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Sample records for hydrogen production coupling

  1. Hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  2. Hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  3. Electrochemical production of hydrogen coupled with the oxidation of arsenite.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungwon; Kwon, Daejung; Kim, Kitae; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The production of hydrogen accompanied by the simultaneous oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) was achieved using an electrochemical system that employed a BiOx-TiO2 semiconductor anode and a stainless steel (SS) cathode in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl) electrolyte. The production of H2 was enhanced by the addition of As(III) during the course of water electrolysis. The synergistic effect of As(III) on H2 production can be explained in terms of (1) the scavenging of reactive chlorine species (RCS), which inhibit the production of H2 by competing with water molecules (or protons) for the electrons on the cathode, by As(III) and (2) the generation of protons, which are more favorably reduced on the cathode than water molecules, through the oxidation of As(III). The addition of 1.0 mM As(III) to the electrolyte at a constant cell voltage (E cell) of 3.0 V enhanced the production of H2 by 12% even though the cell current (I cell) was reduced by 5%. The net effect results in an increase in the energy efficiency (EE) for H2 production (ΔEE) by 17.5%. Furthermore, the value ΔEE, which depended on As(III) concentration, also depended on the applied E cell. For example, the ΔEE increased with increasing As(III) concentration in the micromolar range but decreased as a function of E cell. This is attributed to the fact that the reactions between RCS and As(III) are influenced by both RCS concentration depending on E cell and As(III) concentration in the solution. On the other hand, the ΔEE decreased with increasing As(III) concentration in the millimolar range due to the adsorption of As(V) generated from the oxidation of As(III) on the semiconductor anode. In comparison to the electrochemical oxidation of certain organic compounds (e.g., phenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2-chlorophenol, salicylic acid, catechol, maleic acid, oxalate, and urea), the ΔEE obtained during As(III) oxidation (17.5%) was higher than that observed during the oxidation of the above organic compounds

  4. Assessement of Codes and Standards Applicable to a Hydrogen Production Plant Coupled to a Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Russell

    2006-06-01

    This is an assessment of codes and standards applicable to a hydrogen production plant to be coupled to a nuclear reactor. The result of the assessment is a list of codes and standards that are expected to be applicable to the plant during its design and construction.

  5. Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  6. Sensitivity Studies of Advanced Reactors Coupled to High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) Hydrogen Production Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-04-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the steam or air sweep loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycle producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered.

  7. Optimal control strategies for hydrogen production when coupling solid oxide electrolysers with intermittent renewable energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qiong; Adjiman, Claire S.; Brandon, Nigel P.

    2014-12-01

    The penetration of intermittent renewable energies requires the development of energy storage technologies. High temperature electrolysis using solid oxide electrolyser cells (SOECs) as a potential energy storage technology, provides the prospect of a cost-effective and energy efficient route to clean hydrogen production. The development of optimal control strategies when SOEC systems are coupled with intermittent renewable energies is discussed. Hydrogen production is examined in relation to energy consumption. Control strategies considered include maximizing hydrogen production, minimizing SOEC energy consumption and minimizing compressor energy consumption. Optimal control trajectories of the operating variables over a given period of time show feasible control for the chosen situations. Temperature control of the SOEC stack is ensured via constraints on the overall temperature difference across the cell and the local temperature gradient within the SOEC stack, to link materials properties with system performance; these constraints are successfully managed. The relative merits of the optimal control strategies are analyzed.

  8. Hydrogen production by coupled catalytic partial oxidation and steam methane reforming at elevated pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Luwei; Hong, Qi; Lin, Jianyi; Dautzenberg, F. M.

    Hydrogen production by coupled catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) and steam methane reforming of methane (OSMR) at industrial conditions (high temperatures and pressures) have been studied over supported 1 wt.% NiB catalysts. Mixture of air/CH 4/H 2O was applied as the feed. The effects of O 2:CH 4 ratio, H 2O:CH 4 ratio and the gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) on oxy-steam reforming (OSRM) were also studied. Results indicate that CH 4 conversion increases significantly with increasing O 2:CH 4 or H 2O:CH 4 ratio. However, the hydrogen mole fraction goes through a maximum, depending on reaction conditions, e.g., pressure, temperature and the feed gases ratios. Carbon deposition on the catalysts has been greatly decreased after steam addition. The supported 1 wt.% NiB catalysts exhibit high stability with 85% methane conversion at 15 bar and 800 °C during 70 h time-on-stream reaction (CH 4:O 2:H 2O:N 2 = 1:0.5:1:1.887). The thermal efficiency was increased from 35.8% by CPO (without steam) to 55.6%. The presented data would be useful references for further design of enlarged scale hydrogen production system.

  9. Optimization studies of bio-hydrogen production in a coupled microbial electrolysis-dye sensitized solar cell system.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Folusho Francis; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Chae, Kyu-Jung; Choi, Mi-Jin; Chang, In Seop; Kim, In S

    2010-03-01

    Bio-hydrogen production in light-assisted microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) was optimized by connecting multiple MECs to a single dye (N719) sensitized solar cell (V(OC) approx. 0.7 V). Hydrogen production occurred simultaneously in all the connected MECs when the solar cell was irradiated with light. The amount of hydrogen produced in each MEC depends on the activity of the microbial catalyst on their anode. Substrate (acetate) to hydrogen conversion efficiencies ranging from 42% to 65% were obtained from the reactors during the experiment. A moderate light intensity of 430 W m(-2) was sufficient for hydrogen production in the coupled MEC-DSSC. A higher light intensity of 915 W m(-2), as well as an increase in substrate concentration, did not show any improvement in the current density due to limitation caused by the rate of microbial oxidation on the anode. A significant reduction in the surface area of the connected DSSC only showed a slight effect on current density in the coupled MEC-DSSC system when irradiated with light.

  10. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  11. Modeling a filter press electrolyzer by using two coupled codes within nuclear gen.IV hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Feraud, J.P.; Jomard, F.; Ode, D.; Duhamet, J.; Dehaudt, Ph.; Duterrail Couvat, Y.; Caire, J.P.

    2007-07-01

    Mass production of hydrogen is a major issue for the coming decades particularly to decrease greenhouse gas production. The development of fourth-generation high temperature nuclear reactors has led to renewed interest for hydrogen production. In France, the CEA is investigating new processes using nuclear reactors such as the Westinghouse hybrid cycle. A recent study was devoted to electrical modeling of the hydrogen electrolyzer, which is the key unit of this process. An extensive literature review led to the choice of electrolyte and electrode materials, and the preliminary design of a new cell for production of hydrogen was evaluated. This paper describes an improved model coupling the electrical and thermal phenomena with hydrodynamics in the electrolyzer. The hydrogen electrolyzer chosen here is a filter press design comprising a stack of cathode and anode compartments separated by a membrane. Hydrogen is reduced at the cathode and SO{sub 2} is oxidized at the anode. In a complex reactor of this type the main coupled physical phenomena involved are forced convection of the electrolyte flows, a plume of hydrogen bubbles that modifies the local electrolyte conductivity, and irreversible processes (Joule effect, over-potentials, etc.) that contribute to local overheating. The secondary current distribution was modeled with a commercial FEM code, Flux Expert{sup R}, which was customized with specific finite interfacial elements capable of describing the potential discontinuity associated with the electrochemical over-potential. Since the finite-element method is not capable of properly describing the complex two-phase flows in the cathode compartment, the Fluent{sup R} CFD code was used for thermohydraulic computations. In this way each physical phenomenon was modeled using the best numerical method. The coupling implements an iterative process in which each code computes the physical data it has to transmit to the other one: the two-phase thermohydraulic problem

  12. Coupling of Solar Energy to Hydrogen Peroxide Production in the Cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Roncel, Mercedes; Navarro, José A.; De la Rosa, Miguel A.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide production by blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) under photoautotrophic conditions is of great interest as a model system for the bioconversion of solar energy. Our experimental system was based on the photosynthetic reduction of molecular oxygen with electrons from water by Anacystis nidulans 1402-1 as the biophotocatalyst and methyl viologen as a redox intermediate. It has been demonstrated that the metabolic conditions of the algae in their different growth stages strongly influence the capacity for hydrogen peroxide photoproduction, and so the initial formation rate and net peroxide yield became maximum in the mid-log phase of growth. The overall process can be optimized in the presence of certain metabolic inhibitors such as iodoacetamide and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, as well as by permeabilization of the cellular membrane after drastic temperature changes and by immobilization of the cells in inert supports such as agar and alginate. PMID:16347855

  13. Solar-powered electrochemical oxidation of organic compounds coupled with the cathodic production of molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunwoong; Vecitis, Chad D; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2008-08-21

    A Bi-doped TiO2 anode, which is prepared from a mixed metal oxide coating deposited on Ti metal, is shown to be efficient for conventional water splitting. In this hybrid photovoltaic-electrochemical system, a photovoltaic (PV) cell is used to convert solar light to electricity, which is then used to oxidize a series of phenolic compounds at the semiconductor anode to carbon dioxide with the simultaneous production of molecular hydrogen from water/proton reduction at the stainless steel cathode. Degradation of phenol in the presence of a background NaCl electrolyte produces chlorinated phenols as reaction intermediates, which are subsequently oxidized completely to carbon dioxide and low-molecular weight carboxylic acids. The anodic current efficiency for the complete oxidation of phenolic compounds ranges from 3% to 17%, while the cathodic current efficiency and the energy efficiency for hydrogen gas generation range from 68% to 95% and 30% to 70%, respectively.

  14. Coupling thermoelectricity and electrocatalysis for hydrogen production via PbTesbnd PbS/TiO2 heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqing; Cao, Xiaohao; Wang, Bin; Xia, Min; Lin, Sidney; Guo, Zhanhu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Gao, Shiyuan

    2017-02-01

    PbTesbnd PbS/TiO2 electrodes are produced via wet chemical routes for splitting water into hydrogen at the ambient temperatures. PbTe nano-crystals are firstly deposited via the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) treatment onto TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNAs) prepared by anodic oxidation of Ti substrates. Subsequently, linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) is employed to convert the outer PbTe into PbS, producing PbTesbnd PbS/TiO2 electrodes with a gradient p-n-n band configuration. With the external electric field, the vector charge transfer effect of the TNAs and the gradient energy band structure of PbTesbnd PbS/TNAs, the two electrode system in which PbTesbnd PbS/TNAs functions as the anode illustrates excellent hydrogen production activities. The whole electrochemical system consisted of anode, cathode, electrolyte serves as a hot side while the endothermic electrochemical reactions in hydrogen production as an in situ cold side. At 70 °C and 1.0 V bath voltage, the system registers 6.1 mL cm-2 h-1 rate of hydrogen generation, consuming electric power of 26.2 kW h kg-1 H2, with an energy efficiency of 88.5% and a heat efficiency of 49.9%. This method demonstrates a novel pathway to produce chemical energy from low quality waste heat, benefitting from thermoelectric and electrocatalytic coupling.

  15. Porphyrin-cobaloxime complexes for hydrogen production, a photo- and electrochemical study, coupled with quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Manton, Jennifer C; Long, Conor; Vos, Johannes G; Pryce, Mary T

    2014-03-07

    Two porphyrin-cobaloxime complexes; [{Co(dmgH)2Cl}{MPyTPP}] () and [{Co(dmgH)2Cl}{ZnMPyTPP}] () (dmgH = dimethylglyoxime, MPyTPP = 5-(4-pyridyl)-10,15,20-triphenylporphyrin) have been synthesised as model systems for the generation of hydrogen from water. Although initially envisaged as photocatalytic systems neither complex catalysed the reduction of water to hydrogen following irradiation. However, both complexes are molecular precursors for hydrogen evolution under electrochemical conditions. Turnover numbers for hydrogen production of 1.8 × 10(3) and 5.1 × 10(3) were obtained for and respectively following potentiostatic electrolysis at -1.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl while cobaloxime alone produced a turnover-number of 8.0 × 10(3). The photophysical properties of and were examined to provide an explanation for the lack of photochemical activity. These results, coupled with quantum chemical calculations, confirm that porphyrins fail to act as light-harvesting units for these systems and that the lowest energy excited states are in fact cobaloxime-based rather than porphyrin based.

  16. Development of Efficient Flowsheet and Transient Modeling for Nuclear Heat Coupled Sulfur Iodine Cyclefor Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Shripad T. Revankar; Nicholas R. Brown; Cheikhou Kane; Seungmin Oh

    2010-05-01

    The realization of the hydrogen as an energy carrier for future power sources relies on a practical method of producing hydrogen in large scale with no emission of green house gases. Hydrogen is an energy carrier which can be produced by a thermochemical water splitting process. The Sulfur-Iodine (SI) process is an example of a water splitting method using iodine and sulfur as recycling agents.

  17. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debajyoti; De, Debojyoti; Chaudhuri, Surabhi; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2005-12-21

    The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical), Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  18. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debajyoti; De, Debojyoti; Chaudhuri, Surabhi; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2005-01-01

    The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical), Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source. PMID:16371161

  19. Sustainable hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

  20. Biomimetic Production of Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gust, Devens

    2004-03-01

    . Subsequent electron transfer reactions further separate the electron and hole spatially, reducing the electronic coupling, slowing charge recombination, and lengthening the useful lifetime of the charge separation.(3) Still following the example of natural bacterial photosynthesis, these artificial reaction centers may be inserted into the lipid bilayer membranes of liposomes. There, they are used to power transmembrane proton pumps based on a redox loop that employs a lipid-soluble quinone molecule to shuttle hydrogen ions across the membrane, acidifying the interior of the liposome.(4) Finally, ATP synthase isolated from spinach can be inserted into the liposomal bilayer. Protons flow out of the liposome through the enzyme, driven by the gradient produced by the proton pump. The energy released is used to convert adenosine diphosphate into adenosine triphosphate, which is a major biological energy currency.(5) The chromophores used in these artificial photosynthetic reaction centers may also be attached to wide band gap nanoparticulate semiconductor electrodes, where their excited states inject electrons into the semiconductor, generating the radical cation of the chromophore. Such electrodes have been incorporated into a photoelectrochemical biofuel cell.(6) In the cell, NADH reduces the radical cation, regenerating the chromophore and ultimately producing NAD+. The NAD+ is recycled by converting it back to NADH via dehydrogenase enzymes that oxidize carbohydrates and similar reduced carbon compounds, including glucose, ethanol and methanol. Addition of a suitable cathode produces a cell that generates electric current through the combined action of light and enzymatic oxidation. The two examples of artificial photosynthesis discussed above are potential sources of the reducing power necessary for hydrogen production. A biomimetic approach to this goal is to couple an artificial photosynthetic system to an enzymatic system for hydrogen production isolated from a suitable

  1. Optimization of membrane stack configuration for efficient hydrogen production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells coupled with thermolytic solutions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Nam, Joo-Youn; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-07-01

    Waste heat can be captured as electrical energy to drive hydrogen evolution in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) by using thermolytic solutions such as ammonium bicarbonate. To determine the optimal membrane stack configuration for efficient hydrogen production in MRECs using ammonium bicarbonate solutions, different numbers of cell pairs and stack arrangements were tested. The optimum number of cell pairs was determined to be five based on MREC performance and a desire to minimize capital costs. The stack arrangement was altered by placing an extra low concentration chamber adjacent to anode chamber to reduce ammonia crossover. This additional chamber decreased ammonia nitrogen losses into anolyte by 60%, increased the coulombic efficiency to 83%, and improved the hydrogen yield to a maximum of 3.5 mol H2/mol acetate, with an overall energy efficiency of 27%. These results improve the MREC process, making it a more efficient method for renewable hydrogen gas production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biological hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  3. Hydrogen production from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, John J.

    Biomass energy encompasses a broad category of energy derived from plants and animals as well as the residual materials from each. Hydrogen gas is an effective energy carrier which burns cleanly producing water as the only product. Hydrogen produced from a renewable source such as biomass provides a domestically available, CO2 neutral, non-polluting form of energy. The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to develop two different methods to produce hydrogen gas using biomass as a renewable energy source. The first method was to produce hydrogen using photosynthetic algae. C. reinhardtii has been shown to produce hydrogen using light as an energy source. The objective of this work was to increase hydrogen production by (a) manipulating process variables such as cell concentration, light intensity, and reactor design and (b) immobilizing the algal cells to increase photosynthetic efficiency and address production limitations. The second method of hydrogen production explored was gasification of biomass using supercritical water (SCW). A continuous SCW reactor was constructed to increase capacity and understand the optimum conditions necessary to gasify model compounds. Increasing the capacity of SCW reactors and understanding how basic components of biomass react may lead to further development of this technology.

  4. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Rocheleau, R.; Misra, A.; Miller, E.

    1998-08-01

    A significant component of the US DOE Hydrogen Program is the development of a practical technology for the direct production of hydrogen using a renewable source of energy. High efficiency photoelectrochemical systems to produce hydrogen directly from water using sunlight as the energy source represent one of the technologies identified by DOE to meet this mission. Reactor modeling and experiments conducted at UH provide strong evidence that direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency greater than 10% can be expected using photoelectrodes fabricated from low-cost, multijunction (MJ) amorphous silicon solar cells. Solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8% have been achieved using a 10.3% efficient MJ amorphous silicon solar cell. Higher efficiency can be expected with the use of higher efficiency solar cells, further improvement of the thin film oxidation and reduction catalysts, and optimization of the solar cell for hydrogen production rather than electricity production. Hydrogen and oxygen catalysts developed under this project are very stable, exhibiting no measurable degradation in KOH after over 13,000 hours of operation. Additional research is needed to fully optimize the transparent, conducting coatings which will be needed for large area integrated arrays. To date, the best protection has been afforded by wide bandgap amorphous silicon carbide films.

  5. Development of Tritium Permeation Analysis Code and Tritium Transport in a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Coupled with Hydrogen Production System

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Mike Patterson

    2010-06-01

    Abstract – A tritium permeation analyses code (TPAC) was developed by Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of analyzing tritium distributions in very high temperature reactor (VHTR) systems, including integrated hydrogen production systems. A MATLAB SIMULINK software package was used in developing the code. The TPAC is based on the mass balance equations of tritium-containing species and various forms of hydrogen coupled with a variety of tritium sources, sinks, and permeation models. In the TPAC, ternary fission and neutron reactions with 6Li, 7Li 10B, and 3He were taken into considerations as tritium sources. Purification and leakage models were implemented as main tritium sinks. Permeation of tritium and H2 through pipes, vessels, and heat exchangers were considered as main tritium transport paths. In addition, electroyzer and isotope exchange models were developed for analyzing hydrogen production systems, including high temperature electrolysis and sulfur-iodine processes.

  6. Catalytic Dehydrogenative Coupling of Hydrosilanes with Alcohols for the Production of Hydrogen On-demand: Application of a Silane/Alcohol Pair as a Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Espinosa, David; Carretero-Cerdán, Alba; Baya, Miguel; García, Hermenegildo; Mata, Jose A

    2017-08-10

    The compound [Ru(p-cym)(Cl)2 (NHC)] is an effective catalyst for the room-temperature coupling of silanes and alcohols with the concomitant formation of molecular hydrogen. High catalyst activity is observed for a variety of substrates affording quantitative yields in minutes at room temperature and with a catalyst loading as low as 0.1 mol %. The coupling reaction is thermodynamically and, in the presence of a Ru complex, kinetically favourable and allows rapid molecular hydrogen generation on-demand at room temperature, under air, and without any additive. The pair silane/alcohol is a potential liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) for energy storage over long periods in a safe and secure way. Silanes and alcohols are non-toxic compounds and do not require special handling precautions such as high pressure or an inert atmosphere. These properties enhance the practical applications of the pair silane/alcohol as a good LOHC in the automotive industry. The variety and availability of silanes and alcohols permits a pair combination that fulfils the requirements for developing an efficient LOHC. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Misra, A.

    1996-10-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. One promising option to meet this goal is direct photoelectrolysis in which light absorbed by semiconductor-based photoelectrodes produces electrical power internally to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Under this program, direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8 % have been demonstrated using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Detailed loss analysis models indicate that solar-to-chemical conversion greater than 10% can be achieved with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, the authors describe the continuing progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, results of outdoor testing, and efforts to develop high efficiency, stable prototype systems.

  8. Dedicated nuclear facilities for electrolytic hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foh, S. E.; Escher, W. J. D.; Donakowski, T. D.

    1979-01-01

    An advanced technology, fully dedicated nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen production facility is presented. This plant will produce hydrogen and oxygen only and no electrical power will be generated for off-plant use. The conceptual design was based on hydrogen production to fill a pipeline at 1000 psi and a 3000 MW nuclear base, and the base-line facility nuclear-to-shaftpower and shaftpower-to-electricity subsystems, the water treatment subsystem, electricity-to-hydrogen subsystem, hydrogen compression, efficiency, and hydrogen production cost are discussed. The final conceptual design integrates a 3000 MWth high-temperature gas-cooled reactor operating at 980 C helium reactor-out temperature, direct dc electricity generation via acyclic generators, and high-current density, high-pressure electrolyzers based on the solid polymer electrolyte approach. All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced and pipeline hydrogen is produced at 1000 psi. Hydrogen costs were about half of the conventional nuclear electrolysis process.

  9. Dedicated nuclear facilities for electrolytic hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foh, S. E.; Escher, W. J. D.; Donakowski, T. D.

    1979-01-01

    An advanced technology, fully dedicated nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen production facility is presented. This plant will produce hydrogen and oxygen only and no electrical power will be generated for off-plant use. The conceptual design was based on hydrogen production to fill a pipeline at 1000 psi and a 3000 MW nuclear base, and the base-line facility nuclear-to-shaftpower and shaftpower-to-electricity subsystems, the water treatment subsystem, electricity-to-hydrogen subsystem, hydrogen compression, efficiency, and hydrogen production cost are discussed. The final conceptual design integrates a 3000 MWth high-temperature gas-cooled reactor operating at 980 C helium reactor-out temperature, direct dc electricity generation via acyclic generators, and high-current density, high-pressure electrolyzers based on the solid polymer electrolyte approach. All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced and pipeline hydrogen is produced at 1000 psi. Hydrogen costs were about half of the conventional nuclear electrolysis process.

  10. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

    2005-06-01

    The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The

  11. Nitrogen doped Sr₂Ta₂O₇ coupled with graphene sheets as photocatalysts for increased photocatalytic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Aniruddh; Seger, Brian; Lu, Gao Qing Max; Wang, Lianzhou

    2011-05-24

    In this work we present the synthesis of a new type of nitrogen-doped tantalate, Sr(2)Ta(2)O(7-x)N(x), which exhibited significantly increased visible light absorption and improved photocatalytic hydrogen production by 87% under solar irradiation, compared with its undoped counterpart Sr(2)Ta(2)O(7). The photocatalyst also exhibited a strong capability in photoinduced reduction of exfoliated graphene oxide (GO) to graphene sheets. By using graphene as a support for a Pt cocatalyst, a new type of composite containing graphene-Pt and Sr(2)Ta(2)O(7-x)N(x) was designed, which demonstrated an additional ∼80% increase in hydrogen production and an quantum efficiency of 6.45% (∼177% increase from pristine undoped Sr(2)Ta(2)O(7)) due to the efficient charge carrier separation on the photocatalyst. This work suggests that graphene can play an important role as an electron transfer highway, which facilitates the charge carrier collection onto Pt cocatalysts. The method can thus be considered as an excellent strategy to increase photocatalytic hydrogen production in addition to a commonly applied doping method.

  12. Solar-Driven Water Oxidation and Decoupled Hydrogen Production Mediated by an Electron-Coupled-Proton Buffer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Solar-to-hydrogen photoelectrochemical cells (PECs) have been proposed as a means of converting sunlight into H2 fuel. However, in traditional PECs, the oxygen evolution reaction and the hydrogen evolution reaction are coupled, and so the rate of both of these is limited by the photocurrents that can be generated from the solar flux. This in turn leads to slow rates of gas evolution that favor crossover of H2 into the O2 stream and vice versa, even through ostensibly impermeable membranes such as Nafion. Herein, we show that the use of the electron-coupled-proton buffer (ECPB) H3PMo12O40 allows solar-driven O2 evolution from water to proceed at rates of over 1 mA cm–2 on WO3 photoanodes without the need for any additional electrochemical bias. No H2 is produced in the PEC, and instead H3PMo12O40 is reduced to H5PMo12O40. If the reduced ECPB is subjected to a separate electrochemical reoxidation, then H2 is produced with full overall Faradaic efficiency. PMID:27159121

  13. A photo- and electrochemical investigation of BODIPY-cobaloxime complexes for hydrogen production, coupled with quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Manton, Jennifer C; Long, Conor; Vos, Johannes G; Pryce, Mary T

    2014-03-21

    Two BODIPY-cobaloxime complexes; [{Co(dmgH)2Cl}{3-[bis-(4-ethyl-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-methyl]-pyridine-borondiflouride}] (1a) and [{Co(dmgH)2Cl}{4-[bis-(4-ethyl-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-methyl]-pyridine-borondiflouride}] (2a) (BODIPY = boron dipyrromethene), (dmgH = dimethylglyoxime) have been synthesised and studied as model catalytic systems for the generation of hydrogen gas in aqueous media. Under photochemical conditions, neither complex catalysed the reduction of water to hydrogen. However, both complexes showed considerable activity under electrochemical conditions. Turn-over-numbers for hydrogen production of 1.65 × 10(4) and 1.08 × 10(4) were obtained for 1a and 2a respectively following potentiostatic electrolysis at -1.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl after 1 hour. Quantum chemical calculations were performed to provide an explanation for the lack of photochemical activity.

  14. Photovoltaic hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Hiser, H.W.; Memory, S.B.; Veziroglu, T.N.; Padin, J.

    1996-10-01

    This is a new project, which started in June 1995, and involves photovoltaic hydrogen production as a fuel production method for the future. In order to increase the hydrogen yield, it was decided to use hybrid solar collectors to generate D.C. electricity, as well as high temperature steam for input to the electrolyzer. In this way, some of the energy needed to dissociate the water is supplied in the form of heat (or low grade energy), to generate steam, which results in a reduction of electrical energy (or high grade energy) needed. As a result, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency is increased. In the above stated system, the collector location, the collector tracking sub-system (i.e., orientation/rotation), and the steam temperature have been taken as variables. Five locations selected - in order to consider a variety of latitudes, altitudes, cloud coverage and atmospheric conditions - are Atlanta, Denver, Miami, Phoenix and Salt Lake City. Plain PV and hybrid solar collectors for a stationary south facing system and five different collector rotation systems have been analyzed. Steam temperatures have been varied between 200{degrees}C and 1200{degrees}C. During the first year, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiencies have been considered. The results show that higher steam temperatures, 2 dimensional tracking system, higher elevations and dryer climates causes higher conversion efficiencies. Cost effectiveness of the sub-systems and of the overall system will be analyzed during the second year. Also, initial studies will be made of an advanced high efficiency hybrid solar hydrogen production system.

  15. Hydrogen production from carbonaceous material

    DOEpatents

    Lackner, Klaus S.; Ziock, Hans J.; Harrison, Douglas P.

    2004-09-14

    Hydrogen is produced from solid or liquid carbon-containing fuels in a two-step process. The fuel is gasified with hydrogen in a hydrogenation reaction to produce a methane-rich gaseous reaction product, which is then reacted with water and calcium oxide in a hydrogen production and carbonation reaction to produce hydrogen and calcium carbonate. The calcium carbonate may be continuously removed from the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction zone and calcined to regenerate calcium oxide, which may be reintroduced into the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction zone. Hydrogen produced in the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction is more than sufficient both to provide the energy necessary for the calcination reaction and also to sustain the hydrogenation of the coal in the gasification reaction. The excess hydrogen is available for energy production or other purposes. Substantially all of the carbon introduced as fuel ultimately emerges from the invention process in a stream of substantially pure carbon dioxide. The water necessary for the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction may be introduced into both the gasification and hydrogen production and carbonation reactions, and allocated so as transfer the exothermic heat of reaction of the gasification reaction to the endothermic hydrogen production and carbonation reaction.

  16. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Zhang, Z.

    1995-09-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. Photoelectrochemical devices-direct photoconversion systems utilizing a photovoltaic-type structure coated with water-splitting catalysts-represent a promising option to meet this goal. Direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies greater than 7% and photoelectrode lifetimes of up to 30 hours in 1 molar KOH have been demonstrated in our laboratory using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Loss analysis models indicate that the DOE`s goal of 10% solar-to-chemical conversion can be met with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, we describe recent progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, improvements in photoelectrode efficiency and stability, and designs for higher efficiency and greater stability.

  17. Economics of hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.; Wolsky, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Much of the current interest in hydrogen (H/sub 2/) centers around its potential to displace oil and gas as a fuel. The results of this study should be useful to research and development managers making funding decisions, and they should also be of interest to energy analysts, economists, and proponents of a hydrogen economy. We examined the current costs of H/sub 2/ produced by commercially available technologies (from fossil fuels and by electrolysis) and projected these costs to 2010, to set cost goals for H/sub 2/ produced via new technologies. We also examined the sensitivity of H/sub 2/ costs to varying energy price forecasts, capital costs and the required rate of return on investment, and by-product credits. We find that conventionally produced H/sub 2/ will not break into the fuel market before 2010. 23 references, 19 figures, 12 tables.

  18. Commercializing solar hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.T.; Prairie, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the need for a government-supported program to commercialize hydrogen production methods which use solar energy as the main source of energy. Current methods use hydrocarbons and generate large amounts of carbon dioxide. The paper describes results from a literature survey performed to identify technologies using direct solar energy that were likely to succeed on an industrial scale in the near term. Critical parameters included calculated efficiencies, measured efficiencies, and development status. The cost of solar collectors is cited as the reason most promising solar hydrogen research is not taken to the pilot plant stage. The author recommends use of existing DOE facilities already in operation for pilot plant testing. 14 refs. (CK)

  19. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J.; Batson, Philip E.; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D.; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ~-0.1 V and ~50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER.

  20. Solar hydrogen production demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, K.; Hahn, D.; Marion, B.

    The status of a parabolic trough concentrating photovoltaic system (PTCPS) is described. The electrical output of the PTCPS is direct-coupled to an electrolyzer to produce hydrogen. The rationale behind the project is to overcome the well-documented problems with PTCPS by configuring the receiver for a nonconventional load. The single-crystal silicon PV cells are wired in parallel-series combination to produce 200 A at 2 to 2.5 V. This powers an individual electrolyzer cell. The electrolyzers are distributed among the collector field rather than combined in a conventional stack. Preliminary I-V curves are taken and the original expectations for the system appear to be achievable.

  1. Hydrogen production through photoelectrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, G.; Rao, N. N.; Srivastava, O. N.

    The prospects for solar energy-based photoelectrolysis of water for hydrogen production are discussed, with emphasis on the materials problems that arise in such photoelectrochemical processes. The semiconducting photoelectrode material should be optimized with respect to three different parameters: band gap, flat band potential, and stability. Attention is given to the results thus far experimentally obtained through the use of n-TiO2 and n-WSe2 semiconducting photoelectrodes. The photoelectrical properties of TiO2 will have to be modified so that the solar spectral response comes to yield conversion efficiencies greater than about 1 percent.

  2. Effect of Light/Dark Regimens on Hydrogen Production by Tetraselmis subcordiformis Coupled with an Alkaline Fuel Cell System.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Li, Ying; Guo, Haiyan

    2017-05-11

    To improve the photoproduction of hydrogen (H2) by a green algae-based system, the effect of light/dark regimens on H2 photoproduction regulated by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was investigated. A fuel cell was integrated into a photobioreactor to allow online monitoring of the H2 evolution rate and decrease potential H2 feedback inhibition by consuming the generated H2 in situ. During the first 15 h of H2 evolution, the system was subjected to dark treatment after initial light illumination (L/D = 6/9 h, 9/6 h, and 12/3 h). After the dark period, all systems were again exposed to light illumination until H2 evolution stopped. Two peaks were observed in the H2 evolution rate under all three light/dark regimens. Additionally, a high H2 yield of 126 ± 10 mL L(-1) was achieved using a light/dark regimen of L 9 h/D 6 h/L until H2 production ceased, which was 1.6 times higher than that obtained under continuous illumination. H2 production was accompanied by some physiological and morphological changes in the cells. The results indicated that light/dark regimens improved the duration and yield of H2 photoproduction by the CCCP-regulated process of Tetraselmis subcordiformis.

  3. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J; Batson, Philip E; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ∼-0.1 V and ∼50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER.

  4. Surfactant-induced hydrogen production in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Famiglietti, M.; Luisi, P.L. ); Hochkoeppler, A. . Dept. di Biologia)

    1993-10-01

    Addition of Tween 85 to aqueous suspensions of Anabaena variabilis induced photosynthetic evolution of hydrogen over a time span of several weeks: as much as 148 nmol H[sub 2]/h [center dot] mg dry weight was produced in the first week by a suspension containing 4.2 mg dry weight of cells and 77 mM Tween 85. The chemical structure of Tween 85 was a necessary prerequisite for inducing hydrogen production, as compounds such as Tween 20, 60, and 80 had a quite different effect. There was a coupling between photosynthetic oxygen evolution and hydrogen evolution: Hydrogen evolution started to be effective only when oxygen evolution subdued. The presence of heterocysts in A. variabilis was also required for the Tween-induced hydrogen production. Based on these observations, possible mechanisms for the photosynthetic effect of Tween 85 are advanced and discussed.

  5. Surfactant-Induced hydrogen production in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Famiglietti, M; Hochkoeppler, A; Luisi, P L

    1993-10-01

    Addition of Tween 85 to aqueous suspensions of Anabaena variabilis induced photosynthetic evolution of hydrogen over a time span of several weeks: As much as 148 nmol H(2)/h . mg dry weight was produced in the first week by a suspension containing 4.2 mg dry weight of cells and 77 mM Tween 85. The chemical structure of Tween 85 was a necessary prerequisite for inducing hydrogen production, as compounds such as Tween 20, 60, and 80 had a quite different effect. There was a coupling between photosynthetic oxygen evolution and hydrogen evolution: Hydrogen evolution started to be effective only when oxygen evolution subdued. The presence of heterocysts in A. variabilis was also required for the Tween-induced hydrogen production. Based on these observations, possible mechanisms for the photosynthetic effect of Tween 85 are advanced and discussed. (c) 1993 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Waste/By-Product Hydrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-13

    Waste/By product Hydrogen Waste H2 sources include: � Waste bio‐mass: biogas to high temp fuel cells to produce H2 – there are over two dozen sites...By‐product Hydrogen Fuel Flexibility Biogas : generated from organic waste �Wastewater treatment plants can provide multiple MW of renewable...TCF ( 82 Million cars) � Biogas fuels approximately 210 Million cars Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association

  7. Hydrogen production by photoprocesses

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, S.R.

    1988-10-01

    The concept of producing hydrogen fuel from sunlight is inherently appealing and has captured the imagination of many scientists, innovators, and decision makers. In fact, there are numerous routes to produce hydrogen from solar energy through photoprocesses. Generally, they can be grouped into four processes: electric conversion, thermal conversion, indirect conversion, and direct photon conversion. 12 refs., 11 figs.

  8. Solar hydrogen production: renewable hydrogen production by dry fuel reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Jamie; Miyamoto, Henry K.

    2006-09-01

    SHEC LABS - Solar Hydrogen Energy Corporation constructed a pilot-plant to demonstrate a Dry Fuel Reforming (DFR) system that is heated primarily by sunlight focusing-mirrors. The pilot-plant consists of: 1) a solar mirror array and solar concentrator and shutter system; and 2) two thermo-catalytic reactors to convert Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Water into Hydrogen. Results from the pilot study show that solar Hydrogen generation is feasible and cost-competitive with traditional Hydrogen production. More than 95% of Hydrogen commercially produced today is by the Steam Methane Reformation (SMR) of natural gas, a process that liberates Carbon Dioxide to the atmosphere. The SMR process provides a net energy loss of 30 to 35% when converting from Methane to Hydrogen. Solar Hydrogen production provides a 14% net energy gain when converting Methane into Hydrogen since the energy used to drive the process is from the sun. The environmental benefits of generating Hydrogen using renewable energy include significant greenhouse gas and criteria air contaminant reductions.

  9. Hydrogen production costs -- A survey

    SciTech Connect

    Basye, L.; Swaminathan, S.

    1997-12-04

    Hydrogen, produced using renewable resources, is an environmentally benign energy carrier that will play a vital role in sustainable energy systems. The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of cost-effective technologies for hydrogen production, storage, and utilization to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure. International interest in hydrogen as an energy carrier is high. Research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of hydrogen energy systems are in progress in many countries. Annex 11 of the International Energy Agency (IEA) facilitates member countries to collaborate on hydrogen RD and D projects. The United States is a member of Annex 11, and the US representative is the Program Manager of the DOE Hydrogen R and D Program. The Executive Committee of the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement in its June 1997 meeting decided to review the production costs of hydrogen via the currently commercially available processes. This report compiles that data. The methods of production are steam reforming, partial oxidation, gasification, pyrolysis, electrolysis, photochemical, photobiological, and photoelectrochemical reactions.

  10. Biological Processes for Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    van Niel, Ed W J

    Methane is produced usually from organic waste in a straightforward anaerobic digestion process. However, hydrogen production is technically more challenging as more stages are needed to convert all biomass to hydrogen because of thermodynamic constraints. Nevertheless, the benefit of hydrogen is that it can be produced, both biologically and thermochemically, in more than one way from either organic compounds or water. Research in biological hydrogen production is booming, as reflected by the myriad of recently published reviews on the topic. This overview is written from the perspective of how to transfer as much energy as possible from the feedstock into the gaseous products hydrogen, and to a lesser extent, methane. The status and remaining challenges of all the biological processes are concisely discussed.

  11. Microalgal hydrogen production - A review.

    PubMed

    Khetkorn, Wanthanee; Rastogi, Rajesh P; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Lindblad, Peter; Madamwar, Datta; Pandey, Ashok; Larroche, Christian

    2017-11-01

    Bio-hydrogen from microalgae including cyanobacteria has attracted commercial awareness due to its potential as an alternative, reliable and renewable energy source. Photosynthetic hydrogen production from microalgae can be interesting and promising options for clean energy. Advances in hydrogen-fuel-cell technology may attest an eco-friendly way of biofuel production, since, the use of H2 to generate electricity releases only water as a by-product. Progress in genetic/metabolic engineering may significantly enhance the photobiological hydrogen production from microalgae. Manipulation of competing metabolic pathways by modulating the certain key enzymes such as hydrogenase and nitrogenase may enhance the evolution of H2 from photoautotrophic cells. Moreover, biological H2 production at low operating costs is requisite for economic viability. Several photobioreactors have been developed for large-scale biomass and hydrogen production. This review highlights the recent technological progress, enzymes involved and genetic as well as metabolic engineering approaches towards sustainable hydrogen production from microalgae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian

    2013-12-23

    The objectives of this project, covering two phases and an additional extension phase, were the development of thin film-based hybrid photovoltaic (PV)/photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices for solar-powered water splitting. The hybrid device, comprising a low-cost photoactive material integrated with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H or a-Si in short)-based solar cells as a driver, should be able to produce hydrogen with a 5% solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH) and be durable for at least 500 hours. Three thin film material classes were studied and developed under this program: silicon-based compounds, copper chalcopyrite-based compounds, and metal oxides. With the silicon-based compounds, more specifically the amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC), we achieved a STH efficiency of 3.7% when the photoelectrode was coupled to an a-Si tandem solar cell, and a STH efficiency of 6.1% when using a crystalline Si PV driver. The hybrid PV/a-SiC device tested under a current bias of -3~4 mA/cm{sup 2}, exhibited a durability of up to ~800 hours in 0.25 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte. Other than the PV driver, the most critical element affecting the photocurrent (and hence the STH efficiency) of the hybrid PV/a-SiC device was the surface energetics at the a-SiC/electrolyte interface. Without surface modification, the photocurrent of the hybrid PEC device was ~1 mA/cm{sup 2} or lower due to a surface barrier that limits the extraction of photogenerated carriers. We conducted an extensive search for suitable surface modification techniques/materials, of which the deposition of low work function metal nanoparticles was the most successful. Metal nanoparticles of ruthenium (Ru), tungsten (W) or titanium (Ti) led to an anodic shift in the onset potential. We have also been able to develop hybrid devices of various configurations in a monolithic fashion and optimized the current matching via altering the energy bandgap and thickness of each constituent cell. As a result, the short

  13. Using plants for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this program is to make a quantitative assessment of the potential for using marine algae for producing hydrogen and oxygen from sea water. The approach is to screen selected species of green algae for simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen. Six marine green algae have been identified as having this property. The limiting step of algal hydrogen production is turnover time. This report contains data on the first simultaneous measurement of the turnover times of steady-state photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production. An instrument for measuring the absolute yield of hydrogen or oxygen per saturating single-turnover flash of light has been designed and built as part of this research program.

  14. Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    The Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap identifies research pathways leading to hydrogen production technologies that produce near-zero net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from highly efficient and diverse renewable energy sources. This roadmap focuses on initial development of the technologies, identifies their gaps and barriers, and describes activities by various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) offices to address the key issues and challenges.

  15. Coupled multigroup cross sections for hydrogen interactions in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienke, B. R.; Morel, J. E.; Cayton, T. E.; Howell, R. B.

    1985-10-01

    Using analytical fits to the experimental cross sections for H 3 H 2, and H 2+ interactions in plasmas, developed by Gryzinski, Riviere, Jones, and Freeman, we obtain coupled multigroup cross sections and rate coefficients for hydrogen transport applications. Multigroup cross sections and rate coefficients, for specified energy group boundaries, plasma particle and temperature profiles, and cylindrical plasma confinement radius, are generated against a spatially dependent, local Maxwellian scattering background. Cross sections are formatted for direct use in production multigroup S n, Monte Carlo, or specific transport applications. Ten coupled hydrogen reactions are included and resulting cross sections for ionization, scattering, and production can be coupled or decoupled. Reactions treated include H, H 2 ionization by electrons and protons, H, H 2 charge exchange, and H 2, H 2+ dissociative mechanisms. We detail the formalism used to compute effective cross sections and rates and give practicle results for two fusion reactors.

  16. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Ali T-Raissi

    2005-01-14

    The aim of this work was to assess issues of cost, and performance associated with the production and storage of hydrogen via following three feedstocks: sub-quality natural gas (SQNG), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and water. Three technology areas were considered: (1) Hydrogen production utilizing SQNG resources, (2) Hydrogen storage in ammonia and amine-borane complexes for fuel cell applications, and (3) Hydrogen from solar thermochemical cycles for splitting water. This report summarizes our findings with the following objectives: Technoeconomic analysis of the feasibility of the technology areas 1-3; Evaluation of the hydrogen production cost by technology areas 1; and Feasibility of ammonia and/or amine-borane complexes (technology areas 2) as a means of hydrogen storage on-board fuel cell powered vehicles. For each technology area, we reviewed the open literature with respect to the following criteria: process efficiency, cost, safety, and ease of implementation and impact of the latest materials innovations, if any. We employed various process analysis platforms including FactSage chemical equilibrium software and Aspen Technologies AspenPlus and HYSYS chemical process simulation programs for determining the performance of the prospective hydrogen production processes.

  17. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Leon; Wade, Dave

    2003-07-01

    During the past decade the interest in hydrogen as transportation fuel has greatly escalated. This heighten interest is partly related to concerns surrounding local and regional air pollution from the combustion of fossil fuels along with carbon dioxide emissions adding to the enhanced greenhouse effect. More recently there has been a great sensitivity to the vulnerability of our oil supply. Thus, energy security and environmental concerns have driven the interest in hydrogen as the clean and secure alternative to fossil fuels. Remarkable advances in fuel-cell technology have made hydrogen fueled transportation a near-term possibility. However, copious quantities of hydrogen must be generated in a manner independent of fossil fuels if environmental benefits and energy security are to be achieved. The renewable technologies, wind, solar, and geothermal, although important contributors, simply do not comprise the energy density required to deliver enough hydrogen to displace much of the fossil transportation fuels. Nuclear energy is the only primary energy source that can generate enough hydrogen in an energy secure and environmentally benign fashion. Methods of production of hydrogen from nuclear energy, the relative cost of hydrogen, and possible transition schemes to a nuclear-hydrogen economy will be presented.

  18. Thermochemical production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Dreyfuss, Robert M.

    1976-07-13

    A thermochemical reaction cycle for the generation of hydrogen from water comprising the following sequence of reactions wherein M represents a metal and Z represents a metalloid selected from the arsenic-antimony-bismuth and selenium-tellurium subgroups of the periodic system: 2MO + Z + SO.sub.2 .fwdarw. MZ + MSO.sub.4 (1) mz + h.sub.2 so.sub.4 .fwdarw. mso.sub.4 + h.sub.2 z (2) 2mso.sub.4 .fwdarw. 2mo + so.sub.2 + so.sub.3 + 1/20.sub.2 (3) h.sub.2 z .fwdarw. z + h.sub.2 (4) h.sub.2 o + so.sub.3 .fwdarw. h.sub.2 so.sub.4 (5) the net reaction is the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen.

  19. Multifunctional Pd/Ni-Co catalyst for hydrogen production by chemical looping coupled with steam reforming of acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Fermoso, Javier; Gil, María V; Rubiera, Fernando; Chen, De

    2014-11-01

    High yield of high-purity H2 from acetic acid, a model compound of bio-oil obtained from the fast pyrolysis of biomass, was produced by sorption-enhanced steam reforming (SESR). An oxygen carrier was introduced into a chemical loop (CL) coupled to the cyclical SESR process to supply heat in situ for the endothermic sorbent regeneration to increase the energy efficiency of the process. A new multifunctional 1 %Pd/20 %Ni-20 %Co catalyst was developed for use both as oxygen carrier in the CL and as reforming catalyst in the SESR whereas a CaO-based material was used as CO2 sorbent. In the sorbent-air regeneration step, the Ni-Co atoms in the catalyst undergo strong exothermic oxidation reactions that provide heat for the CaO decarbonation. The addition of Pd to the Ni-Co catalyst makes the catalyst active throughout the whole SESR-CL cycle. Pd significantly promotes the reduction of Ni-Co oxides to metallic Ni-Co during the reforming stage, which avoids the need for a reduction step after regeneration. H2 yield above 90 % and H2 purity above 99.2 vol % were obtained.

  20. Hydrogen production from solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenstadt, M. M.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    Three alternatives for hydrogen production from solar energy have been analyzed on both efficiency and economic grounds. The analysis shows that the alternative using solar energy followed by thermochemical decomposition of water to produce hydrogen is the optimum one. The other schemes considered were the direct conversion of solar energy to electricity by silicon cells and water electrolysis, and the use of solar energy to power a vapor cycle followed by electrical generation and electrolysis. The capital cost of hydrogen via the thermochemical alternative was estimated at $575/kW of hydrogen output or $3.15/million Btu. Although this cost appears high when compared with hydrogen from other primary energy sources or from fossil fuel, environmental and social costs which favor solar energy may prove this scheme feasible in the future.

  1. Hydrogen production from solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenstadt, M. M.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    Three alternatives for hydrogen production from solar energy have been analyzed on both efficiency and economic grounds. The analysis shows that the alternative using solar energy followed by thermochemical decomposition of water to produce hydrogen is the optimum one. The other schemes considered were the direct conversion of solar energy to electricity by silicon cells and water electrolysis, and the use of solar energy to power a vapor cycle followed by electrical generation and electrolysis. The capital cost of hydrogen via the thermochemical alternative was estimated at $575/kW of hydrogen output or $3.15/million Btu. Although this cost appears high when compared with hydrogen from other primary energy sources or from fossil fuel, environmental and social costs which favor solar energy may prove this scheme feasible in the future.

  2. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Bacal, M.; Wada, M.

    2015-06-15

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed.

  3. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacal, M.; Wada, M.

    2015-06-01

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed.

  4. Coupling hydrogen fuel and carbonless utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G.D.

    1998-08-01

    A number of previous analyses have focused on comparisons of single hydrogen vehicles to petroleum and alternative fuel vehicles or of stationary hydrogen storage for utility or local power applications. LLNL`s approach is to compare combined transportation/utility storage systems using hydrogen and fossil fuels. Computer models have been constructed to test the hypothesis that combining carbonless electricity sources and vehicles fueled by electrolytic hydrogen can reduce carbon emissions more cost effectively than either approach alone. Three scenarios have been developed and compared using computer simulations, hourly utility demand data, representative data for solar and wind energy sites, and the latest available EIA projections for transportation and energy demand in the US in 2020. Cost projections were based on estimates from GRI, EIA, and a recent DOE/EPRI report on renewable energy technologies. The key question guiding this analysis was: what can be gained by combining hydrogen fuel production and renewable electricity? Bounding scenarios were chosen to analyze three carbon conscious options for the US transportation fuel and electricity supply system beyond 2020: Reference Case -- petroleum transportation and natural gas electric sector; Benchmark Case -- petroleum transportation and carbonless electric sector; and Target Case -- hydrogen transportation and carbonless electric sector.

  5. Solar-thermal hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    Since hydrogen is not only an eventual and attractive fuel but is also a prime intermediate in the production of many fuels and chemicals, one extremely valuable utilization of a solar thermal facility would be its operation as a system for hydrogen production. Such a use would also fulfill the important requirement for energy storage. Solar thermal systems appear to offer the only practical method for significant hydrogen production from solar energy. The production could utilize advanced methods of water electrolysis if highly efficient generation of solar electricity were developed. Thermochemical cycles for water decomposition appear to be more promising if cycles that match the characteristics of solar heat sources can be developed. Advanced cycles based on solid sulfate or solid oxide decomposition reactions should interface advantageously with solar thermal systems. Sulfuric acid cycles can serve as standards of comparison for these new cycles as they are discovered and developed.

  6. Model based predictive control of a high temperature gas cooled power plant coupled to a hydrogen production facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, Lloyd A.

    This thesis builds upon recent studies focusing on modeling, operation, and control of high temperature gas cooled reactors. A computer model was developed, based on mass, energy, and momentum balances of control volumes throughout the plant. Several simulations of the plant behavior were conducted and their results were compared with those from the literature. Proportional control was combined with optimal control to form a time varying, adjustable gain predictive controller which adjusts the proportional gains during transients. The controller was designed to utilize control rod motions and bypass control valves to maintain desired plant conditions. An optimization scheme was introduced to efficiently solve the optimization problem formulated as part of the predictive controller operation. Several additional transients were run to examine the full plant controller performance. Multiple predictive controllers were designed and their performance was compared with a proportional controller throughout each transient. The predictive controller results confirmed the importance of proper selection of the optimal controller parameters, in particular the controller time step size and the horizon time. The well-designed proportional controllers clearly demonstrated improvements in plant performance during short time scale transients, namely a loss of secondary heat transfer transient and a step change in desired power transient. Results from long time scale transients demonstrated the capabilities of the proposed bypass control system to control electrical power production without the need for storage vessels.

  7. Hydrogen Production by Water Biophotolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, Maria L.; King, Paul W.; Mulder, David W.; Eckert, Carrie; Dubini, Alexandra; Maness, Pin-Ching; Yu, Jianping

    2014-01-22

    The use of microalgae for production of hydrogen gas from water photolysis has been studied for many years, but its commercialization is still limited by multiple challenges. Most of the barriers to commercialization are attributed to the existence of biological regulatory mechanisms that, under anaerobic conditions, quench the absorbed light energy, down-regulate linear electron transfer, inactivate the H2-producing enzyme, and compete for electrons with the hydrogenase. Consequently, the conversion efficiency of absorbed photons into H2 is significantly lower than its estimated potential of 12–13 %. However, extensive research continues towards addressing these barriers by either trying to understand and circumvent intracellular regulatory mechanisms at the enzyme and metabolic level or by developing biological systems that achieve prolonged H2 production albeit under lower than 12–13 % solar conversion efficiency. This chapter describes the metabolic pathways involved in biological H2 photoproduction from water photolysis, the attributes of the two hydrogenases, [FeFe] and [NiFe], that catalyze biological H2 production, and highlights research related to addressing the barriers described above. These highlights include: (a) recent advances in improving our understanding of the O2 inactivation mechanism in different classes of hydrogenases; (b) progress made in preventing competitive pathways from diverting electrons from H2 photoproduction; and (c) new developments in bypassing the non-dissipated proton gradient from down-regulating photosynthetic electron transfer. As an example of a major success story, we mention the generation of truncated-antenna mutants in Chlamydomonas and Synechocystis that address the inherent low-light saturation of photosynthesis. In addition, we highlight the rationale and progress towards coupling biological hydrogenases to non-biological, photochemical charge-separation as a means to bypass the barriers of photobiological

  8. Solar Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, C.; Sutin, N.; Turner, J.

    1996-09-01

    This panel addressed different methods for the photoassisted dissociation of water into its component parts, hydrogen and oxygen. Systems considered include PV-electrolysis, photoelectrochemical cells, and transition-metal based microheterogeneous and homogeneous systems. While none of the systems for water splitting appear economically viable at the present time, the panel identified areas of basic research that could increase the overall efficiency and decrease the costs. Common to all the areas considered was the underlying belief that the water-to-hydrogen half reaction is reasonably well characterized, while the four-electron oxidation of water-to-oxygen is less well understood and represents a significant energy loss. For electrolysis, research in electrocatalysis to reduce overvoltage losses was identified as a key area for increased efficiency. Non-noble metal catalysts and less expensive components would reduce capital costs. While potentially offering higher efficiencies and lower costs, photoelectrochemical-based direct conversion systems undergo corrosion reactions and often have poor energetics for the water reaction. Research is needed to understand the factors that control the interfacial energetics and the photoinduced corrosion. Multi-photon devices were identified as promising systems for high efficiency conversion.

  9. Benefits of hydrogen production research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.; Fujita, T.; Rossen, W.; Jacobs, C.

    1976-01-01

    An economic analysis of total monetary benefits arising from increased volume and efficiency of hydrogen production from various primary energy sources is carried out. The analysis is based on NASA's projections of future hydrogen demand in terms of both established industrial-chemical uses and new energy system applications, along with the mix of primary energy sources needed to meet this demand. A cost methodology model is worked out with the basic cost elements being plant construction costs, feedstock and energy costs, and operating and labor-related costs. A computer simulation technique was developed and a set of model calculations was performed. Some representative outputs of the computer analysis are displayed and conclusions are drawn on major factors determining the overall savings possible in hydrogen production and on its technological and economic impact.

  10. Benefits of hydrogen production research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.; Fujita, T.; Rossen, W.; Jacobs, C.

    1976-01-01

    An economic analysis of total monetary benefits arising from increased volume and efficiency of hydrogen production from various primary energy sources is carried out. The analysis is based on NASA's projections of future hydrogen demand in terms of both established industrial-chemical uses and new energy system applications, along with the mix of primary energy sources needed to meet this demand. A cost methodology model is worked out with the basic cost elements being plant construction costs, feedstock and energy costs, and operating and labor-related costs. A computer simulation technique was developed and a set of model calculations was performed. Some representative outputs of the computer analysis are displayed and conclusions are drawn on major factors determining the overall savings possible in hydrogen production and on its technological and economic impact.

  11. Hydrogen as a fuel - Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C.

    Methods for the production of hydrogen as a fuel using different technologies are evaluated from a technical and economical point of view. The main characteristics of hydrogen are considered, and its properties are compared to those of methane and gasoline. Electrolysis is viewed as the most likely process for practical large-scale H2 production and offers the greatest potential for meeting necessary capital requirements. Thermochemical production of H2 offers the best efficiency (all by-products can be reinjected into the process), but lacks practical experience. Chemical production of H2 using coal as a primary raw material would be practical for countries with large resources of cheap coal. The low boiling point (-433 F), low gaseous density (0.005 lb/cu ft), and low energy requirements of H2 make its storage and transport the most difficult of all synthetic fuels. Moreover, the price of H2 is not competitive with the present price of petroleum. The production of synthetic natural gas and hydrogen is expected to have economical advantages in the near future.

  12. Microbial hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, P.F.; Maness, P.C.; Martin, S.

    1995-09-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria inhabit an anaerobic or microaerophilic world where H{sub 2} is produced and consumed as a shared intermediary metabolite. Within a given bacterial isolate there are as many as 4 to 6 distinct enzymes that function to evolve or consume H{sub 2}. Three of the H{sub 2}-evolving physiologies involving three different enzymes from photosynthetic bacteria have been examined in detail for commercial viability. Nitrogenase-mediated H{sub 2} production completely dissimilates many soluble organic compounds to H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at rates up to 131 {mu}mol H{sub 2}{sm_bullet}min{sup -1}{sm_bullet}g cdw{sup -1} and can remain active for up to 20 days. This metabolism is very energy intensive, however, which limits solar conversion efficiencies. Fermentative hydrogenase can produce H{sub 2} at rates of 440 {mu}mol{sm_bullet}min{sup -1}{sm_bullet}g cdw{sup -1} at low levels of irradiation over indefinite periods. The equilibrium for this activity is low (<0.15 atmospheres), thereby requiring gas sparging, vacuuming, or microbial scavenging to retain prolonged activity. Microbial H{sub 2} production from the CO component of synthesis or producer gases maximally reaches activities of 1.5 mmol{sm_bullet}min{sup -1}{sm_bullet}g cdw{sup -1}. Mass transport of gaseous CO into an aqueous bacterial suspension is the rate-limiting step. Increased gas pressure strongly accelerates these rates. Immobilized bacteria on solid supports at ambient pressures also show enhanced shift activity when the bulk water is drained away. Scaled-up bioreactors with 100-200 cc bed volume have been constructed and tested. The near-term goal of this portion of the project is to engineer and economically evaluate a prototype system for the biological production of H{sub 2} from biomass. The CO shift enables a positive selection technique for O{sub 2}-resistant, H{sub 2}-evolving bacterial enzymes from nature.

  13. Methods and systems for the production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Oh, Chang H [Idaho Falls, ID; Kim, Eung S [Ammon, ID; Sherman, Steven R [Augusta, GA

    2012-03-13

    Methods and systems are disclosed for the production of hydrogen and the use of high-temperature heat sources in energy conversion. In one embodiment, a primary loop may include a nuclear reactor utilizing a molten salt or helium as a coolant. The nuclear reactor may provide heat energy to a power generation loop for production of electrical energy. For example, a supercritical carbon dioxide fluid may be heated by the nuclear reactor via the molten salt and then expanded in a turbine to drive a generator. An intermediate heat exchange loop may also be thermally coupled with the primary loop and provide heat energy to one or more hydrogen production facilities. A portion of the hydrogen produced by the hydrogen production facility may be diverted to a combustor to elevate the temperature of water being split into hydrogen and oxygen by the hydrogen production facility.

  14. Hydrogen Storage and Production Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit; Biris, A. S.; Mazumder, M. K.; Karabacak, T.; Kannarpady, Ganesh; Sharma, R.

    2011-07-31

    This is the final technical report. This report is a summary of the project. The goal of our project is to improve solar-to-hydrogen generation efficiency of the PhotoElectroChemical (PEC) conversion process by developing photoanodes with high absorption efficiency in the visible region of the solar radiation spectrum and to increase photo-corrosion resistance of the electrode for generating hydrogen from water. To meet this goal, we synthesized nanostructured heterogeneous semiconducting photoanodes with a higher light absorption efficiency compared to that of TiO2 and used a corrosion protective layer of TiO2. While the advantages of photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of hydrogen have not yet been realized, the recent developments show emergence of new nanostructural designs of photoanodes and choices of materials with significant gains in photoconversion efficiency.

  15. Hydrogen production and catalyst demetallization process

    SciTech Connect

    Elvin, F.J.

    1989-05-09

    A process is described for the production of molecular hydrogen and demetallization of solid particles comprising: (a) contacting hydrogen sulfide with solid particles at conditions effective to convert the hydrogen sulfide into molecular hydrogen, the solid particles comprising at least one metallic component effective to promote the hydrogen sulfide conversion; (b) separating the molecular hydrogen from elemental sulfur formed in step (a) and unconverted hydrogen sulfide and recovering a product enriched in molecular hydrogen; and (c) demetallizing at least a portion of the solid particles from step (a) to produce demetallized solid particles having a reduced content of the metallic component.

  16. Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

    2009-10-16

    A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was

  17. Coupling hydrogen separation with butanone hydrogenation in an electrochemical hydrogen pump with sulfonated poly (phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shiqi; Wang, Tao; Wu, Xuemei; Xiao, Wu; Yu, Miao; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fengxiang; He, Gaohong

    2016-09-01

    This work reports the novel work of coupling H2/CO2 separation with biomass-derived butanone hydrogenation in non-fluorinated sulfonated poly (phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) (SPPESK) electrochemical hydrogen pump (EHP) reactor. Due to higher resistance to swelling, SPPESK-based EHP reactor exhibits more excellent reaction rate in elevated temperature (60 °C) and higher butanone concentration (2 M) as 270, 260 nmol cm-2 s-1, respectively, higher than 240, 200 nmol cm-2 s-1of Nafion-based EHP reactors. Also, the SPPESK-based EHP reactor remains 90% of initial hydrogenation rate after 4 batches, better than that of Nafion-based EHP reactors, which is only 62%. The energy efficiency of EHP separator reaches 40% under H2/CO2 mixture feed mode, and electricity of about 0.3 kWh is consumed per Nm3 H2 product, being superior to energy consumption compared with alternative processes like PSA and electrolysis of water. In addition, SPPESK-based EHP exhibits better hydrogenation stability due to lower CO2 permeation than Nafion. With increasing CO2 content in H2 feed, hydrogenation rate almost keeps constant at around 210 nmol cm-2 s-1 in SPPESK-based EHP reactor while decreases fast to 50 nmol cm-2 s-1 in Nafion/PTFE-based EHP reactor. These results show integration of gas separation with hydrogenation reactor is feasible in SPPESK-based EHP reactor.

  18. Photofermentative hydrogen production from wastes.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Tugba; Abo-Hashesh, Mona; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2011-09-01

    In many respects, hydrogen is an ideal biofuel. However, practical, sustainable means of its production are presently lacking. Here we review recent efforts to apply the capacity of photosynthetic bacteria to capture solar energy and use it to drive the nearly complete conversion of substrates to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. This process, called photofermentation, has the potential capacity to use a variety of feedstocks, including the effluents of dark fermentations, leading to the development of various configurations of two-stage systems, or various industrial and agricultural waste streams rich in sugars or organic acids. The metabolic and enzymatic properties of this system are presented and the possible waste streams that might be successfully used are discussed. Recently, various immobilized systems have been developed and their advantages and disadvantages are examined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biophotolysis systems for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.K.; Adams, M.W.W.; Gisby, P.E.; Morris, P.; Hall, D.O.

    1981-01-01

    Model systems containing natural and synthetic catalysts were constructed for the production of H/sub 2/ from water using visible solar radiation as the energy source. The authors have investigated the use of aqueous systems with proflavine as the light activator and artificial electron donors for subsequent production of H/sub 2/ when coupled to electron mediators and hydrogenase (or Pt). The characteristics, relative merits and defects of these systems are discussed. 22 refs.

  20. System for thermochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, R.W.; Galloway, T.R.; Krikorian, O.H.

    1981-05-22

    Method and apparatus are described for joule boosting a SO/sub 3/ decomposer using electrical instead of thermal energy to heat the reactants of the high temperature SO/sub 3/ decomposition step of a thermochemical hydrogen production process driven by a tandem mirror reactor. Joule boosting the decomposer to a sufficiently high temperature from a lower temperature heat source eliminates the need for expensive catalysts and reduces the temperature and consequent materials requirements for the reactor blanket. A particular decomposer design utilizes electrically heated silicon carbide rods, at a temperature of 1250/sup 0/K, to decompose a cross flow of SO/sub 3/ gas.

  1. Recent trends in refinery hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Aitani, A.M.; Siddiqui, M.A.B.

    1996-12-31

    Refiners are experiencing a rise in hydrogen requirements to improve product quality and process heavy sour crudes. Fuel reformulation has disrupted refinery hydrogen balance in two ways: more hydrogen is needed for hydroprocessing and less hydrogen is coproduced from catalytic naphtha reforming. The purpose of this paper is to review trends in maximizing refinery hydrogen production by modifications and alternatives to the conventional steam methane reforming, recovery from refinery off gases and {open_quote}across-the-fence{close_quote} hydrogen supply. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Hydrogen atom kinetics in capacitively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunomura, Shota; Katayama, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Isao

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen (H) atom kinetics has been investigated in capacitively coupled very high frequency (VHF) discharges at powers of 16-780 mW cm-2 and H2 gas pressures of 0.1-2 Torr. The H atom density has been measured using vacuum ultra violet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) with a micro-discharge hollow cathode lamp as a VUV light source. The measurements have been performed in two different electrode configurations of discharges: conventional parallel-plate diode and triode with an intermediate mesh electrode. We find that in the triode configuration, the H atom density is strongly reduced across the mesh electrode. The H atom density varies from ˜1012 cm-3 to ˜1010 cm-3 by crossing the mesh with 0.2 mm in thickness and 36% in aperture ratio. The fluid model simulations for VHF discharge plasmas have been performed to study the H atom generation, diffusion and recombination kinetics. The simulations suggest that H atoms are generated in the bulk plasma, by the electron impact dissociation (e + H2 \\to e + 2H) and the ion-molecule reaction (H2 + + H2 \\to {{{H}}}3+ + H). The diffusion of H atoms is strongly limited by a mesh electrode, and thus the mesh geometry influences the spatial distribution of the H atoms. The loss of H atoms is dominated by the surface recombination.

  3. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this mission-oriented research program is the production of renewable hydrogen for fossil fuel processing. This program will build upon promising results that have been obtained in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the utilization of intact microalgae for photosynthetic water splitting. In this process, specially adapted algae are used to perform the light-activated cleavage of water into its elemental constituents, molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of their hydrogen-producing capability. These are: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the original development of an evacuated photobiological reactor for real-world engineering applications; (6) the potential for using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. The significance of each of these points in the context of a practical system for hydrogen production is discussed. This program will be enhanced by collaborative research between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and senior faculty members at Duke University, the University of Chicago, and Iowa State University. The special contribution that these organizations and faculty members will make is access to strains and mutants of unicellular algae that will potentially have useful properties for hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting.

  4. An assessment on hydrogen production using central receiver solar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgen, C.; Bilgen, E.

    An assessment is presented on hydrogen production using a dedicated central receiver solar system concept coupled to two types of hydrogen producing processes, electrolysis and thermochemical. The study on solar electrolytic hydrogen was carried out using solar electricity and four different electrolytic technologies, namely, industrial unipolar 1980 and 1983 technologies, industrial bipolar and solid polymer electrolyte technology. The thermochemical process was the sulphur/iodine cycle, which is being developed by General Atomic Co. Systems, which is capable of producing about one-million GJ hydrogen per year, was developed at the conceptual level, and site specific computations were carried out. A general mathematical model was developed to predict the optical and thermal performance of the central receiver system coupled directly to the chemical plant. Cost models were developed for each subsystem based on the database published in the literature. Levelized and delevelized costs of solar hydrogen were then computed.

  5. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic green algae.

    PubMed

    Ghirardi, Maria L

    2006-08-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, green algae and diatoms are capable of absorbing light and storing up to 10-13% of its energy into the H-H bond of hydrogen gas. This process, which takes advantage of the photosynthetic apparatus of these organisms to convert sunlight into chemical energy, could conceivably be harnessed for production of significant amounts of energy from a renewable resource, water. The harnessed energy could then be coupled to a fuel cell for electricity generation and recycling of water molecules. In this review, current biochemical understanding of this reaction in green algae, and some of the major challenges facing the development of future commercial algal photobiological systems for H2 production have been discussed.

  6. Hydrogen production from microbial strains

    DOEpatents

    Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

  7. Concepts for solar production of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Some basic technical approaches to producing hydrogen from solar energy are surveyed. Solar energy forms are divided into: (1) direct solar radiation and (2) indirect forms such as wind and ocean thermal gradient. Technical approaches are separated into: (1) direct hydrogen production from the action of sunlight on some substrate, (2) hydrogen production from sunlight via an intermediate form of energy such as heat and electricity, and (3) hydrogen production from indirect solar energy via an intermediate energy form. It is concluded that while hydrogen from solar energy will be expensive by present standards, the depletion of fossil fuels will cause solar hydrogen to emerge as one of the few alternatives to a nuclear-electric or nuclear-electric-hydrogen energy system.

  8. Hydrogen energy for tomorrow: Advanced hydrogen production technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The future vision for hydrogen is that it will be cost-effectively produced from renewable energy sources and made available for widespread use as an energy carrier and a fuel. Hydrogen can be produced from water and when burned as a fuel, or converted to electricity, joins with oxygen to again form water. It is a clean, sustainable resource with many potential applications, including generating electricity, heating homes and offices, and fueling surface and air transportation. To achieve this vision, researchers must develop advanced technologies to produce hydrogen at costs competitive with fossil fuels, using sustainable sources. Hydrogen is now produced primarily by steam reforming of natural gas. For applications requiring extremely pure hydrogen, production is done by electrolysis. This is a relatively expensive process that uses electric current to dissociate, or split, water into its hydrogen and oxygen components. Technologies with the best potential for producing hydrogen to meet future demand fall into three general process categories: photobiological, photoelectrochemical, and thermochemical. Photobiological and photoelectrochemical processes generally use sunlight to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Thermochemical processes, including gasification and pyrolysis systems, use heat to produce hydrogen from sources such as biomass and solid waste.

  9. Coupling renewables via hydrogen into utilities: Temporal and spatial issues, and technology opportunities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Iannucci, J.J.; Eyer, J.M.; Horgan, S.A.; Schoenung, S.M. |

    1997-05-01

    In this project, the authors show the technical potential for hydrogen used as an energy storage medium to couple time-dependent renewable energy into time-dependent electric utility loads. This technical analysis provides estimates of regional and national opportunities for hydrogen production, storage and conversion, based on current and near-term leading renewable energy and hydrogen production and storage technologies. Appropriate renewable technologies have been matched to their most viable (high quality and quantity) regional resources (e.g., examining wind electricity production in high wind resource areas only). The renewables are assumed to produce electricity which is instantaneously used by the local utility to meet its loads; any excess electricity is used to produce hydrogen electrolytically and stored for use later in the day, week or year. The hydrogen production from renewables and hydrogen storage use are derived based on a range of assumptions of renewable power plant capacity and fraction of regional electric load to be met (e.g., the amount of hydrogen storage required to meet the Northwest region`s top 20% of electric load). Renewable production/utility load/hydrogen storage coupling models have been developed for wind, photovoltaics, and solar thermal. Hydro power (which normally has its own inherent storage capability) has been analyzed separately.

  10. Biophotolysis systems for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. K.; Adams, M. W. W.; Morris, P.; Hall, D. O.; Gisby, P. E.

    Model systems containing natural and sythetic catalysts were constructed for the production of H2 from water using visible solar radiation as the energy source. Chloroplast membranes were used for light absorption and photodecomposition of water, ferredoxin, flavodoxin, cytochrome, viologen dyes, 'Jeevanu' particles or synthetic clusters containing Fe-Mo-S centers were used as electron transfer catalysts, and hydrogenase or PtO2 served as the proton activator. We have also investigated the use of aqueous systems with proflavine as the light activator and artificial electron donors for subsequent production of H2 when coupled to electron mediators and hydrogenase (or Pt). The characteristics, relative merits and defects of these systems are discussed.

  11. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  12. Production of bioplastics and hydrogen gas by photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuo, Asada; Masato, Miyake; Jun, Miyake

    1998-03-01

    Our efforts have been aimed at the technological basis of photosynthetic-microbial production of materials and an energy carrier. We report here accumulation of poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), a raw material of biodegradable plastics and for production of hydrogen gas, and a renewable energy carrier by photosynthetic microorganisms (tentatively defined as cyanobacteria plus photosynthetic bateria, in this report). A thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. MA19 that accumulates PHB at more than 20% of cell dry wt under nitrogen-starved conditions was isolated and microbiologically identified. The mechanism of PHB accumulation was studied. A mesophilic Synechococcus PCC7942 was transformed with the genes encoding PHB-synthesizing enzymes from Alcaligenes eutrophus. The transformant accumulated PHB under nitrogen-starved conditions. The optimal conditions for PHB accumulation by a photosynthetic bacterium grown on acetate were studied. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms was studied. Cyanobacteria can produce hydrogen gas by nitrogenase or hydrogenase. Hydrogen production mediated by native hydrogenase in cyanobacteria was revealed to be in the dark anaerobic degradation of intracellular glycogen. A new system for light-dependent hydrogen production was targeted. In vitro and in vivo coupling of cyanobacterial ferredoxin with a heterologous hydrogenase was shown to produce hydrogen under light conditions. A trial for genetic trasformation of Synechococcus PCC7942 with the hydrogenase gene from Clostridium pasteurianum is going on. The strong hydrogen producers among photosynthetic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Co-culture of Rhodobacter and Clostriumdium was applied to produce hydrogen from glucose. Conversely in the case of cyanobacteria, genetic regulation of photosynthetic proteins was intended to improve conversion efficiency in hydrogen production by the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV. A mutant acquired by

  13. Redirection of metabolism for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, Caroline S.

    2011-11-28

    This project is to develop and apply techniques in metabolic engineering to improve the biocatalytic potential of the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris for nitrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen gas production. R. palustris, is an ideal platform to develop as a biocatalyst for hydrogen gas production because it is an extremely versatile microbe that produces copious amounts of hydrogen by drawing on abundant natural resources of sunlight and biomass. Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, such as R. palustris, generate hydrogen and ammonia during a process known as biological nitrogen fixation. This reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme nitrogenase and normally consumes nitrogen gas, ATP and electrons. The applied use of nitrogenase for hydrogen production is attractive because hydrogen is an obligatory product of this enzyme and is formed as the only product when nitrogen gas is not supplied. Our challenge is to understand the systems biology of R. palustris sufficiently well to be able to engineer cells to produce hydrogen continuously, as fast as possible and with as high a conversion efficiency as possible of light and electron donating substrates. For many experiments we started with a strain of R. palustris that produces hydrogen constitutively under all growth conditions. We then identified metabolic pathways and enzymes important for removal of electrons from electron-donating organic compounds and for their delivery to nitrogenase in whole R. palustris cells. For this we developed and applied improved techniques in 13C metabolic flux analysis. We identified reactions that are important for generating electrons for nitrogenase and that are yield-limiting for hydrogen production. We then increased hydrogen production by blocking alternative electron-utilizing metabolic pathways by mutagenesis. In addition we found that use of non-growing cells as biocatalysts for hydrogen gas production is an attractive option, because cells divert all resources away from growth and

  14. Coupling renewables via hydrogen into utilities: Temporal and spatial issues, and technology opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Iannucci, J.J.; Horgan, S.A.; Eyer, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    This paper discusses the technical potential for hydrogen used as an energy storage medium to couple time-dependent renewable energy into time-dependent electric utility loads. This analysis will provide estimates of regional and national opportunities for hydrogen production, storage and conversion, based on current and near-term leading renewable energy and hydrogen production and storage technologies. Appropriate renewable technologies, wind, photovoltaics and solar thermal, are matched to their most viable regional resources. The renewables are assumed to produce electricity which will be instantaneously used by the local utility to meet its loads; any excess electricity will be used to produce hydrogen electrolytically and stored for later use. Results are derived based on a range of assumptions of renewable power plant capacity and fraction of regional electric load to be met (e.g., the amount of hydrogen storage required to meet the Northwest region`s top 10% of electric load). For each renewable technology national and regional totals will be developed for maximum hydrogen production per year and ranges of hydrogen storage capacity needed in each year (hydroelectric case excluded). The sensitivity of the answers to the fraction of peak load to be served and the land area dedicated for renewable resources are investigated. These analyses can serve as a starting point for projecting the market opportunity for hydrogen storage and distribution technologies. Sensitivities will be performed for hydrogen production, conversion. and storage efficiencies representing current and near-term hydrogen technologies.

  15. The effect of silver nanoparticles/graphene-coupled TiO2 beads photocatalyst on the photoconversion efficiency of photoelectrochemical hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Ke, Chun-Ren; Guo, Jyun-Sheng; Su, Yen-Hsun; Ting, Jyh-Ming

    2016-10-28

    In this work, a novel configuration of the photoelectrochemical hydrogen production device is demonstrated. It is based on TiO2 beads as the primary photoanode material with the addition of a heterostructure of silver nanoparticles/graphene. The heterostructure not only caters to a great improvement in light harvesting efficiency (LHE) but also enhances the charge collection efficiency. For LHE, the optimized cell based on TiO2 beads/Ag/graphene shows a 47% gain as compared to the cell having a photoanode of commercial P25 TiO2 powders. For the charge collection efficiency, there is a pronounced improvement of an impressive value of 856%. The reason for the improvement in light absorption is attributed to either the light scattering of TiO2 beads or the surface plasmonic resonance on the Ag nanoparticles/graphene. The photoconversion efficiency (PCE) of the resulting cells is also presented and discussed. The PCE of the TiO2 beads/Ag/graphene cell is approximately 2.5 times than that of pure P25 cell.

  16. The production and use of hydrogen in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsec, Jurij

    2017-07-01

    Efficient and sustainable methods of clean fuel production are needed in all countries of the world in the face of depleting oil reserves and the need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. With hydrogen technology we can significantly reduce harmful emissions in air and water. However, a key missing element is a large-scale method of hydrogen production from water. As a carbon-based technology, the predominant existing process (steam-methane reforming (SMR)) is unsuitable regarding global warming, icreased world population, etc. This paper focuses on a production of hydrogen in connection with a thermal power plant. We will show the technologies which allow the coupling between a thermal power plant and hydrogen technologies.

  17. Microwave production of hydrogen and sulfur from hydrogen sulfide wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    A waste-treatment process is being developed that uses cold'' microwave plasma-chemical reactions to split hydrogen sulfide into elemental hydrogen and sulfur. A clean sulfur product can be recovered and sold, while product gases are purified and separated into seams containing hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide for recycle, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. Experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide at 0.5 to 1.5 L/min flow rates and microwave powers of 400 to 1000 W confirmed that conversions of over 90% per pass at process energy requirements approaching 5 kcal/mol are possible. Experiments with impurities typical of petroleum refinery waste hydrogen sulfide streams have demonstrated that these impurities are compatible with the plasma dissociation process and that they do not create new waste treatment problems. This technology has a long-term potential for saving 40 to 70 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu/yr in the refining industry, for an economic savings of $500 million to $1000 million annually. Although the microwave process should show particular advantages for the petroleum refining industry, the low capital costs and modular nature of the new process should make it economically attractive in connection with the small-scale waste-treatment technologies currently used in the natural gas industry. Currently, in the U.S.S.R., a 500-kW demonstration microwave hydrogen sulfide treatment unit operating at near atmospheric pressure is being tested at the natural gas fields in Orenberg. 3 refs.

  18. Microwave production of hydrogen and sulfur from hydrogen sulfide wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    A waste-treatment process is being developed that uses ``cold`` microwave plasma-chemical reactions to split hydrogen sulfide into elemental hydrogen and sulfur. A clean sulfur product can be recovered and sold, while product gases are purified and separated into seams containing hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide for recycle, and the process purge containing carbon dioxide and water. Experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide at 0.5 to 1.5 L/min flow rates and microwave powers of 400 to 1000 W confirmed that conversions of over 90% per pass at process energy requirements approaching 5 kcal/mol are possible. Experiments with impurities typical of petroleum refinery waste hydrogen sulfide streams have demonstrated that these impurities are compatible with the plasma dissociation process and that they do not create new waste treatment problems. This technology has a long-term potential for saving 40 to 70 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu/yr in the refining industry, for an economic savings of $500 million to $1000 million annually. Although the microwave process should show particular advantages for the petroleum refining industry, the low capital costs and modular nature of the new process should make it economically attractive in connection with the small-scale waste-treatment technologies currently used in the natural gas industry. Currently, in the U.S.S.R., a 500-kW demonstration microwave hydrogen sulfide treatment unit operating at near atmospheric pressure is being tested at the natural gas fields in Orenberg. 3 refs.

  19. Hydrogen Production from Liquid Hydrocarbons Demonstration Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Production Syngas Production Fuel Cell Power Plant Diesel Feedstock Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell-_ 89 INIC auat ama o"Go".o a" in#* of move** some"U Thi-s...to naphtha. These hydrogen plant feedstocks have nil sulfur content. End uses for hydrogen include ammonia and methanol manufacture, hydrocracking...Hydrogen 54.9 Carbon monoxide 0.6 Carbon dioxide 22.4 Methane 0.1 Argon 0.3 Nitrogen 21.8 Hydrogen sulfide 1.6 ppmv Carbonyl sulfide 0.5 ppmv Ammonia 0.5

  20. Bioreactor design for photofermentative hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Basar

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen will become a significant fuel in the near future. Photofermentative production of hydrogen is a promising and sustainable process. The design, construction and successful operation of the photobioreactors are of critical importance for photofermentative hydrogen production and became a major field of research where novel technologies are developed and adapted frequently. This paper gives an overview of the design aspects related to photobioreactors giving particular attention to design limitations, construction material, type, operating mode and scale-up. Sub-components of the overall system setup such as mixing, temperature control and hydrogen collection are also discussed. Recent achievements in the photobioreactor technologies are described.

  1. Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Iouri Balachov, PhD

    2007-10-15

    In response to DOE's Solicitation for Grant Applications DE-PS36-03GO93007, 'Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research', SRI International (SRI) proposed to conduct work under Technical Topic Area 5, Advanced Electrolysis Systems; Sub-Topic 5B, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis. We proposed to develop a prototype of a modular industrial system for low-cost generation of H{sub 2} (<$2/kg) by steam electrolysis with anodic depolarization by CO. Water will be decomposed electrochemically into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} on the cathode side of a high-temperature electrolyzer. Oxygen ions will migrate through an oxygen-ion-conductive solid oxide electrolyte. Gas mixtures on the cathode side (H{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O) and on the anode side (CO + CO{sub 2}) will be reliably separated by the solid electrolyte. Depolarization of the anodic process will decrease the electrolysis voltage, and thus the electricity required for H{sub 2} generation and the cost of produced H{sub 2}. The process is expected to be at least 10 times more energy-efficient than low-temperature electrolysis and will generate H{sub 2} at a cost of approximately $1-$1.5/kg. The operating economics of the system can be made even more attractive by deploying it at locations where waste heat is available; using waste heat would reduce the electricity required for heating the system. Two critical targets must be achieved: an H{sub 2} production cost below $2/kg, and scalable design of the pilot H{sub 2} generation system. The project deliverables would be (1) a pilot electrolysis system for H{sub 2} generation, (2) an economic analysis, (3) a market analysis, and (4) recommendations and technical documentation for field deployment. DOE was able to provide only 200K out of 1.8M (or about 10% of awarded budget), so project was stopped abruptly.

  2. Immobilized algal cells used for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, John J.; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Jacoby, William A.

    2007-10-01

    This paper explores the use of the photosynthetic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii bound to solid support particles to produce hydrogen in a two-step cycle. Bound cells are more easily cycled between growth mode and hydrogen production mode. The data indicate that the presence of silica particles does not inhibit the growth of the algae in the sulfur rich growth media. Filtration experiments reveal that the algae effectively bind to the silica particles, as high removal efficiencies are observed. The silica particles appear to approach saturation algae at a mass-loading ratio of about 0.035. In hydrogen production mode, the bound algae perform about as well as free-floating algae in terms of cumulative hydrogen production. A full-factorial experiment is described in which algae concentration was deemed to have a significant effect on cumulative hydrogen production.

  3. Production of hydrogen from alcohols

    DOEpatents

    Deluga, Gregg A.; Schmidt, Lanny D.

    2007-08-14

    A process for producing hydrogen from ethanol or other alcohols. The alcohol, optionally in combination with water, is contacted with a catalyst comprising rhodium. The overall process is preferably carried out under autothermal conditions.

  4. Microwave Hydrogen Production from Methane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    demonstration of MW technology removing and destroying hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and siloxanes from biogas produced by Sacramento Regional Wastewater...running on biogas and is currently conducting the field demonstration of the unit at Tollenaar Dairy in Elk Grove, CA. SMUD, California Air Resources...Small Grant (EISG) project to produce hydrogen (H2) from biogas for the pre-combustion NOx control for the biogas engine. The CEC sponsors this

  5. Production of Hydrogen from Underground Coal Gasification

    DOEpatents

    Upadhye, Ravindra S.

    2008-10-07

    A system of obtaining hydrogen from a coal seam by providing a production well that extends into the coal seam; positioning a conduit in the production well leaving an annulus between the conduit and the coal gasification production well, the conduit having a wall; closing the annulus at the lower end to seal it from the coal gasification cavity and the syngas; providing at least a portion of the wall with a bifunctional membrane that serves the dual purpose of providing a catalyzing reaction and selectively allowing hydrogen to pass through the wall and into the annulus; and producing the hydrogen through the annulus.

  6. Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillo, J. A.; Powell, J. R.; Steinberg, M.

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

  7. Hydrogen Production from Remote Power Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzina, A.; Grimes, G.; Reeves, R.; Wiley, R.

    1980-02-01

    The basic concept for adopting small existing dams to hydrogen production entails the energy conversion steps: hydropower-to-shaft-power via a hydraulic turbine; shaft-power-to-electrical power via a generator; and electrical power-to-hydrogen (and oxygen) via a water electrolyzer. The resource availability is discussed. The concept implementation in Potsdan, New York is mentioned.

  8. Photobiological production of hydrogen using cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Borthakur, D.; McKinley, K.R.; Bylina, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    Cyanobacteria are capable of generating hydrogen using sunlight and water. In both Spirulina and Anabaena, there is a soluble reversible hydrogenase that is involved in hydrogen evolution under anaerobic conditions in the dark. In addition, the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena produces hydrogen as a by-product of nitrogen fixation. Most of this hydrogen is recaptured by a membrane-bound uptake hydrogenase present in Anabaena cells. Experiments have continued to develop a gene transfer system in Spirulina in preparation for improved hydrogen production via genetic manipulation of the reversible hydrogenase. We have identified and characterized four restriction enzymes in Spirulina and cloned the genes for two methylases that protect their own DNA from cleavage by restriction enzymes. We have also cloned and sequenced parts of hupB and hupM genes involved in the synthesis of uptake hydrogenase in Anabaena. Successful cloning of these hup genes represents an important and necessary step in our project because this will enable us to construct Anabaena strains with enhanced hydrogen production ability by disrupting the hup genes involved in hydrogen uptake. We are also setting up a bio-reactor to determine the amount of hydrogen released by different Spirulina and Anabaena strains under different physiological conditions.

  9. Hydrogen production using ammonia borane

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Charles W; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy A; Shrestha, Roshan P

    2013-12-24

    Hydrogen ("H.sub.2") is produced when ammonia borane reacts with a catalyst complex of the formula L.sub.nM-X wherein M is a base metal such as iron, X is an anionic nitrogen- or phosphorus-based ligand or hydride, and L is a neutral ancillary ligand that is a neutral monodentate or polydentate ligand.

  10. Utilization of domestic fuels for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Mirabal, S.T.; Ingley, H.A.; Goel, N.; Goswami, D.Y.

    2004-07-01

    This article describes the present status of the conventional hydrogen production technologies and some of recent developments in the production of hydrogen using solar energy resources. The authors outline the technological status for commercial and near-commercial technologies using both fossil-based and renewable energy sources such as electrolysis using PV and solar thermal power. The conversion of fossil fuels and electrolysis of water using solar conversion technologies are some of the most important methods of H{sub 2} production. An economic analysis for hydrogen production costs is presented comparing steam reformation, partial oxidation, coal gasification, and electrolysis via photovoltaic and solar thermal power. Although fossil fuels are currently the cheapest and most widely used sources of hydrogen production, it is argued from an economic standpoint that renewable sources of hydrogen, such as biomass and solar, are the most promising options for the future. Further, solar hydrogen represents a storable fuel that is produced from this nonstorable and intermittent source of energy. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Coupling of exothermic and endothermic hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Bowden, Mark E.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Houghton, Adrian Y.; Autrey, S. Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Chemical hydrogen storage (CHS) materials are a high-storage-density alternative to the gaseous compressed hydrogen currently used to provide hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles. One of the challenges of CHS materials is addressing the energy barriers required to break the chemical bonds and release the hydrogen. Coupling CHS reactions that are endothermic and exothermic during dehydrogenation can improve onboard energy efficiency and thermal control for the system, making such materials viable. Acceptable coupling between reactions requires both thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. In this work, models were developed to predict the reaction enthalpy and rate required to achieve high conversions for both reactions based on experimental measurements. Modeling results show that the coupling efficiency of exothermic and endothermic reactions is more sensitive to the ratio of the exothermic and endothermic enthalpies than to the ratio of the rates of the two steps. Modeling results also show that a slower endothermic step rate is desirable to permit sufficient heating of the reactor by the exothermic step. We look at two examples of a sequential and parallel reaction scheme and provide some of the first published insight into the required temperature range to maximize the hydrogen release from 1,2-BN cyclohexane and indoline.

  12. Enhancing fermentative hydrogen production from sucrose.

    PubMed

    Perera, Karnayakage Rasika J; Nirmalakhandan, Nagamany

    2010-12-01

    This study evaluated the hypothesis that fermentative hydrogen production from organic-rich feedstock could be enhanced by supplementing with waste materials such as cattle manure that could provide nutritional needs, buffering capacity, and native hydrogen-producing organisms. This hypothesis was tested in batch reactors fed with sucrose blended with cattle manure run at 25 degrees C without any nutrient supplements, pH adjustments, buffering, or gas-sparging. Hydrogen production rates in these reactors ranged 16-30 mL H(2)/g DeltaCOD-day, while hydrogen content in the biogases ranged 50-59%. Compared to literature studies conducted at higher temperatures, hydrogen yields found in this study at 25 degrees C were higher in the range of 3.8-4.7 mol H(2)/mol sucrose added, with higher positive net energy yields (>14 kJ/L). This study demonstrated that cattle manure as a supplement could not only provide hydrogen-producing seed, nutritional needs, and buffering capacity, but also increase hydrogen yield by approximately 10%, improving the economic viability of fermentative biohydrogen production from sugary wastes.

  13. Hydrolysis reactor for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas A.; Matthews, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for hydrolysis of a chemical hydride is provided. The method includes adding a chemical hydride to a reaction chamber and exposing the chemical hydride in the reaction chamber to a temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. in the presence of water and in the absence of an acid or a heterogeneous catalyst, wherein the chemical hydride undergoes hydrolysis to form hydrogen gas and a byproduct material.

  14. Optimizing investments in coupled offshore wind -electrolytic hydrogen storage systems in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Peng; Enevoldsen, Peter; Eichman, Joshua; Hu, Weihao; Jacobson, Mark Z.; Chen, Zhe

    2017-08-01

    In response to electricity markets with growing levels of wind energy production and varying electricity prices, this research examines incentives for investments in integrated renewable energy power systems. A strategy for using optimization methods for a power system consisting of wind turbines, electrolyzers, and hydrogen fuel cells is explored. This research reveals the investment potential of coupling offshore wind farms with different hydrogen systems. The benefits in terms of a return on investment are demonstrated with data from the Danish electricity markets. This research also investigates the tradeoffs between selling the hydrogen directly to customers or using it as a storage medium to re-generate electricity at a time when it is more valuable. This research finds that the most beneficial configuration is to produce hydrogen at a time that complements the wind farm and sell the hydrogen directly to end users.

  15. Optimizing investments in coupled offshore wind-electrolytic hydrogen storage systems in Denmark

    DOE PAGES

    Hou, Peng; Enevoldsen, Peter; Eichman, Joshua; ...

    2017-05-25

    In response to electricity markets with growing levels of wind energy production and varying electricity prices, this research examines incentives for investments in integrated renewable energy power systems. A strategy for using optimization methods for a power system consisting of wind turbines, electrolyzers, and hydrogen fuel cells is explored. This research reveals the investment potential of coupling offshore wind farms with different hydrogen systems. The benefits in terms of a return on investment are demonstrated with data from the Danish electricity markets. This research also investigates the tradeoffs between selling the hydrogen directly to customers or using it as amore » storage medium to re-generate electricity at a time when it is more valuable. Finally, this research finds that the most beneficial configuration is to produce hydrogen at a time that complements the wind farm and sell the hydrogen directly to end users.« less

  16. Recent review of thermochemical hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghi, G. E.

    A survey is presented on the development to date of thermochemical water decomposition methods for the production of hydrogen. It is shown that: (1) both the technological feasibility of thermochemical processes and their competitiveness with water electrolysis have been demonstrated; (2) the scaling up of thermochemical methods to industrial production levels may proceed with existing technology; (3) the slowing down of programs concerned with the development of high temperature nuclear reactors could delay the scaling up of thermochemical hydrogen production to industrial levels; (4) this delay could, however, increase interest in such water decomposition processes as those employing photoreactions; and (5) the efficiency of thermochemical hydrogen production is highest in the case of systems with dedicated heat sources rated above 1000 MWth.

  17. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.H.; Bauer, H.F.; Grimes, R.W.

    1993-03-30

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  18. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.; Bauer, Hans F.; Grimes, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen an carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  19. Coupling of exothermic and endothermic hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Bowden, Mark E.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Houghton, Adrian Y.; Autrey, S. Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Chemical hydrogen storage (CHS) materials are a high-storage-density alternative to the gaseous compressed hydrogen currently used to provide hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles. One of the challenges of CHS materials is addressing the thermodynamic and kinetic barriers required to break the chemical bonds and release the hydrogen. Coupling CHS reactions that are endothermic and exothermic during the dehydrogenation can improve the system on-board energy efficiency and thermal control, making such materials viable. Acceptable coupling between reactions requires both thermodynamic and kinetics considerations. Models were developed to predict the reaction enthalpy and rate required to achieve high conversions for both reactions based on experimental measurements. These modeling results show that the efficiency of coupling of an exothermic and endothermic reaction is more sensitive the magnitude of the ratio of the exothermic and endothermic enthalpies than the ratio of the rates of the two steps. The modeling shows further that a slower rate of the endothermic step is desirable to permit sufficient heating of the reactor by the exothermic step. We look at two examples of a sequential and parallel reaction scheme and provide some of the first insight into the required temperature range to maximize the H2 release from 1,2-BN cyclohexane and indoline.

  20. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.L.; Marsen, B.; Paluselli, D.; Rocheleau, R.

    2004-11-17

    The scope of this photoelectrochemical hydrogen research project is defined by multijunction photoelectrode concepts for solar-powered water splitting, with the goal of efficient, stable, and economic operation. From an initial selection of several planar photoelectrode designs, the Hybrid Photoelectrode (HPE) has been identified as the most promising candidate technology. This photoelectrode consists of a photoelectrochemical (PEC) junction and a solid-state photovoltaic (PV) junction. Immersed in aqueous electrolyte and exposed to sunlight, these two junctions provide the necessary voltage to split water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. The efficiency of the conversion process is determined by the performance of the PEC- and the PV-junctions and on their spectral match. Based on their stability and cost effectiveness, iron oxide (Fe2O3) and tungsten oxide (WO3) films have been studied and developed as candidate semiconductor materials for the PEC junction (photoanode). High-temperature synthesis methods, as reported for some high-performance metal oxides, have been found incompatible with multijunction device fabrication. A low-temperature reactive sputtering process has been developed instead. In the parameter space investigated so far, the optoelectronic properties of WO3 films were superior to those of Fe2O3 films, which showed high recombination of photo-generated carriers. For the PV-junction, amorphous-silicon-based multijunction devices have been studied. Tandem junctions were preferred over triple junctions for better stability and spectral matching with the PEC junction. Based on a tandem a-SiGe/a-SiGe device and a tungsten trioxide film, a prototype hybrid photoelectrode has been demonstrated at 0.7% solar-to-hydrogen (STH) conversion efficiency. The PEC junction performance has been identified as the most critical element for higher-efficiency devices. Research into sputter-deposited tungsten trioxide films has yielded samples with higher photocurrents of

  1. ON-SITE APPLICABILITY OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCING MICROBIAL ELECTROCHEMICAL CELLS COUPLED WITH UV IN WASTEWATER DISINFECTION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an increased interest in the application of microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) for the recovery of value-added products such as hydrogen gas and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from wastewater. H2O2 has strong oxidation capability and produces hydroxyl radicals when coupled w...

  2. ON-SITE APPLICABILITY OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCING MICROBIAL ELECTROCHEMICAL CELLS COUPLED WITH UV IN WASTEWATER DISINFECTION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an increased interest in the application of microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) for the recovery of value-added products such as hydrogen gas and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from wastewater. H2O2 has strong oxidation capability and produces hydroxyl radicals when coupled w...

  3. Systematic Discrimination of Advanced Hydrogen Production Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, in concert with industry, is developing a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate high temperature heat applications to produce hydrogen and electricity or to support other industrial applications. A key part of this program is the production of hydrogen from water that would significantly reduce carbon emissions compared to current production using natural gas. In 2009 the INL led the methodical evaluation of promising advanced hydrogen production technologies in order to focus future resources on the most viable processes. This paper describes how the evaluation process was systematically planned and executed. As a result, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis was selected as the most viable near-term technology to deploy as a part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project.

  4. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae.

    PubMed

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Several species of unicellular green algae, such as the model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, can operate under either aerobic photosynthesis or anaerobic metabolism conditions. A particularly interesting metabolic condition is that of "anaerobic oxygenic photosynthesis", whereby photosynthetically generated oxygen is consumed by the cell's own respiration, causing anaerobiosis in the culture in the light, and induction of the cellular "hydrogen metabolism" process. The latter entails an alternative photosynthetic electron transport pathway, through the oxygen-sensitive FeFe-hydrogenase, leading to the light-dependent generation of molecular hydrogen in the chloroplast. The FeFe-hydrogenase is coupled to the reducing site of photosystem-I via ferredoxin and is employed as an electron-pressure valve, through which electrons are dissipated, thus permitting a sustained electron transport in the thylakoid membrane of photosynthesis. This hydrogen gas generating process in the cells offers testimony to the unique photosynthetic metabolism that can be found in many species of green microalgae. Moreover, it has attracted interest by the biotechnology and bioenergy sectors, as it promises utilization of green microalgae and the process of photosynthesis in renewable energy production. This article provides an overview of the principles of photobiological hydrogen production in microalgae and addresses in detail the process of induction and analysis of the hydrogen metabolism in the cells. Furthermore, methods are discussed by which the interaction of photosynthesis, respiration, cellular metabolism, and H(2) production in Chlamydomonas can be monitored and regulated.

  5. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

    1999-08-24

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch; the reaction mixture also comprising an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; (b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and (c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture. 8 figs.

  6. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, Jonathan; Mattingly, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch. The reaction mixture further comprises an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture.

  7. Enzymatic production of hydrogen from glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this research is to optimize conditions for the enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from biomass-derived glucose. This new project is funded at 0.5 PY level of effort for FY 1995. The rationale for the work is that cellulose is, potentially, a vast source of hydrogen and that enzymes offer a specific and efficient method for its extraction with minimal environmental impact. This work is related to the overall hydrogen program goal of technology development and validation. The approach is based on knowledge that glucose is oxidized by the NADP{sup +} requiring enzyme glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and that the resulting NADPH can donate its electrons to hydrogenase (H{sub 2}ase) which catalyzes the evolution of H{sub 2}. Thus hydrogen production from glucose was achieved using calf liver GDH and Pyrococcus furiosus H{sub 2}ase yielding 17% of theoretical maximum expected. The cofactor NADP{sup +} for this reaction was regenerated and recycled. Current and future work includes understanding the rate limiting steps of this process and the stabilization/immobilization of the enzymes for long term hydrogen production. Cooperative interactions with the Universities of Georgia and Bath for obtaining thermally stable enzymes are underway.

  8. Probing green algal hydrogen production.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liping; Melis, Anastasios

    2002-01-01

    The recently developed two-stage photosynthesis and H(2)-production protocol with green algae is further investigated in this work. The method employs S deprivation as a tool for the metabolic regulation of photosynthesis. In the presence of S, green algae perform normal photosynthesis, carbohydrate accumulation and oxygen production. In the absence of S, normal photosynthesis stops and the algae slip into the H(2)-production mode. For the first time, to our knowledge, significant amounts of H(2) gas were generated, essentially from sunlight and water. Rates of H(2) production could be sustained continuously for ca. 80 h in the light, but gradually declined thereafter. This work examines biochemical and physiological aspects of this process in the absence or presence of limiting amounts of S nutrients. Moreover, the effects of salinity and of uncouplers of phosphorylation are investigated. It is shown that limiting levels of S can sustain intermediate levels of oxygenic photosynthesis, in essence raising the prospect of a calibration of the rate of photosynthesis by the S content in the growth medium of the algae. It is concluded that careful titration of the supply of S nutrients in the green alga medium might permit the development of a continuous H(2)-production process. PMID:12437889

  9. Positron scattering from hydrogen atom embedded in weakly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Arijit; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ratnavelu, K.

    2013-01-01

    The positron-hydrogen collision problem in weakly coupled plasma environment has been investigated by applying a formulation of the three-body collision problem in the form of coupled multi-channel two-body Lippmann-Schwinger equations. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. A simple variational hydrogenic wave function has been employed to calculate the partial-wave scattering amplitude. Plasma screening effects on various possible mode of fragmentation of the system e++H(1s) during the collision, such as 1s →1s and 2s→2s elastic collisions, 1s→2s excitation, positronium formation, elastic proton-positronium collisions, have been reported. Furthermore, a detailed study has been made on differential and total cross sections of the above processes in the energy range 13.6-350 eV of the incident positron.

  10. Indirect Spin-Spin Coupling Constants in the Hydrogen Isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Garbacz, Piotr; Chotkowski, Maciej; Rogulski, Zbigniew; Jaszuński, Michał

    2016-07-21

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of indirect spin-spin coupling constants for hydrogen deuteride (HD), hydrogen tritide (HT), and deuterium tritide (DT) are described. The reduced coupling constants obtained from the gas-phase NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) experiment conducted at 300 K are 2.338(1), 2.334(3), and 2.316(1) × 10(20) T(2) J(-1), while the ab initio values computed at the full configuration interaction level of theory equal 2.349(3), 2.343(3), and 2.322(3) × 10(20) T(2) J(-1) for HD, HT, and DT, respectively. The agreement of the experimental and theoretical results is improved when proper treatment of the influence of nuclear relaxation on the NMR spectrum is applied. However, there is a minor discrepancy between experiment and theory, exceeding the estimated error bars; potential sources of this discrepancy are discussed.

  11. Hydrogen Bonding in the Active Site of Ketosteroid Isomerase: Electronic Inductive Effects and Hydrogen Bond Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Hanoian, Philip; Sigala, Paul A.; Herschlag, Daniel; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Computational studies are performed to analyze the physical properties of hydrogen bonds donated by Tyr16 and Asp103 to a series of substituted phenolate inhibitors bound in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI). As the solution pKa of the phenolate increases, these hydrogen bond distances decrease, the associated NMR chemical shifts increase, and the fraction of protonated inhibitor increases, in agreement with prior experiments. The quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations provide insight into the electronic inductive effects along the hydrogen-bonding network that includes Tyr16, Tyr57, and Tyr32, as well as insight into hydrogen bond coupling in the active site. The calculations predict that the most-downfield NMR chemical shift observed experimentally corresponds to the Tyr16-phenolate hydrogen bond and that Tyr16 is the proton donor when a bound naphtholate inhibitor is observed to be protonated in electronic absorption experiments. According to these calculations, the electronic inductive effects along the hydrogen-bonding network of tyrosines cause the Tyr16 hydroxyl to be more acidic than the Asp103 carboxylic acid moiety, which is immersed in a relatively nonpolar environment. When one of the distal tyrosine residues in the network is mutated to phenylalanine, thereby diminishing this inductive effect, the Tyr16-phenolate hydrogen bond lengthens, and the Asp103-phenolate hydrogen bond shortens, as observed in NMR experiments. Furthermore, the calculations suggest that the differences in the experimental NMR data and electronic absorption spectra for pKSI and tKSI, two homologous bacterial forms of the enzyme, are due predominantly to the third tyrosine that is present in the hydrogen-bonding network of pKSI but not tKSI. These studies also provide experimentally testable predictions about the impact of mutating the distal tyrosine residues in this hydrogen-bonding network on the NMR chemical shifts and electronic absorption spectra

  12. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

  13. Method for the continuous production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Getty, John Paul; Orr, Mark T.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a method for the continuous production of hydrogen. The present method comprises reacting a metal catalyst with a degassed aqueous organic acid solution within a reaction vessel under anaerobic conditions at a constant temperature of .ltoreq.80.degree. C. and at a pH ranging from about 4 to about 9. The reaction forms a metal oxide when the metal catalyst reacts with the water component of the organic acid solution while generating hydrogen, then the organic acid solution reduces the metal oxide thereby regenerating the metal catalyst and producing water, thus permitting the oxidation and reduction to reoccur in a continual reaction cycle. The present method also allows the continuous production of hydrogen to be sustained by feeding the reaction with a continuous supply of degassed aqueous organic acid solution.

  14. Optical pumping production of spin polarized hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, R.J.; Happer, W.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1984-09-01

    There has been much interest recently in the production of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen in various fields, including controlled fusion, quantum fluids, high energy, and nuclear physics. One promising method for the development of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen is the utilization of optical pumping with a laser. Optical pumping is a process in which photon angular momentum is converted into electron and nuclear spin. The advent of tunable CW dye lasers (approx. 1 watt) allows the production of greater than 10/sup 18/ polarized atoms/sec. We have begun a program at Princeton to investigate the physics and technology of using optical pumping to produce large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen. Initial experiments have been done in small closed glass cells. Eventually, a flowing system, open target, or polarized ion source could be constructed.

  15. Reactors Save Energy, Costs for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    While examining fuel-reforming technology for fuel cells onboard aircraft, Glenn Research Center partnered with Garrettsville, Ohio-based Catacel Corporation through the Glenn Alliance Technology Exchange program and a Space Act Agreement. Catacel developed a stackable structural reactor that is now employed for commercial hydrogen production and results in energy savings of about 20 percent.

  16. Silicon Nanowire Photocathodes for Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Soundarrajan; Nann, Thomas; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of silicon for water oxidation and hydrogen production can be improved by exploiting the antireflective properties of nanostructured silicon substrates. In this work, silicon nanowires were fabricated by metal-assisted electroless etching of silicon. An enhanced photocurrent density of −17 mA/cm2 was observed for the silicon nanowires coated with an iron sulphur carbonyl catalyst when compared to bare silicon nanowires (−5 mA/cm2). A substantial amount of 315 µmol/h hydrogen gas was produced at low bias potentials for the silicon nanowires coated with an iron sulphur carbonyl catalyst. PMID:28335272

  17. Enzymatic Hydrogen Production from Starch and Water

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Evans, Barbara R; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Hopkins, Robert C.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2007-01-01

    A novel enzymatic reaction was conducted for producing hydrogen from starch and water at 30oC. The overall reaction comprised of 13 enzymes, 1 cofactor (NADP+), and phosphate was driven by energy stored in carbohydrate starch according to the overall stoichiometry stoichiometric reaction of C6H10O5 (l) + 7 H2O (l) --> 12 H2 (g) + 6 CO2 (g). It is spontaneous and unidirectional because of negative Gibbs free energy and the removal of gaseous products from the aqueous reaction solution. With technology improvement and integration with fuel cells, this technology would be suitable for mobile applications and also solve the challenges associated with hydrogen storage, distribution, and infrastructure in a hydrogen economy.

  18. Thermochemical hydrogen production based on magnetic fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikorian, O. H.; Brown, L. C.

    1982-06-01

    Conceptual design studies were carried out on an integrated fusion/chemical plant system using a Tandem Mirror Reactor fusion energy source to drive the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Water-Splitting Cycle and produce hydrogen as a future feedstock for synthetic fuels. Blanket design studies for the Tandem Mirror Reactor show that several design alternatives are available for providing heat at sufficiently high temperatures to drive the General Atomic Cycle. The concept of a Joule-boosted decomposer is introduced in one of the systems investigated to provide heat electrically for the highest temperature step in the cycle (the SO3 decomposition step), and thus lower blanket design requirements and costs. Flowsheeting and conceptual process designs have been developed for a complete fusion-driven hydrogen plant, and the information has been used to develop a plot plan for the plant and to estimate hydrogen production costs.

  19. Modeling of a Hydrogenic Pellet Production System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leachman, J. W.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.; Nellis, G. F.

    2010-04-01

    Solid hydrogenic pellets are used as fuel for fusion energy machines like the ITER device. This paper discusses the numerical modeling of a Pellet Production System (PPS) that is used to generate these pellets. The PPS utilizes a source of supercritical helium to provide the cooling that is necessary to precool, liquefy, and solidify hydrogenic material that is ultimately extruded and cut into fuel pellets. The specific components within the PPS include a pre-cooling heat exchanger, a liquefier, and a twin-screw solidifying extruder. This paper presents numerical models of each component. These numerical models are used as design tools to predict the performance of the respective devices. The performance of the PPS is dominated by the heat transfer coefficient and viscous dissipation associated with the solidifying hydrogenic fluid in the twin-screw extruder. This observation motivates experimental efforts aimed at precise measurement of these quantities.

  20. Carbon Dioxide-Free Hydrogen Production with Integrated Hydrogen Separation and Storage.

    PubMed

    Dürr, Stefan; Müller, Michael; Jorschick, Holger; Helmin, Marta; Bösmann, Andreas; Palkovits, Regina; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-10

    An integration of CO2 -free hydrogen generation through methane decomposition coupled with hydrogen/methane separation and chemical hydrogen storage through liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) systems is demonstrated. A potential, very interesting application is the upgrading of stranded gas, for example, gas from a remote gas field or associated gas from off-shore oil drilling. Stranded gas can be effectively converted in a catalytic process by methane decomposition into solid carbon and a hydrogen/methane mixture that can be directly fed to a hydrogenation unit to load a LOHC with hydrogen. This allows for a straight-forward separation of hydrogen from CH4 and conversion of hydrogen to a hydrogen-rich LOHC material. Both, the hydrogen-rich LOHC material and the generated carbon on metal can easily be transported to destinations of further industrial use by established transport systems, like ships or trucks.

  1. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H2. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al2O3. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H2, CH4, CO, CO2. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H2O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  2. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Monica Mihet, Maria Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  3. Renewable hydrogen production by photosynthetic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1998-06-01

    This mission-oriented research project is focused on the production of renewable hydrogen. The authors have demonstrated that certain unicellular green algae are capable of sustained simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen by light-activated photosynthetic water splitting. It is the goal of this project to develop a practical chemical engineering system for the development of an economic process that can be used to produce renewable hydrogen. There are several fundamental problems that need to be solved before the application of this scientific knowledge can be applied to the development a practical process: (I) maximizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into hydrogen energy, (2) development of oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase-containing mutants, and (3) development of bioreactors that can be used in a real-world chemical engineering process. The authors are addressing each of these problems here at ORNL and in collaboration with their research colleagues at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Hawaii. This year the authors have focused on item 1 above. In particular, they have focused on the question of how many light reactions are required to split water to molecular hydrogen and oxygen.

  4. Hydrogen production from liquid hydrocarbons demonstration program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, J. B.; Chow, T. K.; Ling, J. K.

    1986-09-01

    The Air Force now uses diesel engine generators as sources of heat and electricity at selected remote sites. Simultaneously, it has investigated alternative cogeneration candidates that offer improved reliability, maintain ability, and economics. One system that shows high potential is a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plant consisting of a fuel conditioner to convert logistic fuels such as DEF-2, DF-a and JP-4 to a hydrogen-rich gas, and a power conditioner to convert the direct current power to alternating current. The objective was to define, and demonstrate, a fuel conditioner to meet performance criteria estabilished for the Air Force Remote Site Fuel Cell Power Plant program. Key criteria included high fuel-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency, rapid startup and load following capability, and minimum water consumption during operations. A process configuration which has the potential to produce a minimum of 0.365 pound of hydrogen per pound of feed diesel consumed is described. The hydrogen-containing product is suitable for phosphoric acid fuel 1 cell power plant. A 2 mole per hour (hydrogen) demonstration plant was designed, constructed and started up.

  5. Assessment of biological Hydrogen production processes: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafpour, G. D.; Shahavi, M. H.; Neshat, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Energy crisis created a special attention on renewable energy sources. Among these sources; hydrogen through biological processes is well-known as the most suitable and renewable energy sources. In terms of process yield, hydrogen production from various sources was evaluated. A summary of microorganisms as potential hydrogen producers discussed along with advantages and disadvantages of several bioprocesses. The pathway of photo-synthetic and dark fermentative organisms was discussed. In fact, the active enzymes involved in performance of biological processes for hydrogen generation were identified and their special functionalities were discussed. The influential factors affecting on hydrogen production were known as enzymes assisting liberation specific enzymes such as nitrogenase, hydrogenase and uptake hydrogenase. These enzymes were quite effective in reduction of proton and form active molecular hydrogen. Several types of photosynthetic systems were evaluated with intension of maximum hydrogen productivities. In addition dark fermentative and light intensities on hydrogen productions were evaluated. The hydrogen productivities of efficient hydrogen producing strains were evaluated.

  6. Self-assembling hydrogel scaffolds for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, Adam S.; Kazantsev, Roman V.; Palmer, Liam C.; McClendon, Mark; Koltonow, Andrew R.; Samuel, Amanda P. S.; Kiebala, Derek J.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2014-11-01

    Integration into a soft material of all the molecular components necessary to generate storable fuels is an interesting target in supramolecular chemistry. The concept is inspired by the internal structure of photosynthetic organelles, such as plant chloroplasts, which colocalize molecules involved in light absorption, charge transport and catalysis to create chemical bonds using light energy. We report here on the light-driven production of hydrogen inside a hydrogel scaffold built by the supramolecular self-assembly of a perylene monoimide amphiphile. The charged ribbons formed can electrostatically attract a nickel-based catalyst, and electrolyte screening promotes gelation. We found the emergent phenomenon that screening by the catalyst or the electrolytes led to two-dimensional crystallization of the chromophore assemblies and enhanced the electronic coupling among the molecules. Photocatalytic production of hydrogen is observed in the three-dimensional environment of the hydrogel scaffold and the material is easily placed on surfaces or in the pores of solid supports.

  7. Design Configurations and Coupling High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor and Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Steven Sherman

    2008-04-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood.

  8. Hydrogen photosynthesis by Rhodobacter capsulatus and its coupling to a PEM fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Deliang; Bultel, Yann; Magnin, Jean-Pierre; Roux, Claude; Willison, John C.

    Four different mutant strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus (IR1, IR3, IR4 and JP91), a photosynthetic purple non-sulfur bacterium, were tested for their ability to produce hydrogen in a 3 L volume photobioreactor coupled to a small PEM fuel cell. The four mutants, together with the wild-type strain, B10, were grown at 30 °C under illumination with 30 mmol L -1DL-lactate and 5 mmol L -1L-glutamate as carbon and nitrogen source, respectively. Bacterial growth was measured by monitoring the increase in absorbance at 660 nm, and hydrogen yield, and substrate conversion efficiency were measured under the same conditions. The hydrogen production capability of the five strains was then compared and shown to be in the order: IR3 > JP91 > IR4 > B10 > IR1. The most preferment strain, IR3, showed a substrate conversion efficiency of 84.8% and a hydrogen yield of 3.9 L L -1 of culture. The biogas produced by these photobioreactor cultures was successfully used as feed for a small PEM fuel cell system, with the mutant IR3 showing the most sustained hydrogen and current production. The maximum current was similar to that obtained using pure hydrogen produced by a small electrolysis cell (High-Tec Inc.).

  9. Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2003-09-01

    This document summarizes the opportunities and challenges for low-cost renewable hydrogen production from wind and hydropower. The Workshop on Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower was held September 9-10, 2003.

  10. Startech Hydrogen Production Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Startech Engineering Department

    2007-11-27

    The assigned work scope includes the modification and utilization of the Plasma Converter System, Integration of a StarCell{trademark} Multistage Ceramic Membrane System (StarCell), and testing of the integrated systems towards DOE targets for gasification and membrane separation. Testing and evaluation was performed at the Startech Engineering and Demonstration Test Center in Bristol, CT. The Objectives of the program are as follows: (1) Characterize the performance of the integrated Plasma Converter and StarCell{trademark} Systems for hydrogen production and purification from abundant and inexpensive feedstocks; (2) Compare integrated hydrogen production performance to conventional technologies and DOE benchmarks; (3) Run pressure and temperature testing to baseline StarCell's performance; and (4) Determine the effect of process contaminants on the StarCell{trademark} system.

  11. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Grant L. Hawkes

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents the technical case for high-temperature nuclear hydrogen production. A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on high-temperature thermal water splitting processes is presented. Specific details of hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis are also provided, including results of recent experiments performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Based on these results, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be a promising technology for efficient large-scale hydrogen production.

  12. Space-based bacterial production of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennakoon, C. L.; Bhardwaj, R. C.; Bockris, J. O.; Henninger, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with the electrochemical production of hydrogen by depolarizing the oxygen evolution reaction using human feces and urine, which contains 30-40% bacteria and yeast. The electroactivity of graphite, tungsten carbide, perovskite and RuO2-coated Ebonex (Ti4O7) as anode materials are compared. The scale-up of the process in a laboratory-scale three-dimensional packed bed cell is discussed.

  13. Space-based bacterial production of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennakoon, C. L.; Bhardwaj, R. C.; Bockris, J. O.; Henninger, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with the electrochemical production of hydrogen by depolarizing the oxygen evolution reaction using human feces and urine, which contains 30-40% bacteria and yeast. The electroactivity of graphite, tungsten carbide, perovskite and RuO2-coated Ebonex (Ti4O7) as anode materials are compared. The scale-up of the process in a laboratory-scale three-dimensional packed bed cell is discussed.

  14. Photoelectrolytic production of hydrogen using semiconductor electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Walker, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental data for the photoelectrolytic production of hydrogen using GaAs photoanodes was presented. Four types of GaAs anodes were investigated: polished GaAs, GaAs coated with gold, GaAs coated with silver, and GaAs coated with tin. The maximum measured efficiency using a tungsten light source was 8.9 percent for polished GaAs electrodes and 6.3 percent for tin coated GaAs electrodes.

  15. Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Levene, J. I.; Mann, M. K.; Margolis, R.; Milbrandt, A.

    2005-09-01

    To determine the potential for hydrogen production via renewable electricity sources, three aspects of the system are analyzed: a renewable hydrogen resource assessment, a cost analysis of hydrogen production via electrolysis, and the annual energy requirements of producing hydrogen for refueling. The results indicate that ample resources exist to produce transportation fuel from wind and solar power. However, hydrogen prices are highly dependent on electricity prices.

  16. Photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberoglu, Halil

    Photobiological hydrogen production is an alternative to thermochemical and electrolytic technologies with the advantage of carbon dioxide sequestration. However, it suffers from low solar to hydrogen energy conversion efficiency due to limited light transfer, mass transfer, and nutrient medium composition. The present study aims at addressing these limitations and can be divided in three parts: (1) experimental measurements of the radiation characteristics of hydrogen producing and carbon dioxide consuming microorganisms, (2) solar radiation transfer modeling and simulation in photobioreactors, and (3) parametric experiments of photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration. First, solar radiation transfer in photobioreactors containing microorganisms and bubbles was modeled using the radiative transport equation (RTE) and solved using the modified method of characteristics. The study concluded that Beer-Lambert's law gives inaccurate results and anisotropic scattering must be accounted for to predict the local irradiance inside a photobioreactor. The need for accurate measurement of the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms was established. Then, experimental setup and analysis methods for measuring the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms have been developed and successfully validated experimentally. A database of the radiation characteristics of representative microorganisms have been created including the cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis, the purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii along with its three genetically engineered strains. This enabled, for the first time, quantitative assessment of the effect of genetic engineering on the radiation characteristics of microorganisms. In addition, a parametric experimental study has been performed to model the growth, CO2 consumption, and H 2 production of Anabaena variabilis as functions of

  17. Solar-driven hydrogen production in green algae.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Tamburic, Bojan; Zemichael, Fessehaye; Hellgardt, Klaus; Nixon, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The twin problems of energy security and global warming make hydrogen an attractive alternative to traditional fossil fuels with its combustion resulting only in the release of water vapor. Biological hydrogen production represents a renewable source of the gas and can be performed by a diverse range of microorganisms from strict anaerobic bacteria to eukaryotic green algae. Compared to conventional methods for generating H(2), biological systems can operate at ambient temperatures and pressures without the need for rare metals and could potentially be coupled to a variety of biotechnological processes ranging from desalination and waste water treatment to pharmaceutical production. Photobiological hydrogen production by microalgae is particularly attractive as the main inputs for the process (water and solar energy) are plentiful. This chapter focuses on recent developments in solar-driven H(2) production in green algae with emphasis on the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We review the current methods used to achieve sustained H(2) evolution and discuss possible approaches to improve H(2) yields, including the optimization of culturing conditions, reducing light-harvesting antennae and targeting auxiliary electron transport and fermentative pathways that compete with the hydrogenase for reductant. Finally, industrial scale-up is discussed in the context of photobioreactor design and the future prospects of the field are considered within the broader context of a biorefinery concept. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Technical and Economic Review of Solar Hydrogen Production Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Erik; Fowler, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen energy systems are being developed to replace fossil fuels-based systems for transportation and stationary application. One of the challenges facing the widespread adoption of hydrogen as an energy vector is the lack of an efficient, economical, and sustainable method of hydrogen production. In the short term, hydrogen produced from…

  19. A Technical and Economic Review of Solar Hydrogen Production Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Erik; Fowler, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen energy systems are being developed to replace fossil fuels-based systems for transportation and stationary application. One of the challenges facing the widespread adoption of hydrogen as an energy vector is the lack of an efficient, economical, and sustainable method of hydrogen production. In the short term, hydrogen produced from…

  20. Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Joseph; Lim, Hankwon; Drnevich, Raymond

    2010-08-05

    Phase I was a technoeconomic feasibility study that defined the process scheme for the integrated ceramic membrane system for hydrogen production and determined the plan for Phase II. The hydrogen production system is comprised of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). Two process options were evaluated: 1) Integrated OTM-HTM reactor – in this configuration, the HTM was a ceramic proton conductor operating at temperatures up to 900°C, and 2) Sequential OTM and HTM reactors – in this configuration, the HTM was assumed to be a Pd alloy operating at less than 600°C. The analysis suggested that there are no technical issues related to either system that cannot be managed. The process with the sequential reactors was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and more likely to be commercialized in a shorter time than the single reactor. Therefore, Phase II focused on the sequential reactor system, specifically, the second stage, or the HTM portion. Work on the OTM portion was conducted in a separate program. Phase IIA began in February 2003. Candidate substrate materials and alloys were identified and porous ceramic tubes were produced and coated with Pd. Much effort was made to develop porous substrates with reasonable pore sizes suitable for Pd alloy coating. The second generation of tubes showed some improvement in pore size control, but this was not enough to get a viable membrane. Further improvements were made to the porous ceramic tube manufacturing process. When a support tube was successfully coated, the membrane was tested to determine the hydrogen flux. The results from all these tests were used to update the technoeconomic analysis from Phase I to confirm that the sequential membrane reactor system can potentially be a low-cost hydrogen supply option when using an existing membrane on a larger scale. Phase IIB began in October 2004 and focused on demonstrating an integrated HTM/water gas shift (WGS) reactor to

  1. Thermal Hydraulic Analyses for Coupling High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor to Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Oh; R. Barner; C. B. Davis; S. Sherman; P. Pickard

    2006-08-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were

  2. Extremophile mediated hydrogen production for hydrogenation of substrates in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjom, Mouzhgun

    Catalytic hydrogenation reactions are pervasive throughout our economy, from production of margarine as food, liquid fuels for transportation and chiral drugs such as L-DOPA. H2 production from non-fossil fuel feedstocks is highly desirable for transition to the "Hydrogen Economy". Also, the rates of hydrogenation reactions that involve a substrate, H 2 gas and a catalyst are often limited by the solubility of H2 in solvent. The present research thus envisioned designing water-soluble catalysts that could effectively utilize biologically produced H2 in a coupled system to hydrogenate substrates in homogeneous mode (two-phase system). Biological production of H2 as an end product or byproduct of the metabolism of organisms that operate under strict anaerobic conditions has been proposed. However, contrary to what was previously observed, Thermotoga neapolitana, belonging to the order of Thermotogales efficiently produces H2 gas under microaerobic conditions (Van Ooteghem et al. 2004). For H2 production by T. neapolitana in the bacterial growth medium (DSM 5068) at an optimum temperature of 70 C, our results in batch mode show that: (1) H2 was produced from glucose though with 16% efficiency, the rest goes to biomass production, (2) H2 gas was produced even when the cultures were inoculated under microaerobic conditions (up to 8% (v/v) O2) suggesting a protective mechanism for one or more [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases in T. neapolitana, (3) H2 production was pH dependent but addition of simple, non-toxic physiological buffering additives such as Methylene succinic acid increased H2 production and (4) H2 production rate varied linearly in the 100--6800 kPa pressure range. We then screened various water-soluble metal catalysts in batch mode and selected the RhCl3.3H2O/TPPTS (TPPTS is a water-soluble ligand) system that achieved 86% hydrogenation of Methylene succinic acid (an olefin) in an aqueous medium pressurized with preformed H2. When water was replaced with the DSM 5068

  3. Hydrogen production through solar energy water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dini, D.

    Water electrolysis systems are seen as the principal means of producing a large amount of hydrogen in the future. Hydrogen energy production from direct solar energy conversion facilities located on the shores of oceans and lakes is discussed. The electrolysis interface is shown to be conveniently adapted to direct solar energy conversion; this, however, will depend on technical and economic feasibility aspects as they emerge from the research phases. The basic requirements for relatively immense solar collection areas for large-scale central conversion facilities, with widely variable electricity charges, are outlined. The operation of electrolysis and photovoltaic array combination is verified at various insolation levels. It is pointed out that solar cell arrays and electrolyzers are producing the expected results with solar energy inputs that are continuously varying.

  4. Resource Assessment for Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production Potential from Fossil and Renewable Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M.; Penev, M.; Heimiller, D.

    2013-09-01

    This study examines the energy resources required to produce 4-10 million metric tonnes of domestic, low-carbon hydrogen in order to fuel approximately 20-50 million fuel cell electric vehicles. These projected energy resource requirements are compared to current consumption levels, projected 2040 business as usual consumptions levels, and projected 2040 consumption levels within a carbonconstrained future for the following energy resources: coal (assuming carbon capture and storage), natural gas, nuclear (uranium), biomass, wind (on- and offshore), and solar (photovoltaics and concentrating solar power). The analysis framework builds upon previous analysis results estimating hydrogen production potentials and drawing comparisons with economy-wide resource production projections

  5. Hydrogen Production via a Commercially Ready

    SciTech Connect

    Paul K. T. Liu

    2007-03-31

    The commercial stainless steel (SS) porous substrate (i.e., ZrO{sub 2}/SS from Pall Corp.) was evaluated comprehensively as substrate for the deposition of the CMS membrane for hydrogen separation. The CMS membrane synthesis protocol we developed originally for the ceramic substrate was adapted here for the stainless steel substrate. Unfortunately no successful hydrogen selective membranes had been prepared during Yr I of this project. The characterization results indicated two major sources of defect present in the stainless steel substrate, which may contribute to the poor CMS membrane quality. They include (i) leaking from the crimp boundary of the stainless steel substrate, and (ii) the delamination of the ZrO{sub 2} layer deposited on the stainless steel substrate during CMS membrane preparation. Recently a new batch of the stainless steel substrate (as the 2nd generation product) was received from the supplier. Our characterization results confirm that leaking of the crimp boundary no longer exists. The thermal stability of the ZrO{sub 2}/stainless steel substrate under the CMS membrane preparation condition will be evaluated during the remaining period of the project. Our goal here is to determine the suitability of the 2nd generation ZrO{sub 2}/SS as substrate for the preparation of the CMS membrane for hydrogen separation by the end of this project period.

  6. 40 CFR 415.410 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen production subcategory. 415.410 Section 415.410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.410 Applicability; description of the hydrogen production... hydrogen as a refinery by-product....

  7. 40 CFR 415.410 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen production subcategory. 415.410 Section 415.410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.410 Applicability; description of the hydrogen production... hydrogen as a refinery by-product....

  8. 40 CFR 415.410 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen production subcategory. 415.410 Section 415.410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.410 Applicability; description of the hydrogen production... hydrogen as a refinery by-product....

  9. 40 CFR 415.410 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen production subcategory. 415.410 Section 415.410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.410 Applicability; description of the hydrogen production... hydrogen as a refinery by-product....

  10. 40 CFR 415.410 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen production subcategory. 415.410 Section 415.410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.410 Applicability; description of the hydrogen production... hydrogen as a refinery by-product....

  11. Hydrogen production by a PEM electrolyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón-González, G.; León-Galicia, A.; González-Huerta, R.; Rivera Camacho, J. M.; Uribe-Salazar, M.

    2015-01-01

    A PEM electrolyser for hydrogen production was evaluated. It was fed with water and a 400 mA, 3.5 V cc electrical power source. The electrolyser was built with two acrylic plates to form the anode and the cathode, two meshes to distribute the current, two seals, two gas diffusers and an assembly membrane-electrode. A small commercial neoprene sheet 1.7 mm thin was used to provide for the water deposit in order to avoid the machining of the structure. For the assembly of the proton interchange membrane a thin square 50 mm layer of Nafion 115 was used.

  12. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Transport. Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Hydrogen storage and in-space hydrogen transport research focused on developing and verifying design concepts for efficient, safe, lightweight liquid hydrogen cryogenic storage systems. Research into hydrogen production had a specific goal of further advancing proton conducting membrane technology in the laboratory at a larger scale. System and process trade studies evaluated the proton conducting membrane technology, specifically, scale-up issues.

  13. Hydrogen Production in the U.S. and Worldwide - 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daryl R.

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the different categories of hydrogen production (captive, by-product, and merchant) and presents production data for 2013 by industry within these categories. Merchant production data is provided for the top-four industrial gas companies.

  14. Production of hydrogen using an anaerobic biological process

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, Robert; Pelter, Libbie S.; Patterson, John A.

    2016-11-29

    Various embodiments of the present invention pertain to methods for biological production of hydrogen. More specifically, embodiments of the present invention pertain to a modular energy system and related methods for producing hydrogen using organic waste as a feed stock.

  15. Study of hydrogen generation plant coupled to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Nicholas Robert

    Hydrogen generation using a high temperature nuclear reactor as a thermal driving vector is a promising future option for energy carrier production. In this scheme, the heat from the nuclear reactor drives an endothermic water-splitting plant, via coupling, through an intermediate heat exchanger. While both high temperature nuclear reactors and hydrogen generation plants have high individual degrees of development, study of the coupled plant is lacking. Particularly absent are considerations of the transient behavior of the coupled plant, as well as studies of the safety of the overall plant. The aim of this document is to contribute knowledge to the effort of nuclear hydrogen generation. In particular, this study regards identification of safety issues in the coupled plant and the transient modeling of some leading candidates for implementation in the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). The Sulfur Iodine (SI) and Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycles are considered as candidate hydrogen generation schemes. Several thermodynamically derived chemical reaction chamber models are coupled to a well-known reference design of a high temperature nuclear reactor. These chemical reaction chamber models have several dimensions of validation, including detailed steady state flowsheets, integrated loop test data, and bench scale chemical kinetics. Eight unique case studies are performed based on a thorough literature review of possible events. The case studies are: (1) feed flow failure from one section of the chemical plant to another, (2) product flow failure (recycle) within the chemical plant, (3) rupture or explosion within the chemical plant, (4) nuclear reactor helium inlet overcooling due to a process holding tank failure, (5) helium inlet overcooling as an anticipated transient without SCRAM, (6) total failure of the chemical plant, (7) parametric study of the temperature in an individual reaction chamber, and (8) control rod insertion in the nuclear reactor. Various parametric

  16. Production of hydrogen from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, S.L.

    1995-11-01

    The Gasification of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) includes gasification and the process for producing a gasificable slurry from raw MSW by using high pressures of steam. A potential energy source, MSW is a composite of organic materials such as: paper, wood, food waste, etc. There are different paper grades producing different results with low-quality paper forming better slurries than high-quality papers; making MSW a difficult feedstock for gasification. The objective of the bench-scale laboratory work has been to establish operating conditions for a hydrothermal pre-processing scheme for municipal solid waste (MSW) that produces a good slurry product that can be pumped and atomized to the gasifier for the production of hydrogen. Batch reactors are used to determine product yields as a function of hydrothermal treatment conditions. Various ratios of water-to-paper were used to find out solid product, gas product, and soluble product yields of MSW. Experimental conditions covered were temperature, time, and water to feed ratio. Temperature had the strongest effect on product yields.

  17. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High-Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.M.; Lessing, P.A.

    2004-07-01

    High-temperature electrolytic water-splitting supported by nuclear process heat and electricity has the potential to produce H{sub 2} with an overall system efficiency near those of the hydrocarbon and thermochemical processes, but without the corrosive conditions of thermochemical processes and without the fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions associated with hydrocarbon processes. Specifically, a high-temperature advanced nuclear reactor coupled with a high-efficiency high-temperature electrolyzer could achieve a competitive thermal-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 45 to 55%. A research program is under way at INEEL to develop a conceptual design for large-scale nuclear production of hydrogen via planar solid oxide electrolysis technology. The design effort is addressing solid oxide cell materials and configuration, performance, durability, operating conditions, economics, and safety. Single and multiple cell experimental studies are being conducted. Interim results indicate that this technology performs close to theoretical predictions and remains a viable means for hydrogen production using nuclear energy. (authors)

  18. Plasma processing methods for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Jasiński, Mariusz

    2016-08-01

    In the future a transfer from the fossil fuel-based economy to hydrogen-based economy is expected. Therefore the development of systems for efficient H2 production becomes important. The several conventional methods of mass-scale (or central) H2 production (methane, natural gas and higher hydrocarbons reforming, coal gasification reforming) are well developed and their costs of H2 production are acceptable. However, due to the H2 transport and storage problems the small-scale (distributed) technologies for H2 production are demanded. However, these new technologies have to meet the requirement of producing H2 at a production cost of (1-2)/kg(H2) (or 60 g(H2)/kWh) by 2020 (the U.S. Department of Energy's target). Recently several plasma methods have been proposed for the small-scale H2 production. The most promising plasmas for this purpose seems to be those generated by gliding, plasmatron and nozzle arcs, and microwave discharges. In this paper plasma methods proposed for H2 production are briefly described and critically evaluated from the view point of H2 production efficiency. The paper is aiming at answering a question if any plasma method for the small-scale H2 production approaches such challenges as the production energy yield of 60 g(H2)/kWh, high production rate, high reliability and low investment cost. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  19. Characterization of high-pressure capacitively coupled hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, S.; Kondo, M.

    2007-11-01

    Capacitively coupled very-high-frequency hydrogen plasmas have been systematically diagnosed in a wide range of a gas pressure from 5 mTorr to 10 Torr. The plasma parameters, ion species, and ion energy distributions (IEDs) are measured using a Langmuir probe, optical emission spectroscopy, and energy filtered mass spectrometer. The measurement results show that the ion species in a hydrogen plasma is determined from ionization channels and subsequent ion-molecule reactions. The ions are dominated by H{sub 2}{sup +} at a less-collisional condition of < or approx. 20 mTorr, whereas those are dominated by H{sub 3}{sup +} at a collisional condition of > or approx. 20 mTorr. The IED is determined by both the sheath potential drop and ion-neutral collisions in the plasma sheath. The IED is broadened for a collisional sheath at > or approx. 0.3 Torr and the ion bombardment energy is lowered. For high-pressure discharge operated at {approx_equal}10 Torr, plasmas are characterized by a low electron temperature of {approx_equal}0.8 eV and a low ion bombardment energy of < or approx. 15 eV.

  20. Microbial production of hydrogen: an overview.

    PubMed

    Nandi, R; Sengupta, S

    1998-01-01

    Production of hydrogen by anaerobes, facultative anaerobes, aerobes, methylotrophs, and photosynthetic bacteria is possible. Anaerobic Clostridia are potential producers and immobilized C. butyricum produces 2 mol H2/mol glucose at 50% efficiency. Spontaneous production of H2 from formate and glucose by immobilized Escherichia coli showed 100% and 60% efficiencies, respectively. Enterobactericiae produces H2 at similar efficiency from different monosaccharides during growth. Among methylotrophs, methanogenes, rumen bacteria, and thermophilic archae, Ruminococcus albus, is promising (2.37 mol/mol glucose). Immobilized aerobic Bacillus licheniformis optimally produces 0.7 mol H2/mol glucose. Photosynthetic Rhodospirillum rubrum produces 4, 7, and 6 mol of H2 from acetate, succinate, and malate, respectively. Excellent productivity (6.2 mol H2/mol glucose) by co-cultures of Cellulomonas with a hydrogenase uptake (Hup) mutant of R. capsulata on cellulose was found. Cyanobacteria, viz., Anabaena, Synechococcus, and Oscillatoria sp., have been studied for photoproduction of H2. Immobilized A. cylindrica produces H2 (20 ml/g dry wt/h) continually for 1 year. Increased H2 productivity was found for Hup mutant of A. variabilis. Synechococcus sp. has a high potential for H2 production in fermentors and outdoor cultures. Simultaneous productions of oxychemicals and H2 by Klebseilla sp. and by enzymatic methods were also attempted. The fate of H2 biotechnology is presumed to be dictated by the stock of fossil fuel and state of pollution in future.

  1. Coupled molybdenum carbide and reduced graphene oxide electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji-Sen; Wang, Yu; Liu, Chun-Hui; Li, Shun-Li; Wang, Yu-Guang; Dong, Long-Zhang; Dai, Zhi-Hui; Li, Ya-Fei; Lan, Ya-Qian

    2016-04-01

    Electrochemical water splitting is one of the most economical and sustainable methods for large-scale hydrogen production. However, the development of low-cost and earth-abundant non-noble-metal catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction remains a challenge. Here we report a two-dimensional coupled hybrid of molybdenum carbide and reduced graphene oxide with a ternary polyoxometalate-polypyrrole/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as a precursor. The hybrid exhibits outstanding electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction and excellent stability in acidic media, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the best among these reported non-noble-metal catalysts. Theoretical calculations on the basis of density functional theory reveal that the active sites for hydrogen evolution stem from the pyridinic nitrogens, as well as the carbon atoms, in the graphene. In a proof-of-concept trial, an electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution is fabricated, which may open new avenues for the design of nanomaterials utilizing POMs/conducting polymer/reduced-graphene oxide nanocomposites.

  2. Coupled molybdenum carbide and reduced graphene oxide electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji-Sen; Wang, Yu; Liu, Chun-Hui; Li, Shun-Li; Wang, Yu-Guang; Dong, Long-Zhang; Dai, Zhi-Hui; Li, Ya-Fei; Lan, Ya-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical water splitting is one of the most economical and sustainable methods for large-scale hydrogen production. However, the development of low-cost and earth-abundant non-noble-metal catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction remains a challenge. Here we report a two-dimensional coupled hybrid of molybdenum carbide and reduced graphene oxide with a ternary polyoxometalate-polypyrrole/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as a precursor. The hybrid exhibits outstanding electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction and excellent stability in acidic media, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the best among these reported non-noble-metal catalysts. Theoretical calculations on the basis of density functional theory reveal that the active sites for hydrogen evolution stem from the pyridinic nitrogens, as well as the carbon atoms, in the graphene. In a proof-of-concept trial, an electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution is fabricated, which may open new avenues for the design of nanomaterials utilizing POMs/conducting polymer/reduced-graphene oxide nanocomposites. PMID:27032372

  3. Hydrogen in the Methanol Production Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralj, Anita Kovac; Glavic, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very important industrial gas in chemical processes. It is very volatile; therefore, it can escape from the process units and its mass balance is not always correct. In many industrial processes where hydrogen is reacted, kinetics are often related to hydrogen pressure. The right thermodynamic properties of hydrogen can be found for…

  4. Hydrogen in the Methanol Production Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralj, Anita Kovac; Glavic, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very important industrial gas in chemical processes. It is very volatile; therefore, it can escape from the process units and its mass balance is not always correct. In many industrial processes where hydrogen is reacted, kinetics are often related to hydrogen pressure. The right thermodynamic properties of hydrogen can be found for…

  5. Butanol production from the effluent of hydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, W H; Chen, S Y; Chao, S J; Jian, Z C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to recover butanol from the effluent of the hydrogen-producing bioreactor containing acetate, butyrate, and carbohydrate. The butanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B592 was evaluated under both unsterilized and sterilized conditions for examining the potential of butanol production for the practical application. Sucrose of 10 g/L and butyrate of 2 g/L coupled with acetate buffer were used to mimic the effluent. Sucrose was completely consumed in the both unsterilized and sterilized conditions during acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. However, the results illustrate that the carbohydrate consumption rate in the unsterilized condition was higher than that in the sterilized condition. The maximum butanol concentrations of 3,500 and 3,750 mg/L were achieved in the sterilized and unsterilized conditions, respectively. Meanwhile, it was found that the acetate and the butyrate concentrations of 600 and 1,500 mg/L, and 300 and 1,000 mg/L were ingested to yield butanol in the sterilized condition and in the unsterilized condition, respectively. The results concluded that high levels of acetate and butyrate could eliminate the interference of other microbial populations, resulting in the enrichment of C. beijerinckii NRRL B592 in the fermentor. The butanol production by C. beijerinckii NRRL B592 could be, therefore, produced from the effluent of the hydrogen-producing bioreactor. It promised that the microbial butanol production is one of attractive bioprocesses to recover energy from wastes.

  6. Hydrogen fuel production by transgenic microalgae.

    PubMed

    Melis, Anastasios; Seibert, Michael; Ghirardi, Maria L

    2007-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the state-of-art in the field of green algal H2-production and examines physiological and genetic engineering approaches by which to improve the hydrogen metabolism characteristics of these microalgae. Included in this chapter are emerging topics pertaining to the application of sulfur-nutrient deprivation to attenuate O2-evolution and to promote H2-production, as well as the genetic engineering of sulfate uptake through manipulation of a newly reported sulfate permease in the chloroplast of the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Application of the green algal hydrogenase assembly genes is examined in efforts to confer H2-production capacity to other commercially significant unicellular green algae. Engineering a solution to the O2 sensitivity of the green algal hydrogenase is discussed as an alternative approach to sulfur nutrient deprivation, along with starch accumulation in microalgae for enhanced H2-production. Lastly, current efforts aiming to optimize light utilization in transgenic microalgae for enhanced H2-production under mass culture conditions are presented. It is evident that application of genetic engineering technologies and the use of transgenic green algae will improve prospects for commercial exploitation of these photosynthetic micro-organisms in the generation of H2, a clean and renewable fuel.

  7. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-01

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  8. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    SciTech Connect

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-22

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  9. Hyperfine coupling of the hydrogen atom in high temperature water.

    PubMed

    Nuzhdin, Kirill; Bartels, David M

    2013-03-28

    The hyperfine coupling constant of the hydrogen atom has been measured in pressurized liquid water up to 300 °C. The reduced constant A(water)∕A(vacuum) is 0.9939 at room temperature, and decreases to a minimum of 0.9918 at 240 °C. The reduced constant then increases at higher temperature. The g-factor is 2.002244(10) at room temperature and decreases to 2.00221(1) at 240 °C. The change in g-factor is proportional to the change in hyperfine coupling. The behavior below 110 °C is in excellent agreement with a previously proposed model in which the H atom is confined to a harmonic solvent cage, and vibrations within the cage mix "p-type" character into the wavefunction, resulting inA(water)∕A(vacuum) < 1. The harmonic model breaks down above 130 °C. We demonstrate that a classical binary collision model using approximate partial molar volume information can recover the observed minima near 240 °C.

  10. Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    2005-01-20

    Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal

  11. Method for low temperature catalytic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2003-07-22

    The invention provides a process for the catalytic production of a hydrogen feed by exposing a hydrogen feed to a catalyst which promotes a base-catalyzed water-gas-shift reaction in a liquid phase. The hydrogen feed can be provided by any process known in the art of making hydrogen gas. It is preferably provided by a process that can produce a hydrogen feed for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The step of exposing the hydrogen feed takes place preferably from about 80.degree. C. to about 150.degree. C.

  12. U-GAS process for production of hydrogen from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Dihu, R.J.; Patel, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Today, hydrogen is produced mainly from natural gas and petroleum fractions. Tomorrow, because reserves of natural gas and oil are declining while demand continues to increase, they cannot be considered available for long-term, large-scale production of hydrogen. Hydrogen obtained from coal is expected to be the lowest cost, large-scale source of hydrogen in the future. The U-GAS coal gasification process and its potential application to the manufacture of hydrogen is discussed. Pilot plant results, the current status of the process, and economic projections for the cost of hydrogen manufactured are presented.

  13. Fermentation and Electrohydrogenic Approaches to Hydrogen Production (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Maness, P. C.; Thammannagowda, S.; Magnusson, L.; Logan, B.

    2010-06-01

    This work describes the development of a waste biomass fermentation process using cellulose-degrading bacteria for hydrogen production. This process is then integrated with an electrohydrogenesis process via the development of a microbial electrolysis cell reactor, during which fermentation waste effluent is further converted to hydrogen to increase the total output of hydrogen from biomass.

  14. Hydrogen Production from Hydrogen Sulfide in IGCC Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Elias Stefanakos; Burton Krakow; Jonathan Mbah

    2007-07-31

    IGCC power plants are the cleanest coal-based power generation facilities in the world. Technical improvements are needed to help make them cost competitive. Sulfur recovery is one procedure in which improvement is possible. This project has developed and demonstrated an electrochemical process that could provide such an improvement. IGCC power plants now in operation extract the sulfur from the synthesis gas as hydrogen sulfide. In this project H{sub 2}S has been electrolyzed to yield sulfur and hydrogen (instead of sulfur and water as is the present practice). The value of the byproduct hydrogen makes this process more cost effective. The electrolysis has exploited some recent developments in solid state electrolytes. The proof of principal for the project concept has been accomplished.

  15. A New Hydrogen-Producing Strain and Its Characterization of Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingxing; Lv, Yongkang; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-12-01

    A newly isolated photo non-sulfur (PNS) bacterium was identified as Rhodopseudomonas palustris PB-Z by sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes and phylogenetic analysis. Under vigorous stirring (240 rpm), the hydrogen production performances were greatly improved: The maximum hydrogen production rate and cumulative hydrogen production increased by 188.9 ± 0.07 % and 83.0 ± 0.06 %, respectively, due to the hydrogen bubbles were immediately removed from the culture medium. The effects of different wavelength of light on hydrogen production with stirring were much different from that without stirring. The ranking on the photo-hydrogen production performance was white > yellow > green > blue > red without stirring and white > yellow > blue > red > green under stirring. The best light source for hydrogen production was tungsten filament lamp. The optimum temperature was 35 °C. The maximal hydrogen production rate and cumulative hydrogen production reached 78.7 ± 2.3 ml/l/h and 1728.1 ± 92.7 mol H2/l culture, respectively, under 35 °C, 240 rpm, and illumination of 4000 lux. Pyruvate was one of the main sources of CO2 and has a great impact on the gas composition.

  16. The sulfur thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokiya, M.

    1981-07-01

    Results of research on sulfur-cycle hydrogen production are presented. An H2S cycle using MoS2 as a catalyst is mentioned as showing promise for thermochemical water splitting, with an equilibrium reaction yield of 7%. Use of I or Pt as catalysts raised efficiencies to 16 and 12%, respectively, and further studies employing hybrid cycles with CO2-S and noble metals are reviewed. Thermal decomposition reactions with sulfuric acid are examined, noting a potential 30% thermal efficiency, and sulfur cycle research being undertaken at various industrial laboratories is outlined. It is noted that experiments with sulfuric acid salts for water electrolysis at Los Alamos will probably use solar collectors as a heat source.

  17. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH)

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Eight cycles in a coordinated set of projects for Solar Thermochemical Cycles for Hydrogen production (STCH) were self-evaluated for the DOE-EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program at a Working Group Meeting on October 8 and 9, 2008. This document reports the initial selection process for development investment in STCH projects, the evaluation process meant to reduce the number of projects as a means to focus resources on development of a few most-likely-to-succeed efforts, the obstacles encountered in project inventory reduction and the outcomes of the evaluation process. Summary technical status of the projects under evaluation is reported and recommendations identified to improve future project planning and selection activities.

  18. Recent work in advanced hydrogen production concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The hydrogen photoelectrolytic conversion activity investigated the practicability of semiconductor electrolytic devises that use solar energy to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen in an apparent single step process. The photocatalytic decomposition of inorganic hydrogen compounds; i.e., hydrobromic and hydriodic acids using rhodium organic bridge complexes were also studied. The feasibility of direct high temperature thermal decompositions of water with diffusion processes for separation of the equilibrium mixture of hydrogen and oxygen into usable energy sources was examined.

  19. Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    contribute to understanding of some basic surface physics problems such as adsorption , atomic scattering, desorption mechanisms * and electron transfer in atom...atomic hydrogen and insensitive to molecular hydrogen. Its cisadvantage is easy saturation with hydrogen occurring at higher hydrogen fluxes. It is...should be able to model the dynamic process, and we plan to study this in the future. When the surface is exposed to the cesium beam for a long enough

  20. Recent work in advanced hydrogen production concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The hydrogen photoelectrolytic conversion activity investigated the practicability of semiconductor electrolytic devises that use solar energy to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen in an apparent single step process. The photocatalytic decomposition of inorganic hydrogen compounds; i.e., hydrobromic and hydriodic acids using rhodium organic bridge complexes were also studied. The feasibility of direct high temperature thermal decompositions of water with diffusion processes for separation of the equilibrium mixture of hydrogen and oxygen into usable energy sources was examined.

  1. Recent work in advanced hydrogen production concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, D. D.

    1981-03-01

    The hydrogen photoelectrolytic conversion activity investigated the practicability of semiconductor electrolytic devises that use solar energy to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen in an apparent single step process. The photocatalytic decomposition of inorganic hydrogen compounds; i.e., hydrobromic and hydriodic acids using rhodium organic bridge complexes were also studied. The feasibility of direct high temperature thermal decompositions of water with diffusion processes for separation of the equilibrium mixture of hydrogen and oxygen into usable energy sources was examined.

  2. Applications of light-induced electron-transfer and hydrogen-abstraction processes: photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen from reducing radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, K.; Whitten, D.G.

    1980-07-16

    A study of several photoprocesses which generate reducing radicals in similar photoelectrochemical cells was reported. Coupling of a light-induced reaction to produce a photocurrent concurrent with hydrogen generation in a second compartment can occur for a number of electron transfers and hydrogen abstractions in what appears to be a fairly general process. Irradiation of the RuL/sub 3//sup +2//Et/sub 3/N: photoanode compartment leads to production of a photocurrent together with generation of hydrogen at the cathode. A rather different type of reaction that also results in formation of two reducing radicals as primary photoproducts if the photoreduction of ketones and H-heteroaromatics by alcohols and other hydrogen atom donors. Irradiation of benzophenone/2-propanol/MV/sup +2/ solutions in the photoanode compartment (intensity 1.4 x 10/sup -8/ einstein/s) leads to a buildup of moderate levels of MV/sup +/ and to a steady photocurrent of 320 ..mu..A. The MV/sup +/ is oxidized at the anode of the photolyzed compartment with concomitant reduction of H/sup +/ in the cathode compartment. There was no decrease in benzophenone concentration over moderate periods of irradiation, and a steady production of hydrogen in the cathode compartment was observed. The photocurrent produced was linear with the square of absorbed light intensity. The quantum efficiency at the above-indicated intensity is 22%; quantitative analysis of the hydrogen produced gives good agreement with this value. 1 figure, 1 table. (DP)

  3. Hydrogen from algal biomass: A review of production process.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Archita; Arya, Shailendra Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Multifariousness of biofuel sources has marked an edge to an imperative energy issue. Production of hydrogen from microalgae has been gathering much contemplation right away. But, mercantile production of microalgae biofuels considering bio-hydrogen is still not practicable because of low biomass concentration and costly down streaming processes. This review has taken up the hydrogen production by microalgae. Biofuels are the up and coming alternative to exhaustible, environmentally and unsafe fossil fuels. Algal biomass has been considered as an enticing raw material for biofuel production, these days photobioreactors and open-air systems are being used for hydrogen production from algal biomass. The formers allow the careful cultivation control whereas the latter ones are cheaper and simpler. A contemporary, encouraging optimization access has been included called algal cell immobilization on various matrixes which has resulted in marked increase in the productivity per volume of a reactor and addition of the hydrogen-production phase.

  4. Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-08-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

  5. Nuclear hydrogen : an assessment of product flexibility and market viability.

    SciTech Connect

    Botterud, A.; Yildiz, B.; Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear energy has the potential to play an important role in the future energy system as a large-scale source of hydrogen without greenhouse gas emissions. Thus far, economic studies of nuclear hydrogen tend to focus on the levelized cost of hydrogen without accounting for the risks and uncertainties that potential investors would face. We present a financial model based on real options theory to assess the profitability of different nuclear hydrogen production technologies in evolving electricity and hydrogen markets. The model uses Monte Carlo simulations to represent uncertainty in future hydrogen and electricity prices. It computes the expected value and the distribution of discounted profits from nuclear hydrogen production plants. Moreover, the model quantifies the value of the option to switch between hydrogen and electricity production, depending on what is more profitable to sell. We use the model to analyze the market viability of four potential nuclear hydrogen technologies and conclude that flexibility in output product is likely to add significant economic value for an investor in nuclear hydrogen. This should be taken into account in the development phase of nuclear hydrogen technologies.

  6. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    PubMed

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3 < 7 mm) and 35% had severe periodontal breakdown (CAL > 7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket.

  7. A microBio reactor for hydrogen production.

    SciTech Connect

    Volponi, Joanne V.; Walker, Andrew William

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the potential of developing a microfluidic reactor capable of enzymatically converting glucose and other carbohydrates to hydrogen. This aggressive project was motivated by work in enzymatic hydrogen production done by Woodward et al. at OWL. The work reported here demonstrated that hydrogen could be produced from the enzymatic oxidation of glucose. Attempts at immobilizing the enzymes resulted in reduced hydrogen production rates, probably due to buffer compatibility issues. A novel in-line sensor was also developed to monitor hydrogen production in real time at levels below 1 ppm. Finally, a theoretical design for the microfluidic reactor was developed but never produced due to the low production rates of hydrogen from the immobilized enzymes. However, this work demonstrated the potential of mimicking biological systems to create energy on the microscale.

  8. Production of negative hydrogen ions on metal grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oohara, W.; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, H.; Kawata, K.

    2015-03-15

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced on a nickel grid with positive-ion irradiation. In order to investigate the production mechanism, a copper grid without the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and positive helium ions without negative ionization are used for comparison. Positive hydrogen ions reflected on the metal surface obtain two electrons from the surface and become negatively ionized. It is found that the production yield of negative ions by desorption ionization of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms seems to be small, and the production is a minor mechanism.

  9. Self-assembling hydrogel scaffolds for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    DOE PAGES

    Weingarten, Adam S.; Kazantsev, Roman V.; Palmer, Liam C.; ...

    2014-10-05

    Integration into a soft material of all the molecular components necessary to generate storable fuels is an interesting target in supramolecular chemistry. The concept is inspired by the internal structure of photosynthetic organelles, such as plant chloroplasts, which colocalize molecules involved in light absorption, charge transport and catalysis to create chemical bonds using light energy. We report in this paper on the light-driven production of hydrogen inside a hydrogel scaffold built by the supramolecular self-assembly of a perylene monoimide amphiphile. The charged ribbons formed can electrostatically attract a nickel-based catalyst, and electrolyte screening promotes gelation. We found the emergent phenomenonmore » that screening by the catalyst or the electrolytes led to two-dimensional crystallization of the chromophore assemblies and enhanced the electronic coupling among the molecules. Finally, photocatalytic production of hydrogen is observed in the three-dimensional environment of the hydrogel scaffold and the material is easily placed on surfaces or in the pores of solid supports.« less

  10. Self-assembling hydrogel scaffolds for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Weingarten, Adam S.; Kazantsev, Roman V.; Palmer, Liam C.; McClendon, Mark; Koltonow, Andrew R.; Samuel, Amanda P. S.; Kiebala, Derek J.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2014-10-05

    Integration into a soft material of all the molecular components necessary to generate storable fuels is an interesting target in supramolecular chemistry. The concept is inspired by the internal structure of photosynthetic organelles, such as plant chloroplasts, which colocalize molecules involved in light absorption, charge transport and catalysis to create chemical bonds using light energy. We report in this paper on the light-driven production of hydrogen inside a hydrogel scaffold built by the supramolecular self-assembly of a perylene monoimide amphiphile. The charged ribbons formed can electrostatically attract a nickel-based catalyst, and electrolyte screening promotes gelation. We found the emergent phenomenon that screening by the catalyst or the electrolytes led to two-dimensional crystallization of the chromophore assemblies and enhanced the electronic coupling among the molecules. Finally, photocatalytic production of hydrogen is observed in the three-dimensional environment of the hydrogel scaffold and the material is easily placed on surfaces or in the pores of solid supports.

  11. Hydrogen production from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wallman, P.H.; Richardson, J.H.; Thorsness, C.B.

    1996-06-28

    We have modified a Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) hydrothermal pretreatment pilot plant for batch operation and blowdown of the treated batch to low pressure. We have also assembled a slurry shearing pilot plant for particle size reduction. Waste paper and a mixture of waste paper/polyethylene plastic have been run in the pilot plant with a treatment temperature of 275{degrees}C. The pilot-plant products have been used for laboratory studies at LLNL. The hydrothermal/shearing pilot plants have produced acceptable slurries for gasification tests from a waste paper feedstock. Work is currently underway with combined paper/plastic feedstocks. When the assembly of the Research Gasification Unit at Texaco (feed capacity approximately 3/4-ton/day) is complete (4th quarter of FY96), gasification test runs will commence. Laboratory work on slurry samples during FY96 has provided correlations between slurry viscosity and hydrothermal treatment temperature, degree of shearing, and the presence of surfactants and admixed plastics. To date, pumpable slurries obtained from an MSW surrogate mixture of treated paper and plastic have shown heating values in the range 13-15 MJ/kg. Our process modeling has quantified the relationship between slurry heating value and hydrogen yield. LLNL has also performed a preliminary cost analysis of the process with the slurry heating value and the MSW tipping fee as parameters. This analysis has shown that the overall process with a 15 MJ/kg slurry gasifier feed can compete with coal-derived hydrogen with the assumption that the tipping fee is of the order $50/ton.

  12. Cosmological particle production at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangamani, Mukund; Rozali, Moshe; Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2015-09-01

    We study the dynamics of a strongly-coupled quantum field theory in a cosmological spacetime using the holographic AdS/CFT correspondence. Specifically we consider a confining gauge theory in an expanding FRW universe and track the evolution of the stress-energy tensor during a period of expansion, varying the initial temperature as well as the rate and amplitude of the expansion. At strong coupling, particle production is inseparable from entropy production. Consequently, we find significant qualitative differences from the weak coupling results: at strong coupling the system rapidly loses memory of its initial state as the amplitude is increased. Furthermore, in the regime where the Hubble parameter is much smaller than the initial temperature, the dynamics is well-modelled as a plasma evolving hydrodynamically.

  13. Hydrogen Production by the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    PubMed Central

    Zürrer, Hans; Bachofen, Reinhard

    1979-01-01

    Continuous photosynthetic production of hydrogen by Rhodospirillum rubrum in batch cultures was observed up to 80 days with the hydrogen donor, pure lactate or lactic acid-containing wastes, supplied periodically. Hydrogen was produced at an average rate of 6 ml/h per g (dry weight) of cells with whey as a hydrogen donor. In continuous cultures with glutamate as a growth-limiting nitrogen source and lactate as a hydrogen donor, hydrogen was evolved at a rate of 20 ml/h per g (dry weight). The composition of the gas evolved remained practically constant (70 to 75% H2, 25 to 30% CO2). Photosynthetic bacteria processing specific organic wastes could be an advantage in large-scale production of hydrogen together with food protein of high value, compared to other biological systems. Images PMID:16345375

  14. Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

  15. Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production in Microalgal Cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Melis, Anastasios

    2014-12-31

    The project addressed the following technical barrier from the Biological Hydrogen Production section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Low Sunlight Utilization Efficiency in Photobiological Hydrogen Production is due to a Large Photosystem Chlorophyll Antenna Size in Photosynthetic Microorganisms (Barrier AN: Light Utilization Efficiency).

  16. Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2005-12-01

    DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills the requirement under section 812 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  17. Process for the thermochemical production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.; Russell, Jr., John L.; Porter, II, John T.; McCorkle, Kenneth H.; Roemer, Thomas S.; Sharp, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen is thermochemically produced from water in a cycle wherein a first reaction produces hydrogen iodide and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 by the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water under conditions which cause two distinct aqueous phases to be formed, i.e., a lighter sulfuric acid-bearing phase and a heavier hydrogen iodide-bearing phase. After separation of the two phases, the heavier phase containing most of the hydrogen iodide is treated, e.g., at a high temperature, to decompose the hydrogen iodide and recover hydrogen and iodine. The H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is pyrolyzed to recover sulfur dioxide and produce oxygen.

  18. Fermentative hydrogen production from agroindustrial lignocellulosic substrates

    PubMed Central

    Reginatto, Valeria; Antônio, Regina Vasconcellos

    2015-01-01

    To achieve economically competitive biological hydrogen production, it is crucial to consider inexpensive materials such as lignocellulosic substrate residues derived from agroindustrial activities. It is possible to use (1) lignocellulosic materials without any type of pretreatment, (2) lignocellulosic materials after a pretreatment step, and (3) lignocellulosic materials hydrolysates originating from a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. According to the current literature data on fermentative H2 production presented in this review, thermophilic conditions produce H2 in yields approximately 75% higher than those obtained in mesophilic conditions using untreated lignocellulosic substrates. The average H2 production from pretreated material is 3.17 ± 1.79 mmol of H2/g of substrate, which is approximately 50% higher compared with the average yield achieved using untreated materials (2.17 ± 1.84 mmol of H2/g of substrate). Biological pretreatment affords the highest average yield 4.54 ± 1.78 mmol of H2/g of substrate compared with the acid and basic pretreatment - average yields of 2.94 ± 1.85 and 2.41 ± 1.52 mmol of H2/g of substrate, respectively. The average H2 yield from hydrolysates, obtained from a pretreatment step and enzymatic hydrolysis (3.78 ± 1.92 mmol of H2/g), was lower compared with the yield of substrates pretreated by biological methods only, demonstrating that it is important to avoid the formation of inhibitors generated by chemical pretreatments. Based on this review, exploring other microorganisms and optimizing the pretreatment and hydrolysis conditions can make the use of lignocellulosic substrates a sustainable way to produce H2. PMID:26273246

  19. Fermentative hydrogen production from agroindustrial lignocellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Reginatto, Valeria; Antônio, Regina Vasconcellos

    2015-06-01

    To achieve economically competitive biological hydrogen production, it is crucial to consider inexpensive materials such as lignocellulosic substrate residues derived from agroindustrial activities. It is possible to use (1) lignocellulosic materials without any type of pretreatment, (2) lignocellulosic materials after a pretreatment step, and (3) lignocellulosic materials hydrolysates originating from a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. According to the current literature data on fermentative H2 production presented in this review, thermophilic conditions produce H2 in yields approximately 75% higher than those obtained in mesophilic conditions using untreated lignocellulosic substrates. The average H2 production from pretreated material is 3.17 ± 1.79 mmol of H2/g of substrate, which is approximately 50% higher compared with the average yield achieved using untreated materials (2.17 ± 1.84 mmol of H2/g of substrate). Biological pretreatment affords the highest average yield 4.54 ± 1.78 mmol of H2/g of substrate compared with the acid and basic pretreatment - average yields of 2.94 ± 1.85 and 2.41 ± 1.52 mmol of H2/g of substrate, respectively. The average H2 yield from hydrolysates, obtained from a pretreatment step and enzymatic hydrolysis (3.78 ± 1.92 mmol of H2/g), was lower compared with the yield of substrates pretreated by biological methods only, demonstrating that it is important to avoid the formation of inhibitors generated by chemical pretreatments. Based on this review, exploring other microorganisms and optimizing the pretreatment and hydrolysis conditions can make the use of lignocellulosic substrates a sustainable way to produce H2.

  20. Anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Oh, Jihun; Branz, Howard M

    2014-05-20

    Exemplary embodiments are disclosed of anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production by photoelectrolysis of water. A nanoporous black Si is disclosed as an efficient photocathode for H.sub.2 production from water splitting half-reaction.

  1. [Continuous bio-hydrogen production by mesophilic and thermophilic cultures].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zuo, Jian-E; Cui, Long-Tao; Xing, Wei; Yang, Yang

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic biological hydrogen productions were achieved successfully in two lab-scale anaerobic hydrogen production reactors under mesophilic (37 degrees C) and thermophilic (55 degrees C) conditions, respectively. The mesophilic reactor, a CSTR, was operated over 4 months by seeding with river sediments and feeding with glucose solution, in which the highest hydrogen production rate was 8.6 L/(L x d) and the substrate hydrogen production molar ratio (H2/glucose) was 1.98. After seeded with anaerobic methanogenic granules, a UASB reactor was thermophilically operated by feeding with sucrose solution and during its steady operation period, the hydrogen production rate was 6.8 L/(L x d) and the substrate hydrogen production molar ratio (H2/sucrose) was 3.6. Within the produced gas, the H2 percentages were about 43% and others were CO2, no methane could be detected. Thermophilic hydrogen-producing granules were successfully cultivated in the UASB reactor, which were grey-white in color, the diameters were about 0.8 - 1.2 mm, and typical settling velocities were about 30 - 40 m/h. Through SEM a great number of bacilli could be found on the surface of the granules which made the surface rough. Total DNA of these two hydrogen production sludges were extracted and purified, and the PCR and DGGE process were conducted, the results indicate that most of the eubacteria in two sludges are the same, but the dominant species are obviously different with each other.

  2. Hydrogen production in anaerobic reactors during shock loads--influence of formate production and H2 kinetics.

    PubMed

    Voolapalli, R K; Stuckey, D C

    2001-05-01

    In this article the role of hydrogen as a process monitoring tool in methanogenic systems was studied by considering the influence of several key system parameters. Hydrogen production was found to be influenced mainly by the inocula's source pH, and varied only slightly with external pH and HCO3- levels. When an inoculum adapted to above neutral conditions (pH > 7) was shocked, reducing equivalents were selectively channelled through formate, while high hydrogen production was noticed with acidically (pH < 6.5) adapted inocula. The results also revealed that the production of hydrogen or formate during shock loads was not strongly associated with microbial morphology (granules or flocs) as high electron fluxes were possible through either during acidogenesis. Shock load experiments in continuous reactors revealed that neither hydrogen nor formate accumulated to any significant degree, nevertheless digester recovery took a long time due to the slow kinetics of volatile fatty acid degradation. Selective formate production under neutral pH environments, coupled with high hydrogenotrophic activity, was found to be responsible for the dampened hydrogen response during the early phases of gradually shocked systems (step change). Based on these results it appears that the role of hydrogen as a process monitoring tool has been overemphasised in the literature.

  3. Oxidative coupling of sp (2) and sp (3) carbon-hydrogen bonds to construct dihydrobenzofurans.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiang-Ling; Wang, Ding; Zhang, Xi-Sha; Li, Xiao-Lei; Chen, Yu-Qin; Li, Yu-Xue; Shi, Zhang-Jie

    2017-08-10

    Metal-catalyzed cross-couplings provide powerful, concise, and accurate methods to construct carbon-carbon bonds from organohalides and organometallic reagents. Recent developments extended cross-couplings to reactions where one of the two partners connects with an aryl or alkyl carbon-hydrogen bond. From an economic and environmental point of view, oxidative couplings between two carbon-hydrogen bonds would be ideal. Oxidative coupling between phenyl and "inert" alkyl carbon-hydrogen bonds still awaits realization. It is very difficult to develop successful strategies for oxidative coupling of two carbon-hydrogen bonds owning different chemical properties. This article provides a solution to this challenge in a convenient preparation of dihydrobenzofurans from substituted phenyl alkyl ethers. For the phenyl carbon-hydrogen bond activation, our choice falls on the carboxylic acid fragment to form the palladacycle as a key intermediate. Through careful manipulation of an additional ligand, the second "inert" alkyl carbon-hydrogen bond activation takes place to facilitate the formation of structurally diversified dihydrobenzofurans.Cross-dehydrogenative coupling is finding increasing application in synthesis, but coupling two chemically distinct sites remains a challenge. Here, the authors report an oxidative coupling between sp (2) and sp (3) carbons by sequentially activating the more active aryl site followed by the alkyl position.

  4. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, R.; Randhava, S.S.; Tsai, S.P.

    1997-09-02

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} laden permeate. 1 fig.

  5. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Rathin; Randhava, Sarabjit S.; Tsai, Shih-Perng

    1997-01-01

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H.sub.2 O.sub.2 laden permeate.

  6. Fluidic hydrogen detector production prototype development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, G. W.; Wright, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    A hydrogen gas sensor that can replace catalytic combustion sensors used to detect leaks in the liquid hydrogen transfer systems at Kennedy Space Center was developed. A fluidic sensor concept, based on the principle that the frequency of a fluidic oscillator is proportional to the square root of the molecular weight of its operating fluid, was utilized. To minimize sensitivity to pressure and temperature fluctuations, and to make the sensor specific for hydrogen, two oscillators are used. One oscillator operates on sample gas containing hydrogen, while the other operates on sample gas with the hydrogen converted to steam. The conversion is accomplished with a small catalytic converter. The frequency difference is taken, and the hydrogen concentration computed with a simple digital processing circuit. The output from the sensor is an analog signal proportional to hydrogen content. The sensor is shown to be accurate and insensitive to severe environmental disturbances. It is also specific for hydrogen, even with large helium concentrations in the sample gas.

  7. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, M.

    2011-10-01

    This independent review is the conclusion arrived at from data collection, document reviews, interviews and deliberation from December 2010 through April 2011 and the technical potential of Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification. The Panel reviewed the current H2A case (Version 2.12, Case 01D) for hydrogen production via biomass gasification and identified four principal components of hydrogen levelized cost: CapEx; feedstock costs; project financing structure; efficiency/hydrogen yield. The panel reexamined the assumptions around these components and arrived at new estimates and approaches that better reflect the current technology and business environments.

  8. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-10-01

    This independent review is the conclusion arrived at from data collection, document reviews, interviews and deliberation from December 2010 through April 2011 and the technical potential of Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification. The Panel reviewed the current H2A case (Version 2.12, Case 01D) for hydrogen production via biomass gasification and identified four principal components of hydrogen levelized cost: CapEx; feedstock costs; project financing structure; efficiency/hydrogen yield. The panel reexamined the assumptions around these components and arrived at new estimates and approaches that better reflect the current technology and business environments.

  9. Hydrogen production by the decomposition of water

    DOEpatents

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Bowman, M.G.

    A process is described for the production of hydrogen from water by a sulfuric acid process employing electrolysis and thermo-chemical decomposition. The water containing SO/sub 2/ is electrolyzed to produce H/sub 2/ at the cathode and to oxidize the SO/sub 2/ to form H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at the anode. After the H/sub 2/ has been separated, a compound of the type M/sub r/X/sub s/ is added to produce a water insoluble sulfate of M and a water insoluble oxide of the metal in the radical X. In the compound M/sub r/X/sub s/, M is at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Ba/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Sr/sup 2 +/, La/sup 2 +/, and Pb/sup 2 +/; X is at least one radical selected from the group consisting of molybdate (MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), tungstate (WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and metaborate (BO/sub 2//sup 1 -/); and r and s are either 1, 2, or 3 depending upon the valence of M and X. The precipitated mixture is filtered and heated to a temperature sufficiently high to form SO/sub 3/ gas and to reform M/sub r/X/sub s/. The SO/sub 3/ is dissolved in a small amount of H/sub 2/O to produce concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the M/sub r/X/sub s/ is recycled to the process. Alternatively, the SO/sub 3/ gas can be recycled to the beginning of the process to provide a continuous process for the production of H/sub 2/ in which only water need be added in a substantial amount. (BLM)

  10. Analysis of Improved Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2010-06-01

    The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using an advanced Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of these system analyses, using the UniSim process analysis software, have shown that the HTE process, when coupled to a VHTR capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs with hydrogen production efficiencies in excess of 50%. In addition, economic analyses performed on the INL reference plant design, optimized to maximize the hydrogen production rate for a 600 MWt VHTR, have shown that a large nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant can to be economically competitive with conventional hydrogen production processes, particularly when the penalties associated with greenhouse gas emissions are considered. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This paper describes the resulting new INL reference design and presents

  11. Coupling of algal biofuel production with wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Neha Chamoli; Panwar, Amit; Bisht, Tara Singh; Tamta, Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae have gained enormous consideration from scientific community worldwide emerging as a viable feedstock for a renewable energy source virtually being carbon neutral, high lipid content, and comparatively more advantageous to other sources of biofuels. Although microalgae are seen as a valuable source in majority part of the world for production of biofuels and bioproducts, still they are unable to accomplish sustainable large-scale algal biofuel production. Wastewater has organic and inorganic supplements required for algal growth. The coupling of microalgae with wastewater is an effective way of waste remediation and a cost-effective microalgal biofuel production. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the possibilities and current scenario regarding coupling of microalgal cultivation with biofuel production emphasizing recent progress in this area.

  12. Coupling of Algal Biofuel Production with Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Amit; Bisht, Tara Singh; Tamta, Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae have gained enormous consideration from scientific community worldwide emerging as a viable feedstock for a renewable energy source virtually being carbon neutral, high lipid content, and comparatively more advantageous to other sources of biofuels. Although microalgae are seen as a valuable source in majority part of the world for production of biofuels and bioproducts, still they are unable to accomplish sustainable large-scale algal biofuel production. Wastewater has organic and inorganic supplements required for algal growth. The coupling of microalgae with wastewater is an effective way of waste remediation and a cost-effective microalgal biofuel production. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the possibilities and current scenario regarding coupling of microalgal cultivation with biofuel production emphasizing recent progress in this area. PMID:24982930

  13. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from biomass derivatives and water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xihong; Xie, Shilei; Yang, Hao; Tong, Yexiang; Ji, Hongbing

    2014-11-21

    Hydrogen, a clean energy carrier with high energy capacity, is a very promising candidate as a primary energy source for the future. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen production from renewable biomass derivatives and water is one of the most promising approaches to producing green chemical fuel. Compared to water splitting, hydrogen production from renewable biomass derivatives and water through a PEC process is more efficient from the viewpoint of thermodynamics. Additionally, the carbon dioxide formed can be re-transformed into carbohydrates via photosynthesis in plants. In this review, we focus on the development of photoanodes and systems for PEC hydrogen production from water and renewable biomass derivatives, such as methanol, ethanol, glycerol and sugars. We also discuss the future challenges and opportunities for the design of the state-of-the-art photoanodes and PEC systems for hydrogen production from biomass derivatives and water.

  14. Application of molecular techniques on heterotrophic hydrogen production research.

    PubMed

    Li, R Y; Zhang, T; Fang, H H P

    2011-09-01

    This paper reviews the application of molecular techniques in heterotrophic hydrogen production studies. Commonly used molecular techniques are introduced briefly first, including cloning-sequencing after polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative real-time PCR. Application of the molecular techniques in heterotrophic hydrogen production studies are discussed in details, focusing on identification of new isolates for hydrogen production, characterization of microbial compositions in bioreactors, monitoring microbial diversity variation, visualization of microbial distribution in hydrogen-producing granular sludge, and quantification of various microbial populations. Some significant findings in recent hydrogen production studies with the application of molecular techniques are discussed, followed by a research outlook of the heterotrophic biohydrogen field.

  15. Hydrogen production by fermentation using acetic acid and lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Nishimura, Yasuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Microbial hydrogen production from sho-chu post-distillation slurry solution (slurry solution) containing large amounts of organic acids was investigated. The highest hydrogen producer, Clostridium diolis JPCC H-3, was isolated from natural environment and produced hydrogen at 6.03+/-0.15 ml from 5 ml slurry solution in 30 h. Interestingly, the concentration of acetic acid and lactic acid in the slurry solution decreased during hydrogen production. The substrates for hydrogen production by C. diolis JPCC H-3, in particular organic acids, were investigated in an artificial medium. No hydrogen was produced from acetic acid, propionic acid, succinic acid, or citric acid on their own. Hydrogen and butyric acid were produced from a mixture of acetic acid and lactic acid, showing that C. diolis. JPCC H-3 could produce hydrogen from acetic acid and lactic acid. Furthermore, calculation of the Gibbs free energy strongly suggests that this reaction would proceed. In this paper, we describe for the first time microbial hydrogen production from acetic acid and lactic acid by fermentation.

  16. Hydrogen production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158 under intense irradiation.

    PubMed

    Krujatz, Felix; Härtel, Paul; Helbig, Karsten; Haufe, Nora; Thierfelder, Simone; Bley, Thomas; Weber, Jost

    2015-01-01

    To identify optimal hydrogen production conditions using growing cultures of Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158 the effects of varying the reactor's volumetric power input (0.01-1.4kWm(-3)) and irradiation intensity (5-2500Wm(-2)) were investigated in batch and continuous production modes. Irradiation intensity had a greater effect on hydrogen production than volumetric power input. Hydrogen production and photofermentative biomass formation were maximized by irradiation at 2250Wm(-2) with a volumetric power input of 0.55kWm(-3). The bacterial dry weight (2.64gL(-1)) and rate of hydrogen production (195mLL(-1)h(-1)) achieved under these conditions were greater than any that have previously been reported for batch-mode hydrogen production by R. sphaeroides. Continuous mode experiments (D=0.1h(-1)) yielded a bacterial dry weight, hydrogen production rate, productivity and hydrogen yield of 2.35±0.18gL(-1), 165±6.2mLL(-1)h(-1), 3.96LL(-1)d(-1) and 36.6%, respectively.

  17. FEASIBILITY OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING LASER INERTIAL FUSION AS THE PRIMARY ENERGY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M

    2006-11-03

    The High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program is developing technology for Laser IFE with the goal of producing electricity from the heat generated by the implosion of deuterium-tritium (DT) targets. Alternatively, the Laser IFE device could be coupled to a hydrogen generation system where the heat would be used as input to a water-splitting process to produce hydrogen and oxygen. The production of hydrogen in addition to electricity would allow fusion energy plants to address a much wider segment of energy needs, including transportation. Water-splitting processes involving direct and hybrid thermochemical cycles and high temperature electrolysis are currently being developed as means to produce hydrogen from high temperature nuclear fission reactors and solar central receivers. This paper explores the feasibility of this concept for integration with a Laser IFE plant, and it looks at potential modifications to make this approach more attractive. Of particular interest are: (1) the determination of the advantages of Laser IFE hydrogen production compared to other hydrogen production concepts, and (2) whether a facility of the size of FTF would be suitable for hydrogen production.

  18. A continuous flow strategy for the coupled transfer hydrogenation and etherification of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural using Lewis acid zeolites.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Van de Vyver, Stijn; Crisci, Anthony J; Gunther, William R; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2014-08-01

    Hf-, Zr- and Sn-Beta zeolites effectively catalyze the coupled transfer hydrogenation and etherification of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural with primary and secondary alcohols into 2,5-bis(alkoxymethyl)furans, thus making it possible to generate renewable fuel additives without the use of external hydrogen sources or precious metals. Continuous flow experiments reveal nonuniform changes in the relative deactivation rates of the transfer hydrogenation and etherification reactions, which impact the observed product distribution over time. We found that the catalysts undergo a drastic deactivation for the etherification step while maintaining catalytic activity for the transfer hydrogenation step. (119) Sn and (29) Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies show that this deactivation can be attributed to changes in the local environment of the metal sites. Additional insights were gained by studying effects of various alcohols and water concentration on the catalytic reactivity.

  19. Faecal hydrogen production in vitro as an indicator for in vivo hydrogen producing capability in the breath hydrogen test.

    PubMed

    Robb, T A; Goodwin, D A; Davidson, G P

    1985-11-01

    In the assessment of carbohydrate malabsorption, it is important to determine if a flat breath hydrogen test is a false negative result. Currently, the only reliable way to do this is with a lactulose test. We determined the reliability of assessing faecal hydrogen production as an indicator of an adequate in vivo hydrogen producing colonic bacterial flora. Unfortunately, the results clearly show that the incidence of falsely positive and negative faecal hydrogen production, when compared with in vivo lactulose testing, is so high that the simple faeces screening test is unsuitable for routine use. Until a simpler alternative is found, centres using the breath hydrogen test to determine carbohydrate malabsorption must continue to rely on lactulose breath testing when it is necessary to exclude potential false negative results.

  20. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien

    2010-08-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a “hydrogen economy.” The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  1. Hydrogen production with coal using a pulverization device

    DOEpatents

    Paulson, Leland E.

    1989-01-01

    A method for producing hydrogen from coal is described wherein high temperature steam is brought into contact with coal in a pulverizer or fluid energy mill for effecting a steam-carbon reaction to provide for the generation of gaseous hydrogen. The high temperature steam is utilized to drive the coal particles into violent particle-to-particle contact for comminuting the particulates and thereby increasing the surface area of the coal particles for enhancing the productivity of the hydrogen.

  2. Process for the production of hydrogen from water

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Maroni, Victor A.; Willit, James L.

    2010-05-25

    A method and device for the production of hydrogen from water and electricity using an active metal alloy. The active metal alloy reacts with water producing hydrogen and a metal hydroxide. The metal hydroxide is consumed, restoring the active metal alloy, by applying a voltage between the active metal alloy and the metal hydroxide. As the process is sustainable, only water and electricity is required to sustain the reaction generating hydrogen.

  3. Cost Analysis of a Concentrator Photovoltaic Hydrogen Production System

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J. R.; McConnell, R. D.; Mosleh, M.

    2005-08-01

    The development of efficient, renewable methods of producing hydrogen are essential for the success of the hydrogen economy. Since the feedstock for electrolysis is water, there are no harmful pollutants emitted during the use of the fuel. Furthermore, it has become evident that concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) systems have a number of unique attributes that could shortcut the development process, and increase the efficiency of hydrogen production to a point where economics will then drive the commercial development to mass scale.

  4. Hydrogen production from dimethyl ether using corona discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ji-Jun; Zhang, Yue-Ping; Liu, Chang-Jun

    Dimethyl ether (DME), with its non-toxic character, high H/C ratio and high-energy volumetric density, is an ideal resource for hydrogen production. In this work, hydrogen production from the decomposition of DME using corona discharge has been studied. The corona discharge plasma decomposition was conducted at ambient conditions. The effects of dilution gas (argon), flow rate, frequency and waveforms on the DME decomposition were investigated. The addition of dilution gas can significantly increase the hydrogen production rate. The highest hydrogen production rate with the lowest energy consumption presents at the flow rate of 27.5 Nml min -1. AC voltage is more favored than DC voltage for the production of hydrogen with less energy input. The optimal frequency is 2.0 kHz. The hydrogen production rate is also affected by the input waveform and decreases as following: sinusoid triangular > sinusoid > ramp > square, whereas the sinusoid waveform shows the highest energy efficiency. The corona discharge decomposition of DME is leading to a simple, easy and convenient hydrogen production with no needs of catalyst and external heating.

  5. Potential application of anaerobic extremophiles for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-11-01

    In processes of the substrate fermentation most anaerobes produce molecular hydrogen as a waste end product, which often controls the culture growth as an inhibitor. Usually in nature the hydrogen is easily removed from an ecosystem, due to its physical features, and an immediate consumption by the secondary anaerobes that sometimes behave as competitors for electron donors; a classical example of this kind of substrate competition in anaerobic microbial communities is the interaction between methanogens and sulfate- or sulfur-reducers. Previously, on the mixed cultures of anaerobes at neutral pH, it was demonstrated that bacterial hydrogen production could provide a good alternative energy source. At neutral pH the original cultures could easily contaminated by methanogens, and the most unpleasant side effect of these conditions is the development of pathogenic bacteria. In both cases the rate of hydrogen production was dramatically decreased since some part of the hydrogen was transformed to methane, and furthermore, the cultivation with pathogenic contaminants on an industrial scale would create an unsafe situation. In our laboratory the experiments with obligately alkaliphilic bacteria producing hydrogen as an end metabolic product were performed at different conditions. The mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic and obligately anaerobic bacterium Spirochaeta americana ASpG1T was studied and various cultivation regimes were compared for the most effective hydrogen production. In a highly mineralized media with pH 9.5-10.0 not many known methanogens are capable of growth, and the probability of developing pathogenic contaminants is theoretically is close to zero (in medicine carbonate- saturated solutions are applied as antiseptics). Therefore the cultivation of alkaliphilic hydrogen producing bacteria could be considered as a safe and economical process for large-scale industrial bio-hydrogen production in the future. Here we present and discuss the experimental data

  6. Thermochemical Production of Hydrogen from Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamberger, C. E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the possible advantages of decomposing water by means of thermochemical cycles. Explains that, if energy consumption can be minimized, this method is capable of producing hydrogen more efficiently than electrolysis. (GA)

  7. Process for the production of hydrogen cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwin, M.B.; Su, J.L.

    1989-09-26

    This patent describes a process for the preparation of hydrogen cyanide. It comprises passing a gaseous reaction mixture of methanol or formaldehyde or a mixture thereof, formamide, ammonia and oxygen under reactive conditions over a metal oxide catalyst.

  8. Thermochemical Production of Hydrogen from Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamberger, C. E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the possible advantages of decomposing water by means of thermochemical cycles. Explains that, if energy consumption can be minimized, this method is capable of producing hydrogen more efficiently than electrolysis. (GA)

  9. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J.

    2017-06-20

    A method is provided for extracting hydrogen from lithium hydride. The method includes (a) heating lithium hydride to form liquid-phase lithium hydride; (b) extracting hydrogen from the liquid-phase lithium hydride, leaving residual liquid-phase lithium metal; (c) hydriding the residual liquid-phase lithium metal to form refined lithium hydride; and repeating steps (a) and (b) on the refined lithium hydride.

  10. Hydrogen production from biodiesel byproduct by immobilized Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Han, Jinmi; Lee, Dohoon; Cho, Jinku; Lee, Jeewon; Kim, Sangyong

    2012-01-01

    The recent rapid growth of the biodiesel industry has generated a significant amount of glycerol as a byproduct. As a result, the price of glycerol is currently relatively low, making it an attractive starting material for the production of chemicals with higher values. Crude glycerol can be directly converted through microbial fermentation into various chemicals such as hydrogen. In this study, we optimized immobilization of a facultative hydrogen producing microorganism, Enterobacter aerogenes, with the goal of developing biocatalysts that was appropriate for the continuous hydrogen production from glycerol. Several carriers were tested and agar was found to be the most effective. In addition, it was clearly shown that variables such as the carrier content and cell loading should be controlled for the immobilization of biocatalysts with high hydrogen productivity, stability, and reusability. After optimization of these variables, we were able to obtain reusable biocatalysts that could directly convert the byproduct stream from biodiesel processes into hydrogen in continuous processes.

  11. Electrolytic production and dispensing of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.E.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    The fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) is undoubtedly the only option that can meet both the California zero emission vehicle (ZEV) standard and the President`s goal of tripling automobile efficiency without sacrificing performance in a standard 5-passenger vehicle. The three major automobile companies are designing and developing FCEVs powered directly by hydrogen under cost-shared contracts with the Department of Energy. Once developed, these vehicles will need a reliable and inexpensive source of hydrogen. Steam reforming of natural gas would produce the least expensive hydrogen, but funding may not be sufficient initially to build both large steam reforming plants and the transportation infrastructure necessary to deliver that hydrogen to geographically scattered FCEV fleets or individual drivers. This analysis evaluates the economic feasibility of using small scale water electrolysis to provide widely dispersed but cost-effective hydrogen for early FCEV demonstrations. We estimate the cost of manufacturing a complete electrolysis system in large quantities, including compression and storage, and show that electrolytic hydrogen could be cost competitive with fully taxed gasoline, using existing residential off-peak electricity rates.

  12. Estimation of bacterial hydrogen sulfide production in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Basic, Amina; Blomqvist, Susanne; Carlén, Anette; Dahlén, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Oral bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production was estimated comparing two different colorimetric methods in microtiter plate format. High H2S production was seen for Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola, and Prevotella tannerae, associated with periodontal disease. The production differed between the methods indicating that H2S production may follow different pathways. PMID:26130377

  13. Liquid hydrogen production and economics for NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, D. L.

    1985-12-01

    Detailed economic analyses for the production of liquid hydrogen used to power the Space Shuttle are presented. The hydrogen production and energy needs of the NASA Kennedy Space Center are reviewed, and steam reformation, polygeneration, and electrolysis for liquid hydrogen production are examined on an equal economic basis. The use of photovoltaics as an electrolysis power source is considered. The 1985 present worth is calculated based on life cycle costs over a 21-year period beginning with full operation in 1990. Two different sets of escalation, inflation, and discount rates are used, with revenue credit being given for energy or other products of the hydrogen production process. The results show that the economic analyses are very dependent on the escalation rates used. The least net present value is found for steam reformation of natural gas, while the best net present value is found for the electrolysis process which includes the phasing of photovoltaics.

  14. Carbonate thermochemical cycle for the production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L [Knoxville, TN; Dole, Leslie R [Knoxville, TN; Ferrada, Juan J [Knoxville, TN; Forsberg, Charles W [Oak Ridge, TN; Haire, Marvin J [Oak Ridge, TN; Hunt, Rodney D [Oak Ridge, TN; Lewis, Jr, Benjamin E [Knoxville, TN; Wymer, Raymond G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-02-23

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  15. Comparison of electrolytic, thermochemical, and other hydrogen-production processes

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, R.; Whaley, T.

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of the following six hydrogen production process categories: catalytic steam reforming of light hydrocarbons; partial oxidation of less-reactive feedstocks such as coal and heavy oil; reaction of active metals or metal hydrides with water or acids; electrolysis of water; thermochemical hydrogen cycles; and photolysis of water. These processes are compared technically, and to the extent possible, economically.

  16. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, Lennart N.

    2004-06-29

    A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

  17. Carbonate Thermochemical Cycle for the Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, Juan J; Collins, Jack Lee; Dole, Leslie Robert; Forsberg, Charles W; Haire, Marvin Jonathan; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Lewis Jr, Benjamin E; Wymer, Raymond; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  18. Potential Application of Anaerobic Extremophiles for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    During substrate fermentation many anaerobes produce the hydrogen as a waste product, which often regulates the growth of the cultures as an inhibitor. In nature the hydrogen is usually removed from the ecosystem due to its physical properties or by consumption of hydrogen by secondary anaerobes, which sometimes behave as competitors for electron donors as is seen in the classical example in anaerobic microbial communities via the interaction between methanogens and sulfate- or sulfur- reducers. It was demonstrated previously on mixed cultures of anaerobes at neutral pH that bacterial hydrogen production could provide an alternative energy source. But at neutral pH the original cultures can easily be contaminated by methanogens, a most unpleasant side effect of these conditions is the development of pathogenic bacteria. In both cases the rate of hydrogen production was dramatically decreased since some part of the hydrogen was transformed to methane, and the cultivation of human pathogens on a global scale is very dangerous. In our laboratory, experiments with obligately alkaliphilic bacteria that excrete hydrogen as the end metabolic product were performed at different temperature regimes. Mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacterial cultures have been studied and compared for the most effective hydrogen production. For high-mineralized media with pH 9.5-10.0 not many methanogens are known to exist. Furthermore, the development of pathogenic contaminant microorganisms is virtually impossible: carbonate-saturated solutions are used as antiseptics in medicine. Therefore the cultivation of alkaliphilic hydrogen producing bacteria could be considered as most safe process for global Scale industry in future. Here we present experimental data on the rates of hydrogen productivity for mesophilic, alkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic bacterium Spirocheta americana ASpG1 and moderately thermophilic, alkaliphilic, facultative anaerobe Anoxybacillus pushchinoensis K1 and

  19. Potential Application of Anaerobic Extremophiles for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    During substrate fermentation many anaerobes produce the hydrogen as a waste product, which often regulates the growth of the cultures as an inhibitor. In nature the hydrogen is usually removed from the ecosystem due to its physical properties or by consumption of hydrogen by secondary anaerobes, which sometimes behave as competitors for electron donors as is seen in the classical example in anaerobic microbial communities via the interaction between methanogens and sulfate- or sulfur- reducers. It was demonstrated previously on mixed cultures of anaerobes at neutral pH that bacterial hydrogen production could provide an alternative energy source. But at neutral pH the original cultures can easily be contaminated by methanogens, a most unpleasant side effect of these conditions is the development of pathogenic bacteria. In both cases the rate of hydrogen production was dramatically decreased since some part of the hydrogen was transformed to methane, and the cultivation of human pathogens on a global scale is very dangerous. In our laboratory, experiments with obligately alkaliphilic bacteria that excrete hydrogen as the end metabolic product were performed at different temperature regimes. Mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacterial cultures have been studied and compared for the most effective hydrogen production. For high-mineralized media with pH 9.5-10.0 not many methanogens are known to exist. Furthermore, the development of pathogenic contaminant microorganisms is virtually impossible: carbonate-saturated solutions are used as antiseptics in medicine. Therefore the cultivation of alkaliphilic hydrogen producing bacteria could be considered as most safe process for global Scale industry in future. Here we present experimental data on the rates of hydrogen productivity for mesophilic, alkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic bacterium Spirocheta americana ASpG1 and moderately thermophilic, alkaliphilic, facultative anaerobe Anoxybacillus pushchinoensis K1 and

  20. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation: challenges and prospects towards scaled-up production.

    PubMed

    RenNanqi; GuoWanqian; LiuBingfeng; CaoGuangli; DingJie

    2011-06-01

    Among different technologies of hydrogen production, bio-hydrogen production exhibits perhaps the greatest potential to replace fossil fuels. Based on recent research on dark fermentative hydrogen production, this article reviews the following aspects towards scaled-up application of this technology: bioreactor development and parameter optimization, process modeling and simulation, exploitation of cheaper raw materials and combining dark-fermentation with photo-fermentation. Bioreactors are necessary for dark-fermentation hydrogen production, so the design of reactor type and optimization of parameters are essential. Process modeling and simulation can help engineers design and optimize large-scale systems and operations. Use of cheaper raw materials will surely accelerate the pace of scaled-up production of biological hydrogen. And finally, combining dark-fermentation with photo-fermentation holds considerable promise, and has successfully achieved maximum overall hydrogen yield from a single substrate. Future development of bio-hydrogen production will also be discussed.

  1. Hydrogen production econometric studies. [hydrogen and fossil fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, J. R.; Bannerot, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The current assessments of fossil fuel resources in the United States were examined, and predictions of the maximum and minimum lifetimes of recoverable resources according to these assessments are presented. In addition, current rates of production in quads/year for the fossil fuels were determined from the literature. Where possible, costs of energy, location of reserves, and remaining time before these reserves are exhausted are given. Limitations that appear to hinder complete development of each energy source are outlined.

  2. Enhanced hydrogen production from formic acid by formate hydrogen lyase-overexpressing Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihito; Nishimura, Taku; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2005-11-01

    Genetic recombination of Escherichia coli in conjunction with process manipulation was employed to elevate the efficiency of hydrogen production in the resultant strain SR13 2 orders of magnitude above that of conventional methods. The formate hydrogen lyase (FHL)-overexpressing strain SR13 was constructed by combining FHL repressor (hycA) inactivation with FHL activator (fhlA) overexpression. Transcription of large-subunit formate dehydrogenase, fdhF, and large-subunit hydrogenase, hycE, in strain SR13 increased 6.5- and 7.0-fold, respectively, compared to the wild-type strain. On its own, this genetic modification effectively resulted in a 2.8-fold increase in hydrogen productivity of SR13 compared to the wild-type strain. Further enhancement of productivity was attained by using a novel method involving the induction of the FHL complex with high-cell-density filling of a reactor under anaerobic conditions. Continuous hydrogen production was achieved by maintaining the reactor concentration of the substrate (free formic acid) under 25 mM. An initial productivity of 23.6 g hydrogen h(-1) liter(-1) (300 liters h(-1) liter(-1) at 37 degrees C) was achieved using strain SR13 at a cell density of 93 g (dry weight) cells/liter. The hydrogen productivity reported in this work has great potential for practical application.

  3. Metal Dichalcogenides Monolayers: Novel Catalysts for Electrochemical Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Catalyst-driven electrolysis of water is considered as a “cleanest” way for hydrogen production. Finding cheap and abundant catalysts is critical to the large-scale implementation of the technology. Two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides nanostructures have attracted increasing attention because of their catalytic performances in water electrolysis. In this work, we systematically investigate the hydrogen evolution reduction of metal dichalcogenides monolayers based on density-functional-theory calculations. We find that metal disulfide monolayers show better catalytic performance on hydrogen production than other metal dichalcogenides. We show that their hydrogen evolution reduction strongly depends on the hydrogen coverage and the catalytic performance reduces with the increment of coverage because of hydrogenation-induced lower conductivity. We further show that the catalytic performance of vanadium disulfide monolayer is comparable to that of Pt at lower hydrogen coverage and the performance at higher coverage can be improved by hybridizing with conducting nanomaterials to enhance conductivity. These metal disulfide monolayers with lower overpotentials may apply to water electrolysis for hydrogen production. PMID:24967679

  4. Solar photoproduction of hydrogen. IEA technical report of the IEA Agreement of the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, J.R.

    1996-09-30

    The report was prepared for the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Program and represents the result of subtask C, Annex 10 - Photoproduction of Hydrogen. The concept of using solar energy to drive the conversion of water into hydrogen and oxygen has been examined, from the standpoints of potential and ideal efficiencies, measurement of (and how to calculate) solar hydrogen production efficiencies, a survey of the state-of-the-art, and a technological assessment of various solar hydrogen options. The analysis demonstrates that the ideal limit of the conversion efficiency for 1 sun irradiance is {approximately}31% for a single photosystem scheme and {approximately}42% for a dual photosystem scheme. However, practical considerations indicate that real efficiencies will not likely exceed {approximately}10% and {approximately}16% for single and dual photosystem schemes, respectively. Four types of solar photochemical hydrogen systems have been identified: photochemical systems, semiconductor systems, photobiological systems, and hybrid and other systems. A survey of the state-of-the-art of these four types is presented. The four types (and their subtypes) have also been examined in a technological assessment, where each has been examined as to efficiency, potential for improvement, and long-term functionality. Four solar hydrogen systems have been selected as showing sufficient promise for further research and development: (1) Photovoltaic cells plus an electrolyzer; (2) Photoelectrochemical cells with one or more semiconductor electrodes; (3) Photobiological systems; and (4) Photodegradation systems. The following recommendations were presented for consideration of the IEA: (1) Define and measure solar hydrogen conversion efficiencies as the ratio of the rate of generation of Gibbs energy of dry hydrogen gas (with appropriate corrections for any bias power) to the incident solar power (solar irradiance times the irradiated area); (2) Expand support for pilot

  5. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.; Tevault, C.V.

    1995-06-01

    In the fundamental biological process of photosynthesis, atmospheric carbon dioxide is reduced to carbohydrate using water as the source of electrons with simultaneous evolution of molecular oxygen: H{sub 2}O + CO{sub 2} + light {yields} O{sub 2} + (CH{sub 2}O). It is well established that two light reactions, Photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) working in series, are required to perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Experimental data supporting the two-light reaction model are based on the quantum requirement for complete photosynthesis, spectroscopy, and direct biochemical analysis. Some algae also have the capability to evolve molecular hydrogen in a reaction energized by the light reactions of photosynthesis. This process, now known as biophotolysis, can use water as the electron donor and lead to simultaneous evolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen. In green algae, hydrogen evolution requires prior incubation under anaerobic conditions. Atmospheric oxygen inhibits hydrogen evolution and also represses the synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme. CO{sub 2} fixation competes with proton reduction for electrons relased from the photosystems. Interest in biophotolysis arises from both the questions that it raises concerning photosynthesis and its potential practical application as a process for converting solar energy to a non-carbon-based fuel. Prior data supported the requirement for both Photosystem I and Photosystem II in spanning the energy gap necessary for biophotolysis of water to oxygen and hydrogen. In this paper we report the at PSII alone is capable of driving sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen in an anaerobically adapted PSI-deficient strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, mutant B4, and that CO{sub 2} competes as an electron acceptor.

  6. Exergetic life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from renewables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.

    Life cycle assessment is extended to exergetic life cycle assessment and used to evaluate the exergy efficiency, economic effectiveness and environmental impact of producing hydrogen using wind and solar energy in place of fossil fuels. The product hydrogen is considered a fuel for fuel cell vehicles and a substitute for gasoline. Fossil fuel technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas and gasoline from crude oil are contrasted with options using renewable energy. Exergy efficiencies and greenhouse gas and air pollution emissions are evaluated for all process steps, including crude oil and natural gas pipeline transportation, crude oil distillation and natural gas reforming, wind and solar electricity generation, hydrogen production through water electrolysis, and gasoline and hydrogen distribution and utilization. The use of wind power to produce hydrogen via electrolysis, and its application in a fuel cell vehicle, exhibits the lowest fossil and mineral resource consumption rate. However, the economic attractiveness, as measured by a "capital investment effectiveness factor," of renewable technologies depends significantly on the ratio of costs for hydrogen and natural gas. At the present cost ratio of about 2 (per unit of lower heating value or exergy), capital investments are about five times lower to produce hydrogen via natural gas rather than wind energy. As a consequence, the cost of wind- and solar-based electricity and hydrogen is substantially higher than that of natural gas. The implementation of a hydrogen fuel cell instead of an internal combustion engine permits, theoretically, an increase in a vehicle's engine efficiency of about of two times. Depending on the ratio in engine efficiencies, the substitution of gasoline with "renewable" hydrogen leads to (a) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions of 12-23 times for hydrogen from wind and 5-8 times for hydrogen from solar energy, and (b) air pollution (AP) emissions reductions of 38

  7. Energy saving system using by-product hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Hirofumi; Yamarnoto, Hirotaka; Ganke, Toshihiko; Satake, Ichirou; Nogi, Toshihide; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    The authors in conjunction with Shikoku Electric Power and Toagosei have been developing a new energy saving system using by-product hydrogen assisted by the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology (AISI) of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) since 1993. The main unit of the system is a 100-kW class phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) utilizing by-product hydrogen. The development technology of this hydrogen PAFC system include the following items; (1) recycling technology for using unreacted exhaust hydrogen at the anode outlet (2) safe processing technology of exhaust hydrogen. The system was constructed at the Tokushima plant of Toagosei and has operated from December 1996. The total operating time reached over 3000 h as of June 1997. The demonstration test will be conducted from 1996 through FY 1998.

  8. FERMENTATIVE AND PHOTOCHEMICAL PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN IN ALGAE

    PubMed Central

    Gaffron, Hans; Rubin, Jack

    1942-01-01

    1.. After 2 hours of fermentation in nitrogen the metabolism of those algae which were found capable of photoreduction with hydrogen changes in such a way that molecular hydrogen is released from the cell in addition to carbon dioxide. 2. The amount of hydrogen formed anaerobically in the dark depends on the amount of some unknown reserve substance in the cell. More hydrogen is formed in presence of added glucose, but no proportionality has been found between the amount of substrate added and that of hydrogen formed. This is probably due to the fact that two types of fermentation reactions exist, with little or no connection between them. Whereas mainly unknown organic acids are formed during the autofermentation, the addition of glucose causes a considerable increase in the production of lactic acid. 3. Algae which have been fermenting for several hours in the dark produce upon illumination free hydrogen at several times the rate observed in the dark, provided carbon dioxide is absent. 4. Certain concentrations of dinitrophenol strongly inhibit the evolution of hydrogen in the dark. Fermentation then continues mainly as a reaction leading to lactic acid. In such poisoned algae the photochemical liberation of hydrogen still continues. 5. If the algae are poisoned with dinitrophenol the presence of carbon dioxide will not interfere with the photochemical evolution of hydrogen. 6. The amount of hydrogen released in this new photochemical reaction depends on the presence of an unknown hydrogen donor in the cell; it can be increased by the addition of glucose but not in proportion to the amount added. 7. The results obtained allow for a more correct explanation of the anaerobic induction period previously described for Scenedesmus and similar algae. The possibility of a photochemical evolution of hydrogen had not been taken into account in the earlier experiments. 8. The origin of the hydrogen released under the influence of light is discussed. PMID:19873339

  9. NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V Park

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

  10. Mechanistic modeling of sulfur-deprived photosynthesis and hydrogen production in suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C R; Bees, MA

    2014-01-01

    The ability of unicellular green algal species such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce hydrogen gas via iron-hydrogenase is well known. However, the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase is closely linked to the photosynthetic chain in such a way that hydrogen and oxygen production need to be separated temporally for sustained photo-production. Under illumination, sulfur-deprivation has been shown to accommodate the production of hydrogen gas by partially-deactivating O2 evolution activity, leading to anaerobiosis in a sealed culture. As these facets are coupled, and the system complex, mathematical approaches potentially are of significant value since they may reveal improved or even optimal schemes for maximizing hydrogen production. Here, a mechanistic model of the system is constructed from consideration of the essential pathways and processes. The role of sulfur in photosynthesis (via PSII) and the storage and catabolism of endogenous substrate, and thus growth and decay of culture density, are explicitly modeled in order to describe and explore the complex interactions that lead to H2 production during sulfur-deprivation. As far as possible, functional forms and parameter values are determined or estimated from experimental data. The model is compared with published experimental studies and, encouragingly, qualitative agreement for trends in hydrogen yield and initiation time are found. It is then employed to probe optimal external sulfur and illumination conditions for hydrogen production, which are found to differ depending on whether a maximum yield of gas or initial production rate is required. The model constitutes a powerful theoretical tool for investigating novel sulfur cycling regimes that may ultimately be used to improve the commercial viability of hydrogen gas production from microorganisms. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 320–335. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24026984

  11. Mechanistic modeling of sulfur-deprived photosynthesis and hydrogen production in suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Williams, C R; Bees, M A

    2014-02-01

    The ability of unicellular green algal species such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce hydrogen gas via iron-hydrogenase is well known. However, the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase is closely linked to the photosynthetic chain in such a way that hydrogen and oxygen production need to be separated temporally for sustained photo-production. Under illumination, sulfur-deprivation has been shown to accommodate the production of hydrogen gas by partially-deactivating O2 evolution activity, leading to anaerobiosis in a sealed culture. As these facets are coupled, and the system complex, mathematical approaches potentially are of significant value since they may reveal improved or even optimal schemes for maximizing hydrogen production. Here, a mechanistic model of the system is constructed from consideration of the essential pathways and processes. The role of sulfur in photosynthesis (via PSII) and the storage and catabolism of endogenous substrate, and thus growth and decay of culture density, are explicitly modeled in order to describe and explore the complex interactions that lead to H2 production during sulfur-deprivation. As far as possible, functional forms and parameter values are determined or estimated from experimental data. The model is compared with published experimental studies and, encouragingly, qualitative agreement for trends in hydrogen yield and initiation time are found. It is then employed to probe optimal external sulfur and illumination conditions for hydrogen production, which are found to differ depending on whether a maximum yield of gas or initial production rate is required. The model constitutes a powerful theoretical tool for investigating novel sulfur cycling regimes that may ultimately be used to improve the commercial viability of hydrogen gas production from microorganisms. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  13. Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production by Direct Sunlight: A Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koca, Atif; Sahin, Musa

    2003-11-01

    The demand for hydrogen will increase within the next decades as a result of the necessity to produce clean and environmentally and economically accepted fuels from natural and renewable energy resources. In principle, hydrogen has the potential to play an important role in future energy systems because of the diversity of its applications, the variety of ways in which it can be stored, its general environmental advantages, and especially because of the possibility of producing hydrogen by splitting water using photocatalysts and solar energy. Methods and techniques of photocatalytic reactions are covered in some detail in many undergraduate chemistry programs. However, many times in instructional settings, little attention is given to how it is used for the production of hydrogen. In the present investigation a photocatalytic hydrogen production experiment suitable for use in undergraduate chemistry laboratories is described. The experiment can be used to introduce students to the concept of a renewable and sustainable hydrogen energy system of the future, as well as its production techniques, and to demonstrate the use of a CdS/ZnS photocatalyst system for photocatalytic hydrogen production from direct sunlight.

  14. Coupling between inter-helical hydrogen bonding and water dynamics in a proton transporter.

    PubMed

    del Val, Coral; Bondar, Luiza; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta

    2014-04-01

    Long-distance proton transfers by proton pumps occurs in discrete steps that may involve the direct participation of protein sidechains and water molecules, and coupling of protonation changes to structural rearrangements of the protein matrix. Here we explore the role of inter-helical hydrogen bonding in long-distance protein conformational coupling and dynamics of internal water molecules. From molecular dynamics simulations of wild type and nine different bacteriorhodopsin mutants we find that both intra- and inter-helical hydrogen bonds are important determinants of the local protein structure, dynamics, and water interactions. Based on molecular dynamics and bioinformatics analyses, we identify an aspartate/threonine inter-helical hydrogen-bonding motif involved in controlling the local conformational dynamics. Perturbation of inter-helical hydrogen bonds can couple to rapid changes in water dynamics.

  15. Light irradiance and spectral distribution effects on cyanobacterial hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatihah Salleh, Siti; Kamaruddin, Azlina; Hekarl Uzir, Mohamad; Rahman Mohamed, Abdul; Halim Shamsuddin, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Light is an essential energy source for photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Changes in both light irradiance and spectral distribution will affect their photosynthetic productivity. Compared to the light irradiance, little investigations have been carried out on the effect of light spectra towards cyanobacterial hydrogen production. Hence, this work aims to investigate the effects of both light quantity and quality on biohydrogen productivity of heterocystous cyanobacterium, A.variabilis. Under white light condition, the highest hydrogen production rate of 31 µmol H2 mg chl a -1 h-1 was achieved at 70 µE m-2 s-1. When the experiment was repeated at the same light irradiance but different light spectra of blue, red and green, the accumulations of hydrogen were significantly lower than the white light except for blue light. As the light irradiance was increased to 350 µE m-2 s-1, the accumulated hydrogen under the blue light doubled that of the white light. Besides that, an unusual prolongation of the hydrogen production up to 120 h was observed. The results obtained suggest that blue light could be the most desirable light spectrum for cyanobacterial hydrogen production.

  16. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Muradov, N.Z.

    1995-09-01

    It is universally accepted that in the next few decades hydrogen production will continue to rely on fossil fuels (primarily, natural gas). On the other hand, the conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming) are complex multi-step processes. These processes also result in the emission of large quantities of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere that produce adverse ecological effects. One alternative is the one-step thermocatalytic cracking (TCC) (or decomposition) of natural gas into hydrogen and carbon. Preliminary analysis indicates that the cost of hydrogen produced by thermal decomposition of natural gas is somewhat lower than the conventional processes after by-product carbon credit is taken. In the short term, this process can be used for on-site production of hydrogen-methane mixtures in gas-filling stations and for CO{sub x}-free production of hydrogen for fuel cell driven prime movers. The experimental data on the thermocatalytic cracking of methane over various catalysts and supports in a wide range of temperatures (500-900{degrees}C) are presented in this paper. Two types of reactors were designed and built at FSEC: continuous flow and pulse fix bed catalytic reactors. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen production yield using oxide type catalysts was studied. Alumina-supported Ni- and Fe-catalysts demonstrated relatively high efficiency in the methane cracking reaction at moderate temperatures (600-800{degrees}C). Kinetic curves of hydrogen production over metal and metal oxide catalysts at different temperatures are presented in the paper. Fe-catalyst demonstrated good stability (for several hours), whereas alumina-supported Pt-catalyst rapidly lost its catalytic activity.

  17. Electrolytic hydrogen production infrastructure options evaluation. Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.E.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    Fuel-cell electric vehicles have the potential to provide the range, acceleration, rapid refueling times, and other creature comforts associated with gasoline-powered vehicles, but with virtually no environmental degradation. To achieve this potential, society will have to develop the necessary infrastructure to supply hydrogen to the fuel-cell vehicles. Hydrogen could be stored directly on the vehicle, or it could be derived from methanol or other hydrocarbon fuels by on-board chemical reformation. This infrastructure analysis assumes high-pressure (5,000 psi) hydrogen on-board storage. This study evaluates one approach to providing hydrogen fuel: the electrolysis of water using off-peak electricity. Other contractors at Princeton University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are investigating the feasibility of producing hydrogen by steam reforming natural gas, probably the least expensive hydrogen infrastructure alternative for large markets. Electrolytic hydrogen is a possible short-term transition strategy to provide relatively inexpensive hydrogen before there are enough fuel-cell vehicles to justify building large natural gas reforming facilities. In this study, the authors estimate the necessary price of off-peak electricity that would make electrolytic hydrogen costs competitive with gasoline on a per-mile basis, assuming that the electrolyzer systems are manufactured in relatively high volumes compared to current production. They then compare this off-peak electricity price goal with actual current utility residential prices across the US.

  18. Hydrogen production from coal using a nuclear heat source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    A strong candidate for hydrogen production in the intermediate time frame of 1985 to 1995 is a coal-based process using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as a heat source. Expected process efficiencies in the range of 60 to 70% are considerably higher than all other hydrogen production processes except steam reforming of a natural gas. The process involves the preparation of a coal liquid, hydrogasification of that liquid, and steam reforming of the resulting gaseous or light liquid product. A study showing process efficiency and cost of hydrogen vs nuclear reactor core outlet temperature has been completed, and shows diminishing returns at process temperatures above about 1500 F. A possible scenario combining the relatively abundant and low-cost Western coal deposits with the Gulf Coast hydrogen users is presented which provides high-energy density transportation utilizing coal liquids and uranium.

  19. Hydrogen production by nitrogen-starved cultures of Anabaena cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Weissman, J C; Benemann, J R

    1977-01-01

    Nitrogen-starved cultures of the alga Anabaena cylindrica 629 produced hydrogen and oxygen continuously for 7 to 19 days. Hydrogen production attained a maximum level after 1 to 2 days of starvation and was followed by a slow decline. The maximum rates were 30 ml of H2 evolved per liter of culture per h or 32 mul of H2 per mg of dry weight per h. In 5 to 7 days the rate of H2 evolution by the more productive cultures fell to one-half its maximum value. The addition of 10(-4) to 5 X 10(-4) M ammonium increased the rate of oxygen evolution and the total hydrogen production of the cultures. H2-O2 ratios were 4:1 under conditions of complete nitrogen starvation and about 1.7:1 after the addition of ammonium. Thus, oxygen evolution was affected by the extent of the nitrogen starvation. Thermodynamic efficiencies of converting incident light energy to free energy of hydrogen via algal photosynthesis were 0.4%. Possible factors limiting hydrogen production were decline of reductant supply and filament breakage. Hydrogen production by filamentous, heterocystous blue-green algae could be used for development of a biophotolysis system.

  20. A coupled model between hydrogen diffusion and mechanical behavior of superelastic NiTi alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhal Letaief, W.; Hassine, T.; Gamaoun, F.

    2017-07-01

    The undesirable effects of hydrogen show significant alterations to the thermomechanical behavior of superelastic NiTi shape memory alloys. Through experimental results, the presence of hydrogen induces a delay of forward transformation. Added to that, hydrogen-induced expansion is clearly noticed. We also remark a loss of superelasticity. These effects occur according to the hydrogen absorption by the NiTi alloy. The aim of this paper is to develop a coupled diffusion-mechanical model of shape memory alloys, which regards the aforesaid effects of hydrogen on the thermomechanical behavior and the transformation mechanism of NiTi alloys. The model is derived from the relationship between the chemical potential of hydrogen and the thermodynamics laws. Furthermore, we introduce a special transformation hardening function that predicts stress-strain behavior well during the transformation plateau. The model is implemented in ABAQUS finite element analysis software through the UMAT and UMATHT subroutines. The simulation results present good concordance with the experiments.

  1. IEA implementing agreement for a programme of research and development on the production of hydrogen from water

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzina, A. ); Struck, B.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Research programs on hydrogen production from USA, Canada, Japan, and the Federal Republic of Germany, are described. The programs are in the areas of electrolyte hydrogen production, thermochemical hydrogen production, and photocatalytic hydrogen production. (CBS)

  2. Synergistic Hydrogen Production in a Biorefinery via Bioelectrochemical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, A. P.; Hamilton, C. Y.; Schell, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells are devices that use biocatalysis and electrolysis for production of hydrogen from organic matter. Biorefinery process streams contain fermentation by products and inhibitors which accumulate in the process stream if the water is recycled. These molecules also affect biomass to biofuel yields if not removed from the recycle water. The presence of sugar- and lignin- degradation products such as furfural, vanillic acid and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde has been shown to reduce fermentation yields. In this work, we calculate the potential for hydrogen production using microbial electrolysis cells from these molecules as substrates. Conversion of these substrates to electricity is demonstrated in microbial fuel cells and will also be presented.

  3. Aerobic Hydrogen Production via Nitrogenase in Azotobacter vinelandii CA6.

    PubMed

    Noar, Jesse; Loveless, Telisa; Navarro-Herrero, José Luis; Olson, Jonathan W; Bruno-Bárcena, José M

    2015-07-01

    The diazotroph Azotobacter vinelandii possesses three distinct nitrogenase isoenzymes, all of which produce molecular hydrogen as a by-product. In batch cultures, A. vinelandii strain CA6, a mutant of strain CA, displays multiple phenotypes distinct from its parent: tolerance to tungstate, impaired growth and molybdate transport, and increased hydrogen evolution. Determining and comparing the genomic sequences of strains CA and CA6 revealed a large deletion in CA6's genome, encompassing genes related to molybdate and iron transport and hydrogen reoxidation. A series of iron uptake analyses and chemostat culture experiments confirmed iron transport impairment and showed that the addition of fixed nitrogen (ammonia) resulted in cessation of hydrogen production. Additional chemostat experiments compared the hydrogen-producing parameters of different strains: in iron-sufficient, tungstate-free conditions, strain CA6's yields were identical to those of a strain lacking only a single hydrogenase gene. However, in the presence of tungstate, CA6 produced several times more hydrogen. A. vinelandii may hold promise for developing a novel strategy for production of hydrogen as an energy compound. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Aerobic Hydrogen Production via Nitrogenase in Azotobacter vinelandii CA6

    PubMed Central

    Noar, Jesse; Loveless, Telisa; Navarro-Herrero, José Luis; Olson, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    The diazotroph Azotobacter vinelandii possesses three distinct nitrogenase isoenzymes, all of which produce molecular hydrogen as a by-product. In batch cultures, A. vinelandii strain CA6, a mutant of strain CA, displays multiple phenotypes distinct from its parent: tolerance to tungstate, impaired growth and molybdate transport, and increased hydrogen evolution. Determining and comparing the genomic sequences of strains CA and CA6 revealed a large deletion in CA6's genome, encompassing genes related to molybdate and iron transport and hydrogen reoxidation. A series of iron uptake analyses and chemostat culture experiments confirmed iron transport impairment and showed that the addition of fixed nitrogen (ammonia) resulted in cessation of hydrogen production. Additional chemostat experiments compared the hydrogen-producing parameters of different strains: in iron-sufficient, tungstate-free conditions, strain CA6's yields were identical to those of a strain lacking only a single hydrogenase gene. However, in the presence of tungstate, CA6 produced several times more hydrogen. A. vinelandii may hold promise for developing a novel strategy for production of hydrogen as an energy compound. PMID:25911479

  5. USE OF THE MODULAR HELIUM REACTOR FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    SCHULTZ,KR

    2003-09-01

    OAK-B135 A significant ''Hydrogen Economy'' is predicted that will reduce our dependence on petroleum imports and reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels, but contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels. The author has recently completed a three-year project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) whose objective was to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source''. Thermochemical water-slitting, a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen, met this objective. The goal of the first phase of this study was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen, and to select one for further detailed consideration. They selected the Sulfur-Iodine cycle. In the second phase, they reviewed all the basic reactor types for suitability to provide the high temperature heat needed by the selected thermochemical water splitting cycle and chose the helium gas-cooled reactor. In the third phase they designed the chemical flowsheet for the thermochemical process and estimated the efficiency and cost of the process and the projected cost of producing hydrogen. These results are summarized in this report.

  6. Hydrogen production by the decomposition of water

    DOEpatents

    Hollabaugh, Charles M.; Bowman, Melvin G.

    1981-01-01

    How to produce hydrogen from water was a problem addressed by this invention. The solution employs a combined electrolytical-thermochemical sulfuric acid process. Additionally, high purity sulfuric acid can be produced in the process. Water and SO.sub.2 react in electrolyzer (12) so that hydrogen is produced at the cathode and sulfuric acid is produced at the anode. Then the sulfuric acid is reacted with a particular compound M.sub.r X.sub.s so as to form at least one water insoluble sulfate and at least one water insoluble oxide of molybdenum, tungsten, or boron. Water is removed by filtration; and the sulfate is decomposed in the presence of the oxide in sulfate decomposition zone (21), thus forming SO.sub.3 and reforming M.sub.r X.sub.s. The M.sub.r X.sub.s is recycled to sulfate formation zone (16). If desired, the SO.sub.3 can be decomposed to SO.sub.2 and O.sub.2 ; and the SO.sub.2 can be recycled to electrolyzer (12) to provide a cycle for producing hydrogen.

  7. Inter-esterified palm products as alternatives to hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Idris, Nor Aini; Dian, Noor Lida Habi Mat

    2005-01-01

    Inter-esterification is one of the processes used to modify the physico-chemical characteristics of oils and fats. Inter-esterification is an acyl-rearrangement reaction on the glycerol molecule. On the other hand, hydrogenation involves addition of hydrogen to the double bonds of unsaturated fatty acids. Due to health implications of trans fatty acids, which are formed during hydrogenation, the industry needs to find alternatives to hydrogenated fats. This paper discusses some applications of inter-esterified fats, with particular reference to inter-esterified palm products, as alternatives to hydrogenation. Some physico-chemical properties of inter-esterified fats used in shortenings are discussed. With inter-esterification, more palm stearin can be incorporated in vanaspati. For confectionary fats and infant formulations, enzymatic inter-esterification has been employed.

  8. Onboard Plasmatron Hydrogen Production for Improved Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel R. Cohn; Leslie Bromberg; Kamal Hadidi

    2005-12-31

    A plasmatron fuel reformer has been developed for onboard hydrogen generation for vehicular applications. These applications include hydrogen addition to spark-ignition internal combustion engines, NOx trap and diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, and emissions reduction from spark ignition internal combustion engines First, a thermal plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. This plasmatron used an electric arc with relatively high power to reform fuels such as gasoline, diesel and biofuels at an oxygen to carbon ratio close to 1. The draw back of this device was that it has a high electric consumption and limited electrode lifetime due to the high temperature electric arc. A second generation plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. It used a low-current high-voltage electric discharge with a completely new electrode continuation. This design uses two cylindrical electrodes with a rotating discharge that produced low temperature volumetric cold plasma., The lifetime of the electrodes was no longer an issue and the device was tested on several fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and biofuels at different flow rates and different oxygen to carbon ratios. Hydrogen concentration and yields were measured for both the thermal and non-thermal plasmatron reformers for homogeneous (non-catalytic) and catalytic reforming of several fuels. The technology was licensed to an industrial auto part supplier (ArvinMeritor) and is being implemented for some of the applications listed above. The Plasmatron reformer has been successfully tested on a bus for NOx trap regeneration. The successful development of the plasmatron reformer and its implementation in commercial applications including transportation will bring several benefits to the nation. These benefits include the reduction of NOx emissions, improving engine efficiency and reducing the nation's oil consumption. The objective of this program has been to develop attractive applications of plasmatron fuel reformer

  9. Biological Hydrogen Production Using Chloroform-treated Methanogenic Granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Chen, Shulin

    In fermentative hydrogen production, the low-hydrogen-producing bacteria retention rate limits the suspended growth reactor productivity because of the long hydraulic retention time (HRT) required to maintain adequate bacteria population. Traditional bacteria immobilization methods such as calcium alginate entrapment have many application limitations in hydrogen fermentation, including limited duration time, bacteria leakage, cost, and so on. The use of chloroform-treated anaerobic granular sludge as immobilized hydrogen-producing bacteria in an immobilized hydrogen culture may be able to overcome the limitations of traditional immobilization methods. This paper reports the findings on the performance of fed-batch cultures and continuous cultures inoculated with chloroform-treated granules. The chloroform-treated granules were able to be reused over four fed-batch cultures, with pH adjustment. The upflow reactor packed with chloroform-treated granules was studied, and the HRT of the upflow reactor was found to be as low as 4 h without any decrease in hydrogen production yield. Initial pH and glucose concentration of the culture medium significantly influenced the performance of the reactor. The optimum initial pH of the culture medium was neutral, and the optimum glucose concentration of the culture medium was below 20 g chemical oxygen demand/L at HRT 4 h. This study also investigated the possibility of integrating immobilized hydrogen fermentation using chloroform-treated granules with immobilized methane production using untreated granular sludge. The results showed that the integrated batch cultures produced 1.01 mol hydrogen and 2 mol methane per mol glucose. Treating the methanogenic granules with chloroform and then using the treated granules as immobilized hydrogen-producing sludge demonstrated advantages over other immobilization methods because the treated granules provide hydrogen-producing bacteria with a protective niche, a long duration of an active

  10. Hydrogen production from small hyropower sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    A synergistic relationship was not found to exist between low-head hydropower and electrolytic hydrogen production. The storageability of hydrogen was expected to mitigate problems of hydrogen generation variability associated with the use of low-head hydropower as the power source. The expense of gaseous hydrogen storage equipment effectively eliminates storage as a means to decouple hydrogen demand and power/hydrogen production. From the opposite perspective, the availability of a low and stable cost of power from low-head hydro was expected to improve the competitiveness of electrolysis. In actuality, the results indicated that hydroelectric power from small dams would be comparatively expensive by current grid power standards (mid-1979). Electrolysis, in the capacity range considered here, is less sensitive to the cost of the power than originally presumed. Other costs including depreciation and capital related charges are more significant. Due to power generation variability, sole reliance on low-head hydropower to provide electricity to the cells would reduce the utilization of the hydrogen production investment, resulting in an increase in unit production costs. These factors were paramount in the Air Products recommendation to discontinue the study before continuing to more detailed stages of analysis, including an analysis of a site specific facility and the construction of a demonstration facility. Another major factor was the unavailability of a pipeline hydrogen supply situation which, because of lower distribution and capital costs, could have been commercially viable. An unfavorable judgment on the combined facility should not be misinterpreted and extended to the component systems. Although a detailed analysis of the individual prospects for electrolysis and low-head hydropower was beyond the study scope, the reader will realize, as the study is reviewed, that each is worthy of individual consideration.

  11. Technoeconomic analysis of renewable hydrogen production, storage, and detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.; Kadam, K.

    1996-10-01

    Technical and economic feasibility studies of different degrees of completeness and detail have been performed on several projects being funded by the Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. Work this year focused on projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, although analyses of projects at other institutions are underway or planned. Highly detailed analyses were completed on a fiber optic hydrogen leak detector and a process to produce hydrogen from biomass via pyrolysis followed by steam reforming of the pyrolysis oil. Less detailed economic assessments of solar and biologically-based hydrogen production processes have been performed and focused on the steps that need to be taken to improve the competitive position of these technologies. Sensitivity analyses were conducted on all analyses to reveal the degree to which the cost results are affected by market changes and technological advances. For hydrogen storage by carbon nanotubes, a survey of the competing storage technologies was made in order to set a baseline for cost goals. A determination of the likelihood of commercialization was made for nearly all systems examined. Hydrogen from biomass via pyrolysis and steam reforming was found to have significant economic potential if a coproduct option could be co-commercialized. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production may have economic potential, but only if low-cost cells can be modified to split water and to avoid surface oxidation. The use of bacteria to convert the carbon monoxide in biomass syngas to hydrogen was found to be slightly more expensive than the high end of currently commercial hydrogen, although there are significant opportunities to reduce costs. Finally, the cost of installing a fiber-optic chemochromic hydrogen detection system in passenger vehicles was found to be very low and competitive with alternative sensor systems.

  12. Sodium acetate enhances hydrogen peroxide production in Weissella cibaria.

    PubMed

    Endo, A; Futagawa-Endo, Y; Kawasaki, S; Dicks, L M T; Niimura, Y; Okada, S

    2009-07-01

    To investigate hydrogen peroxide production by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and to determine the key factors involved. Six strains of Weissella cibaria produced large amounts (2.2-3.2 mmol l(-1)) of hydrogen peroxide in GYP broth supplemented with sodium acetate, but very low accumulations in glucose yeast peptone broth without sodium acetate. Increased production of hydrogen peroxide was also recorded when strains of W. cibaria were cultured in the presence of potassium acetate, sodium isocitrate and sodium citrate. Oxidases and peroxidases were not detected, or were present at low levels in W. cibaria. However, strong nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidase activity was recorded, suggesting that the enzyme plays a key role in production of hydrogen peroxide by W. cibaria. Weissella cibaria produces large quantities of hydrogen peroxide in aerated cultures, in a process that is dependent on the presence of acetate in the culture medium. NADH oxidase is likely the key enzyme in this process. This is the first study showing that sodium acetate, normally present in culture media of LAB, is a key factor for hydrogen peroxide production by W. cibaria. The exact mechanisms involved are not known.

  13. [Hydrogen production by the cyanobacterium Anabaena variablis in the light].

    PubMed

    Gogotov, I N; Kosiak, A V; Krupenko, A N

    1976-01-01

    Light of low intensity (less than or equal to 25-10(5) erg-cm(-2)-sec(-1)) stimulates hydrogen production by cell suspensions of Anabaena variabilis in the presence of glucose, pyruvate or formate. The maximum rate of hydrogen production in the presence of these substrates was observed at light intensities of 650, 1400 and 2250 erg-cm(-2)-sec(-1), respectively. The rate of oxygen production by the cells increases while the rate of hydrogen evolution decreases with increase in light intensity (2.5-6.0-10(3) erg-cm(-2)-sec(-1)). In the presence of DCMU (10(-5)-10(-4) M), hydrogen evolution is not inhibited in the presence of pyruvate or formiate and is inhibited to a less extent in the presence of glucose. According to the results obtained, hydrogen evolution by A. variabilis in the light does not require the action of two photosystems. Inhibition of hydrogen production at significant light intensities is due to the action of oxygen on this process; the rate of oxygen evolution increases with light intensity.

  14. Efficient photothermal catalytic hydrogen production over nonplasmonic Pt metal supported on TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Rui; Luo, Bing; Jing, Dengwei

    2016-10-01

    Most of the traditional photocatalytic hydrogen productions were conducted under room temperature. In this work, we selected nonplasmonic Pt metal anchored on TiO2 nanoparticles with photothermal activity to explore more efficient hydrogen production technology over the whole solar spectrum. Photothermal experiments were carried out in a carefully designed top irradiated photocatalytic reactor that can withstand high temperature and relatively higher pressure. Four typical organic materials, i.e., methyl alcohol (MeOH), trielthanolamne (TEOA), formic acid (HCOOH) and glucose, were investigated. Formic acid, a typical hydrogen carrier, was found to show the best activity. In addition, the effects of different basic parameters such as sacrificial agent concentration and the temperature on the activity of hydrogen generation were systematically investigated for understanding the qualitative and quantitative effects of the photothermal catalytic reaction process. The hydrogen yields at 90 °C of the photothermal catalytic reaction with Pt/TiO2 are around 8.1 and 4.2 times higher than those of reactions carried out under photo or thermal conditions alone. We can see that the photothermal hydrogen yield is not the simple sum of the photo and thermal effects. This result indicated that the Pt/TiO2 nanoparticles can efficiently couple photo and thermal energy to more effectively drive hydrogen production. As a result, the excellent ability makes it superior to other conventional semiconductor photocatalysts and thermal catalysts. Future works could concentrate on exploring photothermal catalysis as well as the potential synergism between photo and thermal effects to find more efficient hydrogen production technology using the whole solar spectrum.

  15. Bacterial bioaugmentation for improving methane and hydrogen production from microalgae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The recalcitrant cell walls of microalgae may limit their digestibility for bioenergy production. Considering that cellulose contributes to the cell wall recalcitrance of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris, this study investigated bioaugmentation with a cellulolytic and hydrogenogenic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum, at different inoculum ratios as a possible method to improve CH4 and H2 production of microalgae. Results Methane production was found to increase by 17?~?24% with the addition of C. thermocellum, as a result of enhanced cell disruption and excess hydrogen production. Furthermore, addition of C. thermocellum enhanced the bacterial diversity and quantities, leading to higher fermentation efficiency. A two-step process of addition of C. thermocellum first and methanogenic sludge subsequently could recover both hydrogen and methane, with a 9.4% increase in bioenergy yield, when compared with the one-step process of simultaneous addition of C. thermocellum and methanogenic sludge. The fluorescence peaks of excitation-emission matrix spectra associated with chlorophyll can serve as biomarkers for algal cell degradation. Conclusions Bioaugmentation with C. thermocellum improved the degradation of C. vulgaris biomass, producing higher levels of methane and hydrogen. The two-step process, with methanogenic inoculum added after the hydrogen production reached saturation, was found to be an energy-efficiency method for hydrogen and methane production. PMID:23815806

  16. Iron-catalyzed hydrogen production from formic acid.

    PubMed

    Boddien, Albert; Loges, Björn; Gärtner, Felix; Torborg, Christian; Fumino, Koichi; Junge, Henrik; Ludwig, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2010-07-07

    Hydrogen represents a clean energy source, which can be efficiently used in fuel cells generating electricity with water as the only byproduct. However, hydrogen generation from renewables under mild conditions and efficient hydrogen storage in a safe and reversible manner constitute important challenges. In this respect formic acid (HCO(2)H) represents a convenient hydrogen storage material, because it is one of the major products from biomass and can undergo selective decomposition to hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the presence of suitable catalysts. Here, the first light-driven iron-based catalytic system for hydrogen generation from formic acid is reported. By application of a catalyst formed in situ from inexpensive Fe(3)(CO)(12), 2,2':6'2''-terpyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline, and triphenylphosphine, hydrogen generation is possible under visible light irradiation and ambient temperature. Depending on the kind of N-ligands significant catalyst turnover numbers (>100) and turnover frequencies (up to 200 h(-1)) are observed, which are the highest known to date for nonprecious metal catalyzed hydrogen generation from formic acid. NMR, IR studies, and DFT calculations of iron complexes, which are formed under reaction conditions, confirm that PPh(3) plays an active role in the catalytic cycle and that N-ligands enhance the stability of the system. It is shown that the reaction mechanism includes iron hydride species which are generated exclusively under irradiation with visible light.

  17. Capacitively coupled hydrogen plasmas sustained by tailored voltage waveforms: vibrational kinetics and negative ions control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diomede, P.; Bruneau, B.; Longo, S.; Johnson, E.; Booth, J.-P.

    2017-07-01

    A comprehensive hybrid model of a hydrogen capacitively coupled plasma, including a detailed description of the molecular vibrational kinetics, has been applied to the study of the effect of tailored voltage waveforms (TVWs) on the production kinetics and transport of negative ions in these discharges. Two kinds of TVWs are considered, valleys-to-peaks and saw-tooth, with amplitude and slope asymmetry respectively. By tailoring the voltage waveform only, it is possible to exert substantial control over the peak density and position of negative ions inside the discharge volume. This control is particularly effective for saw-tooth waveforms. Insight into the mechanisms allowing this control is provided by an analysis of the model results. This reveals the roles of the vibrational distribution function and of the electron energy distribution and their correlations, as well as changes in the negative ion transport in the electric field when using different TVWs. Considering the chemical reactivity of H- ions, the possibility of a purely electrical control of the negative ion cloud in a reactor operating with a feedstock gas diluted by hydrogen may find interesting applications. This is the first study of vibrational kinetics in the context of TVWs in molecular gases.

  18. Protons and pleomorphs: aerobic hydrogen production in Azotobacters.

    PubMed

    Noar, Jesse D; Bruno-Bárcena, José M

    2016-02-01

    As obligate aerobic soil organisms, the ability of Azotobacter species to fix nitrogen is unusual given that the nitrogenase complex requires a reduced cellular environment. Molecular hydrogen is an unavoidable byproduct of the reduction of dinitrogen; at least one molecule of H2 is produced for each molecule of N2 fixed. This could be considered a fault in nitrogenase efficiency, essentially a waste of energy and reducing equivalents. Wild-type Azotobacter captures this hydrogen and oxidizes it with its membrane-bound uptake hydrogenase complex. Strains lacking an active hydrogenase complex have been investigated for their hydrogen production capacities. What is the role of H2 in the energy metabolism of nitrogen-fixing Azotobacter? Is hydrogen production involved in Azotobacter species' protection from or tolerance to oxygen, or vice versa? What yields of hydrogen can be expected from hydrogen-evolving strains? Can the yield of hydrogen be controlled or increased by changing genetic, environmental, or physiological conditions? We will address these questions in the following mini-review.

  19. Enhanced hydrogen production from glucose by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez-Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K

    2007-12-01

    To utilize fermentative bacteria for producing the alternative fuel hydrogen, we performed successive rounds of P1 transduction from the Keio Escherichia coli K-12 library to introduce multiple, stable mutations into a single bacterium to direct the metabolic flux toward hydrogen production. E. coli cells convert glucose to various organic acids (such as succinate, pyruvate, lactate, formate, and acetate) to synthesize energy and hydrogen from formate by the formate hydrogen-lyase (FHL) system that consists of hydrogenase 3 and formate dehydrogenase-H. We altered the regulation of FHL by inactivating the repressor encoded by hycA and by overexpressing the activator encoded by fhlA, removed hydrogen uptake activity by deleting hyaB (hydrogenase 1) and hybC (hydrogenase 2), redirected glucose metabolism to formate by using the fdnG, fdoG, narG, focA, focB, poxB, and aceE mutations, and inactivated the succinate and lactate synthesis pathways by deleting frdC and ldhA, respectively. The best of the metabolically engineered strains, BW25113 hyaB hybC hycA fdoG frdC ldhA aceE, increased hydrogen production 4.6-fold from glucose and increased the hydrogen yield twofold from 0.65 to 1.3 mol H(2)/mol glucose (maximum, 2 mol H(2)/mol glucose).

  20. Tritiated Water on Molecular Sieve without Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, R.T.

    2001-09-10

    Several molecular sieve beds loaded with tritiated water failed to generate hydrogen gas from tritium self-radiolysis at the expected rate. Preliminary gamma-ray irradiation experiments of 4A molecular sieve with varying amounts of oxygen in the over-gas evoke a quenching mechanism. The data suggest that the gas phase rate constant for the production of hydrogen gas is several orders of magnitude smaller than the third order rate constant for scavenging of radical fragments by oxygen.

  1. Hydrogen production using hydrogenase-containing oxygenic photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Melis, Anastasios; Zhang, Liping; Benemann, John R.; Forestier, Marc; Ghirardi, Maria; Seibert, Michael

    2006-01-24

    A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  2. Hydrogen Production Using Hydrogenase-Containing Oxygenic Photosynthetic Organisms

    DOEpatents

    Melis, A.; Zhang, L.; Benemann, J. R.; Forestier, M.; Ghirardi, M.; Seibert, M.

    2006-01-24

    A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  3. Hydrogen storage and delivery: the carbon dioxide - formic acid couple.

    PubMed

    Laurenczy, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and the carbonates, the available natural C1 sources, can be easily hydrogenated into formic acid and formates in water; the rate of this reduction strongly depends on the pH of the solution. This reaction is catalysed by ruthenium(II) pre-catalyst complexes with a large variety of water-soluble phosphine ligands; high conversions and turnover numbers have been realised. Although ruthenium(II) is predominant in these reactions, the iron(II) - tris[(2-diphenylphosphino)-ethyl]phosphine (PP3) complex is also active, showing a new perspective to use abundant and inexpensive iron-based compounds in the CO2 reduction. In the catalytic hydrogenation cycles the in situ formed metal hydride complexes play a key role, their structures with several other intermediates have been proven by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. In the other hand safe and convenient hydrogen storage and supply is the fundamental question for the further development of the hydrogen economy; and carbon dioxide has been recognised to be a viable H2 vector. Formic acid--containing 4.4 weight % of H2, that is 53 g hydrogen per litre--is suitable for H2 storage; we have shown that in aqueous solutions it can be selectively decomposed into CO-free (CO < 10 ppm) CO2 and H2. The reaction takes place under mild experimental conditions and it is able to generate high pressure H2 (up to 600 bar). The cleavage of HCOOH is catalysed by several hydrophilic Ru(II) phosphine complexes (meta-trisulfonated triphenylphosphine, mTPPTS, being the most efficient one), either in homogeneous systems or as immobilised catalysts. We have also shown that the iron(II)--hydrido tris[(2-diphenylphosphino)ethyl]phosphine complex catalyses with an exceptionally high rate and efficiency (turnover frequency, TOF = 9425 h(-1)mol(-1); turnover number, TON = 92400) the formic acid cleavage, in environmentally friendly propylene carbonate solution, opening the way to use cheap, non-noble metal based catalysts for this

  4. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Muradov, N.

    1996-10-01

    The conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming and partial oxidation) are complex, multi-step processes that produce large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The main goal of this project is to develop a technologically simple process for hydrogen production from natural gas (NG) and other hydrocarbon fuels via single-step decomposition of hydrocarbons. This approach eliminates or significantly reduces CO{sub 2} emission. Carbon is a valuable by-product of this process, whereas conventional methods of hydrogen production from NG produce no useful by-products. This approach is based on the use of special catalysts that reduce the maximum temperature of the process from 1400-1500{degrees}C (thermal non-catalytic decomposition of methane) to 500-900{degrees}C. Transition metal based catalysts and various forms of carbon are among the candidate catalysts for the process. This approach can advantageously be used for the development of compact NG reformers for on-site production of hydrogen-methane blends at refueling stations and, also, for the production of hydrogen-rich gas for fuel cell applications. The author extended the search for active methane decomposition catalysts to various modifications of Ni-, Fe-, Mo- and Co-based catalysts. Variation in the operational parameters makes it possible to produce H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} blends with a wide range of hydrogen concentrations that vary from 15 to 98% by volume. The author found that Ni-based catalysts are more effective at temperatures below 750{degrees}C, whereas Fe-based catalysts are effective at temperatures above 800{degrees}C for the production of hydrogen with purity of 95% v. or higher. The catalytic pyrolysis of liquid hydrocarbons (pentane, gasoline) over Fe-based catalyst was conducted. The author observed the production of a hydrogen-rich gas (hydrogen concentration up to 97% by volume) at a rate of approximately 1L/min.mL of hydrocarbon fuel.

  5. A Nonmitochondrial Hydrogen Production in Naegleria gruberi

    PubMed Central

    Tsaousis, Anastasios D.; Nývltová, Eva; Šuták, Robert; Hrdý, Ivan; Tachezy, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Naegleria gruberi is a free-living heterotrophic aerobic amoeba well known for its ability to transform from an amoeba to a flagellate form. The genome of N. gruberi has been recently published, and in silico predictions demonstrated that Naegleria has the capacity for both aerobic respiration and anaerobic biochemistry to produce molecular hydrogen in its mitochondria. This finding was considered to have fundamental implications on the evolution of mitochondrial metabolism and of the last eukaryotic common ancestor. However, no actual experimental data have been shown to support this hypothesis. For this reason, we have decided to investigate the anaerobic metabolism of the mitochondrion of N. gruberi. Using in vivo biochemical assays, we have demonstrated that N. gruberi has indeed a functional [FeFe]-hydrogenase, an enzyme that is attributed to anaerobic organisms. Surprisingly, in contrast to the published predictions, we have demonstrated that hydrogenase is localized exclusively in the cytosol, while no hydrogenase activity was associated with mitochondria of the organism. In addition, cytosolic localization displayed for HydE, a marker component of hydrogenase maturases. Naegleria gruberi, an obligate aerobic organism and one of the earliest eukaryotes, is producing hydrogen, a function that raises questions on the purpose of this pathway for the lifestyle of the organism and potentially on the evolution of eukaryotes. PMID:24682152

  6. Discovery of Photocatalysts for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    D. Brent MacQueen

    2006-10-01

    This project for DOE was designed to address these materials-related issues through a combination of high-throughput screening of semiconductor candidates and theoretical modeling of nanostructures. High-throughput screening is an effective and economical way to examine a large number of candidates and identify those worthy of further study. Unfortunately, in the course of this project, we discovered no semiconductor candidates that can meet the DOE’s stringent requirements for an economically feasible photoelectrochemical process. However, some of our results indicated that several systems may have potential if further optimized. In particular, the published theoretical modeling work indicates that core-shell nanorod structures, if properly engineered, have the potential to overcome the shortfalls of current semiconductors. Although the synthesis of the designed core-shell nanorod structures proved to be beyond the current capabilities of our laboratories, recent advances in the synthesis of core-shell nanorod structures imply that the designed structures can be synthesized. SRI is confident that once these materials are made they will validate our models and lead to economical and environmentally friendly hydrogen from sunlight and water. The high-throughput photolysis analysis module developed at SRI will also have utility in applications such as identifying catalysts for photo-assisted chemical detoxification, as well as non-photolytic applications such as hydrogen storage, which can take advantage of the ability of the analysis module to monitor pressure over time.

  7. Photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    An overview of photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae in the context of its potential as a renewable chemical feed stock and energy carrier is presented. Beginning with its discovery by Gaffron and Rubin in 1942, motivated by curiosity-driven laboratory research, studies were initiated in the early 1970s that focused on photosynthetic hydrogen production from an applied perspective. From a scientific and technical point of view, current research is focused on optimizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiencies represented by the Gibbs Free Energy of molecular hydrogen. The key research questions of maximizing hydrogen and oxygen production by light-activated water splitting in green algae are (1) removing the oxygen sensitivity of algal hydrogenases; (2) linearizing the light saturation curves of photosynthesis throughout the entire range of terrestrial solar irradiance--including the role of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide in optimization of photosynthetic electron transport and (3) the minimum number of light reactions that are required to split water to elemental hydrogen and oxygen. Each of these research topics is being actively addressed by the photobiological hydrogen research community.

  8. Engineering analysis of potential photosynthetic bacterial hydrogen-production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlevich, A.; Karpuk, M. E.

    1982-06-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) are capable of generating hydrogen from organics in effluents from food processing, pulp and paper, and chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Hydrogen evolution takes place under light in the absence of air. The rate of hydrogen production is expected to range between 300 to 600 scf of hydrogen per 1000 galloons of waste stream treated per hour. This hydrogen production system has been demonstrated at a bench-scale level and is ready for engineering development. A conceptual design for a PSB hydrogen production system is described. The system is expected to be sited adjacent to a waste stream source which will be pretreated by fermentation and pH adjustment, innoculated with bacteria, and then passed into the reactor. The reactor effluent can either be discharged into a rapid infiltration system, an irrigation ditch, and/or recycled back into the reactor. Several potential reactor designs have been developed, analyzed, and costed. A large covered pond appears to be the most economical design approach.

  9. Increasing the metabolic capacity of Escherichia coli for hydrogen production through heterologous expression of the Ralstonia eutropha SH operon.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Bisaillon, Ariane; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2013-08-26

    Fermentative hydrogen production is an attractive means for the sustainable production of this future energy carrier but is hampered by low yields. One possible solution is to create, using metabolic engineering, strains which can bypass the normal metabolic limits to substrate conversion to hydrogen. Escherichia coli can degrade a variety of sugars to hydrogen but can only convert electrons available at the pyruvate node to hydrogen, and is unable to use the electrons available in NADH generated during glycolysis. Here, the heterologous expression of the soluble [NiFe] hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha H16 (the SH hydrogenase) was used to demonstrate the introduction of a pathway capable of deriving substantial hydrogen from the NADH generated by fermentation. Successful expression was demonstrated by in vitro assay of enzyme activity. Moreover, expression of SH restored anaerobic growth on glucose to adhE strains, normally blocked for growth due to the inability to re-oxidize NADH. Measurement of in vivo hydrogen production showed that several metabolically engineered strains were capable of using the SH hydrogenase to derive 2 mol H2 per mol of glucose consumed, close to the theoretical maximum. Previous introduction of heterologous [NiFe] hydrogenase in E. coli led to NAD(P)H dependent activity, but hydrogen production levels were very low. Here we have shown for the first time substantial in vivo hydrogen production by a heterologously expressed [NiFe] hydrogenase, the soluble NAD-dependent H2ase of R. eutropha (SH hydrogenase). This hydrogenase was able to couple metabolically generated NADH to hydrogen production, thus rescuing an alcohol dehydrogenase (adhE) mutant. This enlarges the range of metabolism available for hydrogen production, thus potentially opening the door to the creation of greatly improved hydrogen production. Strategies for further increasing yields should revolve around making additional NADH available.

  10. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  11. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  12. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  13. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  14. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  15. EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System

    SciTech Connect

    Garabedian, Harold T. Wight, Gregory Dreier, Ken Borland, Nicholas

    2008-03-30

    A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable

  16. Fermentative hydrogen production from liquid swine manure with glucose supplement using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao

    2009-12-01

    The idea of coupling renewable energy production and agricultural waste management inspired this thesis. The production of an important future fuel---hydrogen gas---from high strength waste stream-liquid swine manure---using anaerobic treatment processes makes the most sustainable sense for both wastewater utilization and energy generation. The objectives of this thesis were to develop a fermentation process for converting liquid swine manure to hydrogen and to maximize hydrogen productivity. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) systems were constructed to carry out this fermentation process, and seed sludge obtained from a dairy manure anaerobic digester and pretreated by nutrient acclimation, heat and pH treatment was used as inoculum. High system stability was indicated by a short startup period of 12 days followed by stable hydrogen production, and successful sludge granulation occurred within 23 days of startup at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 hours. Operation at a progressively decreasing HRT from 24 to 8h gave rise to an increasing biogas production rate from 15.2-34.4L/d, while good linear relationships were observed between both total biogas and hydrogen production rates correlated to HRT, with R2 values of 0.993 and 0.997, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 1.63 mol-H 2/mol-hexose-feed occurred at HRT of 16h, while the HRT of 12h was highly suggested to achieve both high production rate and efficient yield. Hexose utilization efficiencies over 98%, considerable hydrogen production rate up to 14.3 L/d and hydrogen percentage of off-gas up to 43% (i.e., a CO 2/H2 ratio of 1.2) with the absence of CH4 production throughout the whole course of experiment at a pH of 5.0 strongly validated the feasibility of the fermentative H2 production from liquid swine manure using an ASBR system. Ethanol as well as acetic, butyric and valeric acids were produced in the system accompanying the hydrogen production, with acetic acid being the dominant

  17. Reversible Hydrogen Storage in the Lithium Borohydride -- Calcium Hydride Coupled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Frederick; Meyer, Martin

    2008-03-01

    We report large reversible hydrogen storage in a new coupled system, LiBH4/CaH2, via the reaction 6 LiBH4 + CaH2 <-> 6 LiH + CaB6 + 10 H2 having a theoretical hydrogen capacity of 11.7 wt% and an estimated reaction enthalpy of δH = 59 kJ/mole H2. Samples that include 0.25 mole (18.2 wt%) TiCl3 reproducibly store 9.1 wt% hydrogen, corresponding to 95% of the available hydrogen. H2 is the only evolved gas detected by mass spectrometry. X-ray diffraction confirms that the sample cycles between LiBH4 and CaH2 in the hydrogenated state and LiH and CaB6 in the dehydrogenated state.

  18. Fermentative Hydrogen Production From Food Waste Without Inocula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Mizuno, O.; Kameda, T.; Yoshioka, T.

    2008-02-01

    The kind of seed microorganisms and its growth conditions are important factors for the hydrogen fermentation. However, there are many kinds of bacteria in food waste, and it is necessary to know their behavior if it is used as a substrate. Therefore, hydrogen fermentation of food waste was investigated in the absence of inocula with an initial pH varying from 5 to 9 and in a temperature range between 22 to 50 °C. Hydrogen production occurred when the initial pH of the solution containing the food waste was adjusted to 7-9 and the temperature was adjusted to 22 or 35 °C (maximum production was 40 ml-H2/g-TS at an initial pH of 9 and a temperature of 35 °C). However, the hydrogen production stopped when the pH decreased due to the accumulation of organic acids. In the next step, the pH was controlled by the addition of a NaOH solution between 5.0 and 9.0. When the pH was controlled between 5.0-6.0, the hydrogen production increased to a maximum of 90 ml-H2/g-TS at a pH of 5.5 and a temperature of 35 °C; more than 4 times more than for the sample without pH adjustment, due to the acceleration of butyrate fermentation.

  19. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  20. Production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis. Task 1 report

    SciTech Connect

    Block, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    The report presents results of a cooperative effort among the Florida Energy Office, NASA/Kennedy Space Center, the US Department of Energy and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). It reports on a task to evaluate hydrogen production from photovoltaic (PV)-powered electrolysis. The resulting activities covered five years of effort funded at a total of $216,809. The results represent a successful, coordinated effort among two state agencies and two federal agencies. Results are reported on two separate investigations. The first investigation looked at the use of line focus concentrating photovoltaics coupled with single-cell electrolyzers to produce gaseous hydrogen. The concept, and its design, construction and operation, are presented. The objectives of the line focusing PV system are to reduce overall system cost under the assumptions that lenses and mirrors are cheaper to deploy than are PV cells, and that low-voltage, high-current dc electricity can efficiently power a single-cell elctrolyzer to produce hydrogen. The second investigation evaluated a base case cost of PV electrolysis hydrogen production based on present-day PV and electrolyzer costs and efficiencies. A second step analyzed the hydrogen costs based on a best prediction of where PV costs and efficiencies will be in 10 years. These results set the minimum cost standards that other renewable production technologies must meet or better.

  1. Effects of formate on fermentative hydrogen production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Tatsuo; Tanisho, Shigeharu

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of formate on fermentative hydrogen production by Enterobacter aerogenes by way of batch culture. When 20 mM formate was added to pH 6.3 and pH 5.8 E. aerogenes glucose cultures (formate culture) at the beginning of cultivation, hydrogen evolution through both glucose consumption and decomposition of the extrinsic formate occurred together, while hydrogen evolution occurred only through glucose consumption in the control cultures. The hydrogen evolution rates in the formate cultures were faster than in the control cultures, although cell growth and glucose consumption rates in the formate cultures were slower than the control cultures'. The decomposition rate of the extrinsic formate in the pH 5.8 formate culture was faster than in the pH 6.3 formate culture. The hydrogen yield from glucose in the pH 6.3 formate culture increased due to the increasing amount of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide for hydrogen production.

  2. Engineering aspects of hydrogen production from photosynthetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Herlevich, A.; Karpuk, M.

    1982-02-01

    Certain photosynthetic bacteria (PSB), for example, Rhodopseudomonas capsulata, evolve hydrogen when placed in an anaerobic environment with light and a suitable organic substrate. An engineering effort to use such bacteria for large-scale hydrogen production from sunlight is described. A system to produce 28,000 m/sup 3//day (1 x 10/sup 6/ ft/sup 3//day) of hydrogen has been designed on a conceptual level and includes hydrogen cleanup, substrate storage, and waste disposal. The most critical component in the design is the solar bacterial reactor. Several designs were developed and analyzed. A large covered pond concept appears most attractive. Cost estimates for the designs show favorable economics.

  3. Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    M. Patterson; C. Park

    2008-03-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

  4. Production of hydrogen in a conventional microwave oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Shinfuku; Toyota, Hiromichi; Mukasa, Shinobu; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Maehara, Tsunehiro; Kawashima, Ayato

    2009-10-01

    Hydrogen is produced by generating in-liquid plasma in a conventional microwave oven. A receiving antenna unit consisting of seven copper rods is placed at the bottom of the reactor furnace in the microwave oven. 2.45 GHz microwave in-liquid plasma can be generated at the tips of the electrodes in the microwave oven. When the n-dodecane is decomposed by plasma, 74% pure hydrogen gas can be achieved with this device. The hydrogen generation efficiency for a 750 W magnetron output is estimated to be approximately 56% of that of the electrolysis of water. Also, in this process up to 4 mg/s of solid carbon can be produced at the same time. The present process enables simultaneous production of hydrogen gas and the carbide in the hydrocarbon liquid.

  5. In vitro hydrogen production--using energy from the sun.

    PubMed

    Krassen, Henning; Ott, Sascha; Heberle, Joachim

    2011-01-07

    Using solar energy to produce molecular hydrogen is a promising way to supply the civilization with clean energy. Nature provides the key components to collect solar energy as well as to reduce protons, scientists have developed mimics of these enzymatic centers and also found new ways to catalyze the same reactions. This perspective article surveys the different components and in particular the various coupling possibilities of a light sensitizer and catalyst. Pros and cons are discussed.

  6. Design of nanocatalysts for green hydrogen production from bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Bion, Nicolas; Duprez, Daniel; Epron, Florence

    2012-01-09

    Bioethanol is an interesting feedstock that may be used for hydrogen production by steam or autothermal reforming. However, the impurities (heavy alcohols, esters, acids, N compounds) contained in the raw feedstock require a costly purification, as they have a dramatic impact on catalyst activity and stability. Thus, a method that can utilize the raw feedstock without severe degradation of the catalyst would be desirable. In this Minireview, the composition of bioethanol from first and second generation biomass, the reactions involved in the catalytic ethanol steam reforming process and the design of catalysts adapted for hydrogen production from a real bioethanol feed are surveyed.

  7. CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect

    George R. Gavalas

    2001-11-27

    The present project is devoted to developing hydrogen permselective silica membranes supported on composite supports to achieve high flux and selectivity. The supports consist of a thin zeolite silicalite layer coated on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tubes of mean pore size 1 {micro}m. The zeolite layer is grown by reaction in a suitable silicate solution at 95 C. After two or three reaction periods a layer of silicalite crystals about 20 {micro}m thick grows inside the pores of alumina. In addition to the zeolitic pores, this layer contains voids of a few nanometer diameter that remain between the crystals or between the crystals and the pore walls. The quality of the silicalite/alumina composites was evaluated by gas permeation measurements and by nitrogen adsorption and it was found that the residual voids were below 5 nm in diameter. Three techniques were investigated for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of the silica layer on the silicalite/alumina composite support. The first was TEOS pyrolysis at approximately one millibar partial pressure and 650 C. After 8 h reaction the fluxes of hydrogen and nitrogen at ambient temperature had declined by a factor of approximately 100 indicating sealing of defects and zeolitic pores alike. The second CVD technique investigated was SiCl{sub 4} hydrolysis at 90 C. Deposition in this case was conducted in a series of cycles, each cycle comprising two half reactions, i.e. exposure to SiCl{sub 4} followed by exposure to water vapor. The deposition was interrupted every five cycles to measure the permeation properties of the nascent membrane at 120 C. After a few cycles the membrane pores were sealed, but the silica layer was not thermally stable when the temperature was raised to 400 C. In the third technique investigated, silica deposition was carried out by SiCl{sub 4} hydrolysis at 400 C, again in a sequence of half reaction cycles. After 15 cycles the membrane pores were well sealed by a layer stable to at least 400 C.

  8. Inter-hydrogen bond coupling in crystals of 3-phenylpyrazole polymorphs investigated by polarized IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hachuła, Barbara; Flakus, Henryk T; Garbacz, Aleksandra; Stolarczyk, Agnieszka

    2014-04-05

    The remarkably strong differences in the fine structure patterns of the νN-H and νN-D bands, temperature and H/D isotopic effects in crystals of two 3-phenylpyrazole (3PhPz) polymorphs, with tetrameric and hexameric hydrogen bond aggregates, were examined by polarized IR spectroscopy, aided by the calculations utilizing the "strong-coupling" model. Experimental and theoretical approaches have suggested that the anti-co-operativity of hydrogen bonds is the main factor responsible for the differences in the spectral properties of both polymorphs. This interaction affects hydrogen-bond geometry of the associates constituting the lattices and in consequence decides about the relative contribution of two different exciton coupling mechanism, "through-space" (SS) and "tail-to-head" (TH), in the spectra generation. The relative contribution of each individual exciton coupling mechanism in the spectra generation is temperature-dependent. In tetramers the TH coupling mechanism dominates at low temperatures, whereas the role of the SS mechanism increases at higher temperatures. For the hexamers the SS mechanism dominates in the wide temperature range. The two types of 3PhPz associates exhibit two different ways of occurring of the H/D isotopic recognition in the crystal hydrogen bonds. In the tetrameric polymorph identical hydrogen isotope atoms exist in entire hydrogen-bonded cycle of 3PhPz. In the case of 3PhPz hexamers, the H/D isotopic recognition mechanism involves pairs of the closely-spaced hydrogen bonds in a cycle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrochemical production of ozone and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods of using ozone have been developed which sterilize instruments and medical wastes, oxidize organics found in wastewater, clean laundry, break down contaminants in soil into a form more readily digested by microbes, kill microorganisms present in food products, and destroy toxins present in food products. The preferred methods for killing microorganisms and destroying toxins use pressurized, humidified, and concentrated ozone produced by an electrochemical cell.

  10. Thermochemical cycles for the production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.; Dang, V.D.

    Two-step processes for the preparation of hydrogen are described: CrCl/sub 3/(g) ..-->.. CrCl/sub 2/(g) + 1/2Cl/sub 2/(g) and CrCl/sub 2/(s) + HCl(g) reversible CrCl/sub 3/(s) + 1/2H/sub 2/(g); UCl/sub 4/(g) ..-->.. UCl/sub 3/(g) + 1/2Cl/sub 2/(g) and UCl/sub 3/(s) + HCl(g) ..-->.. UCl/sub 4/(s) + 1/2H/sub 2/(g); and CaSO/sub 4/(s) ..-->.. CaO(s) + SO/sub 2/(g) + 1/2O/sub 2/(g) and CaO(s) + SO/sub 2/(g) + H/sub 2/O(l) ..-->.. CaSO/sub 4/(s) + H/sub 2/(g). The high temperature available from solar collectors, high temperature gas reactors or fusion reactors is utilized in the first step in which the reaction is endothermic. The efficiency is at least 60% and with process heat recovery, the efficiency may be increased up to 74.4%. An apparatus fr carrying out the process in conjunction with a fusion reactor, is described.

  11. Photosynthetic Hydrogen and Oxygen Production by Green Algae

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1999-08-22

    Photosynthesis research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is focused on hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae in the context of its potential as a renewable fuel and chemical feed stock. Beginning with its discovery by Gaffron and Rubin in 1942, motivated by curiosity-driven laboratory research, studies were initiated in the early 1970s that focused on photosynthetic hydrogen production from an applied perspective. From a scientific and technical point of view, current research is focused on optimizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiencies represented by the Gibbs Free Energy of molecular hydrogen. The key research questions of maximizing hydrogen and oxygen production by light-activated water splitting in green algae are: (1) removing the oxygen sensitivity of algal hydrogenases; (2) linearizing the light saturation curves of hotosynthesis throughout the entire range of terrestrial solar irradiance-including the role of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide in optimization of photosynthetic electron transpor;t and (3) constructing real-world bioreactors, including the generation of hydrogen and oxygen against workable back pressures of the photoproduced gases.

  12. DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System

    SciTech Connect

    Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

    2011-06-30

    The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production technologies. The

  13. Comparison of hydrogen production and electrical power generation for energy capture in closed-loop ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis systems.

    PubMed

    Hatzell, Marta C; Ivanov, Ivan; Cusick, Roland D; Zhu, Xiuping; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-28

    Currently, there is an enormous amount of energy available from salinity gradients, which could be used for clean hydrogen production. Through the use of a favorable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) cathode, the projected electrical energy generated by a single pass ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis (RED) system approached 78 W h m(-3). However, if RED is operated with the less favorable (higher overpotential) hydrogen evolution electrode and hydrogen gas is harvested, the energy recovered increases by as much ~1.5× to 118 W h m(-3). Indirect hydrogen production through coupling an RED stack with an external electrolysis system was only projected to achieve 35 W h m(-3) or ~1/3 of that produced through direct hydrogen generation.

  14. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu [Knoxville, TN

    2011-04-26

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  15. Fermentative hydrogen production from pretreated biomass: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulos, I A; Bakker, R R; Budde, M A W; de Vrije, T; Claassen, P A M; Koukios, E G

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of employing biomass resources from different origin as feedstocks for fermentative hydrogen production. Mild-acid pretreated and hydrolysed barley straw (BS) and corn stalk (CS), hydrolysed barley grains (BG) and corn grains (CG), and sugar beet extract (SB) were comparatively evaluated for fermentative hydrogen production. Pretreatments and/or enzymatic hydrolysis led to 27, 37, 56, 74 and 45 g soluble sugars/100 g dry BS, CS, BG, CG and SB, respectively. A rapid test was applied to evaluate the fermentability of the hydrolysates and SB extract. The thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus showed high hydrogen production on hydrolysates of mild-acid pretreated BS, hydrolysates of BG and CG, and SB extract. Mild-acid pretreated CS showed limited fermentability, which was partially due to inhibitory products released in the hydrolysates, implying the need for the employment of a milder pretreatment method. The difference in the fermentability of BS and CS is in strong contrast to the similarity of the composition of these two feedstocks. The importance of performing fermentability tests to determine the suitability of a feedstock for hydrogen production was confirmed.

  16. Potential of biogenic hydrogen production for hydrogen driven remediation strategies in marine environments.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Hennebel, Tom; Boon, Nico

    2014-09-25

    Fermentative production of bio-hydrogen (bio-H2) from organic residues has emerged as a promising alternative for providing the required electron source for hydrogen driven remediation strategies. Unlike the widely used production of H2 by bacteria in fresh water systems, few reports are available regarding the generation of biogenic H2 and optimisation processes in marine systems. The present research aims to optimise the capability of an indigenous marine bacterium for the production of bio-H2 in marine environments and subsequently develop this process for hydrogen driven remediation strategies. Fermentative conversion of organics in marine media to H2 using a marine isolate, Pseudoalteromonas sp. BH11, was determined. A Taguchi design of experimental methodology was employed to evaluate the optimal nutritional composition in batch tests to improve bio-H2 yields. Further optimisation experiments showed that alginate-immobilised bacterial cells were able to produce bio-H2 at the same rate as suspended cells over a period of several weeks. Finally, bio-H2 was used as electron donor to successfully dehalogenate trichloroethylene (TCE) using biogenic palladium nanoparticles as a catalyst. Fermentative production of bio-H2 can be a promising technique for concomitant generation of an electron source for hydrogen driven remediation strategies and treatment of organic residue in marine ecosystems.

  17. Hydrogen production via photolytic oxidation of aqueous sodium sulfite solutions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cunping; Linkous, Clovis A; Adebiyi, Olawale; T-Raissi, Ali

    2010-07-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) emission from coal-burning power plants and refinery operations has been implicated as a cause of acid rain and other air pollution related problems. The conventional treatment of SO(2)-contaminated air consists of two steps: SO(2) absorption using an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution, forming aqueous sodium sulfite (Na(2)SO(3)), and Na(2)SO(3) oxidation via air purging to produce sodium sulfate (Na(2)SO(4)). In this process, the potential energy of SO(2) is lost. This paper presents a novel ultraviolet (UV) photolytic process for production of hydrogen from aqueous Na(2)SO(3) solutions. The results show that the quantum efficiency of hydrogen production can reach 14.4% under illumination from a low pressure mercury lamp. The mechanism occurs via two competing reaction pathways that involve oxidation of SO(3)(2-) to SO(4)(2-) directly and through the dithionate (S(2)O(6)(2-)) ion intermediate. The first route becomes dominant once a photostationary state for S(2)O(6)(2-) is established. The initial pH of Na(2)SO(3) solution plays an important role in determining both the hydrogen production rate and the final products of the photolytic oxidation. At initial solution pH of 9.80 Na(2)SO(3) photo-oxidation generates Na(2)SO(4) as the final reaction product, while Na(2)S(2)O(6) is merely a reaction intermediate. The highest hydrogen production rate occurs when the initial solution pH is 7.55. Reduction in the initial solution pH to 5.93 results in disproportionation of HSO(3)(-) to elemental sulfur and SO(4)(2-) but no hydrogen production.

  18. CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect

    George R. Gavalas

    2004-04-01

    The preparation and performance of membranes for application to hydrogen separation from coal-derived gas is described. The membrane material investigated was dense amorphous silica deposited on a suitable support by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Two types of support materials were pursued. One type consisted of a two-layer composite, zeolite silicalite/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, in the form of tubes approximately 0.7 cm in diameter. The other type was porous glass tubes of diameter below 0.2 cm. The first type of support was prepared starting from {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tubes of 1{micro}m mean pore diameter and growing by hydrothermal reaction a zeolite silicalite layer inside the pores of the alumina at the OD side. After calcination to remove the organic template used in the hydrothermal reaction, CVD was carried out to deposit the final silica layer. CVD was carried out by alternating exposure of the surface with silicon tetrachloride and water vapor. SEM and N2 adsorption measurements were employed to characterize the membranes at several stages during their preparation. Permeation measurements of several gases yielded H{sub 2}:N{sub 2} ideal selectivity of 150-200 at room temperature declining to 110 at 250 C. The second type of support pursued was porous glass tubes prepared by a novel extrusion technique. A thick suspension of borosilicate glass powder in a polyethersulfone solution was extruded through a spinneret and after gelation the glass-polymer tube was heat treated to obtain a gas-tight glass tube. Leaching of the glass tube in hot water yielded connected pores with diameter on the order of 100 nm. CVD of the final silica layer was not carried out on these tubes on account of their large pore size.

  19. A Process Model for the Production of Hydrogen Using High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. Mc Kellar; E. A. Harvego; M. Richards; A. Shenoy

    2006-07-01

    High temperature electrolysis (HTE) involves the splitting of stream into hydrogen and oxygen at high temperatures. The primary advantage of HTE over conventional low temperature electrolysis is that considerably higher hydrogen production efficiencies can be achieved. Performing the electrolysis process at high temperatures results in more favorable thermodynamics for electrolysis, more efficient production of electricity, and allows direct use of process heat to generate steam. This paper presents the results of process analyses performed to evaluate the hydrogen production efficiencies of an HTE plant coupled to a 600 MWt Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) that supplies both the electricity and process heat needed to drive the process. The MHR operates with a coolant outlet temperature of 950 C. Approximately 87% of the high-temperature heat is used to generate electricity at high efficiency using a direct, Brayton-cycle power conversion system. The remaining high-temperature heat is used to generate a superheated steam / hydrogen mixture that is supplied to the electrolyzers. The analyses were performed using the HYSYS process modeling software. The model used to perform the analyses consisted of three loops; a primary high temperature helium loop, a secondary helium loop and the HTE process loop. The detailed model included realistic representations of all major components in the system, including pumps, compressors, heat exchange equipment, and the electrolysis stack. The design of the hydrogen production process loop also included a steam-sweep gas system to remove oxygen from the electrolysis stack so that it can be recovered and used for other applications. Results of the process analyses showed that hydrogen production efficiencies in the range of 45% to 50% are achievable with this system.

  20. Nuclear driven water decomposition plant for hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, G. H.; Brecher, L. E.; Farbman, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual design of a hydrogen production plant using a very-high-temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR) to energize a hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical system for water decomposition has been prepared. A graphite-moderated helium-cooled VHTR is used to produce 1850 F gas for electric power generation and 1600 F process heat for the water-decomposition process which uses sulfur compounds and promises performance superior to normal water electrolysis or other published thermochemical processes. The combined cycle operates at an overall thermal efficiency in excess of 45%, and the overall economics of hydrogen production by this plant have been evaluated predicated on a consistent set of economic ground rules. The conceptual design and evaluation efforts have indicated that development of this type of nuclear-driven water-decomposition plant will permit large-scale economic generation of hydrogen in the 1990s.

  1. Liquid hydrogen production and commercial demand in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heydorn, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center, the single largest purchaser of liquid hydrogen (LH2) in the United States, evaluated current and anticipated hydrogen production and consumption in the government and commercial sectors. Specific objectives of the study are as follows: (1) identify LH2 producers in the United States and Canada during 1980-1989 period; (2) compile information in expected changes in LH2 production capabilities over the 1990-2000 period; (3) describe how hydrogen is used in each consuming industry and estimate U.S. LH2 consumption for the chemicals, metals, electronics, fats and oil, and glass industries, and report data on a regional basis; (4) estimate historical and future consumption; and (5) assess the influence of international demands on U.S. plants.

  2. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

  3. Improvements in fermentative biological hydrogen production through metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, Patrick C; Ghosh, Dipankar

    2012-03-01

    Replacement of fossil fuels with alternative energies is increasingly imperative in light of impending climate change and fossil fuel shortages. Biohydrogen has several potential advantages over other biofuels. Dark fermentation as a means of producing biohydrogen is attractive since a variety of readily available waste streams can be used. However, at present its practical application is prevented by the low yields obtained. Here the basic metabolisms leading to hydrogen production are outlined and current research to increase yields, either through modification of existing pathways, or by metabolic engineering to create new, higher yielding, pathways, is discussed. Inactivation of competing reactions and manipulation of culture conditions has lead to higher hydrogen yields, near those predicted by metabolic schemes. However, to be useful, hydrogen production must be increased beyond present limits. Several possibilities for surpassing those limits using metabolic engineering are presented.

  4. Nuclear driven water decomposition plant for hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, G. H.; Brecher, L. E.; Farbman, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual design of a hydrogen production plant using a very-high-temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR) to energize a hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical system for water decomposition has been prepared. A graphite-moderated helium-cooled VHTR is used to produce 1850 F gas for electric power generation and 1600 F process heat for the water-decomposition process which uses sulfur compounds and promises performance superior to normal water electrolysis or other published thermochemical processes. The combined cycle operates at an overall thermal efficiency in excess of 45%, and the overall economics of hydrogen production by this plant have been evaluated predicated on a consistent set of economic ground rules. The conceptual design and evaluation efforts have indicated that development of this type of nuclear-driven water-decomposition plant will permit large-scale economic generation of hydrogen in the 1990s.

  5. Methanol Steam Reforming for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Palo, Daniel R.; Dagle, Robert A.; Holladay, Jamie D.

    2007-09-11

    Review article covering developments in methanol steam reforming in the context of PEM fuel cell power systems. Subjects covered include methanol background, use, and production, comparison to other fuels, power system considerations, militrary requirements, competing technologies, catalyst development, and reactor and system development and demonstration.

  6. Carbon sequestration in soybean crop soils: the role of hydrogen-coupled CO2 fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, A.; Layzell, D. B.; Scott, N. A.; Cen, Y.; Kyser, T. K.

    2011-12-01

    Conversion of native vegetation to agricultural land in order to support the world's growing population is a key factor contributing to global climate change. However, the extent to which agricultural activities contribute to greenhouse gas emissions compared to carbon storage is difficult to ascertain, especially for legume crops, such as soybeans. Soybean establishment often leads to an increase in N2O emissions because N-fixation leads to increased soil available N during decomposition of the low C:N legume biomass. However, soybean establishment may also reduce net greenhouse gas emissions by increasing soil fertility, plant growth, and soil carbon storage. The mechanism behind increased carbon storage, however, remains unclear. One explanation points to hydrogen coupled CO2 fixation; the process by which nitrogen fixation releases H2 into the soil system, thereby promoting chemoautotrophic carbon fixation by soil microbes. We used 13CO2 as a tracer to track the amount and fate of carbon fixed by hydrogen coupled CO2 fixation during one-year field and laboratory incubations. The objectives of the research are to 1) quantify rates of 13CO2 fixation in soil collected from a field used for long-term soybean production 2) examine the impact of H2 gas concentration on rates of 13CO2 fixation, and 3) measure changes in δ13C signature over time in 3 soil fractions: microbial biomass, light fraction, and acid stable fraction. If this newly-fixed carbon is incorporated into the acid-stable soil C fraction, it has a good chance of contributing to long-term soil C sequestration under soybean production. Soil was collected in the field both adjacent to root nodules (nodule soil) and >3cm away (root soil) and labelled with 13CO2 (1% v/v) in the presence and absence of H2 gas. After a two week labelling period, δ13C signatures already revealed differences in the four treatments of bulk soil: -17.1 for root, -17.6 for nodule, -14.2 for root + H2, and -6.1 for nodule + H2

  7. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, S.; Anand, M.; Carvill, B.

    1995-09-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process, the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The consequences of SER are: (1) reformation reaction at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than conventional SMR (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (2) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 99+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (3) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The early focus of the program will be on the identification of an adsorbent/chemisorbent for CO{sub 2} and on the demonstration of the SER concept for SMR in our state-of-the-art bench scale process. In the latter stages, a pilot plant will be built to scale-up the technology and to develop engineering data. The program has just been initiated and no significant results for SMR will be reported. However, results demonstrating the basic principles and process schemes of SER technology will be presented for reverse water gas shift reaction as the model reaction. If successful, this technology will be commercialized by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) and used in its existing hydrogen business. APCI is the world leader in merchant hydrogen production for a wide range of industrial applications.

  8. Photocatalytic production of hydrogen from fixed titanium dioxide thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoye, Njideka Helen

    This thesis is focused on further developing of an efficient method for the photocatalytic hydrogen production. The research aimed to use thin films deposited with TiO2 and doped with Pt in order to substitute slurry solutions that are currently being used. A new depositing experimental approach to manufacture the thin films was proposed and tested for both physical properties and chemical reactivity. Therefore, the experiment was designed into two parts: The first part was on the manufacturing and the physical characterization of titanium dioxide deposited on glass surfaces and the second part was focused on the ability of the thin film to produce hydrogen. For the second part, a photochemical reactor vessel was used to properly place the glass slides to UV-irradiation. This was yielded by a mercury lamp located at the centre of the reactor. The thesis is organized into five different chapters including introduction, literature review, characterization of TiO2 coated surface, experimental design and hydrogen production, finally conclusive observations and future work. Hydrogen production by photodecomposition of water into H2 and O2 has a very low efficiency due to rapid reverse reaction and, as mentioned above, it usually requires a slurry type of solution. This needs additional processing steps such as filtration and recycling of particles. Therefore, it is important to develop an efficient process for hydrogen production. TiO2 coated surfaces could be an excellent technological alternative. In this study, a sol-gel method was used to produce a transparent TiO 2 thin film which was deposited on a glass substrate by using a new coating technique introduced in this work for H2 production. The TiO2 deposited film on a glass substrate by using the spraying method of coating was characterized for physical analysis (surface characteristics, size of nanoparticles and distribution, etc.) by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission

  9. Methods and apparatus for the on-site production of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschmann, Wayne E. (Inventor); James, Patrick I. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods, apparatus, and applications for the on-site production of hydrogen peroxide are described. An embodiment of the apparatus comprises at least one anolyte chamber coupled to at least one anode, at least one catholyte chamber, wherein the at least one catholyte chamber is coupled to at least one cathode, at least one anode membrane and at least one cathode membrane, wherein the anode membrane is adjacent to the at least one anode, wherein the cathode membrane is adjacent to the at least one cathode, at least one central chamber disposed between the at least one anolyte chamber and the at least one catholyte chamber. Hydrogen peroxide is produced by reduction of an oxygen-containing gas at the cathode.

  10. The quadrupole coupling constant of HNC. [hydrogen isocyanide hyperfine structure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, L. E.; Hollis, J. M.; Buhl, D.

    1977-01-01

    The letter reports resolved measurements of the quadrupole hyperfine structure of HNC (hydrogen isocyanide). These measurements were made in the direction of the cool interstellar dust cloud L134, and were used to make an experimental determination of a fundamental spectroscopic constant of HNC, its quadrupole coupling constant.

  11. Capacitively Coupled Radio Frequency Discharge Plasmas In Hydrogen: Particle Modeling and Negative Ion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Diomede, P.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2005-05-16

    We present a 1D(r)2D(v) particle code for capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge plasmas in hydrogen, which includes a rigorous kinetic modeling of ion transport and several solutions to speed up the convergence. In a test case the effect of surface atom recombination and molecule vibrational deactivation on H- concentration is investigated.

  12. Bio-hydrogen production from renewable organic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Shihwu Sung

    2004-04-30

    Methane fermentation has been in practice over a century for the stabilization of high strength organic waste/wastewater. Although methanogenesis is a well established process and methane--the end-product of methanogenesis is a useful energy source; it is a low value end product with relatively less energy content (about 56 kJ energy/g CH{sub 4}). Besides, methane and its combustion by-product are powerful greenhouse gases, and responsible for global climate change. So there is a pressing need to explore alternative environmental technologies that not only stabilize the waste/wastewater but also generate benign high value end products. From this perspective, anaerobic bioconversion of organic wastes to hydrogen gas is an attractive option that achieves both goals. From energy security stand point, generation of hydrogen energy from renewable organic waste/wastewater could substitute non-renewable fossil fuels, over two-third of which is imported from politically unstable countries. Thus, biological hydrogen production from renewable organic waste through dark fermentation represents a critically important area of bioenergy production. This study evaluated both process engineering and microbial physiology of biohydrogen production.

  13. Heat Pre-Treatment of Beverages Wastewater on Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyub, S. Z.; Mohd, N. S.; Ibrahim, S.

    2017-06-01

    At present, a large variety of alternative fuels have been investigated and hydrogen gas is considered as the possible solution for the future due to its unique characteristics. Through dark fermentation process, several factors were found to have significant impact on the hydrogen production either through process enhancement or inhibition and degradation rates or influencing parameters. This work was initiated to investigate the optimum conditions for heat pre-treatment and initial pH for the dark fermentative process under mesophilic condition using a central composite design and response surface methodology (RSM). Different heat treatment conditions and pH were performed on the seed sludge collected from the anaerobic digester of beverage wastewater treatment plant. Heat treatment of inoculum was optimized at different exposure times (30, 90, 120 min), temperatures (80, 90 and 100°C) and pH (4.5, 5.5, 6.5) in order to maximize the biohydrogen production and methanogens activity inhibition. It was found that the optimum heat pre-treatment condition and pH occurred at 100°C for 50 min and the pH of 6.00. At this optimum condition the hydrogen yield was 63.0476 ml H2/mol glucose (H2 Yield) and the COD removal efficiency was 90.87%. In conclusion, it can be hypothesized that different heat treatment conditions led to differences in the initial microbial communities (hydrogen producing bacteria) which resulted in the different hydrogen yields.

  14. Hydrogen and formate oxidation coupled to dissimilatory reduction of iron or manganese by Alteromonas putrefaciens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lonergan, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of Alteromonas putrefaciens to obtain energy for growth by coupling the oxidation of various electron donors to dissimilatory Fe(III) or Mn(IV) reduction was investigated. A. putrefaciens grew with hydrogen, formate, lactate, or pyruvate as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. Lactate and pyruvate were oxidized to acetate, which was not metabolized further. With Fe(III) as the electron acceptor, A. putrefaciens had a high affinity for hydrogen and formate and metabolized hydrogen at partial pressures that were 25-fold lower than those of hydrogen that can be metabolized by pure cultures of sulfate reducers or methanogens. The electron donors for Fe(III) reduction also supported Mn(IV) reduction. The electron donors for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction and the inability of A. putrefaciens to completely oxidize multicarbon substrates to carbon dioxide distinguish A. putrefaciens from GS-15, the only other organism that is known to obtain energy for growth by coupling the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV). The ability of A. putrefaciens to reduce large quantities of Fe(III) and to grow in a defined medium distinguishes it from a Pseudomonas sp., which is the only other known hydrogen-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing microorganism. Furthermore, A. putrefaciens is the first organism that is known to grow with hydrogen as the electron donor and Mn(IV) as the electron acceptor and is the first organism that is known to couple the oxidation of formate to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV). Thus, A. putrefaciens provides a much needed microbial model for key reactions in the oxidation of sediment organic matter coupled to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

  15. A coupled, pore-scale model for methanogenic microbial activity in underground hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebigbo, Anozie; Golfier, Fabrice; Quintard, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Underground hydrogen storage (UHS) as a means of energy storage is an efficient way of compensating for seasonal fluctuations in the availability of energy. One important factor which influences this technology is the activity of methanogenic microorganisms capable of utilising hydrogen and carbon dioxide for metabolism and leading to a change in the stored gas composition. A coupled, pore-scale model is presented which aids in the investigation of the mechanisms that govern the conversion of hydrogen to methane, i.e. advective hydrogen flow, its diffusion into microbial biofilms of multiple species, and its consumption within these biofilms. The model assumes that spherical grains are coated by a film of residual water and treats the biofilm development within each film in a quasi one-dimensional manner. A sample simulation using the presented model illustrates the biofilm growth process in these films as well as the competition between three different microbial species: methanogens, acetogens, and acetotrophs.

  16. Effects of hydrogen isotope in coupling between confinement, wall material and SoL turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Sasaki, M.; Kosuga, Y.

    2017-05-01

    The hydrogen isotope effect on confinement is discussed by investigating the coupling between confinement, wall material and scrape-off-layer (SoL) turbulence. An emphasis is placed upon the dependence of the neutral density on the hydrogen mass number. The momentum loss via CX process in the barrier is studied, and its influence on the radial electric field in the barrier (so as to modify the suppression of transport) is discussed. The penetration of slow neutrals and the reflection of fast neutrals on the wall are considered. Combining these processes, the influence of hydrogen mass number on the atomic, molecular, material and plasma interactions is investigated. The penetration of strong fluctuations in the SoL plasma into the confined plasma via the fuelling of neutral particles (i.e. fuelling fuels turbulence) is also discussed. The hydrogen isotope effect on this source of edge turbulence, which can affect the core-confinement, is discussed.

  17. Hydrogen coupled CO2 fixation in legume cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, T.; Cen, Y.; Layzell, D. B.; Kyser, K.; Scott, N. A.

    2009-05-01

    Electron flow from oxidation of excess H2 released by root nodules was shown to contribute to microbial CO2 fixation in soybean crops. This discovery has important implications for carbon storage in soils used to grow legumes; however, further research is needed to understand the fate and turnover time of this H2-coupled CO2 fixation. Isotopic labeling of soil through incubation with 13CO2 was used to elucidate movement of sequestered carbon into soil carbon pools. Measurement of isotopic shifts was determined using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry. Preliminary experiments have confirmed CO2 uptake through an isotopic shift (Δ13C -20.4 to -14.5 ‰) in 24 hour incubated soils labeled with 13CO2 (1% v/v, 99.5 Atom%) under elevated H2 concentration (6000 ppm). Other incubation experiments have confirmed the biotic nature of observed CO2 uptake by comparing isotopic shifts in oven dried and autoclaved soils to moist soil. Under an elevated H2 atmosphere, no significant isotopic shift was observed in dry and autoclaved soils whereas moist soil showed an isotopic shift of Δ13C -21.9 to 11.4 ‰ over 48 hours. Future experiments will involve longer incubations (7 days) and will be aimed at determining isotopic shifts within soil carbon pools. Samples will be incubated and fractionated into microbial biomass, light fraction carbon, and acid stable carbon and subsequent isotopic analysis will be carried out. This will help determine the distribution of H2- coupled fixed CO2 within soil carbon pools and the turnover time of sequestered carbon. This and further research may lead to modification of greenhouse gas coefficients for leguminous crops that includes a CO2 fixation component.

  18. Process development for hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on growth and product formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Florian; Morweiser, Michael; Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Kruse, Olaf; Posten, Clemens

    2012-11-30

    Certain strains of microalgae are long known to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase enzyme recombines electrons from the chloroplast electron transport chain with protons to form molecular hydrogen directly inside the chloroplast. A sustained hydrogen production can be obtained under low sulfur conditions in C. reinhardtii, reducing the net oxygen evolution by reducing the photosystem II activity and thereby overcoming the inhibition of the hydrogenases. The development of specially adapted hydrogen production strains led to higher yields and optimized biological process preconditions. So far sustainable hydrogen production required a complete exchange of the growth medium to establish sulfur-deprived conditions after biomass growth. In this work we demonstrate the transition from the biomass growth phase to the hydrogen production phase in a single batch culture only by exact dosage of sulfur. This eliminates the elaborate and energy intensive solid-liquid separation step and establishes a process strategy to proceed further versus large scale production. This strategy has been applied to determine light dependent biomass growth and hydrogen production kinetics to assess the potential of H₂ production with C. reinhardtii as a basis for scale up and further process optimization.

  19. Simulation Studies of Hydrogen Ion reflection from Tungsten for the Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi

    2011-09-26

    The production efficiency of negative ions at tungsten surface by particle reflection has been investigated. Angular distributions and energy spectra of reflected hydrogen ions from tungsten surface are calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that angular distributions of reflected hydrogen ions show narrow distributions for low-energy incidence such as 50 eV, and energy spectra of reflected ions show sharp peaks around 90% of incident energy. These narrow angular distributions and sharp peaks are favorable for the efficient extraction of negative ions from an ion source equipped with tungsten surface as negative ionization converter. The retained hydrogen atoms in tungsten lead to the reduction in extraction efficiency due to boarded angular distributions.

  20. Simulation Studies of Hydrogen Ion reflection from Tungsten for the Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi

    2011-09-01

    The production efficiency of negative ions at tungsten surface by particle reflection has been investigated. Angular distributions and energy spectra of reflected hydrogen ions from tungsten surface are calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that angular distributions of reflected hydrogen ions show narrow distributions for low-energy incidence such as 50 eV, and energy spectra of reflected ions show sharp peaks around 90% of incident energy. These narrow angular distributions and sharp peaks are favorable for the efficient extraction of negative ions from an ion source equipped with tungsten surface as negative ionization converter. The retained hydrogen atoms in tungsten lead to the reduction in extraction efficiency due to boarded angular distributions.

  1. Lighting Up Enzymes for Solar Hydrogen Production (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have combined quantum dots, which are spherical nanoparticles that possess unique size-tunable photophysical properties, with the high substrate selectivity and fast turnover of hydrogenase enzymes to achieve light-driven hydrogen (H2) production. They found that quantum dots of cadmium telluride coated in carboxylic acids easily formed highly stable complexes with the hydrogenase and that these hybrid assemblies functioned to catalyze H2 production using the energy of sunlight.

  2. Hydrogen production by Rhodopseudomonas palustris WP 3-5 in a serial photobioreactor fed with hydrogen fermentation effluent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Mei; Hung, Guo-Jan; Yang, Chu-Fang

    2011-09-01

    In this study, a lab-scale serial photobioreactor composed of three column reactors was constructed and continuously operated to investigate several parameters influencing photohydrogen production when using the synthetic wastewater and the anaerobic hydrogen fermentation effluents as the influents. The results indicated that better hydrogen production rate was obtained when the serial photobioreactor was operated under cellular recycling at a short HRT of 8h. The serial photobioreactor maintained high hydrogen content ca. 80% in the produced gas and 0.4× dilution ratio was the suitable ratio for hydrogen production. When the photobioreactor fed with the real wastewater (Effluent 1) containing 100 mg/L NH4Cl, Column 1 reactor successfully reduced ammonia concentration to about 60 mg/L for cell synthesis, resulting in a steady hydrogen production in the following two column reactors. The average hydrogen production rate was 205 mL-H2/L/d.

  3. Electrolytic hydrogen fuel production with solid polymer electrolyte technology.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titterington, W. A.; Fickett, A. P.

    1973-01-01

    A water electrolysis technology based on a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) concept is presented for applicability to large-scale hydrogen production in a future energy system. High cell current density operation is selected for the application, and supporting cell test performance data are presented. Demonstrated cell life data are included to support the adaptability of the SPE system to large-size hydrogen generation utility plants as needed for bulk energy storage or transmission. The inherent system advantages of the acid SPE electrolysis technology are explained. System performance predictions are made through the year 2000, along with plant capital and operating cost projections.

  4. Electrolytic hydrogen fuel production with solid polymer electrolyte technology.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titterington, W. A.; Fickett, A. P.

    1973-01-01

    A water electrolysis technology based on a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) concept is presented for applicability to large-scale hydrogen production in a future energy system. High cell current density operation is selected for the application, and supporting cell test performance data are presented. Demonstrated cell life data are included to support the adaptability of the SPE system to large-size hydrogen generation utility plants as needed for bulk energy storage or transmission. The inherent system advantages of the acid SPE electrolysis technology are explained. System performance predictions are made through the year 2000, along with plant capital and operating cost projections.

  5. Thermochemical hydrogen production studies at LLNL: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, O.H.

    1982-06-08

    Currently, studies are underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on thermochemical hydrogen production based on magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and solar central receivers as heat sources. These areas of study were described earlier at the previous IEA Annex I Hydrogen Workshop (Juelich, West Germany, September 23-25, 1981), and a brief update will be given here. Some basic research has also been underway at LLNL on the electrolysis of water from fused phosphate salts, but there are no current results in that area, and the work is being terminated.

  6. Production of Excited Atomic Hydrogen from Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Furst, J. E.; Gay, T. J.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Landers, A. L.; McLaughlin, K. W.

    2009-05-01

    We have measured the production of Lyα and Hα fluorescence from atomic H for the photodissociation of CH4 by linearly-polarized photons with energies between 20 and 65 eV. Comparison between our Lyα relative cross section and that previously reported [1] show different peak height ratios. This also occurs in the Hα cross section when compared to previous data [2]. We do not observe as significant a drop in either cross section above 35 eV. Our measurements were taken with pressures two orders of magnitude lower than those used in ref. [1]. We present comparisons between data sets and a discussion of possible systematic effects. [1] H. Fukuzawa et al., J. Phys. B. 38, 565 (2005). [2] M. Kato et al., J. Phys. B. 35, 4383 (2002). Support provided by the NSF (Grant PHY-0653379), DOE (LBNL/ALS) and ANSTO (Access to Major Research Facilities Programme).

  7. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry Y.S.

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  8. Radiative Muon Capture on Hydrogen and the Induced Pseudoscalar Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkmans, G.; Ahmad, S.; Armstrong, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bertl, W.; Blecher, M.; Chen, C.; Depommier, P.; Doyle, B.; von Egidy, T.; Gorringe, T.; Gumplinger, P.; Hasinoff, M.; Healey, D.; Larabee, A.; Macdonald, J.; McDonald, S.; Munro, M.; Poutissou, J.; Poutissou, R.; Robertson, B.; Sample, D.; Saettler, E.; Sigler, C.; Taylor, G.; Wright, D.; Zhang, N. ||||||||

    1996-11-01

    The first measurement of the elementary process {mu}{sup {minus}}{ital p}{r_arrow}{nu}{sub {mu}}{ital n}{gamma} is reported. A photon pair spectrometer was used to measure the partial branching ratio (2.10{plus_minus}0.22){times}10{sup {minus}8} for photons of {ital k}{gt}60 MeV. The value of the weak pseudoscalar coupling constant determined from the partial branching ratio is {ital g}{sub {ital p}}({ital q}{sup 2}={minus}0.88{ital m}{sub {mu}}{sup 2})=(9.8{plus_minus}0.7{plus_minus}0.3){ital g}{sub {ital a}}(0), where the first error is the quadrature sum of statistical and systematic uncertainties and the second error is due to the uncertainty in {lambda}{sub op}, the decay rate of the ortho to para {ital p}{mu}{ital p} molecule. This value of {ital g}{sub {ital p}} is {approximately}1.5 times the prediction of partial conservation of axial current and pion-pole dominance. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Hydrogen production from glucose and sorbitol by sorption-enhanced steam reforming: challenges and promises.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Chen, De

    2012-03-12

    Concerning energy and environmental sustainability, it is appealing to produce hydrogen from sugars or sugar alcohols that are readily obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass. Nevertheless, the conversion of such compounds for hydrogen production poses great technical challenges. In this paper, we report that hydrogen purity and yield can be significantly improved by integrating in situ CO(2) capture into the steam reforming reaction of the model compounds-glucose and sorbitol. The experimental assessment was conducted at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.8 for sorbitol and 6 for glucose from 450-625 °C. As predicted by thermodynamic analysis, combining CO(2) capture and reforming reactions at favorable operating conditions yielded very high purity hydrogen, for instance, 98.8 mol % from sorbitol and 99.9 mol % from glucose. However, there are trade-offs between hydrogen purity and yield in practice. The lower operating temperatures in the examined range helped to increase the hydrogen purity and reduce the CO content in the gas product, whereas a high hydrogen yield was more likely to be obtained at higher temperatures. Coupling CO(2) capture lowered the risk of coke formation during the steam reforming of glucose. Coke accumulated in the reactor for the sorption-enhanced steam reforming of glucose was mostly from the slow pyrolysis of glucose before it came into contact with the catalyst-acceptor bed. This problem may be solved by improving heat transfer or reconstructing the reactor, for instance, by using a fluidized-bed reactor.

  10. Coupling glucose fermentation and homoacetogenesis for elevated acetate production: Experimental and mathematical approaches.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Liu, He; Nie, Yan-Qiu; Zeng, Raymond J; Du, Guo-Cheng; Chen, Jian; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-02-01

    Homoacetogenesis is an important potential hydrogen sink in acetogenesis, in which hydrogen is used to reduce carbon dioxide to acetate. So far the acetate production from homoacetogenesis, especially its kinetics, has not been given sufficient attention. In this work, enhanced production of acetate from anaerobic conversion of glucose through coupling glucose fermentation and homoacetogenesis is investigated with both experimental and mathematical approaches. Experiments are conducted to explore elevated acetate production in a coupled anaerobic system. Acetate production could be achieved by homoacetogenesis with a relative high acetate yield under mixed fermentation conditions. With the experimental observations, a kinetic model is formulated to describe such a homoacetogenic process. The maximum homoacetogenic rate (k(m,homo)) is estimated to be 28.5 ± 1.7 kg COD kg⁻¹ COD day⁻¹ with an uptake affinity constant of 3.7 × 10⁻⁵± 3.1 × 10⁻⁶kg COD m⁻³. The improved calculation of homoacetogenic kinetics by our approach could correct the underestimation of homoacetogenesis in anaerobic fermentation processes, as it often occurs in these systems supported by literature analysis. The model predictions match the experimental results in different cases well and provide insights into the dynamics of anaerobic glucose conversion and acetate production. Furthermore, acetate production via homoacetogenesis increases by about 40% through utilizing the fed-batch coupling system, attributed to a balance between the hydrogen production in the acetogenesis phase and the hydrogen consumption in the homoacetogenesis phase. This work provides an effective way for increased anaerobic acetate production, and gives us a better understanding about the homoacetogenic kinetics in the anaerobic fermentation process. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Investigation of the RF efficiency of inductively coupled hydrogen plasmas at 1 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauner, D.; Mattei, S.; Briefi, S.; Fantz, U.; Hatayama, A.; Lettry, J.; Nishida, K.; Tran, M. Q.

    2017-08-01

    The power requirements of RF heated sources for negative hydrogen ions in fusion are substantial, which poses strong demands on the generators and components of the RF circuit. Consequently, an increase of the RF coupling efficiency would be highly beneficial. Fundamental investigations of the RF efficiency in inductively coupled hydrogen and deuterium discharges in cylindrical symmetry are conducted at the lab experiment CHARLIE. The experiment is equipped with several diagnostics including optical emission spectroscopy and a movable floating double probe to monitor the plasma parameters. The presented investigations are performed in hydrogen at a varying pressure between 0.3 and 10 Pa, utilizing a conventional helical ICP coil driven at a frequency of 1 MHz and a fixed power of 520 W for plasma generation. The coupling efficiency is strongly affected by the variation in pressure, reaching up to 85 % between 1 and 3 Pa while dropping down to only 50 % at 0.3 Pa, which is the relevant operating pressure for negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion. Due to the lower power coupling, also the measured electron density at 0.3 Pa is only 5 . 1016 m-3, while it reaches up to 2.5 . 1017 m-3 with increasing coupling efficiency. In order to gain information on the spatially resolved aspects of RF coupling and plasma heating which are not diagnostically accessible, first simulations of the discharge by an electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo collision method have been conducted and are compared to the measurement data. At 1 Pa, the simulated data corresponds well to the results of both axially resolved probe measurements and radially resolved emission profiles obtained via OES. Thereby, information regarding the radial distribution of the electron density and mean energy is provided, revealing a radial distribution of the electron density which is well described by a Bessel profile.

  12. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  13. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Kocha, S.; Peterson, M.; Arent, D.

    1996-10-01

    Photon driven, direct conversion systems consist of a light absorber and a water splitting catalyst as a monolithic system; water is split directly upon illumination. This one-step process eliminates the need to generate electricity externally and subsequently feed it to an electrolyzer. These configurations require only the piping necessary for transport of hydrogen to an external storage system or gas pipeline. This work is focused on multiphoton photoelectrochemical devices for production of hydrogen directly using sunlight and water. Two types of multijunction cells, one consisting of a-Si triple junctions and the other GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs homojunctions, were studied for the photoelectrochemical decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen from an aqueous electrolyte solution. To catalyze the water decomposition process, the illuminated surface of the device was modified either by addition of platinum colloids or by coating with ruthenium dioxide. These colloids have been characterized by gel electrophoresis.

  14. Photoautotrophic hydrogen production by eukaryotic microalgae under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Choi, Jeong-A; Abou-Shanab, R A I; Dempsey, Brian A; Regan, John M; Kim, Jung Rae; Song, Hocheol; Nam, In-Hyun; Kim, Su-Nam; Lee, Woojung; Park, Donghee; Kim, Yongje; Choi, Jaeyoung; Ji, Min-Kyu; Jung, Woosik; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic algae and cyanobacteria produce hydrogen under anaerobic and limited aerobic conditions. Here we show that novel microalgal strains (Chlorella vulgaris YSL01 and YSL16) upregulate the expression of the hydrogenase gene (HYDA) and simultaneously produce hydrogen through photosynthesis, using CO2 as the sole source of carbon under aerobic conditions with continuous illumination. We employ dissolved oxygen regimes that represent natural aquatic conditions for microalgae. The experimental expression of HYDA and the specific activity of hydrogenase demonstrate that C. vulgaris YSL01 and YSL16 enzymatically produce hydrogen, even under atmospheric conditions, which was previously considered infeasible. Photoautotrophic H2 production has important implications for assessing ecological and algae-based photolysis.

  15. Sequestration of carbon dioxide with hydrogen to useful products

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.; Hawkins, Aaron B.; Menon, Angeli Lal; Lipscomb, Gina Lynette Pries; Schut, Gerrit Jan

    2017-03-07

    Provided herein are genetically engineered microbes that include at least a portion of a carbon fixation pathway, and in one embodiment, use molecular hydrogen to drive carbon dioxide fixation. In one embodiment, the genetically engineered microbe is modified to convert acetyl CoA, molecular hydrogen, and carbon dioxide to 3-hydroxypropionate, 4-hydroxybutyrate, acetyl CoA, or the combination thereof at levels greater than a control microbe. Other products may also be produced. Also provided herein are cell free compositions that convert acetyl CoA, molecular hydrogen, and carbon dioxide to 3-hydroxypropionate, 4-hydroxybutyrate, acetyl CoA, or the combination thereof. Also provided herein are methods of using the genetically engineered microbes and the cell free compositions.

  16. Dynamic Simulation and Optimization of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul I. Barton; Mujid S. Kaximi; Georgios Bollas; Patricio Ramirez Munoz

    2009-07-31

    This project is part of a research effort to design a hydrogen plant and its interface with a nuclear reactor. This project developed a dynamic modeling, simulation and optimization environment for nuclear hydrogen production systems. A hybrid discrete/continuous model captures both the continuous dynamics of the nuclear plant, the hydrogen plant, and their interface, along with discrete events such as major upsets. This hybrid model makes us of accurate thermodynamic sub-models for the description of phase and reaction equilibria in the thermochemical reactor. Use of the detailed thermodynamic models will allow researchers to examine the process in detail and have confidence in the accurary of the property package they use.

  17. Self-Assembling Hydrogel Scaffolds for Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Weingarten, Adam S.; Kazantsev, Roman V.; Palmer, Liam C.; McClendon, Mark; Koltonow, Andrew R.; Samuel, Amanda P. S.; Kiebala, Derek J.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2015-01-01

    Integration in a soft material of all molecular components necessary to generate storable fuels is an interesting target in supramolecular chemistry. The concept is inspired by the internal structure of photosynthetic organelles such as plant chloroplasts which co-localize molecules involved in light absorption, charge transport, and catalysis to create chemical bonds with light energy. We report here on the light-driven production of hydrogen inside a hydrogel scaffold built by the supramolecular self-assembly of a perylene monoimide amphiphile. The charged ribbons formed can electrostatically attract a nickel-based catalyst, and electrolyte screening promotes gelation. We found the emergent phenomenon that screening by the catalyst or the electrolytes led to two-dimensional crystallization of the chromophore assemblies and enhanced the electronic coupling among the molecules. Photocatalytic production of hydrogen is observed in the three-dimensional environment of the hydrogel scaffold and the material is easily placed on surfaces or in the pores of solid supports. The development of soft materials that integrate all necessary molecular components to generate storable fuels in the presence of sunlight is an unexplored area of chemistry with potential impact in renewable energy. Such systems could have advantages over the use of large volumes of liquids, dispersions of expensive or toxic inorganic particles, or complex devices. The use of such soft materials with integrated functions and high water content is bioinspired by the internal structure of chloroplasts in plants. These photosynthetic organelles have evolved to co-localize within stacked lipid bilayers in their stroma the protein machinery which integrates light-absorption, charge transport, and the catalytic functions necessary to convert light energy into chemical bonds1,2. Efforts to emulate natural photosynthetic systems over the past several decades have concentrated on the development of efficient

  18. Carbon dioxide free production of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppel, L.; Fehling, T.; Geißler, T.; Baake, E.; Wetzel, T.

    2017-07-01

    The present report summarizes the theoretical modelling and experimental investigation results of the study on the direct thermal methane cracking. This work is a part of the LIMTECH-Project (Liquid Metal Technologies) funded of Helmholtz Alliance and was carried out from 2012 to 2017. The Project-part B5 “CO2-free production of hydrogen” focused on experimental testing and particularly on modelling the novel methane cracking method based on liquid metal technology. The new method uses a bubble column reactor, filled with liquid metal, where both the chemical reaction of methane decomposition and the separation of gas fraction from solid carbon occur. Such reactor system was designed and built in the liquid metal laboratory (KALLA) at KIT. The influences of liquid metal temperature distribution in reactor and feed gas flow rate on methane conversion ratio were investigated experimentally at the temperature range from 930°C to 1175 °C and methane flow rate at the reactor inlet from 50 to 200 mLn/min. In parallel with experimental investigations, a thermochemical model, giving insight in the influence of the above mentioned parameters has been developed at KIT and a CFD model was developed at LUH to get an overview about the bubble dynamics in the reaction system. The influence of different bubble sizes and shapes, multi-inlet coalescence effects as well as the potential of electromagnetic stirring have been investigated.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide production during decomposition of landfill inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Fairweather, R.J.; Barlaz, M.A.

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of a number of landfill inputs on hydrogen sulfide production and on competition between methane production and sulfate reduction during refuse decomposition. Tests were conducted in four-liter reactors that contained residential municipal waste; decomposed refuse as a seed; and various mixtures of anaerobically digested polymer-treated sludge, anaerobically digested lime-stabilized sludge, and wallboard (calcium sulfate) simulating construction and demolition waste. Tests demonstrated that wallboard was the major cause of hydrogen sulfide production and that methanogenesis and sulfate reduction occur concurrently during refuse decomposition. Additionally, both polymer- and lime-treated sludge enhanced refuse decomposition. Despite the presence of excess sulfate, 2.9 to 7.0 times more organic carbon was biodegraded through methanogenesis than through sulfate reduction.

  20. Hydrogen production via urea electrolysis using a gel electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Rebecca L.; Botte, Gerardine G.

    2011-03-01

    A technology was demonstrated for the production of hydrogen and other valuable products (nitrogen and clean water) through the electrochemical oxidation of urea in alkaline media. In addition, this process remediates toxic nitrates and prevents gaseous ammonia emissions. Improvements to urea electrolysis were made through replacement of aqueous KOH electrolyte with a poly(acrylic acid) gel electrolyte. A small volume of poly(acrylic acid) gel electrolyte was used to accomplish the electrochemical oxidation of urea improving on the previous requirement for large amounts of aqueous potassium hydroxide. The effect of gel composition was investigated by varying polymer content and KOH concentrations within the polymer matrix in order to determine which is the most advantageous for the electrochemical oxidation of urea and production of hydrogen.

  1. Hydrogen production: two stage processes for waste degradation.

    PubMed

    Gómez, X; Fernández, C; Fierro, J; Sánchez, M E; Escapa, A; Morán, A

    2011-09-01

    The dark fermentation process generates hydrogen by biological means. It presents two main advantages: fulfilling requirements for mild operational conditions and gaining benefit from the residual biomass. The process itself may be seen as a pre-treatment step in a complete stabilisation chain, with the aim of attaining the valorisation of residual biomass. However, increasing the yield of H2 production is an imperative task. In this manuscript, a review of recent work in the field of fermentative hydrogen production is presented. As dark fermentation has a maximum yield of 33% (on sugars), a description is also presented of possible second stage processes for the degradation of dark fermentation effluents. Alternatives considered were photofermentation and bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as processes capable of converting fermentation sub-products into H2. Anaerobic digestion as a final stabilisation stage was also considered owing to the wide application of this technology in the treatment of bio-wastes.

  2. Effect of hydrogen on the interlayer exchange coupling in Fe/V superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ostanin, S.; Uzdin, V. M.; Demangeat, C.; Wills, J. M.; Alouani, M.; Dreysse, H.

    2000-02-15

    Electronic and magnetic structures of Fe/V superlattices with and without hydrogen in the vanadium spacer are investigated using a relativistic full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital method. We obtained short-range induced spin polarization in V as well as reduced Fe polarization at the Fe/V interface. The value of the magnetic moment induced on the vanadium atoms depends strongly on the distortion caused by the lattice mismatch and hydrogen loading whereas the total moment of the Fe and V interface layers remains almost unchanged. Hydrogenation of the V spacer leads to the decrease of the interface magnetic moment on the V atoms and to a reduction of the density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level. A low DOS could be one of the reasons for the experimental increase of the resistivity of the samples under hydrogen loading and leads to the disappearance of the antiferromagnetic exchange coupling in the Fe/(VH) superlattices for large hydrogen concentration. Doping the V film by a gold monolayer increases the DOS at the Fermi level and could recover the antiferromagnetic coupling. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  3. Thermocatalytic CO2-Free Production of Hydrogen from Hydrocarbon Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    University of Central Florida

    2004-01-30

    The main objective of this project is the development of an economically viable thermocatalytic process for production of hydrogen and carbon from natural gas or other hydrocarbon fuels with minimal environmental impact. The three major technical goals of this project are: (1) to accomplish efficient production of hydrogen and carbon via sustainable catalytic decomposition of methane or other hydrocarbons using inexpensive and durable carbon catalysts, (2) to obviate the concurrent production of CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts and drastically reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the process, and (3) to produce valuable carbon products in order to reduce the cost of hydrogen production The important feature of the process is that the reaction is catalyzed by carbon particulates produced in the process, so no external catalyst is required (except for the start-up operation). This results in the following advantages: (1) no CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts are generated during hydrocarbon decomposition stage, (2) no expensive catalysts are used in the process, (3) several valuable forms of carbon can be produced in the process depending on the process conditions (e.g., turbostratic carbon, pyrolytic graphite, spherical carbon particles, carbon filaments etc.), and (4) CO{sub 2} emissions could be drastically reduced (compared to conventional processes).

  4. Lichen Symbiosis: Nature's High Yielding Machines for Induced Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont’s and photobiont’s consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont’s hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  5. Lichen symbiosis: nature's high yielding machines for induced hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont's and photobiont's consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont's hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications.

  6. Evaluation of hydrogen production by clostridium strains on beet molasses.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ayşe; Kiliç, Nur Koçberber; Dönmez, Gönöl; Dönmez, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792, C. acetobutylicum DSM 1731 and two newly isolated bacteria defined as the members of genus Clostridium - based on the 16S rRNA analysis and biochemical traits - were characterized with regard to their hydrogen production in media containing increasing beet molasses concentrations. The highest hydrogen yield was observed for C. acetobutylicum DSM 792 with a yield of 2.8 mol H2 mol-1 hexose in medium including 60 g L-1 molasses. This bacterium also produced the maximum amount of hydrogen (5908.8 mL L-1) at the same molasses concentration. A slightly lower hydrogen yield was measured for C. acetobutylicum DSM 1731 (2.5 mol H2 mol-1 hexose) when grown on 40 g L-1 molasses. The new isolates Clostridium roseum C and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum PF produced hydrogen with yields of 2.0 mol H2 mol-1 hexose at 40 and 60 g L-1 molasses and 2.1 mol H2 mol-1 hexose at 40 gL-1 molasses, respectively.

  7. Substrate and product inhibition of hydrogen production by the extreme thermophile, Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    van Niel, Ed W J; Claassen, Pieternel A M; Stams, Alfons J M

    2003-02-05

    Substrate and product inhibition of hydrogen production during sucrose fermentation by the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus was studied. The inhibition kinetics were analyzed with a noncompetitive, nonlinear inhibition model. Hydrogen was the most severe inhibitor when allowed to accumulate in the culture. Concentrations of 5-10 mM H(2) in the gas phase (identical with partial hydrogen pressure (pH(2)) of (1-2) x 10(4) Pa) initiated a metabolic shift to lactate formation. The extent of inhibition by hydrogen was dependent on the density of the culture. The highest tolerance for hydrogen was found at low volumetric hydrogen production rates, as occurred in cultures with low cell densities. Under those conditions the critical hydrogen concentration in the gas phase was 27.7 mM H(2) (identical with pH(2) of 5.6 x 10(4) Pa); above this value hydrogen production ceased completely. With an efficient removal of hydrogen sucrose fermentation was mainly inhibited by sodium acetate. The critical concentrations of sucrose and acetate, at which growth and hydrogen production was completely inhibited (at neutral pH and 70 degrees C), were 292 and 365 mM, respectively. Inorganic salts, such as sodium chloride, mimicked the effect of sodium acetate, implying that ionic strength was responsible for inhibition. Undissociated acetate did not contribute to inhibition of cultures at neutral or slightly acidic pH. Exposure of exponentially growing cultures to concentrations of sodium acetate or sodium chloride higher than ca. 175 mM caused cell lysis, probably due to activation of autolysins. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 81: 255-262, 2003.

  8. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Schey

    2009-07-01

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-06ID14788 was executed between the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Transportation Applications, and Idaho National Laboratory to investigate the economics of producing hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity generated by nuclear power. The work under this agreement is divided into the following four tasks: Task 1 – Produce Data and Analyses Task 2 – Economic Analysis of Large-Scale Alkaline Electrolysis Task 3 – Commercial-Scale Hydrogen Production Task 4 – Disseminate Data and Analyses. Reports exist on the prospect that utility companies may benefit from having the option to produce electricity or produce hydrogen, depending on market conditions for both. This study advances that discussion in the affirmative by providing data and suggesting further areas of study. While some reports have identified issues related to licensing hydrogen plants with nuclear plants, this study provides more specifics and could be a resource guide for further study and clarifications. At the same time, this report identifies other area of risks and uncertainties associated with hydrogen production on this scale. Suggestions for further study in some of these topics, including water availability, are included in the report. The goals and objectives of the original project description have been met. Lack of industry design for proton exchange membrane electrolysis hydrogen production facilities of this magnitude was a roadblock for a significant period. However, recent design breakthroughs have made costing this facility much more accurate. In fact, the new design information on proton exchange membrane electrolyzers scaled to the 1 kg of hydrogen per second electrolyzer reduced the model costs from $500 to $100 million. Task 1 was delayed when the original electrolyzer failed at the end of its economic life. However, additional valuable information was obtained when the new electrolyzer was installed. Products developed during this study

  9. Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Thomas, Ph.D., President Franklin D. Lomax, Ph.D, CTO & Principal Investigator, and Maxim Lyubovski, Ph.D.

    2011-03-10

    H{sub 2}Gen, with the support of the Department of Energy, successfully designed, built and field-tested two steam methane reformers with 578 kg/day capacity, which has now become a standard commercial product serving customers in the specialty metals and PV manufacturing businesses. We demonstrated that this reformer/PSA system, when combined with compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) equipment could produce hydrogen that is already cost-competitive with gasoline per mile driven in a conventional (non-hybrid) vehicle. We further showed that mass producing this 578 kg/day system in quantities of just 100 units would reduce hydrogen cost per mile approximately 13% below the cost of untaxed gasoline per mile used in a hybrid electric vehicle. If mass produced in quantities of 500 units, hydrogen cost per mile in a FCEV would be 20% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in an HEV in the 2015-2020 time period using EIA fuel cost projections for natural gas and untaxed gasoline, and 45% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in a conventional car. This 20% to 45% reduction in fuel cost per mile would accrue even though hydrogen from this 578 kg/day system would cost approximately $4.14/kg, well above the DOE hydrogen cost targets of $2.50/kg by 2010 and $2.00/kg by 2015. We also estimated the cost of a larger, 1,500 kg/day SMR/PSA fueling system based on engineering cost scaling factors derived from the two H{sub 2}Gen products, a commercial 115 kg/day system and the 578 kg/day system developed under this DOE contract. This proposed system could support 200 to 250 cars per day, similar to a medium gasoline station. We estimate that the cost per mile from this larger 1,500 kg/day hydrogen fueling system would be 26% to 40% below the cost per mile of untaxed gasoline in an HEV and ICV respectively, even without any mass production cost reductions. In quantities of 500 units, we are projecting per mile cost reductions between 45% (vs. HEVs) and 62% (vs ICVs), with hydrogen

  10. Enhanced hydrogen production of Enterobacter aerogenes mutated by nuclear irradiation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Liu, Min; Song, Wenlu; Ding, Lingkan; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Li; Cen, Kefa

    2017-03-01

    Nuclear irradiation was used for the first time to generate efficient mutants of hydrogen-producing bacteria Enterobacter aerogenes, which were screened with larger colour circles of more fermentative acid by-products. E. aerogenes cells were mutated by nuclear irradiation of (60)Co γ-rays. The screened E. aerogenes ZJU1 mutant with larger colour circles enhanced the hydrogenase activity from 89.8 of the wild strain to 157.4mLH2/(gDWh). The hereditary stability of the E. aerogenes ZJU1 mutant was certified after over ten generations of cultivation. The hydrogen yield of 301mLH2/gglucose with the mutant was higher by 81.8% than that of 166mL/gglucose with the wild strain. The peak hydrogen production rate of 27.2mL/(L·h) with the mutant was higher by 40.9% compared with that of 19.3mL/(L·h) with the wild strain. The mutant produced more acetate and butyrate but less ethanol compared with the wild strain during hydrogen fermentation.

  11. Assessment of methods for hydrogen production using concentrated solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Glatzmaier, G.; Blake, D.; Showalter, S.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess methods for hydrogen production using concentrated solar energy. The results of this work can be used to guide future work in the application of concentrated solar energy to hydrogen production. Specifically, the objectives were to: (1) determine the cost of hydrogen produced from methods that use concentrated solar thermal energy, (2) compare these costs to those of hydrogen produced by electrolysis using photovoltaics and wind energy as the electricity source. This project had the following scope of work: (1) perform cost analysis on ambient temperature electrolysis using the 10 MWe dish-Stirling and 200 MWe power tower technologies; for each technology, sue two cases for projected costs, years 2010 and 2020 the dish-Stirling system, years 2010 and 2020 for the power tower, (2) perform cost analysis on high temperature electrolysis using the 200 MWe power tower technology and projected costs for the year 2020, and (3) identify and describe the key technical issues for high temperature thermal dissociation and the thermochemical cycles.

  12. Radiolytic hydrogen production from process vessels in HB line - production rates compared to evolution rates and discussion of LASL reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.

    1992-11-12

    Hydrogen production from radiolysis of aqueous solutions can create a safety hazard since hydrogen is flammable. At times this production can be significant, especially in HB line where nitric acid solutions containing high concentrations of Pu-238, an intense alpha emitter, are processed. The hydrogen production rates from these solutions are necessary for safety analyses of these process systems. The methods and conclusions of hydrogen production rate tests are provided in this report.

  13. Evidence for coupled motion and hydrogen tunneling of the reaction catalyzed by glutamate mutase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mou-Chi; Marsh, E Neil G

    2007-01-23

    Glutamate mutase is one of a group of adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzymes that catalyze unusual isomerizations that proceed through organic radical intermediates generated by homolytic fission of the coenzyme's unique cobalt-carbon bond. These enzymes are part of a larger family of enzymes that catalyze radical chemistry in which a key step is the abstraction of a hydrogen atom from an otherwise inert substrate. To gain insight into the mechanism of hydrogen transfer, we previously used pre-steady-state, rapid-quench techniques to measure the alpha-secondary tritium kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects associated with the formation of 5'-deoxyadenosine when glutamate mutase was reacted with [5'-(3)H]adenosylcobalamin and L-glutamate. We showed that both the kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects are large and inverse, 0.76 and 0.72, respectively. We have now repeated these measurements using glutamate deuterated in the position of hydrogen abstraction. The effect of introducing a primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect on the hydrogen transfer step is to reduce the magnitude of the secondary kinetic isotope effect to a value close to unity, 1.05 +/- 0.08, whereas the equilibrium isotope effect is unchanged. The significant reduction in the secondary kinetic isotope effect is consistent with motions of the 5'-hydrogen atoms being coupled in the transition state to the motion of the hydrogen undergoing transfer, in a reaction that involves a large degree of quantum tunneling.

  14. Evidence for Coupled Motion and Hydrogen Tunneling the Reaction Catalyzed by Glutamate Mutase:†

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mou-Chi; Marsh, E. Neil G.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate mutase is one of a group of adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzymes that catalyze unusual isomerizations that proceed through organic radical intermediates generated by homolytic fission of coenzyme's unique cobalt-carbon bond. These enzymes are part of a larger family of enzymes that catalyze radical chemistry in which a key step is the abstraction of a hydrogen atom from an otherwise inert substrate. To gain insight into the mechanism of hydrogen transfer we previously used pre-steady state, rapid quench techniques to measure the α-secondary tritium kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects associated with the formation of 5’-deoxyadenosine when glutamate mutase was reacted with [5’-3H]-adenosylcobalamin and L-glutamate. We showed that both the kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects are large and inverse, 0.76 and 0.72 respectively. We have now repeated these measurements using glutamate deuterated in the position of hydrogen abstraction. The effect of introducing a primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect on the hydrogen transfer step is to reduce the magnitude of the secondary kinetic isotope effect to a value close to unity, 1.05 ± 0.08, whereas the equilibrium isotope effect is unchanged. The significant reduction in the secondary kinetic isotope effect is consistent with motions of the 5’-hydrogen atoms being coupled in the transition state to the motion of the hydrogen undergoing transfer, in a reaction that involves a large degree of quantum tunneling. PMID:17223710

  15. Hydrogen Reduction of Lunar Regolith Simulants for Oxygen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, U.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Gokoglu, S. A.; Rogers, K.; Reddington, M.; Oryshchyn, L.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen reduction of the lunar regolith simulants JSC-1A and LHT-2M is investigated in this paper. Experiments conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center are described and are analyzed utilizing a previously validated model developed by the authors at NASA Glenn Research Center. The effects of regolith sintering and clumping, likely in actual production operations, on the oxygen production rate are studied. Interpretations of the obtained results on the basis of the validated model are provided and linked to increase in the effective particle size and reduction in the intra-particle species diffusion rates. Initial results on the pressure dependence of the oxygen production rate are also presented and discussed

  16. Method and System for the Production of Hydrogen at Reduced VHTR Outlet Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2009-10-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility dedicated to hydrogen production, early designs are expected to be dual purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor with electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. The integrated system of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant is being investigated and this system, as it is currently envisioned, will produce hydrogen by utilizing a highly efficient VHTR with a VHTR outlet temperature of 900°C to supply the necessary energy and electricity to the HTSE unit. Though the combined system may produce hydrogen and electricity with high efficiency, the choices of materials that are suitable for use at 900°C are limited due to high-temperature strength, corrosion, and durability (creep) considerations. The lack of materials that are ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) code-certified at these temperatures is also a problem, and is a barrier to commercial deployment. If the current system concept can be modified to produce hydrogen with comparable efficiency at lower temperatures, then the technical barriers related to materials selection and use might be eliminated, and the integrated system may have a much greater probability of

  17. Thermodynamic evaluation of hydrogen production via bioethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zsolt; Cormos, Ana-Maria; Imre-Lucaci, Árpád; Cormos, Cǎlin C.

    2013-11-01

    In this article, a thermodynamic analysis for bioethanol steam reforming for hydrogen production is presented. Bioethanol is a newly proposed renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Reforming of bioethanol provides a promising method for hydrogen production from renewable resources. Steam reforming of ethanol (SRE) takes place under the action of a metal catalyst capable of breaking C-C bonds into smaller molecules. A large domain for the water/bioethanol molar ratio as well as the temperature and average pressure has been used in the present work. The interval of investigated temperature was 100-800°C, the pressure was in the range of 1-10 bar and the molar ratio was between 3-25. The variations of gaseous species concentration e.g. H2, CO, CO2, CH4 were analyzed. The concentrations of the main products (H2 and CO) at lower temperature are smaller than the ones at higher temperature due to by-products formation (methane, carbon dioxide, acetylene etc.). The concentration of H2 obtained in the process using high molar ratio (>20) is higher than the one at small molar ratio (near stoichiometric). When the pressure is increased the hydrogen concentration decreases. The results were compared with literature data for validation purposes.

  18. Thermodynamic evaluation of hydrogen production via bioethanol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zsolt; Cormos, Ana-Maria; Imre-Lucaci, Árpád; Cormos, Călin C.

    2013-11-13

    In this article, a thermodynamic analysis for bioethanol steam reforming for hydrogen production is presented. Bioethanol is a newly proposed renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Reforming of bioethanol provides a promising method for hydrogen production from renewable resources. Steam reforming of ethanol (SRE) takes place under the action of a metal catalyst capable of breaking C-C bonds into smaller molecules. A large domain for the water/bioethanol molar ratio as well as the temperature and average pressure has been used in the present work. The interval of investigated temperature was 100-800°C, the pressure was in the range of 1-10 bar and the molar ratio was between 3-25. The variations of gaseous species concentration e.g. H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} were analyzed. The concentrations of the main products (H{sub 2} and CO) at lower temperature are smaller than the ones at higher temperature due to by-products formation (methane, carbon dioxide, acetylene etc.). The concentration of H2 obtained in the process using high molar ratio (>20) is higher than the one at small molar ratio (near stoichiometric). When the pressure is increased the hydrogen concentration decreases. The results were compared with literature data for validation purposes.

  19. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production Using New Combinatorial Chemistry Derived Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, Alan; Stucky, Galen D.; McFarland, Eric W.

    2004-10-25

    Solar photoelectrochemical water-splitting has long been viewed as one of the “holy grails” of chemistry because of its potential impact as a clean, renewable method of fuel production. Several known photocatalytic semiconductors can be used; however, the fundamental mechanisms of the process remain poorly understood and no known material has the required properties for cost effective hydrogen production. In order to investigate morphological and compositional variations in metal oxides as they relate to opto-electrochemical properties, we have employed a combinatorial methodology using automated, high-throughput, electrochemical synthesis and screening together with conventional solid-state methods. This report discusses a number of novel, high-throughput instruments developed during this project for the expeditious discovery of improved materials for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Also described within this report are results from a variety of materials (primarily tungsten oxide, zinc oxide, molybdenum oxide, copper oxide and titanium dioxide) whose properties were modified and improved by either layering, inter-mixing, or doping with one or more transition metals. Furthermore, the morphologies of certain materials were also modified through the use of structure directing agents (SDA) during synthesis to create mesostructures (features 2-50 nm) that increased surface area and improved rates of hydrogen production.

  20. Hydrogen Production via a Commerically Ready Inorganic membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Liu

    2007-06-30

    It has been known that use of the hydrogen selective membrane as a reactor (MR) could potentially improve the efficiency of the water shift reaction (WGS), one of the least efficient unit operations for production of high purity hydrogen from syngas. However, no membrane reactor technology has been reduced to industrial practice thus far, in particular for a large-scale operation. This implementation and commercialization barrier is attributed to the lack of a commercially viable hydrogen selective membrane with (1) material stability under the application environment and (2) suitability for large-scale operation. Thus, in this project, we have focused on (1) the deposition of the hydrogen selective carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane we have developed on commercially available membranes as substrate, and (2) the demonstration of the economic viability of the proposed WGS-MR for hydrogen production from coal-based syngas. The commercial stainless steel (SS) porous substrate (i.e., ZrO{sub 2}/SS from Pall Corp.) was evaluated comprehensively as the 1st choice for the deposition of the CMS membrane for hydrogen separation. The CMS membrane synthesis protocol we developed previously for the ceramic substrate was adapted here for the stainless steel substrate. Unfortunately no successful hydrogen selective membranes had been prepared during Yr I of this project. The characterization results indicated two major sources of defect present in the SS substrate, which may have contributed to the poor CMS membrane quality. Near the end of the project period, an improved batch of the SS substrate (as the 2nd generation product) was received from the supplier. Our characterization results confirm that leaking of the crimp boundary no longer exists. However, the thermal stability of the ZrO{sub 2}/SS substrate through the CMS membrane preparation condition must be re-evaluated in the future. In parallel with the SS membrane activity, the preparation of the CMS membranes

  1. Solar photochemical production of HBr for off-peak electrolytic hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, H.

    1996-10-01

    Progress is reported on the development of a unique and innovative hydrogen production concept utilizing renewable (Solar) energy and incorporating energy storage. The concept is based on a solar-electrolytic system for production of hydrogen and oxygen. It employs water, bromine, solar energy, and supplemental electrical power. The process consumes only water, sunlight and off-peak electricity, and produces only hydrogen, oxygen, and peaking electrical power. No pollutants are emitted, and fossil fuels are not consumed. The concept is being developed by Solar Reactor Technologies, Inc., (SRT) under the auspices of a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  2. Final Report: Hydrogen Production Pathways Cost Analysis (2013 – 2016)

    SciTech Connect

    James, Brian David; DeSantis, Daniel Allan; Saur, Genevieve

    2016-09-30

    This report summarizes work conducted under a three year Department of Energy (DOE) funded project to Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) to analyze multiple hydrogen (H2) production technologies and project their corresponding levelized production cost of H2. The analysis was conducted using the H2A Hydrogen Analysis Tool developed by the DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The project was led by SA but conducted in close collaboration with the NREL and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In-depth techno-economic analysis (TEA) of five different H2 production methods was conducted. These TEAs developed projections for capital costs, fuel/feedstock usage, energy usage, indirect capital costs, land usage, labor requirements, and other parameters, for each H2 production pathway, and use the resulting cost and system parameters as inputs into the H2A discounted cash flow model to project the production cost of H2 ($/kgH2). Five technologies were analyzed as part of the project and are summarized in this report: Proton Exchange Membrane technology (PEM), High temperature solid oxide electrolysis cell technology (SOEC), Dark fermentation of biomass for H2 production, H2 production via Monolithic Piston-Type Reactors with rapid swing reforming and regeneration reactions, and Reformer-Electrolyzer-Purifier (REP) technology developed by Fuel Cell Energy, Inc. (FCE).

  3. Demonstration and System Analysis of High Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production Using SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01

    At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, an integrated laboratory scale (ILS), 15 kW high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) facility has been developed under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Initial operation of this facility resulted in over 400 hours of operation with an average hydrogen production rate of approximately 0.9 Nm3/hr. The integrated laboratory scale facility is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high-temperature gas handling), multiple-stack hot-zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, and other “integral” issues. Additionally, a reference process model of a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The reference plant design is driven by a 600 megawatt thermal high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4.01×106 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.1% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.36 kg/s with the high-temperature helium-cooled reactor concept. This paper documents the initial operation of the ILS, with experimental details about heat-up, initial stack performance, as well as long-term operation and stack degradation. The paper will also present the optimized design for the reference nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant which may be compared with other hydrogen production methods and power cycles to evaluate relative performance characteristics and plant economics.

  4. Fiber Optic Coupled Raman Based Detection of Hazardous Liquids Concealed in Commercial Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Detecting explosives by portable Raman ana- lyzers: a comparison of 785, 976, 1064 ,and 1550 nm (Retina- Safe) laser excitation,” Spectroscopy, pp...agent (CWA) simulant triethyl phosphate (TEP), hydrogen peroxide, and acetone as representative of toxic industrial compounds (TICs). Fiber optic...distribution is unlimited. Fiber Optic Coupled Raman Based Detection of Hazardous Liquids Concealed in Commercial Products The views, opinions and/or

  5. Glycerophosphate-dependent hydrogen peroxide production by rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jesina, P; Kholová, D; Bolehovská, R; Cervinková, Z; Drahota, Z; Houstek, J

    2004-01-01

    We studied the extent to which hormonally-induced mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH) activity contributes to the supply of reducing equivalents to the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the rat liver. The activity of glycerophosphate oxidase was compared with those of NADH oxidase and/or succinate oxidase. It was found that triiodothyronine-activated mGPDH represents almost the same capacity for the saturation of the respiratory chain as Complex II. Furthermore, the increase of mGPDH activity induced by triiodothyronine correlated with an increase of capacity for glycerophosphate-dependent hydrogen peroxide production. As a result of hormonal treatment, a 3-fold increase in glycerophosphate-dependent hydrogen peroxide production by liver mitochondria was detected by polarographic and luminometric measurements.

  6. Mechanism of Olefin Asymmetric Hydrogenation Catalyzed by Iridium Phosphino-Oxazoline: A Pair Natural Orbital Coupled Cluster Study.

    PubMed

    Sparta, Manuel; Riplinger, Christoph; Neese, Frank

    2014-03-11

    Since the development of chiral phosphino-oxazoline iridium catalysts, which hydrogenate unfunctionalized alkenes enantioselectively, the asymmetric hydrogenation of prochiral olefins has become important in the production of chiral compounds. For the last 10 years, details of the mechanism, including formal oxidation state assignment of the metal center and the nature of intermediates and transition states have been debated. Various contributions have been given from a theoretical point of view, but due to the size of the structures, these have been forced to rely on density functional theory (DFT) methods. In our investigation of the catalytic cycle, we employ both DFT and a correlated ab initio method, namely, the newly implemented domain-based local pair natural orbital coupled-cluster theory with single and double excitations and the inclusion of perturbative triples correction (DLPNO-CCSD(T)). Our results show that the most likely active paths involve the formation of an intermediate Ir(V) species. Furthermore, we have been able to predict the absolute configuration of the major products, and where comparison to experiment is possible, the results of our calculations agree with the enantiomeric excess obtained from hydrogenating five prochiral substrates. This work also shows that it is now possible to study catalytic reactions with untruncated models (having up to 88 atoms) at the CCSD(T) level of theory.

  7. A preliminary systems-engineering study of an advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, W. J. D.; Donakowski, T. D.; Tison, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility concept was synthesized at a conceptual level with the objective of minimizing estimated hydrogen-production costs. The concept is a closely-integrated, fully-dedicated (only hydrogen energy is produced) system whose components and subsystems are predicted on ''1985 technology.'' The principal components are: (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating a helium-Brayton/ammonia-Rankine binary cycle with a helium reactor-core exit temperature of 980 C, (2) acyclic d-c generators, (3) high-pressure, high-current-density electrolyzers based on solid-polymer electrolyte technology. Based on an assumed 3,000 MWt HTGR the facility is capable of producing 8.7 million std cu m/day of hydrogen at pipeline conditions, 6,900 kPa. Coproduct oxygen is also available at pipeline conditions at one-half this volume. It has further been shown that the incorporation of advanced technology provides an overall efficiency of about 43 percent, as compared with 25 percent for a contemporary nuclear-electric plant powering close-coupled contemporary industrial electrolyzers.

  8. Economic Analysis of the Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature-Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-01-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current, AC, to direct current, DC, conversion is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of the plant was also performed using the H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. A required cost of $3.23 per kg of hydrogen produced was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. Approximately 73% of this cost ($2.36/kg) is the result of capital costs associated

  9. Chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl groups on stretched graphene: A coupled QM/QM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katin, Konstantin P.; Prudkovskiy, Vladimir S.; Maslov, Mikhail M.

    2017-09-01

    Using the density functional theory coupled with the nonorthogonal tight-binding model, we analyze the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl groups on the unstrained and stretched graphene sheets. Drawback of finite cluster model of graphene for the chemisorption energy calculation in comparison with the QM/QM approach applied is discussed. It is shown that the chemisorption energy for the hydroxyl group is sufficiently lower than for hydrogen at stretching up to 7.5%. The simultaneous paired chemisorption of hydrogen and hydroxyl groups on the same hexagon has also been examined. Adsorption of two radicals in ortho and para positions is found to be more energetically favorable than those in meta position at any stretching considered. In addition the energy difference between adsorbent pairs in ortho and para positions decreases as the stretching rises. It could be concluded that the graphene stretching leads to the loss of preferred mutual arrangement of two radicals on its surface.

  10. Spurious hydrogen sulfide production by Providencia and Escherichia coli species.

    PubMed Central

    Treleaven, B E; Diallo, A A; Renshaw, E C

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide production was noted in two Escherichia coli strands and one Provaidenica alcalifaciens (Proteus inconstans A) strain isolated from clinical stool specimens durin the summer of 1979. An investigation into this phenomenon revealed the predence of Eubacterium lentum, an anaerobe, growing in synergism with the Enterobacteriaceae and producing H2s. The implications of this association are discssed with reference to clinical microbiology laboratory practice. PMID:7000823

  11. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Khaselev, O.; Bansal, A.; Kocha, S.; Turner, J.A.

    1998-08-01

    With an eye towards developing a photoelectrochemical system for hydrogen production using sunlight as the only energy input, two types of systems were studied, both involving multijunction devices. One set of cells consisted of a-Si triple junctions and the other a GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs tandem cell combination. Additional investigations were carried out on semiconductor surface modifications to move semiconductor band edges to more favorable energetic positions.

  12. Studies of the use of heat from high temperature nuclear sources for hydrogen production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    Future uses of hydrogen and hydrogen production processes that can meet the demand for hydrogen in the coming decades were considered. To do this, a projection was made of the market for hydrogen through the year 2000. Four hydrogen production processes were selected, from among water electrolysis, fossil based and thermochemical water decomposition systems, and evaluated, using a consistent set of ground rules, in terms of relative performance, economics, resource requirements, and technology status.

  13. Hydrogen production from proteins via electrohydrogenesis in microbial electrolysis cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Xing, Defeng; Xie, Tianhui; Ren, Nanqi; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-08-15

    Microorganisms can produce hydrogen gas (H(2)) at high rates by fermentation of carbohydrates, but not from proteins. However, it is possible to produce H(2) at high rates and yields from proteins by electrohydrogenesis in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). Hydrogen gas was generated using bovine serum albumin (BSA, 700 mg/L) in a single-chamber MEC at a rate of Q=0.42+/-0.07 m(3)/m(3)/day and a yield of Y(H2) = 21.0 +/- 5.0 mmol-H2/g-COD, with an energy recovery (relative to electrical input) of eta(E)=75+/-12% (applied voltage of 0.6 V). Hydrogen production was substantially reduced using a complex protein (peptone) under the same conditions, to Q=0.05+/-0.01 m(3)/m(3)/day, YH2 = 2.6 +/- 0.1 mmol-H2/g-COD, and eta(E)=14+/-3%. There was good removal of organic matter for both substrates in terms of either protein (87+/-6 -97 +/-2%) or total COD (86+/-2 - 91+/-2%). Electron recycling likely occurred as Coulombic efficiencies exceeded 100% using BSA. The use of a two-chamber design, with either a CEM or AEM membrane, reduced the hydrogen production rate, but did not appreciably affect the hydrogen yield or energy efficiency. When an MEC was first acclimated to acetate, and then switched to BSA, performance was substantially reduced and was similar to that obtained using peptone. These results demonstrate that electrohydrogenesis can be used to produce H(2) from proteins, and it can also be used as a method for treatment of protein-containing wastewaters.

  14. Dispatchable hydrogen production at the forecourt for electricity grid balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahil, Abdulla; Gammon, Rupert; Brown, Neil

    2017-02-01

    The rapid growth of renewable energy (RE) generation and its integration into electricity grids has been motivated by environmental issues and the depletion of fossil fuels. For the same reasons, an alternative to hydrocarbon fuels is needed for vehicles; hence the anticipated uptake of electric and fuel cell vehicles. High penetrations of RE generators with variable and intermittent output threaten to destabilise electricity networks by reducing the ability to balance electricity supply and demand. This can be greatly mitigated by the use of energy storage and demand-side response (DSR) techniques. Hydrogen production by electrolysis is a promising option for providing DSR as well as an emission-free vehicle fuel. Tariff structures can be used to incentivise the operating of electrolysers as controllable (dispatchable) loads. This paper compares the cost of hydrogen production by electrolysis at garage forecourts under both dispatchable and continuous operation, while ensuring no interruption of fuel supply to fuel cell vehicles. An optimisation algorithm is applied to investigate a hydrogen refueling station in both dispatchable and continuous operation. Three scenarios are tested to see whether a reduced off-peak electricity price could lower the cost of electrolytic hydrogen. These scenarios are: 1) "Standard Continuous", where the electrolyser is operated continuously on a standard all-day tariff of 12p/kWh; 2) "Off-peak Only", where it runs only during off-peak periods in a 2-tier tariff system at the lower price of 5p/kWh; and 3) "2-Tier Continuous", operating continuously and paying a low tariff at off- peak times and a high tariff at other times. This study uses the Libyan coastal city of Derna as a case study. The cheapest electricity cost per kg of hydrogen produced was £2.8, which occurred in Scenario 2. The next cheapest, at £5.8 - £6.3, was in Scenario 3, and the most expensive was £6.8/kg in Scenario 1.

  15. Dependence of Vibronic Coupling on Molecular Geometry and Environment: Bridging Hydrogen Atom Transfer and Electron–Proton Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The rate constants for typical concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions depend on the vibronic coupling between the diabatic reactant and product states. The form of the vibronic coupling is different for electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, which are associated with hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and electron–proton transfer (EPT) mechanisms, respectively. Most PCET rate constant expressions rely on the Condon approximation, which assumes that the vibronic coupling is independent of the nuclear coordinates of the solute and the solvent or protein. Herein we test the Condon approximation for PCET vibronic couplings. The dependence of the vibronic coupling on molecular geometry is investigated for an open and a stacked transition state geometry of the phenoxyl-phenol self-exchange reaction. The calculations indicate that the open geometry is electronically nonadiabatic, corresponding to an EPT mechanism that involves significant electronic charge redistribution, while the stacked geometry is predominantly electronically adiabatic, corresponding primarily to an HAT mechanism. Consequently, a single molecular system can exhibit both HAT and EPT character. The dependence of the vibronic coupling on the solvent or protein configuration is examined for the soybean lipoxygenase enzyme. The calculations indicate that this PCET reaction is electronically nonadiabatic with a vibronic coupling that does not depend significantly on the protein environment. Thus, the Condon approximation is shown to be valid for the solvent and protein nuclear coordinates but invalid for the solute nuclear coordinates in certain PCET systems. These results have significant implications for the calculation of rate constants, as well as mechanistic interpretations, of PCET reactions. PMID:26412613

  16. Dependence of Vibronic Coupling on Molecular Geometry and Environment: Bridging Hydrogen Atom Transfer and Electron-Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Harshan, Aparna Karippara; Yu, Tao; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-10-28

    The rate constants for typical concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions depend on the vibronic coupling between the diabatic reactant and product states. The form of the vibronic coupling is different for electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, which are associated with hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and electron-proton transfer (EPT) mechanisms, respectively. Most PCET rate constant expressions rely on the Condon approximation, which assumes that the vibronic coupling is independent of the nuclear coordinates of the solute and the solvent or protein. Herein we test the Condon approximation for PCET vibronic couplings. The dependence of the vibronic coupling on molecular geometry is investigated for an open and a stacked transition state geometry of the phenoxyl-phenol self-exchange reaction. The calculations indicate that the open geometry is electronically nonadiabatic, corresponding to an EPT mechanism that involves significant electronic charge redistribution, while the stacked geometry is predominantly electronically adiabatic, corresponding primarily to an HAT mechanism. Consequently, a single molecular system can exhibit both HAT and EPT character. The dependence of the vibronic coupling on the solvent or protein configuration is examined for the soybean lipoxygenase enzyme. The calculations indicate that this PCET reaction is electronically nonadiabatic with a vibronic coupling that does not depend significantly on the protein environment. Thus, the Condon approximation is shown to be valid for the solvent and protein nuclear coordinates but invalid for the solute nuclear coordinates in certain PCET systems. These results have significant implications for the calculation of rate constants, as well as mechanistic interpretations, of PCET reactions.

  17. Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, T.A.

    1998-01-31

    The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

  18. Nonadiabatic couplings in low-energy collisions of hydrogen ground-state atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wolniewicz, L.

    2003-10-01

    The effect of nonadiabatic couplings on low-energy s-wave scattering of two hydrogen atoms is investigated. Coupling matrix elements are computed in a wide range of internuclear distances. The resulting scattering equations are numerically unstable and therefore are integrated only approximately. Computations are performed for H, D, and T atoms. The phase shifts in the zero velocity limit are inversely proportional to the nuclear reduced mass {delta}{sub 0}{approx_equal}0.392/{mu}. This leads to infinite scattering lengths.

  19. Electron-phonon coupling mechanisms for hydrogen-rich metals at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Tse, J. S.; Liu, H.

    2017-09-01

    The mechanisms for strong electron-phonon coupling predicted for hydrogen-rich alloys with high superconducting critical temperature (Tc) are examined within the Migdal-Eliashberg theory. Analysis of the functional derivative of Tc with respect to the electron-phonon spectral function shows that at low pressures, when the alloys often adopt layered structures, bending vibrations have the most dominant effect. At very high pressures, the H-H interactions in two- and three-dimensional extended structures are weakened, resulting in mixed bent (libration) and stretch vibrations, and the electron-phonon coupling process is distributed over a broad frequency range leading to very high Tc.

  20. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  1. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  2. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  3. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  4. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  5. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  6. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  7. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  8. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  9. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  10. A critical review on factors influencing fermentative hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Richa; Kumar, Virendra; Pathak, Vinayak V; Ahmad, Shamshad; Aoyi, Ochieng; Tyagi, V V

    2017-03-01

    Biohydrogen production by dark fermentation of different waste materials is a promising approach to produce bio-energy in terms of renewable energy exploration. This communication has reviewed various influencing factors of dark fermentation process with detailed account of determinants in biohydrogen production. It has also focused on different factors such as improved bacterial strain, reactor design, metabolic engineering and two stage processes to enhance the bioenergy productivity from substrate. The study also suggest that complete utilization of substrates for biological hydrogen production requires the concentrated research and development for efficient functioning of microorganism with integrated application for energy production and bioremediation. Various studies have been taken into account here, to show the comparative efficiency of different substrates and operating conditions with inhibitory factors and pretreatment option for biohydrogen production. The study reveals that an extensive research is needed to observe field efficiency of process using low cost substrates and integration of dark and photo fermentation process. Integrated approach of fermentation process will surely compete with conventional hydrogen process and replace it completely in future.

  11. Probing conformational changes in rhodopsin using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Orban, Tivadar; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to evaluate changes in protein conformation between two or more states. Here, we describe a complete methodology that can be used to assess conformational changes in rhodopsin accompanying its transition from the inactive to activated state upon light exposure. This approach may be employed to investigate the structure and conformational changes of various membrane proteins.

  12. Enhancement effect of hematite nanoparticles on fermentative hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongliang; Cui, Maojin; Wei, Liling; Yang, Haijun; Shen, Jianquan

    2011-09-01

    The effects of hematite nanoparticles concentration (0-1600 mg/L) and initial pH (4.0-10.0) on hydrogen production were investigated in batch assays using sucrose-fed anaerobic mixed bacteria at 35°C. The optimum hematite nanoparticles concentration with an initial pH 8.48 was 200mg/L, with the maximum hydrogen yield of 3.21 mol H(2)/mol sucrose which was 32.64% higher than the blank test. At 200mg/L hematite nanoparticles concentration, further initial pH optimization experiments indicated that at pH 6.0 the maximum hydrogen yield reached to 3.57 mol H(2)/mol sucrose and hydrogen content was 66.1%. The slow release of hematite nanoparticles had been recorded by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, TEM analysis indicated that the hematite nanoparticles can affect the shape of bacteria, namely, its length increased from ca. 2.0-3.6 μm to ca. 2.6-5.6 μm, and width became narrower.

  13. Development of efficient photoreactors for solar hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Cunping; Yao, Weifeng; T-Raissi, Ali; Muradov, Nazim

    2011-01-15

    The rate of hydrogen evolution from a photocatalytic process depends not only on the activity of a photocatalyst, but also on photoreactor design. Ideally, a photoreactor should be able to absorb the incident light, promoting photocatalytic reactions in an effective manner with minimal photonic losses. There are numerous technical challenges and cost related issues when designing a large-scale photoreactor for hydrogen production. Active stirring of the photocatalyst slurry within a photoreactor is not practical in large-scale applications due to cost related issues. Rather, the design should allow facile self-mixing of the flow field within the photoreactor. In this paper two types of photocatalytic reactor configurations are studied: a batch type design and another involving passive self-mixing of the photolyte. Results show that energy loss from a properly designed photoreactor is mainly due to reflection losses from the photoreactor window. We describe the interplay between the reaction and the photoreactor design parameters as well as effects on the rate of hydrogen evolution. We found that a passive self-mixing of the photolyte is possible. Furthermore, the use of certain engineering polymer films as photoreactor window materials has the potential for substantial cost savings in large-scale applications, with minimal reduction of photon energy utilization efficiency. Eight window materials were tested and the results indicate that Aclar trademark polymer film used as the photoreactor window provides a substantial cost saving over other engineering polymers, especially with respect to fused silica glass at modest hydrogen evolution rates. (author)

  14. Pathway of Fermentative Hydrogen Production by Sulfate-reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-16

    Biofuels are a promising source of sustainable energy. Such biofuels are intermediate products of microbial metabolism of renewable substrates, in particular, plant biomass. Not only are alcohols and solvents produced in this degradative process but energy-rich hydrogen as well. Non photosynthetic microbial hydrogen generation from compounds other than sugars has not been fully explored. We propose to examine the capacity of the abundant soil anaerobes, sulfate-reducing bacteria, for hydrogen generation from organic acids. These apparently simple pathways have yet to be clearly established. Information obtained may facilitate the exploitation of other microbes not yet readily examined by molecular tools. Identification of the flexibility of the metabolic processes to channel reductant to hydrogen will be useful in consideration of practical applications. Because the tools for genetic and molecular manipulation of sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio are developed, our efforts will focus on two strains, D. vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio G20.Therefore total metabolism, flux through the pathways, and regulation are likely to be limiting factors which we can elucidate in the following experiments.

  15. Techno Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by gasification of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Francis Lau

    2002-12-01

    Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys(reg. sign) design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more

  16. Advanced Electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production by Alternative Thermochemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lvov, Serguei; Chung, Mike; Fedkin, Mark; Lewis, Michele; Balashov, Victor; Chalkova, Elena; Akinfiev, Nikolay; Stork, Carol; Davis, Thomas; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Stanford, Thomas; Weidner, John; Law, Victor; Prindle, John

    2011-01-06

    Hydrogen fuel is a potentially major solution to the problem of climate change, as well as addressing urban air pollution issues. But a key future challenge for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier is a sustainable, low-cost method of producing it in large capacities. Most of the world's hydrogen is currently derived from fossil fuels through some type of reforming processes. Nuclear hydrogen production is an emerging and promising alternative to the reforming processes for carbon-free hydrogen production in the future. This report presents the main results of a research program carried out by a NERI Consortium, which consisted of Penn State University (PSU) (lead), University of South Carolina (USC), Tulane University (TU), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Thermochemical water decomposition is an emerging technology for large-scale production of hydrogen. Typically using two or more intermediate compounds, a sequence of chemical and physical processes split water into hydrogen and oxygen, without releasing any pollutants externally to the atmosphere. These intermediate compounds are recycled internally within a closed loop. While previous studies have identified over 200 possible thermochemical cycles, only a few have progressed beyond theoretical calculations to working experimental demonstrations that establish scientific and practical feasibility of the thermochemical processes. The Cu-Cl cycle has a significant advantage over other cycles due to lower temperature requirements – around 530 °C and below. As a result, it can be eventually linked with the Generation IV thermal power stations. Advantages of the Cu-Cl cycle over others include lower operating temperatures, ability to utilize low-grade waste heat to improve energy efficiency, and potentially lower cost materials. Another significant advantage is a relatively low voltage required for the electrochemical step (thus low electricity input). Other advantages include common chemical agents and

  17. Manufacture of aromatic hydrocarbons from coal hydrogenation products

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Maloletnev; M.A. Gyul'malieva

    2007-08-15

    The manufacture of aromatic hydrocarbons from coal distillates was experimentally studied. A flow chart for the production of benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes was designed, which comprised the hydrogen treatment of the total wide-cut (or preliminarily dephenolized) fraction with FBP 425{sup o}C; fractional distillation of the hydrotreated products into IBP-60, 60-180, 180-300, and 300-425{sup o}C fractions; the hydro-cracking of middle fractions for increasing the yield of gasoline fractions whenever necessary; the catalytic reform of the fractions with bp up to 180{sup o}C; and the extraction of aromatic hydrocarbons.

  18. Critical Research for Cost-Effective Photoelectrochemical Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei; Deng, Xunming; Abken, Anka; Cao, Xinmin; Du, Wenhui; Vijh, Aarohi; Ingler, William; Chen, Changyong; Fan, Qihua; Collins, Robert; Compaan, Alvin; Yan, Yanfa; Giolando, Dean; Turner, John

    2014-10-29

    The objective of this project is to develop critical technologies required for cost-effective production of hydrogen from sunlight and water using a-Si triple junction solar cell based photo-electrodes. In this project, Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE) and its collaborating organizations utilize triple junction a-Si thin film solar cells as the core element to fabricate photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. Triple junction a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe solar cell is an ideal material for making cost-effective PEC system which uses sun light to split water and generate hydrogen. It has the following key features: 1) It has an open circuit voltage (Voc ) of ~ 2.3V and has an operating voltage around 1.6V. This is ideal for water splitting. There is no need to add a bias voltage or to inter-connect more than one solar cell. 2) It is made by depositing a-Si/a-SiGe/aSi-Ge thin films on a conducting stainless steel substrate which can serve as an electrode. When we immerse the triple junction solar cells in an electrolyte and illuminate it under sunlight, the voltage is large enough to split the water, generating oxygen at the Si solar cell side (for SS/n-i-p/sunlight structure) and hydrogen at the back, which is stainless steel side. There is no need to use a counter electrode or to make any wire connection. 3) It is being produced in large rolls of 3ft wide and up to 5000 ft long stainless steel web in a 25MW roll-to-roll production machine. Therefore it can be produced at a very low cost. After several years of research with many different kinds of material, we have developed promising transparent, conducting and corrosion resistant (TCCR) coating material; we carried out extensive research on oxygen and hydrogen generation catalysts, developed methods to make PEC electrode from production-grade a-Si solar cells; we have designed and tested various PEC module cases and carried out extensive outdoor testing; we were able to obtain a solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH

  19. Characterization and optimization of hydrogen production by a salt water blue-green alga Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7. II - Use of immobilization for enhancement of hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phlips, E. J.; Mitsui, A.

    1986-01-01

    The technique of cellular immobilization was applied to the process of hydrogen photoproduction of nonheterocystous, filamentous marine blue-green alga, Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7. Immobilization with agar significantly improved the rate and longevity of hydrogen production, compared to free cell suspensions. Rates of H2 production in excess of 13 microliters H2 mg dry/wt h were observed and hydrogen production was sustained for three weeks. Immobilization also provided some stabilization to environmental variability and was adaptable to outdoor light conditions. In general, immobilization provides significant advantages for the production and maintenance of hydrogen photoproduction for this strain.

  20. Characterization and optimization of hydrogen production by a salt water blue-green alga Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7. II - Use of immobilization for enhancement of hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phlips, E. J.; Mitsui, A.

    1986-01-01

    The technique of cellular immobilization was applied to the process of hydrogen photoproduction of nonheterocystous, filamentous marine blue-green alga, Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7. Immobilization with agar significantly improved the rate and longevity of hydrogen production, compared to free cell suspensions. Rates of H2 production in excess of 13 microliters H2 mg dry/wt h were observed and hydrogen production was sustained for three weeks. Immobilization also provided some stabilization to environmental variability and was adaptable to outdoor light conditions. In general, immobilization provides significant advantages for the production and maintenance of hydrogen photoproduction for this strain.

  1. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  2. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  3. Parametric Evaluation of Large-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Using Different Advanced Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

    2009-09-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the sweep gas loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycles producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered.

  4. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY – SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

    2009-05-01

    A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

  5. Effect of ammonia concentration on fermentative hydrogen production by mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Wan, Wei; Wang, Jianlong

    2009-02-01

    The effect of ammonia concentration ranging from 0 to 10 g N/L on fermentative hydrogen production by mixed cultures was investigated in batch tests using glucose as substrate at 35 degrees C and initial pH 7.0. The experimental results showed that during the fermentative hydrogen production, the substrate degradation efficiency increased with increasing ammonia concentration from 0 to 0.01 g N/L. The hydrogen production potential, hydrogen yield and average hydrogen production rate increased with increasing ammonia concentration from 0 to 0.1g N/L. The maximum hydrogen production potential of 291.4 mL, maximum hydrogen yield of 298.8 mL/g glucose and maximum average hydrogen production rate of 8.5 mL/h were all obtained at the ammonia concentration of 0.1g N/L.

  6. Analysis of Reference Design for Nuclear-Assisted Hydrogen Production at 750°C Reactor Outlet Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego

    2010-05-01

    The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This report describes the resulting new INL reference design coupled to two alternative HTGR power conversion systems, a Steam Rankine Cycle and a Combined Cycle (a Helium Brayton Cycle with a Steam Rankine Bottoming Cycle). Results of system analyses performed to optimize the design and to determine required plant performance and operating conditions when coupled to the two different power cycles are also presented. A 600 MWt high temperature gas reactor coupled with a Rankine steam power cycle at a thermal efficiency of 44.4% can produce 1.85 kg/s of hydrogen and 14.6 kg/s of oxygen. The same capacity reactor coupled with a combined cycle at a thermal efficiency of 42.5% can produce 1.78 kg/s of hydrogen and 14.0 kg/s of oxygen.

  7. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2005-10-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. Results presented in this paper were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, with an active area of 64 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 µm thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Hydrogen production rates up to 90 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Values of area-specific resistance and stack internal temperatures are presented as a function of current density. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate.

  8. Solar hydrogen production with cerium oxides thermochemical cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binotti, Marco; Di Marcoberardino, Gioele; Biassoni, Mauro; Manzolini, Giampaolo

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses the hydrogen production using a solar driven thermochemical cycle. The thermochemical cycle is based on nonstoichiometric cerium oxides redox and the solar concentration system is a solar dish. Detailed optical and redox models were developed to optimize the hydrogen production performance as function of several design parameters (i.e. concentration ratio, reactor pressures and temperatures) The efficiency of the considered technology is compared against two commercially available technologies namely PV + electrolyzer and Dish Stirling + electrolyzer. Results show that solar-to-fuel efficiency of 21.2% can be achieved at design condition assuming a concentration ratio around 5000, reduction and oxidation temperatures of 1500°C and 1275 °C. When moving to annual performance, the annual yield of the considered approach can be as high as 16.7% which is about 43% higher than the best competitive technology. The higher performance implies that higher installation costs around 40% can be accepted for the innovative concept to achieve the same cost of hydrogen.

  9. Materials for Hydrogen Production with Integrated CO2 Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Brink, Ruud W.; de Bruijn, Frank A.

    2009-09-01

    Palladium-based membrane reactors and sorption-enhanced water-gas shift are two promising technologies for efficient production of hydrogen with integrated CO2 capture. This paper discusses material issues of the two crucial materials of these technologies: the membrane and the CO2 sorbent. For Pd and Pd-alloy membranes the major issues concern the stability of the membrane and the poisoning of the membrane surface by compound such as sulfur and carbon monoxide. Both issues are addressed by research into novel Pd-alloys. For the potassium-promoted hydrotalcite CO2 sorbents used in sorption-enhanced water gas shift, the main challenges are a high CO2 adsorption capacity, chemical and mechanical stability, and low steam use for sorbent regeneration. Promising results have recently been reported for several of these challenges. For both hydrogen-selective membranes and CO2 sorbents, the interaction of the materials with sulfur is an import issue to enable their use in the production of hydrogen from coal.

  10. Production of hydrogen sulphide containing gas from underground formations

    SciTech Connect

    Delude, S.G.; Luinstra, E.A.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a process for the production of at least a gaseous product containing a substantial amount of hydrogen sulphide via a bore-hole from an underground formation containing besides the hydrogen sulphide at least elemental sulphur, comprising (a) injection of a liquid substantially consisting of hydrocarbons into the bore-hole or into the underground formation near to the end of the bore-hole; (b) producing a gaseous and a liquid fraction from the underground formation; (c) separating the gaseous fraction from the liquid fraction (d) if necessary, separating an aqueous fraction of the produced liquid fraction from the hydrocarbons-containing fraction; (e) heating the hydrocarbons-containing fraction in order to remove elemental sulphur by conversion to hydrogen sulphide in the presence of a catalyst comprising sulphides of one of more metals from Group VIB and/or Group VIII of the Periodic Table of Elements deposited on a support of alumina, silica or silica alumina; and (f) reinjection of at least a part of the thus treated hydrocarbons-containing fraction into the bore-hole or into the underground formation near to the end of the bore-hole as described hereinbefore.

  11. Towards efficient solar hydrogen production by intercalated carbon nitride photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Gao, Honglin; Yan, Shicheng; Wang, Jiajia; Huang, Yu An; Wang, Peng; Li, Zhaosheng; Zou, Zhigang

    2013-11-07

    The development of efficient photocatalytic material for converting solar energy to hydrogen energy as viable alternatives to fossil-fuel technologies is expected to revolutionize energy shortage and environment issues. However, to date, the low quantum yield for solar hydrogen production over photocatalysts has hindered advances in the practical applications of photocatalysis. Here, we show that a carbon nitride intercalation compound (CNIC) synthesized by a simple molten salt route is an efficient polymer photocatalyst with a high quantum yield. We found that coordinating the alkali metals into the C-N plane of carbon nitride will induce the un-uniform spatial charge distribution. The electrons are confined in the intercalated region while the holes are in the far intercalated region, which promoted efficient separation of photogenerated carriers. The donor-type alkali metal ions coordinating into the nitrogen pots of carbon nitrides increase the free carrier concentration and lead to the formation of novel nonradiative paths. This should favor improved transport of the photogenerated electron and hole and decrease the electron-hole recombination rate. As a result, the CNIC exhibits a quantum yield as high as 21.2% under 420 nm light irradiation for solar hydrogen production. Such high quantum yield opens up new opportunities for using cheap semiconducting polymers as energy transducers.

  12. Light-driven hydrogen production from Photosystem I-catalyst hybrids.

    PubMed

    Utschig, Lisa M; Soltau, Sarah R; Tiede, David M

    2015-04-01

    Solar energy conversion of water into environmentally clean fuels, such as hydrogen, offers one of the best long-term solutions for meeting future global energy needs. In photosynthesis, high quantum yield charge separation is achieved by a series of rapid, photoinitiated electron transfer steps that take place in proteins called reaction centers (RCs). Of current interest are new strategies that couple RC photochemistry to the direct synthesis of energy-rich molecules, offering opportunities to more directly tune the products of photosynthesis and potentially to increase solar energy conversion capacity. Innovative designs link RC photochemistry with synthetic molecular catalysts to create earth abundant biohybrid complexes that use light to rapidly produce hydrogen from water.

  13. Light-driven Hydrogen Production from Photosystem I-Catalyst Hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, Lisa M; Soltau, Sarah R.; Tiede, David M.

    2015-04-01

    Solar energy conversion of water into environmentally clean fuels, such as hydrogen, offers one of the best long-term solutions for meeting future global energy needs. In photosynthesis, high quantum yield charge separation is achieved by a series of rapid, photoinitiated electron transfer steps that take place in proteins called reaction centers (RCs). Of current interest are new strategies that couple RC photochemistry to the direct synthesis of energy-rich molecules, offering opportunities to more directly tune the products of photosynthesis and potentially to increase solar energy conversion capacity. Innovative designs link RC photochemistry with synthetic molecular catalysts to create earth abundant biohybrid complexes that use light to rapidly produce hydrogen from water.

  14. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  15. THE GENUS VEILLONELLA. 3. HYDROGEN SULFIDE PRODUCTION BY GROWING CULTURES.

    PubMed

    ROGOSA, M; BISHOP, F S

    1964-07-01

    Rogosa, Morrison (National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, Md.), and Ferial S. Bishop. The genus Veillonella. III. Hydrogen sulfide production by growing cultures. J. Bacteriol. 88:37-41. 1964.-The conditions necessary for H(2)S production by 105 strains of Veillonella, from a variety of sources and comprising seven anti-genic groups, are presented and discussed. All strains, during 1 to 2 days of growth, produced H(2)S in a defined medium supplemented with proper amounts of l-cysteine, l-cystine, reduced glutathione, thiosulfate, thiocyanate, or thioglycolate. Erratic or negative results were obtained with some commonly used media containing yeast extract and casein digest, but which were not supplemented with appropriate substrates for H(2)S production. Previous literature descriptions of V. alcalescens as not producing H(2)S are incorrect; H(2)S production, or the previously presumed lack of it, cannot be used as a criterion differentiating V. alcalescens from V. parvula.

  16. Hydrogen production by gasification of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Robers, R.

    1994-05-06

    As fossil fuel reserves run lower and lower, and as their continued widespread use leads toward numerous environmental problems, the need for clean and sustainable energy alternatives becomes ever clearer. Hydrogen fuel holds promise as such an energy source, as it burns cleanly and can be extracted from a number of renewable materials such as municipal solid waste (MSW), which is considered to be largely renewable because of its high content of paper and biomass-derived products. A computer model is being developed using Aspen Plus{sup {trademark}} flowsheeting software to simulate a process which produces hydrogen gas from MSW; the model will later be used in studying the economics of this process and is based on an actual Texaco coal gasification plant design.

  17. Photosensitized Production of Hydrogen by Hydrogenase in Reversed Micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilhorst, Riet; Laane, Colja; Veeger, Cees

    1982-06-01

    Hydrogenase (hydrogen:ferricytochrome c3 oxidoreductase, EC 1.12.2.1) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris was encapsulated in reversed micelles with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as surfactant and a chloroform/octane mixture as solvent. Reducing equivalents for hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production were provided by vectorial photosensitized electron transfer from a donor (thiophenol) in the organic phase through a surfactant-Ru2+ sensitizer located in the interphase to methyl viologen concentrated in the aqueous core of the reversed micelle. The results show that reversed micelles provide a microenvironment that (i) stabilizes hydrogenase against inactivation and (ii) allows an efficient vectorial photosensitized electron and proton flow from the organic phase to hydrogenase in the aqueous phase.

  18. Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Wind: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Levene, J. I.

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine the cost of using wind energy to produce hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel. This analysis assumes that a market exists for 50,000 kg of hydrogen per day produced from wind at the wind site; only production costs to the front gate are included, no delivery or dispensing costs are included. Three different scenarios are examined: near term, which represents 2005 currently available technology; mid term, which represents technological improvements and price reductions in the next 5-10 years; and long term, which is representative of the best technology gains and price reductions surmised by industry at this point, and represents the next 10-25 years.

  19. Optimized Flow Sheet for a Reference Commercial-Scale Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; E. A. Harvego; J. S. Herring

    2007-11-01

    This report presents results from the development and optimization of a reference commercialscale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540° C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4.176 × 10 6 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 49.07% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.45 kg/s with the high-temperature helium-cooled reactor concept. The information presented in this report is intended to establish an optimized design for the reference nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant so that parameters can be compared with other hydrogen production methods and power cycles to evaluate relative performance characteristics and plant economics.

  20. Evaluation and simultaneous optimization of bio-hydrogen production using 3 2 factorial design and the desirability function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuetos, M. J.; Gómez, X.; Escapa, A.; Morán, A.

    Various mixtures incorporating a simulated organic fraction of municipal solid wastes and blood from a poultry slaughterhouse were used as substrate in a dark fermentation process for the production of hydrogen. The individual and interactive effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT), solid content in the feed (%TS) and proportion of residues (%Blood) on bio-hydrogen production were studied in this work. A central composite design and response surface methodology were employed to determine the optimum conditions for the hydrogen production process. Experimental results were approximated to a second-order model with the principal effects of the three factors considered being statistically significant (P < 0.05). The production of hydrogen obtained from the experimental point at conditions close to best operability was 0.97 L Lr -1 day -1. Moreover, a desirability function was employed in order to optimize the process when a second, methanogenic, phase is coupled with it. In this last case, the optimum conditions lead to a reduction in the production of hydrogen when the optimization process involves the maximization of intermediary products.

  1. Method for direct production of carbon disulfide and hydrogen from hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Frank Q.; Erekson, Erek James

    1998-12-01

    A method for converting hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to carbon disulfide and hydrogen is provided comprising contacting the hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to a bi-functional catalyst residing in a controlled atmosphere for a time and at a temperature sufficient to produce carbon disulfide and hydrogen. Also provided is a catalyst for converting carbon sulfides and hydrogen sulfides to gasoline range hydrocarbons comprising a mixture containing a zeolite catalyst and a hydrogenating catalyst.

  2. Start Up of Biohydrogen Production System and Effect of Metal Ions on Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, An-ying; Li, Yong-feng; Yue, Li-ran; Yang, Chuan-ping

    2010-11-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production is a promising biochemical route to produce renewable H2. The effect of organic loading rate on the biohydrogen production during the start-up phase and effect of Fe2+ and Mg2+ concentration on biohydrogen production of a continuous stirred tank reactor using molasses wastewater as substrate were investigated. It was found that an initial biomass of 14.07 gVSS/L and an organic loading rate of 6.0 kgCOD/m3ṡd, an equilibrial microbial community in the butyric-type fermentation could be established with in 30 days. It was demonstrated that both Fe2+ and Mg2+ were able to enhance the hydrogen production capacity of microorganism flora. Different concentration of Fe2+ was added to the biohydrogen producing system (50 mg/L, 100 mg/L, 200 mg/L and 500 mg/L), the maximum biogas production yield of 6.78 L/d and the maximum specific hydrogen production rate of 10.1 ml/gVSSṡh were obtained at Fe2+ concentration of 500 mg/L and 200 mg/L, respectively. The maximum biogas production yield of 6.84 L/d and the maximum specific hydrogen production rate of 10.2 ml/gVSSṡh were obtained at Mg2+ concentration of 100 mg/L and 50 mg/L, respectively.

  3. Photosynthetic hydrogen production by a hybrid complex of photosystem I and [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Krassen, Henning; Schwarze, Alexander; Friedrich, Bärbel; Ataka, Kenichi; Lenz, Oliver; Heberle, Joachim

    2009-12-22

    Nature provides key components for generating fuels from renewable resources in the form of enzymatic nanomachines which catalyze crucial steps in biological energy conversion, for example, the photosynthetic apparatus, which transforms solar power into chemical energy, and hydrogenases, capable of generating molecular hydrogen. As sunlight is usually used to synthesize carbohydrates, direct generation of hydrogen from light represents an exception in nature. On the molecular level, the crucial step for conversion of solar energy into H(2) lies in the efficient electronic coupling of photosystem I and hydrogenase. Here we show the stepwise assembly of a hybrid complex consisting of photosystem I and hydrogenase on a solid gold surface. This device gave rise to light-induced H(2) evolution. Hydrogen production is possible at far higher potential and thus lower energy compared to those of previously described (bio)nanoelectronic devices that did not employ the photosynthesis apparatus. The successful demonstration of efficient solar-to-hydrogen conversion may serve as a blueprint for the establishment of this system in a living organism with the paramount advantage of self-replication.

  4. Storage and production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Rita

    The increased utilization of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells as an alternative to internal combustion engines is expected to increase the demand for hydrogen, which is used as the energy source in these systems. The objective of this work is to develop and test new methods for the storage and production of hydrogen for fuel cells. Six ligand-stabilized hydrides were synthesized and tested as hydrogen storage media for use in portable fuel cells. These novel compounds are more stable than classical hydrides (e.g., NaBH4, LiAlH4) and react to release hydrogen less exothermically upon hydrolysis with water. Three of the compounds produced hydrogen in high yield (88 to 100 percent of the theoretical) and at significantly lower temperatures than those required for the hydrolysis of NaBH4 and LiAlH4. However, a large excess of water and acid were required to completely wet the hydride and keep the pH of the reaction medium neutral. The hydrolysis of the classical hydrides with steam can overcome these limitations. This reaction was studied in a flow reactor and the results indicate that classical hydrides can be hydrolyzed with steam in high yields at low temperatures (110 to 123°C) and in the absence of acid. Although excess steam was required, the pH of the condensed steam was neutral. Consequently, steam could be recycled back to the reactor. Production of hydrogen for large-scale transportation fuel cells is primarily achieved via the steam reforming, partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of natural gas or the steam reforming of methanol. However, in all of these processes CO is a by-product that must be subsequently removed because the Pt-based electrocatalyst used in the fuel cells is poisoned by its presence. The direct cracking of methane over a Ni/SiO2 catalyst can produce CO-free hydrogen. In addition to hydrogen, filamentous carbon is also produced. This material accumulates on the catalyst and eventually deactivates it. The Ni/SiO2 catalyst

  5. Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Bockris, John O’M.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech. PMID:28824125

  6. Spectroscopic measurements in low temperature inductively coupled RF discharges in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebschman, Michael Lee

    1999-10-01

    Noninvasive spectroscopic measurements of density and temperature which are characteristic of plasma processing tools have been obtained on inductively driven low- density hydrogen plasma sources. These measurements allow full radial and axial profiles of electron density and temperature to be estimated from absolutely calibrated multichannel spectroscopic measurements of upper state densities and a collisional radiative model that accounts for both collisional and radiative processes. The electron temperature and density were estimated by minimizing the least square deviation of measured population of upper state densities and the prediction of the collisional radiative model. Profiles were obtained over a range of powers from 50 to 200 Watts and pressures from 5 to 50 mTorr in hydrogen in a small cylindrical source. Typical density and temperature measurement profiles have been plotted to characterize the apparatus. An elementary sensitivity analysis, which includes plasma opacity and non- Maxwellian electron distributions, showed that, for hydrogen at processing pressures, the accuracy of the technique is relatively unaffected by these perturbations. The molecular dissociation processes were found to be important in determining the steady state densities of atomic hydrogen but had little affect in populating the upper state hydrogen levels for the plasma conditions measured. A hydrogen working gas and simple geometry were chosen to simplify detailed comparisons with a 2D computational model (INDUCT95) which uses a fluid approximation for the plasma and neutral gas. The code calculates the inductive coupling of the 13.5MHz RIF source and collisional, radiative, and wall losses as well as a complete chemistry model for H2, H, H+, H 3+. Good qualitative agreement between the initial model calculations and experimental data have been obtained over part of the operational range. Lastly, to characterize the apparatus for use in wafer cleaning, radial profiles of the

  7. Hydrogen measurement during steam oxidation using coupled thermogravimetric analysis and quadrupole mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Parkison, Adam J.; Nelson, Andrew Thomas

    2016-01-11

    An analytical technique is presented with the goal of measuring reaction kinetics during steam oxidation reactions for three cases in which obtaining kinetics information often requires a prohibitive amount of time and cost. The technique presented relies on coupling thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with a quantitative hydrogen measurement technique using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). The first case considered is in differentiating between the kinetics of steam oxidation reactions and those for simultaneously reacting gaseous impurities such as nitrogen or oxygen. The second case allows one to independently measure the kinetics of oxide and hydride formation for systems in which both ofmore » these reactions are known to take place during steam oxidation. The third case deals with measuring the kinetics of formation for competing volatile and non-volatile oxides during certain steam oxidation reactions. In order to meet the requirements of the coupled technique, a methodology is presented which attempts to provide quantitative measurement of hydrogen generation using QMS in the presence of an interfering fragmentation species, namely water vapor. This is achieved such that all calibrations and corrections are performed during the TGA baseline and steam oxidation programs, making system operation virtually identical to standard TGA. Benchmarking results showed a relative error in hydrogen measurement of 5.7–8.4% following the application of a correction factor. Lastly, suggestions are made for possible improvements to the presented technique so that it may be better applied to the three cases presented.« less

  8. Hydrogen measurement during steam oxidation using coupled thermogravimetric analysis and quadrupole mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Parkison, Adam J.; Nelson, Andrew Thomas

    2016-01-11

    An analytical technique is presented with the goal of measuring reaction kinetics during steam oxidation reactions for three cases in which obtaining kinetics information often requires a prohibitive amount of time and cost. The technique presented relies on coupling thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with a quantitative hydrogen measurement technique using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). The first case considered is in differentiating between the kinetics of steam oxidation reactions and those for simultaneously reacting gaseous impurities such as nitrogen or oxygen. The second case allows one to independently measure the kinetics of oxide and hydride formation for systems in which both of these reactions are known to take place during steam oxidation. The third case deals with measuring the kinetics of formation for competing volatile and non-volatile oxides during certain steam oxidation reactions. In order to meet the requirements of the coupled technique, a methodology is presented which attempts to provide quantitative measurement of hydrogen generation using QMS in the presence of an interfering fragmentation species, namely water vapor. This is achieved such that all calibrations and corrections are performed during the TGA baseline and steam oxidation programs, making system operation virtually identical to standard TGA. Benchmarking results showed a relative error in hydrogen measurement of 5.7–8.4% following the application of a correction factor. Lastly, suggestions are made for possible improvements to the presented technique so that it may be better applied to the three cases presented.

  9. Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in weakly coupled plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-09-01

    Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1s → n l m excitations of hydrogen, for arbitrary n, l, m, by positron impact in weakly coupled plasma has been investigated using a distorted-wave theory in the momentum space. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined wave function for the hydrogen atom, it has been possible to obtain the distorted-wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made on the effects of plasma screening on the differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20-300 eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1s → n l m inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions for arbitrary n, l, m in weakly coupled plasmas is the first reported in the literature.

  10. Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in weakly coupled plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-09-15

    Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1s→nlm excitations of hydrogen, for arbitrary n, l, m, by positron impact in weakly coupled plasma has been investigated using a distorted-wave theory in the momentum space. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined wave function for the hydrogen atom, it has been possible to obtain the distorted-wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made on the effects of plasma screening on the differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300 eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1s→nlm inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions for arbitrary n, l, m in weakly coupled plasmas is the first reported in the literature.

  11. Excited-state positronium formation in positron-hydrogen collisions under weakly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2016-06-01

    The effect of screening of weakly coupled plasma on positronium (Ps) formation in excited states in the scattering of a positron from the ground state of a hydrogen atom has been investigated using a distorted wave theory which includes screened dipole polarization potential. The effect of external plasma has been incorporated by using the Debye-Hückel screening model of the interacting charge particles. Variationally determined simple hydrogenic wave functions have been used to obtain the distorted wave scattering amplitude in a closed form. Effects of plasma screening on the differential and total cross sections have been studied in detail in the energy range 20-300 eV of incident positron. For the free atomic case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for Ps formation in highly excited states in positron-hydrogen collisions under weakly coupled plasma is reported first time in the literature.

  12. Hydrogen-bond-assisted activation of allylic alcohols for palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Gumrukcu, Yasemin; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-03-01

    We report direct activation of allylic alcohols using a hydrogen-bond-assisted palladium catalyst and use this for alkylation and amination reactions. The novel catalyst comprises a palladium complex based on a functionalized monodentate phosphoramidite ligand in combination with urea additives and affords linear alkylated and aminated allylic products selectively. Detailed kinetic analysis show that oxidative addition of the allyl alcohol is the rate-determining step, which is facilitated by hydrogen bonds between the alcohol, the ligand functional group, and the additional urea additive.

  13. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d’Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N. L.; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production. PMID:26053393

  14. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-06-04

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production.

  15. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O.; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C.

  16. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O.; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C. PMID:28230100

  17. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-23

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C.

  18. Hydrogen production from methane through catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freni, S.; Calogero, G.; Cavallaro, S.

    This paper reviews recent developments in syn-gas production processes used for partial methane oxidation with and/or without steam. In particular, we examined different process charts (fixed bed, fluidised bed, membrane, etc.), kinds of catalysts (powders, foams, monoliths, etc.) and catalytically active phases (Ni, Pt, Rh, etc.). The explanation of the various suggested technical solutions accounted for the reaction mechanism that may selectively lead to calibrated mixtures of CO and H 2 or to the unwanted formation of products of total oxidation (CO 2 and H 2O) and pyrolysis (coke). Moreover, the new classes of catalysts allow the use of small reactors to treat large amounts of methane (monoliths) or separate hydrogen in situ from the other reaction products (membrane). This leads to higher conversions and selectivity than could have been expected thermodynamically. Although catalysts based on Rh are extremely expensive, they can be used to minimise H 2O formation by maximising H 2 yield.

  19. Hydrogen production by gasification of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, R. III

    1994-05-20

    As fossil fuel reserves run lower and lower, and as their continued widespread use leads toward numerous environmental problems, the need for clean and sustainable energy alternatives becomes ever clearer. Hydrogen fuel holds promise as such as energy source, as it burns cleanly and can be extracted from a number of renewable materials such as municipal solid waste (MSW), which can be considered largely renewable because of its high content of paper and biomass-derived products. A computer model is being developed using ASPEN Plus flow sheeting software to simulate a process which produces hydrogen gas from MSW; the model will later be used in studying the economics of this process and is based on an actual Texaco coal gasification plant design. This paper gives an overview of the complete MSW gasification process, and describes in detail the way in which MSW is modeled by the computer as a process material. In addition, details of the gasifier unit model are described; in this unit modified MSW reacts under pressure with oxygen and steam to form a mixture of gases which include hydrogen.

  20. Status of photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen and electrical energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Walker, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    The efficiency for conversion of electromagnetic energy to chemical and electrical energy utilizing semiconductor single crystals as photoanodes in electrochemical cells was investigated. Efficiencies as high as 20 percent were achieved for the conversion of 330 nm radiation to chemical energy in the form of hydrogen by the photoelectrolysis of water in a SrTiO3 based cell. The SrTiO3 photoanodes were shown to be stable in 9.5 M NaOH solutions for periods up to 48 hours. Efficiencies of 9 percent were measured for the conversion of broadband visible radiation to hydrogen using n-type GaAs crystals as photoanodes. Crystals of GaAs coated with 500 nm of gold, silver, or tin for surface passivation show no significant change in efficiency. By suppressing the production of hydrogen in a CdSe-based photogalvanic cell, an efficiency of 9 percent was obtained in conversion of 633 nm light to electrical energy. A CdS-based photogalvanic cell produced a conversion efficiency of 5 percent for 500 nm radiation.

  1. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22 MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.

  2. Production of Hydrogen Using Nuclear Energy and Inorganic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, Brian L.; Trowbridge, Lee D.; Mansur, Louis K.; Forsberg, Charles W.

    2004-07-01

    The sulfur family of thermochemical processes are the leading candidates worldwide for production of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) using nuclear energy. These processes thermo-catalytically crack water yielding hydrogen and oxygen. The processes consist of a series of chemical reactions where all the chemicals are recycled in the process except for water. The processes are potentially efficient, scalable to large sizes, and use no expensive chemical reagents; however, these processes have one major disadvantage: high operating temperatures (800 to 900 deg. C). The high-temperature chemical reaction common to all of these cycles is the equilibrium thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid. There is a potential to lower the peak temperature by 200+ deg. C if the high-temperature decomposition products of sulfuric acid, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and SO{sub 2}, can be separated from SO{sub 3} using an inorganic membrane. The goal of this project is to conduct proof-of-principle experiments and associated analysis to demonstrate the potential for inorganic membranes to dramatically improve the sulfur family of thermochemical processes. We will present preliminary data of the separation efficiency of the product gases from SO{sub 3}. (authors)

  3. Hydrogen Production:. Ceramic Materials for High Temperature Water Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammou, A.

    2006-06-01

    Hydogen, H2 is regarded as the main energy vector for the future. Today, the world production of hydrogen rises to 550 billion Nm3 (44 Mt) corresponding to 1,5% of the primary energy production. Contrary to fossil fuels, H2 does not exist in a native form and its use obviously requires its fabrication and storage. The future status of H2 as a fuel for electricity production (fuel cells) and for automobile transportation makes necessary a considerable increase of its production. Some H2 manufactoring processes are briefly described in the first part of this article : (i) steam methane reforming, (ii) water decomposition by thermochemical cycles, (iii) water decomposition by photoelectrochemistry, (iv) water or organic compounds decomposition in using bacteria or alguae. The second part concerns the H2 production by water electrolysis. This manufactoring process does not exceed 1% of the total production of hydrogen. It is expected that the electrolysers working at high temperature (700-900°C) using ceramic oxides based electrolytes are the more promising. Two groups are considered: electrolysers with proton conductors or oxide ion conductors as electrolytes. Proton conductors belong to the perovskite oxides family MCe1-xLnxO3 with M = Ba, Sr and Ln = Lanthanide. For these conductors, few results on water electrolysis at high temperature are available in the litterature and will be shown here. Electrolysers using oxide ion conductors are more promising. The selected materials are those developped for SOFCs : YSZ for the electrolyte, Ni based cermets for the cathode materials and La1-xSrxMO3±δ with M = Mn, Co, Ni, Fe ... The electrochemical characteristics of the anodic and cathodic interfaces as well as the perfomances of electrolysers working at high temperature are presented.

  4. Photocatalytic hydrogen production over CuO-modified titania.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaguo; Hai, Yang; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2011-05-01

    Efficient hydrogen production and decomposition of glycerol were achieved on CuO-modified titania (CuO-TiO(2)) photocatalysts in glycerol aqueous solutions. CuO clusters were deposited on the titania surface by impregnation of Degussa P25 TiO(2) powder (P25) with copper nitrate followed by calcination. The resulting CuO-TiO(2) composite photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible spectrophotometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N(2) adsorption-desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The low-power ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LED) were used as the light source for photocatalytic H(2)-production reaction. A detailed study of CuO effect on the photocatalytic H(2)-production rates showed that CuO clusters can act as an effective co-catalyst enhancing photocatalytic activity of TiO(2). The optimal CuO content was found to be 1.3 wt.%, giving H(2)-production rate of 2061 μmolh(-1)g(-1) (corresponding to the apparent quantum efficiency (QE) of 13.4% at 365 nm), which exceeded the rate of pure TiO(2) by more than 129 times. The quantum size effect of CuO clusters is deemed to alter its energy levels of the conduction and valence band edges in the CuO-TiO(2) semiconductor systems, which favors the electron transfer and enhances the photocatalytic activity. This work shows not only the possibility of using CuO clusters as a substitute for noble metals in the photocatalytic H(2)-production but also demonstrates a new way for enhancing hydrogen production activity by quantum size effect.

  5. Negative hydrogen ion production in a helicon plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoso, J.; Manoharan, R.; O'Byrne, S.; Corr, C. S.

    2015-09-01

    In order to develop very high energy (>1 MeV) neutral beam injection systems for applications, such as plasma heating in fusion devices, it is necessary first to develop high throughput negative ion sources. For the ITER reference source, this will be realised using caesiated inductively coupled plasma devices, containing either hydrogen or deuterium discharges, operated with high rf input powers (up to 90 kW per driver). It has been suggested that due to their high power coupling efficiency, helicon devices may be able to reduce power requirements and potentially obviate the need for caesiation due to the high plasma densities achievable. Here, we present measurements of negative ion densities in a hydrogen discharge produced by a helicon device, with externally applied DC magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 8.5 mT at 5 and 10 mTorr fill pressures. These measurements were taken in the magnetised plasma interaction experiment at the Australian National University and were performed using the probe-based laser photodetachment technique, modified for the use in the afterglow of the plasma discharge. A peak in the electron density is observed at ˜3 mT and is correlated with changes in the rf power transfer efficiency. With increasing magnetic field, an increase in the negative ion fraction from 0.04 to 0.10 and negative ion densities from 8 × 1014 m-3 to 7 × 1015 m-3 is observed. It is also shown that the negative ion densities can be increased by a factor of 8 with the application of an external DC magnetic field.

  6. Negative hydrogen ion production in a helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, J. Corr, C. S.; Manoharan, R.; O'Byrne, S.

    2015-09-15

    In order to develop very high energy (>1 MeV) neutral beam injection systems for applications, such as plasma heating in fusion devices, it is necessary first to develop high throughput negative ion sources. For the ITER reference source, this will be realised using caesiated inductively coupled plasma devices, containing either hydrogen or deuterium discharges, operated with high rf input powers (up to 90 kW per driver). It has been suggested that due to their high power coupling efficiency, helicon devices may be able to reduce power requirements and potentially obviate the need for caesiation due to the high plasma densities achievable. Here, we present measurements of negative ion densities in a hydrogen discharge produced by a helicon device, with externally applied DC magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 8.5 mT at 5 and 10 mTorr fill pressures. These measurements were taken in the magnetised plasma interaction experiment at the Australian National University and were performed using the probe-based laser photodetachment technique, modified for the use in the afterglow of the plasma discharge. A peak in the electron density is observed at ∼3 mT and is correlated with changes in the rf power transfer efficiency. With increasing magnetic field, an increase in the negative ion fraction from 0.04 to 0.10 and negative ion densities from 8 × 10{sup 14 }m{sup −3} to 7 × 10{sup 15 }m{sup −3} is observed. It is also shown that the negative ion densities can be increased by a factor of 8 with the application of an external DC magnetic field.

  7. NMR studies of solid pentachlorophenol-4-methylpyridine complexes exhibiting strong OHN hydrogen bonds: geometric H/D isotope effects and hydrogen bond coupling cause isotopic polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ip, Brenda C K; Shenderovich, Ilya G; Tolstoy, Peter M; Frydel, Jaroslaw; Denisov, Gleb S; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2012-11-26

    We have studied the hydrogen bond interactions of (15)N labeled 4-methylpyridine (4-MP) with pentachlorophenol (PCP) in the solid state and in polar solution using various NMR techniques. Previous spectroscopic, X-ray, and neutron crystallographic studies showed that the triclinic 1:1 complex (4-MPPCP) exhibits the strongest known intermolecular OHN hydrogen bond in the solid state. By contrast, deuteration of the hydrogen bond gives rise to the formation of a monoclinic structure exhibiting a weaker hydrogen bond. By performing NMR experiments at different deuterium fractions and taking advantage of dipolar (1)H-(15)N recoupling under combined fast MAS and (1)H decoupling, we provide an explanation of the origin of the isotopic polymorphism of 4-MPPCP and improve previous chemical shift correlations for OHN hydrogen bonds. Because of anharmonic ground state vibrations, an ODN hydrogen bond in the triclinic form exhibits a shorter oxygen-hydron and a longer oxygen-nitrogen distance as compared to surrounding OHN hydrogen bonds, which also implies a reduction of the local dipole moment. The dipole-dipole interaction between adjacent coupled OHN hydrogen bonds which determines the structure of triclinic 4-MPPCP is then reduced by deuteration, and other interactions become dominant, leading to the monoclinic form. Finally, the observation of stronger OHN hydrogen bonds by (1)H NMR in polar solution as compared to the solid state is discussed.

  8. Hydrogen production from banyan leaves using an atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Chung; Wu, Tzi-Yi; Jhang, Syu-Ruei; Yang, Po-Ming; Hsiao, Yi-Hsing

    2014-06-01

    Growth of the hydrogen market has motivated increased study of hydrogen production. Understanding how biomass is converted to hydrogen gas can help in evaluating opportunities for reducing the environmental impact of petroleum-based fuels. The microwave power used in the reaction is found to be proportional to the rate of production of hydrogen gas, mass of hydrogen gas produced per gram of banyan leaves consumed, and amount of hydrogen gas formed with respect to the H-atom content of banyan leaves decomposed. Increase the microwave power levels results in an increase of H2 and decrease of CO2 concentrations in the gaseous products. This finding may possibly be ascribed to the water-gas shift reaction. These results will help to expand our knowledge concerning banyan leaves and hydrogen yield on the basis of microwave-assisted pyrolysis, which will improve the design of hydrogen production technologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Survey of hydrogen production and utilization methods. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. P.; Pangborn, J. B.; Gillis, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The use of hydrogen as a synthetic fuel is considered. Processes for the production of hydrogen are described along with the present and future industrial uses of hydrogen as a fuel and as a chemical feedstock. Novel and unconventional hydrogen-production techniques are evaluated, with emphasis placed on thermochemical and electrolytic processes. Potential uses for hydrogen as a fuel in industrial and residential applications are identified and reviewed in the context of anticipated U.S. energy supplies and demands. A detailed plan for the period from 1975 to 1980 prepared for research on and development of hydrogen as an energy carrier is included.

  10. Dynamics of positronium formation in positron-hydrogen collisions embedded in weakly coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nayek, Sujay; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2012-11-15

    Dynamics of positronium (Ps) formation in an arbitrary s-state from an arbitrary s-state of the hydrogen atom in weakly coupled plasma has been investigated within the framework of a distorted-wave theory. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. Using simple variational hydrogenic wave functions and arbitrary order derivatives of the general three-denominator Lewis integral partial-wave scattering amplitudes have been obtained in closed forms. These distorted-wave scattering amplitudes have been used to make a detailed study on differential and total cross sections. It has been found that screening of the interaction potentials has significant effect on the scattering dynamics. Some notable features of cross sections have also been revealed.

  11. Dynamics of positronium formation in positron-hydrogen collisions embedded in weakly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayek, Sujay; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2012-11-01

    Dynamics of positronium (Ps) formation in an arbitrary s-state from an arbitrary s-state of the hydrogen atom in weakly coupled plasma has been investigated within the framework of a distorted-wave theory. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. Using simple variational hydrogenic wave functions and arbitrary order derivatives of the general three-denominator Lewis integral partial-wave scattering amplitudes have been obtained in closed forms. These distorted-wave scattering amplitudes have been used to make a detailed study on differential and total cross sections. It has been found that screening of the interaction potentials has significant effect on the scattering dynamics. Some notable features of cross sections have also been revealed.

  12. Activation of Electron-Deficient Quinones through Hydrogen-Bond-Donor-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Turek, Amanda K; Hardee, David J; Ullman, Andrew M; Nocera, Daniel G; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2016-01-11

    Quinones are important organic oxidants in a variety of synthetic and biological contexts, and they are susceptible to activation towards electron transfer through hydrogen bonding. Whereas this effect of hydrogen bond donors (HBDs) has been observed for Lewis basic, weakly oxidizing quinones, comparable activation is not readily achieved when more reactive and synthetically useful electron-deficient quinones are used. We have successfully employed HBD-coupled electron transfer as a strategy to activate electron-deficient quinones. A systematic investigation of HBDs has led to the discovery that certain dicationic HBDs have an exceptionally large effect on the rate and thermodynamics of electron transfer. We further demonstrate that these HBDs can be used as catalysts in a quinone-mediated model synthetic transformation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Capacitively coupled radio-frequency hydrogen discharges: The role of kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, L.; Jolly, J.; Alves, L. L.

    2007-09-15

    This paper presents a systematic characterization of capacitively coupled radio-frequency hydrogen discharges, produced within a parallel plate cylindrical setup at different rf applied voltages (V{sub rf}=50-600 V), frequencies (f=13.56-40.68 MHz), and pressures (p=0.2-1 torr). A two-dimensional, time-dependent fluid model for charged particle transport is self-consistently solved coupled to a homogeneous kinetic model for hydrogen, including vibrationally excited molecular species and electronically excited atomic species. Numerical simulations are compared with experimental measurements of various plasma parameters. A good quantitative agreement is found between simulations and experiment for the coupled electrical power and the plasma potential. The model underestimates the values of the electron density, the self-bias potential, and the H(n=1) atom density with respect to measurements, but agrees with experiment when predicting that all these parameters increase with either V{sub rf}, f, or p. The dissociation degree is about 10{sup -3} for the work conditions considered. Simulations adopt a wall recombination probability for H atoms that was experimentally measured, thus accounting for surface modification with discharge operating conditions. Results show the key role played by the atomic wall recombination mechanism in plasma description.

  14. Measurements of energy distribution and thrust for microwave plasma coupling of electrical energy to hydrogen for propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, T.; Chapman, R.; Filpus, J.; Hawley, M.; Kerber, R.; Asmussen, J.; Nakanishi, S.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave plasma system for transfer of electrical energy to hydrogen flowing through the system has potential application for coupling energy to a flowing gas in the electrothermal propulsion concept. Experimental systems have been designed and built for determination of the energy inputs and outputs and thrust for the microwave coupling of energy to hydrogen. Results for experiments with pressure in the range 100 microns-6 torr, hydrogen flow rate up to 1000 micronmoles/s, and total absorbed power to 700 w are presented.

  15. Measurements of energy distribution and thrust for microwave plasma coupling of electrical energy to hydrogen for propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, T.; Chapman, R.; Filpus, J.; Hawley, M.; Kerber, R.; Asmussen, J.; Nakanishi, S.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave plasma system for transfer of electrical energy to hydrogen flowing through the system has potential application for coupling energy to a flowing gas in the electrothermal propulsion concept. Experimental systems have been designed and built for determination of the energy inputs and outputs and thrust for the microwave coupling of energy to hydrogen. Results for experiments with pressure in the range 100 microns-6 torr, hydrogen flow rate up to 1000 micronmoles/s, and total absorbed power to 700 w are presented.

  16. Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Michael W. Patterson

    2008-05-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible

  17. NMR Scalar Couplings across Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds between Zinc-Finger Histidine Side Chains and DNA Phosphate Groups.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Abhijnan; Esadze, Alexandre; Roy, Sourav; Iwahara, Junji

    2016-10-10

    NMR scalar couplings across hydrogen bonds represent direct evidence for the partial covalent nature of hydrogen bonds and provide structural and dynamic information on hydrogen bonding. In this article, we report heteronuclear (15)N-(31)P and (1)H-(31)P scalar couplings across the intermolecular hydrogen bonds between protein histidine (His) imidazole and DNA phosphate groups. These hydrogen-bond scalar couplings were observed for the Egr-1 zinc-finger-DNA complex. Although His side-chain NH protons are typically undetectable in heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N correlation spectra due to rapid hydrogen exchange, this complex exhibited two His side-chain NH signals around (1)H 14.3 ppm and (15)N 178 ppm at 35 °C. Through various heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments, these signals were assigned to two zinc-coordinating His side chains in contact with DNA phosphate groups. The data show that the Nδ1 atoms of these His side chains are protonated and exhibit the (1)H-(15)N cross-peaks. Using heteronuclear (1)H, (15)N, and (31)P NMR experiments, we observed the hydrogen-bond scalar couplings between the His (15)Nδ1/(1)Hδ1 and DNA phosphate (31)P nuclei. These results demonstrate the direct involvement of the zinc-coordinating His side chains in the recognition of DNA by the Cys2His2-class zinc fingers in solution.

  18. ENHANCED HYDROGEN ECONOMICS VIA COPRODUCTION OF FUELS AND CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, Elliot B; Bhagavatula, Abhijit; Dadyburjor, Dady; Dixit, Santhoshi; Garlapalli, Ravinder; Magean, Liviu; Mukkha, Mayuri; Olajide, Olufemi A; Stiller, Alfred H; Yurchick, Christopher L

    2011-03-31

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research effort to develop environmentally cleaner projects as a spin-off of the FutureGen project, which seeks to reduce or eliminate emissions from plants that utilize coal for power or hydrogen production. New clean coal conversion processes were designed and tested for coproducing clean pitches and cokes used in the metals industry as well as a heavy crude oil. These new processes were based on direct liquefaction and pyrolysis techniques that liberate volatile liquids from coal without the need for high pressure or on-site gaseous hydrogen. As a result of the research, a commercial scale plant for the production of synthetic foundry coke has broken ground near Wise, Virginia under the auspices of Carbonite Inc. This plant will produce foundry coke by pyrolyzing a blend of steam coal feedstocks. A second plant is planned by Quantex Energy Inc (in Texas) which will use solvent extraction to coproduce a coke residue as well as crude oil. A third plant is being actively considered for Kingsport, Tennessee, pending a favorable resolution of regulatory issues.

  19. Bioelectrochemical hydrogen production from urban wastewater on a pilot scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza, Juan A.; Martínez-Miró, Àlex; Guerrero, Javier; Ruiz, Yolanda; Guisasola, Albert

    2017-07-01

    Bioelectrochemical hydrogen production has been successfully achieved in laboratory-scale conditions with different substrates. However, scaling up microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) is not straightforward, and reported attempts have not been completely successful. This work presents the design, building, start-up and operation of an MEC pilot plant (130 L) based on a cassette configuration. The plant was started up in batch mode with acetate and glucose as substrates and operated for five months with different substrates (i.e. glucose, diluted raw glycerol and real urban wastewater). The best results were obtained in the last period with primary effluent from real urban wastewater. The hydrogen production increased to values higher than 4 L d-1 with a gas purity of 95%, a cathodic gas recovery of 82% and an energy recovery of 121% with respect to the electrical input. The organic matter removal efficiency was approximately 25% for a hydraulic retention time of 2 d with an organic loading rate (OLR) of 0.25 gCOD·L-1·d-1. It should be possible to achieve removal efficiencies around 75% with OLRs lower than 0.05 gCOD·L-1·d-1. These results are promising and represent an important step towards the industrial implementation of these systems.

  20. Ice method for production of hydrogen clathrate hydrates

    DOEpatents

    Lokshin, Konstantin; Zhao, Yusheng

    2008-05-13

    The present invention includes a method for hydrogen clathrate hydrate synthesis. First, ice and hydrogen gas are supplied to a containment volume at a first temperature and a first pressure. Next, the containment volume is pressurized with hydrogen gas to a second higher pressure, where hydrogen clathrate hydrates are formed in the process.