Science.gov

Sample records for hydrogen isotope anomalies

  1. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Meteorite Sulfonic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Teresa L.; Chang, Sherwood

    1997-01-01

    Intramolecular carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios were measured on a homologous series of organic sulfonic acids discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations were observed along with high deuterium/hydrogen ratios. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low-temperature environment that is consistent with that of interstellar clouds. Sulfur-33 enrichments observed in methanesulfonic acid could have resulted from gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of a precursor, carbon disulfide. The source of the sulfonic acid precursors may have been the reactive interstellar molecule carbon monosulfide.

  2. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Organic Compounds from the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, G. W.; Thiemens, M. H.; Jackson, T.; Chang, Sherwood

    1996-01-01

    Isotopic measurements have been made on organic sulfur and phosphorus compounds recently discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Carbon, hydrogen and sulfur measurements were performed on individual members of the organic sulfur compounds, alkyl sulfonates; and carbon and hydrogen measurements were made on bulk alkyl phosphonates. Cooper and Chang reported the first carbon isotopic measurements of Murchison organic sulfonates, providing insight into the potential synthetic mechanisms of these and, possibly, other organic species. Hydrogen isotopic measurements of the sulforiates now reveal deuterium excesses ranging from +660 to +2730 %. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low temperature astrophysical environment consistent with that of dense molecular clouds. Measurements of the sulfur isotopes provide further constraints on the origin and mechanism of formation of these organic molecules. Recently, there has been growing documentation of sulfur isotopic anomalies in meteoritic material. Thiemens and Jackson have shown that some bulk ureilites possess excess S-33 and Thiemens et al. have reported excess S-33 in an oldhamite separate from the Norton County meteorite. Rees and Thode reported a large S-33 excess in an Allende acid residue, however, attempts to verify this measurements have been unsuccessful, possibly due to the heterogeneous nature of the carrier phase. With the recognition that sulfur isotopes may reflect chemistry in the protosolar nebula or the precursor molecular cloud, identification of potential carriers is of considerable interest. In the present study, the stable isotopes of sulfur were measured in methane sulfonic acid extracted from the Murchison meteorite. The isotopic composition was found to be: (delta)S-33 = 2.48 %, (delta)S-34 = 2.49 % and (delta)S-36 = 6.76 %. Based upon analysis of more than 60 meteoritic and numerous terrestrial samples, the mass fractionation lines are

  3. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Organic Compounds from the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, G. W.; Thiemens, M. H.; Jackson, T.; Chang, S.

    1995-09-01

    Carbon, hydrogen and sulfur isotopic measurements have been made on individual members of a recently discovered class of organic sulfur compounds, alkyl sulfonates, in the Murchison meteorite. Cooper and Chang (1) reported the first carbon isotopic measurements of Murchison organic sulfonates, providing insight into potential synthetic mechanisms of these, and possibly other, organic species. Hydrogen isotopic measurements of the sulfonates now reveal deuterium excesses ranging from +660 to +2730 per mil. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low temperature astrophysical environment consistent with that of dense molecular clouds. Measurement of the sulfur isotopes provide further constraints on the origin and mechanism of formation of these organic molecules. Recently, there has been growing documentation of sulfur isotopic anomalies in meteoritic material. Thiemens and Jackson (2) have shown that some bulk ureilites possess excess 33S and Thiemens et al. (3) have reported excess 33S in an oldhamite separate from Norton County. Rees and Thode (4) reported a large 33S excess in an Allende acid residue, however, attempts to verify this measurement have been unsuccessful, possibly due to the heterogeneous nature of the carrier phase. With the recognition that sulfur isotopes may reflect nebular chemistry, identification of potential carriers is of considerable interest. In the present study the three stable isotopes of sulfur were measured in methane sulfonate extracted from the Murchison meteorite. The isotopic composition was found to be delta 33S=2.48, delta 34S=2.49 and delta 36S = 6.76 per mil. Based upon analysis of more than 60 meteoritic, and numerous terrestrial samples, the mass fractionation lines are defined by 33Delta = delta 33S-0.50 delta 34S and 36Delta = delta 36S -1.97 delta 34S. From these relations a 33Delta = 1.24 per mil and 36Delta = 0.89 per mil is observed. These anomalies

  4. Physicochemical isotope anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Esat, T.M.

    1988-06-01

    Isotopic composition of refractory elements can be modified, by physical processes such as distillation and sputtering, in unexpected patterns. Distillation enriches the heavy isotopes in the residue and the light isotopes in the vapor. However, current models appear to be inadequate to describe the detailed mass dependence, in particular for large fractionations. Coarse- and fine-grained inclusions from the Allende meteorite exhibit correlated isotope effects in Mg both as mass-dependent fractionation and residual anomalies. This isotope pattern can be duplicated by high temperature distillation in the laboratory. A ubiquitous property of meteoritic inclusions for Mg as well as for most of the other elements, where measurements exist, is mass-dependent fractionation. In contrast, terrestrial materials such as microtektites, tektite buttons as well as lunar orange and green glass spheres have normal Mg isotopic composition. A subset of interplanetary dust particles labelled as chondritic aggregates exhibit excesses in {sup 26}Mg and deuterium anomalies. Sputtering is expected to be a dominant mechanism in the destruction of grains within interstellar dust clouds. An active proto-sun as well as the present solar-wind and solar-flare flux are of sufficient intensity to sputter significant amounts of material. Laboratory experiments in Mg show widespread isotope effects including residual {sup 26}Mg excesses and mass dependent fractionation. It is possible that the {sup 26}Mg excesses in interplanetary dust is related to sputtering by energetic solar-wind particles. The implication if the laboratory distillation and sputtering effects are discussed and contrasted with the anomalies in meteoritic inclusions the other extraterrestrial materials the authors have access to.

  5. Isotopic anomalies in extraterrestrial grains.

    PubMed

    Ireland, T R

    1996-03-01

    Isotopic compositions are referred to as anomalous if the isotopic ratios measured cannot be related to the terrestrial (solar) composition of a given element. While small effects close to the resolution of mass spectrometric techniques can have ambiguous origins, the discovery of large isotopic anomalies in inclusions and grains from primitive meteorites suggests that material from distinct sites of stellar nucleosynthesis has been preserved. Refractory inclusions, which are predominantly composed of the refractory oxides of Al, Ca, Ti, and Mg, in chondritic meteorites commonly have excesses in the heaviest isotopes of Ca, Ti, and Cr which are inferred to have been produced in a supernova. Refractory inclusions also contain excess 26Mg from short lived 26Al decay. However, despite the isotopic anomalies indicating the preservation of distinct nucleosynthetic sites, refractory inclusions have been processed in the solar system and are not interstellar grains. Carbon (graphite and diamond) and silicon carbide grains from the same meteorites also have large isotopic anomalies but these phases are not stable in the oxidized solar nebula which suggests that they are presolar and formed in the circumstellar atmospheres of carbon-rich stars. Diamond has a characteristic signature enriched in the lightest and heaviest isotopes of Xe, and graphite shows a wide range in C isotopic compositions. SiC commonly has C and N isotopic signatures which are characteristic of H-burning in the C-N-O cycle in low-mass stars. Heavier elements such as Si, Ti, Xe, Ba, and Nd, carry an isotopic signature of the s-process. A minor population of SiC (known as Grains X, ca. 1%) are distinct in having decay products of short lived isotopes 26Al (now 26Mg), 44Ti (now 44Ca), and 49V (now 49Ti), as well as 28Si excesses which are characteristic of supernova nucleosynthesis. The preservation of these isotopic anomalies allows the examination of detailed nucleosynthetic pathways in stars.

  6. HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, R.W.

    1958-08-12

    The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

  7. Chromium isotopic anomalies in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Abundances of the chromium isotopes in terrestrial and bulk meteorite samples are identical to 0.01 percent. However, Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende meteorite show endemic isotopic anomalies in chromium which require at least three nucleosynthetic components. Large anomalies at Cr-54 in a special class of inclusions are correlated with large anomalies at Ca-48 and Ti-50 and provide strong support for a component reflecting neutron-rich nucleosynthesis at nuclear statistical equilibrium. This correlation suggests that materials from very near the core of an exploding massive star may be injected into the interstellar medium.

  8. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, Frederick T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  9. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, F.T.

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu/sub 5/ type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo/sub 4/ and CaNi/sub 5/, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen cn produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  10. Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

  11. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Solomon, David E.

    1977-01-01

    A container for the storage, shipping and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same which has compactness, which is safe against fracture or accident, and which is reusable. The container consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example, of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and will be retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates.

  12. MULTIPLE ORIGINS OF NITROGEN ISOTOPIC ANOMALIES IN METEORITES AND COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleon, Jerome

    2010-10-20

    Isotopic fractionation and mixing calculations compared with coupled hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic composition of organic molecules from primitive chondrites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), and comets C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and 81P/Wild2 reveal that meteoritic and cometary organic matter contains three different isotopic components of different origins. (1) A major component of carbonaceous chondrites, IDPs, and comets Hale-Bopp and Wild2 shows correlated H and N isotopic compositions attributable to isotope exchange between an organic matter of solar composition and a reservoir formed by ion-molecule reactions at T < 25 K under conditions where competing reactions are strongly inhibited, possibly in the final evolutionary stages of the presolar cloud core, or more likely in the coldest outer regions of the solar protoplanetary disk. (2) In carbonaceous chondrites, IDPs, and comet Wild2, this component is mixed with a {sup 15}N-rich component having identical {sup 15}N and D enrichments relative to the protosolar gas. Temperatures > 100 K deduced from the low D/H ratio and an anti-correlation between the abundance of this component and meteoritic age indicate a late origin in the solar protoplanetary disk. N{sub 2} self-shielding and the non-thermal nucleosynthesis of {sup 15}N upon irradiation are possible but unlikely sources of this component, and a chemical origin is preferred. (3) An interstellar component with highly fractionated hydrogen isotopes and unfractionated nitrogen isotopes is present in ordinary chondrites. A dominantly solar origin of D and {sup 15}N excesses in primitive solar system bodies shows that isotopic anomalies do not necessarily fingerprint an interstellar origin and implies that only a very small fraction of volatile interstellar matter survived the events of solar system formation.

  13. Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

    2013-06-25

    The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

  14. Isotopic anomalies from neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Schramm, D. N.; Wefel, J. P.; Blake, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The heavy isotopic anomalies observed recently in the fractionation and unknown nuclear inclusions from the Allende meteorite are explained by neutron reactions during the explosive carbon burning (ECB). This model produces heavy anomalies in the same zone where Al-26 and O-16 are produced, thus reducing the number of source zones required for the isotopic anomalies. Unlike the classical r-process, the ECB n-process avoids the problem with the Sr anomaly and may resolve the problem of conflicting time scales between Al-26 and the r-process isotopes I-129 and Pu-244. Experimental studies of Zr and Ce isotopic composition are proposed to test this model.

  15. Anomalies in the Decay of Particular Nuclear Isotopes (Briefing charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-08

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0109 ANOMALIES IN THE DECAY OF PARTICULAR NUCLEAR ISOTOPES Juan Klein Comision Chilena De Enlgia Nuclea Final Report 05/08/2014...Anomalies in the Decay of Particular Nuclear Isotopes 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0027 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...small annual oscillations in many of the same isotopes as the aforementioned 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nuclear Decay , Periodic Variations 16

  16. Hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlit, J.R.; Denton, W.H.; Sherman, R.H.

    Disclosed is a system of four cryogenic fractional distillation columns interlinked with two equilibrators for separating a DT and hydrogen feed stream into four product streams, consisting of a stream of high purity D/sub 2/, DT, T/sub 2/, and a tritium-free stream of HD for waste disposal.

  17. Hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlit, John R.; Denton, William H.; Sherman, Robert H.

    1982-01-01

    A system of four cryogenic fractional distillation columns interlinked with two equilibrators for separating a DT and hydrogen feed stream into four product streams, consisting of a stream of high purity D.sub.2, DT, T.sub.2, and a tritium-free stream of HD for waste disposal.

  18. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in methane plasma.

    PubMed

    Robert, François; Derenne, Sylvie; Lombardi, Guillaume; Hassouni, Khaled; Michau, Armelle; Reinhardt, Peter; Duhamel, Rémi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Biron, Kasia

    2017-01-31

    The hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H) is commonly used to reconstruct the chemical processes at the origin of water and organic compounds in the early solar system. On the one hand, the large enrichments in deuterium of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from the carbonaceous meteorites are interpreted as a heritage of the interstellar medium or resulting from ion-molecule reactions taking place in the diffuse part of the protosolar nebula. On the other hand, the molecular structure of this IOM suggests that organic radicals have played a central role in a gas-phase organosynthesis. So as to reproduce this type of chemistry between organic radicals, experiments based on a microwave plasma of CH4 have been performed. They yielded a black organic residue in which ion microprobe analyses revealed hydrogen isotopic anomalies at a submicrometric spatial resolution. They likely reflect differences in the D/H ratios between the various CHx radicals whose polymerization is at the origin of the IOM. These isotopic heterogeneities, usually referred to as hot and cold spots, are commensurable with those observed in meteorite IOM. As a consequence, the appearance of organic radicals in the ionized regions of the disk surrounding the Sun during its formation may have triggered the formation of organic compounds.

  19. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in methane plasma

    PubMed Central

    Robert, François; Derenne, Sylvie; Lombardi, Guillaume; Hassouni, Khaled; Michau, Armelle; Reinhardt, Peter; Duhamel, Rémi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Biron, Kasia

    2017-01-01

    The hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H) is commonly used to reconstruct the chemical processes at the origin of water and organic compounds in the early solar system. On the one hand, the large enrichments in deuterium of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from the carbonaceous meteorites are interpreted as a heritage of the interstellar medium or resulting from ion−molecule reactions taking place in the diffuse part of the protosolar nebula. On the other hand, the molecular structure of this IOM suggests that organic radicals have played a central role in a gas-phase organosynthesis. So as to reproduce this type of chemistry between organic radicals, experiments based on a microwave plasma of CH4 have been performed. They yielded a black organic residue in which ion microprobe analyses revealed hydrogen isotopic anomalies at a submicrometric spatial resolution. They likely reflect differences in the D/H ratios between the various CHx radicals whose polymerization is at the origin of the IOM. These isotopic heterogeneities, usually referred to as hot and cold spots, are commensurable with those observed in meteorite IOM. As a consequence, the appearance of organic radicals in the ionized regions of the disk surrounding the Sun during its formation may have triggered the formation of organic compounds. PMID:28096422

  20. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in methane plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, François; Derenne, Sylvie; Lombardi, Guillaume; Hassouni, Khaled; Michau, Armelle; Reinhardt, Peter; Duhamel, Rémi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Biron, Kasia

    2017-01-01

    The hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H) is commonly used to reconstruct the chemical processes at the origin of water and organic compounds in the early solar system. On the one hand, the large enrichments in deuterium of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from the carbonaceous meteorites are interpreted as a heritage of the interstellar medium or resulting from ion‑molecule reactions taking place in the diffuse part of the protosolar nebula. On the other hand, the molecular structure of this IOM suggests that organic radicals have played a central role in a gas-phase organosynthesis. So as to reproduce this type of chemistry between organic radicals, experiments based on a microwave plasma of CH4 have been performed. They yielded a black organic residue in which ion microprobe analyses revealed hydrogen isotopic anomalies at a submicrometric spatial resolution. They likely reflect differences in the D/H ratios between the various CHx radicals whose polymerization is at the origin of the IOM. These isotopic heterogeneities, usually referred to as hot and cold spots, are commensurable with those observed in meteorite IOM. As a consequence, the appearance of organic radicals in the ionized regions of the disk surrounding the Sun during its formation may have triggered the formation of organic compounds.

  1. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    SciTech Connect

    Hindin, Saul G.; Roberts, George W.

    1980-08-12

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

  2. Some key issues in isotopic anomalies - Astrophysical history and aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    Astrophysical history, particularly that period extending from stellar nucleosynthesis events to the formation of meteorites, is discussed as the key element for the understanding of isotopic anomalies in meteorites. The bulk homogeneity of the interstellar medium is considered, and it is argued that, despite the presence of spatial inhomogeneities due to different nucleosynthesis rates in different parts of the galaxy and supernova ejecta, a cosmic chemical memory of nucleosynthesis patterns, rather than an inhomogeneous injection, is the source of isotopic anomalies. According to this view, volatility patterns and some isotopic patterns are mapped onto a grain-size spectrum, and the FUN systematics may be explained by interstellar sputtering. Furthermore, meteoritic He and Ne abundances are inferred to be presolar, and the ubiquitous titanium isotopic anomalies are explained by processes of chemical fixation and condensation in varying environments.

  3. Hydrogen-isotope permeation barrier

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Van Deventer, Erven H.

    1977-01-01

    A composite including a plurality of metal layers has a Cu-Al-Fe bronze layer and at least one outer layer of a heat and corrosion resistant metal alloy. The bronze layer is ordinarily intermediate two outer layers of metal such as austenitic stainless steel, nickel alloys or alloys of the refractory metals. The composite provides a barrier to hydrogen isotopes, particularly tritium that can reduce permeation by at least about 30 fold and possibly more below permeation through equal thicknesses of the outer layer material.

  4. Barium and neodymium isotopic anomalies in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcculloch, M. T.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1978-01-01

    The discovery of Ba and Nd isotopic anomalies in two inclusions from the Allende meteorite is reported. The inclusions are Ca-Al-rich objects typical of the type considered as high-temperature condensation products in the solar nebula and contain distinctive Mg and O isotopic anomalies of the FUN (mass Fractionation, Unknown Nuclear processes) type. Mass-spectrometry results are discussed which show that inclusion C1 has anomalies in Ba at masses 134 and 136, while inclusion EK1-4-1 exhibits large marked negative anomalies at 130, 132, 134, and 136, as well as a positive anomaly at 137. It is also found that inclusion EK1-4-1 shows marked negative anomalies in Nd at masses 142, 146, 148, and 150, in addition to a positive anomaly at 145. These isotopic shifts are attributed to addition of r-process nuclei rather than mass fractionation. It is suggested that an onion-shell supernova explosion followed by injection into the solar nebula is the most likely generic model that may explain the observations.

  5. Apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McMullen, John W.; Wheeler, Michael G.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Sherman, Robert H.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas(es) is (are) stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forming at a significantly lower temperature).

  6. Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Chastagner, P.

    2001-08-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

  7. Ubiquitous isotopic anomalies in Ti from normal Allende inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    A novel technique for the high-precision isotopic analysis of titanium was applied to three terrestrial rocks and coarse- and fine-grained Allende inclusions. Repeated analyses of the three terrestrial rocks gave excellent agreement with a Ti metal standard. All seven Allende inclusions were previously determined to contain isotopically normal Nd and/or Sm, indicating that none belongs to a small group of peculiar intrusions. The discovery of widespread Ti isotopic anomalies in normal Allende inclusions establishes Ti as the first non-noble gas element studied since oxygen to show such isotopic heterogeneity. A survey of nucleosynthetic origins of Ti isotopes suggests that the dominant Ti-50 excesses in these inclusions are due to the relative enrichment of isotopes synthesized during hydrostatic burning in, or near, the core of a massive star.

  8. Zinc isotope anomalies. [in Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkening, J.; Papanastassiou, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Zn isotope composition in refractory-element-rich inclusions of the Allende meteorite are determined. Typical inclusions contain normal Zn. A unique inclusion of the Allende meteorite shows an excess for Zn-66 of 16.7 + or - 3.7 eu (1 eu = 0.01 percent) and a deficit for Zn-70 of 21 + or - 13 eu. These results indicate the preservation of exotic components even for volatile elements in this inclusion. The observed excess Zn-66 correlates with excesses for the neutron-rich isotopes of Ca-48, Ti-50, Cr-54, and Fe-58 in the same inclusion.

  9. Zinc isotope anomalies in Allende meteorite inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loss, R. D.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of Zn, Cr, Ti, and Ca have been measured in a number of CAIs from the Allende meteorite. The aim was to test astrophysical models which predict large excesses of Zn-66 to accompany excesses in the neutron-rich isotopes of Ca, Ti, Cr, and Ni. Some of the CAIs show clearly resolved but small excesses for Zn-66 which are at least an order of magnitude smaller than predicted. This result may simply reflect the volatility and chemical behavior of Zn as compared to the other (more refractory) anomalous elements found in these samples. Alternatively, revision of parameters and assumptions used for the model calculations may be required.

  10. Long-term sedimentary recycling of rare sulphur isotope anomalies.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Christopher T; Planavsky, Noah J; Lyons, Timothy W

    2013-05-02

    The accumulation of substantial quantities of O2 in the atmosphere has come to control the chemistry and ecological structure of Earth's surface. Non-mass-dependent (NMD) sulphur isotope anomalies in the rock record are the central tool used to reconstruct the redox history of the early atmosphere. The generation and initial delivery of these anomalies to marine sediments requires low partial pressures of atmospheric O2 (p(O2); refs 2, 3), and the disappearance of NMD anomalies from the rock record 2.32 billion years ago is thought to have signalled a departure from persistently low atmospheric oxygen levels (less than about 10(-5) times the present atmospheric level) during approximately the first two billion years of Earth's history. Here we present a model study designed to describe the long-term surface recycling of crustal NMD anomalies, and show that the record of this geochemical signal is likely to display a 'crustal memory effect' following increases in atmospheric p(O2) above this threshold. Once NMD anomalies have been buried in the upper crust they are extremely resistant to removal, and can be erased only through successive cycles of weathering, dilution and burial on an oxygenated Earth surface. This recycling results in the residual incorporation of NMD anomalies into the sedimentary record long after synchronous atmospheric generation of the isotopic signal has ceased, with dynamic and measurable signals probably surviving for as long as 10-100 million years subsequent to an increase in atmospheric p(O2) to more than 10(-5) times the present atmospheric level. Our results can reconcile geochemical evidence for oxygen production and transient accumulation with the maintenance of NMD anomalies on the early Earth, and suggest that future work should investigate the notion that temporally continuous generation of new NMD sulphur isotope anomalies in the atmosphere was likely to have ceased long before their ultimate disappearance from the rock record.

  11. Endemic Mo Isotopic Anomalies in Iron and Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Ngo, H. H.

    2004-01-01

    Mo in refractory interstellar grains shows large isotope anomalies. Recent Mo studies showed isotope effects in Allende and Murchison, and in iron meteorites, mesosiderites, and pallasites. Excesses of p- and r-process isotopes (or depletion of sprocess isotopes) of up to 3.5 epsilon units (epsilon u=parts in 10(exp 4)) were reported. We have reported on endemic isotope anomalies in Ru. Other workers have resolved no isotope anomalies for Mo or Ru and have claimed that the work by others is incorrect. Because Ru isotopes can interfere at Mo-96, Mo-98, Mo-100, we improved the chemical separations and eliminated interferences. For Mo work, we used the same solutions from which we separated and analyzed Ru. Three of the iron meteorites (Coahuila, Cape York, and Cape of Good Hope) were chosen for their large Mo isotopic effects. Mo was loaded on outgassed Re filaments, and then reduced; we used Ba(OH)2-NaOH as emitter, and measured Mo in static mode, as MoO3(-). We used Mo-98/Mo-96 for the mass fractionation correction (exponential law). No interferences from Ru or Zr isotopes were detected using the electron multiplier and no corrections were needed. For results on Mo standards we show 2 sigma(not 2 sigma mean) external precision better than: 0.7 epsilon u for Mo-94/Mo-96 and Mo-95/Mo-96; 1.0 epsilon u for Mo-92/Mo-96 and Mo-97/Mo-96; 1.4 epsilon u for Mo-100/Mo-96. Reproducibility for Mo standards is shown as contours (blue lines).

  12. The longevity of the South Pacific isotopic and thermal anomaly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staudigel, H.; Park, K.-H.; Pringle, M.; Rubenstone, J.L.; Smith, W.H.F.; Zindler, A.

    1991-01-01

    The South Pacific is anomalous in terms of the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios of its hot spot basalts, a thermally enhanced lithosphere, and possibly a hotter mantle. We have studied the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope characteristics of 12 Cretaceous seamounts in the Magellans, Marshall and Wake seamount groups (western Pacific Ocean) that originated in this South Pacific Isotopic and Thermal Anomaly (SOPITA). The range and values of isotope ratios of the Cretaceous seamount data are similar to those of the island chains of Samoa, Tahiti, Marquesas and Cook/Austral in the SOPITA. These define two major mantle components suggesting that isotopically extreme lavas have been produced at SOPITA for at least 120 Ma. Shallow bathymetry, and weakened lithosphere beneath some of the seamounts studied suggests that at least some of the thermal effects prevailed during the Cretaceous as well. These data, in the context of published data, suggest: 1. (1)|SOPITA is a long-lived feature, and enhanced heat transfer into the lithosphere and isotopically anomalous mantle appear to be an intrinsic characteristic of the anomaly. 2. (2)|The less pronounced depth anomaly during northwesterly plate motion suggests that some of the expressions of SOPITA may be controlled by the direction of plate motion. Motion parallel to the alignment of SOPITA hot spots focusses the heat (and chemical input into the lithosphere) on a smaller cross section than oblique motion. 3. (3)|The lithosphere in the eastern and central SOPITA appears to have lost its original depleted mantle characteristics, probably due to enhanced plume/lithosphere interaction, and it is dominated by isotopic compositions derived from plume materials. 4. (4)|We speculate (following D.L. Anderson) that the origin of the SOPITA, and possibly the DUPAL anomaly is largely due to focussed subduction through long periods of the geological history of the earth, creating a heterogeneous distribution of recycled components in the lower mantle

  13. Zinc isotope anomalies in Allende meteorite inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Loss, R.D.; Lugmair, G.W. )

    1990-09-01

    The isotopic compositions of Zn, Cr, Ti, and Ca have been measured in a number of CAIs from the Allende meteorite. The aim was to test astrophysical models which predict large excesses of Zn-66 to accompany excesses in the neutron-rich isotopes of Ca, Ti, Cr, and Ni. Some of the CAIs show clearly resolved but small excesses for Zn-66 which are at least an order of magnitude smaller than predicted. This result may simply reflect the volatility and chemical behavior of Zn as compared to the other (more refractory) anomalous elements found in these samples. Alternatively, revision of parameters and assumptions used for the model calculations may be required. 34 refs.

  14. Isotopic anomalies from neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Schramm, D. N.; Wefel, J. P.; Blake, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility that the newly discovered correlated isotopic anomalies for heavy elements in the Allende meteorite were synthesized in the secondary neutron capture episode during the explosive carbon burning, the possible source of the O-16 and Al-26 anomalies, is examined. Explosive carbon burning calculations under typical conditions were first performed to generate time profiles of temperature, density, and free particle concentrations. These quantities were inputted into a general neutron capture code which calculates the resulting isotopic pattern from exposing the preexisting heavy seed nuclei to these free particles during the explosive carbon burning conditions. The interpretation avoids the problem of the Sr isotopic data and may resolve the conflict between the time scales inferred from 1-129, Pu-244, and Al-26.

  15. Palladium Isotopic Evidence for Nucleosynthetic and Cosmogenic Isotope Anomalies in IVB Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Bernhard; Wittig, Nadine; Humayun, Munir; Leya, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    The origin of ubiquitous nucleosynthetic isotope anomalies in meteorites may represent spatial and/or temporal heterogeneity in the sources that supplied material to the nascent solar nebula, or enhancement by chemical processing. For elements beyond the Fe peak, deficits in s-process isotopes have been reported in some (e.g., Mo, Ru, W) but not all refractory elements studied (e.g., Os) that, among the iron meteorites, are most pronounced in IVB iron meteorites. Palladium is a non-refractory element in the same mass region as Mo and Ru. In this study, we report the first precise Pd isotopic abundances from IVB irons to test the mechanisms proposed for the origin of isotope anomalies. First, this study determined the existence of a cosmogenic neutron dosimeter from the reaction 103Rh(n, β-)104Pd in the form of excess 104Pd, correlated with excess 192Pt, in IVB irons. Second, all IVB irons show a deficit of the s-process only isotope 104Pd (\\varepsilon 104Pd = -0.48 ± 0.24), an excess of the r-only isotope 110Pd (\\varepsilon 110Pd = +0.46 ± 0.12), and no resolvable anomaly in the p-process 102Pd (\\varepsilon 102Pd = +1 ± 1). The magnitude of the Pd isotope anomaly is about half that predicted from a uniform depletion of the s-process yields from the correlated isotope anomalies of refractory Mo and Ru. The discrepancy is best understood as the result of nebular processing of the less refractory Pd, implying that all the observed nucleosynthetic anomalies in meteorites are likely to be isotopic relicts. The Mo-Ru-Pd isotope systematics do not support enhanced rates of the 22Ne(α,n)25Mg neutron source for the solar system s-process.

  16. Isotopic anomalies in high Z elements: Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G.W. Jr.; Essling, A.M.; Rauh, E.G.; Graczyk, D.G.

    1989-03-01

    Uranium in terrestrial volcanic ejecta from mantle-related sources has been analyzed mass spectrometrically. The objective was to seek supporting evidence for or refutation isotopic variations reported by Fried et al. (1985) for some such samples. The possibility that terrestrial U is not of constant isotopic composition is extraordinary. If true, mechanisms for creating the variation must be sought and the lack of homogenization within the earth addressed. Samples of 100 grams or more were processed in order to minimize reagent and environmental (laboratory) blank interference and to permit isolation of large amounts (several to tens of ..mu..g) of U for the mass spectrometer (MS) measurements, which utilizes aliquots of /approximately/1 ..mu..g. Aliquants from four volcanic samples gave data which indicate enrichments of /sub 235/U ranging from 0.2% to 5.9% in the 235/238 ratio relative normal uranium ratios. These relative enrichments are consistent with, and in some cases, higher than the 0.18% enrichment reported by Fried et al. (1985) for two volcanic lava samples. However, we were not able to reproduce their results on the Kilauea lava for which they report 0.18% /sup 235/U enrichment. The relative error in our MS ratios is 0.05% -- 0.07%. 1 tab.

  17. More on Ru Endemic Isotope Anomalies in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.; Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    We reported last year on endemic isotope anomalies for Ru in iron meteorites, pallasites, ordinary chondrites, and on a whole-rock sample of Allende. We have extended the Ru measurements to more meteorites, to refractory Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI) from Allende, and to a whole rock sample of Murchison (CM2). In a companion abstract we report on new measurements for the Mo isotopes, in some of the same samples. There has been a renewed interest in searching for isotope anomalies in this nuclide region, as Ru and Mo include many isotopes from r-, s-, and p-process nucleosynhesis. Furthermore, the Ru and Mo p-process isotopes show atypically high abundances, which have been hard to explain through the standard nucleosynthetic processes. Effects are possible in Ru-98 and Ru-99 from Tc-98 (with a poorly known t(sub 1/2)=4.2 to 10Ma) and from Tc-99 (t(sub 1/2)=0.21Ma). Natural Tc is now extinct on Earth due to the short half-lives, but may have been present in the early solar system. Both radiogenic and general isotope anomalies are important in understanding the processes for the formation of the early solar system. The current emphasis on Ru and Mo is also the result of the development of Negative-ion Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and of Multiple-Collector, Inductively-Coupled-Mass-Spectrometry. We have also developed specific chemical siparation techniques for Ru, which eliminated mass interference effects.

  18. Neutron-poor Nickel Isotope Anomalies in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel; Russell, Sara; Elliott, Tim

    2012-10-01

    We present new, mass-independent, Ni isotope data for a range of bulk chondritic meteorites. The data are reported as ɛ60Ni58/61, ɛ62Ni58/61, and ɛ64Ni58/61, or the parts per ten thousand deviations from a terrestrial reference, the NIST SRM 986 standard, of the 58Ni/61Ni internally normalized 60Ni/61Ni, 62Ni/61Ni, and 64Ni/61Ni ratios. The chondrites show a range of 0.15, 0.29, and 0.84 in ɛ60Ni58/61, ɛ62Ni58/61, and ɛ64Ni58/61 relative to a typical sample precision of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.08 (2 s.e.), respectively. The carbonaceous chondrites show the largest positive anomalies, enstatite chondrites have approximately terrestrial ratios, though only EH match Earth's composition within uncertainty, and ordinary chondrites show negative anomalies. The meteorite data show a strong positive correlation between ɛ62Ni58/61 and ɛ64Ni58/61, an extrapolation of which is within the error of the average of previous measurements of calcium-, aluminium-rich inclusions. Moreover, the slope of this bulk meteorite array is 3.003 ± 0.166 which is within the error of that expected for an anomaly solely on 58Ni. We also determined to high precision (~10 ppm per AMU) the mass-dependent fractionation of two meteorite samples which span the range of ɛ62Ni58/61 and ɛ64Ni58/61. These analyses show that "absolute" ratios of 58Ni/61Ni vary between these two samples whereas those of 62Ni/61Ni and 64Ni/61Ni do not. Thus, Ni isotopic differences seem most likely explained by variability in the neutron-poor 58Ni, and not correlated anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes, 62Ni and 64Ni. This contrasts with previous inferences from mass-independent measurements of Ni and other transition elements which invoked variable contributions of a neutron-rich component. We have examined different nucleosynthetic environments to determine the possible source of the anomalous material responsible for the isotopic variations observed in Ni and other transition elements within bulk samples. We find

  19. NEUTRON-POOR NICKEL ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN METEORITES

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel; Elliott, Tim; Russell, Sara

    2012-10-10

    We present new, mass-independent, Ni isotope data for a range of bulk chondritic meteorites. The data are reported as {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, or the parts per ten thousand deviations from a terrestrial reference, the NIST SRM 986 standard, of the {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni internally normalized {sup 60}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni ratios. The chondrites show a range of 0.15, 0.29, and 0.84 in {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61} relative to a typical sample precision of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.08 (2 s.e.), respectively. The carbonaceous chondrites show the largest positive anomalies, enstatite chondrites have approximately terrestrial ratios, though only EH match Earth's composition within uncertainty, and ordinary chondrites show negative anomalies. The meteorite data show a strong positive correlation between {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, an extrapolation of which is within the error of the average of previous measurements of calcium-, aluminium-rich inclusions. Moreover, the slope of this bulk meteorite array is 3.003 {+-} 0.166 which is within the error of that expected for an anomaly solely on {sup 58}Ni. We also determined to high precision ({approx}10 ppm per AMU) the mass-dependent fractionation of two meteorite samples which span the range of {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}. These analyses show that 'absolute' ratios of {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni vary between these two samples whereas those of {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni do not. Thus, Ni isotopic differences seem most likely explained by variability in the neutron-poor {sup 58}Ni, and not correlated anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 62}Ni and {sup 64}Ni. This contrasts with previous inferences from mass-independent measurements of Ni and other

  20. Mass Fractionation Laws, Mass-Independent Effects, and Isotopic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Schauble, Edwin A.

    2016-06-01

    Isotopic variations usually follow mass-dependent fractionation, meaning that the relative variations in isotopic ratios scale with the difference in mass of the isotopes involved (e.g., δ17O ≈ 0.5×δ18O). In detail, however, the mass dependence of isotopic variations is not always the same, and different natural processes can define distinct slopes in three-isotope diagrams. These variations are subtle, but improvements in analytical capabilities now allow precise measurement of these effects and make it possible to draw inferences about the natural processes that caused them (e.g., reaction kinetics versus equilibrium isotope exchange). Some elements, in some sample types, do not conform to the regularities of mass-dependent fractionation. Oxygen and sulfur display a rich phenomenology of mass-independent fractionation, documented in the laboratory, in the rock record, and in the modern atmosphere. Oxygen in meteorites shows isotopic variations that follow a slope-one line (δ17O ≈ δ18O) whose origin may be associated with CO photodissociation. Sulfur mass-independent fractionation in ancient sediments provides the tightest constraint on the oxygen partial pressure in the Archean and the timing of Earth's surface oxygenation. Heavier elements also show departures from mass fractionation that can be ascribed to exotic effects associated with chemical reactions such as magnetic effects (e.g., Hg) or the nuclear field shift effect (e.g., U or Tl). Some isotopic variations in meteorites and their constituents cannot be related to the terrestrial composition by any known process, including radiogenic, nucleogenic, and cosmogenic effects. Those variations have a nucleosynthetic origin, reflecting the fact that the products of stellar nucleosynthesis were not fully homogenized when the Solar System formed. Those anomalies are found at all scales, from nanometer-sized presolar grains to bulk terrestrial planets. They can be used to learn about stellar

  1. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  2. Hydrogen isotope separation installation for tritium facility

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, B.M.; Perevezentsev, A.N.; Selivanenko, I.L.; Tenyaev, B.N.; Vedeneev, A.I.; Golubkov, A.N.

    1995-10-01

    The separation of hydrogen isotopes in the hydrogen-palladium system in sectioned separation columns with the simulation of counter-current isotopic exchange is described. The separation efficiency of sectioned columns is investigated with the experimental installation as a function of various parameters. The separation of deuterium-tritium mixtures with high tritium concentrations is tested with the pilot installation operating at room temperature and atmospheric hydrogen pressure. Due to very high separation efficiency, flexibility and simplicity of operation separation installations with sectioned columns are ideally suitable for tritium laboratories and facilities dealing with separation of hydrogen isotopes. Estimation of applicability of sectioned columns for regeneration of exhaust gas in a fuel cycle of thermonuclear reactors, such as JET and ITER, shows the number of advantages of separation installations with sectioned columns. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Apparatus for separating and recovering hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for recovering hydrogen and separating its isotopes. The apparatus includes a housing bearing at least a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet. A baffle is disposed within the housing, attached thereto by a bracket. A hollow conduit is coiled about the baffle, in spaced relation to the baffle and the housing. The coiled conduit is at least partially filled with a hydride. The hydride can be heated to a high temperature and cooled to a low temperature quickly by circulating a heat transfer fluid in the housing. The spacing between the baffle and the housing maximizes the heat exchange rate between the fluid in the housing and the hydride in the conduit. The apparatus can be used to recover hydrogen isotopes (protium, deuterium and tritium) from gaseous mixtures, or to separate hydrogen isotopes from each other.

  4. Detection of oxygen isotopic anomaly in terrestrial atmospheric carbonates and its implications to Mars

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, R.; Abramian, A.; Horn, J.; Dominguez, G.; Sullivan, R.; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    The debate of life on Mars centers around the source of the globular, micrometer-sized mineral carbonates in the ALH84001 meteorite; consequently, the identification of Martian processes that form carbonates is critical. This paper reports a previously undescribed carbonate formation process that occurs on Earth and, likely, on Mars. We identified micrometer-sized carbonates in terrestrial aerosols that possess excess 17O (0.4–3.9‰). The unique O-isotopic composition mechanistically describes the atmospheric heterogeneous chemical reaction on aerosol surfaces. Concomitant laboratory experiments define the transfer of ozone isotopic anomaly to carbonates via hydrogen peroxide formation when O3 reacts with surface adsorbed water. This previously unidentified chemical reaction scenario provides an explanation for production of the isotopically anomalous carbonates found in the SNC (shergottites, nakhlaites, chassignites) Martian meteorites and terrestrial atmospheric carbonates. The anomalous hydrogen peroxide formed on the aerosol surfaces may transfer its O-isotopic signature to the water reservoir, thus producing mass independently fractionated secondary mineral evaporites. The formation of peroxide via heterogeneous chemistry on aerosol surfaces also reveals a previously undescribed oxidative process of utility in understanding ozone and oxygen chemistry, both on Mars and Earth. PMID:21059939

  5. Detection of oxygen isotopic anomaly in terrestrial atmospheric carbonates and its implications to Mars.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, R; Abramian, A; Horn, J; Dominguez, G; Sullivan, R; Thiemens, Mark H

    2010-11-23

    The debate of life on Mars centers around the source of the globular, micrometer-sized mineral carbonates in the ALH84001 meteorite; consequently, the identification of Martian processes that form carbonates is critical. This paper reports a previously undescribed carbonate formation process that occurs on Earth and, likely, on Mars. We identified micrometer-sized carbonates in terrestrial aerosols that possess excess (17)O (0.4-3.9‰). The unique O-isotopic composition mechanistically describes the atmospheric heterogeneous chemical reaction on aerosol surfaces. Concomitant laboratory experiments define the transfer of ozone isotopic anomaly to carbonates via hydrogen peroxide formation when O(3) reacts with surface adsorbed water. This previously unidentified chemical reaction scenario provides an explanation for production of the isotopically anomalous carbonates found in the SNC (shergottites, nakhlaites, chassignites) Martian meteorites and terrestrial atmospheric carbonates. The anomalous hydrogen peroxide formed on the aerosol surfaces may transfer its O-isotopic signature to the water reservoir, thus producing mass independently fractionated secondary mineral evaporites. The formation of peroxide via heterogeneous chemistry on aerosol surfaces also reveals a previously undescribed oxidative process of utility in understanding ozone and oxygen chemistry, both on Mars and Earth.

  6. Review of Hydrogen Isotope Permeability Through Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, S. A.

    1983-08-15

    This report is the first part of a comprehensive summary of the literature on hydrogen isotope permeability through materials that do not readily form hydrides. While we mainly focus on pure metals with low permeabilities because of their importance to tritium containment, we also give data on higher-permeability materials such as iron, nickel, steels, and glasses.

  7. METHOD OF SEPARATING HYDROGEN ISOTOPES

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, O.N.

    1958-12-01

    The process of separating a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and tritium by contacting finely dlvided palladium with the mixture in order to adsorb the gases, then gradually heating the palladium and collecting the evolved fractlons, is described. The fraction first given off is richer in trltium than later fractions.

  8. Isotope effects of hydrogen and atom tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Pliss, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    The abnormally high mass-dependent isotope effects in liquid-phase hydrogen (deuterium) atom transfer reactions, which are customarily regarded as quantum effects, are actually the products of two classical effects, namely, kinetic and thermodynamic ones. The former is determined by the rate constants for atom transfer and the latter is caused by nonbonded (or noncovalent) isotope effects in the solvation of protiated and deuterated reacting molecules. This product can mimic the large isotope effects that are usually attributed to tunnelling. In enzymatic reactions, tunnelling is of particular interest; its existence characterizes an enzyme as a rigid molecular machine in which the residence time of reactants on the reaction coordinate exceeds the waiting time for the tunnelling event. The magnitude of isotope effect becomes a characteristic parameter of the internal dynamics of the enzyme catalytic site. The bibliography includes 61 references.

  9. Isotopic diversity in nebular dust: The distribution of Ti isotopic anomalies in carbonaceous chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Niemeyer, S. )

    1988-12-01

    Average Ti isotopic patterns are derived for each class of carbonaceous chondrite from a chemically characterized suite of whole-rock samples. There is a well-resolved excess of {sup 50}Ti in a subset of CI meteorites. Mean values of the {sup 50}Ti excess for the four classes span a range of only 2 {epsilon}-units, with an apparent positive correlation with Al content. Previous evidence for anomalies in chondrules is augmented here by demonstrating that: (1) the more pristine Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) in Efremovka show the same isotopic pattern as the typical Allende CAI; and, (2) CM and CV matrix carry {sup 50}Ti excesses of about 2 {epsilon}-units. The distribution of Ti isotopic anomalies among matrix, chondrules, and CAIs suggests a model in which all three constituents formed from precursor-assemblages in which some chemical memories were still intact; the isotopic differences reflect fractionations among the carrier phases of the different isotopic components. Chondrules formed by a mostly closed-system melting of their precursors, and thus provide a recording of the extent of nebular heterogeneity on the mg-size scale. The larger anomalies in CAIs, compared to matrix and most (but not all) chondrules, are attributed primarily to an open- rather than closed-system processing of the CAI precursors. Precursors of both FUN and normal CAIs experienced an episode of intense processing, perhaps partial melting, that created the FUN characteristics, but for normal CAIs the FUN effects were erased by subsequent isotopic equilibration and exchange.

  10. Collision integrals for isotopic hydrogen molecules.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. J.; Munn, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the effects of reduced mass and differences in asymmetry on the collision integrals and thermal diffusion factors of isotopic hydrogen systems. Each system selected for study consisted of two diatoms, one in the j = 0 rotation state and the other in the j = 1 state. The molecules interacted with a Lennard-Jones type potential modified to include angular terms. A set of cross sections and collision integrals were obtained for each system.

  11. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of zeolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios for natural samples of the zeolites analcime, chabazite, clinoptilolite, laumontite, mordenite, and natrolite have been obtained. The zeolite samples were classified into sedimentary, hydrothermal, and igneous groups. The ratios for each species of zeolite are reported. The results are used to discuss the origin of channel water, the role of zeolites in water-rock interaction, and the possibility that a calibrated zeolite could be used as a low-temperature geothermometer.

  12. Biogeochemistry of the stable hydrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estep, Marilyn F.; Hoering, Thomas C.

    1980-08-01

    The fractionation of H isotopes between the water in the growth medium and the organically bonded H from microalgae cultured under conditions, where light intensity and wavelength, temperature, nutrient availability, and the H isotope ratio of the water were controlled, is reproducible and light dependant. All studies were based either on the H isotope ratios of the total organic H or on the lipids, where most of the H is firmly bonded to C. H bonded into other macromolecules, proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids, does not exchange with water, when algae are incubated in water enriched with deuterium. Only after the destruction of quaternary H bonds are labile hydrogens in macromolecules free to exchange with water. By growing algae (18 strains), including blue-green algae, green algae and diatoms, in continuous light, the isotope fractionations in photosynthesis were reproducibly -93 to -178 %. depending on the organism tested. This fractionation was not temperature dependent. Microalgae grown in total darkness with an organic substrate did not show the isotope fractionation seen in cells grown in light. In both light- and dark-grown algae, however, additional depletion of deuterium (-30 to -60%.) in cellular organic matter occurs during the metabolism of carbohydrates to form lipids. Plants from several natural populations also fractionated isotopes during photosynthesis by an average of -90 to -110%. In addition, the organically bonded H in nonsaponifiable lipids was further fractionated by -80%. from that in saponifiable lipids, isolated from two geographically distinct populations of marsh plants. This difference between H isotope ratios of these two groups of lipids provides an endogenous isotopic marker.

  13. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1990-12-11

    This patent describes hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters. Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  14. The isotopic homogeneity in the early solar system: Revisiting the CAI oxygen isotopic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozima, M.; Yamada, A.

    2009-12-01

    Since the first discovery of the mass-independently fractionated oxygen isotopes in anhydrous, high temperature Ca-Al rich inclusion minerals in carbonaceous meteorites (CAIs) by Clayton et al. (1), their common occurrence in primitive meteorites has generally been regarded to reflect some fundamental process prevalent in the early solar nebula. The CAI oxygen isotopic composition is uniquely characterized by (i) large mass independent isotopic fractionation and (ii) their isotopic data in an oxygen three isotope plot (δ17O - δ18O (δ17O ≡ {(17O/16O)/(17O/16O)SMOW - 1} × 1000) yield nearly a straight line with a slope 1.0. In establishing these characteristics, ion microprobe analyses has played a central role, especially an isotopic mapping technique (isotopography) was crucial (e.g., 2). The extraordinary oxygen isotopic ratio in CAIs is widely attributed to the self-shielding absorption of UV radiation in CO, one of the dominant chemical compounds in the early solar nebula (3). However, the self-shielding scenario necessarily leads to the unusual prediction that a mean solar oxygen isotopic composition differs from most of planetary bodies including Earth, Moon, and Mars. If the self-shielding process were indeed responsible to the CAI oxygen isotopic anomaly, this would require a fundamental revision of the current theory of the origin of the solar system, which generally assumes the initial total vaporization of nebula material to give rise to isotopic homogenization. The GENESIS mission launched in 2001(4), which collected oxygen in the solar wind was hoped to resolve the isotopic composition of the Sun. However, because of difficulties in correcting for instrumental and more importantly for intrinsic isotopic fractionation between the SW and the Sun, a final answer is yet to be seen (5). Here, we show on the basis of the oxygen isotopic fractionation systematics that the self shielding hypothesis cannot explain the key characteristics of the CAI oxygen

  15. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOEpatents

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1991-08-20

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

  16. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOEpatents

    Knize, Randall J.; Cecchi, Joseph L.

    1990-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  17. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOEpatents

    Knize, Randall J.; Cecchi, Joseph L.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  18. Strong water isotopic anomalies in the martian atmosphere: probing current and ancient reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, G L; Mumma, M J; Novak, R E; Käufl, H U; Hartogh, P; Encrenaz, T; Tokunaga, A; Khayat, A; Smith, M D

    2015-04-10

    We measured maps of atmospheric water (H2O) and its deuterated form (HDO) across the martian globe, showing strong isotopic anomalies and a significant high deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) enrichment indicative of great water loss. The maps sample the evolution of sublimation from the north polar cap, revealing that the released water has a representative D/H value enriched by a factor of about 7 relative to Earth's ocean [Vienna standard mean ocean water (VSMOW)]. Certain basins and orographic depressions show even higher enrichment, whereas high-altitude regions show much lower values (1 to 3 VSMOW). Our atmospheric maps indicate that water ice in the polar reservoirs is enriched in deuterium to at least 8 VSMOW, which would mean that early Mars (4.5 billion years ago) had a global equivalent water layer at least 137 meters deep.

  19. Strong Water Isotopic Anomalies in the Martian Atmosphere: Probing Current and Ancient Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.; Novak, R. E.; Käufl, H. U.; Hartogh, P.; Encrenaz, T.; Tokunaga, A.; Khayat, A.; Smith, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    We measured maps of atmospheric water (H2O) and its deuterated form (HDO) across the martian globe, showing strong isotopic anomalies and a significant high deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) enrichment indicative of great water loss. The maps sample the evolution of sublimation from the north polar cap, revealing that the released water has a representative D/H value enriched by a factor of about 7 relative to Earth's ocean [Vienna standard mean ocean water (VSMOW)]. Certain basins and orographic depressions show even higher enrichment, whereas high-altitude regions show much lower values (1 to 3 VSMOW). Our atmospheric maps indicate that water ice in the polar reservoirs is enriched in deuterium to at least 8 VSMOW, which would mean that early Mars (4.5 billion years ago) had a global equivalent water layer at least 137 meters deep.

  20. Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; McComas, David J.; Scime, Earl E.

    1996-01-01

    The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

  1. Large sulfur-isotope anomaly in nonvolcanic sulfate aerosol and its implications for the Archean atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Robina; Abaunza, Mariana M.; Jackson, Teresa L.; McCabe, Justin; Savarino, Joël; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur-isotopic anomalies have been used to trace the evolution of oxygen in the Precambrian atmosphere and to document past volcanic eruptions. High-precision sulfur quadruple isotope measurements of sulfate aerosols extracted from a snow pit at the South Pole (1984–2001) showed the highest S-isotopic anomalies (Δ33S = +1.66‰ and Δ36S = +2‰) in a nonvolcanic (1998–1999) period, similar in magnitude to Pinatubo and Agung, the largest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century. The highest isotopic anomaly may be produced from a combination of different stratospheric sources (sulfur dioxide and carbonyl sulfide) via SOx photochemistry, including photoexcitation and photodissociation. The source of anomaly is linked to super El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (1997–1998)-induced changes in troposphere–stratosphere chemistry and dynamics. The data possess recurring negative S-isotope anomalies (Δ36S = −0.6 ± 0.2‰) in nonvolcanic and non-ENSO years, thus requiring a second source that may be tropospheric. The generation of nonvolcanic S-isotopic anomalies in an oxidizing atmosphere has implications for interpreting Archean sulfur deposits used to determine the redox state of the paleoatmosphere. PMID:25092338

  2. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  3. [Fractionation of hydrogen stable isotopes in the human body].

    PubMed

    Siniak, Iu E; Grigor'ev, A I; Skuratov, V M; Ivanova, S M; Pokrovskiĭ, B G

    2006-01-01

    Fractionation of hydrogen stable isotopes was studied in 9 human subjects in a chamber with normal air pressure imitating a space cabin. Mass-spectrometry of isotopes in blood, urine, saliva, and potable water evidenced increases in the contents of heavy H isotope (deuterium) in the body liquids as compared with water. These results support one of the theories according to which the human organism eliminates heavy stable isotopes of biogenous chemical elements.

  4. Equations of state and phase diagrams of hydrogen isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Urlin, V. D.

    2013-11-15

    A new form of the semiempirical equation of state proposed for the liquid phase of hydrogen isotopes is based on the assumption that its structure is formed by cells some of which contain hydrogen molecules and others contain hydrogen atoms. The values of parameters in the equations of state of the solid (molecular and atomic) phases as well as of the liquid phase of hydrogen isotopes (protium and deuterium) are determined. Phase diagrams, shock adiabats, isentropes, isotherms, and the electrical conductivity of compressed hydrogen are calculated. Comparison of the results of calculations with available experimental data in a wide pressure range demonstrates satisfactory coincidence.

  5. Hydrogen isotope systematics of submarine basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyser, T.K.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The D/H ratios and water contents in fresh submarine basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the East Pacific Rise, and Hawaii indicate that the primary D/H ratios of many submarine lavas have been altered by processes including (1) outgassing, (2) addition of seawater at magmatic temperature, and (3) low-temperature hydration of glass. Decreases in ??D and H2O+ from exteriors to interiors of pillows are explained by outgassing of water whereas inverse relations between ??D and H2O+ in basalts from the Galapagos Rise and the FAMOUS Area are attributed to outgassing of CH4 and H2. A good correlation between ??D values and H2O is observed in a suite of submarine tholeiites dredged from the Kilauea East Rift Zone where seawater (added directly to the magma), affected only the isotopic compositions of hydrogen and argon. Analyses of some glassy rims indicate that the outer millimeter of the glass can undergo lowtemperature hydration by hydroxyl groups having ??D values as low as -100. ??D values vary with H2O contents of subaerial transitional basalts from Molokai, Hawaii, and subaerial alkali basalts from the Society Islands, indicating that the primary ??D values were similar to those of submarine lavas. Extrapolations to possible unaltered ??D values and H2O contents indicate that the primary ??D values of most thoteiite and alkali basalts are near -80 ?? 5: the weight percentages of water are variable, 0.15-0.35 for MOR tholeiites, about 0.25 for Hawaiian tholeiites, and up to 1.1 for alkali basalts. The primary ??D values of -80 for most basalts are comparable to those measured for deep-seated phlogopites. These results indicate that hydrogen, in marked contrast to other elements such as Sr, Nd, Pb, and O, has a uniform isotopic composition in the mantle. This uniformity is best explained by the presence of a homogeneous reservoir of hydrogen that has existed in the mantle since the very early history of the Earth. ?? 1984.

  6. On strontium isotopic anomalies and odd-A p-process abundances. [in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    Several aspects of the nucleosynthesis of Sr isotopes are considered in an attempt to shed light on the problem of the Sr isotopic anomalies discovered in an inclusion of the Allende meteorite. Decomposition of the Sr isotopes into average r-, s-, and p-process nucleosynthetic classes is performed. It is suggested that the Allende inclusion most likely has an excess of s-process Sr and that the initial Sr-87/Sr-86 isotopic ratio is probably slightly more primitive than basaltic achondrites. The results also show that Sn-115 is mostly due to the r-process and that odd-A yields are very small. It is concluded that if the Sr anomaly in the inclusion is an average s enhancement, it argues somewhat in favor of a model of gas/dust fractionation of s and r isotopes during accumulation of the inclusion parent in the protosolar cloud.

  7. Isotopic inferences of ancient biochemistries - Carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schidlowski, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    In processes of biological incorporation and subsequent biochemical processing sizable isotope effects occur as a result of both thermodynamic and kinetic fractionations which take place during metabolic and biosynthetic reactions. In this chapter a review is provided of earlier work and recent studies on isotope fractionations in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen. Attention is given to the biochemistry of carbon isotope fractionation, carbon isotope fractionation in extant plants and microorganisms, isotope fractionation in the terrestrial carbon cycle, the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism on the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon, the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon through time, implications of the sedimentary carbon isotope record, the biochemistry of sulfur isotope fractionation, pathways of the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, and the D/H ratio in naturally occurring materials.

  8. Hydrogen isotope type-curves of very hot crude oils.

    PubMed

    Fekete, József; Sajgó, Csanád; Demény, Attila

    2011-01-15

    Several crude oil accumulations in the Pannonian Basin are trapped in uncommonly hot (>170°C) reservoirs. Their maturities range from mature to very mature on the basis of cracking parameters of their biological marker homologous series (ratio of products to reactants). A stable carbon isotopic study of these oils, poor in biological markers commonly used for correlation purposes, did not provide a reliable oil-to-oil correlation. As an alternative tool, the hydrogen isotope compositions of oil fractions separated on the basis of different polarities were measured, and hydrogen isotope type-curves were generated for a set of mature to very mature crude oil samples. This method of presenting hydrogen isotope composition of fractions as type-curves is novel. Nineteen samples (17 crude oils from SE-Hungary, 1 oil condensate and 1 artificial oil) were chosen for the present study. The aim was to examine the applicability of hydrogen isotope type-curves in oil-to-oil correlation and to test the simultaneous application of carbon and hydrogen isotope type-curves in the field of petroleum geochemistry. We have shown that, although the conventionally used co-variation plots proved to be inadequate for the correlation of these hot and mature oils, the simultaneous use of carbon and the newly introduced hydrogen isotope type-curves allows us to group and distinguish oils of different origins.

  9. Nitrogen Isotopic Anomalies in a Hydrous Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. B.; Dai, Z. R.; Weber, P. K.; Graham, G. A.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Bajt, S.; Ishii, H.; Bradley, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere are the fine-grained end member (5 - 50 microns in size) of the meteoritic material available for investigation in the laboratory. IDPs are derived from either cometary or asteroidal sources. Some IDPs contain cosmically primitive materials with isotopic signatures reflecting presolar origins. Recent detailed studies using the NanoSIMS have shown there is a wide variation of isotopic signatures within individual IDPs; grains with a presolar signature have been observed surrounded by material with a solar isotopic composition. The majority of IDPs studied have been anhydrous. We report here results from integrated NanoSIMS/FIB/TEM/Synchrotron IR studies of a hydrous IDP, focused on understanding the correlations between the isotopic, mineralogical and chemical compositions of IDPs.

  10. Endemic Ru Isotopic Anomalies in Iron Meteorites and in Allende

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Small variations for Mo isotopes have been observed recently in the Allende meteorite and in iron meteorites, mesosiderites, and pallasites, using ICPMS. Large effects for Mo have been reported for leaches of Orgueil and in SiC and graphite from Murchison. Variations for Mo in bulk Allende and in Murchison have also been presented by NTIMS. Effects in Ru isotopes can define further the preserved exotic r, s, and p contributions in this mass region, and possible effects in Ru-98 and Ru-99 from Tc-98 (4.2 Ma half-life) and Tc-99 (0.21 Ma half-life). Previous attempts at determination of Ru isotopes yielded no resolved effects. The present work represents a substantial improvement in precision over the earlier work. Chemical and mass spectrometric analytical techniques are presented to determine the Ru isotope compositions in terrestrial standards and in meteorites.

  11. A superior process for forming titanium hydrogen isotopic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Process forms stoichiometric, continuous, strongly bonded titanium hydrogen isotopic films. Films have thermal and electrical conductivities approximately the same as bulk pure titanium, ten times greater than those of usual thin films.

  12. Carbon Isotopic tests on the Origins of the Shuram Anomaly from the San Juan Fm., Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgin, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon isotope anomalies are associated with perturbations to the carbon cycle that offer insight into the geochemical evolution of the Earth. The largest Carbon isotope anomaly in earth history is the Shuram, which remains poorly understood in spite of being linked to the oxygenation of earth, the rise of metazoans, and a complete reorganization of the carbon cycle. From a basin transect of the carbonate-dominated San Juan Formation in southern Peru, we present evidence for the first clear example of the Shuram isotope anomaly in South America. Unique to this succession are ~140 meters of organic-rich black shale within the anomaly, containing as much as 4% TOC. Preliminary data from the organic-rich black shales of the San Juan Fm. confirm that δ13Corg is relatively invariant and does not covary with δ13Ccarb. These observations are consistent with other Shuram sections and support various models: an exogenous carbon source, an enlarged dissolved organic carbon pool, as well as authigenic carbonate production in organic-rich anoxic sediments. Critical tests of these models have been complicated by a paucity of organics in Shuram facies worldwide. Further analyses of the robust organics from the Shuram facies of the San Juan Fm. therefore hold promise in shedding light on the origin of the Shuram isotope anomaly and critical earth history events to which it has been linked.

  13. Carbon isotope anomalies in carbonates of the Karelian series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iudovich, Ia. E.; Makarikhin, V. V.; Medvedev, P. V.; Sukhanov, N. V.

    1990-07-01

    Results are presented on carbon isotope distributions in carbonates of the Karelian complex. A highly anomalous isotopic composition was found in carbonate rocks aged from 2.6 to 1.9 b.y. In the stromatolitic carbonates of the Onega water table, delta-(C-13) reaches a value of +18 percent, while the shungite layer of the Zaonega horizon is characterized by a wide dispersion (from +7.9 to -11.8 percent). These data are in good agreement with the known geochemical boundary (about 2.2 b.y. ago) in the history of the earth.

  14. A search for nickel isotopic anomalies in iron meteorites and chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. H.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2009-03-01

    We report Ni isotopic data, for 58,60-62Ni, on (1) FeNi metal and sulfides in different groups of iron meteorites, (2) sulfides and a whole rock sample of the St. Séverin chondrite, and (3) chondrules from the Chainpur chondrite. We have developed improved, Multiple-Collector, Positive ion Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric (MC-PTIMS) techniques, with Ni + ionization efficiency at 1‰, and chemical separation techniques for Ni which reduce mass interferences to the 1 ppm level, so that no mass interference corrections need be applied, except for 64Ni (from 64Zn, at the 0.1‰ level), for which we do not report results. We normalize the data to 62Ni/ 58Ni to correct for mass dependent isotope fractionation. No evidence was found for resolved radiogenic or general Ni isotope anomalies at the resolution levels of 0.2 and 0.5 ɛu (ɛu = 0.01%) for 60Ni/ 58Ni and 61Ni/ 58Ni, respectively. From the 56Fe/ 58Ni ratios and ɛ( 60Ni/ 58Ni) values, we calculate upper limits for the initial value of ( 60Fe/ 56Fe) 0 of (a) <2.7 × 10 -7 for Chainpur chondrules, (b) <10 -8 for the St. Séverin sulfide, and (c) <4 × 10 -9 for sulfides from iron meteorites. We measured some of the same meteorites measured by other workers, who reported isotopic anomalies in Ni, using Multiple-Collector, Inductively-Coupled Mass Spectrometry. Our results do not support the previous reports of Ni isotopic anomalies in sulfide samples from Mundrabilla by Cook et al. [Cook D. L., Clayton R. N., Wadhwa M., Janney P. E., and Davis A. M. (2008). Nickel isotopic anomalies in troilite from iron meteorites. Geophy. Res. Lett. 35, L01203] and in sulfides from Toluca and Odessa by Quitté et al. [Quitté G., Meier M., Latkoczy C., Halliday A. N., and Gunther D., (2006). Nickel isotopes in iron meteorites-nucleosynthetic anomalies in sulfides with no effects in metals and no trace of 60Fe. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 242, 16-25]. Hence, we find no need for specialized physical-chemical planetary processes

  15. Production of negative ions of hydrogen isotopes. [Patent application

    SciTech Connect

    Garscadden, A.

    1981-05-14

    A process for generating negative ions of hydrogen isotopes is described which comprises cooling the hydrogen gas below 300K, and preferably to about 200K, vibrationally exciting the molecules of the gas, and then dissociating the molecules by electron impact into neutral hydrogen atoms and negative hydrogen ions. Alternatively, the gas may first be vibrationally excited by heating or the like, and then cooled translationally, for example, by rapid expansion prior to dissociation by electron impact. The processes of this invention are characterized by control of non-equilibrium conditions to obtain large increases in dissociative attachment rates by increasing the population of hydrogen gas molecules having a higher vibrational energy state.

  16. Interactions of Hydrogen Isotopes and Oxides with Metal Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2008-08-01

    Understanding and accounting for interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their oxides with metal surfaces is important for persons working with tritium systems. Reported data from several investigators have shown that the processes of oxidation, adsorption, absorption, and permeation are all coupled and interactive. A computer model has been developed for predicting the interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their corresponding oxides in a flowing carrier gas stream with the walls of a metallic tube, particularly at low hydrogen concentrations. An experiment has been constructed to validate the predictive model. Predictions from modeling lead to unexpected experiment results.

  17. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Ice Ih anomalies: Thermal contraction, anomalous volume isotope effect, and pressure-induced amorphization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Michael A.; Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Hirata, So

    2016-05-01

    Ice Ih displays several anomalous thermodynamic properties such as thermal contraction at low temperatures, an anomalous volume isotope effect (VIE) rendering the volume of D2O ice greater than that of H2O ice, and a pressure-induced transition to the high-density amorphous (HDA) phase. Furthermore, the anomalous VIE increases with temperature, despite its quantum-mechanical origin. Here, embedded-fragment ab initio second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theory in the quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) is applied to the Gibbs energy of an infinite, proton-disordered crystal of ice Ih at wide ranges of temperatures and pressures. The quantum effect of nuclei moving in anharmonic potentials is taken into account from first principles without any empirical or nonsystematic approximation to either the electronic or vibrational Hamiltonian. MP2 predicts quantitatively correctly the thermal contraction at low temperatures, which is confirmed to originate from the volume-contracting hydrogen-bond bending modes (acoustic phonons). It qualitatively reproduces (but underestimates) the thermal expansion at higher temperatures, caused by the volume-expanding hydrogen-bond stretching (and to a lesser extent librational) modes. The anomalous VIE is found to be the result of subtle cancellations among closely competing isotope effects on volume from all modes. Consequently, even ab initio MP2 with the aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets has difficulty reproducing this anomaly, yielding qualitatively varied predictions of the sign of the VIE depending on such computational details as the choice of the embedding field. However, the temperature growth of the anomalous VIE is reproduced robustly and is ascribed to the librational modes. These solid-state MP2 calculations, as well as MP2 Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, find a volume collapse and a loss of symmetry and long-range order in ice Ih upon pressure loading of 2.35 GPa or higher. Concomitantly, rapid softening of

  19. Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

  20. Process for recovering evolved hydrogen enriched with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope

    DOEpatents

    Tanaka, John; Reilly, Jr., James J.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a separation means and method for enriching a hydrogen atmosphere with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope by using a solid titaniun alloy hydride. To this end, the titanium alloy hydride containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of vanadium, chromium, manganese, molybdenum, iron, cobalt and nickel is contacted with a circulating gaseous flow of hydrogen containing at least one heavy hydrogen isotope at a temperature in the range of -20.degree. to +40.degree. C and at a pressure above the dissociation pressure of the hydrided alloy selectively to concentrate at least one of the isotopes of hydrogen in the hydrided metal alloy. The contacting is continued until equilibrium is reached, and then the gaseous flow is isolated while the temperature and pressure of the enriched hydride remain undisturbed selectively to isolate the hydride. Thereafter, the enriched hydrogen is selectively recovered in accordance with the separation factor (S.F.) of the alloy hydride employed.

  1. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Fractionation during Anaerobic Biodegradation of Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Silvia A.; Ulrich, Ania C.; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sleep, Brent; Edwards, Elizabeth A.; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis has the potential to distinguish physical from biological attenuation processes in the subsurface. In this study, carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation effects during biodegradation of benzene under anaerobic conditions with different terminal-electron-accepting processes are reported for the first time. Different enrichment factors (ɛ) for carbon (range of −1.9 to −3.6‰) and hydrogen (range of −29 to −79‰) fractionation were observed during biodegradation of benzene under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. These differences are not related to differences in initial biomass or in rates of biodegradation. Carbon isotopic enrichment factors for anaerobic benzene biodegradation in this study are comparable to those previously published for aerobic benzene biodegradation. In contrast, hydrogen enrichment factors determined for anaerobic benzene biodegradation are significantly larger than those previously published for benzene biodegradation under aerobic conditions. A fundamental difference in the previously proposed initial step of aerobic versus proposed anaerobic biodegradation pathways may account for these differences in hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Potentially, C-H bond breakage in the initial step of the anaerobic benzene biodegradation pathway may account for the large fractionation observed compared to that in aerobic benzene biodegradation. Despite some differences in reported enrichment factors between cultures with different terminal-electron-accepting processes, carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis has the potential to provide direct evidence of anaerobic biodegradation of benzene in the field. PMID:12513995

  2. Calcium-48 isotopic anomalies in bulk chondrites and achondrites: Evidence for a uniform isotopic reservoir in the inner protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Chen, James H.; Zhang, Junjun; Papanastassiou, Dimitri A.; Davis, Andrew M.; Travaglio, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) was used to measure the calcium isotopic compositions of carbonaceous, ordinary, enstatite chondrites as well as eucrites and aubrites. We find that after correction for mass-fractionation by internal normalization to a fixed 42Ca/44Ca ratio, the 43Ca/44Ca and 46Ca/44Ca ratios are indistinguishable from terrestrial ratios. In contrast, the 48Ca/44Ca ratios show significant departure from the terrestrial composition (from -2 ε in eucrites to +4 ε in CO and CV chondrites). Isotopic anomalies in ε48Ca correlate with ε50Ti: ε 48Ca=(1.09±0.11)×ε 50Ti+(0.03±0.14). Further work is needed to identify the carrier phase of 48Ca-50Ti anomalies but we suggest that it could be perovskite and that the stellar site where these anomalies were created was also responsible for the nucleosynthesis of the bulk of the solar system inventory of these nuclides. The Earth has identical 48Ca isotopic composition to enstatite chondrites (EH and EL) and aubrites. This adds to a long list of elements that display nucleosynthetic anomalies at a bulk planetary scale but show identical or very similar isotopic compositions between enstatite chondrites, aubrites, and Earth. This suggests that the inner protoplanetary disk was characterized by a uniform isotopic composition (IDUR for Inner Disk Uniform Reservoir), sampled by enstatite chondrites and aubrites, from which the Earth drew most of its constituents. The terrestrial isotopic composition for 17O, 48Ca, 50Ti, 62Ni, and 92Mo is well reproduced by a mixture of 91% enstatite, 7% ordinary, and 2% carbonaceous chondrites. The Earth was not simply made of enstatite chondrites but it formed from the same original material that was later modified by nebular and disk processes. The Moon-forming impactor probably came from the same region as the other embryos that made the Earth, explaining the strong isotopic similarity between lunar and terrestrial rocks.

  3. Oxygen isotope anomaly observed in water vapor from Alert, Canada and the implication for the stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Clayton, Robert N; Huang, Lin; Nakamura, Noboru; Lyons, James R

    2013-09-24

    To identify the possible anomalous oxygen isotope signature in stratospheric water predicted by model studies, 25 water vapor samples were collected in 2003-2005 at Alert station, Canada (82°30'N), where there is downward transport of stratospheric air to the polar troposphere, and were analyzed for δ(17)O and δ(18)O relative to Chicago local precipitation (CLP). The latter was chosen as a reference because the relatively large evaporative moisture source should erase any possible oxygen isotope anomaly from the stratosphere. A mass-dependent fractionation coefficient for meteoric waters, λMDF(H2O) = 0.529 ± 0.003 [2σ standard error (SE)], was determined from 27 CLP samples collected in 2003-2005. An oxygen isotopic anomaly of Δ(17)O = 76 ± 16 ppm (2σ SE) was found in water vapor samples from Alert relative to CLP. We propose that the positive oxygen isotope anomalies observed at Alert originated from stratospheric ozone, were transferred to water in the stratosphere, and subsequently mixed with tropospheric water at high latitudes as the stratospheric air descended into the troposphere. On the basis of this ground signal, the average Δ(17)O in stratospheric water vapor predicted by a steady-state box model is ∼40‰. Seven ice core samples (1930-1991) from Dasuopu glacier (Himalayas, China) and Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation did not show an obvious oxygen isotope anomaly, and Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water exhibited a negative Δ(17)O relative to CLP. Six Alert snow samples collected in March 2011 and measured at Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Gif sur Yvette, France, had (17)Oexcess of 45 ± 5 ppm (2σ SE) relative to Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water.

  4. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yunyan; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Dai, Jinxing; Katz, Barry; Zhang, Shuichang; Tang, Yongchun

    2011-05-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2 cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using δD values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the δ 13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that δD values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that δD values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane.

  5. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Hydrogen Isotope Fractation Between Water and Algal Lipids of Three Strains of Botryococcus braunii Under Controlled Conidtions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Sachs, J. P.

    2004-12-01

    Understanding of precipitation anomaly variations is essential to the reconstruction of paleo-El Nino at the low latitudes. In enclosed lakes, where lake level is affected by the balance between precipitation and evaporation only, water δ D reflects precipitation patterns. Freshwater algae, which utilize lake water for photosynthesis, should incorporate such signal in the hydrogen isotopes of their tissues. However, a fundamental question still exits: do algal lipid biomarkers truly record lake water hydrogen isotopic ratios? We have measured hydrogen isotope fractionation by freshwater algae Botryococcus braunii (3 strains) grown under controlled conditions in the lab. In order to establish a good relationship between lipid δ D and water δ D, for each strain we set up cultures in five waters with different δ D. δ D of alkadienes and botryococcenes of Botryococcus brauni measured on GCIRMS showed strong positive linear relation with water δ D (R2=0.99). Hydrogen isotopic ratios in the algal hydrocarbons are about 165 ‰ more negative compared to the water at the start while they are 270 ‰ more negative compared to water δ D at harvest. Such linear relationships establish a foundation for reconstructing lake water level and thus precipitation anomaly by analyzing δ D of algal lipids preserved in lake sediments.

  7. Hydrogen recycle and isotope exchange from dense carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L.

    1987-03-01

    Dense carbon films were prepared by deposition from hydrogen plasmas to which methane was added. The initial hydrogen recycle coefficient from the films ranges from more than two to less than one. The films contain large amounts of hydrogen (up to 50 at. %). They adjust themselves to provide recycling coefficients near unity. Isotope changeover times tend to be long. The reservoir of hydrogen instantly available to the plasma to maintain or stabilize the recycle coefficient and isotopic composition of the plasma is 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ or greater depending on film preparation, temperature, and prior plasma exposure conditions. Simulator observations tend to support and improve the understanding of the observations in TEXTOR and JET; however, they also point out the need for control of film deposition and operating parameters to provide desirable and reproducible properties. The films and the hydrogen isotopes they contain can be removed easily by plasma processes. Since the hydrogen in these films is relatively immobile except in the zone reached by energetic particles, or at temperatures above 400/sup 0/C, dense carbon films may be useful in managing the tritium recovery from near-term fusion experiments.

  8. Cascades for hydrogen isotope separation using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, F.B.; Grzetic, V.

    1982-01-01

    Designs are presented for continuous countercurrent hydrogen isotope separation cascades based on the use of metal hydrides. The cascades are made up of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or temperature swing adsorption (TSA) stages. The designs were evolved from consideration of previously conducted studies of the separation performance of four types of PSA and TSA processes.

  9. RECTIFIED ABSORPTION METHOD FOR THE SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, C.D.; Hanson, D.N.

    1961-10-17

    A method is described for separating and recovering heavy hydrogen isotopes from gaseous mixtures by multiple stage cyclic absorption and rectification from an approximate solvent. In particular, it is useful for recovering such isoteoes from ammonia feedstock streams containing nitrogen solvent. Modifications of the process ranging from isobaric to isothermal are provided. Certain impurities are tolerated, giving advantages over conventional fractional distillation processes. (AEC)

  10. Hydrogen Isotopic Systematics of Nominally Anhydrous Phases in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Kera

    Hydrogen isotope compositions of the martian atmosphere and crustal materials can provide unique insights into the hydrological and geological evolution of Mars. While the present-day deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio (D/H) of the Mars atmosphere is well constrained (~6 times that of terrestrial ocean water), that of its deep silicate interior (specifically, the mantle) is less so. In fact, the hydrogen isotope composition of the primordial martian mantle is of great interest since it has implications for the origin and abundance of water on that planet. Martian meteorites could provide key constraints in this regard, since they crystallized from melts originating from the martian mantle and contain phases that potentially record the evolution of the H 2O content and isotopic composition of the interior of the planet over time. Examined here are the hydrogen isotopic compositions of Nominally Anhydrous Phases (NAPs) in eight martian meteorites (five shergottites and three nakhlites) using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). This study presents a total of 113 individual analyses of H2O contents and hydrogen isotopic compositions of NAPs in the shergottites Zagami, Los Angeles, QUE 94201, SaU 005, and Tissint, and the nakhlites Nakhla, Lafayette, and Yamato 000593. The hydrogen isotopic variation between and within meteorites may be due to one or more processes including: interaction with the martian atmosphere, magmatic degassing, subsolidus alteration (including shock), and/or terrestrial contamination. Taking into consideration the effects of these processes, the hydrogen isotope composition of the martian mantle may be similar to that of the Earth. Additionally, this study calculated upper limits on the H2O contents of the shergottite and nakhlite parent melts based on the measured minimum H2O abundances in their maskelynites and pyroxenes, respectively. These calculations, along with some petrogenetic assumptions based on previous studies, were subsequently used

  11. Isotopic composition of atmospheric hydrogen and methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bainbridge, A.E.; Suess, H.E.; Friedman, I.

    1961-01-01

    IN a recent communication, Bishop and Taylor1 express the opinion that the tritium concentration of free hydrogen in the atmosphere has been rising over the past ten years, with a doubling time of approximately 18 months. The authors suspect that artificial tritium was released into the atmosphere several years before the Castle test series in 1954, which is commonly assumed to have led to the first pronounced rise in the tritium concentration of terrestrial surface water. Bishop and Taylor's communication includes a diagram of the logarithms of all the experimentally determined tritium values in free atmospheric hydrogen plotted against time. The plot shows that the values follow a straight line that includes the first value obtained by Faltings and Harteck2 on atmospheric hydrogen collected in 1948. ?? 1961 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. A hydrogen gas-water equilibration method produces accurate and precise stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements in nutrition studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to ...

  13. Lignin methoxyl hydrogen isotope ratios in a coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feakins, Sarah J.; Ellsworth, Patricia V.; Sternberg, Leonel da Silveira Lobo

    2013-11-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope ratios of plant lignin methoxyl groups have recently been shown to record the hydrogen isotopic composition of meteoric water. Here we extend this technique towards tracing water source variations across a saltwater to freshwater gradient in a coastal, subtropical forest ecosystem. We measure the hydrogen isotopic composition of xylem water (δDxw) and methoxyl hydrogen (δDmethoxyl) to calculate fractionations for coastal mangrove, buttonwood and hammock tree species in Sugarloaf Key, as well as buttonwoods from Miami, both in Florida, USA. Prior studies of the isotopic composition of cellulose and plant leaf waxes in coastal ecosystems have yielded only a weak correlation to source waters, attributed to leaf water effects. Here we find δDmethoxyl values range from -230‰ to -130‰, across a 40‰ range in δDxw with a regression equation of δDmethoxyl ‰ = 1.8 * δDxw - 178‰ (R2 = 0.48, p < 0.0001, n = 74). This is comparable within error to the earlier published relationship for terrestrial trees which was defined across a much larger 125‰ isotopic range in precipitation. Analytical precision for measurements of δD values of pure CH3I by gas chromatography-pyrolysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-P-IRMS) is σ = 6‰ (n = 31), which is considerably better than for CH3I liberated through cleavage with HI from lignin with σ = 18‰ (n = 26). Our results establish that δDmethoxyl can record water sources and salinity incursion in coastal ecosystems, where variations sufficiently exceed method uncertainties (i.e., applications with δD excursions >50‰). For the first time, we also report yields of propyl iodide, which may indicate lignin synthesis of propoxyl groups under salt-stress.

  14. Hydrogen isotope MicroChemLab FY15.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, David; Luo, Weifang; Stewart, Kenneth D.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a new method to measure the composition of gaseous mixtures of any two hydrogen isotopes, as well as an inert gas component. When tritium is one of those hydrogen isotopes, there is usually some helium present, because the tritium decays to form helium at a rate of about 1% every 2 months. The usual way of measuring composition of these mixtures involves mass spectrometry, which involves bulky, energy-intensive, expensive instruments, including vacuum pumps that can quite undesirably disperse tritium. Our approach uses calorimetry of a small quantity of hydrogen-absorbing material to determine gas composition without consuming or dispersing the analytes. Our work was a proof of principle using a rather large and slow benchtop calorimeter. Incorporation of microfabricated calorimeters, such as those that have been developed in Sandia’s MicroChemLab program or that are now commercially available, would allow for faster measurements and a smaller instrument footprint.

  15. Oxygen Isotopic Anomaly in Terrestrial Atmospheric Carbonates and its Implications to Understand the Role of Water on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Shaheen, R.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral aerosols produced from wind-blown soils are an important component of the earth system and comprise about 1000-3000 Tg.yr-1 compared to 400 Tg.yr-1 of secondary aerosols (e.g. carbonaceous substances, organics, sulfate and nitrates). Aerosols have important consequences for health, visibility and the hydrological cycle as they provide reactive surfaces for heterogeneous chemical transformation that may influence gas phase chemistry in the atmosphere. Tropospheric ozone produced in a cascade of chemical reactions involving NOx and VOC’s, can interact with aerosol surfaces to produce new compounds. Oxygen triple isotopic compositions of atmospheric carbonates have been used for the first time to track heterogeneous chemistry at the aerosol surfaces and to resolve a chemical mechanism that only occurs on particle surfaces. Fine and coarse aerosol samples were collected on filter papers in La Jolla, CA for one week. Aerosol samples were digested with phosphoric acid and released CO2 was purified chromatographically and analyzed for O isotopes after fluorination. Data indicated oxygen isotopic anomaly (Δ17O = δ17O - 0.524 δ18O) ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 per mill. Laboratory experiments revealed that adsorbed water on particle surfaces facilitates the interaction of the gaseous CO2 and O3 with formation of anomalous hydrogen peroxide and carbonates. This newly identified chemical reaction scenario provides a new explanation for production of the isotopically anomalous carbonates found in the SNC Martian meteorites and terrestrial atmospheric carbonates and it also amplifies understanding of water related processes on the surface of Mars. The formation of peroxide via this heterogeneous reaction on aerosols surface suggests a new oxidative process of utility in understanding ozone and oxygen chemistry both at Mars and Earth.

  16. Poisoning effect on solubility of hydrogen isotopes in getter materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Sato, Yuichi; Ogawa, Hidenori; Shirasu, Yoshirou; Miyake, Masanobu

    1991-03-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium solubilities in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys with various compositions have been measured at pressures below 100 Pa. All of the solubility data were found to follow Sieverts' law. The presence of carbon in Ti increased the solubilities of hydrogen isotopes and reduced the enthalpies of solution. The solubility increased and the enthalpy of solution decreased with addition of nitrogen into Zr. The hydrogen solubility in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys was larger than the deuterium solubility. Partial thermodynamic functions of hydrogen and deuterium in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys were obtained by a dilute solution model and compared with those in Ti-(O, N) and Zr-O alloys. The isotope effect of hydrogen and deuterium solubilities in the Ti-(O, N, C) and Zr-(O, N) alloys was discussed, and the tritium solubility in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys was evaluated from hydrogen and deuterium data.

  17. Laser-induced separation of hydrogen isotopes in the liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Freund, Samuel M.; Maier, II, William B.; Beattie, Willard H.; Holland, Redus F.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation is achieved by either (a) dissolving a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound in a liquid solvent, or (b) liquefying a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound, the liquid phase thus resulting being kept at a temperature at which spectral features of the feedstock relating to a particular hydrogen isotope are resolved, i.e., a clear-cut isotope shift is delineated, irradiating the liquid phase with monochromatic radiation of a wavelength which at least preferentially excites those molecules of the feedstock containing a first hydrogen isotope, inducing photochemical reaction in the excited molecules, and separating the reaction product containing the first isotope from the liquid phase.

  18. Oxygen Isotope Anomaly in the Carbonate Fractions of Aerosols and its Potential to Assess Urban Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Abramian, A.; Dominguez, G.; Jackson, T.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    = 0.887) was observed between oxygen isotope anomaly (Δ17O) in the carbonate fraction of coarse aerosols and urban index, indicating that the isotope anomaly of carbonates can be used as a proxy for urban pollution. Additionally, controlled laboratory experiments to understand the origin of isotope anomaly in the carbonate fraction of aerosols will be discussed.

  19. Process for hydrogen isotope concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, William H.

    1976-09-21

    A process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas, wherein liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted, in an exchange section, with one another and with at least one catalyst body comprising at least one metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table and preferably a support therefor, the catalyst body has a liquid-water-repellent, gas permeable polymer or organic resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone coating, so that the isotope concentration takes place by two simultaneously occurring steps, namely, ##EQU1## WHILE THE HYDROGEN GAS FED TO THE EXCHANGE SECTION IS DERIVED IN A REACTOR VESSEL FROM LIQUID WATER THAT HAS PASSED THROUGH THE EXCHANGE SECTION.

  20. Isotopic disproportionation during hydrogen isotopic analysis of nitrogen-bearing organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nair, Sreejesh; Geilmann, Heike; Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Gehre, Matthias; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Brand, Willi A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale High-precision hydrogen isotope ratio analysis of nitrogen-bearing organic materials using high-temperature conversion (HTC) techniques has proven troublesome in the past. Formation of reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H2) has been suspected as a possible cause of incomplete H2 yield and hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Methods The classical HTC reactor setup and a modified version including elemental chromium, both operated at temperatures in excess of 1400 °C, have been compared using a selection of nitrogen-bearing organic compounds, including caffeine. A focus of the experiments was to avoid or suppress hydrogen cyanide (HCN) formation and to reach quantitative H2 yields. The technique also was optimized to provide acceptable sample throughput. Results The classical HTC reaction of a number of selected compounds exhibited H2 yields from 60 to 90 %. Yields close to 100 % were measured for the experiments with the chromium-enhanced reactor. The δ2H values also were substantially different between the two types of experiments. For the majority of the compounds studied, a highly significant relationship was observed between the amount of missing H2and the number of nitrogen atoms in the molecules, suggesting the pyrolytic formation of HCN as a byproduct. A similar linear relationship was found between the amount of missing H2 and the observed hydrogen isotopic result, reflecting isotopic fractionation. Conclusions The classical HTC technique to produce H2 from organic materials using high temperatures in the presence of glassy carbon is not suitable for nitrogen-bearing compounds. Adding chromium to the reaction zone improves the yield to 100 % in most cases. The initial formation of HCN is accompanied by a strong hydrogen isotope effect, with the observed hydrogen isotope results on H2 being substantially shifted to more negative δ2H values. The reaction can be understood as an initial disproportionation leading to H2 and HCN

  1. Hibonite-bearing microspherules - A new type of refractory inclusions with large isotopic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ireland, T. R.; Fahey, A. J.; Zinner, E. K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents petrographic description as well as results on the major- and trace-element chemistry and on Mg, Ca, and Ti isotopic compositions of three refractory inclusions, including 3413-1/31 inclusion from Lance and Murchison 7-228 and 7-753, the mineralogy of which is dominated by the oxide minerals spinel, hibonite, and perovskite. The microspherules examined seem to constitute a separate class of refractory inclusions, characterized by a distinct morphology and mineralogy; large excesses of Ca-48 and Ti-50, and Mg-26 depletions. It is suggested that this type of inclusions must have formed early, prior to the dilution of isotopic anomalies by mixing processes, and in an area characterized by excesses of Ca-48 and Ti-50, depletions of Mg-26, and a lack of Al-26.

  2. Hydrogen Isotopic Composition of Hornblendes From Active Volcanoes of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Y.; Kusakabe, M.; Valdez, G.; Mora, J. C.

    2002-12-01

    Horblendes (Hb) crystallize in water-rich magmas in magma chambers or in deeper zones. Isotopic composition of hydrogen in OH-groups of Hb represents the water isotopic composition of magmatic fluid or dissolved magmatic volatiles and therefore, is an isotopic characteristics of magmatic water. At lower vapor pressure in conduits and shallower magma chambers, Hb can decompose and loose water with significant isotopic effects. We measured hydrogen isotopic composition of hornblendes from modern lavas and pyroclastics of El Chichon, Colima and Popocatepetl volcanoes. Hornblendes from the last and previous pyroclastic flows of El Chichon are the more abundant mineral phases (after plagioclase), showing pleochroism from green to brown. They are relatively uniform in composition (close to magnesian hastingsite hornblende), without chemical variations between cores and rims. Using the Johnson and Rutherford (1989) calibration of the Al-in-hornblende geobarometer, the hornblendes show equilibrium with the melt at pressure of 4 kb that correspond to 12 km of depth. These pressure conditions likely represent the location of the magma chamber below El Chichon volcano, however, these pressure estimates need to be confirmed. The water content of all analyzed Hbs is 1.5-1.8 wt%, but may be higher due to a minor amount of impurities of pyroxenes which sometimes are difficult to separate from Hb. Hydrogen isotopic composition in 10 samples of Hb from El Chichon of different age and facies (pumice, lithic fragments in pyroclastics) was in a narrow range -40 to -37 permil V-SMOW. Such isotopic signature corresponds to so-called "andesitic" waters, i.e. waters from subduction-related magmas, The origin of these waters is suggested to be the recycled water from subducted oceanic sediments. The data for El Chichon volcano are in the range of the already known values for subduction-related magmas though the tectonic setting of El Chichon is more complicated. The measured isotopic

  3. Installations for separation of hydrogen isotopes by the method of chemical isotopic exchange in the `water-hydrogen` system

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, B.M.; Sakharovsky, Y.A.; Rozenkevich, M.B.; Magomedbekov, E.P.; Park, Y.S.; Uborskiy, V.V.; Trenin, V.D.; Alekseev, I.A.; Fedorchenko, O.A.; Karpov, S.P.; Konoplev, K.A.

    1995-10-01

    The paper presents the results of more than a year of running a pilot setup for separation of hydrogen isotopes using catalytic isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water. The setup is 5 m high, has the inner diameter of 28 mm, and is equipped with upper and lower reflux devices. The experimental values of HETP vary from 15 cm at T=333 K to 38 cm at T=293 K. The setup is capable of upgrading diluted heavy water with 85-90% deuterium content up to [D{sub 2}O] > 99.95 at.%, yielding daily 4 kg of the product. We also report on the progress in constructing a similar setup for eliminating tritium and an industrial setup, for which the one reported is a prototype. 10 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Impact of hydrogen isotope species on microinstabilities in helical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Motoki; Nunami, Masanori; Sugama, Hideo; Watanabe, Tomo-Hiko

    2016-07-01

    The impact of isotope ion mass on ion-scale and electron-scale microinstabilities such as ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode, trapped electron mode (TEM), and electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode in helical plasmas are investigated by using gyrokinetic Vlasov simulations with a hydrogen isotope and real-mass kinetic electrons. Comprehensive scans for the equilibrium parameters and magnetic configurations clarify the transition from ITG mode to TEM instability, where a significant TEM enhancement is revealed in the case of inward-shifted plasma compared to that in the standard configuration. It is elucidated that the ion-mass dependence on the ratio of the electron-ion collision frequency to the ion transit one, i.e. {ν\\text{ei}}/{ω\\text{ti}}\\propto {{≤ft({{m}\\text{i}}/{{m}\\text{e}}\\right)}1/2} , leads to a stabilization of the TEM for heavier isotope ions. The ITG growth rate indicates a gyro-Bohm-like ion-mass dependence, where the mixing-length estimate of diffusivity yields γ /k\\bot2\\propto m\\text{i}1/2 . On the other hand, a weak isotope dependence of the ETG growth rate is identified. A collisionality scan also reveals that the TEM stabilization by the isotope ions becomes more significant for relatively higher collisionality in a banana regime.

  5. CRYOGENIC ADSORPTION OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES OVER NANO-STRUCTURED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, S.; Heung, L.

    2010-10-07

    Porous materials such as zeolites, activated carbon, silica gels, alumina and a number of industrial catalysts are compared and ranked for hydrogen and deuterium adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. All samples show higher D{sub 2} adsorption than that of H{sub 2}, in which a HY sample has the greatest isotopic effect while 13X has the highest hydrogen uptake capacity. Material's moisture content has significant impact to its hydrogen uptake. A material without adequate drying could result in complete loss of its adsorption capacity. Even though some materials present higher H{sub 2} adsorption capacity at full pressure, their adsorption at low vapor pressure may not be as good as others. Adsorption capacity in a dynamic system is much less than in a static system. A sharp desorption is also expected in case of temperature upset.

  6. Unexpected hydrogen isotope variation in oceanic pelagic seabirds.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Peggy H; Wiley, Anne E; Rossman, Sam; Stricker, Craig A; James, Helen F

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen isotopes have significantly enhanced our understanding of the biogeography of migratory animals. The basis for this methodology lies in predictable, continental patterns of precipitation δD values that are often reflected in an organism's tissues. δD variation is not expected for oceanic pelagic organisms whose dietary hydrogen (water and organic hydrogen in prey) is transferred up the food web from an isotopically homogeneous water source. We report a 142‰ range in the δD values of flight feathers from the Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis), an oceanic pelagic North Pacific species, and inquire about the source of that variation. We show δD variation between and within four other oceanic pelagic species: Newell's shearwater (Puffinus auricularis newellii), Black-footed albatross (Phoebastria nigripes), Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) and Buller's shearwater (Puffinus bulleri). The similarity between muscle δD values of hatch-year Hawaiian petrels and their prey suggests that trophic fractionation does not influence δD values of muscle. We hypothesize that isotopic discrimination is associated with water loss during salt excretion through salt glands. Salt load differs between seabirds that consume isosmotic squid and crustaceans and those that feed on hyposmotic teleost fish. In support of the salt gland hypothesis, we show an inverse relationship between δD and percent teleost fish in diet for three seabird species. Our results demonstrate the utility of δD in the study of oceanic consumers, while also contributing to a better understanding of δD systematics, the basis for one of the most commonly utilized isotope tools in avian ecology.

  7. Unexpected hydrogen isotope variation in oceanic pelagic seabirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostrom, Peggy H.; Wiley, Anne E.; Rossman, Sam; Stricker, Craig A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes have significantly enhanced our understanding of the biogeography of migratory animals. The basis for this methodology lies in predictable, continental patterns of precipitation δD values that are often reflected in an organism's tissues. δD variation is not expected for oceanic pelagic organisms whose dietary hydrogen (water and organic hydrogen in prey) is transferred up the food web from an isotopically homogeneous water source. We report a 142% range in the δD values of flight feathers from the Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis), an oceanic pelagic North Pacific species, and inquire about the source of that variation. We show δD variation between and within four other oceanic pelagic species: Newell's shearwater (Puffinus auricularis newellii), Black-footed albatross (Phoebastria nigripes), Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) and Buller's shearwater (Puffinus bulleri). The similarity between muscle δD values of hatch-year Hawaiian petrels and their prey suggests that trophic fractionation does not influence δD values of muscle. We hypothesize that isotopic discrimination is associated with water loss during salt excretion through salt glands. Salt load differs between seabirds that consume isosmotic squid and crustaceans and those that feed on hyposmotic teleost fish. In support of the salt gland hypothesis, we show an inverse relationship between δD and percent teleost fish in diet for three seabird species. Our results demonstrate the utility of δD in the study of oceanic consumers, while also contributing to a better understanding of δD systematics, the basis for one of the most commonly utilized isotope tools in avian ecology.

  8. Osmium isotopic constraints on the nature of the DUPAL anomaly from Indian mid-ocean-ridge basalts.

    PubMed

    Escrig, S; Capmas, F; Dupré, B; Allègre, C J

    2004-09-02

    The isotopic compositions of mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORB) from the Indian Ocean have led to the identification of a large-scale isotopic anomaly relative to Pacific and Atlantic ocean MORB. Constraining the origin of this so-called DUPAL anomaly may lead to a better understanding of the genesis of upper-mantle heterogeneity. Previous isotopic studies have proposed recycling of ancient subcontinental lithospheric mantle or sediments with oceanic crust to be responsible for the DUPAL signature. Here we report Os, Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of Indian MORB from the Central Indian ridge, the Rodriguez triple junction and the South West Indian ridge. All measured samples have higher (187)Os/(188)Os ratios than the depleted upper-mantle value and Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions that imply the involvement of at least two distinct enriched components in the Indian upper-mantle. Using isotopic and geodynamical arguments, we reject both subcontinental lithospheric mantle and recycled sediments with oceanic crust as the cause of the DUPAL anomaly. Instead, we argue that delamination of lower continental crust may explain the DUPAL isotopic signature of Indian MORB.

  9. Cerium anomaly across the mid-Tournaisian carbon isotope excursion (TICE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, G.; Morales, D. C.; Maharjan, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Early Mississippian (ca. 359-345 Ma) represents one of the most important greenhouse-icehouse climate transitions in Earth history. Closely associated with this critical transition is a prominent positive carbon isotope excursion (δ13C ≥ +5‰) that has been documented from numerous stratigraphic successions across the globe. This δ13C excursion, informally referred to as the TICE (mid-Tournaisian carbon isotope excursion) event, has been interpreted as resulting from enhanced organic carbon burial, with anticipated outcomes including the lowering of atmospheric CO2 and global cooling, the growth of continental ice sheets and sea-level fall, and the increase of ocean oxygenation and ocean redox changes. The casual relationship between these events has been addressed from various perspectives but not yet clearly demonstrated. To document the potential redox change associated with the perturbation of the carbon cycle, we have analyzed rare earth elements (REE) and trace elements across the TICE in two sections across a shallow-to-deep water transect in the southern Great Basin (Utah and Nevada), USA. In both sections, the REE data show a significant positive cerium (Ce) anomaly (Ce/Ce* = Ce/(0.5La+0.5Pr)). Prior to the positive δ13C shift, most Ce/Ce* values are around 0.3 (between 0.2 and 0.4). Across the δ13C peak, Ce/Ce* values increase up to 0.87, followed by a decrease back to 0.2~0.3 after the δ13C excursion (Figure 1). The positive Ce anomaly is best interpreted as recording expansion of oxygen minimum zone and anoxia resulted from increased primary production. This is consistent with a significant increase of nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) across the δ13C peak. Integration of the carbon, nitrogen, and REE data demonstrates a responsive earth systems change linked to the perturbation of the Early Mississippian carbon cycle.

  10. Evidence From Hydrogen Isotopes in Meteorites for a Martian Permafrost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Wang, J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Fluvial landforms on Mars suggest that it was once warm enough to maintain persistent liquid water on its surface. The transition to the present cold and dry Mars is closely linked to the history of surface water, yet the evolution of surficial water is poorly constrained. We have investigated the evolution of surface water/ ice and its interaction with the atmosphere by measurements of hydrogen isotope ratios (D/H: deuterium/ hydrogen) of martian meteorites. Hydrogen is a major component of water (H2O) and its isotopes fractionate significantly during hydrological cycling between the atmosphere, surface waters, ground ice, and polar cap ice. Based on in situ ion microprobe analyses of three geochemically different shergottites, we reported that there is a water/ice reservoir with an intermediate D/H ratio (delta D = 1,000?2500 %) on Mars. Here we present the possibility that this water/ice reservoir represents a ground-ice/permafrost that has existed relatively intact over geologic time.

  11. Raman spectroscopic and mass spectrometric investigations of the hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labelled methane

    SciTech Connect

    Jewett, J.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-24

    Suitable analytical methods must be tested and developed for monitoring the individual process steps within the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor and for tritium accountability. The utility of laser-Raman spectroscopy accompanied by mass spectrometry with an Omegatron was investigated using the analysis of all hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labeled methanes as an example. The Omegatron is useful for analyzing all hydrogen isotopes mixed with the stable helium isotopes. The application of this mass spectrometer were demonstrated by analyzing mixtures of deuterated methanes. In addition, it was employed to study the radiochemical Witzbach exchange reaction between tritium and methanes. A laser-Raman spectrometer was designed for analysis of tritium-containing gases and was built from individual components. A tritium-compatible, metal-sealed Raman cuvette having windows with good optical properties and additional means for measuring the stray light was first used successfully in this work. The Raman spectra of the hydrogen isotopes were acquired in the pure rotation mode and in the rotation-vibration mode and were used for on. The deuterated methanes were measured by Raman spectroscopy, the wavenumbers determined were assigned to the corresponding vibrations, and the wavenumbers for the rotational fine-structure were summarized in tables. The fundamental Vibrations of the deuterated methanes produced Witzbach reactions were detected and assigned. The fundamental vibrations of the molecules were obtained with Raman spectroscopy for the first time in this work. The @-Raman spectrometer assembled is well suited for the analysis of tritium- containing gases and is practical in combination with mass spectrometry using an Omegatron, for studying gases used in fusion.

  12. Osmium isotope anomalies in chondrites: Results for acid residues and related leachates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuya; O'D. Alexander, Conel M.; Walker, Richard J.

    2010-03-01

    We have investigated Os isotope anomalies in acid residues enriched in insoluble organic matter (IOM) extracted from ten primitive chondrites, acid leachates and residues of these fractions, as well as acid leachates of bulk chondrites. Osmium isotopic compositions of bulk carbonaceous, ordinary and enstatite chondrites are also reported. Consistent with prior results, bulk chondrites have homogeneous Os isotope compositions for s-, r-, and p-process nuclides that are indistinguishable from terrestrial, at the current level of resolution. In contrast, nearly all the IOM-rich residues are enriched in s-process Os, evidently due to the preferential incorporation of s-process enriched presolar grains (most likely presolar SiC). Presolar silicate grains that formed in red giant branch (RGB) or asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are also likely hosts of additional s-process Os in chondrites. Consistent with one prior study, Os released by weak acid leaching of bulk chondrites is slightly to strongly enriched in r-process nuclides, of which the carrier may be fine-grained presolar silicates formed in supernovae or unidentified solar phases. Collectively, the different, chemically concentrated components in these meteorites are variably enriched in s-, r-, and possibly p-process Os, of which the individual carriers must have been produced in multiple stellar environments. The lack of evidence for Os isotopic heterogeneity among bulk chondrites contrasts with evidence for isotopic heterogeneities for various other elements at approximately the same levels of resolution (e.g., Cr, Mo, Ru, Ba, Sm, and Nd). One possible explanation for this is that the heterogeneities for some elements in bulk materials reflect selective removal of some types of presolar grains as a result of nebular processes, and that because of the strong chemical differences between Os and the other elements, the Os was not significantly affected. Another possible explanation is that late-stage injection

  13. Equilibrium carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [1-3]) have suggested that Si- and Fe-isotopic signatures can be used to characterize the compositions and conditions of segregation of metallic cores in planetary interiors. This study expands the theoretical framework to include carbon and hydrogen, which may also be alloying elements. Hydrogen (D/H) and carbon (13C/12C) fractionations in iron-rich metallic melts are estimated by modeling analogous iron-rich crystals, i.e., dhcp-FeH and η-Fe2C. C- and H-atoms in these crystals are completely coordinated by iron. The driving energy for equilibrium fractionation is assumed to come from the reduction of vibrational frequencies when heavy isotopes are substituted for light ones; vibrations are assumed to be harmonic. This treatment is crude at high temperature, and for the relatively anharmonic vibrations typical of hydrogen-bearing substances, but may provide a reasonably accurate, semi-quantitative approximation of real fractionation behavior. Vibrational frequencies of all crystals are modeled with density functional theory, using gradient-corrected functionals and ultrasoft pseudopotentials. For both carbon and hydrogen, the models suggest that the metal phase will be strongly depleted in heavy isotopes. At 2000 K, 1 atm, η-Fe2C will have 3‰ lower 13C/12C than coexisting diamond. Combining this result with previous high-temperature theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [4]), metal-graphite fractionation is expected to be very similar, while metal-CO2 fractionation will be almost twice as large, ca. -5‰. Deuterium/hydrogen fractionations are expected to be an order of magnitude larger, with 50-70‰ lower D/H in dhcp-FeH than in coexisting H2 gas at 2000 K, and approximately 100‰ lower D/H than water vapor. These fractionations are much larger than those inferred for silicon and iron, as expected given the differences in atomic mass. References: 1. Georg et al. (2007) Nature 447:1102; 2. Rustad & Yin

  14. Charge state distribution studies of pure and oxygen mixed krypton ECR plasma - signature of isotope anomaly and gas mixing effect.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pravin; Mal, Kedar; Rodrigues, G

    2016-11-01

    We report the charge state distributions of the pure, 25% and 50% oxygen mixed krypton plasma to shed more light on the understanding of the gas mixing and the isotope anomaly [A. G. Drentje, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 63 (1992) 2875 and Y Kawai, D Meyer, A Nadzeyka, U Wolters and K Wiesemann, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 10 (2001) 451] in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas. The krypton plasma was produced using a 10 GHz all-permanent-magnet ECR ion source. The intensities of the highly abundant four isotopes, viz. (82) Kr (~11.58%), (83) Kr (~11.49%), (84) Kr (~57%) and (86) Kr (17.3%) up to ~ +14 charge state have been measured by extracting the ions from the plasma and analysing them in the mass and the energy using a large acceptance analyzer-cum-switching dipole magnet. The influence of the oxygen gas mixing on the isotopic krypton ion intensities is clearly evidenced beyond +9 charge state. With and without oxygen mixing, the charge state distribution of the krypton ECR plasma shows the isotope anomaly with unusual trends. The anomaly in the intensities of the isotopes having quite closer natural abundance, viz. (82) Kr, (86) Kr and (83) Kr, (86) Kr is prominent, whereas the intensity ratio of (86) Kr to (84) Kr shows a weak signature of it. The isotope anomaly tends to disappear with increasing oxygen mixing in the plasma. The observed trends in the intensities of the krypton isotopes do not follow the prediction of linear Landau wave damping in the plasma. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Demonstration of compound-specific isotope analysis of hydrogen isotope ratios in chlorinated ethenes.

    PubMed

    Kuder, Tomasz; Philp, Paul

    2013-02-05

    High-temperature pyrolysis conversion of organic analytes to H(2) in hydrogen isotope ratio compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is unsuitable for chlorinated compounds such as trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE), due to competition from HCl formation. For this reason, the information potential of hydrogen isotope ratios of chlorinated ethenes remains untapped. We present a demonstration of an alternative approach where chlorinated analytes reacted with chromium metal to form H(2) and minor amounts of HCl. The values of δ(2)H were obtained at satisfactory precision (± 10 to 15 per thousand), however the raw data required daily calibration by TCE and/or DCE standards to correct for analytical bias that varies over time. The chromium reactor has been incorporated into a purge and trap-CSIA method that is suitable for CSIA of aqueous environmental samples. A sample data set was obtained for six specimens of commercial product TCE. The resulting values of δ(2)H were between -184 and +682 ‰, which significantly widened the range of manufactured TCE δ(2)H signatures identified by past work. The implications of this finding to the assessment of TCE contamination are discussed.

  16. The hydrogen anomaly in neutron Compton scattering: new experiments and a quantitative theoretical explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, E. B.; Hartmann, O.; Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C. A.; Abdul-Redah, T.

    2016-08-01

    No consensus has been reached so far about the hydrogen anomaly problem in Compton scattering of neutrons, although strongly reduced H cross-sections were first reported almost 20 years ago. Over the years, this phenomenon has been observed in many different hydrogen-containing materials. Here, we use yttrium hydrides as test objects, YH2, YH3, YD2 and YD3, Y(H x D1-x )2 and Y(H x D1-x )3, for which we observe H anomalies increasing with transferred momentum q. We also observe reduced deuteron cross-sections in YD2 and YD3 and have followed those up to scattering angles of 140° corresponding to high momentum transfers. In addition to data taken using the standard Au-197 foils for neutron energy selection, the present work includes experiments with Rh-103 foils and comparisons were also made with data from different detector setups. The H and D anomalies are discussed in terms of the different models proposed for their interpretation. The ‘electron loss model’ (which assumes energy transfer to excited electrons) is contradicted by the present data, but it is shown here that exchange effects in scattering from two or more protons (or deuterons) in the presence of large zero-point vibrations, can explain quantitatively the reduction of the cross-sections as well as their q-dependence. Decoherence processes also play an essential role. In a scattering time representation, shake-up processes can be followed on the attosecond scale. The theory also shows that large anomalies can appear only when the neutron coherence lengths (determined by energy selection and detector geometry) are about the same size as the distance between the scatterers.

  17. Isotope tracer study of hydrogen spillover on carbon-based adsorbents for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Lachawiec, Anthony J; Yang, Ralph T

    2008-06-17

    A composite material comprising platinum nanoparticles supported on molecular sieve templated carbon was synthesized and found to adsorb 1.35 wt % hydrogen at 298 K and 100 atm. The isosteric heat of adsorption for the material at low coverage was approximately 14 kJ/mol, and it approached a value of 10.6 kJ/mol as coverage increased for pressures at and above 1 atm. The increase in capacity is attributed to spillover, which is observed with the use of isotopic tracer TPD. IRMOF-8 bridged to Pt/C, a material known to exhibit hydrogen spillover at room temperature, was also studied with the hydrogen-deuterium scrambling reaction for comparison. The isotherms were reversible. For desorption, sequential doses of H2 and D2 at room temperature and subsequent TPD yield product distributions that are strong indicators of the surface diffusion controlled reverse spillover process.

  18. Intracrystalline site preference of hydrogen isotopes in borax

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhananga, T.M.; Matsuo, S.

    1985-01-03

    The total hydrogen involved in borax synthesized at 25/sup 0/C in aqueous solution is enriched in deuterium by 5.3% compared with the mother liquor. There is no change in the value of the D/H fractionation factor between the hydrogen in borax and those in the mother liquor with changes in the degree of supersaturation. The fractionation factor changes slightly with a change in the crystallization temperature of borax in the range from 5 to 25/sup 0/C. The D/H ratio in the different sites of borax was estimated by a fractional dehydration technique. The results show that hydrogen atoms of the polyanionic group (B/sub 4/O/sub 5/(OH)/sub 4/) are much more enriched in deuterium than those of the cationic group (Na/sub 2/ x 8H/sub 2/O). The delta D values, referred to the mother liquor from which the borax was crystallized, for the cationic group (site A) and the polyanionic group (site B) are -35 +/- 3 and 167 +/- 13%, respectively based on the fractional dehydration results obtained at -21/sup 0/C. At -21/sup 0/C, isotopic exchange between different sites during dehydration is assumed not to occur. The mechanism for dehydration of borax is discussed. 48 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Analysis of Hydrogen Isotopic Exchange: Lava Creek Tuff Ash and Isotopically Labeled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. M.; Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.; Nolan, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Nolan and Bindeman (2013) placed secondarily hydrated ash from the 7.7 ka eruption of Mt. Mazama (δD=-149‰, 2.3wt% H2Ot) in isotopically labeled water (+650 ‰ δD, +56 ‰ δ18O) and observed that the H2Ot and δ18O values remained constant, but the δD values of ash increased with the surrounding water at 20, 40 and 70 °C. We expand on this work by conducting a similar experiment with ash from the 640 ka Lava Creek Tuff (LCT, δD of -128 ‰; 2.1 wt.% H2Ot) eruption of Yellowstone to see if significantly older glass (with a hypothesized gel layer on the surface shielding the interior from alteration) produces the same results. We have experiments running at 70, 24, and 5 °C, and periodically remove ~1.5 mg of glass to measure the δD (‰) and H2Ot (wt.%) of water extracted from the glass on a TC/EA MAT 253 continuous flow system. After 600 hours, the δD of the samples left at 5 and 24 °C remains at -128 ‰, but increased 8‰ for the 70 °C run series. However, there is no measurable change in wt.% of H2Ot, indicating that hydrogen exchange is not dictated by the addition of water. We are measuring and will report further progress of isotope exchange. We also plan to analyze the water in the LCT glass for δ18O (‰) to see if, as is the case for the Mt. Mazama glass, the δ18O (‰) remains constant. We also analyzed Mt. Mazama glass from the Nolan and Bindeman (2013) experiments that have now been sitting in isotopically labeled water at room temperature for ~5 years. The water concentration is still unchanged (2.3 wt.% H2Ot), and the δD of the water in the glass is now -111 ‰, causing an increase of 38 ‰. Our preliminary results show that exchange of hydrogen isotopes of hydrated glass is not limited by the age of the glass, and that the testing of hydrogen isotopes of secondarily hydrated glass, regardless of age, may not be a reliable paleoclimate indicator.

  20. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Xu, H.; Atia-Tul-Noor, A.; Hu, B. T.; Kielpinski, D.; Sang, R. T.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H2/D2 gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H2 and D2 . The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.

  1. Delineating the effect of El-Nino Southern Oscillations using oxygen and sulfur isotope anomalies of sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Abaunza Quintero, M. M.; Jackson, T.; McCabe, J.; Savarino, J. P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols, unlike greenhouse gases, contribute to global cooling by acting as cloud condensation nuclei in the troposphere and by directly reflecting solar radiation in the stratosphere. To understand the long-term effect of natural and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol on the climate cycle, it is critical to obtain a clear picture of the factors controlling the transport and transformation of sulfate aerosols. We have employed both oxygen triple isotopes and sulfur quadruple isotopes on sulfates from Antarctic ice samples to define the oxidation history, long range transport dynamics, and sources of sulfate aerosols over time. The measurements are used to deconvolve the impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on the stratospheric sulfate aerosol composition. Sulfate aerosols were extracted from a snow pit at the South Pole (1979-2002) with a high resolution temporal (6 month) record of the winter and summer seasons covering two largest volcanic events, Pinatubo and El-chichon and three largest ENSO events of the century. All three oxygen and four sulfur isotopes were measured on the extracted sulfate (Shaheen et al., 2013). The high temperature pyrolysis (1000oC) of silver sulfate yielded O2 and SO2. The oxygen triple isotopic composition of the O2 gas was used to determine the oxidation history of sulfate aerosol and SO2 gas obtained during this reaction was utilized to measure sulfur quadruple isotopes following appropriate reaction chemistry (Farquhar et al., 2001). The data revealed that oxygen isotope anomalies in Antarctic aerosols (Δ17O = 0.8-3.7‰) from 1990 to 2001 are strongly linked to the variation in ozone levels in the upper stratosphere/lower stratosphere. The variations in ozone levels are reflective of the intensity of the ENSO events and changes in relative humidity in the atmosphere during this time period. Sulfate concentrations and sulfur quadruple isotopic composition and associated anomalies were used to elucidate the sources of

  2. Stable hydrogen isotopic analysis of nanomolar molecular hydrogen by automatic multi-step gas chromatographic separation.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Daisuke D; Tsunogai, Urumu; Kamimura, Kanae; Konno, Uta; Ishimura, Toyoho; Nakagawa, Fumiko

    2011-11-15

    We have developed a new automated analytical system that employs a continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer to determine the stable hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of nanomolar quantities of molecular hydrogen (H(2)) in an air sample. This method improves previous methods to attain simpler and lower-cost analyses, especially by avoiding the use of expensive or special devices, such as a Toepler pump, a cryogenic refrigerator, and a special evacuation system to keep the temperature of a coolant under reduced pressure. Instead, the system allows H(2) purification from the air matrix via automatic multi-step gas chromatographic separation using the coolants of both liquid nitrogen (77 K) and liquid nitrogen + ethanol (158 K) under 1 atm pressure. The analytical precision of the δD determination using the developed method was better than 4‰ for >5 nmol injections (250 mL STP for 500 ppbv air sample) and better than 15‰ for 1 nmol injections, regardless of the δD value, within 1 h for one sample analysis. Using the developed system, the δD values of H(2) can be quantified for atmospheric samples as well as samples of representative sources and sinks including those containing small quantities of H(2) , such as H(2) in soil pores or aqueous environments, for which there is currently little δD data available. As an example of such trace H(2) analyses, we report here the isotope fractionations during H(2) uptake by soils in a static chamber. The δD values of H(2) in these H(2)-depleted environments can be useful in constraining the budgets of atmospheric H(2) by applying an isotope mass balance model.

  3. Round robin analyses of hydrogen isotope thin films standards.

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, James Frederick; Doyle, Barney Lee; Wampler, William R.; Wetteland, C. J.; LaDuca, Carol A.; Banks, James Clifford; Wang, Y. Q.; Tesmer, Joseph R.

    2003-06-01

    Hydrogen isotope thin film standards have been manufactured at Sandia National Laboratories for use by the materials characterization community. Several considerations were taken into account during the manufacture of the ErHD standards, with accuracy and stability being the most important. The standards were fabricated by e-beam deposition of Er onto a Mo substrate and the film stoichiometrically loaded with hydrogen and deuterium. To determine the loading accuracy of the standards two random samples were measured by thermal desorption mass spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry techniques with a stated combined accuracy of {approx}1.6% (1{sigma}). All the standards were then measured by high energy RBS/ERD and RBS/NRA with the accuracy of the techniques {approx}5% (1{sigma}). The standards were then distributed to the IBA materials characterization community for analysis. This paper will discuss the suitability of the standards for use by the IBA community and compare measurement results to highlight the accuracy of the techniques used.

  4. Isotope Effects in Collisional VT Relaxation of Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieniek, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    A simple exponential-potential model of molecular collisions leads to a two-parameter analytic expression for rates of collisionally induced vibrational-translation (VT) energy exchange that has been shown to be accurate over variations of orders of magnitude as a function of temperature in a variety of systems. This includes excellent agreement with reported experimental and theoretical results for the fundamental self-relaxation rate of molecular hydrogen H2(v = 1) + H2 yields H2(v = 0) + H2. The analytic rate successfully follows the five-orders-of-magnitude change in experimental values for the temperature range 50-2000 K. This approach is now applied to isotope effects in the vibrational relaxation rates of excited HD and D2 in collision with H2: HD(v = 1)+H2 yields HD(v = 0)+H2 and D2(v = 1)+H2 yields D2(v = 0)+H2. The simplicity of the analytic expression for the thermal rate lends itself to convenient application in modeling the evolving vibrational populations of molecular hydrogen in shocked astrophysical environments.

  5. Significance of Isotopically Labile Organic Hydrogen in Thermal Maturation of Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt Schimmelmann; Maria Mastalerz

    2010-03-30

    Isotopically labile organic hydrogen in fossil fuels occupies chemical positions that participate in isotopic exchange and in chemical reactions during thermal maturation from kerogen to bitumen, oil and gas. Carbon-bound organic hydrogen is isotopically far less exchangeable than hydrogen bound to nitrogen, oxygen, or sulfur. We explore why organic hydrogen isotope ratios express a relationship with organic nitrogen isotope ratios in kerogen at low to moderate maturity. We develop and apply new techniques to utilize organic D/H ratios in organic matter fractions and on a molecular level as tools for exploration for fossil fuels and for paleoenvironmental research. The scope of our samples includes naturally and artificially matured substrates, such as coal, shale, oil and gas.

  6. Carbon, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Cellulose from Plants Having Intermediary Photosynthetic Modes 1

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel O'Reilly; Deniro, Michael J.; Ting, Irwin P.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate and oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose from species of greenhouse plants having different photosynthetic modes were determined. When hydrogen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, four clusters of points are discernible, each representing different photosynthetic modes: C3 plants, C4 plants, CAM plants, and C3 plants that can shift to CAM or show the phenomenon referred to as CAM-cycling. The combination of oxygen and carbon isotope ratios does not distinguish among the different photosynthetic modes. Analysis of the carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate should prove useful for screening different photosynthetic modes in field specimens that grew near one another. This method will be particularly useful for detection of plants which show CAM-cycling. PMID:16663360

  7. Study of hydrogen isotopes super permeation through vanadium membrane on 'Prometheus' setup

    SciTech Connect

    Musyaev, R. K.; Yukhimchuk, A. A.; Lebedev, B. S.; Busnyuk, A. O.; Notkin, M. E.; Samartsev, A. A.; Livshits, A. I.

    2008-07-15

    To develop the membrane pumping technology by means of superpermeable membranes at RFNC-VNIIEF in the 'Prometheus' setup, the experiments on superpermeation of hydrogen isotopes through metal membranes were carried out. The experimental results on superpermeation of thermal atoms of hydrogen isotopes including tritium through a cylindrical vanadium membrane are presented. The possibility of effective pumping, compression and recuperation of hydrogen isotopes by means of superpermeable membrane was demonstrated. The evaluation of membrane pumping rates and asymmetry degree of pure vanadium membrane was given. The work was performed under the ISTC-2854 project. (authors)

  8. A new isotopic reference material for stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope-ratio measurements of water—USGS50 Lake Kyoga Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Mukwaya, Christine; Qi, Haiping; Lorenz, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    This isotopic reference material, designated as USGS50, is intended as one of two reference waters for daily normalization of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic analysis of water with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer or a laser absorption spectrometer, of use especially for isotope-hydrology laboratories analyzing freshwater samples from equatorial and tropical regions.

  9. Carbon isotope curve and iridium anomaly in the Albian-Cenomanian paleoceanic deposits of the Eastern Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, D. P.; Savelyeva, O. L.; Palechek, T. N.; Pokrovsky, B. G.

    2012-04-01

    determined contents of carbon and oxygen stable isotopes in limestones and have compared the received results to isotope curves of other regions. In studied section the curve of d13C is characterized by a clearly expressed positive shift at the level of the lower carbonaceous bed. Below it and in the overlapping stratum of siliceous limestone (1 cm thickness) d13C has the values of 1.9-2.1 pro mille and above it d13C increases up to 2.5-3 pro mille. The precise d13C maximum after a sharp shift is correlatable with the form of a d13C curve of the Middle Cenomanian Tethyan sections. Accordingly, it is possible to assert, that the lower carbonaceous bed was formed during the mid-Cenomanian anoxic event (MCE). Gradual increase of d13C in the upper part of our section is similar to change of d13C in Upper Cenomanian fragments of Tethyan sections, i.e. the lower carbonaceous bed corresponds to anoxic event at the Cenomanian/Turonian boundary (OAE2). Neutron activation analysis indicates increased up to 9 ppb concentration of Ir at the bottom of the lower carbonaceous bed (inorganic part of the sample was analyzed comprising 46% of the bulk rock). This anomaly correlates in the studied section with a positive shift of d13C. Taking into account radiolarian age data this allows to correlate the anomaly with the MCE. A source of iridium and other elements of the platinum group could be basalts and hyaloclastites from the eruptions during the sedimentation period. Anoxic conditions promoted deposit enrichment in ore elements. This work was supported by the RFBR (No. 10-05-00065).

  10. Experimental Evidence for Hydrogen Tunneling when the Isotopic Arrhenius Prefactor (AH/AD) is Unity

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sudhir C.; Klinman, Judith P.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is one of the major tools used for the investigation of hydrogen tunneling in condensed phase. Hydrogen transfer reactions displaying isotopic Arrhenius prefactor ratios (AH/AD) of unity are generally ascribed to a semi-classical mechanism. Here, we have identified a double mutant of soybean lipoxygenase (SLO-1, an enzyme previously shown to follow quantum mechanical hydrogen tunneling), that displays an AH/AD of unity and highly elevated (non-classical) KIEs. This observation highlights the shortcoming of assigning a hydrogen transfer reaction to a semi-classical model based solely on an Arrhenius prefactor ratio. PMID:19061319

  11. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation of benzene and toluene during hydrophobic sorption in multistep batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Imfeld, G; Kopinke, F-D; Fischer, A; Richnow, H-H

    2014-07-01

    The application of compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) for evaluating degradation of organic pollutants in the field implies that other processes affecting pollutant concentration are minor with respect to isotope fractionation. Sorption is associated with minor isotope fractionation and pollutants may undergo successive sorption-desorption steps during their migration in aquifers. However, little is known about isotope fractionation of BTEX compounds after consecutive sorption steps. Here, we show that partitioning of benzene and toluene between water and organic sorbents (i.e. 1-octanol, dichloromethane, cyclohexane, hexanoic acid and Amberlite XAD-2) generally exhibits very small carbon and hydrogen isotope effects in multistep batch experiments. However, carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation was observed for the benzene-octanol pair after several sorption steps (Δδ(13)C=1.6 ± 0.3‰ and Δδ(2)H=88 ± 3‰), yielding isotope fractionation factors of αC=1.0030 ± 0.0005 and αH=1.195 ± 0.026. Our results indicate that the cumulative effect of successive hydrophobic partitioning steps in an aquifer generally results in insignificant isotope fractionation for benzene and toluene. However, significant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation cannot be excluded for specific sorbate-sorbent pairs, such as sorbates with π-electrons and sorbents with OH-groups. Consequently, functional groups of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) may specifically interact with BTEX compounds migrating in an aquifer, thereby resulting in potentially relevant isotope fractionation.

  12. A model predicting hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of mammalian hair at the landscape scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehleringer, J.; Podlesak, D.; Cerling, T.; Chesson, L.; Bowen, G.

    2006-12-01

    A model has been developed to predict hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of keratin in hair of mammalian herbivores and omnivores, incorporating the influences of drinking water and dietary input. The isotopic composition of carbohydrates in food sources and the water in blood and tissues are predicted as intermediate components linking drinking water and dietary sources (environment) with hair (environmental recorder). This model is scaled to landscape and regional levels using geographic information system map predictions of the hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of drinking waters and anticipated hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of carbohydrate food sources. The model was tested using isotope ratios of human hair (an omnivore) from across the USA. We discuss the application of this model as a tool for providing spatially integrated information about the quality of primary productivity relevant to mammalian herbivores over time, through the effects of varying primary productivity on protein nitrogen balance of the herbivore.

  13. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-30

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between "static" and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N-. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles.

  14. Impact-induced devolatilization and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of serpentine: implications for planetary accretion.

    PubMed

    Tyburczy, J A; Krishnamurthy, R V; Epstein, S; Ahrens, T J

    1990-05-01

    The degree of impact-induced devolatilization of nonporous serpentine, porous serpentine, and deuterium-enriched serpentine was investigated using two independent experimental methods, the gas recovery method and the solid recovery method, yielding consistent results. The gas recovery method enables determination of the chemical and hydrogen isotopic composition of the recovered gases. Experiments on deuterium-enriched serpentine unambiguously identify the samples as the source of the recovered gases, as opposed to other possible contaminants. For shock pressures near incipient devolatilization (Pinitial = 5.0 GPa), the hydrogen isotopic composition of the evolved gas is similar to that of the starting material. For higher shock pressures the bulk evolved gas is significantly lower in deuterium than the starting material. There is also significant reduction of H2O to H2 in gases recovered at higher shock pressures, probably caused by reaction of evolved H2O with the metal gas recovery fixture. The hydrogen isotopic fractionation between the evolved gas and the residual solid indicates nonequilibrium, kinetic control of gas-solid isotopic ratios. In contrast, gaseous H2O-H2 isotopic fractionation suggests high temperature (800-1300 K) isotopic equilibrium between the gaseous species, indicating initiation of devolatilization at sites of greater than average energy deposition (i.e., shear bands). Impact-induced hydrogen isotopic fractionation of hydrous silicates during accretion can affect the distribution of hydrogen isotopes of planetary bodies during accretion, leaving the interiors enriched in deuterium. The significance of this process for planetary development depends on the models used for extrapolation of the observed isotopic fractionation to devolatilizations greater than those investigated experimentally and assumptions about timing and rates of protoatmosphere loss, frequency of multiple impacts, and rates of gas-solid or gas-melt isotopic re

  15. SAMPEX observations of energetic hydrogen isotopes in the inner zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looper, M. D.; Blake, J. B.; Cummings, J. R.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    We report observations of geomagnetically-trapped hydrogen isotopes at low altitudes, near the feet of field lines in the inner zone, made with the PET instrument aboard the SAMPEX satellite. We have mapped protons from 19 to 500 MeV, and have discovered a collocated belt of deuterons, which we have mapped from 18 to 58 MeV/nucleon. We found deuterium at about 1% of the level of the proton flux at the same energy per nucleon, and no tritium at energies of tens of MeV/nucleon with an upper limit of about 0.1% of the proton flux. Protons and deuterons showed similar time dependence, with fluxes approximately tripling from July 1992 to March 1996, and similar pitch-angle dependence. The high-L limits of the proton and deuteron belts as functions of energy were organized by rigidity, as was to be expected if these limits were set for both species by inability of particles to sustain adiabatic motion and stable trapping.

  16. Relation between hydrogen isotopic ratios of bone collagen and rain

    SciTech Connect

    Cormie, A.B.; Schwarcz, H.P. ); Gray, J. )

    1994-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic value ([delta]D) of deer bone collagen is related to both [delta]D of rain during the growing season and growing season relative humidity (RH). With correction for the effects of RH, bone [delta]D is related to growing season rain [delta]D in a simple manner with a slope of 1.0. This indicates that, with RH correction, there are no additional sources of bias in the [delta]D of bone due to unaccounted for biologic or climatic effects. Due to a low sensitivity of bone [delta]D to RH effects, both yearly and growing season rain [delta]D can be estimated with considerable accuracy (R = 0.97 and R = 0.96) from bone collagen [delta]D and [delta][sup 15]N. Here, [delta][sup 15]N is used to correct bone [delta]D for the effects of RH. From these estimates of rain [delta]D, it may then be possible to evaluate temperature since the [delta]D of rain primarily reflects local temperature. Therefore, the measurement of bone collagen [delta]D has good potential for evaluating paleoclimates.

  17. In situ monitoring hydrogen isotope retention in ITER first wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhin, E. E.; Andrew, P.; Anthoine, A. D.; Bazhenov, A. N.; Barnsley, R.; Bukreev, I. M.; Bukhovets, V. L.; Chernakov, A. P.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Kochergin, M. M.; Koval, A. N.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Kurskiev, G. S.; Levashova, M. G.; Litvinov, A. E.; Litunovsky, V. N.; Markin, A. V.; Mazul, I. V.; Masyukevich, S. V.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Nemov, A. S.; Novokhatsky, A. N.; Razdobarin, A. G.; Sherstnev, E. V.; Samsonov, D. S.; Semenov, V. V.; Smirnov, A. S.; De Temmerman, G.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Zalavutdinov, R. Kh.; Walsh, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Tritium retention inside the vacuum vessel is a potentially serious constraint in the operation of large-scale fusion machines like ITER. An in situ diagnostics for first wall H/D/T retention by laser induced desorption spectroscopy (LIDS) is proposed for use between plasma discharges. The technique is based on local baking of the first wall by laser irradiation and subsequent analysis of the in-vessel gas by optical emission spectroscopy of plasma radiation. The local heating implementation, kinetics of H/D/T thermal extraction and the accuracy of optical emission spectroscopy measurements are analysed. To resolve the H/D/T lines spectroscopically, their thermal broadening should be minimized to prevent overlapping of the line shapes. A comparative performance analysis of several types of plasma sources with relatively cold ions is made including the following types of discharges: Penning, RF multipactor, laser torch and ECR. All these radiation sources require rather low power and could be used for remote in situ measurements of relative densities of the thermally extracted hydrogen isotopes.

  18. Hydrogen isotope trapping in Al-Cu binary alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Chao, Paul; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the trapping mechanisms for hydrogen isotopes in Al–X Cu (0.0 at. % < X < 3.5 at. %) alloys were investigated using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), electrical conductivity, and differential scanning calorimetry. Constant heating rate TDS was used to determine microstructural trap energies and occupancies. In addition to the trapping states in pure Al reported in the literature (interstitial lattice sites, dislocations, and vacancies), a trap site due to Al–Cu intermetallic precipitates is observed. The binding energy of this precipitate trap is (18 ± 3) kJ•mol–1 (0.19 ± 0.03 eV). Typical occupancy of this trap is high;more » for Al–2.6 at. % Cu (a Cu composition comparable to that in AA2219) charged at 200 °C with 130 MPa D2 for 68 days, there is ca. there is 3.15×10–7 mol D bound to the precipitate trap per mol of Al, accounting for a third of the D in the charged sample.« less

  19. Hydrogen isotope trapping in Al-Cu binary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Paul; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the trapping mechanisms for hydrogen isotopes in Al–X Cu (0.0 at. % < X < 3.5 at. %) alloys were investigated using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), electrical conductivity, and differential scanning calorimetry. Constant heating rate TDS was used to determine microstructural trap energies and occupancies. In addition to the trapping states in pure Al reported in the literature (interstitial lattice sites, dislocations, and vacancies), a trap site due to Al–Cu intermetallic precipitates is observed. The binding energy of this precipitate trap is (18 ± 3) kJ•mol–1 (0.19 ± 0.03 eV). Typical occupancy of this trap is high; for Al–2.6 at. % Cu (a Cu composition comparable to that in AA2219) charged at 200 °C with 130 MPa D2 for 68 days, there is ca. there is 3.15×10–7 mol D bound to the precipitate trap per mol of Al, accounting for a third of the D in the charged sample.

  20. Hydrogen and oxygen in brine shrimp chitin reflect environmental water and dietary isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Kristine E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2010-03-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of the common structural biopolymer chitin are a potential recorder of ecological and environmental information, but our understanding of the mechanisms of incorporation of H and O from environmental substrates into chitin is limited. We report the results of a set of experiments in which the isotopic compositions of environmental water and diet were varied independently in order to assess the contribution of these variables to the H and O isotopic composition of Artemia franciscana chitin. Hydrogen isotope ratios of chitin were strongly linearly correlated with both food and water, with approximately 26% of the hydrogen signal reflecting food and approximately 38% reflecting water. Oxygen isotopes were also strongly correlated with the isotopic composition of water and food, but whereas 69% of oxygen in chitin exchanged with environmental water, only 10% was derived from food. We propose that these observations reflect the position-specific, partial exchange of H and O atoms with brine shrimp body water during the processes of digestion and chitin biosynthesis. Comparison of culture experiments with a set of natural samples collected from the Great Salt Lake, UT in 2006 shows that, with some exceptions, oxygen isotope compositions of chitin track those of water, whereas hydrogen isotopes vary inversely with those of lake water. The different behavior of the two isotopic systems can be explained in terms of a dietary shift from allochthonous particulate matter with relatively higher δ 2H values in the early spring to autochthonous particulate matter with significantly lower δ 2H values in the late summer to autumn. These results suggest oxygen in chitin may be a valuable proxy for the oxygen isotopic composition of environmental water, whereas hydrogen isotope values from the same molecule may reveal ecological and biogeochemical changes within lakes.

  1. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ??? in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) ??2H reproducibility (1?? standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 ??? to 0.58 ???. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2010 by the American Chemical Society.

  2. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ2H reproducibility (1& sigma; standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen

  3. Hydrogen Isotope Measurements of Organic Acids and Alcohols by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-TC-IRMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Fu, Qi; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    One possible process responsible for methane generation on Mars is abiotic formation by Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) synthesis during serpentinization reactions. Measurement of carbon and hydrogen isotopes of intermediary organic compounds can help constrain the origin of this methane by tracing the geochemical pathway during formation. Of particular interest within the context of this work is the isotopic composition of organic intermediaries produced on the surfaces of mineral catalysts (i.e. magnetite) during hydrothermal experiments, and the ability to make meaningful and reproducible hydrogen isotope measurements. Reported here are results of experiments to characterize the hydrogen isotope composition of low molecular weight organic acids and alcohols. The presence of these organic compounds has been suggested by others as intermeadiary products made during mineral surface catalyzed reactions. This work compliments our previous study characterizing the carbon isotope composition of similar low molecular weight intermediary organic compounds (Socki, et al, American Geophysical Union Fall meeting, Abstr. #V51B-2189, Dec., 2010). Our hydrogen isotope measurements utilize a unique analytical technique combining Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometry-High Temperature Conversion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (Py-GC-MS-TC-IRMS). Our technique is unique in that it carries a split of the pyrolyzed GC-separated product to a Thermo DSQ-II? quadrupole mass spectrometer as a means of making qualitative and semi-quantitative compositional measurements of separated organic compounds, therefore both chemical and isotopic measurements can be carried out simultaneously on the same sample.

  4. Evidence from Hydrogen Isotopes in Meteorites for a Subsurface Hydrogen Reservoir on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Wang, Jianhua; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The surface geology and geomorphology of Mars indicates that it was once warm enough to maintain a large body of liquid water on its surface, though such a warm environment might have been transient. The transition to the present cold and dry Mars is closely linked to the history of surface water, yet the evolution of surficial water is poorly constrained. We have conducted in situ hydrogen isotope (D/H) analyses of quenched and impact glasses in three Martian meteorites (Yamato 980459, EETA79001, LAR 06319) by Cameca ims-6f at Digital Terrain Models (DTM) following the methods of [1]. The hydrogen isotope analyses provide evidence for the existence of a distinct but ubiquitous water/ice reservoir (D/H = 2-3 times Earth's ocean water: Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW)) that lasted from at least the time when the meteorites crystallized (173-472 Ma) to the time they were ejected by impacts (0.7-3.3 Ma), but possibly much longer [2]. The origin of this reservoir appears to predate the current Martian atmospheric water (D/H equals approximately 5-6 times SMOW) and is unlikely to be a simple mixture of atmospheric and primordial water retained in the Martian mantle (D/H is approximately equal to SMOW [1]). Given the fact that this intermediate-D/H reservoir (2-3 times SMOW) is observed in a diverse range of Martian materials with different ages (e.g., SNC (Shergottites, Nakhlites, Chassignites) meteorites, including shergottites such as ALH 84001; and Curiosity surface data [3]), we conclude that this intermediate-D/H reservoir is likely a global surficial feature that has remained relatively intact over geologic time. We propose that this reservoir represents either hydrated crust and/or ground ice interbedded within sediments. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that a buried cryosphere accounts for a large part of the initial water budget of Mars.

  5. Isotopic Anomalies in Primitive Solar System Matter: Spin-State Dependent Fractionation of Nitrogen and Deuterium in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milan, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and N-15, This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar core. Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and N-15 and can account for the largest isotop c enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites, However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large N-15 enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, N-15 enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H2, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both N-15 and D in dense cloud cores, We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest N-15 enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D emichment. These calculations therefore support the view that Solar System N-15 and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage, We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  6. Isotopic Anomalies in Primitive Solar System Matter: Spin-State-Dependent Fractionation of Nitrogen and Deuterium in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and N-15. This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar nebula, Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and N-15 and can account for the largest isotopic enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites. However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large N-15 enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, N-15 enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H2, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both N-15 and D in dense cloud cores. We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest N=15 enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D enrichment. These calculations therefore support the view that solar system N-15 and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage. We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  7. ISOTOPIC ANOMALIES IN PRIMITIVE SOLAR SYSTEM MATTER: SPIN-STATE-DEPENDENT FRACTIONATION OF NITROGEN AND DEUTERIUM IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Wirstroem, Eva S.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2012-09-20

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and {sup 15}N. This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar nebula. Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and {sup 15}N and can account for the largest isotopic enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites. However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large {sup 15}N enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, {sup 15}N enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H{sub 2}, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both {sup 15}N and D in dense cloud cores. We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest {sup 15}N enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D enrichment. These calculations therefore support the view that solar system {sup 15}N and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage. We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  8. Isotopic Anomalies in Primitive Solar System Matter: Spin-state Dependent Fractionation of Nitrogen and Deuterium in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnley, Steven B.; Wirstrom, E. S.; Cordiner, M. A.; Milam, S. N.

    2012-10-01

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and 15N. This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar core [1]. Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and 15N and can account for the largest isotopic enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites. However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large 15N enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, 15N enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H2, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both 15N and D in dense cloud cores. We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest 15N enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D enrichment. These calculations therefore support the view that Solar System 15N and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage. We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model. [1] Mumma, M. J. and Charnley, S.B. (2011), ARA&A, 49, 471.

  9. Assessment of shock effects on amphibole water contents and hydrogen isotope compositions: 1. Amphibolite experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minitti, Michelle E.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Taylor, Bruce E.; Dyar, M. Darby; Schultz, Peter H.

    2008-02-01

    Kaersutitic amphiboles found within a subset of the Martian meteorites have low water contents and variably heavy hydrogen isotope compositions. In order to assess if impact shock-induced devolatilization and hydrogen isotope fractionation were determining factors in these water and isotopic characteristics of the Martian kaersutites, we conducted impact shock experiments on samples of Gore Mountain amphibolite in the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). A parallel shock experiment conducted on an anorthosite sample indicated that contamination of shocked samples by the AVGR hydrogen propellant was unlikely. Petrographic study of the experimental amphibolite shock products indicates that only ˜ 10% of the shock products experienced levels of damage equivalent to those found in the most highly shocked kaersutite-bearing Martian meteorites (30-35 GPa). Ion microprobe studies of highly shocked hornblende from the amphibolite exhibited elevated water contents (ΔH 2O ˜ 0.1 wt.%) and enriched hydrogen isotope compositions (Δ D ˜ + 10‰) relative to unshocked hornblende. Water and hydrogen isotope analyses of tens of milligrams of unshocked, moderately shocked, and highly shocked hornblende samples by vacuum extraction/uranium reduction and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), respectively, are largely consistent with analyses of single grains from the ion microprobe. The mechanisms thought to have produced the excess water in most of the shocked hornblendes are shock-induced reduction of hornblende Fe and/or irreversible adsorption of hydrogen. Addition of the isotopically enriched Martian atmosphere to the Martian meteorite kaersutites via these mechanisms could explain their enriched and variable isotopic compositions. Alternatively, regrouping the water extraction and IRMS analyses on the basis of isotopic composition reveals a small, but consistent, degree of impact-induced devolatilization (˜ 0.1 wt.% H 2O) and H isotope enrichment (Δ D ˜ + 10

  10. Biochemical Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation during Lipid Biosynthesis in Higher Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmen, A.; Gamarra, B.; Cormier, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Although hydrogen isotopes (δ2H) of leaf wax lipids are increasingly being applied as (paleo-) hydrological proxies, we still do not understand some of the basic processes that shape the δ2H values of these compounds. In general, it is believed that three variables shape the δ2H values of leaf wax lipids: source water δ2H values, evaporative deuterium (2H) enrichment of leaf water and the biosynthetic fractionation (ɛbio) during the synthesis of organic compounds. While the influences of source water δ2H values and leaf water evaporative 2H enrichment have been well documented, very little is known how ɛbio shapes the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids. I will present the results from recent experiments, where we show that the magnitude of ɛbio, and thus the δ2H value of plant-derived lipids, strongly depends on the carbon (C) metabolism of a plant. Specifically, I will show that plants that rely for their tissue formation on recently assimilated C have δ2H values in their n-alkanes that are up to 60‰ more negative than plants that depend for their tissue formation on stored carbohydrates. Our findings can be explained by the fact that NADPH is the primary source of hydrogen in plant lipids and that the δ2H value of NADPH differs whether NADPH was generated directly in the light reaction of photosynthesis or whether it was generated by processing stored carbohydrates. As such, the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids will directly depend on whether the tissue containing these lipids was synthesized using recent assimilates, e.g. in a C autonomous state or, if it was synthesized from stored or otherwise aquired C sources, e.g. in a not C autonomous state. Given the magnidude of this effect, our results have important implications for interpretation of plant-derived lipid δ2H values when used as (paleo-) hydrological proxies. In addition, our results suggest, that δ2H values of plant-derived lipids could be employed as a new tools to assess the C

  11. Effects of hydrogen isotopes in the irradiation damage of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M. Z.; Liu, P. P.; Zhu, Y. M.; Wan, F. R.; He, Z. B.; Zhan, Q.

    2015-11-01

    The isotope effect of hydrogen in irradiation damage plays an important role in the development of reduced activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels in nuclear reactors. The evolutions of microstructures and mechanical properties of China low active martensitic (CLAM) steel subjected to hydrogen and deuterium ions irradiation are studied comparatively. Under the same irradiation conditions, larger size and smaller density of dislocation loops are generated by deuterium ion than by hydrogen ion. Irradiation hardening occurs under the ion irradiation and the hardening induced by hydrogen ion is higher than by deuterium ion. Moreover, the coarsening of M23C6 precipitates is observed, which can be explained by the solute drag mechanisms. It turns out that the coarsening induced by deuterium ion irradiation is more distinct than by hydrogen ion irradiation. No distinct variations for the compositions of M23C6 precipitates are found by a large number of statistical data after hydrogen isotopes irradiation.

  12. Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation As a Tool to Identify Aerobic and Anaerobic PAH Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Kümmel, Steffen; Starke, Robert; Chen, Gao; Musat, Florin; Richnow, Hans H; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-03-15

    Aerobic and anaerobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biodegradation was characterized by compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of the carbon and hydrogen isotope effects of the enzymatic reactions initiating specific degradation pathways, using naphthalene and 2-methylnaphtalene as model compounds. Aerobic activation of naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene by Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816 and Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17483 containing naphthalene dioxygenases was associated with moderate carbon isotope fractionation (εC = -0.8 ± 0.1‰ to -1.6 ± 0.2‰). In contrast, anaerobic activation of naphthalene by a carboxylation-like mechanism by strain NaphS6 was linked to negligible carbon isotope fractionation (εC = -0.2 ± 0.2‰ to -0.4 ± 0.3‰). Notably, anaerobic activation of naphthalene by strain NaphS6 exhibited a normal hydrogen isotope fractionation (εH = -11 ± 2‰ to -47 ± 4‰), whereas an inverse hydrogen isotope fractionation was observed for the aerobic strains (εH = +15 ± 2‰ to +71 ± 6‰). Additionally, isotope fractionation of NaphS6 was determined in an overlaying hydrophobic carrier phase, resulting in more reliable enrichment factors compared to immobilizing the PAHs on the bottle walls without carrier phase. The observed differences especially in hydrogen fractionation might be used to differentiate between aerobic and anaerobic naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene biodegradation pathways at PAH-contaminated field sites.

  13. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange reactions between clay minerals and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Kharaka, Y.K.

    1976-01-01

    The extent of hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange between clay minerals and water has been measured in the temperature range 100-350?? for bomb runs of up to almost 2 years. Hydrogen isotope exchange between water and the clays was demonstrable at 100??. Exchange rates were 3-5 times greater for montmorillonite than for kaolinite or illite and this is attributed to the presence of interlayer water in the montmorillonite structure. Negligible oxygen isotope exchange occurred at these low temperatures. The great disparity in D and O18 exchange rates observed in every experiment demonstrates that hydrogen isotope exchange occurred by a mechanism of proton exchange independent of the slower process of O18 exchange. At 350?? kaolinite reacted to form pyrophyllite and diaspore. This was accompanied by essentially complete D exchange but minor O18 exchange and implies that intact structural units in the pyrophyllite were inherited from the kaolinite precursor. ?? 1976.

  14. Zinc isotopic composition of iron meteorites: Absence of isotopic anomalies and origin of the volatile element depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Heng; Nguyen, Bach Mai; Moynier, Frédéric

    2013-12-01

    High-precision Zn isotopic compositions measured by MC-ICP-MS are documented for 32 iron meteorites from various fractionally crystallized and silicate-bearing groups. The δ66Zn values range from -0.59‰ up to +5.61‰ with most samples being slightly enriched in the heavier isotopes compared with carbonaceous chondrites (0 < δ66Zn < 0.5). The δ66Zn versus δ68Zn plot of all samples defines a common linear fractionation line, which supports the hypothesis that Zn was derived from a single reservoir or from multiple reservoirs linked by mass-dependent fractionation processes. Our data for Redfields fall on a mass fractionation line and therefore refute a previous claim of it having an anomalous isotopic composition due to nonmixing of nucleosynthetic products. The negative correlation between δ66Zn and the Zn concentration of IAB and IIE is consistent with mass-dependent isotopic fractionation due to evaporation with preferential loss of lighter isotopes in the vapor phase. Data for the Zn concentrations and isotopic compositions of two IVA samples demonstrate that volatile depletion in the IVA parent body is not likely the result of evaporation. This is important evidence that favors the incomplete condensation origin for the volatile depletion of the IVA parent body.

  15. Isotopic Studies of Hydrogen and Deuterium Phase IV at Multi-Megabar Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoryanz, Eugene; Guillaume, Christophe; Scheler, Thomas; Howie, Ross

    2013-06-01

    The recent discovery of the mixed atomic and molecular phase IV of hydrogen (deuterium) is exemplary of how the studies of hydrogen at multi-megabar pressures is constitutive to the understanding of simple systems at extreme compressions. Through a series of high pressure Raman spectroscopic experiments we have conducted an isotopic comparison between hydrogen and deuterium in phase I. Isotopic studies not only reveal differences in phase stability, imposing constraints on the P-T phase diagram, but also provide strong evidence for structural phenomena, such as proton (deuteron) tunnelling. New data will be presented over a wide temperature range.

  16. Sulfur isotopic fractionation in vacuum UV photodissociation of hydrogen sulfide and its potential relevance to meteorite analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Jackson, Teresa L.; Ahmed, Musahid; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Select meteoritic classes possess mass-independent sulfur isotopic compositions in sulfide and organic phases. Photochemistry in the solar nebula has been attributed as a source of these anomalies. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the most abundant gas-phase species in the solar nebula, and hence, photodissociation of H2S by solar vacuum UV (VUV) photons (especially by Lyman-α radiation) is a relevant process. Because of experimental difficulties associated with accessing VUV radiation, there is a paucity of data and a lack of theoretical basis to test the hypothesis of a photochemical origin of mass-independent sulfur. Here, we present multiisotopic measurements of elemental sulfur produced during the VUV photolysis of H2S. Mass-independent sulfur isotopic compositions are observed. The observed isotopic fractionation patterns are wavelength-dependent. VUV photodissociation of H2S takes place through several predissociative channels, and the measured mass-independent fractionation is most likely a manifestation of these processes. Meteorite sulfur data are discussed in light of the present experiments, and suggestions are made to guide future experiments and models. PMID:23431159

  17. Sulfur isotopic fractionation in vacuum UV photodissociation of hydrogen sulfide and its potential relevance to meteorite analysis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Jackson, Teresa L; Ahmed, Musahid; Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-29

    Select meteoritic classes possess mass-independent sulfur isotopic compositions in sulfide and organic phases. Photochemistry in the solar nebula has been attributed as a source of these anomalies. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the most abundant gas-phase species in the solar nebula, and hence, photodissociation of H2S by solar vacuum UV (VUV) photons (especially by Lyman-α radiation) is a relevant process. Because of experimental difficulties associated with accessing VUV radiation, there is a paucity of data and a lack of theoretical basis to test the hypothesis of a photochemical origin of mass-independent sulfur. Here, we present multiisotopic measurements of elemental sulfur produced during the VUV photolysis of H2S. Mass-independent sulfur isotopic compositions are observed. The observed isotopic fractionation patterns are wavelength-dependent. VUV photodissociation of H2S takes place through several predissociative channels, and the measured mass-independent fractionation is most likely a manifestation of these processes. Meteorite sulfur data are discussed in light of the present experiments, and suggestions are made to guide future experiments and models.

  18. Molecular Paleohydrology: Interpreting the Hydrogen-Isotopic Composition of Lipid Biomarkers from Photosynthesizing Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachse, Dirk; Billault, Isabelle; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Dawson, Todd E.; Feakins, Sarah J.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Magill, Clayton R.; McInerney, Francesca A.; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Polissar, Pratigya; Robins, Richard J.; Sachs, Julian P.; Schmidt, Hanns-Ludwig; Sessions, Alex L.; White, James W. C.; West, Jason B.; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen-isotopic abundances of lipid biomarkers are emerging as important proxies in the study of ancient environments and ecosystems. A decade ago, pioneering studies made use of new analytical methods and demonstrated that the hydrogen-isotopic composition of individual lipids from aquatic and terrestrial organisms can be related to the composition of their growth (i.e., environmental) water. Subsequently, compound-specific deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios of sedimentary biomarkers have been increasingly used as paleohydrological proxies over a range of geological timescales. Isotopic fractionation observed between hydrogen in environmental water and hydrogen in lipids, however, is sensitive to biochemical, physiological, and environmental influences on the composition of hydrogen available for biosynthesis in cells. Here we review the factors and processes that are known to influence the hydrogen-isotopic compositions of lipids—especially n-alkanes—from photosynthesizing organisms, and we provide a framework for interpreting their D/H ratios from ancient sediments and identify future research opportunities.

  19. NUCLEOSYNTHETIC TUNGSTEN ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN ACID LEACHATES OF THE MURCHISON CHONDRITE: IMPLICATIONS FOR HAFNIUM-TUNGSTEN CHRONOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, Christoph; Wieler, Rainer; Kleine, Thorsten; Dauphas, Nicolas

    2012-07-01

    Progressive dissolution of the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite with acids of increasing strengths reveals large internal W isotope variations that reflect a heterogeneous distribution of s- and r-process W isotopes among the components of primitive chondrites. At least two distinct carriers of nucleosynthetic W isotope anomalies must be present, which were produced in different nucleosynthetic environments. The co-variation of {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W in the leachates follows a linear trend that is consistent with a mixing line between terrestrial W and a presumed s-process-enriched component. The composition of the s-enriched component agrees reasonably well with that predicted by the stellar model of s-process nucleosynthesis. The co-variation of {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W in the leachates provides a means for correcting the measured {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 182}W/{sup 183}W of Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI) for nucleosynthetic anomalies using the isotopic variations in {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W. This new correction procedure is different from that used previously, and results in a downward shift of the initial {epsilon}{sup 182}W of CAI to -3.51 {+-} 0.10 (where {epsilon}{sup 182}W is the variation in 0.01% of the {sup 182}W/{sup 183}W ratio relative to Earth's mantle). This revision leads to Hf-W model ages of core formation in iron meteorite parent bodies that are {approx}2 Myr younger than previously calculated. The revised Hf-W model ages are consistent with CAI being the oldest solids formed in the solar system, and indicate that core formation in some planetesimals occurred within {approx}2 Myr of the beginning of the solar system.

  20. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  1. American woodcock migratory connectivity as indicated by hydrogen isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullins, Daniel S.; Conway, Warren C.; Haukos, David A.; Hobson, Keith A.; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Comer, Christopher E.; Hung, I-Kuai

    2016-01-01

    To identify factors contributing to the long-term decline of American woodcock, a holistic understanding of range-wide population connectivity throughout the annual cycle is needed. We used band recovery data and isotopic composition of primary (P1) and secondary (S13) feathers to estimate population sources and connectivity among natal, early fall, and winter ranges of hunter-harvested juvenile American woodcock. We used P1 feathers from known-origin pre-fledged woodcock (n = 43) to create a hydrogenδ2Hf isoscape by regressing δ2Hf against expected growing-season precipitation (δ2Hp). Modeled δ2Hp values explained 79% of the variance in P1 δ2Hf values, indicating good model fit for estimating woodcock natal origins. However, a poor relationship (r2 = 0.23) between known-origin, S13 δ2Hf values, and expected δ2Hp values precluded assignment of early fall origins. We applied the δ2Hfisoscape to assign natal origins using P1 feathers from 494 hunter-harvested juvenile woodcock in the United States and Canada during 2010–2011 and 2011–2012 hunting seasons. Overall, 64% of all woodcock origins were assigned to the northernmost (>44°N) portion of both the Central and Eastern Management Regions. In the Eastern Region, assignments were more uniformly distributed along the Atlantic coast, whereas in the Central Region, most woodcock were assigned to origins within and north of the Great Lakes region. We compared our origin assignments to spatial coverage of the annual American woodcock Singing Ground Survey (SGS) and evaluated whether the survey effectively encompasses the entire breeding range. When we removed the inadequately surveyed Softwood shield Bird Conservation Region (BCR) from the northern portion of the SGS area, only 48% of juvenile woodcock originated in areas currently surveyed by the SGS. Of the individuals assigned to the northernmost portions of the breeding range, several were harvested in the southern extent of the

  2. Hydrogen isotope fractionation by Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus in coculture and pure culture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Sakata, Susumu; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2008-06-01

    We grew a hydrogen-utilizing methanogen, Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus strain ΔH, in coculture and pure culture conditions to evaluate the hydrogen isotope fractionation associated with carbonate reduction under low (< several tens of μM; coculture) and high (>6 mM; pure culture) concentrations of H 2 in the headspace. In the cocultures, which were grown at 55 °C with a thermophilic butyrate-oxidizing syntroph, the hydrogen isotopic relationship between methane and water was well represented by the following equation: δD=0.725(±0.003)·δDO-275(±3), in which the hydrogen isotope fractionation factor ( αH) was 0.725 ± 0.003. The relationship was consistent with the isotopic data on methane and water from terrestrial fields (a peat bog in Washington State, USA, and a sandy aquifer in Denmark), where carbonate reduction was reported to be the dominant pathway of methanogenesis. In the pure cultures, grown at 55 and 65 °C, the αH values were 0.755 ± 0.014 and 0.749 ± 0.014, respectively. Dependence of αH on growth temperature was not observed. The αH value at 55 °C in the pure culture was slightly higher than that in the coculture, a finding that disagrees with a hypothesis proposed by Burke [Burke, Jr. R. A. (1993) Possible influence of hydrogen concentration on microbial methane stable hydrogen isotopic composition. Chemosphere26, 55-67] that hydrogen isotope fractionation between methane and water increases (and αH decreases) with increasing H 2 concentration.

  3. DUPAL anomaly in the Sea of Japan: Pb, Nd, and Sr isotopic variations at the eastern Eurasian continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.; Nakamura, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Volcanic rocks from the eastern Eurasian plate margin (southwestern Japan, the Sea of Japan, and northeastern China) show enriched (EMI) component signatures. Volcanic rocks from the Ulreung and Dog Islands in the Sea of Japan show typical DUPAL anomaly characteristics with extremely high ??208/204 Pb (up to 143) and enriched Nd and Sr isotopic compositions (??{lunate}Nd = -3 to -5, 87Sr 86Sr = ~0.705). The ??208/204 Pb values are similar to those associated with the DUPAL anomaly (up to 140) in the southern hemisphere. Because the EMI characteristics of basalts from the Sea of Japan are more extreme than those of southwestern Japan and inland China basalts, we propose that old mantle lithosphere was metasomatized early (prior to the Proterozoic) with subduction-related fluids (not present subduction system) so that it has been slightly enriched in incompatible elements and has had a high Th/U for a long time. The results of this study support the idea that the old subcontinental mantle lithosphere is the source for EMI of oceanic basalts, and that EMI does not need to be stored at the core/ mantle boundary layer for a long time. Dredged samples from seamounts and knolls from the Yamato Basin Ridge in the Sea of Japan show similar isotopic characteristics to basalts from the Mariana arc, supporting the idea that the Yamato Basin Ridge is a spreading center causing separation of the northeast Japan Arc from Eurasia. ?? 1991.

  4. Stable Isotope Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Using Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak-Lovato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage from enhanced oil recovery, carbon storage, and natural gas sites can emit trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide. Trace gas emission at these locations demonstrate unique light stable isotope signatures that provide information to enable source identification of the material. Light stable isotope detection through surface monitoring, offers the ability to distinguish between trace gases emitted from sources such as, biological (fertilizers and wastes), mineral (coal or seams), or liquid organic systems (oil and gas reservoirs). To make light stable isotope measurements, we employ the ultra-sensitive technique, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS). FMS is an absorption technique with sensitivity enhancements approximately 100-1000x more than standard absorption spectroscopy with the advantage of providing stable isotope signature information. We have developed an integrated in situ (point source) system that measures carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide with isotopic resolution and enhanced sensitivity. The in situ instrument involves the continuous collection of air and records the stable isotope ratio for the gas being detected. We have included in-line flask collection points to obtain gas samples for validation of isotopic concentrations using our in-house isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS). We present calibration curves for each species addressed above to demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system. We also show field deployment data demonstrating the capabilities of the system in making live dynamic measurements from an active source.

  5. Impact-induced devolatilization and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of serpentine: Implications for planetary accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyburczy, James A.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, Samuel; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Impact-induced devolatilization of porous serpentine was investigated using two independent experimental methods, the gas recovery and the solid recovery method, each yielding nearly identical results. For shock pressures near incipient devolatilization, the hydrogen isotopic composition of the evolved H2O is very close to that of the starting material. For shock pressures at which up to 12 percent impact-induced devolatilization occurs, the bulk evolved gas is significantly lower in deuterium than the starting material. There is also significant reduction of H2O to H2 in gases recovered at these higher shock pressures, probably caused by reaction of evolved H2O with the metal gas recovery fixture. Gaseous H2O-H2 isotopic fractionation suggests high temperature isotopic equilibrium between the gaseous species, indicating initiation of devolatilization at sites of greater than average energy deposition. Bulk gas-residual solid isotopic fractionations indicate nonequilibrium, kinetic control of gas-solid isotopic ratios. Impact-induced hydrogen isotopic fractionation of hydrous silicates during accretion can strongly affect the long-term planetary isotopic ratios of planetary bodies, leaving the interiors enriched in deuterium. Depending on the model used for extrapolation of the isotopic fractionation to devolatilization fractions greater than those investigated experimentally can result from this process.

  6. Measurements of Cosmic-Ray Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes with the PAMELA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergè, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2016-02-01

    The cosmic-ray hydrogen and helium (1H, 2H, 3He, 4He) isotopic composition has been measured with the satellite-borne experiment PAMELA, which was launched into low-Earth orbit on board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on 2006 June 15. The rare isotopes 2H and 3He in cosmic rays are believed to originate mainly from the interaction of high-energy protons and helium with the galactic interstellar medium. The isotopic composition was measured between 100 and 1100 MeV/n for hydrogen and between 100 and 1400 MeV/n for helium isotopes using two different detector systems over the 23rd solar minimum from 2006 July to 2007 December.

  7. MEASUREMENTS OF COSMIC-RAY HYDROGEN AND HELIUM ISOTOPES WITH THE PAMELA EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Adriani, O.; Bongi, M.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Formato, V.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bottai, S.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Santis, C. De; Castellini, G.; Donato, C. De; Simone, N. De; Felice, V. Di; and others

    2016-02-10

    The cosmic-ray hydrogen and helium ({sup 1}H, {sup 2}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He) isotopic composition has been measured with the satellite-borne experiment PAMELA, which was launched into low-Earth orbit on board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on 2006 June 15. The rare isotopes {sup 2}H and {sup 3}He in cosmic rays are believed to originate mainly from the interaction of high-energy protons and helium with the galactic interstellar medium. The isotopic composition was measured between 100 and 1100 MeV/n for hydrogen and between 100 and 1400 MeV/n for helium isotopes using two different detector systems over the 23rd solar minimum from 2006 July to 2007 December.

  8. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of bacterial methane in a shallow freshwater lake

    SciTech Connect

    Woltemate, I.; Whiticar, M.J.; Schoell, M.

    1984-09-01

    Anoxic sediments from freshwater environments such as bogs, swamps, and lakes undergoing early diagenesis are frequently characterized by the formation of biogenic methane. Freshwater biogenic methanes exhibit carbon and hydrogen isotopic values strongly depleted in C-13 and deuterium relative to the respective values for carbon dioxide and formation water. The percentages of methane generated by fermentation and carbon dioxide reduction can be estimated by comparison of hydrogen isotopes in the formation water and methane. On the basis of these hydrogen isotope data, about 75% of the methane formation in Wurmsee comes from acetate reduction. Fermentation is thus the dominant although not exclusive process. Carbon dioxide reduction contributed the balance of the bacterial methane generated. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  9. Plant leaf wax biomarkers capture gradients in hydrogen isotopes of precipitation from the Andes and Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feakins, Sarah J.; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Salinas, Norma; Shenkin, Alexander; Blonder, Benjamin; Goldsmith, Gregory R.; Ponton, Camilo; Arvin, Lindsay J.; Wu, Mong Sin; Peters, Tom; West, A. Joshua; Martin, Roberta E.; Enquist, Brian J.; Asner, Gregory P.; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2016-06-01

    Plant leaf waxes have been found to record the hydrogen isotopic composition of precipitation and are thus used to reconstruct past climate. To assess how faithfully they record hydrological signals, we characterize leaf wax hydrogen isotopic compositions in forest canopy trees across a highly biodiverse, 3 km elevation range on the eastern flank of the Andes. We sampled the dominant tree species and assessed their relative abundance in the tree community. For each tree we collected xylem and leaf samples for analysis of plant water and plant leaf wax hydrogen isotopic compositions. In total, 176 individuals were sampled across 32 species and 5 forest plots that span the gradient. We find both xylem water and leaf wax δD values of individuals correlate (R2 = 0.8 and R2 = 0.3 respectively) with the isotopic composition of precipitation (with an elevation gradient of -21‰ km-1). Minimal leaf water enrichment means that leaf waxes are straightforward recorders of the isotopic composition of precipitation in wet climates. For these tropical forests we find the average fractionation between source water and leaf wax for C29n-alkanes, -129 ± 2‰ (s.e.m., n = 136), to be indistinguishable from that of temperate moist forests. For C28n-alkanoic acids the average fractionation is -121 ± 3‰ (s.e.m., n = 102). Sampling guided by community assembly within forest plots shows that integrated plant leaf wax hydrogen isotopic compositions faithfully record the gradient of isotopes in precipitation with elevation (R2 = 0.97 for n-alkanes and 0.60 for n-alkanoic acids). This calibration study supports the use of leaf waxes as recorders of the isotopic composition of precipitation in lowland tropical rainforest, tropical montane cloud forests and their sedimentary archives.

  10. Lake Louise Water (USGS47): A new isotopic reference water for stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Lorenz, Jennifer M.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Tarbox, Lauren V.; Mayer, Bernhard; Taylor, Steve

    2014-01-01

    RESULTS: The δ2H and δ18O values of this reference water are –150.2 ± 0.5 ‰ and –19.80 ± 0.02 ‰, respectively, relative to VSMOW on scales normalized such that the δ2H and δ18O values of SLAP reference water are, respectively, –428 and –55.5 ‰. Each uncertainty is an estimated expanded uncertainty (U = 2uc) about the reference value that provides an interval that has about a 95-percent probability of encompassing the true value. CONCLUSION: This isotopic reference material, designated as USGS47, is intended as one of two isotopic reference waters for daily normalization of stable hydrogen and stable oxygen isotopic analysis of water with a mass spectrometer or a laser absorption spectrometer. "

  11. Major evolutionary trends in hydrogen isotope fractionation of vascular plant leaf waxes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Edwards, Erika J; Zeng, Yongbo; Huang, Yongsong

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopic ratios of terrestrial plant leaf waxes (δD) have been widely used for paleoclimate reconstructions. However, underlying controls for the observed large variations in leaf wax δD values in different terrestrial vascular plants are still poorly understood, hampering quantitative paleoclimate interpretation. Here we report plant leaf wax and source water δD values from 102 plant species grown in a common environment (New York Botanic Garden), chosen to represent all the major lineages of terrestrial vascular plants and multiple origins of common plant growth forms. We found that leaf wax hydrogen isotope fractionation relative to plant source water is best explained by membership in particular lineages, rather than by growth forms as previously suggested. Monocots, and in particular one clade of grasses, display consistently greater hydrogen isotopic fractionation than all other vascular plants, whereas lycopods, representing the earlier-diverging vascular plant lineage, display the smallest fractionation. Data from greenhouse experiments and field samples suggest that the changing leaf wax hydrogen isotopic fractionation in different terrestrial vascular plants may be related to different strategies in allocating photosynthetic substrates for metabolic and biosynthetic functions, and potential leaf water isotopic differences.

  12. Major Evolutionary Trends in Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation of Vascular Plant Leaf Waxes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Edwards, Erika J.; Zeng, Yongbo; Huang, Yongsong

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopic ratios of terrestrial plant leaf waxes (δD) have been widely used for paleoclimate reconstructions. However, underlying controls for the observed large variations in leaf wax δD values in different terrestrial vascular plants are still poorly understood, hampering quantitative paleoclimate interpretation. Here we report plant leaf wax and source water δD values from 102 plant species grown in a common environment (New York Botanic Garden), chosen to represent all the major lineages of terrestrial vascular plants and multiple origins of common plant growth forms. We found that leaf wax hydrogen isotope fractionation relative to plant source water is best explained by membership in particular lineages, rather than by growth forms as previously suggested. Monocots, and in particular one clade of grasses, display consistently greater hydrogen isotopic fractionation than all other vascular plants, whereas lycopods, representing the earlier-diverging vascular plant lineage, display the smallest fractionation. Data from greenhouse experiments and field samples suggest that the changing leaf wax hydrogen isotopic fractionation in different terrestrial vascular plants may be related to different strategies in allocating photosynthetic substrates for metabolic and biosynthetic functions, and potential leaf water isotopic differences. PMID:25402476

  13. Selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes (1981-1992)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V. T.; Sutawane, U. B.; Rathi, B. N.

    A selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes is presented. This bibliography covers the period 1981-1992 and is in continuation to Division's earlier report BARC-1192 (1983). The sources of information for this compilation are Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atom Index and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in our library. No claim is made towards exhaustiveness of this bibliography even though sincere attempts have been made for a wide coverage. The bibliography is arranged under the headings: (1) production, purification, recovery, reprocessing and storage; (2) isotope exchange; (3) isotope analysis; (4) properties; and (5) miscellaneous. Total number of references in the bibliography are 1762.

  14. Ultrafiltration by a compacted clay membrane-I. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Hanshaw, B.B.

    1973-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of distilled water and of 0.01 N NaCl forced to flow at ambient temperature under a hydraulic pressure drop of 100 bars across a montmorillonite disc compacted to a porosity of 35 per cent by a pressure of 330 bars. The ultrafiltrates in both experiments were depleted in D by 2.5%. and in O18 by 0.8%. relative to the residual solution. No additional isotopic fractionation due to a salt filtering mechanism was observed at NaCl concentrations up to 0.01 N. Adsorption is most likely the principal mechanism which produces isotopic fractionation, but molecular diffusion may play a minor role. The results suggest that oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of ground water during passage through compacted clayey sediments should be a common occurrence, in accord with published interpretations of isotopic data from the Illinois and Alberta basins. ?? 1973.

  15. CO self-shielding as the origin of oxygen isotope anomalies in the early solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Lyons, J R; Young, E D

    2005-05-19

    The abundances of oxygen isotopes in the most refractory mineral phases (calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions, CAIs) in meteorites have hitherto defied explanation. Most processes fractionate isotopes by nuclear mass; that is, 18O is twice as fractionated as 17O, relative to 16O. In CAIs 17O and 18O are nearly equally fractionated, implying a fundamentally different mechanism. The CAI data were originally interpreted as evidence for supernova input of pure 16O into the solar nebula, but the lack of a similar isotope trend in other elements argues against this explanation. A symmetry-dependent fractionation mechanism may have occurred in the inner solar nebula, but experimental evidence is lacking. Isotope-selective photodissociation of CO in the innermost solar nebula might explain the CAI data, but the high temperatures in this region would have rapidly erased the signature. Here we report time-dependent calculations of CO photodissociation in the cooler surface region of a turbulent nebula. If the surface were irradiated by a far-ultraviolet flux approximately 10(3) times that of the local interstellar medium (for example, owing to an O or B star within approximately 1 pc of the protosun), then substantial fractionation of the oxygen isotopes was possible on a timescale of approximately 10(5) years. We predict that similarly irradiated protoplanetary disks will have H2O enriched in 17O and 18O by several tens of per cent relative to CO.

  16. Holocene precipitation seasonality captured by a dual hydrogen and oxygen isotope approach at Steel Lake, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Anna K.; Nelson, David M.; Hu, Feng Sheng; Huang, Yongsong; Shuman, Bryan N.; Williams, John W.

    2010-12-01

    Middle-Holocene (8 to 4 ka BP) warmth and aridity are well recorded in sediment archives from midcontinental North America. However, neither the climatic driver nor the seasonal character of precipitation during this period is well understood because of the limitations of available proxy indicators. For example, an important challenge is to distinguish among the interacting effects of evaporation, temperature, or precipitation seasonality in existing δ 18O records from the region. Here we combine hydrogen isotopes of palmitic acid and oxygen isotopes of carbonate to derive lake-water isotopic values during the Holocene at Steel Lake in north-central Minnesota. In combination, these data enable us to separate variations in evaporation from variations in the isotopic composition of input-waters to lake. Variations in evaporation are used as a proxy for aridity and lake-water input isotopic values are used as a proxy for the isotopic values of meteoric precipitation. Our results suggest that lake-water input isotopic values were more negative during the middle Holocene than at present. To test whether these more negative values are related to temperature or precipitation seasonality, we compare pollen-inferred temperatures and the expected isotopic value of precipitation resulting from these temperatures to the reconstructed precipitation isotopic values. Results suggest that middle Holocene warmth and aridity were associated with increased evaporation rates and decreased summer precipitation. These inferences are consistent with climate simulations that highlight the role of seasonal insolation and sea surface temperatures in driving variations in precipitation seasonality during the Holocene. Results also suggest that changes in Holocene precipitation seasonality may have influenced the expansion of the prairie-forest border in Minnesota as well as regional variations in grassland community composition. This study demonstrates the efficacy of the dual hydrogen and

  17. Spin-polarized hydrogen and its isotopes: A rich class of quantum phases (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bešlić, I.; Vranješ Markić, L.; Boronat, J.

    2013-10-01

    We review the recent activity in the theoretical description of spin-polarized atomic hydrogen and its isotopes at very low temperatures. Spin-polarized hydrogen is the only system in nature that remains stable in the gas phase even in the zero temperature limit due to its small mass and weak interatomic interaction. Hydrogen and its heavier isotope tritium are bosons, the heavier mass of tritium producing a self-bound (liquid) system at zero temperature. The other isotope, deuterium, is a fermion with nuclear spin one making possible the study of three different quantum systems depending on the population of the three degenerate spin states. From the theoretical point of view, spin-polarized hydrogen is specially appealing because its interatomic potential is very accurately known making possible its precise quantum many-body study. The experimental study of atomic hydrogen has been very difficult due to its high recombination rate, but it finally led to its Bose-Einstein condensate state in 1998. Degeneracy has also been observed in thin films of hydrogen adsorbed on the 4He surface allowing for the possibility of observing the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless superfluid transition.

  18. Isotopes and analogs of hydrogen--from fundamental investigations to practical applications.

    PubMed

    Macrae, Roderick M

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen has a central role in the story of the universe itself and also in the story of our efforts to understand it. This paper retells the story of the part played by hydrogen and its stable isotope deuterium in the primordial synthesis of the elements, then goes on to describe how the spectrum of atomic hydrogen led to insights into the laws governing matter at the most fundamental level, from the quantum mechanics of Schrödinger and Heisenberg, through quantum electrodynamics, to the most recent work investigating the underlying structure of the proton itself. Atomic hydrogen is unique among the elements in that the concept of isotopy--atoms having the same nuclear charge but different masses--is stretched to its limit in the isotopes of hydrogen, ranging from the well-known isotopes deuterium and tritium to exotic species such as muonium, muonic helium, and positronium. These atoms, or atom-like objects, have much to tell us about fundamental aspects of the universe. In recent years the idea of utilizing hydrogen either as an energy source (through nuclear fusion) or as an energy storage medium (bound in hydrides or other materials) has attracted much attention as a possible avenue to a post-oil energy future. Some of the more interesting recent developments are described here. Dedicated to the memory of Brian C. Webster (1939-2008).

  19. Hydrogen isotope analysis of amino acids and whole cells reflects biosynthetic processing of nutrient- and water-derived hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, P.; Newsome, S.; Steele, A.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen (H) isotopes serve as sensitive tracers of biochemical processes that can be exploited to answer critical questions in biogeochemistry, ecology, and microbiology. Despite this apparent utility, relatively little is known about the specific mechanisms of H isotope fractionation involved in biosynthesis. In order to understand how organisms incorporate hydrogen from their chemical milieu into biomass, we have cultured the model bacterium E. coli MG1655 in a variety of media composed of deuterium-labeled nutrients and waters. Isotopic analysis of bulk cell mass reveals that the H fractionation between media water and cell material varies as a function of the nutrient source, with commonly used organic food sources (glucose and tryptone) leading to far smaller fractionation signals than non-standard ones (such as formamide, adenine, and urea). In addition, we have completed compound specific isotope analysis of amino acids using combined GC-IRMS. Amino acids harvested from E. coli cultured on glucose in water of varied D/H composition posses an extraordinary range of isotopic compositions (400-600 %). Furthermore, these amino acids follow a systematic distribution of D/H where proline is always heaviest and glycine is always lightest. However, when the short-chain peptide tryptone is used in place of glucose, only the non-essential amino acids reflect media water D/H values, suggesting the direct incorporation of some media-borne amino acids into cellular protein. These observations provide a foundation for understanding the cellular routing of hydrogen obtained from food and water sources and indicate that D/H analysis can serve as a powerful probe of biological function.

  20. Hydrogen and carbon isotope fractionation during degradation of chloromethane by methylotrophic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nadalig, Thierry; Greule, Markus; Bringel, Françoise; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Keppler, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Chloromethane (CH3Cl) is a widely studied volatile halocarbon involved in the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. Nevertheless, its global budget still remains debated. Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool to constrain fluxes of chloromethane between various environmental compartments which involve a multiplicity of sources and sinks, and both biotic and abiotic processes. In this study, we measured hydrogen and carbon isotope fractionation of the remaining untransformed chloromethane following its degradation by methylotrophic bacterial strains Methylobacterium extorquens CM4 and Hyphomicrobium sp. MC1, which belong to different genera but both use the cmu pathway, the only pathway for bacterial degradation of chloromethane characterized so far. Hydrogen isotope fractionation for degradation of chloromethane was determined for the first time, and yielded enrichment factors (ε) of −29‰ and −27‰ for strains CM4 and MC1, respectively. In agreement with previous studies, enrichment in 13C of untransformed CH3Cl was also observed, and similar isotope enrichment factors (ε) of −41‰ and −38‰ were obtained for degradation of chloromethane by strains CM4 and MC1, respectively. These combined hydrogen and carbon isotopic data for bacterial degradation of chloromethane will contribute to refine models of the global atmospheric budget of chloromethane. PMID:24019296

  1. Application of Hydrogen Isotope Geochemistry to Volcanology: Recent Perspective on Eruption Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, M.; Kasai, Y.; Sato, N.; Yoshimura, S.

    2008-02-25

    Degassing of magma is central to understand the dynamics of volcanic eruption. Hydrogen isotopic composition of volcanic rocks reflects degassing processes. The natural obsidian samples in some eruptions typically show a gently and then rapidly decreasing {delta}D trends with decreasing water content; this led to the two-stage degassing model, with closed-system volatile exsolution (batch fractionation of hydrogen isotope) during the explosive phase followed by open-system degassing (Rayleigh fractionation) to produce the low {delta}D value of the dome and flow lavas. However, the relationship between pattern of degassing (and fractionation) and mode of eruption is controversial. Based on the CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ratio of the obsidians, Rust et al. suggested that the analyzed samples with relatively constant {delta}D value and high water content were buffered (re-equilibrated) with vapor of relatively constant isotopic composition, assuming that silicic magma along conduit wall is fragmented and highly permeable. However, the timing and mechanism of the shift to open system degassing (Rayleigh fractionation) has not been clarified. To further constrain the eruption dynamics, experimental study on the hydrogen isotope fractionation during degassing would be helpful, although common noble metals used as sample capsules, including Au, are permeable to hydrogen at magmatic temperature, and even to water molecule in the prolonged run, probably due to the change of grain boundary properties such as thermal grooving.

  2. Multi-saline sample distillation apparatus for hydrogen isotope analyses : design and accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hassan, Afifa Afifi

    1981-01-01

    A distillation apparatus for saline water samples was designed and tested. Six samples may be distilled simultaneously. The temperature was maintained at 400 C to ensure complete dehydration of the precipitating salts. Consequently, the error in the measured ratio of stable hydrogen isotopes resulting from incomplete dehydration of hydrated salts during distillation was eliminated. (USGS)

  3. Assessing carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of diesel fuel n-alkanes during progressive evaporation.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Syahidah A; Hayman, Alan R; Van Hale, Robert; Frew, Russell D

    2015-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis offers potential for fingerprinting of diesel fuels, however, possible confounding effects of isotopic fractionation due to evaporation need to be assessed. This study measured the fractionation of the stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes in n-alkane compounds in neat diesel fuel during evaporation. Isotope ratios were measured using a continuous flow gas chromatograph/isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Diesel samples were progressively evaporated at 24 ± 2°C for 21 days. Increasing depletion of deuterium in nC12-nC17 alkanes in the remaining liquid with increasing carbon chain length was observed. Negligible carbon isotope fractionation was observed. Preferential vaporization was measured for the shorter chain n-alkanes and the trend decreased with increasing chain length. The decrease in δ(2) H values indicates the preferential vaporization of the isotopically heavier species consistent with available quantitative data for hydrocarbons. These results are most important in the application of stable isotope technology to forensic analysis of diesel.

  4. Hydrogen isotope separation installation for the regeneration of tritium from gas mixtures in tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, B.M.; Perevezentsev, A.N.; Selivanenko, I.L.

    1994-12-31

    The advantages and disadvantages of different methods for hydrogen isotope separation are considered in terms of their applicability for tritium regeneration in a tritium facility. Due to low inventory, simplicity of operation, flexibility, and safety the methods of separation using solid phases are preferable for tritium facility. The detail consideration of the separation processes with a solid phase reveals that highest efficiency of separation should be achieved in a counter-current separation column, which allow multiplying the thermodynamic isotopic effect. Because of difficulties of the organization of a solid phase motion in a separation column this method did not found practical application for separation of hydrogen isotopic mixtures. The main efforts of a few researches groups were devoted to improve the chromatographic separation process and equipment. The detail comparison of the separation in sectioned column with that in chromatographic as well as in cryodistillation columns show that counter-current separation in a sectioned column is more effective and has other advantages when middle throughput is required. Complete regeneration of an isotopic mixture with separation into three practically pure isotopes independently from isotopic composition of feed can be provided using two sectioned separation columns. Separation installation can operate continuously as well as periodically.

  5. Use of H/D isotope effects to gather information about hydrogen bonding and hydrogen exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Miyanoiri, Yohei; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Yang, Chun-Jiun; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2014-04-01

    Polar side-chains in proteins play important roles in forming and maintaining three-dimensional structures, and thus participate in various biological functions. Until recently, most protein NMR studies have focused on the non-exchangeable protons of amino acid residues. The exchangeable protons attached to polar groups, such as hydroxyl (OH), sulfhydryl (SH), and amino (NH2) groups, have mostly been ignored, because in many cases these hydrogen atoms exchange too quickly with water protons, making NMR observations impractical. However, in certain environments, such as deep within the hydrophobic interior of a protein, or in a strong hydrogen bond to other polar groups or interacting ligands, the protons attached to polar groups may exhibit slow hydrogen exchange rates and thus become NMR accessible. To explore the structural and biological implications of the interactions involving polar side-chains, we have developed versatile NMR methods to detect such cases by observing the line shapes of (13)C NMR signals near the polar groups, which are affected by deuterium-proton isotope shifts in a mixture of H2O and D2O. These methods allow the detection of polar side-chains with slow hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates, and therefore provide opportunities to retrieve information about the polar side-chains, which might otherwise be overlooked by conventional NMR experiments. Future prospects of applications using deuterium-proton isotope shifts to retrieve missing structural and dynamic information of proteins are discussed.

  6. The astrophysical interpretation of isotope anomalies in graphite and SiC grains of chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavrukhina, A. K.

    1993-01-01

    The C, N, and Mg isotopic compositions in graphite and SiC grains of carbonaceous chondrites can be explained by nuclear processes in massive O,B stars of second generation passed a stage of WR star with intensive stellar wind, where grain condensation had taken place. The interstellar graphite and SiC grains with anomalous isotopic compositions of C, N, Ne, and Si and other elements of nucleosynthetic origin, found in non-equilibrated chondrites, are most suitable for determination of astro-physical objects, where nucleosynthesis had taken place. Two objects were examined: (1) massive O,B stars of second generation passed a stage of WR star with intensive stellar wind (O,B-WR model) and (2) low-mass stars (1 less than or equal to M/solar mass less than or equal to 3) during thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch phase (TP-AGB model).

  7. Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in Body Water and Hair: Modeling Isotope Dynamics in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, Shannon P.; Valenzuela, Luciano O.; Remien, Christopher H.; Enright, Lindsey E.; Jorgensen, Matthew J.; Kaplan, Jay R.; Wagner, Janice D.; Cerling, Thure E.; Ehleringer, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of drinking water, diet, and atmospheric oxygen influence the isotopic composition of body water (2H/1H, 18O/16O expressed as δ2H and δ18O). In turn, body water influences the isotopic composition of organic matter in tissues, such as hair and teeth, which are often used to reconstruct historical dietary and movement patterns of animals and humans. Here, we used a nonhuman primate system (Macaca fascicularis) to test the robustness of two different mechanistic stable isotope models: a model to predict the δ2H and δ18O values of body water and a second model to predict the δ2H and δ18O values of hair. In contrast to previous human-based studies, use of nonhuman primates fed controlled diets allowed us to further constrain model parameter values and evaluate model predictions. Both models reliably predicted the δ2H and δ18O values of body water and of hair. Moreover, the isotope data allowed us to better quantify values for two critical variables in the models: the δ2H and δ18O values of gut water and the 18O isotope fractionation associated with a carbonyl oxygen-water interaction in the gut (αow). Our modeling efforts indicated that better predictions for body water and hair isotope values were achieved by making the isotopic composition of gut water approached that of body water. Additionally, the value of αow was 1.0164, in close agreement with the only other previously measured observation (microbial spore cell walls), suggesting robustness of this fractionation factor across different biological systems. PMID:22553163

  8. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in body water and hair: modeling isotope dynamics in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Shannon P; Valenzuela, Luciano O; Remien, Christopher H; Enright, Lindsey E; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Kaplan, Jay R; Wagner, Janice D; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2012-07-01

    The stable isotopic composition of drinking water, diet, and atmospheric oxygen influence the isotopic composition of body water ((2)H/(1)H, (18)O/(16)O expressed as δ(2) H and δ(18)O). In turn, body water influences the isotopic composition of organic matter in tissues, such as hair and teeth, which are often used to reconstruct historical dietary and movement patterns of animals and humans. Here, we used a nonhuman primate system (Macaca fascicularis) to test the robustness of two different mechanistic stable isotope models: a model to predict the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of body water and a second model to predict the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of hair. In contrast to previous human-based studies, use of nonhuman primates fed controlled diets allowed us to further constrain model parameter values and evaluate model predictions. Both models reliably predicted the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of body water and of hair. Moreover, the isotope data allowed us to better quantify values for two critical variables in the models: the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of gut water and the (18)O isotope fractionation associated with a carbonyl oxygen-water interaction in the gut (α(ow)). Our modeling efforts indicated that better predictions for body water and hair isotope values were achieved by making the isotopic composition of gut water approached that of body water. Additionally, the value of α(ow) was 1.0164, in close agreement with the only other previously measured observation (microbial spore cell walls), suggesting robustness of this fractionation factor across different biological systems.

  9. Hydrogen isotopic composition of the water in CR chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, L.; Alexander, C. M. O.'D.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.; Quirico, E.; Beck, P.

    2013-04-01

    The thermal and aqueous alteration experienced by QUE 99177, MET 00426, EET 92042, GRA 95229, Renazzo and Al Rais CR chondrites was assessed through multi-technique characterization of their the carbonaceous matter and hydrated mineral phases. Each of the chondrites escaped long duration thermal metamorphism as reflected by the low structural order of the polyaromatic carbonaceous matter assessed by Raman spectroscopy. The infrared spectra of the matrix grains clearly reveal the presence of hydrated minerals in each of the CR chondrites. In particular, the extent of aqueous alteration experienced by QUE 99177 and MET 00426 may have been previously underestimated. The H isotopic compositions of the altering fluids were measured in situ in fine-grained phyllosilicates and individual coarse-grained hydrated silicates. In the analyzed CR chondrites, the main observations are that (i) the water is systematically enriched in D, and the enrichments (δDwater up to 1600‰) can be even higher than the highest D-enrichments reported for cometary water; (ii) the isotopic composition of the water is highly variable at the micrometer scale; (iii) there is no clear trend observed in the isotopic composition of the water (maximum D-enrichment, range of variation) along the aqueous alteration sequence. The D-enrichments and spatial variability are easier to explain as secondary signatures acquired through parent body processes, rather than as being due to the accretion of at least two ices with distinct isotopic compositions and sources that did not fully mix when they melted at the start of the aqueous alteration process.

  10. Large effect of irradiance on hydrogen isotope fractionation of alkenones in Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Benthien, Albert; French, Katherine L.; Epping, Eric; Zondervan, Ingrid; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bijma, Jelle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen isotopic (δD) composition of long-chain alkenones produced by certain haptophyte algae has been suggested as a potential proxy for reconstructing paleo sea surface salinity. However, environmental parameters other than salinity may also affect the δD of alkenones. We investigated the impact of the level of irradiance on hydrogen isotopic fractionation of alkenones versus growth water by cultivating two strains of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi at different light intensities. The hydrogen isotope fractionation decreased by approximately 40‰ when irradiance was increased from 15 to 200 μmol photons m-2 s-1 above which it was relatively constant. The response is likely a direct effect of photosystem I and II activity as the relationship of the fractionation factor α versus light intensity can be described by an Eilers-Peeters photosynthesis model. This irradiance effect is in agreement with published δD data of alkenones derived from suspended particulate matter collected from different depths in the photic zone of the Gulf of California and the eastern tropical North Pacific. However, haptophyte algae tend to bloom at relatively high light intensities (>500 μmol photons m-2 s-1) occurring at the sea surface, at which hydrogen isotope fractionation is relatively constant and not affected by changes in light intensity. Alkenones accumulating in the sediment are likely mostly derived from these surface water haptophyte blooms, when the largest amount of biomass is produced. Therefore, the observed irradiance effect is unlikely to affect the applicability of the hydrogen isotopic composition of sedimentary long chain alkenones as a proxy for paleosalinity.

  11. Tales of volcanoes and El-Nino southern oscillations with the oxygen isotope anomaly of sulfate aerosol.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Robina; Abauanza, Mariana; Jackson, Teresa L; McCabe, Justin; Savarino, Joel; Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-29

    The ability of sulfate aerosols to reflect solar radiation and simultaneously act as cloud condensation nuclei renders them central players in the global climate system. The oxidation of S(IV) compounds and their transport as stable S(VI) in the Earth's system are intricately linked to planetary scale processes, and precise characterization of the overall process requires a detailed understanding of the linkage between climate dynamics and the chemistry leading to the product sulfate. This paper reports a high-resolution, 22-y (1980-2002) record of the oxygen-triple isotopic composition of sulfate (SO4) aerosols retrieved from a snow pit at the South Pole. Observed variation in the O-isotopic anomaly of SO4 aerosol is linked to the ozone variation in the tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere via the Ozone El-Niño Southern Oscillations (ENSO) Index (OEI). Higher (17)O values (3.3‰, 4.5‰, and 4.2‰) were observed during the three largest ENSO events of the past 2 decades. Volcanic events inject significant quantities of SO4 aerosol into the stratosphere, which are known to affect ENSO strength by modulating stratospheric ozone levels (OEI = 6 and (17)O = 3.3‰, OEI = 11 and (17)O = 4.5‰) and normal oxidative pathways. Our high-resolution data indicated that (17)O of sulfate aerosols can record extreme phases of naturally occurring climate cycles, such as ENSOs, which couple variations in the ozone levels in the atmosphere and the hydrosphere via temperature driven changes in relative humidity levels. A longer term, higher resolution oxygen-triple isotope analysis of sulfate aerosols from ice cores, encompassing more ENSO periods, is required to reconstruct paleo-ENSO events and paleotropical ozone variations.

  12. Tales of volcanoes and El-Niño southern oscillations with the oxygen isotope anomaly of sulfate aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Robina; Abauanza, Mariana; Jackson, Teresa L.; McCabe, Justin; Savarino, Joel; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of sulfate aerosols to reflect solar radiation and simultaneously act as cloud condensation nuclei renders them central players in the global climate system. The oxidation of S(IV) compounds and their transport as stable S(VI) in the Earth’s system are intricately linked to planetary scale processes, and precise characterization of the overall process requires a detailed understanding of the linkage between climate dynamics and the chemistry leading to the product sulfate. This paper reports a high-resolution, 22-y (1980–2002) record of the oxygen-triple isotopic composition of sulfate (SO4) aerosols retrieved from a snow pit at the South Pole. Observed variation in the O-isotopic anomaly of SO4 aerosol is linked to the ozone variation in the tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere via the Ozone El-Niño Southern Oscillations (ENSO) Index (OEI). Higher ∆17O values (3.3‰, 4.5‰, and 4.2‰) were observed during the three largest ENSO events of the past 2 decades. Volcanic events inject significant quantities of SO4 aerosol into the stratosphere, which are known to affect ENSO strength by modulating stratospheric ozone levels (OEI = 6 and ∆17O = 3.3‰, OEI = 11 and ∆17O = 4.5‰) and normal oxidative pathways. Our high-resolution data indicated that ∆17O of sulfate aerosols can record extreme phases of naturally occurring climate cycles, such as ENSOs, which couple variations in the ozone levels in the atmosphere and the hydrosphere via temperature driven changes in relative humidity levels. A longer term, higher resolution oxygen-triple isotope analysis of sulfate aerosols from ice cores, encompassing more ENSO periods, is required to reconstruct paleo-ENSO events and paleotropical ozone variations. PMID:23447567

  13. Observations of hydrogen and helium isotopes in solar cosmic rays. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    The isotopic composition of hydrogen and helium in solar cosmic rays provides a means of studying solar flare particle acceleration mechanisms since the enhanced relative abundance of rare isotopes, such as H-2, H-3, and He-3, is due to their production by inelastic nuclear collisions in the solar atmosphere during the flare. Electron isotope spectrometer on an IMP spacecraft was used to measure this isotopic composition. The response of the dE/dx-E particle telescope is discussed, and alpha particle channeling in thin detectors is identified as an important background source affecting measurement of low values of (He-3/He-4). The flare-averaged results obtained for the period October, 1972 November, 1973 are given.

  14. Hydrogen and carbon isotope systematics in hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis under H2-limited and H2-enriched conditions: implications for the origin of methane and its isotopic diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Tomoyo; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Saito, Yayoi; Matsui, Yohei; Takai, Ken; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotope systematics of H2O-H2-CO2-CH4 in hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and their relation to H2 availability were investigated. Two H2-syntrophic cocultures of fermentatively hydrogenogenic bacteria and hydrogenotrophic methanogens under conditions of <102 Pa-H2 and two pure cultures of hydrogenotrophic methanogens under conditions of 105 Pa-H2 were tested. Carbon isotope fractionation between CH4 and CO2 during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was correlated with pH2, as indicated in previous studies. The hydrogen isotope ratio of CH4 produced during rapid growth of the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermococcus okinawensis under high pH2 conditions ( 105 Pa) was affected by the isotopic composition of H2, as concluded in a previous study of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus. This " {δ D}_{{H}_2} effect" is a possible cause of the diversity of previously reported values for hydrogen isotope fractionation between CH4 and H2O examined in H2-enriched culture experiments. Hydrogen isotope fractionation between CH4 and H2O, defined by (1000 + {δ D}_{{CH}_4} )/(1000 + {δ D}_{{H}_2O} ), during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis of the H2-syntrophic cocultures was in the range 0.67-0.69. The hydrogen isotope fractionation of our H2-syntrophic dataset overlaps with those obtained not only from low- pH2 experiments reported so far but also from natural samples of "young" methane reservoirs (0.66-0.74). Conversely, such hydrogen isotope fractionation is not consistent with that of "aged" methane in geological samples (≥0.79), which has been regarded as methane produced via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis from the carbon isotope fractionation. As a possible process inducing the inconsistency in hydrogen isotope signatures between experiments and geological samples, we hypothesize that the hydrogen isotope signature of CH4 imprinted at the time of methanogenesis, as in the experiments and natural young methane, may be altered by diagenetic hydrogen

  15. Genesis and evolution of water in a two-mica pluton: A hydrogen isotope study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, R.H.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements were made of the hydrogen isotope composition of 74 samples of muscovite, biotite, vein quartz and whole rocks from the Papoose Flat pluton, eastern California, U.S.A., and adjacent metamorphic and sedimentary rocks in order to elucidate the genesis and evolution of water and hydrous minerals in a two-mica granodiorite. Electron microprobe analyses were made of all micas so that the Suzuoki-Epstein equation could be used in evaluating the data. Based on experimental, theoretical and textural evidence of mica paragenesis, a model of hydrogen isotope fractionation between an aqueous vapor and a magma during crystallization has been constructed. This model accounts for the observed hydrogen isotope relations and implies that primary hydrogen isotope compositions have been preserved in a large portion of the pluton. The ?? D-values of biotites vary widely over the range -103 to -66% with most values lying between -90 and -70??? Muscovites, on the other hand, are isotopically more uniform and have ?? D-values of -61 to -41??? with most values lying between -50 and -46??? These data are consistent with the interpretation that biotite formed over a long period of crystallization whereas muscovite formed in a narrow interval, presumably during the final stages of crystallization when alumina and water contents were at their highest. Only 8 of the 21 muscovite-biotite pairs analyzed are in hydrogen isotope equilibrium as calculated from the Suzuoki-Epstein equation. Biotites in the western half of the pluton have relatively low ?? D-values of around -85???, whereas those in the eastern half have higher values of up to -66??? This pattern is a consequence of a loss of permeability associated with the syn-intrusive deformation of the western margin of the pluton. This loss of permeability enhanced the preservation of primary hydrogen isotope relations there by diverting water evolved from the magma out through the eastern half of the pluton where some deuteric

  16. Hydrogen isotopes from source water to leaf lipid in a continental-scale sample network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Daniel; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentary plant waxes are useful paleoclimate proxies because they are preserved in depositional settings on geologic timescales and the isotopic composition of the hydrogen in these molecules reflects that of the source water available during biosynthesis. This application is based largely on empirical calibrations that have demonstrated continental-scale correlations between source water and lipid hydrogen isotope values. However, the importance of variable net isotopic fractionation between source water and lipid for different species and environmental conditions is increasingly recognized. Isotopic enrichment of leaf water during transpiration is key among these secondary factors, and is itself sensitive to changes in hydroclimate. Leaf water enrichment also occurs prior to photosynthetic water uptake, and is therefore independent from cellular-level biomarker synthesis. Mechanistic models can predict the mean leaf water hydrogen isotope composition from readily available meteorological variables. This permits global-scale isoscape maps of leaf water isotopic composition and enrichment above source water to be generated, but these models have not been widely validated at continental spatial scales. We have established a network of twenty-one sites across Europe where we are sampling for leaf-, xylem-, and soil-water isotopes (H and O) at approximately 5-week intervals over the summer growing season. We augment the sample set with weekly to monthly precipitation samples and early- and late-season plant wax lipid samples. Collaborators at each site are conducting the sampling, and most sites are members of the FLUXNET tower network that also record high-resolution meteorological data. We present information on the implementation of the network and preliminary results from the 2014 summer season. The complete dataset will be used to track the evolution of water isotopes from source to leaf water and from leaf water to lipid hydrogen across diverse environments

  17. Doubly labeled water method: in vivo oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeller, D.A.; Leitch, C.A.; Brown, C.

    1986-12-01

    The accuracy and precision of the doubly labeled water method for measuring energy expenditure are influenced by isotope fractionation during evaporative water loss and CO/sub 2/ excretion. To characterize in vivo isotope fractionation, we collected and isotopically analyzed physiological fluids and gases. Breath and transcutaneous water vapor were isotopically fractionated. The degree of fractionation indicated that the former was fractionated under equilibrium control at 37/sup 0/C, and the latter was kinetically fractionated. Sweat and urine were unfractionated. By use of isotopic balance models, the fraction of water lost via fractionating routes was estimated from the isotopic abundances of body water, local drinking water, and dietary solids. Fractionated water loss averaged 23% (SD = 10%) of water turnover, which agreed with our previous estimates based on metabolic rate, but there was a systematic difference between the results based on O/sub 2/ and hydrogen. Corrections for isotopic fractionation of water lost in breath and (nonsweat) transcutaneous loss should be made when using labeled water to measure water turnover or CO/sub 2/ production.

  18. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in human hair are related to geography

    PubMed Central

    Ehleringer, James R.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; West, Adam G.; Podlesak, David W.; Cerling, Thure E.

    2008-01-01

    We develop and test a model to predict the geographic region-of-origin of humans based on the stable isotope composition of their scalp hair. This model incorporates exchangeable and nonexchangeable hydrogen and oxygen atoms in amino acids to predict the δ2H and δ18O values of scalp hair (primarily keratin). We evaluated model predictions with stable isotope analyses of human hair from 65 cities across the United States. The model, which predicts hair isotopic composition as a function of drinking water, bulk diet, and dietary protein isotope ratios, explains >85% of the observed variation and reproduces the observed slopes relating the isotopic composition of hair samples to that of local drinking water. Based on the geographical distributions of the isotope ratios of tap waters and the assumption of a “continental supermarket” dietary input, we constructed maps of the expected average H and O isotope ratios in human hair across the contiguous 48 states. Applications of this model and these observations are extensive and include detection of dietary information, reconstruction of historic movements of individuals, and provision of region-of-origin information for unidentified human remains. PMID:18299562

  19. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in human hair are related to geography.

    PubMed

    Ehleringer, James R; Bowen, Gabriel J; Chesson, Lesley A; West, Adam G; Podlesak, David W; Cerling, Thure E

    2008-02-26

    We develop and test a model to predict the geographic region-of-origin of humans based on the stable isotope composition of their scalp hair. This model incorporates exchangeable and nonexchangeable hydrogen and oxygen atoms in amino acids to predict the delta(2)H and delta(18)O values of scalp hair (primarily keratin). We evaluated model predictions with stable isotope analyses of human hair from 65 cities across the United States. The model, which predicts hair isotopic composition as a function of drinking water, bulk diet, and dietary protein isotope ratios, explains >85% of the observed variation and reproduces the observed slopes relating the isotopic composition of hair samples to that of local drinking water. Based on the geographical distributions of the isotope ratios of tap waters and the assumption of a "continental supermarket" dietary input, we constructed maps of the expected average H and O isotope ratios in human hair across the contiguous 48 states. Applications of this model and these observations are extensive and include detection of dietary information, reconstruction of historic movements of individuals, and provision of region-of-origin information for unidentified human remains.

  20. Hydrogen isotope systematics of H2-H2O-CH4 during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Kawagucci, S.; Hattori, S.; Yamada, K.; Ueno, Y.; Takai, K.; Yoshida, N.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotopes of CH4 have been utilized to trace microbial processes. The isotope fractionations during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, one of the major processes of environmental CH4, have been studied by several laboratory incubations. For the carbon isotope, H2 concentration is thought to be the major parameter controlling the carbon isotope fractionation by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. For the hydrogen, on the other hand, factors controlling isotope fractionation remain poorly understood, although H2 concentration is suggested to be important. This uncertainty prevents us to utilize δD-CH4 value as the tracer. The most important and principal question is whether all hydrogen atoms in microbially-generated CH4 come from environmental H2O or not. To answer the question, we investigated the D/H systematics of H2-H2O-CH4 during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis by pure culture incubation with softly deuterium-enriched H2 and/or H2O. Our results demonstrate that δD-CH4 value produced by hydrogenotrophic methanogens depends not only on δD-H2O value but also on δD-H2 value. We observed constant correlation between δD-H2 and δD-CH4 values as well as between δD-H2O and δD-CH4 values, which suggests that hydrogen (/deuterium) atom of substrate H2 is also transferred to the product CH4. This implies that the range of δD-CH4 value produced by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis should be re-evaluated considering the distribution of δD-H2 and δD-H2O values in natural environments.

  1. Distribution of p-process 174Hf in early solar system materials and the origin of nucleosynthetic Hf and W isotope anomalies in Ca-Al rich inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Stefan T. M.; Münker, Carsten; Pfeifer, Markus; Elfers, Bo-Magnus; Sprung, Peter

    2017-02-01

    anomalies in CAIs are therefore best explained by selective processing of presolar carrier phases prior to CAI formation, and not by a late injection of supernova materials. Likewise, other isotope anomalies in additional elements in CAIs relative to the bulk solar system may reflect the same process. The isotopic heterogeneities between the first refractory condensates may have been eradicated partially during CAI formation, because W isotope anomalies in CAIs appear to decrease with increasing W concentrations as inferred from time-integrated 182W/184W. Importantly, the 176Lu-176Hf and 182Hf-182W chronometers are not significantly affected by nucleosynthetic heterogeneity of Hf isotopes in bulk meteorites, but may be affected in CAIs.

  2. Fractionation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Sulfate- and Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Osburn, Magdalena R.; Dawson, Katherine S.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Sessions, Alex L.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen atoms from water and food are incorporated into biomass during cellular metabolism and biosynthesis, fractionating the isotopes of hydrogen—protium and deuterium—that are recorded in biomolecules. While these fractionations are often relatively constant in plants, large variations in the magnitude of fractionation are observed for many heterotrophic microbes utilizing different central metabolic pathways. The correlation between metabolism and lipid δ2H provides a potential basis for reconstructing environmental and ecological parameters, but the calibration dataset has thus far been limited mainly to aerobes. Here we report on the hydrogen isotopic fractionations of lipids produced by nitrate-respiring and sulfate-reducing bacteria. We observe only small differences in fractionation between oxygen- and nitrate-respiring growth conditions, with a typical pattern of variation between substrates that is broadly consistent with previously described trends. In contrast, fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria does not vary significantly between different substrates, even when autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions are compared. This result is in marked contrast to previously published observations and has significant implications for the interpretation of environmental hydrogen isotope data. We evaluate these trends in light of metabolic gene content of each strain, growth rate, and potential flux and reservoir-size effects of cellular hydrogen, but find no single variable that can account for the differences between nitrate- and sulfate-respiring bacteria. The emerging picture of bacterial hydrogen isotope fractionation is therefore more complex than the simple correspondence between δ2H and metabolic pathway previously understood from aerobes. Despite the complexity, the large signals and rich variability of observed lipid δ2H suggest much potential as an environmental recorder of metabolism. PMID:27531993

  3. Mica Mountain Muscovite: A New Silicate Hydrogen Isotope Standard Reference Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonero, A.; Larson, P. B.; Neill, O. K.

    2015-12-01

    A new standard reference material consisting of finely ground muscovite flakes has been developed and utilized at Washington State University to calibrate hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H) measurements to the VSMOW scale. This standard was prepared from a single crystal 'book' of a muscovite-bearing pegmatite near Deary, ID. The value we obtained for this muscovite standard (MMM) is: δD VSMOW = -79.1 ± 2.0‰ relative to NBS-30 biotite at -65.7‰ compared to a VSMOW value of 0.00‰. This mean value was determined for the muscovite and has been used as our working standard. There have been many recent geological applications to continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectroscopy. When hydrogen isotope ratios are of interest, a suitable standard for hydrogen in silicate systems often is not available. With supplies of the older NBS-30 biotite standard exhausted, much D/H data measured on silicate minerals have been linked to the VSMOW scale via non-silicate reference materials which may not behave similarly to minerals under study. Some recent studies have shown the NBS-30 standard to have poor intra-laboratory agreement with that material's measured and accepted isotopic values (Qi et al., 2014). Many laboratories which would measure D/H in silicate minerals would benefit from using a silicate-based standard for hydrogen. With further characterization, this muscovite may also be useful as a standard for silicate oxygen ratios as well as for some major element cations. This muscovite standard gives consistent values and it is easy to work with and does not leave much combustion residue. Also, because muscovite contains little iron, metal-hydride formation and associated fractionation factors is greatly reduced during the sample combustion. A new silicate-hydrogen standard is needed by the community, and this work represents an example of what a replacement standard material could look like.

  4. Hydrogen isotopes in Eocene river gravels and paleoelevation of the Sierra Nevada.

    PubMed

    Mulch, Andreas; Graham, Stephan A; Chamberlain, C Page

    2006-07-07

    We determine paleoelevation of the Sierra Nevada, California, by tracking the effect of topography on precipitation, as recorded in hydrogen isotopes of kaolinite exposed in gold-bearing river deposits from the Eocene Yuba River. The data, compared with the modern isotopic composition of precipitation, show that about 40 to 50 million years ago the Sierra Nevada stood tall (>/=2200 meters), a result in conflict with proposed young surface uplift by tectonic and climatic forcing but consistent with the Sierra Nevada representing the edge of a pre-Eocene continental plateau.

  5. Systematics of isotopic production cross sections from interactions of relativistic 40Ca in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-X.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H. J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T. G.; Insolia, A.; Knott, C. N.; Lindstrom, P. J.; McMahon, M.; Mitchell, J. W.; Potenza, R.; Russo, G. V.; Soutoul, A.; Testard, O.; Tull, C. E.; Tuvé, C.; Waddington, C. J.; Webber, W. R.; Wefel, J. P.

    1997-09-01

    The isotopic production cross sections for 40Ca projectiles at 357, 565, and 763 MeV/nucleon interacting in a liquid hydrogen target have been measured by the Transport Collaboration at the LBL HISS facility. The systematics of these cross sections are studied, and the results indicate that nuclear structure effects are present in the isotope production process during the relativistic collisions. The newly measured cross sections are also compared with those predicted by semiempirical and parametric formulas, but the predictions do not fully describe the systematics such as the energy dependence. The consequences of the cross section systematics in galactic cosmic ray studies are also discussed.

  6. Microscopic observation of kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes in a nanoporous material.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T X; Jobic, H; Bhatia, S K

    2010-08-20

    We report quasielastic neutron scattering studies of H2-D2 diffusion in a carbon molecular sieve, demonstrating remarkable quantum effects, with the heavier isotope diffusing faster below 100 K, confirming our recent predictions. Our transition state theory and molecular dynamics calculations show that while it is critical for this effect to have narrow windows of size comparable to the de Broglie wavelength, high flux requires that the energy barrier be reduced through small cages. Such materials will enable novel processes for kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes.

  7. Microscopic Observation of Kinetic Molecular Sieving of Hydrogen Isotopes in a Nanoporous Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. X.; Jobic, H.; Bhatia, S. K.

    2010-08-01

    We report quasielastic neutron scattering studies of H2-D2 diffusion in a carbon molecular sieve, demonstrating remarkable quantum effects, with the heavier isotope diffusing faster below 100 K, confirming our recent predictions. Our transition state theory and molecular dynamics calculations show that while it is critical for this effect to have narrow windows of size comparable to the de Broglie wavelength, high flux requires that the energy barrier be reduced through small cages. Such materials will enable novel processes for kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes.

  8. HYDROGEN ISOTOPE RECOVERY USING PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS OF WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, E; Scott Greenway, S; Amy Ekechukwu, A

    2007-08-27

    A critical component of tritium glovebox operations is the recovery of high value tritium from the water vapor in the glove box atmosphere. One proposed method to improve existing tritium recovery systems is to replace the disposable hot magnesium beds used to separate the hydrogen and oxygen in water with continuous use Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers (PEMEs). This study examines radiation exposure to the membrane of a PEME and examines the sizing difference that would be needed if the electrolyzer were operated with a cathode water vapor feed instead of an anode liquid water feed.

  9. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope systematics of Lake Baikal, Siberia: Implications for paleoclimate studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, R.R.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1998-01-01

    We interpret oxygen and hydrogen isotope data for water samples from Lake Baikal, Siberia, its tributaries and other local rivers, and local precipitation in terms of the known water budget for the modem lake in order to gain insight into past limnological and climatic processes that influenced the lake. Lake Baikal is remarkably uniform in its isotopic composition (??18O = -15.8 ?? 0.2???; ??D = -123 ?? 2???) and lies slightly to the right of the global meteoric water line, which suggests significant evaporation. Water is supplied to the lake by over 300 rivers and streams. The oxygen isotope values (??18O) of the rivers in the Baikal catchment range from -13.4 to -21.2???. The hydrogen isotope values (??D) for the same area range from -103 to -156???. Both these ranges generally conform to the global meteoric water line. The weighted average isotopic composition of input to the lake (rivers plus precipitation) is -15.2??? for ??18O and -116??? for ??D, values higher than those of the modem lake. Therefore, the isotopic composition of the modem lake cannot be related to the modem input through simple evaporation. Instead, modeling of the isotopic mass balance of the lake suggests that inputs (precipitation and influx from rivers) and outputs (evaporation and outflow) are not at a steady-state equilibrium under current climate conditions. We found previous input to the lake had lower ??18O and ??D values than modem input, which reflects cooler climates in the past compared with modern conditions. Under constant climate conditions, steady-state conditions are not expected to be reached by the lake for at least 700 yr because of its large size and the long residence time of water in the lake.

  10. [Solid state isotope hydrogen exchange for deuterium and tritium in human gene-engineered insulin].

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, Yu A; Dadayan, A K; Kozik, V S; Gasanov, E V; Nazimov, I V; Ziganshin, R Kh; Vaskovsky, B V; Murashov, A N; Ksenofontov, A L; Haribin, O N; Nikolaev, E N; Myasoedov, N F

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of high temperature solid state catalytic isotope exchange in peptides and proteins under the action of catalyst-activated spillover hydrogen was studied. The reaction of human gene-engineered insulin with deuterium and tritium was conducted at 120-140° C to produce insulin samples containing 2-6 hydrogen isotope atoms. To determine the distribution of the isotope label over tritium-labeled insulin's amino acid residues, oxidation of the S-S bonds of insulin by performic acid was performed and polypeptide chains isolated; then their acid hydrolysis, amino acid analysis and liquid scintillation counts of tritium in the amino acids were conducted. The isotope label was shown to be incorporated in all amino acids of the protein, with the peptide fragment FVNQHLCGSHLVE of the insulin β-chain showing the largest incorporation. About 45% of the total protein isotope label was incorporated in His5 and His10 of this fragment. For the analysis of isotope label distribution in labeled insulin's peptide fragments, the recovery of the S-S bonds by mercaptoethanol, the enzymatic hydrolysis by glutamyl endopeptidase from Bacillus intermedius and HPLC division of the resulting peptides were carried out. Attribution of the peptide fragments formed due to hydrolysis at the Glu-X bond in the β-chain was accomplished by mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry analysis data of the deuterium-labeled insulin samples' isotopomeric composition showed that the studied solid state isotope exchange reaction equally involved all the protein molecules. Biological studying of tritium-labeled insulin showed its physiological activity to be completely retained.

  11. Hydrogen Isotope Biogeochemistry of Plant Biomarkers in Tropical Trees from the Andes to Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feakins, S. J.; Ponton, C.; West, A. J.; Malhi, Y.; Goldsmith, G.; Salinas, N.; Bentley, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Plant leaf waxes are well known biomarkers for terrestrial vegetation. Generally, their hydrogen isotopic composition (D/H) records the isotopic composition of precipitation, modulated by leaf water processes and a large biosynthetic fractionation. In addition, the D/H of methoxyl groups on tree wood lignin is an emerging technique thought to record the D/H of source waters, without leaf water complications. Using each of these biomarkers as proxies requires understanding D/H fractionations in plant systems, but few studies have directly studied hydrogen isotope biogeochemistry in tropical plants. An approach that has proven helpful is the paired analysis of plant waters and plant biomarkers: in order that fractionations can be directly computed rather than assumed. This presents logistical challenges in remote tropical forest environments. We report on a unique dataset collected by tree-climbers from 6 well-studied vegetation plots across a 4km elevation transect in the Peruvian Andes and Amazonia. We have measured the D/H of stem water and leaf water, and we compare these to precipitation isotopes and stream waters. The goal of the plant water studies is to understand plant water uptake and stem-leaf water isotopic offsets which can vary due to both transpiration and foliar uptake of water in tropical montane forests. We are in the process of measuring the D/H of plant biomarkers (n-alkanoic acids, n-alkanes and lignin methoxyl) in order to assess how these water isotopic signals are encoded in plant biomarkers. We compare the species-specific modern plant insights to the plant leaf wax n-alkanoic acid D/H that we have recently reported from soils and river sediments from the same region, in order to understand how signals of plant biogeochemistry are integrated into geological sedimentary archives. Progress and open questions in tropical isotope biogeochemistry will be discussed at the meeting.

  12. Isotopically exchangeable organic hydrogen in coal relates to thermal maturity and maceral composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopic exchangeability (Hex) and ??Dn values of non-exchangeable organic hydrogen were investigated in coal kerogens ranging in rank from lignite to graphite. The relative abundance of Hex is highest in lignite with about 18% of total hydrogen being exchangeable, and decreases to around 2.5% in coals with Ro of 1.7 to ca. 5.7%. At Still higher rank (Ro > 6%), Hex increases slightly, although the abundance of total hydrogen decreases. ??Dn is influenced by original biochemical D/H ratios and by thermal maturation in contact with water. Therefore, ??Dn does not show an overall consistent trend with maturity. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermochemical sulphate reduction (TSR) versus maturation and their effects on hydrogen stable isotopes of very dry alkane gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. Y.; Worden, R. H.; Jin, Z. J.; Liu, W. H.; Li, J.; Gao, B.; Zhang, D. W.; Hu, A. P.; Yang, C.

    2014-07-01

    Here we report the first study of the effect of thermochemical sulphate reduction (TSR) on the hydrogen isotopes of natural gas. Variably sour (H2S-bearing) and very dry (>97% methane) gas samples from Lower Triassic, Permian and Carboniferous marine carbonate reservoirs in the Sichuan Basin, China, have been analysed. All gases seem to have been sourced from mature marine kerogen and contain H2S that resulted from TSR. The Carboniferous samples are largely unaffected by TSR and were used to assess the effects of normal thermal maturation processes on the carbon and hydrogen isotopes of methane and ethane as a function of gas dryness (a proxy for thermal maturity). Maturation led to heavier carbon isotopes of methane and ethane and hydrogen isotopes of ethane; in contrast methane hydrogen isotopes seem to have little systematic variation with increasing maturity. TSR did not have a systematic effect on the hydrogen isotopes of methane, although the spread of values diminished (ending up at a constant -120‰) as TSR proceeded. This was possibly due to the partial thermochemical sulphate reduction of ethane adding isotopically light methane and thus offsetting the Rayleigh fractionation effects of TSR of methane. In contrast, hydrogen isotopes of ethane became much heavier as TSR proceeded, to values greater than those for samples only influenced by maturation. Under some circumstances, the effects of TSR can be identified and discerned from the effects of normal thermal maturation by plotting the difference between the carbon isotope compositions of methane and ethane and the difference between the hydrogen isotope compositions of methane and ethane. Do the hydrogen isotope ratios of alkane gases systematically vary as a function of dryness or sourness? Do the hydrogen isotope ratios of alkane gases from the Carboniferous, Permian and Lower Triassic dry gas reservoirs help reveal the maturity and/or extent of TSR in the Sichuan Basin? Is it possible to separate and

  14. Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: limitations of Hf anomalies as sediment input indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, H. K.; Turner, S.; MacPherson, C.; Davidson, J. P.; Gertisser, R.

    2010-12-01

    New Nd-Hf isotope and trace element data for Javanese volcanoes are combined with recently published data to place constraints on subduction inputs at the Sunda arc in Indonesia and assess the value of Hf anomalies (expressed as Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios) as tracers of such inputs. Hf anomaly does not correlate with Hf isotope ratio in Javanese lavas however, Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios do correlate with SiO2. Contrary to previous work, we show that Hf anomaly variation may be controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene and/or amphibole during magmatic differentiation and does not represent the magnitude or type of subduction input in some arcs. Correlation of Sm/Hf with indices of differentiation for other arcs (e.g. Vanuatu, New Britain, Mariana) suggests that differentiation control on Sm/Hf ratios of volcanic rocks may be a relatively common phenomenon. This study corroborates the use of Nd-Hf isotope co-variations in arc volcanic rocks to ascertain subduction input characteristics. The trajectories of regional volcano groups (East, Central and West Java) in Nd-Hf isotope space reveal heterogeneity in the subducted sediment input along Java, which reflects present-day spatial variations in sediment compositions on the down-going plate in the Java Trench.

  15. A revision in hydrogen isotopic composition of USGS42 and USGS43 human-hair stable isotopic reference materials for forensic science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δ2HVSMOW-SLAP) of USGS42 and USGS43 human hair stable isotopic reference materials, normalized to the VSMOW (Vienna-Standard Mean Ocean Water)–SLAP (Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, was originally determined with a high temperature conversion technique using an elemental analyzer (TC/EA) with a glassy carbon tube and glassy carbon filling and analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method can produce inaccurate δ2HVSMOW-SLAPresults when analyzing nitrogen-bearing organic substances owing to the formation of hydrogen cyanide (HCN), leading to non-quantitative conversion of a sample into molecular hydrogen (H2) for IRMS analysis. A single-oven, chromium-filled, elemental analyzer (Cr-EA) coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability of hydrogen isotopic analysis of hydrogen- and nitrogen-bearing organic material because hot chromium scavenges all reactive elements except hydrogen. USGS42 and USGS43 human hair isotopic reference materials have been analyzed with the Cr-EA IRMS method, and the δ2HVSMOW-SLAP values of their non-exchangeable hydrogen fractions have been revised:where mUr = 0.001 = ‰. On average, these revised δ2HVSMOW-SLAP values are 5.7 mUr more positive than those previously measured. It is critical that readers pay attention to the δ2HVSMOW-SLAP of isotopic reference materials in publications as they may need to adjust the δ2HVSMOW–SLAP measurement results of human hair in previous publications to ensure all results are on the same isotope-delta scale.

  16. Precision Measurement of the Hydrogen-Deuterium 1S-2S Isotope Shift

    SciTech Connect

    Parthey, Christian G.; Matveev, Arthur; Alnis, Janis; Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Kolachevsky, Nikolai; Haensch, Theodor W.; Jentschura, Ulrich D.

    2010-06-11

    Measuring the hydrogen-deuterium isotope shift via two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition, we obtain 670 994 334 606(15) Hz. This is a 10-times improvement over the previous best measurement [A. Huber et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 468 (1998)] confirming its frequency value. A calculation of the difference of the mean square charge radii of deuterium and hydrogen results in {sub d}-{sub p}=3.820 07(65) fm{sup 2}, a more than twofold improvement compared to the former value.

  17. Method and apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes. [stored as uranium hydride in a block of copper

    DOEpatents

    McMullen, J.W.; Wheeler, M.G.; Cullingford, H.S.; Sherman, R.H.

    1982-08-10

    An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas is stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forms at a significantly lower temperature).

  18. Hydrogen bonding and vapor pressure isotope effect of deuterioisomeric methanethiols

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, H.; Szydlowski, J.; Dill-Staffenberger, L.

    1981-04-16

    Wilson parameters, activity coefficients, association constants, and other thermodynamic functions which are derived from isothermal vapor pressure measurements between 223 and 293 K for binary mixtures of CH/sub 3/SH, CH/sub 3/SD, CS/sub 3/SH, and CD/sub 3/SD with n-hexane show the weakness of the hydrogen and the deuterium bonds of methanethiol. As far as these functions depend on the association model used for the calculation, the relation of their values to those obtained for the corresponding amines and alcohols under the same conditions attests the weak methanethiol association. While for the more strongly associated methylamines and methanols a greater energy of the deuterium bond compared to the hydrogen bond has clearly been observed, the differences between the thermodynamic functions of the systems with the SH compounds and of those with the SD compounds are insignificant. This observation as well as the fact that the vapor pressure ratios P-(CH/sub 3/SD)/P(CH/sub 3/SH) are only slightly greater than unity, that the ratios P(CD/sub 3/SD)/P(CH/sub 3/SH) are even greater than P(CD/sub 3/SH)/P(CH/sub 3/SH), and that the changes of these ratios with temperature and dilution are small in comparison to the strong increase of the corresponding quotients of the methylamines and the methanols are the consequence of the weak methanethiol association. P(CH/sub 3/SD)/P(CH/sub 3/SH), P(CD/sub 3/SH)/P(CH/sub 3/SH), and P(CD/sub 3/SD)/P(CH/sub 3/SH) are represented by equations of the type ln P/sub D/ P/sub H/ = -A/T/sup 2/ + B/T where A and B are nearly additive. The low values of A and B for CH/sub 3/SD/CH/sub 3/SH in comparison to the high values for CH/sub 3/ND/sub 2//CH/sub 3/NH/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/OD/CH/sub 3/OH reflect the weakness of the methanethiol hydrogen bonds. The constants can be related to the thermochemical and the spectroscopic data reported in the literature.

  19. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Dynamic compression of hydrogen isotopes at megabar pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunin, Ryurik F.; Urlin, Vitalii D.; Medvedev, Aleksandr B.

    2010-09-01

    We review the results of shock compression of solid protium to the pressure 66 GPa, of liquid deuterium to 110 GPa, and of solid deuterium to 123 GPa in explosive devices of spherical geometry. The results are compared with data obtained by US scientists using traditional energy sources (explosives and light-gas guns), striker acceleration in a strong magnetic field (Z facility at Sandia), and powerful lasers (Nova at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Omega at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester). Results of density measurements of hydrogen isotopes under quasi-isentropic compression are analyzed. The absence of an anomalous increase in density under shock and quasi-isentropic compression of hydrogen isotopes is demonstrated. On the other hand, both processes exhibit a sharp change in the compression curve slopes, at the respective pressures 45 and 300 GPa.

  20. Multi-purpose hydrogen isotopes separation plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Boniface, H.A.; Gnanapragasam, N.V.; Ryland, D.K.; Suppiah, S.; Castillo, I.

    2015-03-15

    There is a potential interest at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories to remove tritium from moderately tritiated light water and to reclaim tritiated, downgraded heavy water. With only a few limitations, a single CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) process configuration can be designed to remove tritium from heavy water or light water and upgrade heavy water. Such a design would have some restrictions on the nature of the feed-stock and tritium product, but could produce essentially tritium-free light or heavy water that is chemically pure. The extracted tritium is produced as a small quantity of tritiated heavy water. The overall plant capacity is fixed by the total amount of electrolysis and volume of catalyst. In this proposal, with 60 kA of electrolysis a throughput of 15 kg*h{sup -1} light water for detritiation, about 4 kg*h{sup -1} of heavy water for detritiation and about 27 kg*h{sup -1} of 98% heavy water for upgrading can be processed. Such a plant requires about 1,000 liters of AECL isotope exchange catalyst. The general design features and details of this multi-purpose CECE process are described in this paper, based on some practical choices of design criteria. In addition, we outline the small differences that must be accommodated and some compromises that must be made to make the plant capable of such flexible operation. (authors)

  1. Hydrogen Isotopes Record the History of the Martian Hydrosphere and Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.; Kurokawa, H.; Sato, M.; Alexander, C. M. O'D; Wang, J.

    2015-01-01

    The surface geology and geomorphology of Mars indicates that it was once warm enough to maintain a large body of liquid water on its surface, though such a warm environment might have been transient. The transition to the present cold and dry Mars is closely linked to the history of surface water, yet the evolution of surficial water is poorly constrained. This study presents insights from hydrogen isotopes for the origin and evolution of Martian water reservoirs.

  2. 35Cl NQR study of geometric isotope effect in hydrogen bonded chlorooctanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdanowska-Fraçzek, M.

    1994-05-01

    35Cl NQR spectroscopy was applied to study the geometric isotope effect in a wide range of 2 : 1 salts of chloroacetic, trichloroacetic and difluorochloroacetic acids. The NQR results were correlated with IR spectroscopic studies, which provided information on the potential shape for proton motion. The NQR results were discussed on the basis of a variational correlated ground state wave function theory of a single hydrogen bond.

  3. Evolution, Abundance and Biocalcification of Calcareous Nannoplankton During the Aptian (Early Cretaceous): Causes and Consequences for C Isotopic Anomalies, Climate Changes and the Carbon Cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erba, E.

    2005-12-01

    The mid Cretaceous is marked by extreme greenhouse conditions, coeval with emplacement of large igneous provinces, C isotopic anomalies, major changes in structure and composition of the oceans, and accelerated rates in the evolutionary history of calcareous plankton. The Aptian is a crucial interval to decipher links between biotic evolution and environmental pressure: it is appealing for understanding nannofloral biocalcification and feedbacks in the carbonate system and in the global carbon cycle. Ontong Java, Manihiki and Kerguelen Plateaus formed in the Aptian affecting the ocean-atmosphere system with excess CO2, changes in Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations, and varying nutrient cycling. Two large C isotopic anomalies are associated with episodes of prolonged high primary productivity, changes in alkality, global warming and cooling, anoxia, speciations and extinctions in planktonic communities. Nannofossil diversity, abundance and biocalcification are quantified in continuous, complete, pelagic sections to derive biosphere-geosphere interactions at short and long time scales. The early Aptian C isotopic anomaly interrupts a speciation episode in calcareous nannoplankton paralleled by a drastic reduction in nannofossil paleofluxes culminating in the nannoconid crisis preceding the Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a and the negative C isotopic spike linked to clathrate melting presumably triggered by the thermal maximum at the onset of the mid Cretaceous greenhouse climate. No extinctions are recorded. In the early late Aptian resumption of nannoconid production and appearance of several taxa are coeval with a return to normal C isotopic values. The occurrence of calpionellids and diversified planktonic foraminifers indicate successful biocalcification and restoration of the thermocline. In the late Aptian a drop in nannofossil abundance and accelerated extinction rates are associated with another C isotopic excursion under cool conditions possibly due to a prolonged volcanic

  4. Jarosite-water oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionations: preliminary experimental data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, R.O.; Stoffregen, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Stable isotope studies of alunite have added a powerful tool for understanding geochemical processes in the surficial environment. Jarosite [KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6], like alunite, is a common mineral in the weathered portions of many sulfide-bearing ore deposits and mine drainages where its formation reflects acidic conditions produced by the oxidation of sulfides. This paper describes oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionations in jarosite-water experiments over a temperature range of 100?? to 250??C and the extrapolation of the results to surface conditions. It also includes some general observations on the exchange reaction mechanism that are important for evaluating how well natural samples of jarosite retain primary isotopic compositions. -from Authors

  5. Extreme changes in stable hydrogen isotopes and precipitation characteristics in a landfalling Pacific storm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Neiman, P.J.; White, A.B.; Landwehr, J.M.; Ralph, F.M.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    With a new automated precipitation collector we measured a remarkable decrease of 51??? in the hydrogen isotope ratio (?? 2H) of precipitation over a 60-minute period during the landfall of an extratropical cyclone along the California coast on 21 March 2005. The rapid drop in ??2H occurred as precipitation generation transitioned from a shallow to a much deeper cloud layer, in accord with synoptic-scale ascent and deep "seeder-feeder" precipitation. Such unexpected ?? 2H variations can substantially impact widely used isotope-hydrograph methods. From extreme ??2H values of -26 and -78???, we calculate precipitation temperatures of 9.7 and -4.2??C using an adiabatic condensation isotope model, in good agreement with temperatures estimated from surface observations and radar data. This model indicates that 60 percent of the moisture was precipitated during ascent as temperature decreased from 15??C at the ocean surface to -4??C above the measurement site.

  6. Four Decades of Hyperfine Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Martin G. H.; Mårtensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    Isotopic differences in the distribution of nuclear charge and magnetization give rise to "hyperfine structure anomalies" which were observed already in the 1950s. More recently, the distribution of nuclear magnetization has been found to complicate the interpretation of the measured hyperfine splittings in highly charged hydrogen-like ions. In this paper, results of numerical calculations for a few hydrogen-like systems (133Cs, 165Ho, 185,187Re and 209Bi) of current experimental interest are presented in terms of moments of the nuclear charge and magnetization distribution, thereby displaying directly the sensitivity and emphasizing the need for a better understanding of nuclear wavefunctions. In addition, we also present results of many-body perturbation theory calculations for Cs hyperfine anomalies, in connection with experiments planned at ISOLDE.

  7. What the Spatial Correlation of He Isotope and Seimic Velocity Anomalies Implies for Rifting and Volatile Sources in Ethiopia and Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, B. M.; Hilton, D. R.; Hammond, J. O. S.; Halldorsson, S. A.; Scarsi, P.

    2015-12-01

    Helium isotope ratios higher than the upper mantle value of 8 ± 1RA (RA = air 3He/4He) are unambiguous tracers of deep mantle (plume) volatile input in lavas and geothermal fluids from Ethiopia and Afar. However the significance of the surface distribution of He isotope ratios in terms of plume structure and melt distribution has received little attention. Recent seismic studies of this segment of the East African Rift give greatly improved lateral resolution of velocity anomalies allowing, for the first time, a detailed comparison of He isotope variations and tomographic imaging of melts, which presumably act to supply heat, mass and volatiles to the surface. To produce a detailed map of He isotope ratios of the region, we generated 94 new high quality He measurements of fluid inclusions in mafic phenocrysts from lavas sampled along (and off) the axis of the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) and Afar. Our contribution nearly doubles the existing dataset. Now, ~95% of the region from Chamo Lake through Afar including flood basalts on the flank of the MER - an area of ~400 000 km2- falls within 90 km of a He isotope measurement. This allows us to compare the spatial distribution of He isotope ratios from young lavas with the pattern of upper mantle S-wave velocity anomalies (Hammond et al. 2013) to determine how regions of low velocity (high melt content) correlate with He isotope ratios. We find that regions of higher 3He/4He ratios - up to 19 RA - correlate with anomalously low velocities at 75 km (i.e. shallow mantle) depth, and sites with low He isotope ratios cluster in higher velocity regions. Sustained upwelling and impingement of a deep mantle plume could explain this spatial correlation; however recent seismic evidence suggests shallow decompression melting accounts for most current volcanism in the MER and Afar (Rychert et al. 2012). Elevated He isotope ratios may therefore reflect shallow remobilization of stalled, undegassed plume material in the absence of a

  8. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of algae and bacteria from hydrothermal environments, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estep, Marilyn L. F.

    1984-03-01

    Stromatolites forming today on a small scale in hydrothermal environments are chemical and biological analogues of much larger Precambrian formations. Carbon isotopic composition varied as a function of CO 2 concentration, pH, and species composition. Stratiform, layered stromatolites grew in silica-depositing springs at 55° to 70°C; they consisted mainly of a unicellular alga, Synechococcus, and a filamentous, photosynthetic bacterium, Chloroflexus. These thermophiles become enriched in 12C as the concentration of carbon dioxide in the effluent waters increases. At a concentration of 40 ppm total inorganic C, and δ 13C of organic carbon was ˜ -12%., whereas at 900 ppm total inorganic C, the δ 13C of similar species was ˜ -25%.. Conical stromatolites or conophytons (principally a filamentous, blue-green alga Phormidium and Chloroflexus) grew at 40°-55°C. In older, broader conophytons, Chloroflexus was the dominant organism. Their δ 13C values were ˜ -18%. in a variety of hot springs. In carbonate-depositing springs, i.e., carbon dioxide saturated, conophytons and stromatolites consisting of a variety of blue-green algae and photosynthetic bacteria had the most negative δ 13C values (to -30%.). These carbon isotope ratios are directly comparable to carbon isotope ratios of kerogen from Precambrian stromatolites. The presence and activity of methanogenic bacteria or heterotrophic, aerobic and anaerobic bacteria did not alter significantly the δ 13C of the original organic matter. The hydrogen isotopic fractionation between thermophilic organisms and water is 0 to -74 for temperatures of 85° to 46°C, respectively. Acidophilic algae fractionated hydrogen isotopes to a lesser extent than did the photosynthetic organisms inhabiting neutral pH springs. Because organic matter retains some of its original isotopic signature, relationships of CO 2 levels, pH, temperature, and species composition between modern stromatolites and their environment and those of

  9. Nitrogen isotope ratios of nitrate and N* anomalies in the subtropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Chisato; Makabe, Akiko; Shiozaki, Takuhei; Toyoda, Sakae; Yoshida, Osamu; Furuya, Ken; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen isotopic ratios of nitrate (δ15N-NO3-) were analyzed above 1000 m water depth along 17°S in the subtropical South Pacific during the revisit WOCE P21 cruise in 2009. The δ15N-NO3- and N* values were as high as 17‰ and as low as -18 μmol N L-1, respectively, at depths around 250 m east of 115°W, but were as low as 5‰ and as high as +1 μmol N L-1, respectively, in subsurface waters west of 170°W. The relationships among NO3- concentrations, N* values, δ15N-NO3- values, and oxygen and nitrite concentrations suggest that a few samples east of 90°W were from suboxic and nitrite-accumulated conditions and were possibly affected by in situ water column denitrification. Most of the high-δ15N-NO3- and negative-N* waters were probably generated by mixing between Subantarctic Mode Water from the Southern Ocean and Oxygen Deficit Zone Water from the eastern tropical South Pacific, with remineralization of organic matter occurring during transportation. Moreover, the relationship between δ15N-NO3- and N* values, as well as Trichodesmium abundances and size-specific nitrogen fixation rates at the surface, suggest that the low-δ15N-NO3- and positive-N* subsurface waters between 160°E and 170°W were generated by the input of remineralized particles created by in situ nitrogen fixation, mainly by Trichodesmium spp. Therefore, the δ15N values of sediments in this region are expected to reveal past changes in nitrogen fixation or denitrification rates in the subtropical South Pacific. The copyright line for this article was changed on 5 JUN 2015 after original online publication.

  10. Investigations of intramolecular hydrogen bonding in three types of Schiff bases by 2H and 3H NMR isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Schilf, Wojciech; Bloxsidge, James P; Jones, John R; Lu, Shui-Yu

    2004-06-01

    Hydrogen bonding within the structures of three Schiff bases (1-3), obtained by condensation of 4-methoxy-, 5-methoxy- and 4,6-dimethoxysalicylaldehyde with methylamine, was investigated by measuring deuterium and tritium NMR isotope effects. The primary deuterium and tritium isotope effects (delta(XH)-delta(XD/T)) and secondary one-bond nitrogen deuterium effect appear to be very useful parameters for defining the character of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The tritium isotope effects were also determined for nitrogen-hydrogen one-bond coupling constants for both 4-methoxy and 4,6-dimethoxy derivatives. These parameters are seen to be highly sensitive to hydrogen bond characteristics and can be used to distinguish localized and tautomeric hydrogen bonds.

  11. Investigation related to hydrogen isotopes separation by cryogenic distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Bornea, A.; Zamfirache, M.; Stefanescu, I.; Preda, A.; Balteanu, O.; Stefan, I.

    2008-07-15

    Research conducted in the last fifty years has shown that one of the most efficient techniques of removing tritium from the heavy water used as moderator and coolant in CANDU reactors (as that operated at Cernavoda (Romania)) is hydrogen cryogenic distillation. Designing and implementing the concept of cryogenic distillation columns require experiments to be conducted as well as computer simulations. Particularly, computer simulations are of great importance when designing and evaluating the performances of a column or a series of columns. Experimental data collected from laboratory work will be used as input for computer simulations run at larger scale (for The Pilot Plant for Tritium and Deuterium Separation) in order to increase the confidence in the simulated results. Studies carried out were focused on the following: - Quantitative analyses of important parameters such as the number of theoretical plates, inlet area, reflux flow, flow-rates extraction, working pressure, etc. - Columns connected in series in such a way to fulfil the separation requirements. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory-scale installation to investigate the performance of contact elements with continuous packing. The packing was manufactured in our institute. (authors)

  12. Absorption/desorption of hydrogen isotopes and isotopic waters by Zr-alloy getters

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimura, K.; Matsuyama, M.; Watanabe, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    1988-07-01

    Zr-alloy getters have been applied to tritium handling and vacuum conditioning for fusion devices. Some of their properties, however, should be improved to apply them in future devices. From this viewpoint, we have studied the effects of alloying on the getter properties of Zr alloys. We found that the activation energy of absorption and desorption of hydrogen varied considerably with alloying. The activation energy for hydrogen absorption was 0.74 for Zr/sub 61/Al/sub 39/, 0.01 for Zr/sub 57/V/sub 36/Fe/sub 7/, 0.63 for Zr/sub 67/Ni/sub 33/, and 2.8 kcal/mol for Zr/sub 85/Ni/sub 15/, whereas that for Zr was 2.6 kcal/mol. The heat of hydrogen absorption was 27.8 kcal/mol for Zr: it changed with alloying as 32.0--33.4 (Zr/sub 61/Al/sub 39/), 27.8--28.4 (Zr/sub 57/V/sub 36/Fe/sub 7/), 29.0 (Zr/sub 67/Ni/sub 33/), and 28.0 (Zr/sub 85/Ni/sub 15/). In addition, the ratio of the pumping speed of water vapor to that of hydrogen at room temperature varied with alloying element: for example, 1/40 for Zr/sub 57/V/sub 36/Fe/sub 7/ and 1/4 for Zr/sub 67/Ni/sub 33/. The alloying effects mentioned above are considered due to modification of the electronic and/or geometric structure of Zr with alloying.

  13. Hydrogen isotope composition of leaf wax n-alkanes in Arabidopsis lines with different transpiration rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedentchouk, N.; Lawson, T.; Eley, Y.; McAusland, L.

    2012-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen are used widely to investigate modern and ancient water cycles. The D/H composition of organic compounds derived from terrestrial plants has recently attracted significant attention as a proxy for palaeohydrology. However, the role of various plant physiological and biochemical factors in controlling the D/H signature of leaf wax lipids in extant plants remains unclear. The focus of this study is to investigate the effect of plant transpiration on the D/H composition of n-alkanes in terrestrial plants. This experiment includes 4 varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana that differ with respect to stomatal density and stomatal geometry. All 4 varieties were grown indoors under identical temperature, relative humidity, light and watering regimes and then sampled for leaf wax and leaf water stable isotopic measurements. During growth, stomatal conductance to carbon dioxide and water vapour were also determined. We found that the plants varied significantly in terms of their transpiration rates. Transpiration rates were significantly higher in Arabidopsis ost1 and ost1-1 varieties (2.4 and 3.2 mmol m-2 s-1, respectively) than in Arabidopsis RbohD and Col-0 (1.5 and 1.4). However, hydrogen isotope measurements of n-alkanes extracted from leaf waxes revealed a very different pattern. Varieties ost1, ost1-1, and RbohD have very similar deltaD values of n-C29 alkane (-125, -128, and -127 per mil), whereas the deltaD value of Col-0 is more negative (-137 per mil). The initial results of this work suggest that plant transpiration is decoupled from the D/H composition of n-alkanes. In other words, physical processes that affect water vapour movement between the plant and its environment apparently cannot account for the stable hydrogen isotope composition of organic compounds that comprise leaf waxes. Additional, perhaps biochemical, processes that affect hydrogen isotope fractionation during photosynthesis might need to be invoked

  14. Hydrogen isotopic composition of individual n-alkanes as an intrinsic tracer for bioremediation and source identification of petroleum contamination.

    PubMed

    Pond, Kristy L; Huang, Yongsong; Wang, Yi; Kulpa, Charles F

    2002-02-15

    The isotopic signatures of crude oil hydrocarbons are potentially powerful intrinsic tracers to their origins and the processes by which the oils are modified in the environment. Stable carbon isotopic data are of limited use for studying petroleum contaminants because of the relatively small amount of isotopic fractionation that occurs during natural processes. Hydrogen isotopes, in contrast, are commonly fractionated to a much greater extent and as a result display larger variations in delta values. We studied the effect of in vitro aerobic biodegradation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of individual n-alkanes from crude oil. The isotopic analysis was conducted using gas chromatography-thermal conversion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. In general, biodegradation rates decreased with increasing hydrocarbon chain length, consistent with previous studies. More importantly the n-alkanes that were degraded at the fastest rates (n-C15 to n-C18) also showed the largest overall isotopic fractionation (approximately 12-25 per thousand deuterium enrichment), suggesting that the lower molecular weight n-alkanes can be used to monitor in-situ bioremediation of crude oil contamination. The hydrogen isotopic compositions of the longer chain alkanes (n-C19 to n-C27) were relatively stable during biodegradation (<5%o overall deuterium enrichment), indicating that these compounds are effective tracers for oil-source identification studies.

  15. Hydrogen isotopic composition of the Martian mantle inferred from the newest Martian meteorite fall, Tissint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mane, P.; Hervig, R.; Wadhwa, M.; Garvie, L. A. J.; Balta, J. B.; McSween, H. Y.

    2016-11-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of planetary reservoirs can provide key constraints on the origin and history of water on planets. The sources of water and the hydrological evolution of Mars may be inferred from the hydrogen isotopic compositions of mineral phases in Martian meteorites, which are currently the only samples of Mars available for Earth-based laboratory investigations. Previous studies have shown that δD values in minerals in the Martian meteorites span a large range of -250 to +6000‰. The highest hydrogen isotope ratios likely represent a Martian atmospheric component: either interaction with a reservoir in equilibrium with the Martian atmosphere (such as crustal water), or direct incorporation of the Martian atmosphere due to shock processes. The lowest δD values may represent those of the Martian mantle, but it has also been suggested that these values may represent terrestrial contamination in Martian meteorites. Here we report the hydrogen isotopic compositions and water contents of a variety of phases (merrillites, maskelynites, olivines, and an olivine-hosted melt inclusion) in Tissint, the latest Martian meteorite fall that was minimally exposed to the terrestrial environment. We compared traditional sample preparation techniques with anhydrous sample preparation methods, to evaluate their effects on hydrogen isotopes, and find that for severely shocked meteorites like Tissint, the traditional sample preparation techniques increase water content and alter the D/H ratios toward more terrestrial-like values. In the anhydrously prepared Tissint sample, we see a large range of δD values, most likely resulting from a combination of processes including magmatic degassing, secondary alteration by crustal fluids, shock-related fractionation, and implantation of Martian atmosphere. Based on these data, our best estimate of the δD value for the Martian depleted mantle is -116 ± 94‰, which is the lowest value measured in a phase in the

  16. Fractionation of sulfur and hydrogen isotopes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris with perturbed DsrC expression.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Venceslau, Sofia S; Pereira, Inês A C; Johnston, David T; Bradley, Alexander S

    2016-10-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction is the central microbial metabolism in global sulfur cycling. Understanding the importance of sulfate reduction to Earth's biogeochemical S cycle requires aggregating single-cell processes with geochemical signals. For sulfate reduction, these signals include the ratio of stable sulfur isotopes preserved in minerals, as well as the hydrogen isotope ratios and structures of microbial membrane lipids preserved in organic matter. In this study, we cultivated the model sulfate reducer, Desulfovibrio vulgaris DSM 644(T), to investigate how these parameters were perturbed by changes in expression of the protein DsrC. DsrC is critical to the final metabolic step in sulfate reduction to sulfide. S and H isotopic fractionation imposed by the wild type was compared to three mutants. Discrimination against (34)S in sulfate, as calculated from the residual reactant, did not discernibly differ among all strains. However, a closed-system sulfur isotope distillation model, based on accumulated sulfide, produced inconsistent results in one mutant strain IPFG09. Lipids produced by IPFG09 were also slightly enriched in (2)H. These results suggest that DsrC alone does not have a major impact on sulfate-S, though may influence sulfide-S and lipid-H isotopic compositions. While intriguing, a mechanistic explanation requires further study under continuous culture conditions.

  17. Hydrogen isotope exchange between n-alkanes and water under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Eoghan P.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the extent of hydrogen isotope (2H and 1H) exchange between hydrocarbons and water under hydrothermal conditions, we performed experiments heating C1-C5n-alkanes in aqueous solutions of varying initial 2H/1H ratios in the presence of a pyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite redox buffer at 323 °C and 35-36 MPa. Extensive and reversible incorporation of water-derived hydrogen into C2-C5n-alkanes was observed on timescales of months. In contrast, comparatively minor exchange was observed for CH4. Isotopic exchange is facilitated by reversible equilibration of n-alkanes and their corresponding n-alkenes with H2 derived from the disproportionation of water. Rates of δ2H variation in C3+n-alkanes decreased with time, a trend that is consistent with an asymptotic approach to steady state isotopic compositions regulated by alkane-water isotopic equilibrium. Substantially slower δ2H variation was observed for ethane relative to C3-C5n-alkanes, suggesting that the greater stability of C3+ alkenes and isomerization reactions may dramatically enhance rates of 2H/1H exchange in C3+n-alkanes. Thus, in reducing aqueous environments, reversible reaction of alkanes and their corresponding alkenes facilitates rapid 2H/1H exchange between water and alkyl-bound hydrogen on relatively short geological timescales at elevated temperatures and pressures. The proximity of some thermogenic and purported abiogenic alkane δ2H values to those predicted for equilibrium 2H/1H fractionation with ambient water suggests that this process may regulate the δ2H signatures of some naturally occurring hydrocarbons.

  18. Suppression of hydrogenated carbon film deposition and hydrogen isotope retention by nitrogen addition into cold remote H/D and CH4 mixture plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, K.; Notani, M.; Uesugi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ishijima, T.

    2015-08-01

    Control of tritium retention and its removal from the first wall of future fusion devices are one of the most crucial issues for safety and effective use for fuel. Nitrogen addition into remote edge plasmas has been considered and tested as an effective method for suppression of carbon film deposition and reduction of hydrogen isotope absorption in the deposited films. In this paper we have investigated the scavenger effects of nitrogen injected into low temperature D2/CH4 plasmas on hydrogenated carbon film growth using a small helical device. The result of the deposition shows that the key reactive particles with CN and ND(H) bonds to suppression of hydrogenated carbon film growth and hydrogen isotope absorption are much slowly generated compared with hydrocarbon particles such as CD(H)x and C2D(H)x. This may be due to the slow atomic nitrogen diffusion into hydrogenated carbon layer and the chemical equilibrium between nitrogen absorption.

  19. Sims Analysis of Water Abundance and Hydrogen Isotope in Lunar Highland Plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Zhang, Youxue; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R.; Eiler, John M.; Neal, Clive R.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of indigenous water in mare basaltic glass beads has challenged the view established since the Apollo era of a "dry" Moon. Since this discovery, measurements of water in lunar apatite, olivine-hosted melt inclusions, agglutinates, and nominally anhydrous minerals have confirmed that lunar igneous materials contain water, implying that some parts of lunar mantle may have as much water as Earth's upper mantle. The interpretation of hydrogen (H) isotopes in lunar samples, however, is controversial. The large variation of H isotope ratios in lunar apatite (delta Deuterium = -202 to +1010 per mille) has been taken as evidence that water in the lunar interior comes from the lunar mantle, solar wind protons, and/or comets. The very low deuterium/H ratios in lunar agglutinates indicate that solar wind protons have contributed to their hydrogen content. Conversely, H isotopes in lunar volcanic glass beads and olivine-hosted melt inclusions being similar to those of common terrestrial igneous rocks, suggest a common origin for water in both Earth and Moon. Lunar water could be inherited from carbonaceous chondrites, consistent with the model of late accretion of chondrite-type materials to the Moon as proposed by. One complication about the sources of lunar water, is that geologic processes (e.g., late accretion and magmatic degassing) may have modified the H isotope signatures of lunar materials. Recent FTIR analyses have shown that plagioclases in lunar ferroan anorthosite contain approximately 6 ppm H2O. So far, ferroan anorthosite is the only available lithology that is believed to be a primary product of the lunar magma ocean (LMO). A possible consequence is that the LMO could have contained up to approximately 320 ppm H2O. Here we examine the possible sources of water in the LMO through measurements of water abundances and H isotopes in plagioclase of two ferroan anorthosites and one troctolite from lunar highlands.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Irradiation-driven Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Analogs of Protoplanetary Hydrous Silicate Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Laurent, Boris; Leroux, Hugues; Remusat, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The origin of hydrogen in chondritic components is poorly understood. Their isotopic composition is heavier than the solar nebula gas. In addition, in most meteorites, hydrous silicates are found to be lighter than the coexisting organic matter. Ionizing irradiation recently emerged as an efficient hydrogen fractionating process in organics, but its effect on H-bearing silicates remains essentially unknown. We report the evolution of the D/H of hydrous silicates experimentally irradiated by electrons. Thin films of amorphous silica, amorphous “serpentine,” and pellets of crystalline muscovite were irradiated at 4 and 30 keV. For all samples, irradiation leads to a large hydrogen loss correlated with a moderate deuterium enrichment of the solid residue. The entire data set can be described by a Rayleigh distillation. The calculated fractionation factor is consistent with a kinetically controlled fractionation during the loss of hydrogen. Furthermore, for a given ionizing condition, the deuteration of the silicate residues is much lower than the deuteration measured on irradiated organic macromolecules. These results provide firm evidence of the limitations of ionizing irradiation as a driving mechanism for D-enrichment of silicate materials. The isotopic composition of the silicate dust cannot rise from a protosolar to a chondritic signature during solar irradiations. More importantly, these results imply that irradiation of the disk naturally induces a strong decoupling of the isotopic signatures of coexisting organics and silicates. This decoupling is consistent with the systematic difference observed between the heavy organic matter and the lighter water typically associated with minerals in the matrix of most carbonaceous chondrites.

  1. The Use of Stable Hydrogen Isotopes as a Geothermometer in Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proskurowski, G.; Lilley, M. D.; Früh-Green, G. L.; Olson, E. J.; Kelley, D. S.

    2004-12-01

    Terrestrial geothermal work by Arnason in the 1970's demonstrated the utility of stable hydrogen isotopes as a geothermometer[1]. However, with the exception of two data points from 9°N in a study by Horibe and Craig[2], the value of this geothermometer in hydrothermal systems has never been rigorously assessed. Equilibrium fractionation factors for H2-H2O and H2-CH4 have previously been determined experimentally and theoretically over a range of temperatures and provide an expression relating alpha (fractionation) and temperature. We have measured the dD of H2(g), CH4(g) and H2O from a diverse selection of hydrothermal vent localities including Lost City, Middle Valley, Endeavour, Guaymas, Logatchev, Broken Spur, and SWIR. These samples were chosen to represent a wide range of fluid temperatures and a variety of environmental settings. We see a strong correlation between measured vent temperature and predicted vent temperature using both the hydrogen-water and the methane-hydrogen geothermometers over a temperature range of 25-400°C. In the case of the H2-H2O geothermometer, the predicted temperatures are slightly elevated with respect to the measured temperatures at the low temperature Lost City site, and are in good agreement at high temperature vent sites. The H2-CH4 geothermometer predicts temperatures that are 40-80°C elevated with respect to the measured temperature in both the low and high temperature sites. These measurements demonstrate that the hydrogen isotope geothermometer in the hydrogen-methane-water system is robust in hydrothermal systems and may be a useful tool in determining the temperature of the root zone. 1. Arnason, B., The Hydrogen-Water Isotope Thermometer Applied to Geothermal Areas In Iceland. Geothermics, 1977. 5: p. 75-80. 2. Horibe, Y. and H. Craig, D/ H fractionation in the system methane-hydrogen-water. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 1995. 59(24): p. 5209-5217.

  2. An instrumental and numerical method to determine the hydrogenic ratio in isotopic experiments in the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Baciero, A. Zurro, B.; Martínez, M.

    2014-11-15

    The isotope effect is an important topic that is relevant for future D-T fusion reactors, where the use of deuterium, rather than hydrogen, may lean to improved plasma confinement. An evaluation of the ratio of hydrogen/deuterium is needed for isotope effect studies in current isotopic experiments. Here, the spectral range around H{sub α} and D{sub α} lines, obtained with an intensified multi-channel detector mounted to a 1-m focal length spectrometer, is analyzed using a fit function that includes several Gaussian components. The isotopic ratio evolution for a single operational day of the TJ-II stellarator is presented. The role of injected hydrogen by Neutral Beam Injection heating is also studied.

  3. Effects of volatilization on carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of MTBE.

    PubMed

    Kuder, Tomasz; Philp, Paul; Allen, Jon

    2009-03-15

    Contaminant attenuation studies utilizing CSIA (compound-specific isotope analysis) routinely assume that isotope effects (IEs) result only from degradation. Experimental results on MTBE behavior in diffusive volatilization and dynamic vapor extraction show measurable changes in the isotope ratios of the MTBE remaining in the aqueous or nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) matrix. A conceptual model for interpretation of those IEs is proposed, based on the physics of liquid-air partitioning. Normal or inverse IEs were observed for different volatilization scenarios. The range of carbon enrichment factors (epsilon) was from +0.7 per thousand (gasoline vapor extraction) to -1 per thousand (diffusive volatilization of MTBE from gasoline), the range of hydrogen epsilon was from +7 per thousand (gasoline vapor extraction) to -12 per thousand (air sparging of aqueous MTBE). The observed IEs are lower than those associated with MTBE degradation. However, under a realistic scenario for MTBE vapor removal, their magnitude is within the detection limits of CSIA. The potential for interference of those IEs is primarily in confusing the interpretation of samples with a small extent of fractionation and where only carbon CSIA data are available. The IEs resulting from volatilization and biodegradation, respectively, can be separated by combined carbon and hydrogen 2D-CSIA.

  4. Measurements of Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes with the BESS-Polar II Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; BESS-Polar Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Balloon-Borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS-Polar II) flew successfully over Antarctica for 24.5 days in December 2007 through January 2008 during a period of minimum Solar activity. BESS-Polar II is configured with a solenoidal superconducting magnet and a suite of precision particle detectors. It can accurately identify hydrogen and helium isotopes among the incoming cosmic-ray nuclei with energies from 0.2 up to about 1.5 GeV/n. The long duration of the flight, and the good stability of the detectors increased the number of cosmic-ray events previously recorded with BESS-Polar I by a factor of 5, reaching about 4.7 billion collected particles. This allows to study and measure energy spectrum of hydrogen and helium isotope fluxes with unprecedented precision. The isotope flux and ratio measurements with BESS-Polar II will be presented and compared to previous measurements and theoretical predictions. They provide essential information to constrain cosmic-ray propagation models.

  5. Carbon and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Fractionation Associated with the Aerobic and Anaerobic Degradation of Saturated and Alkylated Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Musat, Florin; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans H

    2016-01-01

    Saturated hydrocarbons (alkanes) and alkylated aromatic hydrocarbons are abundant environmental compounds. Hydrocarbons are primarily removed from the environment by biodegradation, a process usually associated with moderate carbon and significant hydrogen isotope fractionation allowing monitoring of biodegradation processes in the environment. Here, we review the carbon and hydrogen stable isotope fractionation associated with the cleavage of C-H bonds at alkyl chains of hydrocarbons. Propane, n-butane and ethylbenzene were used as model components for alkyl moieties of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons with emphasis on the cleavage of the C-H bond without the involvement of molecular oxygen. The carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation factors were further used to explore the diagnostic potential for characterizing the mode of bond cleavage under oxic and anoxic conditions. x039B; factors, calculated to correlate carbon and hydrogen fractionation, allowed to distinguish between aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation processes in the environment.

  6. Collective vibrational effects in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins studied by isotopic substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Johansson, C.; Christensen, D. H.; Hvidt, S.; Flink, J.; Høime Hansen, S.; Poulsen, F.

    2000-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the fast dynamics of simple liquid amides and proteins. Raman spectra in the visible region of liquid amides are obtained with a triple additive scanning monochromator, whereas FT-Raman technique is used in the near-IR region in order to avoid fluorescence from impurities in the proteins. Raman spectra are shown in the amide-I region of HCONHCH 3 ( N-methylformamide with all isotopes in their natural abundance), H 13CONHCH 3, HC 18ONHCH 3, human growth hormone, frog tropomyosin and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 including C-13 and N-15 enriched samples of the latter. Resonance energy transfer (RET) between amide molecules gives rise to a non-coincidence effect of the anisotropic and the isotropic components of the amide-I band. This effect influences the band position in mixtures of liquid amide isotopomers. A further spectral feature caused by collective vibrational modes in the hydrogen bonded liquid amides is named coalescence of bands in mixtures of isotopomers (CBMI). The result of this effect is that only one band is found in mixtures of isotopomers where bands at different frequencies are observed for each of the isotopomers. A similar effect may account for the observation of protein amide-I bands with frequencies dependent only on the secondary structure of the protein and not on the amino acid residues. RET and CBMI are due to a collectivity of vibrational modes in different amide molecules. This collectivity may be related to a cooperativity of hydrogen bonds. A low-frequency band around 100 cm -1 is observed in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins. Isotopic substitution shows that the mode corresponding to this band involves displacements of atoms in hydrogen bonds. This mode may drive a breaking of the hydrogen bond.

  7. Isotopic evidence for biogenic molecular hydrogen production in the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, S.; Kock, A.; Steinhoff, T.; Fiedler, B.; Fietzek, P.; Kaiser, J.; Krol, M. C.; Popa, M. E.; Chen, Q.; Tanhua, T.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-10-01

    Oceans are a net source of molecular hydrogen (H2) to the atmosphere. The production of marine H2 is assumed to be mainly biological by N2 fixation, but photochemical pathways are also discussed. We present measurements of mole fraction and isotopic composition of dissolved and atmospheric H2 from the southern and northern Atlantic between 2008 and 2010. In total almost 400 samples were taken during five cruises along a transect between Punta Arenas (Chile) and Bremerhaven (Germany), as well as at the coast of Mauretania. The isotopic source signatures of dissolved H2 extracted from surface water are highly deuterium-depleted and correlate negatively with temperature, showing δD values of (-629 ± 54) ‰ for water temperatures at (27 ± 3) °C and (-249 ± 88) ‰ below (19 ± 1) °C. The results for warmer water masses are consistent with biological production of H2. This is the first time that marine H2 excess has been directly attributed to biological production by isotope measurements. However, the isotope values obtained in the colder water masses indicate that beside possible biological production a significant different source should be considered. The atmospheric measurements show distinct differences between both hemispheres as well as between seasons. Results from the global chemistry transport model TM5 reproduce the measured H2 mole fractions and isotopic composition well. The climatological global oceanic emissions from the GEMS database are in line with our data and previously published flux calculations. The good agreement between measurements and model results demonstrates that both the magnitude and the isotopic signature of the main components of the marine H2 cycle are in general adequately represented in current atmospheric models despite a proposed source different from biological production or a substantial underestimation of nitrogen fixation by several authors.

  8. Isotopic evidence for biogenic molecular hydrogen production in the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, S.; Kock, A.; Steinhoff, T.; Fiedler, B.; Fietzek, P.; Kaiser, J.; Krol, M.; Popa, M. E.; Chen, Q.; Tanhua, T.; Röckmann, T.

    2016-01-01

    Oceans are a net source of molecular hydrogen (H2) to the atmosphere. The production of marine H2 is assumed to be mainly biological by N2 fixation, but photochemical pathways are also discussed. We present measurements of mole fraction and isotopic composition of dissolved and atmospheric H2 from the southern and northern Atlantic between 2008 and 2010. In total almost 400 samples were taken during 5 cruises along a transect between Punta Arenas (Chile) and Bremerhaven (Germany), as well as at the coast of Mauritania.

    The isotopic source signatures of dissolved H2 extracted from surface water are highly deuterium-depleted and correlate negatively with temperature, showing δD values of (-629 ± 54) ‰ for water temperatures at (27 ± 3) °C and (-249 ± 88) ‰ below (19 ± 1) °C. The results for warmer water masses are consistent with the biological production of H2. This is the first time that marine H2 excess has been directly attributed to biological production by isotope measurements. However, the isotope values obtained in the colder water masses indicate that beside possible biological production, a significant different source should be considered.

    The atmospheric measurements show distinct differences between both hemispheres as well as between seasons. Results from the global chemistry transport model TM5 reproduce the measured H2 mole fractions and isotopic composition well. The climatological global oceanic emissions from the GEMS database are in line with our data and previously published flux calculations. The good agreement between measurements and model results demonstrates that both the magnitude and the isotopic signature of the main components of the marine H2 cycle are in general adequately represented in current atmospheric models despite a proposed source different from biological production or a substantial underestimation of nitrogen fixation by several authors.

  9. Geographic Variation of Strontium and Hydrogen Isotopes in Avian Tissue: Implications for Tracking Migration and Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Sellick, Megan J.; Kyser, T. Kurt; Wunder, Michael B.; Chipley, Don; Norris, D. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Background Isotopes can provide unique solutions to fundamental problems related to the ecology and evolution of migration and dispersal because prior movements of individuals can theoretically be tracked from tissues collected from a single capture. However, there is still remarkably little information available about how and why isotopes vary in wild animal tissues, especially over large spatial scales. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we describe variation in both stable-hydrogen (δDF) and strontium (87Sr/86SrF) isotopic compositions in the feathers of a migratory songbird, the Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), across 18 sampling sites in North America and then examine potential mechanisms driving this variation. We found that δDF was correlated with latitude of the sampling site, whereas 87Sr/86SrF was correlated with longitude. δDF was related to δD of meteoric waters where molting occurred and 87Sr/86SrF was influenced primarily by the geology in the area where feathers were grown. Using simulation models, we then assessed the utility of combining both markers to estimate the origin of individuals. Using 13 geographic regions, we found that the number of individuals correctly assigned to their site of origin increased from less than 40% using either δD or 87Sr/86Sr alone to 74% using both isotopes. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that these isotopes have the potential to provide predictable and complementary markers for estimating long-distance animal movements. Combining isotopes influenced by different global-scale processes may allow researchers to link the population dynamics of animals across large geographic ranges. PMID:19266102

  10. Isotopic fractionation in proteins as a measure of hydrogen bond length

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2015-07-28

    If a deuterated molecule containing strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds is placed in a hydrogenated solvent, it may preferentially exchange deuterium for hydrogen. This preference is due to the difference between the vibrational zero-point energy for hydrogen and deuterium. It is found that the associated fractionation factor Φ is correlated with the strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. This correlation has been used to determine the length of the H-bonds (donor-acceptor separation) in a diverse range of enzymes and has been argued to support the existence of short low-barrier H-bonds. Starting with a potential energy surface based on a simple diabatic state model for H-bonds, we calculate Φ as a function of the proton donor-acceptor distance R. For numerical results, we use a parameterization of the model for symmetric O–H⋯O bonds [R. H. McKenzie, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 196 (2012)]. We consider the relative contributions of the O–H stretch vibration, O–H bend vibrations (both in plane and out of plane), tunneling splitting effects at finite temperature, and the secondary geometric isotope effect. We compare our total Φ as a function of R with NMR experimental results for enzymes, and in particular with an earlier model parametrization Φ(R), used previously to determine bond lengths.

  11. Sulfur, carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotope geochemistry of the Idaho cobalt belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Craig A.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Slack, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Cobalt-copper ± gold deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt, including the deposits of the Blackbird district, have been analyzed for their sulfur, carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotope compositions to improve the understanding of ore formation. Previous genetic hypotheses have ranged widely, linking the ores to the sedimentary or diagenetic history of the host Mesoproterozoic sedimentary rocks, to Mesoproterozoic or Cretaceous magmatism, or to metamorphic shearing. The δ34S values are nearly uniform throughout the Blackbird dis- trict, with a mean value for cobaltite (CoAsS, the main cobalt mineral) of 8.0 ± 0.4‰ (n = 19). The data suggest that (1) sulfur was derived at least partly from sedimentary sources, (2) redox reactions involving sulfur were probably unimportant for ore deposition, and (3) the sulfur was probably transported to sites of ore for- mation as H2S. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of the ore-forming fluid, which are calculated from analyses of biotite-rich wall rocks and tourmaline, do not uniquely identify the source of the fluid; plausible sources include formation waters, metamorphic waters, and mixtures of magmatic and isotopically heavy meteoric waters. The calculated compositions are a poor match for the modified seawaters that form vol- canogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of siderite, a mineral that is widespread, although sparse, at Blackbird, suggest formation from mixtures of sedimentary organic carbon and magmatic-metamorphic carbon. The isotopic compositions of calcite in alkaline dike rocks of uncertain age are consistent with a magmatic origin. Several lines of evidence suggest that siderite postdated the emplacement of cobalt and copper, so its significance for the ore-forming event is uncertain. From the stable isotope perspective, the mineral deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt contrast with typical VMS and sedimentary exhalative deposits. They show characteristics of deposit

  12. Dynamic behavior of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten-carbon composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, T.; Tsuchiya, B.; Morita, K.

    The thermal re-emission of hydrogen isotopes from WC layers on graphite, implanted with 5 keV H +2 and D +2 ion beams up to saturation at room temperature, has been studied by means of the elastic recoil detection (ERD) technique. It is found on isochronal annealing for 10 min that the re-emission takes place in three stages: the first stage occurs for retained fraction of 1.0-0.6, the second stage for retained fractions of 0.6-0.2 and the third stage below the retained fraction of 0.2, which is ascribed to re-emission from carbon segregated in the grain boundaries of the WC layers. It is also found on isothermal annealing that the concentration of retained hydrogen decreases rapidly in the beginning and hereafter very gradually with increasing the annealing time. The isothermal re-emission curves have been analyzed by taking into account the two trapping sites and the mass balance equations with two kinds of thermal detrapping ( Σd 1, Σd 2), retrapping (Σ t) and local molecular recombination ( K1) between free hydrogen atoms. The isotope difference of the rate constants for elementary processes determined by best fitting of the solution to the experimental re-emission profiles is discussed with relevance to the nature of two trapping sites.

  13. Hydrogen isotope separation in carbon nanotubes: calculation of coupled rotational and translational States at high densities.

    PubMed

    Garberoglio, Giovanni; Johnson, J Karl

    2010-03-23

    The effect of the quantized rotational degrees of freedom of hydrogen on the adsorption and sieving properties in carbon nanotubes is studied using computer simulations. We have developed a highly efficient multiple timestep algorithm for hybrid Monte Carlo sampling of quantized rotor configurations and extended the grand canonical Boltzmann bias method to rigid linear molecules. These new computational tools allow us to calculate accurately the quantum sieving selectivities for cases of extreme two-dimensional confinement as a function of pressure. The para-T2/para-H2 selectivity at 20 K is analyzed as a function of the tube diameter and the density of adsorbed hydrogen. Extraordinarily high selectivities, up to 2.6 x 10(8), are observed in the narrowest nanotube. The quantized nature of the rotational degrees of freedom is found to dramatically affect adsorption and selectivity for hydrogen isotopes adsorbed in very narrow nanotubes. The T2/H2 zero-pressure selectivity increases from 2.4 x 10(4) to 1.7 x 10(8) in the (3,6) nanotube at 20 K when quantum rotations are accounted for. The isotopic selectivity is found to increase with pressure, tending to a constant value at saturation. A simplified mean-field model is used to discuss the origin of this behavior.

  14. The setup of an extraction system coupled to a hydrogen isotopes distillation column

    SciTech Connect

    Zamfirache, M.; Bornea, A.; Stefanescu, I.; Bidica, N.; Balteanu, O.; Bucur, C.

    2008-07-15

    Among the most difficult problems of cryogenic distillation one stands apart: the extraction of the heavy fraction. By an optimal design of the cycle scheme, this problem could be avoided. A 'worst case scenario' is usually occurring when the extracted fraction consists of one prevalent isotope such as hydrogen and small amounts of the other two hydrogen isotopes (deuterium and/or tritium). This situation is further complicated by two parameters of the distillation column: the extraction flow rate and the hold-up. The present work proposes the conceptual design of an extraction system associated to the cryogenic distillation column used in hydrogen separation processes. During this process, the heavy fraction (DT, T{sub 2}) is separated, its concentration being the highest at the bottom of the distillation column. From this place the extraction of the gaseous phase can now begin. Being filled with adsorbent, the extraction system is used to temporarily store the heavy fraction. Also the extraction system provides samples for the gas Chromatograph. The research work is focused on the existent pilot plant for tritium and deuterium separation from our institute to validate the experiments carried out until now. (authors)

  15. Breakthrough curve analysis of pressure swing adsorption for hydrogen isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotoh, K.; Tanaka, M.; Sakamoto, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Asakura, Y.; Uda, T.; Sugiyama, T.

    2008-07-15

    For the purpose of developing an effective system for hydrogen isotope separation, we have been studying the adsorption-desorption dynamic behavior of hydrogen and deuterium in a packed-bed column with synthetic zeolites, aimed at applying the pressure swing adsorption process. The adsorption behavior of molecules in the packed-bed is reflected in the breakthrough curves. To understand the characteristic behaviors of hydrogen isotopes in the packed-bed, we carried out breakthrough experiments in a conventional adsorption process and in a practical process following sequential processes alternating between adsorption and desorption. From the former experiments, the results were obtained that the overall mass transfer was influenced by longitudinal dispersion relating to the superficial velocity and that the process governing the mass transfer within adsorbents was diffusion in the macro-pores of pellets. In the latter experiments, unique profile breakthrough curves were observed. These curves can be described with the numerical simulation assuming the initial distributions in a packed-bed. (authors)

  16. Hydrogen isotopes in individual amino acids reflect differentiated pools of hydrogen from food and water in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Marilyn L.; Griffin, Patrick L.; Newsome, Seth D.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope (δ2H) analysis is widely used in animal ecology to study continental-scale movement because δ2H can trace precipitation and climate. To understand the biochemical underpinnings of how hydrogen is incorporated into biomolecules, we measured the δ2H of individual amino acids (AAs) in Escherichia coli cultured in glucose-based or complex tryptone-based media in waters with δ2H values ranging from −55‰ to +1,070‰. The δ2H values of AAs in tryptone spanned a range of ∼250‰. In E. coli grown on glucose, the range of δ2H among AAs was nearly 200‰. The relative distributions of δ2H of AAs were upheld in cultures grown in enriched waters. In E. coli grown on tryptone, the δ2H of nonessential AAs varied linearly with the δ2H of media water, whereas δ2H of essential AAs was nearly identical to δ2H in diet. Model calculations determined that as much as 46% of hydrogen in some nonessential AAs originated from water, whereas no more than 12% of hydrogen in essential AAs originated from water. These findings demonstrate that δ2H can route directly at the molecular level. We conclude that the patterns and distributions in δ2H of AAs are determined through biosynthetic reactions, suggesting that δ2H could become a new biosignature for studying novel microbial pathways. Our results also show that δ2H of AAs in an organism’s tissues provides a dual tracer for food and environmental (e.g., drinking) water. PMID:27444017

  17. Hydrogen Isotopic Composition of Water in the Martian Atmosphere and Released from Rocknest Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leshin, L. A.; Webster, C. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Flesh, G. J.; Christensen, L. E.; Stern, J. C.; Franz, H. B.; McAdam, A. C.; Niles, P. B.; Archer, P. B., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Jones, J. H.; Ming, D. W.; Atreya, S. K.; Owen, T. C.; Conrad, P.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover sampled the aeolian bedform called Rocknest as its first solid samples to be analyzed by the analytical instruments CheMin and SAM. The instruments ingested aliquots from a sieved sample of less than 150 micrometer grains. As discussed in other reports at this conference [e.g., 1], CheMin discovered many crystalline phases, almost all of which are igneous minerals, plus some 10s of percent of x-ray amorphous material. The SAM instrument is focused on understanding volatiles and possible organics in the fines, performing evolved gas analysis (EGA) with the SAM quadrapole mass spectrometer (QMS), isotope measurements using both the QMS and the tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), which is sensitive to CO2, water and methane, and organics with the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). As discussed in the abstract by Franz et al. [2] and others, EGA of Rocknest fines revealed the presence of significant amounts of H2O as well as O-, C- and S-bearing materials. SAM has also tasted the martian atmosphere several times, analyzing the volatiles in both the TLS and QMS [e.g., 3,4]. This abstract will focus on presentation of initial hydrogen isotopic data from the TLS for Rocknest soils and the atmosphere, and their interpretation. Data for CO2 isotopes and O isotopes in water are still being reduced, but should be available by at the conference.

  18. Proton-irradiation-induced anomaly in the electrical conductivity of a hydrogen-bonded ferroelastic system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui; Lee, Kwang-Sei

    2009-11-01

    An anomalous abrupt drop in the electrical conductivity has been observed at the ferroelastic phase transition of a proton-irradiated system of hydrogen-bonded TlH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. As a result of the high-resolution {sup 31}P NMR chemical-shift measurements, distinct changes in the atomic displacements due to the irradiation were identified in the ferroelastic and paraelastic phases. Besides, {sup 1}H NMR spin-spin relaxation measurements revealed a change due to the irradiation in the proton dynamics at the ferroelastic phase transition, apparently accounting for the much-reduced electrical conductivity in the paraelastic phase of the irradiated system.

  19. Assessment of the hydrogen external tank pressure decay anomaly on Space Transportation System (STS) 51-L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M.

    1988-01-01

    Following the Challenger tragedy, an evaluation of the integrated main propulsion system flight data revealed a premature decay in the hydrogen external tank ullage pressure. A reconstruction of predicted ullage pressure versus time indicated an inconsistency between predicted and measured ullage pressure starting at approximately 65.5 seconds into the flight and reaching a maximum value between 72 and 72.9 seconds. This discrepancy could have been caused by a hydrogen gas leak or by a liquied hydrogen leak that occurred either in the pressurization system or in the external tank. The corresponding leak rates over the time interval from 65.5 to 72.9 seconds were estimated to range from 0.28 kg/s (0.62 lbm/s) + or - 41 percent to between 0.43 and 0.51kg/s (0.94 and 1.12lbs/s) + or - 1 percent for a gas leak and from 72.9 kg/s (160.5 lbs/s) + or - 41 percent to between 111.6 and 133.2 kg/s (245.8 and 293.3 lbs/s) + or - 1 percent for a liquid leak. No speculation is made to ascertain whether the leak is liquid or gas, as this cannot be determined from the analysis performed. Four structural failures in the hydrogen external tank were considered to explain the leak rates. A break in the 5-cm (2 in) pressurization line, in the 13-cm (5 in) vent line, or in the 43-cm (17 in) feedline is not likely. A break in the 10-cm (4 in) recirculation line with a larger structural failure occurring in the 72 to 73-second time period, the time of the visibly identified premature pressure decay, does seem plausible and the most likely of the four modes considered. These modes are not all-inclusive and do not preclude the possibility of a leak elsewhere in the tank.

  20. Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: Limitations of Hf anomalies as sediment input indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Heather K.; Turner, Simon; Macpherson, Colin G.; Gertisser, Ralf; Davidson, Jon P.

    2011-04-01

    New Nd-Hf isotope and trace element data for Javanese volcanoes are combined with recently published data to place constraints on subduction inputs at the Sunda arc in Indonesia and assess the value of Hf anomalies (expressed as Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios) as tracers of such inputs. Hf anomaly does not correlate with Hf isotope ratio in Javanese lavas, however, Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios do correlate with SiO 2. Contrary to previous work, we show that Hf anomaly variation may be controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene and/or amphibole during magmatic differentiation and does not represent the magnitude or type of subduction input in some arcs. Correlation of Sm/Hf with indices of differentiation for other arcs (e.g., Vanuatu, New Britain, and Mariana) suggests that differentiation control on Sm/Hf ratios in volcanic arc rocks may be a relatively common phenomenon. This study corroborates the use of Nd-Hf isotope co-variations in arc volcanic rocks to ascertain subduction input characteristics. The trajectories of regional volcano groups (East, Central and West Java) in Nd-Hf isotope space reveal heterogeneity in the subducted sediment input along Java, which reflects present-day spatial variations in sediment compositions on the down-going plate in the Java Trench. The high Sm/Hf ratio required in the sediment end-member for some Javanese basalts suggests that partial melting of subducted sediment occurs in the presence of residual zircon, and is inconsistent with residual monazite or allanite.

  1. Carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen isotopes in solvent-extractable organic matter from carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    CCl4 and CH3OH solvent extractions were performed on the Murray, Murchison, Orgueil and Renazzo carbonaceous chondrites. Delta-D values of +300-+500% are found in the case of the CH3OH-soluble organic matter. The combined C, H and N isotope data makes it unlikely that the CH3OH-soluble components are derivable from, or simply related to, the insoluble organic polymer found in the same meteorites. A relation between the event that formed hydrous minerals in CI1 and CM2 meteorites and the introduction of water- and methanol-soluble organic compounds is suggested. Organic matter soluble in CCl4 has no N, and delta-C-13 values are lower than for CH3OH-soluble phases. It is concluded that there either are large isotopic fractionations for carbon and hydrogen between different soluble organic phases, or the less polar components are partially of terrestrial origin.

  2. Stable-isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen in precipitation at Norman, Oklahoma, 1996-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaeschke, Jeanne B.; Scholl, Martha A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Masoner, Jason R.; Christenson, Scott; Qi, Haiping

    2011-01-01

    Precipitation samples for measurement of stable-isotope ratios of hydrogen (delta2H) and oxygen (delta18O) were collected at the Norman Landfill Research Site in Norman, Oklahoma, from May 1996 to October 2008. Rainfall amounts also were measured at the site (U.S. Geological Survey gaging station 07229053) during the collection period. The delta2H of precipitation samples ranged from -121.9 to +8.3 per mil, and the delta18O of precipitation ranged from -16.96 to +0.50 per mil. The volume-weighted average values for delta2H and delta18O of precipitation over the 12-year measurement period were -31.13 per mil for delta2H and -5.57 per mil for delta18O. Average summer-season delta2H and delta18O values of precipitation usually were more positive (enriched in the heavier isotopes) than winter values.

  3. Systematics of isotopic production cross sections from interactions of relativistic {sup 40}Ca in hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Guzik, T.G.; McMahon, M.; Wefel, J.P.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Costa, S.; Insolia, A.; Potenza, R.; Russo, G.V.; Tuve, C.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Knott, C.N.; Waddington, C.J.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Tull, C.E.; Mitchell, J.W.; Webber, W.R.

    1997-09-01

    The isotopic production cross sections for {sup 40} Ca projectiles at 357, 565, and 763 MeV/nucleon interacting in a liquid hydrogen target have been measured by the Transport Collaboration at the LBL HISS facility. The systematics of these cross sections are studied, and the results indicate that nuclear structure effects are present in the isotope production process during the relativistic collisions. The newly measured cross sections are also compared with those predicted by semiempirical and parametric formulas, but the predictions do not fully describe the systematics such as the energy dependence. The consequences of the cross section systematics in galactic cosmic ray studies are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. BESS-Polar II Hydrogen and Helium Isotope Measurements to Constrain Cosmic-Ray Propagation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; BESS-Polar Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with Superconducting Spectrometer BESS-Polar II flew over Antarctica for 24.5 days from December 2007 through January 2008, during the 23rd solar cycle minimum. The instrument is made of complementary particle detectors which allow to precisely measure the charge, velocity and rigidity of incoming cosmic rays. It can accurately separate cosmic-ray hydrogen and helium isotopes from 0.2 to 1.5 GeV/nucleon. Flux and secondary-to-primary ratios of these particles can bring important information to better understand the cosmic-ray propagation history in the Galaxy. BESS-Polar II provides the most precise isotope measurements to date between 0.2 and 1.5 GeV/nucleon. These data will be reported and constraints on cosmic-ray propagation models, using the GALPROP program, will be discussed.

  5. Hydrogen-isotope evidence for extrusion mechanisms of the Mount St Helens lava dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Steven W.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope analyses were used to determine water content and deuterium content for 18 samples of the Mount St Helens dome dacite in an attempt to identify the triggering mechanisms for periodic dome-building eruptions of lava. These isotope data, the first ever collected from an active lava dome, suggest a steady-state process of magma evolution combining crystallization-induced volatile production in the chamber with three different degassing mechanisms: closed-system volatile loss in the magma chamber, open-system volatile release during ascent, and kinetically controlled degassing upon eruption at the surface. The data suggest the future dome-building eruptions may require a new influx of volatile-rich magma into the chamber.

  6. Hydrogen isotope measurement of bird feather keratin, one laboratory's response to evolving methodologies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Majie; Dettman, David L

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen in organic tissue resides in a complex mixture of molecular contexts. Some hydrogen, called non-exchangeable (H(non)), is strongly bound, and its isotopic ratio is fixed when the tissue is synthesized. Other pools of hydrogen, called exchangeable hydrogen (H(ex)), constantly exchange with ambient water vapor. The measurement of the δ(2)H(non) in organic tissues such as hair or feather therefore requires an analytical process that accounts for exchangeable hydrogen. In this study, swan feather and sheep wool keratin were used to test the effects of sample drying and capsule closure on the measurement of δ(2)H(non) values, and the rate of back-reaction with ambient water vapor. Homogenous feather or wool keratins were also calibrated at room temperature for use as control standards to correct for the effects of exchangeable hydrogen on feathers. Total δ(2)H values of both feather and wool samples showed large changes throughout the first ∼6 h of drying. Desiccant plus low vacuum seems to be more effective than room temperature vacuum pumping for drying samples. The degree of capsule closure affects exchangeable hydrogen equilibration and drying, with closed capsules responding more slowly. Using one control keratin standard to correct for the δ(2)H(ex) value for a batch of samples leads to internally consistent δ(2)H(non) values for other calibrated keratins run as unknowns. When placed in the context of other recent improvements in the measurement of keratin δ(2)H(non) values, we make recommendations for sample handing, data calibration and the reporting of results.

  7. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation by microbial methane oxidation: Improved determination

    SciTech Connect

    Mahieu, Koenraad . E-mail: Koenraad.Mahieu@Ugent.be; Visscher, Alex De; Vanrolleghem, Peter A.; Cleemput, Oswald Van

    2006-07-01

    Isotope fractionation is a promising tool for quantifying methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. For good quantification an accurate determination of the isotope fractionation factor ({alpha}) of methane oxidation based on independent batch experiments with soil samples from the landfill cover is required. Most studies so far used data analysis methods based on approximations of the Rayleigh model to determine {alpha}. In this study, the two most common approximations were tested, the simplified Rayleigh approach and the Coleman method. To do this, the original model of Rayleigh was described in measurable variables, methane concentration and isotopic abundances, and fitted to batch oxidation data by means of a weighted non-linear errors-in-variables regression technique. The results of this technique were used as a benchmark to which the results of the two conventional approximations were compared. Three types of batch data were used: simulated data, data obtained from the literature, and data obtained from new batch experiments conducted in our laboratory. The Coleman approximation was shown to be acceptable but not recommended for carbon fractionation (error on {alpha} - 1 up to 5%) and unacceptable for hydrogen fractionation (error up to 20%). The difference between the simplified Rayleigh approach and the exact Rayleigh model is much smaller for both carbon and hydrogen fractionation (error on {alpha} - 1 < 0.05%). There is also a small difference when errors in both variables (methane concentration and isotope abundance) are accounted for instead of assuming an error-free independent variable. By means of theoretical calculations general criteria, not limited to methane, {sup 13}C, or D, were developed for the validity of the simplified Rayleigh approach when using labelled compounds.

  8. Hydrogen isotope systematics of phase separation in submarine hydrothermal systems: Experimental calibration and theoretical models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berndt, M.E.; Seal, R.R.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Seyfried, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation factors were measured for coexisting brines and vapors formed by phase separation of NaCl/H2O fluids at temperatures ranging from 399-450??C and pressures from 277-397 bars. It was found that brines are depleted in D compared to coexisting vapors at all conditions studied. The magnitude of hydrogen isotope fractionation is dependent on the relative amounts of Cl in the two phases and can be empirically correlated to pressure using the following relationship: 1000 ln ??(vap-brine) = 2.54(??0.83) + 2.87(??0.69) x log (??P), where ??(vap-brine) is the fractionation factor and ??P is a pressure term representing distance from the critical curve in the NaCl/H2O system. The effect of phase separation on hydrogen isotope distribution in subseafloor hydrothermal systems depends on a number of factors, including whether phase separation is induced by heating at depth or by decompression of hydrothermal fluids ascending to the seafloor. Phase separation in most subseafloor systems appears to be a simple process driven by heating of seawater to conditions within the two-phase region, followed by segregation and entrainment of brine or vapor into a seawater dominated system. Resulting vent fluids exhibit large ranges in Cl concentration with no measurable effect on ??D. Possible exceptions to this include hydrothermal fluids venting at Axial and 9??N on the East Pacific Rise. High ??D values of low Cl fluids venting at Axial are consistent with phase separation taking place at relatively shallow levels in the oceanic crust while negative ??D values in some low Cl fluids venting at 9??N suggest involvement of a magmatic fluid component or phase separation of D-depleted brines derived during previous hydrothermal activity.

  9. Influence of thermal maturity on the hydrogen isotope content of extractable hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radke, J.; Bechtel, A.; Püttmann, W.; Gleixner, G.

    2003-04-01

    Based on hydrogen isotope analysis of hydrocarbons from recent sediments it is suggested that compound specific hydrogen isotope ratios are a new proxy to reconstruct the palaeoclimate (Sauer et al., 2001). However, it remains unclear if transformation of carbon bound hydrogen with environmental water during maturation or thermal methanogenesis might influence the observed values. Short-term experiments excluded exchange reactions of deuterium from alkanes (Schimmelmann et al., 1999), however, thermally stressed kerogens are enriched in deuterium (Schoell, 1984). Therefore, we investigated the influence of maturity on the deltaD-values of alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids. In the Kupferschiefer horizon from the Polish Zechstein Basin thermal maturity of organic matter is correlated to burial depth yielding a natural long-term exchange experiment. The deltaD-values of extracted hydrocarbons linearly correlated with thermal maturity. These results enable the correction of deltaD values from biomarkers with known maturity and therefore expanding palaeoclimatic reconstructions using deltaD values to the geological past. References: SAUER, P.E., EGLINTON, T.I., HAYES, J.M., SCHIMMELMANN, A. &SESSIONS, A.L. (2001) Compound specific D/H ratios of lipid biomarkers from sediments as a proxy for environmental and climatic conditions. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 65(2), 213-222. SCHIMMELMANN, A., LEWAN, M.D. &WINTSCH, R.P. (1999) D/H isotope ratios of kerogen, bitumen, oil, and water in hydrous pyrolysis of source rocks containing kerogen types I, II, IIS, and III. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 63(22), 3751-3766. SCHOELL, M. (1984) Wasserstoff- und Kohlenstoffisotope in organischen Substanzen, Erdölen und Erdgasen. Schweitzerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, Stuttgart. Reihe D (67), 161pp.

  10. Hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic compounds in plants reflect the plant's carbon metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, M. A.; Kahmen, A.; Werner, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The main factors controlling δ2H of plant organic compounds are generally assumed to be the plant's source water and the evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water. Hydrogen isotope analyses of plant compounds from sediments or tree rings are therefore mainly applied to assess hydrological conditions at different spatial and temporal scales. However, the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of plant organic compounds (ɛbio) also accounts for a large part of the variability observed in the δ2H values. Nevertheless, only few studies have directly addressed the physiological basis of this variability and even fewer studies have thus explored possible applications of hydrogen isotope variability in plant organic compounds for plant physiological research. Here we show two datasets indicating that the plant's carbon metabolism can have a substantial influence on δ2H values of n-alkanes and cellulose. First, we performed a controlled experiment where we forced plants into heterotrophic and autotrophic C-metabolism by growing them under four different light treatments. Second, we assessed the δ2H values of different parasitic heterotrophic plants and their autotrophic host plants. Our two datasets show a systematic shift in ɛbio of up to 80 ‰ depending on the plant's carbon metabolism (heterotrophic or autotrophic). Differences in n-alkane and cellulose δ2H values in plants with autotrophic vs. heterotrophic metabolisms can be explained by different NADPH pools that are used by the plants to build their compounds either with assimilates that originate directly from photosynthesis or from stored carbohydrates. Our results have significant implications for the calibration and interpretation of geological records. More importantly, as the δ2H values reflect the plant's carbon metabolism involved during the tissue formation, our findings highlight the potential of δ2H values as new tool for studying plant and ecosystem carbon

  11. Water masses along the OVIDE 2010 section as identified by oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelker, Antje; Salgueiro, Emilia; Thierry, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    The OVIDE transect between the western Iberian Peninsula and the southern tip of Greenland is one of the hydrographic sections in the North Atlantic that is measured regularly to identify changes in water mass formation and transport and thus to evaluate the state of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (Mercier et al., 2015; García-Ibáñez et al., 2015; both in Progr. in Oceanography). During the OVIDE 2010 campaign seawater samples covering the complete water column were collected on the section between Portugal and the Reykjanes ridge for stable isotope analyses. Oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) stable isotope values were measured simultaneously by cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy using a L1102-i Picarro water isotope analyser at the Godwin Laboratory for Paleoclimate Research (Univ. Cambridge, UK). Within the upper water column the stable isotope values clearly mark the positions of the Portugal Current (40.3°N 11°W), the North Atlantic Drift (46.2°N 19.4°W) and of the subarctic front (51°N 23.5°W). Up to Station 36 (47.7°N 20.6°W) an upper (around 600 m) and lower (around 1000 m) branch of the Mediterranean Outflow water (MOW) can clearly be distinguished by high oxygen (0.5-0.7‰) and hydrogen (3-5‰) values. At Station 28 (42.3°N 15.1°W) strong MOW influence is also indicated between 1400 and 1600 m. In the west European Basin, lower oxygen isotope values reveal the presence of Labrador Sea Water (LSW) below the MOW (down to 2200 m). Close to and west of the subarctic front this water mass shallows and occupies the complete interval between 1000 and 2000 m water depth. In the Iceland basin, two additional levels with lower oxygen isotope values are observed. The deeper level (2200-3500 m) marks Iceland Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW) that based on its distinct isotopic signature (δ18O ≤ 0.25‰) can be traced as far east as 18.5°W (down to at least 3500 m). Close to the Reykjanes ridge both, the ISOW and LSW, are also

  12. The relationship between microstructure and hydrogen isotopes in the Wildhorse detachment, Pioneer Mountains, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, R. R.; Mulch, A.; Teyssier, C.; Seaton, N. C.; Tokle, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Pioneer migmatite-cored metamorphic core complex in south-central Idaho is bounded by the N-dipping Wildhorse Detachment fault, a low-angle normal fault that separates low-grade metasediments and volcanics from amphibolite facies metasediments, migmatites, and granites. The complex developed during the Eocene owing to extensional deformation and emplacement of magma and partially molten rocks. The core rocks were subsequently exhumed along the Wildhorse detachment in Eocene time. Within the detachment, a 100 m thick section of mica- and K-feldspar-bearing mylonitic quartzite contains NW-trending stretching lineations indicating top-to-the-NW sense of shear. We present combined microstructure and stable isotope data from a transect across the quartzite section to evaluate the relationship among microstructure development, strain localization, and fluid-rock interaction. Microstructure and EBSD data from quartz in conjunction with hydrogen stable isotope data and electron microprobe data on biotite and white mica suggest a systematic relationship between fluid flow and strain. EBSD analyses indicate a significant component of simple shear deformation, with prominent asymmetry of c- and a-axes patterns consistent with top-to-the-NW sense of shear. Synkinematic white mica and biotite deltaD values from the quartzite samples form two groups with highly negative deltaD values of ca. -145 per mil and -120 per mil, respectively. Microstructural observations show distinct differences between the two groups delineated by the hydrogen isotope analyses. The more negative group is characterized by intensely deformed and recrystallized quartz with very small recrystallized grains. The less negative group generally shows microstructures consistent with regime 2 deformation (quartz ribbons and large quartz grains flattened in the foliation). Micas are coarser in the less negative group than in the more negative group. Hydrogen stable isotope ratios of syntectonic hydrous

  13. Practically convenient and industrially-aligned methods for iridium-catalysed hydrogen isotope exchange processes.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, A R; Idziak, C; Kerr, W J; Mondal, B; Paterson, L C; Tuttle, T; Andersson, S; Nilsson, G N

    2014-06-14

    The use of alternative solvents in the iridium-catalysed hydrogen isotope exchange reaction with developing phosphine/NHC Ir(I) complexes has identified reaction media which are more widely applicable and industrially acceptable than the commonly employed chlorinated solvent, dichloromethane. Deuterium incorporation into a variety of substrates has proceeded to deliver high levels of labelling (and regioselectivity) in the presence of low catalyst loadings and over short reaction times. The preparative outputs have been complemented by DFT studies to explore ligand orientation, as well as solvent and substrate binding energies within the catalyst system.

  14. Gas Feeding System Supplying the U-400M Cyclotron Ion Source with Hydrogen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukhimchuk, A. A.; Antilopov, V. V.; Apasov, V. A.; Vinogradov, Yu. I.; Golubkov, A. N.; Gornostaev, Ye. V.; Grishechkin, S. K.; Demin, A. M.; Zlatoustovski, S. V.; Klevtsov, V. G.; Kuryakin, A. V.; Malkov, I. N.; Musyaev, R. K.; Pustovoi, V. I.; Bekhterev, V. V.; Bogomolov, S. L.; Gulbekian, G. G.; Yefremov, A. A.; Zelenak, A.; Leporis, M.; Loginov, V. N.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pashchenko, S. V.; Rodin, A. M.; Smirnov, Yu. I.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Yazvitski, N. Yu.

    2005-09-01

    Automated system feeding into ion source hydrogen isotopes as molecules with preset ratio of the fluxes is described. The control system automatically maintained the working parameters and provided graphic and digital representation of the controlled processes. The radiofrequency (RF) ion source installed at the axial injection line of the cyclotron produced ion beams of HD+, HT+, DT+, D2H+, etc. At a several months DT+ beam acceleration the tritium consumption was less than 108 Bq/hr. The intensity of a 58.2 MeV triton beam (T+ ions) extracted from the cyclotron chamber was about 10 nA.

  15. Multiple Uses of Hydrogen Isotopes as a Tracer of Rehydration Processes in Glassy Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, B. I.; Fink, J. H.; Guan, Y.; Leshin, L. A.

    2001-12-01

    Silicic lava flows contain zones of enhanced vesicularity with high total H2O contents. This relationship between volatile content and vesicularity has promoted the monitoring of active lava domes using remote sensing techniques in an effort to forecast explosive activity. A persistent complication in attempts to relate surface texture to H2O content and explosivity was the confounding effect of meteoric H2O. Glassy and vesicular lavas exposed at the surface of the Earth for prolonged periods readily interact with meteoric H2O. Rehydration is a time-, temperature-, and porosity-dependent process governed by the slow diffusion of molecular H2O into the glass. This inevitable addition of secondary H2O obscures the spatial distribution of juvenile H2O in lava flows. The ability to distinguish magmatic from meteoric H2O in glassy lavas would help identify regions of overpressure on active domes and thereby improve hazard assessment. Three types of hydrogen isotopic studies of glassy lavas have been utilized to disentangle rehydration processes from primary magmatic ones. First, bulk hydrogen isotopic data on variably textured lava flows reveal enrichments in both δ D and total H2O as vesicularity increases. Mixing between a degassed magmatic and a partially evaporated meteoric H2O best explains the observed trend from lower δ D values in the interior massive obsidian samples to higher δ D in the most surficial vesicular pumice. Second, step-heated hydrogen isotopic analyses further prove that the vesicular samples contain a high percentage of meteoric H2O. Whereas dense massive obsidian samples release a large fraction of deuterium-depleted H2O at temperatures above 600° C, the bubble-rich pumiceous samples lose a majority of their H2O at temperatures below 400° C. Lastly, the Cameca 6f ion microprobe at ASU was used to measure hydrogen isotope transects into the vesicle-melt interface. The gradation from depleted δ D values in the glassy interstices to more

  16. Hydrogen isotope exchange in tungsten: Discussion as removal method for tritium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, J.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Alimov, V. Kh.; Markina, E.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange in re-crystallized polycrystalline tungsten was investigated at 320 and 450 K. In a first step the tungsten samples were loaded with deuterium to a fluence of 1024 D/m2 from a low-temperature plasma at 200 eV/D particle energy. In a second step, H was implanted at the same particle energy and similar target temperature with a mass-separated ion beam at different ion fluences ranging from 2 × 1020 to 7.5 × 1023 H/m2. The analytic methods used were nuclear reaction analysis with D(3He,p)α reaction and elastic recoil detection analysis with 4He. In order to determine the D concentration at depths of up to 7.4 μm the 3He energy was varied from 0.5 to 4.5 MeV. It was found that already at an H fluence of 2 × 1020 H/m2, i.e. at 1/5000 of the initial D fluence, about 30% of the retained D was released. Depth profiling of D without and with subsequent H implantation shows strong replacement close to the surface at 320 K, but extending to all analyzable depths at 450 K especially at high fluences, leading to higher release efficiency. The reverse sequence of hydrogen isotopes allowed the analysis of the replacing isotope and showed that the release of D is balanced by the uptake of H. It also shows that hydrogen does not diffuse through a region of filled traps into a region were unfilled traps can be encounter but transport is rather a dynamic process of trapping and de-trapping even at 320 K. Initial D retention in H loaded W is an order of magnitude higher than in pristine W, indicating that every H-containing trap is a potential trap for D. In consequence, hydrogen isotope exchange is not a viable method to significantly enhance the operation time before the tritium inventory limit is reached but should be considered an option to reduce the tritium inventory in ITER before major interventions at the end of an operation period.

  17. Climatic implications of an 8000-year hydrogen isotope time series from bristlecone pine trees

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Epstein, S. )

    1994-08-19

    Tree rings from three dendrochronologically dated bristlecone pines were analyzed for stable hydrogen isotopic composition. These trees give a continuous time series from 8000 years ago to the present that indicates the presence of a postglacial climate optimum 6800 years ago and a continuous cooling since then. The qualitative agreement between this record and records from other sources, such as ice cores, pollen, and treeline fluctuations, indicates that these climate changes were global. This record can serve as a reference for other climate indicators throughout the past 8000 years.

  18. About Tagish Lake as a Potential Parent Body for Polar Micrometeorites; Clues from their Hydrogen Isotopic Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engrand, C.; Gounelle, M.; Zolensky, M. E.; Duprat, J.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of the Antarctic micrometeorites (AMMs) is still a matter of debate. Their closest meteoritic counterparts are the C2 chondrites, but the match is not perfect, and the parent body(ies) of the AMMs is(are) still to be identified. Tagish Lake is a new meteorite fall which bears similarity with CI1 and CM2 chondrites, but is distinct from both. Based on the mineralogy of phyllosilicates, Noguchi et al. proposed that the phyllosilicate-rich AMMs and the Tagish Lake meteorites could derive from similar asteroids. The hydrogen isotopic compositions of extra-terrestrial samples can be used to get some insight on their origin. The D/H ratios of AMMs and of Tagish Lake have been measured, but using different analytical techniques. They are therefore not directly comparable. We performed additional hydrogen isotopic analyses of fragments of Tagish Lake using the same experimental setup previously used for the measurement of the hydrogen isotopic composition of AMMs. In this work, we could also analyze separately both lithologies of Tagish Lake (carbonate-poor and -rich). The distributions of delta D values measured in the two lithologies of Tagish Lake are very similar, indicating that fluids with similar hydrogen isotopic compositions altered the meteorite on the parent body for the two lithologies. Yet, the hydrogen isotopic composition of Tagish Lake is different from that of AMMs, suggesting that they do not derive from the same parent body.

  19. Solar flare accelerated isotopes of hydrogen and helium. [observed by IMP-4 and IMP-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anglin, J. D.; Dietrich, W. F.; Simpson, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of solar flare hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, helium-3, and helium-4 in the energy range approximately 10 to 50 MeV per nucleon obtained with instrumentation on the IMP-4 and IMP-5 satellites are reported and studies based on these results which place several constraints on theories of solar flare particle acceleration are discussed. A brief review of previous work and the difficulties in studying the rare isotopes of hydrogen and helium is also included. Particular emphasis is placed on the fact that the information to be obtained from the solar flare products of high energy interactions is not available through either solar wind observations where both the acceleration mechanism and the coronal source of the nuclear species are different, or optical measurements of solar active regions.

  20. Multisample conversion of water to hydrogen by zinc for stable isotope determination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, C.; Coplen, T.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two techniques for the conversion of water to hydrogen for stable isotope ratio determination have been developed that are especially suited for automated multisample analysis. Both procedures involve reaction of zinc shot with a water sample at 450 ??C. in one method designed for water samples in bottles, the water is put in capillaries and is reduced by zinc in reaction vessels; overall savings in sample preparation labor of 75% have been realized over the standard uranium reduction technique. The second technique is for waters evolved under vacuum and is a sealed-tube method employing 9 mm o.d. quartz tubing. Problems inherent with zinc reduction include surface inhomogeneity of the zinc and exchange of hydrogen both with the zinc and with the glass walls of the vessels. For best results, water/zinc and water/glass surface area ratios of vessels should be kept as large as possible.

  1. Does transpiration matter to the hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, F. A.; Helliker, B. R.; Freeman, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    Transpiration and evaporation from soils both affect he hydrogen isotope composition of leaf water, but the extent to which they effect the hydrogen isotope ratio of leaf wax lipids is still under debate. To address this question, we analyzed hydrogen isotope ratios of high-molecular weight n-alkanes (δDl) and oxygen isotope ratios of α-cellulose (δ18OC) for C3 and C4 grasses grown in the field and in controlled-environment growth chambers. The relatively firm understanding of 18O-enrichment in leaf water and α-cellulose was used to elucidate fractionation patterns of δDl signatures. In the different relative humidity environments of the growth chambers, we observed clear and predictable effects of leaf-water enrichment on δ18OC values. Using a Craig-Gordon model, we demonstrate that leaf water in the growth chamber grasses should have experienced significant D-enriched due to transpiration. Nonetheless, we found no effect of transpirational D-enrichment on the δDl values. In field samples, we saw clear evidence of enrichment (correlating with relative humidity of the field sites) in both δ18OC and δDl. These seemingly contrasting results can be explained if leaf waxes are synthesized in an environment that is isotopically similar to water entering plant roots due to either temporal or spatial isolation from evaporatively enriched leaf waters. For grasses in the controlled environment, there was no enrichment of source water, whereas enrichment of grass source water via evaporation from soils and/or stems was likely for grass samples grown in the field. Based on these results, evaporation from soils and/or stems appears to affect δDl, but transpiration from leaves does not. Further evidence for this conclusion is found in modeling expected net evapotranspirational enrichment. A Craig-Gordon model applied to each of the field sites yields leaf water oxygen isotope ratios that can be used to accurately predict the observed δ18OC values. In contrast, the

  2. Isotopic effect of parametric instabilities during lower hybrid waves injection into hydrogen/deuterium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Aihui; Gao, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Based on the local dispersion relation, the parametric instability (PI) was numerically investigated for the injection of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) into hydrogen and deuterium plasmas separately. Numerical calculations under typical scrape-off layer parameters in tokamak plasmas show that both the unstable regions of the PI and the values of growth rates are close for two cases, in spite of the decaying channel of the ion sound quasimode or ion cyclotron quasimode (ICQM). These numerical results could be understood by the analyses based on the fluid model. Parameter dependences are also similar for hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. For example, the ICQM growth rate increases with an increasing density, a decreasing temperature, and a decreasing magnetic field in deuterium plasmas as it does in hydrogen plasmas. The isotopic effect of the PI during the LHW injection is weak. As a result, the lower hybrid current drive efficiency at a high density in deuterium plasmas cannot be much improved over hydrogen plasmas if the PI process dominates the behavior of LHWs at the plasma edge.

  3. Stable hydrogen-isotope ratios in beetle chitin: preliminary European data and re-interpretation of North American data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröcke, Darren R.; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Elias, Scott; Miller, Randall F.

    2006-08-01

    Beetle exoskeletons contain chitin, a poly amino-sugar that is biosynthesized incorporating hydrogen isotopes from diet and water. As the stable isotope ratios D/H (or 2H/ 1H, expressed as δ D values) of precipitation and diet are jointly influenced by climate, the biochemically recorded hydrogen-isotope ratio in fossil beetle exoskeleton has the potential to be used for paleoclimatic reconstruction. New δ D data from modern beetles are presented as a preliminary database for Europe, with a re-evaluation of earlier North American data. We present correlated matrices of δ D values in modern beetle chitin and modern precipitation to demonstrate the concept. We review the pertinent literature to highlight the history, utility, and likely future research directions for the use of chitin's stable isotopes in entomological paleoclimatology.

  4. The fractionation factors of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios for VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, H.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere, some of which are carcinogenic, teratogenic, or mutagenic. VOCs in ambient air originate from many sources, including vehicle exhausts, gasoline evaporation, solvent use, natural gas emissions, and industrial processes, and undergo intricate chemical reactions in the atmosphere. To develop efficient air pollution remediation strategies, it is important to clearly identify the emission sources and elucidate the reaction mechanisms in the atmosphere. Recently, stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of VOCs in some sources and ambient air have been measured by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). In this study, we measured δ13C and stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) of atmospheric VOCs by using the gas chromatography/thermal conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with a thermal desorption instrument (TD-GC/TC/IRMS). The wider δD differences between sources were found in comparison with the δ13C studies. Therefore, determining δD values of VOCs in ambient air is potentially useful in identifying VOC sources and their reactive behavior in the atmosphere. However, to elucidate the sources and behavior of atmospheric VOCs more accurately, isotopic fractionation during atmospheric reaction must be considered. In this study, we determined isotopic fractionation of the δ13C and δD values for the atmospheric some VOCs under irradiation conditions. As the results, δ13C for target all VOCs and δD for most VOCs were increasing after irradiation. But, the δD values for both benzene and toluene tended to decrease as irradiation time increased. We also estimated the fractionation factors for benzene and toluene, 1.27 and 1.05, respectively, which differed from values determined in previous studies. In summary, we were able to identify an inverse isotope effect for the δD values of benzene and toluene

  5. Turnover of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in the body water, CO 2, hair, and enamel of a small mammal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlesak, David W.; Torregrossa, Ann-Marie; Ehleringer, James R.; Dearing, M. Denise; Passey, Benjamin H.; Cerling, Thure E.

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope signatures of animal tissues are strongly correlated with the isotope signature of local precipitation and as a result, isotope signatures of tissues are commonly used to study resource utilization and migration in animals and to reconstruct climate. To better understand the mechanisms behind these correlations, we manipulated the isotope composition of the drinking water and food supplied to captive woodrats to quantify the relationships between drinking water ( δdw), body water ( δbw), and tissue ( δt). Woodrats were fed an isotopically constant food but were supplied with isotopically depleted or enriched water. Some animals were switched between these waters, allowing simultaneous determination of body water turnover, isotope change recorded in teeth and hair, and fractional contributions of atmospheric O 2, drinking water, and food to the oxygen and hydrogen budgets of the animals. The half-life of the body water turnover was 3-6 days. A mass balance model estimated that drinking water, atmospheric O 2, and food were responsible for 56%, 30%, and 15% of the oxygen in the body water, respectively. Drinking water and food were responsible for 71% and 29% of the hydrogen in the body water, respectively. Published generalized models for lab rats and humans accurately estimated δbw, as did an updated version of a specific model for woodrats. The change in drinking water was clearly recorded in hair and tooth enamel, and multiple-pool and tooth enamel forward models closely predicted these changes in hair and enamel, respectively. Oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the drinking water strongly influence the composition of the body water and tissues such as hair and tooth enamel; however, food and atmospheric O 2 also contribute oxygen and/or hydrogen atoms to tissue. Controlled experiments allow researchers to validate models that estimate δt based on δdw and so will increase the reliability of estimates of resource utilization and climate

  6. Comparable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of plant leaf wax n-alkanoic acids in arid and humid subtropical ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li; Zheng, Mei; Fraser, Matthew; Huang, Yongsong

    2014-02-01

    Leaf wax hydrogen isotope proxies have been widely used to reconstruct past hydrological changes. However, published reconstructions have given little consideration for the potentially variable hydrogen isotopic fractionation relative to precipitation (ɛwax-p) under different climate and environmental settings. Chief among various potential factors controlling fractionation is relative humidity, which is known to strongly affect oxygen isotopic ratios of plant cellulose, but its effect on hydrogen isotopic fractionation of leaf waxes is still ambiguous. Analyses of lake surface sediments and individual modern plants have provided valuable information on the variability of ɛwax-p, but both approaches have significant limitations. Here, we present an alternative method to obtain the integrated, time-resolved ecosystem-level ɛwax-p values, by analyzing modern aerosol samples collected weekly from arid (Arizona lowlands) and humid subtropical (Atlanta, Georgia) environments during the main growth season. Because aerosol samples mainly reflect regional leaf wax resources, the extreme contrast in the hydroclimate and associated vegetation assemblages between our study sites allows us to rigorously assess the impact of relative humidity and associated vegetation assemblages on leaf wax hydrogen isotopic fractionation. We show there is only minor difference (mostly <10‰) in the mean ɛwax-p values in the two end-member environments. One possible explanation is that the positive isotopic effects of low relative humidity are offset by progressive replacement of trees with grasses that have a more negative apparent fractionation. Our results represent an important step toward quantitative interpretation of leaf wax hydrogen isotopic records.

  7. Long-term stability of hydrogen isotope ratios in hydrated volcanic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassel, Elizabeth J.; Breecker, Daniel O.

    2017-03-01

    The advancement of conceptual and numerical geodynamic models necessitates quantitative, orogen-scale paleoelevation data. Felsic volcanic glasses, which record the hydrogen isotope compositions (δD) of meteoric water shortly after deposition, provide several advantages as a paleoelevation proxy. Questions remain, however, about the reliability of this relatively new proxy, including the effect of hydrofluoric (HF) acid abrasion in the preparation of glass shards for hydrogen isotope analysis and the stability of hydrogen isotope ratios in hydrated glass shards over geologic time (106-107 years). HF acid abrasion of natural ancient glass shards results in systematic shifts in glass δD values away from modern water δD values. To evaluate the effectiveness of HF acid abrasion, we treated 70-150 μm glass shards separated from various natural tephras with deuterium-labeled water (DLW; δD = +18,205‰) for up to 400 days. For all glasses, this treatment resulted in elevated δD values in comparison to untreated samples. HF acid abrasion after DLW exposure, however, removed this effect and restored glass shards to their original untreated δD values in samples older than 104 years. HF acid abrasion removes hydrous alteration precipitates at the glass surface without measurably changing the δD values of the underlying hydrated glass, regardless of abrasion duration or glass composition. Additionally, 45-34 Ma glasses record δD values that directly reflect their depositional environments as determined by stratigraphy: glasses from tuffs deposited in demonstrably evaporative lacustrine environments have relatively high δD values compared to glasses from contemporaneous tuffs deposited in nearby fluvial environments, which have much lower δD values. The preservation of δD values that systematically vary with original depositional environment, despite >30 Myr of post-hydration exposure to the same meteoric water, indicates that these volcanic glasses resisted

  8. Hydrogen-isotopic variability in fatty acids from Yellowstone National Park hot spring microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, Magdalena R.; Sessions, Alex L.; Pepe-Ranney, Charles; Spear, John R.

    2011-09-01

    We report the abundances and hydrogen-isotopic compositions (D/H ratios) of fatty acids extracted from hot-spring microbial mats in Yellowstone National Park. The terrestrial hydrothermal environment provides a useful system for studying D/H fractionations because the numerous microbial communities in and around the springs are visually distinct, separable, and less complex than those in many other aquatic environments. D/H fractionations between lipids and water ranged from -374‰ to +41‰ and showed systematic variations between different types of microbial communities. Lipids produced by chemoautotrophic hyperthermophilic bacteria, such as icosenoic acid (20:1), generally exhibited the largest and most variable fractionations from water (-374‰ to -165‰). This was in contrast to lipids characteristic of heterotrophs, such as branched, odd chain-length fatty acids, which had the smallest fractionations (-163‰ to +41‰). Mats dominated by photoautotrophs exhibited intermediate fractionations similar in magnitude to those expressed by higher plants. These data support the hypothesis that variations in lipid D/H are strongly influenced by central metabolic pathways. Shifts in the isotopic compositions of individual fatty acids across known ecological boundaries show that the isotopic signature of specific metabolisms can be recognized in modern environmental samples, and potentially recorded in ancient ones. Considering all sampled springs, the total range in D/H ratios is similar to that observed in marine sediments, suggesting that the trends observed here are not exclusive to the hydrothermal environment.

  9. Isotope Dependence and Quantum Effects on Atomic Hydrogen Diffusion in Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Walker, J A; Mezyk, S P; Roduner, E; Bartels, D M

    2016-03-03

    Relative diffusion coefficients were determined in water for the D, H, and Mu isotopes of atomic hydrogen by measuring their diffusion-limited spin-exchange rate constants with Ni(2+) as a function of temperature. H and D atoms were generated by pulse radiolysis of water and measured by time-resolved pulsed EPR. Mu atoms are detected by muonium spin resonance. To isolate the atomic mass effect from solvent isotope effect, we measured all three spin-exchange rates in 90% D2O. The diffusion depends on the atomic mass, demonstrating breakdown of Stokes-Einstein behavior. The diffusion can be understood using a combination of water "cavity diffusion" and "hopping" mechanisms, as has been proposed in the literature. The H/D isotope effect agrees with previous modeling using ring polymer molecular dynamics. The "quantum swelling" effect on muonium due to its larger de Broglie wavelength does not seem to slow its "hopping" diffusion as much as predicted in previous work. Quantum effects of both the atom mass and the water librations have been modeled using RPMD and a qTIP4P/f quantized flexible water model. These results suggest that the muonium diffusion is very sensitive to the Mu versus water potential used.

  10. Hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes in grasses are insensitive to transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, Francesca A.; Helliker, Brent R.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed hydrogen isotope ratios of high-molecular weight n-alkanes ( δD l) and oxygen isotope ratios of α-cellulose ( δ18O C) for C 3 and C 4 grasses grown in the field and in controlled-environment growth chambers. The relatively firm understanding of 18O-enrichment in leaf water and α-cellulose was used to elucidate fractionation patterns of δD l signatures. In the different relative humidity environments of the growth chambers, we observed clear and predictable effects of leaf-water enrichment on δ18O C values. Using a Craig-Gordon model, we demonstrate that leaf water in the growth chamber grasses should have experienced significant D-enriched due to transpiration. Nonetheless, we found no effect of transpirational D-enrichment on the δD l values. In field samples, we saw clear evidence of enrichment (correlating with relative humidity of the field sites) in both δ18O C and δD l. These seemingly contrasting results could be explained if leaf waxes are synthesized in an environment that is isotopically similar to water entering plant roots due to either temporal or spatial isolation from evaporatively enriched leaf waters. For grasses in the controlled environment, there was no enrichment of source water, whereas enrichment of grass source water via evaporation from soils and/or stems was likely for grass samples grown in the field. Based on these results, evaporation from soils and/or stems appears to affect δD l, but transpiration from leaves does not. Further evidence for this conclusion is found in modeling expected net evapotranspirational enrichment. A Craig-Gordon model applied to each of the field sites yields leaf water oxygen isotope ratios that can be used to accurately predict the observed δ18O C values. In contrast, the calculated leaf water hydrogen isotope ratios are more enriched than what is required to predict observed δD l values. These calculations lend support to the conclusion that while δ18O C reflects both soil

  11. Biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis in higher plants reflects carbon metabolism of the plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Marc-André; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Compound-specific isotope analyses of plant material are frequently applied to understand the response of plants to the environmental changes. As it is generally assume that the main factors controlling δ2H values in plants are the plant's source water and evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water, hydrogen isotope analyses of plant material are mainly applied regarding hydrological conditions at different time scales. However, only few studies have directly addressed the variability of the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of organic compounds (ɛbio), accounting also for a large part in the δ2H values of plants but generally assumed to be constant. Here we present the results from a climate-controlled growth chambers experiment where tested the sensitivity of ɛbio to different light treatments. The different light treatments were applied to induce different metabolic status (autotrophic vs. heterotrophic) in 9 different plant species that we grew from large storage organs (e.g. tubers or roots). The results show a systematic ɛbio shift (up to 80 ) between the different light treatments for different compounds (i.e. long chain n-alkanes and cellulose). We suggest that this shift is due to the different NADPH pools used by the plants to build up the compounds from stored carbohydrates in heterotrophic or autotrophic conditions. Our results have important implications for the calibration and interpretation of sedimentary and tree rings records in geological studies. In addition, as the δ2H values reflect also strongly the carbon metabolism of the plant, our findings support the idea of δ2H values as an interesting proxy for plant physiological studies.

  12. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation by Methylomirabilis oxyfera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasigraf, Olivia; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Ettwig, Katharina F.

    2012-07-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to nitrite reduction is a recently discovered methane sink of as yet unknown global significance. The bacteria that have been identified to carry out this process, Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera, oxidize methane via the known aerobic pathway involving the monooxygenase reaction. In contrast to aerobic methanotrophs, oxygen is produced intracellularly and used for the activation of methane by a phylogenetically distinct particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Here we report the fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen during methane oxidation by an enrichment culture of M. oxyfera bacteria. In two separate batch incubation experiments with different absolute biomass and methane contents, the specific methanotrophic activity was similar and the progressive isotope enrichment identical. Headspace methane was consumed up to 98% with rates showing typical first order reaction kinetics. The enrichment factors determined by Rayleigh equations were -29.2 ± 2.6‰ for δ13C (εC) and -227.6 ± 13.5‰ for δ2H (εH), respectively. These enrichment factors were in the upper range of values reported so far for aerobic methanotrophs. In addition, two-dimensional specific isotope analysis (Λ = ( α H - 1 - 1)/( α C - 1 - 1)) was performed and also the determined Λ value of 9.8 was within the range determined for other aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs. The results showed that in contrast to abiotic processes biological methane oxidation exhibits a narrow range of fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen irrespective of the underlying biochemical mechanisms. This work will therefore facilitate the correct interpretation of isotopic composition of atmospheric methane with implications for modeling of global carbon fluxes.

  13. [Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of Precipitation and Its Water Vapor Sources in Eastern Qaidam Basin].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian-jia; Chen, Hui; Gong, Guo-li

    2015-08-01

    Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes can be used as a tracer to analyze water vapor sources of atmospheric precipitation. We choose Golmud and Delingha as our study areas, Golmud locates in the south of Qaidam basin, and Delingha locates in the northeast. Based on the analysis of monthly change of hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of precipitation during June to September of 2010, and the relationship between deltaD and delta18O in precipitation, we investigated the water vapor sources of precipitation in eastern Qaidam basin. The results show that: (1) meteoric water line between June to September in Golmud is: deltaD = 7.840 delta18O - 4.566 (R2 = 0.918, P < 0.001), and in Delingha is: deltaD = 7.833 delta18O + 8.606 (R2 = 0.986, P < 0.001). The slopes and intercepts of meteoric water line between June to September in both Golmud and Delingha are lower than the global average, and the intercept in Golmud is only -4.566, which indicates the extremely arid climate condition. (2) the delta18O content of precipitation is much higher in Golmud in early July, it shows the enrichment of some heavier isotopes. However, the delta18O content of precipitation becomes lower from late July to early September, especially for the late September. The 8180 content of precipitation in Delingha is higher in June to August than that in late September. (3) the water vapor sources of precipitation in Golmud and Delingha are different, Golmud area is the northern border of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau where the southwest monsoon can reach, and the southwest monsoon brings water vapors of precipitation, but the water vapors of precipitation in Delingha are mainly from local evaporation.

  14. Geochemistry and origin of formation waters in the western Canada sedimentary basin-I. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitchon, B.; Friedman, I.

    1969-01-01

    Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen, together with chemical analyses, were determined for 20 surface waters, 8 shallow potable formation waters, and 79 formation waters from oil fields and gas fields. The observed isotope ratios can be explained by mixing of surface water and diagenetically modified sea water, accompanied by a process which enriches the heavy oxygen isotope. Mass balances for deuterium and total dissolved solids in the western Canada sedimentary basin demonstrate that the present distribution of deuterium in formation waters of the basin can be derived through mixing of the diagenetically modified sea water with not more than 2.9 times as much fresh water at the same latitude, and that the movement of fresh water through the basin has redistributed the dissolved solids of the modified sea water into the observed salinity variations. Statistical analysis of the isotope data indicates that although exchange of deuterium between water and hydrogen sulphide takes place within the basin, the effect is minimized because of an insignificant mass of hydrogen sulphide compared to the mass of formation water. Conversely, exchange of oxygen isotopes between water and carbonate minerals causes a major oxygen-18 enrichment of formation waters, depending on the relative masses of water and carbonate. Qualitative evidence confirms the isotopic fractionation of deuterium on passage of water through micropores in shales. ?? 1969.

  15. Widespread tungsten isotope anomalies and W mobility in crustal and mantle rocks of the Eoarchean Saglek Block, northern Labrador, Canada: Implications for early Earth processes and W recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingao; Touboul, Mathieu; Ishikawa, Akira; Walker, Richard J.; Graham Pearson, D.

    2016-08-01

    Well-resolved 182W isotope anomalies, relative to the present mantle, in Hadean-Archean terrestrial rocks have been interpreted to reflect the effects of variable late accretion and early mantle differentiation processes. To further explore these early Earth processes, we have carried out W concentration and isotopic measurements of Eoarchean ultramafic rocks, including lithospheric mantle rocks, meta-komatiites, a layered ultramafic body and associated crustal gneisses and amphibolites from the Uivak gneiss terrane of the Saglek Block, northern Labrador, Canada. These analyses are augmented by in situ W concentration measurements of individual phases in order to examine the major hosts of W in these rocks. Although the W budget in some rocks can be largely explained by a combination of their major phases, W in other rocks is hosted mainly in secondary grain-boundary assemblages, as well as in cryptic, unidentified W-bearing 'nugget' minerals. Whole rock W concentrations in the ultramafic rocks show unexpected enrichments relative, to elements with similar incompatibilities. By contrast, W concentrations are low in the Uivak gneisses. These data, along with the in situ W concentration data, suggest metamorphic transport/re-distribution of W from the regional felsic rocks, the Uivak gneiss precursors, to the spatially associated ultramafic rocks. All but one sample from the lithologically varied Eoarchean Saglek suite is characterized by generally uniform ∼ + 11 ppm enrichments in 182W relative to Earth's modern mantle. Modeling shows that the W isotopic enrichments in the ultramafic rocks were primarily inherited from the surrounding 182W-rich felsic precursor rocks, and that the W isotopic composition of the original ultramafic rocks cannot be determined. The observed W isotopic composition of mafic to ultramafic rocks in intimate contact with ancient crust should be viewed with caution in order to plate constraints on the early Hf-W isotopic evolution of the

  16. Hydrogen bonding at the water surface revealed by isotopic dilution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stiopkin, Igor V; Weeraman, Champika; Pieniazek, Piotr A; Shalhout, Fadel Y; Skinner, James L; Benderskii, Alexander V

    2011-06-08

    The air-water interface is perhaps the most common liquid interface. It covers more than 70 per cent of the Earth's surface and strongly affects atmospheric, aerosol and environmental chemistry. The air-water interface has also attracted much interest as a model system that allows rigorous tests of theory, with one fundamental question being just how thin it is. Theoretical studies have suggested a surprisingly short 'healing length' of about 3 ångströms (1 Å = 0.1 nm), with the bulk-phase properties of water recovered within the top few monolayers. However, direct experimental evidence has been elusive owing to the difficulty of depth-profiling the liquid surface on the ångström scale. Most physical, chemical and biological properties of water, such as viscosity, solvation, wetting and the hydrophobic effect, are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. This can be probed by observing the lineshape of the OH-stretch mode, the frequency shift of which is related to the hydrogen-bond strength. Here we report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the air-water interface using surface-selective heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy to focus on the 'free OD' transition found only in the topmost water layer. By using deuterated water and isotopic dilution to reveal the vibrational coupling mechanism, we find that the free OD stretch is affected only by intramolecular coupling to the stretching of the other OD group on the same molecule. The other OD stretch frequency indicates the strength of one of the first hydrogen bonds encountered at the surface; this is the donor hydrogen bond of the water molecule straddling the interface, which we find to be only slightly weaker than bulk-phase water hydrogen bonds. We infer from this observation a remarkably fast onset of bulk-phase behaviour on crossing from the air into the water phase.

  17. Hydrogen isotope fractionation between C-H-O species in magmatic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foustoukos, D. I.; Mysen, B. O.

    2012-12-01

    Constraining the hydrogen isotope fractionation between H-bearing volatiles (e.g. H2, CH4, hydrocarbons, H2O) as function of temperature and pressure helps to promote our understanding of the isotopic composition of evolved magmatic fluids and the overall mantle-cycling of water and reduced C-O-H volatiles. To describe the thermodynamics of the exchange reactions between the different H/D isotopologues of H2 and CH4 under supercritical water conditions, a novel experimental technique has been developed by combining vibrational Raman spectroscopy with hydrothermal diamond anvil cell designs (HDAC), which offers a method to monitor the in-situ evolution of H/D containing species. To this end, the equilibrium relationship between H2-D2-HD in supercritical fluid was investigated at temperatures ranging from 300 - 800 oC and pressures ~ 0.3 - 1.3 GPa [1]. Experimental results obtained in-situ and ex-situ show a significant deviation from the theoretical values of the equilibrium constant predicted for ideal-gas reference state, and with an apparent negative temperature effect triggered by the enthalpy contributions due to mixing in supercritical water. Here, we present a series of HDAC experiments conducted to evaluate the role of supercritical water on the isotopic equilibrium between H/D methane isotopologues at 600 - 800 oC and 409 - 1622 MPa. In detail, tetrakis-silane (Si5C12H36) was reacted with H2O-D2O aqueous solution in the presence of either Ni or Pt metal catalyst, resulting to the formation of deuterated methane species such as CH3D, CHD3, CH2D2 and CD4. Two distinctly different set of experiments ("gas phase"; "liquid phase") were performed by adjusting the silane/water proportions. By measuring the relative intensities of Raman vibrational modes of species, experimental results demonstrate distinctly different thermodynamic properties for the CH4-CH3D-CHD3-CH2D2 equilibrium in gas and liquid-water-bearing systems. In addition, the D/H molar ratio of

  18. Emissions of molecular hydrogen (H2) and its isotopic signature from residential heaters and waste incinerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M. K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S. W.; Roeckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric molecular hydrogen (H2) has recently received increased interest in the scientific community because of a potential shift to a global hydrogen energy economy which could potentially alter the atmospheric budget of H2 due to substantial leakage. This calls for an improved understanding of the present day's atmospheric H2 budget. One of the major sources of H2 are emissions from incomplete combustion of fossil fuel. While emissions of H2 from car exhaust have been studied extensively, those from fossil fuel based heating systems have remained a matter of speculation. Here we present results from measurements of a variety of residential heating systems covering oil, gas, and wood heating with various burner capacities. For oil and gas heating systems we surprisingly find no net H2 emissions, i.e. the exhaust air contains H2 at or below the mole fractions of the intake air (approx. 0.5 ppm). While H2 emissions are virtually absent, those of carbon monoxide (CO) are not. As a consequence, caution has to be exercised when modeling H2 emissions based on assumed H2/CO ratios and using CO emission inventories. We also find that the molecular hydrogen in the approx. 0.5 ppm exhaust air is isotopically strongly depleted (-20 permil to -200 permil) compared to the ambient air (+130 permil). This suggests that H2 is involved in the combustion processes, and therefore the H2 of the intake air is not the same H2 in the exhaust air. Exhausts from waste incinerator plants are generally also depleted in H2 mole fractions and in their H/D isotopic composition.

  19. MEASUREMENT OF THE ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF HYDROGEN AND HELIUM NUCLEI IN COSMIC RAYS WITH THE PAMELA EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Adriani, O.; Bongi, M.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Carbone, R.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Borisov, S.; Casolino, M.; De Pascale, M. P.; Bottai, S.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Castellini, G.; Danilchenko, I. A.; De Santis, C.; and others

    2013-06-10

    The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make new measurements of cosmic ray H and He isotopes. The isotopic composition was measured between 100 and 600 MeV/n for hydrogen and between 100 and 900 MeV/n for helium isotopes over the 23rd solar minimum from 2006 July to 2007 December. The energy spectrum of these components carries fundamental information regarding the propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy which are competitive with those obtained from other secondary to primary measurements such as B/C.

  20. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope constraints on hydrothermal alteration of the Trinity peridotite, Klamath Mountains, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liakhovitch, V.; Quick, J.E.; Gregory, R.T.

    2005-01-01

    The Trinity peridotite represents a rare opportunity to examine a relatively fertile plagioclase peridotite that was exhumed and later subjected to intrusive events in a seafloor environment, followed by its emplacement and incorporation into a continent. Over 250 stable isotopic determinations on whole rocks and minerals elucidate the hydrothermal evolution of the Trinity complex. All three serpentine polymorphs are present in the Trinity peridotite; these separate on the basis of their ??D values: antigorite, -46 < ??D < -82??? and lizardite and chrysotile, -90 < ??D < -106 and -110 < ??D < -136???, respectively. Antigorite coexists with chlorite, talc, and tremolite in contact aureole assemblages associated with Silurian/Devonian gabbroic plutons. Lizardite and chrysotile alteration carries a meteoric signature, which suggests association with post-emplacement serpentinization, or overprinting of earlier low-temperature seafloor serpentinization. Regionally, contours of ??D values exhibit bull's-eye patterns associated with the gabbroic plutons, with ??D maxima coinciding with the blackwall alteration at the margins on the plutons. In contrast to the hydrogen isotope behavior, oxygen isotope values of the three polymorphs are indistinguishable, spanning the range 5.3 < ??18O< 7.5, and suggesting low integrated fluid fluxes and strongly 18O-shifted fluids. Inferred primary ?? 18O values for peridotite, gabbro, and late Mesozoic granodiorite indicate a progressive 18O enrichment with time for the source regions of the rocks. These isotopic signatures are consistent with the geology, petrochemistry, and geochronology of the Trinity massif, which indicate the following history: (1) lithospheric emplacement and cooling of the peridotite in an oceanic environment ??? 472 Ma; (2) intrusion of gabbroic plutons into cold peridotite in an arc environment between 435 and 404 Ma; and finally (3) intrusion of felsic plutons between 171 and 127 Ma, long after the peridotite

  1. Stable hydrogen isotope composition of n-alkanes in urban atmospheric aerosols in Taiyuan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Huiling; Li, Yinghui; Peng, Lin; Liu, Xiangkai; Liu, Xiaofeng; Song, Chongfang; Mu, Ling

    2017-03-01

    The hydrogen isotope compositions (δD) of n-alkanes associated with particulate matter with a diameter of ≤10 μm from Taiyuan, China, during heating and non-heating periods were measured via gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry to reveal the spatial and temporal characteristics of five functional zones and to provide another constraint on atmospheric pollutants. The δD values of n-C16 to n-C31 during the heating and non-heating periods ranged from -235.9‰ to -119.8‰ and from -231.3‰ to -129.2‰, respectively, but these similar spans had different distribution features. During the heating period, the δD distributions between non-central heating and commercial districts were consistent, as were those between residential and industrial districts; the n-alkanes came from two or more types of emission sources. Coal soot might be the primary local emission source, but not the only source. During the non-heating period, the n-alkanes of n-C16 to n-C20 were more depleted in D with the increasing carbon number in all functional zones, but there was no rule for n-C21 to n-C31. Specifically, coal soot and vehicle exhaust might be the primary sources of n-alkanes for non-central heating districts in the heating and non-heating periods, respectively, according to the δD distribution of n-C18 to n-C22; gasoline vehicle exhaust might be an n-alkane source, and the hydrogen isotope fractionation effect during the condensation process should be a pollution mechanism for the commercial district during the heating period; the δD distribution difference of n-C16 to n-C18 between the two periods in the residential and industrial districts was consistent, which indicates a similar source of fossil fuel combustion and a similar isotope fractionation effect during the non-heating period.

  2. Method and means of reducing erosion of components of plasma devices exposed to helium and hydrogen isotope radiation

    DOEpatents

    Kaminsky, Manfred S.; Das, Santosh K.; Rossing, Thomas D.

    1977-01-25

    Surfaces of components of plasma devices exposed to radiation by atoms or ions of helium or isotopes of hydrogen can be protected from damage due to blistering by shielding the surfaces with a structure formed by sintering a powder of aluminum or beryllium and its oxide or by coating the surfaces with such a sintered metal powder.

  3. Seasonal Variations in the Biochemical Fractionation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Spartina alterniflora.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, A. L.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (D/H) of lipids are being intensively explored as a paleoenvironmental proxy, particularly for continental regimes where organic preservation in lakes is generally high. Several studies have already shown good correlations between δD values of lake water and sedimentary (core-top) lipids, but the fractionations indicated by those correlations do not agree well between studies. Moreover, the data cannot be adequately described by a single biochemical fractionation. These difficulties suggest that the relationship between environmental water and plant lipid δD is controlled by multiple environmental and biochemical factors. Understanding these factors will lead to a more robust interpretation of D/H as a paleoclimate proxy. Here we examine seasonal changes in biochemical H-isotopic fractionation by the salt marsh grass Spartina alterniflora. Because S. alterniflora grows partially submerged in a tidal estuary, it has an unlimited and isotopically unvarying source of water for growth. Thus environmental influences on fractionation should be negligible, allowing us to examine seasonal changes in biochemical fractionations. C27 and C29 n-alkanes, β-sitosterol, phytol, and C16 and C18 fatty acids were extracted and analyzed from 35 samples of S. alterniflora harvested from the same location over a period of 18 months. All lipids except β-sitosterol exhibit statistically significant depletions of D during summer months relative to the rest of the year. The magnitude of the isotopic shift is up to 36‰ in the fatty acids (δD values from -130 to -166‰), 31‰ in n-alkanes (-161 to -192‰), and 24‰ in phytol (-252 to -276‰). The shift in D/H ratio is in the opposite direction from that expected due to increased evapotranspiration during the summer months. The largest D-depletions coincide with periods of maximal growth. The observed pattern is interpreted as resulting from increased use of stored carbohydrates as substrates for lipid

  4. Hydrogen and Carbon Vapour Pressure Isotope Effects in Liquid Fluoroform Studied by Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oi, Takao; Mitome, Ryota; Yanase, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    H/D and 12C/13C vapour pressure isotope effects (VPIEs) in liquid fluoroform (CHF3) were studied at the MPW1PW91/6-31 ++ G(d) level of theory. The CHF3 monomer and CHF3 molecules surrounded by other CHF3 molecules in every direction in CHF3 clusters were used as model molecules of vapour and liquid CHF3. Although experimental results in which the vapour pressure of liquid 12CHF3 is higher than that of liquid 12CDF3 and the vapour pressure of liquid 13CHF3 is higher than that of liquid 12CHF3 between 125 and 212 K were qualitatively reproduced, the present calculations overestimated the H/D VPIE and underestimated the 12C/13C VPIE. Temperature-dependent intermolecular interactions between hydrogen and fluorine atoms of neighbouring molecules were required to explain the temperature dependences of both H/D and 12C/13C VPIEs.

  5. Gas Feeding System Supplying the U-400M Cyclotron Ion Source with Hydrogen Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Angilopov, V.V.; Apasov, V.A.

    2005-07-15

    Automated system feeding into ion source hydrogen isotopes as molecules with preset ratio of the fluxes is described. The control system automatically maintained the working parameters and provided graphic and digital representation of the controlled processes. The radiofrequency (RF) ion source installed at the axial injection line of the cyclotron produced ion beams of HD{sup +}, HT{sup +}, DT{sup +}, D{sub 2}H{sup +}, etc. At a several months DT{sup +} beam acceleration the tritium consumption was less than 108 Bq/hr. The intensity of a 58.2 MeV triton beam (T{sup +} ions) extracted from the cyclotron chamber was about 10 nA.

  6. Autoinduced catalysis and inverse equilibrium isotope effect in the frustrated Lewis pair catalyzed hydrogenation of imines.

    PubMed

    Tussing, Sebastian; Greb, Lutz; Tamke, Sergej; Schirmer, Birgitta; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Luy, Burkhard; Paradies, Jan

    2015-05-26

    The frustrated Lewis pair (FLP)-catalyzed hydrogenation and deuteration of N-benzylidene-tert-butylamine (2) was kinetically investigated by using the three boranes B(C6F5)3 (1), B(2,4,6-F3-C6H2)3 (4), and B(2,6-F2-C6H3)3 (5) and the free activation energies for the H2 activation by FLP were determined. Reactions catalyzed by the weaker Lewis acids 4 and 5 displayed autoinductive catalysis arising from a higher free activation energy (2 kcal mol(-1)) for the H2 activation by the imine compared to the amine. Surprisingly, the imine reduction using D2 proceeded with higher rates. This phenomenon is unprecedented for FLP and resulted from a primary inverse equilibrium isotope effect.

  7. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION TCAP HYDROGEN ISOTOPE SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L; Henry Sessions, H; Steve Xiao, S; Heather Mentzer, H

    2009-01-09

    The first generation of TCAP hydrogen isotope separation process has been in service for tritium separation at the Savannah River Site since 1994. To prepare for replacement, a next-generation TCAP process has been developed. This new process simplifies the column design and reduces the equipment requirements of the thermal cycling system. An experimental twelve-meter column was fabricated and installed in the laboratory to demonstrate its performance. This new design and its initial test results were presented at the 8th International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology and published in the proceedings. We have since completed the startup and demonstration the separation of protium and deuterium in the experimental unit. The unit has been operated for more than 200 cycles. A feed of 25% deuterium in protium was separated into two streams each better than 99.7% purity.

  8. Interactions of relativistic 36Ar and 40Ar nuclei in hydrogen: Isotopic production cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, C. N.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Chen, C.-X.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H. J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T. G.; Insolia, A.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Mitchell, J. W.; Potenza, R.; Russo, G. V.; Soutoul, A.; Testard, O.; Tull, C. E.; Tuvé, C.; Waddington, C. J.; Webber, W. R.; Wefel, J. P.

    1997-07-01

    The interactions of 36Ar projectile nuclei with energies of 361, 546, and 765 MeV/nucleon and 40Ar nuclei with 352 MeV/nucleon, have been studied in a liquid-hydrogen target as part of a program to study interactions of relevance to the problem of cosmic-ray propagation in the interstellar medium. We have measured the cross sections for the production of isotopic fragments of the projectile nuclei in these interactions. The variations of these cross sections with mass, charge, and energy, are examined for insights into any systematic features of this type of fragmentation reaction that might aid predictions of other, unmeasured cross sections. These cross sections are also compared with the values derived from the most commonly used prediction techniques. It is suggested that these techniques could be improved by taking account of the systematic features identified here.

  9. Recent advances in SRS on hydrogen isotope separation using thermal cycling absorption process

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Kit Heung, L.; Sessions, H.T.

    2015-03-15

    TCAP (Thermal Cycling Absorption Process) is a gas chromatograph in principle using palladium in the column packing, but it is unique in the fact that the carrier gas, hydrogen, is being isotopically separated and the system is operated in a semi-continuous manner. TCAP units are used to purify tritium. The recent TCAP advances at Savannah River Site (SRS) include compressor-free concept for heating/cooling, push and pull separation using an active inverse column, and compact column design. The new developments allow significantly higher throughput and better reliability from 1/10 of the current production system's footprint while consuming 60% less energy. Various versions are derived in the meantime for external customers to be used in fusion energy projects.

  10. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect.

    PubMed

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-08-12

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D2O and a catalytic amount of H2SO4. The resulting labeled product is characterized by (1)H NMR. Students also visualize a significant kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD ≈ 3 to 4) by adding iodine tincture to solutions of unlabeled resorcinol and the H-D exchange product. This method is highly adaptable to fit a target audience and has been successfully implemented in a pedagogical capacity with second-year introductory organic chemistry students as part of their laboratory curriculum. It was also adapted for students at the advanced high school level.

  11. Leaf waxes in riparian trees: hydrogen isotopes, concentrations, and chain-length patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipple, B. J.; Ehleringer, J.; Doman, C.; Khachaturyan, S.

    2011-12-01

    The stable hydrogen isotope ratios of epicuticular leaf wax n-alkanes record aspects of a plant's ecophysiological conditions. However, it remains unclear as to whether n-alkane hydrogen isotope values (δ2H) directly reflect environmental water (source water or tissue water) or environmental water in combination with a biochemical fractionation. Furthermore, it is uncertain if leaf n-alkane δ2H values reflect a single time interval during leaf expansion or if n-alkane δ2H values record the combination of inputs throughout the entire lifespan of a leaf. These different possibilities will influence how leaf wax biomarkers are interpreted in both ecological and environmental reconstruction contexts. To address these issues, we sampled leaves/buds, stems, and water sources of five common western U.S. riparian species under natural field conditions throughout the growing season. Riparian species were selected because the input water source is most likely to be nearly constant through the growing season. We found that species in this study demonstrated marked and systematic variations in n-alkane concentration, average chain length, and δ2H values. Intraspecific patterns were consistent: average chain lengths and δ2H values increased from bud opening through full leaf expansion with little variation during the remainder of the sampling interval, while leaf-wax concentration as a fraction of total biomass increased throughout the growing season. These data imply that leaf-wax δ2H values reflect multiple periods of wax growth and that the leaf wax is continually produced throughout a leaf's lifespan.

  12. Comparison of methods for separating small quantities of hydrogen isotopes from an inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Willms, R.S.; Tuggle, D.; Birdsell, S.; Parkinson, J.; Price, B.; Lohmeir, D.

    1998-03-01

    It is frequent within tritium processing systems that a small amount of hydrogen isotopes (Q{sub 2}) must be separated from an inert gas such as He, Ar and N{sub 2}. Thus, a study of presently available technologies for effecting such a separation was performed. A base case and seven technology alternatives were identified and a simple design of each was prepared. These technologies included oxidation-adsorption-metal bed reduction, oxidation-adsorption-palladium membrane reactor, cryogenic adsorption, cryogenic trapping, cryogenic distillation, hollow fiber membranes, gettering and permeators. It was found that all but the last two methods were unattractive for recovering Q{sub 2} from N{sub 2}. Reasons for technology rejection included (1) the method unnecessarily turns the hydrogen isotopes into water, resulting in a cumbersome and more hazardous operation, (2) the method would not work without further processing, and (3) while the method would work, it would only do so in an impractical way. On the other hand, getters and permeators were found to be attractive methods for this application. Both of these methods would perform the separation in a straightforward, essentially zero-waste, single step operation. The only drawback for permeators was that limited low-partial Q{sub 2} pressure data is available. The drawbacks for getters are their susceptibility to irreversible and exothermic reaction with common species such as oxygen and water, and the lack of long-term operation of such beds. More research is envisioned for both of these methods to mature these attractive technologies.

  13. Hydrogen isotope fractionation and redox-controlled solution mechanisms in silicate-COH melt + fluid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    The behavior of volatiles in silicate-COH melts and fluids and hydrogen isotope fractionation between melt and fluid were determined experimentally to advance our understanding of the role of volatiles in magmatic processes. Experiments were conducted in situ while the samples were at the desired temperature and pressure to 825°C and ~1.6 GPa and with variable redox conditions. Under oxidizing conditions, melt and fluid comprised CO2, CO3, HCO3, OH, H2O, and silicate components, whereas under reducing conditions, the species were CH4, H2, H2O, and silicate components. Temperature-dependent hydrogen isotope exchange among structural entities within coexisting fluids and melts yields ΔH values near 14 and 24 kJ/mol and -5 and -1 kJ/mol under oxidizing and reducing conditions, respectively. This temperature (and probably pressure)-dependent D/H fractionation is because of interaction between D and H and silicate and C-bearing species in silicate-saturated fluids and in COH fluid-saturated melts. The temperature- and pressure-dependent D/H fractionation factors suggest that partial melts in the presence of COH volatiles in the upper mantle can have δD values 100% or more lighter relative to coexisting silicate-saturated fluid. This effect is greater under oxidizing than under reducing conditions. It is suggested that δD variations of upper mantle mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) sources, inferred from the δD of MORB magmatic rocks, can be explained by variations in redox conditions during melting. Lower δD values of the MORB magma reflect more reducing conditions in the mantle source.

  14. An interlaboratory study to test instrument performance of hydrogen dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, T.B.

    2001-01-01

    An interlaboratory comparison of forty isotope-ratio mass spectrometers of different ages from several vendors has been performed to test 2H/1H performance with hydrogen gases of three different isotopic compositions. The isotope-ratio results (unsufficiently corrected for H3+ contribution to the m/z = 3 collector, uncorrected for valve leakage in the change-over valves, etc.) expressed relative to one of these three gases covered a wide range of values: -630??? to -790??? for the second gas and -368??? to -462??? for the third gas. After normalizing the isotopic abundances of these test gases (linearly adjusting the ?? values so that the gases with the lowest and highest 2H content were identical for all laboratories), the standard deviation of the 40 measurements of the intermediate gas was a remarkably low 0.85???. It is concluded that the use of scaling factors is mandatory for providing accurate internationally comparable isotope-abundance values. Linear scaling for the isotope-ratio scales of gaseous hydrogen mass spectrometers is completely adequate. ?? Springer-Verlag 2001.

  15. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope variations in the Pecos River of American Southwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F.; Miyamoto, S.

    2006-12-01

    The Pecos River is located in eastern New Mexico and western Texas, and its salinity increases downstream. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions (δ18O and δD) were measured on surface waters sampled from the Pecos River and its tributaries in March, May, and July of 2005. The measurements show considerably large variations in δ18O and δD, ranging from a δ18O of - 8.9‰ and δD of -64.5‰ in March at Salt Creek to a δ18O of 3.6‰ and δD of 1.6‰ in July at Girvin. Many surface waters except for head and tail waters have negative values of deuterium excess (dexcess=δD-8δ18O). Combined with the existing stable isotopic data from three gaging stations along the Pecos River (Santa Rosa, Red Bluff and Langtry) collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, it appears that evaporative enrichments of heavier isotopic species (O-18 and D) are more evident in the middle section than other parts of the river. δ18O and δD decrease at Langtry due to substantial increases in local runoff. The enhanced evaporation in the middle Pecos River is probably ascribed to a prolonged residence time resulting from anthropogenic perturbations (e.g., multi-cycle irrigation water uses and water impoundments in typically shallow reservoirs). Additionally, natural topographical gradients may have played a role in affecting water residence time and the amount of water evaporated from watersheds. These observations suggest that high dissolved salt contents of the Pecos River can be attributed to intense evaporation besides dissolution of geological salt deposits.

  16. Tracing the geographical origin of early potato tubers using stable hydrogen isotope ratios of methoxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Keppler, Frank; Hamilton, John T G

    2008-12-01

    The application of stable isotope ratio measurements has become an extremely useful tool for tracing the provenance of food products, thus ensuring that consumers receive products which comply with their labelled specifications. Recently, it has been shown that relative stable hydrogen isotope abundances (delta(2)H values) of wood lignin methoxyl groups have a distinct range that reflects the delta(2)H values of their meteoric source water. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the isotope information stored in methoxyl groups in plant matter generally might assist with determining the place of origin of plant material. We now have measured delta(2)H values of methoxyl groups from natural compounds in tubers of early potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) grown in different geographical locations. Tubers of early potatoes were collected from across Europe and regions close to the Mediterranean Sea between April and July 2004. The methoxyl groups from the potatoes were found to be highly depleted in (2)H, relative to both their meteoric water and bulk biomass, and a systematic shift of the delta(2)H values between methoxyl groups and meteoric water was observed. A constant fractionation of-161+/-11 per thousand. between methoxyl groups and modelled meteoric water is shown over a transaction covering the delta(2)H values of meteoric water from-95 per thousand in Northern Sweden to+25 per thousand in Egypt. From this information, early potato tubers from Middle Europe can be clearly distinguished from those of Mediterranean regions and from Northern Europe. Thus, we suggest that delta(2)H values of methoxyl groups have the potential to become an effective tool in assisting with the constraint of the geographical origin of potato tubers and other food stuffs.

  17. Hydrogen Isotopes as a Sentinel of Biological Invasion by the Japanese Beetle, Popillia japonica (Newman).

    PubMed

    Hungate, Bruce A; Kearns, Diana N; Ogle, Kiona; Caron, Melanie; Marks, Jane C; Rogg, Helmuth W

    2016-01-01

    Invasive species alter ecosystems, threaten native and endangered species, and have negative economic impacts. Knowing where invading individuals are from and when they arrive to a new site can guide management. Here, we evaluated how well the stable hydrogen isotope composition (δ2H) records the recent origin and time since arrival of specimens of the invasive Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newman) captured near the Portland International Airport (Oregon, U.S.A.). The δ2H of Japanese beetle specimens collected from sites across the contiguous U.S.A. reflected the δ2H of local precipitation, a relationship similar to that documented for other organisms, and one confirming the utility of δ2H as a geographic fingerprint. Within weeks after experimental relocation to a new isotopic environment, the δ2H of beetles changed linearly with time, demonstrating the potential for δ2H to also mark the timing of arrival to a new location. We used a hierarchical Bayesian model to estimate the recent geographical origin and timing of arrival of each specimen based on its δ2H value. The geographic resolution was broad, with values consistent with multiple regions of origin in the eastern U.S.A., slightly favoring the southeastern U.S.A. as the more likely source. Beetles trapped from 2007-2010 had arrived 30 or more days prior to trapping, whereas the median time since arrival declined to 3-7 days for beetles trapped from 2012-2014. This reduction in the time between arrival and trapping at the Portland International Airport supports the efficacy of trapping and spraying to prevent establishment. More generally, our analysis shows how stable isotopes can serve as sentinels of biological invasions, verifying the efficacy of control measures, or, alternatively, indicating when those measures show signs of failure.

  18. Hydrogen Isotopes as a Sentinel of Biological Invasion by the Japanese Beetle, Popillia japonica (Newman)

    PubMed Central

    Ogle, Kiona; Caron, Melanie; Marks, Jane C.; Rogg, Helmuth W.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive species alter ecosystems, threaten native and endangered species, and have negative economic impacts. Knowing where invading individuals are from and when they arrive to a new site can guide management. Here, we evaluated how well the stable hydrogen isotope composition (δ2H) records the recent origin and time since arrival of specimens of the invasive Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newman) captured near the Portland International Airport (Oregon, U.S.A.). The δ2H of Japanese beetle specimens collected from sites across the contiguous U.S.A. reflected the δ2H of local precipitation, a relationship similar to that documented for other organisms, and one confirming the utility of δ2H as a geographic fingerprint. Within weeks after experimental relocation to a new isotopic environment, the δ2H of beetles changed linearly with time, demonstrating the potential for δ2H to also mark the timing of arrival to a new location. We used a hierarchical Bayesian model to estimate the recent geographical origin and timing of arrival of each specimen based on its δ2H value. The geographic resolution was broad, with values consistent with multiple regions of origin in the eastern U.S.A., slightly favoring the southeastern U.S.A. as the more likely source. Beetles trapped from 2007–2010 had arrived 30 or more days prior to trapping, whereas the median time since arrival declined to 3–7 days for beetles trapped from 2012–2014. This reduction in the time between arrival and trapping at the Portland International Airport supports the efficacy of trapping and spraying to prevent establishment. More generally, our analysis shows how stable isotopes can serve as sentinels of biological invasions, verifying the efficacy of control measures, or, alternatively, indicating when those measures show signs of failure. PMID:26959686

  19. Compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis of heteroatom-bearing compounds via gas chromatography-chromium-based high-temperature conversion (Cr/HTC)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Renpenning, Julian; Kümmel, Steffen; Hitzfeld, Kristina L; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Gehre, Matthias

    2015-09-15

    The traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) approach toward compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of hydrogen for heteroatom-bearing (i.e., N, Cl, S) compounds has been afflicted by fractionation bias due to formation of byproducts HCN, HCl, and H2S. This study presents a chromium-based high-temperature conversion (Cr/HTC) approach for organic compounds containing nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur. Following peak separation along a gas chromatographic (GC) column, the use of thermally stable ceramic Cr/HTC reactors at 1100-1500 °C and chemical sequestration of N, Cl, and S by chromium result in quantitative conversion of compound-specific organic hydrogen to H2 analyte gas. The overall hydrogen isotope analysis via GC-Cr/HTC-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) achieved a precision of better than ± 5 mUr along the VSMOW-SLAP scale. The accuracy of GC-Cr/HTC-IRMS was validated with organic reference materials (RM) in comparison with online EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS and offline dual-inlet IRMS. The utility and reliability of the GC-Cr/HTC-IRMS system were documented during the routine measurement of more than 500 heteroatom-bearing organic samples spanning a δ(2)H range of -181 mUr to 629 mUr.

  20. The effect of hydrogen isotopes and helium on the tensile properties of 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.J.; Lohmeier, D.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy-rate-forged (HERF) stainless steels are used as the materials of construction for pressure vessels designed for the containment of hydrogen and its isotopes. Hydrogen and helium, the decay product of tritium, are known to embrittle these materials. HERF stainless steels have a relatively good resistance to hydrogen-and-helium-induced embrittlement when compared to annealed stainless steels due to their high number density of dislocations, which act as traps for hydrogen and helium. However, the degree of embrittlement in these materials can vary considerably because of microstructure and yield strength variations introduced during the forging process. In this study the effect of hydrogen and tritium on the tensile properties of 21-6-9 stainless steel was measured as a function of HERF yield strength in the range of 660 to 930 MPa. The effect of microstructure was studied also be conducting tensile tests with HERF and annealed samples.

  1. Hydrogen Isotope Ratios of Leaf Waxes in C3 and C4 Grasses Record Meteoric Water and Aridity Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, F. A.; Freeman, K. H.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Helliker, B.

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios of sedimentary n-alkanes (C27-C33) from vascular plants potentially provide a valuable record of past hydrologic conditions. To explore this, we analyzed grasses grown in a greenhouse and calculated fractionation factors (epsilon) between source water and n-alkane for each sample. An average difference of 21 permil is observed between C3 and C4 grasses, which is comparable to that determined for grasses collected from the Great Plains. The more positive isotope values in C4 grasses likely reflects smaller interveinal distance compared to C3 grass leaves, allowing greater back-diffusion of transpirationally enriched water from stomata, as documented with the oxygen isotope ratios of grass leaf water and cellulose by Helliker and Ehleringer (2000). The oxygen isotope difference is magnified at low relative humidity, when transpiration rates are higher. A similar effect is expected in hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf water and plant compounds. However, preliminary results from grasses grown hydroponically at different relative humidities suggest that there may be a decoupling of the hydrogen isotope ratio of leaf-wax n-alkanes and the oxygen isotope ratio of leaf water and cellulose. To examine the effects of source water delta D and climate on n-alkane delta D values, we analyzed grasses collected from the Great Plains. We use river water delta D values as a proxy for source water and the epsilon values determined in the greenhouse experiments, to predict expected values for C3 and C4 grass lipids. Measured values compare well to predicted values, with the exception of two semi-arid sites where evapotranspiration may have led to leaf-waters that are enriched in deuterium. Residual delta D values (measured-expected) correspond strongly with measures of aridity, such as annual precipitation and recipitation/evaporation ratios.

  2. Effects of shock and Martian alteration on Tissint hydrogen isotope ratios and water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallis, L. J.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.; Taylor, G. J.; Stöffler, D.; Smith, C. L.; Lee, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    The Tissint meteorite, a picritic shergottite, fell to Earth in Morocco on the 18th of July 2011, and is only the fifth Martian meteorite witnessed to fall. Hydrogen isotope ratios and water contents are variable within different minerals in Tissint. Ringwoodite and shock melt pockets contain elevated D/H ratios relative to terrestrial values (δD = 761-4224‰). These high ratios in recrystallized phases indicate significant implantation of hydrogen from the D-rich Martian atmosphere during shock. In contrast, although olivine has detectable water abundances (230-485 ppm), it exhibits much lower D/H ratios (δD = +88 to -150‰), suggesting this water was not implanted from the Martian atmosphere. The minimal terrestrial weathering experienced by Tissint gives confidence that the olivine-hosted water has a Martian origin, but its high concentration indicates direct inheritance from the parental melt is improbable, especially given the low pressure of olivine crystallisation. Incorporation of a low δD crustal fluid, or deuteric alteration during crystallisation, could explain the relatively high water contents and low D/H ratios in Tissint olivine.

  3. Cultivation-independent detection of autotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria by DNA stable-isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Pumphrey, Graham M; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Spain, Jim C

    2011-07-01

    Knallgas bacteria are a physiologically defined group that is primarily studied using cultivation-dependent techniques. Given that current cultivation techniques fail to grow most bacteria, cultivation-independent techniques that selectively detect and identify knallgas bacteria will improve our ability to study their diversity and distribution. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify knallgas bacteria in rhizosphere soil of legumes and in a microbial mat from Obsidian Pool in Yellowstone National Park. When samples were incubated in the dark, incorporation of (13)CO(2) was H(2) dependent. SIP enabled the detection of knallgas bacteria that were not detected by cultivation, and the majority of bacteria identified in the rhizosphere soils were betaproteobacteria predominantly related to genera previously known to oxidize hydrogen. Bacteria in soil grew on hydrogen at concentrations as low as 100 ppm. A hydB homolog encoding a putative high-affinity NiFe hydrogenase was amplified from (13)C-labeled DNA from both vetch and clover rhizosphere soil. The results indicate that knallgas bacteria can be detected by SIP and populations that respond to different H(2) concentrations can be distinguished. The methods described here should be applicable to a variety of ecosystems and will enable the discovery of additional knallgas bacteria that are resistant to cultivation.

  4. Hydrogen isotope ratios of recent lacustrine sedimentary n-alkanes record modern climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachse, D.; Radke, J.; Gleixner, G.

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios were measured on n-alkanes (n-C 12 to n-C 31) extracted from recent lake surface sediments along a N-S European transect to test if modern climate variability is recorded in these biomarkers. δD values of the n-alkanes are compared to δD values of meteoric water from the IAEA-GNIP database spanning a range from -119‰ in northern Sweden to -41‰ in southern Italy, to lake water δD values, and to mean annual temperatures, varying between -2.0°C in the north and 13.7°C in the south. δD values of the short-chained n-alkanes n-C 12 to n-C 20, excluding algal derived n-C 17 and n-C 19, are higher in the north and lower in the south. The isotopic fractionation ɛ for hydrogen between meteoric water and the short-chained n-alkanes is increasing from N to S by more than 100‰ and is significantly correlated to mean annual temperature for n-C 16 and n-C 18. This suggests that these n-alkanes may originate from a different source in the northern lakes, possibly due to petroleum contamination, or are synthesized using a different biochemical pathway. The n-C 17 and n-C 19 alkanes of algal origin, the n-C 21 and n-C 23 alkanes originating from water plants, and the long-chain n-alkanes n-C 25, n-C 27, n-C 29, and n-C 31 of terrestrial origin, clearly correlate with δD values of meteoric water, lake water, and mean annual temperature, indicating that they excellently record the δD value of meteoric water. The mean hydrogen isotope fractionation ɛ C17/w of -157‰ (SD = 13) between n-C 17 and meteoric water is fairly constant over the wide range of different climates and lake environments, suggesting only minor influence of environmental factors on this biochemical fractionation. This suggests that δD values of n-C 17 are suitable to reconstruct the isotopic composition of source water. The mean fractionation between the long-chain n-alkanes and water is -128‰ (SD = 12). The mean difference of 31‰ between both ɛ values is likely due to

  5. Multidimensional isotope analysis of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen as tool for identification of the origin of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Gilevska, Tetyana; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans Hermann

    2015-11-10

    Multidimensional isotope profiling is a useful tool for the characterization of the provenance of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API). To evaluate this approach, samples of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) ibuprofen were collected from 32 manufactures and 13 countries, and carbon, hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios were analyzed by elemental analyzer, chromium-filled elemental analyzer and high temperature conversion elemental analyzer (EA, Cr-EA and TC/EA) coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The range of isotope values of ibuprofen (δ(13)C: -33.2±0.1‰ to -27.4±0.1‰; δ(2)H: -121.4±1.5‰ to -41.2±0.8‰; and δ(18)O: -12.6±0.3‰ to 19.0±0.6‰) allowed characterization and distinction of 5 groups, which reflect synthetic pathways and/or use of different raw materials, as well as possible isotope fractionation during the synthesis reactions. This study highlights that multi isotope fingerprinting has potential for identification of sources, and provides a database of isotope composition of ibuprofen (δ(2)H, δ(13)C, δ(18)O) that might improve the tracing of origin, transport pathways and environmental fate of ibuprofen.

  6. Compound Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Type II and III Kerogen Extracted by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Pernia, Denet; Evans, Michael; Fu, Qi; Bissada, Kadry K.; Curiale, Joseph A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    The use of Hydrogen (H) isotopes in understanding oil and gas resource plays is in its infancy. Described here is a technique for H isotope analysis of organic compounds pyrolyzed from oil and gas shale-derived kerogen. Application of this technique will progress our understanding. This work complements that of Pernia et al. (2013, this meeting) by providing a novel method for the H isotope analysis of specific compounds in the characterization of kerogen extracted by analytically diverse techniques. Hydrogen isotope analyses were carried out entirely "on-line" utilizing a CDS 5000 Pyroprobe connected to a Thermo Trace GC Ultra interfaced with a Thermo MAT 253 IRMS. Also, a split of GC-separated products was sent to a DSQ II quadrupole MS to make semi-quantitative compositional measurements of the extracted compounds. Kerogen samples from five different basins (type II and III) were dehydrated (heated to 80 C overnight in vacuum) and analyzed for their H isotope compositions by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-TC-IRMS. This technique takes pyrolysis products separated via GC and reacts them in a high temperature conversion furnace (1450 C) which quantitatively forms H2, following a modified method of Burgoyne and Hayes, (1998, Anal. Chem., 70, 5136-5141). Samples ranging from approximately 0.5 to 1.0mg in size, were pyrolyzed at 800 C for 30s. Compounds were separated on a Poraplot Q GC column. Hydrogen isotope data from all kerogen samples typically show enrichment in D from low to high molecular weight compounds. Water (H2O) average deltaD = -215.2 (V-SMOW), ranging from -271.8 for the Marcellus Shale to -51.9 for the Polish Shale. Higher molecular weight compounds like toluene (C7H8) have an average deltaD of -89.7 0/00, ranging from -156.0 for the Barnett Shale to -50.0 for the Monterey Shale. We interpret these data as representative of potential H isotope exchange between hydrocarbons and sediment pore water during formation within each basin. Since hydrocarbon H isotopes

  7. [Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of lake water and geothermal spring water in arid area of south Tibet].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ke; Shen, Li-Cheng; Wang, Peng

    2014-08-01

    The condition of water cycles in Tibet Plateau is a complex process, and the hydrogen and oxygen isotopes contain important information of this process. Based on the analysis of isotopic composition of freshwater lake, saltwater lake and geothermal water in the southern Tibetan Plateau, this study investigated water cycling, composition and variation of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes and the influencing factors in the study area. The study found that the mean values of delta18O and deltaD in Daggyaima lake water (-17.0 per thousand for delta18O and -138. 6 per thousand for deltaD), Langcuo lake water (-6.4 per thousand for delta18O and -87.4 per thousand for deltaD) and Dagejia geothermal water (-19.2 per thousand for delta18 and -158.2 per thousand for deltaD) all showed negative delta18O and deltaD values in Tibetan Plateau by the influence of altitude effects. Lake water and geothermal water were influenced by evaporation effects in inland arid area, and the slope of evaporation line was less than 8. Deuterium excess parameters of lake water and geothermal water were all negative. The temperature of geothermal reservoirs in Dagejia geothermal field was high,and oxygen shift existed in the relationship of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes.

  8. Highly effective hydrogen isotope separation in nanoporous metal-organic frameworks with open metal sites: direct measurement and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyunchul; Savchenko, Ievgeniia; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Heine, Thomas; Hirscher, Michael

    2014-01-28

    Separating gaseous mixtures that consist of very similar size is one of the critical issues in modern separation technology. Especially, the separation of the isotopes hydrogen and deuterium requires special efforts, even though these isotopes show a very large mass ratio. Conventionally, H/D separation can be realized through cryogenic distillation of the molecular species or the Girdler-sulfide process, which are among the most energy-intensive separation techniques in the chemical industry. However, costs can be significantly reduced by using highly mass-selective nanoporous sorbents. Here, we describe a hydrogen isotope separation strategy exploiting the strongly attractive open metal sites present in nanoporous metal-organic frameworks of the CPO-27 family (also referred to as MOF-74). A theoretical analysis predicts an outstanding hydrogen isotopologue separation at open metal sites due to isotopal effects, which has been directly observed through cryogenic thermal desorption spectroscopy. For H2/D2 separation of an equimolar mixture at 60 K, the selectivity of 12 is the highest value ever measured, and this methodology shows extremely high separation efficiencies even above 77 K. Our theoretical results imply also a high selectivity for HD/H2 separation at similar temperatures, and together with catalytically active sites, we propose a mechanism to produce D2 from HD/H2 mixtures with natural or enriched deuterium content.

  9. Hydrogeochemistry and Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Compositions of Sea Water Intrusion in Masan-Jinhae Area, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, H.; Song, Y.; Jeong, C.; Kim, Y.; Lee, J.

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the geochemical characteristics of the sea water intrusion in Masan - Jinhae area that is bounded by the South Sea of the Korean Peninsula. Sampling of precipitation, stream water, groundwater and sea water in the hydrologic cycle, measurement in field, and the analysis of dissolved ions and oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes were carried out in order to understand hydrogeochemical property, and to analyze the mixing status of sea water with fresh water. The most appropriate parameters for understanding the status of sea water intrusion were also discussed in this study. Electric conductivity value shows outlier over 1000 §Á/§¯ in some groundwater, which suggests the evidence of sea water intrusion around the well. Groundwater is divided into three types; (Ca,Mg)-(HCO3) type, (Ca,Mg)-(Cl,SO4) type, and (Na+K)-(Cl,SO4) type. In particular, the second type could be due to geochemical evolution through reverse ion exchange reaction with sea water, and third type is chemically similar to sea water. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of precipitation, stream water, groundwater and sea water show that precipitation reflects seasonal variation, and that stream water is more affected by groundwater rather than surface water. The origin of groundwater is also related to the meteoric water. The oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of the collected sea water are lower than normal sea water. In order to understand the source of salinity in saline groundwater, hydrogeochemical parameters, and oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions were introduced in this stduy. All the parameters and isotope composition data indicate that the salinity was originated from sea water intrusion. The mixing ratios of sea water was determined by using Br, Cl concentration and ¥ä18O. Mixing ratio of sea water in saline groundwater shows scarce changes in most of the wells.

  10. 3D-CSIA: carbon, chlorine, and hydrogen isotope fractionation in transformation of TCE to ethene by a Dehalococcoides culture.

    PubMed

    Kuder, Tomasz; van Breukelen, Boris M; Vanderford, Mindy; Philp, Paul

    2013-09-03

    Carbon (C), chlorine (Cl), and hydrogen (H) isotope effects were determined during dechlorination of TCE to ethene by a mixed Dehalococcoides (Dhc) culture. The C isotope effects for the dechlorination steps were consistent with data published in the past for reductive dechlorination (RD) by Dhc. The Cl effects (combined with an inverse H effect in TCE) suggested that dechlorination proceeded through nucleophilic reactions with cobalamin rather than by an electron transfer mechanism. Depletions of (37)Cl in daughter compounds, resulting from fractionation at positions away from the dechlorination center (secondary isotope effects), further support the nucleophilic dechlorination mechanism. Determination of C and Cl isotope ratios of the reactants and products in the reductive dechlorination chain offers a potential tool for differentiation of Dhc activity from alternative transformation mechanisms (e.g., aerobic degradation and reductive dechlorination proceeding via outer sphere mechanisms), in studies of in situ attenuation of chlorinated ethenes. Hydrogenation of the reaction products (DCE, VC, and ethene) showed a major preference for the (1)H isotope. Detection of depleted dechlorination products could provide a line of evidence in discrimination between alternative sources of TCE (e.g., evolution from DNAPL sources or from conversion of PCE).

  11. Practical-scale tests of cryogenic molecular sieve for separating low-concentration hydrogen isotopes from helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willms, R. S.; Taylor, D. J.; Enoeda, Mikio; Okuno, Kenji

    1994-04-01

    Earlier bench-scale work at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory examined a number of adsorbents for their suitability for separating low-concentration hydrogen (no tritium) from helium. One of the effective adsorbents was Linde 5A molecular sieve. Recently, experiments including tritium were conducted using practical-scale adsorbers. These tests used existing cryogenic molecular sieve beds (CMSB's) which each contain about 1.6 kg of Linde 5A molecular sieve. They are part of the TSTA integrated tritium processing system. Gas was fed to each CMSB at about 13 SLPM with a nominal composition of 99% He, 0.98% H2, and 0.02% HT. In all cases, for an extended period of time, the beds allowed no detectable (via Raman spectroscopy) hydrogen isotopes to escape in the bed effluent. Thereafter, the hydrogen isotopes appeared in the bed exit with a relatively sharp breakthrough curve. This work concludes that cryogenic molecular sieve adsorption is a practical and effective means of separating low-concentration hydrogen isotopes from a helium carrier.

  12. Simulation of the diurnal variations of the isotope anomaly (?17O) of reactive trace gases (NOx, HOx) and implications for the ?17O of nitrate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Samuel; Sander, Rolf; Savarino, Joël.

    2010-05-01

    The isotope anomaly of secondary atmospheric species such as nitrate (NO3-) has potential to provide useful constrains on their formation pathways. Indeed, the ?17O of their precursors (NOx, HOx etc.) differs and depends on their interactions with ozone, which is the main source of non-zero ?17O in the atmosphere. Interpreting variations of ?17O in nitrate requires an in-depth understanding of the ?17O of its precursors taking into account non-linear chemical regimes operating under various environmental settings. In addition, the role of isotope exchange reactions must be carefully accounted for. To investigate the relevance of various assessments of the isotopic signature of nitrate production pathways that have recently been proposed in the literature, an atmospheric chemistry box model (MECCA, Sander et al., 2005, ACP)) was used to explicitly compute the diurnal variations of the isotope anomaly of NOx, HOx under several conditions prevailing in the marine boundary layer. ?17O was propagated from ozone to other species (NO, NO2, OH, HO2, RO2, NO3, N2O5, HONO, HNO3, HNO4, H2O2) according to the classical mass-balance equation applied at each time step of the model (30 seconds typically). The model confirms that diurnal variations in ?17O of NOx are well predicted by the photochemical steady-state relationship introduced by Michalski et al. (2003, GRL) during the day, but that at night a different approach must be employed (e.g. « fossilization » of the ?17O of NOx as soon as the photochemical lifetime of NOx drops below ca. 5 minutes). The model also allows to evaluate the impact on ?17O of NOx and nitrate of the frequently made simplifying assumption that ?17O(HOx)=0 permil, with and without mass-independent fractionation during the H+O2-HO2 reaction. Recommendations for the modeling of ?17O of nitrate will be given, based on the extensive model work carried out. In addition, the link between diurnal variations of the ?17O of nitrate precursors and seasonal

  13. Oxygen isotope, aeromagnetic, and gravity anomalies associated with hydrothermally altered zones in the Yankee Fork mining district, Custer County, Idaho.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criss, R.E.; Champion, D.E.; McIntyre, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    Anomalous geochemical and geophysical properties correlate spatially with epithermal Ag-Au deposits in altered volcanic rocks. Areas of low 18O, low magnetic susceptibilities, low remanent magnetizations and relatively high rock densities are much larger than the zones of obvious (not shown) hydrothermal alteration. Low aeromagnetic intensities and positive Bouguer anomalies are also associated with the altered rock, as which has delta 18O <6per mille. The altering and mineralizing fluids were Tertiary meteoric waters.-G.J.N.

  14. Hydrogen stable isotopic constraints on methane emissions from oil and gas extraction in the Colorado Front Range, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Botner, E. C.; Jimenez, K.; Blake, N. J.; Schroeder, J.; Meinardi, S.; Barletta, B.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.; Flocke, F. M.; Pfister, G.; Bon, D.; Crawford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The climatic implications of a shift from oil and coal to natural gas depend on the magnitude of fugitive emissions of methane from the natural gas supply chain. Attempts to constrain methane emissions from natural gas production regions can be confounded by other sources of methane. Here we demonstrate the utility of stable isotopes, particularly hydrogen isotopes, for source apportionment of methane emissions. The Denver, Colorado area is home to a large oil and gas field with both conventional oil and gas wells and newer hydraulic fracturing wells. The region also has a large metropolitan area with several landfills and a sizable cattle population. As part of the DISCOVER-AQ and FRAPPE field campaigns in summer 2014, we collected three types of canister samples for analysis of stable isotopic composition of methane: 1), samples from methane sources; 2), samples from two stationary ground sites, one in the Denver foothills, and one in an oil and gas field; and 3), from the NCAR C-130 aircraft in samples upwind and downwind of the region. Our results indicate that hydrogen isotope ratios are excellent tracers of sources of methane in the region, as we have shown previously in California and Texas. Use of carbon isotope ratios is complicated by the similarity of natural gas isotope ratios to that of background methane. Our results indicate that, despite the large amount of natural gas production in the region, biological sources such as cattle feedlots and landfills account for at least 50% of total methane emissions in the Front Range. Future work includes comparison of isotopes and alkane ratios as tracers of methane sources, and calculation of total methane fluxes in the region using continuous measurements of methane concentrations during aircraft flights.

  15. Influence of salinity on hydrogen isotope fractionation in Rhizophora mangroves from Micronesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, S. Nemiah; Sachs, Julian P.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H or δ2H) of plant leaf waxes typically covary with those of precipitation, and are therefore used as a proxy for past hydrologic variability. Mangroves present an important exception to this relationship, as salinity can strongly influence 2H fractionation in leaf lipids. To better understand and calibrate this effect, δ2H values of taraxerol and n-alkanes were measured in the leaves of Rhizophora spp. (red mangroves) from three estuaries and four brackish lakes on the Micronesian islands of Pohnpei and Palau, and compared to the δ2H and δ18O values of leaf water, xylem water and surface water. Net 2H discrimination between surface water and taraxerol increased by 0.9 ± 0.2‰ per part per thousand (ppt-1) over a salinity range of 1-34 ppt. Xylem water was always depleted in 2H relative to surface water, and the magnitude of this depletion increased with salinity, which is most likely due to a combination of greater 2H discrimination by roots during water uptake and opportunistic use of freshwater. Changes in the 2H content of xylem water can account for up to 43% of the change in net taraxerol fractionation with salinity. Leaf water isotopes were minimally enriched relative to xylem water and there was not significant variability in leaf water enrichment with salinity, which is consistent with a Péclet-modified Craig-Gordon model of leaf water enrichment. As leaf water enrichment is therefore unlikely to be responsible for increased 2H/1H fractionation in mangrove leaf lipids at elevated salinities, the majority of this signal is most likely explained either by changes in biosynthetic fractionation in response to salt stress or by salinity influenced changes in the timing of water uptake and lipid synthesis.

  16. Transhydrogenase and Growth Substrate Influence Lipid Hydrogen Isotope Ratios in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Flynn, Theodore M.; Suess, Melanie K.; Bradley, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fatty acids preserve metabolic and environmental information in their hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H). This ratio is influenced by parameters that include the 2H/1H of water in the microbial growth environment, and biosynthetic fractionations between water and lipid. In some microbes, this biosynthetic fractionation has been shown to vary systematically with central energy metabolism, and controls on fatty acid 2H/1H may be linked to the intracellular production of NADPH. We examined the apparent fractionation between media water and the fatty acids produced by Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Growth was in batch culture with malate as an electron donor for sulfate respiration, and with pyruvate and fumarate as substrates for fermentation and for sulfate respiration. A larger fractionation was observed as a consequence of respiratory or fermentative growth on pyruvate than growth on fumarate or malate. This difference correlates with opposite apparent flows of electrons through the electron bifurcating/confurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB. When grown on malate or fumarate, mutant strains of D. alaskensis G20 containing transposon disruptions in a copy of nfnAB show different fractionations than the wild type strain. This phenotype is muted during fermentative growth on pyruvate, and it is absent when pyruvate is a substrate for sulfate reduction. All strains and conditions produced similar fatty acid profiles, and the 2H/1H of individual lipids changed in concert with the mass-weighted average. Unsaturated fatty acids were generally depleted in 2H relative to their saturated homologs, and anteiso-branched fatty acids were generally depleted in 2H relative to straight-chain fatty acids. Fractionation correlated with growth rate, a pattern that has also been observed in the fractionation of sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:27445998

  17. The stable isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen in the tropopause region probed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenburg, A. M.; Schuck, T. J.; Baker, A. K.; Zahn, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Röckmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    More than 450 air samples that were collected in the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere (UTLS) region around the tropopause (TP) by the CARIBIC aircraft (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) have been analyzed for molecular hydrogen (H2) mixing ratios (m(H2)) and H2 isotopic composition (deuterium content, δD). More than 120 of the analysed samples consisted of air from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS). These show that m(H2) does not vary appreciably with O3-derived height above the thermal TP, whereas δD does increase with height. The isotope enrichment is caused by competing H2 production and destruction processes that enrich the stratospheric H2 reservoir in deuterium (D); the exact shapes of the profiles are mainly determined by mixing of stratospheric with tropospheric air. Tight negative correlations are found between δD and the mixing ratios of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as a result of the relatively long lifetimes of these three species. The correlations are described by δ D [‰]=-0.35 · m(CH4)[ppb]+768 and δD [‰]=-1.90 · m(N2O)[ppb]+745. These correlations are similar to previously published results and likely hold globally. Samples that were collected from the Indian subcontinent up to 40° N before, during and after the summer monsoon season show no significant seasonal change in m(H2), but δD is up to 15‰ lower in the July, August and September monsoon samples. This δD lowering is correlated with m(CH4) increase. The significant correlation with m(CH4) and the absence of a perceptible m(H2) increase that accompanies the δD lowering indicates that microbial production of very D-depleted H2 in the wet season may contribute to this phenomenon. Some of the samples have very high m(H2) and very low δD values, which indicates a pollution effect. Aircraft engine exhaust plumes are a suspected cause, since the effect mostly occurs in samples collected close to airports

  18. The stable isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen in the tropopause region probed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenburg, A. M.; Schuck, T. J.; Baker, A. K.; Zahn, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Röckmann, T.

    2012-05-01

    More than 450 air samples that were collected in the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere (UTLS) region by the CARIBIC aircraft (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) have been analyzed for molecular hydrogen (H2) mixing ratios (χ(H2)) and H2 isotopic composition (deuterium content, δD). More than 120 of the analyzed samples contained air from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS). These show that χ(H2) does not vary appreciably with O3-derived height above the thermal tropopause (TP), whereas δD does increase with height. The isotope enrichment is caused by H2 production and destruction processes that enrich the stratospheric H2 reservoir in deuterium (D); the exact shapes of the profiles are mainly determined by mixing of stratospheric with tropospheric air. Tight negative correlations are found between δD and the mixing ratios of methane (χ(CH4)) and nitrous oxide (χ(N2O)), as a result of the relatively long lifetimes of these three species. The correlations are described by δD[‰]=-0.35 · χ(CH4)[ppb]+768 and δD[‰]=-1.90· χ(N2O)[ppb]+745. These correlations are similar to previously published results and likely hold globally for the LMS. Samples that were collected from the Indian subcontinent up to 40° N before, during and after the summer monsoon season show no significant seasonal change in χ(H2), but δD is up to 12.3‰ lower in the July, August and September monsoon samples. This δD decrease is correlated with the χ(CH4) increase in these samples. The significant correlation with χ(CH4) and the absence of a perceptible χ(H2) increase that accompanies the δD decrease indicates that microbial production of very D-depleted H2 in the wet season may contribute to this phenomenon. Some of the samples have very high χ(H2) and very low δD values, which indicates a pollution effect. Aircraft engine exhaust plumes are a suspected cause, since the effect mostly occurs in samples

  19. Hydrogen isotope composition of dry season atmospheric water vapor on Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels-Crow, K. E.; Galewsky, J.; Hardy, D. R.; Braun, C.

    2011-12-01

    In-situ measurements of modern meteorological conditions at Quelccaya Ice Cap's summit, including the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor, may aid in the interpretation of the 1500-year, annually resolved ice-core record available from the site (Thompson et al., 2003). Betweeen July 7 and July 9, 2011, we collected 11 samples of atmospheric water vapor from the summit of Quelccaya and analyzed the hydrogen isotopic composition on a Finnegan MAT-252 mass spectrometer using the method of Strong et al 2007. δD values ranged from -134% to -168%, and specific humidity ranged from 1.5 to 3 g/kg. The isotopic composition of tropical Andean ice cores has been variously interpreted in terms of simple Rayleigh distillation models, in which water evaporates from the tropical Atlantic and condenses as it moves upslope (Grootes et al., 1989; Pierrehumbert, 1999), or in terms of the condensation temperature (Thompson et al., 2003). The joint distribution of water vapor concentrations and δD values in our dataset cannot be explained by a simple upslope Rayleigh distillation model. Such a model predicts higher water-vapor concentrations and lower δD values than those measured during the sampling period. We hypothesize that the joint distribution of water vapor mixing ratio and isotopic composition can be explained by large-scale mixing of air parcels that were last saturated in the upper tropical troposphere. Such mixing necessarily leads to parcels that have higher delta values than would be expected for the simple Rayleigh distillation to the observed mixing ratio. Local effects of snow sublimation may exert additional controls over the water-vapor mixing ratio and delta values. Further monitoring during both the wet and dry seasons may clarify the relationship between large-scale water-vapor transport and the snow and ice preserved on Quelccaya. References Friedman, I. (1953) Deuterium content of natural waters and other substances, Geoch. et Cosmochim. Acta, 4

  20. The History of Water on Venus: a Scenario Accounting for Present Neon and Hydrogen Isotopic Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmann, C.; Chassefiere, E.; Lognonne, P.

    2009-12-01

    In order to study the evolution of the primitive atmosphere of Venus, we developped a time dependent model of hydrogen hydrodynamic escape powered by solar EUV (Extreme UV) flux and solar wind, and accounting for oxygen frictional escape We study specifically the isotopic fractionation of noble gases resulting from hydrodynamic escape. The fractionation’s primary cause is the effect of diffusive/gravitational separation between the homopause and the base of the escape. Heavy noble gases such as Kr and Xe are not fractionated. Ar is only marginally fractionated whereas Ne is moderately fractionated. We also take into account oxygen dragged off along with hydrogen by hydrodynamic process. In that case, most of the available energy is consumed by oxygen and the amount of energy available for the escape of hydrogen is reduced by one order of magnitude. We find nonetheless scenarios that are compatible with present-day Ne and Ar fractionation in Venus atmosphere. Our model suggests that during the first 100 Myr of the planetary accretion of Venus, no more than the content of five terrestrial oceans (5 TO) of water have been lost to space. Our preferred scenario shows that around 60% of the oxygen contained in this water was left behind in the atmosphere. During the end of the accretion, the atmospheric water vapor pressure could have been maintained at the value required to maintain the surface temperature above the liquidus. We argue that hydrodynamic escape could have controlled the solidification rate of the magma ocean during the end of the accretion period by pumping the water out of the magma, through the atmosphere, remaining at a pressure of around 300 bar. After most of the water in the magma has been extracted, the atmosphere progressively dried up, and the magma ocean crystallized, leading to a final collapse of the hydrodynamic escape. The end of the hydrodynamic escape phase and the crystallization of the primitive magma ocean would thus roughly coincide

  1. Isotopic anomalies of Ne, Xe, and C in meteorites. I - Separation of carriers by density and chemical resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Tang; Lewis, Roy S.; Anders, Edward; Grady, M. M.; Wright, I. P.

    1988-01-01

    The carriers of presolar noble gases were studied by isotopically analyzing 19 separates from the Murray and Murchison C2 chondrites for Ne, Xe, C, and N. It is found that the carriers of Ne-E(H) and Xe-S are resistant to HCl, HF, boiling HClO4, and CrO3-H2SO4, and thus must be either diamond or some resistant carbide or oxide. The carrier of Ne-E(L) may be some form of amorphous carbon with delta C13 of about +340 percent. A new carbon component, C theta, found as 0.2-2-micron inclusions in Murchison spinel, is amorphous and contains little or no noble gas. A new heavy nitrogen component is found which has an abundance of about 1 ppm in the bulk meteorite, combusts at 450-500 C, and may be associated wtih isotopically normal carbon or with C-alpha.

  2. Application of carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses to detect exogenous citric acid in Japanese apricot liqueur.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Fumikazu; Oe, Takaaki; Hashiguchi, Tomokazu; Hisatsune, Yuri; Kawao, Takafumi; Fujii, Tsutomu

    2017-08-01

    Japanese apricot liqueur manufacturers are required to control the quality and authenticity of their liqueur products. Citric acid made from corn is the main acidulant used in commercial liqueurs. In this study, we conducted spiking experiments and carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses to detect exogenous citric acid used as an acidulant in Japanese apricot liqueurs. Our results showed that the δ(13)C values detected exogenous citric acid originating from C4 plants but not from C3 plants. The δ(2)H values of citric acid decreased as the amount of citric acid added increased, whether the citric acid originated from C3 or C4 plants. Commercial liqueurs with declared added acidulant provided higher δ(13)C values and lower δ(2)H values than did authentic liqueurs and commercial liqueurs with no declared added acidulant. Carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses are suitable as routine methods for detecting exogenous citric acid in Japanese apricot liqueur.

  3. Longitudinal dispersion coefficient depending on superficial velocity of hydrogen isotopes flowing in column packed with zeolite pellets at 77.4 K

    SciTech Connect

    Kotoh, K.; Kubo, K.; Takashima, S.; Moriyama, S.T.; Tanaka, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Authors have been developing a cryogenic pressure swing adsorption system for hydrogen isotope separation. In the problem of its design and operation, it is necessary to predict the concentration profiles developing in packed beds of adsorbent pellets. The profiling is affected by the longitudinal dispersion of gas flowing in packed beds, in addition to the mass transfer resistance in porous media of adsorbent pellets. In this work, an equation is derived for estimating the packed-bed dispersion coefficient of hydrogen isotopes, by analyzing the breakthrough curves of trace D{sub 2} or HD replacing H{sub 2} adsorbed in synthetic zeolite particles packed columns at the liquefied nitrogen temperature 77.4 K. Since specialized for hydrogen isotopes, this equation can be considered to estimate the dispersion coefficients more reliable for the cryogenic hydrogen isotope adsorption process, than the existing equations. (authors)

  4. Towards a palaeosalinity proxy: hydrogen isotopic fractionation between source water and lipids produced via different biosynthetic pathways in haptophyte algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivall, David; M'Boule, Daniela; Heinzelmann, Sandra M.; Kasper, Sebastian; Sinke-Schoen, Daniëlle; Sininnghe-Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2014-05-01

    Palaeosalinity is one of the most important oceanographic parameters that cannot currently be quantified with reasonable accuracy from sedimentary records. Hydrogen isotopic fractionation between water and alkenones is dependent, amongst other factors, upon the salinity in which alkenone-producing haptophyte algae grow and is represented by the fractionation factor, α, increasing with salinity.1 As such, the hydrogen isotopic composition of alkenones is emerging as a palaeosalinity proxy. Understanding the mechanism behind the sensitivity of fractionation to salinity is important for the correct application of the proxy, however this mechanism is currently unknown. Here we present hydrogen isotopic compositions of lipids produced via different biosynthetic pathways from batch cultures of Emiliania huxleyi CCMP 1516 and Isochrysis galbana CCMP 1323 grown over a range of salinities and discuss the possible sources of the sensitivity of hydrogen isotope fractionation to salinity. α for C37 alkenones (produced via an unknown biosynthetic pathway but assumed to be acetogenic; e.g.2) and that for C14:0, C16:0, and C18:1 fatty acids (acetogenic) from exponential growth phase I. galbana show a similar sensitivity to salinity, increasing at 0.0013-0.0019 per salinity unit (S-1). Meanwhile, in exponential growth phase E. huxleyi, α for C37 alkenones and α for brassicasterol (mevalonate pathway) increase at 0.0015-0.0022 S-1, but α for phytol (methylerythritol pathway) shows no significant relationship with salinity. These results suggest that fractionation is sensitive to salinity for lipids formed both in the chloroplast and cytosol. They also suggest that the sensitivity may either originate in glyceralde-3-phosphate or pyruvate but is then lost through hydrogen exchange with cell water during sugar rearrangements in the methylerythritol pathway or sensitivity originates with the production and consumption of acetate. References Schouten, S., Ossebaar, J., Schreiber

  5. Iridium(I)-catalyzed regioselective C-H activation and hydrogen-isotope exchange of non-aromatic unsaturated functionality.

    PubMed

    Kerr, William J; Mudd, Richard J; Paterson, Laura C; Brown, Jack A

    2014-11-03

    Isotopic labelling is a key technology of increasing importance for the investigation of new CH activation and functionalization techniques, as well as in the construction of labelled molecules for use within both organic synthesis and drug discovery. Herein, we report for the first time selective iridium-catalyzed CH activation and hydrogen-isotope exchange at the β-position of unsaturated organic compounds. The use of our highly active [Ir(cod)(IMes)(PPh3 )][PF6 ] (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene) catalyst, under mild reaction conditions, allows the regioselective β-activation and labelling of a range of α,β-unsaturated compounds with differing steric and electronic properties. This new process delivers high levels of isotope incorporation over short reaction times by using low levels of catalyst loading.

  6. Understanding continental-scale variation in plant hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios - Pseudotsuga menziesii across a 1500 km transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. B.; Wilson, E.; Hyodo, A.

    2013-12-01

    The isotopic composition of plant tissues provides an important recorder of vegetation response to climate. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios have been used to infer precipitation isotope ratios and therefore variability in temperature. While this is the case, important questions remain about the primary drivers of plant tissue hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratio variation, including fundamental questions about the role of plant physiology. Relatively recent work suggests, in some species, an important role of physiology in organic matter d2H, in particular stomatal conductance, while other work suggests a distinct lack of influence of physiology. It is critical that mechanistic models of plant tissue variation in δ2H and δ18O can encompass landscape and larger-scale variability in plant isotope ratios. In particular existing models need to be compared to large-scale observations in order to assess their ability to describe variation in climate and plant physiology driven by such geographic variables as continentality and elevation. We report on ongoing work to better understand the role of climate and other drivers in plant tissue isotopic composition across relatively large spatial scales. An approximately 1500 km-long transect was established from the Continental Divide in North America (at approximately 39° N latitude) to the Coast Range. Leaf, branch, and tree core samples of Pseudotsuga menziesii were collected, along with surface waters. At each location, samples were collected from at least three elevations and on the western and eastern slopes of the target mountain range. Xylem water broadly reflected local precipitation as inferred from a global precipitation isoscape model and local surface water measurements. There was also a clear difference across the transect in apparent access to surface water, with the drier interior showing greater source water evaporative enrichment. In addition, the relationships between leaf water and stem water changed

  7. Hydrogen isotope response to changing salinity and rainfall in Australian mangroves.

    PubMed

    Ladd, S Nemiah; Sachs, Julian P

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios ((2) H/(1) H, δ(2) H) of leaf waxes covary with those in precipitation and are therefore a useful paleohydrologic proxy. Mangroves are an exception to this relationship because their δ(2) H values are also influenced by salinity. The mechanisms underlying this response were investigated by measuring leaf lipid δ(2) H and leaf and xylem water δ(2) H and δ(18) O values from three mangrove species over 9.5 months in a subtropical Australian estuary. Net (2) H/(1) H fractionation between surface water and leaf lipids decreased by 0.5-1.0‰ ppt(-1) for n-alkanes and 0.4-0.8‰ ppt(-1) for isoprenoids. Xylem water was (2) H depleted relative to surface water, reflecting (2) H discrimination of 4-10‰ during water uptake at all salinities and opportunistic uptake of freshwater at high salinity. However, leaf water (2) H enrichment relative to estuary water was insensitive to salinity and identical for all species. Therefore, variations in leaf and xylem water δ(2) H values cannot explain the salinity-dependent (2) H depletion in leaf lipids, nor the 30‰ range in leaf lipid δ(2) H values among species. Biochemical changes in direct response to salt stress, such as increased compatible solute production or preferential use of stored carbohydrates, and/or the timing of lipid production and subsequent turnover rates, are more likely causes.

  8. Hydrogen Donor-Acceptor Fluctuations from Kinetic Isotope Effects: A Phenomenological Model

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Daniel; Cheatum, Christopher M.; Kohen, Amnon

    2012-01-01

    Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and their temperature dependence can probe the structural and dynamic nature of enzyme-catalyzed proton or hydride transfers. The molecular interpretation of their temperature dependence requires expensive and specialized QM/MM calculations to provide a quantitative molecular understanding. Currently available phenomenological models use a non-adiabatic assumption that is not appropriate for most hydride and proton-transfer reactions, while others require more parameters than the experimental data justify. Here we propose a phenomenological interpretation of KIEs based on a simple method to quantitatively link the size and temperature dependence of KIEs to a conformational distribution of the catalyzed reaction. The present model assumes adiabatic hydrogen tunneling, and by fitting experimental KIE data, the model yields a population distribution for fluctuations of the distance between donor and acceptor atoms. Fits to data from a variety of proton and hydride transfers catalyzed by enzymes and their mutants, as well as non-enzymatic reactions, reveal that steeply temperature-dependent KIEs indicate the presence of at least two distinct conformational populations, each with different kinetic behaviors. We present the results of these calculations for several published cases and discuss how the predictions of the calculations might be experimentally tested. The current analysis does not replace molecular quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) investigations, but it provides a fast and accessible way to quantitatively interpret KIEs in the context of a Marcus-like model. PMID:22857146

  9. Measurement and modeling of oxidation rate of hydrogen isotopic gases by soil.

    PubMed

    Ota, Masakazu; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Moriizumi, Jun; Iida, Takao

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of oxidation rate of hydrogen isotopic gases by soil were made to model HT oxidation rate by soil. Soil was sampled at a cultivated farmland and laboratory measurements of the oxidation rate of H(2) and D(2) gases simulating HT gas were carried out under controlled conditions of soil. The oxidation rate increased with increase of H(2) or D(2) concentration in air and nearly saturated at high concentration. The oxidation rate was low under extremely dry and wet soil conditions and was the highest at soil water content of 8-14 w/w%. The oxidation rate increased exponentially with increasing soil temperature and was the highest at 46 degrees C. Michaelis constant K(m) increased exponentially with increasing soil temperature. Oxidation rate of H(2) was generally higher than that of D(2), while K(m) of H(2) was generally lower than that of D(2). From these results, oxidation rate of HT was modeled as a product of the functions that represent dependency on each soil factor.

  10. Kinetics of hydrogen isotope exchange in β-phase Pd-H-D

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Weifang; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2015-07-22

    Hydrogen isotope gas exchange within palladium powders is examined using a batch-type reactor coupled to a residual gas analyzer (RGA). Furthermore, the exchange rates in both directions (H2 + PdD and D2 + PdH) are measured in the temperature range 178–323 K for the samples with different particle sizes. The results show this batch-type exchange is closely approximated as a first-order kinetic process with a rate directly proportional to the surface area of the powder particles. An exchange rate constant of 1.40 ± 0.24 μmol H2/atm cm2 s is found for H2 + PdD at 298 K, 1.4 times highermore » than that for D2 + PdH, with an activation energy of 25.0 ± 3.2 kJ/mol H for both exchange directions. Finally, a comparison of exchange measurement techniques shows these coefficients, and the fundamental exchange probabilities are in good agreement with those obtained by NMR and flow techniques.« less

  11. Kinetics of hydrogen isotope exchange in β-phase Pd-H-D

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Weifang; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2015-07-22

    Hydrogen isotope gas exchange within palladium powders is examined using a batch-type reactor coupled to a residual gas analyzer (RGA). Furthermore, the exchange rates in both directions (H2 + PdD and D2 + PdH) are measured in the temperature range 178–323 K for the samples with different particle sizes. The results show this batch-type exchange is closely approximated as a first-order kinetic process with a rate directly proportional to the surface area of the powder particles. An exchange rate constant of 1.40 ± 0.24 μmol H2/atm cm2 s is found for H2 + PdD at 298 K, 1.4 times higher than that for D2 + PdH, with an activation energy of 25.0 ± 3.2 kJ/mol H for both exchange directions. Finally, a comparison of exchange measurement techniques shows these coefficients, and the fundamental exchange probabilities are in good agreement with those obtained by NMR and flow techniques.

  12. Evolution of water reservoirs on Mars: Constraints from hydrogen isotopes in martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, H.; Sato, M.; Ushioda, M.; Matsuyama, T.; Moriwaki, R.; Dohm, J. M.; Usui, T.

    2014-05-01

    Martian surface morphology implies that Mars was once warm enough to maintain persistent liquid water on its surface. While the high D/H ratios (˜6 times the Earth's ocean water) of the current martian atmosphere suggest that significant water has been lost from the surface during martian history, the timing, processes, and the amount of the water loss have been poorly constrained. Recent technical developments of ion-microprobe analysis of martian meteorites have provided accurate estimation of hydrogen isotope compositions (D/H) of martian water reservoirs at the time when the meteorites formed. Based on the D/H data from the meteorites, this study demonstrates that the water loss during the pre-Noachian (>41-99 m global equivalent layers, GEL) was more significant than in the rest of martian history (>10-53 m GEL). Combining our results with geological and geomorphological evidence for ancient oceans, we propose that undetected subsurface water/ice (≃100-1000 m GEL) should exist, and it exceeds the observable present water inventory (≃20-30 m GEL) on Mars.

  13. Hydrogen Isotopic Constraints on the Evolution of Surface and Subsurface Water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Kurokawa, H.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O’D.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2017-01-01

    The geology and geomorphology of Mars provide clear evidence for the presence of liquid water on its surface during the Noachian and Hesperien eras (i.e., >3 Ga). In contrast to the ancient watery environment, today the surface of Mars is relatively dry. The current desert-like surface conditions, however, do not necessarily indicate a lack of surface or near-surface water/ice. In fact, massive deposits of ground ice and/or icy sediments have been proposed based on subsurface radar sounder observations. Hence, accurate knowledge of both the evolution of the distribution of water and of the global water inventory is crucial to our understanding of the evolution of the climate and near-surface environments and the potential habitability of Mars. This study presents insights from hydrogen isotopes for the interactive evolution of Martian water reservoirs. In particular, based on our new measurement of the D/H ratio of 4 Ga-old Noachian water, we constrain the atmospheric loss and possible exchange of surface and subsurface water through time.

  14. MECHANICAL ALLOYING AND THERMAL TREATMENT FOR PRODUCTION OF ZIRCONIUM IRON HYDROGEN ISOTOPE GETTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.

    2008-02-20

    The objective of this task was to demonstrate that metal hydrides could be produced by mechanical alloying in the quantities needed to support production-scale hydrogen isotope separations. Three starting compositions (ratios of elemental Zr and Fe powders) were selected and attritor milled under argon for times of 8 to 60 hours. In general, milling times of at least 24 hours were required to form the desired Zr{sub 2}Fe and Zr{sub 3}Fe phases, although a considerable amount of unalloyed Zr and Fe remained. Milling in liquid nitrogen does not appear to provide any advantages over milling in hexane, particularly due to the formation of ZrN after longer milling times. Carbides of Zr formed during some of the milling experiments in hexane. Elemental Zr was present in the as-milled material but not detected after annealing for milling times of 48 and 60 hours. It may be that after intimate mixing of the powders in the attritor mill the annealing temperature was sufficient to allow for the formation of a Zr-Fe alloy. Further investigation of this conversion is necessary, and could provide an opportunity for reducing the amount of unreacted metal powder after milling.

  15. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of eclogites and associated rocks from the Eastern Sesia zone (Western Alps, Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desmons, J.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope analyses have been made of mineral separates from eclogites, glaucophanites and glaucophane schists from the eastern Sesia zone (Italian Western Alps). Regularities in (1) hydrogen isotope compositions, (2) order of 18O enrichment among coexisting minerals, and (3) ?? 18O (quartz-rutile) and ?? 18O (quartz-phengite) imply attainment of a high degree of isotopic equilibrium. However, some scattering of ??18O values of individual minerals indicates that the eclogitic assemblage did not form in the presence of a thoroughly pervasive fluid. Minerals from an eclogitic lens enclosed in marble have ??18O values distinctly different from those measured in the other rocks. The ??18O values are high in comparison with other type C eclogites of the world, and it is proposed that the fluid present during the high pressure metamorphism has to a large extent been inherited from the precursor rocks of amphibolite facies. An average formation temperature of 540 ?? C is inferred from the oxygen isotope fractionations between quartz and rutile and between quartz and white mica. This temperature is in accordance with petrologic considerations and implies subduction of the precursor rocks into the upper mantle to achieve the high pressures required. ?? 1978 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Capture of heavy hydrogen isotopes in a metal-organic framework with active Cu(I) sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinrauch, I.; Savchenko, I.; Denysenko, D.; Souliou, S. M.; Kim, H.-H.; Le Tacon, M.; Daemen, L. L.; Cheng, Y.; Mavrandonakis, A.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Volkmer, D.; Schütz, G.; Hirscher, M.; Heine, T.

    2017-03-01

    The production of pure deuterium and the removal of tritium from nuclear waste are the key challenges in separation of light isotopes. Presently, the technological methods are extremely energy- and cost-intensive. Here we report the capture of heavy hydrogen isotopes from hydrogen gas by selective adsorption at Cu(I) sites in a metal-organic framework. At the strongly binding Cu(I) sites (32 kJ mol-1) nuclear quantum effects result in higher adsorption enthalpies of heavier isotopes. The capture mechanism takes place most efficiently at temperatures above 80 K, when an isotope exchange allows the preferential adsorption of heavy isotopologues from the gas phase. Large difference in adsorption enthalpy of 2.5 kJ mol-1 between D2 and H2 results in D2-over-H2 selectivity of 11 at 100 K, to the best of our knowledge the largest value known to date. Combination of thermal desorption spectroscopy, Raman measurements, inelastic neutron scattering and first principles calculations for H2/D2 mixtures allows the prediction of selectivities for tritium-containing isotopologues.

  17. Compound specific carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses of volatile organic compounds in various emissions of combustion processes.

    PubMed

    Vitzthum von Eckstaedt, Christiane D; Grice, Kliti; Ioppolo-Armanios, Marisa; Kelly, David; Gibberd, Mark

    2012-11-01

    This study presents carbon (δ(13)C) and hydrogen (δD) isotope values of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in various emission sources using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TD-GC-irMS). The investigated VOCs ranged from C6 to C10. Samples were taken from (i) car exhaust emissions as well as from plant combustion experiments of (ii) various C3 and (iii) various C4 plants. We found significant differences in δ values of analysed VOCs between these sources, e.g. δ(13)C of benzene ranged between (i) -21.7 ± 0.2 ‰, (ii) -27.6 ± 1.6 ‰ and (iii) -16.3 ± 2.2 ‰, respectively and δD of benzene ranged between (i) -73 ± 13 ‰, (ii) -111 ± 10 ‰ and (iii) -70 ± 24 ‰, respectively. Results of VOCs present in investigated emission sources were compared to values from the literature (aluminium refinery emission). All source groups could be clearly distinguished using the dual approach of δ(13)C and δD analysis. The results of this study indicate that the correlation of compound specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis provides the potential for future research to trace the fate and to determine the origin of VOCs in the atmosphere using thermal desorption compound specific isotope analysis.

  18. Capture of heavy hydrogen isotopes in a metal-organic framework with active Cu(I) sites

    PubMed Central

    Weinrauch, I.; Savchenko, I.; Denysenko, D.; Souliou, S. M.; Kim, H-H; Le Tacon, M.; Daemen, L. L.; Cheng, Y.; Mavrandonakis, A.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Volkmer, D.; Schütz, G.; Hirscher, M.; Heine, T.

    2017-01-01

    The production of pure deuterium and the removal of tritium from nuclear waste are the key challenges in separation of light isotopes. Presently, the technological methods are extremely energy- and cost-intensive. Here we report the capture of heavy hydrogen isotopes from hydrogen gas by selective adsorption at Cu(I) sites in a metal-organic framework. At the strongly binding Cu(I) sites (32 kJ mol−1) nuclear quantum effects result in higher adsorption enthalpies of heavier isotopes. The capture mechanism takes place most efficiently at temperatures above 80 K, when an isotope exchange allows the preferential adsorption of heavy isotopologues from the gas phase. Large difference in adsorption enthalpy of 2.5 kJ mol−1 between D2 and H2 results in D2-over-H2 selectivity of 11 at 100 K, to the best of our knowledge the largest value known to date. Combination of thermal desorption spectroscopy, Raman measurements, inelastic neutron scattering and first principles calculations for H2/D2 mixtures allows the prediction of selectivities for tritium-containing isotopologues. PMID:28262794

  19. Determining the Effect of Growth Rate on Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation of Algal Lipids in Two North Pacific Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfshorndl, M.; Sachs, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical hydrologic changes have a large effect on global climate, but there does not yet exist a good indicator of rainfall variation in the tropics. Understanding past natural variability of such features as the Intertropical Convergence Zone and El Niño Southern Oscillation provides information about the extent of anthropogenic climate change today. The hydrogen isotopic composition (D/H ratio) of algal lipids has been shown to track the isotopic composition of source water in which the organism grew, providing information about precipitation variability over time. However, culture work has revealed that environmental factors such as salinity, temperature, growth rate, and irradiance also influence algal lipid D/H ratios. Here I present work determining the effect of growth rate and irradiance on the hydrogen isotope composition of alkenone-producing algae in the water column in two North Pacific locations, off the coast of Oregon and near the Hawaii Ocean Time Series site. This work corroborates empirical relationships observed in culture studies and indicates that the effects of growth rate and irradiance should be taken into account when applying the D/H isotope ratio rainfall proxy to reconstruct past climates.

  20. Mechanism of heat generation from loading gaseous hydrogen isotopes into palladium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriyeva, Olga

    I have carried out the study of hydrogen isotope reactions in the presence of palladium nanoparticles impregnated into oxide powder. My goal was to explain the mechanisms of heat generation in those systems as a result of exposure to deuterium gas. Some researchers have associated this heating with a nuclear reaction in the Pd lattice. While some earlier experiments showed a correlation between the generation of excess heat and helium production as possible evidence of a nuclear reaction, the results of that research have not been replicated by the other groups and the search for radiation was unsuccessful. Therefore, the unknown origin of the excess heat produced by these systems is of great interest. I synthesized different types of Pd and Pt-impregnated oxide samples similar to those used by other research groups. I used different characterization techniques to confirm that the fabrication method I used is capable of producing Pd nanoparticles on the surface of alumina support. I used a custom built gas-loading system to pressurize the material with hydrogen and deuterium gas while measuring heat output as a result of these pressurizations. My initial study confirmed the excess heat generation in the presence of deuterium. However, the in-situ radiometry and alpha-particle measurements did not show any abnormal increase in counts above the background level. In the absence of nuclear reaction products, I decided to look for a conventional chemical process that could account for the excess heat generation. It was earlier suggested that Pd in its nanoparticle form catalyzes hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions in the material. To prove the chemical nature of the observed phenomena I demonstrated that the reaction can be either exo- or endothermic based on the water isotope trapped in the material and the type of gas provided to the system. The H/D exchange was confirmed by RGA, NMR and FTIR analysis. I quantified the amount of energy that can be released due

  1. Chromium isotope anomaly in an impactite sample from the El'gygytgyn structure, Russia: Evidence for a ureilite projectile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foriel, Julien; Moynier, Frederic; Schulz, Toni; Koeberl, Christian

    2013-07-01

    The 3.6 Ma, 18-km-diameter El'gygytgyn impact structure (Arctic Russia) is unique among the currently known terrestrial impact craters in that it is the only one that was formed in acid volcanic rocks. Previous analyses of impactites from El'gygytgyn showed minor enrichments of the siderophile elements, including Ir, which, together with distinct Cr enrichments, gave rise to speculation that an achondritic projectile was involved. We studied the major and trace element composition in samples from the new ICDP drill core obtained near the center of the structure, as well as the chromium isotopic composition of an impact glass sample collected on the surface. Several suevitic breccias from the upper part of the suevite sequence in the drill core show higher Cr and Ni contents compared with felsic volcanic rocks in the lower part of the core and from surface samples. However, it is difficult to unambiguously establish a meteoritic component from trace element data, as input from (rare) mafic target rocks is a possibility. In contrast, the Cr isotopic composition of the impact glass sample yielded a nonterrestrial ɛ54Cr value of -0.72 ± 0.31 (2 std. err.). This negative ɛ54Cr is different from known carbonaceous chondrite values (ɛ54Cr of +0.95 to +1.65), but is nearly identical to reported values for ureilites (approximately -0.77). The value is, however, also within analytical error of eucrites (approximately -0.38) and ordinary chondrites (approximately -0.42). Given the chemical signatures found in previous analyses of El'gytgytgyn impactites and the similarity of our Cr isotopic data to ureilites, we suggest that the impacting asteroid could have been an F-type asteroid of mixed composition, similar to the recent Almahata Sitta fall in Sudan.

  2. The Carbon and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Methane Released from Natural Wetlands and Ruminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansdown, John Malcolm

    The delta^{13} {rm C} of CH_4 emitted from the tropical Amazon river floodplain, temperate peat bogs in Washington and Minnesota, and the arctic Alaskan tundra was -59, -73, -66, and -65perthous, respectively. The deltaD of CH_4 from these sites was -294, -308, -339, and -391perthous, respectively, and a linear relationship was observed between the deltaD of CH_4 and soil water. A ^{13} C balance between CH_4, CO _2 and soil organic matter indicated a higher percentage of CH_4 production via methyl conversion at the Amazon floodplain than at the other wetland sites and that the anoxic CO _2 flux was 1.5 to 2.0 times the CH _4 flux. The ^{13} C balance provided greater constraint on the anoxic CO_2 flux than calculations based on soil water gradients. An in situ value of 0.774 for the hydrogen kinetic isotope effect during microbial CH _4 oxidation was estimated from the increase in the delta^{13} {rm C} and deltaD of CH_4 in flux samples from the Amazon site. The average delta^{13 }{rm C} of CH_4 released from an acidic peat bog in Washington state (pH = 3.5) was -73perthous, lower than previously measured at freshwater wetland sites. Soil incubations with ^{14 }C-labeled CO_2 and acetate substrates showed that CO_2 reduction accounted for essentially all methane production in the bog. An in situ value of 0.933 for the carbon kinetic isotope effect for CO_2 reduction was calculated from the delta^{13 }{rm C} of the CH_4 flux and soil water CO_2.. The delta^{13} {rm C} and deltaD of CH_4 emitted from ruminants was measured and averaged -63 and -404perthous, respectively. CO _2 reduction accounted for ~70% of rumen CH_4 production based on the change in the delta ^{13}{rm C} and deltaD of rumen CH_4 vs. time during normal conditions and after the addition of deuterated water to the rumen. These results contrast the dogma in the literature that CO_2 reduction accounts for essentially all CH _4 production in the rumen. A global budget for the deltaD of CH_4 was

  3. Stable-isotopic anomalies and the accretionary assemblage of the Earth and Mars: A subordinate role for carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Paul H.

    2011-11-01

    Plots such as ɛ 54Cr vs. ɛ 50Ti and ɛ 54Cr vs. Δ 17O reveal a fundamental dichotomy among planetary materials. The "carbonaceous" chondrites, by virtue of high ɛ 50Ti and high ɛ 62Ni, as well as, especially for any given Δ 17O, high ɛ 54Cr, are separated by a wide margin from all other materials. The significance of the bimodality is further manifested by several types of meteorites with petrological-geochemical characteristics that suggest membership in the opposite category from the true pedigree as revealed by the stable isotopes. Ureilites, for example, despite having diversely low Δ 17O and about the same average carbon content as the most C-rich carbonaceous chondrite, have clear stable-isotopic signatures of noncarbonaceous pedigree. The striking bimodality on the ɛ 54Cr vs. ɛ 50Ti and ɛ 54Cr vs. Δ 17O diagrams suggests that the highest taxonomic division in meteorite/planetary classification should be between carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous materials. The bimodality may be an extreme manifestation of the effects of episodic accretion of early solids in the protoplanetary nebula. However, an alternative, admittedly speculative, explanation is that the bimodality corresponds to a division between materials that originally accreted in the outer solar system (carbonaceous) and materials that accreted in the inner solar system (noncarbonaceous). In any event, both the Earth and Mars plot squarely within the noncarbonaceous composition-space. Applying the lever rule to putative mixing lines on the ɛ 50Ti vs. ɛ 54Cr and Δ 17O vs. ɛ 54Cr diagrams, the carbonaceous/(carbonaceous + noncarbonaceous) mixing ratio C/( C + NC) is most likely close to (very roughly) 24% for Earth and 9% for Mars. Estimated upper limits for C/( C + NC) are 32% for Earth and 18% for Mars. However, the uncertainties are such that isotopic data do not require or even significantly suggest that Earth has higher C/( C + NC) than Mars. Among known chondrite groups, EH yields a

  4. Analysis of the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of beverage waters without prior water extraction using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chesson, Lesley A; Bowen, Gabriel J; Ehleringer, James R

    2010-11-15

    Hydrogen (δ(2)H) and oxygen (δ(18)O) stable isotope analysis is useful when tracing the origin of water in beverages, but traditional analytical techniques are limited to pure or extracted waters. We measured the isotopic composition of extracted beverage water using both isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS; specifically, wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We also analyzed beer, sodas, juices, and milk 'as is' using IRIS. For IRIS analysis, four sequential injections of each sample were measured and data were corrected for sample-to-sample memory using injections (a) 1-4, (b) 2-4, and (c) 3-4. The variation between δ(2)H and δ(18)O values calculated using the three correction methods was larger for unextracted (i.e., complex) beverages than for waters. The memory correction was smallest when using injections 3-4. Beverage water δ(2)H and δ(18)O values generally fit the Global Meteoric Water Line, with the exception of water from fruit juices. The beverage water stable isotope ratios measured using IRIS agreed well with the IRMS data and fit 1:1 lines, with the exception of sodas and juices (δ(2)H values) and beers (δ(18)O values). The δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of waters extracted from beer, soda, juice, and milk were correlated with complex beverage δ(2)H and δ(18)O values (r = 0.998 and 0.997, respectively) and generally fit 1:1 lines. We conclude that it is possible to analyze complex beverages, without water extraction, using IRIS although caution is needed when analyzing beverages containing sugars, which can clog the syringe and increase memory, or alcohol, a known spectral interference.

  5. Ultrafiltration by a compacted clay membrane. I - Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation. II - Sodium ion exclusion at various ionic strengths.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coplen, T. B.; Hanshaw, B. B.

    1973-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of distilled water and of 0.01N NaCl forced to flow at ambient temperature under a hydraulic pressure drop of 100 bars across a montmorillonite disk compacted to a porosity of 35% by a pressure of 330 bars. The ultrafiltrates in both experiments were depleted in D by 2.5% and in O-18 by 0.8% relative to the residual solution. No additional isotopic fractionation due to a salt-filtering mechanism was observed at NaCl concentrations up to 0.01N. Adsorption is most likely the principal mechanism which produces isotopic fractionation, but molecular diffusion may play a minor role. The results suggest that oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of ground water during passage through compacted clayey sediments should be a common occurrence, in accord with published interpretations of isotopic data from the Illinois and Alberta basins. It is shown how it is possible to proceed from the ion exchange capacity of clay minerals and, by means of the Donnan membrane equilibrium concept and the Teorell-Meyer-Siever theory, develop a theory to explain why and to what extent ultrafiltration occurs when solutions of known concentration are forced to flow through a clay membrane.

  6. Nuclear field shift effect as a possible cause of Te isotopic anomalies in the early solar system —An alternative explanation of Fehr et al. (2006 and 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moynier, F.; Fujii, T.; Albarède, F.

    2009-12-01

    We explore the possibility that Te isotopic anomalies measured in Ca-Al-rich inclusions (Fehr et al. 2009) and in leachates of carbonaceous chondrites (Fehr et al. 2006) may be due to mass-independent effects controlled by nuclear field shift rather than to nucleosynthetic processes. Fehr et al.’s spectrum of mass-independent anomalies of Te isotopes shows a smooth correlation with mass number and nuclear charge distribution. Ratios of even to odd isotopes, as the 125Te/126Te ratio used by these authors for normalization are particularly prone to nuclear field shift effects. We show that the alternative normalization of isotopic ratios to 130Te/126Te strongly reduces the trend of isotopic fractionation with mass number, leaving only 125Te as truly anomalous. For both normalizations (125Te/126Te and 130Te/126Te), Fehr et al.’s results fit the theory of Bigeleisen (1996), which suggests that the nuclear field shift effect can potentially account for the observed Te isotope abundances, as an alternative to nucleosynthetic processes. We propose that these mass-independent effects may be acquired during accretion of sulfides from the solar nebula.

  7. Hydrogen-isotope transport in an ELBRODUR G CuCrZr alloy for nuclear applications in heat sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, S. J.; Byeon, W. J.; Shin, H. W.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, Jaeyong; Lee, S. K.; Kim, Jaewoo

    2016-05-01

    We present the first complete data set of the transport parameters (permeability, diffusivity, and solubility) of hydrogen and deuterium in an ELBRODUR G precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloy experimentally measured by using the time-dependent gas-phase technique in an elevated temperature range of 300-600 °C for nuclear applications in heat sinks. Using the measured values for hydrogen and deuterium and a quantum mechanical model based on a harmonic approximation, an extrapolation for tritium is also presented. The isotope effect ratios for the transport parameters were also estimated. Furthermore, our hydrogen results for ELBRODUR G were compared with the results for other copper alloys previously reported by other authors.

  8. Evaluating Changes in Paleo-temperature Gradients using Hydrogen Isotopic Compositions of Leaf-wax Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, S.; Huber, M.; Pagani, M.

    2014-12-01

    A long-standing problem in the paleoclimate modeling community has been the inability of the models to reproduce the shallow meridional temperature gradient (∆T) observed in proxy temperature records for the warm, greenhouse time intervals in Earth's history, such as the early Eocene. It is often stated that this mismatch indicates a missing high-latitude feedback mechanism in the climate models that would cause substantial polar amplification of warming. However, this issue is complicated by the potential biasing of proxy records due to issues related to temperature calibrations and/or diagenesis. In this study, we propose an alternative approach to estimate ∆T for these time intervals using hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf-wax biomarkers (dDleaf-wax) preserved in the sedimentary record. Today, dDleaf-wax is closely related to the hydrological cycle and source vegetation. In the mid- and high-latitudes, dDleaf-wax changes pertaining to the hydrological cycle can be interpreted using a Rayleigh distillation process, where evaporated moisture from the sub-tropics undergoes isotopic fractionation and becomes increasingly D-depleted during poleward transport. We develop a box model based on the Rayleigh distillation process that uses the global mean temperature for the time-period and geological archives of dDleaf-wax to estimate the meridional temperature gradient. We use this box model for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~56Ma), a rapid-warming event in the early Eocene where global warming is accompanied by evidence for increased input of greenhouse gases. We compile existing leaf-wax dDleaf-wax records from the extra-tropics to estimate ∆T before and during the PETM. Preliminary results suggest that the temperature gradient increased during the body of the PETM, contradicting our expectations based on temperature proxies. We also use this approach to estimate ∆T during other intervals in earth's history, such as the early Eocene. Further

  9. Search for extinct natural radioactivity of Pb205 via thallium-isotope anomalies in chondrites and lunar soil.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huey, J. M.; Kohman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Thallium and Pb204 contents were determined by stable-isotope-dilution analysis in 16 chondrites, one achondrite, and Apollo 11 and 12 lunar fines. Meteoritic thallium contents vary over a large range, 0.02 to 100 ppb, corresponding to the fact that thallium is a highly fractionated volatile element. Lunar thallium contents are less than 5 ppb. The Tl205/Tl203 ratio was determined in most of the samples, with precision ranging from 0.03% to several percent depending mainly on the amount of thallium present. No variations from the terrestrial ratio were observed. The chondritic isochron slope for Pb205 (13.8-m.y. half-life) is less than or equal to 0.00009 (99% confidence level), corresponding to an interval of at least 60 m.y. and possibly exceeding 120 m.y. between the termination of s-process nucleosynthesis and the lead-thallium fractionations.

  10. Stable hydrogen isotopes record the summering grounds of eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis).

    PubMed

    Pylant, Cortney L; Nelson, David M; Keller, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Bats face numerous threats associated with global environmental change, including the rapid expansion of wind-energy facilities, emerging infectious disease, and habitat loss. An understanding of the movement and migration patterns of these highly dispersive animals would help reveal how spatially localized the impacts from these threats are likely to be on bat populations, thus aiding in their conservation. Stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δ (2)H) can be used to infer regions where bats have foraged during the summer molt season, thus allowing an assessment of summering location and distance of movement of bats sampled during other times of year. However, a major impediment to the application of δ (2)H for inference of bat movements is that the relationship between δ (2)H of bat hair and precipitation tends to be species specific and is still unknown for some key species of conservation concern. We addressed this issue by using geo-referenced museum specimens to calibrate the relationship between δ (2)H of hair (δ (2)Hhair) and long-term δ (2)H of growing-season precipitation (δ (2)HGSprecip) at the site of collection for eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), one of the main species of bats experiencing large numbers of fatalities at wind-energy facilities in North America. Based on comparison of δ (2)Hhair and δ (2)HGSprecip values for males we estimated a period of molt of June 14-August 7. Within this period, male and female red bats exhibited a significant positive relationship between δ (2)Hhair and δ (2)HGSprecip. These results establish the relationship between δ (2)Hhair and δ (2)HGSprecip for red bats, which is necessary for the use of δ (2)Hhair to infer the movement and migration patterns of this important species. These results provide a critical resource to conservation biologists working to assess the impacts of environmental change on bat populations.

  11. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of waters from fumaroles at Kilauea summit, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkley, Todd K.; Quick, James E.; Gregory, Robert T.; Gerlach, Terrence M.

    1995-03-01

    Condensate samples were collected in 1992 from a high-temperature (300° C) fumarole on the floor of the Halemaumau Pit Crater at Kilauea. The emergence about two years earlier of such a hot fumarole was unprecedented at such a central location at Kilauea. The condensates have hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions which indicate that the waters emitted by the fumarole are composed largely of meteoric water, that any magmatic water component must be minor, and that the precipitation that was the original source to the fumarole fell on a recharge area on the slopes of Mauna Loa Volcano to the west. However, the fumarole has no tritium, indicating that it taps a source of water that has been isolated from atmospheric water for at least 40 years. It is noteworthy, considering the unstable tectonic environment and abundant local rainfall of the Kilauea and Mauna Loa regions, that waters which are sources to the hot fumarole remain uncontaminated from atmospheric sources over such long times and long transport distances. As for the common, boiling point fumaroles of the Kilauea summit region, their 18O, D and tritium concentrations indicate that they are dominated by recycling of present day meteoric water. Though the waters of both hot and boiling point fumaroles have dominantly meteoric sources, they seem to be from separate hydrological regimes. Large concentrations of halogens and sulfur species in the condensates, together with the location at the center of the Kilauea summit region and the high temperature, initially suggested that much of the total mass of the emissions of the hot fumarole, including the H2O, might have come directly from a magma body. The results of the present study indicate that it is unreliable to infer a magmatic origin of volcanic waters based solely on halogen or sulfur contents, or other aspects of chemical composition of total condensates.

  12. Hydrogen isotope detection in metal matrix using double-pulse laser-induced breakdown-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantoni, Roberta; Almaviva, Salvatore; Caneve, Luisa; Colao, Francesco; Maddaluno, Giorgio; Gasior, Pawel; Kubkowska, Monika

    2017-03-01

    The amount of hydrogen isotopes retained in plasma facing components (PFCs) and the determination of their surface layer composition are among the most critical issues for the next generation fusion device, ITER, under construction in Cadarache (France). Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is currently under evaluation as a technique suitable for quantitative, in situ, non-invasive measurements of these quantities. In order to detect traces of contaminant in metallic samples and improve its limit of detection (LOD), the Double Pulse LIBS (DP-LIBS) variant can be used instead of the standard Single Pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS), as it has been proven by several authors that DP-LIBS can considerably raise the analytical performances of the technique. In this work Mo samples coated with a 1.5-1.8 μm thick W-Al mixed layer, contaminated with co-deposited deuterium (D) were measured by SP- and DP-LIBS under vacuum (p 5 × 10- 5 mbar), with an experimental set-up simulating conditions that can be found in a real fusion device between plasma discharges. A partial Calibration Free procedure (pCF) was applied to the LIBS data in order to retrieve the relative concentration of W and Al in the mixed layer. The amount of deuterium was then inferred by using tungsten as internal standard, accounting for the intensity ratio between the Dα line and nearby W I lines. The results are in satisfactory agreement with those obtained from preliminary Ion Beam Analysis measurements performed immediately after the specimen's realization.

  13. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of waters from fumaroles at Kilauea summit, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkley, T.K.; Quick, J.E.; Gregory, R.T.; Gerlach, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    Condensate samples were collected in 1992 from a high-temperature (300?? C) fumarole on the floor of the Halemaumau Pit Crater at Kilauea. The emergence about two years earlier of such a hot fumarole was unprecedented at such a central location at Kilauea. The condensates have hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions which indicate that the waters emitted by the fumarole are composed largely of meteoric water, that any magmatic water component must be minor, and that the precipitation that was the original source to the fumarole fell on a recharge area on the slopes of Mauna Loa Volcano to the west. However, the fumarole has no tritium, indicating that it taps a source of water that has been isolated from atmospheric water for at least 40 years. It is noteworthy, considering the unstable tectonic environment and abundant local rainfall of the Kilauea and Mauna Loa regions, that waters which are sources to the hot fumarole remain uncontaminated from atmospheric sources over such long times and long transport distances. As for the common, boiling point fumaroles of the Kilauea summit region, their 18O, D and tritium concentrations indicate that they are dominated by recycling of present day meteoric water. Though the waters of both hot and boiling point fumaroles have dominantly meteoric sources, they seem to be from separate hydrological regimes. Large concentrations of halogens and sulfur species in the condensates, together with the location at the center of the Kilauea summit region and the high temperature, initially suggested that much of the total mass of the emissions of the hot fumarole, including the H2O, might have come directly from a magma body. The results of the present study indicate that it is unreliable to infer a magmatic origin of volcanic waters based solely on halogen or sulfur contents, or other aspects of chemical composition of total condensates. ?? 1995 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Stable hydrogen isotopes record the summering grounds of eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis)

    PubMed Central

    Pylant, Cortney L.; Keller, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Bats face numerous threats associated with global environmental change, including the rapid expansion of wind-energy facilities, emerging infectious disease, and habitat loss. An understanding of the movement and migration patterns of these highly dispersive animals would help reveal how spatially localized the impacts from these threats are likely to be on bat populations, thus aiding in their conservation. Stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) can be used to infer regions where bats have foraged during the summer molt season, thus allowing an assessment of summering location and distance of movement of bats sampled during other times of year. However, a major impediment to the application of δ2H for inference of bat movements is that the relationship between δ2H of bat hair and precipitation tends to be species specific and is still unknown for some key species of conservation concern. We addressed this issue by using geo-referenced museum specimens to calibrate the relationship between δ2H of hair (δ2Hhair) and long-term δ2H of growing-season precipitation (δ2HGSprecip) at the site of collection for eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), one of the main species of bats experiencing large numbers of fatalities at wind-energy facilities in North America. Based on comparison of δ2Hhair and δ2HGSprecip values for males we estimated a period of molt of June 14–August 7. Within this period, male and female red bats exhibited a significant positive relationship between δ2Hhair and δ2HGSprecip. These results establish the relationship between δ2Hhair and δ2HGSprecip for red bats, which is necessary for the use of δ2Hhair to infer the movement and migration patterns of this important species. These results provide a critical resource to conservation biologists working to assess the impacts of environmental change on bat populations. PMID:25337458

  15. Rayleigh-based concept to tackle strong hydrogen fractionation in dual isotope analysis-the example of ethylbenzene degradation by Aromatoleum aromaticum.

    PubMed

    Dorer, Conrad; Höhener, Patrick; Hedwig, Normen; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Vogt, Carsten

    2014-05-20

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a state-of-the-art analytical tool that can be used to establish and quantify biodegradation of pollutants such as BTEX compounds at contaminated field sites. Using isotopes of two elements and characteristic Lambda values (Λ) in dual-isotope-plots can provide insight into reaction mechanisms because kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) of both elements are reflected. However, the concept's validity in the case of reactions that show strong isotope fractionation needs to be examined. The anaerobic ethylbenzene degradation pathway of Aromatoleum aromaticum is initiated by the ethylbenzene dehydrogenase-catalyzed monohydroxylation of the benzylic carbon atom. Measurements of stable isotope ratios revealed highly pronounced hydrogen fractionation, which could not be adequately described by the classical Rayleigh approach. This study demonstrates the nonlinear behavior of hydrogen isotope ratios caused by anaerobic ethylbenzene hydroxylation both mathematically and experimentally, develops alternative dual plots to enable the comparison of reactions by considering the reacting atoms, and illustrates the importance of the stereochemical aspects of substrate and product for the quantification of hydrogen fractionation in an enzymatic reaction. With regard to field application, proposals for an improved CSIA evaluation procedure with respect to pronounced hydrogen enrichment are given.

  16. Relative humidity across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum via combined hydrogen-oxygen isotope paleohygrometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, F. A.; Bloch, J. I.; Secord, R.; Wing, S. L.; Kraus, M. J.; Boyer, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) presents an opportunity to characterize continental hydrologic changes during rapid and extreme global warming. The Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA, has long been recognized for the PETM sequences preserved there and sits in an ideal location for recording hydrologic changes in the interior of North America. The southeast Bighorn Basin is of particular interest because it contains not only alluvial paleosols and vertebrate fossils, but also macrofloral remains from the PETM. The carbon isotope excursion associated with this event is preserved in this part of the Basin in leaf wax lipids, tooth enamel, and bulk organic matter. To characterize the hydrologic changes that occurred during the PETM we are applying a suite of isotopic, paleobotanical and paleopedological approaches to sections in the southeast Bighorn Basin. Reported here are results from the combined hydrogen and oxygen isotope analysis aimed at reconstructing relative humidity. Oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of biogenic apatite from mammalian tooth enamel and fish scales vary with environment, physiology and diet. Because mammals are homeothermic, they primarily track surface water values with predictable physiological offsets. Hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) of leaf-wax lipids (long-chain n-alkanes) reflect both meteoric water δD values and additional D-enrichment caused by evapotranspiration. The enrichment factor between water δD and n-alkane δD can therefore be used as a proxy for relative humidity (RH). In this study, δ18O of surface water is estimated using the δ18O of Coryphodon tooth enamel. We use these δ18O values to estimate surface water δD values using the Global Meteoric Water Line (δD = 8δ18O + 10). We then calculate relative humidity from n-alkane δD values using a Craig-Gordon type isotopic model for D-enrichment caused by transpiration from leaves. Results of the combined hydrogen-oxygen isotope paleohygrometer indicate a general rise in

  17. Comparison of two stable hydrogen isotope-ratio measurement techniques on Antarctic surface-water and ice samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopple, J.A.; Hannon, J.E.; Coplen, T.B.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison of the new hydrogen isotope-ratio technique of Vaughn et al. ([Vaughn, B.H., White, J.W.C., Delmotte, M., Trolier, M., Cattani, O., Stievenard, M., 1998. An automated system for hydrogen isotope analysis of water. Chem. Geol. (Isot. Geosci. Sect.), 152, 309-319]; the article immediately preceding this article) for the analysis of water samples utilizing automated on-line reduction by elemental uranium showed that 94% of 165 samples of Antarctic snow, ice, and stream water agreed with the ??2H values determined by H2-H2O platinum equilibration, exhibiting a bias of +0.5??? and a 2 - ?? variation of 1.9???. The isotopic results of 10 reduction technique samples, however, gave ??2H values that differed by 3.5??? or more, and were too negative by as much as 5.4??? and too positive by as much as 4.9??? with respect to those determined using the platinum equilibration technique.

  18. Energy Spectrum and Time Variations of Cosmic-Ray Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes with BESS-Polar II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picot-Clemente, Nicolas

    The Balloon-Borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS-Polar II) flew successfully over Antarctica for 24.5 days in December 2007 through January 2008 during a period of minimum solar activity. BESS-Polar II is configured with a solenoidal superconducting magnet and a suite of precision particle detectors. It can accurately identify hydrogen and helium isotopes among the incoming cosmic-ray nuclei with energies from 0.2 up to about 1.5 GeV/n. The long duration of the flight, and the good stability of the detectors increased the number of cosmic-ray events previously recorded with BESS-Polar I by a factor of 5, reaching about 4.7 billion collected particles. This allows to study and measure energy spectrum and time variations of hydrogen and helium isotope fluxes with unprecedented precision. The isotope flux and ratio measurements with BESS-Polar II will be presented and compared to various propagation models. The time variations will also be presented along with the corresponding solar activity during the data taking period.

  19. Investigation of hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rate in mixed gas (H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}) at pressure up to 200 MPa using Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonov, V.V.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Musyayev, R.K.; Gurkin, A.I.

    2015-03-15

    Raman spectroscopy is a relevant method for obtaining objective data on isotopic exchange rate in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes, since it allows one to determine a gaseous mix composition in real time without sampling. We have developed a high-pressure fiber-optic probe to be used for obtaining protium Raman spectra under pressures up to 400 MPa and we have recorded spectral line broadening induced by molecule collisions starting from ∼ 40 MPa. Using this fiber-optic probe we have performed experiments to study isotopic exchange kinetics in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes (protium-deuterium) at pressures up to 200 MPa. Preliminary results show that the dependence of the average isotopic exchange rate related to pressure take unexpected values at the very beginning of the time evolution. More work is required to understand this inconsistency.

  20. Bridging the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis: ortho/para H(2) conversion, hydrogen isotope scrambling, and hydrogenation of olefins by Ir(CO)Cl(PPh(3))(2).

    PubMed

    Matthes, Jochen; Pery, Tal; Gründemann, Stephan; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Sabo-Etienne, Sylviane; Chaudret, Bruno; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2004-07-14

    Some transition metal complexes are known to catalyze ortho/para hydrogen conversion, hydrogen isotope scrambling, and hydrogenation reactions in liquid solution. Using the example of Vaska's complex, we present here evidence by NMR that the solvent is not necessary for these reactions to occur. Thus, solid frozen solutions or polycrystalline powdered samples of homogeneous catalysts may become heterogeneous catalysts. Comparative liquid- and solid-state studies provide novel insight into the reaction mechanisms.

  1. HETEROGENEOUS ISOTOPIC ANOMALIES OF SM AND GD IN THE NORTON COUNTY METEORITE: EVIDENCE FOR IRRADIATION FROM THE ACTIVE EARLY SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Hiroshi; Kondo, Tomoyo; Yoneda, Shigekazu

    2012-02-20

    Large and heterogeneous isotopic variations of {sup 150}Sm/{sup 149}Sm and {sup 158}Gd/{sup 157}Gd due to neutron capture reactions caused by cosmic-ray irradiation were found in chemical and mineral separates from the Norton County meteorite. The light-colored separates, consisting mainly of enstatite (Mg{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 6}), have a very large neutron fluence of 1.98 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} n cm{sup -2}, which is 10 times higher than that of the whole rock. Furthermore, four chemical separates showed a large variation in neutron fluences, ranging from 1.82 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} to 1.87 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} n cm{sup -2}. The variable amounts of neutron fluences from a small single fragment of the Norton County meteorite cannot be simply explained by single-stage cosmic-ray irradiation in space. Rare earth element (REE) analyses revealed that the fractions with high neutron fluences have similar chemical properties to those in the early condensates in the solar system, showing depletions of Eu and Yb in their REE abundance patterns. The data provide evidence for an activity of the early Sun (T Tauri), suggesting the migration of early and intense irradiation materials into the Norton County meteorite's parent body.

  2. Investigation of the microbial metabolism of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the kangaroo foregut by stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Scott; Kang, Alicia; Gulino, Lisa-Maree; Manefield, Mike; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Kienzle, Marco; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Dawson, Kerri; Klieve, Athol V

    2014-09-01

    Kangaroos ferment forage material in an enlarged forestomach analogous to the rumen, but in contrast to ruminants, they produce little or no methane. The objective of this study was to identify the dominant organisms and pathways involved in hydrogenotrophy in the kangaroo forestomach, with the broader aim of understanding how these processes are able to predominate over methanogenesis. Stable isotope analysis of fermentation end products and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) were used to investigate the organisms and biochemical pathways involved in the metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach. Our results clearly demonstrate that the activity of bacterial reductive acetogens is a key factor in the reduced methane output of kangaroos. In in vitro fermentations, the microbial community of the kangaroo foregut produced very little methane, but produced a significantly greater proportion of acetate derived from carbon dioxide than the microbial community of the bovine rumen. A bacterial operational taxonomic unit closely related to the known reductive acetogen Blautia coccoides was found to be associated with carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism in the kangaroo foregut. Other bacterial taxa including members of the genera Prevotella, Oscillibacter and Streptococcus that have not previously been reported as containing hydrogenotrophic organisms were also significantly associated with metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach.

  3. Investigation of the microbial metabolism of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the kangaroo foregut by stable isotope probing

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, Scott; Kang, Alicia; Gulino, Lisa-Maree; Manefield, Mike; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Kienzle, Marco; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Dawson, Kerri; Klieve, Athol V

    2014-01-01

    Kangaroos ferment forage material in an enlarged forestomach analogous to the rumen, but in contrast to ruminants, they produce little or no methane. The objective of this study was to identify the dominant organisms and pathways involved in hydrogenotrophy in the kangaroo forestomach, with the broader aim of understanding how these processes are able to predominate over methanogenesis. Stable isotope analysis of fermentation end products and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) were used to investigate the organisms and biochemical pathways involved in the metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach. Our results clearly demonstrate that the activity of bacterial reductive acetogens is a key factor in the reduced methane output of kangaroos. In in vitro fermentations, the microbial community of the kangaroo foregut produced very little methane, but produced a significantly greater proportion of acetate derived from carbon dioxide than the microbial community of the bovine rumen. A bacterial operational taxonomic unit closely related to the known reductive acetogen Blautia coccoides was found to be associated with carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism in the kangaroo foregut. Other bacterial taxa including members of the genera Prevotella, Oscillibacter and Streptococcus that have not previously been reported as containing hydrogenotrophic organisms were also significantly associated with metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach. PMID:24621520

  4. Mechanical properties and permeability of hydrogen isotopes through CrNi35WTiAl alloy, containing radiogenic helium

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimkin, I.P.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Boitsov, I.Y.; Malkov, I.L.; Musyaev, R.K.; Baurin, A.Y.; Shevnin, E.V.; Vertey, A.V.

    2015-03-15

    The long-term contact of structural materials (SM) with tritium-containing media makes their properties in terms of kinetic permeability of hydrogen isotopes change. This change is the consequence of the defect formation in SM due to the result of {sup 3}He build-up generated by the radioactive decay of tritium dissolved in SM. This paper presents the experimental results concerning the permeability of hydrogen isotopes through CrNi35WTiAl alloy containing {sup 3}He and the impact of the presence of {sup 3}He and H on its mechanical properties. Tensile tests of cylindrical samples containing various concentrations of {sup 3}He (90, 230 and 560 appm) have been performed in inert and hydrogen atmospheres. The build-up of {sup 3}He has been made using the 'helium trick' technique. The maximal decrease in the plastic characteristics of the CrNi35WTiAl alloy occurs in samples with the highest {sup 3}He (560 appm) content at 873 K. The permeability of deuterium through the CrNi35WTiAl alloy in the initial state and that with 560 appm of {sup 3}He content was explored. The presence of this {sup 3}He concentration has shown an increase in deuterium permeability, evidently due to structural changes in the material under the impact of radiogenic helium.

  5. Effects of Mild Water Stress and Diurnal Changes in Temperature and Humidity on the Stable Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotopic Composition of Leaf Water in Cornus stolonifera L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Lawrence B.; Ehleringer, James R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we make comparisons between the observed stable isotopic composition of leaf water and the predictions of the Craig-Gordon model of isotopic enrichment when plants (Cornus stolonifera L.) were exposed to natural, diurnal changes in temperature and humidity in a glasshouse. In addition, we determined the effects of mild water stress on the isotopic composition of leaf water. The model predicted different patterns of diurnal change for the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf water. The observed leaf water isotopic composition followed qualitatively similar patterns of diurnal change to those predicted by the model. At midday, however, the model always predicted a higher degree of heavy isotope enrichment than was actually observed in leaves. There was no effect of mild water stress on the hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf water. For the oxygen isotopic composition of leaf water, there was either no significant difference between control and water-stressed plants or the stressed plants had lower δ18O values, despite the enriched stem water isotopic composition observed for the stressed plants. PMID:16668385

  6. Meteoric water in normal fault systems: Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on authigenic phases in brittle fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. H.; Anderson, R.; Mulch, A.; Solum, J. G.; Valley, J. W.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    The nature of fluid circulation systems in normal fault systems is fundamental to understanding the nature of fluid movement within the upper crust, and has important implications for the on-going controversy about the strength of faults. Authigenic phases in clay gouges and fault breccias record the isotopic signature of the fluids they formed in equilibrium with, and can be used to understand the ‘plumbing system’ of brittle fault environments. We obtained paired oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on authigenic illite and/or smectite in clay gouge from normal faults in two geologic environments, 1.) low-angle normal faults (Ruby Mountains detachment, NV; Badwater Turtleback, CA; Panamint range-front detachment; CA; Amargosa detachment; CA; Waterman Hills detachment, CA), and 2.) An intracratonic high-angle normal fault (Moab Fault, UT). All authigenic phases in these clay gouges are moderately light isotopically with respect to oxygen (illite δ18O -2.0 - + 11.5 ‰ SMOW, smectite δ18O +3.6 and 17.9 ‰) and very light isotopically with respect to hydrogen (illite δD -148 to -98 ‰ SMOW, smectite δD -147 to -92 ‰). Fluid compositions calculated from the authigenic clays at temperatures of 50 - 130 ○C (as indicated by clay mineralogy) indicate that both illite and smectite in normal fault clay gouge formed in the presence of near-pristine to moderately-evolved meteoric fluids and that igneous or metamorphic fluids are not involved in clay gouge formation in these normal fault settings. We also obtained paired oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on chlorites derived from footwall chlorite breccias in 4 low-angle normal fault detachment systems (Badwater and Mormon Point Turtlebacks, CA, the Chemehuevi detachment, CA, and the Buckskin-Rawhide detachment, AZ). All chlorites are isotopically light to moderately light with respect to oxygen (δ18O +0.29 to +8.1 ‰ SMOW) and very light with respect to hydrogen (δD -97 to -113 ‰) and indicate

  7. Late glacial climate record of midwestern United States from the hydrogen isotope ratio of lake organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy R.V.; Syrup, K.A.; Baskaran, M.

    1995-09-15

    A hydrogen isotope time series obtained from an analysis of organic matter extracted form a lake core in Kalamazoo, southwestern Michigan, reveals four distinct isotope stages with the last 12,000 years that can be interpreted in terms of oscillations between cold and warm, dry climates. The most dramatic are a cold phase between 12,000 and 9000 years before present (B.P.), a warm, dry period between 8500 and 2000 years B.P., a cold period between 2000 and 1000 years B.P., and a warming trend since 1000 years B.P. The warming trend of the last 1000 years is comparable in magnitude to the mid-Holocene warm phase. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Vapor phase exsolution as a controlling factor in hydrogen isotope variation in granitic rocks: the Notch Peak granitic stock, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nabelek, P.I.; O'Neil, J.R.; Papike, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Notch Peak granitic stock, western Utah, is comprised of three concentric sequentially intruded rock types, from granite at the rim, to quartz monzonite I, to quartz monzonite II at the core. The ??18O values of whole rocks vary about an average of 9.4 (SMOW), irrespective of the rock type and position relative to contact, suggesting that the three magmas had the same parent. The whole rock ??D values in the stock range from -100 to -55. ??D values increase toward the cores of both quartz monzonite I and quartz monzonite II, resulting in concentric contours. The ??D contours of quartz monzonite II cross-cut those of quartz monzonite I, suggesting little isotopic interaction between these bodies and the absence of a late pervasive fluid phase. There is a positive correlation between ??D values and water content of the samples, where samples from each body define a distinct field. The positive correlation is explained by isotopic fractionation attendant on vapor exsolution from the crystallizing magma. An observed increase in ??D with the degree of chloritization, a trend opposite to that observed in systems where participation of meteoric water has been demonstrated, is the result of subsolidus interaction with the exsolved fluids. These results show that large variations in the hydrogen isotope ratios of a granitoid can arise by exsolution of a vapor phase from the melt on crystallization. In general, magmas with larger modal amount of primary hydrous phases will tend to have higher ??D values than those with small amounts of hydrous phases. Furthermore, the relatively high ??D values of chlorites at Notch Peak confirm the applicability of classical concepts of closed-system deuteric alteration to some granitoid bodies. Thus, meteoric water interaction need not be always invoked to explain hydrogen isotope variation and deuteric alteration in granitoids. ?? 1983.

  9. Experimental investigation of sulphur isotope partitioning during outgassing of hydrogen sulphide from diluted aqueous solutions and seawater.

    PubMed

    Baune, Claudia; Bottcher, Michael E

    2010-12-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen sulphide across the sediment-water interface and subsequent liberation to the atmosphere may occur in iron-deficient coastal marine environments with enhanced microbial activity in surface sediments and corresponding accumulation of dissolved H2S in near-surface pore waters. The involvement of analogue processes in periods of global mass extinctions during Earth's history (e.g. at the Permian-Triassic boundary) is currently in discussion [L.R. Kump, A. Pavlov, and M. Arthur,Massive Release of Hydrogen Sulfide to the Surface Ocean and Atmosphere During Intervals of Oceanic Anoxia, Geology 33, 397 (2005)]. The outgassing of H₂S is associated with a fractionation of the stable sulphur isotopes, which has so far only been investigated experimentally at selected acidic and neutral pH values, and no experiments with seawater had been carried out. In this communication, we report on sulphur isotope fractionation that takes place during the experimental degassing of H₂S from aqueous solution by an inert gas (N₂) at 21 °C. Experiments were conducted in the pH range between 2.6 and 10.8, corresponding to the dominance fields of dissolved hydrogen sulphide (H₂S(aq)), bisulphide (HS-(aq)), and mixtures of both sulphide species. Overall isotope enrichment factors between -1.6 and +3.0‰ were observed, with the residual dissolved sulphide being enriched or depleted in ³⁴S compared to the liberated H₂S at low and high pH values, respectively. The difference in the low and high pH isotope fractionation effects can be explained by isotope exchange between H₂S(aq) and HS-(aq) [B. Fry, H. Gest, and J.M. Hayes, Sulfur Isotope Effects Associated with Protonation of HS- and Volatilization of H₂S, Chem. Geol. (Isot. Geosci. Sec.) 58, 253 (1986); R. Geßler and K. von Gehlen, Investigation of Sulfur Isotope Fractionation Between H2S Gas and Aqueous Solutions, Fresenius J. Anal. Chem. 324, 130 (1986)] followed by the subsequent transfer of H

  10. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions as indicators of granite genesis in the New England Batholith, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Shaw, S.E.; Flood, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies of a number of granite suites and mineral separates from the New England Batholith indicate that ??O18 can be used to discriminate the major granite protoliths. The granite suites previously subdivided on the basis of mineralogical and geochemical criteria into S-type (sedimentary) and I-type (igneous) have ??O18 values consistently higher in the S-type granites (10.4-12.5) than in the spatially related I-type plutons (7.7-9.9). There appears to be a systematic variation in ??O18 from the most S-type to the most I-type granites, the dividing point between the two occuring at ??O18 equal to 10. A group of leucocratic granites that form about half of the batholith and difficult to classify mineralogically and geochemically is found to have low ??O18 values (6.4-8.1), suggesting an affinity to the most I-type granites. A single leucogranite pluton with minor muscovite has a ??O18 of 9.6 which is significantly higher than other leucogranites indicating a different origin perhaps involving amphibole fractionation. The behavior of ??D in the plutonic rocks is much less systematic than ??O18. Excluding samples collected adjacent to major faults, the ??D values show a rough positive correlation with water content similar to, but less pronounced than, the trend previously observed in the Berridale Batholith, southeastern Australia. This relation is considered to reflect an interaction between meteoric water and the granites, the largest effect being observed in samples with the least amount of water. Of note is the generally lower ??D values of the upper Paleozoic New England Batholith compared with the Silurian Berridale Batholith. This difference may be related to a near equatorial paleolatitude of 22 ??S in the Silurian and near polar paleolatitudes in the late Carboniferous that have been inferred for these regions. Granite samples collected from near major faults, and one ignimbrite sample of rhyodacite composition, have very low ??D

  11. Hydrogen bond geometries and proton tautomerism of homoconjugated anions of carboxylic acids studied via H/D isotope effects on 13C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Tolstoy, Peter M; Koeppe, Benjamin; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S; Smirnov, Sergei N; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2012-11-26

    Ten formally symmetric anionic OHO hydrogen bonded complexes, modeling Asp/Glu amino acid side chain interactions in nonaqueous environment (CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl solution, 200-110 K) have been studied by (1)H, (2)H, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, i.e. intermolecularly H-bonded homoconjugated anions of acetic, chloroacetic, dichloroacetic, trifluoroacetic, trimethylacetic, and isobutyric acids, and intramolecularly H-bonded hydrogen succinate, hydrogen rac-dimethylsuccinate, hydrogen maleate, and hydrogen phthalate. In particular, primary H/D isotope effects on the hydrogen bond proton signals as well as secondary H/D isotope effects on the (13)C signals of the carboxylic groups are reported and analyzed. We demonstrate that in most of the studied systems there is a degenerate proton tautomerism between O-H···O(-) and O(-)···H-O structures which is fast in the NMR time scale. The stronger is the proton donating ability of the acid, the shorter and more symmetric are the H-bonds in each tautomer of the homoconjugate. For the maleate and phthalate anions exhibiting intramolecular hydrogen bonds, evidence for symmetric single well potentials is obtained. We propose a correlation between H/D isotope effects on carboxylic carbon chemical shifts and the proton transfer coordinate, q(1) = ½(r(OH) - r(HO)), which allows us to estimate the desired OHO hydrogen bond geometries from the observed (13)C NMR parameters, taking into account the degenerate proton tautomerism.

  12. 60 Myr records of major elements and Pb-Nd isotopes from hydrogenous ferromanganese crusts: Reconstruction of seawater paleochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, M.; O'Nions, R. K.; Hein, J.R.; Banakar, V.K.

    1999-01-01

    We compare the time series of major element geochemical and Pb- and Nd-isotopic composition obtained for seven hydrogenous ferromanganese crusts from the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans which cover the last 60 Myr. Average crust growth rates and age-depth relationships were determined directly for the last about 10 Myr using 10Be/9Be profiles. In the absence of other information these were extrapolated to the base of the crusts assuming constant growth rates and constant initial 10Be/9Be ratios due to the lack of additional information. Co contents have also been used previously to estimate growth rates in Co-rich Pacific and Atlantic seamount crusts (Puteanus and Halbach, 1988). A comparison of 10Be/9Be- and Co-based dating of three Co-rich crusts supports the validity of this approach and confirms the earlier chronologies derived from extrapolated 10Be/9Be-based growth rates back to 60 Ma. Our data show that the flux of Co into Co-poor crusts has been considerably lower. The relationship between growth rate and Co content for the Co-poor crusts developed from these data is in good agreement with a previous study of a wider range of marine deposits (Manheim, 1986). The results suggest that the Co content provides detailed information on the growth history of ferromanganese crusts, particularly prior to 10-12 Ma where the 10Be-based method is not applicable. The distributions of Pb and Nd isotopes in the deep oceans over the last 60 Myr are expected to be controlled by two main factors: (a) variations of oceanic mixing patterns and flow paths of water masses with distinct isotopic signatures related to major paleogeographic changes and (b) variability of supply rates or provenance of detrital material delivered to the ocean, linked to climate change (glaciations) or major tectonic uplift. The major element profiles of crusts in this study show neither systematic features which are common to crusts with similar isotope records nor do they generally show

  13. Oxygen, hydrogen, sulfur, and carbon isotopes in the Pea Ridge magnetite-apatite deposit, southeast Missouri, and sulfur isotope comparisons to other iron deposits in the region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Craig A.; Day, Warren C.; Rye, Robert O.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen, hydrogen, sulfur, and carbon isotopes have been analyzed in the Pea Ridge magnetite-apatite deposit, the largest historic producer among the known iron deposits in the southeast Missouri portion of the 1.5 to 1.3 Ga eastern granite-rhyolite province. The data were collected to investigate the sources of ore fluids, conditions of ore formation, and provenance of sulfur, and to improve the general understanding of the copper, gold, and rare earth element potential of iron deposits regionally. The δ18O values of Pea Ridge magnetite are 1.9 to 4.0‰, consistent with a model in which some magnetite crystallized from a melt and other magnetite—perhaps the majority—precipitated from an aqueous fluid of magmatic origin. The δ18O values of quartz, apatite, actinolite, K-feldspar, sulfates, and calcite are significantly higher, enough so as to indicate growth or equilibration under cooler conditions than magnetite and/or in the presence of a fluid that was not entirely magmatic. A variety of observations, including stable isotope observations, implicate a second fluid that may ultimately have been meteoric in origin and may have been modified by isotopic exchange with rocks or by evaporation during storage in lakes.Sulfur isotope analyses of sulfides from Pea Ridge and seven other mineral deposits in the region reveal two distinct populations that average 3 and 13‰. Two sulfur sources are implied. One was probably igneous melts or rocks belonging to the mafic- to intermediate-composition volcanic suite that is present at or near most of the iron deposits; the other was either melts or volcanic rocks that had degassed very extensively, or else volcanic lakes that had trapped rising magmatic gases. The higher δ34S values correspond to deposits or prospects where copper is noteworthy—the Central Dome portion of the Boss deposit, the Bourbon deposit, and the Vilander prospective area. The correspondence suggests that (1) sulfur either limited the deposition

  14. Vibronic model for H/D isotopic “self-organization” effects in hydrogen bond cyclic trimeric systems: 4-Bromopyrazole crystal IR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flakus, Henryk T.; Pyzik, Aleksandra

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model has been proposed, aiming to explain a new kind of H/D isotopic effects concerning hydrogen bond systems, i.e. the H/D isotopic "self-organization" effects, recently deduced from the IR spectra of molecular crystals. The problem of existence of these kinds of co-operative effects was considered in the limits of a vibronic model in the Herzberg-Teller approximation, for cyclic trimeric systems of hydrogen bonds. It was shown that non-conventional attraction forces between three identical hydrogen isotope atoms, resulting from the vibronic mechanism, are responsible for excess stabilization energy of cyclic hydrogen bond trimers. The H/D "self-organization" effects were deduced to be negligible in the case of non-symmetric HDD, or HHD-type trimers, containing both, hydrogen and deuterium bonds in one ring trimer. The symmetric trimers of the HHH and of the DDD-type should be more stable, when compared with the HDD, or the HHD-type trimer properties. This thermodynamic effect explains the IR spectral properties of molecular crystals containing cyclic trimers of hydrogen bonds in their lattices, accompanying to isotopic dilution. The results of the theoretical considerations were confronted with the IR spectra of 4-bromopyrazole crystals, which were measured in a wide temperature range (from 298 to 77 K), using polarized light, in the frequency ranges of the proton or deuterium stretching vibrations bands.

  15. Relationship between the hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of deer bone and their use in the estimation of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormie, A. B.; Luz, B.; Schwarcz, H. P.

    1994-08-01

    The hydrogen isotopic ratio of bone collagen (δDb) and the oxygen isotopic ratio of bone phosphate (δ 18Ob) from North American white-tailed deer are each related to both the isotopic ratio of local rain and relative humidity during the growing season. The humidity corrected bone δDb and δ 18Ob are highly correlated with each other with a correlation coefficient of 0.962. The regression slope of this equation (8.0) reflects the δD vs. δ 18O slope of meteoric water when we use a model which assumes that bone oxygen derives from leaf water rather than from drinking or environmental water. Therefore, growing season rain is the likely source of bone H and O. The effects of humidity are significantly greater for δ 18Ob than for δDb. Relative humidity (RH) can be estimated with moderate accuracy (± 6%) from a combination of bone phosphate δ 18Ob and collagen δDb and δ 15Nb. This indicates some potential benefits of using fossil bone for evaluating palaeohumidity. The estimate of RH improves to ± 4% when only data from warm climate areas are considered. It appears that for cold climate areas of North America, there may be a discrepancy between the actual leaf water values and the leaf water isotopic values predicted on the basis of the leaf water models used here. It seems possible that the further study of bone isotopic values may lead to a better understanding of how the average leaf water values of an area are related to local environment.

  16. Relationship between the hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of deer bone and their use in the estimation of relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Cormie, A.B.; Schwarcz, H.P. ); Luz, B. )

    1994-08-01

    The hydrogen isotopic ratio of bone collagen ([delta]Db) and the oxygen isotopic ratio of bone phosphate ([delta][sup 18]Ob) from North American white-tailed deer are each related to both the isotopic ratio of local rain and relative humidity during the growing season. The humidity corrected bone [delta]Db and [delta][sup 18]Ob are highly correlated with each other with a correlation coefficient of 0.962. The regression slope of this equation (8.0) reflects the [delta]D vs. [delta][sup 18]O slope of meteoric water when one uses a model which assumes that bone oxygen derives from leaf water rather than from drinking or environmental water. Therefore, growing season rain is the likely source of bone H and O. The effects of humidity are significantly greater for [delta][sup 18]Ob than for [delta]Db. Relative humidity (RH) can be estimated with moderate accuracy ([+-]6%) from a combination of bone phosphate [delta][sup 18]Ob and collagen [delta]Db and [delta][sup 15]b. This indicates some potential benefits of using fossil bone for evaluating palaeohumidity. The estimate of RH improves to [+-]4% when only data from warm climate areas are considered. It appears that for cold climate areas of North America, there may be a discrepancy between the actual leaf water values and the leaf water isotopic values predicted on the basis of the leaf water models used here. It seems possible that the further study of bone isotopic values may lead to a better understanding of how the average leaf water values of an area are related to local environment.

  17. The effect of soil hydrology on the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of plants' source water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kuilian; Feng, Xiahong

    2001-02-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the isotopic composition of plants' source water is the main factor affecting the isotopic composition of tree rings. Because of soil hydrological processes, soil water as the source water for plants may isotopically differ from precipitation that contains climatic information (such as surface temperature). This study addresses the effects of soil hydrological processes on the isotopic compositions of soil water and discusses how these effects affect interpretations of tree ring data in isotopic dendroclimatology. We collected precipitation, soil gas at two depths (20 and 50 cm), and twigs from a maple tree ( Acer saccharum) on a biweekly basis during the growing season in 1997-1999 at Hanover, NH, USA. Water was extracted from the twig samples by vacuum distillation. All water samples were analyzed for both δD and δ 18O. Soil CO 2 was extracted from soil gas and measured for the δ 18O values, and using the soil temperature and assuming isotopic equilibrium between CO 2 and H 2O, we calculated the δ 18O values of soil water. Comparisons among the isotopic time series of each type of sample indicate the following. (1) The isotopic composition of soil water is much less variable than that of precipitation, suggesting isotopic mixing between waters of different precipitation events. (2) In early spring, soil water at all depths is isotopically similar to winter precipitation, but with time the surface soil water becomes progressively enriched in deuterium and 18O due to infiltration of summer rain and enrichment through soil water evaporation. (3) The influence of summer precipitation decreases with increasing depth, and soil at 50 cm can only receive water from large storms. (4) Replacement of old soil water with new infiltrating water is dependent upon frequency and intensity of growing season precipitation, and it is generally more efficient in a wet year than in a dry year. (5) The tree we studied uses water mainly from near

  18. On-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples using elemental chromium: an extension for high temperature elemental-analyzer techniques.

    PubMed

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Gilevska, Tetyana; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Meijer, Harro A J; Brand, Willi A; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature conversion (HTC) technique using an elemental analyzer with a glassy carbon tube and filling (temperature conversion/elemental analysis, TC/EA) is a widely used method for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water and many solid and liquid organic samples with analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method may produce inaccurate δ(2)H results, with values deviating by more than 20 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1‰) from the true value for some materials. We show that a single-oven, chromium-filled elemental analyzer coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability for hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic substances (Cr-EA method). Hot chromium maximizes the yield of molecular hydrogen in a helium carrier gas by irreversibly and quantitatively scavenging all reactive elements except hydrogen. In contrast, under TC/EA conditions, heteroelements like nitrogen or chlorine (and other halogens) can form hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen chloride (HCl) and this can cause isotopic fractionation. The Cr-EA technique thus expands the analytical possibilities for on-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples significantly. This method yielded reproducibility values (1-sigma) for δ(2)H measurements on water and caffeine samples of better than 1.0 and 0.5 mUr, respectively. To overcome handling problems with water as the principal calibration anchor for hydrogen isotopic measurements, we have employed an effective and simple strategy using reference waters or other liquids sealed in silver-tube segments. These crimped silver tubes can be employed in both the Cr-EA and TC/EA techniques. They simplify considerably the normalization of hydrogen-isotope measurement data to the VSMOW-SLAP (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water-Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, and their use improves accuracy of the data by eliminating evaporative loss and associated isotopic fractionation while

  19. On-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples using elemental chromium: An extension for high temperature elemental-analyzer techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Gilevska, Tetyana; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Meijer, Harro A.J.; Brand, Willi A.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature conversion (HTC) technique using an elemental analyzer with a glassy carbon tube and filling (temperature conversion/elemental analysis, TC/EA) is a widely used method for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water and many solid and liquid organic samples with analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method may produce inaccurate δ2H results, with values deviating by more than 20 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1‰) from the true value for some materials. We show that a single-oven, chromium-filled elemental analyzer coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability for hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic substances (Cr-EA method). Hot chromium maximizes the yield of molecular hydrogen in a helium carrier gas by irreversibly and quantitatively scavenging all reactive elements except hydrogen. In contrast, under TC/EA conditions, heteroelements like nitrogen or chlorine (and other halogens) can form hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen chloride (HCl) and this can cause isotopic fractionation. The Cr-EA technique thus expands the analytical possibilities for on-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples significantly. This method yielded reproducibility values (1-sigma) for δ2H measurements on water and caffeine samples of better than 1.0 and 0.5 mUr, respectively. To overcome handling problems with water as the principal calibration anchor for hydrogen isotopic measurements, we have employed an effective and simple strategy using reference waters or other liquids sealed in silver-tube segments. These crimped silver tubes can be employed in both the Cr-EA and TC/EA techniques. They simplify considerably the normalization of hydrogen-isotope measurement data to the VSMOW-SLAP (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water-Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, and their use improves accuracy of the data by eliminating evaporative loss and associated isotopic fractionation while

  20. Hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  1. Hydrogen isotope abundances in the solar system. Part II: Meteorites with terrestrial-like D / H ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, François; Javoy, Marc; Halbout, Jérôme; Dimon, Bernard; Merlivat, Liliane

    1987-07-01

    Hydrogen isotopic compositions were determined by progressive pyrolysis in type 6 to type 3 ordinary chondrites. A marked decrease in the isotopic composition patterns was observed at intermediate temperatures (250-300°C) and results from the pyrolysis of a D-depleted component. A δD value of-400‰ for this component can be inferred from a mathematical treatment of the H concentration release pattern. At higher temperatures (600 to 900°C) the bimodal δD pattern was observed in Hedjaz (L3-L6) with negative δD values, suggesting the presence of a carbonaceous chondrite-like organic polymer in this meteorite. A peak in the δD pattern was observed at high temperature in all the analyzed samples, suggesting that D-rich H is widespread among meteorites. A minimum of 50% of the total H is concentrated in the fine-grained particles (the "holy smoke") of equilibrated chondrites, reinforcing the idea that H is associated with the C. An internal correlation between the bulk isotopic composition of HT H 2 and the maximum measured D/H ratio is interpreted as the result of either the mixing of two components (Model 1), namely a D-depleted H at -400‰ and a D-rich H at +5000‰, or a progressive isotopic fractionation of a D-depleted reservoir (Model 2). The first model (the favored one) implies that the two components were present in different proportions at the time of the formation of each meteorite, and that metamorphism has homogeneized the two phases. The uniqueness of the two isotopic end-members for all meteorites is not demonstrated. The second model relates the isotopic fractionation of the D-rich phase to the degree of equilibration of chondrites. All the isotopic variations reported in this work for ordinary chondrites can be explained quantitatively by either one of these two models. The upper and lower limits for the D/Hratios of the D-rich and of the D-depleted H in meteorites are calculated to be 1.1 × 10 -3 and 9 × 10 -5, respectively.

  2. Compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis of sub-parts per billion level waterborne petroleum hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.; Huang, Y.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis (CSCIA and CSHIA) has been increasingly used to study the source, transport, and bioremediation of organic contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. In natural aquatic systems, dissolved contaminants represent the bioavailable fraction that generally is of the greatest toxicological significance. However, determining the isotopic ratios of waterborne hydrophobic contaminants in natural waters is very challenging because of their extremely low concentrations (often at sub-parts ber billion, or even lower). To acquire sufficient quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with 10 ng/L concentration for CSHIA, more than 1000 L of water must be extracted. Conventional liquid/liquid or solid-phase extraction is not suitable for such large volume extractions. We have developed a new approach that is capable of efficiently sampling sub-parts per billion level waterborne petroleum hydrocarbons for CSIA. We use semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to accumulate hydrophobic contaminants from polluted waters and then recover the compounds in the laboratory for CSIA. In this study, we demonstrate, under a variety of experimental conditions (different concentrations, temperatures, and turbulence levels), that SPMD-associated processes do not induce C and H isotopic fractionations. The applicability of SPMD-CSIA technology to natural systems is further demonstrated by determining the ??13C and ??D values of petroleum hydrocarbons present in the Pawtuxet River, RI. Our results show that the combined SPMD-CSIA is an effective tool to investigate the source and fate of hydrophobic contaminants in the aquatic environments.

  3. Fifteen Years of Stable Oxygen, Hydrogen, and Carbon Isotopic Data from the Surface Waters in South Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swart, P. K.; Price, R. M.

    2008-05-01

    The flow of water into the coastal zone of South Florida has been subject to significant anthropogenic modification over the past 100 years. Information on pre-anthropogenic conditions has been usually obtained from proxy indicators such as the oxygen isotope ratios contained in sedimentological archives such as corals and sediment cores. The current effort to restore water flows to historic conditions combined with a 10 year record of stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements from > 100 locations in the Everglades, Biscayne Bay, and the west coast and a > 15 year record from Florida Bay offers a unique opportunity to study the influence of changes in water management upon this proxy. Such information is important in assessing the veracity of previous oxygen isotopic interpretations as well as the influence of the restoration effort to influence water flows. Two of the significant findings are; 1) There has been a continual decline in the δ18O of the freshwater end-member reaching the western portion of Florida Bay suggesting a reduction a change in the hydrological status of this portion of Florida Bay; 2) there has been a decline in the δ13C of the dissolved inorganic carbon in all the coastal environments, which is ten times the rate of decline in the δ13C of the atmosphere originated from the burning of fossil fuel. These two examples suggest multiple influences upon the coastal ecosystem relating to anthropogenic activity.

  4. Stable hydrogen isotope ratios of lignin methoxyl groups as a paleoclimate proxy and constraint of the geographical origin of wood.

    PubMed

    Keppler, Frank; Harper, David B; Kalin, Robert M; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Farmer, Nicola; Davis, Simon; Schmidt, Hanns-Ludwig; Brown, David M; Hamilton, John T G

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of organic compounds are valuable tools for determining the geographical origin, identity, authenticity or history of samples from a vast range of sources such as sediments, plants and animals, including humans. Hydrogen isotope ratios (delta(2)H values) of methoxyl groups in lignin from wood of trees grown in different geographical areas were measured using compound-specific pyrolysis isotope ratio mass spectrometry analysis. Lignin methoxyl groups were depleted in (2)H relative to both meteoric water and whole wood. A high correlation (r(2) = 0.91) was observed between the delta(2)H values of the methoxyl groups and meteoric water, with a relatively uniform fractionation of -216 +/- 19 per thousand recorded with respect to meteoric water over a range of delta(2)H values from -110 in northern Norway to +20 per thousand in Yemen. Thus, woods from northern latitudes can be clearly distinguished from those from tropical regions. By contrast, the delta(2)H values of bulk wood were only relatively poorly correlated (r(2) = 0.47) with those of meteoric water. Measurement of the delta(2)H values of lignin methoxyl groups is potentially a powerful tool that could be of use not only in the constraint of the geographical origin of lignified material but also in paleoclimate, food authenticity and forensic investigations.

  5. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope analyses of bowhead whale baleen as biochemical recorders of migration and arctic environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deHart, Pieter A. P.; Picco, Candace M.

    2015-06-01

    An analysis of the stable isotopes of oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) was used to examine the linkage between sea ice concentration and the migration of western arctic bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus; WABW). We compared δ18O and δD variability along the length of WABW baleen with isotopic values of zooplankton prey from different WABW habitat, with published δ13C and δ15N data, and with historical sea ice records. Zooplankton signatures varied widely (δ18O = -13‰-56‰; δD = -220‰ to -75‰), with regional separation between winter (Bering Sea) and summer (eastern Beaufort Sea) habitats of WABW observable in δD. The δ18O and δD of WABW varied significantly along the length of baleen (δ18O = 8-18‰; δD = -180 to -80‰), confirming seasonal migration and reflecting distinct regional dietary variation in isotopes. WABW migration appears to have varied concomitant with temporal sea ice concentration (SIC) changes; in years with high SIC, the difference in δD of WABW baleen between seasonal habitats was significantly greater than low SIC periods. This work shows that SIC is not only a determinant of habitat accessibility for WABW, but baleen may also be a record of historical SIC and Arctic climate.

  6. Effects of trophic level and metamorphosis on discrimination of hydrogen isotopes in a plant-herbivore system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Jacob M.; Wolf, Nathan; Stricker, Craig A.; Collier, Timothy R.; del Rio, Martinez Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes in ecological studies requires that we know the magnitude of discrimination factors between consumer and element sources. The causes of variation in discrimination factors for carbon and nitrogen have been relatively well studied. In contrast, the discrimination factors for hydrogen have rarely been measured. We grew cabbage looper caterpillars (Trichoplusia ni) on cabbage (Brassica oleracea) plants irrigated with four treatments of deuterium-enriched water (δD = -131, -88, -48, and -2‰, respectively), allowing some of them to reach adulthood as moths. Tissue δD values of plants, caterpillars, and moths were linearly correlated with the isotopic composition of irrigation water. However, the slope of these relationships was less than 1, and hence, discrimination factors depended on the δD value of irrigation water. We hypothesize that this dependence is an artifact of growing plants in an environment with a common atmospheric δD value. Both caterpillars and moths were significantly enriched in deuterium relative to plants by ~45‰ and 23‰ respectively, but the moths had lower tissue to plant discrimination factors than did the caterpillars. If the trophic enrichment documented here is universal, δD values must be accounted for in geographic assignment studies. The isotopic value of carbon was transferred more or less faithfully across trophic levels, but δ15N values increased from plants to insects and we observed significant non-trophic 15N enrichment in the metamorphosis from larvae to adult.

  7. Assessing the Utility of Hydrogen, Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes in Estimating Consumer Allochthony in Two Shallow Eutrophic Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Syväranta, Jari; Scharnweber, Kristin; Brauns, Mario; Hilt, Sabine; Mehner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen stable isotopes (δ2H) have recently been used to complement δ13C and δ15N in food web studies due to their potentially greater power to separate sources of organic matter in aquatic food webs. However, uncertainties remain regarding the use of δ2H, since little is known about the potential variation in the amount of exchangeable hydrogen (Hex) among common sample materials or the patterns of δ2H when entire food webs are considered. We assessed differences in Hex among the typical sample materials in freshwater studies and used δ2H, δ13C and δ15N to compare their effectiveness in tracing allochthonous matter in food webs of two small temperate lakes. Our results showed higher average amounts of Hex in animal tissues (27% in fish and macroinvertebrates, 19% in zooplankton) compared to most plant material (15% in terrestrial plants and 8% in seston/periphyton), with the exception of aquatic vascular plants (23%, referred to as macrophytes). The amount of Hex correlated strongly with sample lipid content (inferred from C:N ratios) in fish and zooplankton samples. Overall, the three isotopes provided good separation of sources (seston, periphyton, macrophytes and allochthonous organic matter), particularly the δ2H followed by δ13C. Aquatic macrophytes revealed unexpectedly high δ2H values, having more elevated δ2H values than terrestrial organic matter with direct implications for estimating consumer allochthony. Organic matter from macrophytes significantly contributed to the food webs in both lakes highlighting the need to include macrophytes as a potential source when using stable isotopes to estimate trophic structures and contributions from allochthonous sources. PMID:27167517

  8. Use of the hydrogen and carbon stable isotopes in the characterization of oils from the Potiguar Basin (onshore), Northeastern Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Santos Neto, E.V.; Hayes, J.M. ); Trindade, L.A. )

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of marine-evaporitic, lacustrine, and mixed oils were measured in selected samples from the onshore Potiguar Basin, Brazil. The isotopic data, together with GC and GC/MS results and geological information, were used to investigate the relationship between [delta]D and [delta][sup 13]C in the assessment of source rock facies, thermal maturity, biodegradation, and distance of secondary migration. The marine-evaporitic oils are depleted in D (-l 17[per thousand] to -136[per thousand]), and enriched in [sup 13]C (-25.6[per thousand] to - 26.4[per thousand]), whereas the lacustrine oils are enriched in D (-88[per thousand] to -101[per thousand]) and depleted in [sup 13]C (-30.1[per thousand] to -33.6[per thousand]). Values of [delta]D for mixed oils are intermediate between those of marine- evaporitic and lacustrine oils. The results suggest that [delta]D is a reliable tool for identification of oils that differ genetically, and the hydrogen isotopic compositions of the oils can be related to the [delta]D of the water in the paleoenvironments where the organic matter was produced. Therefore, [delta]D can be a useful tool to estimate, at least roughly, the paleo-[delta]D of the waters of the depositional environments and indirectly may give clues about paleo-climatic conditions. There was no detectable influence ofthermal maturation, biodegradation, or distance of secondary migration on the 8D of the oils. Marine-evaporitic and lacustrine oils can easily be distinguished using [delta][sup 13]C, but resolution of marine-evaporitic and mixed oils is not always possible. This indicates that [delta][sup 13]C can be a good tool for geochemical correlation, but is not diagnostic per se regarding the origins of all different types of oils. However, coupling of [delta][sup 13]C and [delta]D provides more powerful results.

  9. Geometries and tautomerism of OHN hydrogen bonds in aprotic solution probed by H/D isotope effects on (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, Peter M; Guo, Jing; Koeppe, Benjamin; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S; Smirnov, Sergei N; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-10-14

    The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of 17 OHN hydrogen-bonded complexes formed by CH(3)(13)COOH(D) with 14 substituted pyridines, 2 amines, and N-methylimidazole have been measured in the temperature region between 110 and 150 K using CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl mixture as solvent. The slow proton and hydrogen bond exchange regime was reached, and the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group were measured. In combination with the analysis of the corresponding (1)H chemical shifts, it was possible to distinguish between OHN hydrogen bonds exhibiting a single proton position and those exhibiting a fast proton tautomerism between molecular and zwitterionic forms. Using H-bond correlations, we relate the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group with the OHN hydrogen bond geometries.

  10. Bird Migration and Avian Influenza: A Comparison of Hydrogen Stable Isotopes and Satellite Tracking Methods.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Eli S; Kelly, Jeffrey F; Xiao, Xiangming; Takekawa, John Y; Hill, Nichola J; Yamage, Mat; Haque, Enam Ul; Islam, Mohammad Anwarul; Mundkur, Taej; Yavuz, Kiraz Erciyas; Leader, Paul; Leung, Connie Y H; Smith, Bena; Spragens, Kyle A; Vandegrift, Kurt; Hosseini, Parviez R; Saif, Samia; Mohsanin, Samiul; Mikolon, Andrea; Islam, Ausrafal; George, Acty; Sivananinthaperumal, Balachandran; Daszak, Peter; Newman, Scott H

    2014-10-01

    Satellite-based tracking of migratory waterfowl is an important tool for understanding the potential role of wild birds in the long-distance transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza. However, employing this technique on a continental scale is prohibitively expensive. This study explores the utility of stable isotope ratios in feathers in examining both the distances traveled by migratory birds and variation in migration behavior. We compared the satellite-derived movement data of 22 ducks from 8 species captured at wintering areas in Bangladesh, Turkey, and Hong Kong with deuterium ratios (δD) of these and other individuals captured at the same locations. We derived likely molting locations from the satellite tracking data and generated expected isotope ratios based on an interpolated map of δD in rainwater. Although δD was correlated with the distance between wintering and molting locations, surprisingly, measured δD values were not correlated with either expected values or latitudes of molting sites. However, population-level parameters derived from the satellite-tracking data, such as mean distance between wintering and molting locations and variation in migration distance, were reflected by means and variation of the stable isotope values. Our findings call into question the relevance of the rainfall isotope map for Asia for linking feather isotopes to molting locations, and underscore the need for extensive ground truthing in the form of feather-based isoscapes. Nevertheless, stable isotopes from feathers could inform disease models by characterizing the degree to which regional breeding populations interact at common wintering locations. Feather isotopes also could aid in surveying wintering locations to determine where high-resolution tracking techniques (e.g. satellite tracking) could most effectively be employed. Moreover, intrinsic markers such as stable isotopes offer the only means of inferring movement information from birds that have died

  11. Bird migration and avian influenza: a comparison of hydrogen stable isotopes and satellite tracking methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridge, Eli S.; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Xiao, Xiangming; Takekawa, John Y.; Hill, Nichola J.; Yamage, Mat; Haque, Enam Ul; Islam, Mohammad Anwarul; Mundkur, Taej; Yavuz, Kiraz Erciyas; Leader, Paul; Leung, Connie Y.H.; Smith, Bena; Spragens, Kyle A.; Vandegrift, Kurt J.; Hosseini, Parviez R.; Saif, Samia; Mohsanin, Samiul; Mikolon, Andrea; Islam, Ausrafal; George, Acty; Sivananinthaperumal, Balachandran; Daszak, Peter; Newman, Scott H.

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based tracking of migratory waterfowl is an important tool for understanding the potential role of wild birds in the long-distance transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza. However, employing this technique on a continental scale is prohibitively expensive. This study explores the utility of stable isotope ratios in feathers in examining both the distances traveled by migratory birds and variation in migration behavior. We compared the satellite-derived movement data of 22 ducks from 8 species captured at wintering areas in Bangladesh, Turkey, and Hong Kong with deuterium ratios (δD) in the feathers of these and other individuals captured at the same locations. We derived likely molting locations from the satellite tracking data and generated expected isotope ratios based on an interpolated map of δD in rainwater. Although δD was correlated with the distance between wintering and molting locations, surprisingly, measured δD values were not correlated with either expected values or latitudes of molting sites. However, population-level parameters derived from the satellite-tracking data, such as mean distance between wintering and molting locations and variation in migration distance, were reflected by means and variation of the stable isotope values. Our findings call into question the relevance of the rainfall isotope map for Asia for linking feather isotopes to molting locations, and underscore the need for extensive ground truthing in the form of feather-based isoscapes. Nevertheless, stable isotopes from feathers could inform disease models by characterizing the degree to which regional breeding populations interact at common wintering locations. Feather isotopes also could aid in surveying wintering locations to determine where high-resolution tracking techniques (e.g. satellite tracking) could most effectively be employed. Moreover, intrinsic markers such as stable isotopes offer the only means of inferring movement information from

  12. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Measurements of Alcohols and Organic Acids by Online Pyroprobe-GC-IRMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Fu, Qi; Niles, Paul B.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The detection of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, combined with evidence showing widespread water-rock interaction during martian history, suggests that the production of methane on Mars may be the result of mineral surface-catalyzed CO2 and or CO reduction during Fisher-Tropsch Type (FTT) reactions. A better understanding of these reaction pathways and corresponding C and H isotope fractionations is critical to deciphering the synthesis of organic compounds produced under abiotic hydrothermal conditions. Described here is a technique for the extraction and analysis of both C and H isotopes from alcohols (C1-C4) and organic acids (C1-C6). This work is meant to provide a "proof of concept" for making meaningful isotope measurements on complex mixtures of solid-phase hydrocarbons and other intermediary products produced during high-temperature and high-pressure synthesis on mineral-catalyzed surfaces. These analyses are conducted entirely "on-line" utilizing a CDS model 5000 Pyroprobe connected to a Thermo Trace GC Ultra that is interfaced with a Thermo MAT 253 isotope ratio mass spectrometer operating in continuous flow mode. Also, this technique is designed to carry a split of the GC-separated product to a DSQ II quadrupole mass spectrometer as a means of making semi-quantitative compositional measurements. Therefore, both chemical and isotopic measurements can be carried out on the same sample.

  13. Progress on the Study of Isotopic Composition in Metallic Thin Films Undergone to Electrochemical Loading of Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apicella, M.; Violante, V.; Sarto, F.; Rosada, A.; Santoro, E.; Castagna, E.; Sibilia, C.; McKubre, M.; Tanzella, F.; Hubler, G.

    A research activity has started some years ago in the framework of collaboration between the ENEA (Italy) and the SRI (USA), aimed to the identification of traces of nuclear reactions in condensed matter. This work has also involved cross-linked analysis in order to identify effects due to contaminants that could affect the isotopic shift estimate. Nickel thin films have been sputtered on a polymeric substrate and loaded with hydrogen by electrolysis. Reference and active thin films have been prepared contemporaneously during the same sputtering process to have on both the same deposition and the same impurities composition. Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) has been used to analyze the isotopic composition of the electrolyzed and blank substrates. Preliminary results (Violante et al., Proc. 10th Int. Conf. Cold Fusion (ICCF-10), Cambridge, 2003) indicated that a reasonable reproducible apparent shift of the isotopic composition of the Cu element occurred in some of the electrolyzed films, with an increasing of mass 65, while the natural value was always observed for all the blank samples. Cu was particularly suitable for being used as a marker elements because of its only two mass isotopes (63/65) that do not overlap with isotopes of other elements having the same masses. In this work, new experiments have been reproduced to increase the statitistics and further analysis has been performed in order to exclude that the revealed shift was traceable to an artifact.These included SIMS scanning of the sample surface, depth profile analysis by SIMS, mass spectrometric analysis of the electrolyte, SUPER-SIMS [2] analysis of one couple of reference and active films. In particular, the possible contribution from mass interferences on the 65-mass extra-signal has been considered, coming from contaminants or double ionized species. On the basis of the new results, a more complex scenario has been evidenced, suggesting that the former attribution of the Cu63/Cu65

  14. Comparison of induced damage, range, reflection, and sputtering yield between amorphous, bcc crystalline, and bubble-containing tungsten materials under hydrogen isotope and noble gas plasma irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Seiki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Tokitani, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Binary-collision-approximation simulation of hydrogen isotope (i.e., hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium) and noble gas (i.e., helium, neon, and argon) injections into tungsten materials is performed. Three tungsten structures (i.e., amorphous, bcc crystalline, and helium bubble-containing structures) are prepared as target materials. Then, the trajectories of incident atoms, the distribution of recoil atoms, the penetration depth range of incident atoms, the sputtering yield, and the reflection rate are carefully investigated for these target materials.

  15. Temperature effects on the behavior of liquid hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical-shell directly driven inertial confinement fusion target

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Mok, L.S.

    1984-05-01

    The present work studies the temperature effects on the formation of a uniform liquid hydrogen layer inside a spherical glass shell (SGS). The profile of the liquid layer is first investigated for an isothermal case. An equation suitable for describing the profile is derived by including the London-van der Waals attractive forces between the liquid and substrate molecules. Two theoretical models are then established to explain the changes in the liquid layer profile under the influence of a vertically applied temperature gradient. The characteristics of the fluid flows are obtained by solving the fluid equations under the low-Reynolds-number approximations. The effect of the component separation both in the liquid layer and the vapor region, which is induced by the temperature gradient, is studied when the enclosure inside the SGS is a mixture of hydrogen isotopes. A uniform layer can also be formed for the mixture liquid except that the required temperature gradient is now positive in direction, unlike the case of the single-component liquid. The heating effect due to the radioactive decay of tritium is also evaluated. An experimental apparatus capable of generating a desired temperature gradient across the SGS at liquid hydrogen temperatures is described. The profiles of the liquid layer are observed for different temperature gradients and the results are in qualitative agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  16. Carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen in carbonaceous chondrites Abundances and isotopic compositions in bulk samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Whole-rock samples of 25 carbonaceous chondrites were analyzed for contents of C, H and N and delta C-13, delta D and delta N-15. Inhomogeneous distribution of these isotopes within individual meteorites is pronounced in several cases. Few systematic intermeteorite trends were observed; N data are suggestive of isotopic inhomogeneity in the early solar system. Several chondrites revealed unusual compositions which would repay further, more detailed study. The data are also useful for classification of carbonaceous chondrites; N abundance and isotopic compositions can differentiate existing taxonomic groups with close to 100 percent reliability; Al Rais and Renazzo clearly constitute a discrete 'grouplet', and there are hints that both CI and CM groups may each be divisible into two subgroups.

  17. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding. 2. Enormous deuterium isotope effect on the phosphorescence of 6-hydroxybenzanthrone

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, M.H.; Gillispie, G.D.; Haddon, R.C.

    1982-10-28

    The laser-excited fluorescence and phosphorescence spectra of the title compound and its hydroxy-deuterated analogue have been measured in an n-hexane Shpol'skii matrix at 10 K. The deuterium substitution has only a minor effect on the fluorescence intensity and the fluorescence and phosphorescence vibronic patterns but leads to a greater than order of magnitude increase in the phosphorescence quantum yield. The phosphorescence lifetimes have been measured to be 19 ms for the normal isotopic species and 300 ms for the deuterated form. This probably represents the largest deuterium isotope effect yet observed in aromatic molecule photophysics.

  18. Gas and hydrogen isotopic analyses of volcanic eruption clouds in Guatemala sampled by aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.I.; Cadle, R.D.; Heidt, L.E.; Friedman, I.; Lazrus, A.L.; Huebert, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Gas samples were collected by aircraft entering volcanic eruption clouds of three Guatemalan volcanoes. Gas chromatographic analyses show higher H2 and S gas contents in ash eruption clouds and lower H2 and S gases in vaporous gas plumes. H isotopic data demonstrate lighter isotopic distribution of water vapor in ash eruption clouds than in vaporous gas plumes. Most of the H2O in the vaporous plumes is probably meteoric. The data are the first direct gas analyses of explosive eruptive clouds, and demonstrate that, in spite of atmospheric admixture, useful compositional information on eruptive gases can be obtained using aircraft. ?? 1980.

  19. Reconstruction of seawater chemistry from deeply subducted oceanic crust; hydrogen and oxygen isotope of lawsonite eclogites preserving pillow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamabata, D., VI; Masuyama, Y.; Tomiyasu, F.; Ueno, Y.; Yui, T. F.; Okamoto, K.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand evolution of life, change of seawater chemistry from Hadean, Archean to present is significant. Pillow structure is well-preserved in the Archean greenstone belt (e.g. Komiya et al., 1999). Oxygen and hydrogen isotope of rims in the pillow is useful conventional tool to decipher chemistry of Paleao-seawater from Archean to Present. However, Archean greenstone belt suffered regional metamorphism from greenschist to Amphibolite facies conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to testify the validity of pillow chemistry from recent (Phanerozoic) metamorphosed greenstone. We have systematically collected pillowed greenstone from blueschist and eclogites. Two eclogite exhibiting pillow structures were chosen for oxygen and hydrogen isotope analysis. One is from Corsica (lawsonite eclogite collected with Dr. Alberto Vidale Barbarone) and another is from Cazadero, Franciscan belt (collected by Dr. Tatsuki Tsujimori). The both are ascribed as MORB from major and trace bulk chemistry and Ca is rich in the core and Na is poor in the rims. The former exhibits garnet, omphacite, lawsonite, and glacophane. Phengite is in core of the pillow and chlorite is in the rims. In the latter, besides garnet, omphacite, epdiote and glaucophane, chlorite is recognized with phengite in the core. Glaucophane is richer in the rims from the both samples, therefore istope analysis of glaucophane was done. Mineral separation was carefully done using micro-mill, heavy liquid and isodynamic separator. 20 mg specimens were used for oxygen isotope analysis and 2mg were for hydrogen analysis. δ18O of the all analysis (7.7 to 8.3) is within the range of unaltered igneous oceanic crust and high temperature hydrothermal alteration although rims (8.3 for Franciscan and 8.0 for Corsica) are higher than cores (7.7 for Franciscan and Corsica). δD data is also consistent with hydrothermal alteration. It is relative higher in core from the Corsica and Franciscan (-45 and -56) than of the

  20. Hydrogen isotope correction for laser instrument measurement bias at low water vapor concentration using conventional isotope analyses: application to measurements from Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L R; Sharp, Z D; Galewsky, J; Strong, M; Van Pelt, A D; Dong, F; Noone, D

    2011-03-15

    The hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of water vapor can be measured with commercially available laser spectroscopy analyzers in real time. Operation of the laser systems in relatively dry air is difficult because measurements are non-linear as a function of humidity at low water concentrations. Here we use field-based sampling coupled with traditional mass spectrometry techniques for assessing linearity and calibrating laser spectroscopy systems at low water vapor concentrations. Air samples are collected in an evacuated 2 L glass flask and the water is separated from the non-condensable gases cryogenically. Approximately 2 µL of water are reduced to H(2) gas and measured on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In a field experiment at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), we ran Picarro and Los Gatos Research (LGR) laser analyzers for a period of 25 days in addition to periodic sample collection in evacuated flasks. When the two laser systems are corrected to the flask data, they are strongly coincident over the entire 25 days. The δ(2)H values were found to change by over 200‰ over 2.5 min as the boundary layer elevation changed relative to MLO. The δ(2)H values ranged from -106 to -332‰, and the δ(18)O values (uncorrected) ranged from -12 to -50‰. Raw data from laser analyzers in environments with low water vapor concentrations can be normalized to the international V-SMOW scale by calibration to the flask data measured conventionally. Bias correction is especially critical for the accurate determination of deuterium excess in dry air.

  1. APPLICATION OF STABLE CARBON AND HYDROGEN ISOTOPIC TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE IN THE FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory


    A significant challenge in environmental studies is to determine the onset and extent of MTBE bioremediation at an affected site, which may involve indirect approaches such as microcosm verification of microbial activities at a given site. Stable isotopic fractionation is cha...

  2. A reconnaissance study of oxygen, hydrogen and strontium isotopes in geochemically diverse lakes, Western Nebraska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gosselin, D.C.; Nabelek, P.E.; Peterman, Z.E.; Sibray, S.

    1997-01-01

    Reconnaissance ??18O,, ??D, and ??87Sr data for fifteen lakes in the Western Lakes Region of the Sand Hills of Nebraska indicate dynamic hydrologic systems. The rather narrow range of ??87Sr from lake water (1.1 to 2.1) and groundwater (0.9 to 1.7) indicates that the groundwater is generally unradiogenic. Groundwater residence times and relatively unradiogenic volcanic ash within the dune sediments control the ??87Sr values. Based on the mutual variations of ??18O and ??D, the lakes can be divided into three groups. In Group 1, both ??18O and ??D values increase from spring to fall. The ??18O and ??D values in Group 2 decreased from spring to fall. Group 3 are ephemeral lakes that went dry some time during 1992. The data and isotopic modeling show that variations in the ratio of evaporation relative to groundwater inflow, local humidity conditions, and the ??(a) has substantial influence on the isotopic composition. In addition, isotopic behavior in ephemeral hakes can be rather unusual because of the changing activities of water and mineral precipitation and redissolution. The annual and interannual isotopic variability of these lakes which is reflected in the paleonvironmental indicators may be the rule rather than the exception in these types of systems.

  3. Compound-specific carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen isotope analysis of N-nitrosodimethylamine in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Spahr, Stephanie; Bolotin, Jakov; Schleucher, Jürgen; Ehlers, Ina; von Gunten, Urs; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2015-03-03

    Mitigation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and other hazardous water disinfection byproducts (DBP) is currently hampered by a limited understanding of DBP formation mechanisms. Because variations of the stable isotope composition of NDMA can potentially reveal reaction pathways and precursor compounds, we developed a method for the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of (13)C/(12)C, (15)N/(14)N, and (2)H/(1)H ratios of NDMA by gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). Method quantification limits for the accurate isotope analysis of NDMA, N-nitrosodiethyl-, -dipropyl-, and -dibutylamine as well as N-nitrosopyrrolidine were between 0.18 to 0.60 nmol C, 0.40 to 0.80 nmol N, and 2.2 to 5.8 nmol H injected on column. Coupling solid phase extraction (SPE) to GC/IRMS enabled the precise quantification of C, N, and H isotope ratios of NDMA in aqueous samples at concentrations of 0.6 μM (45 μg L(-1)). We validated the proposed method with a laboratory experiment, in which NDMA was formed with stoichiometric yield (97 ± 4%) through chloramination of the pharmaceutical ranitidine (3 μM). δ(13)C and δ(2)H values of NDMA remained constant during NDMA formation while its δ(15)N increased due to a reaction at a N atom in the rate-limiting step of NDMA formation. The δ(2)H value of NDMA determined by SPE-GC/IRMS also corresponded well to the δ(2)H value of the N(CH3)2-group of ranitidine measured by quantitative deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This observation implies that the N(CH3)2-moiety of ranitidine is transferred to NDMA without being chemically altered and illustrates the accuracy of the proposed method.

  4. Isotopic fractionation factor and hydrogenic potential in 2-hydroxy-1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2-penten-4-one

    SciTech Connect

    Kreevoy, M.M.; Ridl, B.A.

    1981-04-02

    The title compound (enol-hexafluoroacetylacetone) has an isotopic fractionation factor of 0.6 +- 0.1. This, and much other information about this compound, can be rationalized if the enolic hydrogen bridges between the two oxygens and is governed by a double minimum potential function with a central maximum of approx. 3000 cm/sup -1/ (8 kcal/mol)(eq 10).

  5. Light element isotopic compositions of cometary matter returned by the STARDUST mission

    SciTech Connect

    McKeegan, K D; Aleon, J; Bradley, J; Brownlee, D; Busemann, H; Butterworth, A; Chaussidon, M; Fallon, S; Floss, C; Gilmour, J; Gounelle, M; Graham, G; Guan, Y; Heck, P R; Hoppe, P; Hutcheon, I D; Huth, J; Ishii, H; Ito, M; Jacobsen, S B; Kearsley, A; Leshin, L A; Liu, M; Lyon, I; Marhas, K; Marty, B; Matrajt, G; Meibom, A; Messenger, S; Mostefaoui, S; Nakamura-Messenger, K; Nittler, L; Palma, R; Pepin, R O; Papanastassiou, D A; Robert, F; Schlutter, D; Snead, C J; Stadermann, F J; Stroud, R; Tsou, P; Westphal, A; Young, E D; Ziegler, K; Zimmermann, L; Zinner, E

    2006-10-10

    Hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen isotopic compositions are heterogeneous among comet 81P/Wild2 particle fragments, however extreme isotopic anomalies are rare, indicating that the comet is not a pristine aggregate of presolar materials. Non-terrestrial nitrogen and neon isotope ratios suggest that indigenous organic matter and highly volatile materials were successfully collected. Except for a single circumstellar stardust grain, silicate and oxide minerals have oxygen isotopic compositions consistent with solar system origin. One refractory grain is {sup 16}O-enriched like refractory inclusions in meteorites, suggesting formation in the hot inner solar nebula and large-scale radial transport prior to comet accretion in the outer solar system.

  6. Hydrogen isotope ratios of lacustrine sedimentary n-alkanes as proxies of tropical African hydrology: Insights from a calibration transect across Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Yannick; Schwab, Valérie F.; Gleixner, Gerd; Kahmen, Ansgar; Todou, Gilbert; Séné, Olivier; Onana, Jean-Michel; Achoundong, Gaston; Sachse, Dirk

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen isotope values (δD) of sedimentary aquatic and terrestrial lipid biomarkers, originating from algae, bacteria, and leaf wax, have been used to record isotopic properties of ancient source water (i.e., precipitation and/or lake water) in several mid- and high-latitude lacustrine environments. In the tropics, however, where both processes associated with isotope fractionation in the hydrologic system and vegetation strongly differ from those at higher latitudes, calibration studies for this proxy are not yet available. To close this gap of knowledge, we sampled surface sediments from 11 lakes in Cameroon to identify those hydro-climatological processes and physiological factors that determine the hydrogen isotopic composition of aquatic and terrestrial lipid biomarkers. Here we present a robust framework for the application of compound-specific hydrogen isotopes in tropical Africa. Our results show that the δD values of the aquatic lipid biomarker n-C17 alkane were not correlated with the δD values of lake water. Carbon isotope measurements indicate that the n-C17 alkane was derived from multiple source organisms that used different hydrogen pools for biosynthesis. We demonstrate that the δD values of the n-C29 alkane were correlated with the δD values of surface water (i.e., river water and groundwater), which, on large spatial scales, reflect the isotopic composition of mean annual precipitation. Such a relationship has been observed at higher latitudes, supporting the robustness of the leaf-wax lipid δD proxy on a hemispheric spatial scale. In contrast, the δD values of the n-C31 alkane did not show such a relationship but instead were correlated with the evaporative lake water δD values. This result suggests distinct water sources for both leaf-wax lipids, most likely originating from two different groups of plants. These new findings have important implications for the interpretation of long-chain n-alkane δD records from ancient lake sediments

  7. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes on columns packed with alumina, modified alumina and sol-gel alumina.

    PubMed

    Naik, Y P; Gupta, N K; Pillai, K T; Rao, G A Rama; Venugopal, V

    2012-01-06

    The stationary phase of alumina adsorbents, prepared by different chemical processes, was used to study the separation behaviour of hydrogen isotopes. Three types of alumina, obtained by conventional hydroxide route alumina coated with silicon oxide and alumina prepared by internal gelation process (IGP), were used as packing material to study the separation of HT and T(2) in a mixture at various temperatures. The conventional alumina and silicon oxide coated alumina resolved HT and T(2) at 77K temperature with different retention times. The retention times on SiO(2) coated columns were found to be higher than those of other adsorbents. However, the column filled with IGP alumina was found to be ideal for the separation of HT and T(2) at 240 K. The peaks were well resolved in less than 5 min on this column.

  8. Strong isotope effects on the charge transfer in slow collisions of He2+ with atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium.

    PubMed

    Stolterfoht, N; Cabrera-Trujillo, R; Ohrn, Y; Deumens, E; Hoekstra, R; Sabin, J R

    2007-09-07

    Probabilities and cross sections for charge transfer by He2+ impact on atomic hydrogen (H), deuterium (D), and tritium (T) at low collision energies are calculated. The results are obtained using an ab initio theory, which solves the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. For the H target, excellent agreement is achieved between the present and previous results. Differences by orders of magnitude are observed between the cross sections for H, D, and T. A method is introduced to separate the contributions of charge-transfer mechanisms due to radial and rotational coupling. The large differences observed for H, D, and T are attributed to isotope effects in the rotational coupling mechanism.

  9. Energy Spectrum Measurements of Cosmic-Ray Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes with the BESS-Polar II Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picot-Clemente, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    The Balloon-Borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS-Polar II) flew successfully over Antarctica during 24.5 days in December 2007 through January 2008 during a period of minimum solar activity. The long duration of the flight, and the good stability of the detectors, improved by a factor of 5 the number of cosmic-ray events previously recorded with BESS-Polar I, reaching about 4.7 billion collected particles. Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray hydrogen and helium isotopes have been measured with the instrument from 0.2 to about 1.5 GeV/n, with unprecedented accuracy. These new flux and ratio measurements provide important information to better understand the propagation history of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. The results obtained with the BESS-Polar II instrument will be presented and compared with different propagation models.

  10. Interactions of relativistic {sup 36}Ar and {sup 40}Ar nuclei in hydrogen: Isotopic production cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, C.N.; Waddington, C.J.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Costa, S.; Insolia, A.; Potenza, R.; Russo, G.V.; Tuve, C.; Chen, C.; Guzik, T.G.; Testard, O.; Wefel, J.P.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Tull, C.E.; Mitchell, J.W.; Webber, W.R.

    1997-07-01

    The interactions of {sup 36}Ar projectile nuclei with energies of 361, 546, and 765 MeV/nucleon and {sup 40}Ar nuclei with 352 MeV/nucleon, have been studied in a liquid-hydrogen target as part of a program to study interactions of relevance to the problem of cosmic-ray propagation in the interstellar medium. We have measured the cross sections for the production of isotopic fragments of the projectile nuclei in these interactions. The variations of these cross sections with mass, charge, and energy, are examined for insights into any systematic features of this type of fragmentation reaction that might aid predictions of other, unmeasured cross sections. These cross sections are also compared with the values derived from the most commonly used prediction techniques. It is suggested that these techniques could be improved by taking account of the systematic features identified here. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Sulfur mass-independent fractionation during photolysis and photoexcitation of SO2 and CS2 and implications to the source reactions for Archean sulfur isotope anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, S.; Whitehill, A. R.; Oduro, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    produces large positive anomaly in both Δ33S and Δ36S (up to 100 ‰) even in optically thin conditions, suggesting quantum dynamic origin of the S-MIF. Brown polymer material produced under photolysis and photoexciation of CS2 also yield S-MIF but isotope patterns are different from those of SO2 photochemistry and different from Archean pattern. If SO2 photolysis and photoexcitation are the main source of Archean S-MIF, the different Δ36S/Δ33S values can be linked to the different magnitude of contributions from SO2 photolysis and photoexciation. For example, increased contribution of photoexciation band is expected under a thick organic haze layer that attenuates high energy UV and chemically traps excited state SO2.

  12. Stark broadening for diagnostics of the electron density in non-equilibrium plasma utilizing isotope hydrogen alpha lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin; Tan, Xiaohua; Wan, Xiang; Chen, Lei; Jin, Dazhi; Qian, Muyang; Li, Gongping

    2014-04-28

    Two Stark broadening parameters including FWHM (full width at half maximum) and FWHA (full width at half area) of isotope hydrogen alpha lines are simultaneously introduced to determine the electron density of a pulsed vacuum arc jet. To estimate the gas temperature, the rotational temperature of the C{sub 2} Swan system is fit to 2500 ± 100 K. A modified Boltzmann-plot method with b{sub i}-factor is introduced to determine the modified electron temperature. The comparison between results of atomic and ionic lines indicates the jet is in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electron temperature is close to 13 000 ± 400 K. Based on the computational results of Gig-Card calculation, a simple and precise interpolation algorithm for the discrete-points tables can be constructed to obtain the traditional n{sub e}-T{sub e} diagnostic maps of two Stark broadening parameters. The results from FWHA formula by the direct use of FWHM = FWHA and these from the diagnostic map are different. It can be attributed to the imprecise FWHA formula form and the deviation between FWHM and FWHA. The variation of the reduced mass pair due to the non-equilibrium effect contributes to the difference of the results derived from two hydrogen isotope alpha lines. Based on the Stark broadening analysis in this work, a corrected method is set up to determine n{sub e} of (1.10 ± 0.08) × 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}, the reference reduced mass μ{sub 0} pair of (3.30 ± 0.82 and 1.65 ± 0.41), and the ion kinetic temperature of 7900 ± 1800 K.

  13. A Novel Framework for Quantifying past Methane Recycling by Sphagnum-Methanotroph Symbiosis Using Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Ratios of Leaf Wax Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Jonathan E.; Isles, Peter D. F.; Peteet, Dorothy M.

    2014-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric methane is strongly linked to variations in Earth's climate. Currently, we can directly reconstruct the total atmospheric concentration of methane, but not individual terms of the methane cycle. Northern wetlands, dominated by Sphagnum, are an important contributor of atmospheric methane, and we seek to understand the methane cycle in these systems. We present a novel method for quantifying the proportion of carbon Sphagnum assimilates from its methanotrophic symbionts using stable isotope ratios of leaf-wax biomarkers. Carbon isotope ratios of Sphagnum compounds are determined by two competing influences, water content and the isotope ratio of source carbon. We disentangled these effects using a combined hydrogen and carbon isotope approach. We constrained Sphagnum water content using the contrast between the hydrogen isotope ratios of Sphagnum and vascular plant biomarkers. We then used Sphagnum water content to calculate the carbon isotope ratio of Sphagnum's carbon pool. Using a mass balance equation, we calculated the proportion of recycled methane contributed to the Sphagnum carbon pool, 'PRM.' We quantified PRM in peat monoliths from three microhabitats in the Mer Bleue peatland complex. Modern studies have shown that water table depth and vegetation have strong influences on the peatland methane cycle on instrumental time scales. With this new approach, delta C-13 of Sphagnum compounds are now a useful tool for investigating the relationships among hydrology, vegetation, and methanotrophy in Sphagnum peatlands over the time scales of entire peatland sediment records, vital to our understanding of the global carbon cycle through the Late Glacial and Holocene.

  14. A novel framework for quantifying past methane recycling by Sphagnum-methanotroph symbiosis using carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Jonathan E.; Isles, Peter D. F.; Peteet, Dorothy M.

    2014-05-01

    concentration of atmospheric methane is strongly linked to variations in Earth's climate. Currently, we can directly reconstruct the total atmospheric concentration of methane, but not individual terms of the methane cycle. Northern wetlands, dominated by Sphagnum, are an important contributor of atmospheric methane, and we seek to understand the methane cycle in these systems. We present a novel method for quantifying the proportion of carbon Sphagnum assimilates from its methanotrophic symbionts using stable isotope ratios of leaf-wax biomarkers. Carbon isotope ratios of Sphagnum compounds are determined by two competing influences, water content and the isotope ratio of source carbon. We disentangled these effects using a combined hydrogen and carbon isotope approach. We constrained Sphagnum water content using the contrast between the hydrogen isotope ratios of Sphagnum and vascular plant biomarkers. We then used Sphagnum water content to calculate the carbon isotope ratio of Sphagnum's carbon pool. Using a mass balance equation, we calculated the proportion of recycled methane contributed to the Sphagnum carbon pool, "PRM." We quantified PRM in peat monoliths from three microhabitats in the Mer Bleue peatland complex. Modern studies have shown that water table depth and vegetation have strong influences on the peatland methane cycle on instrumental time scales. With this new approach, δ13C of Sphagnum compounds are now a useful tool for investigating the relationships among hydrology, vegetation, and methanotrophy in Sphagnum peatlands over the time scales of entire peatland sediment records, vital to our understanding of the global carbon cycle through the Late Glacial and Holocene.

  15. Diffusion of hydrogen isotopes in palladium hydride and deuteride in the presence of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Astakhov, I.I.; Kazarinov, V.E.; Reznikova, L.A.; Teplitskaya, G.L.

    1994-12-01

    The effect of Li incorporation into Pd on the hydrogen flow through a membrane Pd-electrode was found. It was of interest to determine the mechanism of this effect by a direct measurement of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the Pd-H{sub x} phase and in the ternary Li-PdH{sub x} phase that was formed by the cathodic polarization of Pd in the solutions of lithium salts. A study of the effect of lithium on the diffusion of deuterium in the Li-PdD{sub x} phase might also be useful in solving this problem. In this work, a method of electrochemical extraction of absorbed hydrogen is used for these measurements; this method has been developed for nonsteady-state conditions, in particular. The X-ray examination of the formed phases was performed by a DRON-3M set-up with the use of CoK{sub {alpha}} radiation.

  16. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic characterization of methane from wetlands and lakes of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Western Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Christopher S.; Kelley, Cheryl A.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Showers, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The results are reported of a study of the carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of methane from tundra environments of the Yukon-Kuskokwin Delta of western Alaska. The delta C-13 value of diffusive methane emissions from wet meadow tundra of the Delta is -65.82 +/- 2.21 per mil (n=18). Detritus-rich sediments of tundra lakes are loaded with methane-rich gas bubbles during the warm season. Spatial trend is the major gas concentration and isotopic values of methane in these gas bubbles appear to reflect processes associated with production rate and mechanisms; high methane concentrations, lightest delta C-13 values, the heaviest delta D value occur in detritus-rich sediments isolated from emergent vegetation. Heavier delta C-13 and lighter delta D values in methane from heavily vegetated lake margins suggest a shift toward a larger role for acetate fermentation in association with aquatic plants and plant detritus. Bubble ebullition is estimated to account for up to 17 percent of total Delta methane emissions.

  17. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic characterization of methane from wetlands and lakes of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Western Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, C.S.; Kelley, C.A.; Chanton, J.P.; Showers, W.J. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh )

    1992-10-01

    The results are reported of a study of the carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of methane from tundra environments of the Yukon-Kuskokwin Delta of western Alaska. The delta C-13 value of diffusive methane emissions from wet meadow tundra of the Delta is -65.82 +/- 2.21 per mil (n=18). Detritus-rich sediments of tundra lakes are loaded with methane-rich gas bubbles during the warm season. Spatial trend is the major gas concentration and isotopic values of methane in these gas bubbles appear to reflect processes associated with production rate and mechanisms; high methane concentrations, lightest delta C-13 values, the heaviest delta D value occur in detritus-rich sediments isolated from emergent vegetation. Heavier delta C-13 and lighter delta D values in methane from heavily vegetated lake margins suggest a shift toward a larger role for acetate fermentation in association with aquatic plants and plant detritus. Bubble ebullition is estimated to account for up to 17 percent of total Delta methane emissions. 50 refs.

  18. Differential isotopic enrichment to facilitate characterization of asymmetric multimeric proteins using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Bruce D.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Patel, Disha; Arnold, Eddy; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled to mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful tool for analyzing the conformational dynamics of protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Recent advances in instrumentation and methodology have expanded the utility of HDX for the analysis of large and complex proteins; however, asymmetric dimers with shared amino acid sequence present a unique challenge for HDX because assignment of peptides with identical sequence to their subunit of origin remains ambiguous. Here we report the use of differential isotopic labeling to facilitate HDX analysis of multimers using HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) as a model. RT is an asymmetric heterodimer of 51 kDa (p51) and 66 kDa (p66) subunits. The first 440 residues of p51 and p66 are identical. In this study differentially labeled RT was reconstituted from isotopically enriched (15N-labeled) p51 and unlabeled p66. In order to enable detection of 15N-deuterated RT peptides, the software HDX Workbench was modified to follow a 100% 15N model. Our results demonstrated that 15N enrichment of p51 did not affect its conformational dynamics compared to unlabeled p51, but 15N-labeled p51 did show different conformational dynamics than p66 in the RT heterodimer. Differential HDX-MS of isotopically labeled RT in the presence of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) efavirenz (EFV) showed subunit-specific perturbation in the rate of HDX consistent with previously published results and the RT-EFV co-crystal structure. PMID:25763479

  19. Assessing site-specific spatio-temporal variations in hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes of human drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, C. D.; Bowen, G. J.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen (δ2H and δ18O) are environmental forensic tracers that can be used to constrain the origin and movement of animals, people, and products. The fundamental assumption underlying this method is that water resources at different geographic locations have distinct and characteristic isotopic signatures that are assimilated into organic tissues. Although much is known about regional-scale spatio-temporal variability in δ2H and δ18O of water, few studies have addressed the question of how distinct these geographic and seasonal patterns are for any given site. To address this question, a 2-year survey of δ2H and δ18O in tap water from across the contiguous U.S. and Canada was conducted. The data show that seasonal variability in δ2H and δ18O of tap water is generally low (<10 ‰ for δ2H), and those with the highest variability can be classified as: a) cities or towns in areas of high climate seasonality, or b) large cities in arid or seasonally arid regions which access and switch among multiple water sources throughout the year. The data suggest that inter-annual variation in tap water isotope ratios is typically low, with a median difference for month-month pairs during the 2 sampling years of 2.7 (δ2H). The results from this study confirm the existence of temporal variability in δ2H and δ18O of tap water, but suggest that this variability in human-managed systems is highly damped and may be amenable to classification, modeling, and prediction. In all, the data provide the foundation for incorporating temporal variation in predictive models of water and organic δ2H and δ18O, leading to more robust and statistically defensible tests of geographic origin.

  20. Capture and isotopic exchange method for water and hydrogen isotopes on zeolite catalysts up to technical scale for pre-study of processing highly tritiated water

    SciTech Connect

    Michling, R.; Braun, A.; Cristescu, I.; Dittrich, H.; Gramlich, N.; Lohr, N.; Glugla, M.; Shu, W.; Willms, S.

    2015-03-15

    Highly tritiated water (HTW) may be generated at ITER by various processes and, due to the excessive radio toxicity, the self-radiolysis and the exceedingly corrosive property of HTW, a potential hazard is associated with its storage and process. Therefore, the capture and exchange method for HTW utilizing Molecular Sieve Beds (MSB) was investigated in view of adsorption capacity, isotopic exchange performance and process parameters. For the MSB, different types of zeolite were selected. All zeolite materials were additionally coated with platinum. The following work comprised the selection of the most efficient zeolite candidate based on detailed parametric studies during the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2}O laboratory scale exchange experiments (about 25 g zeolite per bed) at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). For the zeolite, characterization analytical techniques such as Infrared Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetry and online mass spectrometry were implemented. Followed by further investigation of the selected zeolite catalyst under full technical operation, a MSB (about 22 kg zeolite) was processed with hydrogen flow rates up to 60 mol*h{sup -1} and deuterated water loads up to 1.6 kg in view of later ITER processing of arising HTW. (authors)

  1. Hydrogen and carbon isotopic ratios of polycyclic aromatic compounds in two CM2 carbonaceous chondrites and implications for prebiotic organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongsong; Aponte, José C.; Zhao, Jiaju; Tarozo, Rafael; Hallmann, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Study of meteoritic organic compounds offers a unique opportunity to understand the origins of the organic matter in the early Solar System. Meteoritic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heteropolycyclic aromatic compounds (HACs) have been studied for over fifty years, however; their hydrogen stable isotopic ratios (δD) have never been reported. Compound-specific δD measurements of PAHs and HACs are important, in part because the carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C) of various meteoritic PAHs cannot be readily distinguished from their terrestrial counterparts and it is difficult to rule out terrestrial contamination based on carbon isotopic ratios alone. In this study, we have extracted and identified more than sixty PAHs and HACs present in two CM2 carbonaceous chondrites Murchison and LON 94101. Their carbon and hydrogen stable isotopic ratios (δ13C and δD) were measured and used to discuss about their synthetic environments and formation mechanisms. The concentration of aromatic compounds is ∼30% higher in Murchison than in the Antarctic meteorite LON 94101, but both samples contained similar suites of PAHs and HACs. All PAHs and HACs found exhibited positive δD values (up to 1100‰) consistent with an extraterrestrial origin, indicating the relatively low δ13C values are indeed an inherent feature of the meteoritic aromatic compounds. The hydrogen isotopic data suggest aromatic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites were mainly formed in the cold interstellar environments. Molecular level variations in hydrogen and carbon isotopic values offer new insights to the formation pathways for the aromatic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites.

  2. Deuterium retention in tungsten after heavy ion damage and hydrogen isotope exchange in PISCES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, J. L.; Wang, Y. Q.; Dittmar, T.; Doerner, R. P.; Tynan, G. R.

    2014-08-01

    The effect of H isotope exchange and radiation damage on the retention of D in W was examined in the PISCES linear plasma device. W samples were treated with D plasma at low sample temperatures (473 K), with a fluence of 1026 ions/m2 and ion energies of 150 eV. Each sample was then exposed to varying doses of H plasma with similar sample temperature and plasma conditions to fluences ranging from 0 to 1026 ions/m2, to examine the effectiveness of isotope exchange as a means of tritium removal. The D(3He, p)4He nuclear reaction was used to measure D concentration profiles up to a depth of 7.7 μm. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was used to determine the D retained throughout the bulk of the sample. Isotope exchange allows for a unique study of atomic migration by separately examining the diffusion of implanted atoms from those bombarding the surface. D atoms are exchanged out of traps as a result of H plasma bombardment and diffuse until either falling into another trap or reaching the surface to recombine and escape. Radiation damage at levels of 0.01, 0.1, and 1 displacements per atom (dpa) was carried out before plasma exposure on some samples with 2 MeV Cu ions as a surrogate for damage caused by fusion neutrons. The Cu ion damage was compared to damage induced by 6 MeV W ions to see if there is an effect of Cu contamination on retention. We saw little difference in Cu versus W ion damage at low dpa, but at 1 dpa, where Cu content reached 65 appm, contamination seems to be significant. Retention measurements showed that ion damage has little effectiveness on isotope removal at these sample temperatures; however, there is evidence to suggest that the trapping mechanisms in W change as damage is increased.

  3. The diffusivity of hydrogen isotopes in liquid lithium and in solid yttrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxbaum, R. E.; Johnson, E. F.

    1982-12-01

    The separation of tritium from liquid lithium at low concentrations is an important problem for fusion technology. One of the most promising techniques for effecting this separation involves sorbing the tritium on solid yttrium metal. Reliable diffusivity data are essential for a realistic evaluation of this technique. The bodies of relevant experimental diffusivity data, i.e., data on protium diffusion in liquid lithium, protium diffusion in solid yttrium, and the isotope effect in metals, are reviewed.

  4. Oxygen, hydrogen, and helium isotopes for investigating groundwater systems of the Cape Verde Islands, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Solomon, D. Kip; Gingerich, Stephen B.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

    2009-07-01

    Stable isotopes (δ18O, δ2H), tritium (3H), and helium isotopes (3He, 4He) were used for evaluating groundwater recharge sources, flow paths, and residence times of three watersheds in the Cape Verde Islands (West Africa). Stable isotopes indicate the predominance of high-elevation precipitation that undergoes little evaporation prior to groundwater recharge. In contrast to other active oceanic hotspots, environmental tracers show that deep geothermal circulation does not strongly affect groundwater. Low tritium concentrations at seven groundwater sites indicate groundwater residence times of more than 50 years. Higher tritium values at other sites suggest some recent recharge. High 4He and 3He/4He ratios precluded 3H/3He dating at six sites. These high 3He/4He ratios (R/Ra values of up to 8.3) are consistent with reported mantle derived helium of oceanic island basalts in Cape Verde and provided end-member constraints for improved dating at seven other locations. Tritium and 3H/3He dating shows that São Nicolau Island’s Ribeira Fajã Basin has groundwater residence times of more than 50 years, whereas Fogo Island’s Mosteiros Basin and Santo Antão Island’s Ribeira Paul Basin contain a mixture of young and old groundwater. Young ages at selected sites within these two basins indicate local recharge and potential groundwater susceptibility to surface contamination and/or salt-water intrusion.

  5. The stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope variation of water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles.

    PubMed

    Spangenberg, Jorge E; Vennemann, Torsten W

    2008-01-01

    A set of bottled waters from a single natural spring distributed worldwide in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles has been used to examine the effects of storage in plastic polymer material on the isotopic composition (delta18O and delta2H values) of the water. All samples analyzed were subjected to the same packaging procedure but experienced different conditions of temperature and humidity during storage. Water sorption and the diffusive transfer of water and water vapor through the wall of the PET bottle may cause isotopic exchange between water within the bottle and water vapor in air near the PET-water interface. Changes of about +4 per thousand for delta2H and +0.7 per thousand for delta18O have been measured for water after 253 days of storage within the PET bottle. The results of this study clearly indicate the need to use glass bottles for storing water samples for isotopic studies. It is imperative to transfer PET-bottled natural waters to glass bottles for their use as calibration material or potential international working standards.

  6. Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P.; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2015-03-01

    Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry.

  7. Computationally efficient determination of hydrogen isotope effects on the thermodynamic stability of metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Kelly M.; Sholl, David S.

    2012-10-01

    Although the thermodynamics of metal hydrides at low to moderate temperatures has been successfully described with density functional theory (DFT) calculations using 0 K total energies and simple harmonic models, it is unclear if this approach is valid for hydrides that are stable at high temperatures. To aid development of computationally efficient methods, this paper uses DFT to explore the predicted stabilities of ZrH2, HfH2, TiH2, LiH, and NaH with four levels of theory. We also investigate isotope effects to understand if these should be accounted for in screening of deuterated or tritiated materials. We show that calculations that account for vibrational corrections to the crystal lattice are not necessary to get an accurate description of relative stabilities of metal hydrides. The shifts in dissociation temperatures due to isotope substitutions are <50 K for all materials, with larger shifts for lighter materials, as expected. We show that accounting for vibrational effects due to isotope substitution in metal hydrides is unnecessary to accurately predict the relative stabilities of metal hydrides at high temperatures.

  8. Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P.; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry. PMID:25733906

  9. Oxygen, hydrogen, and helium isotopes for investigating groundwater systems of the Cape Verde Islands, West Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, V.M.; Solomon, K.D.; Gingerich, S.B.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotopes (??18O, ??2H), tritium (3H), and helium isotopes (3He, 4He) were used for evaluating groundwater recharge sources, flow paths, and residence times of three watersheds in the Cape Verde Islands (West Africa). Stable isotopes indicate the predominance of high-elevation precipitation that undergoes little evaporation prior to groundwater recharge. In contrast to other active oceanic hotspots, environmental tracers show that deep geothermal circulation does not strongly affect groundwater. Low tritium concentrations at seven groundwater sites indicate groundwater residence times of more than 50 years. Higher tritium values at other sites suggest some recent recharge. High 4He and 3He/4He ratios precluded 3H/3He dating at six sites. These high 3He/4He ratios (R/Ra values of up to 8.3) are consistent with reported mantle derived helium of oceanic island basalts in Cape Verde and provided end-member constraints for improved dating at seven other locations. Tritium and 3H/3He dating shows that S??o Nicolau Island's Ribeira Faj?? Basin has groundwater residence times of more than 50 years, whereas Fogo Island's Mosteiros Basin and Santo Ant??o Island's Ribeira Paul Basin contain a mixture of young and old groundwater. Young ages at selected sites within these two basins indicate local recharge and potential groundwater susceptibility to surface contamination and/or salt-water intrusion. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  10. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D[subscript 2]O and a catalytic amount of H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4]. The resulting labeled product is characterized by [superscript 1]H NMR. Students also…

  11. Determination of Equine Cytochrome c Backbone Amide Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Rates by Mass Spectrometry Using a Wider Time Window and Isotope Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-03-01

    A new strategy to analyze amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) data is proposed, utilizing a wider time window and isotope envelope analysis of each peptide. While most current scientific reports present HDX-MS data as a set of time-dependent deuteration levels of peptides, the ideal HDX-MS data presentation is a complete set of backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The ideal data set can provide single amide resolution, coverage of all exchange events, and the open/close ratio of each amide hydrogen in EX2 mechanism. Toward this goal, a typical HDX-MS protocol was modified in two aspects: measurement of a wider time window in HDX-MS experiments and deconvolution of isotope envelope of each peptide. Measurement of a wider time window enabled the observation of deuterium incorporation of most backbone amide hydrogens. Analysis of the isotope envelope instead of centroid value provides the deuterium distribution instead of the sum of deuteration levels in each peptide. A one-step, global-fitting algorithm optimized exchange rate and deuterium retention during the analysis of each amide hydrogen by fitting the deuterated isotope envelopes at all time points of all peptides in a region. Application of this strategy to cytochrome c yielded 97 out of 100 amide hydrogen exchange rates. A set of exchange rates determined by this approach is more appropriate for a patent or regulatory filing of a biopharmaceutical than a set of peptide deuteration levels obtained by a typical protocol. A wider time window of this method also eliminates false negatives in protein-ligand binding site identification.

  12. Determination of Equine Cytochrome c Backbone Amide Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Rates by Mass Spectrometry Using a Wider Time Window and Isotope Envelope.

    PubMed

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-03-01

    A new strategy to analyze amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) data is proposed, utilizing a wider time window and isotope envelope analysis of each peptide. While most current scientific reports present HDX-MS data as a set of time-dependent deuteration levels of peptides, the ideal HDX-MS data presentation is a complete set of backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The ideal data set can provide single amide resolution, coverage of all exchange events, and the open/close ratio of each amide hydrogen in EX2 mechanism. Toward this goal, a typical HDX-MS protocol was modified in two aspects: measurement of a wider time window in HDX-MS experiments and deconvolution of isotope envelope of each peptide. Measurement of a wider time window enabled the observation of deuterium incorporation of most backbone amide hydrogens. Analysis of the isotope envelope instead of centroid value provides the deuterium distribution instead of the sum of deuteration levels in each peptide. A one-step, global-fitting algorithm optimized exchange rate and deuterium retention during the analysis of each amide hydrogen by fitting the deuterated isotope envelopes at all time points of all peptides in a region. Application of this strategy to cytochrome c yielded 97 out of 100 amide hydrogen exchange rates. A set of exchange rates determined by this approach is more appropriate for a patent or regulatory filing of a biopharmaceutical than a set of peptide deuteration levels obtained by a typical protocol. A wider time window of this method also eliminates false negatives in protein-ligand binding site identification. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. Determination of Equine Cytochrome c Backbone Amide Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Rates by Mass Spectrometry Using a Wider Time Window and Isotope Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-01-01

    A new strategy to analyze amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) data is proposed, utilizing a wider time window and isotope envelope analysis of each peptide. While most current scientific reports present HDX-MS data as a set of time-dependent deuteration levels of peptides, the ideal HDX-MS data presentation is a complete set of backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The ideal data set can provide single amide resolution, coverage of all exchange events, and the open/close ratio of each amide hydrogen in EX2 mechanism. Toward this goal, a typical HDX-MS protocol was modified in two aspects: measurement of a wider time window in HDX-MS experiments and deconvolution of isotope envelope of each peptide. Measurement of a wider time window enabled the observation of deuterium incorporation of most backbone amide hydrogens. Analysis of the isotope envelope instead of centroid value provides the deuterium distribution instead of the sum of deuteration levels in each peptide. A one-step, global-fitting algorithm optimized exchange rate and deuterium retention during the analysis of each amide hydrogen by fitting the deuterated isotope envelopes at all time points of all peptides in a region. Application of this strategy to cytochrome c yielded 97 out of 100 amide hydrogen exchange rates. A set of exchange rates determined by this approach is more appropriate for a patent or regulatory filing of a biopharmaceutical than a set of peptide deuteration levels obtained by a typical protocol. A wider time window of this method also eliminates false negatives in protein-ligand binding site identification.

  14. Electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase is central to hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis in sulfate reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, W.; Flynn, T. M.; Suess, M.; Bradley, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    A significant range in microbial lipid 2H/1H ratios is observed in modern marine sediments [Li et al. 2009. GCA]. The magnitude of hydrogen isotope fractionation between microbial lipids and growth water (2ɛlipid-H2O) is hypothesized to relate to the central carbon and energy metabolism [Zhang et al. 2009. PNAS]. These observations have raised the intriguing possibility for culture independent identification of the dominant metabolic pathways operating in environments critical to the geological record. One such metabolism we would like to track for its global significance in sedimentary carbon cycling is bacterial sulfate reduction [Jørgensen. 1982. Nature]. To-date, heterotrophic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) have been observed to produce lipids that are depleted in fatty acid H-isotope composition, relative to growth water (2ɛlipid-H2O ~ -125 to -175 ‰), with experiments on different substrates yielding little variability [Campbell et al. 2009. GCA; Osburn. 2013; Dawson et al. 2015. Geobiology]. In stark contrast, aerobic heterotrophs show a wide range in fractionations (2ɛlipid-H2O ~ +300 to -125‰) which seems to scale with the route cellular carbon metabolism [Zhang et al. 2009. PNAS; Heinzelmann et al. 2015. Front Microbio]. Recent work in aerobic methylotrophs [Bradley et al. 2014. AGU] implicates transhydrogenase (TH) activity as a critical control on 2ɛlipid-H2O. This work suggests a specific driving mechanism for this range in fractionation is the ratio of intracellular NADPH/NADH, and more fundamentally, the intracellular redox state. In SRB a key component of energy metabolism is the activity of electron-bifurcating TH [Price et al. 2014. Front Microbio], for which a recent transposon mutant library has generated a number of knockouts in the target gene [Kuehl et al. 2014. mBio] in the model organism Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20. In this study we compare growth rates, fatty acid concentrations and 2ɛlipid-H2O from wild type and TH

  15. The relationship between stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios of water in astomatal plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, Lee W.; DeNiro, Michael J.; Keeley, Jon E.; Taylor, H. P.; O'Neil, J. R.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1991-01-01

    Isotropic fractination of leaf water during transpiration i