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Sample records for hydrogen gas getters

  1. Development of hydrogen gas getters for TRU waste

    SciTech Connect

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Mroz, E. J.; Peterson, E.; Stone, M.; Haga, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For this reason, the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in waste shipment containers (Transuranic Package Transporter-II or TP-II containers) is limited to the lower explosion limit of hydrogen in air (5 vol%). The use of hydrogen getters is being investigated to prevent the build up of hydrogen during storage and transport of the TP-II containers (up to 60 days). Preferred hydrogen getters are solid materials that scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and chemically and irreversibly bind it in the solid state. One proven getter, 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene or DEB, belongs to a class of compounds called alkynes, which are characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds. These carbon atoms will, in the presence of suitable catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with hydrogen to form the corresponding saturated alkane compounds. Because DEB contains two triple bonds, one mole of DEB reacts with 4 moles of hydrogen. The standard formulation for the 'DEB getter' is a mixture of 75% DEB and 25% carbon catalyst (5% palladium on carbon). Certain chemicals such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are known to 'poison' and reduce the activity of the catalyst. Therefore, in addition to the standard formulation, a semi-permeable barrier that encapsulates and protects the getter and its catalyst from poisons was also developed. The uncoated and polymer coated getter formulations were subjected to tests that determined the performance of the getters with regard to capacity, operating temperature range (with hydrogen in nitrogen and in air), hydrogen concentration, poisons, aging, pressure, reversibility, and radiation effects. This testing program was designed to address the following performance requirements: (1) Minimum rate for hydrogen removal of 1.2E-5 moles hydrogen per second for 60 days; (2) Sufficient getter material within

  2. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Stone; Michael Benson; Christopher Orme; Thomas Luther; Eric Peterson

    2005-09-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds. Carbon may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. In the presence of oxygen, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB has the needed binding rate and capacity for hydrogen that potentially could be generated in the TRUPACT II. Phases 1 and 2 of this project showed that uncoated DEB performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests. Based upon these results, Phase 3, the final project phase, included larger scale testing. Test vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the inner containment vessel of a TRUPACT-II container and a payload of seven 55-gallon drums. The tests were run with an atmosphere of air for 63.9 days at ambient temperature (15-27°C) and a scaled hydrogen generation rate of 2.60E-07 moles per second (0.35 cc/min). A second type of getter known as VEI, a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds, was also tested in Phase 3. Hydrogen was successfully “gettered” by both getter systems. Hydrogen concentrations remained below 5 vol% (in

  3. Hydrogen gettering the overpressure gas from highly radioactive liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.L.; McCoy, J.C.; Schicker, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    Remediation of current inventories of high-activity radioactive liquid waste (HALW) requires transportation of Type-B quantities of radioactive material, possibly up to several hundred liters. However, the only currently certified packaging is limited to quantities of 50 ml (0.01 gal) quantities of Type-B radioactive liquid. Efforts are under way to recertify the existing packaging to allow the shipment of up to 4 L (1.1 gal) of Type-B quantities of HALW, but significantly larger packaging could be needed in the future. Scoping studies and preliminary designs have identified the feasibility of retrofitting an insert into existing casks, allowing the transport of up to 380 L (100 gal) of HALW. However, the insert design and ultimate certification strategy depend heavily on the gas-generating attributes of the HALW. A non-vented containment vessel filled with HALW, in the absence of any gas-mitigation technologies, poses a deflagration threat and, therefore, gas generation, specifically hydrogen generation, must be reliably controlled during all phases of transportation. Two techniques are available to mitigate hydrogen accumulation: recombiners and getters. Getters have an advantage over recombiners in that oxides are not required to react with the hydrogen. A test plan was developed to evaluate three forms of getter material in the presence of both simulated HALW and the gases that are produced by the HALW. These tests demonstrated that getters can react with hydrogen in the presence of simulated waste and in the presence of several other gases generated by the HALW, such as nitrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and carbon monoxide. Although the use of such a gettering system has been shown to be technically feasible, only a preliminary design for its use has been completed. No further development is planned until the requirement for bulk transport of Type-B quantities of HALW is more thoroughly defined.

  4. Gettering of hydrogen and methane from a helium gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cárdenas, Rosa Elia; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172{sup ®} getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. The optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650 °C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110 °C to remove the hydrogen. This approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  5. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    DOE PAGES

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-10-21

    In our study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. Moreover, the optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. Finally, this approach eliminatedmore » the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.« less

  6. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Stewart, Kenneth D.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. We performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. The optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. This approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. We anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  7. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-10-21

    In our study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. Moreover, the optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. Finally, this approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  8. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, L.A.; Mead, K.E.; Smith, H.M.

    1983-09-20

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (1) a solid acetylenic compound and (2) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  9. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, Larry A.; Mead, Keith E.; Smith, Henry M.

    1983-01-01

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  10. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-04-29

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the reusltant hydrogen.

  11. Oxidation resistant organic hydrogen getters

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Buffleben, George M.

    2008-09-09

    A composition for removing hydrogen from an atmosphere, comprising a mixture of a polyphenyl ether and a hydrogenation catalyst, preferably a precious metal catalyst, and most preferably Pt. This composition is stable in the presence of oxygen, will not polymerize or degrade upon exposure to temperatures in excess of 200.degree. C., or prolonged exposure to temperatures in the range of 100-300.degree. C. Moreover, these novel hydrogen getter materials can be used to efficiently removing hydrogen from mixtures of hydrogen/inert gas (e.g., He, Ar, N.sub.2), hydrogen/ammonia atmospheres, such as may be encountered in heat exchangers, and hydrogen/carbon dioxide atmospheres. Water vapor and common atmospheric gases have no adverse effect on the ability of these getter materials to absorb hydrogen.

  12. Hydrogen Uptake of DPB Getter Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Herberg, J L; Saab, A P; Weigle, J; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S; McLean II, W

    2008-05-30

    The physical and chemical properties of 1,4-diphenylbutadiyne (DPB) blended with carbon-supported Pd (DPB-Pd/C) in the form of pellets during hydrogenation were investigated. A thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) was employed to measure the kinetics of the hydrogen uptake by the DPB getter pellets. The kinetics obtained were then used to develop a semi-empirical model, based on gas diffusion into solids, to predict the performance of the getter pellets under various conditions. The accuracy of the prediction model was established by comparing the prediction models with independent experimental data on hydrogen pressure buildup in sealed systems containing DPB getter pellets and subjected to known rates of hydrogen input. The volatility of the hydrogenated DPB products and its effects on the hydrogen uptake kinetics were also analyzed.

  13. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area - Phase 2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Mark Lee

    2002-04-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB. It has the needed binding rate and capacity, but some of the chemical species that might be present in the containers could interfere with its ability to remove hydrogen. This project is focused upon developing a protective polymeric membrane coating for the DEB getter material, which comes in the form of small, irregularly shaped particles. This report summarizes the experimental results of the second phase of the development of the materials.

  14. Hydrogen and moisture getter and absorber for sealed devices

    DOEpatents

    Smith, H.M.; Schicker, J.R.

    1999-03-30

    The present invention is a hydrogen getter and method for formulating and using the getter. This getter effectively removes hydrogen gas typically present in many hermetically-sealed electronic applications where the presence of such gas would otherwise be harmful to the electronics. The getter is a non-organic composition, usable in a wide range of temperatures as compared to organic getters. Moreover, the getter is formulated to be used without the need for the presence of oxygen. The getter is comprised of effective amounts of an oxide of a platinum group metal, a desiccant, and a gas permeable binder which preferably is cured after composition in an oxygen-bearing environment at about 150 to about 205 degrees centigrade.

  15. Low temperature, low pressure hydrogen gettering

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.R.; Courtney, R.L.; Harrah, L.A.

    1975-07-22

    A system is described for the gettering of hydrogen and its isotopes. The gettering materials are painted or coated onto, or otherwise disposed in an area or volume from which hydrogen is to be removed. (auth)

  16. Low temperature, low pressure hydrogen gettering

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D. Richard; Courtney, Robert L.; Harrah, Larry A.

    1976-06-15

    The invention relates to the gettering of hydrogen and its isotopes, the gettering materials being painted or coated onto, or otherwise disposed in an area or volume from which hydrogen is to be removed.

  17. Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Getter-Doped Polymer Transducer for Monitoring Cumulative Exposure: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Maitland, D J; Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Letts, S A; Trebes, J E

    2008-06-05

    A novel prototype optical sensor for monitoring cumulative hydrogen gas exposure was fabricated and evaluated. Chemical-to-optical transduction was accomplished by detecting the intensity of 670 nm laser light transmitted through a hydrogen getter-doped polymer film mounted at the end of an optical fiber; the transmittance of the composite film increased with uptake of hydrogen by the embedded getter. The composite film consisted of the hydrogen getter 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene, also known as DEB, with carbon-supported palladium catalyst embedded in silicone elastomer. Because the change in transmittance was irreversible and occurred continuously as the getter captured hydrogen, the sensor behaved like a dosimeter, providing a unique indication of the cumulative gas exposure.

  18. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, T.J.; Whinnery, L.L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition is described comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. 1 fig.

  19. Polymer system for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    2000-01-01

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  20. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  1. Method for charging a hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Keyser, Matthew A.; Benson, David K.

    1998-01-01

    A method for charging a sample of either a permanent or reversible getter material with a high concentration of hydrogen while maintaining a base pressure below 10.sup.-4 torr at room temperature involves placing the sample of hydrogen getter material in a chamber, activating the sample of hydrogen getter material, overcharging the sample of getter material through conventional charging techniques to a high concentration of hydrogen, and then subjecting the sample of getter material to a low temperature vacuum bake-out process. Application of the method results in a reversible hydrogen getter which is highly charged to maximum capacities of hydrogen and which concurrently exhibits minimum hydrogen vapor pressures at room temperatures.

  2. Method for charging a hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C.E.; Keyser, M.A.; Benson, D.K.

    1998-09-15

    A method for charging a sample of either a permanent or reversible getter material with a high concentration of hydrogen while maintaining a base pressure below 10{sup {minus}4} torr at room temperature involves placing the sample of hydrogen getter material in a chamber, activating the sample of hydrogen getter material, overcharging the sample of getter material through conventional charging techniques to a high concentration of hydrogen, and then subjecting the sample of getter material to a low temperature vacuum bake-out process. Application of the method results in a reversible hydrogen getter which is highly charged to maximum capacities of hydrogen and which concurrently exhibits minimum hydrogen vapor pressures at room temperatures. 9 figs.

  3. Getter pump for hydrogen and hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Wen L.

    1989-01-01

    A gettering device for hydrogen isotopes and gaseous hydrocarbons based on the interaction of a plasma and graphite used as cathodic material. The plasma is maintained at a current density within the range of about 1 to about 1000 mA/cm.sup.2. The graphite may be heated to a temperature greater than 1000.degree. C. The new device offers high capacity, low noise, and gas species selectivity.

  4. Getter pump for hydrogen and hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Wen Ling

    1987-10-14

    A gettering device for hydrogen isotopes and gaseous hydrocarbons based on the interaction of a plasma and graphite used as cathodic material. The plasma is maintained at a current density within the range of about 1 to about 1000 mA/cm/sup 2/. The graphite may be heated to a temperature greater than 1000/degree/C. The new device offers high capacity, low noise, and gas species selectivity. 2 figs.

  5. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOEpatents

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1991-08-20

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

  6. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOEpatents

    Knize, Randall J.; Cecchi, Joseph L.

    1990-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  7. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOEpatents

    Knize, Randall J.; Cecchi, Joseph L.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  8. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1990-12-11

    This patent describes hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters. Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  9. An issue paper on the use of hydrogen getters in transportation packaging

    SciTech Connect

    NIGREY,PAUL J.

    2000-02-01

    The accumulation of hydrogen is usually an undesirable occurrence because buildup in sealed systems pose explosion hazards under certain conditions. Hydrogen scavengers, or getters, can avert these problems by removing hydrogen from such environments. This paper provides a review of a number of reversible and irreversible getters that potentially could be used to reduce the buildup of hydrogen gas in containers for the transport of radioactive materials. In addition to describing getters that have already been used for such purposes, novel getters that might find application in future transport packages are also discussed. This paper also discusses getter material poisoning, the use of getters in packaging, the effects of radiation on getters, the compatibility of getters with packaging, design considerations, regulatory precedents, and makes general recommendations for the materials that have the greatest applicability in transport packaging. At this time, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory composite getter, DEB [1,4-(phenylethylene)benzene] or similar polymer-based getters, and a manganese dioxide-based getter appear to be attractive candidates that should be further evaluated. These getters potentially can help prevent pressurization from radiolytic reactions in transportation packaging.

  10. Tritium gettering from air with hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.; Uribe, F.S.; Stevens, C.G.; Tsugawa, T.T.

    1985-08-01

    The managers of all tritium facilities now worry about their emissions into the atmosphere. The only method for cleaning tritium out of air is to catalyze the formation of tritiated water which is adsorbed, along with the overwhelming bulk of naturally occurring water vapor, on a zeolite molecular sieve. This method generally costs several million dollars for a small system, because of the necessary steel ducting, compressors and holding tanks. We have long had the dream of finding another getter that might be cheaper to use and would, hopefully, not make tritiated water (HTO). In a previous paper, we discovered that hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP, with the formula HUO/sub 2/PO/sub 4/ x 4H/sub 2/O) getters 1 ppM of tritium gas out of moist air. This makes HUP the first known ''direct'' tritium getter to work in air. However, the tritium enters a hydroxyl network within the HUP, so that it is effectively still in ''water'' form within the HUP. Worse yet, we found up to 10% tritiated water formed during the previous gettering experiments. HUP is unusual in possessing the exceptionally low vapor pressure of 0.6 torr water vapor at 298/sup 0/K. This allows HUP to be used in fairly dry environments. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Even, Jr., William R.

    2000-01-01

    A novel method for preparing a hydrogenation composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon--carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces and particularly from atmospheres within enclosed spaces that contain air, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide or ammonia. The organic polymers molecules containing carbon--carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble noble metal catalyst composition. High molecular weight polymers may be added to the organic polymer/catalyst mixture in order to improve their high temperature performance. The hydrogenation composition is prepared by dispersing the polymers in a suitable solvent, forming thereby a solution suspension, flash-freezing droplets of the solution in a liquid cryogen, freeze-drying the frozen droplets to remove frozen solvent incorporated in the droplets, and recovering the dried powder thus formed.

  12. Method for absorbing hydrogen using an oxidation resisant organic hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Buffleben, George M.

    2009-02-03

    A composition for removing hydrogen from an atmosphere, comprising a mixture of a polyphenyl ether and a hydrogenation catalyst, preferably a precious metal catalyst, and most preferably platinum, is disclosed. This composition is stable in the presence of oxygen, will not polymerize or degrade upon exposure to temperatures in excess of 200.degree. C., or prolonged exposure to temperatures in the range of 100-300.degree. C. Moreover, these novel hydrogen getter materials can be used to efficiently remove hydrogen from mixtures of hydrogen/inert gas (e.g., He, Ar, N.sub.2), hydrogen/ammonia atmospheres, such as may be encountered in heat exchangers, and hydrogen/carbon dioxide atmospheres. Water vapor and common atmospheric gases have no adverse effect on the ability of these getter materials to absorb hydrogen.

  13. Hydrogen gettering packing material, and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.; Thompson, Lisa M.; Smith, Henry Michael; Schicker, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  14. Characterization and Testing of Improved Hydrogen Getter Materials - FY16 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Kevin Mark; Sandoval, Cynthia Wathen

    2016-11-07

    Organic-based hydrogen getter materials have been in use for many years. These materials are able to prevent the dangerous buildup of hydrogen gas in sealed containers, and are also used to protect surrounding materials from degradation caused by chemical reactions. This document describes these materials.

  15. Method of gettering hydrogen under conditions of low pressure

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Gruen, Dieter M.

    1983-01-01

    A ternary intermetallic compound having the formula Zr(V.sub.1-x Cr.sub.x).sub.2 where x is in the range of 0.01 to 0.90 is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 200.degree. C., at pressures down to 10.sup.-6 Torr. The compound is suitable for use as a hydrogen getter in low pressure, high temperature applications such as magnetic confinement fusion devices.

  16. Design, fabrication, and testing of a getter-based atmosphere purification and waste treatment system for a nitrogen-hydrogen-helium glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Bibeault, M. L.; Paglieri, S. N.; Tuggle, D. G.; Wermer, J. R.; Nobile Jr, A.

    2008-07-15

    A system containing a combination of getters (Zr-Mn-Fe, SAES St909; and Zr{sub 2}Fe, SAES St198) was used to process the nitrogen-hydrogen-helium atmosphere in a glovebox used for handling metal tritide samples. During routine operations, the glovebox atmosphere is recirculated and hydrogenous impurities (i.e. CQ{sub 4}, Q{sub 2}O, and NQ{sub 3}, where Q =H, D, T) are decomposed (cracked) and removed by Zr-Mn-Fe without absorbing elemental hydrogen isotopes. If the tritium content of the glovebox atmosphere becomes unacceptably high, the getter system can rapidly strip the glovebox atmosphere of all hydrogen isotopes by absorption on the Zr{sub 2}Fe, thus lessening the burden on the facility waste gas treatment system. The getter system was designed for high flowrate ( > 100 1/min), which is achieved by using a honeycomb support for the getter pellets and 1.27-cm diameter tubing throughout the system for reduced pressure drop. The novel getter bed design also includes an integral preheater and copper liner to accommodate swelling of the getter pellets, which occurs during loading with oxygen and carbon impurities. Non-tritium functional tests were conducted to determine the gettering efficiencies at different getter bed temperatures and flowrates by recirculating gas through the system from, a 6-m{sup 3} glovebox containing known concentrations of impurities. (authors)

  17. Assessment of Zr-Fe-V getter alloy for gas-gap heat switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prina, M.; Kulleck, J. G.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A commercial Zr-V-Fe alloy (i.e., SAES Getters trade name alloy St-172) has been assessed as reversible hydrogen storage material for use in actuators of gas gap heat switches. Two prototype actuators containing the SAES St-172 material were built and operated for several thousand cycles to evaluate performance of the metal hydride system under conditions simulating heat switch operation.

  18. Gettering of copper to hydrogen-induced cavities in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong-Leung, J.; Ascheron, C. E.; Petravic, M.; Elliman, R. G.; Williams, J. S.

    1995-03-01

    Hydrogen implantation and subsequent thermal annealing is found to result in a well-defined band of cavities in Si. This band is an extremely efficient gettering layer for Cu which is also introduced into the near surface of Si by ion implantation. Profiling of implanted Cu indicates that ˜95% of an initial 3×1015 cm-2 Cu implant is redistributed following annealing at a temperature of 780 °C from a near-surface damaged layer to a narrow band of cavities of width ˜1000 Å at a depth of ˜1 μm. Furthermore, the Si between the surface and the cavity band is essentially defect-free and that some cavities contain the bulk Cu3Si phase.

  19. Studies of Hydrogen Getter Material Self-decomposition and Reaction Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Saab, A P; Dinh, L N

    2007-03-19

    Diacetylene based hydrogen getters are examined in order to gauge their self decomposition products, as well as to determine possible origins for observed losses in origins getter capacity. Simple long term (several months) thermal aging tests were conducted, with periodic solid solid-phase micro micro-extraction (SPME) sampling followed by GC/MS analysis. The results suggest that bis(diphenylethynyl) benzene tends to decompose to give phenyl contaminants more readily than diphenylbutadiyne. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction studies of the palladium catalyst following varying extents of reaction with hydrogen show that there is no change to the catalyst particles, indicating that any change in capacity originates from other causes. These causes are suggested by Sievert's-type experiments on the reaction of the getter with a low pressure (about 10 Torr) hydrogen atmosphere. The reaction data indicate that the getter capacity depends on the pressure of hydrogen to which the material is exposed, and also its thermal history.

  20. Performance testing of aged hydrogen getters against criteria for interim safe storage of plutonium bearing materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Nissen, April; Buffleben, George M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen getters were tested for use in storage of plutonium-bearing materials in accordance with DOE's Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials. The hydrogen getter HITOP was aged for 3 months at 70 C and tested under both recombination and hydrogenation conditions at 20 and 70 C; partially saturated and irradiated aged getter samples were also tested. The recombination reaction was found to be very fast and well above the required rate of 45 std. cc H2h. The gettering reaction, which is planned as the backup reaction in this deployment, is slower and may not meet the requirements alone. Pressure drop measurements and {sup 1}H NMR analyses support these conclusions. Although the experimental conditions do not exactly replicate the deployment conditions, the results of our conservative experiments are clear: the aged getter shows sufficient reactivity to maintain hydrogen concentrations below the flammability limit, between the minimum and maximum deployment temperatures, for three months. The flammability risk is further reduced by the removal of oxygen through the recombination reaction. Neither radiation exposure nor thermal aging sufficiently degrades the getter to be a concern. Future testing to evaluate performance for longer aging periods is in progress.

  1. The Effects of Temperature and Carbon Tetrachloride on Polymer Based Hydrogen Getters

    SciTech Connect

    George M. Buffleben; Timothy J. Shepod

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes hydrogen pumping by organic getters in the presence of carbon tetrachloride, and how the reduction of pumping in the presence of this catalyst poison can be minimized through the choice of catalyst. Catalyst A is shown to be preferred in a clean environment, and catalyst B for a poisoned environment. Additional, we examine the effects of temperature on pumping rates, and show that this getter is effective over a large temperature range from -23 to 107 degrees Celsius.

  2. Hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the SAES St707 non-evaporable getter at various temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Irving; Mills, Bernice E.

    2010-08-01

    A prototype of a tritium thermoelectric generator (TTG) is currently being developed at Sandia. In the TTG, a vacuum jacket reduces the amount of heat lost from the high temperature source via convection. However, outgassing presents challenges to maintaining a vacuum for many years. Getters are chemically active substances that scavenge residual gases in a vacuum system. In order to maintain the vacuum jacket at approximately 1.0 x 10{sup -4} torr for decades, nonevaporable getters that can operate from -55 C to 60 C are going to be used. This paper focuses on the hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the St707{trademark} non-evaporable getter by SAES. Using a getter testing manifold, we have carried out experiments to test these characteristics of the getter over the temperature range of -77 C to 60 C. The results from this study can be used to size the getter appropriately.

  3. New High Capacity Getter for Vacuum-Insulated Mobile Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    H. Londer; G. R. Myneni; P. Adderley; G. Bartlok; J. Setina; W. Knapp; D. Schleussner

    2006-05-01

    Current ''Non evaporable getters'' (NEGs), based on the principle of metallic surface sorption of gas molecules, are important tools for the improving the performance of many vacuum systems. High porosity alloys or powder mixtures of Zr, Ti, Al, V, Fe and other metals are the base materials for this type of getters. The continuous development of vacuum technologies has created new challenges for the field of getter materials. The main sorption parameters of the current NEGs, namely, pumping speed and sorption capacity, have reached certain upper limits. Chemically active metals are the basis of a new generation of NEGs. The introduction of these new materials with high sorption capacity at room temperature is a long-awaited development. These new materials enable the new generation of NEGs to reach faster pumping speeds, significantly higher sticking rates and sorption capacities up to 104 times higher during their lifetimes. Our development efforts focus on producing these chemically active metals with controlled insulation or protection. The main structural forms of our new getter materials are spherical powders, granules and porous multi-layers. The full pumping performance can take place at room temperature with activation temperatures ranging from room temperature to 650 C. In one of our first pilot projects, our proprietary getter solution was successfully introduced as a getter pump in a double-wall mobile LH2 tank system. Our getters were shown to have very high sorption capacity of all relevant residual gases, including H2. This new concept opens the opportunity for significant vacuum improvements, especially in the field of H2 pumping which is an important task in many different vacuum applications.

  4. New High Capacity Getter for Vacuum-Insulated Mobile Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londer, H.; Myneni, G. R.; Adderley, P.; Bartlok, G.; Setina, J.; Knapp, W.; Schleussner, D.

    2006-05-01

    Current "Non evaporable getters" (NEGs), based on the principle of metallic surface sorption of gas molecules, are important tools for the improving the performance of many vacuum systems. High porosity alloys or powder mixtures of Zr, Ti, Al, V, Fe and other metals are the base materials for this type of getters. The continuous development of vacuum technologies has created new challenges for the field of getter materials. The main sorption parameters of the current NEGs, namely, pumping speed and sorption capacity, have reached certain upper limits. Chemically active metals are the basis of a new generation of NEGs. The introduction of these new materials with high sorption capacity at room temperature is a long-awaited development. These new materials enable the new generation of NEGs to reach faster pumping speeds, significantly higher sticking rates and sorption capacities up to 104 times higher during their lifetimes. Our development efforts focus on producing these chemically active metals with controlled insulation or protection. The main structural forms of our new getter materials are spherical powders, granules and porous multi-layers. The full pumping performance can take place at room temperature with activation temperatures ranging from room temperature to 650 °C. In one of our first pilot projects, our proprietary getter solution was successfully introduced as a getter pump in a double-wall mobile LH2 tank system. Our getters were shown to have very high sorption capacity of all relevant residual gases, including H2. This new concept opens the opportunity for significant vacuum improvements, especially in the field of H2 pumping which is an important task in many different vacuum applications.

  5. Effect of hydrogen glow discharge conditioning on Zr/Al getter pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Cecchi, J.L.; Ulrickson, M.

    1981-01-01

    Zr/Al bulk getter pumps are presently being considered for use in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to reduce impurities and limit the recycling of hydrogenic species. It is necessary that these pumps not be adversely affected by the hydrogen glow discharge cleaning (GDC) which is planned as part of the routine TFTR vessel wall conditioning. The GDC procedure involves the use of a dc glow discharge with a 400 V bias voltage. The total fluence of hydrogenic ions given to the affected surfaces during a typical conditioning period is 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -2/. We have investigated the effects of typical GDC runs on a getter-pump module containing 25 g of Zr/Al mounted in a 100 liter test stand. Pumping speed, capacity, and regeneration characteristics have been studied after various exposures to GDC.

  6. Effect of gamma irradiation on MnO2/Ag2O hydrogen getter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chlique, Christophe; Lambertin, David; Galliez, Kévin; Labed, Véronique; Dannoux-Papin, Adeline; Jobic, Stéphane; Deniard, Philippe; Leoni, Elisa

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to show the stability of γ-MnO2/Ag2O hydrogen getter under gamma irradiation in order to be suitable for decreasing the hydrogen risk during the nuclear waste transportation. The chemical and the structural properties of the getter were barely unchanged for irradiated doses up to 4 MGy. The pair distribution function (PDF) analysis showed that the γ-MnO2, which can be describe as an intergrowth of the ramsdellite phase (R-MnO2) and the pyrolusite phase (β-MnO2), had the same intergrowth rate (around 60% for β-MnO2 and 40% for R-MnO2) after irradiation and the silver containing promoter was also unchanged. The getter remains therefore efficient for hydrogen trapping. Furthermore, γ-MnO2/Ag2O was tested in a closed environment in the presence of hydrogen released by organic technological waste radiolysis, such as polyvinyl chloride, ion exchange resins, polyethylene and silicone. Over 80% of the hydrogen, generated by organic radiolysis, was trapped under a 1.5 MGy gamma irradiation.

  7. Studies of chromium gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, J.E.; Mioduszewski, P.; Stratton, L.W.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results have shown that hydrogen pumping by chromium is a surface effect. Unlike with titanium, the getter material used in many present day tokamaks, there is no significant diffusion into the bulk. Additional experiments have been carried out to measure the basic characteristics of chromium films for gases of interest in tokamak research. These gases include deuterium, oxygen and nitrogen. A vacuum system is described which allowed precise control of the test gas, a constant wall temperature and determination of the projected getter surface area. A quadrupole mass spectrometer, rather than simply a total pressure gauge, was utilized to measure the partial pressure of the test gas as well as the residual gas composition in the system. A quartz crystal monitor was used to measure film thickness. Pumping speeds and sticking coefficients are given as a function of surface coverage for each test gas. A comparison will be made with titanium films deposited in the same vacuum system and under similar conditions.

  8. Poisoning effect on solubility of hydrogen isotopes in getter materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Sato, Yuichi; Ogawa, Hidenori; Shirasu, Yoshirou; Miyake, Masanobu

    1991-03-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium solubilities in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys with various compositions have been measured at pressures below 100 Pa. All of the solubility data were found to follow Sieverts' law. The presence of carbon in Ti increased the solubilities of hydrogen isotopes and reduced the enthalpies of solution. The solubility increased and the enthalpy of solution decreased with addition of nitrogen into Zr. The hydrogen solubility in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys was larger than the deuterium solubility. Partial thermodynamic functions of hydrogen and deuterium in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys were obtained by a dilute solution model and compared with those in Ti-(O, N) and Zr-O alloys. The isotope effect of hydrogen and deuterium solubilities in the Ti-(O, N, C) and Zr-(O, N) alloys was discussed, and the tritium solubility in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys was evaluated from hydrogen and deuterium data.

  9. Engineering Report on the Fission Gas Getter Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Lynne; Ghose, Sanjit; Gill, Simerjeet; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Strachan, Denis M.

    2012-11-01

    In 2010, the Department of Energy (DOE) requested that a Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)-led team research the possibility of using a getter material to reduce the pressure in the plenum region of a light water reactor fuel rod. During the first two years of the project, several candidate materials were identified and tested using a variety of experimental techniques, most with xenon as a simulant for fission products. Earlier promising results for candidate getter materials were found to be incorrect, caused by poor experimental techniques. In May 2012, it had become clear that none of the initial materials had demonstrated the ability to adsorb xenon in the quantities and under the conditions needed. Moreover, the proposed corrective action plan could not meet the schedule needed by the project manager. BNL initiated an internal project review which examined three questions: 1. Which materials, based on accepted materials models, might be capable of absorbing xenon? 2. Which experimental techniques are capable of not only detecting if xenon has been absorbed but also determine by what mechanism and the resulting molecular structure? 3. Are the results from the previous techniques useable now and in the future? As part of the second question, the project review team evaluated the previous experimental technique to determine why incorrect results were reported in early 2012. This engineering report is a summary of the current status of the project review, description of newly recommended experiments and results from feasibility studies at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS).

  10. Studies of chromium gettering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpkins, J. E.; Mioduszewski, P.; Stratton, L. W.

    1982-12-01

    Preliminary results have shown that hydrogen pumping by chromium is a surface effect. Unlike with titanium, the getter material used in many present day tokamaks, there is no significant diffusion into the bulk. This feature, which would minimize the tritium inventory, makes chromium a viable alternate to titanium gettering for future tokamaks. Additional experiments have been carried out to measure the basic characteristics of chromium films for gases of interest in tokamak research. These gases include deuterium, oxygen and nitrogen. A vacuum system is described which allowed precise control of the test gas, a constant wall temperature and determination of the projected getter surface area. A quadrupole mass spectrometer, rather than simply a total pressure gauge, was utilized to measure the partial pressure of the test gas as well as the residual gas composition in the system. A quartz crystal monitor was used to measure film thickness. Pumping speeds and sticking coefficients are given as a function of surface coverage for each test gas. A comparison will be made with titanium films deposited in the same vacuum system and under similar conditions.

  11. Characterization Of The Hydrogenation Products Of Bix (phenylethynyl) Benzene (DEB) Getter Using Combined GC/FTIR/MS, FT-Raman, and ATR Spectroscopies (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Smyrl, N. R.; Powell, G. L.

    2011-06-09

    Organic hydrogen getters are utilized to minimize hydrogen accumulation in sealed systems where such build up could produce either a safety problem from pressure build up or corrosion problem due the hydriding of metals contained in the sealed vessel. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) is a hydrogen getter that is based on the palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to single bonds in aromatic aryl compound. DEB is a getter mixed with 25% carbon and 1% Pd and pressed into pellets with some porosity. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reactions with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates.

  12. Evaluation of RTV as a Moldable Matrix When Combined With Molecular Sieve and Organic Hydrogen Getter

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    This work was undertaken in an effort to develop a combined RTV 615/3Å molecular sieve/DEB molded component. A molded RTV 615/3Å molecular sieve component is currently in production, and an RTV 615/DEB component was produced in the past. However, all three materials have never before been combined in a single production part, and this is an opportunity to create a new component capable of being molded to shape, performing desiccation, and hydrogen gettering. This analysis looked at weapons system parameters and how they might influence part design. It also looked at material processing and how it related to mixing, activating a dessicant, and hydrogen uptake testing.

  13. Absorption/desorption of hydrogen isotopes and isotopic waters by Zr-alloy getters

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimura, K.; Matsuyama, M.; Watanabe, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    1988-07-01

    Zr-alloy getters have been applied to tritium handling and vacuum conditioning for fusion devices. Some of their properties, however, should be improved to apply them in future devices. From this viewpoint, we have studied the effects of alloying on the getter properties of Zr alloys. We found that the activation energy of absorption and desorption of hydrogen varied considerably with alloying. The activation energy for hydrogen absorption was 0.74 for Zr/sub 61/Al/sub 39/, 0.01 for Zr/sub 57/V/sub 36/Fe/sub 7/, 0.63 for Zr/sub 67/Ni/sub 33/, and 2.8 kcal/mol for Zr/sub 85/Ni/sub 15/, whereas that for Zr was 2.6 kcal/mol. The heat of hydrogen absorption was 27.8 kcal/mol for Zr: it changed with alloying as 32.0--33.4 (Zr/sub 61/Al/sub 39/), 27.8--28.4 (Zr/sub 57/V/sub 36/Fe/sub 7/), 29.0 (Zr/sub 67/Ni/sub 33/), and 28.0 (Zr/sub 85/Ni/sub 15/). In addition, the ratio of the pumping speed of water vapor to that of hydrogen at room temperature varied with alloying element: for example, 1/40 for Zr/sub 57/V/sub 36/Fe/sub 7/ and 1/4 for Zr/sub 67/Ni/sub 33/. The alloying effects mentioned above are considered due to modification of the electronic and/or geometric structure of Zr with alloying.

  14. Hydrogen gas purification apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagihara, N.; Gamo, T.; Iwaki, T.; Moriwaki, Y.

    1984-04-24

    A hydrogen gas purification apparatus which includes at least one set of two hydrogen purification containers coupled to each other for heat exchanging therebetween, each of the hydrogen purification containers containing a hydrogen absorbing alloy. The hydrogen gas purification apparatus is so arranged as to cause hydrogen gas to be selectively desorbed from and absorbed into the hydrogen absorbing alloy by the amount of heat produced when the hydrogen gas is selectively absorbed into and desorbed from the hydrogen absorbing alloy.

  15. Absorption and desorption of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium for Zr--V--Fe getter

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimura, K.; Inoue, N.; Watanabe, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    1984-07-01

    Nonevaporable getters have wide applicability for developing the tritium handling techniques for thermonuclear fusion devices. From this viewpoint, mechanisms of the absorption and desorption of hydrogen isotopes and the isotope effects were investigated for a Zr--V--Fe alloy (St-707) by means of the mass analyzed thermal desorption spectroscopy. It was observed that the absorption rate was proportional to the first power of the pressure, indicating that the rate limiting step is the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen isotopes on the surface. The activation energy was very small, in the order of magnitude of a few tens of calories per mole in a temperature range from -196 to 200 /sup 0/C. The desorption rate was proportional to the square of the amount of absorption, indicating that the rate limiting step is the associative desorption reaction of hydrogen atoms or ions diffused to the surface from the bulk. The rate constants for hydrogen and deuterium were determined as k/sub d/(H/sub 2/) = (5.3/sup +2.6//sub -1.7/)exp(-(28.0 +- 0.7) x 10/sup 3//RT) and k/sub d/(D/sub 2/) = (5.0/sup +2.7//sub -1.7/)exp(-(28.6 +- 0.8) x 10/sup 3//RT) in (1/Pa 1 s), respectively, where R is in (cal/mol deg). With regard to tritium, the rate constant was evaluated as k/sub d/(T/sub 2/) = (5.0/sup +20//sub -4.0/)exp(-(29.3 +- 3) x 10/sup 3//RT), however, the frequency factor will have to be corrected by knowing the relative sensitivity factor of the mass spectrometer for tritium (T/sub 2/).

  16. Impurity and recycling control with gettering in ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, J.E.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Isler, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    The vacuum vessel of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is Ti-gettered with a surface coverage of 70%. The major effects of gettering are: (1) reduction of the oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen content in the plasma and (2) improved density control due to wall pumping of the working gas hydrogen. The overall leak rate in ATF is 2{times}10{sup {minus}4} Torr-l/s which is too high for successful plasma operation. Ti-gettering is routinely employed every morning prior to operation and compensates for this shortcoming by reducing the partial pressure of nitrogen and other residual gas components to the low 10{sup {minus}9} Torr range which is close to the RGA background pressure. Rate-of-rise measurements at this stage show only argon and some methane. The argon is used to monitor the leak rate. In addition to impurity reduction, gettering leads to low recycling of the working gas which appears to be crucial for density control in ATF. The capacity of the gettered surface is large enough to show a strong effect even after 24 hours. An extensive data base on the short-term and long-term effects of gettering on the residual gas composition and its effects on plasma performance has been established over the past three years and will be discussed in this paper. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Impurity gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, S.T.

    1995-06-01

    Transition metal impurities are well known to cause detrimental effects when present in the active regions of Si devices. Their presence degrades minority carrier lifetime, provides recombination-generation centers, increases junction leakage current and reduces gate oxide integrity. Thus, gettering processes are used to reduce the available metal impurities from the active region of microelectronic circuits. Gettering processes are usually divided into intrinsic (or internal) and extrinsic (or external) categories. Intrinsic refers to processing the Si wafer in a way to make available internal gettering sites, whereas extrinsic implies externally introduced gettering sites. Special concerns have been raised for intrinsic gettering. Not only will the formation of the precipitated oxide and denuded zone be difficult to achieve with the lower thermal budgets, but another inherent limit may set in. In this or any process which relies on the precipitation of metal silicides the impurity concentration can only be reduced as low as the solid solubility limit. However, the solubilities of transition metals relative to silicide formation are typically found to be {approx_gt}10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3} at temperatures of 800 C and above, and thus inadequate to getter to the needed concentration levels. It is thus anticipated that future microelectronic device processing will require one or more of the following advances in gettering technology: (1) new and more effective gettering mechanisms; (2) quantitative models of gettering to allow process optimization at low process thermal budgets and metal impurity concentrations, and/or (3) development of front side gettering methods to allow for more efficient gettering close to device regions. These trend-driven needs provide a driving force for qualitatively new approaches to gettering and provide possible new opportunities for the use of ion implantation in microelectronics processing.

  18. Deposition and Characterization of Improved Hydrogen Getter Materials - Report on FY 14-15 Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Kevin Mark; Sandoval, Cynthia Wathen

    2015-10-15

    The goals of this work have been two-fold. First, to perform an initial, quantitative, optimization of getter performance, with the primary variables being DEB/Pd ratio and UV power. Second, to simplify the deposition process to make it more compatible with the DOE production environment.

  19. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  20. Electrolytic gettering of tritium from air

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.; Tsugawa, R.T.; Stevens, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    We have removed 90% of 1 part-per-million tritium gas in air of 25% to 35% humidity by the dc electrical action of the solid proton electrolyte hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP). Gettering takes 5 to 24 hours for a 1 cm/sup 2/ HUP disc at 2 to 4 V in a static, 1200 cc gas volume. Hydrogen gas may be used to flush captured tritium through the HUP. Liquid water leaches out the tritium but water vapor is ineffective. This technique promises an alternative to the conventional catalyst/zeolite method.

  1. Design optimization of metal getter reactors for removing tritium from flowing gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, A.; Bieniewski, T.; Frame, K.; Little, R.; Fisher, K.

    1995-10-01

    A reaction engineering approach was used to design a SAES St 198 metal getter reactor for a glovebox detritiation system. The detritiation system will be used to decontaminate and decommission an Li(D, T)-contaminated glovebox previously used in the U.S. nuclear weapons program. The approach involved development of a model that calculates reactor breakthrough curves as a function of various reactor physical parameters. Experiments involving flow of deuterium in nitrogen through a small metal getter reactor validated the model. The model was then used to investigate the effects of temperature, getter pellet size, reactor diameter, and reactor volume on the reactor performance. The resulting design was a 7 cm diam. by 40 cm long cylindrical reactor that operates at 250 {degree}C, and is filled with 5 kg of as-received SAES St 198 getter pellets. The reactor handles a flow rate of 100 L/min. An St 909 getter reactor was used upstream of the St 198 reactor for impurity removal and water decomposition. The glovebox cleanup system design and getter reactor mechanical design are discussed. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Rupe, J. H.; Kushida, R. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by injecting air and hydrocarbon fuel at one end of a cylindrically shaped chamber to form a mixture and igniting the mixture to provide hot combustion gases by partial oxidation of the hydrocarbon fuel. The combustion gases move away from the ignition region to another region where water is injected to be turned into steam by the hot combustion gases. The steam which is formed mixes with the hot gases to yield a uniform hot gas whereby a steam reforming reaction with the hydrocarbon fuel takes place to produce a hydrogen rich gas.

  3. Update to SAND2007-0095, SAND2007-1789P, and SAND2007-7165P: 18-Month 70°C Aging Study of HiTop Hydrogen Getter for WSRC

    SciTech Connect

    Buffleben, George M.; Nissen, April; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2008-05-01

    Hydrogen getters were tested for use in storage of plutonium-bearing materials in accordance with DOE's Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials. The original studies, documented in Sandia Report SAND2007-0095, included HiTop getter material aged for 3 months at 70°C. This material was aged for an additional 3 months for a total of 6 months at 70°C, and the performance of the getter was evaluated again and documented in Sandia Report SAND2007-1789P. This material was then aged for an additional 7 months for a total of 13 months at 70°C, and the performance of the getter under recombination and gettering conditions was evaluated. A sample of the 13 months aged getter was exposed to radiation at SRNL, and the performance of this sample was also evaluated. The results of the 13 months study is reported in SAND2007-7165P. The HiTop material was aged for an additional 5 months for a total of 18 months. This material was split into two samples with the second sample being exposed to radiation at SRNL. The performance of the 18 month aged HiTop material is covered in this report. The 18-month aged material showed similar performance under gettering conditions to the previously aged material: the recombination rate is well above the required rate of 45 std. cc H2/h, and the gettering reaction occurs in the absence of oxygen at a slower rate. Both pressure drop measurements and 1H NMR analyses support these conclusions. 1H NMR analyses show extremely minor changes in the 18-month aged material, which can be possibly attributed to slight decomposition of the HiTop material or absorption of contaminants during the aging process.

  4. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-06-20

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device is disclosed. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500 C to about 700 C for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal. 1 fig.

  5. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500.degree. C. to about 700.degree. C. for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal.

  6. MECHANICAL ALLOYING AND THERMAL TREATMENT FOR PRODUCTION OF ZIRCONIUM IRON HYDROGEN ISOTOPE GETTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.

    2008-02-20

    The objective of this task was to demonstrate that metal hydrides could be produced by mechanical alloying in the quantities needed to support production-scale hydrogen isotope separations. Three starting compositions (ratios of elemental Zr and Fe powders) were selected and attritor milled under argon for times of 8 to 60 hours. In general, milling times of at least 24 hours were required to form the desired Zr{sub 2}Fe and Zr{sub 3}Fe phases, although a considerable amount of unalloyed Zr and Fe remained. Milling in liquid nitrogen does not appear to provide any advantages over milling in hexane, particularly due to the formation of ZrN after longer milling times. Carbides of Zr formed during some of the milling experiments in hexane. Elemental Zr was present in the as-milled material but not detected after annealing for milling times of 48 and 60 hours. It may be that after intimate mixing of the powders in the attritor mill the annealing temperature was sufficient to allow for the formation of a Zr-Fe alloy. Further investigation of this conversion is necessary, and could provide an opportunity for reducing the amount of unreacted metal powder after milling.

  7. Materials for the scavanging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Phillip, Bradley L.

    1997-01-01

    A hydrogen getter composition comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compostions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases.

  8. Materials for the scavanging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Phillip, Bradley L.

    1997-01-01

    A hydrogen getter composition comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compositions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100.degree. C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases.

  9. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  10. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  11. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  12. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Al-Jassim, M.

    1995-08-01

    We have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that utilizes the very large surface areas, produced by porous silicon etch on both front and back surfaces of the silicon wafer, as gettering sites. In this method, a simple and low-cost chemical etching is used to generate the porous silicon layers. Then, a high-flux solar furnace (HFSF) is used to provide high-temperature annealing and the required injection of silicon interstitials. The gettering sites, along with the gettered impurities, can be easily removed at the end the process. The porous silicon removal process consists of oxidizing the porous silicon near the end the gettering process followed by sample immersion in HF acid. Each porous silicon gettering process removes up to about 10 {mu}m of wafer thickness. This gettering process can be repeated so that the desired purity level is obtained.

  13. Neutral beam dump with cathodic arc titanium gettering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Krivenko, A. S.; Murakhtin, S. V.; Savkin, V. Ya.; Korepanov, S. A.; Putvinski, S.

    2011-03-01

    An incomplete neutral beam capture can degrade the plasma performance in neutral beam driven plasma machines. The beam dumps mitigating the shine-through beam recycling must entrap and retain large particle loads while maintaining the beam-exposed surfaces clean of the residual impurities. The cathodic arc gettering, which provides high evaporation rate coupled with a fast time response, is a powerful and versatile technique for depositing clean getter films in vacuum. A compact neutral beam dump utilizing the titanium arc gettering was developed for a field-reversed configuration plasma sustained by 1 MW, 20-40 keV neutral hydrogen beams. The titanium evaporator features a new improved design. The beam dump is capable of handling large pulsed gas loads, has a high sorption capacity, and is robust and reliable. With the beam particle flux density of 5 × 1017 H/(cm2s) sustained for 3-10 ms, the beam recycling coefficient, defined as twice the ratio of the hydrogen molecular flux leaving the beam dump to the incident flux of high-energy neutral atoms, is ˜0.7. The use of the beam dump allows us to significantly reduce the recycling of the shine-through neutral beam as well as to improve the vacuum conditions in the machine.

  14. Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Lee, Myung W.

    1999-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

  15. Hydrogen gas relief valve

    DOEpatents

    Whittlesey, Curtis C.

    1985-01-01

    An improved battery stack design for an electrochemical system having at least one cell from which a gas is generated and an electrolyte in communication with the cell is described. The improved battery stack design features means for defining a substantially closed compartment for containing the battery cells and at least a portion of the electrolyte for the system, and means in association with the compartment means for selectively venting gas from the interior of the compartment means in response to the level of the electrolyte within the compartment means. The venting means includes a relief valve having a float member which is actuated in response to the level of the electrolyte within the compartment means. This float member is adapted to close the relief valve when the level of the electrolyte is above a predetermined level and open the relief valve when the level of electrolyte is below this predetermined level.

  16. Evolution of gettering technologies for vacuum tubes to getters for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiotti, M.

    2008-05-01

    Getter materials are technically proven and industrially accepted practical ways to maintain vacuum inside hermetically sealed tubes or devices to assure high reliability and long lifetime of the operating devices. The most industrially proven vacuum tube is the cathode rays tubes (CRTs), where large surfaces are available for the deposition of an evaporated barium film by a radio frequency inductive heating of a stainless steel container filled with a BaAl4 powder mixed to Ni powder. The evolution of the CRTs manufacturing technologies required also new types of barium getters able to withstand some thermal process in air without any deterioration of the evaporation characteristics. In other vacuum tubes such as traveling waves tubes, the space available for the evaporation of a barium film and the sorption capacity required to assure the vacuum for the lifetime of the devices did not allow the use of the barium film, prompting the development of sintered non evaporable getter pills that can be activated during the manufacturing process or by flowing current through an embedded resistance. The same sintered non evaporable getter pills could find usage also in evacuated parts to thermally isolate the infrared sensors for different final applications. In high energy physics particle accelerators, the getter technology moved from localized vacuum getter pumps or getter strips to a getter coating over the surface of vacuum chambers in order to guarantee a more uniform pumping speed. With the advent of solid state electronics, new challenges faced the getter technology to assure long life to vacuum or inert gas filled hermetical packages containing microelectronic devices, especially in the telecommunication and military applications. A well known problem of GaAs devices with Pd or Pt metalization is the H2 poisoning of the metal gate: to prevent this degradation a two layer getter film has been develop to absorb a large quantity of H2 per unit of getter surface. The

  17. Development of a Tritium Cleanup System for a Large Helical Device Using Nonvolatile Getter Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Takao; Sakuma, Yoichi; Kabutomori, Toshiki; Shibuya, Mamoru

    2000-01-15

    A tritium cleanup system has been conceptually developed for the large helical device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science. The system is a processing device employed to remove tritium from exhaust gas. In the exhaust gas discharged from the LHD in normal operation, the major part of tritium constituents should be in a form of hydrogen molecules because the fuel used in plasma experiments with the LHD is hydrogen molecules. From this viewpoint, we have designed a tritium cleanup system, which is characterized by tritium being removed and stored in a form of hydrogen molecules with less impurities, like oxygen and carbon, and its decomposition and the separation processes are introduced to convert various tritiated compounds into a form of hydrogen molecules of high purity. Besides these, there is another aspect in that getter materials are applied in both decomposition of tritiated compounds and storage of hydrogen molecules containing tritium.The system design is composed of three essential component parts: a hydrogen separator, a hydrogen absorbing vessel, and a decomposition process vessel. The hydrogen separator and the decomposition process vessel make a process loop repeat to remove hydrogen into a form of hydrogen molecules with less impurities. It is important that 'less impurities' means having a less bad influence on hydrogen-absorbing materials used in the storage vessel.We think that the hydrogen separator will be manufactured by employing a palladium hydrogen purifier system, which is available in the marketplace, and the hydrogen storage vessel will also be manufactured by using hydrogen-absorbing alloys like titanium. Thus, the serious problem imposed on us is how to realize the decomposition process vessel. To develop the decomposition process vessel, we thought nonvolatile getter materials were promising and carried out performance tests of methane decomposition by the nonvolatile getter materials, where methane was used because it is

  18. RENEWABLE LIQUID GETTERING PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.

    1962-08-21

    A method and structure were developed for pumping gases by simple absorption into a liquid gettering material. The invention comprises means ror continuously pumping a liquid getterrng material from a reservoir to the top of a generally vertical surface disposed in a vacuum pumping chamber to receive gaseous and other particles in the liquid gettering material which continuously flows downward over the vertical suiface. Means are provided for continuous removal, degassing, and return of a portion of the liquid gettering material from the reservoir connected with collectrng means at the base of the generally vertical plate. (AEC)

  19. Cleanup and improvement of operational performance of ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) by chromium and titanium gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Isler, R.C.; Bigelow, T.S.; Crume, E.C.; England, A.C.; Glowienka, J.C.; Horton, L.D.; Jernigan, T.C.; Langley, R.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Murakami, M.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Simpkins, J.E.; Wilgen, J.B.; Wing, W.R. ); Bell, G.L. ); Morita, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Several improvements have been realized recently in the performance of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). These have been achieved largely because of expanded employment of chromium and titanium gettering, as opposed to the earliest wall conditioning efforts that relied solely on glow discharge cleaning and baking. Spectroscopic analysis indicates that radiation decreases from as much as 75% to about 25% of the input power between nongettered operation and operation when approximately 70% of the vacuum vessel walls are covered with titanium. Nevertheless, the most important contribution of gettering appears to be the reduction of recycling and of hydrogen evolved from the walls during a discharge, thereby permitting better control of the gas fueling rate. As a result, operational procedures have been developed that allow much higher densities to be obtained than those reached without gettering. The maximum stored energy, confinement time, and line averaged density obtained in ATF to date are: 28 kJ, 25 ms, and 1.2 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3}. In addition, quasisteady operation during neutral beam injection (NBI) into high-density plasmas has been achieved without the evolution to collapse which characterizes the low-density discharges. This paper describes the changes of impurity radiation effected by gettering and compares the behavior of low-density and high-density plasmas when titanium films are deposited over 50% or more of the vacuum vessel walls. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. New Gas Polarographic Hydrogen Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Jesus A.; Barile, Ron

    2004-01-01

    Polarography is the measurement of the current that flows in solution as a function of an applied voltage. The actual form of the observed polarographic current depends upon the manner in which the voltage is applied and on the characteristics of the working electrode. The new gas polarographic H2 sensor shows a current level increment with concentration of the gaseous H2 similar to those relating to metal ions in liquid electrolytes in well-known polarography. This phenomenon is caused by the fact that the diffusion of the gaseous H2 through a gas diffusion hole built in the sensor is a rate-determining step in the gaseous-hydrogen sensing mechanism. The diffusion hole artificially limits the diffusion of the gaseous H2 toward the electrode located at the sensor cavity. This gas polarographic H2 sensor. is actually an electrochemical-pumping cell since the gaseous H2 is in fact pumped via the electrochemical driving force generated between the electrodes. Gaseous H2 enters the diffusion hole and reaches the first electrode (anode) located in the sensor cavity to be transformed into an H+ ions or protons; H+ ions pass through the electrolyte and reach the second electrode (cathode) to be reformed to gaseous H2. Gas polarographic 02 sensors are commercially available; a gas polarographic 02 sensor was used to prove the feasibility of building a new gas polarographic H2 sensor.

  1. Comparison of methods for separating small quantities of hydrogen isotopes from an inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Willms, R.S.; Tuggle, D.; Birdsell, S.; Parkinson, J.; Price, B.; Lohmeir, D.

    1998-03-01

    It is frequent within tritium processing systems that a small amount of hydrogen isotopes (Q{sub 2}) must be separated from an inert gas such as He, Ar and N{sub 2}. Thus, a study of presently available technologies for effecting such a separation was performed. A base case and seven technology alternatives were identified and a simple design of each was prepared. These technologies included oxidation-adsorption-metal bed reduction, oxidation-adsorption-palladium membrane reactor, cryogenic adsorption, cryogenic trapping, cryogenic distillation, hollow fiber membranes, gettering and permeators. It was found that all but the last two methods were unattractive for recovering Q{sub 2} from N{sub 2}. Reasons for technology rejection included (1) the method unnecessarily turns the hydrogen isotopes into water, resulting in a cumbersome and more hazardous operation, (2) the method would not work without further processing, and (3) while the method would work, it would only do so in an impractical way. On the other hand, getters and permeators were found to be attractive methods for this application. Both of these methods would perform the separation in a straightforward, essentially zero-waste, single step operation. The only drawback for permeators was that limited low-partial Q{sub 2} pressure data is available. The drawbacks for getters are their susceptibility to irreversible and exothermic reaction with common species such as oxygen and water, and the lack of long-term operation of such beds. More research is envisioned for both of these methods to mature these attractive technologies.

  2. Device removes hydrogen gas from enclosed spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, W. N.

    1966-01-01

    Hydrogen-oxidant galvanic cell removes small amounts of hydrogen gas continually released from equipment, such as vented silver-zinc batteries, in enclosed compartments where air venting is not feasible. These cells are used in satellite compartments.

  3. Assuring ultra-clean environments in microsystem packages : irreversible and reversible getters.

    SciTech Connect

    Zifer, Thomas; Whinnery, LeRoy L., Jr.; Hollenshead, Jeromy Todd; Buffleben, George M.; McElhanon, James Ross; Nilson, Robert H.

    2003-11-01

    A new generation of irreversible, chemically reacting getters specifically targeted toward assuring the integrity of the local environment within microsystem packages were developed and evaluated. These reactive getters incorporate volatile species into a polymer through covalent bonds, thus producing a non-volatile product. These reactive getters will be combined with getters that rely on absorption media (e.g. zeolites and high surface area carbon fibers) to scavenge non-reactive species, like solvents. Our getter systems will rely on device packaging to limit exchange between the microsystem and the global environment. Thus, the internal getters need only provide local environmental control within the microsystem package. A series of experiments were conducted to determine uptake rates and capacities absorption and reactive-based getters. Diffusion rates through the binder used to hold the getter particles together were also investigated. Getters were evaluated in environments with a saturated headspace and with a limited amount of the volatile species of interest. One- and two-dimensional numerical models and analysis techniques have been developed and used to predict the transport of contaminant species within a representative microsystem package consisting of an open gas-filled volume adjacent to a polymer layer containing embedded particles of getter. The two-dimensional model features explicit representation of the individual getter particles while the one-dimensional treatment assumes a homogeneous distribution of getter material within the getterlpolymer layer. Example calculations illustrate the dependence of getter performance on reaction rates, polymer diffusivity, and getter particle volume fraction. In addition, the model is used to deduce surface reaction rates, solid phase diffusivities, and maximum-loading densities by least-squares fitting of model predictions to measured histories of gas-phase contaminant concentration and getter weight gain.

  4. Evaluation of H2 Getter Materials for Use in the TRUPACT-II

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.

    1999-11-15

    Savannah River Site (SRS) has many waste drums containing Pu-238 that exceed the currently allowed wattage for transportation in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). By eliminating layers of confinement in waste drums and using getters to remove hydrogen gas, the TRUPACT-II waste loading can be increased significantly, with the potential of reaching the package''s 40-watt thermal limit. The cost savings associated with increasing the waste loading are enormous, and can be measured by reduced numbers of shipments, required processing facilities, and years of effort. To support the decision-making process and provide a good starting point for future development efforts at SRTC, the design requirements for a getter system to be used in the TRUPACT-II were compiled and are discussed in detail in the Appendix.

  5. QED-1 device and measurements of gettering efficiency for a simulated divertor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, D.K.; Yamada, M.

    1980-03-01

    The QED-1 device at PPL has provided gettering efficiency data for neutralized hydrogen plasma on titanium. The hollow-anode arcjet produces a plasma column 1 cm in diameter with 10/sup 12/ < n/sub e/ < 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/ and T/sub i/ approx.< T/sub e/ = 3-10 eV, confined by an axial magnetic field of 1-6 kG. The gettering measurements are based on monitoring neutral gas density with respect to time in the divertor simulation chamber of QED-1. The present results indicate that the plasma particles lose their charge and most of their energy when they strike the neutralizer plate.

  6. A new technique for pumping hydrogen gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    A system for pumping hydrogen gas without isotopic fractionation has been developed. The pump contains uranium metal, which when heated to about 80??C reacts with hydrogen to form UH3. The UH3 is heated to above 500??C to decompose the hydride and regenerate the hydrogen. ?? 1970.

  7. Hydrogen gas sensor and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    McKee, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the pressure of hydrogen gas in a nuclear reactor, and method of manufacturing the same. The sensor comprises an elongated tube of hydrogen permeable material which is connected to a pressure transducer through a feedthrough tube which passes through a wall at the boundary of the region in which hydrogen is present. The tube is pressurized and flushed with hydrogen gas at an elevated temperature during the manufacture of the sensor in order to remove all gasses other than hydrogen from the device.

  8. User’s Guide for Getter Rate Test System

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, Monte R.

    2007-06-27

    This User’s Guide describes the operation and maintenance of the Getter Rate Test System, including the mechanical equipment, instrumentation, and datalogger/computer components. The Getter Rate Test System includes equipment and instrumentation to conduct two getter rate tests simultaneously. The mechanical equipment comprises roughing and high-vacuum pumps, heated test chambers, standard hydrogen leaks, and associated piping and valves. Instrumentation includes thermocouples, pressure (vacuum) transducers, panel displays, analog-to-digital signal converter, and associated wiring. The datalogger/computer is a stand-alone computer with installed software to allow the user to record data input from the pressure transducers to data files and to calculate the getter rate from the data in an Excel® spreadsheet.

  9. Conversion of glycerol to hydrogen rich gas.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nguyen H; Kannangara, G S Kamali

    2013-12-21

    Presently there is a glut of glycerol as the by-product of biofuel production and it will grow as production increases. The conundrum is how we can consume this material and convert it into a more useful product. One potential route is to reform glycerol to hydrogen rich gas including synthesis gas (CO + H2) and hydrogen. However, there is recent literature on various reforming techniques which may have a bearing on the efficiency of such a process. Hence in this review reforming of glycerol at room temperature (normally photo-catalytic), catalysis at moderate and high temperature and a non-catalytic pyrolysis process are presented. The high temperature processes allow the generation of synthesis gas with the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratios being suitable for synthesis of dimethyl ether, methanol and for the Fischer-Tropsch process using established catalysts. Efficient conversion of synthesis gas to hydrogen involves additional catalysts that assist the water gas shift reaction, or involves in situ capture of carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Reforming at reduced temperatures including photo-reforming offers the opportunity of producing synthesis gas or hydrogen using single catalysts. Together, these processes will assist in overcoming the worldwide glut of glycerol, increasing the competitiveness of the biofuel production and reducing our dependency on the fossil based, hydrogen rich gas.

  10. Taxis toward hydrogen gas by Methanococcus maripaludis.

    PubMed

    Brileya, Kristen A; Connolly, James M; Downey, Carey; Gerlach, Robin; Fields, Matthew W

    2013-11-05

    Knowledge of taxis (directed swimming) in the Archaea is currently expanding through identification of novel receptors, effectors, and proteins involved in signal transduction to the flagellar motor. Although the ability for biological cells to sense and swim toward hydrogen gas has been hypothesized for many years, this capacity has yet to be observed and demonstrated. Here we show that the average swimming velocity increases in the direction of a source of hydrogen gas for the methanogen, Methanococcus maripaludis using a capillary assay with anoxic gas-phase control and time-lapse microscopy. The results indicate that a methanogen couples motility to hydrogen concentration sensing and is the first direct observation of hydrogenotaxis in any domain of life. Hydrogenotaxis represents a strategy that would impart a competitive advantage to motile microorganisms that compete for hydrogen gas and would impact the C, S and N cycles.

  11. Performance of Zr-Al getter pumps under transient load conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, L.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Simpkins, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Testing of the pump limiter concept in the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak will involve the use of Zr-Al nonevaporable getter pumps capable of handling intermittent pulses of hydrogen and/or deuterium in the presence of carbon and oxygen impurity concentrations of several percent. To study the pumping characteristics under these conditions we have installed a Zr-Al cartridge pump in a vacuum chamber equipped with a fast gas puff feed system, a quadrupole residual gas analyzer, and a high speed ion gauge for transient pressure measurements. In this paper we report on the performance of the pump over a wide range of gas loads up to that sufficient to provide tens of monolayers coverage of the getter surface. With flow rates up to 13 torr L/s, pumping speeds for hydrogen were measured to be 1200-1500 L/s at pressures up to 10 mtorr. The measurements were carried out with gas pulses ranging in length from 50 ms to over 1 s and under conditions that provided a constant pumping speed for impurity species.

  12. Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

  13. Gettering Silicon Wafers with Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon wafers subjected to gettering in phosphorus atmosphere have longer diffusion lengths and higher solar-cell efficiencies than untreated wafers. Gettering treatment improves properties of solar cells manufactured from impure silicon and is compatible with standard solar-cell processing.

  14. Gettering Silicon Wafers with Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon wafers subjected to gettering in phosphorus atmosphere have longer diffusion lengths and higher solar-cell efficiencies than untreated wafers. Gettering treatment improves properties of solar cells manufactured from impure silicon and is compatible with standard solar-cell processing.

  15. Hydrogen-rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus are described for producing hydrogen-rich product gases. A spray of liquid hydrocarbon is mixed with a stream of air in a startup procedure and the mixture is ignited for partial oxidation. The stream of air is then heated by the resulting combustion to reach a temperature such that a signal is produced. The signal triggers a two way valve which directs liquid hydrocarbon from a spraying mechanism to a vaporizing mechanism with which a vaporized hydrocarbon is formed. The vaporized hydrocarbon is subsequently mixed with the heated air in the combustion chamber where partial oxidation takes place and hydrogen-rich product gases are produced.

  16. Surface characterization of a Zr--V--Fe getter by XPS-SIMS: activation process and D/sub 2/O exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimura, K.; Ashida, K.; Watanabe, K.

    1985-03-01

    To apply hydrogen storage materials (getters) to tritium recovery and storage, it is important to understand the activation process of the getters and their pumping characteristics not only for tritium gas, but also impurity gases such as HTO. From this viewpoint, the activation process of the Zr--V--Fe getter (St-707, SAES Getters) and absorption process of D/sub 2/O were investigated with XPS-SIMS. An as-received getter surface was observed to be covered with H/sub 2/O, CO, O/sub 2/, and hydrocarbons. In addition, the getter components formed respective oxides on the surface. The activation, which consisted of vacuum heating above 500 /sup 0/C, caused the disappearance of the adsorbed impurities from the surface, forming a metallic surface consisting of Zr(87 at.%) and V(13 at.%). Exposure to D/sub 2/O vapor at 25 /sup 0/C resulted in the adsorption of D/sub 2/O as D/sub 2/O(a) and/or OD(a). In addition, a part of the surface was oxidized. Elevation of the exposure temperature to 300 /sup 0/C caused the disappearance of the D/sub 2/O(a) and/or OD(a). Consequently the O-coverage decreased, although the partially oxidized surface remained. We conclude that both Zr and V function as the active sites for the decomposition of D/sub 2/O(a) and/or OD(a). However, the Zr sites work more actively for the decomposition reaction than the V sites do. Consequently, these Zr sites determine the absorption rate.

  17. Materials for the scavenging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, T.J.; Phillip, B.L.

    1997-12-30

    A hydrogen getter composition is described comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compositions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100 C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluoropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases. 7 figs.

  18. Materials for the scavenging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, T.J.; Phillip, B.L.

    1997-04-29

    A hydrogen getter composition is described comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compositions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluoropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases. 7 figs.

  19. Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Gencorp Aerojet Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System was developed through the cooperation of industry, academia, and the Government. Although the original purpose of the system was to detect leaks in the main engine of the space shuttle while on the launch pad, it also has significant commercial potential in applications for which there are no existing commercial systems. With high sensitivity, the system can detect hydrogen leaks at low concentrations in inert environments. The sensors are integrated with hardware and software to form a complete system. Several of these systems have already been purchased for use on the Ford Motor Company assembly line for natural gas vehicles. This system to detect trace hydrogen gas leaks from pressurized systems consists of a microprocessor-based control unit that operates a network of sensors. The sensors can be deployed around pipes, connectors, flanges, and tanks of pressurized systems where leaks may occur. The control unit monitors the sensors and provides the operator with a visual representation of the magnitude and locations of the leak as a function of time. The system can be customized to fit the user's needs; for example, it can monitor and display the condition of the flanges and fittings associated with the tank of a natural gas vehicle.

  20. Titanium-nitrogen reaction investigated for application to gettering systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arntzen, J. D.; Coleman, L. F.; Kyle, M. L.; Pierce, R. D.

    1968-01-01

    Titanium is one of several gettering materials available for removing nitrogen from inert gases. The reaction rate of titanium-metal sponge and nitrogen in argon-nitrogen mixtures was studied at 900 degrees C. The rate was found to depend upon the partial pressure of nitrogen in the gas phase. Mathematical relationships simulate titanium systems.

  1. Thermal Battery Operating Gas Atmosphere Control and Heat Transfer Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The effects of gases and gas mixtures on global...highly effective in atmospheres of pure hydrogen and are potentially useful in mixtures of hydrogen and air. Barium chromate (BaCrO4) placed in contact...15 Figure 9. Gas gettering from a 79.6/20.4 volume percent hydrogen/air mixture

  2. U-GAS process for production of hydrogen from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Dihu, R.J.; Patel, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Today, hydrogen is produced mainly from natural gas and petroleum fractions. Tomorrow, because reserves of natural gas and oil are declining while demand continues to increase, they cannot be considered available for long-term, large-scale production of hydrogen. Hydrogen obtained from coal is expected to be the lowest cost, large-scale source of hydrogen in the future. The U-GAS coal gasification process and its potential application to the manufacture of hydrogen is discussed. Pilot plant results, the current status of the process, and economic projections for the cost of hydrogen manufactured are presented.

  3. Hydrogen gas storage in fluorinated ultramicroporous tunnel crystal.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Katagiri, Toshimasa

    2012-08-21

    We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder.

  4. Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    York, William; Hughes, Michael; Berry, Jonathan; Russell, Tamara; Lau, Y. C.; Liu, Shan; Arnett, Michael; Peck, Arthur; Tralshawala, Nilesh; Weber, Joseph; Benjamin, Marc; Iduate, Michelle; Kittleson, Jacob; Garcia-Crespo, Andres; Delvaux, John; Casanova, Fernando; Lacy, Ben; Brzek, Brian; Wolfe, Chris; Palafox, Pepe; Ding, Ben; Badding, Bruce; McDuffie, Dwayne; Zemsky, Christine

    2015-07-30

    The objective of this program was to develop the technologies required for a fuel flexible (coal derived hydrogen or syngas) gas turbine for IGCC that met DOE turbine performance goals. The overall DOE Advanced Power System goal was to conduct the research and development (R&D) necessary to produce coal-based IGCC power systems with high efficiency, near-zero emissions, and competitive capital cost. To meet this goal, the DOE Fossil Energy Turbine Program had as an interim objective of 2 to 3 percentage points improvement in combined cycle (CC) efficiency. The final goal is 3 to 5 percentage points improvement in CC efficiency above the state of the art for CC turbines in IGCC applications at the time the program started. The efficiency goals were for NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm NOx (@15 % O2). As a result of the technologies developed under this program, the DOE goals were exceeded with a projected 8 point efficiency improvement. In addition, a new combustion technology was conceived of and developed to overcome the challenges of burning hydrogen and achieving the DOE’s NOx goal. This report also covers the developments under the ARRA-funded portion of the program that include gas turbine technology advancements for improvement in the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of gas turbines for industrial applications with carbon capture and sequestration. Example applications could be cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, steel and aluminum plants, manufacturing facilities, etc. The DOE’s goal for more than 5 percentage point improvement in efficiency was met with cycle analyses performed for representative IGCC Steel Mill and IGCC Refinery applications. Technologies were developed in this program under the following areas: combustion, larger latter stage buckets, CMC and EBC, advanced materials and coatings, advanced configurations to reduce cooling, sealing and rotor purge flows, turbine aerodynamics, advanced sensors, advancements in first

  5. Compact solid source of hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2004-06-08

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  6. Competitive gettering of copper in Czochralski silicon by implantation-induced cavities and internal gettering sites

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Weber, E.R.; Myers, S.M.; Petersen, G.A.

    1996-11-01

    The effectiveness of copper gettering by implantation-induced cavities in competition with internal gettering sites in silicon was demonstrated. The cavities were formed in the near surface region by He implantation and annealing while the internal gettering sites were created in the material{close_quote}s bulk by a ramped hi{endash}lo{endash}hi oxygen precipitation heat treatment. Ion implantation was used to controllably introduce the copper. The quantity of implanted copper was below that corresponding to saturation of solution throughout the wafer at the gettering temperatures of 700 and 800{degree}C. The cavities were found to be an effective gettering site in the presence of internal gettering sites with only a small amount of copper being gettered at the internal gettering sites. These results have important implications for optimal gettering of metallic impurities from integrated circuit device regions. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Efficient combining of ion pumps and getter-palladium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Paolini, C.; Mura, M.; Ravelli, F.

    2008-07-15

    Nonevaporable getters (NEGs) have been extensively studied in the last several years for their sorption properties toward many gases. In particular, an innovative alloy as a thin film by magnetron sputtering was developed and characterized at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. It is composed of Ti-Zr-V and protected by an overlayer of palladium (Pd), according to a technology for which the authors got the licence. NEG-Pd thin films used in combination with ion getter pumps is a simple, easy way to handle pumping devices for ultrahigh and extremely high vacuum applications. To show how to apply this coating technology to the internal surface of different types of ion pumps, the authors carried out several tests on pumps of various shapes, sizes (in terms of nominal pumping speed), and types (diode, noble diode, and triode). Special care was taken during the thermal cycle of baking and activation of the pumps to preserve the internal film from sources of contamination and/or from the sputtering of the titanium cathodes of the pump. Some important remarks will be made about the most appropriate conditions of pressure and temperature. The performance of the NEG-Pd-coated ion pumps was evaluated in terms of ultimate pressure and hydrogen pumping speed. The contribution of the thin film is particularly relevant for the pumping of this gas, due to its high sticking factor on palladium and the great sorption capacity of the underlying getter. Finally, the possibility of further improvement by substituting palladium with other Pd-based alloys will also be evaluated.

  8. Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

    2009-01-22

    The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

  9. SAES St 909 Getter Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Holder, J. E

    2005-09-07

    Process gas tritium stripper technology has gone from catalytic oxidation followed by absorption on molecular sieve/zeolite beds to non-evaporate metal getter technology. SAES Getters produces a number of commercial getter products including St 909. St 909, a Zr-Mn-Fe alloy, is sold in pellet form, can decompose (''crack'') a number of process gas impurities, and retains lower levels of tritium than other getters. The performance of this material to remove process impurities, especially methane, under of variety of operating conditions has been part of a Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for five years. St 909 has been tested at the bench (6 gram) scale, the pilot (500 gram) scale, and at the full (5300) gram scale under a variety of test conditions. This paper gives a brief summary of test results obtained for the different scale tests.

  10. Gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen permeability of three different types of commercially available natural gas polyethylene pipes was determined. Ring tensile tests were conducted on permeability-exposed and as-received samples. Hydrogen-methane leakage experiments were also performed. The results show no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow (through leaks) on the distribution of blends of hydrogen and methane. The data collected show that the polyethylene pipe is 4 to 6 times more permeable to hydrogen than to methane.

  11. Gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen permeability of three different types of commercially available natural gas polyethylene pipes was determined. Ring tensile tests were conducted on permeability-exposed and as-received samples. Hydrogen-methane leakage experiments were also performed. The results show no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow (through leaks) on the distribution of blends of hydrogen and methane. The data collected show that the polyethylene pipe is 4 to 6 times more permeable to hydrogen than to methane.

  12. Copper in silicon: Quantitative analysis of internal and proximity gettering

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Flink, C.; Weber, E.R.

    1997-08-01

    The behavior of copper in the presence of a proximity gettering mechanism and a standard internal gettering mechanism in silicon was studied. He implantation-induced cavities in the near surface region were used as a proximity gettering mechanism and oxygen precipitates in the bulk of the material provided internal gettering sites. Moderate levels of copper contamination were introduced by ion implantation such that the copper was not supersaturated during the anneals, thus providing realistic copper contamination/gettering conditions. Copper concentrations at cavities and internal gettering sites were quantitatively measured after the annealings. In this manner, the gettering effectiveness of cavities was measured when in direct competition with internal gettering sites. The cavities were found to be the dominant gettering mechanism with only a small amount of copper gettered at the internal gettering sites. These results reveal the benefits of a segregation-type gettering mechanism for typical contamination conditions.

  13. Aluminum gettering in single and multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E.R.

    1995-08-01

    Al gettering has been performed on integrated circuit (I.C.) quality silicon and a variety of single and multicrystalline silicon solar cell materials. The minority carrier diffusion length, Ln, has been used to quantify the gettering response. Vast differences in response to the Al gettering treatment are observed between the I.C. quality silicon and the solar cell materials. The I.C. silicon generally responds well while the solar cell silicon performance progressively degrades with increasing gettering temperature. Preliminary data shows that by performing a Rapid Thermal Annealing treatment prior to the Al gettering, an improved or further degraded Ln emerges in solar cell material depending on the material`s manufacturer. We explain these observed phenomena by suggesting that Al gettering in solar cell silicon is an impurity emission-limited process while for I.C. quality silicon it is diffusion limited.

  14. Titanium-Based Getter Solution for Wafer-Level MEMS Vacuum Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram, Vivek; Ling, Xie; Bangtao, Chen

    2013-03-01

    Ultrahigh-vacuum conditions can be achieved by employing porous absorbent materials such as Ti, Zr, Ta, and Yt. Commercial getters are primarily Zr-based, since Zr possesses the best adsorption characteristics. Titanium is not considered as a candidate, since adsorption of gases by Ti is significantly reduced due to oxidation and other contamination. In the present work, it is demonstrated that the adsorption property of Ti can be substantially enhanced and benchmarked against other Zr-based commercial getters by employing a sacrificial layer such as Ni over Ti, and also by using other surface engineering techniques. It has been confirmed that, in addition to the activation temperature, the vacuum level during getter activation also plays a pivotal role in influencing the adsorption characteristics of Ti. It has been determined that the getter life could be significantly improved by the reversible adsorption characteristic of H2 gas, facilitating regeneration cycles.

  15. Hydrogen gas storage in fluorinated ultramicroporous tunnel crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Katagiri, Toshimasa

    2012-07-01

    We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder.We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. CCDC 246922. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30940h

  16. Two-stage coal liquefaction without gas-phase hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, H.P.

    1986-06-05

    A process is provided for the production of a hydrogen-donor solvent useful in the liquefaction of coal, wherein the water-gas shift reaction is used to produce hydrogen while simultaneously hydrogenating a donor solvent. A process for the liquefaction of coal using said solvent is also provided. The process enables avoiding the use of a separate water-gas shift reactor as well as high pressure equipment for liquefaction. 3 tabs.

  17. Systems analysis of hydrogen supplementation in natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Hermelee, A.; Beller, M.; D'Acierno, J.

    1981-11-01

    The potential for hydrogen supplementation in natural gas pipelines is analyzed for a specific site from both mid-term (1985) and long-term perspectives. The concept of supplementing natural gas with the addition of hydrogen in the existing gas pipeline system serves to provide a transport and storage medium for hydrogen while eliminating the high investment costs associated with constructing separate hydrogen pipelines. This paper examines incentives and barriers to the implementation of this concept. The analysis is performed with the assumption that current developmental programs will achieve a process for cost-effectively separating pure hydrogen from natural gas/hydrogen mixtures to produce a separable and versatile chemical and fuel commodity. The energy systems formulation used to evaluate the role of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure is the Reference Energy System (RES). The RES is a network diagram that provides an analytic framework for incorporating all resources, technologies, and uses of energy in a uniform manner. A major aspect of the study is to perform a market analysis of traditional uses of resources in the various consuming sectors and the potential for hydrogen substitution in these sectors. The market analysis will focus on areas of industry where hydrogen is used as a feedstock rather than for its fuel-use opportunities to replace oil and natural gas. The sectors of industry where hydrogen is currently used and where its use can be expanded or substituted for other resources include petroleum refining, chemicals, iron and steel, and other minor uses.

  18. Evaluation of hydrogen as a cryogenic wind tunnel test gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haut, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The nondimensional ratios used to describe various flow situations in hydrogen were determined and compared with the corresponding ideal diatomic gas ratios. The results were used to examine different inviscid flow configurations. The relatively high value of the characteristic rotational temperature causes the behavior of hydrogen, under cryogenic conditions, to deviate substantially from the behavior of an ideal diatomic gas in the compressible flow regime. Therefore, if an idea diatomic gas is to be modeled, cryogenic hydrogen is unacceptable as a wind tunnel test gas in a compressible flow situation.

  19. Savannah River Site/K Area Complex getter life extension report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Woodsmall, Todd; Nissen, April

    2008-08-01

    The K Area Complex (KAC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been utilizing HiTop hydrogen getter material in 9975 Shipping Containers to prevent the development of flammable environments during storage of moisture-containing plutonium oxides. Previous testing and subsequent reports have been performed and produced by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to demonstrate the suitability and longevity of the getter during storage at bounding thermal conditions. To date, results have shown that after 18 months of continuous storage at 70 C, the getter is able to both recombine gaseous hydrogen and oxygen into water when oxygen is available, and irreversibly getter (i.e. scavenge) hydrogen from the vapor space when oxygen is not available, both under a CO{sub 2} environment. [Refs. 1-5] Both of these reactions are catalytically enhanced and thermodynamically favorable. The purpose of this paper is to establish the justification that maintaining the current efforts of biannual testing is no longer necessary due to the robust performance of the getter material, the very unlikely potential that the recombination reaction will fail during storage conditions in KAC, and the insignificant aging effects that have been seen in the testing to date.

  20. Investigation of Isotope Effects in the Gas Streams Supplied by a 1:1 ITER Storage Bed Using a Micro Gas Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Beloglazov, S.; Glugla, M.; Wagner, R.; Fanghaenel, E.; Gruenhagen, S.

    2005-07-15

    In the present design of the Storage and Delivery System of the ITER Tritium Plant deuterium, tritium and their mixtures are stored in hydrogen storage beds with a storage capacity of 100 g. During plasma operation it is required that deuterium-tritium gases with well defined ratios of D/T are supplied by the different hydrogen storage beds. Due to the isotope effects the composition of the hydrogen gas mixture supplied by the getter bed may be different from the one absorbed in the getter and may even change during unloading of the bed depending on the variation of the isotope effect with the actual amount of hydrogen isotopes stored in the bed.At the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe a 1:1 prototype of ITER hydrogen storage bed with a capacity of 100 g tritium and a target supply rate of up to 200 Pam3s-1 was designed and manufactured. The getter bed is currently filled with zirconium-cobalt and is installed in an experimental rig coupled with a micro gas chromatograph in order to perform texts under different operation conditions and to characterize the possible isotope effects. In this work a first data on the isotope effect during loading and unloading of the getter bed with the different hydrogen-deuterium mixtures is presented.

  1. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, Lennart N.

    2004-06-29

    A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

  2. Development Of A Centrifugal Hydrogen Pipeline Gas Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Di Bella, Francis A.

    2015-04-16

    Concepts NREC (CN) has completed a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project to analyze, design, and fabricate a pipeline capacity hydrogen compressor. The pipeline compressor is a critical component in the DOE strategy to provide sufficient quantities of hydrogen to support the expected shift in transportation fuels from liquid and natural gas to hydrogen. The hydrogen would be generated by renewable energy (solar, wind, and perhaps even tidal or ocean), and would be electrolyzed from water. The hydrogen would then be transported to the population centers in the U.S., where fuel-cell vehicles are expected to become popular and necessary to relieve dependency on fossil fuels. The specifications for the required pipeline hydrogen compressor indicates a need for a small package that is efficient, less costly, and more reliable than what is available in the form of a multi-cylinder, reciprocating (positive displacement) compressor for compressing hydrogen in the gas industry.

  3. Technetium Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Asmussen, Robert M.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2015-10-15

    The cementitious material known as Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. Two radionuclides of particular concern in these waste streams are technetium-99 (99Tc) and iodine-129 (129I). These radioactive tank waste components contribute the most to the environmental impacts associated with the cleanup of the Hanford site. A recent environmental assessment of Cast Stone performance, which assumes a diffusion controlled release of contaminants from the waste form, calculates groundwater in excess of the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for both contaminants. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of both 99Tc and 129I in Cast Stone. One method to improve the performance of Cast Stone is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc and I, therefore reducing their diffusion out of Cast Stone. In this paper, we present results of Tc and I removal from solution with various getters with batch sorption experiments conducted in deionized water (DIW) and a highly caustic 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. In general, the data show that the selected getters are effective in DIW but their performance is comprised when experiments are performed with the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. Reasons for the mitigated performance in the LAW simulant may be due to competition with Cr present in the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant and to a pH effect.

  4. State of technology on hydrogen fueled gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esgar, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A series of investigations was conducted episodically from the 1950's to the early 1970's to investigate the feasibility and potential problem areas in the use of hydrogen fuel for gas turbine engines. A brief summary and bibliography are presented of the research that has been conducted by NASA, its predecessor NACA, and by industry under U. S. Air Force sponsorship. Although development efforts would be required to provide hydrogen fueled gas turbine engines for aircraft, past research has shown that hydrogen fueled engines are feasible, and except for flight weight liquid hydrogen pumps, there are no problem areas relating to engines requiring significant research.

  5. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-01

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  6. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    SciTech Connect

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-22

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  7. Fluorine gettering by activated charcoal in a radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, L.K.; Toth, L.M.

    1988-10-01

    Activated charcoal has been shown to be an effective gettering agent for the fluorine gas that is liberated in a radiation environment. Even though activated charcoal is a commonly used getter, little is known about the radiation stability of the fluorine-charcoal product. This work has shown that not only is the product stable in high gamma radiation fields, but also that radiation enhances the capacity of the charcoal for the fluorine. The most useful application of this work is with the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel salt because the radioactive components (fission products and actinides) cause radiolytic damage to the solid LiF-BeF/sub 2/-ZrF/sub 4/-UF/sub 4/ (64.5, 30.3, 5.0, 0.13 mol %, respectively) resulting in the liberation of fluorine gas. This work has also demonstrated that the maximum damage to the fuel salt by approx.3 /times/ 10/sup 7/ R/h gamma radiation is approximately 2%, at which point the rate of recombination of fluorine with active metal sites within the salt lattice equals the rate of fluorine generation. The enhanced reactivity of the activated charcoal and radiation stability of the product ensures that the gettered fluorine will stay sequestered in the charcoal.

  8. [Raman spectroscopic investigation of hydrogen storage in nitrogen gas hydrates].

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing-guo; Liu, Chang-ling; Ye, Yu-guang; Li, Cheng-feng

    2012-08-01

    Recently, hydrogen storage using clathrate hydrate as a medium has become a hotspot of hydrogen storage research In the present paper, the laser Raman spectroscopy was used to study the hydrogen storage in nitrogen hydrate. The synthetic nitrogen hydrate was reacted with hydrogen gas under relatively mild conditions (e.g., 15 MPa, -18 degrees C). The Raman spectra of the reaction products show that the hydrogen molecules have enclathrated the cavities of the nitrogen hydrate, with multiple hydrogen cage occupancies in the clathrate cavities. The reaction time is an important factor affecting the hydrogen storage in nitrogen hydrate. The experimental results suggest that nitrogen hydrates are expected to be an effective media for hydrogen storage.

  9. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  10. Quantitative determination of hydrogen in solids by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Addach, H; Berçot, P; Wery, M; Rezrazi, M

    2004-11-19

    Processes such as electroplating or acid cleaning are notorious causes of post-processing failure through hydrogen embrittlement. So, the determination of amounts of hydrogen in metals is of great importance. An analysis method for investigation of H content in solids has been established based on hot extraction and gas chromatography system. Hot extraction in inert gas enables complete and/or partial removal of the hydrogen from the samples. A gas chromatography system is used to determine quantitatively the amount of thermally desorbed hydrogen. An investigation of the baking operating conditions is made of the hydrogen desorption rate of zinc-plated steel parts. Then, an analysis of the polarisation conditions upon chromium electroplating is given.

  11. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.; Bell, C.M.; Chow, P.; Louie, J.; Mohr, J.M.; Peinemann, K.V.; Pinnau, I.; Wijmans, J.G.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    The production of hydrogen from synthesis gas made by gasification of coal is expensive. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the total process. In this report we describe the results of a program aimed at the development of membranes and membrane modules for the separation and purification of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The performance properties of the developed membranes were used in an economic evaluation of membrane gas separation systems in the coal gasification process. Membranes tested were polyetherimide and a polyamide copolymer. The work began with an examination of the chemical separations required to produce hydrogen from synthesis gas, identification of three specific separations where membranes might be applicable. A range of membrane fabrication techniques and module configurations were investigated to optimize the separation properties of the membrane materials. Parametric data obtained were used to develop the economic comparison of processes incorporating membranes with a base-case system without membranes. The computer calculations for the economic analysis were designed and executed. Finally, we briefly investigated alternative methods of performing the three separations in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The three potential opportunities for membranes in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas are: (1) separation of hydrogen from nitrogen as the final separation in a air-blown or oxygen-enriched air-blown gasification process, (2) separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide to reduce or eliminate the conventional ethanolamine acid gas removal unit, and (3) separation of hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide form carbon monoxide prior to the shift reactor to influence the shift reaction. 28 refs., 54 figs., 40 tabs.

  12. Drinking hydrogen water and intermittent hydrogen gas exposure, but not lactulose or continuous hydrogen gas exposure, prevent 6-hydorxydopamine-induced Parkinson’s disease in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lactulose is a synthetic disaccharide that can be catalyzed only by intestinal bacteria in humans and rodents, and a large amount of hydrogen is produced by bacterial catalysis of lactulose. We previously reported marked effects of ad libitum administration of hydrogen water on prevention of a rat model of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods End-alveolar breath hydrogen concentrations were measured in 28 healthy subjects and 37 PD patients, as well as in 9 rats after taking hydrogen water or lactulose. Six-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced hemi-PD model was stereotactically generated in rats. We compared effects of hydrogen water and lactulose on prevention of PD. We also analyzed effects of continuous and intermittent administration of 2% hydrogen gas. Results Hydrogen water increased breath hydrogen concentrations from 8.6 ± 2.1 to 32.6 ± 3.3 ppm (mean and SEM, n = 8) in 10 min in healthy subjects. Lactulose increased breath hydrogen concentrations in 86% of healthy subjects and 59% of PD patients. Compared to monophasic hydrogen increases in 71% of healthy subjects, 32% and 41% of PD patients showed biphasic and no increases, respectively. Lactulose also increased breath hydrogen levels monophasically in 9 rats. Lactulose, however, marginally ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced PD in rats. Continuous administration of 2% hydrogen gas similarly had marginal effects. On the other hand, intermittent administration of 2% hydrogen gas prevented PD in 4 of 6 rats. Conclusions Lack of dose responses of hydrogen and the presence of favorable effects with hydrogen water and intermittent hydrogen gas suggest that signal modulating activities of hydrogen are likely to be instrumental in exerting a protective effect against PD. PMID:22608009

  13. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  14. A new process for removing hydrogen sulfide from gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, K.; Allford, K.T.

    1986-01-01

    A novel, patented sour gas sweetening process was introduced to the gas processing industry in September, 1984. This new process is referred to as the one-step process in this paper. The one-step process selectively removes hydrogen sulfide from sour gases and converts dissolved hydrogen sulfide directly to sulfur in a bubble tower filled with the sweetener solution. The sweetener, a proprietary formulation, is an alkaline solution of oxidizing and buffering agents. Oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur is achieved by a liquid phase oxidation technique.

  15. Self regulating formulations for safe hydrogen gettering

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2002-01-01

    A method and composition are disclosed for preventing uncontrolled exothermic reaction in the presence of a catalyst. A catalyst deployed as a finely divided powder which is attached to the surface of a low melting point wax or wax-like material which is utilized as a carrier for the catalyst. During operation should the catalyst overheat due to uncontrolled conditions brought about by a run-away reaction the heat of reaction melts the low melting point wax which would itself wet the surface of the catalyst and prevent further catalysis.

  16. Self regulating formulations for safe hydrogen gettering

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2004-03-16

    A method and composition are disclosed for preventing uncontrolled exothermic reaction in the presence of a catalyst. A catalyst deployed as a finely divided powder which is attached to the surface of a low melting point wax or wax-like material which is utilized as a carrier for the catalyst. During operation should the catalyst overheat due to uncontrolled conditions brought about by a run-away reaction the heat of reaction melts the low melting point wax which would itself wet the surface of the catalyst and prevent further catalysis.

  17. Catalytic hydrogenation of polyaromatic compounds using coke-oven gas instead of pure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Braekman-Danheux, C.E.; Fontana, A.H.; Laurent, Ph.M.; Lolivier, Ph.

    1995-12-31

    In order to improve the economy of the conversion process of polyaromatic molecules to their hydroaromatics analogs, catalytic hydrogenation of phenanthrene has been carried out under pressure of different simulated coke-oven gases instead of pure hydrogen. The influence of reaction time, temperature and pressure on the hydrogenation yields and on the nature of the obtained products has been studied. Comparisons have been made with reaction with pure hydrogen in the same conditions. The influence of the different components of a real coke-oven gas has also been pointed out. The results indicate that coke-oven gas can be used if the goal is not to obtain perhydroaromatics compounds for a thermal cracking, but to give partly hydrogenated compounds to be used as hydrogen donor solvent in a coal liquefaction process. The results have been applied to coal-tar highly aromatic fractions.

  18. Design of hydrogen gas sensors based on surface plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Norman R.; Berini, Pierre; Tait, R. Niall

    2011-08-01

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a clean energy source is gaining significant global interest. Hydrogen gas can be combustible in air at concentrations starting at 4%, so a low cost, compact and reliable leak detector for hydrogen gas integratable into systems is desired. A Long Range Surface Plasmon Polariton (LRSPP) membrane waveguide structure is discussed as a hydrogen sensor. Palladium on a silicon dioxide free-standing membrane is proposed as the waveguide structure. Palladium absorbs hydrogen thereby inducing a detectable change in its permittivity. The design of straight waveguide and Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) architectures are discussed. Finite element method (FEM) simulations are conducted to choose appropriate designs to maximize sensor sensitivity.

  19. Hydrogen Gas Sensors Based on Semiconductor Oxide Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haoshuang; Wang, Zhao; Hu, Yongming

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the hydrogen gas sensing properties of semiconductor oxide (SMO) nanostructures have been widely investigated. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the research progress in the last five years concerning hydrogen gas sensors based on SMO thin film and one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. The hydrogen sensing mechanism of SMO nanostructures and some critical issues are discussed. Doping, noble metal-decoration, heterojunctions and size reduction have been investigated and proved to be effective methods for improving the sensing performance of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures. The effect on the hydrogen response of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures of grain boundary and crystal orientation, as well as the sensor architecture, including electrode size and nanojunctions have also been studied. Finally, we also discuss some challenges for the future applications of SMO nanostructured hydrogen sensors. PMID:22778599

  20. Process for hydrogen isotope concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, William H.

    1976-09-21

    A process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas, wherein liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted, in an exchange section, with one another and with at least one catalyst body comprising at least one metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table and preferably a support therefor, the catalyst body has a liquid-water-repellent, gas permeable polymer or organic resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone coating, so that the isotope concentration takes place by two simultaneously occurring steps, namely, ##EQU1## WHILE THE HYDROGEN GAS FED TO THE EXCHANGE SECTION IS DERIVED IN A REACTOR VESSEL FROM LIQUID WATER THAT HAS PASSED THROUGH THE EXCHANGE SECTION.

  1. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    1999-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  2. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Doshi, R.

    1999-07-27

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400 C for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide. 4 figs.

  3. Methanation of gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having a relatively high concentration of hydrogen are pretreated so as to remove the hydrogen in a recoverable form for use in the second step of a cyclic, essentially two-step process for the production of methane. The thus-treated streams are then passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. This active carbon is reacted with said hydrogen removed from the feed gas stream to form methane. The utilization of the CO in the feed gas stream is appreciably increased, enhancing the overall process for the production of relatively pure, low-cost methane from CO-containing waste gas streams.

  4. Internal gettering by metal alloy clusters

    DOEpatents

    Buonassisi, Anthony; Heuer, Matthias; Istratov, Andrei A.; Pickett, Matthew D.; Marcus, Mathew A.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2010-07-27

    The present invention relates to the internal gettering of impurities in semiconductors by metal alloy clusters. In particular, intermetallic clusters are formed within silicon, such clusters containing two or more transition metal species. Such clusters have melting temperatures below that of the host material and are shown to be particularly effective in gettering impurities within the silicon and collecting them into isolated, less harmful locations. Novel compositions for some of the metal alloy clusters are also described.

  5. Gas Permeable Chemochromic Compositions for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokerman, Gary (Inventor); Mohajeri, Nahid (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A (H2) sensor composition includes a gas permeable matrix material intermixed and encapsulating at least one chemochromic pigment. The chemochromic pigment produces a detectable change in color of the overall sensor composition in the presence of H2 gas. The matrix material provides high H2 permeability, which permits fast permeation of H2 gas. In one embodiment, the chemochromic pigment comprises PdO/TiO2. The sensor can be embodied as a two layer structure with the gas permeable matrix material intermixed with the chemochromic pigment in one layer and a second layer which provides a support or overcoat layer.

  6. Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrandt, A.; Mann, M.

    2009-02-01

    This paper estimates the quantity of hydrogen that could be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power by county in the United States. The study estimates that more than 72 million tonnes of hydrogen can be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power per year in the country (considering only 30% of their total annual production). The United States consumed about 396 million tonnes of gasoline in 2007; therefore, the report suggests the amount of hydrogen from these sources could displace about 80% of this consumption.

  7. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Muradov, N.Z.

    1995-09-01

    It is universally accepted that in the next few decades hydrogen production will continue to rely on fossil fuels (primarily, natural gas). On the other hand, the conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming) are complex multi-step processes. These processes also result in the emission of large quantities of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere that produce adverse ecological effects. One alternative is the one-step thermocatalytic cracking (TCC) (or decomposition) of natural gas into hydrogen and carbon. Preliminary analysis indicates that the cost of hydrogen produced by thermal decomposition of natural gas is somewhat lower than the conventional processes after by-product carbon credit is taken. In the short term, this process can be used for on-site production of hydrogen-methane mixtures in gas-filling stations and for CO{sub x}-free production of hydrogen for fuel cell driven prime movers. The experimental data on the thermocatalytic cracking of methane over various catalysts and supports in a wide range of temperatures (500-900{degrees}C) are presented in this paper. Two types of reactors were designed and built at FSEC: continuous flow and pulse fix bed catalytic reactors. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen production yield using oxide type catalysts was studied. Alumina-supported Ni- and Fe-catalysts demonstrated relatively high efficiency in the methane cracking reaction at moderate temperatures (600-800{degrees}C). Kinetic curves of hydrogen production over metal and metal oxide catalysts at different temperatures are presented in the paper. Fe-catalyst demonstrated good stability (for several hours), whereas alumina-supported Pt-catalyst rapidly lost its catalytic activity.

  8. Gettering of metal impurities in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeter, W.; Spiecker, E.; Apel, M.

    1995-08-01

    Gettering means the removal of metallic impurities from the device-active area of the wafer by transport to a predesigned region-called gettering layer (GL). We introduce an interface at z = d{sub GL}, at which the effect of the gettering mechanism on the metal impurity distribution in the wafer is quantified, e.g. by specifying currents or by interfacial reactions of metal impurities, self interstitials etc. between GL and wafer. In response metal impurities will diffuse out of the wafer into the gettering layer. Following such a concept, in general three species of the metal impurity (M) are involved in gettering: M{sub p} {l_arrow} M{sub i} {l_arrow} M{sub GL}. M{sub p} denotes immobile species in the wafer, which are precipitated into suicides or segregated at extended defects or whose diffusivity is too small to contribute noticeably to transport during the gettering procedure - like many substitutional metal species.

  9. Molecular processes in astrophysics: Calculations of hydrogen + hydrogen gas excitation, de-excitation, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Matthew Thomas

    The implications of H+H2 cooling in astrophysics is important to several applications. One of the most significant and pure applications is its role in cooling in the early universe. Other applications would include molecular dynamics in nebulae and their collapse into stars and astrophysical shocks. Shortly after the big bang, the universe was a hot primordial gas of photons, electrons, and nuclei among other ingredients. By far the most dominant nuclei in the early universe was hydrogen. In fact, in the early universe the matter density was 90 percent hydrogen and only 10 percent helium with small amounts of lithium and deuterium. In order for structure to form in the universe, this primordial gas must form atoms and cool. One of the significant cooling mechanisms is the collision of neutral atomic hydrogen with a neutral diatomic hydrogen molecule. This work performs calculations to determine collisional cooling rates of hydrogen using two potential surfaces.

  10. Method and apparatus for removing residual hydrogen from a purified gas

    SciTech Connect

    Briesacher, J.L.; Applegarth, C.H.; Lorimer, D.H.

    1993-08-24

    A method is described for removing residual hydrogen from a purified gas comprising the steps of: (a) heating an impure gas; (b) contacting the heated impure gas with an impurity sorbing material to produce a purified gas having trace amounts of residual hydrogen; (c) cooling the purified gas to a temperature less than about 100 C; and (d) contacting the cooled purified gas with a hydrogen sorbing material to at least partially remove said residual hydrogen.

  11. Recovery of purified helium or hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

    1974-01-15

    A process is described for the removal of helium or hydrogen from gaseous mixtures also containing contaminants. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatomspheric pressure to preferentially absorb the contaminants in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed gas enriched in hydrogen or helium is withdrawn from the absorption zone as product. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in contaminants is withdrawn separately from the absorption zone. (10 claims)

  12. Formation of Long-Lived Gas Species in Hydrogen Thyratrons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    16.6 FOm1ATION OF LONG- LIVED GAS SPECIES IN HYDROGEN THYRATRONS Martin Gundersen and Shekhar Guha Departments of Electrical Engineering and...area is inadequate. 2) Further study should make it possible to determine precisely the role of long- lived electronic states in thyratron recovery...3 sec. The 2s state of the hydrogen atom is also long- lived (Table I). Its formation is indicated by a strong Balmer emission. DISCUSSION The

  13. Pumping of hydrocarbons using non-evaporable getters

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, L.C.; Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Pumping speed measurements have been obtained for a number of gaseous hydrocarbons including members of the alkene, alkadiene, and cycloalkane groups as a function of temperature using a Zr-Al alloy getter. Pumping speeds were obtained by analysis of an exponential least squares fit to the pressure decay curve following introduction of each gas. It was found that these pumping speeds are relatively high (up to 400 1/s) and exhibit, with only a few exceptions, little temperature dependence. This is in contrast to the earlier reported results for the alkane series.

  14. Toward understanding and modeling of impurity gettering in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teh Y.; Gafiteanu, R.; Goesele, U.M.

    1995-08-01

    Gettering of harmful impurities away from the device active regions has already become an integral part of manufacturing integrated circuits (IC) using Czochralski (CZ) Si wafers, and is experiencing an increasing importance in Si solar cell fabrications for improving the cell efficiency. Gettering consists of (1) the creation of suitable gettering sites; and (2) the gettering processes of contaminants. Requirements for successful gettering differ between the IC and solar cell cases, because ICs are monolithic devices situated at the Si wafer surfaces while solar cells are bulk devices, and because the Si substrate materials used are different. For IC fabrications, the method used is that of intrinsic or internal gettering (IG) which utilizes oxygen precipitates and their associated defects in the CZ Si wafer bulk as gettering sites. Because of the bulk nature of IG sites, the scheme cannot be used also for solar cells. Only some kind of extrinsic or external gettering (EG) schemes with gettering sites located at the wafer surface regions can be used for solar cells. The gettering of the harmful contaminants, usually metals, to the gettering region involves the metal dissolution from precipitated state, the metal atom diffusion to and the stabilization at the gettering sites. A mathematical model of the gettering process is presented.

  15. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks. A Review of Key Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.; Antonia, O.; Penev, M.

    2013-03-01

    This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines. Blending hydrogen into the existing natural gas pipeline network has also been proposed as a means of increasing the output of renewable energy systems such as large wind farms.

  16. Gas Requirements in Pressurized Transfer of Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluck, D. F.; Kline, J. F.

    1961-01-01

    Of late, liquid hydrogen has become a very popular fuel for space missions. It is being used in such programs as Centaur and Saturn. Furthermore, hydrogen is the ideal working fluid for nuclear powered space vehicles currently under development. In these applications, liquid hydrogen fuel is generally transferred to the combustion chamber by a combination of pumping and pressurization. The pump forces the liquid propellant from the fuel tank to the combustion chamber; gaseous pressurant holds tank pressure sufficiently high to prevent cavitation at the pump inlet and to maintain the structural rigidity of the tank. The pressurizing system, composed of pressurant, tankage, and associated hardware can be a large portion of the total vehicle weight. Pressurant weight can be reduced by introducing the pressurizing gas at temperatures substantially greater than those of liquid hydrogen. Heat and mass transfer processes thereby induced complicate gas requirements during discharge. These requirements must be known to insure proper design of the pressurizing system. The aim of this paper is to develop from basic mass and energy transfer processes a general method to predict helium and hydrogen gas usage for the pressurized transfer of liquid hydrogen. This required an analytical and experimental investigation, the results of which are described in this paper.

  17. Hydrogen Gas as a Fuel in Direct Injection Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanasekaran, Chinnathambi; Mohankumar, Gabriael

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen is expected to be one of the most important fuels in the near future for solving the problem caused by the greenhouse gases, for protecting environment and saving conventional fuels. In this study, a dual fuel engine of hydrogen and diesel was investigated. Hydrogen was conceded through the intake port, and simultaneously air and diesel was pervaded into the cylinder. Using electronic gas injector and electronic control unit, the injection timing and duration varied. In this investigation, a single cylinder, KIRLOSKAR AV1, DI Diesel engine was used. Hydrogen injection timing was fixed at TDC and injection duration was timed for 30°, 60°, and 90° crank angles. The injection timing of diesel was fixed at 23° BTDC. When hydrogen is mixed with inlet air, emanation of HC, CO and CO2 decreased without any emission (exhaustion) of smoke while increasing the brake thermal efficiency.

  18. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  19. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  20. Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator Cycle with a Reciprocating Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C

    2002-06-11

    A four-chamber piston pump is powered by decomposed 85% hydrogen peroxide. The performance envelope of the evolving 400 gram pump has been expanded to 172 cc/s water flow at discharge pressures near 5 MPa. A gas generator cycle system using the pump has been tested under similar conditions of pressure and flow. The powerhead gas is derived from a small fraction of the pumped hydrogen peroxide, and the system starts from tank pressures as low as 0.2 MPa. The effects of steam condensation on performance have been evaluated.

  1. Production of bioplastics and hydrogen gas by photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuo, Asada; Masato, Miyake; Jun, Miyake

    1998-03-01

    Our efforts have been aimed at the technological basis of photosynthetic-microbial production of materials and an energy carrier. We report here accumulation of poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), a raw material of biodegradable plastics and for production of hydrogen gas, and a renewable energy carrier by photosynthetic microorganisms (tentatively defined as cyanobacteria plus photosynthetic bateria, in this report). A thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. MA19 that accumulates PHB at more than 20% of cell dry wt under nitrogen-starved conditions was isolated and microbiologically identified. The mechanism of PHB accumulation was studied. A mesophilic Synechococcus PCC7942 was transformed with the genes encoding PHB-synthesizing enzymes from Alcaligenes eutrophus. The transformant accumulated PHB under nitrogen-starved conditions. The optimal conditions for PHB accumulation by a photosynthetic bacterium grown on acetate were studied. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms was studied. Cyanobacteria can produce hydrogen gas by nitrogenase or hydrogenase. Hydrogen production mediated by native hydrogenase in cyanobacteria was revealed to be in the dark anaerobic degradation of intracellular glycogen. A new system for light-dependent hydrogen production was targeted. In vitro and in vivo coupling of cyanobacterial ferredoxin with a heterologous hydrogenase was shown to produce hydrogen under light conditions. A trial for genetic trasformation of Synechococcus PCC7942 with the hydrogenase gene from Clostridium pasteurianum is going on. The strong hydrogen producers among photosynthetic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Co-culture of Rhodobacter and Clostriumdium was applied to produce hydrogen from glucose. Conversely in the case of cyanobacteria, genetic regulation of photosynthetic proteins was intended to improve conversion efficiency in hydrogen production by the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV. A mutant acquired by

  2. Method of capturing or trapping zinc using zinc getter materials

    DOEpatents

    Hunyadi Murph, Simona E.; Korinko, Paul S.

    2017-07-11

    A method of trapping or capturing zinc is disclosed. In particular, the method comprises a step of contacting a zinc vapor with a zinc getter material. The zinc getter material comprises nanoparticles and a metal substrate.

  3. Mechanisms of transition-metal gettering in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; SEIBT,M.; SCHROTER,W.

    2000-03-23

    The atomic process, kinetics, and equilibrium thermodynamics underlying the gettering of transition-metal impurities in Si are reviewed from a mechanistic perspective. Methods for mathematical modeling of gettering are reviewed and illustrated. Needs for further research are discussed.

  4. Evaporation in equilibrium, in vacuum, and in hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagahara, Hiroko

    1993-01-01

    Evaporation experiments were conducted for SiO2 in three different conditions: in equilibrium, in vacuum, and in hydrogen gas. Evaporation rate in vacuum is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that in equilibrium, which is consistent with previous works. The rate in hydrogen gas changes depending on hydrogen pressure. The rate at 10 exp -7 bar of hydrogen pressure is as small as that of free evaporation, but at 10 exp -5 bar of hydrogen pressure it is larger than that in equilibrium. In equilibrium and in vacuum, the evaporation rate is limited by decomposition of SiO2 on the crystal surface, but it is limited by a diffusion process for evaporation in hydrogen gas. Therefore, evaporation rate of minerals in the solar nebula can be shown neither by that in equilibrium nor by that in vacuum. The maximum temperature of the solar nebula at the midplane at 2-3 AU where chondrites are believed to have originated is calculated to be as low as 150 K, 1500 K, or in between them. The temperature is, in any case, not high enough for total evaporation of the interstellar materials. Therefore, evaporation of interstellar materials is one of the most important processes for the origin and fractionation of solid materials. The fundamental process of evaporation of minerals has been intensively studied for these several years. Those experiments were carried out either in equilibrium or in vacuum; however, evaporation in the solar nebula is in hydrogen (and much smaller amount of helium) gas. In order to investigate evaporation rate and compositional (including isotopic) fractionation during evaporation, vaporization experiments for various minerals in various conditions are conducted. At first, SiO2 was adopted for a starting material, because thermochemical data and its nature of congruent vaporization are well known. Experiments were carried out in a vacuum furnace system.

  5. Evaporation in equilibrium, in vacuum, and in hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagahara, Hiroko

    1993-01-01

    Evaporation experiments were conducted for SiO2 in three different conditions: in equilibrium, in vacuum, and in hydrogen gas. Evaporation rate in vacuum is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that in equilibrium, which is consistent with previous works. The rate in hydrogen gas changes depending on hydrogen pressure. The rate at 10 exp -7 bar of hydrogen pressure is as small as that of free evaporation, but at 10 exp -5 bar of hydrogen pressure it is larger than that in equilibrium. In equilibrium and in vacuum, the evaporation rate is limited by decomposition of SiO2 on the crystal surface, but it is limited by a diffusion process for evaporation in hydrogen gas. Therefore, evaporation rate of minerals in the solar nebula can be shown neither by that in equilibrium nor by that in vacuum. The maximum temperature of the solar nebula at the midplane at 2-3 AU where chondrites are believed to have originated is calculated to be as low as 150 K, 1500 K, or in between them. The temperature is, in any case, not high enough for total evaporation of the interstellar materials. Therefore, evaporation of interstellar materials is one of the most important processes for the origin and fractionation of solid materials. The fundamental process of evaporation of minerals has been intensively studied for these several years. Those experiments were carried out either in equilibrium or in vacuum; however, evaporation in the solar nebula is in hydrogen (and much smaller amount of helium) gas. In order to investigate evaporation rate and compositional (including isotopic) fractionation during evaporation, vaporization experiments for various minerals in various conditions are conducted. At first, SiO2 was adopted for a starting material, because thermochemical data and its nature of congruent vaporization are well known. Experiments were carried out in a vacuum furnace system.

  6. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.; Antonia, O.; Penev, M.

    2013-03-01

    The United States has 11 distinct natural gas pipeline corridors: five originate in the Southwest, four deliver natural gas from Canada, and two extend from the Rocky Mountain region. This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines.

  7. Hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, A. I.; Nazarova, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    A hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine unit is considered that can be used in both nuclear and centralized power industries. However, it is the most promising when used for power-generating plants based on renewable energy sources (RES). The basic feature of the energy storage system in question is combination of storing the energy in compressed air and hydrogen and oxygen produced by the water electrolysis. Such a process makes the energy storage more flexible, in particular, when applied to RES-based power-generating plants whose generation of power may considerably vary during the course of a day, and also reduces the specific cost of the system by decreasing the required volume of the reservoir. This will allow construction of such systems in any areas independent of the local topography in contrast to the compressed-air energy storage gas-turbine plants, which require large-sized underground reservoirs. It should be noted that, during the energy recovery, the air that arrives from the reservoir is heated by combustion of hydrogen in oxygen, which results in the gas-turbine exhaust gases practically free of substances hazardous to the health and the environment. The results of analysis of a hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are presented. Its layout and the principle of its operation are described and the basic parameters are computed. The units of the system are analyzed and their costs are assessed; the recovery factor is estimated at more than 60%. According to the obtained results, almost all main components of the hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are well known at present; therefore, no considerable R&D costs are required. A new component of the system is the H2-O2 combustion chamber; a difficulty in manufacturing it is the necessity of ensuring the combustion of hydrogen in oxygen as complete as possible and preventing formation of nitric oxides.

  8. Detection of hydrogen chloride gas in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    Launch vehicle effluent (LVE) monitoring is part of NASA's overall tropospheric and stratospheric environmental program. Following nine techniques are evaluated and developed in report: bubbler method, pH measurements, indicator tubes, microcoulometers, modified condensation nuclei counter, dual-isotope absorption, gas-filter correlation, chemiluminescent nitric oxide detection, chemiluminescent luminol-oxidation detection.

  9. First detection of hydrogen in the β Pictoris gas disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P. A.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Bourrier, V.; Hébrard, G.; Kiefer, F.; Beust, H.; Ferlet, R.; Lagrange, A.-M.

    2017-03-01

    The young and nearby star β Pictoris (β Pic) is surrounded by a debris disk composed of dust and gas known to host a myriad evaporating exocomets, planetesimals and at least one planet. At an edge-on inclination, as seen from Earth, this system is ideal for debris disk studies providing an excellent opportunity to use absorption spectroscopy to study the planet forming environment. Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) we observe the most abundant element in the disk, hydrogen, through the H I Lyman α (Ly-α) line. We present a new technique to decrease the contamination of the Ly-α line by geocoronal airglow in COS spectra. This Airglow Virtual Motion (AVM) technique allows us to shift the Ly-α line of the astrophysical target away from the contaminating airglow emission revealing more of the astrophysical line profile. This new AVM technique, together with subtraction of an airglow emission map, allows us to analyse the shape of the β Pic Ly-α emission line profile and from it, calculate the column density of neutral hydrogen surrounding β Pic. The column density of hydrogen in the β Pic stable gas disk at the stellar radial velocity is measured to be log (NH/ 1 cm2) ≪ 18.5. The Ly-α emission line profile is found to be asymmetric and we propose that this is caused by H I falling in towards the star with a bulk radial velocity of 41 ± 6 km s-1 relative to β Pic and a column density of log (NH/ 1 cm2) = 18.6 ± 0.1. The high column density of hydrogen relative to the hydrogen content of CI chondrite meteorites indicates that the bulk of the hydrogen gas does not come from the dust in the disk. This column density reveals a hydrogen abundance much lower than solar, which excludes the possibility that the detected hydrogen could be a remnant of the protoplanetary disk or gas expelled by the star. We hypothesise that the hydrogen gas observed falling towards the star arises from the dissociation of

  10. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the

  11. Development of a hydrogen gas sensor using microfabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Qinghai; Stuczynski, Matthew; Madzsar, George C.

    1992-01-01

    Microfabrication and micromachining technologies are used to produce a hydrogen gas sensor based on a palladium-silver film. The sensor uses a heater that is fabricated by diffusing p-type borones into the substrate, forming a resistance heater. A diode for temperature measurement is produced using p-type boron and n-type phosphor diffused into the substrate. A thickness of the palladium-silver film is approximately 300 arcsec. The hydrogen gas sensor employs the proven palladium-silver diode structure and is surrounded by a phosphor doped resistance heater which can be heated up to a temperature of 250 C. Experimental results show that the sensor is capable of operating over a wide range of hydrogen concentration levels between 0-95 percent without any hysteresis effects.

  12. Hydrogen Gas Presents a Promising Therapeutic Strategy for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingling; Yu, Yonghao; Wang, Guolin

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by a severe inflammatory response to infection. It remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients despite developments in monitoring devices, diagnostic tools, and new therapeutic options. Recently, some studies have found that molecular hydrogen is a new therapeutic gas. Our studies have found that hydrogen gas can improve the survival and organ damage in mice and rats with cecal ligation and puncture, zymosan, and lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis. The mechanisms are associated with the regulation of oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and apoptosis, which might be through NF-κB and Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway. In this paper, we summarized the progress of hydrogen treatment in sepsis. PMID:24829918

  13. Development of a hydrogen gas sensor using microfabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Qinghai; Stuczynski, Matthew; Madzsar, George C.

    1992-01-01

    Microfabrication and micromachining technologies are used to produce a hydrogen gas sensor based on a palladium-silver film. The sensor uses a heater that is fabricated by diffusing p-type borones into the substrate, forming a resistance heater. A diode for temperature measurement is produced using p-type boron and n-type phosphor diffused into the substrate. A thickness of the palladium-silver film is approximately 300 arcsec. The hydrogen gas sensor employs the proven palladium-silver diode structure and is surrounded by a phosphor doped resistance heater which can be heated up to a temperature of 250 C. Experimental results show that the sensor is capable of operating over a wide range of hydrogen concentration levels between 0-95 percent without any hysteresis effects.

  14. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.R

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen and hydrocarbon detection in aeronautical applications is important for reasons of safety and emissions control. The use of silicon carbide as a semiconductor in a metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structure opens opportunities to measure hydrogen and hydrocarbons in high temperature environments beyond the capabilities of silicon-based devices. The purpose of this paper is to explore the response and stability of Pd-SiC Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range from 100 to 400 C. The effect of heat treating on the diode properties as measured at 100 C is explored. Subsequent operation at 400 C demonstrates the diodes' sensitivity to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. It is concluded that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures but further studies are necessary to determine the diodes' long term stability.

  15. Biomass & Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Fuel For Gas Turbine (Power Generation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant progress has been made by major power generation equipment manufacturers in the development of market applications for hydrogen fuel use in gas turbines in recent years. Development of a new application using gas turbines for significant reduction of power plant CO2 e...

  16. Biomass & Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Fuel For Gas Turbine (Power Generation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant progress has been made by major power generation equipment manufacturers in the development of market applications for hydrogen fuel use in gas turbines in recent years. Development of a new application using gas turbines for significant reduction of power plant CO2 e...

  17. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Muradov, N.

    1996-10-01

    The conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming and partial oxidation) are complex, multi-step processes that produce large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The main goal of this project is to develop a technologically simple process for hydrogen production from natural gas (NG) and other hydrocarbon fuels via single-step decomposition of hydrocarbons. This approach eliminates or significantly reduces CO{sub 2} emission. Carbon is a valuable by-product of this process, whereas conventional methods of hydrogen production from NG produce no useful by-products. This approach is based on the use of special catalysts that reduce the maximum temperature of the process from 1400-1500{degrees}C (thermal non-catalytic decomposition of methane) to 500-900{degrees}C. Transition metal based catalysts and various forms of carbon are among the candidate catalysts for the process. This approach can advantageously be used for the development of compact NG reformers for on-site production of hydrogen-methane blends at refueling stations and, also, for the production of hydrogen-rich gas for fuel cell applications. The author extended the search for active methane decomposition catalysts to various modifications of Ni-, Fe-, Mo- and Co-based catalysts. Variation in the operational parameters makes it possible to produce H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} blends with a wide range of hydrogen concentrations that vary from 15 to 98% by volume. The author found that Ni-based catalysts are more effective at temperatures below 750{degrees}C, whereas Fe-based catalysts are effective at temperatures above 800{degrees}C for the production of hydrogen with purity of 95% v. or higher. The catalytic pyrolysis of liquid hydrocarbons (pentane, gasoline) over Fe-based catalyst was conducted. The author observed the production of a hydrogen-rich gas (hydrogen concentration up to 97% by volume) at a rate of approximately 1L/min.mL of hydrocarbon fuel.

  18. Onboard Plasmatron Generation of Hydrogen rich Gas for Diesel Engine Exhaust Aftertreatment and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Heywood,J.; Rabinovich, A.

    2002-08-25

    Plasmatron reformers can provide attractive means for conversion of diesel fuel into hydrogen rich gas. The hydrogen rich gas can be used for improved NOx trap technology and other aftertreatment applications.

  19. Dominant factors of the laser gettering of silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, Yu. I. E-mail: yuibokhan@gmail.com; Kamenkov, V. S.; Tolochko, N. K.

    2015-02-15

    The laser gettering of silicon wafers is experimentally investigated. The typical gettering parameters are considered. The surfaces of laser-treated silicon wafers are investigated by microscopy. When studying the effect of laser radiation on silicon wafers during gettering, a group of factors determining the conditions of interaction between the laser beam and silicon-wafer surface and affecting the final result of treatment are selected. The main factors determining the gettering efficiency are revealed. Limitations on the desired value of the getter-layer capacity on surfaces with insufficiently high cleanness (for example, ground or matte) are established.

  20. Argon-Hydrogen Shielding Gas Mixtures for Activating Flux-Assisted Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Her-Yueh

    2010-11-01

    Using activating flux for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to improve penetration capability is a well-established technique. Argon is an inert gas and the one most widely used as a shielding gas for GTAW. For the most austenitic stainless steels, pure argon does not provide adequate weld penetration. Argon-hydrogen mixtures give a more even heat input to the workpiece, increasing the arc voltage, which tends to increase the volume of molten material in the weld pool as well as the weld depth-to-width ratio. Great interest has been shown in the interaction between activating flux and the hydrogen concentration in an argon-based shielding gas. In this study, the weld morphology, the arc profile, the retained delta ferrite content, the angular distortion, and the microstructures were examined. The application of an activating flux combining argon and hydrogen for GTAW is important in the industry. The results of this study are presented here.

  1. Hydrogen gas embrittlement and the disc pressure test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelet, E. J.; Troiano, A. R.

    1973-01-01

    A disc pressure test has been used to study the influenced of a hydrogen gas environment on the mechanical properties of three high strength superalloys, Inconel 718, L-605 and A-286, in static and dynamic conditions. The influence of the hydrogen pressure, loading rate, temperature, mechanical and thermal fatigue has investigated. The permeation characteristics of Inconel 718 have been determined in collaboration with the French AEC. The results complemented by a fractographic study are consistent either with a stress-sorption or with an internal embrittlement type of mechanism.

  2. Erosion of graphite surface exposed to hot supersonic hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, O. P.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical model based on laminar boundary layer flow equations is developed to predict the erosion rate of a graphite (AGCarb-101) surface exposed to a hot supersonic stream of hydrogen gas. The supersonic flow in the nozzle outside the boundary layer formed over the surface of the specimen is determined by assuming one-dimensional isentropic conditions. An overall surface reaction rate expression based on the experimental studies by Clarke and Fox is used to describe the interaction of hydrogen with graphite. A satisfactory agreement is found between the results of the computation, and the available experimental data. Some shortcomings of the model, and further possible improvements are discussed.

  3. NEG (non evaporable getter) pumps for organic compounds and water removal in EUVL tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, A.; Manini, P.; Raimondi, S.

    2008-03-01

    One of present EUVL challenges is to reduce as much as possible the organic compounds and water partial pressures during the lithographic process. These gases can in fact interact with sensitive surfaces and, in the presence of EUV radiation, decompose to generate carbon-based films and oxides, which are detrimental to the optics, reducing its performance, lifetime and significantly increasing the equipment total cost of ownership. With this respect, use of Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) pumps seems particularly attractive. Getter pumps are very clean, vibration-free, compact, able to deliver large pumping speed for all active gases, including water and hydrogen. In the present paper, we report for the first time the results of specific tests aimed at measuring the pumping speed for some selected organic compounds, namely toluene and decane (n-decane). The study shows that getter pumps can effectively sorb these large organic molecules with high speed and capacity. Speed and capacity increases when operating the getter cartridge at moderate temperature (e.g. 150-200°C), however remarkable sorption is achieved, even at room temperature, without any power applied. When coupled with turbo-molecular pumps NEG pumps have therefore the potential to improve the ultimate vacuum and mitigate the carbon/oxygen contamination in a UHV lithographic system.

  4. Disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and tritiated hydrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniazzi, A. B.; Morton, C. S.

    2008-07-15

    Kinectrics and its predecessor company Ontario Hydro Research Div. (a division of Ontario Hydro) had a fully operational tritium laboratory on site since the early 1980's. During those years numerous projects and experiments were undertaken using hydrogen and tritium for the most part. Metals with an affinity for hydrogen are commonly employed as scavengers of hydrogenic gases from process streams or as hydrogen storage mediums. The two most common of these metals used were depleted uranium and a zirconium-iron alloy (SAES St198). The break-up of Ontario Hydro through deregulation activities resulted in the building of a new, smaller, tritium laboratory and the decommissioning of the original tritium laboratory. Decommissioning activities resulted in the need to safely dispose of these reactive metals. Disposal of these metals is not straight forward. For safe, long term, disposal it has been decided to oxidize the metals in a controlled fashion. The oxidized beds, containing the metals, will be sent to a radioactive waste site for long term storage. Options for disposal of tritiated hydrogen gas are presented and discussed. This paper provides a disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and hydrogen thereby closing the loop in tritium handling. (authors)

  5. Instruction manual for UTEP weld gas hydrogen detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John; Pang, Tonghui

    1992-01-01

    The instrument described in this manual was developed at the University of Texas at El Paso under contract from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center. The instrument has been used to detect hydrogen in the shielding gas of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welds at concentrations of less than 100 ppm. The instrument makes measurements in real time during the welding operation and provides the operator with an easily readable graphic display of the present level of hydrogen in the arc as well as the level of hydrogen over the past approximately five minutes. In this way the welder can not only tell if the present level of hydrogen is excessive, but can see what changes in weld parameters have done to the level of hydrogen. The welder can set the level of hydrogen that is considered critical and the instrument display will indicate when that level has been exceeded. All detection is from the torch side. All needed equipment is supplied by the developer except for an IBM PC compatible computer which must be supplied by the user. Source code is supplied in this manual so that the user can modify the control program as desired.

  6. Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

    2006-09-01

    This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  7. Getter materials for cracking ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Boffito, Claudio; Baker, John D.

    1999-11-02

    A method is provided for cracking ammonia to produce hydrogen. The method includes the steps of passing ammonia over an ammonia-cracking catalyst which is an alloy including (1) alloys having the general formula Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x M.sub.1 M.sub.2, wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 are selected independently from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, and x is between about 0.0 and about 1.0 inclusive; and between about 20% and about 50% Al by weight. In another aspect, the method of the invention is used to provide methods for operating hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cells. In still another aspect, the present invention provides a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine and a hydrogen fuel cell including the above-described ammonia-cracking catalyst.

  8. Effects of shielding gas hydrogen content on the arc behavior in gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoien, M.I.; Olson, D.L.; Liu, S.

    1994-12-31

    The primary role of the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is to protect the weld pool and tungsten electrode from the oxygen and nitrogen in the surrounding atmosphere. Traditionally inert gases such as argon and helium have been used, either as pure gases or mixed with each other. However, additions of small amounts of hydrogen have been reported to improve weld bead penetration and enable higher welding speeds to be used. The present work was performed to investigate the effect of small hydrogen additions on the arc behavior in GTAW, and to further the fundamental understanding of the effect of shielding gas on arc characteristics. GTAW bead-on-plate welds were made on 12.5 mm x 150 mm x 75 mm Type 304 stainless steel test coupons. The welding current, voltage, and their variations were continuously monitored during welding. After welding, each test coupon was sectioned and prepared using standard metallographic techniques and etched in Vilella`s etch for macroexamination of the weld bead cross section. Bead width, depth, and cross-sectional area were measured using a LECO image analysator system. The influence of hydrogen content in an argon has tungsten arc was characterized. The electrical behavior of the arc, including the arc resistance, was measured as a function of current and hydrogen content. A better fundamental understanding of arc behavior and energy transfer was achieved using these experimental gas mixes. The results allow the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) Small additions of hydrogen in the argon based shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding significantly change the weld bead geometry due to changes in the arc column. (2) Selection of the right argon, hydrogen shielding gas mixture to give the optimum arc column characteristics for a given condition can improve weld quality and increase productivity. (3) The resistance of the arc column was found to be an adequate parameter to describe the arc column behavior.

  9. Absorption media for irreversibly gettering thionyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Buffleben, George; Goods, Steven H.; Shepodd, Timothy; Wheeler, David R.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy

    2002-01-01

    Thionyl chloride is a hazardous and reactive chemical used as the liquid cathode in commercial primary batteries. Contrary to previous thinking, ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon (Calgon Corporation) reversibly absorbs thionyl chloride. Thus, several candidate materials were examined as irreversible getters for thionyl chloride. The capacity, rate and effect of temperature were also explored. A wide variety of likely materials were investigated through screening experiments focusing on the degree of heat generated by the reaction as well as the material absorption capacity and irreversibility, in order to help narrow the group of possible getter choices. More thorough, quantitative measurements were performed on promising materials. The best performing getter was a mixture of ZnO and ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. In this example, the ZnO reacts with thionyl chloride to form ZnCl.sub.2 and SO.sub.2. The SO.sub.2 is then irreversibly gettered by ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. This combination of ZnO and carbon has a high capacity, is irreversible and functions effectively above -20.degree. C.

  10. Technetium getters in the near surface environment

    SciTech Connect

    KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; ZHANG,PENGCHU; WESTRICH,HENRY R.; BRYAN,CHARLES R.; MOLECKE,MARTIN A.

    2000-05-19

    Conventional performance assessments assume that radioactive {sup 99}Tc travels as a non-sorbing component with an effective K{sub d} (distribution coefficient) of 0. This is because soil mineral surfaces commonly develop net negative surface charges and pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}), with large ionic size and low electrical density, is not sorbed onto them. However, a variety of materials have been identified that retain Tc and may eventually lead to promising Tc getters. In assessing Tc getter performance it is important to evaluate the environment in which the getter is to function. In many contaminant plumes Tc will only leach slowly from the source of the contamination and significant dilution is likely. Thus, sub-ppb Tc concentrations are expected and normal groundwater constituents will dominate the aquifer chemistry. In this setting a variety of constituents were found to retard TcO{sub 4}: imogolite, boehmite, hydrotalcite, goethite, copper sulfide and oxide and coal. Near leaking tanks of high level nuclear waste, Tc may be present in mg/L level concentrations and groundwater chemistry will be dominated by constituents from the waste. Both bone char, and to a lesser degree, freshly precipitated Al hydroxides may be effective Tc scavengers in this environment. Thus, the search for Tc getters is far from hopeless, although much remains to be learned about the mechanisms by which these materials retain Tc.

  11. A Converter for Producing a Hydrogen-Containing Synthesis Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Yu. P.; Molchanov, O. N.; Britov, B. K.; Fedorov, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    A computational thermodynamic and experimental investigation of the characteristics of a model of a converter for producing a hydrogen-containing synthesis gas from a hydrocarbon fuel (kerosene) with its separate delivery to thermal-oxidative and steam conversions has been carried out. It is shown that the optimum conditions of converter operation correspond to the oxidant excess coefficient in the converter's combustion chamber α > 0.5 at a temperature of the heat-transmitting wall (made from a heat-resistant KhN78T alloy (ÉI 435)) of 1200 K in the case of using a nickel corrugated tape catalyst. The content of hydrogen in the synthesis gas attains in this case 60 vol.%, and there is no release of carbon (soot) in the conversion products as well as no need for water cooling of the converter walls.

  12. Interstellar Hydrogen Gas Entering the Heliosphere: Four Years of IBEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saul, Lukas; Wurz, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Interstellar neutral gas enters the heliosphere unimpeded by solar wind and heliopause magnetic fields. Observations of this gas have determined the relative motion of our sun and the interstellar medium as well as properties of this medium. We report here on direct observations of interstellar neutral Hydrogen by NASA's IBEX satellite over four years of operation. The observed flux at 1AU is not constant but varies due to solar variability which affects the ionization rate and the radiation pressure. Further, the direction of the H flux is offset from other species. We explain these observations in the context of low energy neutral atom sensors developed at the University of Bern in Switzerland.

  13. LOX vaporization in high-pressure, hydrogen-rich gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1990-01-01

    LOX droplet vaporization in high-pressure hydrogen-rich gas is analyzed, with special attention to thermodynamic effects which compel the surface to heat to the critical state and to supercritical vaporization processes on heating to criticality. Subcritical vaporization is modeled using a quasi-steady diffusion-controlled gas-phase transport formulation coupled to an effective-conductivity internal-energy-transport model accounting for circulation effects. It is demonstrated how the droplet surface might heat to the critical state, for ambient pressures slightly greater than the critical pressure of oxygen, such that the bulk of propellant within the droplet remains substantially below the critical mixing temperature.

  14. Triboelectric Hydrogen Gas Sensor with Pd Functionalized Surface

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung-Ho; Kwon, Yang Hyeog; Kim, Young-Hwan; Jung, Joo-Yun; Nah, Junghyo

    2016-01-01

    Palladium (Pd)-based hydrogen (H2) gas sensors have been widely investigated thanks to its fast reaction and high sensitivity to hydrogen. Various sensing mechanisms have been adopted for H2 gas sensors; however, all the sensors must be powered through an external battery. We report here an H2 gas sensor that can detect H2 by measuring the output voltages generated during contact electrification between two friction surfaces. When the H2 sensor, composed of Pd-coated ITO (indium tin oxide) and PET (polyethylene Terephthalate) film, is exposed to H2, its output voltage is varied in proportion to H2 concentration because the work function (WF) of Pd-coated surface changes, altering triboelectric charging behavior. Specifically, the output voltage of the sensor is gradually increased as exposing H2 concentration increases. Reproducible and sensitive sensor response was observed up 1% H2 exposure. The approach introduced here can easily be adopted to development of triboelectric gas sensors detecting other gas species. PMID:28335313

  15. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-06-01

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1×1018atoms/s , where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells.

  16. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-06-15

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10{sup 18} atoms/s, where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells.

  17. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of metalorganic molecules diluted in hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hideo; Watanabe, Masanobu; Mukai, Seiji; Yajima, Hiroyoshi

    1988-12-01

    Ultraviolet absorption spectra of trimethyl gallium, triethyl gallium, and trimethyl aluminum diluted in hydrogen gas were measured as a function of the wavelength (185-350 nm) and the concentration of the molecules (4.8×10 -6 -1.6×10 -4 mol/liter). Their absorbances changed linearly with the concentration of the molecules, which allowed us to calculate the molar absorption coefficients of the molecules on the basis of the Beer-Lambert law.

  18. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  19. EUV tools: hydrogen gas purification and recovery strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landoni, Cristian; Succi, Marco; Applegarth, Chuck; Riddle Vogt, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    The technological challenges that have been overcome to make extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV) a reality have been enormous1. This vacuum driven technology poses significant purity challenges for the gases employed for purging and cleaning the scanner EUV chamber and source. Hydrogen, nitrogen, argon and ultra-high purity compressed dry air (UHPCDA) are the most common gases utilized at the scanner and source level. Purity requirements are tighter than for previous technology node tools. In addition, specifically for hydrogen, EUV tool users are facing not only gas purity challenges but also the need for safe disposal of the hydrogen at the tool outlet. Recovery, reuse or recycling strategies could mitigate the disposal process and reduce the overall tool cost of operation. This paper will review the types of purification technologies that are currently available to generate high purity hydrogen suitable for EUV applications. Advantages and disadvantages of each purification technology will be presented. Guidelines on how to select the most appropriate technology for each application and experimental conditions will be presented. A discussion of the most common approaches utilized at the facility level to operate EUV tools along with possible hydrogen recovery strategies will also be reported.

  20. OPERATION OF A TRITIUM GLOVEBOX CLEAN-UP SYSTEM USING ZIRCONIUM MANGANESE IRON AND ZIRCONIUM TWO IRON METAL GETTERS

    SciTech Connect

    E. LARSON; K. COOK

    2000-08-01

    A metal hydride-based tritium clean-up system has been successfully operated for more than four years on an 11 m{sup 3} helium/nitrogen glovebox which was used for handling metal tritide powders. The clean-up system consists of two beds: (1) a Zr-Mn-Fe (in a 10% by weight Al binder, SAES ST909) bed operating at 675 C followed by (2) a Zr{sub 2}Fe (SAES ST198) bed operating at 250 C. The Zr-Mn-Fe bed serves to condition the gas stream by cracking hydrogenous impurities (such as H{sub 2}O and hydrocarbons) and absorbing oxygen and carbon. The Zr{sub 2}Fe bed absorbs the hydrogen isotopes from the flowing stream by forming a solid hydride compound. These beds contain 3 kilograms of Zr{sub 2}Fe and have been loaded routinely with 230-250 STP liters of hydrogen isotopes in earlier trials. The Zr-Mn-Fe alloy exhibits an anomaly during activation, namely an exotherm upon initial exposure to nitrogen. The purpose of this work is to better understand this reaction. Nitrogen absorption studies were done in order to quantify the nitrogen taken up by the getter and to characterize the reaction kinetics. In addition, ST909 phases before and after the reaction were studied with x-ray diffraction.

  1. Non evaporable getter (NEG) technology: A powerful tool for UHV-XHV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccallini, Enrico; Siviero, Fabrizio; Bonucci, Antonio; Conte, Andrea; Srivastava, Peeyush; Paolo, Manini

    2012-06-01

    Ultra and Extreme High Vacuum (UHV and XHV respectively) levels are needed in several vacuum-related applications for wide pressure and time range. The Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) technology is one of the most important examples to get XHV/UHV condition in the vacuum systems. In fact the high reactivity of the getter materials towards active gases in a wide temperature range (from room temperature to several hundreds of °C) allows removing very efficiently active gases such as H2, H2O, CO2, CO, N2, and so on. When declining, the pumping speed of NEG can be easily restored, by reactivating the getter material with a thermal process ("reactivation"). In this framework, SAES Getters S.p.A. has a long expertise in producing NEG pumps (and more in general NEG technology) which can provide vacuum conditions from the low to the ultra high level. An overall overview of NEG pump technology will be given in this paper considering 1) the involved mechanisms for gas adsorption into the NEG material, 2) operational conditions of NEG pumps and 3) example of applications which demonstrate the benefits of NEG pumps use in XHV/UHV systems. Future perspectives for NEG pumps in UHV/XHV applications will be also given.

  2. The Transmission Factor Method: in-situ Characterization of Getter Coated Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Bonucci, Antonio; Conte, Andrea; Manini, Paolo; Raimondi, Stefano

    2007-01-19

    Particle accelerators and synchrotron light source need low residual pressure during operating conditions. In specific applications like narrow-gap insertion devices, NEG coating has proved to be very effective. ASTM F798-82 standard is the common characterization method for the sorption performance of getters. In the case of getter coated pipes, the measurement is conducted 'offline' on a sample (coupon), suitably positioned inside the chamber to be coated and removed after the process. Although this approach is suitable to guarantee the control of the process, in-situ characterization should be useful to evaluate residual pressure during the operating conditions. A different measurement technique (Transmission Factor Method) is here described. It is based on the measurement of pressures ratio at the inlet and the outlet of a coated pipe, under a flow of test gas. A calibration curve is calculated using a modellistic approach and permits to evaluate sticking probability of the coated surface from the pressure ratio. Preliminary experimental results about the characterization of this getter will be shown. Keywords: Getter sorption measurement.

  3. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program's maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model's predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  4. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program`s maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model`s predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  5. Polymer formulation for removing hydrogen and liquid water from an enclosed space

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2006-02-21

    This invention describes a solution to the particular problem of liquid water formation in hydrogen getters exposed to quantities of oxygen. Water formation is usually desired because the recombination reaction removes hydrogen without affecting gettering capacity and the oxygen removal reduces the chances for a hydrogen explosion once free oxygen is essentially removed. The present invention describes a getter incorporating a polyacrylate compound that can absorb up to 500% of its own weight in liquid water without significantly affecting its hydrogen gettering/recombination properties, but that also is insensitive to water vapor.

  6. Integrated Micro-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensor. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Frank DiMeo, Jr.

    2000-10-02

    This report details our recent progress in developing novel MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) based hydrogen gas sensors. These sensors couple novel thin films as the active layer on a device structure known as a Micro-HotPlate. This coupling has resulted in a gas sensor that has several unique advantages in terms of speed, sensitivity, stability and amenability to large scale manufacture. This Phase-I research effort was focused on achieving the following three objectives: (1) Investigation of sensor fabrication parameters and their effects on sensor performance. (2) Hydrogen response testing of these sensors in wet/dry and oxygen-containing/oxygen-deficient atmospheres. (3) Investigation of the long-term stability of these thin film materials and identification of limiting factors. We have made substantial progress toward achieving each of these objectives, and highlights of our phase I results include the demonstration of signal responses with and without oxygen present, as well as in air with a high level of humidity. We have measured response times of <0.5 s to 1% H{sub 2} in air, and shown the ability to detect concentrations of <200 ppm. These results are extremely encouraging and suggest that this technology has substantial potential for meeting the needs of a hydrogen based economy. These achievements demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-hotplates structures in conjunction with palladium+coated metal-hydride films for sensing hydrogen in many of the environments required by a hydrogen based energy economy. Based on these findings, they propose to continue and expand the development of this technology in Phase II.

  7. ELECTROCHEMICAL SEPARATION AND CONCENTRATION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE FROM GAS MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Winnick, Jack; Sather, Norman F.; Huang, Hann S.

    1984-10-30

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4 -- or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S--. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  8. Electrochemical separation and concentration of hydrogen sulfide from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Winnick, Jack; Sather, Norman F.; Huang, Hann S.

    1984-10-30

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4 -- or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S--. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  9. Copper gettering by aluminum precipitates in aluminum-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN,GARY A.; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.

    2000-03-20

    Copper in Si is shown to be strongly gettered by Al-rich precipitates formed by implanting Al to supersaturation and followed by annealing. At temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C a layer containing Al precipitates is found to getter Cu from Cu silicide located on the opposite side of a 0.25-mm Si wafer, indicating a substantially lower chemical potential for the Cu in the molten-A1 phase. Cu gettering proceeds rapidly until an atomic ratio of approximately 2 Cu atoms to 1 Al atom is reached in the precipitated Al region, after which the gettering process slows. Redistribution of Cu from one Al-rich layer to another at low Cu concentrations demonstrates that a segregation-type gettering mechanism is operating. Cu gettering occurs primarily in the region containing the precipitated Al rather than the region where the Al is entirely substitutional.

  10. Low-cost, high-performance nonevaporable getter pumps using nonevaporable getter pills

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Hiraku; Ohno, Shinya; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Masato; Okudaira, Koji K.; Mase, Kazuhiko Kikuchi, Takashi

    2016-09-15

    Nonevaporable getter (NEG) pumps are widely used for maintaining a clean ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) of ≤10{sup −8 }Pa because of their high pumping speeds for hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and active gases in the UHV region. In addition, they are oil free, evaporation free, sputtering free, sublimation free, magnetic field free, vibration free, economical, compact, lightweight, and energy saving. In the present paper, the authors report a new NEG pump which is composed of commercial 60 NEG pills (ϕ10 × 3 mm; 70 wt. % Zr, 24.6 wt. % V, and 5.4 wt. % Fe), titanium parts, a DN 40 conflat flange, and a tantalum heater. The NEG pills are vertically and radially aligned around the heater to maximize the effective area for pumping. After activation at 400 °C for 30 min, the pumping speeds of the NEG pump were measured with the orifice method. Pumping speeds of 140–130, 200–140, 190–130, and 35–17 l/s were estimated for H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} gasses, respectively, in a pumped-quantity range of 0.01–0.1 Pa l. Since the NEG pump is composed of a heating unit and a NEG module, the pumping speeds can be improved by increasing the number of NEG modules. These NEG pumps are favorable alternatives to sputtering ion pumps or titanium sublimation pumps.

  11. Silica membranes for hydrogen separation from coal gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gavalas, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    This project is a continuation of a previous DOE-UCR project (DE-FG22- 89PC89765) dealing with the preparation of silica membranes highly permselective to hydrogen at elevated temperatures, suitable for hydrogen separation from coal gas. The membranes prepared in the previous project had very high selectivity but relatively low permeance. Therefore, the general objectives of this project were to improve the permeance of these membranes and to obtain fundamental information about membrane structure and properties. The specific objectives were: (1) to explore new silylation reagents and reaction conditions with the purpose of reducing the thickness and increasing the permeance of silica membranes prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), (2) to characterize the membrane structure, (3) to delineate mechanism and kinetics of deposition, (4) to measure the permeability of silica layers at different extents of deposition, and (5) to mathematically model the relationship between structure and deposition kinetics.

  12. Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2007-12-11

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  13. 1,4-diphenylbutadiyne as a potential tritium getter

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.H.; Bissell, E.E.; Tsugawa, R.T.; Souers, P.C.

    1980-10-01

    Research on the acetylene compound 1,4-diphenylbutadiyne is an effort to develop an air-operative tritium gas scavenger. T/sub 2/ adds to the acetylene bond of the organic in the presence of a metal catalyst. The catalyst also stimulates the oxidation reaction as well. The butadiyne compound has shown good reaction efficiency at 300 ppM T/sub 2/ in static dry air. At this concentration 75% of the scavenged tritium was in the organic. This work has expanded to the investigation of liquid acetylenes, metal acetylene complexes, organometallics and acetylene based alcohols. The best of these compounds has gettered 100% of 10 to 500 ppM T/sub 2/ for both static and dynamic air flow conditions.

  14. Selective permeation of hydrogen gas using cellulose nanofibril film.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Hayaka; Fujisawa, Shuji; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2013-05-13

    Biobased membranes that can selectively permeate hydrogen gas have been developed from aqueous dispersions of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCN) prepared from wood cellulose: TOCN-coated plastic films and self-standing TOCN films. Compared with TOCNs with sodium, lithium, potassium, and cesium carboxylate groups, TOCN with free carboxyl groups (TOCN-COOH) had much high and selective H2 gas permeation performance. Because permeabilities of H2, N2, O2, and CO2 gases through the membranes primarily depended on their kinetic diameters, the gas permeation behavior of the various TOCNs can be explained in terms of a diffusion mechanism. Thus, the selective H2 gas permeability for TOCN-COOH was probably due to a larger average size in free volume holes present between nanofibrils in the layer and film than those of other TOCNs with metal carboxylate groups. The obtained results indicate that TOCN-COOH membranes are applicable as biobased H2 gas separation membranes in fuel cell electric power generation systems.

  15. Ionization-Assisted Getter Pumping for Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, Robert L.; Burt, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    A method eliminates (or recovers from) residual methane buildup in getter-pumped atomic frequency standard systems by applying ionizing assistance. Ultra-high stability trapped ion frequency standards for applications requiring very high reliability, and/or low power and mass (both for ground-based and space-based platforms) benefit from using sealed vacuum systems. These systems require careful material selection and system processing (cleaning and high-temperature bake-out). Even under the most careful preparation, residual hydrogen outgassing from vacuum chamber walls typically limits the base pressure. Non-evaporable getter pumps (NEGs) provide a convenient pumping option for sealed systems because of low mass and volume, and no power once activated. An ion gauge in conjunction with a NEG can be used to provide a low mass, low-power method for avoiding the deleterious effects of methane buildup in high-performance frequency standard vacuum systems.

  16. Plasma reforming and partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel vapor to produce synthesis gas and/or hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2003-08-19

    Methods and systems for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  17. Plasma Reforming And Partial Oxidation Of Hydrocarbon Fuel Vapor To Produce Synthesis Gas And/Or Hydrogen Gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2004-10-19

    Methods and systems are disclosed for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  18. [Hydrogen and oxidative stress injury--from an inert gas to a medical gas].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao-li; Du, Jun-bao; Tang, Chao-shu

    2011-04-18

    Oxidative stress is intensive cellular oxidation caused by redundant reactive oxygen species (ROS) or free radicals. Redundant ROS causes DNA fracture, lipid peroxidation and protein inactivation, thus leading to severe cell damage. Recent studies have shown that hydrogen is a good anti-oxidant. It selectively reduces the hydroxyl radical, the most cytotoxic of ROS; however, it does not react with other ROS, which play physiological roles. As a result, it could protect tissues against oxidative stress injuries, such as ischemia/reperfusion injury of the heart, liver and intestine, cisplatin nephrotoxicity, sepsis and colon inflammation. As a medical gas, hydrogen may have a prospect for far-reaching clinical application.

  19. Buffer Gas Experiments in Mercury (Hg+) Ion Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Sang K.; Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    We describe the results of the frequency shifts measured from various buffer gases that might be used as a buffer gas to increase the loading efficiency and cooling of ions trapped in a small mercury ion clock. The small mass, volume and power requirement of space clock precludes the use of turbo pumps. Hence, a hermetically sealed vacuum system, incorporating a suitable getter material with a fixed amount of inert buffer gas may be a practical alternative to the groundbased system. The collision shifts of 40,507,347.996xx Hz clock transition for helium, neon and argon buffer gases were measured in the ambient earth magnetic field. In addition to the above non-getterable inert gases we also measured the frequency shifts due to getterable, molecular hydrogen and nitrogen gases which may be used as buffer gases when incorporated with a miniature ion pump. We also examined the frequency shift due to the low methane gas partial pressure in a fixed higher pressure neon buffer gas environment. Methane gas interacted with mercury ions in a peculiar way as to preserve the ion number but to relax the population difference in the two hyperfine clock states and thereby reducing the clock resonance signal. The same population relaxation was also observed for other molecular buffer gases (N H,) but at much reduced rate.

  20. Buffer Gas Experiments in Mercury (Hg+) Ion Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Sang K.; Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    We describe the results of the frequency shifts measured from various buffer gases that might be used as a buffer gas to increase the loading efficiency and cooling of ions trapped in a small mercury ion clock. The small mass, volume and power requirement of space clock precludes the use of turbo pumps. Hence, a hermetically sealed vacuum system, incorporating a suitable getter material with a fixed amount of inert buffer gas may be a practical alternative to the groundbased system. The collision shifts of 40,507,347.996xx Hz clock transition for helium, neon and argon buffer gases were measured in the ambient earth magnetic field. In addition to the above non-getterable inert gases we also measured the frequency shifts due to getterable, molecular hydrogen and nitrogen gases which may be used as buffer gases when incorporated with a miniature ion pump. We also examined the frequency shift due to the low methane gas partial pressure in a fixed higher pressure neon buffer gas environment. Methane gas interacted with mercury ions in a peculiar way as to preserve the ion number but to relax the population difference in the two hyperfine clock states and thereby reducing the clock resonance signal. The same population relaxation was also observed for other molecular buffer gases (N H,) but at much reduced rate.

  1. Study on Fiber-optic Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Wen, Jun-Qing; Zhang, Xiao-Zhen; Wang, Wei; Feng, De-Quan; Wang, Qi; Jia, Fei

    We describe a novel fiber-optic gas sensor which hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) gas can be detected by a silver coated fiber bragg grating (FBG). The H2S sensitive material Ag can be coated on the cladding surrounding surface of FBG by conventional silver mirror reaction. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) was applied to analysis the Ag film structure before and after the interaction with H2S gas. By conducting the experiment of Ag-coated optical sensor (AOS), the relation between the H2S gas concentration and absorption spectrum was built. Result shows that while the concentration alters from 0 to 9.32%, a linear response of AOS signal to H2S concentration was observed with the response sensitivity of 0.332 dBm/% and linearity R2=0.9966. Such H2S sensor is suitable for monitoring the H2S hazard as a one time disposable logging-while-drilling sensor.

  2. Gas phase hydrogen permeation in alpha titanium and carbon steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Shah, K. K.; Reeves, B. H.; Gadgeel, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium and heats of Armco ingot iron and steels containing from 0.008-1.23 w/oC were annealed or normalized and machined into hollow cylinders. Coefficients of diffusion for alpha-Ti and alpha-Fe were determined by the lag-time technique. Steady state permeation experiments yield first power pressure dependence for alpha-Ti and Sievert's law square root dependence for Armco iron and carbon steels. As in the case of diffusion, permeation data confirm that alpha-titanium is subject to at least partial phase boundary reaction control while the steels are purely diffusion controlled. The permeation rate in steels also decreases as the carbon content increases. As a consequence of Sievert's law, the computed hydrogen solubility decreases as the carbon content increases. This decreases in explained in terms of hydrogen trapping at carbide interfaces. Oxidizing and nitriding the surfaces of alpha-titanium membranes result in a decrease in the permeation rate for such treatment on the gas inlet surfaces but resulted in a slight increase in the rate for such treatment on the gas outlet surfaces. This is explained in terms of a discontinuous TiH2 layer.

  3. Background reduction by a getter pump around the ionization volume of a Lamb-shift polarimeter and possible improvements of polarized ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, R.; Emmerich, R.; Grigoryev, K.; Paetz gen Schieck, H.; Ley, J.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Rathmann, F.; Sarkadi, J.; Seyfarth, H.; Tenckhoff, G.; Vasilyev, A.

    2005-05-15

    The Koeln-Juelich Lamb-shift polarimeter is used to measure the nuclear polarization of the hydrogen or deuterium beam produced with the atomic-beam source for the polarized target at the ANKE spectrometer at COSY-Juelich. The precision of the earlier results had been dominated by the recombination of atoms in the ionizer. Protons or deuterons from the dissociative ionization of unpolarized recombined H{sub 2} or D{sub 2} molecules had strongly contributed to the extracted ion beam. To suppress this effect, in the new ionizer a nonevaporable getter pump of about 2000 l/s H{sub 2} or D{sub 2} pumping speed surrounds the ionization volume. It reduces the extracted current of unpolarized ions, produced from the recombined molecular gas, by a factor of about 20 compared with the earlier value, which reduces the error of the polarization measurements to about 0.5%. Now the H{sub 2} or D{sub 2} molecules in the ionization volume predominantly are those which are contained in the incoming beam from the atomic beam source. This allows the measurement of the fraction of unpolarized molecules in the polarized atomic H-vector or D-vector beam. The improvement achieved is a valuable step toward the measurement of the nuclear polarization of a gas sample, extracted from the storage cell of the polarized internal gas target for the spectrometer ANKE in the COSY-Juelich storage ring with the Lamb-shift polarimeter. Furthermore, the results show that the polarization of proton or deuteron beams would be increased by the installation of such a pump around the ionization volume of atomic-beam ion sources with an electron-impact ionizer. For ECR ionizers the recombined H{sub 2} or D{sub 2} molecules would be absorbed, whereas the noble gases, used as buffer, are not pumped by the getter material.

  4. Mechanisms of transition-metal gettering in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. M.; Seibt, M.; Schroeter, W.

    2000-10-01

    The atomic process, kinetics, and equilibrium thermodynamics underlying the gettering of transition-metal impurities in Si are reviewed. Methods for mathematical modeling of gettering are discussed and illustrated. Needs for further research are considered. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Modeling phosphorus diffusion gettering of iron in single crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarahiltunen, A.; Savin, H.; Yli-Koski, M.; Talvitie, H.; Sinkkonen, J.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for phosphorus diffusion gettering (PDG) of iron in silicon, which is based on a special fitting procedure to experimental data. We discuss the possibilities of the underlying physics of the segregation coefficient. Finally, we show that the proposed PDG model allows quantitative analysis of gettering efficiency of iron at various processing conditions.

  6. Titanium defect structure change after gas-phase hydrogenation at different temperatures and cooling rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylov, Andrey A.; Laptev, Roman S.; Kudiiarov, Viktor N.; Volokitina, Tatiana L.

    2016-11-01

    Influence of gas-phase hydrogenation temperature and cooling rate on defect structure of commercially pure titanium alloy was experimentally studied by means of positron annihilation spectroscopy. The change of temperature in the process of gas-phase hydrogenation was in the range of 500-700°C, while the change of cooling rate was in the range of 0.4-10.4°C/min. With increasing of gas-phase hydrogenation temperature, significant increase of hydrogen sorption rate was found. High temperature gas-phase hydrogenation of commercially pure titanium alloy lead to the formation of vacancy and hydrogen-vacancy complexes. For the same concentration of hydrogen, temperature variation or variation of cooling rate had no effect on the type of defect. However, this variation provides significant changes in defect concentration.

  7. Overview of Two Hydrogen Energy Storage Studies: Wind Hydrogen in California and Blending in Natural Gas Pipelines (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of two NREL energy storage studies: Wind Hydrogen in California: Case Study and Blending Hydrogen Into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues. The presentation summarizes key issues, major model input assumptions, and results.

  8. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao-xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP. PMID:27115738

  9. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao-Xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP.

  10. Selective hydrogen gas sensor using CuFe2O4 nanoparticle based thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haija, Mohammad Abu; Ayesh, Ahmad I.; Ahmed, Sadiqa; Katsiotis, Marios S.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen gas sensors based on CuFe2O4 nanoparticle thin films are presented in this work. Each gas sensor was prepared by depositing CuFe2O4 thin film on a glass substrate by dc sputtering inside a high vacuum chamber. Argon inert gas was used to sputter the material from a composite sputtering target. Interdigitated metal electrodes were deposited on top of the thin films by thermal evaporation and shadow masking. The produced sensors were tested against hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and ethylene gases where they were found to be selective for hydrogen. The sensitivity of the produced sensors was maximum for hydrogen gas at 50 °C. In addition, the produced sensors exhibit linear response signal for hydrogen gas with concentrations up to 5%. Those sensors have potential to be used for industrial applications because of their low power requirement, functionality at low temperatures, and low production cost.

  11. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

    2004-02-01

    This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space

  12. First principles study of inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) interactions with hydrogen in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiang-Shan; Hou, Jie; Li, Xiang-Yan; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, C. S.; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-04-01

    We have systematically evaluated binding energies of hydrogen with inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) defects, including interstitial clusters and vacancy-inert-gas complexes, and their stable configurations using first-principles calculations. Our calculations show that these inert-gas defects have large positive binding energies with hydrogen, 0.4-1.1 eV, 0.7-1.0 eV, and 0.6-0.8 eV for helium, neon, and argon, respectively. This indicates that these inert-gas defects can act as traps for hydrogen in tungsten, and impede or interrupt the diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten, which supports the discussion on the influence of inert-gas on hydrogen retention in recent experimental literature. The interaction between these inert-gas defects and hydrogen can be understood by the attractive interaction due to the distortion of the lattice structure induced by inert-gas defects, the intrinsic repulsive interaction between inert-gas atoms and hydrogen, and the hydrogen-hydrogen repelling in tungsten lattice.

  13. Microsensor measurements of hydrogen gas dynamics in cyanobacterial microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Michael; Revsbech, Niels P; Kühl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria sp.). The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5-5 pA per μmol L(-1) H2). Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8-10% H2 saturation) within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1-2 h in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct biophotolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g., sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats.

  14. Microsensor measurements of hydrogen gas dynamics in cyanobacterial microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Michael; Revsbech, Niels P.; Kühl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria sp.). The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5–5 pA per μmol L-1 H2). Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8–10% H2 saturation) within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1–2 h in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct biophotolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g., sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats. PMID:26257714

  15. a Study of Using Hydrogen Gas for Steam Boiler in CHOLOR- Alkali Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peantong, Sasitorn; Tangjitsitcharoen, Somkiat

    2017-06-01

    Main products of manufacturing of Cholor - Alkali, which commonly known as industrial chemical, are chlorine gas (Cl2), Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) and hydrogen gas (H2). Chorine gas and sodium hydroxide are two main products for commercial profit; where hydrogen gas is by product. Most industries release hydrogen gas to atmosphere as it is non-profitable and less commercial scale. This study aims to make the most use of hydrogen as a substitute energy of natural gas for steam boiler to save energy cost. The second target of this study is to reduce level of CO2 release to air as a consequence of boiler combustion. This study suggests to install boiler that bases on hydrogen as main power with a high turndown ratio of at least 1:6. However, this case study uses boiler with two mode such as natural gas (NG) mode and mixed mode as they need to be flexible for production. Never the less, the best boiler selection is to use single mode energy of hydrogen. The most concerned issue about hydrogen gas is explosion during combustion stage. Stabilization measures at emergency stop is introduced to control H2 pressure to protect the explosion. This study varies ratio of natural gas to hydrogen gas to find the optimal level of two energy sources for boiler and measure total consumption through costing model; where CO2 level is measured at the boiler stack. The result of this study shows that hydrogen gas can be a substitute energy with natural gas and can reduce cost. Natural gas cost saving is 248,846 baht per month and reduce level of NOx is 80 ppm 7% O2 and 2 % of CO2 release to air as a consequence of boiler combustion.

  16. Hydrodesulphurization of Light Gas Oil using hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghamdi, Abdulaziz

    2009-12-01

    The production of clean fuel faces the challenges of high production cost and complying with stricter environmental regulations. In this research, the ability of using a novel technology of upgrading heavy oil to treat Light Gas Oil (LGO) will be investigated. The target of this project is to produce cleaner transportation fuel with much lower cost of production. Recently, a novel process for upgrading of heavy oil has been developed at University of Waterloo. It is combining the two essential processes in bitumen upgrading; emulsion breaking and hydroprocessing into one process. The water in the emulsion is used to generate in situ hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). This hydrogen can be used for the hydrogenation and hydrotreating reaction which includes sulfur removal instead of the expensive molecular hydrogen. This process can be carried out for the upgrading of the bitumen emulsion which would improve its quality. In this study, the hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of LGO was conducted using in situ hydrogen produced via the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). The main objective of this experimental study is to evaluate the possibility of producing clean LGO over dispersed molybdenum sulphide catalyst and to evaluate the effect of different promoters and syn-gas on the activity of the dispersed Mo catalyst. Experiments were carried out in a 300 ml Autoclave batch reactor under 600 psi (initially) at 391°C for 1 to 3 hours and different amounts of water. After the hydrotreating reaction, the gas samples were collected and the conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen via WGSR was determined using a refinery gas analyzer. The sulphur content in liquid sample was analyzed via X-Ray Fluorescence. Experimental results showed that using more water will enhance WGSR but at the same time inhibits the HDS reaction. It was also shown that the amount of sulfur removed depends on the reaction time. The plan is to investigate the effect of synthesis gas (syngas

  17. Hydrogen detection in high pressure gas mixtures using a twin hole fibre Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobnic, Dan; Mihailov, Stephen J.; Walker, Robert B.; Cuglietta, Gino; Smelser, Christopher W.

    2011-05-01

    A sensor for detecting high-pressure hydrogen gas is presented that is based on Bragg gratings inscribed in a microstructured twin hole optical fibre with femtosecond pulse duration 800 nm radiation and a phase mask. Utilising the well-known variation of refractive index of silica upon exposure to hydrogen gas, the presence of hydrogen results in a shift of the Bragg resonance. The use of a microstructured fibre design allows for more rapid diffusion of H2 into and out of the fibre core resulting in faster detection of hydrogen gas compared to standard optical fibre. Grating inscription with the femtosecond laser technique allows for sensor operation at high temperatures.

  18. Effect of hydrogen in an argon GTAW shielding gas: Arc characteristics and bead morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoeien, M.; Olson, D.L.; Liu, S. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); Peters, R. )

    1995-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen additions to an argon shielding gas on the heat input and weld bead morphology was investigated using the gas tungsten arc welding process. Variations in weld bead size and shape with hydrogen additions were related to changes in the ability of the arc to generate heat and not to generate perturbations in the weld pool caused by Marangoni fluid flow.

  19. Numerical simulation of high pressure release and dispersion of hydrogen into air with real gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksarfard, R.; Kameshki, M. R.; Paraschivoiu, M.

    2010-06-01

    Hydrogen is a renewable and clean source of energy, and it is a good replacement for the current fossil fuels. Nevertheless, hydrogen should be stored in high-pressure reservoirs to have sufficient energy. An in-house code is developed to numerically simulate the release of hydrogen from a high-pressure tank into ambient air with more accuracy. Real gas models are used to simulate the flow since high-pressure hydrogen deviates from ideal gas law. Beattie-Bridgeman and Abel Noble equations are applied as real gas equation of state. A transport equation is added to the code to calculate the concentration of the hydrogen-air mixture after release. The uniqueness of the code is to simulate hydrogen in air release with the real gas model. Initial tank pressures of up to 70 MPa are simulated.

  20. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  1. Acute pit gas (hydrogen sulfide) poisoning in confinement cattle.

    PubMed

    Hooser, S B; Van Alstine, W; Kiupel, M; Sojka, J

    2000-05-01

    Rapid deaths in confinement cattle caused by exposure to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas from manure pits has not been reported in the USA. In 1997, 158 cattle in 2 confinement pens were exposed to H2S gas as the manure in the pits under a slatted floor was agitated prior to pumping. Approximately 35 of the cattle were lying on the floor when the upper agitator was turned on. Within 5 minutes, many these cattle were down on their sides and paddling. Of these, 26 died within a few minutes. The survivors were treated and sent to slaughter. Cattle that did not show immediate signs of toxicosis remained clinically unaffected. Two steers that were near death were brought to the Purdue Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory for clinical evaluation, euthanasia, and necropsy. They were recumbent and unresponsive to visual and auditory stimuli. Necropsy examination yielded no significant gross lesions. No evidence of viral or bacterial infection was found. Ocular fluid nitrate concentrations were within normal limits, and no lead was detected in either animal. Microscopic examination revealed lesions consistent with H2S-induced central nervous system anoxia. Histologically, sections of brain demonstrated massive, diffuse cerebral cortical laminar necrosis and edema. Portions of the outer lamina contained hypereosinophilic and shrunken neurons. The subcortical white matter was vacuolated in some areas. The history, clinical signs, and histologic lesion of cerebral laminar necrosis led to a diagnosis of H2S toxicosis in these cattle.

  2. Upgrade to the Cryogenic Hydrogen Gas Target Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Michael; Tribble, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen gas target at Texas A&M is a vital component for creating a secondary radioactive beam that is then used in experiments in the Momentum Achromat Recoil Spectrometer (MARS). A stable beam from the K500 superconducting cyclotron enters the gas cell and some incident particles are transmuted by a nuclear reaction into a radioactive beam, which are separated from the primary beam and used in MARS experiments. The pressure in the target chamber is monitored so that a predictable isotope production rate can be assured. A ``black box'' received the analog pressure data and sent RS232 serial data through an outdated serial connection to an outdated Visual Basic 6 (VB6) program, which plotted the chamber pressure continuously. The black box has been upgraded to an Arduino UNO microcontroller [Atmel Inc.], which can receive the pressure data and output via USB to a computer. It has been programmed to also accept temperature data for future upgrade. A new computer program, with updated capabilities, has been written in Python. The software can send email alerts, create audible alarms through the Arduino, and plot pressure and temperature. The program has been designed to better fit the needs of the users. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  3. Regio-Selective Intramolecular Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange in Gas-Phase Electron Transfer Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-05-01

    Protein backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) typically utilizes enzymatic digestion after the exchange reaction and before MS analysis to improve data resolution. Gas-phase fragmentation of a peptic fragment prior to MS analysis is a promising technique to further increase the resolution. The biggest technical challenge for this method is elimination of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange (scrambling) in the gas phase. The scrambling obscures the location of deuterium. Jørgensen's group pioneered a method to minimize the scrambling in gas-phase electron capture/transfer dissociation. Despite active investigation, the mechanism of hydrogen scrambling is not well-understood. The difficulty stems from the fact that the degree of hydrogen scrambling depends on instruments, various parameters of mass analysis, and peptide analyzed. In most hydrogen scrambling investigations, the hydrogen scrambling is measured by the percentage of scrambling in a whole molecule. This paper demonstrates that the degree of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange depends on the nature of exchangeable hydrogen sites. The deuterium on Tyr amide of neurotensin (9-13), Arg-Pro-Tyr-Ile-Leu, migrated significantly faster than that on Ile or Leu amides, indicating the loss of deuterium from the original sites is not mere randomization of hydrogen and deuterium but more site-specific phenomena. This more precise approach may help understand the mechanism of intramolecular hydrogen exchange and provide higher confidence for the parameter optimization to eliminate intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange during gas-phase fragmentation. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. Regio-Selective Intramolecular Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange in Gas-Phase Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-05-01

    Protein backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) typically utilizes enzymatic digestion after the exchange reaction and before MS analysis to improve data resolution. Gas-phase fragmentation of a peptic fragment prior to MS analysis is a promising technique to further increase the resolution. The biggest technical challenge for this method is elimination of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange (scrambling) in the gas phase. The scrambling obscures the location of deuterium. Jørgensen's group pioneered a method to minimize the scrambling in gas-phase electron capture/transfer dissociation. Despite active investigation, the mechanism of hydrogen scrambling is not well-understood. The difficulty stems from the fact that the degree of hydrogen scrambling depends on instruments, various parameters of mass analysis, and peptide analyzed. In most hydrogen scrambling investigations, the hydrogen scrambling is measured by the percentage of scrambling in a whole molecule. This paper demonstrates that the degree of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange depends on the nature of exchangeable hydrogen sites. The deuterium on Tyr amide of neurotensin (9-13), Arg-Pro-Tyr-Ile-Leu, migrated significantly faster than that on Ile or Leu amides, indicating the loss of deuterium from the original sites is not mere randomization of hydrogen and deuterium but more site-specific phenomena. This more precise approach may help understand the mechanism of intramolecular hydrogen exchange and provide higher confidence for the parameter optimization to eliminate intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange during gas-phase fragmentation.

  5. Regio-Selective Intramolecular Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange in Gas-Phase Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-02-01

    Protein backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) typically utilizes enzymatic digestion after the exchange reaction and before MS analysis to improve data resolution. Gas-phase fragmentation of a peptic fragment prior to MS analysis is a promising technique to further increase the resolution. The biggest technical challenge for this method is elimination of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange (scrambling) in the gas phase. The scrambling obscures the location of deuterium. Jørgensen's group pioneered a method to minimize the scrambling in gas-phase electron capture/transfer dissociation. Despite active investigation, the mechanism of hydrogen scrambling is not well-understood. The difficulty stems from the fact that the degree of hydrogen scrambling depends on instruments, various parameters of mass analysis, and peptide analyzed. In most hydrogen scrambling investigations, the hydrogen scrambling is measured by the percentage of scrambling in a whole molecule. This paper demonstrates that the degree of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange depends on the nature of exchangeable hydrogen sites. The deuterium on Tyr amide of neurotensin (9-13), Arg-Pro-Tyr-Ile-Leu, migrated significantly faster than that on Ile or Leu amides, indicating the loss of deuterium from the original sites is not mere randomization of hydrogen and deuterium but more site-specific phenomena. This more precise approach may help understand the mechanism of intramolecular hydrogen exchange and provide higher confidence for the parameter optimization to eliminate intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange during gas-phase fragmentation.

  6. Lifetime prediction in vacuum packaged MEMS provided with integrated getter film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siviero, Fabrizio; Bonucci, Antonio; Conte, Andrea; Moraja, Marco; Gigan, Olivier; Thomas, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    Thin-film getter integration is one of the key technologies enabling the development of a wide class of MEMS devices, such as IR microbolometers and inertial sensors, where stringent vacuum requirements must be satisfied to achieve the desired performances and preserve them for the entire lifetime. Despite its importance, the question about lifetime prediction is still very difficult to answer in a reliable way. Here we present an experimental approach to the evaluation of lifetime, based on an accelerated life test performed varying both the storage conditions and the getter area. A test vehicle based on a resonator device was used. The hermeticity was evaluated by means of specific leak testing, while MEMS behavior during the ageing test was studied monitoring device functional parameters and by residual gas analysis (RGA). Unexpected results were observed leading to the discovery that methane is pumped by the getter below 100°C. These results served as the inputs of a suitable model allowing extrapolating the device lifetime in operating? conditions, and pointed out that RGA is an essential tool to correctly interpret the aging tests.

  7. Investigation on the Hydrogen Gas Sensor Based on Exothermicity Reaction by Hydrogen Absorption into the Pd Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Noriaki; Kimura, Mitsuteru

    We have proposed a novel micro-calorimetric hydrogen sensor based on the temperature difference detection due to the exothermic reaction caused by hydrogen absorption in the palladium (Pd) thin film as a hydrogen absorbing material, and demonstrated using the prototype hydrogen sensor with a microheater and a pair of cantilever SOI thermocouples that this H2 sensor by this proposed mechanism is surely possible. We have ascertained that the sensor output voltage is increased as the H2 concentration is increased, that the exothermic reaction ceases after finish of the hydrogen absorption, the exothermic reaction by hydrogen absorption occurs even in pure N2 gas, that larger output voltage is observed for lower ambient temperature even under no oxygen gas, and that this hydrogen sensor does not respond to the CH4 gas. We have found that the detection of H2 concentration based on the exothermic reaction is preferred to carried out after heating the sensing region rather than during heating it especially in lower H2 concentration than about 5 vol.%, because we can use the null method to detect the extremely low H2 concentration.

  8. Phosphorus and boron diffusion gettering of iron in monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talvitie, H.; Vähänissi, V.; Haarahiltunen, A.; Yli-Koski, M.; Savin, H.

    2011-05-01

    We have studied experimentally the phosphorus diffusion gettering (PDG) of iron in monocrystalline silicon at the temperature range of 650-800 °C. Our results fill the lack of data at low temperatures so that we can obtain a reliable segregation coefficient for iron between a phosphorus diffused layer and bulk silicon. The improved segregation coefficient is verified by time dependent PDG simulations. Comparison of the PDG to boron diffusion gettering (BDG) in the same temperature range shows PDG to be only slightly more effective than BDG. In general, we found that BDG requires more carefully designed processing conditions than PDG to reach a high gettering efficiency.

  9. Modeling boron diffusion gettering of iron in silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarahiltunen, A.; Talvitie, H.; Savin, H.; Yli-Koski, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Sinkkonen, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a model is presented for boron diffusion gettering of iron in silicon during thermal processing. In the model, both the segregation of iron due to high boron doping concentration and heterogeneous precipitation of iron to the surface of the wafer are taken into account. It is shown, by comparing simulated results with experimental ones, that this model can be used to estimate boron diffusion gettering efficiency of iron under a variety of processing conditions. Finally, the application of the model to phosphorus diffusion gettering is discussed.

  10. Transient getter scheme for the tokamak fusion test reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchi, J. L.; Cohen, S. A.; Sredniawski, J. J.

    1980-02-01

    A method has been developed of utilizing SAES Zr/Al getter modules, which obviates the need for frequent interruptions of machine operation by using the pulsed operation of TFTR. These interruptions are required for regeneration of the absorbed tritium after as few as 50 machine pulses. With the Zr/Al getter at 500-600 C it is possible to achieve a quasisteady state in tritium loading where the quantity of tritium desorbed between pulses is equal to the quantity which is absorbed during a pulse. Since frequent thermal cycling is not required, this scheme also reduces the possibility of Zr/Al getter material fatigue.

  11. Study of Hydrogen Recovery Systems for Gas Vented While Refueling Liquid-Hydrogen Fueled Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of capturing and reliquefying the cold hydrogen vapor produced during the fueling of aircraft designed to utilize liquid hydrogen fuel were investigated. An assessment of the most practical, economic, and energy efficient of the hydrogen recovery methods is provided.

  12. Measurements of laminar burning velocities for natural gas-hydrogen-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zuohua; Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Ke; Liu, Bing; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Deming

    2006-07-15

    Laminar flame characteristics of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames were studied in a constant-volume bomb at normal temperature and pressure. Laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths were obtained at various ratios of hydrogen to natural gas (volume fraction from 0 to 100%) and equivalence ratios (f from 0.6 to 1.4). The influence of stretch rate on flame was also analyzed. The results show that, for lean mixture combustion, the flame radius increases with time but the increasing rate decreases with flame expansion for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, while at high hydrogen fractions, there exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time. For rich mixture combustion, the flame radius shows a slowly increasing rate at early stages of flame propagation and a quickly increasing rate at late stages of flame propagation for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, and there also exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time for mixtures with high hydrogen fractions. Combustion at stoichiometric mixture demonstrates the linear relationship between flame radius and time for natural gas-air, hydrogen-air, and natural gas-hydrogen-air flames. Laminar burning velocities increase exponentially with the increase of hydrogen fraction in mixtures, while the Markstein length decreases and flame instability increases with the increase of hydrogen fractions in mixture. For a fixed hydrogen fraction, the Markstein number shows an increase and flame stability increases with the increase of equivalence ratios. Based on the experimental data, a formula for calculating the laminar burning velocities of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames is proposed. (author)

  13. Apparatus and method for treating pollutants in a gas using hydrogen peroxide and UV light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Charles David (Inventor); Clausen, Christian Anthony (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for treating pollutants in a gas may include a source of hydrogen peroxide, and a treatment injector for creating and injecting dissociated hydrogen peroxide into the flow of gas. The treatment injector may further include an injector housing having an inlet, an outlet, and a hollow interior extending therebetween. The inlet may be connected in fluid communication with the source of hydrogen peroxide so that hydrogen peroxide flows through the hollow interior and toward the outlet. At least one ultraviolet (UV) lamp may be positioned within the hollow interior of the injector housing. The at least one UV lamp may dissociate the hydrogen peroxide flowing through the tube. The dissociated hydrogen peroxide may be injected into the flow of gas from the outlet for treating pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides.

  14. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR TREATING POLLUTANTS IN A GAS USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND UV LIGHT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Charles David (Inventor); Clauseu, christian Anthony (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for treating pollutants in a gas may include a source of hydrogen peroxide, and a treatment injector for creating and injecting dissociated hydrogen peroxide into the flow of gas. The treatment injector may further include an injector housing having an inlet, an outlet, and a hollow interior extending there between. The inlet may be connected in fluid communication with the source of hydrogen peroxide so that hydrogen peroxide flows through the hollow interior and toward the outlet. At least one ultraviolet (UV) lamp may be positioned within the hollow interior of the injector housing. The at least one UV lamp may dissociate the hydrogen peroxide flowing through the tube. The dissociated hydrogen peroxide may be injected into the flow of gas from the outlet for treating pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides.

  15. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures. PMID:24113685

  16. Regional gastric mucosal blood flow measurements by hydrogen gas clearance in the anesthetized rat and rabbit.

    PubMed

    Leung, F W; Guth, P H; Scremin, O U; Golanska, E M; Kauffman, G L

    1984-07-01

    Hydrogen gas clearance using 3% hydrogen in air and platinum contact electrodes was employed for measuring antral and corpus mucosal blood flow in anesthetized animals. Significantly greater antral than corpus mucosal blood flow was consistently demonstrated. Corpus but not antral mucosal blood flow showed a significant dose-related increase with intravenous pentagastrin. Vasopressin induced a significant dose-related decrease in both antral and corpus mucosal blood flow. Simultaneous measurement of basal corpus mucosal blood flow by hydrogen gas clearance and of gastric mucosal blood flow by aminopyrine clearance gave similar values, but the changes with intravenous pentagastrin or vasopressin measured by aminopyrine clearance were of a much higher order of magnitude. Hydrogen gas clearance, however, reflected changes in left gastric artery blood flow much more closely than did aminopyrine clearance. Therefore, we conclude that the hydrogen gas clearance technique as described is valid for measuring regional gastric mucosal blood flow. It is safe and has potential application in human studies.

  17. Silicon carbide-based hydrogen gas sensors for high-temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-10-09

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  18. The production of high dose hydrogen gas by the AMS-H-01 for treatment of disease.

    PubMed

    Camara, Richard; Huang, Lei; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a new and promising treatment option for a variety of diseases including stroke. Here, we introduce the AMS-H-01, a medically approved machine capable of safely producing ~66% hydrogen gas. Furthermore, we propose the significance of this machine in the future of hydrogen gas research.

  19. The production of high dose hydrogen gas by the AMS-H-01 for treatment of disease

    PubMed Central

    Camara, Richard; Huang, Lei; Zhang, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a new and promising treatment option for a variety of diseases including stroke. Here, we introduce the AMS-H-01, a medically approved machine capable of safely producing ~66% hydrogen gas. Furthermore, we propose the significance of this machine in the future of hydrogen gas research. PMID:27867484

  20. Molecular wake shield gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for measuring and characterizing the ultrahigh vacuum in the wake of an orbiting spacecraft are studied. A high sensitivity mass spectrometer that contains a double mass analyzer consisting of an open source miniature magnetic sector field neutral gas analyzer and an identical ion analyzer is proposed. These are configured to detect and identify gas and ion species of hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide and any other gas or ion species in the 1 to 46 amu mass range. This range covers the normal atmospheric constituents. The sensitivity of the instrument is sufficient to measure ambient gases and ion with a particle density of the order of one per cc. A chemical pump, or getter, is mounted near the entrance aperture of the neutral gas analyzer which integrates the absorption of ambient gases for a selectable period of time for subsequent release and analysis. The sensitivity is realizable for all but rare gases using this technique.

  1. New detection method for hydrogen gas for screening hydrogen-producing microorganisms using water-soluble wilkinson's catalyst derivative.

    PubMed

    Katsuda, Tomohisa; Ooshima, Hiroshi; Azuma, Masayuki; Kato, Jyoji

    2006-09-01

    A water-soluble color indicator was developed for the effective screening of hydrogen-producing microorganisms. This indicator consists of a coloring agent and a water-soluble derivative of Wilkinson's catalyst. Wilkinson's catalyst, Tris(triphenylphosphine) rhodium chloride, had been developed as a catalyst for the hydrogenation of olefins. We used a sulfonate of the catalyst for the hydrogenation of coloring agent in an aqueous medium. Several coloring agents, such as methyl orange, methyl red sodium, neutral red and Evan's blue, dissolved in water together with the sulfonated catalyst showed a change in color when hydrogen gas was fed into the solution by sparging at room temperature. We confirmed that methyl orange was decolorized by biologically produced hydrogen, when the photosynthetic bacterial strain Rhodobacter capsulatus ST-410 was grown in a medium containing 0.6 mM catalyst and 0.075 mM methyl orange in test tubes of 5 ml working volume.

  2. Design of a miniature hydrogen fueled gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, M.; Lopiccolo, R. C.; Simonson, M. R.; Serovy, G. K.; Okiishi, T. H.; Miller, M. J.; Sisto, F.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, and delivery of a miniature hydrogen-fueled gas turbine engine are discussed. The engine was to be sized to approximate a scaled-down lift engine such as the teledyne CAE model 376. As a result, the engine design emerged as a 445N(100 lb.)-thrust engine flowing 0.86 kg (1.9 lbs.) air/sec. A 4-stage compressor was designed at a 4.0 to 1 pressure ratio for the above conditions. The compressor tip diameter was 9.14 cm (3.60 in.). To improve overall engine performance, another compressor with a 4.75 to 1 pressure ratio at the same tip diameter was designed. A matching turbine for each compressor was also designed. The turbine tip diameter was 10.16 cm (4.0 in.). A combustion chamber was designed, built, and tested for this engine. A preliminary design of the mechanical rotating parts also was completed and is discussed. Three exhaust nozzle designs are presented.

  3. A positive role for hydrogen gas in adventitious root development.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongchao; Liao, Weibiao

    2016-06-02

    Our recent study highlights the role of hydrogen gas (H2) in adventitious root development in cucumber. H2 is an effective gaseous signal molecule with the abilities to regulate plant growth and development and enhance plant resistance to environmental stimulus. In addition, the effect of H2 on fruit senescence and flowering time also has been reported. Adventitious root development is a critical step in plant vegetative propagation affected by a serious of signaling molecules, such as auxin, nitric oxide (NO), carbon oxide (CO), ethylene and Ca(2+). Observational evidence has shown that H2 can regulate adventitious root development in a dose-dependent manner. H2 may regulate HO-1/CO pathway through or not through NO pathway during adventitious rooting. Rooting-related enzymes, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, indoleacetic acid oxidase were required for H2-induced adventitious root. CsDNAJ-1, CsCPDK1/5, CsCDC6, CsAUX228-like, and CsAUX22D-like genes also were involved in this process.

  4. Introducing porous silicon as a sacrificial material to obtain cavities in substrate of SOI wafers and a getter material for MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Wajihuddin

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonators have been a subject of research for more than four decades. The reason is the huge potential they possess for frequency applications. The use of a MEMS resonator as the timing element has an experimental history and huge progress has been made in this direction. Vacuum encapsulated MEMS resonators are required for high precision frequency control. Hence, a device with a high quality factor and durability is needed. In this effort, a new process for producing a cavity in the substrate of Silicon on insulator (SOI) MEMS devices and augmenting it with a getter using porous silicon is developed. The process involves a mask-less, self-aligned cost effective electrochemical etching process. A 10 mum cavity is introduced in the substrate of SOI dies. This helps in increasing the packaging volume of the SOI resonators along with mitigating the viscous damping effects. The stiction problem in MEMS devices is effectively eliminated and millimeter long slender MEMS structures do not get stuck to the substrate. It also helps in reducing the parasitic capacitance between the device side and the substrate. The porous silicon getter is introduced as a getter material for vacuum encapsulated MEMS devices. This getter needs no external mask and is self-aligned. It requires no external heat or additional materials to operate. The highly reactive porous silicon can readily react with the oxygen gas and form an oxide layer that can trap other gas molecules. This helps in maintaining low pressures in the cavity of the bonded MEMS resonators. A tuning fork resonator with a resonant frequency of 245 kHz was used to realize the benefits of the cavity and the getter. It was observed that the unpackaged device with the cavity in the substrate showed two times better quality factor at different pressures, than the device with no cavity. In order to understand the benefits of porous silicon as a getter, the MEMS devices (one with only a cavity

  5. Stable hydrogen isotopic analysis of nanomolar molecular hydrogen by automatic multi-step gas chromatographic separation.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Daisuke D; Tsunogai, Urumu; Kamimura, Kanae; Konno, Uta; Ishimura, Toyoho; Nakagawa, Fumiko

    2011-11-15

    We have developed a new automated analytical system that employs a continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer to determine the stable hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of nanomolar quantities of molecular hydrogen (H(2)) in an air sample. This method improves previous methods to attain simpler and lower-cost analyses, especially by avoiding the use of expensive or special devices, such as a Toepler pump, a cryogenic refrigerator, and a special evacuation system to keep the temperature of a coolant under reduced pressure. Instead, the system allows H(2) purification from the air matrix via automatic multi-step gas chromatographic separation using the coolants of both liquid nitrogen (77 K) and liquid nitrogen + ethanol (158 K) under 1 atm pressure. The analytical precision of the δD determination using the developed method was better than 4‰ for >5 nmol injections (250 mL STP for 500 ppbv air sample) and better than 15‰ for 1 nmol injections, regardless of the δD value, within 1 h for one sample analysis. Using the developed system, the δD values of H(2) can be quantified for atmospheric samples as well as samples of representative sources and sinks including those containing small quantities of H(2) , such as H(2) in soil pores or aqueous environments, for which there is currently little δD data available. As an example of such trace H(2) analyses, we report here the isotope fractionations during H(2) uptake by soils in a static chamber. The δD values of H(2) in these H(2)-depleted environments can be useful in constraining the budgets of atmospheric H(2) by applying an isotope mass balance model.

  6. Harvesting hydrogen gas from air pollutants with an un-biased gas phase photo-electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Sammy W; Van Hal, Myrthe; Bosserez, Tom; Rongé, Jan; Hauchecorne, Birger; Martens, Johan A; Lenaerts, Silvia

    2017-02-08

    The concept of an all-gas-phase photo-electrochemical cell (PEC) producing hydrogen gas from volatile organic contaminated gas and light is presented. Without applying any external bias, organic contaminants are degraded and hydrogen gas is produced in separate electrode compartments. The system works most efficiently with organic pollutants in inert carrier gas. In the presence of oxygen gas, the cell performs less efficiently but still significant photocurrents are generated, showing the cell can be run on organic contaminated air. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate new application opportunities of PEC technology and to encourage further advancement toward photo-electrochemical remediation of air pollution with the attractive feature of simultaneous energy recovery and pollution abatement.

  7. Refractory two-dimensional hole gas on hydrogenated diamond surface

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Daicho, Akira; Kurihara, Shinichiro; Yokoyama, Yuki; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2012-12-15

    Use of two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG), induced on a hydrogenated diamond surface, is a solution to overcoming one of demerits of diamond, i.e., deep energy levels of impurities. This 2DHG is affected by its environment and accordingly needs a passivation film to get a stable device operation especially at high temperature. In response to this requirement, we achieved the high-reliability passivation forming an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film on the diamond surface using an atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) method with an H{sub 2}O oxidant at 450 Degree-Sign C. The 2DHG thus protected survived air annealing at 550 Degree-Sign C for an hour, establishing a stable high-temperature operation of 2DHG devices in air. In part, this achievement is based on high stability of C-H bonds up to 870 Degree-Sign C in vacuum and above 450 Degree-Sign C in an H{sub 2}O-containing environment as in the ALD. Chemically, this stability is supported by the fact that both the thermal decomposition of C-H bonds and reaction between C-H bonds and H{sub 2}O are endothermic processes. It makes a stark contrast to the instability of Si-H bonds, which decompose even at room temperature being exposed to atomic hydrogen. In this respect, the diamond 2DHG devices are also promising as power devices expectedly being free from many instability phenomena, such as hot carrier effect and negative-bias temperature instability, associated with Si devices. As to adsorbate, which is the other prerequisite for 2DHG, it desorbed in vacuum below 250 Degree-Sign C, and accordingly some new adsorbates should have adsorbed during the ALD at 450 Degree-Sign C. As a clue to this question, we certainly confirmed that some adsorbates, other than those at room temperature, adsorbed in air above 100 Degree-Sign C and remained at least up to 290 Degree-Sign C. The identification of these adsorbates is open for further investigation.

  8. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry Y.S.

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  9. Development of an Inexpensive RGB Color Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen Cyanide Gas.

    PubMed

    Greenawald, Lee A; Boss, Gerry R; Snyder, Jay L; Reeder, Aaron; Bell, Suzanne

    2017-10-12

    An inexpensive red, green, blue (RGB) color sensor was developed for detecting low ppm concentrations of hydrogen cyanide gas. A piece of glass fiber filter paper containing monocyanocobinamide [CN(H2O)Cbi] was placed directly above the RGB color sensor and an on chip LED. Light reflected from the paper was monitored for RGB color change upon exposure to hydrogen cyanide at concentrations of 1.0-10.0 ppm as a function of 25%, 50%, and 85% relative humidity. A rapid color change occurred within 10 s of exposure to 5.0 ppm hydrogen cyanide gas (near the NIOSH recommended exposure limit). A more rapid color change occurred at higher humidity, suggesting a more effective reaction between hydrogen cyanide and CN(H2O)Cbi. The sensor could provide the first real time respirator end-of-service-life alert for hydrogen cyanide gas.

  10. [Measurement of regional blood flow using hydrogen gas generated by electrolysis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Koshu, K; Endo, S; Takaku, A; Saito, T

    1981-10-01

    Electrolytically generated hydrogen gas used to measure local blood flow by Stosseck et al. The data obtained by their method, however, did not correlated well with that obtained by original Aukland's method, hydrogen clearance method. We have tried to record the concentration of hydrogen gas after electrolytic generation of hydrogen gas at the white matter of the mongrel dogs. As a result, we found that its curves could be approximated to monoexponential curves during the first several minutes. This fact was also noticed in the experiment, in which circulation had been stopped due to cardiac arrest. A simple equation to calculate the regional blood flow was brought out through the approximation mentioned above. The values calculated by this new equation correlated well with that obtained by original hydrogen clearance method. This new method to detect the regional blood flow is simple and easy. Therefore it may contribute to some experiments, especially to the experiments with small animals.

  11. FIRST OPERATING RESULTS OF A DYNAMIC GAS BEARING TURBINE IN AN INDUSTRIAL HYDROGEN LIQUEFIER

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, S.; Decker, L.

    2010-04-09

    Hydrogen has been brought into focus of industry and public since fossil fuels are depleting and costs are increasing dramatically. Beside these issues new high-tech processes in the industry are in need for hydrogen at ultra pure quality. To achieve these requirements and for efficient transportation, hydrogen is liquefied in industrial plants. Linde Gas has commissioned a new 5.5 TPD Hydrogen liquefier in Leuna, Germany, which has been engineered and supplied by Linde Kryotechnik. One of the four expansion turbines installed in the liquefaction process is equipped with dynamic gas bearings. Several design features and operational characteristics of this application will be discussed. The presentation will include results of efficiency and operational reliability that have been determined from performance tests. The advantages of the Linde dynamic gas bearing turbine for future use in hydrogen liquefaction plants will be shown.

  12. ZrCoCe Getter Films for MEMS Vacuum Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yaohua; Cui, Jiandong; Cui, Hang; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Zhimin; Du, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In order to specifically support the technology trend of increased miniaturization of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) devices, highly porous ZrCoCe non-evaporable getter (NEG) film has been produced by direct current magnetron sputtering from a preformed ZrCoCe alloy target. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the ZrCoCe film is constructed with porous columnar crystals, which are further built up with assembled ZrCoCe amorphous or nanocrystalline grains with an average grain size of 5 nm. Gas sorption investigation shows that this film can be activated at a low temperature of 300°C for 30 min and has excellent stable sorption characteristics. Sorption properties can be further improved with elevating activation temperatures due to nanocrystals growing and amorphous regions crystallizing. The capability of ZrCoCe films to withstand wafer physical or chemical cleaning processes is investigated, indicating their compatibility with MEMS vacuum packaging and the appropriate way to store them.

  13. Inspection of the hydrogen gas pressure with metal shield by cold neutron radiography at CMRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hang; Cao, Chao; Huo, Heyong; Wang, Sheng; Wu, Yang; Yin, Wei; Sun, Yong; Liu, Bin; Tang, Bin

    2017-04-01

    The inspection of the process of gas pressure change is important for some applications (e.g. gas tank stockpile or two phase fluid model) which need quantitative and non-touchable measurement. Neutron radiography provides a suitable tool for such investigations with nice resolution. The quantitative cold neutron radiography (CNR) is developed at China Mianyang Research Reactor (CMRR) to measure the hydrogen gas pressure with metal shield. Because of the high sensitivity to hydrogen, even small change of the hydrogen pressure can be inspected by CNR. The dark background and scattering neutron effect are both corrected to promote measurement precision. The results show that CNR can measure the hydrogen gas pressure exactly and the pressure value average relative error between CNR and barometer is almost 1.9%.

  14. Nitrate removal in aquaria systems: use of electrochemically generated hydrogen gas as electron donor for denitrification.

    PubMed

    Grommen, R; Verstraete, W

    2003-01-01

    Nitrate, the end product of the nitrification process, tends to accumulate in aquaria systems. Removal of nitrate in these systems by means of biological denitrification requires the addition of an external electron donor. In this study, the possibilities for using hydrogen gas in aquaria systems as a harmless alternative to other electron donors such as sulphur or reduced organic carbon was investigated. To circumvent safety issues regarding the storage of large volumes of hydrogen gas, in situ generation of hydrogen gas by means of a separate electrochemical cell was chosen. A plug flow reactor filled with polyester cotton wool as carrier material for denitrifying bacteria received hydrogen gas in the headspace. Removal rates of 15 +/- 6 mg N per day were achieved with a hydraulic residence time of 3.3 hours. During the start-up phase nitrite peaks up to 3 mg N per liter were measured in the effluent of the reactor.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: BIOQUELL, INC. CLARIS C HYDROGEN PEROXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Clarus C Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator, a biological decontamination device manufactured by BIOQUELL, Inc. The unit was tested by evaluating its ability to decontaminate seven types...

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: BIOQUELL, INC. CLARIS C HYDROGEN PEROXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Clarus C Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator, a biological decontamination device manufactured by BIOQUELL, Inc. The unit was tested by evaluating its ability to decontaminate seven types...

  17. Toxicological analysis of 17 autopsy cases of hydrogen sulfide poisoning resulting from the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas.

    PubMed

    Maebashi, Kyoko; Iwadate, Kimiharu; Sakai, Kentaro; Takatsu, Akihiro; Fukui, Kenji; Aoyagi, Miwako; Ochiai, Eriko; Nagai, Tomonori

    2011-04-15

    Although many cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning have been reported, in most of these cases, it resulted from the accidental inhalation of hydrogen sulfide gas. In recent years, we experienced 17 autopsy cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning due to the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas. In this study, the concentrations of sulfide and thiosulfate in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid and pleural effusion were examined using GC/MS. The sulfide concentrations were blood: 0.11-31.84, urine: 0.01-1.28, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.02-1.59 and pleural effusion: 2.00-8.59 (μg/ml), while the thiosulfate concentrations were blood: 0-0.648, urine: 0-2.669, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.004-0.314 and pleural effusion: 0.019-0.140 (μmol/ml). In previous reports, the blood concentration of thiosulfate was said to be higher than that of sulfide in hydrogen sulfide poisoning cases, although the latter was higher than the former in 8 of the 14 cases examined in this study. These results are believed to be strongly influenced by the atmospheric concentration of hydrogen sulfide the victims were exposed to and the time interval between exposure and death.

  18. Hydrogen Sensors Boost Hybrids; Today's Models Losing Gas?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Advanced chemical sensors are used in aeronautic and space applications to provide safety monitoring, emission monitoring, and fire detection. In order to fully do their jobs, these sensors must be able to operate in a range of environments. NASA has developed sensor technologies addressing these needs with the intent of improving safety, optimizing combustion efficiencies, and controlling emissions. On the ground, the chemical sensors were developed by NASA engineers to detect potential hydrogen leaks during Space Shuttle launch operations. The Space Shuttle uses a combination of hydrogen and oxygen as fuel for its main engines. Liquid hydrogen is pumped to the external tank from a storage tank located several hundred feet away. Any hydrogen leak could potentially result in a hydrogen fire, which is invisible to the naked eye. It is important to detect the presence of a hydrogen fire in order to prevent a major accident. In the air, the same hydrogen-leak dangers are present. Stress and temperature changes can cause tiny cracks or holes to form in the tubes that line the Space Shuttle s main engine nozzle. Such defects could allow the hydrogen that is pumped through the nozzle during firing to escape. Responding to the challenges associated with pinpointing hydrogen leaks, NASA endeavored to improve propellant leak-detection capabilities during assembly, pre-launch operations, and flight. The objective was to reduce the operational cost of assembling and maintaining hydrogen delivery systems with automated detection systems. In particular, efforts have been focused on developing an automated hydrogen leak-detection system using multiple, networked hydrogen sensors that are operable in harsh conditions.

  19. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Getters for Tc and I Removal from Liquid Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qafoku, N. P.; Asmussen, M.; Lawter, A.; Neeway, J.; Smith, G.

    2015-12-01

    A cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, is being evaluated as a possible supplemental waste form for the low activity waste (LAW) at the Hanford Site, which contains significant amounts of radioactive 99Tc and 129I, as part of the tank waste cleanup mission. To improve the retention of Tc and/or I in Cast Stone, materials with a high affinity for Tc and/or I, termed "getters," can be added to decrease the rate of contaminant release and diffusivity, and improve Cast Stone performance. A series of kinetic batch sorption experiments was performed to determine the effectiveness of the getter materials. Several Tc getters [blast furnace slag, Sn (II) apatite, SnCl2, nanoporous Sn phosphate, KMS-2 (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and Sn(II) hydroxyapatite] and I getters [layered Bi hydroxide, natural argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, Ag-impregnated carbon, and Ag-exchanged zeolite] were tested in different solution media, 18.2 MΩ DI H2O and a caustic LAW waste simulant containing 6.5 M Na or 7.8 M Na. The experiments were conducted at room temperature in the presence or absence of air. Results indicated that most Tc getters (with the exception of KMS-2) performed better in the DI H2O solution than in the 6.5 and 7.8 M Na LAW simulant. In addition, Tc sequestration may be affected by the presence of other redox sensitive elements that were present in the LAW simulant, such as Cr. The Tc getter materials have been examined through various solid-state characterization techniques such as XRD, SEM/EDS, XANES and EXAFS which provided evidence for plausible mechanisms of aqueous Tc removal. The results indicated that the Tc precipitates differ depending on the getter material and that Tc(VII) is reduced to Tc(IV) in most of the getters but to a differing extents. For the I getters, Ag-exchanged zeolite and synthetic argentite were the most effective ones. The other I getters showed limited effectiveness for sorbing I under the high ionic strength and caustic

  1. A pyrolysis/gas chromatographic method for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, R. H.; Bustin, R.; Gibson, E. K.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples. The sample is heated under vacuum after which the evolved gases are separated by gas chromatography with a helium ionization detector. The system is calibrated by injecting known amounts of hydrogen, as determined manometrically. The method, which is rapid and reliable, was checked for a variety of lunar soils; the limit of detection is about 10 ng of hydrogen.

  2. Molecular hydrogen as a preventive and therapeutic medical gas: initiation, development and potential of hydrogen medicine.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shigeo

    2014-10-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been accepted to be an inert and nonfunctional molecule in our body. We have turned this concept by demonstrating that H2 reacts with strong oxidants such as hydroxyl radical in cells, and proposed its potential for preventive and therapeutic applications. H2 has a number of advantages exhibiting extensive effects: H2 rapidly diffuses into tissues and cells, and it is mild enough neither to disturb metabolic redox reactions nor to affect signaling reactive oxygen species; therefore, there should be no or little adverse effects of H2. There are several methods to ingest or consume H2; inhaling H2 gas, drinking H2-dissolved water (H2-water), injecting H2-dissolved saline (H2-saline), taking an H2 bath, or dropping H2-saline into the eyes. The numerous publications on its biological and medical benefits revealed that H2 reduces oxidative stress not only by direct reactions with strong oxidants, but also indirectly by regulating various gene expressions. Moreover, by regulating the gene expressions, H2 functions as an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic, and stimulates energy metabolism. In addition to growing evidence obtained by model animal experiments, extensive clinical examinations were performed or are under investigation. Since most drugs specifically act to their targets, H2 seems to differ from conventional pharmaceutical drugs. Owing to its great efficacy and lack of adverse effects, H2 has promising potential for clinical use against many diseases.

  3. Hydrogen gas sensing properties of PdO thin films with nano-sized cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack Lee, Young; Lee, Jun Min; Kim, Yeon Ju; Hyoun Joe, Jin; Lee, Wooyoung

    2010-04-01

    We report on a novel method for the fabrication of highly sensitive hydrogen gas sensors based on palladium oxide thin films and have investigated their hydrogen sensing properties and nanostructures. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of palladium oxide and reduced palladium thin films as hydrogen sensors. The palladium oxide thin films were deposited on thermally oxidized Si substrates using a reactive direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering system. Considerable changes in the resistance of the palladium oxide thin films were observed when they were initially exposed to hydrogen gas, as a result of the reduction process. After the initial exposure to hydrogen gas of PdO30%, its sensitivity increased up to ~ 4.5 × 103%. The morphology of the PdO surface was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), in order to investigate the interactions between palladium oxide and hydrogen. The SEM images showed a large number of nano-sized cracks on the surface of the palladium oxide during the reduction process, which acted to increase the effective surface-to-volume ratio. The response behaviors of the reduced Pd films to hydrogen gas were reversible and had an enhanced sensing property when compared with those of the pure Pd films. In addition, their sensitivities and response times were improved due to the nano-sized cracks on the surfaces. The results demonstrate that palladium oxide and reduced palladium thin films can be applied for use in highly sensitive hydrogen sensors.

  4. Hydrogen gas sensing properties of PdO thin films with nano-sized cracks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Tack; Lee, Jun Min; Kim, Yeon Ju; Joe, Jin Hyoun; Lee, Wooyoung

    2010-04-23

    We report on a novel method for the fabrication of highly sensitive hydrogen gas sensors based on palladium oxide thin films and have investigated their hydrogen sensing properties and nanostructures. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of palladium oxide and reduced palladium thin films as hydrogen sensors. The palladium oxide thin films were deposited on thermally oxidized Si substrates using a reactive direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering system. Considerable changes in the resistance of the palladium oxide thin films were observed when they were initially exposed to hydrogen gas, as a result of the reduction process. After the initial exposure to hydrogen gas of PdO(30%), its sensitivity increased up to approximately 4.5 x 10(3)%. The morphology of the PdO surface was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), in order to investigate the interactions between palladium oxide and hydrogen. The SEM images showed a large number of nano-sized cracks on the surface of the palladium oxide during the reduction process, which acted to increase the effective surface-to-volume ratio. The response behaviors of the reduced Pd films to hydrogen gas were reversible and had an enhanced sensing property when compared with those of the pure Pd films. In addition, their sensitivities and response times were improved due to the nano-sized cracks on the surfaces. The results demonstrate that palladium oxide and reduced palladium thin films can be applied for use in highly sensitive hydrogen sensors.

  5. Manifestations of collisions in the laser SRS - CARS diagnostics of hydrogen in rarefied gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, Gen M; Mogileva, T N; Kalyuzhnyi, D G; Mikheev, Geor M

    2002-01-31

    CARS diagnostics of hydrogen in rarefied gas mixtures is performed using the biharmonic laser pump based on the SRS by the vibrational hydrogen transition. The diagnostics is shown to be substantially affected by collisions, which result in variations in the linewidth and the frequency of the Raman-active transition. This influence is distinctly observed at pressures higher than 0.05 atm and depends on the composition of the buffer gas mixture. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  6. Potential energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of hydrogen production from coke oven gas in U.S. Steel Mills.

    SciTech Connect

    Joseck, F.; Wang, M.; Wu, Y.; Energy Systems; DOE

    2008-02-01

    For this study, we examined the energy and emission effects of hydrogen production from coke oven gas (COG) on a well-to-wheels basis and compared these effects with those of other hydrogen production options, as well as with those of conventional gasoline and diesel options. We then estimated the magnitude of hydrogen production from COG in the United States and the number of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) that could potentially be fueled with the hydrogen produced from COG. Our analysis shows that this production pathway can achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction benefits. This pathway is especially worth considering because first, the sources of COG are concentrated in the upper Midwest and in the Northeast United States, which would facilitate relatively cost-effective collection, transportation, and distribution of the produced hydrogen to refueling stations in these regions. Second, the amount of hydrogen that could be produced may fuel about 1.7 million cars, thus providing a vital near-term hydrogen production option for FCV applications.

  7. Application of CFRP with High Hydrogen Gas Barrier Characteristics to Fuel Tanks of Space Transportation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemoto, Koichi; Yamamoto, Yuta; Okuyama, Keiichi; Ebina, Takeo

    In the future, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) with high hydrogen gas barrier performance will find wide applications in all industrial hydrogen tanks that aim at weight reduction; the use of such materials will be preferred to the use of conventional metallic materials such as stainless steel or aluminum. The hydrogen gas barrier performance of CFRP will become an important issue with the introduction of hydrogen-fuel aircraft. It will also play an important role in realizing fully reusable space transportation system that will have high specific tensile CFRP structures. Such materials are also required for the manufacture of high-pressure hydrogen gas vessels for use in the fuel cell systems of automobiles. This paper introduces a new composite concept that can be used to realize CFRPs with high hydrogen gas barrier performance for applications in the cryogenic tanks of fully reusable space transportation system by the incorporation of a nonmetallic crystal layer, which is actually a dense and highly oriented clay crystal laminate. The preliminary test results show that the hydrogen gas barrier characteristics of this material after cryogenic heat shocks and cyclic loads are still better than those of other polymer materials by approximately two orders of magnitude.

  8. Thermal management of the adsorption-based vessel for hydrogeneous gas storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, L. L.; Kanonchik, L. E.; Babenko, V. A.

    2012-09-01

    Thermal management is a design bottleneck in the creation of rational gas storage sorption systems. Inefficient heat transfer in a sorption bed is connected with a relatively low thermal conductivity (0.1-0.5 W/(mṡK)) and an appreciable sorption heat of activated gas storage materials. This work is devoted to the development of a thermally regulated onboard system of hydrogenous gas (methane and hydrogen) storage with the use of novel carbon sorbents. A hydrogenous gas storage system based on combined gas adsorption and compression at moderate pressures (3-6 MPa) and low temperatures (from the temperature of liquid nitrogen of about 77 K to a temperature of 273 K) is suggested.

  9. Hydrogen pumping and release by graphite under high flux plasma bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Nygren, R.; Wilson, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Inert gas (helium or argon) plasma bombardment has been found to increase the surface gas adsorptivity of isotropic graphite (POCO-graphite), which can then getter residual gases in a high vacuum system. The inert gas plasma bombardment was carried out at a flux approx. = 1 x 10/sup 18/ ions s/sup -1/ cm/sup -2/ to a fluence of the order of 10/sup 21/ ions/cm/sup 2/ and at temperatures around 800/sup 0/C. The gettering capability of graphite can be easily recovered by repeating inert gas plasma bombardment. The activated graphite surface exhibits a smooth, sponge-like morphology with significantly increased pore openings, which correlates with the observed increase in the surface gas adsorptivity. The activated graphite surface has been observed to pump hydrogen plasma particles as well. From calibrated H-alpha measurements, the dynamic hydrogen retention capacity is evaluated to be as large as 2 x 10/sup 18/ H/cm/sup 2/ at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C and at a plasma bombarding energy of 300 eV. The graphite temperature was varied between 15 and 480/sup 0/C. Due to the plasma particle pumping capability, hydrogen recycling from the activated graphite surface is significantly reduced, relative to that from a pre-saturated surface. A pre-saturated surface was also observed to reproducibly pump a hydrogen plasma to a concentration of 9.5 x 10/sup 17/ H/cm/sup 2/. The hydrogen retention capacity of graphite is found to decrease with increasing temperature. A transient pumping mechanism associated with the sponge-like surface morphology is conjectured to explain the large hydrogen retention capacity. Hydrogen release behavior under helium and argon plasma bombardment was also investigated, and the result indicated the possibility of some in-pore retrapping effect. 43 refs., 11 figs.

  10. Hydrogen Gas Emissions from Active Faults and Identification of Flow Pathway in a Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, T.; Niwa, M.; Kurosawa, H.; Shimada, K.

    2010-12-01

    It has been observed that hydrogen gas emissions from the subsurface along active faults exceed atmospheric concentrations (e.g. Sugisaki et. al., 1983). Experimental studies have shown that hydrogen gas is generated in a radical reaction of water with fractured silicate minerals due to rock fracturing caused by fault movement (e.g. Kita et al., 1982). Based on such research, we are studying an investigation method for an assessment of fault activity using hydrogen gas emissions from fracture zones. To start, we have devised portable equipment for rapid and simple in situ measurement of hydrogen gas emissions (Shimada et al., 2008). The key component of this equipment is a commercially available and compact hydrogen gas sensor with an integral data logger operable at atmospheric pressure. In the field, we have drilled shallow boreholes into incohesive fault rocks to depths ranging from 15 to 45 cm using a hand-operated drill with a 9mm drill-bit. Then, we have measured the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from active faults such as: the western part of the Atotsugawa fault zone, the Atera fault zone and the Neodani fault in central Japan; the Yamasaki fault zone in southwest Japan; and the Yamagata fault zone in northeast Japan. In addition, we have investigated the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from other major geological features such as tectonic lines: the Butsuzo Tectonic Line in the eastern Kii Peninsula and the Atokura Nappe in the Northeastern Kanto Mountains. As a result of the investigations, hydrogen gas concentration in emissions from the active faults was measured to be in the approximate range from 6,000 ppm to 26,000 ppm in two to three hours after drilling. A tendency for high concentrations of hydrogen gas in active faults was recognized, in contrast with low concentrations in emissions from tectonic lines that were observed to be in the range from 730 ppm to 2,000 ppm. It is inferred that the hydrogen gas migrates to ground

  11. Attenuation of hydrogen radicals traveling under flowing gas conditions through tubes of different materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grubbs, R.K.; George, S.M.

    2006-05-15

    Hydrogen radical concentrations traveling under flowing gas conditions through tubes of different materials were measured using a dual thermocouple probe. The source of the hydrogen radicals was a toroidal radio frequency plasma source operating at 2.0 and 3.3 kW for H{sub 2} pressures of 250 and 500 mTorr, respectively. The dual thermocouple probe was comprised of exposed and covered Pt/Pt13%Rh thermocouples. Hydrogen radicals recombined efficiently on the exposed thermocouple and the energy of formation of H{sub 2} heated the thermocouple. The second thermocouple was covered by glass and was heated primarily by the ambient gas. The dual thermocouple probe was translated and measured temperatures at different distances from the hydrogen radical source. These temperature measurements were conducted at H{sub 2} flow rates of 35 and 75 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) inside cylindrical tubes made of stainless steel, aluminum, quartz, and Pyrex. The hydrogen radical concentrations were obtained from the temperatures of the exposed and covered thermocouples. The hydrogen concentration decreased versus distance from the plasma source. After correcting for the H{sub 2} gas flow using a reference frame transformation, the hydrogen radical concentration profiles yielded the atomic hydrogen recombination coefficient, {gamma}, for the four materials. The methodology of measuring the hydrogen radical concentrations, the analysis of the results under flowing gas conditions, and the determination of the atomic hydrogen recombination coefficients for various materials will help facilitate the use of hydrogen radicals for thin film growth processes.

  12. The self limiting effect of hydrogen cluster in gas jet under liquid nitrogen temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Han Jifeng; Yang Chaowen; Miao Jingwei; Fu Pengtao; Luo Xiaobing; Shi Miangong

    2010-09-15

    The generation of hydrogen clusters in gas jet is tested using the Rayleigh scattering method under liquid nitrogen temperature of 79 K. The self limiting effect of hydrogen cluster is studied and it is found that the cluster formation is greatly affected by the number of expanded molecules. The well designed liquid nitrogen cold trap ensured that the hydrogen cluster would keep maximum size for maximum 15 ms during one gas jet. The scattered light intensity exhibits a power scaling on the backing pressure ranging from 5 to 48 bar with the power value of 4.1.

  13. Hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    Diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated hydrocarbons are produced as reactor gases in a fast quench reactor. During the fast quench, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  14. Fast-quench reactor for hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2006-08-29

    A fast-quench reactor for production of diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated carbons is provided. During the fast quench in the downstream diverging section of the nozzle, such as in a free expansion chamber, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  15. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  16. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  17. Hydrogen gas filling into an actual tank at high pressure and optimization of its thermal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md. Tawhidul Islam; Monde, Masanori; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2009-09-01

    Gas with high pressure is widely used at present as fuel storage mode for different hydrogen vehicles. Different types of materials are used for constructing these hydrogen pressure vessels. An aluminum lined vessel and typically carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials are commercially used in hydrogen vessels. An aluminum lined vessel is easy to construct and posses high thermal conductivity compared to other commercially available vessels. However, compared to CFRP lined vessel, it has low strength capacity and safety factors. Therefore, nowadays, CFRP lined vessels are becoming more popular in hydrogen vehicles. Moreover, CFRP lined vessel has an advantage of light weight. CFRP, although, has many desirable properties in reducing the weight and in increasing the strength, it is also necessary to keep the material temperature below 85 °C for maintaining stringent safety requirements. While filling process occurs, the temperature can be exceeded due to the compression works of the gas flow. Therefore, it is very important to optimize the hydrogen filling system to avoid the crossing of the critical limit of the temperature rise. Computer-aided simulation has been conducted to characterize the hydrogen filling to optimize the technique. Three types of hydrogen vessels with different volumes have been analyzed for optimizing the charging characteristics of hydrogen to test vessels. Gas temperatures are measured inside representative vessels in the supply reservoirs (H2 storages) and at the inlet to the test tank during filling.

  18. Experimental research of optical fiber hydrogen gas sensing system based on palladium-silver alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Lu-jun; Zhou, Gao-feng; Li, Zheng-feng; Cao, Yan-long

    2016-11-01

    A novel optical fiber hydrogen sensing system based on palladium (Pd) and sliver (Ag) is proposed. By direct current (DC) magnetron process, Pd/Ag alloy ultra-thin films were deposited on the substrate to eliminate the hydrogen embrittlement of sensor based on pure Pd. Several samples with different thin film thicknesses were fabricated at different substrate temperatures and tested in the optical fiber hydrogen sensor setup. We do a series of experiments for obtaining optimum sputtering parameters, such as optimum sputtering temperature and thickness of Pd/Ag alloy film. The humidity effect and reliability experiment for the optical fiber hydrogen gas sensor are reported in detail. The testing results demonstrate the Pd/Ag alloy is a promising material for optical fiber hydrogen gas sensor.

  19. Mechanical degradation of API X65 pipeline steel by exposure to hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Lee, Hae Moo; Kim, Yong-il; Nahm, Seung-Hoon

    2011-06-01

    Hydrogen-induced degradations have generally been investigated through the ex situ testing of cathodically hydrogen-charged specimens. However, the cathodic charging cannot realize damage accumulation by gaseous hydrogen in transportation pipelines. Thus, we designed an ampule specimen which enables an in situ tensile test containing gaseous hydrogen. Ampule specimens made of API (American Petroleum Institute) X65 pipeline steel showed significant reductions of 3.4 % and 4.1 %, respectively, in their ultimate tensile strength and fracture strain after exposure to 20 MPa of hydrogen gas. The resulting fracture surface showed quasi-cleavage perpendicular to the loading direction and a fracture thickness close to the initial wall thickness, significantly different from the complex dimples and highly reduced fracture thickness by shear deformations in nitrogen gas and air environments.

  20. Structural and optical properties of silicon nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation in hydrogen background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, T.; Inada, M.; Yoshida, K.; Umezu, I.; Sugimura, A.

    We studied the structural and optical properties of silicon (Si) nanoparticles (np-Si) prepared by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in hydrogen (H2) background gas. The mean diameter of the np-Si was estimated to be approximately 5 nm. The infrared absorption corresponding to Si-Hn (n=1,2,3) bonds was observed at around 2100 cm-1, and a Raman scattering peak corresponding to crystalline Si was observed at around 520 cm-1. These results indicate that nanoparticles are not an alloy of Si and hydrogen but Si nanocrystal covered by hydrogen or hydrogenated silicon. This means that surface passivated Si nanoparticles can be prepared by PLA in H2 gas. The band-gap energy of np-Si prepared in H2 gas (1.9 eV) was larger than that of np-Si prepared in He gas (1.6 eV) even though they are almost the same diameter. After decreasing the hydrogen content in np-Si by thermal annealing, the band-gap energy decreased, and reached the same energy level as np-Si prepared in He gas. Thus, the optical properties of np-Si were affected by the hydrogenation of the surface of np-Si.

  1. A solid oxide fuel cell system fed with hydrogen sulfide and natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yixin; Schaefer, Laura

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) occurs naturally in crude petroleum, natural gas, volcanic gases, hot springs, and some lakes. Hydrogen sulfide can also result as a by-product from industrial activities, such as food processing, coke ovens, paper mills, tanneries, and petroleum refineries. Sometimes, it is considered to be an industrial pollutant. However, hydrogen can be decomposed from H 2S and then used as fuel for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). This paper presents an examination of a simple hydrogen sulfide and natural gas-fed solid oxide fuel cell system. The possibility of utilization of hydrogen sulfide as a feedstock in a solid oxide fuel cell is discussed. A system configuration of an SOFC combined with an external H 2S decomposition device is proposed, where a certain amount of natural gas is supplied to the SOFC. The exhaust fuel gas of the SOFC is after-burned with exhaust air from the SOFC, and the heat of the combustion gas is utilized in the decomposition of H 2S in a decomposition reactor (DR) to produce hydrogen to feed the SOFC. The products are electricity and industry-usable sulfur. Through a mass and energy balance, a preliminary thermodynamic analysis of this system is performed, and the system efficiency is calculated. Also in this paper, the challenges in creating the proposed configuration are discussed, and the direction of future work is presented.

  2. Biological reduction of chlorate in a gas-lift reactor using hydrogen as an energy source.

    PubMed

    Kroon, A G M; van Ginkel, C G

    2004-01-01

    Chlorate release into the environment occurs with its manufacture and use. Biological reduction of chlorate offers an attractive option to decrease this release. A hydrogen gas-lift reactor with microorganisms attached to pumice particles was used for the treatment of wastewater containing high concentrations of chlorate. The microorganisms used chlorate as an electron acceptor and hydrogen gas as a reducing agent. After a start-up period of only a few weeks, chlorate reduction rates of 3.2 mmol L(-1) h(-1) were achieved during continuous operation. During this period, a hydrogen consumption rate of 14.5 mmol L(-1) h(-1) was observed. Complete removal of chlorate was maintained at hydraulic retention times of 6 h. This study clearly demonstrates the potential of hydrogen gas-lift bioreactors for the treatment of chlorate-containing waste streams.

  3. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

  4. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

  5. Technetium and Iodine Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Snyder, Michelle MV

    2015-02-19

    To determine the effectiveness of the various getter materials prior to their solidification in Cast Stone, a series of batch sorption experiments was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. To quantify the effectiveness of the removal of Tc(VII) and I(I) from solution by getters, the distribution coefficient, Kd (mL/g), was calculated. Testing involved placing getter material in contact with spiked waste solutions at a 1:100 solid-to-solution ratio for periods up to 45 days with periodic solution sampling. One Tc getter was also tested at a 1:10 solid-to-solution ratio. Two different solution media, 18.2 MΩ deionized water (DI H2O) and a 7.8 M Na LAW simulant, were used in the batch sorption tests. Each test was conducted at room temperature in an anoxic chamber containing N2 with a small amount of H2 (0.7%) to maintain anoxic conditions. Each getter-solution combination was run in duplicate. Three Tc- and I-doping concentrations were used separately in aliquots of both the 18.2 MΩ DI H2O and a 7.8 M Na LAW waste simulant. The 1× concentration was developed based on Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model runs to support the River Protection Project System Plan Revision 6. The other two concentrations were 5× and 10× of the HTWOS values. The Tc and I tests were run separately (i.e., the solutions did not contain both solutes). Sampling of the solid-solution mixtures occurred nominally after 0.2, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 days and ~35 to 45 days. Seven getter materials were tested for Tc and five materials were tested for I. The seven Tc getters were blast furnace slag 1 (BFS1) (northwest source), BFS2 (southeast source), Sn(II)-treated apatite, Sn(II) chloride, nano tin phosphate, KMS (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and tin hydroxapatite. The five iodine getters were layered bismuth hydroxide (LBH), argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, silver-treated carbon, and silver-treated zeolite. The Tc Kd values

  6. Technetium and Iodine Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Snyder, Michelle MV

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the various getter materials prior to their solidification in Cast Stone, a series of batch sorption experiments was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. To quantify the effectiveness of the removal of Tc(VII) and I(I) from solution by getters, the distribution coefficient, Kd (mL/g), was calculated. Testing involved placing getter material in contact with spiked waste solutions at a 1:100 solid-to-solution ratio for periods up to 45 days with periodic solution sampling. One Tc getter was also tested at a 1:10 solid-to-solution ratio. Two different solution media, 18.2 MΩ deionized water (DI H2O) and a 7.8 M Na LAW simulant, were used in the batch sorption tests. Each test was conducted at room temperature in an anoxic chamber containing N2 with a small amount of H2 (0.7%) to maintain anoxic conditions. Each getter-solution combination was run in duplicate. Three Tc- and I-doping concentrations were used separately in aliquots of both the 18.2 MΩ DI H2O and a 7.8 M Na LAW waste simulant. The 1× concentration was developed based on Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model runs to support the River Protection Project System Plan Revision 6. The other two concentrations were 5× and 10× of the HTWOS values. The Tc and I tests were run separately (i.e., the solutions did not contain both solutes). Sampling of the solid-solution mixtures occurred nominally after 0.2, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 days and ~35 to 45 days. Seven getter materials were tested for Tc and five materials were tested for I. The seven Tc getters were blast furnace slag 1 (BFS1) (northwest source), BFS2 (southeast source), Sn(II)-treated apatite, Sn(II) chloride, nano tin phosphate, KMS (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and tin hydroxapatite. The five iodine getters were layered bismuth hydroxide (LBH), argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, silver-treated carbon, and silver-treated zeolite. The Tc Kd values measured from experiments conducted

  7. Getters for improved technetium containment in cementitious waste forms.

    PubMed

    Asmussen, R Matthew; Pearce, Carolyn I; Miller, Brian W; Lawter, Amanda R; Neeway, James J; Lukens, Wayne W; Bowden, Mark E; Miller, Micah A; Buck, Edgar C; Serne, R Jeffery; Qafoku, Nikolla P

    2018-01-05

    A cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, is a possible candidate technology for the immobilization of low activity nuclear waste (LAW) at the Hanford site. This work focuses on the addition of getter materials to Cast Stone that can sequester Tc from the LAW, and in turn, lower Tc release from the Cast Stone. Two getters which produce different products upon sequestering Tc from LAW were tested: Sn(II) apatite (Sn-A) that removes Tc as a Tc(IV)-oxide and potassium metal sulfide (KMS-2) that removes Tc as a Tc(IV)-sulfide species, allowing for a comparison of stability of the form of Tc upon entering the waste form. The Cast Stone with KMS-2 getter had the best performance with addition equivalent to ∼0.08wt% of the total waste form mass. The observed diffusion (Dobs) of Tc decreased from 4.6±0.2×10(-12)cm(2)/s for Cast Stone that did not contain a getter to 5.4±0.4×10(-13)cm(2)/s for KMS-2 containing Cast Stone. It was found that Tc-sulfide species are more stable against re-oxidation within getter containing Cast Stone compared with Tc-oxide and is the origin of the decrease in Tc Dobs when using the KMS-2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Transient getter scheme for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchi, J.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Sredniawski, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The ability of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to attain the largest fusion power gain depends critically on minimizing plasma contamination and controlling the densities of the reacting deuterium and tritium. Experiments on a number of tokamaks have demonstrated that gettering over an appreciable surface area (> or = 10%) of the vacuum vessel greatly facilitates both of these objectives. One particular problem in implementing a surface pumping system in TFTR, however, is a restriction on the maximum allowable tritium content of the getter. This restriction could require regeneration of the absorbed tritium after as few as 50 machine pulses. We have developed a scheme utilizing SAES Zr/Al getter modules which obviates the need for such frequent interruptions of machine operation by taking advantage of the pulsed operation of TFTR. With the Zr/Al getter at temperatures between 500/sup 0/--600/sup 0/C it is possible to achieve a quasisteady state in the tritium loading where the quantity of tritium desorbed between pulses is equal to the quantity which is absorbed during a pulse. Since frequent thermal cycling is not required, this scheme also reduces the possibility of Zr/Al getter material fatigue.

  9. Transient getter scheme for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchi, J.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Sredniawski, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The ability of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to attain the largest fusion power gain depends critically on minimizing plasma contamination and controlling the densities of the reacting deuterium and tritium. Experiments on a number of tokamaks have demonstrated that gettering over an appreciable surface area (greater than or equal to 10%) of the vacuum vessel greatly facilitates both of these objectives. One particular problem in implementing a surface pumping system in TFTR, however, is a restriction on the maximum allowable tritium content of the getter. This restriction could require regeneration of the absorbed tritium after as few as 50 machine pulses. We have developed a scheme utilizing SAES Zr/Al getter modules which obviates the need for such frequent interruptions of machine operation by taking advantage of the pulsed operation of TFTR. With the Zr/Al getter at temperatures between 500/sup 0/C to 600/sup 0/C it is possible to achieve a quasi-steady state in the tritium loading where the quantity of tritium desorbed between pulses is equal to the quantity which is absorbed during a pulse. Since frequent thermal cycling is not required, this scheme also reduces the possibility of Zr/Al getter material fatigue.

  10. Hydrogen gas reduces hyperoxic lung injury via the Nrf2 pathway in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Tomohiro; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Shigemura, Norihisa; Huang, Chien-Sheng; Masutani, Kosuke; Tanaka, Yugo; Noda, Kentaro; Peng, Ximei; Takahashi, Toru; Billiar, Timothy R.; Okumura, Meinoshin; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperoxic lung injury is a major concern in critically ill patients who receive high concentrations of oxygen to treat lung diseases. Successful abrogation of hyperoxic lung injury would have a huge impact on respiratory and critical care medicine. Hydrogen can be administered as a therapeutic medical gas. We recently demonstrated that inhaled hydrogen reduced transplant-induced lung injury and induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1. To determine whether hydrogen could reduce hyperoxic lung injury and investigate the underlying mechanisms, we randomly assigned rats to four experimental groups and administered the following gas mixtures for 60 h: 98% oxygen (hyperoxia), 2% nitrogen; 98% oxygen (hyperoxia), 2% hydrogen; 98% balanced air (normoxia), 2% nitrogen; and 98% balanced air (normoxia), 2% hydrogen. We examined lung function by blood gas analysis, extent of lung injury, and expression of HO-1. We also investigated the role of NF-E2-related factor (Nrf) 2, which regulates HO-1 expression, by examining the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes and the ability of hydrogen to reduce hyperoxic lung injury in Nrf2-deficient mice. Hydrogen treatment during exposure to hyperoxia significantly improved blood oxygenation, reduced inflammatory events, and induced HO-1 expression. Hydrogen did not mitigate hyperoxic lung injury or induce HO-1 in Nrf2-deficient mice. These findings indicate that hydrogen gas can ameliorate hyperoxic lung injury through induction of Nrf2-dependent genes, such as HO-1. The findings suggest a potentially novel and applicable solution to hyperoxic lung injury and provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms and actions of hydrogen. PMID:23475767

  11. A comparison of gettering in single- and multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Jastrzebski, L.; Tan, T.

    1996-05-01

    The differences in the impurity gettering between single and multicrystalline silicon are discussed. These differences arise from impurity-defect interactions that occur during thermal processing of multicrystalline material. A gettering model is proposed to explain the observed behaviour of gettering in multicrystalline cells.

  12. Dynamic transition of supercritical hydrogen: defining the boundary between interior and atmosphere in gas giants.

    PubMed

    Trachenko, K; Brazhkin, V V; Bolmatov, D

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the physics of gas giants requires knowledge about the behavior of hydrogen at extreme pressures and temperatures. Molecular hydrogen in these planets is supercritical, and has been considered as a physically homogeneous state where no differences can be made between a liquid and a gas and where all properties undergo no marked or distinct changes with pressure and temperature, the picture believed to hold below the dissociation and metallization transition. Here, we show that in Jupiter and Saturn, supercritical molecular hydrogen undergoes a dynamic transition around 10 GPa and 3000 K from the "rigid" liquid state to the "nonrigid" gas-like fluid state at the Frenkel line recently proposed, with the accompanying qualitative changes of all major physical properties. The consequences of this finding are discussed, including a physically justified way to demarcate the interior and the atmosphere in gas giants.

  13. Manufacture of a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas from a starting material containing carbon and/or hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Santen, S.; Johansson, B.

    1984-08-21

    In a process for manufacturing a gas substantially containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas from a starting material containing carbon and/or hydrocarbon, the starting material is injected in powder or liquid form together with an oxidizing agent and slag former in a combustion zone while heat energy is simultaneously supplied. The combustion zone is formed in the lower portion of a shaft filled with particulate, solid, carbonaceous material and sulphur-binding slag former.

  14. TWRS hydrogen mitigation gas characterization system design and fabrication engineering task plan

    SciTech Connect

    Straalsund, E.K.

    1995-01-01

    The flammable gas watch-list (FGWL) tanks, which have demonstrated a gas release event (GRE) exceeding 0.625% hydrogen by volume will require additional characterization. The purpose of this additional characterization is to accurately measure the flammable and hazardous gas compositions and resulting lower flammability limit (LFL) of the tank vapor space during baseline and GRE emissions. Data from this characterization will help determine methods to resolve the unreviewed safety questions for the FGWL tanks. This document details organization responsibilities and engineering requirements for the design and fabrication of two gas characterization systems used to monitor flammable gas watch-list tanks.

  15. Experimental Study of Internal Gettering Efficiency of Iron in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarahiltunen, A.; Yli-Koski, M.; Väinölä, H.; Palokangas, M.; Saarnilehto, E.; Sinkkonen, J.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied internal gettering efficiency of iron in silicon by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and standard lifetime methods (SPV, µPCD). Conventional high low high anneals were performed to produce a series of wafers with varying denuded zone (DZ) width and oxygen precipitation density. The wafers were intentionally iron contaminated to a level of about 3 5*1013cm 3. After contamination the wafers were annealed at 900°C and then slowly cooled to 850, 800, 750, 700 or 600°C. After cooling the remaining interstitial iron concentration was measured by SPV, µ-PCD and DLTS. The experimental results are compared with simulations. Our results indicate that with this contamination level, the gettering is effective only at temperatures below 750°C when iron is supersaturated over a factor of twenty. For temperatures above 750°C the gettering is limited by iron precipitation in the bulk.

  16. Anaerobic and aerobic hydrogen gas formation by the blue-green alga Anabaena cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Daday, A; Platz, R A; Smith, G D

    1977-11-01

    An investigation was made of certain factors involved in the formation of hydrogen gas, both in an anaerobic environment (argon) and in air, by the blue-green alga Anabaena cylindrica. The alga had not been previously adapted under hydrogen gas and hence the hydrogen evolution occurred entirely within the nitrogen-fixing heterocyst cells; organisms grown in a fixed nitrogen source, and which were therefore devoid of heterocysts, did not produce hydrogen under these conditions. Use of the inhibitor dichlorophenyl-dimethyl urea showed that hydrogen formation was directly dependent on photosystem I and only indirectly dependent on photosystem II, consistent with heterocysts being the site of hydrogen formation. The uncouplers carbonyl cyanide chlorophenyl hydrazone and dinitrophenol almost completely inhibited hydrogen formation, indicating that the process occurs almost entirely via the adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent nitrogenase. Salicylaldoxime also inhibited hydrogen formation, again illustrating the necessity of photophosphorylation. Whereas hydrogen formation could usually only be observed in anaerobic, dinitrogen-free environments, incubation in the presence of the dinitrogen-fixing inhibitor carbon monoxide plus the hydrogenase inhibitor acetylene resulted in significant formation of hydrogen even in air. Hydrogen formation was studied in batch cultures as a function of age of the cultures and also as a function of culture concentration, in both cases the cultures being harvested in logarithmic growth. Hydrogen evolution (and acetylene-reducing activity) exhibited a distinct maximum with respect to the age of the cultures. Finally, the levels of the protective enzyme, superoxide dismutase, were measured in heterocyst and vegetative cell fractions of the organism; the level was twice as high in heterocyst cells (2.3 units/mg of protein) as in vegetative cells (1.1 units/mg of protein). A simple procedure for isolating heterocyst cells is described.

  17. Operation of a high-gradient superconducting radio-frequency cavity with a non-evaporable getter pump

    DOE PAGES

    Ciovati, G.; Geng, R.; Lushtak, Y.; ...

    2016-10-28

    The use of non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps in particle accelerators has increased significantly over the past few years because of their large pumping speed, particularly for hydrogen, compared to the size of the pump. A concern about using such pumps in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators is the possibility of shedding particulates which could then migrate into the SRF cavities and produce field emission, therefore degrading the cavity performance. One option to mitigate such issue is to use sintered getter materials which intrinsically offer superior mechanical and particle retention properties. In this article we present the results from cryogenic RF testsmore » of a high-gradient SRF cavity after being evacuated several times with an NEG pump equipped with sintered getter disks and placed in close proximity to the cavity. Here, the results showed that the cavity performance was not affected by the pump up to the quench gradient of 34 MV/m. As a result of this study, two such NEG pumps have been installed next to a cryomodule in the CEBAF accelerator to maintain ultra-high vacuum in the SRF cryomodule and two adjacent warm girder sections.« less

  18. Operation of a high-gradient superconducting radio-frequency cavity with a non-evaporable getter pump

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, G.; Geng, R.; Lushtak, Y.; Manini, P.; Maccallini, E.; Stutzman, M.

    2016-10-28

    The use of non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps in particle accelerators has increased significantly over the past few years because of their large pumping speed, particularly for hydrogen, compared to the size of the pump. A concern about using such pumps in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators is the possibility of shedding particulates which could then migrate into the SRF cavities and produce field emission, therefore degrading the cavity performance. One option to mitigate such issue is to use sintered getter materials which intrinsically offer superior mechanical and particle retention properties. In this article we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of a high-gradient SRF cavity after being evacuated several times with an NEG pump equipped with sintered getter disks and placed in close proximity to the cavity. Here, the results showed that the cavity performance was not affected by the pump up to the quench gradient of 34 MV/m. As a result of this study, two such NEG pumps have been installed next to a cryomodule in the CEBAF accelerator to maintain ultra-high vacuum in the SRF cryomodule and two adjacent warm girder sections.

  19. PALLADIUM DOPED TIN OXIDE BASED HYDROGEN GAS SENSORS FOR SAFETY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, Upendra; Nadig, D. S.

    2010-04-09

    Hydrogen is considered to be a hazardous gas since it forms a flammable mixture between 4 to 75% by volume in air. Hence, the safety aspects of handling hydrogen are quite important. For this, ideally, highly selective, fast response, small size, hydrogen sensors are needed. Although sensors based on different technologies may be used, thin-film sensors based on palladium (Pd) are preferred due to their compactness and fast response. They detect hydrogen by monitoring the changes to the electrical, mechanical or optical properties of the films. We report the development of Pd-doped tin-oxide based gas sensors prepared on thin ceramic substrates with screen printed platinum (Pt) contacts and integrated nicrome wire heaters. The sensors are tested for their performances using hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixtures to a maximum of 4%H{sub 2} in N{sub 2}. The sensors detect hydrogen and their response times are less than a few seconds. Also, the sensor performance is not altered by the presence of helium in the test gas mixtures. By the above desired performance characteristics, field trials of these sensors have been undertaken. The paper presents the details of the sensor fabrication, electronic circuits, experimental setup for evaluation and the test results.

  20. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Doped Tungsten Oxide Thin Films for Hydrogen Gas Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wongchoosuk, Chatchawal; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Phokharatkul, Ditsayut; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2010-01-01

    In this work we have fabricated hydrogen gas sensors based on undoped and 1 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-doped tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films by means of the powder mixing and electron beam (E-beam) evaporation technique. Hydrogen sensing properties of the thin films have been investigated at different operating temperatures and gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppm to 50,000 ppm. The results indicate that the MWCNT-doped WO3 thin film exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen. Thus, MWCNT doping based on E-beam co-evaporation was shown to be an effective means of preparing hydrogen gas sensors with enhanced sensing and reduced operating temperatures. Creation of nanochannels and formation of p-n heterojunctions were proposed as the sensing mechanism underlying the enhanced hydrogen sensitivity of this hybridized gas sensor. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on a MWCNT-doped WO3 hydrogen sensor prepared by the E-beam method. PMID:22163623

  1. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) and Power-to-Gas Economic Analysis; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Eichman, Joshua

    2015-07-30

    This presentation summarizes opportunities for hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas and presents the results of a market analysis performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to quantify the value of energy storage. Hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas systems have the ability to integrate multiple energy sectors including electricity, transportation, and industrial. On account of the flexibility of hydrogen systems, there are a variety of potential system configurations. Each configuration will provide different value to the owner, customers and grid system operator. This presentation provides an economic comparison of hydrogen storage, power-to-gas and conventional storage systems. The total cost is compared to the revenue with participation in a variety of markets to assess the economic competitiveness. It is found that the sale of hydrogen for transportation or industrial use greatly increases competitiveness. Electrolyzers operating as demand response devices (i.e., selling hydrogen and grid services) are economically competitive, while hydrogen storage that inputs electricity and outputs only electricity have an unfavorable business case. Additionally, tighter integration with the grid provides greater revenue (e.g., energy, ancillary service and capacity markets are explored). Lastly, additional hours of storage capacity is not necessarily more competitive in current energy and ancillary service markets and electricity markets will require new mechanisms to appropriately compensate long duration storage devices.

  2. On the formation of hydrogen gas on copper in anoxic water.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Adam Johannes; Lilja, Christina; Brinck, Tore

    2011-08-28

    Hydrogen gas has been detected in a closed system containing copper and pure anoxic water [P. Szakalos, G. Hultquist, and G. Wikmark, Electrochem. Solid-State Lett. 10, C63 (2007) and G. Hultquist, P. Szakalos, M. Graham, A. Belonoshko, G. Sproule, L. Grasjo, P. Dorogokupets, B. Danilov, T. Aastrup, G. Wikmark, G. Chuah, J. Eriksson, and A. Rosengren, Catal. Lett. 132, 311 (2009)]. Although bulk corrosion into any of the known phases of copper is thermodynamically forbidden, the present paper shows how surface reactions lead to the formation of hydrogen gas in limited amounts. While water cleavage on copper has been reported and investigated before, formation of molecular hydrogen at a single-crystal Cu[100] surface is here explored using density functional theory and transition state theory. It is found that although solvent catalysis seems possible, the fastest route to the formation of molecular hydrogen is the direct combination of hydrogen atoms on the copper surface. The activation free energy (ΔG(s)(‡)(f)) of hydrogen formation in condensed phase is 0.70 eV, which corresponds to a rate constant of 10 s(-1) at 298.15 K, i.e., a relatively rapid process. It is estimated that at least 2.4 ng hydrogen gas could form per cm(2) on a perfect copper surface.

  3. Timing of Getter Material Addition in Cementitious Wasteforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawter, A.; Qafoku, N. P.; Asmussen, M.; Neeway, J.; Smith, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    A cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, is being evaluated as a possible supplemental immobilization technology for the Hanford sites's low activity waste (LAW), which contains radioactive 99Tc and 129I, as part of the tank waste cleanup mission. Cast Stone is made of a dry blend 47% blast furnace slag, 45% fly ash, and 8% ordinary Portland cement, mixed with a low-activity waste (LAW). To improve the retention of Tc and/or I in Cast Stone, materials with a high affinity for Tc and/or I, termed "getters," can be added to provide a stable domain for the radionuclides of concern. Previous testing conducted with a variety of getters has identified Tin(II)-Apatite and Silver Exchanged Zeolite as promising candidates for Tc and I, respectively. Investigation into the sequence in which getters are added to Cast Stone was performed following two methods: 1) adding getters to the Cast Stone dry blend, and then mixing with liquid waste, and 2) adding getters to the liquid waste first, followed by addition of the Cast Stone dry blend. Cast Stone monolith samples were prepared with each method and leach tests, following EPA method 1315, were conducted in either distilled water or simulated vadose zone porewater for a period of up to 63 days. The leachate was analyzed for Tc, I, Na, NO3-, NO2- and Cr with ICP-MS, ICP-OES and ion chromatography and the results indicated that the Cast Stone with getter addition in the dry blend mix (method 1) has lower rates of Tc and I leaching. The mechanisms of radionuclide release from the Cast Stone were also investigated with a variety of solid phase characterization techniques of the monoliths before and after leaching, such as XRD, SEM/EDS, TEM/SAED and other spectroscopic techniques.

  4. Molecular hydrogen: An inert gas turns clinically effective.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2015-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) appeared as an experimental agent in biomedicine approximately 40 years ago, yet the past 5 years seem to confirm its medicinal value in the clinical environment. H2 improves clinical end-points and surrogate markers in several clinical trials, from metabolic diseases to chronic systemic inflammatory disorders to cancer. However, less information is available concerning its medicinal properties, such as dosage and administration, or adverse reactions and use in specific populations. The present paper overviews the clinical relevance of molecular hydrogen, and summarizes data from clinical trials on this innovative medical agent. Clinical profiles of H2 provide evidence-based direction for practical application and future research on molecular hydrogen for the wider health care community.

  5. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. [Poly(etherimide) and poly(ether-ester-amide) membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    During the last quarter several high performance membranes for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. The heat-resistant resin poly(etherimide) has been selected as the polymer with the most outstanding properties for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. Flat sheet and hollow fiber poly(etherimide) membranes have been prepared and evaluated with pure gases and gas mixtures at elevated pressures and temperatures. Multilayer composite poly(ether-ester-amide) membranes were also developed. These membranes are useful for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide hydrogen. They have very high selectivities and extremely high normalized carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide fluxes. Separation of carbon dioxide/hydrogen streams is a key problem in hydrogen production from coal. The development of the two membranes now gives us two approaches to separate these gas streams, depending on the stream's composition. If the stream contains small quantities of hydrogen, the hydrogen- permeable poly(etherimide) membrane would be used to produce a hydrogen-enriched permeate. If the stream contains small quantities of carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide, the poly(ether-ester-amide) membrane would be used to produce a carbon dioxide/hydrogen sulfide-free, hydrogen-enriched residue stream. 6 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-31

    During the last quarter several high performance membranes for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. The heat-resistant resin poly(etherimide) has been selected as the polymer with the most outstanding properties for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. Flat sheet and hollow fiber poly(etherimide) membranes have been prepared and evaluated with pure gases and gas mixtures at elevated pressures and temperatures. Multilayer composite poly(ether-ester-amide) membranes were also developed. These membranes are useful for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide hydrogen. They have very high selectivities and extremely high normalized carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide fluxes. Separation of carbon dioxide/hydrogen streams is a key problem in hydrogen production from coal. The development of the two membranes now gives us two approaches to separate these gas streams, depending on the stream`s composition. If the stream contains small quantities of hydrogen, the hydrogen- permeable poly(etherimide) membrane would be used to produce a hydrogen-enriched permeate. If the stream contains small quantities of carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide, the poly(ether-ester-amide) membrane would be used to produce a carbon dioxide/hydrogen sulfide-free, hydrogen-enriched residue stream. 6 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Neutron Scattering Measurements of Hydrogen Distribution in a Zircaloy-4 Alloy Charged with Hydrogen Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Elena; Garlea, Vasile O; Choo, Hahn; Hubbard, Camden R; Liaw, Peter K; Rack, P. D.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron incoherent scattering measurements were conducted on Zircaloy-4 round bars. The specimens were charged in a tube furnace at 430 C, using a 12.5 vol. % hydrogen in an argon mixture for 30, 60, and 90 minutes at 13.8 kPa pressure. The volume-average neutron diffraction measurements showed the presence of the face-centered-cubic delta zirconium hydride ({delta}-ZrH{sub 2}) phase in the hydrogenated specimens. The assessment of the background in the diffraction profiles due to the incoherent scattering from the hydrogen atoms was carried out by performing inelastic scans around zero energy transfer and at a fixed two-theta value for which there was only flat background and no coherent scattering. To estimate the relative amount of hydrogen in the Zircaloy-4 samples, the increase in incoherent scattering intensities with hydrogen content was calibrated using samples for which the hydrogen content was known. Measurement of the background scattering from locations within the round bar was also performed to map the distribution of hydrogen content.

  8. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through September 1999.

  9. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through October 1999.

  10. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through January 2000.

  11. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through July 1999.

  12. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through December 1999.

  13. Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through April 1998.

  14. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through November 1999.

  15. Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through June 1998.

  16. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through February 1999.

  17. Risk-informed separation distances for hydrogen gas storage facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Houf, William G.; Merilo, Erik; Winters, William Stanley, Jr.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Groethe, Mark; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Ruggles, Adam James; Moen, Christopher D.; Schefer, Robert W.; Keller, Jay O.; Zhang, Yao; Evans, Gregory Herbert

    2010-09-01

    The use of risk information in establishing code and standard requirements enables: (1) An adequate and appropriate level of safety; and (2) Deployment of hydrogen facilities are as safe as gasoline facilities. This effort provides a template for clear and defensible regulations, codes, and standards that can enable international market transformation.

  18. Evaluation of Electrochemical Nitrogen/hydrogen Gas Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, J. E.; Sexton, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    An electrochemical nitrogen-hydrogen separator subsystem was investigated for use following catalytic dissociation of ammonia or hydrazine in a storage system being considered for long-duration manned space flight. An experimental cell with concentric tubular Pd-25Ag alloy hydrogen diffusion electrodes and hermetically sealed aqueous caustic electrolyte was developed.It was found that this cell operated satisfactorily at 210 C to 245 C and produced dry nitrogen and dry hydrogen with either or both gases at pressures up to 6.8 atmospheres (100 psia) or higher for storage. The final cell developed was operated satisfactorily for 176 days (4200 hours) with no evidence of deterioration of current-voltage performance. The best experimental performance was obtained at 245 C at currents up to 4 amperes (180 ma/sq cm and 360 ma/sq cm anode and cathode current densities, respectively) with a maximum steady-state cell voltage of 0.125 volt for an anode feed of pure hydrogen.

  19. Treating landfill gas hydrogen sulphide with mineral wool waste (MWW) and rod mill waste (RMW).

    PubMed

    Bergersen, Ove; Haarstad, Ketil

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) gas is a major odorant at municipal landfills. The gas can be generated from different waste fractions, for example demolition waste containing gypsum based plaster board. The removal of H2S from landfill gas was investigated by filtering it through mineral wool waste products. The flow of gas varied from 0.3 l/min to 3.0 l/min. The gas was typical for landfill gas with a mean H2S concentration of ca. 4500 ppm. The results show that the sulphide gas can effectively be removed by mineral wool waste products. The ratios of the estimated potential for sulphide precipitation were 19:1 for rod mill waste (RMW) and mineral wool waste (MWW). A filter consisting of a mixture of MWW and RMW, with a vertical perforated gas tube through the center of filter material and with a downward gas flow, removed 98% of the sulfide gas over a period of 80 days. A downward gas flow was more efficient in contacting the filter materials. Mineral wool waste products are effective in removing hydrogen sulphide from landfill gas given an adequate contact time and water content in the filter material. Based on the estimated sulphide removal potential of mineral wool and rod mill waste of 14 g/kg and 261 g/kg, and assuming an average sulphide gas concentration of 4500 ppm, the removal capacity in the filter materials has been estimated to last between 11 and 308 days. At the studied location the experimental gas flow was 100 times less than the actual gas flow. We believe that the system described here can be upscaled in order to treat this gas flow. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the prevention of arterial gas embolism in food grade hydrogen peroxide ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hendriksen, Stephen M; Menth, Nicholas L; Westgard, Bjorn C; Cole, Jon B; Walter, Joseph W; Masters, Thomas C; Logue, Christopher J

    2016-12-14

    Food grade hydrogen peroxide ingestion is a relatively rare presentation to the emergency department. There are no defined guidelines at this time regarding the treatment of such exposures, and providers may not be familiar with the potential complications associated with high concentration hydrogen peroxide ingestions. In this case series, we describe four patients who consumed 35% hydrogen peroxide, presented to the emergency department, and were treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Two of the four patients were critically ill requiring intubation. All four patients had evidence on CT or ultrasound of venous gas emboli and intubated patients were treated as if they had an arterial gas embolism since an exam could not be followed. After hyperbaric oxygen therapy each patient was discharged from the hospital neurologically intact with no other associated organ injuries related to vascular gas emboli. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is an effective treatment for patients with vascular gas emboli after high concentration hydrogen peroxide ingestion. It is the treatment of choice for any impending, suspected, or diagnosed arterial gas embolism. Further research is needed to determine which patients with portal venous gas emboli should be treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

  1. Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, S.M. Jr.; Bishop, D.M.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1998-11-24

    Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer. 4 figs.

  2. Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, Jr., Samuel M.; Bishop, Dawn M.; Follstaedt, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer.

  3. The MIT Laser-Driven Target of Nuclear Polarized Hydrogen Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clasie, B.; Crawford, C.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.; Seely, J.; Xu, W.

    2007-04-01

    The laser-driven target at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) produced nuclear polarized hydrogen gas in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. The best result achieved was 50.5% polarization with 58.2% degree of dissociation of the sample beam exiting the storage cell at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1 × 1018 atoms/s.

  4. Detection of hydrogen gas-producing anaerobes in refuse-derived fuel (RDF) pellets.

    PubMed

    Sakka, Makiko; Kimura, Tetsuya; Ohmiya, Kunio; Sakka, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    Recently, we reported that refuse-derived fuel (RDF) pellets contain a relatively high number of viable bacterial cells and that these bacteria generate heat and hydrogen gas during fermentation under wet conditions. In this study we analyzed bacterial cell numbers of RDF samples manufactured with different concentrations of calcium hydroxide, which is usually added to waste materials for the prevention of rotting of food wastes and the acceleration of drying of solid wastes, and determined the amount of hydrogen gas produced by them under wet conditions. Furthermore, we analyzed microflora of the RDF samples before and during fermentation by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA followed by sequencing. We found that the RDF samples contained various kinds of clostridia capable of producing hydrogen gas.

  5. Microbial electrolysis cells for high yield hydrogen gas production from organic matter.

    PubMed

    Logan, Bruce E; Call, Douglas; Cheng, Shaoan; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Sleutels, Tom H J A; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W; Rozendal, René A

    2008-12-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (> 0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment.

  6. NMR properties of hydrogen-bonded glycine cluster in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Jorge R.; da Silva, Arnaldo Machado; Ghosh, Angsula; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab

    2016-11-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to study the effect of the hydrogen bond formation on the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) parameters of hydrogen-bonded clusters of glycine molecules in gas-phase. DFT predicted isotropic chemical shifts of H, C, N and O of the isolated glycine with respect to standard reference materials are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The variations of isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts for all atoms constituting these clusters containing up to four glycine molecules have been investigated systematically employing gradient corrected hybrid B3LYP functional with three different types of extended basis sets. The clusters are mainly stabilized by a network of strong hydrogen bonds among the carboxylic (COOH) groups of glycine monomers. The formation of hydrogen bond influences the molecular structure of the clusters significantly which, on the other hand, gets reflected in the variations of NMR properties. The carbon (C) atom of the sbnd COOH group, the bridging hydrogen (H) and the proton-donor oxygen (O) atom of the Osbnd H bond suffer downfield shift due to the formation of hydrogen bond. The hydrogen bond lengths and the structural complexity of the clusters are found to vary with the number of participating monomers. A direct correlation between the hydrogen bond length and isotropic chemical shift of the bridging hydrogen is observed in all cases. The individual variations of the principal axis elements in chemical shift tensor provide additional insight about the different nature of the monomers within the cluster.

  7. Real gas CFD simulations of hydrogen/oxygen supercritical combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, S.; Jarczyk, M.; Pfitzner, M.; Rogg, B.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive numerical framework has been established to simulate reacting flows under conditions typically encountered in rocket combustion chambers. The model implemented into the commercial CFD Code ANSYS CFX includes appropriate real gas relations based on the volume-corrected Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS) for the flow field and a real gas extension of the laminar flamelet combustion model. The results indicate that the real gas relations have a considerably larger impact on the flow field than on the detailed flame structure. Generally, a realistic flame shape could be achieved for the real gas approach compared to experimental data from the Mascotte test rig V03 operated at ONERA when the differential diffusion processes were only considered within the flame zone.

  8. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A.

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  9. Advances of zeolite based membrane for hydrogen production via water gas shift reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen is considered as a promising energy vector which can be obtained from various renewable sources. However, an efficient hydrogen production technology is still challenging. One technology to produce hydrogen with very high capacity with low cost is through water gas shift (WGS) reaction. Water gas shift reaction is an equilibrium reaction that produces hydrogen from syngas mixture by the introduction of steam. Conventional WGS reaction employs two or more reactors in series with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given volume of catalyst. Membrane reactor as new technology can cope several drawbacks of conventional reactor by removing reaction product and the reaction will favour towards product formation. Zeolite has properties namely high temperature, chemical resistant, and low price makes it suitable for membrane reactor applications. Moreover, it has been employed for years as hydrogen selective layer. This review paper is focusing on the development of membrane reactor for efficient water gas shift reaction to produce high purity hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Development of membrane reactor is discussed further related to its modification towards efficient reaction and separation from WGS reaction mixture. Moreover, zeolite framework suitable for WGS membrane reactor will be discussed more deeply.

  10. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Nibur, Kevin A.

    2010-11-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  11. Low-Dimensional Palladium Nanostructures for Fast and Reliable Hydrogen Gas Detection

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jin-Seo; Lee, Jun Min; Lee, Wooyoung

    2011-01-01

    Palladium (Pd) has received attention as an ideal hydrogen sensor material due to its properties such as high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen gas, fast response, and operability at room temperature. Interestingly, various Pd nanostructures that have been realized by recent developments in nanotechnologies are known to show better performance than bulk Pd. This review highlights the characteristic properties, issues, and their possible solutions of hydrogen sensors based on the low-dimensional Pd nanostructures with more emphasis on Pd thin films and Pd nanowires. The finite size effects, relative strengths and weaknesses of the respective Pd nanostructures are discussed in terms of performance, manufacturability, and practical applicability. PMID:22346605

  12. In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

    2002-09-20

    The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

  13. Numerical estimation of ultrasonic production of hydrogen: Effect of ideal and real gas based models.

    PubMed

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-01-01

    Based on two different assumptions regarding the equation describing the state of the gases within an acoustic cavitation bubble, this paper studies the sonochemical production of hydrogen, through two numerical models treating the evolution of a chemical mechanism within a single bubble saturated with oxygen during an oscillation cycle in water. The first approach is built on an ideal gas model, while the second one is founded on Van der Waals equation, and the main objective was to analyze the effect of the considered state equation on the ultrasonic hydrogen production retrieved by simulation under various operating conditions. The obtained results show that even when the second approach gives higher values of temperature, pressure and total free radicals production, yield of hydrogen does not follow the same trend. When comparing the results released by both models regarding hydrogen production, it was noticed that the ratio of the molar amount of hydrogen is frequency and acoustic amplitude dependent. The use of Van der Waals equation leads to higher quantities of hydrogen under low acoustic amplitude and high frequencies, while employing ideal gas law based model gains the upper hand regarding hydrogen production at low frequencies and high acoustic amplitudes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The nature of selenium hydrogen bonding: gas phase spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculations.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Kamal K; Singh, Santosh K; Ghosh, Paulami; Ghosh, Debashree; Das, Aloke

    2017-08-25

    Subsequent to the recent re-definition of hydrogen bonding by the IUPAC committee, there has been a growing search for finding the presence of this ever interesting non-covalent interaction between a hydrogen atom in an X-H group and any other atom in the periodic table. In recent gas phase experiments, it has been observed that hydrogen bonding interactions involving S and Se are of similar strength to those with an O atom. However, there is no clear explanation for the unusual strength of this interaction in the case of hydrogen bond acceptors which are not conventional electronegative atoms. In this work, we have explored the nature of Se hydrogen bonding by studying indoledimethyl selenide (indmse) and phenoldimethyl selenide (phdmse) complexes using gas phase IR spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculations. We have found through various energy decomposition analysis (EDA) methods and natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations that, along with electrostatics and polarization, charge transfer interactions are important to understand Se/S hydrogen bonding and there is a delicate balance between the various interactions that plays the crucial role rather than a single component of the interaction energy. An in-depth understanding of this type of non-covalent interaction has immense significance in biology as amino acids containing S and Se are widely present in proteins and hence hydrogen bonding interactions involving S and Se atoms contribute to the folding of proteins.

  15. Production of hydrogen sulphide containing gas from underground formations

    SciTech Connect

    Delude, S.G.; Luinstra, E.A.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a process for the production of at least a gaseous product containing a substantial amount of hydrogen sulphide via a bore-hole from an underground formation containing besides the hydrogen sulphide at least elemental sulphur, comprising (a) injection of a liquid substantially consisting of hydrocarbons into the bore-hole or into the underground formation near to the end of the bore-hole; (b) producing a gaseous and a liquid fraction from the underground formation; (c) separating the gaseous fraction from the liquid fraction (d) if necessary, separating an aqueous fraction of the produced liquid fraction from the hydrocarbons-containing fraction; (e) heating the hydrocarbons-containing fraction in order to remove elemental sulphur by conversion to hydrogen sulphide in the presence of a catalyst comprising sulphides of one of more metals from Group VIB and/or Group VIII of the Periodic Table of Elements deposited on a support of alumina, silica or silica alumina; and (f) reinjection of at least a part of the thus treated hydrocarbons-containing fraction into the bore-hole or into the underground formation near to the end of the bore-hole as described hereinbefore.

  16. A study of the processes in the RF hydrogen gas dissociator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.

    1980-01-01

    The role of the RF gas dissociator in the hydrogen maser is examined. Based on collisional and plasma transport processes, the performance of the source is investigated. It is found that while the complexity of the collisional processes in the RF dissociator prohibits an easily obtained quantitative expression for the performance of the source, it is nevertheless possible to make general inferences concerning the qualitative performance based on collisional effects. An analytical expression for the efficiency of the source in atom production is obtained based on plasma transport processes. On the basis of this study some recommendations are made for the development of more efficient RF hydrogen gas dissociators for use in masers.

  17. Laboratory Studies of Hydrogen Gas Generation Using the Cobalt Chloride Catalyzed Sodium Borohydride-Water Reaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    temperature of the reaction depends on both the H2O:NaBH4 ratio and the percentage of CoCl2 relative to NaBH4. Experiments showed that the minimum...TECHNICAL REPORT 2082 July 2015 Laboratory Studies of Hydrogen Gas Generation Using the Cobalt Chloride Catalyzed Sodium...hydrogen gas all as a function of reaction time. This 100-L experiment used a H2O:NaBH4 ratio of 4.6:1 and 4% CoCl2 relative to NaBH4. The cooling

  18. Alignment of graphene oxide nanostructures between microgap electrodes via dielectrophoresis for hydrogen gas sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Budhi; Wang, Jianwei; Rathi, Servin; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2015-05-18

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanostructures have been aligned between conducting electrodes via dielectrophoresis (DEP) with different electrical configurations. The arrangement of ground with respect to peak-to-peak voltage (V{sub pp}) plays a crucial role in manipulating the GO nanostructures. Grounds on both sides of the V{sub pp} electrode give an excellent linking of GO nanostructures which is explained by scanning electron microscopy and current-voltage characteristics. A finite element method simulation explains the electric field and voltage variation profile during DEP process. The optimized aligned GO nanostructures are used as hydrogen gas sensor with a sensitivity of 6.0% for 800 ppm hydrogen gas.

  19. The use of ethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas

    SciTech Connect

    Marakhovskii, L.F.; Rezunenko, Y.I.; Popov, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The investigations of the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S by an EDA solution showed the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in ethylenediamine solutions is almost twice that in monoethanolamine solutions. Ethylenediamine may be used as an absorber for thorough removal of H/sub 2/S from coke oven gas in the presence of CO/sub 2/ and HCN. The hydrogen cyanide of coke oven gas, having practically no effect on the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/, may in this case be used in the form of ethylenethiourea - a marketable byproduct.

  20. Exceptional gettering response of epitaxially grown kerfless silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D. M.; Markevich, V. P.; Hofstetter, J.; Jensen, M. A.; Morishige, A. E.; Castellanos, S.; Lai, B.; Peaker, A. R.; Buonassisi, T.

    2016-02-08

    The bulk minority-carrier lifetime in p- and n-type kerfless epitaxial (epi) crystalline silicon wafers is shown to increase >500 during phosphorus gettering. We employ kinetic defect simulations and microstructural characterization techniques to elucidate the root cause of this exceptional gettering response. Simulations and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) indicate that a high concentra- tion of point defects (likely Pt) is “locked in” during fast (60 C/min) cooling during epi wafer growth. The fine dispersion of moderately fast-diffusing recombination-active point defects limits as-grown lifetime but can also be removed during gettering, confirmed by DLTS measurements. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy indicates metal agglomerates at structural defects, yet the structural defect density is sufficiently low to enable high lifetimes. Consequently, after phosphorus diffusion gettering, epi silicon exhibits a higher lifetime than materials with similar bulk impurity contents but higher densities of structural defects, including multicrystalline ingot and ribbon silicon materials. As a result, device simulations suggest a solar-cell efficiency potential of this material >23%.

  1. Exceptional gettering response of epitaxially grown kerfless silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, D. M.; Markevich, V. P.; Hofstetter, J.; Jensen, M. A.; Morishige, A. E.; Castellanos, S.; Lai, B.; Peaker, A. R.; Buonassisi, T.

    2016-02-01

    The bulk minority-carrier lifetime in p- and n-type kerfless epitaxial (epi) crystalline silicon wafers is shown to increase >500× during phosphorus gettering. We employ kinetic defect simulations and microstructural characterization techniques to elucidate the root cause of this exceptional gettering response. Simulations and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) indicate that a high concentration of point defects (likely Pt) is "locked in" during fast (60 °C/min) cooling during epi wafer growth. The fine dispersion of moderately fast-diffusing recombination-active point defects limits as-grown lifetime but can also be removed during gettering, confirmed by DLTS measurements. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy indicates metal agglomerates at structural defects, yet the structural defect density is sufficiently low to enable high lifetimes. Consequently, after phosphorus diffusion gettering, epi silicon exhibits a higher lifetime than materials with similar bulk impurity contents but higher densities of structural defects, including multicrystalline ingot and ribbon silicon materials. Device simulations suggest a solar-cell efficiency potential of this material >23%.

  2. Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with silicon carbide getter

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    An improved cesium getter 28 is provided in a breeder reactor fuel element or pin in the form of an extended surface area, low density element formed in one embodiment as a helically wound foil 30 located with silicon carbide, and located at the upper end of the fertile material upper blanket 20.

  3. Exceptional Gettering Response of Epitaxially Grown Kerfless Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D.M.; Markevich, V.P.; Hofstetter, J.; Jensen, M. A.; Morishige, A.E.; Castellanos, S.; Lai, B.; Peaker, A.R.; Buonassisi, T.

    2016-02-14

    The bulk minority-carrier lifetime in p- and n-type kerfless epitaxial (epi) crystalline silicon wafers is shown to increase >500× during phosphorus gettering. We employ kinetic defect simulations and microstructural characterization techniques to elucidate the root cause of this exceptional gettering response. Simulations and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) indicate that a high concentration of point defects (likely Pt) is “locked in” during fast (60 °C/min) cooling during epi wafer growth. The fine dispersion of moderately fast-diffusing recombination-active point defects limits as-grown lifetime, but can also be removed during gettering, confirmed by DLTS measurements. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy indicates metal agglomerates at structural defects, yet the structural defect density is sufficiently low to enable high lifetimes. Consequently, after phosphorus diffusion gettering, epi silicon exhibits a higher lifetime than materials with similar bulk impurity contents but higher densities of structural defects, including multicrystalline ingot and ribbon silicon materials. Device simulations suggest a solar-cell efficiency potential of this material >23%.

  4. Exceptional gettering response of epitaxially grown kerfless silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Powell, D. M.; Markevich, V. P.; Hofstetter, J.; ...

    2016-02-08

    The bulk minority-carrier lifetime in p- and n-type kerfless epitaxial (epi) crystalline silicon wafers is shown to increase >500 during phosphorus gettering. We employ kinetic defect simulations and microstructural characterization techniques to elucidate the root cause of this exceptional gettering response. Simulations and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) indicate that a high concentra- tion of point defects (likely Pt) is “locked in” during fast (60 C/min) cooling during epi wafer growth. The fine dispersion of moderately fast-diffusing recombination-active point defects limits as-grown lifetime but can also be removed during gettering, confirmed by DLTS measurements. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy indicates metal agglomeratesmore » at structural defects, yet the structural defect density is sufficiently low to enable high lifetimes. Consequently, after phosphorus diffusion gettering, epi silicon exhibits a higher lifetime than materials with similar bulk impurity contents but higher densities of structural defects, including multicrystalline ingot and ribbon silicon materials. As a result, device simulations suggest a solar-cell efficiency potential of this material >23%.« less

  5. Purification of liquid metal systems with sodium coolant from oxygen using getters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, F. A.; Konovalov, M. A.; Sorokin, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    For increasing the safety and economic parameters of nuclear power stations (NPSs) with sodium coolant, it was decided to install all systems contacting radioactive sodium, including purification systems of circuit I, in the reactor vessel. The performance and capacity of cold traps (CTs) (conventional element of coolant purification systems) in these conditions are limited by their volume. It was proposed to use hot traps (HTs) in circuit I for coolant purification from oxygen. It was demonstrated that, at rated parameters of the installation when the temperature of the coolant streamlining the getter (gas absorber) is equal to 550°C, the hot trap can provide the required coolant purity. In shutdown modes at 250-300°C, the performance of the hot trap is reduced by four orders of magnitude. Possible HT operation regimes for shutdown modes and while reaching rated parameters were proposed and analyzed. Basic attention was paid to purification modes at power rise after commissioning and accidental contamination of the coolant when the initial oxygen concentration in it reached 25 mln-1. It was demonstrated that the efficiency of purification systems can be increased using HTs with the getter in the form of a foil or granules. The possibility of implementing the "fast purification" mode in which the coolant is purified simultaneously with passing over from the shutdown mode to the rated parameters was substantiated.

  6. Mechanical grooving effect on the gettering efficiency of crystalline silicon based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarroug, Ahmed; Hamed, Zied Ben; Derbali, Lotfi; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2017-04-01

    This paper examines a gettering process of Czochralski silicon (CZ) via mechanical texture, followed by two step heat treatment in the presence of porous silicon layer (PSL) under oxygen flow gas. It is shown that a process with PS has a positive trend of improvement in the electronic quality, and found to be more efficient when used in combination with mechanical grooving. We obtained a significant increase of the effective minority carrier lifetime and majority charge carriers mobility. Thus, there is an apparent decrease in the resistivity. These parameters were estimated through a The Quasi-Steady-State Photo-Conductance technique (QSSPC), the van Der Pauw method and Hall Effect. Particularly, we have made obvious that the large enhancement of the electronic quality of the wafers can be related to the presence of grooves, the influence during which the gettering process is of importance to overcome the unexpected saturation phenomena. The current voltage I-V characteristics of all samples had been measured under illumination. They were shown to enhance the photovoltaic properties of solar cells.

  7. Use of non evaporable getter pumps to ensure long term performances of high quantum efficiency photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sertore, Daniele Michelato, Paolo; Monaco, Laura; Manini, Paolo; Siviero, Fabrizio

    2014-05-15

    High quantum efficiency photocathodes are routinely used as laser triggered emitters in the advanced high brightness electron sources based on radio frequency guns. The sensitivity of “semiconductor” type photocathodes to vacuum levels and gas composition requires special care during preparation and handling. This paper will discuss the results obtained using a novel pumping approach based on coupling a 20 l s{sup −1} sputter ion getter pump with a CapaciTorr® D100 non evaporable getter (NEG) pump. A pressure of 8⋅10{sup −8} Pa was achieved using only a sputter ion pump after a 6 day bake-out. With the addition of a NEG pump, a pressure of 2⋅10{sup −9} Pa was achieved after a 2 day bake-out. These pressure values were maintained without power due to the ability of the NEG to pump gases by chemical reaction. Long term monitoring of cathodes quantum efficiencies was also carried out at different photon wavelengths for more than two years, showing no degradation of the photoemissive film properties.

  8. Method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2000-01-01

    A method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide within a reformer 10 is disclosed. According to the method, a stream including an oxygen-containing gas is directed adjacent to a first vessel 18 and the oxygen-containing gas is heated. A stream including unburned fuel is introduced into the oxygen-containing gas stream to form a mixture including oxygen-containing gas and fuel. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and unburned fuel is directed tangentially into a partial oxidation reaction zone 24 within the first vessel 18. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and fuel is further directed through the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 to produce a heated reformate stream including hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide. Steam may also be mixed with the oxygen-containing gas and fuel, and the reformate stream from the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 directed into a steam reforming zone 26. High- and low-temperature shift reaction zones 64,76 may be employed for further fuel processing.

  9. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yunyan; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Dai, Jinxing; Katz, Barry; Zhang, Shuichang; Tang, Yongchun

    2011-05-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2 cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using δD values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the δ 13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that δD values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that δD values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane.

  11. Hydrogen Energy Storage and Power-to-Gas: Establishing Criteria for Successful Business Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Eichman, Joshua; Melaina, Marc

    2015-10-27

    As the electric sector evolves and increasing amounts of variable generation are installed on the system, there are greater needs for system flexibility, sufficient capacity and greater concern for overgeneration. As a result there is growing interest in exploring the role of energy storage and demand response technologies to support grid needs. Hydrogen is a versatile feedstock that can be used in a variety of applications including chemical and industrial processes, as well as a transportation fuel and heating fuel. Traditionally, hydrogen technologies focus on providing services to a single sector; however, participating in multiple sectors has the potential to provide benefits to each sector and increase the revenue for hydrogen technologies. The goal of this work is to explore promising system configurations for hydrogen systems and the conditions that will make for successful business cases in a renewable, low-carbon future. Current electricity market data, electric and gas infrastructure data and credit and incentive information are used to perform a techno-economic analysis to identify promising criteria and locations for successful hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas projects. Infrastructure data will be assessed using geographic information system applications. An operation optimization model is used to co-optimizes participation in energy and ancillary service markets as well as the sale of hydrogen. From previous work we recognize the great opportunity that energy storage and power-to-gas but there is a lack of information about the economic favorability of such systems. This work explores criteria for selecting locations and compares the system cost and potential revenue to establish competitiveness for a variety of equipment configurations. Hydrogen technologies offer unique system flexibility that can enable interactions between multiple energy sectors including electric, transport, heating fuel and industrial. Previous research established that

  12. Hydrogen Gas Reduced Acute Hyperglycemia-Enhanced Hemorrhagic Transformation in a Focal Ischemia Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, C.H.; ANATOL, M.; ZHAN, Y.; LIU, W.W.; OSTROWKI, R.P.; TANG, JIPING; ZHANG, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is one of the major factors for hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke. In this study, we tested hydrogen gas on hemorrhagic transformation in a rat focal cerebral ischemia model. Sprague–Dawley rats (n=72) were divided into the following groups: sham; sham treated with hydrogen gas (H2); Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO); and MCAO treated with H2 (MCAO+H2). All the rats received an injection of 50% dextrose (6ml/kg intraperitoneally) and underwent MCAO 15 min later. Following a 90 min ischemic period, hydrogen was inhaled for 2 hr during reperfusion. We measured the level of blood glucose at 0 hr, 0.5 hr, 4 hr, and 6 hr after dextrose injection. Infarct and hemorrhagic volumes, neurologic score, oxidative stress (evaluating by the level of 8OHG, HNE and nitrotyrosine), MMP-2/MMP-9 activity were measured at 24 hr after ischemia. We found that hydrogen inhalation for 2 hr reduced infarct and hemorrhagic volumes and improved neurological functions. This effect of hydrogen is accompanied by a reduction of the expressions of 8OHG, HNE, nitrotyrosine and the activity of MMP-9. Furthermore, a reduction of the blood glucose level from 500±32.51 to 366±68.22 mg/dl at 4 hr after dextrose injection was observed in hydrogen treated animals. However, the treatment had no significant effect on the expression of ZO-1, occluding, collagen IV or AQP4. In conclusion, hydrogen gas reduced the infarction, hemorrhagic transformation, and improved neurological functions in rat. The potential mechanisms of decreased oxidative stress and glucose levels after hydrogen treatment warrant further investigation. PMID:20423721

  13. Hydrogen gas reduced acute hyperglycemia-enhanced hemorrhagic transformation in a focal ischemia rat model.

    PubMed

    Chen, C H; Manaenko, A; Zhan, Y; Liu, W W; Ostrowki, R P; Tang, J; Zhang, J H

    2010-08-11

    Hyperglycemia is one of the major factors for hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke. In this study, we tested the effect of hydrogen gas on hemorrhagic transformation in a rat focal cerebral ischemia model. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=72) were divided into the following groups: sham; sham treated with hydrogen gas (H(2)); Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO); and MCAO treated with H(2) (MCAO+H(2)). All rats received an injection of 50% dextrose (6 ml/kg i.p.) and underwent MCAO 15 min later. Following a 90 min ischemic period, hydrogen was inhaled for 2 h during reperfusion. We measured the level of blood glucose at 0 h, 0.5 h, 4 h, and 6 h after dextrose injection. Infarct and hemorrhagic volumes, neurologic score, oxidative stress (evaluated by measuring the level of 8 Hydroxyguanosine (8OHG), 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal (HNE) and nitrotyrosine), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/MMP-9 activity were measured at 24 h after ischemia. We found that hydrogen inhalation for 2 h reduced infarct and hemorrhagic volumes and improved neurological functions. This effect of hydrogen was accompanied by a reduction of the expression of 8OHG, HNE, and nitrotyrosine and the activity of MMP-9. Furthermore, a reduction of the blood glucose level from 500+/-32.51 to 366+/-68.22 mg/dl at 4 h after dextrose injection was observed in hydrogen treated animals. However, the treatment had no significant effect on the expression of ZO-1, occludin, collagen IV or aquaporin4 (AQP4). In conclusion, hydrogen gas reduced brain infarction, hemorrhagic transformation, and improved neurological function in rats. The potential mechanisms of decreased oxidative stress and glucose levels after hydrogen treatment warrant further investigation.

  14. Gas tungsten arc and low hydrogen shielded metal arc welding of carbon steel. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-128-ASME-1 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and low hydrogen shielded metal arc welding of carbon steels (P-1-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 2 inch; filler metals are ER70S-3 (F-6, A-1) (GTAW) and E7018 (F-4, A-1); shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  15. Stimulated Raman amplification of femtosecond pulses in hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, V.; Rebane, A.; Erni, D.; Ollikainen, O.; Wild, Urs P.; Bespalov, V.; Staselko, D.

    1996-12-01

    We report efficient amplification of weak femtosecond supercontinuum pulses by a stimulated Raman scattering process in pressurized H2 gas excited with 350-fs-duration frequency-doubled pulses from a regenerative-amplified Ti:sapphire laser. An amplification factor of 109 is obtained at the wavelength of 465 nm for seed pulses produced by supercontinuum generation in glass.

  16. Electrochemical polishing of hydrogen sulfide from coal synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, E.F.; Winnick, J.

    1995-11-01

    An advanced process has been developed for the separation of H{sub 2}S from coal gasification product streams through an electrochemical membrane. This technology is developed for use in coal gasification facilities providing fuel for cogeneration coal fired electrical power facilities and Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell electrical power facilities. H{sub 2}S is removed from the syn-gas by reduction to the sulfide ion and H at the cathode. The sulfide ion migrates to the anode through a molten salt electrolyte suspended in an inert ceramic matrix. Once at the anode it is oxidized to elemental sulfur and swept away for condensation in an inert gas stream. The syn-gas is enriched with the H{sub 2}. Order-of-magnitude reductions in H{sub 2}S have been repeatably recorded (100 ppm to 10 ppm H{sub 2}S) on a single pass through the cell. This process allows removal of H{sub 2}S without cooling the gas stream and with negligible pressure loss through the separator. Since there are no absorbents used, there is no absorption/regeneration step as with conventional technology. Elemental sulfur is produced as a by-product directly, so there is no need for a Claus process for sulfur recovery. This makes the process economically attractive since it is much less equipment intensive than conventional technology.

  17. Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Bockris, John O’M.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech. PMID:28824125

  18. Hydrogen Separation by Natural Zeolite Composite Membranes: Single and Multicomponent Gas Transport.

    PubMed

    Farjoo, Afrooz; Kuznicki, Steve M; Sadrzadeh, Mohtada

    2017-10-06

    Single and multicomponent gas permeation tests were used to evaluate the performance of metal-supported clinoptilolite membranes. The efficiency of hydrogen separation from lower hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, and ethylene) was studied within the temperature and pressure ranges of 25-600 °C and 110-160 kPa, respectively. The hydrogen separation factor was found to reduce noticeably in the gas mixture compared with single gas experiments at 25 °C. The difference between the single and multicomponent gas results decreased as the temperature increased to higher than 300 °C, which is when the competitive adsorption-diffusion mechanism was replaced by Knudsen diffusion or activated diffusion mechanisms. To evaluate the effect of gas adsorption, the zeolite surface isotherms of each gas in the mixture were obtained from 25 °C to 600 °C. The results indicated negligible adsorption of individual gases at temperatures higher than 300 °C. Increasing the feed pressure resulted in a higher separation efficiency for the individual gases compared with the multicomponent mixture, due to the governing effect of the adsorptive mechanism. This study provides valuable insight into the application of natural zeolites for the separation of hydrogen from a mixture of hydrocarbons.

  19. Enhancement of hydrogen gas sensing of nanocrystalline nickel oxide by pulsed-laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Soleimanpour, A M; Khare, Sanjay V; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H

    2012-09-26

    This paper reports the effect of post-laser irradiation on the gas-sensing behavior of nickel oxide (NiO) thin films. Nanocrystalline NiO semiconductor thin films were fabricated by a sol-gel method on a nonalkaline glass substrate. The NiO samples were irradiated with a pulsed 532-nm wavelength, using a Nd:YVO(4) laser beam. The effect of laser irradiation on the microstructure, electrical conductivity, and gas-sensing properties was investigated as a function of laser power levels. It was found that the crystallinity and surface morphology were modified by the pulsed-laser irradiation. Hydrogen gas sensors were fabricated using both as-deposited and laser-irradiated NiO films. It was observed that the performance of gas-sensing characteristics could be changed by the change of laser power levels. By optimizing the magnitude of the laser power, the gas-sensing property of NiO thin film was improved, compared to that of as-deposited NiO films. At the optimal laser irradiation conditions, a high response of NiO sensors to hydrogen molecule exposure of as little as 2.5% of the lower explosion threshold of hydrogen gas (40,000 ppm) was observed at 175 °C.

  20. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. [Polyetherimide, cellulose acetate and ethylcellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this program is to develop polymer membranes useful in the preparation of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas. During this quarter the first experiment were aimed at developing high performance composite membranes for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. Three polymers have been selected as materials for these membranes: polyetherimide cellulose acetate and ethylcellulose. This quarter the investigators worked on polyetherimide and cellulose acetate membranes. The overall structure of these membranes is shown schematically in Figure 1. As shown, a microporous support membrane is first coated with a high flux intermediate layer then with an ultrathin permselective layer and finally, if necessary, a thin protective high flux layer. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. Validation of hydrogen gas stratification and mixing models

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsingtzu; Zhao, Haihua

    2015-05-26

    Two validation benchmarks confirm that the BMIX++ code is capable of simulating unintended hydrogen release scenarios efficiently. The BMIX++ (UC Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) code has been developed to accurately and efficiently predict the fluid mixture distribution and heat transfer in large stratified enclosures for accident analyses and design optimizations. The BMIX++ code uses a scaling based one-dimensional method to achieve large reduction in computational effort compared to a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two BMIX++ benchmark models have been developed. One is for a single buoyant jet in an open space and another is for a large sealed enclosure with both a jet source and a vent near the floor. Both of them have been validated by comparisons with experimental data. Excellent agreements are observed. The entrainment coefficients of 0.09 and 0.08 are found to fit the experimental data for hydrogen leaks with the Froude number of 99 and 268 best, respectively. In addition, the BIX++ simulation results of the average helium concentration for an enclosure with a vent and a single jet agree with the experimental data within a margin of about 10% for jet flow rates ranging from 1.21 × 10⁻⁴ to 3.29 × 10⁻⁴ m³/s. In conclusion, computing time for each BMIX++ model with a normal desktop computer is less than 5 min.

  2. Validation of hydrogen gas stratification and mixing models

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Hsingtzu; Zhao, Haihua

    2015-05-26

    Two validation benchmarks confirm that the BMIX++ code is capable of simulating unintended hydrogen release scenarios efficiently. The BMIX++ (UC Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) code has been developed to accurately and efficiently predict the fluid mixture distribution and heat transfer in large stratified enclosures for accident analyses and design optimizations. The BMIX++ code uses a scaling based one-dimensional method to achieve large reduction in computational effort compared to a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two BMIX++ benchmark models have been developed. One is for a single buoyant jet in an open space and another is for amore » large sealed enclosure with both a jet source and a vent near the floor. Both of them have been validated by comparisons with experimental data. Excellent agreements are observed. The entrainment coefficients of 0.09 and 0.08 are found to fit the experimental data for hydrogen leaks with the Froude number of 99 and 268 best, respectively. In addition, the BIX++ simulation results of the average helium concentration for an enclosure with a vent and a single jet agree with the experimental data within a margin of about 10% for jet flow rates ranging from 1.21 × 10⁻⁴ to 3.29 × 10⁻⁴ m³/s. In conclusion, computing time for each BMIX++ model with a normal desktop computer is less than 5 min.« less

  3. Intensity of Hydrogen Line Emission from Accreting Gas-Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Yuhiko; Tanigawa, Takayuki; Ikoma, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    Planets have been thought to form in circumstellar gaseous disks. Indeed, a number of young stars surrounded by such disks have been already detected. Recently, there are some reports on detection of gap-like structure in circumstellar disks, which suggests that there are forming massive protoplanets embedded in the disks. A challenging issue is how to find forming planets in circumstellar disks directly. In this study, we investigate whether detectable emission occurs from accreting gas-giant planets. In a circumstellar disk, once a solid core becomes massive enough, it captures the surrounding disk gas gravitationally in a runaway manner. Since the disk gas accretion occurs much faster than angular momentum loss, a circumplanetary disk is formed in the mid-plane of the circumstellar disk. Recent three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations by Tanigawa et al. (2012) revealed that the gas flowed from the cicumstellar disk to the circumplanetary disk not horizontally but vertically. According to those simulations, the disk gas falls onto the circumplanetary disk at a speed comparable to the free fall speed, and the local gas temperature reaches up to tens of thousands of kelvin because of shock heating near the planet. Thus, the presence of an accreting gas giant planet may be found by observation of the radiative emission from such hot gas in the circumplanetary disk, which we quantify in this study. In particular, we focus on the intensity of line emission from hydrogen. We have simulated the post-shock gas flow with non-equilibrium chemical reaction and electron transition. Then, we have found that the intensity of some hydrogen lines is proportional to the number density of the surrounding circumstellar disk gas and square of the planet mass, so the protoplanet’s hydrogen-line emission is less intense by a few orders of magnitude relative to the protostar’s emission under some realistic conditions. Also, the duration time is comparable to the dissipation time

  4. ASU nitrogen sweep gas in hydrogen separation membrane for production of HRSG duct burner fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Panuccio, Gregory J.; Raybold, Troy M.; Jamal, Agil; Drnevich, Raymond Francis

    2013-04-02

    The present invention relates to the use of low pressure N2 from an air separation unit (ASU) for use as a sweep gas in a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to increase syngas H2 recovery and make a near-atmospheric pressure (less than or equal to about 25 psia) fuel for supplemental firing in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) duct burner.

  5. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  6. Laser acceleration of protons with an optically shaped, near-critical hydrogen gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-hsin; Helle, Michael; Ting, Antonio; Gordon, Daniel; Dover, Nicholas; Ettlinger, Oliver; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Marcus

    2017-03-01

    We report our recent experimental results on CO2 laser acceleration of protons, with a near-critical hydrogen gas target tailored by a Nd:YAG laser-produced blast wave. Monoenergetic protons with energies up to 2.5 MeV were observed.

  7. NEAR-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AND CARBONYL SULFIDE BY AN AUTOMATIC GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automatic gas chromatograph with a flame photometric detector that samples and analyzes hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide at 30-s intervals is described. Temperature programming was used to elute trace amounts of carbon disulfide present in each injection from a Supelpak-S...

  8. One-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic calculations of a hydrogen-gas puff

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, S.; Nielsen, P.D.

    1981-04-20

    A one-dimensional Lagrangian calculation of the implosion of a hydrogen gas puff is presented. At maximum compression, 60% of the mass is located in a density spike .5 mm off the axis with a half width of 40 ..mu..m. The temperature on axis reaches 200 eV.

  9. NEAR-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AND CARBONYL SULFIDE BY AN AUTOMATIC GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automatic gas chromatograph with a flame photometric detector that samples and analyzes hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide at 30-s intervals is described. Temperature programming was used to elute trace amounts of carbon disulfide present in each injection from a Supelpak-S...

  10. Testing of a Hydrogen Diffusion Flame Array Injector at Gas Turbine Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Nathan T.; Sidwell, Todd G.; Strakey, Peter A.

    2013-07-03

    High-hydrogen gas turbines enable integration of carbon sequestration into coal-gasifying power plants, though NO{sub x} emissions are often high. This work explores nitrogen dilution of hydrogen diffusion flames to reduce thermal NO{sub x} emissions and avoid problems with premixing hydrogen at gas turbine pressures and temperatures. The burner design includes an array of high-velocity coaxial fuel and air injectors, which balances stability and ignition performance, combustor pressure drop, and flame residence time. Testing of this array injector at representative gas turbine conditions (16 atm and 1750 K firing temperature) yields 4.4 ppmv NO{sub x} at 15% O{sub 2} equivalent. NO{sub x} emissions are proportional to flame residence times, though these deviate from expected scaling due to active combustor cooling and merged flame behavior. The results demonstrate that nitrogen dilution in combination with high velocities can provide low NO{sub x} hydrogen combustion at gas turbine conditions, with significant potential for further NO{sub x} reductions via suggested design changes.

  11. Impact of pH on hydrogen oxidizing redox processes in aquifers due to gas intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzgen, Adrian; Berta, Marton; Dethlefsen, Frank; Ebert, Markus; Dahmke, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen production from excess energy and its storage can help increasing the efficiency of solar and wind in the energy mix. Therefore, hydrogen needs large-scale intermediate storage independent of the intended later use as hydrogen gas or as reactant to produce methane in the Sabatier process. A possible storage solution is using the geological subsurface such as caverns built in salt deposits or aquifers that are not used for drinking water production. However, underground storage of hydrogen gas potentially leads to accidental gas leakages into near-surface potable aquifers triggering subsequent geochemical processes. These leakages pose potential risks that are currently not sufficiently understood. To close this gap in knowledge, a high-pressure laboratory column system was used to simulate a hydrogen gas intrusion into a shallow aquifer. Water and sediment were gained from a sandy Pleistocene aquifer near Neumünster, Germany. In the first stage of the experiment, 100% hydrogen gas was used to simulate dissolved hydrogen concentrations between 800 and 4000 µM by varying pH2 between 2 and 15 bars. pH values rose to between 7.9 and 10.4, partly due to stripping CO2 from the groundwater used during H2 gas addition. In a second stage, the pH was regulated in a range of 6.7 to 7.9 by using a gas mixture of 99% H2 and 1% CO2 at 5 bars of total gas pressure. Observed processes included hydrogen oxidation, sulfate reduction, acetogenesis, formate production, and methanogenesis, which were independent of the hydrogen concentration. Hydrogen oxidation and sulfate reduction showed zeroth order reaction rates and rate constants (106 to 412 µM/h and 12 to 33 µM/h, respectively) in the pH range between 8 and 10. At pH levels between 7 and 8, both reactions started out faster near the column's inflow but then seemed limited towards the columns outflow, suggesting the dependence of sulfate reduction on the pH-value. Acetogenesis dominated the pH range between 8 and 10

  12. Heat and mass transfer rates during flow of dissociated hydrogen gas over graphite surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nema, V. K.; Sharma, O. P.

    1986-01-01

    To improve upon the performance of chemical rockets, the nuclear reactor has been applied to a rocket propulsion system using hydrogen gas as working fluid and a graphite-composite forming a part of the structure. Under the boundary layer approximation, theoretical predictions of skin friction coefficient, surface heat transfer rate and surface regression rate have been made for laminar/turbulent dissociated hydrogen gas flowing over a flat graphite surface. The external stream is assumed to be frozen. The analysis is restricted to Mach numbers low enough to deal with the situation of only surface-reaction between hydrogen and graphite. Empirical correlations of displacement thickness, local skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local non-dimensional heat transfer rate have been obtained. The magnitude of the surface regression rate is found low enough to ensure the use of graphite as a linear or a component of the system over an extended period without loss of performance.

  13. Heat and mass transfer rates during flow of dissociated hydrogen gas over graphite surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nema, V. K.; Sharma, O. P.

    1986-01-01

    To improve upon the performance of chemical rockets, the nuclear reactor has been applied to a rocket propulsion system using hydrogen gas as working fluid and a graphite-composite forming a part of the structure. Under the boundary layer approximation, theoretical predictions of skin friction coefficient, surface heat transfer rate and surface regression rate have been made for laminar/turbulent dissociated hydrogen gas flowing over a flat graphite surface. The external stream is assumed to be frozen. The analysis is restricted to Mach numbers low enough to deal with the situation of only surface-reaction between hydrogen and graphite. Empirical correlations of displacement thickness, local skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local non-dimensional heat transfer rate have been obtained. The magnitude of the surface regression rate is found low enough to ensure the use of graphite as a linear or a component of the system over an extended period without loss of performance.

  14. On thermal conductivity of gas mixtures containing hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Victor P.; Pätz, Markus

    2016-12-01

    A brief review of formulas used for the thermal conductivity of gas mixtures in CFD simulations of rocket combustion chambers is carried out in the present work. In most cases, the transport properties of mixtures are calculated from the properties of individual components using special mixing rules. The analysis of different mixing rules starts from basic equations and ends by very complex semi-empirical expressions. The formulas for the thermal conductivity are taken for the analysis from the works on modelling of rocket combustion chambers. H_2- O_2 mixtures are chosen for the evaluation of the accuracy of the considered mixing rules. The analysis shows that two of them, of Mathur et al. (Mol Phys 12(6):569-579, 1967), and of Mason and Saxena (Phys Fluids 1(5):361-369, 1958), have better agreement with the experimental data than other equations for the thermal conductivity of multicomponent gas mixtures.

  15. The hydrogen gas clearance method for liver blood flow examination: inhalation or local application of hydrogen?

    PubMed

    Metzger, H P

    1989-01-01

    The combined method of hydrogen inhalation and local hydrogen production enable the determination of hepatic blood flow (HBF) and local hepatic blood flow (LHBF). LHBF was registered within a small superficial tissue volume of 0.5 mm in diameter by means of a multi-wire electrode having 200 microns producing and 100 microns measuring wires arranged within less than 300 microns distance between the measuring wires. The feeding current for hydrogen production was 1 microA, the potential less than 10 V. The clearance in response to inhalation was registered by means of the same measuring electrodes within the same tissue volume. Spontaneously breathing rats (Wistar-Frömter strain, 180-230 g bw, N = 19, ketamin-xylazine anesthesia, artificial respiration) showed the following flow values: HBF +/- SD = 0.50 +/- 0.26 ml/g.min, n = 48 registrations; LHBF +/- SD = 4.66 +/- 2.13 ml/g.min, n = 43. The validity of the combined method is demonstrated in the LHBF/HBF graph which summarizes the data of hemorrhagic and control animals, m = 0.1 and yo = 0.001. The correlation coefficient of r = 0.685 shows a reasonable correlation of the combined data despite the wide scattering of the individual values.

  16. Measurement of OH density and gas temperature in incipient spark-ignited hydrogen-air flame

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2008-01-15

    To investigate the electrostatic ignition of hydrogen-air mixtures, the density of OH radicals and the gas temperature are measured in an incipient spark-ignited hydrogen-air flame using laser-induced predissociation fluorescence (LIPF). The assessment of the electrostatic hazard of hydrogen is necessary for developing hydrogen-based energy systems in which hydrogen is used in fuel cells. The spark discharge occurs across a 2-mm gap with pulse duration approximately 10 ns. First, a hydrogen (50%)-air mixture is ignited by spark discharge with E=1.35E{sub -}, where E is the spark energy and E{sub -} is the minimum ignition energy. In this mixture, OH density decreases after spark discharge. It is 3 x 10{sup 16}cm{sup -3} at t=0{mu}s and 4 x 10{sup 15}cm{sup -3} at t=100{mu}s, where t is the postdischarge time. On the other hand, the gas temperature increases after spark discharge. It is 900 K at t=30{mu}s and 1400 K at t=200{mu}s. Next, a stoichiometric (hydrogen (30%)-air) mixture is ignited by spark discharge with E=1.25E{sub -}. In this mixture, OH density is approximately constant at 4 x 10{sup 16}cm{sup -3} for 150 {mu}s after spark discharge, and the gas temperature increases from 1000 K (t=0{mu}s) to 1800 K (t=150{mu}s). (author)

  17. Dissolution of uranium metal without hydride formation or hydrogen gas generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderquist, Chuck; McNamara, Bruce; Oliver, Brian

    2008-09-01

    This study shows that metallic uranium will cleanly dissolve in carbonate-peroxide solution without generation of hydrogen gas or uranium hydride. Metallic uranium shot, 0.5-1 mm diameter, was reacted with ammonium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide solutions ranging in concentration from 0.13 M to 1.0 M carbonate and 0.50 M to 2.0 M peroxide. The dissolution rate was calculated from the reduction in bead mass, and independently by uranium analysis of the solution. The calculated dissolution rate ranged from about 4 × 10 -3 to 8 × 10 -3 mm/h, dependent primarily on the peroxide concentration. Hydrogen analysis of the etched beads showed that no detectable hydrogen was introduced into the uranium metal by the etching process.

  18. Influence of hydrogen patterning gas on electric and magnetic properties of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J. H.; Endoh, T.; Kim, Y.; Kim, W. K.; Park, S. O.

    2014-05-07

    To identify the degradation mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using hydrogen, the properties of the MTJs were measured by applying an additional hydrogen etch process and a hydrogen plasma process to the patterned MTJs. In these studies, an additional 50 s hydrogen etch process caused the magnetoresistance (MR) to decrease from 103% to 14.7% and the resistance (R) to increase from 6.5 kΩ to 39 kΩ. Moreover, an additional 500 s hydrogen plasma process decreased the MR from 103% to 74% and increased R from 6.5 kΩ to 13.9 kΩ. These results show that MTJs can be damaged by the hydrogen plasma process as well as by the hydrogen etch process, as the atomic bonds in MgO may break and react with the exposed hydrogen gas. Compounds such as MgO hydrate very easily. We also calculated the damaged layer width (DLW) of the patterned MTJs after the hydrogen etching and plasma processes, to evaluate the downscaling limitations of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random-access memory (STT-MRAM) devices. With these calculations, the maximum DLWs at each side of the MTJ, generated by the etching and plasma processes, were 23.8 nm and 12.8 nm, respectively. This result validates that the hydrogen-based MTJ patterning processes cannot be used exclusively in STT-MRAMs beyond 20 nm.

  19. High-response on-line gas analysis system for hydrogen-reaction combustion products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, A. J.; Gaugler, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The results of testing an on-line quadrupole gas analyzer system are reported. Gas samples were drawn from the exhaust of a hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen rocket which simulated the flow composition and dynamics at the combustor exit of a supersonic combustion ramjet engine. System response time of less than 50 milliseconds was demonstrated, with analytical accuracy estimated to be + or - 5 percent. For more complex chemical systems with interfering atom patterns, analysis would be more difficult. A cooled-gas pyrometer probe was evaluated as a total temperature indicator and as the primary mass flow measuring element for the total sample flow rate.

  20. Hydrogen Gas Sensing Characteristics of Nanostructured NiO Thin Films Synthesized by SILAR Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaduman, Irmak; Çorlu, Tugba; Yıldırım, M. Ali; Ateş, Aytunç; Acar, Selim

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructured NiO thin films have been synthesized by a facile, low-cost successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method, and the effects of the film thickness on their hydrogen gas sensing properties investigated. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. The XRD results revealed that the crystallinity improved with increasing thickness, exhibiting polycrystalline structure. SEM studies showed that all the films covered the glass substrate well. According to optical absorption measurements, the optical bandgap decreased with increasing film thickness. The gas sensing properties of the nanostructured NiO thin films were studied as a function of operating temperature and gas concentration. The samples showed good sensing performance of H2 gas with high response. The maximum response was 75% at operating temperature of 200°C for hydrogen gas concentration of 40 ppm. These results demonstrate that nanostructured NiO thin films synthesized by the SILAR method have potential for application in hydrogen detection.

  1. A nondestructive leak detection method for flexible food packages using hydrogen as a tracer gas.

    PubMed

    Hurme, E U; Ahvenainen, R

    1998-09-01

    A nondestructive leak detection method developed at Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) was tested for both gas-flushed and vacuum flexible packages. In the method, a gas package containing 0.5 to 5.0% (vol/vol) hydrogen in nitrogen was positioned in a test chamber, a controlled vacuum was pulled in the chamber through a pipe connected to a hydrogen sensor, and leaking packages were detected by the sensor as increased H2 concentration. The H2 tracer gas (0.5 to 5.0%) was introduced into leaking finished vacuum packages at 200 kPa pressure. Within 1 to 4 s the developed test method was able to detect leaks down to 10 to 15 microns and 20 to 30 microns in diameter in commercially manufactured gas-flushed packages filled with roasted meat balls and vacuum packages filled with ground coffee, respectively. Before leak testing, the vacuum packages were charged with H2 for 30 s. The sensitivity and leak detection time of the test method were improved when the H2 concentration in the package was increased and when the free space in the test chamber was decreased. The evaluated H2 concentrations did not affect the sensory or microbiological quality of the roasted meat balls. This study clearly demonstrated that the hydrogen tracer gas leak detection method has potential to be further developed as a fast, nondestructive, on-line leak testing apparatus for flexible packages with or without a headspace.

  2. Hydrogen gas detection by means of a fiber optic interferometer sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciak, E.; Opilski, Z.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a simple fiber optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) sensor that is used to detection and measure concentration of hydrogen gas in the air. The operating principle of the sensor is discussed in this paper, and it was noticed that the wavelength positions of the FPI reflectance peaks change with the concentration of hydrogen gas. The sensor has been successfully used to monitor concentration of H{2} in the air below Lower Explosion Limit (LEL). The sensor utilizes a layered sensing structure. This structure includes gasochromic titanium dioxide (TiO{2}) sensing film. The optical H{2} gas sensor has a very short response time and a fast regeneration time at room temperature.

  3. On thermal conductivity of gas mixtures containing hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Victor P.; Pätz, Markus

    2017-06-01

    A brief review of formulas used for the thermal conductivity of gas mixtures in CFD simulations of rocket combustion chambers is carried out in the present work. In most cases, the transport properties of mixtures are calculated from the properties of individual components using special mixing rules. The analysis of different mixing rules starts from basic equations and ends by very complex semi-empirical expressions. The formulas for the thermal conductivity are taken for the analysis from the works on modelling of rocket combustion chambers. \\hbox {H}_2{-}\\hbox {O}_2 mixtures are chosen for the evaluation of the accuracy of the considered mixing rules. The analysis shows that two of them, of Mathur et al. (Mol Phys 12(6):569-579, 1967), and of Mason and Saxena (Phys Fluids 1(5):361-369, 1958), have better agreement with the experimental data than other equations for the thermal conductivity of multicomponent gas mixtures.

  4. Evaluation of SAES COMBOGETTER(r) for Use in Nuclear Material Transportation Packages

    SciTech Connect

    George M. Buffleben; Timothy J. Shepodd; Paul J. Nigrey

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the testing of SAES COMBOGETTER{reg_sign} and evaluates its potential use as a hydrogen getter in nuclear material transportation packages. We measured the getters hydrogen uptake capacity, and uptake rates under different conditions including temperature, gas composition, and poisons. We also compared this getter to another commercially available hydrogen getter.

  5. Method for the purification of noble gases, nitrogen and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Baker, J.D.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Tuggle, D.G.

    1997-09-23

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the purification and collection of hydrogen isotopes in a flowing inert gaseous mixture containing impurities, wherein metal alloy getters having the capability of sorbing non-hydrogen impurities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ammonia, nitrogen and water vapor are utilized to purify the gaseous mixture of impurities. After purification hydrogen isotopes may be more efficiently collected. A plurality of parallel process lines utilizing metal getter alloys can be used to provide for the continuous purification and collection of the hydrogen isotopes. 15 figs.

  6. Method for the purification of noble gases, nitrogen and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Baker, John D.; Meikrantz, David H.; Tuggle, Dale G.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the purification and collection of hydrogen isotopes in a flowing inert gaseous mixture containing impurities, wherein metal alloy getters having the capability of sorbing non-hydrogen impurities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ammonia, nitrogen and water vapor are utilized to purify the gaseous mixture of impurities. After purification hydrogen isotopes may be more efficiently collected. A plurality of parallel process lines utilizing metal getter alloys can be used to provide for the continuous purification and collection of the hydrogen isotopes.

  7. Quantitative hydrogen analysis of zircaloy-4 in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with ambient helium gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ramli, Muliadi; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Niki, Hideaki; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Idris, Nasrullah; Maruyama, Tadashi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Tjia, May On; Pardede, Marincan; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Hedwig, Rinda; Lie, Zener Sukra; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Davy Putra

    2007-12-01

    This experiment was carried out to address the need for overcoming the difficulties encountered in hydrogen analysis by means of plasma emission spectroscopy in atmospheric ambient gas. The result of this study on zircaloy-4 samples from a nuclear power plant demonstrates the possibility of attaining a very sharp emission line from impure hydrogen with a very low background and practical elimination of spectral contamination of hydrogen emission arising from surface water and water vapor in atmospheric ambient gas. This was achieved by employing ultrapure ambient helium gas as well as the proper defocusing of the laser irradiation and a large number of repeated precleaning laser shots at the same spot of the sample surface. Further adjustment of the gating time has led to significant reduction of spectral width and improvement of detection sensitivity to {approx}50 ppm. Finally, a linear calibration curve was also obtained for the zircaloy-4 samples with zero intercept. These results demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for practical in situ and quantitative analysis of hydrogen impurity in zircaloy-4 tubes used in a light water nuclear power plant.

  8. National Combustion Code Used To Study the Hydrogen Injector Design for Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannetti, Anthony C.; Norris, Andrew T.; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen, in the gas state, has been proposed to replace Jet-A (the fuel used for commercial jet engines) as a fuel for gas turbine combustion. For the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen only, water is the only product and the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, is not produced. This is an obvious benefit of using hydrogen as a fuel. The situation is not as simple when air replaces oxygen in the combustion process. (Air is mainly a mixture of oxygen, nitrogen, and argon. Other components comprise a very small part of air and will not be mentioned.) At the high temperatures found in the combustion process, oxygen reacts with nitrogen, and this produces nitrogen oxide compounds, or NOx--the main component of atmospheric smog. The production of NOx depends mainly on two variables: the temperature at which combustion occurs, and the length of time that the products of combustion stay, or reside, in the combustor. Starting from a lean (excess air) air-to-fuel ratio, the goal of this research was to minimize hot zones caused by incomplete premixing and to keep the residence time short while producing a stable flame. The minimization of these two parameters will result in low- NOx hydrogen combustion.

  9. Hydrogen Gas Ameliorates Hepatic Reperfusion Injury After Prolonged Cold Preservation in Isolated Perfused Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Shingo; Wakayama, Kenji; Fukai, Moto; Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Takahisa; Fukumori, Daisuke; Shibata, Maki; Yamashita, Kenichiro; Kimura, Taichi; Todo, Satoru; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen gas reduces ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) in the liver and other organs. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive. We investigated whether hydrogen gas ameliorated hepatic I/R injury after cold preservation. Rat liver was subjected to 48-h cold storage in University of Wisconsin solution. The graft was reperfused with oxygenated buffer with or without hydrogen at 37° for 90 min on an isolated perfusion apparatus, comprising the H2 (+) and H2 (-) groups, respectively. In the control group (CT), grafts were reperfused immediately without preservation. Graft function, injury, and circulatory status were assessed throughout the perfusion. Tissue samples at the end of perfusion were collected to determine histopathology, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. In the H2 (-) group, IRI was indicated by a higher aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) leakage, portal resistance, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine-positive cell rate, apoptotic index, and endothelial endothelin-1 expression, together with reduced bile production, oxygen consumption, and GSH/GSSG ratio (vs. CT). In the H2 (+) group, these harmful changes were significantly suppressed [vs. H2 (-)]. Hydrogen gas reduced hepatic reperfusion injury after prolonged cold preservation via the maintenance of portal flow, by protecting mitochondrial function during the early phase of reperfusion, and via the suppression of oxidative stress and inflammatory cascades thereafter.

  10. Direct Chlorination Process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5% hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90% excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

  11. Controlling residual hydrogen gas in mass spectra during pulsed laser atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Kolli, R Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Residual hydrogen (H2) gas in the analysis chamber of an atom probe instrument limits the ability to measure H concentration in metals and alloys. Measuring H concentration would permit quantification of important physical phenomena, such as hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, hydrogen trapping, and grain boundary segregation. Increased insight into the behavior of residual H2 gas on the specimen tip surface in atom probe instruments could help reduce these limitations. The influence of user-selected experimental parameters on the field adsorption and desorption of residual H2 gas on nominally pure copper (Cu) was studied during ultraviolet pulsed laser atom probe tomography. The results indicate that the total residual hydrogen concentration, HTOT, in the mass spectra exhibits a generally decreasing trend with increasing laser pulse energy and increasing laser pulse frequency. Second-order interaction effects are also important. The pulse energy has the greatest influence on the quantity HTOT, which is consistently less than 0.1 at.% at a value of 80 pJ.

  12. Effects of a Hydrogen Gas Environment on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Stable Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Kyohei; Oda, Yasuji; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Higashida, Kenji

    In order to clarify the effects of a hydrogen gas environment on the fatigue crack growth characteristics of stable austenitic stainless steels, bending fatigue tests were carried out in a hydrogen gas, in a nitrogen gas at 1.0 MPa and in air on a SUS316L using the Japanese Industrial Standards (type 316L). Also, in order to discuss the difference in the hydrogen sensitivity between austenitic stainless steels, the fatigue tests were also carried out on a SUS304 using the Japanese Industrial Standards (type 304) metastable austenitic stainless steel as a material for comparison. The main results obtained are as follows. Hydrogen gas accelerates the fatigue crack growth rate of type 316L. The degree of the fatigue crack growth acceleration is low compared to that in type 304. The fracture surfaces of both the materials practically consist of two parts; the faceted area seemed to be brittle and the remaining area occupying a greater part of the fracture surface and seemed to be ductile. The faceted area does not significantly contribute to the fatigue crack growth rate in both austenitic stainless steels. The slip-off mechanism seems to be valid not only in air and in nitrogen, but also in hydrogen. Also, the main cause of the fatigue crack growth acceleration of both materials occurs by variation of the slip behaviour. The difference in the degree of the acceleration, which in type 316L is lower than in type 304, seems to be caused by the difference in the stability of the γ phase.

  13. Backside damage-gettering in cast polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J.; Roncin, S.; Alexander, P.

    1984-01-01

    The technique of backside-damage gettering improves the performance of short minority-carrier diffusion length, large-grain (grain diameter greater than 1 to 2 mm), cast polycrystalline silicon. On average, increases of nearly 20 percent in short-circuit current, 10 mV in open-circuit voltage, and 15 percent in peak-power were obtained by heat-treating 300 micron thick polycrystalline wafers at 1000 C in flowing nitrogen for 5 hours. Additional measurements of the bulk and space-charge recombination current components indicate that this improvement results from a significant increase in the minority-carrier diffusion length due to gettering of impurities from the bulk.

  14. Boron gettering on cavities induced by helium implantation in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roqueta, F.; Alquier, D.; Ventura, L.; Dubois, Ch.; Jérisian, R.

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, we shed light on the strong interaction between the cavity layer induced by helium implantation and boron. First of all, we evidence the impact of He gettering step on a boron-diffused profile. In order to study the boron-cavity interaction, we had used uniformly boron-doped wafers implanted with helium at high dose and anneal using usual furnace annealing (FA) as well as rapid thermal annealing. Then, to avoid any precipitation phenomena, conditions were chosen to not exceed the boron solid solubility value. Our experimental results exhibit a large trapping of boron within the cavity layer. This trapping occurs since the early stage of the annealing. These results enable us to have better understanding of this He gettering step as well as its interaction with boron atoms, which are of great interest for device.

  15. Two-chamber hydrogen generation and application: access to pressurized deuterium gas.

    PubMed

    Modvig, Amalie; Andersen, Thomas L; Taaning, Rolf H; Lindhardt, Anders T; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2014-06-20

    Hydrogen and deuterium gas were produced and directly applied in a two-chamber system. These gaseous reagents were generated by the simple reaction of metallic zinc with HCl in water for H2 and DCl in deuterated water for D2. The setup proved efficient in classical Pd-catalyzed reductions of ketones, alkynes, alkenes, etc. in near-quantitative yields. The method was extended to the synthesis and isotope labeling of quinoline and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline derivatives. Finally, CX-546 and Olaparib underwent efficient Ir-catalyzed hydrogen isotope exchange reactions.

  16. Low-power, fast, selective nanoparticle-based hydrogen sulfide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickelson, William; Sussman, Allen; Zettl, Alex

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate a small, low-cost, low-power, highly sensitive, and selective nanomaterials-based gas sensor. A network of tungsten oxide nanoparticles is heated by an on-chip microhotplate while the conductance of the network is monitored. The device can be heated with short pulses, thereby drastically lowering the power consumption, without diminishing the sensor response. The sensor shows high sensitivity to hydrogen sulfide and does not have significant cross sensitivities to hydrogen, water, or methane, gases likely to be present in operation. A sensing mechanism is proposed, and its effect on electronic properties is discussed.

  17. Laser-driven target of high-density nuclear-polarized hydrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Clasie, B.; Crawford, C.; Seely, J.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-02-15

    We report the best figure-of-merit achieved for an internal nuclear polarized hydrogen gas target and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation, and the experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation. The best result achieved for this target was 50.5% polarization with 58.2% degree of dissociation of the sample beam exiting the storage cell at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10{sup 18} atoms/s.

  18. Laser-driven target of high-density nuclear-polarized hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clasie, B.; Crawford, C.; Seely, J.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-02-01

    We report the best figure-of-merit achieved for an internal nuclear polarized hydrogen gas target and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation, and the experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation. The best result achieved for this target was 50.5% polarization with 58.2% degree of dissociation of the sample beam exiting the storage cell at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1×1018atoms/s .

  19. Pd/V{2}O{5} fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciak, E.; Opilski, Z.; Urbańczyk, M.

    2005-10-01

    The paper presents an optical-fiber hydrogen sensor. The sensor utilizes a layered sensing structure. This structure is a layered Fabry-Perot interferometer and includes gasochromic vanadium pentoxide (V{2}O{5}). A structure is made at the end of multi-mode optical fiber as a sensing element. The sensor permits to detect and to measure the concentration of hydrogen in a gaseous medium. The optical H{2} gas sensor has a very short response time and a fast regeneration time at room temperature.

  20. Modelling of fast hydrogen permeability of alloys for membrane gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaika, Yu. V.; Rodchenkova, N. I.

    2017-05-01

    The method of measuring the specific hydrogen permeability is used to study various alloys that are promising for gas separation installations. The nonlinear boundary value problem of hydrogen permeability complying with the specific features of the experiment and its modifications taking into account the high transfer rate is presented. Substantial difference from the quasi-equilibrium model (Richardson approximation in the assumption of the equilibrium Sieverts' law near the surface) has been discussed. The model is tested on published experimental data on Ta77Nb23 alloy.

  1. EFFECT OF MINOR ADDITIONS OF HYDROGEN TO ARGON SHIELDING GAS WHEN WELDING AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WITH THE GTAW PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2004-12-15

    This paper provides the technical basis to conclude that the use of hydrogen containing shielding gases during welding of austenitic stainless steels will not lead to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) of the weld or weld heat affected zone. Argon-hydrogen gas mixtures, with hydrogen additions up to 35% [1], have been successfully used as the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of austenitic stainless steels. The addition of hydrogen improves weld pool wettability, bead shape control, surface cleanliness and heat input. The GTAW process is used extensively for welding various grades of stainless steel and is preferred when a very high weld quality is desired, such as that required for closure welding of nuclear materials packages. The use of argon-hydrogen gas mixtures for high-quality welding is occasionally questioned, primarily because of concern over the potential for HIC. This paper was written specifically to provide a technical basis for using an argon-hydrogen shielding gas in conjunction with the development, at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), of an ''optimized'' closure welding process for the DOE standardized spent nuclear fuel canister [2]. However, the basis developed here can be applied to other applications in which the use of an argon-hydrogen shielding gas for GTAW welding of austenitic stainless steels is desired.

  2. Distributed Non-evaporable Getter pumps for the storage ring of the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Dortwegt, R.; Benaroya, R.

    1993-07-01

    A pair of distributed Non-evaporable Getter (NeG) strip assemblies is installed in each of 236 aluminum vacuum chambers of the 1104-m storage ring of the Advanced Photon Source. Distributed pumping is provided to remove most of the gas resulting from photon-stimulated desorption occurring along the outer walls of the chambers. This is an efficient way of pumping because conductance is limited along the beam axis. The St-707 NeG strips are conditioned at 450{degree}C for 45 min. with 42 A. Base pressures obtained are also as low as 4 {times} 10{sup 11} Torr. The NeG strip assemblies are supported by a series of electrically isolated, 125-mm-long, interlocking stainless steel carriers. These unique interlocking carrier elements provide flexibility along the vacuum chamber curvature (r=38.96 m) and permit removal and installation of assemblies with as little as 150 mm external clearance between adjacent chambers.

  3. Effects of getters on hermetically sealed micromachined cesium-neon cells for atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Chutani, R. K.; Boudot, R.; Mauri, L.; Gorecki, C.; Liu, X.; Passilly, N.

    2013-05-01

    The wafer-level integration technique of PageWafer® (SAES Getters’ solution for getter film integration into wafer to wafer bonded devices) has been tested in hermetically sealed miniature glass-Si-glass cells filled with Cs and Ne, e.g. for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) atomic clock applications. Getter effects on the cell atmosphere are analyzed by quadruple mass spectroscopy and coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy. The quadruple mass spectroscopy revealed that the residual gases (H2, O2, N2 and CO2) that are attributed to anodic bonding process are drastically reduced by the getter films while desirable gases such as Ne seem to remain unaffected. The impurity pressure in the getter-integrated cells was measured to be less than 4 × 10-2 mbar, i.e. pressure 50 times lower than the one measured in the cells without getter (2 mbar). Consequently, the atmosphere of the getter-integrated cells is much more pure than that of the getter-free cells. CPT signals obtained from the getter-integrated cells are stable and are, in addition, similar to each other within a cell batch, suggesting the strong potential of applications of this getter film and especially for its wafer-level integration to MEMS atomic clocks and magnetometers.

  4. Explosive composition with group VIII metal nitroso halide getter

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1,500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds capable of chemically reacting with free radicals or ions under shock initiation conditions of 2,000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less of energy fluence.

  5. Explosive composition with group VIII metal nitroso halide getter

    DOEpatents

    Walker, F.E.; Wasley, R.J.

    1982-06-22

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1,500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds capable of chemically reacting with free radicals or ions under shock initiation conditions of 2,000 calories/cm[sup 2] or less of energy fluence.

  6. Low-Emission Hydrogen Combustors for Gas Turbines Using Lean Direct Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John; Smith, Timothy D.; Kundu, Krishna

    2007-01-01

    One of the key technology challenges for the use of hydrogen in gas turbine engines is the performance of the combustion system, in particular the fuel injectors. To investigate the combustion performance of gaseous hydrogen fuel injectors flame tube combustor experiments were performed. Tests were conducted to measure the nitrogen oxide (NO(x)) emissions and combustion performance at inlet conditions of 588 to 811 K, 0.4 to 1.4 MPa, and equivalence ratios up to 0.48. All the injectors were based on Lean Direct Injection (LDI) technology with multiple injection points and quick mixing. One challenge to hydrogen-based premixing combustion systems is flashback since hydrogen has a reaction rate over 7 times that of Jet-A. To reduce the risk, design mixing times were kept short and velocities high to minimize flashback. Five fuel injector designs were tested in 6.35- and 8.9-cm-diameter flame tubes with non-vitiated heated air and gaseous hydrogen. Data is presented on measurements of NO(x) emissions and combustion efficiency for the hydrogen injectors at 2.540, 7.937, and 13.652 cm from the injector face. Results show that for some configurations, NO(x) emissions are comparable to that of state of the art Jet-A LDI combustor concepts.

  7. Low Emission Hydrogen Combustors for Gas Turbines Using Lean Direct Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John; Smith, Timothy D.; Kundu, Krishna

    2005-01-01

    One of the key technology challenges for the use of hydrogen in gas turbine engines is the performance of the combustion system, in particular the fuel injectors. To investigate the combustion performance of gaseous hydrogen fuel injectors flame tube combustor experiments were performed. Tests were conducted to measure the nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and combustion performance at inlet conditions of 600 to 1000 deg F, 60 to 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia), and equivalence ratios up to 0.48. All the injectors were based on Lean Direct Injection (LDI) technology with multiple injection points and quick mixing. One challenge to hydrogen based premixing combustion systems is flashback since hydrogen has a reaction rate over seven times that of Jet-A. To reduce the risk, design mixing times were kept short and velocities high to minimize flashback. Five fuel injector designs were tested in 2.5 and 3.5-in. diameter flame tubes with non-vitiated heated air and gaseous hydrogen. Data is presented on measurements of NOx emissions and combustion efficiency for the hydrogen injectors at 1.0, 3.125, and 5.375 in. from the injector face. Results show that for some configurations, NOx emissions are comparable to that of state of the art Jet-A LDI combustor concepts.

  8. Gas-phase synthesis of Mg-Ti nanoparticles for solid-state hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Calizzi, M; Venturi, F; Ponthieu, M; Cuevas, F; Morandi, V; Perkisas, T; Bals, S; Pasquini, L

    2016-01-07

    Mg-Ti nanostructured samples with different Ti contents were prepared via compaction of nanoparticles grown by inert gas condensation with independent Mg and Ti vapour sources. The growth set-up offered the option to perform in situ hydrogen absorption before compaction. Structural and morphological characterisation was carried out by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of an extended metastable solid solution of Ti in hcp Mg was detected up to 15 at% Ti in the as-grown nanoparticles, while after in situ hydrogen absorption, phase separation between MgH2 and TiH2 was observed. At a Ti content of 22 at%, a metastable Mg-Ti-H fcc phase was observed after in situ hydrogen absorption. The co-evaporation of Mg and Ti inhibited nanoparticle coalescence and crystallite growth in comparison with the evaporation of Mg only. In situ hydrogen absorption was beneficial to subsequent hydrogen behaviour, studied by high pressure differential scanning calorimetry and isothermal kinetics. A transformed fraction of 90% was reached within 100 s at 300 °C during both hydrogen absorption and desorption. The enthalpy of hydride formation was not observed to differ from bulk MgH2.

  9. Production of hydrogen-rich gas from methane by thermal plasma reform.

    PubMed

    Chun, Young N; Kim, Seong C

    2007-12-01

    This study investigated the reforming characteristics and optimum operating condition of the high-temperature plasma torch (so called plasmatron) for hydrogen-rich gas (syngas) production. At the optimum condition, the composition of produced syngas was 45.4% hydrogen (H2), 6.9% carbon monoxide (CO), 1.5% carbon dioxide (CO2), and 1.1% acetylene (C2H2). The H2/CO ratio was 6.6, hydrogen yield was 78.8%, and the energy conversion rate was 63.6%. To obtain the optimum operating condition, parametric studies were carried out examining the effects of O2/CH4 ratio, steam/CH4 ratio, and Ni catalyst addition in reactor. When the steam/CH4 ratio was 1.23, the production of hydrogen was maximized and the methane conversion rate was 99.7%. The syngas composition was determined to be 50.4% H2, 5.7% CO, 13.8% CO2, and 1.1% C2H2. The H2/CO ratio was 9.7, hydrogen yield was 93.7%, and the energy conversion rate was 78.8%. Hydrogen production with catalyst was effective, compared with no catalyst.

  10. Fivefold enhancement in stability of organic light-emitting diodes with addition of non-evaporable getter pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Duy C.; Oyama, Shiho; Sakai, Heisuke; Porcelli, Tommaso; Siviero, Fabrizio; Maccallini, Enrico; Urbano, Marco; Murata, Hideyuki

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate a significant enhancement of the operational stability of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by fabricating the devices under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions in the region of 10-10-10-11 Torr. The UHV condition is achieved by utilizing non-evaporable getter pumps together with regular turbo molecular pumps in an OLED deposition chamber. The short-term stability of the OLEDs is prolonged fivefold because of the removal of detrimental gases, especially water. We suggest that ultra-clean fabrication conditions are indispensable for revealing the true intrinsic degradation mode of OLEDs. Additionally, we analyze the effect of operating residual gas analyzers during the device fabrication.

  11. Hydrogen Gas Inhalation Attenuates Seawater Instillation-Induced Acute Lung Injury via the Nrf2 Pathway in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Diao, Mengyuan; Zhang, Sheng; Wu, Lifeng; Huan, Le; Huang, Fenglou; Cui, Yunliang; Lin, Zhaofen

    2016-12-01

    Seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury involves oxidative stress and apoptosis. Although hydrogen gas inhalation is reportedly protective in multiple types of lung injury, the effect of hydrogen gas inhalation on seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of hydrogen gas on seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury and explored the mechanisms involved. Rabbits were randomly assigned to control, hydrogen (2 % hydrogen gas inhalation), seawater (3 mL/kg seawater instillation), and seawater + hydrogen (3 mL/kg seawater instillation + 2 % hydrogen gas inhalation) groups. Arterial partial oxygen pressure and lung wet/dry weight ratio were detected. Protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 levels were determined. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used to monitor changes in lung specimens, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assayed. In addition, NF-E2-related factor (Nrf) 2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein expression were measured, and apoptosis was assessed by measuring caspase-3 expression and using terminal deoxy-nucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining. Hydrogen gas inhalation markedly improved lung endothelial permeability and decreased both MDA content and MPO activity in lung tissue; these changes were associated with decreases in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in BALF. Hydrogen gas also alleviated histopathological changes and cell apoptosis. Moreover, Nrf2 and HO-1 expressions were significantly activated and caspase-3 expression was inhibited. These results demonstrate that hydrogen gas inhalation attenuates seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury in rabbits and that the protective effects observed may be related to the activation of the Nrf2 pathway.

  12. Getter Incorporation into Cast Stone and Solid State Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Asmussen, Robert M.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Stephenson, John R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Washton, Nancy M.; Neeway, James J.; Du, Yingge; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Clayton, Ray E.; Saslow, Sarah A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Cordova, Elsa; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2016-09-28

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is collecting relevant available data on waste forms for use as a supplemental immobilization technology, to provide the additional capacity needed to treat low-activity waste (LAW) in Hanford Site tanks and complete the tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost-effective manner. One candidate supplemental waste form, fabricated using a low-temperature process, is a cementitious grout called Cast Stone. Cast Stone has been under investigation for this application at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) since initial screening tests in FY13. This report is the culmination of work to lower the diffusivities of Tc and I from Cast Stone using getters. Getters are compounds added to a system designed to selectively sequester a species of interest to provide increased stability to the species. The work contained within this report is related to waste form development and testing and does not directly support the 2017 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment. However, this work contains valuable information which may be used in performance assessment maintenance past FY17, and in future waste form development. This report on performance characterization of Tc and I getters in Cast Stone fabricated with simulated LAW covers several areas of interest and major findings to WRPS:

  13. Rate limiting mechanism of transition metal gettering in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Thompson, A.C.; Imaizumi, M.; Hieslmair, H.; Weberr, E.R.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have performed studies on multicrystalline silicon used for solar cells in the as-grown state and after a series of processing and gettering steps. The principal goal of this work is to determine the rate limiting step for metal impurity gettering from multicrystalline silicon with an emphasis on the release of impurities from structural defects. Synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence mapping was used to monitor the release process. Copper and nickel impurities were found to reside primarily at dislocations in the as-grown state of the material. Short annealing treatments rapidly dissolved the impurity agglomerates. Based on these results and modeling of the dissolution process, copper and nickel is in the form of small agglomerates (< 10 nm) clustered together over micron-scale regions in the as-grown material. Aluminum gettering further disintegrated the agglomerates to below the sensitivity of the system, 2--5 nm in radii. No significant barrier to release of copper or nickel from dislocations was observed.

  14. Adaptation of a commercially available 200 kW natural gas fuel cell power plant for operation on a hydrogen rich gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Maston, V.A.

    1997-12-01

    International Fuel Cells (IFC) has designed a hydrogen fueled fuel cell power plant based on a modification of its standard natural gas fueled PC25{trademark} C fuel cell power plant. The natural gas fueled PC25 C is a 200 kW, fuel cell power plant that is commercially available. The program to accomplish the fuel change involved deleting the natural gas processing elements, designing a new fuel pretreatment subsystem, modifying the water and thermal management subsystem, developing a hydrogen burner to combust unconsumed hydrogen, and modifying the control system. Additionally, the required modifications to the manufacturing and assembly procedures necessary to allow the hydrogen fueled power plant to be manufactured in conjunction with the on-going production of the standard PC25 C power plants were identified. This work establishes the design and manufacturing plan for the 200 kW hydrogen fueled PC25 power plant.

  15. Determining air quality and greenhouse gas impacts of hydrogen infrastructure and fuel cell vehicles.

    PubMed

    Stephens-Romero, Shane; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jacob; Dabdub, Donald; Samuelsen, Scott

    2009-12-01

    Adoption of hydrogen infrastructure and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) to replace gasoline internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has been proposed as a strategy to reduce criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation sector and transition to fuel independence. However, it is uncertain (1) to what degree the reduction in criteria pollutants will impact urban air quality, and (2) how the reductions in pollutant emissions and concomitant urban air quality impacts compare to ultralow emission gasoline-powered vehicles projected for a future year (e.g., 2060). To address these questions, the present study introduces a "spatially and temporally resolved energy and environment tool" (STREET) to characterize the pollutant and GHG emissions associated with a comprehensive hydrogen supply infrastructure and HFCVs at a high level of geographic and temporal resolution. To demonstrate the utility of STREET, two spatially and temporally resolved scenarios for hydrogen infrastructure are evaluated in a prototypical urban airshed (the South Coast Air Basin of California) using geographic information systems (GIS) data. The well-to-wheels (WTW) GHG emissions are quantified and the air quality is established using a detailed atmospheric chemistry and transport model followed by a comparison to a future gasoline scenario comprised of advanced ICE vehicles. One hydrogen scenario includes more renewable primary energy sources for hydrogen generation and the other includes more fossil fuel sources. The two scenarios encompass a variety of hydrogen generation, distribution, and fueling strategies. GHG emissions reductions range from 61 to 68% for both hydrogen scenarios in parallel with substantial improvements in urban air quality (e.g., reductions of 10 ppb in peak 8-h-averaged ozone and 6 mug/m(3) in 24-h-averaged particulate matter concentrations, particularly in regions of the airshed where concentrations are highest for the gasoline scenario).

  16. Identification of gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl hydrogen sulfate in the Los Angeles atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Eatough, D.J.; White, V.F.; Hansen, L.D.; Eatough, N.L.; Cheney, J.L.

    1986-09-01

    Gas-phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl hydrogen sulfate have been identified in the atmosphere in Los Angeles. Gas-phase concentrations of these two alkyl sulfates were determined by using analytical methods based on the collection of the compounds before collection of particles using diffusion denuders and after collection of particles using resin beds or sorption filters, and specific analysis of the collected alkyl sulfates by ion chromatography. The data show the dimethyl sulfate is present in both particles and the gas phase. The concentration of total gas-phase methyl sulfates was found to vary from 34 to 178 nmol/m/sup 3/ during the smog episode studied. These species constituted a significant fraction of the total sulfur budget in the Los Angeles basin during the sampling period.

  17. On physical nanoscale aspects of compatibility of steels with hydrogen and natural gas.

    PubMed

    Nechaev, Yu S; Ochsner, A

    2010-02-01

    The possibilities of effective solutions of relevant technological problems are considered based on the analysis of fundamental physical aspects, elucidation of the nano-structural mechanisms and interrelations of aging and hydrogen embrittlement of materials (steels) in the hydrogen industry and gas-main industries. The adverse effects which these mechanisms and processes have on the service properties and technological lifetime of materials are analyzed. The concomitant fundamental process of formation of carbohydride-like and other segregation nanostructures at dislocations (with the segregation capacity 1 to 1.5 orders of magnitude greater than in the widely used Cottrell 'atmosphere' model) and grain boundaries is discussed in the context of how these nanostructures affect technological processes (aging, hydrogen embrittlement, stress corrosion damage, and failure) and the physicomechanical properties of the metallic materials (including the technological lifetimes of pipeline steels).

  18. Hydrogen storage materials discovery via high throughput ball milling and gas sorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Kaye, Steven S; Riley, Conor; Greenberg, Doron; Galang, Daniel; Bailey, Mark S

    2012-06-11

    The lack of a high capacity hydrogen storage material is a major barrier to the implementation of the hydrogen economy. To accelerate discovery of such materials, we have developed a high-throughput workflow for screening of hydrogen storage materials in which candidate materials are synthesized and characterized via highly parallel ball mills and volumetric gas sorption instruments, respectively. The workflow was used to identify mixed imides with significantly enhanced absorption rates relative to Li2Mg(NH)2. The most promising material, 2LiNH2:MgH2 + 5 atom % LiBH4 + 0.5 atom % La, exhibits the best balance of absorption rate, capacity, and cycle-life, absorbing >4 wt % H2 in 1 h at 120 °C after 11 absorption-desorption cycles.

  19. [Feasibility investigation of hydrogen instead of helium as carrier gas in the determination of five organophosphorus pesticides by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenxue; Zhou, Shixue

    2015-01-01

    Helium is almost the only choosable carrier gas used in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A mixed standard solution of five organophosphorus pesticides was analyzed by using GC-MS, and hydrogen or helium as carrier gas, so as to study the feasibility of hydrogen instead of helium as carrier gas for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides. Combining a mass spectrum database built by ourselves, the results were deconvolved and identified by Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution & Identification System (AMDIS32), a software belonging to the workstation of the instrument. Then, the statistical software, IBM SPSS Statistics 19.0 was used for the clustering analysis of the data. The results indicated that when hydrogen was used as carrier gas, the peaks of the pesticides detected were slightly earlier than those when helium used as carrier gas, but the resolutions of the chromatographic peaks were lower, and the fraction good indices (Frac. Good) were lower, too. When hydrogen was used as carrier gas, the signals of the pesticides were unstable, the measuring accuracies of the pesticides were reduced too, and even more, some compounds were undetectable. Therefore, considering the measuring accuracy, the signal stability, and the safety, etc., hydrogen should be cautiously used as carrier gas in the determination of organophosphorus pesticides by GC-MS.

  20. Development of a Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Double Saw Resonator System at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Yunusa, Zainab; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar; Ismail, Alyani; Isa, Maryam Mohd; Yaacob, Mohd Hanif; Rahmanian, Saeed; Ibrahim, Siti Azlida; Shabaneh, Arafat A.A

    2015-01-01

    A double SAW resonator system was developed as a novel method for gas sensing applications. The proposed system was investigated for hydrogen sensing. Commercial Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) resonators with resonance frequencies of 433.92 MHz and 433.42 MHz were employed in the double SAW resonator system configuration. The advantages of using this configuration include its ability for remote measurements, and insensitivity to vibrations and other external disturbances. The sensitive layer is composed of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes and polyaniline nanofibers which were deposited on pre-patterned platinum metal electrodes fabricated on a piezoelectric substrate. This was mounted into the DSAWR circuit and connected in parallel. The sensor response was measured as the difference between the resonance frequencies of the SAW resonators, which is a measure of the gas concentration. The sensor showed good response towards hydrogen with a minimum detection limit of 1%. PMID:25730480

  1. Recovery of bromine from waste gas-phase hydrogen bromide streams using an electrolytic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Wauters, C.N; Winnick, J.

    1996-09-01

    An electrochemical cell is used to demonstrate a significant improvement in the recovery of bromine (Br{sub 2}) from waste gas-phase hydrogen bromide (HBr) streams. The continuous process operates at 300 C and utilizes reticulated vitreous carbon gas-diffusion electrodes, a molten (Li{sub 0.575}K{sub 0.133}Cs{sub 0.292})Br electrolyte, and borosilicate glass fiber membrane. HBr is simultaneously electrolytically decomposed and separated into a hydrogen enriched waste stream and pure anhydrous Br{sub 2} product stream. Simulated industrial waste streams containing HBr, nitrogen, water vapor, and organic compounds have been tested. These results include removals of greater than 90% and current densities approaching 1.0 A/cm{sup 2}.

  2. Chemical synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods for enhanced hydrogen gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musarrat, Jabeen; Muhammad Azhar, Iqbal; R Vasant, Kumar; Mansoor, Ahmed; Muhammad Tayyeb, Javed

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods are prepared using equimolar solution of zinc nitrate ((Zn(NO3)2) and hexamethylenetetramine (C6H12N4) by the hydrothermal technique at 80 °C for 12 h. Epitaxial growth is explored by X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, revealing that the ZnO nanorods have a hexagonal (wurtzite) structure. Absorption spectra of ZnO are measured by UV—visible spectrometer. The surface morphology is investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The synthesized ZnO nanorods are used for detecting the 150 °C hydrogen gas with a concentration over 1000 ppm. The obtained results show a reversible response. The influence of operating temperature on hydrogen gas detecting characteristic of ZnO nanorods is also investigated.

  3. Hydrogen gas generation from refuse-derived fuel (RDF) under wet conditions.

    PubMed

    Sakka, Makiko; Kimura, Tetsuya; Sakka, Kazuo; Ohmiya, Kunio

    2004-02-01

    An explosion has recently occurred at a silo containing refuse-derived fuels (RDF) in Japan. There is a possibility that microorganisms are involved in generation of combustible gas from RDF and this study was aimed at showing the presence of bacteria that can ferment RDF pellets. All RDF samples tested contained a relatively high number of viable bacterial cells, 1.4x10(5) to 3.2x10(6) viable cells/g. These bacteria in the RDF samples fermented them to generate heat and hydrogen gas.

  4. Stable Isotope Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Using Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak-Lovato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage from enhanced oil recovery, carbon storage, and natural gas sites can emit trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide. Trace gas emission at these locations demonstrate unique light stable isotope signatures that provide information to enable source identification of the material. Light stable isotope detection through surface monitoring, offers the ability to distinguish between trace gases emitted from sources such as, biological (fertilizers and wastes), mineral (coal or seams), or liquid organic systems (oil and gas reservoirs). To make light stable isotope measurements, we employ the ultra-sensitive technique, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS). FMS is an absorption technique with sensitivity enhancements approximately 100-1000x more than standard absorption spectroscopy with the advantage of providing stable isotope signature information. We have developed an integrated in situ (point source) system that measures carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide with isotopic resolution and enhanced sensitivity. The in situ instrument involves the continuous collection of air and records the stable isotope ratio for the gas being detected. We have included in-line flask collection points to obtain gas samples for validation of isotopic concentrations using our in-house isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS). We present calibration curves for each species addressed above to demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system. We also show field deployment data demonstrating the capabilities of the system in making live dynamic measurements from an active source.

  5. Liquefaction of Elbitsan and Yatagan lignites in carbon monoxide/hydrogen gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bolat, E.; Oner, M.; Yalin, G.; Dincer, S. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects of experimental parameters on the liquefaction yields of Elbistan and Yatagan lignites that were investigated by using different solvents, gases and catalysts. In hydroliquefaction of Elbistan lignite with anthracene and creosote oils, higher oil yields were obtained with anthracene oil. Based on this result, anthracene oil was chosen as solvent for further work done with Elbistan lignite. First, the effect of moisture in lignite samples was observed with synthesis gas as medium gas; then, the effect of carbon monoxide/hydrogen ratio in liquefaction gas mixture was determined using moist lignite samples. The highest oil yield was obtained with most lignite sample in 3CO/1H{sub 2} gas moisture and it was 57.3% (daf.) The hydroliquefaction oil yields of Yatagan lignite obtained with creosote oil were higher than those obtained in anthracene oil. On further work done with Yatagan lignite, creosote oil was chosen as solvent. First, the effects of CoMo and red mud catalysts, then in catalyzed medium, the effects of moisture in lignite samples and at last, using most lignite samples and red mud catalyst, the effects of carbon monoxide/hydrogen ratio in gas moisture, were investigated.

  6. Process for producing methane from gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. While carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having hydrogen or water present therein can be used only the carbon monoxide available after reaction with said hydrogen or water is decomposed to form said active surface carbon. Although hydrogen or water will be converted, partially or completely, to methane that can be utilized in a combustion zone to generate heat for steam production or other energy recovery purposes, said hydrogen is selectively removed from a CO--H.sub.2 -containing feed stream by partial oxidation thereof prior to disproportionation of the CO content of said stream.

  7. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. Task 4 report; Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas, for example, steam reforming (SR), are complex multi-step processes. These processes also result in the emission of large quantities of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere. One alternative is the single-step thermocatalytic cracking (TCC) (or decomposition) of natural gas into hydrogen and carbon. The comparative assessment of SR and TCC processes was conducted. Thermocatalytic cracking of methane over various catalysts and supports in a wide range of temperatures (500--900 C) and flow rates was conducted. Two types of fix bed catalytic reactors were designed, built and tested: continuous flow and pulse reactors. Ni-Mo/Alumina and Fe-catalysts demonstrated relatively high efficiency in the methane cracking reaction at the range of temperatures 600--800 C. Fe-catalyst demonstrated fairly good stability, whereas alumina-supported Pt-catalyst rapidly lost its catalytic activity. Methane decomposition reaction over Ni-Mo/alumina was studied over wide range of space velocities in a continuous flow fixed bed catalytic reactor. The experimental results indicate that the hydrogen yield decreases noticeably with an increase in the space velocity of methane. The pulse type catalytic reactor was used to test the activity of the catalysts. It was found that induction period on the kinetic curve of hydrogen production corresponded to the reduction of metal oxide to metallic form of the catalyst. SEM method was used to study the structure of the carbon deposited on the catalyst surface.

  8. Intermediate energy proton stopping power for hydrogen molecules and monoatomic helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Stopping power in the intermediate energy region (100 keV to 1 MeV) was investigated, based on the work of Lindhard and Winther, and on the local plasma model. The theory is applied to calculate stopping power of hydrogen molecules and helium gas for protons of energy ranging from 100 keV to 2.5 MeV. Agreement with the experimental data is found to be within 10 percent.

  9. Process for Generation of Hydrogen Gas from Various Feedstocks Using Thermophilic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ooteghem Van, Suellen

    2005-09-13

    A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45 degrees C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

  10. Aqueous process for recovering sulfur from hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Arunabha

    2015-05-05

    A process for recovering sulfur from a hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas utilizes an aqueous reaction medium, a temperature of about 110-150.degree. C., and a high enough pressure to maintain the aqueous reaction medium in a liquid state. The process reduces material and equipment costs and addresses the environmental disadvantages associated with known processes that rely on high boiling point organic solvents.

  11. Intermediate energy proton stopping power for hydrogen molecules and monoatomic helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Stopping power in the intermediate energy region (100 keV to 1 MeV) was investigated, based on the work of Lindhard and Winther, and on the local plasma model. The theory is applied to calculate stopping power of hydrogen molecules and helium gas for protons of energy ranging from 100 keV to 2.5 MeV. Agreement with the experimental data is found to be within 10 percent.

  12. Process for generation of hydrogen gas from various feedstocks using thermophilic bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Ooteghem, Suellen Van

    2005-09-13

    A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45.degree. C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

  13. Hydrogen turbines for space power systems: A simplified axial flow gas turbine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogen cooled, turbine powered space weapon systems require a relatively simple, but reasonably accurate hydrogen gas expansion turbine model. Such a simplified turbine model would require little computational time and allow incorporation into system level computer programs while providing reasonably accurate volume/mass estimates. This model would then allow optimization studies to be performed on multiparameter space power systems and provide improved turbine mass and size estimates for the various operating conditions (when compared to empirical and power law approaches). An axial flow gas expansion turbine model was developed for these reasons and is in use as a comparative bench mark in space power system studies at Sandia. The turbine model is based on fluid dynamic, thermodynamic, and material strength considerations, but is considered simplified because it does not account for design details such as boundary layer effects, shock waves, turbulence, stress concentrations, and seal leakage. Although the basic principles presented here apply to any gas or vapor axial flow turbine, hydrogen turbines are discussed because of their immense importance on space burst power platforms.

  14. Atomic and molecular hydrogen gas temperatures in a low-pressure helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuell, Cameron M.; Corr, Cormac S.

    2015-08-01

    Neutral gas temperatures in hydrogen plasmas are important for experimental and modelling efforts in fusion technology, plasma processing, and surface modification applications. To provide values relevant to these application areas, neutral gas temperatures were measured in a low pressure (< 10 mTorr) radiofrequency helicon discharge using spectroscopic techniques. The atomic and molecular species were not found to be in thermal equilibrium with the atomic temperature being mostly larger then the molecular temperature. In low power operation (< 1 kW), the molecular hydrogen temperature was observed to be linearly proportional to the pressure while the atomic hydrogen temperature was inversely proportional. Both temperatures were observed to rise linearly with input power. For high power operation (5-20 kW), the molecular temperature was found to rise with both power and pressure up to a maximum of approximately 1200 K. Spatially resolved measurements near a graphite target demonstrated localised cooling near the sample surface. The temporal evolution of the molecular gas temperature during a high power 1.1 ms plasma pulse was also investigated and found to vary considerably as a function of pressure.

  15. Improvement of saturation magnetization of Fe nanoparticles by post-annealing in a hydrogen gas atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kin, Masane Tanaka, Masaaki; Hayashi, Yasushi; Hasaegawa, Jun; Kura, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Tomoyuki

    2015-05-07

    Fe nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5} and then post-annealing in a hydrogen gas atmosphere to produce highly monodisperse Fe NPs with high saturation magnetization (M{sub s}). The as-synthesized pre-anneal Fe NPs had an expanded α-Fe structure and M{sub s} was only 39% of that for bulk Fe because of the low crystallinity and the inclusion of a surfactant. Post-annealing of the Fe NPs in a hydrogen gas atmosphere at 200 °C improved the crystallinity of the Fe NPs from an amorphous-like structure to a body centered cubic (bcc) structure without any lattice expansion. This result indicates that hydrogen gas plays a significant role in improvement of the crystallinity of Fe NPs. Accompanying the improvement in crystallinity, M{sub s} for the Fe NPs increased from 86 to 190 emu/g{sub net} at 300 K, the values of which include the weight of surfactant. This enhanced M{sub s} is almost the same as that of bulk Fe (218 emu/{sub Fe}). It was concluded that the crystallinity has a significant influence on the M{sub s} of the Fe NPs because long-range ordering of the lattice can maintain strong direct exchange interactions between Fe atoms.

  16. Hydrogen turbines for space power systems: A simplified axial flow gas turbine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogen cooled, turbine powered space weapon systems require a relatively simple, but reasonably accurate hydrogen gas expansion turbine model. Such a simplified turbine model would require little computational time and allow incorporation into system level computer programs while providing reasonably accurate volume/mass estimates. This model would then allow optimization studies to be performed on multiparameter space power systems and provide improved turbine mass and size estimates for the various operating conditions (when compared to empirical and power law approaches). An axial flow gas expansion turbine model was developed for these reasons and is in use as a comparative bench mark in space power system studies at Sandia. The turbine model is based on fluid dynamic, thermodynamic, and material strength considerations, but is considered simplified because it does not account for design details such as boundary layer effects, shock waves, turbulence, stress concentrations, and seal leakage. Although the basic principles presented here apply to any gas or vapor axial flow turbine, hydrogen turbines are discussed because of their immense importance on space burst power platforms.

  17. Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Air Products and Chemicals

    2008-09-30

    An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

  18. A comparative study of ethylene oxide gas, hydrogen peroxide gas plasma, and low-temperature steam formaldehyde sterilization.

    PubMed

    Kanemitsu, Keiji; Imasaka, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Shiho; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Ueno, Kumi; Takemura, Hiromu; Hirayama, Yoshihiro; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2005-05-01

    To compare the efficacies of ethylene oxide gas (EOG), hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (PLASMA), and low-temperature steam formaldehyde (LTSF) sterilization methods. The efficacies of EOG, PLASMA, and LTSF sterilization were tested using metal and plastic plates, common medical instruments, and three process challenge devices with narrow lumens. All items were contaminated with Bacillus stearothermophilus spores or used a standard biological indicator. EOG and LTSF demonstrated effective killing of B. stearothermophilus spores, with or without serum, on plates, on instruments, and in process challenge devices. PLASMA failed to adequately sterilize materials on multiple trials in several experiments, including two of three plates, two of three instruments, and all process challenge devices. Our results suggest that PLASMA sterilization may be unsuccessful under certain conditions, particularly when used for items with complex shapes and narrow lumens. Alternatively, LTSF sterilization demonstrates excellent efficacy and is comparable to EOG sterilization. LTSF could potentially act as a substitute if EOG becomes unavailable due to environmental concerns.

  19. SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. During Year I, we have successfully fabricated SiC macro porous membranes via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder, which were then deposited with thin, micro-porous (6 to 40{angstrom} in pore size) films via sol-gel technique as intermediate layers. Finally, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was deposited on this substrate via our CVD/I technique. The composite membrane thus prepared demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers. Building upon the positive progress made in the Year I preliminary study, we will conduct an optimization study in Year II to develop an optimized H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment.

  20. A micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for detection of hydrogen and atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Chul; Yoon, Seung-Il; Lee, Chung-il; Kim, Yong-Jun; Song, Soonho

    2009-02-01

    This paper demonstrates the fabrication and performance of a micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for an effective and inexpensive gas analysis system. The proposed micro-thermoelectric gas sensor was fabricated by using a surface micromachining technique. The sensing mechanism, consisting of thermoelectric material and a novel metal catalyst, was fabricated on the highly thermally resistive layer for reduced heat transfer to the substrate allowing for a simple fabrication process. The micro-thermoelectric gas sensor detects target gas species by measuring the reaction heat of the catalytic reaction between the target gas and a novel metal catalyst using Cu-Bi thermopiles. The catalytic reaction occurs only on the hot junction of the sensing thermopile where the metal catalyst is deposited. In order to reduce the external thermal noise, a difference between the output voltage of the sensing and the reference thermopiles was measured by using a differential amplifier. The response of the fabricated sensor was linear to temperature difference. The fabricated sensor can be used to detect various concentrations of hydrogen and atomic oxygen, where the output voltage linearly increased with the gas concentration.

  1. DECONTAMINATION ASSESSMENT OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS, AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACTS USING A HYDROGEN PERIOXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To evaluate the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface materials using hydrogen peroxide gas. Methods and Results: B. anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. Stearothermophilus spores were dried on seven...

  2. ANALYSIS OF A HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR POWERED HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS HYDROGEN PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; A. M. Gandrik

    2010-11-01

    An updated reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The reactor heat is used to produce heat and electric power to the HTE plant. A Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 44.4% was used to provide the electric power. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 1.1 million cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 42.8% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.85 kg/s (66 million SCFD) and an oxygen production rate of 14.6 kg/s (33 million SCFD). An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.03/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20% for a reactor cost of $2000/kWt and $2.41/kg of hydrogen for a reactor cost of $1400/kWt.

  3. SIC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2003-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. SiC macro-porous membranes have been successfully fabricated via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder. Also, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was prepared via our CVD/I technique. This composite membrane demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers and sol-gel techniques. Building upon the positive progress made in the membrane development study, we conducted an optimization study to develop an H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment. In addition, mathematical simulation has been performed to compare the performance of the membrane reactor (MR) vs conventional packed bed reactor for WGS reaction. Our result demonstrates that >99.999% conversion can be accomplished via WGS-MR using the hydrogen selective membrane developed by us. Further, water/CO ratio can be reduced, and >97% hydrogen recovery and <200 ppm CO can be accomplished according to the mathematical simulation. Thus, we believe that the operating economics of WGS can be improved significantly based upon the proposed MR concept. In parallel, gas separations and hydrothermal and long-term-storage stability of the

  4. Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with axial tandem stacking and getter

    DOEpatents

    Gibby, Ronald L.; Lawrence, Leo A.; Woodley, Robert E.; Wilson, Charles N.; Weber, Edward T.; Johnson, Carl E.

    1981-01-01

    A breeder reactor fuel element having a tandem arrangement of fissile and fertile fuel with a getter for fission product cesium disposed between the fissile and fertile sections. The getter is effective at reactor operating temperatures to isolate the cesium generated by the fissile material from reacting with the fertile fuel section.

  5. Specific features of SRS-CARS monitoring of low impurity concentrations of hydrogen in dense gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, Gennady M.; Mogileva, Tatyana N.; Popov, Aleksey Yu.

    2006-09-01

    The possibility of measuring the hydrogen impurity concentration in dense gas mixtures by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is studied. In this technique, biharmonic laser pumping based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in compressed hydrogen is used. Because of the interference between the coherent scattering components from buffer gas molecules and molecules of the impurity to be detected, the signal recorded may depend on the hydrogen concentration by a parabolic law, which has a minimum and makes the results uncertain. It is shown that this uncertainty can be removed if the frequency of the biharmonic laser pump, which is produced by the SRS oscillator, somewhat differs from the frequency of molecular oscillations of hydrogen in the test mixture. A sensitivity of 5 ppm is obtained as applied to the hydrogen-air mixture under normal pressure. The description of a set-up for the determination of the coefficient of the hydrogen diffusion in gas mixtures is given. The main assembly units are a diffusion chamber and an automated laser system for the selective hydrogen diagnostics in gas mixtures by the SRS-CARS method. The determination of the diffusion coefficient is based on the approximation of the experimental data describing the hydrogen concentration varying with time at a specified point in the diffusion chamber and the accurate solution of the diffusion equation for the selected one-dimensional geometry of the experiment.

  6. Development of a Low NOx Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbine Operating on Hydrogen-Rich Renewable and Opportunity Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-01

    Solar Turbines Inc., in collaboration with Pennsylvania State University and the University of Southern California, will develop injector technologies for gas turbine use of high-hydrogen content renewable and opportunity fuels derived from coal, biomass, industrial process waste, or byproducts. This project will develop low-emission technology for alternate fuels with high-hydrogen content, thereby reducing natural gas requirements and lowering carbon intensity.

  7. Reduced-order modellin for high-pressure transient flow of hydrogen-natural gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaie, Baba G.; Khan, Ilyas; Alshomrani, Ali Saleh; Alqahtani, Aisha M.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper the transient flow of hydrogen compressed-natural gas (HCNG) mixture which is also referred to as hydrogen-natural gas mixture in a pipeline is numerically computed using the reduced-order modelling technique. The study on transient conditions is important because the pipeline flows are normally in the unsteady state due to the sudden opening and closure of control valves, but most of the existing studies only analyse the flow in the steady-state conditions. The mathematical model consists in a set of non-linear conservation forms of partial differential equations. The objective of this paper is to improve the accuracy in the prediction of the HCNG transient flow parameters using the Reduced-Order Modelling (ROM). The ROM technique has been successfully used in single-gas and aerodynamic flow problems, the gas mixture has not been done using the ROM. The study is based on the velocity change created by the operation of the valves upstream and downstream the pipeline. Results on the flow characteristics, namely the pressure, density, celerity and mass flux are based on variations of the mixing ratio and valve reaction and actuation time; the ROM computational time cost advantage are also presented.

  8. Overview of geologic storage of natural gas with an emphasis on assessing the feasibility of storing hydrogen.

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, Anna Snider

    2009-09-01

    In many regions across the nation geologic formations are currently being used to store natural gas underground. Storage options are dictated by the regional geology and the operational need. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in understanding theses various geologic storage options, the advantages and disadvantages, in the hopes of developing an underground facility for the storage of hydrogen as a low cost storage option, as part of the hydrogen delivery infrastructure. Currently, depleted gas/oil reservoirs, aquifers, and salt caverns are the three main types of underground natural gas storage in use today. The other storage options available currently and in the near future, such as abandoned coal mines, lined hard rock caverns, and refrigerated mined caverns, will become more popular as the demand for natural gas storage grows, especially in regions were depleted reservoirs, aquifers, and salt deposits are not available. The storage of hydrogen within the same type of facilities, currently used for natural gas, may add new operational challenges to the existing cavern storage industry, such as the loss of hydrogen through chemical reactions and the occurrence of hydrogen embrittlement. Currently there are only three locations worldwide, two of which are in the United States, which store hydrogen. All three sites store hydrogen within salt caverns.

  9. Plasma-chemical treatment of hydrogen sulfide in natural gas processing. Final report, May 1991--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

    1993-05-01

    A new process for the treatment of hydrogen sulfide waste that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology has been under development in Russia and the United States. Whereas the present waste-treatment technology, at best, only recovers sulfur, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur by dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a plasma by means of a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. A research project has been undertaken to determine the suitability of the plasma process in natural gas processing applications. The experiments tested acid-gas compositions with 30--65% carbon dioxide, 0--7% water, and 0--0.2% of a standard mixture of pipeline gas. The balance gas in all cases was hydrogen sulfide. The reactor pressure for the experiments was 50 torr, and the microwave power was 1.0 kW. Conversions of hydrogen sulfide ranged from 80 to 100%, while 35--50% of the carbon dioxide was converted to carbon monoxide. This conversion of carbon dioxide resulted in a loss of hydrogen production and an energy loss from a hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment perspective. Tests of a direct natural gas treatment concept showed that hydrocarbon losses were unacceptably high; consequently, the concept would not be economically viable.

  10. Hydrogen Gas Retention and Release from WTP Vessels: Summary of Preliminary Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Wells, Beric E.; Bao, Jie; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Buchmiller, William C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Chun, Jaehun; Karri, Naveen K.; Li, Huidong; Tran, Diana N.

    2015-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently being designed and constructed to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in the 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. A number of technical issues related to the design of the pretreatment facility (PTF) of the WTP have been identified. These issues must be resolved prior to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) reaching a decision to proceed with engineering, procurement, and construction activities for the PTF. One of the issues is Technical Issue T1 - Hydrogen Gas Release from Vessels (hereafter referred to as T1). The focus of T1 is identifying controls for hydrogen release and completing any testing required to close the technical issue. In advance of selecting specific controls for hydrogen gas safety, a number of preliminary technical studies were initiated to support anticipated future testing and to improve the understanding of hydrogen gas generation, retention, and release within PTF vessels. These activities supported the development of a plan defining an overall strategy and approach for addressing T1 and achieving technical endpoints identified for T1. Preliminary studies also supported the development of a test plan for conducting testing and analysis to support closing T1. Both of these plans were developed in advance of selecting specific controls, and in the course of working on T1 it was decided that the testing and analysis identified in the test plan were not immediately needed. However, planning activities and preliminary studies led to significant technical progress in a number of areas. This report summarizes the progress to date from the preliminary technical studies. The technical results in this report should not be used for WTP design or safety and hazards analyses and technical results are marked with the following statement: “Preliminary Technical Results for Planning – Not to be used for WTP Design

  11. Experimental Evaluation of SI Engine Operation Supplemented by Hydrogen Rich Gas from a Compact Plasma Boosted Reformer

    SciTech Connect

    J. B. Green, Jr.; N. Domingo; J. M. E. Storey; R.M. Wagner; J.S. Armfield; L. Bromberg; D. R. Cohn; A. Rabinovich; N. Alexeev

    2000-06-19

    It is well known that hydrogen addition to spark-ignited (SI) engines can reduce exhaust emissions and increase efficiency. Micro plasmatron fuel converters can be used for onboard generation of hydrogen-rich gas by partial oxidation of a wide range of fuels. These plasma-boosted microreformers are compact, rugged, and provide rapid response. With hydrogen supplement to the main fuel, SI engines can run very lean resulting in a large reduction in nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emissions relative to stoichiometric combustion without a catalytic converter. This paper presents experimental results from a microplasmatron fuel converter operating under variable oxygen to carbon ratios. Tests have also been carried out to evaluate the effect of the addition of a microplasmatron fuel converter generated gas in a 1995 2.3-L four-cylinder SI production engine. The tests were performed with and without hydrogen-rich gas produced by the plasma boosted fuel converter with gasoline. A one hundred fold reduction in NO x due to very lean operation was obtained under certain conditions. An advantage of onboard plasma-boosted generation of hydrogen-rich gas is that it is used only when required and can be readily turned on and off. Substantial NO x reduction should also be obtainable by heavy exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) facilitated by use of hydrogen-rich gas with stoichiometric operation.

  12. Method And Apparatus For Converting Hydrocarbon Fuel Into Hydrogen Gas And Carbon Dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2001-03-27

    A hydrocarbon fuel reforming method is disclosed suitable for producing synthesis hydrogen gas from reactions with hydrocarbons fuels, oxygen, and steam. A first mixture of an oxygen-containing gas and a first fuel is directed into a first tube 108 to produce a first reaction reformate. A second mixture of steam and a second fuel is directed into a second tube 116 annularly disposed about the first tube 108 to produce a second reaction reformate. The first and second reaction reformates are then directed into a reforming zone 144 and subject to a catalytic reforming reaction. In another aspect of the method, a first fuel is combusted with an oxygen-containing gas in a first zone 108 to produce a reformate stream, while a second fuel under steam reforming in a second zone 116. Heat energy from the first zone 108 is transferred to the second zone 116.

  13. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes produced by direct current arc discharge in hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, M.; Bandow, S.; Ando, Y.

    2004-11-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were produced by direct current (DC) arc discharge in the mixture gas of H 2-N 2. Raman scattering spectroscopy was used to characterize the MWNTs. Radial breathing mode vibration signals were observed at 272 and 388 cm -1. Tangential mode vibration signal was observed at ≈1582 cm -1, and other intense signals were also observed at ≈1860 cm -1for the MWNTs produced in the gas with the H 2 contents exceeding 90%. DC arc discharge in pure D 2 was also carried out, by which it was confirmed that the peak position and intensity of the Raman signal at ≈1860 cm -1 were independent of whether the gas was H 2 or D 2. This suggests that the ≈1860 cm -1 band is not associated with hydrogen-based vibrations.

  14. Material problems arising from impurity gettering of lithium by zirconium or titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich Borgstedt, Hans

    Hot trapping for purification of lithium is necessary to improve the compatibility of vanadium alloys with the blanket fluid. In hot traps operated at 973 K using titanium or zirconium as getter materials mass transfer between the structural materials, 18Cr-9Ni stainless steels, and the getter materials occurs. Mainly nickel and manganese migrate from the stainless steel housing to the getter foils. The leaching of nickel and manganese causes accelerated corrosion of the structural material. The deposition of nickel on the getter surfaces leads to the formation of crystalline surface layers or diffusion of this element into the foils forming alloys with titanium or zirconium. This second phenomenon may influence the efficiency of the gettering reactions.

  15. Gas pump with movable gas pumping panels

    DOEpatents

    Osher, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for pumping gas continuously a plurality of articulated panels of getter material, each of which absorbs gases on one side while another of its sides is simultaneously reactivated in a zone isolated by the panels themselves from a working space being pumped.

  16. Gas pump with movable gas pumping panels

    DOEpatents

    Osher, J.L.

    Apparatus for pumping gas continuously a plurality of articulated panels of getter material, each of which absorbs gases on one side while another of its sides is simultaneously reactivated in a zone isolated by the panels themselves from a working space being pumped.

  17. Hydrogen gas inhalation inhibits progression to the "irreversible" stage of shock after severe hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaru; Sano, Motoaki; Hayashida, Kei; Tamura, Tomoyoshi; Homma, Koichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi; Sasaki, Junichi

    2017-09-01

    Mortality of hemorrhagic shock primarily depends on whether or not the patients can endure the loss of circulating volume until radical treatment is applied. We investigated whether hydrogen (H2) gas inhalation would influence the tolerance to hemorrhagic shock and improve survival. Hemorrhagic shock was achieved by withdrawing blood until the mean arterial blood pressure reached 30-35 mm Hg. After 60 minutes of shock, the rats were resuscitated with a volume of normal saline equal to four times the volume of shed blood. The rats were assigned to either the H2 gas (1.3% H2, 26% O2, 72.7% N2)-treated group or the control gas (26% O2, 74% N2)-treated group. Inhalation of the specified gas mixture began at the initiation of blood withdrawal and continued for 2 hours after fluid resuscitation. The survival rate at 6 hours after fluid resuscitation was 80% in H2 gas-treated rats and 30% in control gas-treated rats (p < 0.05). The volume of blood that was removed through a catheter to induce shock was significantly larger in the H2 gas-treated rats than in the control rats. Despite losing more blood, the increase in serum potassium levels was suppressed in the H2 gas-treated rats after 60 minutes of shock. Fluid resuscitation completely restored blood pressure in the H2 gas-treated rats, whereas it failed to fully restore the blood pressure in the control gas-treated rats. At 2 hours after fluid resuscitation, blood pressure remained in the normal range and metabolic acidosis was well compensated in the H2 gas-treated rats, whereas we observed decreased blood pressure and uncompensated metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia in the surviving control gas-treated rats. H2 gas inhalation delays the progression to irreversible shock. Clinically, H2 gas inhalation is expected to stabilize the subject until curative treatment can be performed, thereby increasing the probability of survival after hemorrhagic shock.

  18. Tensile Properties and Swelling Behavior of Sealing Rubber Materials Exposed to High-Pressure Hydrogen Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamabe, Junichiro; Nishimura, Shin

    Rubber O-rings exposed to high-pressure hydrogen gas swell, and the volume increase induced by swelling influences tensile properties of the O-rings. Samples of nonfilled (NF), carbon black-filled (CB), and silica-filled (SC) sulfur-vulcanized acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber were exposed to hydrogen at 30 °C and pressures of up to 100 MPa, and the effect of hydrogen exposure on the volume increase, hydrogen content, and tensile properties was investigated. The residual hydrogen content, measured 35 minutes after decompression, increased with increasing hydrogen pressure in the range 0.7-100 MPa for all three samples. In contrast, the volumes of NF, CB, and SC barely changed at pressures below 10 MPa, whereas they increased at pressures above 10 MPa. This nonlinear volume increase is probably related to the free volume of the rubber structure. The volume increase of the CB and SC samples was smaller than that of the NF samples, possibly because of the superior tensile properties of CB and SC. As the volumes of the NF, CB, and SC samples increased, their tensile elastic moduli decreased as a result of a decrease in crosslink density and elongation by volume increase. Although the true fracture stress of NF was barely dependent on the volume of the specimen, those of CB and SC clearly decreased as the volume increased. The decrease in the true fracture stress of CB and SC was related to the volume increase by swelling, showing that the boundary structure between the filler and the rubber matrix was changed by the volume increase.

  19. The MuCap experiment: A measurement of the muon capture rate in hydrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, T. I.

    2007-10-26

    We have recently measured the rate of nuclear muon capture by the proton, using a novel technique which involves a time projection chamber operating in ultraclean, deuterium-depleted hydrogen gas. The target's low gas density of 1% compared to liquid hydrogen is key to avoiding uncertainties that arise from the formation of muonic molecules. The capture rate from the hyperfine singlet ground state of the {mu}p atom was obtained from the difference between the {mu}{sup -} disappearance rate in hydrogen and the world average for the {mu}{sup +} decay rate, yielding {lambda}{sub S} = 725.0{+-}17.4 s{sup -1}, from which the induced pseudoscalar coupling of the nucleon, g{sub P}(q{sup 2} = 0.88m{sub {mu}}{sup 2}) = 7.3{+-}1.1, is extracted. This result is consistent with theoretical predictions for g{sub P} that are based on the approximate chiral symmetry of QCD.

  20. Experimental and computational studies of the gas-phase reaction of halon 1211 with hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Kennedy, Eric M; Uddin, Md Azhar; Sullivan, Simon P; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z

    2005-05-01

    The gas-phase reaction of halon 1211 (CBrClF2) with hydrogen has been studied experimentally at atmospheric pressure in a plug flow, isothermal reactor over the temperature range of 673 to 973 K, at residence times ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 s with an input ratio of N2:H2:halon 1211 of 19:10:1. The major carbon containing products include CHClF2, CHBrF2, CH2F2, and CH4. Gas-phase reactions of CHClF2, CCl2F2, and CH2F2 with hydrogen are also investigated under the conditions similar to those for halon 1211 hydrodehalogenation, and the results are used to assist in understanding the mechanism of the reaction of halon 1211 with hydrogen. A kinetic reaction scheme involving 90 species and 430 reaction steps is developed and used to model the halon 1211 hydrodehalogenation reaction. Generally, satisfactory agreement between experimental and computational results is obtained for the production of major species. Using the software package AURORA, the reaction pathways leading to the formation of major products are elucidated. It has been found that the reaction steps involving CF2 are responsible for the formation of CH4.

  1. Catalytic hydrogenation and gas permeation properties of metal-containing poly(phenylene oxide) and polysulfone

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrong Gao; Yun Xu; Shijian Liao; Ren Liu; Daorong Yu . Dalian Inst. of Chemical Physics)

    1993-11-10

    Metal-containing polymers, PPL-DPP-Pd, PPO-CPA-Pd, PSF-DPP-Pd, PSF-CPA-Pd (PDD = diphenylphosphinyl, CPA = o-carboxy phenyl amino), PPO-M (M = Pd,Cu,Co,Ni), and PSF-Pd, were prepared by incorporating metal chloride with either modified or unmodified poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO) and polysulfone (PSF). The Pd-containing polymers exhibit catalytic activity in the hydrogenation of cyclopentadiene under mild conditions both in alcohol solution and in the gas phase. The selectivity in the hydrogenation of diene to monoene in the gas phase can be controlled by adjusting the hydrogen partial pressure. The metal-containing polymers, PPL-M and PSF-Pd, can be cast easily into the membranes. The H[sub 2]/N[sub 2] permselectivity for PPO-M is higher than that for unmodified PPO, whereas the permeability of H[sub 2] changes slightly. The H[sub 2] permeability and H[sub 2]/N[sub 2] permselectivity for the PPO-Pd membrane are up to 67.5 barrers and 135, respectively.

  2. Hydrogen sulfide gas emission under turbulent conditions - an experimental approach for free-fall drops.

    PubMed

    Matias, N M; Matos, J S; Ferreira, F

    2014-01-01

    Odor nuisance and sulfide corrosion in sewers carrying septic wastewater are accelerated at points of turbulence such as drops in manholes, but accurate methods or empirical expressions to evaluate the gas stripping rate at those particular sites are still missing. With the aim of improving the current knowledge on the influence of free-fall drops on the release of hydrogen sulfide gas, an experimental set-up was built allowing different free-fall drops heights and flows. Three types of experiments were carried out: reaeration tests without sulfide; sulfide oxidation tests; and hydrogen sulfide release tests. With the increase of the free-fall drop height or of the flow, a higher rate of air-to-water mass oxygen transfer was observed. Results regarding sulfide oxidation tests with reaeration through the free-fall have shown that the oxidation rate was correlated with flow. In the hydrogen sulfide release tests, the maximum concentration in the atmosphere reached 500 ppm. Results also showed that increasing the flow rate decreased the time at which the maximum concentrations in the atmosphere were observed.

  3. Microbial electrodialysis cell for simultaneous water desalination and hydrogen gas production.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Maha; Kiely, Patrick D; Call, Douglas F; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-12-15

    A new approach to water desalination is to use exoelectrogenic bacteria to generate electrical power from the biodegradation of organic matter, moving charged ions from a middle chamber between two membranes in a type of microbial fuel cell called a microbial desalination cell. Desalination efficiency using this approach is limited by the voltage produced by the bacteria. Here we examine an alternative strategy based on boosting the voltage produced by the bacteria to achieve hydrogen gas evolution from the cathode using a three-chambered system we refer to as a microbial electrodialysis cell (MEDC). We examined the use of the MEDC process using two different initial NaCl concentrations of 5 g/L and 20 g/L. Conductivity in the desalination chamber was reduced by up to 68 ± 3% in a single fed-batch cycle, with electrical energy efficiencies reaching 231 ± 59%, and maximum hydrogen production rates of 0.16 ± 0.05 m(3) H(2)/m(3) d obtained at an applied voltage of 0.55 V. The advantage of this system compared to a microbial fuel cell approach is that the potentials between the electrodes can be better controlled, and the hydrogen gas that is produced can be used to recover energy to make the desalination process self-sustaining with respect to electrical power requirements.

  4. Fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor utilizing surface plasmon resonance and native defects of zinc oxide by palladium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D.

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental study on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor employing a palladium doped zinc oxide nanocomposite (ZnO(1-x)Pd x , 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.85) layer over the silver coated unclad core of the fiber. Palladium doped zinc oxide nanocomposites (ZnO(1-x)Pd x ) are prepared by a chemical route for different composition ratios and their structural, morphological and hydrogen sensing properties are investigated experimentally. The sensing principle involves the absorption of hydrogen gas by ZnO(1-x)Pd x , altering its dielectric function. The change in the dielectric constant is analyzed in terms of the red shift of the resonance wavelength in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. To check the sensing capability of sensing probes fabricated with varying composition ratio (x) of nanocomposite, the SPR curves are recorded typically for 0% H2 and 4% H2 in N2 atmosphere for each fabricated probe. On changing the concentration of hydrogen gas from 0% to 4%, the red shift in the SPR spectrum confirms the change in dielectric constant of ZnO(1-x)Pd x on exposure to hydrogen gas. It is noted that the shift in the SPR spectrum increases monotonically up to a certain fraction of Pd in zinc oxide, beyond which it starts decreasing. SEM images and the photoluminescence (PL) spectra reveal that Pd dopant atoms substitutionally incorporated into the ZnO lattice profoundly affect its defect levels; this is responsible for the optimal composition of ZnO(1-x)Pd x to sense the hydrogen gas. The sensor is highly selective to hydrogen gas and possesses high sensitivity. Since optical fiber sensing technology is employed along with the SPR technique, the present sensor is capable of remote sensing and online monitoring of hydrogen gas.

  5. Evaluation of Technical Feasibility of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Fueled with Hydrogen, Natural Gas, and DME

    SciTech Connect

    John Pratapas; Daniel Mather; Anton Kozlovsky

    2007-03-31

    The objective of the proposed project was to confirm the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas to improve the performance, efficiency, controllability and emissions of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The project team utilized both engine simulation and laboratory testing to evaluate and optimize how blends of hydrogen and natural gas fuel might improve control of HCCI combustion. GTI utilized a state-of-the art single-cylinder engine test platform for the experimental work in the project. The testing was designed to evaluate the feasibility of extending the limits of HCCI engine performance (i.e., stable combustion, high efficiency and low emissions) on natural gas by using blends of natural gas and hydrogen. Early in the project Ricardo provided technical support to GTI as we applied their engine performance simulation program, WAVE, to our HCCI research engine. Modeling support was later provided by Digital Engines, LLC to use their proprietary model to predict peak pressures and temperatures for varying operating parameters included in the Design of Experiments test plan. Digital Engines also provided testing support for the hydrogen and natural gas blends. Prof. David Foster of University of Wisconsin-Madison participated early in the project by providing technical guidance on HCCI engine test plans and modeling requirements. The main purpose of the testing was to quantify the effects of hydrogen addition to natural gas HCCI. Directly comparing straight natural gas with the hydrogen enhanced test points is difficult due to the complexity of HCCI combustion. With the same air flow rate and lambda, the hydrogen enriched fuel mass flow rate is lower than the straight natural gas mass flow rate. However, the energy flow rate is higher for the hydrogen enriched fuel due to hydrogen's significantly greater lower heating value, 120 mJ/kg for hydrogen compared to 45 mJ/kg for natural gas. With these caveats in mind, an

  6. Nuclear reactor fuel element with vanadium getter on cladding

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Carl E.; Carroll, Kenneth G.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element is described which has an outer cladding, a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material and a layer of vanadium as an oxygen getter on the inner surface of the cladding. The vanadium reacts with oxygen released by the fissionable material during irradiation of the core to prevent the oxygen from reacting with and corroding the cladding. Also described is a method for coating the inner surface of small diameter tubes of cladding with a layer of vanadium.

  7. Human health cost of hydrogen sulfide air pollution from an oil and gas Field.

    PubMed

    Kenessary, Dinara; Kenessary, Almas; Kenessariyev, Ussen Ismailovich; Juszkiewicz, Konrad; Amrin, Meiram Kazievich; Erzhanova, Aya Eralovna

    2017-06-08

    Introduction and objective. The Karachaganak oil and gas condensate field (KOGCF), one of the largest in the world, located in the Republic of Kazakhstan (RoK) in Central Asia, is surrounded by 10 settlements with a total population of 9,000 people. Approximately73% of this population constantly mention a specific odour of rotten eggs in the air, typical for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions, and the occurrence of low-level concentrations of hydrogen sulfide around certain industrial installations (esp. oil refineries) is a well known fact. Therefore, this study aimed at determining the impact on human health and the economic damage to the country due to H2S emissions. Materials and method. Dose-response dependency between H2S concentrations in the air and cardiovascular morbidity using multiple regression analysis was applied. Economic damage from morbidity was derived with a newly-developed method, with Kazakhstani peculiarities taken into account. Results.Hydrogen sulfide air pollution due to the KOGCF activity costs the state almost $60,000 per year. Moreover, this is the reason for a more than 40% rise incardiovascular morbidity in the region. Conclusion. The reduction of hydrogen sulfide emissions into the air is recommended, as well as successive constant ambient air monitoring in future. Economic damage evaluation should be made mandatory, on a legal basis, whenever an industrial facility operation results in associated air pollution.

  8. Dissolution of Uranium Metal Without Hydride Formation or Hydrogen Gas Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Oliver, Brian M.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2008-09-01

    This study shows that metallic uranium will cleanly dissolve in carbonate-peroxide solution without generation of hydrogen gas or uranium hydride. Metallic uranium shot, 0.5 to 1 mm diameter, were reacted with ammonium carbonate - hydrogen peroxide solution ranging in concentration from 0.13M to 1.0M carbonate and 0.50M to 2.0M peroxide. The uranium beads were weighed before and after reacting with the etch solution, and from the weights of the beads, their diameters were calculated, before and after the etch. The etch rate on the beads was then calculated from the reduction in bead diameter, and independently by uranium analysis of the solution. The calculated etch rate ranged from about 4 x 10-4 to 8 x 10-4 cm per hour, dependent primarily on the peroxide concentration. A hydrogen analysis of the etched beads showed that no detectable hydrogen was introduced into the uranium metal by the etching process.

  9. Precipitates and hydrogen passivation at crystal defects in n- and p-type multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerligs, L. J.; Komatsu, Y.; Röver, I.; Wambach, K.; Yamaga, I.; Saitoh, T.

    2007-11-01

    The effects of phosphorous gettering and hydrogenation on the minority carrier recombination at crystal defects in directionally solidified multicrystalline silicon are described. Representative industrial wafers, both p- and n-type, and current technologies for the gettering and hydrogenation are used. The main result of this work is a strong link between activation of extended crystal defects (ECDs) by gettering and their passivation by hydrogenation. It is shown that gettering or annealing increases the recombination at active as well as inactive ECDs. Surprisingly, hydrogenation can neutralize this change in activity due to the gettering. However, it neutralizes only part, at most, of the ECD activity already present before the gettering. Therefore, under current industrial processing techniques, these two high-temperature process steps individually give large change but together much less net change of the crystal defect activity. Related phenomena are observed in wafers with strongly varying impurity concentration. Finally, there is little difference in these observations between n- and p-type wafers.

  10. Possibilities of gas-phase synthesis of diamond structures from mixtures of hydrogen and hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebrov, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    To date, there is no universally recognized notion of diamond structure formation from the gas phase. The set of fragments determining this process differs for different methods of activation. Information on elementary processes of the interaction of hydrogen and hydrocarbon molecules with a surface for activation and deposition can be found in the literature, but it is scarce. Scientific problems of thermal activation relate not only to carbon structure synthesis; the description of non?equilibrium processes in channel flows with heterogeneous chemical reactions has unquestionable importance. In this review, the modern state of studies on the interaction of hydrogen and methane molecules and their fragments with high-temperature tungsten surfaces and diamond surfaces at temperatures close to 1300 K is considered, and accessible results are presented.

  11. Reduction of gaseous pollutant emissions from gas turbine combustors using hydrogen-enriched jet fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress in an evaluation of the applicability of the hydrogen enrichment concept to achieve ultralow gaseous pollutant emission from gas turbine combustion systems is described. The target emission indexes for the program are 1.0 for oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide, and 0.5 for unburned hydrocarbons. The basic concept utilizes premixed molecular hydrogen, conventional jet fuel, and air to depress the lean flammability limit of the mixed fuel. This is shown to permit very lean combustion with its low NOx production while simulataneously providing an increased flame stability margin with which to maintain low CO and HC emission. Experimental emission characteristics and selected analytical results are presented for a cylindrical research combustor designed for operation with inlet-air state conditions typical for a 30:1 compression ratio, high bypass ratio, turbofan commercial engine.

  12. Low-power, fast, selective nanoparticle-based hydrogen sulfide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Allen; Mickelson, William; Zettl, A.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a small, low-cost, low-power, highly sensitive, and selective nanomaterials-based gas sensor. A network of tungsten oxide nanoparticles is heated by an on-chip microhotplate while the conductance of the network is monitored. The device can be heated with short pulses, thereby drastically lowering the power consumption, without diminishing the sensor response. The sensor shows high sensitivity to hydrogen sulfide and does not have significant cross sensitivities to hydrogen, water, or methane, gases likely to be present in operation. A sensing mechanism is proposed, and its effect on electronic properties is discussed. The authors thank Eni S.p.A, the National Science Foundation-supported Center of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems under Grant No. EEC-083819 and U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231

  13. Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Relationships in Hydrogen Gas for Pressure Swing Adsorber Vessel Steels

    DOE PAGES

    Somerday, Brian P.; Barney, Monica

    2014-12-04

    We measured the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for SA516 Grade 70 steel as a function of stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) and load-cycle frequency to provide life-prediction data relevant to pressure swing adsorber (PSA) vessels. For ΔK values up to 18.5 MPa m1/2, the baseline da/dN versus ΔK relationship measured at 1Hz in 2.8 MPa hydrogen gas represents an upper bound with respect to crack growth rates measured at lower frequency. However, at higher ΔK values, we found that the baseline da/dN data had to be corrected to account for modestly higher crack growth rates at the lower frequenciesmore » relevant to PSA vessel operation.« less

  14. Gas phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange of arginine and arginine dipeptides complexed with alkali metals.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Laura A; Marzluff, Elaine M

    2011-08-25

    The hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated and alkali-metal cationized Arg-Gly and Gly-Arg peptides with D(2)O in the gas phase was studied using electrospray ionization quadropole ion trap mass spectrometry. The Arg-Gly and Gly-Arg alkali metal complexes exchange significantly more hydrogens than protonated Arg-Gly and Gly-Arg. We propose a mechanism where the peptide shifts between a zwitterionic salt bridge and nonzwitterionic charge solvated conformations. The increased rate of H/D exchange of the alkali metal complexes is attributed to the peptide metal complexes' small energy difference between the salt-bridge conformation and the nonzwitterionic charge-solvated conformation. Implications for the applicability of this mechanism to other zwitterionic systems are discussed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Assessment of the efficacy of a low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization system.

    PubMed

    Kyi, M S; Holton, J; Ridgway, G L

    1995-12-01

    The STERRAD 100 sterilization system (Johnson & Johnson Medical Ltd) uses low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma for sterilization of heat labile equipment. The efficacy of the machine was tested by contaminating a standard set of instruments with different organisms and using a filtration method to assess recovery of organisms from the wash fluids of instruments post-sterilization. Experiments were performed under clean (the organism only) and dirty (organism mixed with egg protein) conditions. A parallel study conducted using a 3M STERIVAC ethylene oxide sterilizer could not be completed owing to closure of the ethylene oxide plant. For sterilization of instruments with long and narrow lumens, hydrogen peroxide adaptors are necessary. The STERRAD 100 sterilizer can achieve effective sterilization of heat labile instruments with a reduction of 6 log10 cfu/mL of organisms tested. This method has the advantages over ethylene oxide sterilization of safety, ease of maintenance and no requirement for aeration time.

  16. Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Relationships in Hydrogen Gas for Pressure Swing Adsorber Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.; Barney, Monica

    2014-12-04

    We measured the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for SA516 Grade 70 steel as a function of stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) and load-cycle frequency to provide life-prediction data relevant to pressure swing adsorber (PSA) vessels. For ΔK values up to 18.5 MPa m1/2, the baseline da/dN versus ΔK relationship measured at 1Hz in 2.8 MPa hydrogen gas represents an upper bound with respect to crack growth rates measured at lower frequency. However, at higher ΔK values, we found that the baseline da/dN data had to be corrected to account for modestly higher crack growth rates at the lower frequencies relevant to PSA vessel operation.

  17. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1997-01-01

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  18. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, R.V.

    1997-12-30

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  19. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, R.V.

    1999-02-02

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

  20. Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide coal gas

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1999-01-01

    Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.