No significant changes were observed in the control group, which received no treatment. The average 2 hours afterward F/Cr ratios were 0.29 and 0.27 respectively (p = 0.426). The topical application of dental fluoride varnish leads to a significant increase in urine F-, which is attributable to the application of the product.

  19. Ab initio molecular dynamics of hydrogen dissociation on metal surfaces using neural networks and novelty sampling.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Jeffery; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2007-10-21

    We outline a hybrid multiscale approach for the construction of ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) useful for performing six-dimensional (6D) classical or quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of diatomic molecules reacting at single crystal surfaces. The algorithm implements concepts from the corrugation reduction procedure, which reduces energetic variation in the PES, and uses neural networks for interpolation of smoothed ab initio data. A novelty sampling scheme is implemented and used to identify configurations that are most likely to be predicted inaccurately by the neural network. This hybrid multiscale approach, which couples PES construction at the electronic structure level to MD simulations at the atomistic scale, reduces the number of density functional theory (DFT) calculations needed to specify an accurate PES. Due to the iterative nature of the novelty sampling algorithm, it is possible to obtain a quantitative measure of the convergence of the PES with respect to the number of ab initio calculations used to train the neural network. We demonstrate the algorithm by first applying it to two analytic potentials, which model the H2/Pt(111) and H2/Cu(111) systems. These potentials are of the corrugated London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato form, which are based on DFT calculations, but are not globally accurate. After demonstrating the convergence of the PES using these simple potentials, we use DFT calculations directly and obtain converged semiclassical trajectories for the H2/Pt(111) system at the PW91/generalized gradient approximation level. We obtain a converged PES for a 6D hydrogen-surface dissociation reaction using novelty sampling coupled directly to DFT. These results, in excellent agreement with experiments and previous theoretical work, are compared to previous simulations in order to explore the sensitivity of the PES (and therefore MD) to the choice of exchange and correlation functional. Despite having a lower energetic

  20. Ab initio molecular dynamics of hydrogen dissociation on metal surfaces using neural networks and novelty sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Jeffery; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2007-10-01

    We outline a hybrid multiscale approach for the construction of ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) useful for performing six-dimensional (6D) classical or quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of diatomic molecules reacting at single crystal surfaces. The algorithm implements concepts from the corrugation reduction procedure, which reduces energetic variation in the PES, and uses neural networks for interpolation of smoothed ab initio data. A novelty sampling scheme is implemented and used to identify configurations that are most likely to be predicted inaccurately by the neural network. This hybrid multiscale approach, which couples PES construction at the electronic structure level to MD simulations at the atomistic scale, reduces the number of density functional theory (DFT) calculations needed to specify an accurate PES. Due to the iterative nature of the novelty sampling algorithm, it is possible to obtain a quantitative measure of the convergence of the PES with respect to the number of ab initio calculations used to train the neural network. We demonstrate the algorithm by first applying it to two analytic potentials, which model the H2/Pt(111) and H2/Cu(111) systems. These potentials are of the corrugated London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato form, which are based on DFT calculations, but are not globally accurate. After demonstrating the convergence of the PES using these simple potentials, we use DFT calculations directly and obtain converged semiclassical trajectories for the H2/Pt(111) system at the PW91/generalized gradient approximation level. We obtain a converged PES for a 6D hydrogen-surface dissociation reaction using novelty sampling coupled directly to DFT. These results, in excellent agreement with experiments and previous theoretical work, are compared to previous simulations in order to explore the sensitivity of the PES (and therefore MD) to the choice of exchange and correlation functional. Despite having a lower energetic

  1. Fluoride Content of Bottled Drinking Water in Chennai, Tamilnadu.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Sujatha; Ravi, Karunya; Rajapandian, K; Gurunathan, Deepa

    2015-10-01

    The optimum level of fluoride in drinking water is 0.7 to 1.2 ppm. Decreased fluoride concentration leads to increased risk of caries and increased concentration can lead to dental or skeletal fluorosis. One crore liters of water is supplied to Chennai and surrounding areas through pouches and bottles which carters about one third of city population. The aim of this study is to determine the fluoride concentration in top 10 bottled waters in Chennai and to check the accuracy of their labelling. Top selling bottled waters, 6 multinational and 4 Non- multinational brands were selected for the study. Three different batches of each brand were purchased. The labels of the bottled were removed after collecting the details regarding fluoride content. All the bottles were numbered and sent for fluoride content analysis using SPADNS calorimetric method. All the brands and batches which were analysed for the study had less than optimal fluoride content and there is a significant variation in fluoride concentration of each brand and among different batches of same brand bottled waters. The range of fluoride level in tested samples was between 0.27 to 0.59. Only one brand's label had information regarding the fluoride content. Standardization of fluoride levels in bottled waters and labelling of fluoride content should become mandatory.

  2. Monitoring of fluoride in groundwater resources of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mesdaghinia, Alireza; Vaghefi, Kooshiar Azam; Montazeri, Ahmad; Mohebbi, Mohammad Reza; Saeedi, Reza

    2010-04-01

    Fluoride concentration in groundwater resources that used as the source of drinking water in urban areas of Iran was determined. All of the groundwater wells located in urban areas were monitored in 2008. Fluoride concentration of water samples was measured using SPADNS method. The nationwide mean fluoride concentration in the groundwater resources was found to be 0.47 +/- 0.28 (+/- standard deviation) mg/L. Only in Bushehr Province, the provincial mean fluoride level in the groundwater resources was higher than the WHO guideline value of 1.5 mg/L (1.86 +/- 0.86 mg/L). At nationwide level, the portion of extracted groundwater with fluoride concentration lower than the minimum permissible level of 0.5 mg/L, desirable fluoride range of 0.5-1.5 mg/L and elevated fluoride level was 69.2, 29.3 and 1.4%, respectively. In the areas with low fluoride content drinking water, it is recommended that fluoride is absorbed by use of high fluoride content foods and beverages. The recommendations for the circumstances with excessive fluoride content of drinking water are provision of drinking water from alternative sources and defluoridation of drinking water by point-of-use systems, respectively.

  3. Fluoride Content of Bottled Drinking Water in Chennai, Tamilnadu

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Karunya; Rajapandian, K.; Gurunathan, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Context The optimum level of fluoride in drinking water is 0.7 to 1.2 ppm. Decreased fluoride concentration leads to increased risk of caries and increased concentration can lead to dental or skeletal fluorosis. One crore liters of water is supplied to Chennai and surrounding areas through pouches and bottles which carters about one third of city population. Aim The aim of this study is to determine the fluoride concentration in top 10 bottled waters in Chennai and to check the accuracy of their labelling. Materials and Methods Top selling bottled waters, 6 multinational and 4 Non- multinational brands were selected for the study. Three different batches of each brand were purchased. The labels of the bottled were removed after collecting the details regarding fluoride content. All the bottles were numbered and sent for fluoride content analysis using SPADNS calorimetric method. Results All the brands and batches which were analysed for the study had less than optimal fluoride content and there is a significant variation in fluoride concentration of each brand and among different batches of same brand bottled waters. The range of fluoride level in tested samples was between 0.27 to 0.59. Only one brand’s label had information regarding the fluoride content. Conclusion Standardization of fluoride levels in bottled waters and labelling of fluoride content should become mandatory. PMID:26557612

  4. Hydrogen Storage in Diamond Powder Utilizing Plasma NaF Surface Treatment for Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, David A.; Leal-Quiros, E.; Velez, Angel; Prelas, Mark A.; Gosh, Tushar

    2006-12-04

    Hydrogen Fuel Cells offer the vital solution to the world's socio-political dependence on oil. Due to existing difficulty in safe and efficient hydrogen storage for fuel cells, storing the hydrogen in hydrocarbon compounds such as artificial diamond is a realistic solution. By treating the surface of the diamond powder with a Sodium Fluoride plasma exposure, the surface of the diamond is cleaned of unwanted molecules. Due to fluorine's electro negativity, the diamond powder is activated and ready for hydrogen absorption. These diamond powder pellets are then placed on a graphite platform that is heated by conduction in a high voltage circuit made of tungsten wire. Then, the injection of hydrogen gas into chamber allows the storage of the Hydrogen on the surface of the diamond powder. By neutron bombardment in the nuclear reactor, or Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis, the samples are examined for parts per million amounts of hydrogen in the sample. Sodium Fluoride surface treatment allows for higher mass percentage of stored hydrogen in a reliable, resistant structure, such as diamond for fuel cells and permanently alters the diamonds terminal bonds for re-use in the effective storage of hydrogen. The highest stored amount utilizing the NaF plasma surface treatment was 22229 parts per million of hydrogen in the diamond powder which amounts to 2.2229% mass increase.

  5. Socio-economic differences in public opinion regarding water fluoridation in Queensland.

    PubMed

    Mummery, W Kerry; Duncan, Mitchell; Kift, Ryan

    2007-08-01

    To describe public opinion relating to the fluoridation of drinking water in a sample of the Queensland population. Data were collected by means of a computer-assisted telephone interview survey from a sample of the Queensland population. Descriptive statistics and logistical regression were used to examine associations between variables. Seventy per cent of the total sample supported water fluoridation of their local supply. More than 71% of the total sample agreed that water fluoridation was safe. People living in areas of higher socio-economic/relative socio-economic advantage were more likely to support the addition of fluoride to local drinking water and agree that it was safe. Opinions about fluoridation varied by respondent age and gender. General support was found in this sample of the Queensland population for fluoridation of drinking water. In Queensland, fluoridation of the water supply is now a political decision. Information about public opinion on fluoridation may assist decision makers in the final determination.

  6. [Fluoride urinary excretion in Mexico City's preschool children].

    PubMed

    Juárez-López, María Lilia Adriana; Hernández-Guerrero, Juan Carlos; Jiménez-Farfán, Dolores; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Murrieta-Pruneda, Francisco; López-Jiménez, Georgina

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of urinary fluoride excretion during dental developing stage has been reported for different countries with community fluoride programs. Also, one of the factors that could influence on retention and excretion of fluoride is the deficient nutrition so the aim of this study was to determine fluoride urinary excretion by a group of preschool children with and without malnutrition. Urinary samples from 24 hours were collected from 60 preschool children selected by convenience from Iztapalapa area of Mexico City, 30 with malnutrition and 30 with standard nutritrional status by weight for age. The samples were analyzed by fluoride especific electrode. Orion 720A. The average concentration of fluoride in urine from preschool children with and without malnutrition were 0.89 +/- 0.4 mg/L and 0.80 +/- 0.3 mg/L, respectively. The mean of 24 hours total fluoride excreted were 367 +/- 150 microg/24 hrs. in malnutrition children and 355 +/- 169 microg/24 hrs. for those with standard nutritional status. There were no differences statistically significant between groups. The urinary fluoride excretion for children with and without malnutrition were in the optimal range of fluoridation for the prevention of caries decay. Malnutrition was no associated with changes on fluoride orine concentration and excretion rates.

  7. Fluoride concentration in plaque in adolescents after topical application of different fluoride varnishes.

    PubMed

    Sköld-Larsson, K; Modéer, T; Twetman, S

    2000-03-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the fluoride (F) concentration in plaque after a single topical application of different fluoride varnishes with contrasting levels of F. Thirty adolescents (12-17 years) with fixed orthodontic appliances were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Bifluoride (6% F), Duraphat (2.23% F) and Fluor Protector (0.1% F). The varnishes were applied after professional cleaning in one upper quadrant, leaving the opposite quadrant untreated according to the split-mouth technique. Pooled plaque samples from each quadrant were collected at baseline and 3 days, 7 days and 30 days after the varnish treatment, and fluoride was analysed by microdiffusion. All fluoride varnishes increased the fluoride concentration in plaque compared with baseline, and the mean values varied between 23 and 138 ng F/mg after 3 days, depending on varnish F concentration. Compared with the control quadrant, statistically significant elevations were recorded for Bifluoride after 3 days and 7 days and Duraphat after 3 days, while no significant differences were revealed in the Fluor Protector group. The fluoride concentration in plaque was back to baseline levels for all participants in the Duraphat group after 7 days, while some individuals in the Bifluoride and Fluor Protector groups still registered slightly increased levels after 30 days. The results suggest that fluoride varnish treatments resulted in elevated fluoride levels in plaque adjacent to fixed orthodontic appliances for a period of up to 1 week, although different patterns was disclosed for the various brands.

  8. Effective Fluoride Mouthwash Delivery Methods as an Alternative to Rinsing.

    PubMed

    Rattanawiboon, Chayanit; Chaweewannakorn, Chayanit; Saisakphong, Tanyamai; Kasevayuth, Kasekarn; Trairatvorakul, Chutima

    2016-01-01

    Special-needs patients with high caries risk cannot benefit from the proven caries-reducing effect of fluoride mouthrinse because of poor rinsing compliance and a lack of home-use fluoride application recommendations. This study aimed to evaluate whether two modified delivery methods-spray or swab application-could raise the salivary fluoride to levels similar to that of rinsing. Five healthy men and 16 healthy women, ages 18-22 years, participated in this crossover study. The subjects performed a standardized brushing routine twice a day with 1,000-ppm fluoride dentifrice 1 week before and during the experimental period. The three fluoride mouthwash (0.05% NaF; 226-ppm fluoride) administration methods consisted of rinsing, spray, and cotton swab application. Each application was separated by at least 1 week. Unstimulated whole saliva was sampled for 2 minutes at baseline and at 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, and 120 minutes after each fluoride mouthwash application. Salivary fluoride level (ppm) was measured by a blinded investigator using an ion-specific electrode (ORION EA940). The differences in salivary fluoride concentration for each application method were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA at a nominal significance level of .05. The newly designed fluoride mouthwash delivery methods yielded a similar fluoride level in whole saliva compared to that of rinsing at all time points (p > .05). The t half-life of fluoride concentration ranged from 1.62 minutes (SD = 0.53) in the spray group to 2.08 minutes (SD = 0.87) in the cotton swab group; the values were not significantly different. Our results indicate that the spray and cotton swab fluoride delivery methods were effective alternatives to conventional mouth rinsing. Caregivers of individuals with acute and chronic illness, including developmental disabilities affecting cognitive or physical abilities, may consider using these alternative fluoride delivery methods to help promote dental hygiene.

  9. A comparative assessment of fluoride concentration available in saliva using daily prescribed topical fluoride agents

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Manjit; Tewari, Amrit; Chawla, H. S.; Sachdev, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the availability of fluoride concentration in saliva following the use of fluoride mouthrinse and dentifrice. Materials and Methods: The experiment was carried out in 7–15 year-old school children of Chandigarh (n = 90). The children were nonfluoride users. Baseline saliva samples were collected. The subjects were exposed to two test agents, i.e., fluoride mouthrinse (0.05%, 225 ppm F) and dentifrice (1000 ppm F) for 7 days and on the day 8, saliva samples were collected over a 20 hrs period. Wash out period of 31/2 months was there before the subjects were exposed to the second test agent. Fluoride in saliva was estimated using fluoride ion-specific electrode. Written informed consent was taken. Statistical Analysis: Kolmogorov–Smirnov test was applied to test the normality of the variables. Mann–Whitney U-test was used to compare the fluoride concentration available in saliva at respective time intervals subsequent to use of the two test agents. Results: Fluoride concentration was elevated in saliva compared to baseline for both the test agents. Fluoride mouthrinse (0.05% sodium fluoride [NaF]) and dentifrice (1000 ppm monofluorophosphate [MFP]) showed a biphasic clearance. Peak in saliva occurred at 15 mins postuse. Night-time use resulted in higher concentration of fluoride in saliva compared to baseline. There was statistically significantly higher fluoride concentration available in saliva for the dentifrice at 5 hrs, 10 hrs, and 20 hrs postuse (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Subsequent to the use of NaF (0.05%) daily mouthrinse and MFP dentifrice (1000 ppm) the fluoride concentration in saliva remained elevated to a level of 0.12 ppm for mouthrinse and 0.14 ppm for dentifrice compared to baseline (0.03 ppm) up to 20 hrs postuse. The therapeutic window though not yet established but suggested is 0.1–1 ppm for prevention of demineralization, indicating that daily use of fluoride mouthrinse and dentifrice provides fluoride concentration in

  10. [Remineralization of artificial root caries by fluoride dentifrice of different fluoride concentration in vitro].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Chun; Yu, Shao-Jie; Hu, De-Yu

    2010-12-01

    Although the effectiveness of fluoride dentifrice in remineralizing enamel caries has been established, the optimum fluoride concentration for remineralization root caries has not been defined. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the effect of 1.1g/L, 1.45g/L and 5g/L fluoride dentifrices in remineralization of artificial root caries. Sound human tooth fragments obtained from the cervical portion of root were stored in a demineralization solution for 96h at 37 degrees centigrade to induce artificial root caries lesions. The fragments were then randomly divided into four treatment groups including 1.1g/L, 1.45g/L, 5g/L fluoride dentifrice group and non-fluoride dentifrice control group. The demineralized samples were pH-cycled through treatment solutions, acidic buffer and neutral buffer for 8 days at 6 cycles per day. The samples were evaluated using electrical caries monitor(ECM), polarized light microscopy (PLM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The data was analyzed using ANOVA with SPSS13.0 software package. Variations of LgECM, total fluorescence and average fluorescence from CLSM after remineralization in fluoride dentifrice groups were significantly higher than those in the control group(P<0.05) Variations of LgECM, total fluorescence and average fluorescence from CLSM after remineralization in the 5g/L fluoride dentifrice group were significantly higher than those in the 1.1g/L and 1.45g/L fluoride dentifrice groups(P<0.05). PLM observation showed that a banding or deposit of mineral appeared within the lesions of specimens in the fluoride dentifrice groups. A wider mineral band was seen in the 5g/L fluoride dentifrice group than in the 1.1g/L and 1.45g/L fluoride dentifrice groups. Fluoride dentifrice is effective in remineralizing artificial root caries and 5g/L fluoride dentifrice has better effect than 1.1g/L and 1.45g/L fluoride dentifrices.

  11. The water fluoridation debate.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Michael G; Ellwood, Roger P; Pretty, Iain A

    2011-01-01

    Water fluoridation schemes have been employed for over 50 years. Water fluoridation has been a source of continuous debate between those who advocate its use as a public health measure and those who oppose it. There have been no new fluoridation schemes in the U.K. for nearly 30 years owing to principally legislative, but also geographic, financial, and political reasons. However, in early 2008, the U.K. Secretary of State for Health promoted the use of water fluoridation schemes for areas in England with the highest rates of decay. This article, the third and final article of three, aims to discuss the arguments surrounding water fluoridation and its continued relevance as a public health measure. This article aims to provide an update for general practitioners for the background and the current status of the water fluoridation debate and to enable them to answer non-clinical questions raised by patients.

  12. Measurement of hydrogen peroxide in biological samples containing high levels of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Bleau, G; Giasson, C; Brunette, I

    1998-10-01

    The physiological concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the aqueous humor was reported to range between 25 and 60 microM, and conditions leading to elevated levels could have important damaging effects such as cataract formation. However, the high concentration of ascorbic acid in aqueous humor, which is 20 times that of plasma, was recently shown to interfere in the dichlorophenol-indophenol assay for hydrogen peroxide. The actual concentration of hydrogen peroxide in this fluid has become a controversial issue. In the present study, we used the method of ferrous oxidation of xylenol orange (FOX1 assay) performed in a nitrogen atmosphere to accurately measure low levels of hydrogen peroxide, even in the presence of ascorbic acid at concentrations normally found in aqueous humor. Contrary to values reported in the literature, we observed that the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the rabbit aqueous humor is less than 5 microM, which is the detection limit of the method. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  13. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    PubMed

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  14. Monitoring salt fluoridation programs through urinary excretion studies.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Thomas M; Schulte, Andreas G

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews problems associated with urinary collection for the estimation of fluoride exposure and recent findings in this context. After intake of a salted meal at noon, children aged 9 to 14 excreted on average 45 microgF/h. Morning and nocturnal excretions were only 16 microgF/h with the exception of those children who ate bread made with fluoridated salt (25 microF/h). Fluoride excretions in children consuming drinking water with 0.6 to 0.8 ppmF were similar, but the variations within the 24 h period were smaller. When it is not feasible to obtain reliable 24 h urinary collections, fairly precise extrapolations of 24 h excretions can be obtained from three separate collections lasting about 16 hours, which should cover morning, early afternoon and the whole night. Three- to six-year-old children benefitting from optimal fluoride supply through water or milk excreted approximately 0.35 to 0.40 mgF/24 h; this range seems to correspond to an optimal usage of fluorides. Studies on urinary fluoride excretion, like those on total fluoride intake, cannot be carried out on random samples. Due to the necessity of close cooperation of parents and children, such studies were done with "convenience" samples. In westernized countries with now low caries prevalence, intermittent high urinary excretions occur frequently. Possible sources are fluoride intake from concentrated oral care products (fluoride gels, fluoride chewing gums) or from dentifrices (containing 1000 to 1500 ppmF), mineral waters, industrial tea preparation or fluoride tablets (or other supplements). These problems do not affect the amount of fluoride in fingernail clippings which appear to be suitable for the routine monitoring of fluoride exposure.

  15. [Fluoride intake by children from water and dentifrice].

    PubMed

    Lima, Y B; Cury, J A

    2001-12-01

    To determine the total fluoride dose to which children were exposed during the critical age of developing dental fluorosis, in an optimally fluoridated region, having diet (liquids and solids) and dentifrice as fluoride sources. For the pilot study, 39 children (aged 20 to 30 months) were selected from a day care center in Piracicaba, Brazil. They drank and ate food prepared with fluoridated water. To determine the total dose of fluoride exposure, duplicate-plate samples and products from tooth brushing were collected for two consecutive days, in four periods of the year. Fluoride was determined using an ion specific electrode. A 5% level of significance variance analysis (Anova) was carried out. Children were exposed to a total fluoride dose of 0.090 mg/day/kg of body weight, of which 45% came from the diet and 55% from dentifrice. Assuming 0.07 mg/kg as a threshold value of fluoride systemic exposure, children were exposed to a risk dose for dental fluorosis. Thus, measures to reduce fluoride intake at the studied age range would be recommended. Reducing the amount of dentifrice used for tooth brushing seems to be the best measure, given the risk/benefits of fluoride use from the public health perspective.

  16. Arsenic from community water fluoridation: quantifying the effect.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Emily; Shapiro, Howard; Li, Ye; Minnery, John G; Copes, Ray

    2016-04-01

    Community water fluoridation is a WHO recommended strategy to prevent dental carries. One debated concern is that hydrofluorosilicic acid, used to fluoridate water, contains arsenic and poses a health risk. This study was undertaken to determine if fluoridation contributes to arsenic in drinking water, to estimate the amount of additional arsenic associated with fluoridation, and compare this to the National Sanitation Foundation/American National Standards Institute (NSF/ANSI) standard and estimates from other researchers. Using surveillance data from Ontario drinking water systems, mixed effects linear regression was performed to examine the effect of fluoridation status on the difference in arsenic concentration between raw water and treated water samples. On average, drinking water treatment was found to reduce arsenic levels in water in both fluoridated and non-fluoridated systems by 0.2 μg/L. However, fluoridated systems were associated with an additional 0.078 μg/L (95% CI 0.021, 0.136) of arsenic in water when compared to non-fluoridated systems (P = 0.008) while controlling for raw water arsenic concentrations, types of treatment processes, and source water type. Our estimate is consistent with concentrations expected from other research and is less than 10% of the NSF/ANSI standard of 1 μg/L arsenic in water. This study provides further information to inform decision-making regarding community water fluoridation.

  17. Changes in plaque fluoride levels by school-based fluoride rinsing and tablet programs in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Abu Nasir Mohammad Nazmul; Sampaio, Fabio Correia; von der Fehr, Frithjof Ramm; Arneberg, Pål

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of school-based fluoride rinsing and tablet programs on plaque fluoride levels. A total of 42 children (8-9 years) were selected from two neighboring schools in Dhaka, Bangladesh. After caries recordings, vestibular plaque samples from the maxillary central incisors and mandibular first molars were collected and frozen on day 0 (baseline). The subjects of one school (rinsing group, n = 15) rinsed with 0.05% NaF, while those from the other school (tablet group, n = 16) used a 0.5 mg F tablet on the 5 school days during a 3-week period. The surfaces were sampled on the first and last school day every week. The fluoride and protein contents of each sample were analyzed using micro-techniques. The median plaque fluoride levels were 9.1 ppm at baseline in the rinsing group and 2.5 ppm in the tablet group (P < 0.05). This difference could in part be related to reported fluoride toothpaste usage. After 4 days on the fluoride programs, plaque fluoride levels in the rinsing group increased to 27.3, 24.5 and 14.2 ppm in the 3 consecutive weeks. The corresponding values after tablet usage were 8.0, 6.5 and 7.1 ppm, respectively. After 3 days without fluoride during the weekends, levels declined towards baseline values in both groups. Hence, the plaque fluoride levels in 8 to 9-year-old Bangladeshi children were increased by both rinsing and tablet programs, but the effect was not detectable 3 days later.

  18. Fluoride in dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Wiegand, Annette; Rios, Daniela; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Dental erosion develops through chronic exposure to extrinsic/intrinsic acids with a low pH. Enamel erosion is characterized by a centripetal dissolution leaving a small demineralized zone behind. In contrast, erosive demineralization in dentin is more complex as the acid-induced mineral dissolution leads to the exposure of collagenous organic matrix, which hampers ion diffusion and, thus, reduces further progression of the lesion. Topical fluoridation inducing the formation of a protective layer on dental hard tissue, which is composed of CaF(2) (in case of conventional fluorides like amine fluoride or sodium fluoride) or of metal-rich surface precipitates (in case of titanium tetrafluoride or tin-containing fluoride products), appears to be most effective on enamel. In dentin, the preventive effect of fluorides is highly dependent on the presence of the organic matrix. In situ studies have shown a higher protective potential of fluoride in enamel compared to dentin, probably as the organic matrix is affected by enzymatical and chemical degradation as well as by abrasive influences in the clinical situation. There is convincing evidence that fluoride, in general, can strengthen teeth against erosive acid damage, and high-concentration fluoride agents and/or frequent applications are considered potentially effective approaches in preventing dental erosion. The use of tin-containing fluoride products might provide the best approach for effective prevention of dental erosion. Further properly designed in situ or clinical studies are recommended in order to better understand the relative differences in performance of the various fluoride agents and formulations. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Acid demineralization susceptibility of dental enamel submitted to different bleaching techniques and fluoridation regimens.

    PubMed

    Salomão, Dlf; Santos, Dm; Nogueira, Rd; Palma-Dibb, Rg; Geraldo-Martins, Vr

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the acid demineralization susceptibility of bleached dental enamel submitted to different fluoride regimens. One hundred bovine enamel blocks (6×6×3 mm) were randomly divided into 10 groups (n=10). Groups 1 and 2 received no bleaching. Groups 3 to 6 were submitted to an at-home bleaching technique using 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP; G3 and G4) or 10% carbamide peroxide (CP; G5 and G6). Groups 7 to 10 were submitted to an in-office bleaching technique using 35% HP (G7 and G8) or 35% CP (G9 and G10). During bleaching, a daily fluoridation regimen of 0.05% sodium fluoride (NaF) solution was performed on groups 3, 5, 7, and 9, while weekly fluoridation with a 2% NaF gel was performed on groups 4, 6, 8, and 10. The samples in groups 2 to 10 were pH cycled for 14 consecutive days. The samples from all groups were then assessed by cross-sectional Knoop microhardness at different depths from the outer enamel surface. The average Knoop hardness numbers (KHNs) were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The comparison between groups 1 and 2 showed that the demineralization method was effective. The comparison among groups 2 to 6 showed the same susceptibility to acid demineralization, regardless of the fluoridation method used. However, the samples from groups 8 and 10 showed more susceptibility to acid demineralization when compared with group 2 (p<0.05). Groups 7 and 9 provided similar results to group 2, but the results of those groups were different when compared with groups 8 and 10. The use of 6% HP and 10% CP associated with daily or weekly fluoridation regimens did not increase the susceptibility of enamel to acid demineralization. However, the use of 35% HP and 35% CP must be associated with a daily fluoridation regimen, otherwise the in-office bleaching makes the bleached enamel more susceptible to acid demineralization.

  20. Thermal atomic layer etching of crystalline aluminum nitride using sequential, self-limiting hydrogen fluoride and Sn(acac){sub 2} reactions and enhancement by H{sub 2} and Ar plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Nicholas R.; Sun, Huaxing; Sharma, Kashish; George, Steven M.

    2016-09-15

    Thermal atomic layer etching (ALE) of crystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) films was demonstrated using sequential, self-limiting reactions with hydrogen fluoride (HF) and tin(II) acetylacetonate [Sn(acac){sub 2}] as the reactants. Film thicknesses were monitored versus number of ALE reaction cycles at 275 °C using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). A low etch rate of ∼0.07 Å/cycle was measured during etching of the first 40 Å of the film. This small etch rate corresponded with the AlO{sub x}N{sub y} layer on the AlN film. The etch rate then increased to ∼0.36 Å/cycle for the pure AlN films. In situ SE experiments established the HF and Sn(acac){sub 2} exposures that were necessary for self-limiting surface reactions. In the proposed reaction mechanism for thermal AlN ALE, HF fluorinates the AlN film and produces an AlF{sub 3} layer on the surface. The metal precursor, Sn(acac){sub 2}, then accepts fluorine from the AlF{sub 3} layer and transfers an acac ligand to the AlF{sub 3} layer in a ligand-exchange reaction. The possible volatile etch products are SnF(acac) and either Al(acac){sub 3} or AlF(acac){sub 2}. Adding a H{sub 2} plasma exposure after each Sn(acac){sub 2} exposure dramatically increased the AlN etch rate from 0.36 to 1.96 Å/cycle. This enhanced etch rate is believed to result from the ability of the H{sub 2} plasma to remove acac surface species that may limit the AlN etch rate. The active agent from the H{sub 2} plasma is either hydrogen radicals or radiation. Adding an Ar plasma exposure after each Sn(acac){sub 2} exposure increased the AlN etch rate from 0.36 to 0.66 Å/cycle. This enhanced etch rate is attributed to either ions or radiation from the Ar plasma that may also lead to the desorption of acac surface species.

  1. Ion release from, and fluoride recharge of a composite with a fluoride-containing bioactive glass

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Harry B.; Gwinner, Fernanda; Mitchell, John C.; Ferracane, Jack L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Materials that are capable of releasing ions such as calcium and fluoride, that are necessary for remineralization of dentin and enamel, have been the topic of intensive research for many years. The source of calcium has most often been some form of calcium phosphate, and that for fluoride has been one of several metal fluoride or hexafluorophosphate salts. Fluoride-containing bioactive glass (BAG) prepared by the sol-gel method acts as a single source of both calcium and fluoride ions in aqueous solutions. The objective of this investigation was to determine if BAG, when added to a composite formulation, can be used as a single source for calcium and fluoride ion release over an extended time period, and to determine if the BAG-containing composite can be recharged upon exposure to a solution of 5,000 ppm fluoride. Methods BAG 61 (61% Si; 31% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) and BAG 81 (81% Si; 11% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) were synthesized by the sol gel method. The composite used was composed of 50/50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA, 0.8% EDMAB, 0.4% CQ, and 0.05% BHT, combined with a mixture of BAG (15%) and strontium glass (85%) to a total filler load of 72% by weight. Disks were prepared, allowed to age for 24 h, abraded, then placed into DI water. Calcium and fluoride release was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy and fluoride ion selective electrode methods, respectively, after 2, 22, and 222 h. The composite samples were then soaked for 5 min in an aqueous 5,000 ppm fluoride solution, after which calcium and fluoride release was again measured at 2, 22, and 222 h time points. Results Prior to fluoride recharge, release of fluoride ions was similar for the BAG 61 and BAG 81 composites after 2 h, and also similar after 22 h. At the four subsequent time points, one prior to, and three following fluoride recharge, the BAG 81 composite released significantly more fluoride ions (p<0.05). Both composites were recharged by exposure to 5,000 ppm fluoride, although the BAG 81

  2. Fluorides and non-fluoride remineralization systems.

    PubMed

    Amaechi, Bennett T; van Loveren, Cor

    2013-01-01

    Caries develops when the equilibrium between de- and remineralization is unbalanced favoring demineralization. De- and remineralization occur depending on the degree of saturation of the interstitial fluids with respect to the tooth mineral. This equilibrium is positively influenced when fluoride, calcium and phosphate ions are added favoring remineralization. In addition, when fluoride is present, it will be incorporated into the newly formed mineral which is then less soluble. Toothpastes may contain fluoride and calcium ions separately or together in various compounds (remineralization systems) and may therefore reduce demineralization and promote remineralization. Formulating all these compounds in one paste may be challenging due to possible premature calcium-fluoride interactions and the low solubility of CaF2. There is a large amount of clinical evidence supporting the potent caries preventive effect of fluoride toothpastes indisputably. The amount of clinical evidence of the effectiveness of the other remineralization systems is far less convincing. Evidence is lacking for head to head comparisons of the various remineralization systems. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Probability of foliar injury for Acer sp. based on foliar fluoride concentrations.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Andrew M; Dixon, Murray J; Terry, Debbie T; Todd, Aaron K; Luciani, Michael A; Williamson, Michele L; Roszak, Danuta S; Farias, Kim A

    2016-12-01

    Fluoride is considered one of the most phytotoxic elements to plants, and indicative fluoride injury has been associated over a wide range of foliar fluoride concentrations. The aim of this study was to determine the probability of indicative foliar fluoride injury based on Acer sp. foliar fluoride concentrations using a logistic regression model. Foliage from Acer nedundo, Acer saccharinum, Acer saccharum and Acer platanoides was collected along a distance gradient from three separate brick manufacturing facilities in southern Ontario as part of a long-term monitoring programme between 1995 and 2014. Hydrogen fluoride is the major emission source associated with the manufacturing facilities resulting with highly elevated foliar fluoride close to the facilities and decreasing with distance. Consistent with other studies, indicative fluoride injury was observed over a wide range of foliar concentrations (9.9-480.0 μg F(-) g(-1)). The logistic regression model was statistically significant for the Acer sp. group, A. negundo and A. saccharinum; consequently, A. negundo being the most sensitive species among the group. In addition, A. saccharum and A. platanoides were not statistically significant within the model. We are unaware of published foliar fluoride values for Acer sp. within Canada, and this research provides policy maker and scientist with probabilities of indicative foliar injury for common urban Acer sp. trees that can help guide decisions about emissions controls. Further research should focus on mechanisms driving indicative fluoride injury over wide ranging foliar fluoride concentrations and help determine foliar fluoride thresholds for damage.

  4. Fluoride content of bottled drinking waters available in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Aldrees, Abdullah M.; Al-Manea, Saad M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to examine the fluoride concentration of commercially available bottled water products in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and to assess the accuracy of the labeling of fluoride concentration on the tested brands. Methods Fifteen randomly selected commercial brands of bottled water were obtained from supermarkets in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Three bottles of each brand were purchased, and fluoride content was measured using a combination fluoride-ion-selective electrode. The average reading for each brand was estimated and also compared with the fluoride content printed on the label. Results The mean (±SD) fluoride content of the 12 local bottled water samples was 0.79 (±0.09) mg/L with a range from 0.5 to 0.83 mg/L. The mean fluoride concentration of the three imported brands was 0.67 (±0.02) mg/L with a narrow range of fluoride content (0.65–0.69). All tested samples mention the fluoride content on the label except two imported brands. Five samples showed a significant difference between our evaluation and stated content of fluoride that ranged between +0.46 and −0.2 mg/L. Conclusions Bottled drinking waters available in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia contain differing concentration of fluoride, but within a safe range for use as a source of systemic fluoride. In addition, the manufactures’ labeling of fluoride content may be inaccurate. PMID:23960496

  5. Calcium fluoride window mounting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, D. Douglas

    1982-10-01

    A technique has been developed for joining a large calcium fluoride crystal to a stainless-steel flange by means of a silver transition ring. The process involves both vacuum brazing using a copper-silver alloy and air brazing using silver chloride. This paper describes the procedure used in fabricating a high-vacuum leak-tight calcium fluoride window assembly.

  6. PRODUCTION OF THORIUM FLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Zachariasen, W.H.

    1959-08-11

    A process is presented for producing anhydrous thorium fluoride comprising the step of contacting a saturated aqueous solution of thorium nitrate with an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid having a concentration of about 45 to 50% by weight at a temperature above 70 deg C whereby anhydrous thorium fluoride precipitates.

  7. Indium fluoride glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Mohammed

    2012-03-01

    Fluoride glasses are the only material that transmit light from ultraviolet to mid-infrared and can be drawn into industrial optical fibers. The mechanical and optical properties of new indium fluoride glass fibers have been investigated. Multimode fiber 190 microns, has very high mechanical strength greater than 100 kpsi and optical loss as low as 45 dB/km between 2 and 4 microns. Unlike chalcogenide glass fibers, indium fluoride fiber has a wide transmission window from 0.3 to 5.5 microns without any absorption peak. Indium fluoride glass fibers are the technology of choice for all application requiring transmission up to 5 micron such as infrared contour measure (IRCM) and chemical sensing. Furthermore, Indium fluoride glasses have low phonon energy and can be heavily doped and co-doped whit rare-earth elements. Therefore they are very promising candidates for infrared fiber lasers.

  8. Comparison of in vitro fluoride uptake from whitening toothpastes and a conventional toothpaste in demineralised enamel.

    PubMed

    Altenburger, Markus J; Bernhart, Jasmin; Schicha, Thurid D; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Hellwig, Elmar

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the compatibility of abrasives and fluoride compounds deal exclusively with fluoride uptake and remineralization after storing the enamel specimens in a toothpaste-saliva mixture. The influence of brushing on the fluoride uptake when highly abrasive toothpastes are used has hardly been investigated so far. The aim of the present study was to investigate fluoride uptake in initially demineralised dental enamel after storage in, or brushing with, whitening toothpaste slurries, compared to a conventional toothpaste. For this purpose two widely available whitening toothpastes with ionically bound fluoride (sodium fluoride NaF), two with covalently-bound fluoride toothpastes (sodium monofluorophosphate, NaMFP) and a conventional amine fluoride toothpaste (AmF) were compared. The fluoride uptake after use of the AmF toothpaste was shown to be statistically significantly higher than that after application of the NaF toothpastes, which in turn was statistically significantly higher than the uptake resulting from NaMFP application. The fluoride uptake was slightly higher when the enamel samples were brushed with NaF toothpaste, rather than just stored in the respective toothpaste slurry. Brushing with highly abrasive toothpastes did not negatively influence fluoride uptake in demineralised dental enamel. The ionic form of the fluoride in toothpastes appears to be critical for increased fluoride uptake. The acidic components of the AmF toothpaste improved fluoride uptake compared to alkaline NaF toothpastes.

  9. Dietary fluoride supplements for children--the role of the physician.

    PubMed

    Alley, J W; Alderman, E J; Levy, S M; Kuthy, R A

    1989-09-01

    1. All children should receive one form of systemic fluoride and appropriate forms of topical fluoride. 2. If a child is not receiving optimally fluoridated water, the dentist or physician should prescribe dietary fluoride supplements (tablets or drops). 3. The correct dosage must be determined based on patient age and fluoride content of the patient's main water source(s). 4. Special attention is necessary concerning fluoride intake for children breast feeding or consuming infant formula. 5. To arrive at the correct fluoride dose, these steps should be followed: A. Always have a sample of the main drinking water source (usually home water) analyzed for the fluoride content before prescribing a fluoride supplement, if you do not have other specific knowledge of water fluoride content. The Medical College of Georgia (Department of Oral Biology - Dr. Whitford) provides water fluoride assay services. B. When the fluoride content of the water has been determined, the fluoride level and the child's age should be matched on Table 1 to arrive at the correct supplement dose. 6. Dr. Alderman, Director of the Office of Dental Health, Division of Public Health, Georgia Department of Human Resources, can provide lists of communities in Georgia that are optimally fluoridated.

  10. Intraoral fluoride levels after use of conventional and high-fluoride dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Pessan, Juliano P; Conceição, Juliana M; Grizzo, Larissa T; Székely, Melinda; Fazakas, Zita; Buzalaf, Marília Ar

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate saliva and plaque as indicators of intraoral fluoride (F) levels after the use of conventional and high-fluoride dentifrices. Subjects were randomly assigned to brush their teeth with conventional (1000 ppm F), high-fluoride (5000 ppm F), and placebo dentifrices (fluoride free) for 10 days, following a double-blind, crossover protocol. Saliva and plaque samples were collected on the morning of the 5(th) and 10th days, respectively at 1 and 12 h after brushing, and analyzed with an ion-selective electrode after HMDS-facilitated diffusion. Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA, Tukey's test and Spearman's correlation coefficient (p < 0.05). Plaque and salivary F levels were significantly increased after the use of conventional and high-fluoride dentifrices when compared to values obtained for placebo, except plaque 12 h after the use of conventional dentifrice. A positive and significant correlation was found between fluoride concentrations in plaque and saliva for both times of sample collection. Both indicators assessed were able to detect significant differences among treatments and between times after brushing. The use of a high-fluoride dentifrice is able to significantly increase intraoral fluoride levels throughout the day, being therefore a useful therapy for patients at high caries risk. A dentifrice with high fluoride concentration could be regarded as a useful therapy of F delivery for high caries-risk patients, since intraoral F levels were sustained throughout most of the day after using this formulation.

  11. Enhancement of fluoride release from glass ionomer cement following a coating of silver fluoride.

    PubMed

    Ariffin, Z; Ngo, H; McIntyre, J

    2006-12-01

    This study investigated the extent to which a coating of 10% silver fluoride (AgF) on discs of glass jonomer cements (GIGs) would enhance the release of fluoride ion into eluting solutions at varying pH. Forty discs each of Fuji LX, Fuji VII and of Vitrebond were prepared in a plastic mould. Twenty discs of each material were coated for 30 seconds with a 10% solution of AgF. Five discs each of coated and uncoated material were placed individually in 4m1 of differing eluant solutions. The eluant solutions comprised deionized distilled water (DDW) and three separate acetate buffered solutions at pH 7, pH 5 and pH 3. After 30 minutes the discs were removed and placed in five vials containing 4m1 of the various solutions for a further 30 minutes. This was repeated for further intervals of time up to 216 hours, and all eluant solutions were stored. Fluoride concentrations in the eluant solutions were estimated using a fluoride specific electrode, with TISAB IV as a metal ion complexing and ionic concentration adjustment agent. Cumulative fluoride release patterns were determined from the incremental data. The coating of AgF greatly enhanced the level of fluoride ion release from all materials tested. Of the uncoated samples, Vitrehond released the greater concentrations of fluoride ion, followed by Fuji VII. However, cumulative levels of fluoride released from coated samples of the GICs almost matched those from coated Vitrebond. It was concluded that a coating of 10% AgF on GICs and a resin modified GIC greatly enhanced the concentration of fluoride released from these materials. This finding might be applied to improving protection against recurrent caries, particularly in high caries risk patients, and in the atraumatic restorative technique (ART) of restoration placement.

  12. Emissions of fluorides from welding processes.

    PubMed

    Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pągowska, Emilia; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2015-11-01

    The levels of fluoride airborne particulates emitted from welding processes were investigated. They were sampled with the patented IOM Sampler, developed by J. H. Vincent and D. Mark at the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), personal inhalable sampler for simultaneous collection of the inhalable and respirable size fractions. Ion chromatography with conductometric detection was used for quantitative analysis. The efficiency of fluoride extraction from the cellulose filter of the IOM sampler was examined using the standard sample of urban air particle matter SRM-1648a. The best results for extraction were obtained when water and the anionic surfactant N-Cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used in an ultrasonic bath. The limits of detection and quantification for the whole procedure were 8μg/L and 24μg/L, respectively. The linear range of calibration was 0.01-10mg/L, which corresponds to 0.0001-0.1mg of fluorides per m(3) in collection of a 20L air sample. The concentration of fluorides in the respirable fraction of collected air samples was in the range of 0.20-1.82mg/m(3), while the inhalable fraction contained 0.23-1.96mg/m(3) of fluorides during an eight-hour working day in the welding room.

  13. Evaluation of the direct and diffusion methods for the determination of fluoride content in table salt.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Mier, E A; Soto-Rojas, A E; Buckley, C M; Margineda, J; Zero, D T

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess methods currently used for analyzing fluoridated salt in order to identify the most useful method for this type of analysis. Seventy-five fluoridated salt samples were obtained. Samples were analyzed for fluoride content, with and without pretreatment, using direct and diffusion methods. Element analysis was also conducted in selected samples. Fluoride was added to ultra pure NaCl and non-fluoridated commercial salt samples and Ca and Mg were added to fluoride samples in order to assess fluoride recoveries using modifications to the methods. Larger amounts of fluoride were found and recovered using diffusion than direct methods (96%-100% for diffusion vs. 67%-90% for direct). Statistically significant differences were obtained between direct and diffusion methods using different ion strength adjusters. Pretreatment methods reduced the amount of recovered fluoride. Determination of fluoride content was influenced both by the presence of NaCl and other ions in the salt. Direct and diffusion techniques for analysis of fluoridated salt are suitable methods for fluoride analysis. The choice of method should depend on the purpose of the analysis.

  14. Evaluation of the direct and diffusion methods for the determination of fluoride content in table salt

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Mier, E. Angeles; Soto-Rojas, Armando E.; Buckley, Christine M.; Margineda, Jorge; Zero, Domenick T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess methods currently used for analyzing fluoridated salt in order to identify the most useful method for this type of analysis. Basic research design Seventy-five fluoridated salt samples were obtained. Samples were analyzed for fluoride content, with and without pretreatment, using direct and diffusion methods. Element analysis was also conducted in selected samples. Fluoride was added to ultra pure NaCl and non-fluoridated commercial salt samples and Ca and Mg were added to fluoride samples in order to assess fluoride recoveries using modifications to the methods. Results Larger amounts of fluoride were found and recovered using diffusion than direct methods (96%–100% for diffusion vs. 67%–90% for direct). Statistically significant differences were obtained between direct and diffusion methods using different ion strength adjusters. Pretreatment methods reduced the amount of recovered fluoride. Determination of fluoride content was influenced both by the presence of NaCl and other ions in the salt. Conclusion Direct and diffusion techniques for analysis of fluoridated salt are suitable methods for fluoride analysis. The choice of method should depend on the purpose of the analysis. PMID:20088217

  15. Determination of Fluoride in the Bottled Drinking Waters in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Amanlou, Massoud; Hosseinpour, Maedeh; Azizian, Homa; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Navabpoor, Mojtaba; Souri, Effat

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride is recognized as an effective agent for dental caries prevention. Generally, the main source of fluoride intake is drinking water. In this study, fluoride content in 18 commercial brands of bottled waters was investigated. Six samples from each batch of 18 Iranian commercial brands of bottled waters were supplied. The fluoride content of samples was analyzed by Fluoride Ion Selective Electrode. The mean ± SD fluoride content of the bottled waters was 0.202 ± 0.00152 mg/L with a range from 0.039 to 0.628 mg/L which was lower than the accepted limits for fluoride content of drinking water (1 mg/L). This finding suggested that in the region which water has high fluoride content, drinking bottled water is preferred to drinking tap water, as it could lower the risk of fluorosis. However, the risk of dental caries increases in people who mainly drink bottled waters; thus, they should use fluoride supplements. PMID:24363704

  16. Fluoride release and uptake capacities of fluoride-releasing restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Attar, Nuray; Turgut, Melek D

    2003-01-01

    Many fluoride-releasing dental materials are being sold on the basis of their cariostatic properties. However, the amount fluoride release of these materials is still uncertain. This study investigated the fluoride release and uptake characteristics of four flowable resin composites (Heliomolar Flow, Tetric Flow, Wave, Perma Flo), one flowable compomer (Dyract flow), one conventional glass ionomer cement mixed with two different powder/liquid ratios (ChemFlex Syringeable and ChemFlex Condensable), one packable resin composite (SureFil), one ion-releasing composite (Ariston pHc) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer). Seven discs (6-mm diameter and 1.5-mm height) were prepared for each material. Each disc was immersed in 3.5 ml of deionized water within a plastic vial and stored at 37 degrees C. The deionized water was changed every 24 hours and the release of fluoride was measured for 30 days. At the end of this period, the samples were recharged with 2 ml of 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel for four minutes. Then, all samples were reassessed for an additional 10 days. The fluoride release of all samples was measured with a specific fluoride electrode and an ionanalyzer. Statistical analyses were conducted using two-way repeated measure ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests. For all tested materials, the greatest fluoride release was observed after the first day of the study (p<0.01) but gradually diminished with time. During the test period, Tetric Flow released the lowest amount of fluoride; however, no statistically significant difference was found from Wave and Heliomolar Flow (p>0.05). Ariston pHc released the highest amount of fluoride, followed by ChemFlex Syringeable, Vitremer and ChemFlex Condensable. There were statistically significant differences among these materials (p<0.05). Fluoride release of all materials were significantly increased after the first day following refluoridation and Ariston pHc released the greatest

  17. Novel fluorogenic probe for fluoride ion based on the fluoride-induced cleavage of tert-butyldimethylsilyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2007-06-01

    A highly sensitive and selective fluorogenic probe for fluoride ion, 4-methylumbelliferyl tert-butyldimethylsilyl ether (4-MUTBS), was designed and synthesized. 4-MUTBS was a weakly fluorescent compound and was synthesized via the one-step reaction of 4-MU with tert-butyldimethylsilyl chloride. Upon incubation with fluoride ion in acetone-water solution (7:3, v/v), the Si-O bond of 4-MUTBS was cleaved and highly fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) was released, hence leading to the fluorescence increase of the reaction solution. The fluorescence increase is linearly with fluoride concentration in the range 50-8000 nmol l -1 with a detection limit of 19 nmol l -1 (3 σ). Because of the high affinity of silicon toward fluoride ion, the proposed probe shows excellent selectivity toward fluoride ion over other anions. The method has been successfully applied to the fluoride determination in toothpaste and tap water samples.

  18. Four-sample lactose hydrogen breath test for diagnosis of lactose malabsorption in irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Feng; Fox, Mark; Chu, Hua; Zheng, Xia; Long, Yan-Qin; Pohl, Daniel; Fried, Michael; Dai, Ning

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To validate 4-sample lactose hydrogen breath testing (4SLHBT) compared to standard 13-sample LHBT in the clinical setting. METHODS: Irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea (IBS-D) and healthy volunteers (HVs) were enrolled and received a 10 g, 20 g, or 40 g dose lactose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) in a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial. The lactase gene promoter region was sequenced. Breath samples and symptoms were acquired at baseline and every 15 min for 3 h (13 measurements). The detection rates of lactose malabsorption (LM) and lactose intolerance (LI) for a 4SLHBT that acquired four measurements at 0, 90, 120, and 180 min from the same data set were compared with the results of standard LHBT. RESULTS: Sixty IBS-D patients and 60 HVs were studied. The genotype in all participants was C/C-13910. LM and LI detection rates increased with lactose dose from 10 g, 20 g to 40 g in both groups (P < 0.001). 4SLHBT showed excellent diagnostic concordance with standard LHBT (97%-100%, Kappa​​ 0.815-0.942) with high sensitivity (90%-100%) and specificity (100%) at all three lactose doses in both groups. CONCLUSION: Reducing the number of measurements from 13 to 4 samples did not significantly impact on the accuracy of LHBT in health and IBS-D. 4SLHBT is a valid test for assessment of LM and LI in clinical practice. PMID:26140004

  19. Salivary Fluoride Levels after Use of High-Fluoride Dentifrice

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Glauber Campos; Cruz, Priscila Figueiredo; Bohn, Ana Clarissa Cavalcante Elvas; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate salivary fluoride (F) availability after toothbrushing with a high-F dentifrice. Twelve adult volunteers took part in this crossover and blind study. F concentration in saliva was determined after brushing with a high-F dentifrice (5000 µg F/g) or with a conventional F concentration dentifrice (1100 µg F/g) followed by a 15 mL distilled water rinse. Samples of nonstimulated saliva were collected on the following times: before (baseline), and immediately after spit (time = 0) and after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min. F analysis was performed with a fluoride-sensitive electrode and the area under curve of F salivary concentration × time (µg F/mL × min−1) was calculated. At baseline, no significant difference was found among dentifrices (P > 0.05). After brushing, both dentifrices caused an elevated fluoride level in saliva; however salivary F concentration was significantly higher at all times, when high-F dentifrice was used (P < 0.01). Even after 120 min, salivary F concentration was still higher than the baseline values for both dentifrices (P < 0.001). High-F dentifrice enhanced the bioavailability of salivary F, being an option for caries management in patients with high caries risk. PMID:25821849

  20. Salivary fluoride levels after use of high-fluoride dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Vale, Glauber Campos; Cruz, Priscila Figueiredo; Bohn, Ana Clarissa Cavalcante Elvas; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate salivary fluoride (F) availability after toothbrushing with a high-F dentifrice. Twelve adult volunteers took part in this crossover and blind study. F concentration in saliva was determined after brushing with a high-F dentifrice (5000 µg F/g) or with a conventional F concentration dentifrice (1100 µg F/g) followed by a 15 mL distilled water rinse. Samples of nonstimulated saliva were collected on the following times: before (baseline), and immediately after spit (time = 0) and after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min. F analysis was performed with a fluoride-sensitive electrode and the area under curve of F salivary concentration × time (µg F/mL × min(-1)) was calculated. At baseline, no significant difference was found among dentifrices (P > 0.05). After brushing, both dentifrices caused an elevated fluoride level in saliva; however salivary F concentration was significantly higher at all times, when high-F dentifrice was used (P < 0.01). Even after 120 min, salivary F concentration was still higher than the baseline values for both dentifrices (P < 0.001). High-F dentifrice enhanced the bioavailability of salivary F, being an option for caries management in patients with high caries risk.

  1. A receptor incorporating OH, NH and CH binding motifs for a fluoride selective chemosensor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Li, Yongjun; Yu, Yanwen; Liu, Taifeng; Cheng, Songhua; Liu, Huibiao; Li, Yuliang

    2012-06-14

    An anion receptor combined different types of hydrogen bond donors such as OH, NH and CH groups has been synthesized. By rotation of the sub methyl group, this receptor showed evident (1)H NMR response to both fluoride and sulfate, while colorimetric and fluorescent responses were only observed in the presence of fluoride.

  2. Fluoride geochemistry of thermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: I. Aqueous fluoride speciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deng, Y.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Blaine, McCleskey R.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal water samples from Yellowstone National Park (YNP) have a wide range of pH (1–10), temperature, and high concentrations of fluoride (up to 50 mg/l). High fluoride concentrations are found in waters with field pH higher than 6 (except those in Crater Hills) and temperatures higher than 50 °C based on data from more than 750 water samples covering most thermal areas in YNP from 1975 to 2008. In this study, more than 140 water samples from YNP collected in 2006–2009 were analyzed for free-fluoride activity by ion-selective electrode (ISE) method as an independent check on the reliability of fluoride speciation calculations. The free to total fluoride concentration ratio ranged from <1% at low pH values to >99% at high pH. The wide range in fluoride activity can be explained by strong complexing with H+ and Al3+ under acidic conditions and lack of complexing under basic conditions. Differences between the free-fluoride activities calculated with the WATEQ4F code and those measured by ISE were within 0.3–30% for more than 90% of samples at or above 10−6 molar, providing corroboration for chemical speciation models for a wide range of pH and chemistry of YNP thermal waters. Calculated speciation results show that free fluoride, F−, and major complexes (HF(aq)0">HF(aq)0, AlF2+, AlF2+">AlF2+and AlF30">AlF30) account for more than 95% of total fluoride. Occasionally, some complex species like AlF4-">AlF4-, FeF2+, FeF2+">FeF2+, MgF+ and BF2(OH)2-">BF2(OH)2- may comprise 1–10% when the concentrations of the appropriate components are high. According to the simulation results by PHREEQC and calculated results, the ratio of main fluoride species to total fluoride varies as a function of pH and the concentrations and ratios of F and Al.

  3. Comparison of two stable hydrogen isotope-ratio measurement techniques on Antarctic surface-water and ice samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopple, J.A.; Hannon, J.E.; Coplen, T.B.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison of the new hydrogen isotope-ratio technique of Vaughn et al. ([Vaughn, B.H., White, J.W.C., Delmotte, M., Trolier, M., Cattani, O., Stievenard, M., 1998. An automated system for hydrogen isotope analysis of water. Chem. Geol. (Isot. Geosci. Sect.), 152, 309-319]; the article immediately preceding this article) for the analysis of water samples utilizing automated on-line reduction by elemental uranium showed that 94% of 165 samples of Antarctic snow, ice, and stream water agreed with the ??2H values determined by H2-H2O platinum equilibration, exhibiting a bias of +0.5??? and a 2 - ?? variation of 1.9???. The isotopic results of 10 reduction technique samples, however, gave ??2H values that differed by 3.5??? or more, and were too negative by as much as 5.4??? and too positive by as much as 4.9??? with respect to those determined using the platinum equilibration technique.

  4. Formulation and Characterization of Antibacterial Fluoride-releasing Sealants

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuwei; Townsend, Janice; Wang, Yapin; Lee, Eun Chee; Evans, Katie; Hender, Erica; Hagan, Joseph L.; Xu, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to formulate and characterize experimental antibacterial fluoride-releasing sealants and compare them with commercial sealants for fluoride release, recharge, adhesion, and microleakage. Methods Two experimental sealants (Exp-1, Exp-2) containing a synthesized antibacterial fluoride-releasing monomer and fluoride-releasing filler were formulated. Exp-2 also contained NovaMin nanoparticles. Commercial sealants Clinpro (CL) FluoroShield (FS), and SeLECT Defense (E34) were also included. Fluoride release from disk samples in deionized water was measured daily using an ion-selective electrode for 14 days, and after recharging with Neutra-Foam (2.0% sodium fluoride), fluoride was measured for 5 days. Microtensile bonding strengths (MTBS) to enamel were tested after 24-hour storage in water at 37°C or thermocycling 5-55°C for 1,000 cycles. A microleakage test was conducted on extracted teeth using a dye-penetration method. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance with the Tukey’s honestly significant difference test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results Exp-1 and Exp-2 had significantly higher fluoride release and recharge capabilities than CL and FL (P<.05). All tested sealants had similar MTBS before and after thermocycling. Exp-2 and Exp-1 had significantly lower microleakage scores (P<.05) than other groups. Conclusion The experimental sealants had higher fluoride release and recharge capabilities and similar or better retention than commercial sealants. PMID:23635887

  5. Formulation and characterization of antibacterial fluoride-releasing sealants.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuwei; Townsend, Janice; Wang, Yapin; Lee, Eun Chee; Evans, Katie; Hender, Erica; Hagan, Joseph L; Xu, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate and characterize experimental antibacterial fluoride-releasing sealants and compare them with commercial sealants for fluoride release, recharge, adhesion, and microleakage. Two experimental sealants (Exp-1, Exp-2) containing a synthesized antibacterial fluoride-releasing monomer and fluoride-releasing filler were formulated. Exp-2 also contained NovaMin nanoparticles. Commercial sealants Clinpro (CL) FluroShield (FS), and SeLECT Defense (E34) were also included. Fluoride release from disk samples in deionized water was measured daily using an ion-selective electrode for 14 days, and after recharging with Neutra-Foam (2.0% sodium fluoride), fluoride was measured for 5 days. Microtensile bonding strengths (MTBS) to enamel were tested after 24-hour storage in water at 37°C or thermocycling 5-55°C for 1,000 cycles. A microleakage test was conducted on extracted teeth using a dye-penetration method. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance with the Tukey's honestly significant difference test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Exp-1 and Exp-2 had significantly higher fluoride release and recharge capabilities than CL and FL (P<.05). All tested sealants had similar MTBS before and after thermocycling. Exp-2 and Exp-1 had significantly lower microleakage scores (P<.05) than other groups. The experimental sealants had higher fluoride release and recharge capabilities and similar or better retention than commercial sealants.

  6. Australian opinions on water fluoridation: do Queenslanders believe differently?

    PubMed

    Akers, Harry F; Armfield, Jason M

    2010-11-01

    To test whether residents of Queensland differ from residents elsewhere in Australia with respect to support for water fluoridation. Questionnaire data were obtained from an Australia-wide sample of 517 adults. The study occurred in 2008, shortly after the state government mandated fluoridation across Queensland. There were no significant differences in fluoridation support or in beliefs regarding the benefits and harms of fluoridation between Queensland and non-Queensland residents. However, respondents from Queensland were more resistant to changing their minds regarding their fluoridation stance, more distrusting of public health officials, and more supportive of decisions to introduce fluoridation being made by the people via a referendum. After controlling for potentially confounding variables, Queenslanders demonstrated significantly more support for water fluoridation than non-Queenslanders. Perceived Queensland characteristics, which political scientists have used to explain aberrant political behavior or public policy, were not relevant to the longstanding pre-2009 disparity in water fluoridation coverage between Queensland and the rest of Australia. The findings of this investigation do not support the assumption that Queenslanders are more opposed to fluoridation than residents elsewhere in Australia. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. The stability of hydrogen ion and specific conductance in filtered wet-deposition samples stored at ambient temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, J.D.; Schroder, L.J.; Morden-Moore, A. L.; Bowersox, V.C.

    1995-01-01

    Separate experiments by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Illinois State Water Survey Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL) independently assessed the stability of hydrogen ion and specific conductance in filtered wet-deposition samples stored at ambient temperatures. The USGS experiment represented a test of sample stability under a diverse range of conditions, whereas the CAL experiment was a controlled test of sample stability. In the experiment by the USGS, a statistically significant (?? = 0.05) relation between [H+] and time was found for the composited filtered, natural, wet-deposition solution when all reported values are included in the analysis. However, if two outlying pH values most likely representing measurement error are excluded from the analysis, the change in [H+] over time was not statistically significant. In the experiment by the CAL, randomly selected samples were reanalyzed between July 1984 and February 1991. The original analysis and reanalysis pairs revealed that [H+] differences, although very small, were statistically different from zero, whereas specific-conductance differences were not. Nevertheless, the results of the CAL reanalysis project indicate there appears to be no consistent, chemically significant degradation in sample integrity with regard to [H+] and specific conductance while samples are stored at room temperature at the CAL. Based on the results of the CAL and USGS studies, short-term (45-60 day) stability of [H+] and specific conductance in natural filtered wet-deposition samples that are shipped and stored unchilled at ambient temperatures was satisfactory.

  8. Fluoride analysis of human milk in remote areas of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chuckpaiwong, S; Nakornchai, S; Surarit, R; Soo-ampon, S

    2000-09-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the fluoride content in human milk collected from mothers living in remote areas of Thailand and to correlate it with fluoride concentrations in drinking water and water for domestic use. Four to five ml of breast milk were sampled from mothers living in villages where schools under the jurisdiction of the Department of Border Patrol Police were located. The schools were sampled by Multiple Stratified Cluster Random Sampling. Fluoride was determined by microdiffusion method. Statistical analysis were made by ANOVA and LSD test. Correlation between fluoride content in milk and water was assessed by Kendall's tau-b. The mean fluoride concentration in breast milk was 0.017+/-0.02 ppm. There was no difference in breast milk fluoride concentration between regions (p=0.6). No correlation was found between breast milk fluoride content and fluoride concentrations in either drinking water or water for domestic use (r(tau) = -0.09, p = 0.32, r(tau) = -0.04, p = 0.65 respectively).

  9. Fluoride content of still bottled waters available in the North-East of England, UK.

    PubMed

    Zohouri, F V; Maguire, A; Moynihan, P J

    2003-11-08

    The aims of this study were to measure the fluoride content of still bottled waters on sale in the UK and to estimate and compare the fluoride intake from tap and bottled water for British children. Three bottles of 25 commercial brands of bottled water were purchased from supermarkets, grocery stores and health shops in the North-East of England. All samples were still spring, mineral or distilled waters, sold in plastic bottles. The fluoride content of all samples was determined, in duplicate, using a Fluoride Ion Selective Electrode. The mean (+/- SD) fluoride content of the bottled waters was 0.08 (+/- 0.08) mg L(-1) with a range from 0.01-0.37 mg L(-1) which is below the accepted standard for optimally fluoridated water. The mean fluoride intake for 4-18-year-olds when the source of water intake is solely fluoridated tap water was estimated to be 0.26 mg F per day; compared with 0.16 mg F per day, when a combination of tap and bottled water is consumed. Bottled water, from those sampled, is unlikely to make an important contribution to total fluoride intake in British diets. Consumption of bottled water containing a negligible amount of fluoride in preference to fluoridated tap water might result in less than optimal fluoride ingestion in young people.

  10. A study to investigate fluoride contamination and fluoride exposure dose assessment in lateritic zones of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Samal, Alok C; Bhattacharya, Piyal; Mallick, Anusaya; Ali, Md Motakabber; Pyne, Jagadish; Santra, Subhas C

    2015-04-01

    To assess the status of severity of fluoride contamination in lateritic Bankura and Purulia districts of West Bengal, concentrations of fluoride in different water sources and agricultural field soils were investigated. The fluoride content (mg/l) was observed to differ with aquifer depths: 0.19-0.47 in dug wells, 0.01-0.17 in shallow tube wells, and 0.07-1.6 in deep tube wells. Fluoride within the World Health Organization (WHO) prescribed range (1.0-1.5 mg/l) was estimated only in ~17% of the total collected water samples while ~67% showed <0.7 mg/l fluoride and thus may impede in the production and maintenance of healthy teeth and bones of the residents, especially children. Fluoride in water was found to be significantly correlated (r = 0.63) with pH. The exposure dose of fluoride (mg/kg/day) from drinking water in infants, children, and adults was estimated in the ranges 0.02-0.53, 0.01-0.24, and 0.01-0.14, respectively against the standard value of 0.05. A clear risk of dental fluorosis is apparent in infants and children of the study area. The fluoride in soil (55-399 mg/kg) was detected to be significantly correlated with the fluoride content in deep tube wells and soil pH (r = 0.56 and 0.71, respectively). The relationships of soil fluoride with total hardness and that with phosphate were not significant. There is a high possibility of bioaccumulation of fluoride from contaminated soil and water of the study area to cultivated crops. This will enhance the quantity of fluoride intake into human food chain in addition to drinking water pathway.

  11. Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Windt, Norman F.; Williams, Joe L.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a process for decontaminating particulate nickel contaminated with actinide-metal fluorides. In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel containing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

  12. Effect of fluoridated water on intelligence in 10-12-year-old school children

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, A.; Dhanya, R. S.; Narayan, Ajay; Sam, George; Adarsh, V. J.; Kiran, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship of drinking water fluoride levels with children's intelligence quotient (IQ). Materials and Methods: Water was collected from initially identified endemic fluoride regions according to the geological research of Government of India. Fluoride concentration of the water was assessed by utilizing fluoride ion selective electrode, Orion 9609BN, and categorized on the basis of fluoride concentration into low, medium, and high-fluoride regions, i.e., Virajpet (low fluoride level < 1.2 ppm), Banavara (Medium fluoride level 1.2–2 ppm), and Mastihalli (High fluoride levels > 3 ppm). Government school from all three villages were selected randomly and IQ levels were assessed by using Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices. This test was conducted on each child in the study sample. Results: A significant inverse relationship was found between the fluoride concentration in drinking water and IQ (r value = −0.204; P < 0.000). It was observed that IQ level was negatively correlated with fluoride concentration in drinking water. Conclusion: It is concluded that IQ level was negatively correlated with fluoride level in drinking water. Factors that might affect children's IQ need to be considered, and it is necessary to devise solutions for preventing the harmful effects of excessive intake of fluoride ion to the body. PMID:28217543

  13. Effect of exercise on fluoride metabolism in adult humans: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    V. Zohoori, Fatemeh; Innerd, Alison; Azevedo, Liane B.; Whitford, Gary M.; Maguire, Anne

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of all aspects of fluoride metabolism is critical to identify its biological effects and avoid fluoride toxicity in humans. Fluoride metabolism and subsequently its body retention may be affected by physiological responses to acute exercise. This pilot study investigated the effect of exercise on plasma fluoride concentration, urinary fluoride excretion and fluoride renal clearance following no exercise and three exercise intensity conditions in nine healthy adults after taking a 1-mg Fluoride tablet. After no, light, moderate and vigorous exercise, respectively, the mean (SD) baseline-adjusted i) plasma fluoride concentration was 9.6(6.3), 11.4(6.3), 15.6(7.7) and 14.9(10.0) ng/ml; ii) rate of urinary fluoride excretion over 0–8 h was 46(15), 44(22), 34(17) and 36(17) μg/h; and iii) rate of fluoride renal clearance was 26.5(9.0), 27.2(30.4), 13.1(20.4) and 18.3(34.9) ml/min. The observed trend of a rise in plasma fluoride concentration and decline in rate of fluoride renal clearance with increasing exercise intensity needs to be investigated in a larger trial. This study, which provides the first data on the effect of exercise with different intensities on fluoride metabolism in humans, informs sample size planning for any subsequent definitive trial, by providing a robust estimate of the variability of the effect. PMID:26581340

  14. Effect of exercise on fluoride metabolism in adult humans: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    V Zohoori, Fatemeh; Innerd, Alison; Azevedo, Liane B; Whitford, Gary M; Maguire, Anne

    2015-11-19

    An understanding of all aspects of fluoride metabolism is critical to identify its biological effects and avoid fluoride toxicity in humans. Fluoride metabolism and subsequently its body retention may be affected by physiological responses to acute exercise. This pilot study investigated the effect of exercise on plasma fluoride concentration, urinary fluoride excretion and fluoride renal clearance following no exercise and three exercise intensity conditions in nine healthy adults after taking a 1-mg Fluoride tablet. After no, light, moderate and vigorous exercise, respectively, the mean (SD) baseline-adjusted i) plasma fluoride concentration was 9.6(6.3), 11.4(6.3), 15.6(7.7) and 14.9(10.0) ng/ml; ii) rate of urinary fluoride excretion over 0-8 h was 46(15), 44(22), 34(17) and 36(17) μg/h; and iii) rate of fluoride renal clearance was 26.5(9.0), 27.2(30.4), 13.1(20.4) and 18.3(34.9) ml/min. The observed trend of a rise in plasma fluoride concentration and decline in rate of fluoride renal clearance with increasing exercise intensity needs to be investigated in a larger trial. This study, which provides the first data on the effect of exercise with different intensities on fluoride metabolism in humans, informs sample size planning for any subsequent definitive trial, by providing a robust estimate of the variability of the effect.

  15. Survey of fluoride levels in vended water stations.

    PubMed

    Jadav, Urvi G; Archarya, Bhavini S; Velasquez, Gisela M; Vance, Bradley J; Tate, Robert H; Quock, Ryan L

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to measure the fluoride concentration of water derived from vended water stations (VWS) and to identify its clinical implications, especially with regard to caries prevention and fluorosis. VWS and corresponding tap water samples were collected from 34 unique postal zip codes; samples were analyzed in duplicate for fluoride concentration. Average fluoride concentration in VWS water was significantly lower than that of tap water (P < 0.001). Fluoride concentration in the VWS water ranged from <0.01 ppm to 0.04 ppm, with a mean concentration of 0.02 ppm (±0.02 ppm). Patients utilizing VWS as their primary source of drinking water may not be receiving optimal caries preventive benefits; thus dietary fluoride supplementation may be indicated. Conversely, to minimize the risk of fluorosis in infants consuming reconstituted infant formula, water from a VWS may be used.

  16. Method for converting UF5 to UF4 in a molten fluoride salt

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Melvin R.; Bamberger, Carlos E.; Kelmers, A. Donald

    1977-01-01

    The reduction of UF.sub.5 to UF.sub.4 in a molten fluoride salt by sparging with hydrogen is catalyzed by metallic platinum. The reaction is also catalyzed by platinum alloyed with gold reaction equipment.

  17. Groundwater fluoride enrichment in an active rift setting: Central Kenya Rift case study.

    PubMed

    Olaka, Lydia A; Wilke, Franziska D H; Olago, Daniel O; Odada, Eric O; Mulch, Andreas; Musolff, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater is used extensively in the Central Kenya Rift for domestic and agricultural demands. In these active rift settings groundwater can exhibit high fluoride levels. In order to address water security and reduce human exposure to high fluoride in drinking water, knowledge of the source and geochemical processes of enrichment are required. A study was therefore carried out within the Naivasha catchment (Kenya) to understand the genesis, enrichment and seasonal variations of fluoride in the groundwater. Rocks, rain, surface and groundwater sources were sampled for hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations, the data was statistically and geospatially analyzed. Water sources have variable fluoride concentrations between 0.02-75 mg/L. 73% exceed the health limit (1.5mg/L) in both dry and wet seasons. F(-) concentrations in rivers are lower (0.2-9.2mg/L) than groundwater (0.09 to 43.6 mg/L) while saline lake waters have the highest concentrations (0.27-75 mg/L). The higher values are confined to elevations below 2000 masl. Oxygen (δ(18)O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic values range from -6.2 to +5.8‰ and -31.3 to +33.3‰, respectively, they are also highly variable in the rift floor where they attain maximum values. Fluoride base levels in the precursor vitreous volcanic rocks are higher (between 3750-6000 ppm) in minerals such as cordierite and muscovite while secondary minerals like illite and kaolinite have lower remnant fluoride (<1000 ppm). Thus, geochemical F(-) enrichment in regional groundwater is mainly due to a) rock alteration, i.e. through long residence times and natural discharge and/or enhanced leakages of deep seated geothermal water reservoirs, b) secondary concentration fortification of natural reservoirs through evaporation, through reduced recharge and/or enhanced abstraction and c) through additional enrichment of fluoride after volcanic emissions. The findings are useful to help improve water management in Naivasha as well as similar

  18. How Does Fluoride Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fluoride is a natural element found in the earth's crust as well as in water and air. ... Activity: Teeth What Are Dentures? Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend Permissions Guidelines About KidsHealth ...

  19. Fluoridation: strategies for success.

    PubMed Central

    Isman, R

    1981-01-01

    Of 19 referenda on community water fluoridation held in the first six months of 1980, 17 were defeated. Among the postulated reasons are a growing distrust of government and the health establishment. The public remains largely ignorant of the purpose and benefits of fluoridation. The emotionalism surrounding the issue has made it difficult to generate public support outside of the health professions. Opponents have also learned to fight fluoridation with increasingly sophisticated techniques. Some of the strategies used in recent successful campaigns in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon are described; recommendations that can be applied to communities considering fluoridation include careful wording of ballot measures so they are unequivocally clear and simple; timing ballot measures with elections likely to draw the largest voter turnout; broadening the base of political and financial support; using a figurehead if possible; and making maximum use of the media. PMID:7246838

  20. Fluoride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... broken through the gums have changes in the enamel that covers the teeth. Faint white lines or ... regarding fluoride intake from reconstituted infant formula and enamel fluorosis: a report of the American Dental Association ...

  1. Fluoridation: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Isman, R

    1981-07-01

    Of 19 referenda on community water fluoridation held in the first six months of 1980, 17 were defeated. Among the postulated reasons are a growing distrust of government and the health establishment. The public remains largely ignorant of the purpose and benefits of fluoridation. The emotionalism surrounding the issue has made it difficult to generate public support outside of the health professions. Opponents have also learned to fight fluoridation with increasingly sophisticated techniques. Some of the strategies used in recent successful campaigns in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon are described; recommendations that can be applied to communities considering fluoridation include careful wording of ballot measures so they are unequivocally clear and simple; timing ballot measures with elections likely to draw the largest voter turnout; broadening the base of political and financial support; using a figurehead if possible; and making maximum use of the media.

  2. Hydrogen bonding. Part 25. The nature of the hydrogen bond in hydroxytropenylium chloride (tropone hydrochloride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Kenneth M.; Cross, Joan E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.

    1988-08-01

    Hydroxytropenylium iodide and bromide contain normal electrostatic OH⋯X - hydrogen bonds. Hydroxytropenylium chloride, however, contains a hydrogen bond intermediate between the normal electrostatic type and the very strong covalent type, similar to the hydrogen bonds found in choline fluoride or the Type I C∞v hydrogen dihalide ions. Infrared comparisons with compounds previously studied demonstrate that the hydroxytropenylium ion is a stronger hydrogen bond donor than either choline cation or protonated betaine cation, and suggest that hydroxytropenylium fluoride, if it can be prepared, should contain a three-center covalent hydrogen bond.

  3. Comparative exploration of hydrogen sulfide and water transmembrane free energy surfaces via orthogonal space tempering free energy sampling

    DOE PAGES

    Lv, Chao; Aitchison, Erick W.; Wu, Dongsheng; ...

    2015-06-29

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a commonly known toxic gas compound, possesses unique chemical features that allow this small solute molecule to quickly diffuse through cell membranes. Taking advantage of the recent orthogonal space tempering (OST) method, we comparatively mapped the transmembrane free energy landscapes of H2S and its structural analogue, water (H2O), seeking to decipher the molecular determinants that govern their drastically different permeabilities. Here, as revealed by our OST sampling results, in contrast to the highly polar water solute, hydrogen sulfide is evidently amphipathic, and thus inside membrane is favorably localized at the interfacial region, that is, the interface betweenmore » the polar head-group and nonpolar acyl chain regions. Because the membrane binding affinity of H2S is mainly governed by its small hydrophobic moiety and the barrier height inbetween the interfacial region and the membrane center is largely determined by its moderate polarity, the transmembrane free energy barriers to encounter by this toxic molecule are very small. Moreover when H2S diffuses from the bulk solution to the membrane center, the above two effects nearly cancel each other, so as to lead to a negligible free energy difference. Lastly, this study not only explains why H2S can quickly pass through cell membranes but also provides a practical illustration on how to use the OST free energy sampling method to conveniently analyze complex molecular processes.« less

  4. Comparative exploration of hydrogen sulfide and water transmembrane free energy surfaces via orthogonal space tempering free energy sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Chao; Aitchison, Erick W.; Wu, Dongsheng; Zheng, Lianqing; Cheng, Xiaolin; Yang, Wei

    2015-06-29

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a commonly known toxic gas compound, possesses unique chemical features that allow this small solute molecule to quickly diffuse through cell membranes. Taking advantage of the recent orthogonal space tempering (OST) method, we comparatively mapped the transmembrane free energy landscapes of H2S and its structural analogue, water (H2O), seeking to decipher the molecular determinants that govern their drastically different permeabilities. Here, as revealed by our OST sampling results, in contrast to the highly polar water solute, hydrogen sulfide is evidently amphipathic, and thus inside membrane is favorably localized at the interfacial region, that is, the interface between the polar head-group and nonpolar acyl chain regions. Because the membrane binding affinity of H2S is mainly governed by its small hydrophobic moiety and the barrier height inbetween the interfacial region and the membrane center is largely determined by its moderate polarity, the transmembrane free energy barriers to encounter by this toxic molecule are very small. Moreover when H2S diffuses from the bulk solution to the membrane center, the above two effects nearly cancel each other, so as to lead to a negligible free energy difference. Lastly, this study not only explains why H2S can quickly pass through cell membranes but also provides a practical illustration on how to use the OST free energy sampling method to conveniently analyze complex molecular processes.

  5. Comparative exploration of hydrogen sulfide and water transmembrane free energy surfaces via orthogonal space tempering free energy sampling.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chao; Aitchison, Erick W; Wu, Dongsheng; Zheng, Lianqing; Cheng, Xiaolin; Yang, Wei

    2016-03-05

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S), a commonly known toxic gas compound, possesses unique chemical features that allow this small solute molecule to quickly diffuse through cell membranes. Taking advantage of the recent orthogonal space tempering (OST) method, we comparatively mapped the transmembrane free energy landscapes of H2 S and its structural analogue, water (H2 O), seeking to decipher the molecular determinants that govern their drastically different permeabilities. As revealed by our OST sampling results, in contrast to the highly polar water solute, hydrogen sulfide is evidently amphipathic, and thus inside membrane is favorably localized at the interfacial region, that is, the interface between the polar head-group and nonpolar acyl chain regions. Because the membrane binding affinity of H2 S is mainly governed by its small hydrophobic moiety and the barrier height inbetween the interfacial region and the membrane center is largely determined by its moderate polarity, the transmembrane free energy barriers to encounter by this toxic molecule are very small. Moreover when H2 S diffuses from the bulk solution to the membrane center, the above two effects nearly cancel each other, so as to lead to a negligible free energy difference. This study not only explains why H2 S can quickly pass through cell membranes but also provides a practical illustration on how to use the OST free energy sampling method to conveniently analyze complex molecular processes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Toxic fluoride gas emissions from lithium-ion battery fires.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Petra; Blomqvist, Per; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2017-08-30

    Lithium-ion battery fires generate intense heat and considerable amounts of gas and smoke. Although the emission of toxic gases can be a larger threat than the heat, the knowledge of such emissions is limited. This paper presents quantitative measurements of heat release and fluoride gas emissions during battery fires for seven different types of commercial lithium-ion batteries. The results have been validated using two independent measurement techniques and show that large amounts of hydrogen fluoride (HF) may be generated, ranging between 20 and 200 mg/Wh of nominal battery energy capacity. In addition, 15-22 mg/Wh of another potentially toxic gas, phosphoryl fluoride (POF3), was measured in some of the fire tests. Gas emissions when using water mist as extinguishing agent were also investigated. Fluoride gas emission can pose a serious toxic threat and the results are crucial findings for risk assessment and management, especially for large Li-ion battery packs.

  7. Analysis of laser shock experiments on precompressed samples using a quartz reference and application to warm dense hydrogen and helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brygoo, Stephanie; Millot, Marius; Loubeyre, Paul; Lazicki, Amy E.; Hamel, Sebastien; Qi, Tingting; Celliers, Peter M.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H.; Fratanduono, Dayne E.; Hicks, Damien G.; Rygg, J. Ryan; Smith, Raymond F.; Swift, Damian C.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Jeanloz, Raymond

    2015-11-01

    Megabar (1 Mbar = 100 GPa) laser shocks on precompressed samples allow reaching unprecedented high densities and moderately high ˜103-104 K temperatures. We describe here a complete analysis framework for the velocimetry (VISAR) and pyrometry (SOP) data produced in these experiments. Since the precompression increases the initial density of both the sample of interest and the quartz reference for pressure-density, reflectivity, and temperature measurements, we describe analytical corrections based on available experimental data on warm dense silica and density-functional-theory based molecular dynamics computer simulations. Using our improved analysis framework, we report a re-analysis of previously published data on warm dense hydrogen and helium, compare the newly inferred pressure, density, and temperature data with most advanced equation of state models and provide updated reflectivity values.

  8. Analysis of laser shock experiments on precompressed samples using a quartz reference and application to warm dense hydrogen and helium

    SciTech Connect

    Brygoo, Stephanie; Millot, Marius; Loubeyre, Paul; Lazicki, Amy E.; Hamel, Sebastien; Qi, Tingting; Celliers, Peter M.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H.; Fratanduono, Dayne E.; Hicks, Damien G.; Rygg, J. Ryan; Smith, Raymond F.; Swift, Damian C.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Jeanloz, Raymond

    2015-11-16

    Megabar (1 Mbar = 100 GPa) laser shocks on precompressed samples allow reaching unprecedented high densities and moderately high ~103–104 K temperatures. We describe in this paper a complete analysis framework for the velocimetry (VISAR) and pyrometry (SOP) data produced in these experiments. Since the precompression increases the initial density of both the sample of interest and the quartz reference for pressure-density, reflectivity, and temperature measurements, we describe analytical corrections based on available experimental data on warm dense silica and density-functional-theory based molecular dynamics computer simulations. Finally, using our improved analysis framework, we report a re-analysis of previously published data on warm dense hydrogen and helium, compare the newly inferred pressure, density, and temperature data with most advanced equation of state models and provide updated reflectivity values.

  9. Analysis of laser shock experiments on precompressed samples using a quartz reference and application to warm dense hydrogen and helium

    DOE PAGES

    Brygoo, Stephanie; Millot, Marius; Loubeyre, Paul; ...

    2015-11-16

    Megabar (1 Mbar = 100 GPa) laser shocks on precompressed samples allow reaching unprecedented high densities and moderately high ~103–104 K temperatures. We describe in this paper a complete analysis framework for the velocimetry (VISAR) and pyrometry (SOP) data produced in these experiments. Since the precompression increases the initial density of both the sample of interest and the quartz reference for pressure-density, reflectivity, and temperature measurements, we describe analytical corrections based on available experimental data on warm dense silica and density-functional-theory based molecular dynamics computer simulations. Finally, using our improved analysis framework, we report a re-analysis of previously published datamore » on warm dense hydrogen and helium, compare the newly inferred pressure, density, and temperature data with most advanced equation of state models and provide updated reflectivity values.« less

  10. Hydrogen breath test for diagnosis of lactose malabsorption: The importance of timing and the number of breath samples

    PubMed Central

    Di Camillo, Mauro; Marinaro, Vanessa; Argnani, Fiorenza; Foglietta, Tiziana; Vernia, Piero

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The hydrogen breath test (H2BT) is the most widely used procedure in the diagnostic workup of lactose malabsorption and lactose intolerance. AIM: To establish whether a simplified two-or three-sample test may reduce time, costs and staff resources without reducing the sensitivity of the procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data from 1112 patients (292 men, 820 women) with a positive 4 h, nine-sample H2BT were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were stratified according to the degree of lactose malabsorption, the occurrence and type of symptoms. Loss of sensitivity in the procedure was evaluated taking into account two-sample tests (0 min and 120 min or 0 min and 210 min) or three-sample tests (0 min, 120 min and 180 min or 0 min, 120 min and 210 min). RESULTS: Using a two-sample test (0 min and 120 min or 0 min and 210 min) the false-negative rate was 33.4% and 22.7%, respectively. With a three-sample test (0 min, 120 min and 180 min or 0 min, 120 min or 210 min), lactose malabsorption was diagnosed in 91.2% (1014 of 1112) patients and in 96.1% (1068 of 1112) patients, respectively. Of 594 patients with abdominal symptoms, 158 (26.6%) and 73 (12.2%) would have false-negative results with 0 min and 120 min or 0 min and 210 min two-sample tests, respectively. The three-sample tests, 0 min, 120 min and 180 min or 0 min, 120 min and 210 min, have a false-negative rate of 5.9% and 2.1%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A three-sample H2BT is time-and cost-sparing without significant loss of sensitivity for the diagnosis both of lactose malabsorption and lactose intolerance. PMID:16609755

  11. Potential Energy Curves of Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fallon, Robert J.; Vanderslice, Joseph T.; Mason, Edward A.

    1960-01-01

    Potential energy curves for the X(sup 1)sigma+ and V(sup 1)sigma+ states of HF and DF have been calculated by the Rydberg-Klein-Rees method. The results calculated from the different sets of data for HF and DF are found to be in very good agreement. The theoretical results of Karo are compared to the experimental results obtained here.

  12. Risk perception, psychological heuristics and the water fluoridation controversy.

    PubMed

    Perrella, Andrea M L; Kiss, Simon J

    2015-04-29

    Increasingly, support for water fluoridation has come under attack. We seek an explanation, focusing on the case of Waterloo, Ontario, where a 2010 referendum overturned its water fluoridation program. In particular, we test whether individuals perceive the risks of water fluoridation based not on 'hard' scientific evidence but on heuristics and cultural norms. A sample of 376 residents in Waterloo were surveyed in June 2012 using random digit dialing. We use factor analysis, OLS regression, as well as t-tests to evaluate a survey experiment to test the credibility hypothesis. Perceptions of fluoride as a risk are lower among those who perceive fluoride's benefits (B = .473, p < 0.001) and those whose cultural view is 'egalitarian' (B = .156, p < 0.05). The experiment shows a lower level of perception of fluoride's benefits among respondents who are told that water fluoridation is opposed by a national advocacy group (Group A) compared to those who are told that the government and the World Health Organization support fluoridation (Group B) (t = 1.6547, p < 0.05), as well as compared to the control group (t = 1.8913, p < 0.05). There is no difference between Group B and the control, possibly because people's already general support for fluoridation is less prone to change when told that other public organizations also support fluoridation. Public health officials should take into account cultural norms and perceptions when individuals in a community appear to rise up against water fluoridation, with implications for other public health controversies.

  13. Permeability and fluoride release of lining materials containing amine fluorides.

    PubMed

    Nordbö, H; Eriksen, H M

    1976-11-01

    The addition of amine fluorides to a copal recin (Copalite) and a chlorine caoutchouc varnish (Pergut S-40) has been studied. The permeability of Copalite films was only slightly increased whereas the excellent film-forming qualities of Pergut S-40 were destroyed by the addition of fluorides. A high fluoride release was found initially from test films of the materials but within 2-3 weeks a decrease to very low fluoride levels was observed.

  14. Fluorides in groundwater and its impact on health.

    PubMed

    Shailaja, K; Johnson, Mary Esther Cynthia

    2007-04-01

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring toxic mineral present in drinking water and causes yellowing of teeth, tooth problems etc. Fluorspar, Cryolite and Fluorapatite are the naturally occurring minerals, from which fluoride finds its path to groundwater through infiltration. In the present study two groundwater samples, Station I and Station II at Hyderabad megacity, the capital of Andhra Pradesh were investigated for one year from January 2001 to December 2001. The average fluoride values were 1.37 mg/l at Station I and 0.91 mg/l at Station II. The permissible limit given by BIS (1983) 0.6-1.2 mg/l and WHO (1984) 1.5 mg/l for fluoride in drinking water. The groundwaters at Station I exceeded the limit while at Station II it was within the limits. The study indicated that fluoride content of 0.5 mg/l is sufficient to cause yellowing of teeth and dental problems.

  15. Assessment of groundwater quality with respect to fluoride.

    PubMed

    Salve, P R; Maurya, A; Kumbhare, P S; Ramteke, D S; Wate, S R

    2008-09-01

    The study was conducted in the summer season (April-May 2007). The fluoride concentration along with physico-chemical parameters in ground water samples was determined in various villages of Kadi tehsil at Mehsana district of Gujarat state (India), since in most of the villages it is the only source of drinking water. The fluoride concentrations in these villages varied from 0.94 to 2.81 mg/L (1.37+/-0.56) with highest fluoride level at Visalpur (2.08 mg/L) and lowest at Adaraj (0.91 mg/L). There was found a positive correlation of pH with fluoride and a negative relationship of fluoride with bicarbonate which is generally observed in deep ground water.

  16. Effect of laser irradiation on the fluoride uptake of silver diamine fluoride treated dentine.

    PubMed

    Mei, May L; Ito, Leticia; Zhang, C F; Lo, Edward C M; Chu, C H

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the fluoride uptake of dentine treated with a 38 % silver diamine fluoride (SDF) solution and laser irradiation at sub-ablative energy levels. Fifteen human dentine slices were prepared and divided into four samples each. Four types of laser were chosen: CO2 (10,600 nm), Er:YAG (2,940 nm), Nd:YAG (1,064 nm) and Diode (810 nm). First, the four samples from 12 of the dentine slices were treated with SDF, and then irradiated by one of the four types of laser at three different settings. One sample was untreated and acted as a control. The setting that rendered the highest fluoride uptake was selected. Second, the remaining dentine slices were treated with SDF and irradiated by the four lasers with the selected settings. Fluoride uptake was assessed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry at the dentine surface and up to 20 μm below the surface. The selected settings were CO2 irradiation at 1.0 W for 1 s, Er:YAG irradiation at 0.5 W for 20 s, Nd:YAG irradiation at 2.0 W for 1 s and diode irradiation at 3.0 W for 3 s. The fluoride content (weight %) at the dentine surface following CO2, Er:YAG, Nd:YAG and diode irradiation was 6.91 ± 3.15, 4.09 ± 1.19, 3.35 ± 2.29 and 1.73 ± 1.04, respectively. CO2 and Er:YAG irradiation resulted in higher fluoride uptake than Nd:YAG and diode irradiation at all levels (p < 0.05). CO2 laser and Er:YAG laser irradiation rendered higher fluoride uptake in the SDF-treated dentine than Nd:YAG laser and diode laser irradiation.

  17. Safety Evaluation of Fluoride Content in Tea Infusions Consumed in the Azores-a Volcanic Region with Water Springs naturally Enriched in Fluoride.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Diana Paula Silva; Garcia, Patrícia Ventura; Amaral, Leslie; Ferreira, Teresa; Dos Santos Rodrigues, Armindo

    2017-01-24

    Tea is the second most commonly consumed beverage in the world. It is well recognized that the consumption of tea in high quantities can promote the development of fluorosis. The main objective of this study is to estimate the exposure to fluoride in the Azores through drinking tea prepared with water from different volcanic locations, by i) investigating the fluoride (F) content of various commercial brands of tea (Camellia sinensis) marketed in Azores and ii) comparing tea releasing rates of F according to brewing time, considering the fluoride concentration in the different types of water used for the infusion. Fluoride contents were determined by ion-selective electrode in 30 samples of drinking water from three different locations and in 450 samples of tea (black and green tea) from three different brands. Fluoride concentration in water ranged from 0.29 to 1.56 ppm (Porto Formoso and Sete Cidades village, respectively). Fluoride concentrations increased with brewing time, reaching the highest values in the Azorean black and green tea infusions. For all the studied brands, a negative correlation was found between tea fluoride contents and the pH of the water used to prepare the infusion. Fluoride concentration in infusions was significantly associated with the background fluoride concentration in drinking water. Since the fluoride concentration in groundwater varies accordingly to the geological conditions and tea consumption can contribute to fluoride intake, it is important to define the limits for tea consumption, particularly in fluoride-rich areas. Graphical Abstract Fluoride concentrations in black and green tea for 3 minutes of brewing time and, association between fluoride concentration and pH with brewing time.

  18. Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children.

    PubMed

    Lockner, Frida; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2017-01-20

    The efficacy and safety of combined use of topical fluoride products are essential issues that must be monitored. To assess urinary excretion of fluoride after application of two different dental varnishes containing 2.26% fluoride in 3- to 4-year-old children and to compare the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste. Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste. After a 1-week run-in period, 0.1 mL of the two fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Profluorid Varnish) was topically applied in a randomized order. Baseline and experimental urine was collected during 6-h periods. The fluoride content was determined with an ion-sensitive electrode. There was a statistically significant increase in the 6-h fluoride excretion after application of both experimental varnishes, with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste (P < 0.01). When fluoridated toothpaste was used, the mean fluoride excretion was 0.20 mg/6 h after application of Duraphat and 0.29 mg/6 h after application of Profluorid Varnish (P = 0.18). Topical applications of 0.1 mL of fluoride varnish significantly increased the 6-h fluoride excretion. As some individuals displayed excretion levels exceeding the optimal fluoride exposure, a restricted use of fluoride toothpaste in connection with the varnish applications would decrease fluoride exposure. © 2017 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Fluctuation of fluoride concentrations in drinking waters: a collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Larsen, M J; Fejerskov, O; Bojen, O; Senderowitz, F; Lambrou, D; Manji, F; Hobdell, M

    1989-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the variations with time in the concentrations of fluoride in drinking water sources in Greenland, Kenya, Greece, Denmark and Ireland. Water samples were collected monthly and shipped to laboratories in Aarhus for electrometric analyses. In Narssaq, Greenland the fluoride concentration of a single piped water supply ranged from 0.3 to 2.8 ppm, the variations being related to climate, precipitation and temperature over the year. Water from the Athi River, Kenya had a fluoride content ranging from 0.3 to 1.2 ppm, the higher concentrations being associated with the dry seasons. The fluoride concentration in piped water from mountain rivers in Mourjes, Greece, ranged over the year between 1.3 to 2.0 ppm, the changes being apparently unrelated to rainfall. Marked variations in fluoride concentrations from 0.5 to over 3.5 ppm were observed in water from artesian wells in Assiros, Greece. In drinking waters from boreholes in Boennerup Strand, Denmark, fluoride concentrations ranged with time from 1.4 to 2.4 ppm, the variations being unrelated to climate or precipitation, while little variation in fluoride concentrations was found in water from boreholes in either Roedvig or Egens, Denmark. Water obtained from two sources of artificially fluoridated water supplies from Ireland showed considerable variations with time, although pooled samples indicated relatively constant levels over the year. The study indicates that the results of single fluoride ion measurement from any given source should not be taken as being a reliable indicator of fluoride exposure from drinking water.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Trace and ultratrace analysis of purified water samples and hydrogen peroxide solutions for phosphorus by flow-injection method.

    PubMed

    Li, Zenhai; Oshima, Mitsuko; Sabarudin, Akhmad; Motomizu, Shoji

    2005-03-01

    A highly sensitive fluorescence-quenching method for the determination of phosphorus based on the formation of an ion associate between molybdophosphate and Rhodamine B (RB) was developed. A simple flow-injection system coupled with a fluorescence detector was used to measure the fluorescence intensity at 560 nm and 580 nm as an excitation and an emission wavelength, respectively. The calibration graph for phosphorus showed a good linearity in the range of (0 - 1) x 10(-7) M (1 M = 1 mol L(-1)), and a detection limit of 1 x 10(-9) M (S/N = 3). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of ultratrace amounts of phosphorus in ultrapurified and purified water samples, and to the determination of trace amounts of phosphorus in commercially-available hydrogen peroxide solutions with satisfactory results.

  1. MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

    1960-01-01

    Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

  2. Gas and hydrogen isotopic analyses of volcanic eruption clouds in Guatemala sampled by aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.I.; Cadle, R.D.; Heidt, L.E.; Friedman, I.; Lazrus, A.L.; Huebert, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Gas samples were collected by aircraft entering volcanic eruption clouds of three Guatemalan volcanoes. Gas chromatographic analyses show higher H2 and S gas contents in ash eruption clouds and lower H2 and S gases in vaporous gas plumes. H isotopic data demonstrate lighter isotopic distribution of water vapor in ash eruption clouds than in vaporous gas plumes. Most of the H2O in the vaporous plumes is probably meteoric. The data are the first direct gas analyses of explosive eruptive clouds, and demonstrate that, in spite of atmospheric admixture, useful compositional information on eruptive gases can be obtained using aircraft. ?? 1980.

  3. Highly hydrogen-sensitive thermal desorption spectroscopy system for quantitative analysis of low hydrogen concentration (∼1 × 10(16) atoms/cm(3)) in thin-film samples.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Taku; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Sakaguchi, Isao; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-05-01

    We developed a highly hydrogen-sensitive thermal desorption spectroscopy (HHS-TDS) system to detect and quantitatively analyze low hydrogen concentrations in thin films. The system was connected to an in situ sample-transfer chamber system, manipulators, and an rf magnetron sputtering thin-film deposition chamber under an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) atmosphere of ∼10(-8) Pa. The following key requirements were proposed in developing the HHS-TDS: (i) a low hydrogen residual partial pressure, (ii) a low hydrogen exhaust velocity, and (iii) minimization of hydrogen thermal desorption except from the bulk region of the thin films. To satisfy these requirements, appropriate materials and components were selected, and the system was constructed to extract the maximum performance from each component. Consequently, ∼2000 times higher sensitivity to hydrogen than that of a commercially available UHV-TDS system was achieved using H(+)-implanted Si samples. Quantitative analysis of an amorphous oxide semiconductor InGaZnO4 thin film (1 cm × 1 cm × 1 μm thickness, hydrogen concentration of 4.5 × 10(17) atoms/cm(3)) was demonstrated using the HHS-TDS system. This concentration level cannot be detected using UHV-TDS or secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) systems. The hydrogen detection limit of the HHS-TDS system was estimated to be ∼1 × 10(16) atoms/cm(3), which implies ∼2 orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than that of SIMS and resonance nuclear reaction systems (∼10(18) atoms/cm(3)).

  4. Carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen in carbonaceous chondrites Abundances and isotopic compositions in bulk samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Whole-rock samples of 25 carbonaceous chondrites were analyzed for contents of C, H and N and delta C-13, delta D and delta N-15. Inhomogeneous distribution of these isotopes within individual meteorites is pronounced in several cases. Few systematic intermeteorite trends were observed; N data are suggestive of isotopic inhomogeneity in the early solar system. Several chondrites revealed unusual compositions which would repay further, more detailed study. The data are also useful for classification of carbonaceous chondrites; N abundance and isotopic compositions can differentiate existing taxonomic groups with close to 100 percent reliability; Al Rais and Renazzo clearly constitute a discrete 'grouplet', and there are hints that both CI and CM groups may each be divisible into two subgroups.

  5. Sampling procedure for the measurement of dissolved hydrogen and volatile fatty acids in the rumen of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Wang, R; Janssen, P H; Zhang, X M; Sun, X Z; Pacheco, D; Tan, Z L

    2016-03-01

    Dissolved hydrogen (dH) influences the pathways of VFA production and is a precursor of methane formation in the rumen. Measurements of dH in rumen fluid taken at the same time as measuring other rumen fermentation end products would improve our quantitative understanding of the role of dH as a controller of rumen fermentation. Sample collections though a rumen cannula and using oral stomach tubing were compared for measurements of dissolved gases and fermentation end products in the rumen fluid of 4 ruminally cannulated dairy cows fed a total mixed ration of corn silage and concentrate. Rumen fluid was collected at 0, 2.5, and 6 h after morning feeding through the cannula from cranial dorsal rumen, cranial ventral rumen, central rumen, caudal dorsal rumen, and caudal ventral rumen and in parallel by oral stomach tubing at 2 insertion depths of 180 cm (sampling the central rumen) and 200 cm (sampling the caudal dorsal rumen). The cranial dorsal rumen had the greatest pH and smallest VFA concentration among 5 sites sampled. Samples collected by oral stomach tubing had greater ( < 0.001) rumen pH and less ( < 0.001) dissolved methane (dCH) and lower VFA concentration than that collected through rumen cannula. The dH concentrations were positively correlated ( > 0.8) in rumen samples collected by the 2 sampling techniques, with a concordance correlation coefficient larger than 0.8 and scale shift being about 0.1 away from unity. The variations in the measurement of dH, dCH, pH, and VFA in samples collected by oral stomach tubing are most likely the result of saliva contamination. The time of sampling relative to feeding had significant influence ( < 0.01) on dissolved gases and fermentation end products, with the greatest concentrations of dH, dCH, and VFA measured 2.5 h after morning feeding. The dH was correlated positively ( > 0.58) with dCH and negatively ( < -0.65) with the estimated net H production relative to the amount of VFA produced. This indicated that

  6. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lippert, F

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the in vitro fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions. Poly(methyl methacrylate) blocks (Perspex, n=3 per group) were painted with 80 ± 5 mg fluoride varnish (n=10) and placed into artificial saliva for 30 min. Then, blocks were placed into either 1% citric acid (pH 2.27) or 0.3% citric acid (pH 3.75) solutions (n=3 per solution and varnish) for 30 min with the solutions being replaced every 5 min. Saliva and acid solutions were analyzed for fluoride content. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA (varnish, solution, time). The three-way interaction was significant (p>0.0001). Fluoride release and release patterns varied considerably between varnishes. Fluoride release in saliva varied by a factor of more than 10 between varnishes. Some varnishes (CavityShield, Nupro, ProFluorid, Vanish) showed higher fluoride release in saliva than during the first 5 min of acid exposure, whereas other varnishes (Acclean, Enamel-Pro, MI Varnish, Vella) showed the opposite behavior. There was little difference between acidic solutions. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes varies considerably and also depends on the dissolution medium. Bearing in mind the limitations of laboratory research, the consumption of acidic drinks after fluoride varnish application should be avoided to optimize the benefit/risk ratio.

  7. Response of grapevines to fluoride under field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, F.

    1983-07-01

    Grapevines (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz) were fumigated in open-top chambers with hydrogen fluoride for 64 days at mean atmospheric fluoride concentrations of 0.17 or 0.28 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/. Other grapevines grown under ambient conditions in the vineyard or maintained in control chambers were exposed to 0.13 or 0.05 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/, respectively. Leaves of grapevines exposed to 0.28, 0.17, 0.13, or 0.05 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/ accumulated up to 85, 55, 20, or 11 ..mu..gFg/sup -1/, respectively. Foliar necrosis was observed on plants exposed to 0.28 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/, but no injury symptoms were observed at 0.17 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/ or in control plants. Grapevines growing under ambient conditions had significantly greater mean bunch weight, peduncle weight, number of grapes per bunch, and leaf protein levels than the fumigated treatments. However, these differences may be associated with a chamber effect rather than with an effect of fluoride on grapevines. No significant differences were found between treatments for grape potential alcohol content, fruit acids, number of bunches or grapes per vine, fresh weight of grapes, or leaf chlorophyll content, despite foliar fluoride concentrations in the highest fluoride fumigation level reaching 85 ..mu..gFg/sup -1/. No evidence was found of significant fluoride accumulation in berries or canes. 26 references, 4 tables.

  8. Intake and metabolism of fluoride.

    PubMed

    Whitford, G M

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the major factors that determine the body burden of inorganic fluoride. Fluoride intake 25 or more years ago was determined mainly by measurement of the concentration of the ion in the drinking water supply. This is not necessarily true today because of ingestion from fluoride-containing dental products, the "halo effect", the consumption of bottled water, and the use of water purification systems in the home. Therefore, the concentration of fluoride in drinking water may not be a reliable indicator of previous intake. Under most conditions, fluoride is rapidly and extensively absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. The rate of gastric absorption is inversely related to the pH of the gastric contents. Overall absorption is reduced by calcium and certain other cations and by elevated plasma fluoride levels. Fluoride removal from plasma occurs by calcified tissue uptake and urinary excretion. About 99% of the body burden of fluoride is associated with calcified tissues, and most of it is not exchangeable. In general, the clearance of fluoride from plasma by the skeleton is inversely related to the stage of skeletal development. Skeletal uptake, however, can be positive or negative, depending on the level of fluoride intake, hormonal status, and other factors. Dentin fluoride concentrations tend to increase throughout life and appear to be similar to those in bone. Research to determine whether dentin is a reliable biomarker for the body burden of fluoride is recommended. The renal clearance of fluoride is high compared with other halogens. It is directly related to urinary pH. Factors that acidify the urine increase the retention of fluoride and vice versa. The renal clearance of fluoride decreases and tissue levels increase when the glomerular filtration rate is depressed on a chronic basis.

  9. [Fluoride content of table salt in Mexico City].

    PubMed

    Maupomé Carvantes, G; Jaramillo Lanchero, R D; Andrade Delgado, L C; Juárez Reyes, P L; López Pérez, R; Sánchez Navarro, W; Sánchez Pérez, L; Vásquez Obregón, V H

    1995-09-01

    The fluoride content of a sample of bags of salt for sale in Mexico City was measured in order to estimate the proportion of marketed salt that contained the quantity of fluoride set by the National Program for Prevention of Dental Caries through Consumption of Fluoridated Table Salt. The effectiveness of that program had never been evaluated. In March 1993, bags of salt were obtained from 70 of the 3544 neighborhoods that make up Mexico City. The stores were selected by simple random sampling. Salt was likewise purchased from 20% of the 146 supermarkets and self-service stores in the city, also selected as a random sample. Then, blind measurement was done of the fluoride content of 221 bags of salt. The true content of this element was often found to be below the amount called for by the government. In addition, it did not coincide with the quantity indicated on the package label, which is a violation of the law.

  10. Fluoride in water consumed by children in remote areas of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chuckpaiwong, S; Nakornchai, S; Surarit, R; Soo-ampon, S; Kasetsuwan, R

    2000-06-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze fluoride content in water for drinking and for use in remote areas of Thailand. Water was sampled from schools and villages along the border by Multiple Stratified Cluster Random Sampling. Fluoride levels of 214 water samples from 48 schools and 48 villages were assessed in triplicate by fluoride ion electrode. The fluoride content in different regions and types of water were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test at a significance level of 0.05. Results showed that fluoride in drinking water and water for use from the schools and villages were 0.01-0.37 ppm, 0.01-0.19 ppm, 0.01-0.87 ppm and 0.01-0.92 ppm, respectively. There was no difference in fluoride content in drinking water from various regions (p=0.23). However, there was a statistical difference in fluoride level in water for use (p=0.04, p=0.01) in various regions. The highest fluoride content was found in samples from the central and eastern region (0.19+/-0.24 ppm and 0.29+/-0.28 ppm respectively). When comparing types of water, ie ground water, surface water and rain water, there were differences in fluoride content (p=0.0). Underground water had the highest fluoride content (0.31+/-0.23 ppm).

  11. Risk perception and water fluoridation support and opposition in Australia.

    PubMed

    Armfield, Jason Mathew; Akers, Harry Francis

    2010-01-01

    A considerable body of evidence confirms that water fluoridation effectively reduces the community incidence of dental caries with minimal side effects. However, proposals to introduce this widely endorsed public-health measure are often perceived as controversial, and public opinion frequently plays a role in the outcome. Despite this, the public's perception of risk associated with water fluoridation has not been well researched and remains poorly understood. Our objectives were to determine whether risk perceptions reflecting various "outrage" factors are associated with water fluoridation support and opposition. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire survey of a national sample of 517 Australian adults (response rate = 34.7 percent) aged 18-92 years. Approximately 70.5 percent of respondents supported water fluoridation, with 15.1 percent opposed and 14.3 percent neutral. Sixteen of the 20 assessed outrage factors were significantly associated with water fluoridation stance in the predicted direction, with greater outrage being related to increased water fluoridation opposition. An overall outrage index computed from the 16 significant outrage factors accounted for a statistically significant 58 percent of the variance in water fluoridation stance beyond the effects of age, gender, socioeconomic status, and age and presence of children. Outrage factors are important aspects of the public's perception of risk in relation to water fluoridation. Given that water fluoridation appears to be a low-risk, high-outrage controversy, efforts to mitigate the level of public outrage, rather than continuing to deny possible hazards, may offer a worthwhile strategy in gaining public acceptance for the extension of water fluoridation.

  12. Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Windt, N.F.; Williams, J.L.

    In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel contianing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

  13. Level of Fluoride in Soil, Grain and Water in Jalgaon District, Maharashtra, India

    PubMed Central

    Dodamani, Arun Suresh; Vishwakarma, Prashanth; Jadhav, Harish Chaitram; Khairnar, Mahesh Ravindra; Deshmukh, Manjiri Abhay; Wadgave, Umesh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Fluoride has an influence on both oral as well as systemic health. The major source of fluoride to body is through drinking water as well as through diet. Staple diet mainly depends on local environmental factors, food grains grown locally, its availability etc. Determination of fluoride level in these food grains is important. So, estimation of the amount of fluoride in grains and its relation to the sources of fluoride used for their cultivation viz., soil and water is important. Aim To estimate the relation of fluoride concentration in grains (Jowar) with respect to that of soil and water used for their cultivation. Materials and Methods Fifteen samples each of soil, water and grains were collected using standardized method from the same farm fields of randomly selected villages of Jalgaon district. Fluoride ion concentration was determined in laboratory using SPADNS technique. Mean difference in fluoride levels in between the groups were analyzed using ANOVA and Post-Hoc Tukey test. Linear regression method was applied to analyse the association of the fluoride content of grain with water and soil. Results There was a significant difference in between mean fluoride levels of soil and water (p<0.001) and in between soil and grain (p<0.001); however, difference in between mean fluoride levels of water and grain was found to be non significant (p=0.591). Also fluoride levels in all the three groups showed significant association with each other. Conclusion Fluoride level of soil, grains and water should be adjusted to an optimum level. Soil has positive correlation with respect to uptake of fluoride by Jowar grains. So, Jowar grains with optimum fluoride content should be made available in the commercial markets so that oral and general health can be benefitted. PMID:28384970

  14. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  15. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    PubMed

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride.

  16. [Elimination of fluoride in urine during fluoridation of salt and drinking water].

    PubMed

    Wespi, H J; Bürgi, W

    1982-07-17

    From 552 ambulatory gynecological patients in different parts of Switzerland the urinary excretion of fluorine was measured. The patients were classified into 4 groups according to origin: (1) 84 women were from the Canton Basel-Stadt. In this city water has been fluoridated since 1962; (2) 139 women from Canton Glarus. In this area a pilot study was under way using table and baker's salt, to both of which 250 mg F/kg had been added; (3) 128 women from Canton Aargau who were using a low dose fluoridated salt (90 mg F/kg); (4) 201 patients from Cantons Aargau and Tessin respectively who were consuming neither fluoridated water or salt acted as controls. Quantitation of ionized fluorine in urine was performed by means of the fluoride ion sensitive electrode in afternoon urine samples, thus eliminating the influence of sex difference and diurnal rhythm in fluorine excretion. The molar urinary fluorine concentration was related to the corresponding urinary creatinine concentration and expressed as mumol F per mmol creatinine. The fluoridation of salt or water was considered ideal when the excretion factor amounted to 6.29 mumol X mmol-1. The most important finding was that the Glarus females excrete higher levels of fluorine than the patients from Basel, though the difference was no significant. The fluoridation of salt with 90 mg F/kg is followed by an increase of the excretion factor from 2.58 to 3.65 mumol X mmol-1. It could also be demonstrated that in Canton Glarus, where salt with higher fluorine content is used, the excretion coefficient remains below the level believed to be toxic in the long run. It is concluded that salt fluoridation with 250 gm F/kg is safe. Furthermore, the excretion of fluorine in the control group seems to confirm that fluorine is a trace element of ubiquitous occurrence even excreted in urine of individuals who deliberately avoid fluorine as an additive to table salt or water.

  17. Ion-chromatographic determination of chloride and fluoride in electrolyte from the halogen tin-plating process.

    PubMed

    Korth, W; Ellis, J

    1984-06-01

    A simple and rapid procedure is proposed for the determination of chloride and free fluoride in tin electroplating fluid. Suppressor-column ion-chromatography is used after oxidation of hexafluorostannate(II) to hexafluorostannate(IV) with hydrogen peroxide. Concurrent determination of tin(II) and total tin then allows calculation of the concentrations of fluoride, hexafluorostannate(II) and hexafluorostannate(IV).

  18. Ferrimyoglobin-Fluoride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an experiment which is designed to investigate the reaction of the protein ferrimyoglobin with fluoride. The activity uses readily available apparatus and the technique of optical absorbance for measurement of concentrations. Experimental design, procedures, and treatment of the equilibrium data are detailed. (CW)

  19. Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    relatively low refractive Indices in the visible range of about 1.5-1.9 and fairly good chemical resistance towards water and weak acids. Their...particularly interesting to compare with crystalline fluorides (Refs. 25, 37) such as 7800 spinel-type Li2NiF4 ; 7700 rutile-type NiF2 ; 7500 perovskite-type

  20. Fluorine (soluble fluoride)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fluorine ( soluble fluoride ) ; CASRN 7782 - 41 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  1. Ferrimyoglobin-Fluoride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an experiment which is designed to investigate the reaction of the protein ferrimyoglobin with fluoride. The activity uses readily available apparatus and the technique of optical absorbance for measurement of concentrations. Experimental design, procedures, and treatment of the equilibrium data are detailed. (CW)

  2. Other Fluoride Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... About CDC.gov . Oral Health home Oral Health Basics Children's Oral Health Protecting Your Child's Teeth Brush Up on Healthy Teeth Adult Oral Health ... concentration of fluoride in a small amount of material in close contact with the teeth for many hours. Varnishes must be reapplied at ...

  3. Salt fluoridation and oral health.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the caries-protective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%). In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67%) and Switzerland (85%). In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  4. Sensitivity of two biomarkers for biomonitoring exposure to fluoride in children and women: A study in a volcanic area.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Diana Paula Silva; Garcia, Patrícia Ventura; Amaral, Leslie; Ferreira, Teresa; Cury, Jaime A; Vieira, Waldomiro; Rodrigues, Armindo Dos Santos

    2016-07-01

    The natural enrichment of water with fluoride is related to natural sources such as volcanic activity, with it being documented that fluorosis, an endemic and widespread disease in volcanic areas, is associated to the ingestion of high levels of fluoride through water. Thus, in this study, we aimed to define the fluoride concentration in drinking waters of volcanic origin and compare the sensitivity of urine and nail clippings as biomarkers for fluoride exposure in adults and children. Samples of drinking water from four villages in São Miguel Island (Azores) were used and the fluoride concentration was determined, as well the fluoride content in urine and toenails clippings from 66 children and 63 adults from these villages. A validated diet questionnaire, assessing sources of fluoride, was recorded for each participant. The fluoride determination in urine and nail clipping samples was made using a fluoride-specific electrode. A positive correlation was found between the fluoride daily intake and fluoride content in children urine (rs = 0.475; p < 0.001) and in their nail clippings (rs = 0.475; p < 0.001), while in adult women, the fluoride daily intake correlated positively with fluoride content nail clippings (rs = 0.495, p < 0.001). This reveals that nail clippings are more reliable as biomarkers of chronic exposure to fluoride than urine for populations of different ages (children vs. adults). Furthermore, nail clippings are more suitable than urine fluoride levels to assess long term exposure to fluoride in areas where the exposure to fluoride in drinking water is considered within, or slightly above, the recommended legal values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B; Zholobak, Nadezhda M; Baranchikov, Alexander E; Ryabova, Anastasia V; Ivanov, Vladimir K

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF3:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF3 nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Crystal structure of μ-fluorido-bis­{(η4-cyclo­octa­diene)[hexa­fluorido­anti­monato(V)]platinum(II)} hexa­fluorido­anti­monate(V) hydrogen fluoride 0.75-solvate1

    PubMed Central

    Seppelt, Konrad; Friedemann, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In the complex cation of the binuclear solvated title salt, [Pt2F(SbF6)2(C8H12)2]SbF6·0.75HF, an F atom bridges the two platinum(II) atoms with a bond angle of 123.3 (2)°. The corresponding Pt—F bond lengths are in the range of other fluorine-bridged binuclear platinum(II) complexes. Two of the three SbF6 − anions each coordinate with one F atom to one platinum(II) atom. Including the η4-bound cyclo­octa­diene (COD) ligands, the overall coordination sphere of each platinum(II) atom is square-planar. The third SbF6 − anion is not bound to the complex. Hydrogen fluoride is present in the crystal structure as a solvent disordered over three positions, each with an occupancy of 0.25. F⋯F distances of 2.5512 (7), 2.6076 (8) and 3.2215 (10) Å to surrounding SbF6 − anions are indicative of F—H⋯F hydrogen-bonding inter­actions although no H atoms could be localized for the disordered solvent mol­ecules. The resulting hydrogen-bonded network is three-dimensional. PMID:26870575

  7. Mapping of fluoride endemic areas and assessment of fluoride exposure.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopalan; Jaswanth, A; Gopalakrishnan, S; Siva ilango, S

    2009-02-15

    The prevalence of fluorosis is mainly due to the consumption of more fluoride through drinking water. It is necessary to find out the fluoride endemic areas to adopt remedial measures to the people on the risk of fluorosis. The objectives of this study are to estimate the fluoride exposure through drinking water from people of different age group and to elucidate the fluoride endemic areas through mapping. Assessment of fluoride exposure was achieved through the estimation fluoride level in drinking water using fluoride ion selective electrode method. Google earth and isopleth technique were used for mapping of fluoride endemic areas. From the study it was observed that Nilakottai block of Dindigul district in Tamil Nadu is highly fluoride endemic. About 88% of the villages in this block have fluoride level more than the prescribed permissible limit in drinking water. Exposure of fluoride among different age groups was calculated in this block, which comprises 32 villages. The maximum estimated exposure doses were 0.19 mg/kg/day for infants, 0.17 mg/kg/day for children and 0.10 mg/kg/day for adults. When compared with adequate intake of minimal safe level exposure dose of 0.01 mg/kg/day for infants and 0.05 mg/kg/day for other age groups, a health risk due to fluorosis to the people in Nilakottai block has become evident. From the results, the people in Nilakottai block are advised to consume drinking water with fluoride level less than 1 mg/l. It has been recommended to the government authorities to take serious steps to supply drinking water with low fluoride concern for the fluorosis affected villages.

  8. Fluoride intake in children living in a high-fluoride area in Ethiopia - intake through beverages.

    PubMed

    Malde, M K; Zerihun, L; Julshamn, K; Bjorvatn, K

    2003-01-01

    The present study was conducted in Wonji Shoa, a sugar estate in the Ethiopian Rift Valley. Drinking water in the area is provided either by the Awash River or by high-fluoride ground water wells. Defluoridation plants have been installed, but are not in regular use, and fluorosis, dental as well as skeletal, is endemic. The aim of this study was to assess daily fluoride intake from drinking water and beverages in children from neighbouring villages with varying fluoride concentration in the drinking water. Thirty families were selected from two of the plantation villages (A and K). The criterion for being included in the project was the presence in the household of at least one child, fully weaned and below the age of 5 years. For sampling of beverages, the duplicate portion technique was used. The fluoride concentration in the beverage samples was determined using standard methods, using a fluoride ion-selective electrode. Ten of the selected households in Village A fetched water from the Awash River (1.8 mg F-/L) while five relied upon water from a local well (2.1 mg F-/L). All 15 households in Village K used water from a local well with fluoride concentration of 14.4 mg/L. The mean daily fluoride intake from drinking water and beverages during the four days, varied from 1.2 to 1.5 mg and 5.9 to 8.8 mg in Village A and K, respectively. Low variety in types of beverages consumed was reported both during the study period and through the questionnaire. Only local water was used for beverage preparation. Children who consumed milk had a reduced fluoride intake. Tea, which was part of the children's diet, was not found to be a main source of fluoride. A2n effective defluoridation of the drinking water or a change of water source would seem to be the only options for avoidance of dental and possibly skeletal fluorosis.

  9. Fluoride in drinking water and human urine in Southern Haryana, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupinder; Gaur, Shalini; Garg, V K

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the fluoride content in drinking water and urine samples of adolescent males aged 11-16 years living in Southern Haryana, India. A total of 30 drinking water sources in the studied habitations were assessed for fluoride contamination. Fluoride was estimated in the urine of 400 male children randomly selected from these habitations. The fluoride concentration in drinking water and urine samples was determined using USEPA fluoride ion selective electrode method. The mean fluoride concentration in drinking water samples of Pataudi, Haily Mandi and Harsaru villages was 1.68+/-0.35, 3.22+/-1.18 and 1.78+/-0.12 mg/l, respectively. The mean urinary fluoride concentration was 2.26+/-0.024 mg/l at Pataudi, 2.48+/-0.77 mg/l at Haily Mandi and 2.43+/-0.84 mg/l at Harsaru village. The higher fluoride levels in the urine of children may be associated to higher fluoride levels in drinking water. The accuracy of measurements was assessed with known addition method in water and urine. Mean fluoride recovery was 98.0 and 99.1% in water and urine. The levels obtained were reproducible with in +/-3% error limit.

  10. On-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples using elemental chromium: an extension for high temperature elemental-analyzer techniques.

    PubMed

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Gilevska, Tetyana; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Meijer, Harro A J; Brand, Willi A; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature conversion (HTC) technique using an elemental analyzer with a glassy carbon tube and filling (temperature conversion/elemental analysis, TC/EA) is a widely used method for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water and many solid and liquid organic samples with analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method may produce inaccurate δ(2)H results, with values deviating by more than 20 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1‰) from the true value for some materials. We show that a single-oven, chromium-filled elemental analyzer coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability for hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic substances (Cr-EA method). Hot chromium maximizes the yield of molecular hydrogen in a helium carrier gas by irreversibly and quantitatively scavenging all reactive elements except hydrogen. In contrast, under TC/EA conditions, heteroelements like nitrogen or chlorine (and other halogens) can form hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen chloride (HCl) and this can cause isotopic fractionation. The Cr-EA technique thus expands the analytical possibilities for on-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples significantly. This method yielded reproducibility values (1-sigma) for δ(2)H measurements on water and caffeine samples of better than 1.0 and 0.5 mUr, respectively. To overcome handling problems with water as the principal calibration anchor for hydrogen isotopic measurements, we have employed an effective and simple strategy using reference waters or other liquids sealed in silver-tube segments. These crimped silver tubes can be employed in both the Cr-EA and TC/EA techniques. They simplify considerably the normalization of hydrogen-isotope measurement data to the VSMOW-SLAP (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water-Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, and their use improves accuracy of the data by eliminating evaporative loss and associated isotopic fractionation while

  11. On-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples using elemental chromium: An extension for high temperature elemental-analyzer techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Gilevska, Tetyana; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Meijer, Harro A.J.; Brand, Willi A.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature conversion (HTC) technique using an elemental analyzer with a glassy carbon tube and filling (temperature conversion/elemental analysis, TC/EA) is a widely used method for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water and many solid and liquid organic samples with analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method may produce inaccurate δ2H results, with values deviating by more than 20 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1‰) from the true value for some materials. We show that a single-oven, chromium-filled elemental analyzer coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability for hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic substances (Cr-EA method). Hot chromium maximizes the yield of molecular hydrogen in a helium carrier gas by irreversibly and quantitatively scavenging all reactive elements except hydrogen. In contrast, under TC/EA conditions, heteroelements like nitrogen or chlorine (and other halogens) can form hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen chloride (HCl) and this can cause isotopic fractionation. The Cr-EA technique thus expands the analytical possibilities for on-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples significantly. This method yielded reproducibility values (1-sigma) for δ2H measurements on water and caffeine samples of better than 1.0 and 0.5 mUr, respectively. To overcome handling problems with water as the principal calibration anchor for hydrogen isotopic measurements, we have employed an effective and simple strategy using reference waters or other liquids sealed in silver-tube segments. These crimped silver tubes can be employed in both the Cr-EA and TC/EA techniques. They simplify considerably the normalization of hydrogen-isotope measurement data to the VSMOW-SLAP (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water-Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, and their use improves accuracy of the data by eliminating evaporative loss and associated isotopic fractionation while

  12. Chemical Composition and Microhardness of Human Enamel Treated with Fluoridated Whintening Agents. A Study in Situ

    PubMed Central

    Petta, Thais de Mendonça; do Socorro Batista de Lima Gomes, Yasmin; Antunes Esteves, Renata; do Carmo Freitas Faial, Kelson; Souza D`Almeida Couto, Roberta; Martins Silva, Cecy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dental whitening has been increasingly sought out to improve dental aesthetics, but may cause chemical and morphological changes in dental enamel surfaces. Objective: Assess in situ the effects of high-concentration hydrogen peroxide with and without fluoride on human dental enamel using the ion chromatography test (IC) and the Knoop hardness test (KHN). Material and Methods: Nineteen enamel specimens were prepared using third human molars. These specimens were fixed on molars of volunteers and were divided into groups: OP38-Opalescence Boost PF38%, PO37-Pola Office 37.5% and CO-Control group. For chemical analysis (n= 3), the dentin layer was removed, keeping only the enamel, which was subjected to acidic digestion by microwave radiation. It was necessary to perform sample dilutions for the elements fluorine (F), calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) for quantification using the IC test. The KHN (n= 5) was performed before and after the treatments. Five indentations were made, separated by 100 µm, for each specimen using a load of 25 gf for 5 seconds in the microdurometer. The data were analyzed using ANOVA with a 5% significance level. Results: The OP38 group had the largest concentrations of F, Ca and P ions. The PO37 group showed the lowest concentrations of F and Ca ions. The average KHN was not significantly different between the OP38 and PO37 groups. Conclusion: Enamel whitened with hydrogen peroxide containing fluoride had greater concentrations of F, Ca and P ions. The presence of fluoride in the whitening agent did not influence the enamel microhardness. PMID:28405245

  13. [Operational control of water fluoridation in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Maia, Lucianne Cople; Valença, Ana Maria Gondim; Soares, Eduardo Lúcio; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the operational control of water fluoridation at the city water supply plant in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from January to December 2000. The water treatment supervisor filled out a questionnaire on the control of water fluoridation. In addition, water samples were collected every two weeks for fluoride analysis before and after treatment. Samples were analyzed by an independent laboratory using an ion-specific electrode. According to the water treatment supervisor, the entire process for controlling fluoride concentration in the water was rigorous and complied with Brazilian guidelines, but according to testing, 96% of samples were inadequate in terms of risks/benefits of fluoride use from water. The information obtained from the plant supervisor and the test data were thus mutually inconsistent. Based on these data, an independent water fluoride concentration control program is needed to ensure the benefits of dental caries prevention for the population.

  14. Histopathological changes of renal tissue following sodium fluoride administration in two consecutive generations of mice. Correlation with the urinary elimination of fluoride.

    PubMed

    Dimcevici Poesina, Nicoleta; Bălălău, Cristian; Nimigean, Vanda Roxana; Nimigean, Victor; Ion, Ion; Baconi, Daniela; Bârcă, Maria; Băran Poesina, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the toxic effects (evaluated as histopathological changes) of sodium fluoride on the kidney in two consecutive generations of NMRI mice. An attempt to correlate the toxicity with the urinary elimination of fluoride has been made, as urinary fluoride excretion has been widely used as an indicator of fluoride intake and exposure. Six mixed (males and females) animal groups have been constituted by dividing the populations of mice derived from pregnant females (named "mothers" 0.5 mg sodium fluoride) treated with 0.5 mg sodium fluoride by daily gavage and pregnant females (named "mothers" 0.25 mg sodium fluoride) treated with 0.25 mg sodium fluoride by daily gavage; three types of sodium fluoride treatments were administrated: homeopathic, allopathic-homeopathic and allopathic. When the animals reached the adulthood, by randomization, they were selected in pairs for giving birth to the second generation of mice. No treatments were administrated to the second generation of mice; thus, the urinary elimination of fluoride in the second generation is attributed to exposure at sodium fluoride before birth. The administration of sodium fluoride to the first generation (F1) is realized until the mice reached the adulthood. For the first generation, the urine was collected at three times, every three weeks: at the age of four weeks, seven weeks and 11 weeks; single sampling urine, at the age of four weeks, has been conducted for the second generation. The urine samples have been analyzed using the ion selective electrode method for fluoride. For the histopathological examination, the animals were killed by cervical dislocation; the kidneys were collected in a 10% formalin solution. The preparation of samples for optical microscopy was realized with Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. The results indicate that the elimination of fluoride was similar (at the second evaluation, at 7-week-old of the first generation) for the both generations

  15. Magnesium and fluoride distribution in human cementum with age.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, S; Nakagaki, H; Takami, Y; Eba, H; Kirkham, J; Robinson, C

    2000-12-01

    Sixty-two human teeth, obtained from subjects aged 11 to 80 years, were used to determine the magnesium and fluoride concentration and distribution with age in human cementum. Transverse sections were prepared from the root region of teeth. Samples, each 30 microm thick, were abraded in sequence from the cementum surface and the cemento-dentine junction by an abrasive micro-sampling technique. Magnesium concentrations were lower in the cementum surface, and increased towards the cemento-dentine junction (CDJ), while fluoride concentrations were higher in cementum surfaces and tended to decrease towards CDJ. Fluoride distribution patterns were similar to that reported earlier while average fluoride concentration increased with age, however, either no change or decreasing tendencies were observed with magnesium.

  16. Health Effects Associated with Water Fluoridation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Virginia L.

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is presented concerning fluoridation of water supplies. Correlation between fluoride in drinking water and improved dental health is reviewed. Relationship is expressed between fluoridation and reduced tooth decay. Use of fluoride in treating skeletal disorders is discussed. Author advocates fluoridating water supplies. (SA)

  17. Use of fluorides in dental caries management.

    PubMed

    Chu, C H; Mei, May L; Lo, Edward C M

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride is commonly and widely used to prevent and even arrest caries. The clinical effects of fluorides depend on the chemical compounds utilized and the methods used to apply the fluoride ion to the surface of the tooth. Fluorosis has been reported in conjunction with increased doses of fluoride. A coordinated approach to fluoride delivery is essential to avoid the risk of fluorosis.

  18. Health Effects Associated with Water Fluoridation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Virginia L.

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is presented concerning fluoridation of water supplies. Correlation between fluoride in drinking water and improved dental health is reviewed. Relationship is expressed between fluoridation and reduced tooth decay. Use of fluoride in treating skeletal disorders is discussed. Author advocates fluoridating water supplies. (SA)

  19. Comparative study of fluoride released and recharged from conventional pit and fissure sealants versus surface prereacted glass ionomer technology

    PubMed Central

    Salmerón-Valdés, Elias Nahum; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J; Alanis-Tavira, Jorge; Morales-Luckie, Raúl Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Context: The fluoride release of sealants in vitro shows a marked decrease. Giomers are distinguishable from manufactured resin-based sealants and contain prereacted glass-ionomer particles (PRG). Aims: To compare the amounts of fluoride released from the main pit and fissure of a resin-based sealant with that from a Giomer and to assess the abilities of the sealant and the Giomer to recharge when exposed to regular use of fluoride rinse. Materials and Methods: The readings for the fluoride concentration were carried out for 60 days using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. After this period, the samples were recharged using a fluoride mouth rinse. The amount of fluoride released after this recharge was determined for 5 days. The data were analyzed using Student's t- and analysis of variance tests. Results: In general, all materials presented higher fluoride release in the first 24 h; G1 and G4 showed a higher fluoride release in this period. On the other hand, G3 and G1 presented the most constant fluoride release until the 8th day, wherein all the sealants considerably decreased in the amount of fluoride released. Conclusion: G1 and G3 released higher concentrations of fluoride, although no significant differences were found. Giomers recharged in the first 24 h after polymerization presented an improved and sustained fluoride release. PMID:26957792

  20. Water fluoridation and oral health.

    PubMed

    Harding, Máiréad Antoinette; O'Mullane, Denis Martin

    2013-11-01

    Water fluoridation, is the controlled addition of fluoride to the water supply, with the aim of reducing the prevalence of dental caries. Current estimates suggest that approximately 370 million people in 27 countries consume fluoridated water, with an additional 50 million consuming water in which fluoride is naturally occurring. A pre-eruptive effect of fluoride exists in reducing caries levels in pit and fissure surfaces of permanent teeth and fluoride concentrated in plaque and saliva inhibits the demineralisation of sound enamel and enhances the remineralisation of demineralised enamel. A large number of studies conducted worldwide demonstrate the effectiveness of water fluoridation. Objections to water fluoridation have been raised since its inception and centre mainly on safety and autonomy. Systematic reviews of the safety and efficacy of water fluoridation attest to its safety and efficacy; dental fluorosis identified as the only adverse outcome. Water fluoridation is an effective safe means of preventing dental caries, reaching all populations, irrespective of the presence of other dental services. Regular monitoring of dental caries and fluorosis is essential particularly with the lifelong challenge which dental caries presents. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  1. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornett, R. J.; Kazi, Z. H.; Zhao, X.-L.; Chartrand, M. G.; Charles, R. J.; Kieser, W. E.

    2015-10-01

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF3. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF3 precipitates were diluted about 6-8 fold with PbF2. The measured concentrations of 239,240Pu and 241Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of 239,240Pu and 241Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  2. Coarse-Grained Conformational Sampling of Protein Structure Improves the Fit to Experimental Hydrogen-Exchange Data.

    PubMed

    Devaurs, Didier; Antunes, Dinler A; Papanastasiou, Malvina; Moll, Mark; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Kavraki, Lydia E

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) undergone by a protein in solution produces experimental data that translates into valuable information about the protein's structure. Data produced by HDX experiments is often interpreted using a crystal structure of the protein, when available. However, it has been shown that the correspondence between experimental HDX data and crystal structures is often not satisfactory. This creates difficulties when trying to perform a structural analysis of the HDX data. In this paper, we evaluate several strategies to obtain a conformation providing a good fit to the experimental HDX data, which is a premise of an accurate structural analysis. We show that performing molecular dynamics simulations can be inadequate to obtain such conformations, and we propose a novel methodology involving a coarse-grained conformational sampling approach instead. By extensively exploring the intrinsic flexibility of a protein with this approach, we produce a conformational ensemble from which we extract a single conformation providing a good fit to the experimental HDX data. We successfully demonstrate the applicability of our method to four small and medium-sized proteins.

  3. Coarse-Grained Conformational Sampling of Protein Structure Improves the Fit to Experimental Hydrogen-Exchange Data

    PubMed Central

    Devaurs, Didier; Antunes, Dinler A.; Papanastasiou, Malvina; Moll, Mark; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.; Kavraki, Lydia E.

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) undergone by a protein in solution produces experimental data that translates into valuable information about the protein's structure. Data produced by HDX experiments is often interpreted using a crystal structure of the protein, when available. However, it has been shown that the correspondence between experimental HDX data and crystal structures is often not satisfactory. This creates difficulties when trying to perform a structural analysis of the HDX data. In this paper, we evaluate several strategies to obtain a conformation providing a good fit to the experimental HDX data, which is a premise of an accurate structural analysis. We show that performing molecular dynamics simulations can be inadequate to obtain such conformations, and we propose a novel methodology involving a coarse-grained conformational sampling approach instead. By extensively exploring the intrinsic flexibility of a protein with this approach, we produce a conformational ensemble from which we extract a single conformation providing a good fit to the experimental HDX data. We successfully demonstrate the applicability of our method to four small and medium-sized proteins. PMID:28344973

  4. Mapping of fluoride endemic areas and correlation studies of fluoride with other quality parameters of drinking water of Veppanapalli block of Dharmapuri district in Tamil Nadu.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, G; Sundarraj, A Shunmuga; Elango, K P

    2003-10-01

    193 drinking water samples from water sources of 27 panchayats of Veppanapalli block of Dharmapuri district of Tamil Nadu were analysed for chemical quality parameters. Based on the fluoride content of the water sources, fluoride maps differentiating regions with high / low fluoride levels were prepared using Isopleth mapping technique. The interdependence among the important chemical quality parameters were assessed using correlation studies. The experimental results of the application of linear and multiple regression equations on the influence of hardness, alkalinity, total dissolved solids and pH on fluoride are discussed.

  5. Fluoride ion release and solubility of fluoride enriched interim cements.

    PubMed

    Lewinstein, Israel; Block, Jonathan; Melamed, Guy; Dolev, Eran; Matalon, Shlomo; Ormianer, Zeev

    2014-08-01

    Interim and definitive restorations cemented with interim cements for a prolonged interval are susceptible to bacterial infiltration and caries formation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the long-term fluoride release and solubility of aged ZnO-based interim cements enriched separately with 0.4% NaF and SnF2. Four different brands of cements (Tempbond, Tempbond NE, Procem, and Freegenol) were tested for fluoride release and solubility. For every test, 6 disk specimens of each cement with NaF and SnF2, and 6 with no fluoride enrichment (control) were fabricated, for a total of 72 specimens. The disks were incubated in deionized water. Fluoride ion release was recorded at 1, 7, 14, 21, 63, 91, and 182 days. Solubility was calculated as weight percent after 90 days of incubation. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance with repeated measures and the Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc test (P<.05). Cements mixed with fluorides released fluoride ions for at least 182 days. Cements mixed with NaF released more fluoride ions than those mixed with SnF2 (P<.001). The cumulative release rates from all the tested cements mixed with either NaF or SnF2 were linear with respect to t(½) (r>.97), indicating a diffusion-controlled fluoride release. Cement and fluoride types were the main affecting factors in fluoride ion release. The addition of fluorides slightly increased the solubility of the cements. Given their long-term sustained and diffusive controlled release, these fluorides, particularly NaF when mixed with ZnO-based interim cements, may be useful for caries prevention under provisionally cemented restorations. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A review on fluoride varnishes: an alternative topical fluoride treatment.

    PubMed

    Clark, D C

    1982-06-01

    The in vitro, in vivo and clinical research on topical fluoride varnishes in surveyed. The probable mechanisms of action for fluoride varnishes is discussed and this effect demonstrated from the results of in vitro and in vivo research. Findings from clinical studies are summarized and selected results are used to estimate expected preventive effects from the treatment. The practical advantages and limitations of fluoride varnishes are also reviewed and indications for the future used of these preventive agents are considered.

  7. Spatial distribution mapping of drinking water fluoride levels in Karnataka, India: fluoride-related health effects.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Chitta R; Shahnawaz, Khijmatgar; Kumari, Divya; Chowdhury, Avidyuti; Bedi, Raman; Lynch, Edward; Harding, Stewart; Grootveld, Martin

    2016-11-01

    (1) To estimate the concentrations of fluoride in drinking water throughout different zones and districts of the state of Karnataka. (2) To investigate the variation of fluoride concentration in drinking water from different sources, and its relationships to daily temperature and rainfall status in the regional districts. (3) To develop an updated fluoride concentration intensity map of the state of Karnataka, and to evaluate these data in the context of fluoride-related health effects such as fluorosis and their prevalence. Aqueous standard solutions of 10, 100 and 1,000 ppm fluoride (F(-)) were prepared with analytical grade Na(+)/F(-) and a buffer; TISAB II was incorporated in both calibration standard and analysis solutions in order to remove the potentially interfering effects of trace metal ions. This analysis was performed using an ion-selective electrode (ISE), and mean determination readings for n = 5 samples collected at each Karnataka water source were recorded. The F(-) concentration in drinking water in Karnataka state was found to vary substantially, with the highest mean values recorded being in the north-eastern zone (1.61 ppm), and the lowest in the south-western one (only 0.41 ppm). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that there were very highly significant 'between-zone' and 'between-districts-within-zones' sources of variation (p < 10(-5)-10(-9)), results consistent with a substantial spatial variance of water source F(-) levels within this state. The southern part of Karnataka has low levels of F(-) in its drinking water, and may require fluoridation treatment in order to mitigate for dental caries and further ailments related to fluoride deficiency. However, districts within the north-eastern region have contrastingly high levels of fluoride, an observation which has been linked to dental and skeletal fluorosis. This highlights a major requirement for interventional actions in order to ensure maintenance of the recommended

  8. Associations among dental caries experience, fluorosis, and fluoride exposure from drinking water sources in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    AlDosari, Abdullah M; Akpata, Enosakhare S; Khan, Nazeer

    2010-01-01

    a) To correlate fluoride levels in drinking water sources with caries experience and dental fluorosis in Saudi Arabia, and suggest appropriate fluoride concentration for drinking water in the country. Fluoride levels were determined from 3,629 samples obtained from drinking water sources in 11 regions of Saudi Arabia. Based on the fluoride concentrations, a stratified sample of subjects aged 6-7, 12-13, and 15-18 years was obtained from the regions. A total of 12,200 selected subjects were examined for dental caries according to the World Health Organization criteria, and dental fluorosis, using Thylstrup and Fejerskov classification. There was an inverse relationship between fluoride exposure and caries experience, but the prevalence of dental fluorosis increased with increase in fluoride concentration. There was no significant difference in caries experience or in the prevalence of dental fluorosis when fluoride levels increased from 0.3 ppm to 0.6 ppm. In contrast, caries experience was lower, while severity of fluorosis was significantly higher at fluoride levels above 0.6 ppm. a) Fluoride levels in drinking water sources in Saudi Arabia correlate significantly with caries experience and prevalence of dental fluorosis. b) Appropriate fluoride concentration for drinking water in Saudi Arabia may be about 0.6 ppm.

  9. The effect of water purification systems on fluoride content of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, A R; Raju, O S; Kurthukoti, A J; Vishwas, T D

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of different water purification systems on the fluoride content of drinking water and to compare the efficacy of these water purification systems in reducing the fluoride content. Five different water purification systems were tested in this study. They were reverse osmosis, distillation, activated carbon, Reviva , and candle filter. The water samples in the study were of two types, viz, borewell water and tap water, these being commonly used by the people of Davangere City, Karnataka. The samples were collected before and after purification, and fluoride analysis was done using fluoride ion-specific electrode. The results showed that the systems based on reverse osmosis, viz, reverse osmosis system and Reviva showed maximum reduction in fluoride levels, the former proving to be more effective than the latter; followed by distillation and the activated carbon system, with the least reduction being brought about by candle filter. The amount of fluoride removed by the purification system varied between the system and from one source of water to the other. Considering the beneficial effects of fluoride on caries prevention; when drinking water is subjected to water purification systems that reduce fluoride significantly below the optimal level, fluoride supplementation may be necessary. The efficacy of systems based on reverse osmosis in reducing the fluoride content of water indicates their potential for use as defluoridation devices.

  10. Potential fluoride contamination in the drinking water of Marks Nagar, Unnao district, Uttar Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Jha, S K; Nayak, A K; Sharma, Y K

    2010-06-01

    This study was conducted in the summer season (May, 2007). The fluoride concentration along with other physico-chemical parameters in ground water samples was determined in Marks Nagar of Unnao district, Uttar Pradesh (India), since it is the only source of drinking water for the villagers. The fluoride concentration in the water varied from 0.8 to 13.9 mgl(-1) with a mean of 4.02 mgl(-1). The correlation analysis revealed that fluoride had a positive correlation with pH, CO(3), HCO(3), and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), whereas a negative correlation with Ca and Mg was found. A soil profile was also dug in the area to assess depth-wise fluoride content in the soil. The soil samples and underneath calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) concretion were analyzed for fluoride content. The percent of soluble fluoride to total fluoride in the soil varied from 25.15 to 4.76% down the soil profile. The soluble fluoride was found to decrease with the increase in the clay content in the soil. The total leachable fluoride in CaCO(3) concretions was found to be 6.08%. It was inferred from this study that the soil and underneath layer of CaCO(3) concretions may be the potential source of fluoride contamination in the shallow drinking water sources of the area.

  11. Determination of fluoride source in ground water using petrographic studies in Dashtestan area, south of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaleb-Looie, Sedigheh; Moore, Farid, ,, Dr.

    2010-05-01

    The groundwater occurs in Dashtestan area, contains a high level of fluoride. Since groundwater is vastly used for drinking and irrigation purposes, the local residents are at high risk of fluoride toxicity, as already evidenced by the occurrence of dental Fluorosis in many residents. 35 surface and groundwater samples were collected in September, 2009. The results show that in 23 samples the fluoride concentration is above the permissible level (1.5ppm). Petrographic study of lithological units in the catchment area indicates that mica minerals are the most probable source of fluoride content in the study area.

  12. Effect of home-used water purifier on fluoride concentration of drinking water in southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Kheirmand, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fluoride in drinking water plays a key role in dental health. Due to the increasing use of water-purifier, the effect of these devices on fluoride concentration of drinking water was evaluated. Materials and Methods: Drinking water samples were collected before and after passing through a home water-purifier, from four different water sources. The fluoride, calcium and magnesium concentration of the samples were measured using the quantitative spectrophotometery technique. Data were analyzed by the Wilcoxon test. P value < 0.1 was considered as significant. Results: The result showed that the concentration of fluoride was 0.05-0.61 ppm before purification and was removed completely afterward. Furthermore, other ions reduced significantly after treatment by the water purifier. Conclusion: This study revealed that this device decreases the fluoride content of water, an issue which should be considered in low and high-fluoridated water sources. PMID:24130584

  13. Estimation of fluoride intake from milk-based infant formulas and baby foods.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hie Jin; Sohn, Woosung; Kim, Baek Il; Kwon, Ho Keun; Choi, Choong Ho; Kim, Hae-Young

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the amount of fluoride ingested from infant formula and baby food in infants aged up to 6 months in South Korea. The fluoride content of 20 commercially available formulas and 8 baby food samples from 4 different brands was measured using a modified microdiffusion method and fluoride ion selective electrode. The amount of fluoride (F) ingested by infants was estimated assuming that the samples were reconstituted with water containing 0, 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0 ppm F. When the reconstituted formulas and baby foods contained 0.8 ppm F water, the infants were estimated to ingest fluoride in the range of 0.018 to 0.298 mg/kg/day. The findings of this study suggest that there is a need for clear guidelines for fluoride consumption by infants that should be followed by manufacturers and parents. © 2013 APJPH.

  14. Groundwater fluoride and dental fluorosis in southwestern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Gbadebo, A M

    2012-10-01

    This study was carried out to assess the fluoride levels of groundwater from open wells, consumed by the residents of three communities located in two distinct geological terrains of southwestern Nigeria. Fluoride concentration was determined using spectrophotometric technique, while analysis of other parameters like temperature, pH and total dissolve solids followed standard methods. Results of the analysis indicated that groundwater samples from Abeokuta Metropolis (i.e., basement complex terrain) had fluoride content in the range of 0.65 ± 0.21 and 1.20 ± 0.14. These values were found to be lower than the fluoride contents in the groundwater samples from Ewekoro peri-urban and Lagos metropolis where the values ranged between 1.10 ± 0.14-1.45 ± 0.07 and 0.15 ± 0.07-2.20 ± 1.41 mg/l, respectively. The fluoride contents in almost all locations were generally higher than the WHO recommended 0.6 mg/l. Analysis of Duncan multiple range test indicated that there is similarity in the level of significance of fluoride contents between different locations of same geological terrain at p ≤ 0.05. It was also observed that fluoride distribution of groundwater samples from the different geological terrain was more dependent on factors like pH and TDS than on temperature. The result of the analyzed social demographic characteristics of the residents indicated that the adults (between the age of 20 and >40 years) showed dental decay than the adolescent (<20 years). This signifies incidence of dental fluorosis by the high fluoride content in the drinking water of the populace. Further investigation on all sources of drinking water and other causes of tooth decay in the area is suggested.

  15. Fluoride concentration in public water supply: 72 months of analysis.

    PubMed

    Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba; Saliba, Orlando; Chiba, Fernando Yamamoto; Sumida, Doris Hissako; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Saliba, Nemre Adas

    2012-01-01

    Known as one of the ten most important advances on Public Health in the 20th century, fluoridation of public water supply is a measure of wide population coverage, which is effective on caries control. The city of Araçatuba, in the Northwest region of the São Paulo state, Brazil, started public water supply fluoridation in 1972 and, based on the average annual highest temperature, has kept the fluoride concentration between 0.6 to 0.8 mgF/L. The purpose of this study was to analyze monthly the fluoride concentration in public water supply in the city of Araçatuba during 72 months. Water samples were collected monthly on weekdays, directly from the water distribution network, on pre-established locations and analyzed in duplicate between November 2004 and October 2010 at the Research Laboratory of the Nucleus for Public Health (NEPESCO) of the Public Health Graduate Program from Araçatuba Dental School/UNESP, Brazil, using an fluoride-specific electrode connected to an ion analyzer. From the total of samples (n=591), 67.2% (n=397) presented fluoride concentration between 0.6 and 0.8 mgF/L; 20.6% (n=122) below 0.6 mgF/L; 11.5% (n=68) between 0.8 and 1.2 mgF/L and 0.7% (n=4) above 1.2 mgF/L. Most samples showed fluoride levels within the recommended parameters. Minimal variation was observed among the analyzed collection locations, showing that the city has been able to control the fluoride levels in the public water supply and reinforcing the importance of surveillance and constant monitoring to assure the quality of the water delivered to the population.

  16. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Richard L.; McKenzie, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

  17. High density fluoride glass calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Q.; Scheltzbaum, J.; Akgun, U.

    2014-04-01

    The unprecedented radiation levels in current Large Hadron Collider runs, and plans to even increase the luminosity creates a need for new detector technologies to be investigated. Quartz plates to replace the plastic scintillators in current LHC calorimeters have been proposed in recent reports. Quartz based Cherenkov calorimeters can solve the radiation damage problem, however light production and transfer have proven to be challenging. This report summarizes the results from a computational study on the performance of a high-density glass calorimeter. High-density, scintillating, fluoride glass, CHG3, was used as the active material. This glass has been developed specifically for hadron collider experiments, and is known for fast response time, in addition to high light yield. Here, the details of a Geant4 model for a sampling calorimeter prototype with 20 layers, and its hadronic as well as electromagnetic performances are reported.

  18. Containerless processing of fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-based experiments on glass formation, crystallization, surface tension, vaporization, and chemical durability of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum (ZBL) fluoride glass are summarized. In a container large, columnar grains grew out from the container-glass interface during cooling. The main crystalline phase was alpha BaZrF6. A ZBL glass sphere was levitated acoustically during Shuttle flight STS-11. The glass was melted and then cooled while being levitated (containerless). Crystallization in the recovered sample was very fine and mainly beta BaZr2F10, showing the influence of the container on the nucleation and microstructure of crystallization in the glass. Glass formation should be easier for a containerless glass than in a container.

  19. Containerless processing of fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-based experiments on glass formation, crystallization, surface tension, vaporization, and chemical durability of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum (ZBL) fluoride glass are summarized. In a container large, columnar grains grew out from the container-glass interface during cooling. The main crystalline phase was alpha BaZrF6. A ZBL glass sphere was levitated acoustically during Shuttle flight STS-11. The glass was melted and then cooled while being levitated (containerless). Crystallization in the recovered sample was very fine and mainly beta BaZr2F10, showing the influence of the container on the nucleation and microstructure of crystallization in the glass. Glass formation should be easier for a containerless glass than in a container.

  20. Aqueous geochemistry of fluoride enriched groundwater in arid part of Western India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chander Kumar; Mukherjee, Saumitra

    2015-02-01

    Fluoride-enriched water has become a major public health issue in India. The present study tries to evaluate the geochemical mechanism of fluoride enrichment in groundwater of western India. Total 100 groundwater samples were collected for the study spreading across the entire study area. The results of the analyzed parameters formed the attribute database for geographical information system (GIS) analysis and final output maps. A preliminary field survey was conducted and fluoride testing was done using Hach make field kits. The fluoride concentration ranges from 0.08 to 6.6 mg/L (mean 2.4 mg/L), with 63 % of the samples containing fluoride concentrations that exceed the World Health Organization (WHO) drinking water guideline value of 1.5 mg/L and 85 % samples exceeding the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) guidelines of 1 mg/L. The study also reveals high concentration of nitrate that is found to be above WHO standrads. The dominant geochemical facies present in water are Na-Cl-HCO3 (26 samples), Na-Ca-Cl-HCO3 (20 samples), Na-Cl (14 samples), and Na-Ca-Mg-Cl-HCO3 (11 samples); however, sodium and bicarbonate being the major component in all the water types of 100 samples, which in fact has a tendency to increase fluoride concentration in water by dissolving fluoride from fluorite. The thermodynamic considerations between the activities of calcium, fluoride, and bicarbonate suggest that fluoride concentration is being governed by activity of calcium ion. X-ray diffraction analysis of sediments reveals calcite and fluorite are the main solubility-control minerals controlling the aqueous geochemistry of high fluoride groundwater. The results indicate that the fluoride concentration in groundwater is mainly governed by geochemical composition of rocks, such as metamorphic granites and sedimentary rocks, alkaline hydrogeological environment, climatic conditions, high temperature and lesser rainfall, and geochemical processes such as weathering, evaporation

  1. Destabilization effect of transition metal fluorides on sodium borohydride.

    PubMed

    Kalantzopoulos, Georgios N; Guzik, Matylda N; Deledda, Stefano; Heyn, Richard H; Muller, Jiri; Hauback, Bjørn C

    2014-10-14

    The effect of transition metal fluorides on the decomposition of NaBH4 has been investigated for NaBH4 ball milled with TiF3, MnF3 or FeF3. The compounds were examined by thermal programmed desorption with residual gas analysis, thermo gravimetric analysis and volumetric measurements using a Sieverts-type apparatus. The phase formation process during thermal decomposition was studied by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction on the as-milled powders. NaBF4 was among the products in all mechano-chemical reactions. (11)B-NMR spectra analysis gave NaBF4 : NaBH4 ratios of 1 : 150 for Na-Ti, 1 : 40 for Na-Mn, and 1 : 10 for Na-Fe. Pure NaBH4 possessed a hydrogen release onset temperature of 430 °C. The hydrogen release in the NaBH4-MnF3 system began as low as 130 °C. FeF3 decreased the onset temperature to 161 °C and TiF3 to 200 °C. TiF3 reacted completely with NaBH4 below 320 °C. All the examined systems have negligible emissions of diborane species. H-sorption studies performed at selected temperatures above 300 °C exhibited relatively fast desorption kinetics. Partial hydrogen re-absorption was observed for the Na-Mn and Na-Fe samples.

  2. Structural, mechanistic, and computational analysis of the effects of anomeric fluorines on anomeric fluoride departure in 5-fluoroxylosyl fluorides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Seo; Greig, Ian R; Vocadlo, David J; McCarter, John D; Patrick, Brian O; Withers, Stephen G

    2011-10-12

    The effects of fluorine substitution at the C-5 center of pyranosyl fluorides on the reactivity at the C-1 anomeric center was probed by studying a series of 5-fluoroxylosyl fluoride derivatives. X-ray structures of their per-O-acetates detailed the effects on the ground-state structures. First-order rate constants for spontaneous hydrolysis, in conjunction with computational studies, revealed that changes in the stereochemistry of the 5-fluorine had minimal effects on the solvolysis rate constants and that the observed rate reductions were broadly similar to those caused by additional fluorine substitution at C-1 but significantly less than those due to substitution at C-2. Differences in the trapping behavior of 5- versus 2-fluoro-substituted glycosyl fluorides with α- and β-glycosidases arise more from differences in steric effects and hydrogen-bonding interactions than from intrinsic reactivity differences.

  3. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, R.L.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1989-10-17

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag formed in the production of metallic uranium by the reduction of depleted uranium tetrafluoride with metallic magnesium in a retort wherein the slag contains the free metals magnesium and uranium and also oxides and fluorides of the metals. The slag having a radioactivity level of at least about 7,000 rhoCi/gm. The method comprises the steps of: grinding the slag to a median particle size of about 200 microns; contacting the ground slag in a reaction zone with an acid having a strength of from about 0.5 to 1.5 N for a time of from about 4 to about 20 hours in the presence of a catalytic amount of iron; removing the liquid product; treating the particulate solid product; repeating the last two steps at least one more time to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 rhoCi/gm.

  4. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, R.L.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1989-10-17

    This patent describes a method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag formed in the production of metallic uranium by the reduction of depleted uranium tetrafluoride with metallic magnesium in a retort wherein the slag contains the free metals magnesium and uranium and also oxides and fluorides of the metals, the slag having a radioactivity level of at least about 7,000 pCi/gm. The method comprises: grinding the slag to a median particle size of about 200 microns; contacting the ground slag in a reaction zone with an acid having a strength of from about 0.5 to 1.5 N for a time of from about 4 to about 20 hours in the presence of a catalytic amount of iron, the reaction zone being maintained at a temperature within the range of from about 60{degrees} to 90{degrees} C. and the weight of ratio of slag to acid being within the range of from about 1:2 to 1:6 to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product; removing the liquid product; treating the particulate solid product; and repeating steps at least one more time to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm.

  5. An investigation of suitable bag materials for the collection and storage of breath samples containing hydrogen cyanide.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Francis J; Razavi, Cyrus; Webb, A Kevin; Jones, Andrew M; Spaněl, Patrik; Smith, David; Lenney, Warren

    2012-09-01

    The SPACE study will assess exhaled breath hydrogen cyanide (HCN) concentrations as a marker of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection in 240 children with cystic fibrosis (CF). It will use off-line selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) analysis and so we needed to investigate which breath sampling bag material to use, the maximum storage time before analysis and the benefit of warming the bag samples. We studied 15 children with CF, 8 had chronic PA infection and 7 did not. Each exhaled directly into the instrument (on-line) and also into two 25 µm thick Nalophan (25N), two 70 µm Nalophan (70N) and two Tedlar® bags. Bags were stored at 20 or 37 °C. HCN concentrations were analysed at 1, 6, 24 and 48 h (off-line). Acetone and water vapour concentrations were also measured in parallel. Correlation between on-line and off-line concentrations measured by SIFT-MS was better for all compounds and bag types at 37 °C. The median (IQR) on-line HCN concentration was 8.9(4.4-13.7) parts per billion by volume, ppbv. Both on-line and off-line HCN concentrations were significantly higher in patients with PA infection than those without. At 37 °C the correlation between on-line and off-line HCN concentrations was good up to 6 h in the 25N bag (R(2) = 0.79) and up to 24 h for the 70N and Tedlar bags (R(2) = 0.82 and 0.86). The correlation between on- and off-line acetone concentrations at 37 °C was good up to 24 h in 25N, 70N and Tedlar bags (R(2) = 0.89, 0.93 and 0.97). In all three types of bag the water vapour concentration fell quickly and by 24 h was equivalent to that of lab air. Samples stored in Tedlar or 70N bags, warmed to 37 °C and analysed within 24 h, give HCN and acetone concentrations which correlate well with on-line measurements.

  6. Young children and fluoride toothpaste.

    PubMed

    Rock, W P

    1994-07-09

    Studies have shown a higher prevalence of enamel mottling in children who live in fluoridated areas than in those from low fluoride areas. It is possible that the additive effect of fluoride ingestion from water and toothpaste may be responsible since it is known that young children may swallow up to half of the toothpaste on the brush. Parents must supervise toothbrushing for young children, low fluoride paste should be used, and the brush merely smeared with paste. The commonly recommended pea-sized quantity may be too much.

  7. [Water fluoridation and public health].

    PubMed

    Barak, Shlomo

    2003-11-01

    Fluoridation in Israel was first mooted in 1973 and finally incorporated into law in November 2002 obligating the Ministry of Health to add fluoride to the nation's water supply. Epidemiology studies in the USA have shown that the addition of one part per million of fluoride to the drinking water reduced the caries rate of children's teeth by 50% to 60% with no side effects. Both the WHO in 1994 and the American Surgeon General's report of 2000 declared that fluoridation of drinking water was the safest and most efficient way of preventing dental caries in all age groups and populations. Opposition to fluoridation has arisen from "antifluoridation" groups who object to the "pollution" of drinking water by the addition of chemicals and mass medication in violation of the "Patient's Rights" law and the Basic Law of Human Dignity and Liberty. A higher prevalence of hip fractures in elderly osteoporotic women and osteosarcoma in teenagers has been reported in areas where excess fluoride exists in the drinking water. However, none of the many independent professional committees reviewing the negative aspects of fluoridation have found any scientific evidence associating fluoridation with any ill-effects or health problems. In Israel, where dental treatment is not included in the basket of Health Services, fluoridation is the most efficient and cheapest way of reducing dental disease, especially for the poorer members of the population.

  8. Ultrastructural evaluation of enamel after dental bleaching associated with fluoride.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, John A; Bittencourt, Bruna; Michel, Milton; Sabino, Nilson; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara M M

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects on human enamel after two bleaching procedures: with a fluoridated bleaching agent and with topical fluoride application postbleaching. It used 43 enamel blocks (3 mm(2) ) that were ground flat (600-2,000 grit) and polished with polishing paste (one and one-fourth). Specimens were randomly divided into three groups according to the bleaching procedure: (1) control group, (2) hydrogen peroxide 35% (HPF) and topical application of fluoride 1.23%, and (3) HP 38% (OP) with fluoride in its composition. Bleaching agents were used according to the manufacturer's instructions. Three methodologies were used: nanoindentation, to observe surface hardness and elastic modulus; atomic force microscopy, to observe surface roughness (R(a) - R(z)); and scanning electron microscopy, to observe the enamel surface effects. Group OP had a decrease in the elastic modulus after bleaching, which was recovered at 14 days. An increased roughness (R(a); 32%) was observed on group HPF and had an increased erosion on enamel surface (67%). It was concluded that topical application of fluoride, after using the nonfluoridated whitening agent, increased the roughness values and erosion of enamel.

  9. Effect of xylitol and fluoride on enamel erosion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chunmuang, Siriwan; Jitpukdeebodintra, Suwanna; Chuenarrom, Chanya; Benjakul, Pojjanut

    2007-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the anti-erosive effects of xylitol, fluoride and a xylitol/fluoride combination used as an additive in an acidic drink or as mouthrinse after enamel was exposed to an acidic drink, in vitro. Human third molars were divided into 7 groups (A-G). Samples from groups A to D were immersed for 5 min in orange juice only (A), orange juice plus either 25% xylitol (B), F(-) 1 ppm (C) or a 25% xylitol/F(-) 1 ppm combination (D), respectively. Samples from groups E to G were immersed in orange juice for 5 min and then in either 40% xylitol (E), F(-) 227 ppm (F) or a 40% xylitol/F(-) 227 ppm combination (G), for 1 min respectively. This process was performed four times daily for 14 days. Mineral loss was determined from the lesion depth and surface hardness. Erosion depth progressively increased in all groups, except E, where erosion depth was significantly lower than group A. Surface microhardness progressively decreased in all groups, except E, where hardness was significantly higher than group A. This study demonstrated that addition of xylitol, fluoride or a xylitol/fluoride combination to an acidic drink or post-treatment with fluoride or a xylitol/fluoride combination could reduce, but not prevent, enamel erosion.

  10. Water fluoridation and osteoporotic fracture.

    PubMed

    Hillier, S; Inskip, H; Coggon, D; Cooper, C

    1996-09-01

    Osteoporotic fractures constitute a major public health problem. These fractures typically occur at the hip, spine and distal forearm. Their pathogenesis is heterogeneous, with contributions from both bone strength and trauma. Water fluoridation has been widely proposed for its dental health benefits, but concerns have been raised about the balance of skeletal risks and benefits of this measure. Fluoride has potent effects on bone cell function, bone structure and bone strength. These effects are mediated by the incorporation of fluoride ions in bone crystals to form fluoroapatite, and through an increase in osteoblast activity. It is believed that a minimum serum fluoride level of 100 ng/ml must be achieved before osteoblasts will be stimulated. Serum levels associated with drinking water fluoridated to 1 ppm are usually several times lower than this value, but may reach this threshold at concentrations of 4 ppm in the drinking water. Animal studies suggest no effect of low-level (0-3 ppm) fluoride intake on bone strength, but a possible decrease at higher levels. Sodium fluoride has been used to treat established osteoporosis for nearly 30 years. Recent trials of this agent, prescribed at high doses, have suggested that despite a marked increase in bone mineral density, there is no concomitant reduction in vertebral fracture incidence. Furthermore, the increase in bone density at the lumbar spine may be achieved at the expense of bone mineral in the peripheral cortical skeleton. As a consequence, high dose sodium fluoride (80 mg daily) is not currently used to treat osteoporosis. At lower doses, recent trials have suggested a beneficial effect on both bone density and fracture. The majority of epidemiological evidence regarding the effect of fluoridated drinking water on hip fracture incidence is based on ecological comparisons. Although one Finnish study suggested that hip fracture rates in a town with fluoridated water were lower than those in a matching town

  11. Fluoride-based, low temperature solid electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seajin; Otagawa, T.; Madou, M.

    Lanthanum fluoride electrolytes were tested to determine whether fluoride electrolytes can be used as fuel cell electrolytes at low temperatures. The planar-type fuel cell were operated in oxygen/hydrogen gases with nickel oxide/nickel as the anode and a perovskite structure oxide (La(0.6)Sr(0.4)CoO3) as the cathode. In order to reduce the fuel cell operating temperature while maintaining the highest possible current, various thin and thick film techniques were assessed. They include e-beam evaporation and dc plasma spray methods. Fuel cells incorporating plasma-sprayed LaF3 films yielded a short-circuit current density on the order of 0.4 mA/sq cm at 450 C, and the current density under an overpotential of 0.2V showed no sign of decay over 17 hours. In the co-ionic (fluoride and oxide ion) conduction mode, the lanthanum fluoride electrolyte based fuel cells could sustain current in oxygen/hydrogen gases.

  12. Inhibition of multispecies biofilms by a fluoride-releasing dental prosthesis copolymer.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Sufian A; German, Matthew J; Rolland, Sarah L; Rickard, Alexander H; Jakubovics, Nicholas S

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to develop a new mixed-species acidogenic biofilm model and use it to assess the antimicrobial properties of a novel fluoride-releasing copolymer. Stubs composed of a copolymer of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) were produced by chemically-activated free radical polymerization. A fluoride-releasing copolymer was developed by incorporating sodium fluoride in place of a portion of the PMMA. Samples were mounted in polysulfone Modified Robbins Devices (MRDs) and were optimized for single- and mixed-species biofilm formation by Candida albicans, Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans. Fluoride release was sustained for at least 48h in flowing conditions. Fluoride did not affect the colonization and biofilm growth of any of the microorganisms in monocultures. However, in mixed-species biofilms, cell densities of all three species were reduced approximately ten-fold (p<0.05) on the fluoridated material compared with the non-fluoridated copolymer. These data demonstrate that intermicrobial interactions in mixed-species acidogenic biofilms are sensitive to fluoride, and that the inclusion of fluoride in a denture lining copolymer reduces the formation of polymicrobial biofilms. The growth of acidogenic microorganisms on denture materials is associated with denture stomatitis and dental caries on surrounding teeth. A fluoride-releasing copolymer that inhibits acidogenic mixed-species biofilms, such as the material described in this study, has the potential to control these diseases by limiting biofilm growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tissue distributions of fluoride and its toxicity in the gills of a freshwater teleost, Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinling; Chen, Jianjie; Wang, Jundong; Wu, Xiangtian; Li, Yundong; Xie, Lingtian

    2013-04-15

    Fish take up fluoride directly from water and are susceptible to fluoride contamination of their environment. In this study, we examined the tissue distributions of fluoride and its toxicity in the gills of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) chronically exposed to fluoride. Carp were exposed to a range of aqueous fluoride (35-124 mg/L) and sampled at 30, 60 and 90 days. The accumulation of fluoride in the tissues increased with the level and duration of exposure. Steady state was not achieved under the experimental conditions. The gills accumulated the highest levels of fluoride followed by the liver>brain>kidney>muscle>intestine. A dose-dependent inhibition was observed for the enzyme activities of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase in the gills after the fish were exposed for 90 days. Also, accumulation of fluoride was associated with the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and a dose-dependent stimulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the gill tissues, suggesting that fluoride promoted oxidative stress in the fish. Microscopic examinations revealed injuries to gill tissues and chloride cells, with the severity of injury increasing with exposure concentration. These results suggest that chronic exposure to elevated concentrations of fluoride may induce toxicity in the common carp.

  14. Fluoride in groundwater, Varaha River Basin, Visakhapatnam District, Andhra Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Rao, N Subba

    2009-05-01

    Excess intake of fluoride through drinking water causes fluorosis on human beings in many States of the country (India), including Andhra Pradesh. Groundwater quality in the Varaha River Basin located in the Visakhapatnam District of Andhra Pradesh has been studied, with reference to fluoride content, for its possible sources for implementing appropriate management measures, according to the controlling mechanism of fluoride concentration in the groundwater. The area occupied by the river basin is underlain by the Precambrian Eastern Ghats, over which the Recent sediments occur. Results of the chemical data of the groundwater suggest that the considerable number of groundwater samples show fluoride content greater than that of the safe limit prescribed for drinking purpose. Statistical analysis shows that the fluoride has a good positive relation, with pH and bicarbonate. This indicates an alkaline environment, as a dominant controlling mechanism for leaching of fluoride from the source material. Other supplementary factors responsible for the occurrence of fluoride in the groundwater are evapotranspiration, long contact time of water with the aquifer material, and agricultural fertilizers. A lack of correlation between fluoride and chloride, and a high positive correlation between fluoride and bicarbonate indicate recharge of the aquifer by the river water. However, the higher concentration of fluoride observed in the groundwater in some locations indicates insufficient dilution by the river water. That means the natural dilution did not perform more effectively. Hence, the study emphasizes the need for surface water management structures, with people's participation, for getting more effective results.

  15. Sustainable approach for recycling waste lamb and chicken bones for fluoride removal from water followed by reusing fluoride-bearing waste in concrete.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zainab Z; AbdelKareem, Hala N

    2015-11-01

    Sustainable management of waste materials is an attractive approach for modern societies. In this study, recycling of raw waste lamb and chicken bones for defluoridation of water has been estimated. The effects of several experimental parameters including contact time, pH, bone dose, fluoride initial concentration, bone grains size, agitation rate, and the effect of co-existing anions in actual samples of wastewater were studied for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions. Results indicated excellent fluoride removal efficiency up to 99.4% and 99.8% using lamb and chicken bones, respectively at fluoride initial concentration of 10 mg F/L and 120 min contact time. Maximum fluoride uptake was obtained at neutral pH range 6-7. Fluoride removal kinetic was well described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Both, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models could fit the experimental data well with correlation coefficient values >0.99 suggesting favorable conditions of the process. Furthermore, for complete sustainable management of waste bones, the resulted fluoride-bearing sludge was reused in concrete mixes to partially replace sand. Tests of the mechanical properties of fluoride sludge-modified concrete mixes indicated a potential environmentally friendly approach to dispose fluoride sludge in concrete and simultaneously enhance concrete properties.

  16. Effect of Fluoride, Chlorhexidine and Fluoride-chlorhexidine Mouthwashes on Salivary Streptococcus mutans Count and the Prevalence of Oral Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Sadat Sajadi, Fatemeh; Moradi, Mohammad; Pardakhty, Abbas; Yazdizadeh, Razieh; Madani, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Streptococcus mutans is the main pathogenic agent involved in dental caries, and may be eliminated using mouthwashes. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of fluoride, chlorhexidine, and fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwashes on salivary S. mutans count after two weeks of use and determine the prevalence of their side effects on the oral mucosa. Materials and methods. In this clinical trial, 120 12-14 year-old students were selected and divided into three groups. Each group was given one of fluoride, chlorhexidine, or fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwashes. They were asked to use it twice a day for two weeks. Salivary samples were collected at baseline and after two weeks. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results. In all the study groups, there were statistically significant reductions in salivary S. mutans counts two weeks after using the mouthwashes (P < 0.05). In addition, fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwash had a significant effect on the reduction of S. mutans count in comparison with fluoride alone. The prevalence of oral side effects in fluoride-chlorhexidine mouth-wash was more than 90%. Conclusion. Adding fluoride to chlorhexidine mouthwash can significantly decrease salivary S. mutans count after two weeks. Fluoride-chlorhexidine has the highest rate of oral side effects between the evaluated mouthwash compounds.

  17. Effects of flossing and rinsing with a fluoridated mouthwash after brushing with a fluoridated toothpaste on salivary fluoride clearance.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, R M; Horay, C; Huntington, E; Mehta, V

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that flossing after brushing with a fluoridated toothpaste may lower salivary fluoride (F), and to evaluate the consequence of subsequent F mouthwash use. Twenty adults used 3 oral hygiene regimes in a randomised order: A, brushing with an NaF toothpaste; B, as A but followed by professional flossing; C, as B followed by rinsing with an NaF mouthwash. Saliva samples were collected up to 120 min after each regime and analysed for F. The mean area under the clearance curve value for regime C was statistically significantly greater than the corresponding values for A and B (p < 0.0001), which differed little. The regime that included the mouthwash may provide better anticaries protection.

  18. Bone fluoride concentrations of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) resident near an aluminium smelter in south-eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Hufschmid, J; Beveridge, I; Coulson, G; Gould, J

    2011-08-01

    Lesions of skeletal and dental fluorosis have been described recently in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus). The present study further examined the epidemiology of skeletal fluorosis in this species. Bone fluoride concentrations were obtained from a range of skeletal sites of animals from a high (Portland Aluminium) and a low (Cape Bridgewater) fluoride environment in Victoria, Australia. Age, but not sex, affected the mean bone fluoride concentration of kangaroos. For a given age, bone fluoride concentrations were significantly higher in kangaroos from Portland than Cape Bridgewater. Concentrations varied between skeletal sites examined, with samples containing cancellous bone having higher fluoride concentrations than those containing only cortical bone.

  19. Simple One-Pot Syntheses and Characterizations of Free Fluoride- and Bifluoride-Containing Polymers Soluble in Non-Aqueous Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Steinle, Dominik; Friedrich, Laura; Bevilacqua, Nico; von Hauff, Elizabeth; Gschwind, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    One of the problems that arise with bifluoride- or fluoride-containing compounds is their poor solubility in non-aqueous solvents. We report herein a facile one-pot synthesis and the chemical analysis of fluoride/bifluoride-containing polymers, which are soluble in MeCN. Different polymers, such as Polyvinylacetate or Polyethylene imine and saccharides, such as maltodextrin, were complexed with ammonium (bi)fluoride using hydrogen bonds to form the desired (bi)fluoride-containing compounds. The newly formed hydrogen bonding (bi)fluoride-doped polymer matrices were analyzed using infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and X-ray diffraction. The promising materials also underwent impedance spectroscopy, conductivity measurements and preliminary tests as electrolytes for room temperature fluoride ion batteries along with an analysis of their performance. PMID:28774092

  20. Abnormally high fluoride levels in commercial preparations of 40 per cent silver fluoride solution: contraindications for use in children.

    PubMed

    Gotjamanos, T; Orton, V

    1998-12-01

    Although a 40 per cent solution of silver fluoride would be expected to contain 6 per cent fluoride (60,000 ppm), F-levels of 100,000 ppm and 120,000 ppm were found in 14 commercial samples analysed at The University of Western Australia in 1993 and 1994. To determine whether F-levels in 40 per cent AgF preparations have remained high, the present investigation was aimed at analysing different batches of commercial preparations obtained more recently. Fluoride ion analysis was carried out on 24 AgF samples using the Ion-Selective Electrode technique. Independent analyses of the same samples were carried out by a private chemical testing laboratory (Genalysis). Ten samples supplied by Agson Chemical Export were found to contain between 75,000 and 100,000 ppm F-: Genalysis reported 80,000 to 120,000 ppm. Fourteen samples supplied by Southern Dental Industries were found to contain between 70,000 and 120,000 ppm F-; Genalysis reported 88,000 to 108,000 ppm F-. These results confirm significantly higher than expected F-levels (ANOVA p < 0.05) in commercial preparations of 40 per cent AgF. The solutions tested were found to contain a mixture of ammonium fluoride, sodium or potassium fluoride, and silver fluoride. The additional presence of silver difluoride and hydrofluoric acid resulting from the manufacturing process has been suggested as an explanation for the much higher than expected levels of fluoride ion. In view of possible toxicity of 40 per cent AgF in young children, it is concluded that such a highly concentrated solution should not be used clinically; instead, lower strength AgF solutions should be investigated for their efficacy in caries treatment.

  1. [Monitoring water fluoridation in three cities in Piauí State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Josiene Saibrosa; do Val, Cinthya Melo; Costa, Juliana Nolêto; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva; Silva, Thais Alves Elias; Sampaio, Fábio Correia

    2007-05-01

    This study aimed to monitor the fluoride concentration in the public water supply in Teresina, Floriano, and Parnaíba, Piauí State, Brazil. Samples were collected monthly for one year between 2004 and 2005. Six sites in each city were randomly selected for water sampling (total n = 576), 192 in each city. Fluoride assays were performed in duplicate, using a specific electrode. Most samples were below the optimum fluoride concentration, and only 4.3% (n = 25) presented acceptable values (0.60-0.80 ppm). Acceptable samples totaled 7.8% (n = 15), 4.7% (n = 9), and 0.5% (n = 1) in Teresina, Floriano, and Parnaíba, respectively. By conclusion, fluoride levels in the public water supply in the three cities were below the optimum concentration, and a permanent surveillance system is thus needed to guarantee effective water fluoridation in the State of Piauí.

  2. Fluoride availability from natural resources in The Gambia--implications for oral health care.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Rainer A; Markovic, Ljubisa; Gaengler, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Changing food patterns in combination with ineffective oral hygiene measures and insufficient bioavailability of fluoride from drinking water and other sources seem to impair the dental health status in developing countries, especially in the younger population. Therefore, preventive programmes in controlling dental caries progression should be based on local conditions. For mapping the drinking water fluoride content throughout The Gambia, samples of water from rural community wells, public water taps, commercial mineral water, and from the Gambia-River were measured. Additionally, fluoride concentrations of locally extracted table salt and green tea were determined. Showed the need for supplementary fluoride intake, because natural dietary fluoride availability is very low. Age-related recommendations for oral health care and for additional fluoride bioavailability are given, taking into account local socio-economic conditions in the Republic of The Gambia and similar developing countries.

  3. Fluoride in the drinking water of Nagaur tehsil of Nagaur District, Rajasthan, India.

    PubMed

    Arif, M; Hussain, I; Hussain, J; Sharma, S; Kumar, S

    2012-06-01

    Fluoride concentration of groundwater samples from 100 villages of Nagaur tehsil was determined, 85 villages were found to have fluoride concentration more than 1.5 mg/L. The maximum fluoride concentration was recorded 6.6 mg/L in groundwater of Singhani village, while the minimum was recorded in Kurchhi village. As per the desirable and maximum permissible limit for fluoride in drinking water, determined by World Health Organization, the groundwater of about 85 villages of the studied sites is unfit for drinking purpose.

  4. Determination of fluoride in tap water in Morocco using a direct electrochemical method.

    PubMed

    El Jaoudi, Rachid; Mamouch, Fouzia; Ait El Cadi, Mina; Bousliman, Yassir; Cherrah, Yahia; Bouklouze, Abdelaziz

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the fluoride concentration in tap drinking water in different cities of Morocco using an electrochemical ion-selective method. Three samples were collected from each thirteen selected cities in the period between March and May 2011. The median value of fluoride was 0.94 mg/L (0.21-2.97). High fluoride concentrations (>0.8 mg/L) were found in sixteen cities. Very high values were found in phosphate regions such as Khouribga which is known to be an endemic dental fluorosis area. This study has shown that the concentration of fluoride in drinking water exceeds the limit especially in phosphate regions.

  5. Potential fluoride contamination in the drinking water of Naranji area, NorthWest Frontier Province, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mohammad Tahir; Danishwar, Shuhab

    2003-12-01

    The drinking water of Naranji village and surrounding areas of the NorthWest Frontier Province (NWFP), Pakistan, was analyzed for its fluoride content. The fluoride content of water samples from the springs in the Naranji village goes up to 13.52 mg kg(-1), which exceeds the permissible limit (1.5 mg kg(-1)) set by the World Health Organization (WHO). This study explores the source of fluoride contamination and attributes it to the alkaline rocks of the Ambela granitic complex and the Koga complex. The low-lying areas towards the south have a fluoride content within the permissible limit. The Naranji area therefore needs urgent remedial measures.

  6. Caries management with fluoride agents.

    PubMed

    Lam, Anty; Chu, C H

    2012-11-01

    Dental caries is the single most common, chronic oral disease of childhood. It is progressive and cumulative, and becomes more complex over time. The Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health revealed that more than 51 million school hours are lost each year as a result of dental problems. Contemporary caries management philosophy has changed from the traditional surgical approach to a medical model that emphasizes prevention. Among various strategies for caries prevention or reduction, fluoride therapy has been highly promoted. Various in-office and over-the-counter fluoride products are available for caries prevention. Dental professionals should identify and assess the caries risk level of patients and optimize the use of fluorides in caries management. Since multiple sources of fluoride exposure exist, a coordinated approach to fluoride delivery is essential.

  7. Tealeaves may release or absorb fluoride, depending on the fluoride content of water.

    PubMed

    Malde, Marian Kjellevold; Greiner-Simonsen, Rita; Julshamn, Kåre; Bjorvatn, Kjell

    2006-08-01

    As the tea plant (Camellia sinensis) is known to accumulate fluoride from the soil, the tealeaves may contain high concentrations of fluoride, which is easily released during infusion. In this study, we have tested the possible effect of original fluoride concentration in the water on the fluoride release from tea. Moreover, we wanted to test the possible capacity of tealeaves (commercially available tea) to absorb fluoride from high-fluoride water. In low-fluoride water, fluoride is easily released from tealeaves. Depending upon the fluoride content of the water, dried tealeaves are able also to absorb fluoride. Thus, if a cup of tea is made from high-fluoride water, the fluoride concentration of the infusion may actually be lower than the original fluoride concentration of the water.

  8. WET FLUORIDE SEPARATION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1958-11-25

    The separation of U/sup 233/ from thorium, protactinium, and fission products present in neutron-irradiated thorium is accomplished by dissolving the irradiated materials in aqueous nitric acid, adding either a soluble fluoride, iodate, phosphate, or oxalate to precipltate the thorium, separating the precipltate from the solution, and then precipitating uranlum and protactinium by alkalizing the solution. The uranium and protactinium precipitate is removcd from the solution and dissolved in nitric acid. The uranyl nitrate may then be extracted from the acid solution by means of ether, and the protactinium recovered from the aqueous phase.

  9. Water fluoridation, dentition status and bone health of older people in Ireland.

    PubMed

    O Sullivan, Vincent; O Connell, Brian C

    2015-02-01

    To examine some of the potential benefits and risks of water fluoridation for older adults. This study used 'The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing', to access a nationally representative sample of 4977 people aged 50 and older. The sample was used to estimate associations between the percentage of households in a respondent's local area with a currently fluoridated water supply and the probability of two binary outcomes: the respondent having all their own teeth and having normal bone density. Past exposure of individuals to fluoridated water was not assessed; the prevalence of fluoridated water in local supplies was obtained from the 2006 Census of Ireland. The Census data indicated that there was considerable variation in the proportion of households with fluoridated water supplies, especially in rural areas. Bone mineral density was estimated from a heel ultrasound of each respondent, and their number of teeth was self-reported. A range of individual variables, such as educational attainment, housing wealth, age and health behaviours, was controlled for. It was found that the greater the percentage of households with a fluoridated water supply in an area, the higher the probability that respondents had all their own teeth. There was no significant relationship between the proportion of households with a fluoridated water supply in an area and bone health. This study suggests that water fluoridation provides a net health gain for older Irish adults, though the effects of fluoridation warrant further investigation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Determination of Fluoride in Organic and Non-organic Wines.

    PubMed

    Paz, Soraya; Jaudenes, Juan Ramón; Gutiérrez, Angel José; Rubio, Carmen; Hardisson, Arturo; Revert, Consuelo

    2016-12-27

    Fluorine is an element of great importance to human health, as it is considered to be an essential element. However, both a deficiency and an excess, it can cause various problems. It is for this reason that values have been established regarding the recommended daily intake (RDI) and acceptable daily intake (ADI). The largest source of incorporation of fluoride is water, but it can be found in other foods and beverages, such as vegetables, tea, and wine. The aim of the study was to establish the fluoride concentration in organic and non-organic wines from different appellations of origin of the Canary Islands and mainland Spain, in order to assess the contribution of fluoride and toxic risk. A total of 53 samples of red, white, and rosé wines, both organic and non-organic, from different appellations of origin were analyzed. They were analyzed by potentiometric determination with ion-selective electrode for fluoride using the method of standard addition. The wines analyzed are within the recommended limits set by the International Organisation of Vine and Wine. RDI is not exceeded for adults, taking into account the data provided by the Spanish Agency for Consumer Affairs, Food Safety and Nutrition on the average consumption of "table wines" in Spain. Fluoride intake from wine poses no risk to the health of adults. The fluoride concentration of organic and non-organic wines is within the range of 0.03 to 0.70 mg/L.

  11. Community Water Fluoridation and Intelligence: Prospective Study in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Jonathan M; Thomson, W Murray; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Moffitt, Terrie E; Zeng, Jiaxu; Foster Page, Lyndie A; Poulton, Richie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between community water fluoridation (CWF) and IQ. Methods. We conducted a prospective study of a general population sample of those born in Dunedin, New Zealand, between April 1, 1972, and March 30, 1973 (95.4% retention of cohort after 38 years of prospective follow-up). Residence in a CWF area, use of fluoride dentifrice and intake of 0.5-milligram fluoride tablets were assessed in early life (prior to age 5 years); we assessed IQ repeatedly between ages 7 to 13 years and at age 38 years. Results. No clear differences in IQ because of fluoride exposure were noted. These findings held after adjusting for potential confounding variables, including sex, socioeconomic status, breastfeeding, and birth weight (as well as educational attainment for adult IQ outcomes). Conclusions. These findings do not support the assertion that fluoride in the context of CWF programs is neurotoxic. Associations between very high fluoride exposure and low IQ reported in previous studies may have been affected by confounding, particularly by urban or rural status.

  12. Community Water Fluoridation and Intelligence: Prospective Study in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, W. Murray; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Zeng, Jiaxu; Foster Page, Lyndie A.; Poulton, Richie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between community water fluoridation (CWF) and IQ. Methods. We conducted a prospective study of a general population sample of those born in Dunedin, New Zealand, between April 1, 1972, and March 30, 1973 (95.4% retention of cohort after 38 years of prospective follow-up). Residence in a CWF area, use of fluoride dentifrice and intake of 0.5-milligram fluoride tablets were assessed in early life (prior to age 5 years); we assessed IQ repeatedly between ages 7 to 13 years and at age 38 years. Results. No clear differences in IQ because of fluoride exposure were noted. These findings held after adjusting for potential confounding variables, including sex, socioeconomic status, breastfeeding, and birth weight (as well as educational attainment for adult IQ outcomes). Conclusions. These findings do not support the assertion that fluoride in the context of CWF programs is neurotoxic. Associations between very high fluoride exposure and low IQ reported in previous studies may have been affected by confounding, particularly by urban or rural status. PMID:24832151

  13. Topical fluoride for caries prevention

    PubMed Central

    Weyant, Robert J.; Tracy, Sharon L.; Anselmo, Theresa (Tracy); Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D.; Donly, Kevin J.; Frese, William A.; Hujoel, Philippe P.; Iafolla, Timothy; Kohn, William; Kumar, Jayanth; Levy, Steven M.; Tinanoff, Norman; Wright, J. Timothy; Zero, Domenick; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Meyer, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A panel of experts convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs presents evidence-based clinical recommendations regarding professionally applied and prescription-strength, home-use topical fluoride agents for caries prevention. These recommendations are an update of the 2006 ADA recommendations regarding professionally applied topical fluoride and were developed by using a new process that includes conducting a systematic review of primary studies. Types of Studies Reviewed The authors conducted a search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library for clinical trials of professionally applied and prescription-strength topical fluoride agents—including mouthrinses, varnishes, gels, foams and pastes—with caries increment outcomes published in English through October 2012. Results The panel included 71 trials from 82 articles in its review and assessed the efficacy of various topical fluoride caries-preventive agents. The panel makes recommendations for further research. Practical Implications The panel recommends the following for people at risk of developing dental caries: 2.26 percent fluoride varnish or 1.23 percent fluoride (acidulated phosphate fluoride) gel, or a prescription-strength, home-use 0.5 percent fluoride gel or paste or 0.09 percent fluoride mouthrinse for patients 6 years or older. Only 2.26 percent fluoride varnish is recommended for children younger than 6 years. The strengths of the recommendations for the recommended products varied from “in favor” to “expert opinion for.” As part of the evidence-based approach to care, these clinical recommendations should be integrated with the practitioner's professional judgment and the patient's needs and preferences. PMID:24177407

  14. A hybrid approach for treating fluorided water and biogeophysical monitoring of treatment processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    A laboratory experiment has been conducted for investigating the possibility of development of novel techniques for treating fluoride contamination and monitoring of physico-chemical alterations caused by biogeochemical processes in the media. In the present study, high adsorption capacity and ion-exchange property of natural zeolites have been utilized in treating fluoride contamination. The preset goals are achieved by designing and constructing experimental setup consisting of three columns, first one is filled with 450 ppm fluorided water prepared by dissolving sodium fluoride in deionized water, the second is filled with zeolite and fluorided water, and the third is filled with zeolite, fluorided water, sodium lactate and the bacterial seed. The first and the second columns were poisoned with sodium azide for preventing the growth of microorganisms. The self-potential (SP) signals associated with physico-chemical alterations in natural zeolite induced by biogeochemical processes are measured by using Cu-CuSO4 gel electrodes. Liquid-phase analysis of samples from column two and three show the reduced concentrations of fluoride and aluminum and it indicates the possibility of precipitation of insoluble aluminum fluoride. This is further confirmed by the presence of fluoride and aluminum in the solid samples as detected by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The distinct SP of the order of -50 mV and 200 mV have been associated with biostimulated fluoride remediation and geochemical fluoride remediation processes respectively. Thus, there is a possibility of non-invasive monitoring of fluoride remediation processes driven by both microbes and chemical processes. It is found that after thirty-day nitrate and sulfate is introduced in column two due chemical interaction between water and natural zeolite. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that a hybrid approach, a combination of ion exchange and adsorption properties of natural zeolite and the bioremediation is more

  15. Urinary and plasma fluoride levels in pregnant women from Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Deena B; Basu, Niladri; Martinez-Mier, E Angeles; Sánchez, Brisa N; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Yun; Parajuli, Rajendra Prasad; Peterson, Karen; Mercado-Garcia, Adriana; Bashash, Morteza; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio; Hu, Howard; Téllez-Rojo, Martha Maria

    2016-10-01

    There is need to assess the developmental neurotoxicity of fluoride. Our knowledge of prenatal fluoride exposure is challenged as few population-based studies have been conducted and these generally date back several decades, provide incomplete data on sociodemographic variables, and have methodological limitations. To measure urinary and plasma fluoride levels across three time points in pregnant mothers who were enrolled in the Early Life Exposures in Mexico to Environmental Toxicants (ELEMENT) birth cohort study. Fluoride levels were characterized in archived urine and plasma from 872 pregnant mothers sampled from the ELEMENT cohort. Various statistical methods were used to analyze the fluoride data with particular consideration for changes across three stages of pregnancy and against sociodemographic variables. All samples had detectable levels of fluoride. The mean urinary and plasma fluoride levels were 0.91 and 0.0221mg/L respectively, and these were not statistically different across three stages of pregnancy. Fluoride levels correlated across the stages of pregnancy studied, with stronger correlations between neighboring stages. Urinary fluoride changed as pregnancy progressed with levels increasing until ~23 weeks and then decreasing until the end of pregnancy. For plasma fluoride, there was a decreasing trend but this was not of statistical significance. Creatinine-adjusted urinary fluoride levels did not associate consistently with any of the sociodemographic variables studied. This study provides the most extensive characterization to date of fluoride exposure throughout pregnancy. These results provide the foundation to explore exposure-related health outcomes in the ELEMENT cohort and other studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Urinary Fluoride Concentration in Children with Disabilities Following Long-Term Fluoride Tablet Ingestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Jung-Ren; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Hsiao, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shun-Te; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Urine is the most commonly utilized biomarker for fluoride excretion in public health and epidemiological studies. Approximately 30-50% of fluoride is excreted from urine in children. Urinary fluoride excretion reflects the total fluoride intake from multiple sources. After administering fluoride tablets to children with disabilities, urinary…

  17. Urinary Fluoride Concentration in Children with Disabilities Following Long-Term Fluoride Tablet Ingestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Jung-Ren; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Hsiao, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shun-Te; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Urine is the most commonly utilized biomarker for fluoride excretion in public health and epidemiological studies. Approximately 30-50% of fluoride is excreted from urine in children. Urinary fluoride excretion reflects the total fluoride intake from multiple sources. After administering fluoride tablets to children with disabilities, urinary…

  18. Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

  19. [Determination of fluoride in toothpastes marketed in Morocco using a fluoride-selective electrode].

    PubMed

    Eljaoudi, R; Ait El Cadi, M; Mamouch, F; Bousliman, Y; Ousaid, A; Cherrah, Y; Bouklouze, A

    2012-06-01

    Dental caries represents a problem of public health in Morocco and the reduction of this pathology is a priority of the Ministry of Health. The use of fluoride toothpastes is, at present, recognized as being an effective means for the prevention of dental caries. [corrected] The aim of our study was to verify the correspondence of the information marked on packagings with the international standards, but also to determine using potentiometry the quantity of fluorine presents in toothpastes marketed in Morocco from three origins: pharmacies, hypermarkets and ambulant sellers. The study concerned 56 toothpastes, 73.2% of toothpastes respect the standards of the concerning WHO dates of manufacturing and lapsing. The type of fluoride was specified only on 67.8% of packagings and the used concentration of fluoride was indicated only in 62.5% of the tested samples. For 56 studied toothpastes, the results revealed that if we take into account standards recommended by the WHO and the European Union, only 57.1% of toothpastes could have an effect dental caries. The results of this study show that there is a real need of quality control of fluoride toothpastes sold in Morocco especially those of the itinerant market.

  20. Comparative evaluation and effect of organic and inorganic fluoride dentifrices on enamel microhardness: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Krishna Prasad; Satish, S. V.; Gouda, Veerbhadra; Badade, Abhishek Rajpal; Gouda, Basavana; Patil, Snehalata

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare and evaluate the microhardness of enamel surface after the application of organic fluoride and inorganic fluoride dentifrices. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted premolars were collected and decoronation of all the teeth was done at cementoenamel junction. The crowns were sectioned mesiodistally into two halves with the help of diamond disc, and then the subsequent forty samples kept in 1% citric acid for the demineralization and divided into two groups by simple randomization, that is, Group A (inorganic sodium fluoride dentifrice) and Group B (organic amine fluoride dentifrice). They were treated using same protocol for 3 min, daily twice for 7 days. Those samples preserved in artificial saliva in between treatment. The enamel surface microhardness evaluated using Vickers hardness test at base level, after demineralization, as well as after remineralization. Statistical analysis of surface microhardness obtained at different stages done by Student's t-test and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The samples which were treated with sodium fluoride (Group A) could not restore the mean microhardness after treatment to that of preoperative level whereas amine fluoride (Group B) treated samples showed a statistically significant increase in mean surface microhardness from baseline. Conclusion: Organic fluoride (amine fluoride) remineralization was more effective in restoring enamel microhardness than inorganic fluoride (sodium fluoride) remineralization. PMID:27114952

  1. Effects of simulated solar radiation on the transmission of magnesium fluoride and cryolite thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heslin, T.

    1974-01-01

    Thin films of cryolite magnesium fluoride on fused silica substrates were exposed to 1126 equivalent sun-hours of radiation. The optical transmissions of the samples were measured before and after irradiation. The results indicate that, after the degradation of the silica substrate is accounted for, the cryolite is severely affected by the simulated solar radiation, but the magnesium fluoride is only slightly affected.

  2. Assessment of fluoride contaminations in groundwater of hard rock aquifers in Madurai district, Tamil Nadu (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thivya, C.; Chidambaram, S.; Rao, M. S.; Thilagavathi, R.; Prasanna, M. V.; Manikandan, S.

    2015-07-01

    The fluoride contamination in drinking water is already gone to the alarming level and it needs the immediate involvement and attention of all people to solve this problem. Fluoride problem is higher in hard rock terrains in worldwide and Madurai is such type of hard rock region. Totally 54 samples were collected from the Madurai district of Tamilnadu with respect to lithology. The samples collected were analysed for major cations and anions using standard procedures. The higher concentration of fluoride is noted in the Charnockite rock types of northern part of the study area. 20 % of samples are below 0.5 ppm and 6 % of samples are above 1.5 ppm exceeding the permissible limit. The affinity between the pH and fluoride ions in groundwater suggests that dissolution of fluoride bearing minerals in groundwater. The higher concentration of fluoride ions are observed in the lower EC concentration. The isotopic study suggests that fluoride is geogenic in nature. In factor scores, fluoride is noted in association with pH which indicates the dissolution process.

  3. Assessment of fluoride contaminations in groundwater of hard rock aquifers in Madurai district, Tamil Nadu (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thivya, C.; Chidambaram, S.; Rao, M. S.; Thilagavathi, R.; Prasanna, M. V.; Manikandan, S.

    2017-05-01

    The fluoride contamination in drinking water is already gone to the alarming level and it needs the immediate involvement and attention of all people to solve this problem. Fluoride problem is higher in hard rock terrains in worldwide and Madurai is such type of hard rock region. Totally 54 samples were collected from the Madurai district of Tamilnadu with respect to lithology. The samples collected were analysed for major cations and anions using standard procedures. The higher concentration of fluoride is noted in the Charnockite rock types of northern part of the study area. 20 % of samples are below 0.5 ppm and 6 % of samples are above 1.5 ppm exceeding the permissible limit. The affinity between the pH and fluoride ions in groundwater suggests that dissolution of fluoride bearing minerals in groundwater. The higher concentration of fluoride ions are observed in the lower EC concentration. The isotopic study suggests that fluoride is geogenic in nature. In factor scores, fluoride is noted in association with pH which indicates the dissolution process.

  4. Fluoride-induced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lantz, O; Jouvin, M H; De Vernejoul, M C; Druet, P

    1987-08-01

    Renal fluoride toxicity in human beings is difficult to assess in the literature. Although experimental studies and research on methoxyflurane toxicity have shown frank renal damage, observations of renal insufficiency related to chronic fluoride exposure are scarce. We report a case of fluoride intoxication related to potomania of Vichy water, a highly mineralized water containing 8.5 mg/L of fluoride. Features of fluoride osteosclerosis were prominent and end-stage renal failure was present. The young age of the patient, the long duration of high fluoride intake, and the absence of other cause of renal insufficiency suggest a causal relationship between fluoride intoxication and renal failure.

  5. Fluoride release from new light-cured orthodontic bonding agents.

    PubMed

    McNeill, C J; Wiltshire, W A; Dawes, C; Lavelle, C L

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of fluoride release with time from 1 nonfluoridated and 3 fluoride-containing orthodontic bonding materials in distilled water and artificial saliva. Materials tested were Assure (Reliance Orthodontic Products, Itasca, Ill), Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Tokyo, Japan), Python (TP Orthodontics, LaPorte, Ind), and Transbond XT (3M Dental Products, Monrovia, Calif). Ten specimens of each material type were stored in distilled water, and 10 of each type were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. Fluoride release was measured with an ion-specific electrode. Readings were taken periodically for a total time period of 6 months. At day 1, Assure released the most fluoride into distilled water (66.2 microg/cm(2)) and into artificial saliva (65.8 microg/cm(2)), followed by Fuji Ortho LC (25.9 microg/cm(2); 18.8 microg/cm(2)), Python (6.3 microg/cm(2); 4.2 microg/cm(2)), and Transbond (0.1 microg/cm(2); 0.1 microg/cm(2)). The fluoride release rates were highest during the first days of testing, declining to lower but more stable levels. At the end of 6 months, Fuji Ortho LC released the most fluoride (3.8 microg/cm(2); 3.5 microg/cm(2)) followed by Assure (3.1 microg/cm(2); 2.8 microg/cm(2)), Python (2.6 microg/cm(2); 1.7 microg/cm(2)), and Transbond (0.1 microg/cm(2); 0.1 microg/cm(2)). The type of storage medium did not dramatically affect fluoride release. The second part of the study, undertaken after a year of sample storage, tested the 20 samples of Assure for a further 2-week period, after exposure to running and still distilled water. Although fluoride release rates declined with time, they were still higher than the 1.5 microg/cm(2) level that is referenced as inhibiting decalcification of enamel in a clinical environment. Release rates were similar in running and still water at all time points. Throughout the 6-month period, all 3 fluoride-containing materials had rates of fluoride release that could theoretically

  6. Speciation of fluoride in workroom air during primary production of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Skaugset, Nils Petter; Ellingsen, Dag G; Notø, Hilde; Jordbekken, Lars; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2015-03-01

    Exposure to fluorides (F(-)) and particulate matter (PM) was assessed by personal sampling with use of Respicon® sampler in Prebake and Søderberg pot rooms in seven aluminium smelters. The inhalable PM mass was dominated by the extra-thoracic aerosol sub-fraction, which contributed with around 70% for both Prebake and Søderberg pot room workers. Quantitative and qualitative differences in exposure were found between pot room workers in smelters using these two technologies. Prebake pot room workers were exposed to 1.4 to 1.7 times higher PM concentrations than Søderberg pot room workers, depending on aerosol sub-fraction. Prebake pot room workers were also exposed to 2.5 to 2.9 higher air concentrations of water-soluble F(-) (FWS(-)) and 2.8 to 5.3 higher air concentrations of non water-soluble F(-) (FAS(-)) than Søderberg pot room workers, depending on aerosol sub-fraction. However, exposure to hydrogen fluoride (HF) was 1.3 times higher among Søderberg pot room workers. The relative amount of FWS(-), however, was higher among Søderberg pot room workers, while the relative amount of particulate F(-) (sum of FWS(-) and FAS(-)) was higher among Prebake pot room workers (6.5 vs. 3.9%). Exposure to the same PM concentration yielded higher FWS(-) and FAS(-) air concentrations among Prebake compared to Søderberg pot room workers.

  7. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-08-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 {+-} 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO{sub 4} at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. Studies on the effect of added LiNO{sub 3} or Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF{sub 6} content of WF{sub 6} gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF{sub 6}.

  8. Fluoride and bacterial content of bottled water vs tap water.

    PubMed

    Lalumandier, J A; Ayers, L W

    2000-03-01

    Bottled water has become a status symbol and is frequently used in place of tap water. While both waters are considered safe to drink, is either more beneficial in preventing tooth decay and is there a difference in purity? To determine the fluoride level and bacterial content of commercially bottled waters municipal tap water and to compare the results. Comparative study. Cleveland, Ohio. Fifty-seven samples of 5 categories of bottled waters were purchased from local stores. Samples of tap water were collected in sterile containers from the 4 local water processing plants. Fluoride levels were determined by an ion-selective electrode method. Water was cultured quantitatively and levels of bacteria were calculated as colony-forming units (CFUs) per milliliter. Fluoride levels and bacterial counts. Fluoride levels within the range recommended for drinking water by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, 0.80 to 1.30 mg/L, were found in only 3 samples of bottled water tested. The fluoride levels of tap water samples were within 0.04 mg/L of the optimal fluoride level of 1.00 mg/L. The bacterial counts in the bottled water samples ranged from less than 0.01 CFU/mL to 4900 CFUs/mL, including 6 samples with levels substantially above 1000 CFUs/mL. In contrast, bacterial counts in samples of tap water ranged from 0.2 to 2.7 CFUs/mL. Five percent of the bottled water purchased in Cleveland fell within the required fluoride range recommended by the state, compared with 100% of the tap water samples, all of which were also within 0.04 mg/L of the optimal fluoride level of 1.00 mg/L. Use of bottled water based on the assumption of purity can be misguided. Recently, the Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, published a final ruling that requires community water systems to regularly report to the public on the quality of local tap water; there are no similar proposals to determine the quality of bottled water through labeling.

  9. Optical Restoration of Lead Fluoride Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, A.; Cole, P. L.; Bertin, P.; Forest, T. A.; Mestari, M.; Naeem, S.; Roche, J.; Camacho, C. Muñoz; LeBaron, N.

    2009-03-01

    Due to its relatively high resistance to high radiation, lead fluoride (PbF2) crystals are becoming an increasingly popular material of choice for electromagnetic calorimetry, such as for experiments requiring the measurement of high-energy photons in Hall A of Jefferson Lab. For our studies we irradiated the PbF2 crystals using an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) followed by exposing the crystals to blue light so as to restore the nominal optical properties. This technique of optical bleaching with blue light affords an efficient and low-cost means for reversing the deleterious effects of optical transmission loss in radiation-damaged lead fluoride crystals. Whereas earlier experiments irradiated the PbF2 samples with 1.1 and 1.3 MeV gammas from 60Co, we used pulsed beams of energetic electrons from the tunable 25-MeV LINAC at Idaho Accelerator Center of Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. A 20-MeV beam of electrons was targeted onto four separate 19 cm length samples of lead fluoride over periods of 1, 2, and 4 hours yielding doses between 7 kGy and 35 kGy. Samples were then bleached with blue light of wavelength 410-450 nm for periods between 19.5 and 24 hours. We performed this process twice—radiation, bleaching, radiation, and then followed by bleaching again—for each of these four PbF2 samples. We shall discuss the efficacy of blue light curing on samples that have undergone two cycles of electron irradiation and optical bleaching.

  10. Optical Restoration of Lead Fluoride Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Spilker, A.; Cole, P. L.; Forest, T. A.; Mestari, M.; Naeem, S.; LeBaron, N.; Bertin, P.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Roche, J.

    2009-03-10

    Due to its relatively high resistance to high radiation, lead fluoride (PbF{sub 2}) crystals are becoming an increasingly popular material of choice for electromagnetic calorimetry, such as for experiments requiring the measurement of high-energy photons in Hall A of Jefferson Lab. For our studies we irradiated the PbF{sub 2} crystals using an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) followed by exposing the crystals to blue light so as to restore the nominal optical properties. This technique of optical bleaching with blue light affords an efficient and low-cost means for reversing the deleterious effects of optical transmission loss in radiation-damaged lead fluoride crystals. Whereas earlier experiments irradiated the PbF{sub 2} samples with 1.1 and 1.3 MeV gammas from {sup 60}Co, we used pulsed beams of energetic electrons from the tunable 25-MeV LINAC at Idaho Accelerator Center of Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. A 20-MeV beam of electrons was targeted onto four separate 19 cm length samples of lead fluoride over periods of 1, 2, and 4 hours yielding doses between 7 kGy and 35 kGy. Samples were then bleached with blue light of wavelength 410-450 nm for periods between 19.5 and 24 hours. We performed this process twice - radiation, bleaching, radiation, and then followed by bleaching again - for each of these four PbF{sub 2} samples. We shall discuss the efficacy of blue light curing on samples that have undergone two cycles of electron irradiation and optical bleaching.

  11. Uniform partial dissolution of bone mineral by using fluoride and phosphate ions combination.

    PubMed

    DePaula, Carl Alex; Pan, Yong; Guzelsu, Nejat

    2008-01-01

    Mineral content is one of the main predictors of the mechanical properties of bone tissue. The contribution of the bone mineral phase to the mechanical properties of bone has been investigated by reducing the mineral content of bone with different in vitro treatment techniques such as hydrochloric acid (HCl), ethylenedinitrilo tetraacetic acid (EDTA), and fluoride ion treatment. In this study, we propose a new treatment technique which combines fluoride and phosphate ions. Bovine femur specimens were used to determine the mechanical properties of cortical bone after different fluoride phosphate ion combination treatments. The treatment solutions, which contain different fluoride and phosphate ion concentrations, dissolved part of the bone mineral in a uniform manner throughout the bone samples. Dissolution by products, which precipitated in the bone tissue, contained calcium fluoride with phosphate ions (CaF(2)/P) and fluorapatite/fluorhydroxyapatite-type material (FAp/FHAp) and acted as filler. Depending on the fluoride and phosphate concentration in a treatment solution, the precipitated material's ratio of FAp/FHAp to total fluoride containing phase (FAp/FHAp + CaF(2)/P) in bone tissue also changed. High fluoride ion content in treatment solutions generated more CaF(2)/P type of precipitate, and low fluoride ion concentration generated more FAp/FHAp type precipitates as compared to high fluoride concentration treatments. These experiments show that phosphate ions are another important parameter of a treatment solution, in addition to ionic strength, pH, and the duration of treatment. In vitro, phosphate fluoride combinations partially dissolve bone mineral content in a wider range than fluoride treatment alone in a uniform manner. With this new technique one can control more precisely the partial dissolution of the bone mineral and mineral phase's contribution to mechanical properties of bone tissue.

  12. Fluoride: A naturally-occurring health hazard in drinking-water resources of Northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chuah, C Joon; Lye, Han Rui; Ziegler, Alan D; Wood, Spencer H; Kongpun, Chatpat; Rajchagool, Sunsanee

    2016-03-01

    In Northern Thailand, incidences of fluorosis resulting from the consumption of high-fluoride drinking-water have been documented. In this study, we mapped the high-fluoride endemic areas and described the relevant transport processes of fluoride in enriched waters in the provinces of Chiang Mai and Lamphun. Over one thousand surface and sub-surface water samples including a total of 995 collected from shallow (depth: ≤ 30 m) and deep (> 30 m) wells were analysed from two unconnected high-fluoride endemic areas. At the Chiang Mai site, 31% of the shallow wells contained hazardous levels (≥ 1.5 mg/L) of fluoride, compared with the 18% observed in the deep wells. However, at the Lamphun site, more deep wells (35%) contained water with at least 1.5mg/L fluoride compared with the shallow wells (7%). At the Chiang Mai site, the high-fluoride waters originate from a nearby geothermal field. Fluoride-rich geothermal waters are distributed across the area following natural hydrological pathways of surface and sub-surface water flow. At the Lamphun site, a well-defined, curvilinear high-fluoride anomalous zone, resembling that of the nearby conspicuous Mae Tha Fault, was identified. This similarity provides evidence of the existence of an unmapped, blind fault as well as its likely association to a geogenic source (biotite-granite) of fluoride related to the faulted zone. Excessive abstraction of ground water resources may also have affected the distribution and concentration of fluoride at both sites. The distribution of these high-fluoride waters is influenced by a myriad of complex natural and anthropogenic processes which thus created a challenge for the management of water resources for safe consumption in affected areas. The notion of clean and safe drinking water can be found in deeper aquifers is not necessarily true. Groundwater at any depth should always be tested before the construction of wells.

  13. Strontium-90 fluoride data sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a compilation of available data and appropriate literature references on the properties of strontium-90 fluoride and nonradioactive strontium fluoride. The objective of the document is to compile in a single source pertinent data to assist potential users in the development, licensing, and use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/-fueled radioisotope heat sources for terrestrial power conversion and thermal applications. The report is an update of the Strontium-90 Fluoride Data Sheet (BNWL-2284) originally issued in April 1977.

  14. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  15. Spectral Diversity Crystalline Fluoride Lasers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    2 4.-. i1.34 I R TUNABLE Table IX XeF Pumoe TM3 +: YLF :1 .Tm:YLF exhibits nearly ideal parameters for high energy operation aa3x10-20cm 2 ESAT 0cm e...host crystal, lithium yttrium fluoride, LiYF*4 ( YLF )" 1..0 Introductin Within the realm of crystalline laser materials,. the class of fluorides...on the host crystal, lithium yttrium fluoride, LiYF4 - often shortened as YLF . Tables I and 12 show the mechanical, thermal, and optical properties

  16. Salivary retention after application of fluoride gel using toothbrush or tray: a crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Cecilia Claudia Costa; Lula, Estevam Carlos de Oliveira; Azevedo, Izabelle Maria Cabral de; Maia, Mariana de Figueiredo Lopes E; Lopes, Fernanda Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there are no studies in the literature evaluating salivary fluoride retention after small amounts of fluoride gel are applied to children's teeth. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to compare salivary retention after gel application using a toothbrush or by traditional application with trays. In this crossover study, children with active caries (n = 10) were randomized into one of the following treatment groups: a) application of fluoride gel using a tray (control), or b) application of fluoride gel with a toothbrush (treatment). After a 7-day washout period, the treatments were inverted. Unstimulated saliva samples were collected at baseline and 0.5, 5, 15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes after acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel application in order to analyze fluoride retention in saliva. The area under the curve (AUC) was also calculated. There were no differences in fluoride retention after application of small amounts of APF with a toothbrush compared to traditional gel application using trays at all time points studied, and no differences in AUC were observed (Student t-test, p > 0.05). These results suggest that application of fluoride gel in children using a toothbrush can be utilized as an option rather than traditional trays, since the same salivary retention of fluoride is obtained using a lower dose.

  17. Effects of fluoridated drinking water on dental caries in Australian adults.

    PubMed

    Slade, G D; Sanders, A E; Do, L; Roberts-Thomson, K; Spencer, A J

    2013-04-01

    Systematic reviews produce conflicting conclusions regarding dental caries-preventive effects of water fluoridation in adults. The authors investigated the relationship using data from the nationally representative 2004-2006 Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health. Effects were compared between the pre-fluoridation cohort born before 1960 (n = 2,270) and the cohort born between 1960 and 1990 (n = 1,509), when widespread implementation of fluoridation increased population coverage from < 1% to 67%. Residential history questionnaires determined the percentage of each person's lifetime exposed to fluoridated water. Examiners recorded decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMF-Teeth) and decayed and filled tooth surfaces (DF-Surfaces). Socio-demographic and preventive dental behaviors were included in multivariable least-squares regression models adjusted for potential confounding. In fully adjusted models, > 75% of lifetime exposure to fluoridation relative to < 25% of lifetime exposure was associated with 11% and 10% fewer DMF-Teeth in the pre-1960 (p < .0001) and 1960-1990 cohorts (p = .018), respectively. Corresponding reductions in DF-Surfaces were 30% (p < .001) and 21% (p < .001). Findings for intermediate fluoridation exposure suggested a dose-response relationship. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses accounting for missing data. In this nationally representative sample of Australian adults, caries-preventive effects of water fluoridation were at least as great in adults born before widespread implementation of fluoridation as after widespread implementation of fluoridation.

  18. Portland Water Fluoridation: A Newspaper Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Allison; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Lewis, Patricia Ryan

    2017-03-01

    Portland, Oregon is the largest city in the United States without community water fluoridation (CWF). A newspaper analysis was conducted of the failed 2013 CWF campaign to evaluate anti-fluoridation and pro-fluoridation messaging provided by newspapers during the campaign. News content was categorized by type and slant (pro-fluoridation, anti-fluoridation, or neutral) and 34 variables were tabulated (23 anti-fluoridation, 11 pro-fluoridation). Results showed overall messaging was slightly pro-fluoridation, as compared to anti-fluoridation or neutral content (35%, 32%, and 33% respectively). Editorial content was 85% pro-fluoridation and 15% anti-fluoridation. The most frequent anti-fluoridation variables were alternatives to water fluoridation, mass/forced medication and concerns about the political process. Conversely, tooth decay and social justice were the most commonly cited pro-fluoridation variables. Newspapers can be influential in shaping public policy opinions in the fight for community water fluoridation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Investing in professional advocacy: a case study of a successful fluoridation campaign in rural New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Sivaneswaran, S; Chong, G T F

    2011-09-01

    In New South Wales (NSW), Australia, the responsibility to implement water fluoridation rests with local government Councils, partly accounting for the hindrance in its statewide implementation. Since 2003, the NSW Health Department has been actively promoting water fluoridation to the remaining unfluoridated rural communities. To describe the community education and consultation strategies which led to the implementation of fluoridation in two rural NSW towns. In February 2005, the Mid-Western Regional Council and the NSW Health Department undertook a comprehensive community education process followed by a consultation process. The education process included the organization of public forums; distribution of fluoridation information packs; building rapport with the local media; and the use of local disease and treatment data to demonstrate oral health disparities with neighbouring fluoridated towns. The consultation process to determine support for fluoridation included seeking written submissions from the community and conducting interviews on a random sample of households by an independent research organization. A total of 502 (N = 1,012) interviews to determine support for fluoridation were completed, achieving a response rate of 49.6%. 54% of respondents wanted their water supplies fluoridated, 25% did not and the remaining 21% were unsure. In June 2005, the Mid-Western Regional Council resolved to implement water fluoridation and fluoride was added to the towns' water supplies in November 2007. This case study demonstrates that it is possible to garner community support for water fluoridation with the use of a multifaceted approach in educating and consulting communities and stakeholders.

  20. Health risk assessment of fluoride in drinking water from Anhui Province in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-jian; Jin, You-qian; Wei, Jun-ling

    2013-05-01

    This study analyzes the concentrations and health risks of fluoride in 249 drinking water samples collected from different regions of Anhui Province in China. Results indicated that fluoride content in drinking water ranged from 0.12 to 1.94 mg L(-1) (mean = 0.57 mg L(-1)) in the following order: Huaibei plain region > Jianghuai hill region ≈ Dabieshan mountainous region > plain along the Yangtze River region > southern Anhui mountainous region. The fluoride contents were less than 0.50 mg L(-1) in 66.66 % of the drinking water samples, 0.51-1.0 mg L(-1) in 23.29 %, and higher than 1.0 mg L(-1) in 12.04 %. The fluoride levels in some samples were lower than the recommended values for controlling dental caries (0.50-1.0 mg L(-1)). The total fluoride intake from drinking water was between 0.14 and 2.33 mg per day in different regions of the province, supposing an individual consumes 1.2 L of water per day. Therefore, measures should be taken to increase fluoride intake in the Jianghuai hill region, Dabieshan mountainous region, plain along the Yangtze River, and southern Anhui mountainous region to control dental caries. On the other hand, the fluoride levels must be reduced in the Huaibei plain region to decrease endemic fluorosis. The results serve as crucial guidelines for managing fluoride safety in drinking water and controlling endemic fluorosis in different regions of Anhui Province.

  1. Fluoride content of soft drinks, nectars, juices, juice drinks, concentrates, teas and infusions marketed in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Fojo, C; Figueira, M E; Almeida, C M M

    2013-01-01

    A potentiometric method using a fluoride combination ion-selective electrode was validated and used to analyse 183 samples, including soft drinks, juices, nectars, juice drinks, concentrates, teas and infusions marketed in Portugal. The fluoride levels were higher in extract-based soft drinks, juice drinks and juice, with fluoride values of 0.86 ± 0.35, 0.40 ± 0.24 and 0.37 ± 0.11 mg l⁻¹, respectively. The lowest fluoride concentration was found in infusion samples (0.12 ± 0.01 mg l⁻¹), followed by teas and carbonated soft drinks with fluoride concentrations of 0.16 ± 0.12 and 0.18 ± 0.07 mg l⁻¹, respectively. Nectars, concentrates and juice-based drinks had similar fluoride concentrations of 0.33 ± 0.16, 0.29 ± 0.12 and 0.25 ± 0.14 mg l⁻¹, respectively. The fluoride concentrations in all these samples would only contribute intakes below the acceptable daily intake (ADI = 0.05 mg kg⁻¹ body weight day⁻¹), indicating that, individually, these beverages cannot induce fluoride toxicity in the population group of children.

  2. Fluoride concentration in community water and bottled drinking water: a dilemma today.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, S; Marya, C M; Jnaneswar, A; Kumar, H

    2013-01-01

    Because of the potential for contamination of municipal water supplies, people appear to be turning to alternative sources for their pure drinking water. The present study analyzed the fluoride concentration in community water and bottled drinking water sold in Faridabad city. A comparative evaluation of fluoride content in community water supply and bottled drinking water was done using ion-selective electrode method. The community water samples were collected from six different areas (i.e. north zone, south zone, east zone, west zone and central zone) in the city from public health water supply taps while bottled drinking water samples were randomly picked from grocery shops or supermarkets. The fluoride concentration in the community water supply in this study ranges from 0.11 to 0.26 mg/L with mean fluoride concentration of 0.17 mg/L. The mean concentration of fluoride in bottled drinking water was 0.06 mg/L. The differences observed between mean of two water samples was statistically significant. The results obtained from the present study clearly state that the fluoride concentration was insufficient in community water supply from all the areas and also was deficient in bottled drinking water sold in Faridabad city. So, Alternative sources of fluorides should be supplemented for optimal dental benefits from the use of fluoride.

  3. Fluoride release from aged resin composites containing fluoridated glass filler.

    PubMed

    Itota, Toshiyuki; Al-Naimi, Omar T; Carrick, Thomas E; Yoshiyama, Masahiro; McCabe, John F

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release from aged resin composites containing different types of fluoridated glass filler into both deionized distilled water and lactic acid solution. Three resin composites, UniFil S (containing fluoro-alumino-silicate glass filler), Reactmer (containing pre-reacted glass-ionomer filler) and Beautifil (containing both types of fillers) were used. A conventional glass-ionomer cement, Ketac-Fil, was used as a control. Five disk specimens of each material were prepared and aged in water for 10 weeks. After aging, specimens were immersed in deionized distilled water for a further 6 days and then in aqueous lactic acid (pH 4.0) for 2 days. This process was repeated twice more and the specimens were subsequently immersed in water for a further 12 days. Fluoride release was measured every 2 days throughout the post-aging period. The amount of fluoride release for aged UniFil S and Beautifil markedly increased in acid solution compared with water storage. The difference was not so great for aged Reactmer and Ketac-Fil. UniFil S and Beautifil gave significantly greater fluoride release in water following immersion in acid solution (p<0.05, two-way ANOVA and Scheffe's test), but Reactmer and Ketac-Fil showed no such increase in fluoride release after acid immersion. These results suggested that the nature of the fluoridated glass filler within a resin composite and the way in which the material interacts with an acidic environment affected the amount of fluoride released.

  4. Effect of Fluoride Gels on Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    China, Ana L.P; Souza, Nayara M; Gomes, Yasmin do S. B. de L; Alexandrino, Larissa D; Silva, Cecy M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of bleaching treatments containing added calcium and combined with neutral or acidic fluoride gels on tooth enamel was investigated in vitro through Knoop microhardness (KHN) and surface roughness (SR) measurements. A total of 60 bovine incisors were tested, including 30 for SR measurements and 30 for KHN measurements. The specimens were divided into 12 groups and subjected to a bleaching agent with hydrogen peroxide 35% (Whiteness HP 35% Maxx, FGM) or hydrogen peroxide 35% with calcium (Whiteness HP 35% Blue Calcium, FGM) and a fluoride treatment flugel acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) or flugel neutral fluoride (NF). Control specimens were submitted to bleaching treatments without fluoride. Microhardness tests were performed using a Knoop indentor. Roughness measurements were obtained using a roughness analyzer. Measurements were obtained before and after treatment. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C between treatments. The results were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Treatments using APF combined with 35% HP caused a decrease in microhardness, while NF combined with HP 35% Ca increased the enamel hardness. Fluoride gels did not alter the SR of the bleached enamel. PMID:25419249

  5. Formation of phosphate-containing calcium fluoride at the expense of enamel, hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, J; Christoffersen, M R; Arends, J; Leonardsen, E S

    1995-01-01

    During the caries process complex reactions involving calcium, phosphate, hydrogen and fluoride ions as main species take place. In this study the precipitation and dissolution reactions occurring in suspensions of enamel, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and fluorapatite (FAP) on addition of fluoride were investigated under well-defined conditions. pH and pF were monitored; calcium and phosphate concentrations were measured at selected times; the solid phases were examined by infra-red, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Precipitation of phosphate-containing calcium fluoride crystals, CaF2(P), can cause severe reduction in the calcium ion concentration and release of hydrogen ions from the precipitated phosphate. These reactions result in considerable dissolution of enamel, HAP and even of FAP. More of the added mineral dissolves with 50 mmol/l fluoride than with 10 mmol/l fluoride, mainly due to the greater reduction in calcium ion concentration. This work shows that phosphate-containing calcium fluoride is most likely an important compound to be considered in the caries process.

  6. Method for the determination of lignin content of a sample by flash pyrolysis in an atmosphere of hydrogen or helium and method therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy (Inventor); Kwack, Eug Y. (Inventor); Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The lignin content of wood, paper pulp or other material containing lignin (such as filter paper soaked in black liquor) is more readily determined by flash pyrolysis of the sample at approximately 550.degree. C. in a reducing atmosphere of hydrogen or in an inert atmosphere of helium followed by a rapid analysis of the product gas by a mass spectrometer. The heated pyrolysis unit as fabricated comprises a small platinum cup welded to an electrically-heated stainless steel ribbon with control means for programmed short duration (1.5 sec, approximately) heating and means for continuous flow of hydrogen or helium. The pyrolysis products enter an electron-ionization mode mass spectrometer for spectral evaluation. Lignin content is obtained from certain ratios of integrated ion currents of many mass spectral lines, the ratios being linearly related to the Kappa number of Klason lignin.

  7. Anticariogenic effect of fluoride-releasing elastomers in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Miura, Karina Katsue; Ito, Izabel Yoko; Enoki, Carla; Elias, Ana Maria; Matsumoto, Mírian Aiko Nakane

    2007-01-01

    This in vivo experimental study evaluated the efficacy of fluoride-releasing elastomers in the control of Streptococcus mutans levels in the oral cavity. Forty orthodontic patients were recruited and divided into two groups of 20. Fluoride-releasing elastomeric ligature ties (Fluor-I-Ties, Ortho Arch Co. Inc., USA) were used in the experimental group, and conventional elastomeric ligature ties (D. Morelli, Brazil), in the control group. Two initial samples of saliva were collected at a 14-day interval to determine the number of colony forming units (CFU) of Streptococcus mutans. Immediately after collecting the second sample, fluoride-releasing elastomeric ligature ties were placed in the patients of the experimental group, and conventional ligature ties, in the patients of the control group. Seven, 14 and 28 days after placement of the elastomeric ligature ties, saliva and plaque surrounding the orthodontic appliance were collected for microbiologic analysis. There were no significant differences in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFUs in saliva or plaque in the area surrounding the fluoride-releasing or conventional elastomeric ligature ties. Thus, fluoride-releasing elastomeric ligature ties should not be indicated to reduce the incidence of enamel decalcification in orthodontic patients. Since there was no significant reduction in S. mutans in saliva or plaque, other means of prevention against enamel decalcification should be indicated for these patients.

  8. FLUORIDE CONCENTRATION IN WATER AT THE AREA SUPPLIED BY THE WATER TREATMENT STATION OF BAURU, SP

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Carolina Simonetti; Ramires, Irene; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Bastos, José Roberto de Magalhães

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the fluoride concentration in the public water supply at the area supplied by the Water Treatment Station of Bauru and classify the samples as acceptable or unacceptable according to the fluoride concentration. Material and methods: samples were collected from 30 areas at two periods, October 2002 and March 2003. The fluoride concentration in the samples was determined in duplicate, using an ion sensitive electrode (Orion 9609) connected to a potentiometer (Procyon, model 720). Samples with fluoride concentration ranging from 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L were considered acceptable, and those whose concentration was outside this range as unacceptable. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results: the fluoride concentration of the water samples varied between 0.31 and 2.01 mg F/L. Nearly 56% of the samples were classified as acceptable. Conclusion: the variations in fluoride concentration at the area supplied by the Water Treatment Station reinforce the need of constant monitoring for maintenance of adequate fluoride levels in the public water supply. PMID:19089059

  9. Geochemical evaluation of fluoride contamination of groundwater in the Thoothukudi District of Tamilnadu, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaraja, C.; Chidambaram, S.; Anandhan, P.; Prasanna, M. V.; Thivya, C.; Thilagavathi, R.; Sarathidasan, J.

    2014-09-01

    Fluoride is a chemical element that has been shown to cause significant effects on human health through drinking water. Different forms of fluoride exposure are of importance and have shown to affect the body's fluoride content and thus increasing the risks of fluoride-prone diseases. Fluoride has beneficial effects on teeth; however, low concentrations of fluoride intensify the risk of tooth decay. Fluoride can also be quite detrimental at higher concentrations at skeletal fluorosis. The Thoothukudi District is a hard rock and alluvial plain marked as one of the Fluoride-increase area in Tamilnadu due to occurrence of various rock types including fluoride-bearing minerals. The F- content of groundwater can thus originate from the dissolution of Fluoride-bearing minerals in the bed rock. Hundred representative groundwater samples from Thoothukudi District were collected during two different seasons. Samples were analysed for F-, other major cations and anions. The study area is chiefly composed of hornblende biotite gneiss, charnockite, alluvio marine, fluvial marine and granite with small patches of quartzite and sandstone. Higher concentration of fluoride is observed during pre-monsoon (3.3 mg l-1) compared to the post-monsoon (2.4 mg l-1) due to the dilution effect. Spatial distribution and factor score show that higher concentrations of F- are noted in the north and central part of the study area owing to lithology. Bicarbonate is well correlated with F- which explains that both ions were derived from the weathering. While F- has a very weak correlation with pH which may be due to the increase of alkalinity resulting from the increase of carbonate and bicarbonate ions.

  10. Comparison of the Biological Impacts of the Fluoride Compounds by Graphical Risk Visualization Map Technique.

    PubMed

    Usuda, Kan; Kono, Rei; Ueno, Takaaki; Ito, Yuichi; Dote, Tomotaro; Yokoyama, Hirotaka; Kono, Koichi; Tamaki, Junko

    2015-09-01

    Various fluoride compounds are widely used in industry. The present risk assessment study was conducted using a series of inorganic binary fluorides of the type XFn, where X(n) = Na(+), K(+), Li(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Al(3+), Nd(3+), La(3+), Ce(3+), Sm(3+), Gd(3+), Y(3+), Yb(2+), and Zn(2+). The aqueous solutions of these salts were orally administrated to 16 experimental groups (one for each of the salts tested). The levels of fluoride, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase in cumulative 24-h urine samples and creatinine clearance were measured to assess possible acute renal damages. The levels of fluoride, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase were also determined in serum samples to assess possible acute hepatic damages. The results reveal that sodium fluoride (NaF), potassium fluoride (KF), and zinc fluoride tetrahydrate (ZnF2 (.)4H2O) can carry the fluoride ion into the bloodstream and that it is excreted via urine more readily than the other compounds tested. These fluorides were assigned the highest risk impact factor. Most of the rare earth fluorides are insoluble in water while those groups 2 and 13 of the periodic table are slightly soluble, so that they do not have a significant negative risk. These findings suggest that the biological impact of fluoride depends on the accompanying counter ion and its solubility. The risk map obtained in the present study shows that the graphical visualization map technique employed is a valuable new tool to assess the toxicological risk of chemical compounds.

  11. Do Fluoride Ions Protect Teeth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Begins with the procedure and results from an investigation on the effect of fluoride on the reaction between eggshell (substitute teeth) and dilute ethanoic acid. Describes an elegantly modified and improvised apparatus. (DDR)

  12. Do Fluoride Ions Protect Teeth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Begins with the procedure and results from an investigation on the effect of fluoride on the reaction between eggshell (substitute teeth) and dilute ethanoic acid. Describes an elegantly modified and improvised apparatus. (DDR)

  13. Prevalence of fluorosis and identification of fluoride endemic areas in Manur block of Tirunelveli District, Tamil Nadu, South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Subarayan Bothi; Viswanathan, Gopalan; Siva Ilango, S.

    2012-12-01

    Prevalence of fluorosis is mainly due to the consumption of more fluoride through drinking water. It is necessary to identify the fluoride endemic areas to adopt remedial measures for the people under the risk of fluorosis. The objectives of this study were to identify the exact location of fluoride endemic areas in Manur block of Tirunelveli District and to estimate fluoride exposure level through drinking water for different age groups. Identification of fluoride endemic areas was performed through Isopleth and Google earth mapping techniques. Fluoride level in drinking water samples was estimated by fluoride ion selective electrode method. A systematic clinical survey conducted in 19 villages of Manur block revealed the rate of prevalence of fluorosis. From this study, it has been found that Alavanthankulam, Melapilliyarkulam, Keezhapilliyarkulam, Nadupilliyarkulam, Keezhathenkalam and Papankulam are the fluoride endemic villages, where the fluoride level in drinking water is above 1 mg/l. Consumption of maximum fluoride exposure levels of 0.30 mg/kg/day for infants, 0.27 mg/kg/day for children and 0.15 mg/kg/day for adults were found among the respective age group people residing in high fluoride endemic area. As compared with adequate intake level of fluoride of 0.01 mg/kg/day for infants and 0.05 mg/kg/day for other age groups, the health risk due to excess fluoride intake to the people of Alavanthankulam and nearby areas has become evident. Hence the people of these areas are advised to consume drinking water with optimal fluoride to avoid further fluorosis risks.

  14. Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Dias, Ranga; Noked, Ori; Salamat, Ashkan; Zaghoo, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    One of the great challenges in condensed matter physics has been to produce metallic hydrogen (MH) in the laboratory. There are two approaches: solid molecular hydrogen can be compressed to high density at extreme pressures of order 5-6 megabars. The transition to MH should take place at low temperatures and is expected to occur as a structural first-order phase transition with dissociation of molecules into atoms, rather than the closing of a gap. A second approach is to produce dense molecular hydrogen at pressures of order 1-2 megabars and heat the sample. With increasing temperature, it was predicted that molecular hydrogen first melts and then dissociates to atomic metallic liquid hydrogen as a first-order phase transition. We have observed this liquid-liquid phase transition to metallic hydrogen, also called the plasma phase transition. In low-temperature studies, we have pressurized HD to over 3 megabars and observed two new phases. Molecular hydrogen has been pressurized to 4.2 megabars. A new phase transition has been observed at 3.55 megabars, but it is not yet metallic.

  15. Total and Free Fluoride Concentration in Various Brands of Toothpaste Marketed in India

    PubMed Central

    Siddanna, Sunitha

    2015-01-01

    Background For fluoridated toothpaste to be effective in controlling dental caries, an adequate concentration of soluble fluoride must be available in the oral cavity. Aim To determine the total and free fluoride concentration in various brands of toothpaste marketed in India. Materials and Methods Three samples of 12 different toothpastes were purchased from supermarkets in Mysore city, Karnataka, India. Toothpastes were analysed in duplicate using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. The concentration of total fluoride (TF) and total soluble fluoride (TSF) were determined. Results Measured TF was consistent with that declared by the manufacturer in five products. Four toothpastes showed lower TF and two higher TF than declared. Most toothpastes exhibited TSF concentrations similar to the TF content except four samples that displayed considerably lower TSF than TF. Conclusion The measurement of total and free fluoride concentrations of toothpastes available in India showed inhomogenities. Therefore there is a need for stringent regulatory control measures for the determination of fluoride content in toothpastes in developing country like India. PMID:26557607

  16. Geochemical factors controlling the occurrence of high fluoride groundwater in the Nagar Parkar area, Sindh, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Tahir; Naseem, Shahid; Usmani, Tanzil Haider; Bashir, Erum; Khan, Farooque Ahmed; Bhanger, Muhammad Iqbal

    2009-11-15

    Fluoride concentrations in groundwater near Nagar Parkar in the Thar Desert of southeastern Pakistan range from 1.13 to 7.85 mg/l, and roughly 78% of the samples contain fluoride in concentrations that exceed the drinking water standard of 1.5mg/l set by WHO. The groundwater is alkaline (pH 7.1-8.4), brackish (TDS 449-15,933 mg/l), and classified as Na-Cl type water. This prevailing chemical character reflects the influence of saltwater intrusion, high evaporation rates, and ion exchange. Groundwater is also supersaturated with respect to calcite, which promotes the removal of Ca(2+) and HCO(3)(-) from solution. As a result, groundwater is generally undersaturated with respect to fluorite, the mineral that typically controls the upper limit of fluoride concentrations. This study examines a number of geochemical parameters in an effort to discover the controls on fluoride concentrations in groundwater. High fluoride concentrations are associated with high TDS, high pH, high Na concentrations, and high sodium absorption ratios (SAR). This suggests that elevated fluoride levels are the result of enhanced fluorite solubility due to Ca depletion and high ionic strength and the release of fluoride from colloid surfaces under high pH conditions. Contrary to what has been found in other studies, sample depth and water temperature do not appear to have a significant role in the distribution of fluoride within the groundwater.

  17. Fluoride - an adjunctive therapeutic agent for periodontal disease? Evidence from a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santhosh; Sharma, Jyothi; Duraiswamy, Prabu; Kulkarni, Suhas

    2009-10-01

    To assess the influence of the water fluoride level on periodontal status, by determining the periodontal health status of subjects residing in low, optimum and high fluoride areas. A cross sectional survey was carried out on 967 adults aged 35-44 years old, from the Udaipur district of India. A stratified cluster random sampling technique was implemented in order to collect a representative sample from low (<0.6 ppm), optimum (0.6 - 1.2 ppm) and high fluoride (>3 ppm) areas, based on the fluoride concentration in drinking water. Periodontal status was assessed in accordance to WHO criteria. The Chi-square test was used to compare proportions, and logistic regression analysis was used to determine the contribution of water fluoride levels to periodontal disease. Those residing in areas of low fluoride levels were more likely to present periodontal pockets than those living in high fluoride areas 1.3 (95 % CI 1.11+/-1.86). Subjects living in areas of low fluoride were noted to have a higher risk of periodontal attachment loss of more than 8mm (OR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.67+/-3.85). The risk for presence of periodontal pockets and attachment loss of more than 8mm increased by 1.17 (95 % CI 1.02+/-1.69) and 1.59 (95 % CI 1.27+/-3.29) respectively for those residing in areas of optimum fluoride levels. Deep periodontal pockets were more prevalent (6.3%) among those residing in areas of low fluoride, followed by optimum (5.2%) and high (3.1%). As the fluoride concentrations increased, the prevalence of shallow and deep periodontal pockets decreased. The severity of periodontal disease was significantly associated with fluoride levels, with cases of loss of attachment gradually decreasing when moving from low fluoride areas to high fluoride areas. It appears that longitudinal studies need to be conducted in order to ascertain the benefits; and microbiological analysis of dental plaque and periodontium should be carried out in order to confirm the effects of fluoride on

  18. Development of gold standard ion-selective electrode-based methods for fluoride analysis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Mier, E A; Cury, J A; Heilman, J R; Katz, B P; Levy, S M; Li, Y; Maguire, A; Margineda, J; O'Mullane, D; Phantumvanit, P; Soto-Rojas, A E; Stookey, G K; Villa, A; Wefel, J S; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M; Zero, D T; Zhang, W; Zohouri, V

    2011-01-01

    Currently available techniques for fluoride analysis are not standardized. Therefore, this study was designed to develop standardized methods for analyzing fluoride in biological and nonbiological samples used for dental research. A group of nine laboratories analyzed a set of standardized samples for fluoride concentration using their own methods. The group then reviewed existing analytical techniques for fluoride analysis, identified inconsistencies in the use of these techniques and conducted testing to resolve differences. Based on the results of the testing undertaken to define the best approaches for the analysis, the group developed recommendations for direct and microdiffusion methods using the fluoride ion-selective electrode. Initial results demonstrated that there was no consensus regarding the choice of analytical techniques for different types of samples. Although for several types of samples, the results of the fluoride analyses were similar among some laboratories, greater differences were observed for saliva, food and beverage samples. In spite of these initial differences, precise and true values of fluoride concentration, as well as smaller differences between laboratories, were obtained once the standardized methodologies were used. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.90 to 0.93, for the analysis of a certified reference material, using the standardized methodologies. The results of this study demonstrate that the development and use of standardized protocols for F analysis significantly decreased differences among laboratories and resulted in more precise and true values. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Development of Gold Standard Ion-Selective Electrode-Based Methods for Fluoride Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Mier, E.A.; Cury, J.A.; Heilman, J.R.; Katz, B.P.; Levy, S.M.; Li, Y.; Maguire, A.; Margineda, J.; O’Mullane, D.; Phantumvanit, P.; Soto-Rojas, A.E.; Stookey, G.K.; Villa, A.; Wefel, J.S.; Whelton, H.; Whitford, G.M.; Zero, D.T.; Zhang, W.; Zohouri, V.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: Currently available techniques for fluoride analysis are not standardized. Therefore, this study was designed to develop standardized methods for analyzing fluoride in biological and nonbiological samples used for dental research. Methods A group of nine laboratories analyzed a set of standardized samples for fluoride concentration using their own methods. The group then reviewed existing analytical techniques for fluoride analysis, identified inconsistencies in the use of these techniques and conducted testing to resolve differences. Based on the results of the testing undertaken to define the best approaches for the analysis, the group developed recommendations for direct and microdiffusion methods using the fluoride ion-selective electrode. Results Initial results demonstrated that there was no consensus regarding the choice of analytical techniques for different types of samples. Although for several types of samples, the results of the fluoride analyses were similar among some laboratories, greater differences were observed for saliva, food and beverage samples. In spite of these initial differences, precise and true values of fluoride concentration, as well as smaller differences between laboratories, were obtained once the standardized methodologies were used. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.90 to 0.93, for the analysis of a certified reference material, using the standardized methodologies. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that the development and use of standardized protocols for F analysis significantly decreased differences among laboratories and resulted in more precise and true values. PMID:21160184

  20. Delayed fracture of Ni-Ti superelastic alloys in acidic and neutral fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Nagumo, Michihiko

    2004-04-01

    Hydrogen-related degradation of the mechanical properties of a Ni-Ti superelastic alloy has been examined by means of delayed fracture tests in acidic and neutral fluoride solutions and hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. Delayed fracture took place in both solutions; the time to fracture was shorter in the acidic solutions than in the neutral solutions with the same fluoride concentration. The time to fracture was reduced in both solutions when applied stress exceeded the critical stress for martensite transformation. In the acidic solutions, Ni-Ti superelastic alloy underwent general corrosion and absorbed substantial amounts of hydrogen. Fractographic features suggested that the delayed fracture in the acidic solutions was attributable to hydrogen embrittlement, whereas in the neutral solutions, a different fracture mode appeared associated with localized corrosion only in the vicinity of the fracture initiation area. In the neutral solutions, the amount of absorbed hydrogen was much less than that in the acidic solutions, and the delayed fracture was likely to be induced by active path corrosion accompanying hydrogen absorption. The results of the present study imply that the hydrogen-related degradation of performance of Ni-Ti superelastic alloys occurs in the presence of fluoride.

  1. The determination of cobalt(II) at DME using catalytic hydrogen current technique in various water samples, agricultural materials and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kanchi, S; Saraswathi, K; Venkatasubba Naidu, N

    2011-12-01

    Two novel and facile ligands ammonium piperidine dithiocarbamate (Amm Pip-DTC) and ammonium morpholine dithiocarbamate (Amm Mor-DTC) were synthesized for the development of rapid and cost effective catalytic hydrogen current technique to analyze cobalt(II) in the presence of NH(4)Cl-NH(4)OH at pH 7.8 and 8.4 with Amm Pip-DTC and Amm Mor-DTC. These ligands produce catalytic hydrogen currents with Co(II) at peak potentials -1.24 V and -1.44 V vs. SCE respectively. Quantitative experimental conditions are developed by studying effect of pH, supporting electrolyte (NH(4)Cl), ligand and metal ion concentrations and effect of adverse ions on peak height to improve the sensitivity, selectivity and detection limits of the catalytic hydrogen current technique and compared it in terms of Student's t test and variance ratio f test with differential pulse polarographic (DPP) method. The developed technique was applied for the analysis of cobalt(II) in various water samples, agricultural materials and pharmaceuticals and the results obtained are in good agreement with the DPP data.

  2. Binding characteristics of homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers for acyclovir using an (acceptor-donor-donor)-(donor-acceptor-acceptor) hydrogen-bond strategy, and analytical applications for serum samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Suqin; Tan, Lei; Wang, Ganquan; Peng, Guiming; Kang, Chengcheng; Tang, Youwen

    2013-04-12

    This paper demonstrates a novel approach to assembling homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) based on mimicking multiple hydrogen bonds between nucleotide bases by preparing acyclovir (ACV) as a template and using coatings grafted on silica supports. (1)H NMR studies confirmed the AAD-DDA (A for acceptor, D for donor) hydrogen-bond array between template and functional monomer, while the resultant monodisperse molecularly imprinted microspheres (MIMs) were evaluated using a binding experiment, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and solid phase extraction. The Langmuir isothermal model and the Langmuir-Freundlich isothermal model suggest that ACV-MIMs have more homogeneous binding sites than MIPs prepared through normal imprinting. In contrast to previous MIP-HPLC columns, there were no apparent tailings for the ACV peaks, and ACV-MIMs had excellent specific binding properties with a Ka peak of 3.44 × 10(5)M(-1). A complete baseline separation is obtained for ACV and structurally similar compounds. This work also successfully used MIMs as a specific sorbent for capturing ACV from serum samples. The detection limit and mean recovery of ACV was 1.8 ng/mL(-1) and 95.6%, respectively, for molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction coupled with HPLC. To our knowledge, this was the first example of MIPs using AAD-DDA hydrogen bonds.

  3. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM SLUDGE SAMPLE BOTTLES CAUSED BY RADIOLYSIS AND CHEMISTRY WITH CONCETNRATION DETERMINATION IN A STANDARD WASTE BOX (SWB) OR DRUM FOR TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    RILEY DL; BRIDGES AE; EDWARDS WS

    2010-03-30

    A volume of 600 mL of sludge, in 4.1 L sample bottles (Appendix 7.6), will be placed in either a Super Pig (Ref. 1) or Piglet (Ref. 2, 3) based on shielding requirements (Ref. 4). Two Super Pigs will be placed in a Standard Waste Box (SWB, Ref. 5), as their weight exceeds the capacity of a drum; two Piglets will be placed in a 55-gallon drum (shown in Appendix 7.2). The generation of hydrogen gas through oxidation/corrosion of uranium metal by its reaction with water will be determined and combined with the hydrogen produced by radiolysis. The hydrogen concentration in the 55-gallon drum and SWB will be calculated to show that the lower flammability limit of 5% hydrogen is not reached. The inner layers (i.e., sample bottle, bag and shielded pig) in the SWB and drum will be evaluated to assure no pressurization occurs as the hydrogen vents from the inner containers (e.g., shielded pigs, etc.). The reaction of uranium metal with anoxic liquid water is highly exothermic; the heat of reaction will be combined with the source term decay heat, calculated from Radcalc, to show that the drum and SWB package heat load limits are satisfied. This analysis does five things: (1) Estimates the H{sub 2} generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water; (2) Estimates the H{sub 2} generation from radiolysis (using Radcalc 4.1); (3) Combines both H{sub 2} generation amounts, from Items 1 and 2, and determines the percent concentration of H{sub 2} in the interior of an SWB with two Super Pigs, and the interior of a 55-gallon drum with two Piglets; (4) From the combined gas generation rate, shows that the pressure at internal layers is minimal; and (5) Calculates the maximum thermal load of the package, both from radioactive decay of the source and daughter products as calculated/reported by Radcalc 4.1, and from the exothermic reaction of uranium metal with water.

  4. Fluoride concentrations in three types of commercially packed tea drinks in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Hsiao, Pao-Kuei; Chiang, Kuang-Mao

    2003-01-01

    Tea is a popular drink around the world. It is also one of the major sources of fluoride intake. The objectives of this study were to assess fluoride concentrations in popular non-, semi-, and full-fermented tea drinks sold on the Taiwan market. Concentration differences among three types of commercially available tea drinks (tea leaf, tea bag, and packaged tea beverage) were explored. Several influential factors in intake concentrations were evaluated. The acute threshold intake (ATI) and allowable daily intake (ADI) of those tea drinks were also estimated. For each commercial type, samples from the most popular tea in one particular fermentation degree (non, semi, and full) were randomly purchased and analyzed for fluoride concentrations. Fluoride levels in different rounds of tea, in different containers, and with different ratios of water and tea leaf were also assessed. In total, 132 tea samples were analyzed. The mean fluoride concentrations in leaf tea without the first round, leaf tea with the first round, bagged tea, and packaged tea were 7.04, 7.79, 5.37, and 25.7 mg/l, respectively. Most of the intake concentrations in those samples exceeded 4 mg/l F, the lower bound of fluoride levels reported in the literatures to be associated with a lower IQ in children and a higher risk of bone fracture. Fluoride concentrations in packaged tea were the highest among the three types of commercially available tea. For studied leaf and bagged tea, almost a constant amount of fluoride was infused from the same amount of tea leaf regardless of the water volume. Besides this, making tea with glass or pottery tea makers would not affect fluoride intake concentrations. Acute intoxication is unlikely to occur. However, tea lovers in high fluoride content areas shall consider limit their consumption of tea drinks to avoid potential chronic effects.

  5. Aquaporin 5 Interacts with Fluoride and Possibly Protects against Caries

    PubMed Central

    Deeley, Kathleen; Poletta, Fernardo A.; Mereb, Juan C.; Leite, Aline L.; Barreta, Priscila A. T. M.; Silva, Thelma L.; Dizak, Piper; Ruff, Timothy; Patir, Asli; Koruyucu, Mine; Abbasoğlu, Zerrin; Casado, Priscila L.; Brown, Andrew; Zaky, Samer H.; Bayram, Merve; Küchler, Erika C.; Cooper, Margaret E.; Liu, Kai; Marazita, Mary L.; Tanboğa, İlknur; Granjeiro, José M.; Seymen, Figen; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Sfeir, Charles; Owyang, Hongjiao; Buzalaf, Marília A. R.; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQP) are water channel proteins and the genes coding for AQP2, AQP5, and AQP