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Sample records for hydrogen rich water

  1. Hydrogen-rich water attenuates experimental periodontitis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kasuyama, Kenta; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tamaki, Naofumi; Azuma, Tetsuji; Irie, Koichiro; Endo, Yasumasa; Morita, Manabu

    2011-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the development of periodontitis. As molecular hydrogen can act as a scavenger of ROS, we examined the effects of treatment with hydrogen-rich water on a rat model of periodontitis. A ligature was placed around the maxillary molars for 4 weeks to induce periodontitis, and the animals were given drinking water with or without hydrogen-rich water. The rats with periodontitis which were treated with pure water showed a time-dependent increase in serum ROS level. Compared with the rats without periodontitis, the periodontitis-induced rats which were given pure water also showed polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration and alveolar bone loss at 4 weeks. Hydrogen-rich water intake inhibited an increase in serum ROS level and lowered expression of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and nitrotyrosine in the periodontal tissue at 4 weeks. Such conditions prevented polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration and osteoclast differentiation following periodontitis progression. Furthermore, inflammatory signalling pathways, such as mitogen-activated protein kinases, were less activated in periodontal lesions from hydrogen-rich water-treated rats as compared with pure water-treated rats. Consuming hydrogen-rich water might be beneficial in suppressing periodontitis progression by decreasing gingival oxidative stress. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Effects of hydrogen-rich water on aging periodontal tissues in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kawabata, Yuya; Kasuyama, Kenta; Endo, Yasumasa; Yoneda, Toshiki; Yamane, Mayu; Azuma, Tetsuji; Ekuni, Daisuke; Morita, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damage is involved in age-related inflammatory reactions. The anti-oxidative effects of hydrogen-rich water suppress oxidative damage, which may aid in inhibiting age-related inflammatory reactions. We investigated the effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on aging periodontal tissues in healthy rats. Four-month-old male Fischer 344 rats (n = 12) were divided into two groups: the experimental group (hydrogen-rich water treatment) and the control group (distilled water treatment). The rats consumed hydrogen-rich water or distilled water until 16 months of age. The experimental group exhibited lower periodontal oxidative damage at 16 months of age than the control group. Although protein expression of interleukin-1β did not differ, gene expression of Nod-like receptor protein 3 inflammasomes was activated in periodontal tissues from the experimental group as compared with the control group. Drinking hydrogen-rich water is proposed to have anti-aging effects on periodontal oxidative damage, but not on inflammatory reactions in healthy rats. PMID:24985521

  3. Effectiveness of hydrogen rich water on antioxidant status of subjects with potential metabolic syndrome-an open label pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Atsunori; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Sharma, Prachi; Evans, Malkanthi; Guthrie, Najla

    2010-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by cardiometabolic risk factors that include obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Oxidative stress is known to play a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of hydrogen rich water (1.5-2 L/day) in an open label, 8-week study on 20 subjects with potential metabolic syndrome. Hydrogen rich water was produced, by placing a metallic magnesium stick into drinking water (hydrogen concentration; 0.55-0.65 mM), by the following chemical reaction; Mg + 2H(2)O --> Mg (OH)(2) + H(2). The consumption of hydrogen rich water for 8 weeks resulted in a 39% increase (p<0.05) in antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) and a 43% decrease (p<0.05) in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in urine. Further, subjects demonstrated an 8% increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and a 13% decrease in total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol from baseline to week 4. There was no change in fasting glucose levels during the 8 week study. In conclusion, drinking hydrogen rich water represents a potentially novel therapeutic and preventive strategy for metabolic syndrome. The portable magnesium stick was a safe, easy and effective method of delivering hydrogen rich water for daily consumption by participants in the study.

  4. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:26798423

  5. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Naofumi; Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  6. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Rupe, J. H.; Kushida, R. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by injecting air and hydrocarbon fuel at one end of a cylindrically shaped chamber to form a mixture and igniting the mixture to provide hot combustion gases by partial oxidation of the hydrocarbon fuel. The combustion gases move away from the ignition region to another region where water is injected to be turned into steam by the hot combustion gases. The steam which is formed mixes with the hot gases to yield a uniform hot gas whereby a steam reforming reaction with the hydrocarbon fuel takes place to produce a hydrogen rich gas.

  7. Preventive Effects of Drinking Hydrogen-Rich Water on Gingival Oxidative Stress and Alveolar Bone Resorption in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Toshiki; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Ekuni, Daisuke; Irie, Koichiro; Azuma, Tetsuji; Machida, Tatsuya; Miyai, Hisataka; Fujimori, Kouhei; Morita, Manabu

    2017-01-01

    Obesity induces gingival oxidative stress, which is involved in the progression of alveolar bone resorption. The antioxidant effect of hydrogen-rich water may attenuate gingival oxidative stress and prevent alveolar bone resorption in cases of obesity. We examined whether hydrogen-rich water could suppress gingival oxidative stress and alveolar bone resorption in obese rats fed a high-fat diet. Male Fischer 344 rats (n = 18) were divided into three groups of six rats each: a control group (fed a regular diet and drinking distilled water) and two experimental groups (fed a high-fat diet and drinking distilled water or hydrogen-rich water). The level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was determined to evaluate oxidative stress. The bone mineral density of the alveolar bone was analyzed by micro-computerized tomography. Obese rats, induced by a high-fat diet, showed a higher gingival level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and a lower level of alveolar bone density compared to the control group. Drinking hydrogen-rich water suppressed body weight gain, lowered gingival level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, and reduced alveolar bone resorption in rats on a high-fat diet. The results indicate that hydrogen-rich water could suppress gingival oxidative stress and alveolar bone resorption by limiting obesity. PMID:28098768

  8. Preventive Effects of Drinking Hydrogen-Rich Water on Gingival Oxidative Stress and Alveolar Bone Resorption in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Toshiki; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Ekuni, Daisuke; Irie, Koichiro; Azuma, Tetsuji; Machida, Tatsuya; Miyai, Hisataka; Fujimori, Kouhei; Morita, Manabu

    2017-01-13

    Obesity induces gingival oxidative stress, which is involved in the progression of alveolar bone resorption. The antioxidant effect of hydrogen-rich water may attenuate gingival oxidative stress and prevent alveolar bone resorption in cases of obesity. We examined whether hydrogen-rich water could suppress gingival oxidative stress and alveolar bone resorption in obese rats fed a high-fat diet. Male Fischer 344 rats ( n = 18) were divided into three groups of six rats each: a control group (fed a regular diet and drinking distilled water) and two experimental groups (fed a high-fat diet and drinking distilled water or hydrogen-rich water). The level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was determined to evaluate oxidative stress. The bone mineral density of the alveolar bone was analyzed by micro-computerized tomography. Obese rats, induced by a high-fat diet, showed a higher gingival level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and a lower level of alveolar bone density compared to the control group. Drinking hydrogen-rich water suppressed body weight gain, lowered gingival level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, and reduced alveolar bone resorption in rats on a high-fat diet. The results indicate that hydrogen-rich water could suppress gingival oxidative stress and alveolar bone resorption by limiting obesity.

  9. Hydrogen-rich water ameliorates bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Yukako; Ito, Mikako; Oshima, Takahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-09-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is characterized by developmental arrest of the alveolar tissue. Oxidative stress is causally associated with development of BPD. The effects of hydrogen have been reported in a wide range of disease models and human diseases especially caused by oxidative stress. We made a rat model of BPD by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the amniotic fluid at E16.5. The mother started drinking hydrogen-rich water from E9.5 and also while feeding milk. Hydrogen normalized LPS-induced abnormal enlargement of alveoli at P7 and P14. LPS increased staining for nitrotyrosine and 8-OHdG of the lungs, and hydrogen attenuated the staining. At P1, LPS treatment decreased expressions of genes for FGFR4, VEGFR2, and HO-1 in the lungs, and hydrogen increased expressions of these genes. In contrast, LPS treatment and hydrogen treatment had no essential effect on the expression of SOD1. Inflammatory marker proteins of TNFα and IL-6 were increased by LPS treatment, and hydrogen suppressed them. Treatment of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells with 10% hydrogen gas for 24 hr decreased production of reactive oxygen species in both LPS-treated and untreated cells. Lack of any known adverse effects of hydrogen makes hydrogen a promising therapeutic modality for BPD. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016; 51:928-935. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  11. Oral intake of hydrogen-rich water ameliorated chlorpyrifos-induced neurotoxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Ling; Liu, Mengyu

    Chronic exposure to low-levels of organophosphate (OP) compounds, such as chlorpyrifos (CPF), induces oxidative stress and could be related to neurological disorders. Hydrogen has been identified as a novel antioxidant which could selectively scavenge hydroxyl radicals. We explore whether intake of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) can protect Wistar rats from CPF-induced neurotoxicity. Rats were gavaged daily with 6.75 mg/kg body weight (1/20 LD{sub 50}) of CPF and given HRW by oral intake. Nissl staining and electron microscopy results indicated that HRW intake had protective effects on the CPF-induced damage of hippocampal neurons and neuronal mitochondria. Immunostaining results showed that the increasedmore » glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in astrocytes induced by CPF exposure can be ameliorated by HRW intake. Moreover, HRW intake also attenuated CPF-induced oxidative stress as evidenced by enhanced level of MDA, accompanied by an increase in GSH level and SOD and CAT activity. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity tests showed significant decrease in brain AChE activity after CPF exposure, and this effect can be ameliorated by HRW intake. An in vitro study demonstrated that AChE activity was more intense in HRW than in normal water with or without chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO), the metabolically-activated form of CPF. These observations suggest that HRW intake can protect rats from CPF-induced neurotoxicity, and the protective effects of hydrogen may be mediated by regulating the oxidant and antioxidant status of rats. Furthermore, this work defines a novel mechanism of biological activity of hydrogen by directly increasing the AChE activity. - Highlights: • Hydrogen molecules protect rats from CPF-induced damage of hippocampal neurons. • The increased GFAP expression induced by CPF can also be ameliorated by hydrogen. • Hydrogen molecules attenuated the increase in CPF-induced oxidative stress. • Hydrogen molecules attenuated AChE inhibition in

  12. Stable Hydrogen-rich Atmospheres of Young Rocky Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Catling, D. C.; Gacesa, M.

    2016-12-01

    SourceURL:file://localhost/Volumes/Lexar/Zahnle_AGU_2016.docx Understanding hydrogen escape is essential to understanding the limits to habitability, both for liquid water where the Sun is bright, but also to assess the true potential of H2 as a greenhouse gas where the Sun is faint. Hydrogen-rich primary atmospheres of Earth-like planets can result either from gravitational capture of solar nebular gases (with helium), or from impact shock processing of a wide variety of volatile-rich planetesimals (typically accompanied by H2O, CO2, and under the right circumstances, CH4). Most studies of hydrogen escape from planets focus on determining how fast the hydrogen escapes. In general this requires solving hydrodynamic equations that take into account the acceleration of hydrogen through a critical transonic point and an energy budget that should include radiative heating and cooling, thermal conduction, the work done in lifting the hydrogen against gravity, and the residual heat carried by the hydrogen as it leaves. But for planets from which hydrogen escape is modest or insignificant, the atmosphere can be approximated as hydrostatic, which is much simpler, and for which a relatively full-featured treatment of radiative cooling by embedded molecules, atoms, and ions such as CO2 and H3+ is straightforward. Previous work has overlooked the fact that the H2 molecule is extremely efficient at exciting non-LTE CO2 15 micron emission, and thus that radiative cooling can be markedly more efficient when H2 is abundant. We map out the region of phase space in which terrestrial planets keep hydrogen-rich atmospheres, which is what we actually want to know for habitability. We will use this framework to reassess Tian et al's (Science 308, pp. 1014-1017, 2005) hypothesis that H2-rich atmospheres may have been rather long-lived on Earth itself. Finally, we will address the empirical observation that rocky planets with thin or negligible atmospheres are rarely or never bigger than

  13. Hydrogen-rich Water Exerting a Protective Effect on Ovarian Reserve Function in a Mouse Model of Immune Premature Ovarian Failure Induced by Zona Pellucida 3

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Wang, Shu-Yu; Yin, Cheng-Hong; Wang, Tong; Jia, Chan-Wei; Ma, Yan-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background: Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a disease that affects female fertility but has few effective treatments. Ovarian reserve function plays an important role in female fertility. Recent studies have reported that hydrogen can protect male fertility. Therefore, we explored the potential protective effect of hydrogen-rich water on ovarian reserve function through a mouse immune POF model. Methods: To set up immune POF model, fifty female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups: Control (mice consumed normal water, n = 10), hydrogen (mice consumed hydrogen-rich water, n = 10), model (mice were immunized with zona pellucida glycoprotein 3 [ZP3] and consumed normal water, n = 15), and model-hydrogen (mice were immunized with ZP3 and consumed hydrogen-rich water, n = 15) groups. After 5 weeks, mice were sacrificed. Serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels, granulosa cell (GC) apoptotic index (AI), B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and BCL2-associated X protein (Bax) expression were examined. Analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) software. Results: Immune POF model, model group exhibited markedly reduced serum AMH levels compared with those of the control group (5.41 ± 0.91 ng/ml vs. 16.23 ± 1.97 ng/ml, P = 0.033) and the hydrogen group (19.65 ± 7.82 ng/ml, P = 0.006). The model-hydrogen group displayed significantly higher AMH concentrations compared with that of the model group (15.03 ± 2.75 ng/ml vs. 5.41 ± 0.91 ng/ml, P = 0.021). The GC AI was significantly higher in the model group (21.30 ± 1.74%) than those in the control (7.06 ± 0.27%), hydrogen (5.17 ± 0.41%), and model-hydrogen groups (11.24 ± 0.58%) (all P < 0.001). The GC AI was significantly higher in the model-hydrogen group compared with that of the hydrogen group (11.24 ± 0.58% vs. 5.17 ± 0.41%, P = 0.021). Compared with those of the model group, ovarian tissue Bcl-2 levels increased (2.18 ± 0.30 vs. 3.01 ± 0.33, P = 0.045) and the Bax

  14. Effects of hydrogen rich water on prolonged intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Da Ponte, Alessandro; Giovanelli, Nicola; Nigris, Daniele; Lazzer, Stefano

    2018-05-01

    Recent studies showed a positive effect of hydrogen rich water (HRW) intake on acid-base homeostasis at rest. We investigated 2-weeks of HRW intake on repeated sprint performance and acid-base status during prolonged intermittent cycling exercise. In a cross over single-blind protocol, 8 trained male cyclists (age [mean±SD] 41±7 years, body mass 72.3±4.4 kg, height 1.77±0.04 m, maximal oxygen uptake [V̇O2max] 52.6±4.4 mL·kg-1·min-1) were provided daily with 2 liters of placebo normal water (PLA, pH 7.6, oxidation/reduction potential [ORP] +230 mV, free hydrogen content 0 ppb) or HRW (pH 9.8, ORP -180 mV, free Hydrogen 450 ppb). Tests were performed at baseline and after each period of 2 weeks of treatment. The treatments were counter-balanced and the sequence randomized. The 30-minute intermittent cycling trial consisted in 10 3-minute blocks, each one composed by 90 seconds at 40% V̇O2max, 60 seconds at 60% V̇O2max, 16 seconds all out sprint, and 14 seconds active recovery. Oxygen uptake (V̇O2), heart rate and power output were measured during the whole test, while mean and peak power output (PPO), time to peak power and Fatigue Index (FI) were determined during all the 16 seconds sprints. Lactate, pH and bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentrations were determined at rest and after each sprint on blood obtained by an antecubital vein indwelling catheter. In the PLA group, PPO in absolute values decreased significantly at the 8th and 9th of 10 sprints and in relative values, ΔPPO, decreased significantly at 6th, 8th and 9th of 10 sprints (by mean: -12±5%, P<0.006), while it remained unchanged in HRW group. Mean power, FI, time to peak power and total work showed no differences between groups. In both conditions lactate levels increased while pH and HCO3- decreased progressively as a function of the number of sprints. Two weeks of HRW intake may help to maintain PPO in repetitive sprints to exhaustion over 30 minutes.

  15. Deuterium-rich Water in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloule, E.; Robert, F.

    1995-09-01

    D/H ratios of 2 meteorites (Renazzo CR and Semarkona LL3), which are known to exhibit the largest departures from the terrestrial hydrogen isotopic ratios, have been determined with the CRPG Nancy ion-microprobe. Correlations between the D/H ratios and the chemical compositions (H2O, K, Si, C/H) of plausible hydrogen carriers were observed. From these correlations, it is possible to show that, contrary to previous interpretations, phyllosilicates are the carriers of the deuterium-rich hydrogen in Semarkona and Renazzo : 870 x10-6 D/H 670 x106 (+4600 dD 3300) and 320 x10-6 (dD 1050), respectively. Hydrogen is also present in the chondrules of these two deuterium-rich meteorites. Isotopic equilibrium between the deuterium depleted phases and the deuterium-rich phyllosilicates was never attained. This is illustrated at a micron scale by the D/H ratios obtained continuously during a 3 hours measurement on a same position (see figure below). It can be seen that water-rich mineral(s) having D/H up to 550 x10-6 (dD = +2500) are in contact with a mineral having D/H = 234 x10-6 (dD = +500). The thickness of the boundary where the diffusion of hydrogen took place is restricted to less than 0.2 mm. Such isotopic heterogeneity is quite spectacular if one remembers that the isotopic variations that we can see within these 0.2 mm are an order of magnitude larger than the total observed variations on Earth. The large differences in D/H ratios between matrix (up to 700 x 10-6, dD up to +3500) and chondrules (from 120 x10-6 (dD = -230) to 230 x10-6 (dD = +475)) show that hydrogen in chondrules cannot originate from the matrix by simple contamination or diffusion processes. The high D/H ratios measured in water bearing minerals could not have been produced thermally within a dense solar nebula. Chemical reactions (i.e. involving ions or radicals), taking place in interstellar space or in the outer regions of the nebula at 110-140K are presently the only conceivable mechanisms

  16. Hydrogen-rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus are described for producing hydrogen-rich product gases. A spray of liquid hydrocarbon is mixed with a stream of air in a startup procedure and the mixture is ignited for partial oxidation. The stream of air is then heated by the resulting combustion to reach a temperature such that a signal is produced. The signal triggers a two way valve which directs liquid hydrocarbon from a spraying mechanism to a vaporizing mechanism with which a vaporized hydrocarbon is formed. The vaporized hydrocarbon is subsequently mixed with the heated air in the combustion chamber where partial oxidation takes place and hydrogen-rich product gases are produced.

  17. Hydrogen-rich pure water prevents cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema in SMP30 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yohei; Sato, Tadashi; Sugimoto, Masataka; Baskoro, Hario; Karasutani, Keiko; Mitsui, Aki; Nurwidya, Fariz; Arano, Naoko; Kodama, Yuzo; Hirano, Shin-Ichi; Ishigami, Akihito; Seyama, Kuniaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-10-07

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is predominantly a cigarette smoke (CS)-triggered disease with features of chronic systemic inflammation. Oxidants derived from CS can induce DNA damage and stress-induced premature cellular senescence in the respiratory system, which play significant roles in COPD. Therefore, antioxidants should provide benefits for the treatment of COPD; however, their therapeutic potential remains limited owing to the complexity of this disease. Recently, molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) has been reported as a preventive and therapeutic antioxidant. Molecular H 2 can selectively reduce hydroxyl radical accumulation with no known side effects, showing potential applications in managing oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and lipid metabolism. However, there have been no reports on the efficacy of molecular H 2 in COPD patients. In the present study, we used a mouse model of COPD to investigate whether CS-induced histological damage in the lungs could be attenuated by administration of molecular H 2 . We administered H 2 -rich pure water to senescence marker protein 30 knockout (SMP30-KO) mice exposed to CS for 8 weeks. Administration of H 2 -rich water attenuated the CS-induced lung damage in the SMP30-KO mice and reduced the mean linear intercept and destructive index of the lungs. Moreover, H 2 -rich water significantly restored the static lung compliance in the CS-exposed mice compared with that in the CS-exposed H 2 -untreated mice. Moreover, treatment with H 2 -rich water decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage markers such as phosphorylated histone H2AX and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, and senescence markers such as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1, and β-galactosidase in the CS-exposed mice. These results demonstrated that H 2 -rich pure water attenuated CS-induced emphysema in SMP30-KO mice by reducing CS-induced oxidative DNA damage and premature cell senescence in the lungs. Our

  18. The Stability of Hydrogen-Rich Atmospheres of Earth-Like Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding hydrogen escape is essential to understanding the limits to habitability, both for liquid water where the Sun is bright, but also to assess the true potential of H2 as a greenhouse gas where the Sun is faint. Hydrogen-rich primary atmospheres of Earth-like planets can result either from gravitational capture of solar nebular gases (with helium), or from impact shock processing of a wide variety of volatile-rich planetesimals (typically accompanied by H2O, CO2, and under the right circumstances, CH4). Most studies of hydrogen escape from planets focus on determining how fast the hydrogen escapes. In general this requires solving hydro- dynamic equations that take into account the acceleration of hydrogen through a critical transonic point and an energy budget that should include radiative heating and cooling, thermal conduction, the work done in lifting the hydrogen against gravity, and the residual heat carried by the hydrogen as it leaves. But for planets from which hydrogen escape is modest or insignificant, the atmosphere can be approximated as hydrostatic, which is much simpler, and for which a relatively full-featured treatment of radiative cooling by embedded molecules, atoms, and ions such as CO2 and H3+ is straightforward. Previous work has overlooked the fact that the H2 molecule is extremely efficient at exciting non-LTE CO2 15 micron emission, and thus that radiative cooling can be markedly more efficient when H2 is abundant. We map out the region of phase space in which terrestrial planets keep hydrogen-rich atmospheres, which is what we actually want to know for habitability. We will use this framework to reassess Tian et al's hypothesis that H2-rich atmospheres may have been rather long-lived on Earth itself. Finally, we will address the empirical observation that rocky planets with thin or negligible atmospheres are rarely or never bigger than 1.6 Earth radii.

  19. Oral intake of hydrogen-rich water inhibits intimal hyperplasia in arterialized vein grafts in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiang; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Masutani, Kosuke; Peng, Ximei; Sun, Qing; Stolz, Donna B.; Pribis, John P.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Sun, Xuejun; Bermudez, Christian A.; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Nakao, Atsunori

    2012-01-01

    Aims Arterialized vein grafts often fail due to intimal hyperplasia. Hydrogen potently protects organs and cells from many insults via its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. We investigated the efficacy of oral administration of hydrogen-rich water (HW) for prevention of intimal hyperplasia. Methods and results The inferior vena cava was excised, stored in cold Ringer solution for 2 h, and placed as an interposition graft in the abdominal aorta of syngeneic Lewis rats. HW was generated by immersing a magnesium stick in tap water (Mg + 2H2O → Mg (OH)2 + H2). Beginning on the day of graft implantation, recipients were given tap water [regular water (RW)], HW or HW that had been subsequently degassed water (DW). Six weeks after grafting, the grafts in the rats given RW or DW had developed intimal hyperplasia, accompanied by increased oxidative injury. HW significantly suppressed intimal hyperplasia. One week after grafting, the grafts in HW-treated rats exhibited improved endothelial integrity with less platelet and white blood cell aggregation. Up-regulation of the mRNAs for intracellular adhesion molecules was attenuated in the vein grafts of the rats receiving HW. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 was also significantly inhibited in grafts receiving HW. In rat smooth muscle cell (A7r5) cultures, hydrogen treatment for 24 h reduced smooth muscle cell migration. Conclusion Drinking HW significantly reduced neointima formation after vein grafting in rats. Drinking HW may have therapeutic value as a novel therapy for intimal hyperplasia and could easily be incorporated into daily life. PMID:22287575

  20. Dose-dependent inhibition of gastric injury by hydrogen in alkaline electrolyzed drinking water

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hydrogen has been reported to relieve damage in many disease models, and is a potential additive in drinking water to provide protective effects for patients as several clinical studies revealed. However, the absence of a dose–response relationship in the application of hydrogen is puzzling. We attempted to identify the dose–response relationship of hydrogen in alkaline electrolyzed drinking water through the aspirin induced gastric injury model. Methods In this study, hydrogen-rich alkaline water was obtained by adding H2 to electrolyzed water at one atmosphere pressure. After 2 weeks of drinking, we detected the gastric mucosal damage together with MPO, MDA and 8-OHdG in rat aspirin induced gastric injury model. Results Hydrogen-dose dependent inhibition was observed in stomach mucosal. Under pH 8.5, 0.07, 0.22 and 0.84 ppm hydrogen exhibited a high correlation with inhibitory effects showed by erosion area, MPO activity and MDA content in the stomach. Gastric histology also demonstrated the inhibition of damage by hydrogen-rich alkaline water. However, 8-OHdG level in serum did not have significant hydrogen-dose dependent effect. pH 9.5 showed higher but not significant inhibitory response compared with pH 8.5. Conclusions Hydrogen is effective in relieving the gastric injury induced by aspirin-HCl, and the inhibitory effect is dose-dependent. The reason behind this may be that hydrogen-rich water directly interacted with the target tissue, while the hydrogen concentration in blood was buffered by liver glycogen, evoking a suppressed dose–response effect. Drinking hydrogen-rich water may protect healthy individuals from gastric damage caused by oxidative stress. PMID:24589018

  1. Dose-dependent inhibition of gastric injury by hydrogen in alkaline electrolyzed drinking water.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jinling; Shang, Guodong; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Saihara, Yasuhiro; Hou, Lingyan; Velasquez, Natalia; Liu, Wenjun; Lu, Yun

    2014-03-03

    Hydrogen has been reported to relieve damage in many disease models, and is a potential additive in drinking water to provide protective effects for patients as several clinical studies revealed. However, the absence of a dose-response relationship in the application of hydrogen is puzzling. We attempted to identify the dose-response relationship of hydrogen in alkaline electrolyzed drinking water through the aspirin induced gastric injury model. In this study, hydrogen-rich alkaline water was obtained by adding H2 to electrolyzed water at one atmosphere pressure. After 2 weeks of drinking, we detected the gastric mucosal damage together with MPO, MDA and 8-OHdG in rat aspirin induced gastric injury model. Hydrogen-dose dependent inhibition was observed in stomach mucosal. Under pH 8.5, 0.07, 0.22 and 0.84 ppm hydrogen exhibited a high correlation with inhibitory effects showed by erosion area, MPO activity and MDA content in the stomach. Gastric histology also demonstrated the inhibition of damage by hydrogen-rich alkaline water. However, 8-OHdG level in serum did not have significant hydrogen-dose dependent effect. pH 9.5 showed higher but not significant inhibitory response compared with pH 8.5. Hydrogen is effective in relieving the gastric injury induced by aspirin-HCl, and the inhibitory effect is dose-dependent. The reason behind this may be that hydrogen-rich water directly interacted with the target tissue, while the hydrogen concentration in blood was buffered by liver glycogen, evoking a suppressed dose-response effect. Drinking hydrogen-rich water may protect healthy individuals from gastric damage caused by oxidative stress.

  2. Immersing lungs in hydrogen-rich saline attenuates lung ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mamoru; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Saito, Masao; Tanaka, Satona; Miyamoto, Ei; Ohata, Keiji; Kondo, Takeshi; Motoyama, Hideki; Hijiya, Kyoko; Aoyama, Akihiro; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Anti-oxidant effects of hydrogen have been reported in studies examining ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of immersing lungs in hydrogen-rich saline on lung IRI. Lewis rats were divided into three groups: (i) sham, (ii) normal saline and (iii) hydrogen-rich saline. In the first experiment, the left thoracic cavity was filled with either normal saline or hydrogen-rich saline for 1 h. Then, we measured the hydrogen concentration in the left lung using a sensor gas chromatograph ( N = 3 per group). In the second experiment, lung IRI was induced by occlusion of the left pulmonary hilum for 1 h, followed by reperfusion for 3 h. During the ischaemic period, the left thoracic cavity was filled with either normal saline or hydrogen-rich saline. After reperfusion, we assessed lung function, histological changes and cytokine production ( N = 5-7 per group). Immersing lungs in hydrogen-rich saline resulted in an elevated hydrogen concentration in the lung (6.9 ± 2.9 μmol/1 g lung). After IRI, pulmonary function (pulmonary compliance and oxygenation levels) was significantly higher in the hydrogen-rich saline group than in the normal saline group ( P  < 0.05). Similarly, pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (interleukin-1β and interleukin-6) in the left lung were significantly lower in the hydrogen-rich saline group than in the normal saline group ( P  < 0.05). Immersing lungs in hydrogen-rich saline delivered hydrogen into the lung and consequently attenuated lung IRI. Hydrogen-rich solution appears to be a promising approach to managing lung IRI. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Pilot study: Effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on muscle fatigue caused by acute exercise in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kosuke; Nakao, Atsunori; Adachi, Takako; Matsui, Yasushi; Miyakawa, Shumpei

    2012-01-01

    Muscle contraction during short intervals of intense exercise causes oxidative stress, which can play a role in the development of overtraining symptoms, including increased fatigue, resulting in muscle microinjury or inflammation. Recently it has been said that hydrogen can function as antioxidant, so we investigated the effect of hydrogen-rich water (HW) on oxidative stress and muscle fatigue in response to acute exercise. Ten male soccer players aged 20.9 ± 1.3 years old were subjected to exercise tests and blood sampling. Each subject was examined twice in a crossover double-blind manner; they were given either HW or placebo water (PW) for one week intervals. Subjects were requested to use a cycle ergometer at a 75 % maximal oxygen uptake (VO2) for 30 min, followed by measurement of peak torque and muscle activity throughout 100 repetitions of maximal isokinetic knee extension. Oxidative stress markers and creatine kinase in the peripheral blood were sequentially measured. Although acute exercise resulted in an increase in blood lactate levels in the subjects given PW, oral intake of HW prevented an elevation of blood lactate during heavy exercise. Peak torque of PW significantly decreased during maximal isokinetic knee extension, suggesting muscle fatigue, but peak torque of HW didn't decrease at early phase. There was no significant change in blood oxidative injury markers (d-ROMs and BAP) or creatine kinease after exercise. Adequate hydration with hydrogen-rich water pre-exercise reduced blood lactate levels and improved exercise-induced decline of muscle function. Although further studies to elucidate the exact mechanisms and the benefits are needed to be confirmed in larger series of studies, these preliminary results may suggest that HW may be suitable hydration for athletes.

  4. Hydrogen-rich water affected blood alkalinity in physically active men.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M; Stojanovic, Marko D

    2014-01-01

    Possible appliance of effective and safe alkalizing agent in the treatment of metabolic acidosis could be of particular interest to humans experiencing an increase in plasma acidity, such as exercise-induced acidosis. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the daily oral intake of 2L of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) for 14 days would increase arterial blood alkalinity at baseline and post-exercise as compared with the placebo. This study was a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 52 presumably healthy physically active male volunteers. Twenty-six participants received HRW and 26 a placebo (tap water) for 14 days. Arterial blood pH, partial pressure for carbon dioxide (pCO2), and bicarbonates were measured at baseline and postexercise at the start (day 0) and at the end of the intervention period (day 14). Intake of HRW significantly increased fasting arterial blood pH by 0.04 (95% confidence interval; 0.01 - 0.08; p < 0.001), and postexercise pH by 0.07 (95% confidence interval; 0.01 - 0.10; p = 0.03) after 14 days of intervention. Fasting bicarbonates were significantly higher in the HRW trial after the administration regimen as compared with the preadministration (30.5 ± 1.9 mEq/L vs. 28.3 ± 2.3 mEq/L; p < 0.0001). No volunteers withdrew before the end of the study, and no participant reported any vexatious side effects of supplementation. These results support the hypothesis that HRW administration is safe and may have an alkalizing effect in young physically active men.

  5. Neutron imaging of hydrogen-rich fluids in geomaterials and engineered porous media: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfect, E.; Cheng, C.-L.; Kang, M.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Lamanna, J. M.; Gragg, M. J.; Wright, D. M.

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in visualization technologies are providing new discoveries as well as answering old questions with respect to the phase structure and flow of hydrogen-rich fluids, such as water and oil, within porous media. Magnetic resonance and x-ray imaging are sometimes employed in this context, but are subject to significant limitations. In contrast, neutrons are ideally suited for imaging hydrogen-rich fluids in abiotic non-hydrogenous porous media because they are strongly attenuated by hydrogen and can "see" through the solid matrix in a non-destructive fashion. This review paper provides an overview of the general principles behind the use of neutrons to image hydrogen-rich fluids in both 2-dimensions (radiography) and 3-dimensions (tomography). Engineering standards for the neutron imaging method are examined. The main body of the paper consists of a comprehensive review of the diverse scientific literature on neutron imaging of static and dynamic experiments involving variably-saturated geomaterials (rocks and soils) and engineered porous media (bricks and ceramics, concrete, fuel cells, heat pipes, and porous glass). Finally some emerging areas that offer promising opportunities for future research are discussed.

  6. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreasmore » were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.« less

  7. Effects of Hydrogen-Rich Saline on Hepatectomy-Induced Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction in Old Mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yue; Guo, Shanbin; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Ying; Zhao, Ping; Zhao, Xiaochun

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the protective effects and underlying mechanisms of hydrogen-rich saline on the cognitive functions of elder mice with partial hepatectomy-induced postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Ninety-six old male Kunming mice were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 24 each): control group (group C), hydrogen-rich saline group (group H), POCD group (group P), and POCD + hydrogen-rich saline group (group PH). Cognitive function was subsequently assessed using Morris water-maze (MWM) test. TNF-α and IL-1β levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry, along with NF-κB activity determined by ELISA. The morphology of hippocampal tissues were further observed by HE staining. Learning and memory abilities of mice were significantly impaired at day 10 and day 14 post-surgery, as partial hepatectomy significantly prolonged the escape latency, decreased time at the original platform quadrant and frequency of crossing in group P when compared to group C (p < 0.05). The surgery also increased the contents of TNF-α, IL-1β, and NF-κB activity at all time points after surgery (p < 0.05). The introduction of hydrogen-rich saline (group PH) partially rescued spatial memory and learning as it shortened escape latency and increased time and crossing frequency of original platform compared to group P (p < 0.05). Moreover, such treatment also decreased TNF-α and IL-1β levels and NF-κB activity (p < 0.05). In addition, cell necrosis in the hippocampus induced by hepatectomy was also rescued by hydrogen-rich saline. Hydrogen-rich saline can alleviate POCD via inhibiting NF-κB activity in the hippocampus and reducing inflammatory response.

  8. Efficacy and tolerability of hydrogen carbonate-rich water for heartburn

    PubMed Central

    Beer, André-Michael; Uebelhack, Ralf; Pohl, Ute

    2016-01-01

    requested and were analyzed as ITT population. The occurrence of heartburn was statistically significantly reduced at wk 6 in both the ITT and the PP populations. At wk 6, the mean number of heartburn episodes/week decreased by 5.1 episodes (P < 0.001) and the mean duration of heartburn symptoms by 19 min (ITT) (P = 0.002). The frequency of heartburn symptoms was reduced in 89.6% of the patients (P < 0.001), and the duration of symptoms in 79.2% of patients (ITT) (P < 0.001). All dimensions of the RDQ (heartburn, regurgitation, gastro-esophageal reflux disease symptoms, dyspepsia) showed a significant improvement at 6 wk. Likewise, disease-specific quality of life improved significantly (QOLRAD, GIQLI). Overall, 89.4% of patients rated the efficacy of the test water as “good” or “very good”, as did the investigators for 91.5% of the patients. There were no serious AEs. After 6 wk, systolic and diastolic blood pressure values decreased slightly but significantly [-3.5 and -3.0 mmHg, respectively (P = 0.008 and P = 0,002)]. Ninety-six percent of patients and investigators for the same percentage of patients rated the tolerability of the water as “good” or “very good”. CONCLUSION: The data demonstrate effectiveness of a hydrogen carbonate-rich mineral water in alleviating heartburn frequency and severity, thereby improving quality of life. The water has excellent tolerability. PMID:26909240

  9. Comment on "A hydrogen-rich early Earth atmosphere".

    PubMed

    Catling, David C

    2006-01-06

    Tian et al. (Reports, 13 May 2005, p. 1014) proposed a hydrogen-rich early atmosphere with slow hydrogen escape from a cold thermosphere. However, their model neglects the ultraviolet absorption of all gases other than H2. The model also neglects Earth's magnetic field, which affects the temperature and density of ions and promotes nonthermal escape of neutral hydrogen.

  10. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates hippocampus endoplasmic reticulum stress after cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Gui, Qinfang; Jin, Li; Yu, Pan; Wu, Lin; Cao, Liangbin; Wang, Qiang; Duan, Manlin

    2017-02-15

    Hydrogen-rich saline can selectively scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and protect brain against ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) has been implicated in the pathological process of cerebral ischemia. However, very little is known about the role of hydrogen-rich saline in mediating pathophysiological reactions to ERS after I/R injury caused by cardiac arrest. The rats were randomly divided into three groups, sham group (n=30), ischemia/reperfusion group (n=40) and hydrogen-rich saline group (n=40). The rats in experimental groups were subjected to 4min of cardiac arrest and followed by resuscitation. Then they were randomized to receive 5ml/kg of either hydrogen-rich saline or normal saline. Hydrogen-rich saline significantly improves survival rate and neurological function. The beneficial effects of hydrogen-rich saline were associated with decreased levels of oxidative products, as well as the increased levels of antioxidant enzymes. Furthermore, the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline were accompanied by the increased activity of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), the decreased activity of cysteinyl aspartate specific proteinase-12 (caspase-12) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates brain I/R injury may through inhibiting hippocampus ERS after cardiac arrest in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ground and Excited-Electronic-State Dissociations of Hydrogen-Rich and Hydrogen-Deficient Tyrosine Peptide Cation Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viglino, Emilie; Lai, Cheuk Kuen; Mu, Xiaoyan; Chu, Ivan K.; Tureček, František

    2016-09-01

    We report a comprehensive study of collision-induced dissociation (CID) and near-UV photodissociation (UVPD) of a series of tyrosine-containing peptide cation radicals of the hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-deficient types. Stable, long-lived, hydrogen-rich peptide cation radicals, such as [AAAYR + 2H]+● and several of its sequence and homology variants, were generated by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of peptide-crown-ether complexes, and their CID-MS3 dissociations were found to be dramatically different from those upon ETD of the respective peptide dications. All of the hydrogen-rich peptide cation radicals contained major (77%-94%) fractions of species having radical chromophores created by ETD that underwent photodissociation at 355 nm. Analysis of the CID and UVPD spectra pointed to arginine guanidinium radicals as the major components of the hydrogen-rich peptide cation radical population. Hydrogen-deficient peptide cation radicals were generated by intramolecular electron transfer in CuII(2,2 ':6 ',2 ″-terpyridine) complexes and shown to contain chromophores absorbing at 355 nm and undergoing photodissociation. The CID and UVPD spectra showed major differences in fragmentation for [AAAYR]+● that diminished as the Tyr residue was moved along the peptide chain. UVPD was found to be superior to CID in localizing Cα-radical positions in peptide cation radical intermediates.

  12. Iron-rich clay minerals on Mars - Potential sources or sinks for hydrogen and indicators of hydrogen loss over time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Although direct evidence is lacking, indirect evidence suggests that iron-rich clay minerals or poorly-ordered chemical equivalents are widespread on the Martian surface. Such clays can act as sources or sinks for hydrogen ('hydrogen sponges'). Ferrous clays can lose hydrogen and ferric clays gain it by the coupled substitution Fe(3+)O(Fe(2+)OH)-1, equivalent to minus atomic H. This 'oxy-clay' substitution involves only proton and electron migration through the crystal structure, and therefore occurs nondestructively and reversibly, at relatively low temperatures. The reversible, low-temperature nature of this reaction contrasts with the irreversible nature of destructive dehydroxylation (H2O loss) suffered by clays heated to high temperatures. In theory, metastable ferric oxy-clays formed by dehydrogenation of ferrous clays over geologic time could, if exposed to water vapor, extract the hydrogen from it, releasing oxygen.

  13. Protective Effects of Hydrogen-Rich Saline on Rats with Smoke Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Liu, Qi; Wang, Dawei; Feng, Shihai; Zhao, Yongjian; Shi, Yun; Liu, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on rats with smoke inhalation injury. Methods. 36 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 12 per group): sham group (S), inhalation injury plus normal saline treatment group (I+NS), and inhalation injury plus hydrogen-rich saline treatment group (I+HS). 30 min after injury, normal saline and hydrogen-rich saline were injected intraperitoneally (5 mL/kg) in I+NS group and I+HS group, respectively. All rats were euthanized and blood and organ specimens were collected for determination 24 h after inhalation injury. Results. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 expression, and apoptosis index (AI) in I+HS group were significantly decreased (P < 0.05), while superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were increased compared with those in I+NS group; and a marked improvement in alveolar structure was also found after hydrogen-rich saline treatment. Conclusions. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment exerts protective effects in acute lung injury induced by inhalation injury, at least in part through the activation of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant pathways and inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:26090070

  14. Attenuation of Cigarette Smoke-Induced Airway Mucus Production by Hydrogen-Rich Saline in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingxi; Dong, Yuchao; Xu, Wujian; Li, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Over-production of mucus is an important pathophysiological feature in chronic airway disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Cigarette smoking (CS) is the leading cause of COPD. Oxidative stress plays a key role in CS-induced airway abnormal mucus production. Hydrogen protected cells and tissues against oxidative damage by scavenging hydroxyl radicals. In the present study we investigated the effect of hydrogen on CS-induced mucus production in rats. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: sham control, CS group, hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment group and hydrogen-rich saline control group. Lung morphology and tissue biochemical changes were determined by immunohistochemistry, Alcian Blue/periodic acid-Schiff staining, TUNEL, western blot and realtime RT-PCR. Results Hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment attenuated CS-induced mucus accumulation in the bronchiolar lumen, goblet cell hyperplasia, muc5ac over-expression and abnormal cell apoptosis in the airway epithelium as well as malondialdehyde increase in the BALF. The phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1068 and Nrf2 up-regulation expression in the rat lungs challenged by CS exposure were also abrogated by hydrogen-rich saline. Conclusion Hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment ameliorated CS-induced airway mucus production and airway epithelium damage in rats. The protective role of hydrogen on CS-exposed rat lungs was achieved at least partly by its free radical scavenging ability. This is the first report to demonstrate that intraperitoneal administration of hydrogen-rich saline protected rat airways against CS damage and it could be promising in treating abnormal airway mucus production in COPD. PMID:24376700

  15. Variations of the Hydrogen Bonding and of the Hydrogen Bonded Network in Ethanol-Water Mixtures on Cooling.

    PubMed

    Pothoczki, Szilvia; Pusztai, Laszlo; Bako, Imre

    2018-06-12

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations have been conducted for ethanol-water liquid mixtures in the water-rich side of the composition range, with 10, 20 and 30 mol % of the alcohol, at temperatures between room temperature and the experimental freezing point of the given mixture. All-atom type (OPLS) interatomic potentials have been assumed for ethanol, in combination with two kinds of rigid water models (SPC/E and TIP4P/2005). Both combinations have provided excellent reproductions of the experimental X-ray total structure factors at each temperature; this yielded a strong basis for further structural analyses. Beyond partial radial distribution functions, various descriptors of hydrogen bonded assemblies, as well as of the hydrogen bonded network have been determined. A clear tendency was observed towards that an increasing proportion of water molecules participate in hydrogen bonding with exactly 2 donor- and 2 acceptor sites as temperature decreases. Concerning larger assemblies held together by hydrogen bonding, the main focus was put on the properties of cyclic entities: it was found that, similarly to methanol-water mixtures, the number of hydrogen bonded rings has increased with lowering temperature. However, for ethanol-water mixtures the dominance of not the six-, but of the five-fold rings could be observed.

  16. Administration of hydrogen-rich saline in mice with allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijuan; Chen, Xiaoping; Qian, Liren; Shen, Jianliang; Cai, Jianming

    2015-03-12

    Hydrogen, as a novel antioxidant, has been shown to selectively reduce the level of hydroxyl radicals and alleviate acute oxidative stress in many animal experiments. Hydrogen-rich saline provides a high concentration of hydrogen that can be easily and safely applied. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) has been the most curative therapy for hematological malignancies. However, acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is the main cause of death in post-transplantation patients. In this study, we examined whether hydrogen-rich saline would show favorable effects on acute GVHD in mice. After lethal irradiation, BALB/c mice received bone marrow transplantation from C57BL/6 mice. Hydrogen-rich saline (5 ml/kg) was given to recipient mice in the hydrogen group once a day by intraperitoneal injection, and saline (5 ml/kg) was given to recipient mice in the saline group. Survival rates were monitored, clinical and pathological scores of aGVHD were determined after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), and the serum cytokine levels were examined on the 7th day after BMT. This study proves that hydrogen-rich saline increased the survival rate, reduced clinical and histopathological scores of aGVHD, promoted the recovery of white blood cells, reduced the serum cytokine levels, and reversed tissue damage after transplantation in mice. Hydrogen has potential as an effective and safe therapeutic agent in aGVHD.

  17. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Doshi, R.

    1999-07-27

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400 C for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide. 4 figs.

  18. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    1999-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  19. Hydrogen generation by reaction of Si nanopowder with neutral water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Matsuda, Shinsuke; Imamura, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2017-05-01

    Si and its oxide are nonpoisonous materials, and thus, it can be taken for medical effects. We have developed a method of generation of hydrogen by use of reactions of Si nanopowder with water in the neutral pH region. Si nanopowder is fabricated by the simple bead milling method. Si nanopowder reacts with water to generate hydrogen even in cases where pH is set at the neutral region between 7.0 and 8.6. The hydrogen generation rate strongly depends on pH and in the case of pH 8.0, ˜55 ml/g hydrogen which corresponds to that contained in approximately 3 L saturated hydrogen-rich water is generated in 1 h. The reaction rate for hydrogen generation greatly increases with pH, indicating that the reacting species is hydroxide ions. The change of pH after the hydrogen generation reaction is negligibly low compared with that estimated assuming that hydroxide ions are consumed by the reaction. From these results, we conclude the following reaction mechanism: Si nanopowder reacts with hydroxide ions in the rate-determining reaction to form hydrogen molecules, SiO2, and electrons in the conduction band. Then, generated electrons are accepted by water molecules, resulting in production of hydrogen molecules and hydroxide ions. The hydrogen generation rate strongly depends on the crystallite size of Si nanopowder, but not on the size of aggregates of Si nanopowder. The present study shows a possibility to use Si nanopowder for hydrogen generation in the body in order to eliminate hydroxyl radicals which cause various diseases.

  20. Hydrogen-rich saline protects retina against glutamate-induced excitotoxic injury in guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lihua; Ge, Li; Qin, Shucun; Shi, Yunzhi; Du, Changqing; Du, Hui; Liu, Liwei; Yu, Yang; Sun, Xuejun

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H(2)) is an efficient antioxidant that can selectively reduce hydroxyl radicals and inhibit oxidative stress-induced injuries. We investigated the protective effects and mechanism of hydrogen-rich saline in a glutamate-induced retinal injury model. Retinal excitotoxicity was induced in healthy guinea pigs by injecting glutamate into the vitreous cavity. After 30 min, hydrogen-rich saline was injected into the vitreous cavity, the peritoneal cavity or both. Seven days later, the retinal stress response was evaluated by examining the stress biomarkers, inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78). The impaired glutamate uptake was assessed by the expression of the excitatory amino acid transporter 1(EAAT-1). The retinal histopathological changes were investigated, focusing on the thicknesses of the entire retina and its inner layer, the number of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL) and the ultrastructure of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and glial cells. Compared with the glutamate-induced injury group, the hydrogen-rich saline treatment reduced the loss of cells in the GCL and thinning of the retina and attenuated cellular morphological damage. These improvements were greatest in animals that received H(2) injections into both the vitreous and the peritoneal cavities. The hydrogen-rich saline also inhibited the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in Müller cells, CD11b in microglia, and iNOS and GRP78 in glial cells. Moreover, the hydrogen-rich saline increased the expression of EAAT-1. In conclusion, the administration of hydrogen-rich saline through the intravitreal or/and intraperitoneal routes could reduce the retinal excitotoxic injury and promote retinal recovery. This result likely occurs by inhibiting the activation of glial cells, decreasing the production of the iNOS and GRP78 and promoting glutamate clearance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A massive hydrogen-rich Martian greenhouse recorded in D/H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, K.; Schaefer, L. K.; Desch, S. J.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.

    2017-12-01

    The deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio in Martian atmospheric water ( 6x standard mean ocean water, SMOW) [1,2] is higher than that of known sources [3,4] alluding to a planetary enrichment process. A recent measurement by the Curiosity rover of Hesperian clays yields a D/H value 3x higher than SMOW [5], demonstrating that most enrichment occurred early in planetary history, buttressing the conclusions of Martian meteorite studies [6,7]. Extant models of the isotopic evolution of the Martian hydrosphere have not incorporated primordial H2, despite its likely abundance on early Mars. Here, we report the first 1D climate calculations with an atmospheric composition determined via degassing from a reducing magma ocean to study Martian climate during an early water ocean stage. A reducing Martian magma ocean is expected based on experimental petrology [8], the degassing of which gives rise to an H2-rich steam atmosphere [9] with strong attendant greenhouse warming [10,11] even after the removal of steam via condensation. At the pressures and temperatures prevailing in such a degassed greenhouse, we find that isotopic exchange in the fluid envelope is rapid, strongly concentrating deuterium in water molecules over molecular hydrogen [12]. The subsequent loss of the isotopically light H2-rich atmosphere results in a 2x D/H enrichment in the oceans via isotopic equilibration alone. These calculations suggest that most of the D/H enrichment observed in the first billion years of Martian history is produced by the evolution of a massive ( 100 bar) H2-rich greenhouse in the aftermath of magma ocean crystallization. The proposed link between early planetary process and modern isotopic observable opens a new window into the earliest history of Mars. [1] Owen, T. et al. Science 240, 1767-1770 (1988). [2] Webster, C. R. et al. Science 341, 260-263 (2013). [3] Lunine, J. I. et al. Icarus 165, 1-8, (2003). [4] Marty, B. et al. EPSL 441, 91-102, (2016). [5] Mahaffy, P. et al

  2. Anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of hydrogen-rich water alleviate ethanol-induced fatty liver in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Pin; Chuang, Wen-Chen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Chen, Chih-Yen

    2017-07-21

    To investigate the effects of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) treatment on prevention of ethanol (EtOH)-induced early fatty liver in mice. In vitro reduction of hydrogen peroxide by HRW was determined with a chemiluminescence system. Female mice were randomly divided into five groups: control, EtOH, EtOH + silymarin, EtOH + HRW and EtOH + silymarin + HRW. Each group was fed a Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet containing EtOH or isocaloric maltose dextrin (control diet). Silymarin was used as a positive control to compare HRW efficacy against chronic EtOH-induced hepatotoxicity. HRW was freshly prepared and given at a dosage of 1.2 mL/mouse trice daily. Blood and liver tissue were collected after chronic-binge liquid-diet feeding for 12 wk. The in vitro study showed that HRW directly scavenged hydrogen peroxide. The in vivo study showed that HRW increased expression of acyl ghrelin, which was correlated with food intake. HRW treatment significantly reduced EtOH-induced increases in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, triglycerol and total cholesterol levels, hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6. HRW attenuated malondialdehyde level, restored glutathione depletion and increased superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities in the liver. Moreover, HRW reduced TNF-α and IL-6 levels but increased IL-10 and IL-22 levels. HRW protects against chronic EtOH-induced liver injury, possibly by inducing acyl ghrelin to suppress the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 and induce IL-10 and IL-22, thus activating antioxidant enzymes against oxidative stress.

  3. Anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of hydrogen-rich water alleviate ethanol-induced fatty liver in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Pin; Chuang, Wen-Chen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Chen, Chih-Yen

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) treatment on prevention of ethanol (EtOH)-induced early fatty liver in mice. METHODS In vitro reduction of hydrogen peroxide by HRW was determined with a chemiluminescence system. Female mice were randomly divided into five groups: control, EtOH, EtOH + silymarin, EtOH + HRW and EtOH + silymarin + HRW. Each group was fed a Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet containing EtOH or isocaloric maltose dextrin (control diet). Silymarin was used as a positive control to compare HRW efficacy against chronic EtOH-induced hepatotoxicity. HRW was freshly prepared and given at a dosage of 1.2 mL/mouse trice daily. Blood and liver tissue were collected after chronic-binge liquid-diet feeding for 12 wk. RESULTS The in vitro study showed that HRW directly scavenged hydrogen peroxide. The in vivo study showed that HRW increased expression of acyl ghrelin, which was correlated with food intake. HRW treatment significantly reduced EtOH-induced increases in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, triglycerol and total cholesterol levels, hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6. HRW attenuated malondialdehyde level, restored glutathione depletion and increased superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities in the liver. Moreover, HRW reduced TNF-α and IL-6 levels but increased IL-10 and IL-22 levels. CONCLUSION HRW protects against chronic EtOH-induced liver injury, possibly by inducing acyl ghrelin to suppress the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 and induce IL-10 and IL-22, thus activating antioxidant enzymes against oxidative stress. PMID:28785146

  4. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortright, R. D.; Davda, R. R.; Dumesic, J. A.

    2002-08-01

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose-which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals-to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams.

  5. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Cortright, R D; Davda, R R; Dumesic, J A

    2002-08-29

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500 K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose -- which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals -- to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams.

  6. Hydrogen-Rich Water Ameliorates Total Body Irradiation-Induced Hematopoietic Stem Cell Injury by Reducing Hydroxyl Radical

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaolei; Han, Xiaodan; Li, Yuan; Lu, Lu; Li, Deguan

    2017-01-01

    We examined whether consumption of hydrogen-rich water (HW) could ameliorate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) injury in mice with total body irradiation (TBI). The results indicated that HW alleviated TBI-induced HSC injury with respect to cell number alteration and to the self-renewal and differentiation of HSCs. HW specifically decreased hydroxyl radical (∙OH) levels in the c-kit+ cells of 4 Gy irradiated mice. Proliferative bone marrow cells (BMCs) increased and apoptotic c-kit+ cells decreased in irradiated mice uptaken with HW. In addition, the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of γ-H2AX and percentage of 8-oxoguanine positive cells significantly decreased in HW-treated c-kit+ cells, indicating that HW can alleviate TBI-induced DNA damage and oxidative DNA damage in c-kit+ cells. Finally, the cell cycle (P21), cell apoptosis (BCL-XL and BAK), and oxidative stress (NRF2, HO-1, NQO1, SOD, and GPX1) proteins were significantly altered by HW in irradiated mouse c-kit+ cells. Collectively, the present results suggest that HW protects against TBI-induced HSC injury. PMID:28243358

  7. Hydrogen-Rich Water Ameliorates Total Body Irradiation-Induced Hematopoietic Stem Cell Injury by Reducing Hydroxyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junling; Xue, Xiaolei; Han, Xiaodan; Li, Yuan; Lu, Lu; Li, Deguan; Fan, Saijun

    2017-01-01

    We examined whether consumption of hydrogen-rich water (HW) could ameliorate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) injury in mice with total body irradiation (TBI). The results indicated that HW alleviated TBI-induced HSC injury with respect to cell number alteration and to the self-renewal and differentiation of HSCs. HW specifically decreased hydroxyl radical ( ∙ OH) levels in the c-kit + cells of 4 Gy irradiated mice. Proliferative bone marrow cells (BMCs) increased and apoptotic c-kit + cells decreased in irradiated mice uptaken with HW. In addition, the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of γ -H2AX and percentage of 8-oxoguanine positive cells significantly decreased in HW-treated c-kit + cells, indicating that HW can alleviate TBI-induced DNA damage and oxidative DNA damage in c-kit + cells. Finally, the cell cycle (P21), cell apoptosis (BCL-XL and BAK), and oxidative stress (NRF2, HO-1, NQO1, SOD, and GPX1) proteins were significantly altered by HW in irradiated mouse c-kit + cells. Collectively, the present results suggest that HW protects against TBI-induced HSC injury.

  8. Serpentine by Hydrogenation of Fe-rich Ferromagnesiosilica PCs in Aggregate IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2001-01-01

    Condensed hydrogen-bearing magnesiosilica smokes support that hydrogenation at H2/H2O ratios may lead to the formation of rare Fe-rich serpentine plus metallic iron in ferromagnesiosilica PCs with appropriate (Mg,Fe)/Si ratios that were acquired during their formation. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Hyperoxygenated hydrogen-rich solution suppresses shock- and resuscitation-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yangjie; Liu, Ting; Mei, Xiaopeng; Meng, Xiangzhong; Gou, Xingchun; Deng, Bin; Xu, Hao; Xu, Lixian

    2017-12-01

    It is not known whether simultaneous delivery of hydrogen and oxygen can reduce injury caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HSR). This study investigated the therapeutic potential of hyperoxygenated hydrogen-rich solution (HHOS), a combined hydrogen/oxygen carrier, in a rat model of HSR-induced liver injury. Rats (n = 60) were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 6 per group at each time point). One group underwent sham operation, and the others were subjected to severe hemorrhagic shock and then treated with lactated Ringer's solution (LRS), hydrogen-rich solution, hyperoxygenated solution, or HHOS. At 2 and 6 h after resuscitation, blood samples (n = 6) were collected from the femoral artery and serum concentrations of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were measured. Rats were then sacrificed, and histopathological changes in the liver were evaluated by quantifying the percentage of apoptotic cells by caspase-3 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling. Inflammation was assessed by assessing malondialdehyde content and tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin (IL)-6 expression. Compared to lactated Ringer's solution, hydrogen-rich solution, or hyperoxygenated solution groups, serum AST and alanine aminotransferase levels and IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and malondialdehyde expression in liver tissue were decreased by HHOS treatment. The number of caspase-3- and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells was decreased (P < 0.05) by HHOS treatment, 2 and 6 h after resuscitation. HHOS has protective effects against liver injury in a rat model of HSR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intestinal Microbiota Ecological Response to Oral Administrations of Hydrogen-Rich Water and Lactulose in Female Piglets Fed a Fusarium Toxin-Contaminated Diet.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weijiang; Ji, Xu; Zhang, Qing; Yao, Wen

    2018-06-16

    The objective of the current experiment was to explore the intestinal microbiota ecological response to oral administrations of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) and lactulose (LAC) in female piglets fed a Fusarium mycotoxin-contaminated diet. A total of 24 individually-housed female piglets (Landrace × large × white; initial average body weight, 7.25 ± 1.02 kg) were randomly assigned to receive four treatments (six pigs/treatment): uncontaminated basal diet (negative control, NC), mycotoxin-contaminated diet (MC), MC diet + HRW (MC + HRW), and MC diet + LAC (MC + LAC) for 25 days. Hydrogen levels in the mucosa of different intestine segments were measured at the end of the experiment. Fecal scoring and diarrhea rate were recorded every day during the whole period of the experiment. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) profiles in the digesta of the foregut and hindgut samples were assayed. The populations of selected bacteria and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of total bacteria and methanogenic Archaea were also evaluated. Results showed that Fusarium mycotoxins not only reduced the hydrogen levels in the caecum but also shifted the SCFAs production, and populations and communities of microbiota. HRW treatment increased the hydrogen levels of the stomach and duodenum. HRW and LAC groups also had higher colon and caecum hydrogen levels than the MC group. Both HRW and LAC protected against the mycotoxin-contaminated diet-induced higher diarrhea rate and lower SCFA production in the digesta of the colon and caecum. In addition, the DGGE profile results indicated that HRW and LAC might shift the pathways of hydrogen-utilization bacteria, and change the diversity of intestine microbiota. Moreover, HRW and LAC administrations reversed the mycotoxin-contaminated diet-induced changing of the populations of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bifidobacterium in ileum digesta and hydrogen-utilizing bacteria in colon digesta.

  11. Electrochemically reduced water exerts superior reactive oxygen species scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Harada, Gakuro; Nakamichi, Noboru; Kabayama, Shigeru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Gong, Wei; Sakata, Ichiro; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemically reduced water (ERW) is produced near a cathode during electrolysis and exhibits an alkaline pH, contains richly dissolved hydrogen, and contains a small amount of platinum nanoparticles. ERW has reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging activity and recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen-dissolved water exhibits ROS-scavenging activity. Thus, the antioxidative capacity of ERW is postulated to be dependent on the presence of hydrogen levels; however, there is no report verifying the role of dissolved hydrogen in ERW. In this report, we clarify whether the responsive factor for antioxidative activity in ERW is dissolved hydrogen. The intracellular ROS scavenging activity of ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water was tested by both fluorescent stain method and immuno spin trapping assay. We confirm that ERW possessed electrolysis intensity-dependent intracellular ROS-scavenging activity, and ERW exerts significantly superior ROS-scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water. ERW retained its ROS-scavenging activity after removal of dissolved hydrogen, but lost its activity when autoclaved. An oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and chemiluminescence assay could not detect radical-scavenging activity in both ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water. These results indicate that ERW contains electrolysis-dependent hydrogen and an additional antioxidative factor predicted to be platinum nanoparticles. PMID:28182635

  12. Electrochemically reduced water exerts superior reactive oxygen species scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Harada, Gakuro; Nakamichi, Noboru; Kabayama, Shigeru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Gong, Wei; Sakata, Ichiro; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemically reduced water (ERW) is produced near a cathode during electrolysis and exhibits an alkaline pH, contains richly dissolved hydrogen, and contains a small amount of platinum nanoparticles. ERW has reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging activity and recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen-dissolved water exhibits ROS-scavenging activity. Thus, the antioxidative capacity of ERW is postulated to be dependent on the presence of hydrogen levels; however, there is no report verifying the role of dissolved hydrogen in ERW. In this report, we clarify whether the responsive factor for antioxidative activity in ERW is dissolved hydrogen. The intracellular ROS scavenging activity of ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water was tested by both fluorescent stain method and immuno spin trapping assay. We confirm that ERW possessed electrolysis intensity-dependent intracellular ROS-scavenging activity, and ERW exerts significantly superior ROS-scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water. ERW retained its ROS-scavenging activity after removal of dissolved hydrogen, but lost its activity when autoclaved. An oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and chemiluminescence assay could not detect radical-scavenging activity in both ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water. These results indicate that ERW contains electrolysis-dependent hydrogen and an additional antioxidative factor predicted to be platinum nanoparticles.

  13. Hydrogen in drinking water attenuates noise-induced hearing loss in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Kashio, Akinori; Sakamoto, Takashi; Suzukawa, Keigo; Kakigi, Akinobu; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2011-01-03

    It has been shown that molecular hydrogen acts as a therapeutic and preventive antioxidant by selectively reducing the hydroxyl radical, the most cytotoxic of the reactive oxygen species. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that acoustic damage in guinea pigs can be attenuated by the consumption of molecular hydrogen. Guinea pigs received normal water or hydrogen-rich water for 14 days before they were exposed to 115 dB SPL 4-kHz octave band noise for 3h. Animals in each group underwent measurements for auditory brainstem response (ABR) or distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) before the treatment (baseline) and immediately, 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after noise exposure. The ABR thresholds at 2 and 4 kHz were significantly better on post-noise days 1, 3, and 14 in hydrogen-treated animals when compared to the normal water-treated controls. Compared to the controls, the hydrogen-treated animals showed greater amplitude of DPOAE input/output growth functions during the recovery process, with statistical significance detected on post-noise days 3 and 7. These findings suggest that hydrogen can facilitate the recovery of hair cell function and attenuate noise-induced temporary hearing loss. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  15. Long-term treatment of hydrogen-rich saline abates testicular oxidative stress induced by nicotine in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Lu, DanDan; Zhang, Yaling; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that long-term treatment with hydrogen-rich saline abated testicular oxidative stress induced by nicotine in mice. The effects of hydrogen-rich saline (6 ml/kg, i.p.), vitamin C (60 mg/kg, i.p.) and vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p.) on reproductive system and testicular oxidative levels in nicotine-treated (4.5 mg/kg, s.b.) mice were investigated. It was found that vitamin C and vitamin E attenuated serum oxidative level, but did not lower testicular oxidative levels in mice subjected to chronic nicotine treatment, and did not improve the male reproductive damage and apoptosis induced by nicotine. Different from normal antioxidants, vitamin C and vitamin E, hydrogen-rich saline abated oxidative stress in testis, and protected against nicotine-induced male reproductive damages. Our results first demonstrated that long-term treatment with hydrogen-rich saline attenuated testicular oxidative level and improved male reproductive function in nicotine-treated mice.

  16. Curiosity Finds Hydrogen-Rich Area of Mars Subsurface

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-19

    Curiosity's Russian-made instrument for checking hydration levels in the ground beneath the rover detected an unusually high amount at a site near "Marias Pass," prompting repeated passes over the area to map the hydrogen amounts. The instrument is named Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons, or DAN. It detects hydrogen by the effect of hydrogen atoms on neutrons entering the ground either from cosmic rays and Curiosity's power source (DAN's passive mode) or from the instrument's neutron pulse generator (DAN's active mode). DAN recognizes which neutrons have bounced off hydrogen from their rerduced energy level. This map, covering an area about 130 feet (40 meters) across, shows results from DAN's multiple traverses over the area, with color coding for levels of hydrogen detected. The red coding indicates amounts of hydrogen three to four times as high as the amounts detected anywhere previously along Curiosity's traverse of about 6.9 miles (11.1 kilometers) since landing in August 2012. The inset map at lower right shows the full traverse through Sol 1051 (July 21, 2015), with names assigned to rectangles within Gale Crater for geological mapping purposes. The vertical bar at left indicates the color coding according to counts per second in DAN's passive mode. The hydrogen detected by DAN is interpreted as water molecules or hydroxyl ions bound within minerals or water absorbed onto minerals in the rocks and soil, to a depth of about 3 feet (1 meter) beneath the rover. The amount of hydrogen is often expressed as "water equivalent hydrogen" based on two hydrogen atoms per molecule of water. In the same area where DAN detected an unusually high amount of hydration, Curiosity's Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument detected an unusually high amount of silica in several rock targets. The DAN and ChemCam findings led to the rover's science team choosing a rock target called "Buckskin" for collection of a drilled sample to be analyzed by the rover's internal laboratory

  17. Continuous online Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry analysis of hydrogen chloride (HCl), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water (H2O) in nitrogen-rich and ethylene-rich streams.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Serena; Pollard, Maria; Boit, Kipchirchir

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of optical spectroscopy techniques being applied to the online analysis of continuous processes has increased in the past couple of decades. The ability to continuously "watch" changing stream compositions as operating conditions change has proven invaluable to pilot and world-scale manufacturing in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Presented here is an application requiring continuous monitoring of parts per million (ppm) by weight levels of hydrogen chloride (HCl), water (H2O), and carbon dioxide (CO2) in two gas-phase streams, one nitrogen-rich and one ethylene-rich. Because ethylene has strong mid-infrared (IR) absorption, building an IR method capable of quantifying HCl, H2O, and CO2 posed some challenges. A long-path (5.11m) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer was used in the mid-infrared region between 1800 and 5000 cm(-1), with a 1 cm(-1) resolution and a 10 s spectral update time. Sample cell temperature and pressure were controlled and measured to minimize measurement variability. Models using a modified classical least squares method were developed and validated first in the laboratory and then using the process stream. Analytical models and process sampling conditions were adjusted to minimize interference of ethylene in the ethylene-rich stream. The predictive capabilities of the measurements were ±0.5 ppm for CO2 in either stream; ±1.1 and ±1.3 ppm for H2O in the nitrogen-rich and ethylene-rich streams, respectively; and ±1.0 and ±2.4 ppm for HCl in the nitrogen-rich and ethylene-rich streams, respectively. Continuous operation of the instrument in the process stream was demonstrated using an automated stream switching sample system set to 10 min intervals. Response time for all components of interest was sufficient to acquire representative stream composition data. This setup provides useful insight into the process for troubleshooting and optimizing plant operating conditions.

  18. Cobalt-embedded nitrogen-rich carbon nanotubes efficiently catalyze hydrogen evolution reaction at all pH values.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoxin; Huang, Xiaoxi; Goswami, Anandarup; Silva, Rafael; Sathe, Bhaskar R; Mikmeková, Eliška; Asefa, Tewodros

    2014-04-22

    Despite being technically possible, splitting water to generate hydrogen is still practically unfeasible due mainly to the lack of sustainable and efficient catalysts for the half reactions involved. Herein we report the synthesis of cobalt-embedded nitrogen-rich carbon nanotubes (NRCNTs) that 1) can efficiently electrocatalyze the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with activities close to that of Pt and 2) function well under acidic, neutral or basic media alike, allowing them to be coupled with the best available oxygen-evolving catalysts-which also play crucial roles in the overall water-splitting reaction. The materials are synthesized by a simple, easily scalable synthetic route involving thermal treatment of Co(2+) -embedded graphitic carbon nitride derived from inexpensive starting materials (dicyandiamide and CoCl2 ). The materials' efficient catalytic activity is mainly attributed to their nitrogen dopants and concomitant structural defects. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Intrathecal Infusion of Hydrogen-Rich Normal Saline Attenuates Neuropathic Pain via Inhibition of Activation of Spinal Astrocytes and Microglia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuejun; Xiang, Zhenghua; Yang, Liqun; Huang, Shengdong; Lu, Zhijie; Sun, Yuming; Yu, Wei-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are key molecules that mediate neuropathic pain. Although hydrogen is an established antioxidant, its effect on chronic pain has not been characterized. This study was to investigate the efficacy and mechanisms of hydrogen-rich normal saline induced analgesia. Methodology/Principal findings In a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (L5 SNL), intrathecal injection of hydrogen-rich normal saline relieved L5 SNL-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Importantly, repeated administration of hydrogen-rich normal saline did not lead to tolerance. Preemptive treatment with hydrogen-rich normal saline prevented development of neuropathic pain behavior. Immunofluorochrome analysis revealed that hydrogen-rich normal saline treatment significantly attenuated L5 SNL-induced increase of 8-hydroxyguanosine immunoreactive cells in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn. Western blot analysis of SDS/PAGE-fractionated tyrosine-nitrated proteins showed that L5 SNL led to increased expression of tyrosine-nitrated Mn-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in the spinal cord, and hydrogen-rich normal saline administration reversed the tyrosine-nitrated MnSOD overexpression. We also showed that the analgesic effect of hydrogen-rich normal saline was associated with decreased activation of astrocytes and microglia, attenuated expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the spinal cord. Conclusion/Significance Intrathecal injection of hydrogen-rich normal saline produced analgesic effect in neuropathic rat. Hydrogen-rich normal saline-induced analgesia in neuropathic rats is mediated by reducing the activation of spinal astrocytes and microglia, which is induced by overproduction of hydroxyl and peroxynitrite. PMID:24857932

  20. Water adsorption on the P-rich GaP(100) surface: optical spectroscopy from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Matthias M.; Sprik, Michiel

    2018-03-01

    The contact of water with semiconductors typically changes its surface electronic structure by oxidation or corrosion processes. A detailed knowledge—or even control of—the surface structure is highly desirable, as it impacts the performance of opto-electronic devices from gas-sensing to energy conversion applications. It is also a prerequisite for density functional theory-based modelling of the electronic structure in contact with an electrolyte. The P-rich GaP(100) surface is extraordinary with respect to its contact with gas-phase water, as it undergoes a surface reordering, but does not oxidise. We investigate the underlying changes of the surface in contact with water by means of theoretically derived reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS). A comparison of our results with experiment reveals that a water-induced hydrogen-rich phase on the surface is compatible with the boundary conditions from experiment, reproducing the optical spectra. We discuss potential reaction paths that comprise a water-enhanced hydrogen mobility on the surface. Our results also show that computational RAS—required for the interpretation of experimental signatures—is feasible for GaP in contact with water double layers. Here, RAS is sensitive to surface electric fields, which are an important ingredient of the Helmholtz-layer. This paves the way for future investigations of RAS at the semiconductor–electrolyte interface.

  1. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    DOEpatents

    Hindin, Saul G.; Roberts, George W.

    1980-08-12

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

  2. Hydrogen-bond rich ionic liquids with hydroxyl cationic tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Li; Shi, Rui; Wang, Yanting; Ou-Yang, Zhong-Can

    2013-02-01

    To investigate if the amphiphilic feature exhibited in ionic liquids (ILs) with nonpolar cationic tails still exists in ILs with polar tails, by performing molecular dynamics simulations for 1-(8-hydroxyoctyl)-3-methyl-imidazolium nitrate (COH) and 1-octyl-3-methyl-imidazolium nitrate (C8), we found that, in COH, cationic tail groups can no longer aggregate to form separated nonpolar tail domains, instead hydroxyl groups form a rich number of hydrogen bonds with other groups, indicating that the hydroxyl substituent changes the IL system from an amphiphilic liquid to a polar liquid. Due to the large amount of hydrogen bonds, COH has slower dynamics than C8.

  3. Rationally Designed Hierarchically Structured Tungsten Nitride and Nitrogen-Rich Graphene-Like Carbon Nanocomposite as Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanping; Chen, Gao; Zhong, Yijun; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Zongping

    2018-02-01

    Practical application of hydrogen production from water splitting relies strongly on the development of low-cost and high-performance electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The previous researches mainly focused on transition metal nitrides as HER catalysts due to their electrical conductivity and corrosion stability under acidic electrolyte, while tungsten nitrides have reported poorer activity for HER. Here the activity of tungsten nitride is optimized through rational design of a tungsten nitride-carbon composite. More specifically, tungsten nitride (WN x ) coupled with nitrogen-rich porous graphene-like carbon is prepared through a low-cost ion-exchange/molten-salt strategy. Benefiting from the nanostructured WN x , the highly porous structure and rich nitrogen dopant (9.5 at%) of the carbon phase with high percentage of pyridinic-N (54.3%), and more importantly, their synergistic effect, the composite catalyst displays remarkably high catalytic activity while maintaining good stability. This work highlights a powerful way to design more efficient metal-carbon composites catalysts for HER.

  4. Stable and Efficient CuO Based Photocathode through Oxygen-Rich Composition and Au-Pd Nanostructure Incorporation for Solar-Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Masudy-Panah, Saeid; Siavash Moakhar, Roozbeh; Chua, Chin Sheng; Kushwaha, Ajay; Dalapati, Goutam Kumar

    2017-08-23

    Enhancing stability against photocorrosion and improving photocurrent response are the main challenges toward the development of cupric oxide (CuO) based photocathodes for solar-driven hydrogen production. In this paper, stable and efficient CuO-photocathodes have been developed using in situ materials engineering and through gold-palladium (Au-Pd) nanoparticles deposition on the CuO surface. The CuO photocathode exhibits a photocurrent generation of ∼3 mA/cm 2 at 0 V v/s RHE. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) analysis and X-ray spectroscopy (XPS) confirm the formation of oxygen-rich (O-rich) CuO film which demonstrates a highly stable photocathode with retained photocurrent of ∼90% for 20 min. The influence of chemical composition on the photocathode performance and stability has been discussed in detail. In addition, O-rich CuO photocathodes deposited with Au-Pd nanostructures have shown enhanced photoelectrochemical performance. Linear scan voltammetry characteristic shows ∼25% enhancement in photocurrent after Au-Pd deposition and reaches ∼4 mA/cm 2 at "0" V v/s RHE. Hydrogen evolution rate significantly depends on the elemental composition of CuO and metal nanostructure. The present work has demonstrated a stable photocathode with high photocurrent for visible-light-driven water splitting and hydrogen production.

  5. Hydrogen-rich saline inhibits tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by alleviating airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zibing; Geng, Wenye; Jiang, Chuanwei; Zhao, Shujun; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Ying; Qin, Shucun; Li, Chenxu; Zhang, Xinfang; Si, Yanhong

    2017-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease induced by tobacco smoke has been regarded as a great health problem worldwide. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline, a novel antioxidant, on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and explore the underlying mechanism. Sprague-Dawley rats were made chronic obstructive pulmonary disease models via tobacco smoke exposure for 12 weeks and the rats were treated with 10 ml/kg hydrogen-rich saline intraperitoneally during the last 4 weeks. Lung function testing indicated hydrogen-rich saline decreased lung airway resistance and increased lung compliance and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 0.1 s/forced vital capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. Histological analysis revealed that hydrogen-rich saline alleviated morphological impairments of lung in tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. ELISA assay showed hydrogen-rich saline lowered the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-8 and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. The content of malondialdehyde in lung tissue and serum was also determined and the data indicated hydrogen-rich saline suppressed oxidative stress reaction. The protein expressions of mucin MUC5C and aquaporin 5 involved in mucus hypersecretion were analyzed by Western blot and ELISA and the data revealed that hydrogen-rich saline down-regulated MUC5AC level in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue and up-regulated aquaporin 5 level in lung tissue of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that administration of hydrogen-rich saline exhibits significant protective effect on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease through alleviating inflammation, reducing oxidative stress and lessening mucus hypersecretion in tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats

  6. Molecular Hydrogen Alleviates Cellular Senescence in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hara, Fumihiko; Tatebe, Junko; Watanabe, Ippei; Yamazaki, Junichi; Ikeda, Takanori; Morita, Toshisuke

    2016-08-25

    Substantial evidence indicates that molecular hydrogen (H2) has beneficial vascular effects because of its antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, hydrogen-rich water may prove to be an effective anti-aging drink. This study examined the effects of H2on endothelial senescence and clarified the mechanisms involved. Hydrogen-rich medium was produced by a high-purity hydrogen gas generator. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) for various time periods in normal or hydrogen-rich medium. The baseline H2concentration in hydrogen-rich medium was 0.55±0.07 mmol/L. This concentration gradually decreased, and H2was almost undetectable in medium after 12 h. At 24 h after TCDD exposure, HUVECs treated with TCDD exhibited increased 8OHdG and acetyl-p53 expression, decreased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))/NADH ratio, impaired Sirt1 activity, and enhanced senescence-associated β-galactosidase. However, HUVECs incubated in hydrogen-rich medium did not exhibit these TCDD-induced changes accompanying Nrf2 activation, which was observed even after H2was undetectable in the medium. Chrysin, an inhibitor of Nrf2, abolished the protective effects of H2on HUVECs. H2has long-lasting antioxidant and anti-aging effects on vascular endothelial cells through the Nrf2 pathway, even after transient exposure to H2. Hydrogen-rich water may thus be a functional drink that increases longevity. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2037-2046).

  7. Protective Effects of Hydrogen-Rich Saline Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Alveolar Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Yun-Qian; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Mao, Yan-Fei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Liu, Yu-Jian; Jiang, Lai

    2017-05-19

    BACKGROUND Fibrotic change is one of the important reasons for the poor prognosis of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The present study investigated the effects of hydrogen-rich saline, a selective hydroxyl radical scavenger, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Male ICR mice were divided randomly into 5 groups: Control, LPS-treated plus vehicle treatment, and LPS-treated plus hydrogen-rich saline (2.5, 5, or 10 ml/kg) treatment. Twenty-eight days later, fibrosis was assessed by determination of collagen deposition, hydroxyproline, and type I collagen levels. Development of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was identified by examining protein expressions of E-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 content, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), malondialdehyde (MDA) content, catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were determined. RESULTS Mice exhibited increases in collagen deposition, hydroxyproline, type I collagen contents, and TGF-β1 production in lung tissues after LPS treatment. LPS-induced lung fibrosis was associated with increased expression of α-SMA, as well as decreased expression of E-cadherin. In addition, LPS treatment increased MDA levels but decreased T-AOC, CAT, and SOD activities in lung tissues, indicating that LPS induced pulmonary oxidative stress. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment at doses of 2.5, 5, or 10 ml/kg significantly attenuated LPS-induced pulmonary fibrosis. LPS-induced loss of E-cadherin in lung tissues was largely reversed, whereas the acquisition of α-SMA was dramatically decreased by hydrogen-rich saline treatment. In addition, hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated LPS-induced oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS Hydrogen-rich saline may protect against LPS-induced EMT and pulmonary fibrosis through suppressing oxidative stress.

  8. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  9. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  10. Pathways to Earth-like atmospheres. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV)-powered escape of hydrogen-rich protoatmospheres.

    PubMed

    Lammer, Helmut; Kislyakova, K G; Odert, P; Leitzinger, M; Schwarz, R; Pilat-Lohinger, E; Kulikov, Yu N; Khodachenko, M L; Güdel, M; Hanslmeier, M

    2011-12-01

    We discuss the evolution of the atmosphere of early Earth and of terrestrial exoplanets which may be capable of sustaining liquid water oceans and continents where life may originate. The formation age of a terrestrial planet, its mass and size, as well as the lifetime in the EUV-saturated early phase of its host star play a significant role in its atmosphere evolution. We show that planets even in orbits within the habitable zone of their host stars might not lose nebular- or catastrophically outgassed initial protoatmospheres completely and could end up as water worlds with CO2 and hydrogen- or oxygen-rich upper atmospheres. If an atmosphere of a terrestrial planet evolves to an N2-rich atmosphere too early in its lifetime, the atmosphere may be lost. We show that the initial conditions set up by the formation of a terrestrial planet and by the evolution of the host star's EUV and plasma environment are very important factors owing to which a planet may evolve to a habitable world. Finally we present a method for studying the discussed atmosphere evolution hypotheses by future UV transit observations of terrestrial exoplanets.

  11. Hydrogen-Rich Medium Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Monocyte-Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Vascular Endothelial Permeability via Rho-Associated Coiled-Coil Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Keliang; Wang, Weina; Chen, Hongguang; Han, Huanzhi; Liu, Daquan; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-07-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. In recent years, molecular hydrogen, as an effective free radical scavenger, has been shown a selective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect, and it is beneficial in the treatment of sepsis. Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK) participates in junction between normal cells, and regulates vascular endothelial permeability. In this study, we used lipopolysaccharide to stimulate vascular endothelial cells and explored the effects of hydrogen-rich medium on the regulation of adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability. We found that hydrogen-rich medium could inhibit adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and decrease levels of adhesion molecules, whereas the levels of transepithelial/endothelial electrical resistance values and the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin were increased after hydrogen-rich medium treatment. Moreover, hydrogen-rich medium could lessen the expression of ROCK, as a similar effect of its inhibitor Y-27632. In addition, hydrogen-rich medium could also inhibit adhesion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich medium could regulate adhesion of monocytes/polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability, and this effect might be related to the decreased expression of ROCK protein.

  12. [Regulative effects of hydrogen-rich medium on monocytic adhesion and vascular endothelial permeability].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-na; Xie, Ke-liang; Chen, Hong-guang; Han, Huan-zhi; Wang, Guo-lin; Yu, Yong-hao

    2013-11-19

    To explore the regulative effects of hydrogen-rich medium on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced monocytes adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and vascular endothelial permeability in vitro. Endothelial cells were seeded in 6-well plates and randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 42 each):control (A), hydrogen-rich medium (B), LPS (C) and LPS+hydrogen-rich medium (D). Cells were cultured in plain culture medium in groups A and C or in hydrogen-saturated culture medium in groups B and D.LPS 1 µg/ml was added into groups C and D.When forming a monolayer, monocytes were added into each group after 6, 12 and 24 h respectively. After a 90-minute co-culturing, adhesion status was detected by Wright-Giemsa stain.Supernatants were collected to detect the concentrations of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression of VE-cadherin was measured by Western blot. Cells were stained with immunofluorescence to show the distribution of VE-cadherin after a 24-hour incubation. Compared with group A, the adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells increased (P < 0.05) in group C, the levels of E-selectin and VCAM-1 became elevated (P < 0.05) while the expression of VE-cadherin decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Compared with group C, adhesion decreased in group D (P < 0.05), the levels of E-selectin and VCAM-1 decreased (P < 0.05) while there was an increased expression of VE-cadherin (P < 0.05). Three timepoints showed the same tendency. The results of 24 h fluorescence indicated that, compared with group A, VE-cadherin was incomplete in cell-cell connections in group C.However it was complete and well-distributed in group D versus group C. Hydrogen-rich medium may reduce the LPS-induced release of adhesion molecules, lessen monocytic adhesion to HUVEC and regulate the expression of VE-cadherin to protect vascular permeability.

  13. Hydrogen Rich Water Attenuates Renal Injury and Fibrosis by Regulation Transforming Growth Factor-β Induced Sirt1.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhaoyu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Xianlin; Zhang, Xuemei; He, Xiaozhou; Fan, Min

    2017-01-01

    The current research was designed to study the role of hydrogen in renal fibrosis and the renal epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Hydrogen rich water (HW) was used to treat animal and cell models. Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) was performed on Balb/c mice to create a model of renal fibrosis. Human kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 cells) were treated with TGF-β1 for 36 h to induce EMT. Serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were measured to test renal function, in addition, kidney histology and immunohistochemical staining of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive cells was performed to examine the morphological changes. The treatment with UUO induced a robust fibrosis of renal interstitium, shrink of glomerulus and partial fracture of basement membrane. Renal function was also impaired in the experimental group with UUO, with an increase of Scr and BUN in serum. After that, Western-blot was performed to examine the expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, E-cadherin, Smad2 and Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1). The treatment with HW attenuated the development of fibrosis and deterioration of renal function in UUO model. In HK-2 cells, the pretreatment of HW abolished EMT induced by TGF-β1. The down-regulation the expression of Sirt1 induced by TGF-β1 which was dampened by the treatment with HW. Sirtinol, a Sirt1 inhibitor, reversed the effect of HW on EMT induced by TGF-β1. HW can inhibit the development of fibrosis in kidney and prevents HK-2 cells from undergoing EMT which is mediated through Sirt1, a downstream molecule of TGF-β1.

  14. Effect of water on hydrogen permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulligan, David; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    Doping of hydrogen with CO and CO2 was developed to reduce hydrogen permeation in Stirling engines by forming a low permeability oxide coating on the inner surface of the heater head tubes. Although doping worked well, under certain circumstances the protective oxide could be chemically reduced by the hydrogen in the engine. Some oxygen is required in the hydrogen to prevent reduction. Eventually, all the oxygen in the hydrogen gas - whatever its source - shows up as water. This is the result of hydrogen reducing the CO, CO2, or the protective inner surface oxides. This water can condense in the engine system under the right conditions. If the concentration of water vapor is reduced to a low enough level, the hydrogen can chemically reduce the oxide coating, resulting in an increase in permeability. This work was done to define the minimum water content required to avoid this reduction in the oxide coating. The results of this testing show that a minimum of approximately 750 ppm water is required to prevent an increase in permeability of CG-27, a high temperature metal alloy selected for Stirling engine heater tubes.

  15. Process for hydrogen isotope concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, William H.

    1976-09-21

    A process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas, wherein liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted, in an exchange section, with one another and with at least one catalyst body comprising at least one metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table and preferably a support therefor, the catalyst body has a liquid-water-repellent, gas permeable polymer or organic resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone coating, so that the isotope concentration takes place by two simultaneously occurring steps, namely, ##EQU1## WHILE THE HYDROGEN GAS FED TO THE EXCHANGE SECTION IS DERIVED IN A REACTOR VESSEL FROM LIQUID WATER THAT HAS PASSED THROUGH THE EXCHANGE SECTION.

  16. Hydrogenation of carbonaceous materials

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Joseph; Oberg, Carl L.; Russell, Larry H.

    1980-01-01

    A method for reacting pulverized coal with heated hydrogen-rich gas to form hydrocarbon liquids suitable for conversion to fuels wherein the reaction involves injection of pulverized coal entrained in a minimum amount of gas and mixing the entrained coal at ambient temperature with a separate source of heated hydrogen. In accordance with the present invention, the hydrogen is heated by reacting a small portion of the hydrogen-rich gas with oxygen in a first reaction zone to form a gas stream having a temperature in excess of about 1000.degree. C. and comprising a major amount of hydrogen and a minor amount of water vapor. The coal particles then are reacted with the hydrogen in a second reaction zone downstream of the first reaction zone. The products of reaction may be rapidly quenched as they exit the second reaction zone and are subsequently collected.

  17. [Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates hyperalgesia and reduces cytokines in rats with post-herpetic neuralgia via activating autophagy].

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongtao; Chen, Hongguang; Dong, Aili; Wang, Yanyan; Bian, Yingxue; Xie, Keliang

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the role of autophagy in hydrogen-rich saline attenuating post-herpetic neuralgia( PHN) in rats. A total of 100 male SD rats were randomly divided into the five groups( n = 20) : control group,PHN group,PHN group treated with hydrogen-rich saline( PHN-H2group),PHN group treated with hydrogen-rich saline and3-MA( PHN-H2-3-MA group),PHN group treated with hydrogen-rich saline and rapamycin( PHN-H2-Rap group). PHN models were established by varicella-zoster virus( VZV) inoculation. After modeling,15 mg / kg 3-MA or 10 mg / kg rapamycin were intraperitoneally injected in corresponding rats with PHN once two days for 3 times. Hydrogen-rich saline( 10 m L / kg)was injected intraperitoneally twice a day for 7 consecutive days in PHN-H2 group,PHN-H2-3-MA group and PHN-H2-Rap group after VZV injection. The paw withdrawal thresholds( PWT) of 50 rats were detected at 3,7,14 and 21 days after modeling. Spinal cord enlargements of the other 50 rats were collected to examine tumor necrosis factor α( TNF-α),interleukine 1β( IL-1β) and IL-6 by ELISA and autophagy protein microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3( LC3),beclin 1and P62 by Western blotting. Compared with the control group,the rats in the PHN group presented with decreased PWT,increased levels of TNF-α,IL-1β,IL-6,LC3Ⅱ and beclin 1,and down-regulated P62 expression. Compared with PHN group,the rats in the PHN-H2 group and PHN-H2-Rap group showed increased PWT,decreased levels of TNF-α,IL-1β and IL-6,further up-regulated expressions of LC3 and beclin 1 as wel as P62 expression. Compared with PHN-H2 group,the rats in the PHN-H2-3-MA group had reduced PWT,elevated expressions of TNF-α,IL-1β and IL-6,suppressed expressions of LC3 and beclin 1,and enhanced p62 expression. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuated PWT and inhibited the release of cytokines TNF-α,IL-1β,IL-6 in rats with PHN via activating autophagy.

  18. Hydrogen considerations in light-water power reactons

    SciTech Connect

    Keilholtz, G.W.

    1976-02-01

    A critical review of the literature now available on hydrogen considerations in light-water power reactors (LWRs) and a bibliography of that literature are presented. The subject matter includes mechanisms for the generation of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures, a description of the fundamental properties of such mixtures, and their spontaneous ignition in both static and dynamic systems. The limits for hydrogen flammability and flame propagation are examined in terms of the effects of pressure, temperature, and additives; the emphasis is on the effects of steam and water vapor. The containment systems for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs) are compared, and methodsmore » to control hydrogen and oxygen under the conditions of both normal operation and postulated accidents are reviewed. It is concluded that hydrogen can be controlled so that serious complications from the production of hydrogen will not occur. The bibliography contains abstracts from the computerized files of the Nuclear Safety Information Center. Key-word, author, and permuted-title indexes are provided. The bibliography includes responses to questions asked by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which relate to hydrogen, as well as information on normal operations and postulated accidents including generation of hydrogen from core sprays. Other topics included in the ten sections of the bibliography are metal-water reactions, containment atmosphere, radiolytic gas, and recombiners.« less

  19. Hydrogen-rich saline alleviates experimental noise-induced hearing loss in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Zheng, H; Ruan, F; Chen, X; Zheng, G; Kang, M; Zhang, Q; Sun, X

    2012-05-03

    To examine the efficiency of hydrogen-rich saline in the treatment of intensive noise-induced cochlear injury. Forty guinea pigs were assigned to one of four groups: HS+NOISE (i.p. injection hydrogen-rich saline), NS+NOISE (i.p. injection normal saline), NOISE ALONE (noise control), and NO TREATMENT (normal control) groups. The HS+NOISE, NS+NOISE, and NOISE ALONE groups were exposed to intensive noise (4 h at 115 dB SPL noise of 4000±100 Hz). The auditory brainstem response (ABR) was used to examine the hearing threshold in each group. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) was used to examine outer hair cell function. We also examined cochlear morphology to evaluate inner and outer hair cell trauma induced by noise exposure. Hydrogen-rich saline was administered twice daily for 6 days (2.5 ml/kg, i.p.) 24 h after noise exposure. Baseline ABR thresholds and DPOAE values were normal in all groups at the measured frequencies (2, 4, 8, and 16 kHz) before noise exposure. The ABR threshold shift was 50-55 dB across the frequencies tested, and average DPOAE declined in the NOISE ALONE, NS+NOISE, and HS+NOISE groups 24 h after noise exposure. However, the changes in cochlear parameters were different between groups. The HS+NOISE group showed a significantly decreased ABR threshold value as compared with the NS+NOISE or NOISE ALONE group (P<0.01) on day 7. The mean DPOAE recovered to some extent in the three noise exposure groups, but at most frequencies the HS+NOISE group showed significantly increased DPOAE on day 7 as compared with the NS+NOISE group or NOISE ALONE group (P<0.01). Surface Corti organ preparations stained with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) showed that most outer hair cells (OHCs) were still dropsical and a few were missing 7 days after noise exposure in the NS+NOISE group. Only a few OHCs were slightly dropsical in the HS+NOISE group. The numbers of missing hair cells 7 days after noise exposure were significantly greater in the NOISE ONLY and

  20. Water and hydrogen are immiscible in Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Bali, Enikő; Audétat, Andreas; Keppler, Hans

    2013-03-14

    In the deep, chemically reducing parts of Earth's mantle, hydrous fluids contain significant amounts of molecular hydrogen (H2). Thermodynamic models of fluids in Earth's mantle so far have always assumed that molecular hydrogen and water are completely miscible. Here we show experimental evidence that water and hydrogen can coexist as two separate, immiscible phases. Immiscibility between water and hydrogen may be the cause of the formation of enigmatic, ultra-reducing domains in the mantle that contain moissanite (SiC) and other phases indicative of extremely reducing conditions. Moreover, the immiscibility between water and hydrogen may provide a mechanism for the rapid oxidation of Earth's upper mantle immediately following core formation.

  1. Effects of shock and Martian alteration on Tissint hydrogen isotope ratios and water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallis, L. J.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.; Taylor, G. J.; Stöffler, D.; Smith, C. L.; Lee, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    The Tissint meteorite, a picritic shergottite, fell to Earth in Morocco on the 18th of July 2011, and is only the fifth Martian meteorite witnessed to fall. Hydrogen isotope ratios and water contents are variable within different minerals in Tissint. Ringwoodite and shock melt pockets contain elevated D/H ratios relative to terrestrial values (δD = 761-4224‰). These high ratios in recrystallized phases indicate significant implantation of hydrogen from the D-rich Martian atmosphere during shock. In contrast, although olivine has detectable water abundances (230-485 ppm), it exhibits much lower D/H ratios (δD = +88 to -150‰), suggesting this water was not implanted from the Martian atmosphere. The minimal terrestrial weathering experienced by Tissint gives confidence that the olivine-hosted water has a Martian origin, but its high concentration indicates direct inheritance from the parental melt is improbable, especially given the low pressure of olivine crystallisation. Incorporation of a low δD crustal fluid, or deuteric alteration during crystallisation, could explain the relatively high water contents and low D/H ratios in Tissint olivine.

  2. [Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates hyperalgesia and reduces cytokines in rats with post-herpetic neuralgia via activating autophagy].

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongtao; Chen, Hongguang; Dong, Aili; Wang, Yanyan; Bian, Yingxue; Xie, Keliang

    2017-02-01

    Objective To investigate the role of autophagy in hydrogen-rich saline attenuating post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) in rats. Methods A total of 100 male SD rats were randomly divided into the five groups (n=20): control group, PHN group, PHN group treated with hydrogen-rich saline (PHN-H 2 group), PHN group treated with hydrogen-rich saline and 3-MA (PHN-H 2 -3-MA group), PHN group treated with hydrogen-rich saline and rapamycin (PHN-H 2 -Rap group). PHN models were established by varicella-zoster virus (VZV) inoculation. After modeling, 15 mg/kg 3-MA or 10 mg/kg rapamycin were intraperitoneally injected in corresponding rats with PHN once two days for 3 times. Hydrogen-rich saline (10 mL/kg) was injected intraperitoneally twice a day for 7 consecutive days in PHN-H 2 group, PHN-H 2 -3-MA group and PHN-H 2 -Rap group after VZV injection. The paw withdrawal thresholds (PWT) of 50 rats were detected at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after modeling. Spinal cord enlargements of the other 50 rats were collected to examine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukine 1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 by ELISA and autophagy protein microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), beclin 1 and P62 by Western blotting. Results Compared with the control group, the rats in the PHN group presented with decreased PWT, increased levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, LC3II and beclin 1, and down-regulated P62 expression. Compared with PHN group, the rats in the PHN-H 2 group and PHN-H 2 -Rap group showed increased PWT, decreased levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, further up-regulated expressions of LC3 and beclin 1 as well as P62 expression. Compared with PHN-H 2 group, the rats in the PHN-H 2 -3-MA group had reduced PWT, elevated expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, suppressed expressions of LC3 and beclin 1, and enhanced p62 expression. Conclusion Hydrogen-rich saline attenuated PWT and inhibited the release of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 in rats with PHN via activating autophagy.

  3. Time-resolved PIV investigation of flashback in stratified swirl flames of hydrogen-rich fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Rakesh; Clemens, Noel

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen is one of the promising alternative fuels to achieve greener power generation. However, susceptibility of flashback in swirl flames of hydrogen-rich fuels acts as a major barrier to its adoption in gas turbine combustors. The current study seeks to understand the flow-flame interaction during the flashback of the hydrogen-rich flame in stratified conditions. Flashback experiments are conducted with a model combustor equipped with an axial swirler and a center-body. Fuel is injected in the main swirl flow via the fuel ports on the swirler vanes. To achieve mean radial stratification, these fuel ports are located at a radial location closer to the outer wall of the mixing tube. Stratification in the flow is assessed by employing Anisole PLIF imaging. Flashback is triggered by a rapid increase in the global equivalence ratio. The upstream propagation of the flame is investigated by employing time-resolved stereoscopic PIV and chemiluminescence imaging. Stratification leads to substantially different flame propagation behavior as well as increased flame surface wrinkling. We gratefully acknowledge the sponsorship by the DOE NETL under Grant DEFC2611-FE0007107.

  4. UV-Vis Action Spectroscopy Reveals a Conformational Collapse in Hydrogen-Rich Dinucleotide Cation Radicals.

    PubMed

    Korn, Joseph A; Urban, Jan; Dang, Andy; Nguyen, Huong T H; Tureček, František

    2017-09-07

    We report the generation of deoxyriboadenosine dinucleotide cation radicals by gas-phase electron transfer to dinucleotide dications and their noncovalent complexes with crown ether ligands. Stable dinucleotide cation radicals of a novel hydrogen-rich type were generated and characterized by tandem mass spectrometry and UV-vis photodissociation (UVPD) action spectroscopy. Electron structure theory analysis indicated that upon electron attachment the dinucleotide dications underwent a conformational collapse followed by intramolecular proton migrations between the nucleobases to give species whose calculated UV-vis absorption spectra matched the UVPD action spectra. Hydrogen-rich cation radicals generated from chimeric riboadenosine 5'-diesters gave UVPD action spectra that pointed to novel zwitterionic structures consisting of aromatic π-electron anion radicals intercalated between stacked positively charged adenine rings. Analogies with DNA ionization are discussed.

  5. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from biomass derivatives and water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xihong; Xie, Shilei; Yang, Hao; Tong, Yexiang; Ji, Hongbing

    2014-11-21

    Hydrogen, a clean energy carrier with high energy capacity, is a very promising candidate as a primary energy source for the future. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen production from renewable biomass derivatives and water is one of the most promising approaches to producing green chemical fuel. Compared to water splitting, hydrogen production from renewable biomass derivatives and water through a PEC process is more efficient from the viewpoint of thermodynamics. Additionally, the carbon dioxide formed can be re-transformed into carbohydrates via photosynthesis in plants. In this review, we focus on the development of photoanodes and systems for PEC hydrogen production from water and renewable biomass derivatives, such as methanol, ethanol, glycerol and sugars. We also discuss the future challenges and opportunities for the design of the state-of-the-art photoanodes and PEC systems for hydrogen production from biomass derivatives and water.

  6. Hydrogen as a New Class of Radioprotective Agent

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Liren; Shen, Jianliang; Chuai, Yunhai; Cai, Jianming

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that most of the ionizing radiation-induced damage is caused by hydroxyl radicals (·OH) follows radiolysis of H2O. Molecular hydrogen (H2) has antioxidant activities by selectively reducing ·OH and peroxynitrite(ONOO-). We firstly hypothesized and demonstrated the radioprotective effect of H2 in vitro and in vivo, which was also repeated on different experimental animal models by different departments. A randomized, placebo-controlled study showed that consumption of hydrogen-rich water reduces the biological reaction to radiation-induced oxidative stress without compromising anti-tumor effects. These encouraging results suggested that H2 represents a potentially novel preventative strategy for radiation-induced oxidative injuries. H2 is explosive. Therefore, administration of hydrogen-rich solution (physiological saline/pure water/other solutions saturated with H2) may be more practical in daily life and more suitable for daily consumption. This review focuses on major scientific and clinical advances of hydrogen-rich solution/H2 as a new class of radioprotective agent. PMID:24155664

  7. Hydrogen-rich water achieves cytoprotection from oxidative stress injury in human gingival fibroblasts in culture or 3D-tissue equivalents, and wound-healing promotion, together with ROS-scavenging and relief from glutathione diminishment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate protective effects of hydrogen-rich water (HW) against reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced cellular harmful events and cell death in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and three-dimensional (3D-) gingival tissue equivalents. HW was prepared with a magnesium stick in 600-mL double distilled water (DDW) overnight. Dissolved hydrogen was about 1460 ± 50 μg/L versus approximately 1600 μg/L for the saturated hydrogen. Under cell-free conditions, HW, dose-dependently, significantly scavenged peroxyl radicals (ROO·) derived from 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH). Extract from HW-treated HGF cells scavenged ROO· more markedly than that from DDW-treated cells, suggesting that HW can increase the intracellular antioxidant capacity. Hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently increased the intracellular ROS generation, which was significantly repressed by HW, both in the cytoplasm and nuclei. LIVE/DEAD staining and our original cell viability dye-extraction assay showed that HW significantly protected HGF cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Hydrogen peroxide also diminished the contents of intracellular glutathione, which were appreciably relieved by HW-pretreatment. Additionally, HW noticeably prevented cumene hydroperoxide-induced generation of cellular ROS in epidermis parts of 3D-gingival equivalents. The in vitro scratch assay showed that HW was able to diminish physical injury-induced ROS generation and promote wound healing in HGF cell monolayer sheets. In summary, HW was able to increase intracellular antioxidative capacity and to protect cells and tissue from oxidative damage. Thus, HW might be used for prevention/treatment of oxidative stress-related diseases.

  8. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates skin ischemia/reperfusion induced apoptosis via regulating Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and ASK-1/JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-Qi; Liu, Yi-Fang; Ma, Xue-Mei; Xiao, Yi-Ding; Wang, You-Bin; Zhang, Ming-Zi; Cheng, Ai-Xin; Wang, Ting-Ting; Li, Jia-La; Zhao, Peng-Xiang; Xie, Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Many pathways have been reported involving the effect of hydrogen-rich saline on protecting skin flap partial necrosis induced by the inflammation of ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study focused on the influence of hydrogen-rich saline treatment on apoptosis pathway of ASK-1/JNK and Bcl-2/Bax radio in I/R injury of skin flaps. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. Group 1 was sham surgery group, Group 2 and 3 were ischemia/reperfusion surgery treated with physiological saline and hydrogen-rich saline respectively. Blood perfusion of flap was measured by Laser doppler flowmeters. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to observe morphological changes. Early apoptosis in skin flap was observed through TUNEL staining and presented as the percentage of TUNEL-positive cells of total cells. pASK-1, pJNK, Bcl-2 and Bax were examined by immunodetection. In addition Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 were detected by qPCR. Caspase-3 activity was also measured. Compared to the Group 2, tissues from the group 3 were observed with a high expression of Bcl-2 and a low expression of pASK-1, pJNK, and Bax, a larger survival area and a high level of blood perfusion. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorated inflammatory infiltration and decreased cell apoptosis. The results indicate that hydrogen-rich saline could ameliorate ischemia/reperfusion injury and improve flap survival rate by inhibiting the apoptosis factor and, at the same time, promoting the expression of anti-apoptosis factor. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Thermochemical water decomposition. [hydrogen separation for energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    At present, nearly all of the hydrogen consumed in the world is produced by reacting hydrocarbons with water. As the supply of hydrocarbons diminishes, the problem of producing hydrogen from water alone will become increasingly important. Furthermore, producing hydrogen from water is a means of energy conversion by which thermal energy from a primary source, such as solar or nuclear fusion of fission, can be changed into an easily transportable and ecologically acceptable fuel. The attraction of thermochemical processes is that they offer the potential for converting thermal energy to hydrogen more efficiently than by water electrolysis. A thermochemical hydrogen-production process is one which requires only water as material input and mainly thermal energy, or heat, as an energy input. Attention is given to a definition of process thermal efficiency, the thermodynamics of the overall process, the single-stage process, the two-stage process, multistage processes, the work of separation and a process evaluation.

  10. Process for the production of hydrogen from water

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E [Naperville, IL; Maroni, Victor A [Naperville, IL; Willit, James L [Batavia, IL

    2010-05-25

    A method and device for the production of hydrogen from water and electricity using an active metal alloy. The active metal alloy reacts with water producing hydrogen and a metal hydroxide. The metal hydroxide is consumed, restoring the active metal alloy, by applying a voltage between the active metal alloy and the metal hydroxide. As the process is sustainable, only water and electricity is required to sustain the reaction generating hydrogen.

  11. Hydrogen and water reactor safety: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for papers presented in the following areas of interest: 1) hydrogen research programs; 2) hydrogen behavior during light water reactor accidents; 3) combustible gas generation; 4) hydrogen transport and mixing; 5) combustion modeling and experiments; 6) accelerated flames and detonations; 7) combustion mitigation and control; and 8) equipment survivability.

  12. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, wemore » show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H 2O 2 and the 4e– oxidation to O 2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO 2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H 2O 2 evolution selectively.« less

  13. Habitability constraints on water-rich exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Höning, Dennis; Rivoldini, Attilio; Heistracher, Clemens; Zimov, Nastasia; Journaux, Baptiste; Lammer, Helmut; Van Hoolst, Tim; Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan

    2016-04-01

    This research addresses the characterization, modelling, thermal evolution and possible habitability of water-rich exoplanets. Water is necessary for the origin and survival of life as we know it. In the search for habitable worlds, water-rich planets therefore seem obvious candidates. The water layer on such planets could be hundreds of kilometers deep. Depending on the temperature profile and the pressure gradient, it is likely that at great depths a significant part of the water layer is solid high pressure ice. Whether the solid ice layer extends to the bottom of the water layer, or if a shallow lower ocean forms above the silicate mantle, depends amongst others on the thermal state of the planet. We therefore model the thermal evolution of water-rich planets with a 1D parameterized model. Depth-dependent profiles for thermodynamic properties as well as pressure and gravity are obtained by solving the Poisson equation for the gravity and the hydrostatic pressure equation for pre-defined mass and composition (in terms of iron, silicates and water) [1]. For density, equations of state are applied. For the simulation of the thermal evolution of water-rich planets, several parameters (as initial temperatures or layer thicknesses) are unknown. We therefore employ a quantitatve study with more than 20'000 simulations, where we investigated which parameters have the largest influence on the appearance of a lower ocean, i.e. the possible melting of high-pressure ice by heat flowing out of the silicate mantle [2]. We find that the surface temperature has the largest influence on the thickness of water layers, for which a lower ocean can still form between the high-pressure ice layer and the silicate mantle. For higher surface temperatures, not only entirely liquid oceans are possible for deeper water shells, also a liquid ocean can form under high-pressure ice layers of hundreds of kilometer thickness (for a 1 Earth-mass planet). Deeper down, the lower ocean can still

  14. Biomass to hydrogen-rich syngas via catalytic steam gasification of bio-oil/biochar slurry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanyi; Yao, Jingang; Liu, Jing; Yan, Beibei; Shan, Rui

    2015-12-01

    The catalytic steam gasification of bio-oil/biochar slurry (bioslurry) for hydrogen-rich syngas production was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor using LaXFeO3 (X=Ce, Mg, K) perovskite-type catalysts. The effects of elemental substitution in LaFeO3, temperature, water to carbon molar ratio (WCMR) and bioslurry weight hourly space velocity (WbHSV) were examined. The results showed that La0.8Ce0.2FeO3 gave the best performance among the prepared catalysts and had better catalytic activity and stability than the commercial 14 wt.% Ni/Al2O3. The deactivation caused by carbon deposition and sintering was significantly depressed in the case of La0.8Ce0.2FeO3 catalyst. Both higher temperature and lower WbHSV contributed to more H2 yield. The optimal WCMR was found to be 2, and excessive introducing of steam reduced hydrogen yield. The La0.8Ce0.2FeO3 catalyst gave a maximum H2 yield of 82.01% with carbon conversion of 65.57% under the optimum operating conditions (temperature=800°C, WCMR=2 and WbHSV=15.36h(-1)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrogen-rich scandium compounds at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kazutaka

    2017-10-01

    Scandium hydrides at high pressures have been investigated by using ab initio density functional calculations. Although the stable scandium hydride so far known to have the highest content rate of hydrogen is ScH3, other more hydrogen-rich compounds are found to be possible at high pressures. These are ScH4 in the I 4 /m m m structure above 160 GPa, ScH6 in the P 63/m m c structure from 135 to 265 GPa, and ScH6 in the I m 3 ¯m structure above 265 GPa. The three phases are all metallic, and the superconducting transition temperatures estimated from the extended McMillan equation are 67 K in the I 4 /m m m ScH4 at 195 GPa, 63 K in the P 63/m m c ScH6 at 145 GPa, and 130 K in the I m 3 ¯m ScH6 at 285 GPa. While the I 4 /m m m tetrahydride and the I m 3 ¯m hexahydride were similarly predicted for yttrium (another group-3 element), the P 63/m m c hexahydride is possible only for scandium. The smaller atomic size of scandium stabilizes the P 63/m m c structure, and other nearby d -block elements, whose atomic sizes are smaller or comparable, might be likewise capable of forming such polyhydrides.

  16. Photoelectrochemical water splitting in separate oxygen and hydrogen cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landman, Avigail; Dotan, Hen; Shter, Gennady E.; Wullenkord, Michael; Houaijia, Anis; Maljusch, Artjom; Grader, Gideon S.; Rothschild, Avner

    2017-06-01

    Solar water splitting provides a promising path for sustainable hydrogen production and solar energy storage. One of the greatest challenges towards large-scale utilization of this technology is reducing the hydrogen production cost. The conventional electrolyser architecture, where hydrogen and oxygen are co-produced in the same cell, gives rise to critical challenges in photoelectrochemical water splitting cells that directly convert solar energy and water to hydrogen. Here we overcome these challenges by separating the hydrogen and oxygen cells. The ion exchange in our cells is mediated by auxiliary electrodes, and the cells are connected to each other only by metal wires, enabling centralized hydrogen production. We demonstrate hydrogen generation in separate cells with solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 7.5%, which can readily surpass 10% using standard commercial components. A basic cost comparison shows that our approach is competitive with conventional photoelectrochemical systems, enabling safe and potentially affordable solar hydrogen production.

  17. Effect of water on hydrogen permeability. [Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulligan, D. D.; Tomazic, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    Doping of hydrogen with CO or CO2 was developed to reduce hydrogen permeation in Stirling engines by forming low permeability oxide coatings in the heater tubes. An end product of this process is water - which can condense in the cold parts of the engine system. If the water vapor is reduced to a low enough level, the hydrogen can reduce the oxide coating resulting in increased permeability. The equilibrium level of water (oxygen bearing gas) required to avoid reduction of the oxide coating was investigated. Results at 720 C and 13.8 MPa have shown that: (1) pure hydrogen will reduce the coating; (2) 500 ppm CO (500 ppm water equivalent) does not prevent the reduction; and (3) 500 ppm CO2 (1000 ppm water) appears to be close to the equilibrium level. Further tests are planned to define the equilibrium level more precisely and to extend the data to 820 C and 3.4, 6.9, and 13.8 MPa.

  18. A Water Rich Mars Surface Mission Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Andrews, Alida; Joosten, B. Kent; Watts, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    In an on-going effort to make human Mars missions more affordable and sustainable, NASA continues to investigate the innovative leveraging of technological advances in conjunction with the use of accessible Martian resources directly applicable to these missions. One of the resources with the broadest utility for human missions is water. Many past studies of human Mars missions assumed a complete lack of water derivable from local sources. However, recent advances in our understanding of the Martian environment provides growing evidence that Mars may be more "water rich" than previously suspected. This is based on data indicating that substantial quantities of water are mixed with surface regolith, bound in minerals located at or near the surface, and buried in large glacier-like forms. This paper describes an assessment of what could be done in a "water rich" human Mars mission scenario. A description of what is meant by "water rich" in this context is provided, including a quantification of the water that would be used by crews in this scenario. The different types of potential feedstock that could be used to generate these quantities of water are described, drawing on the most recently available assessments of data being returned from Mars. This paper specifically focuses on sources that appear to be buried quantities of water ice. (An assessment of other potential feedstock materials is documented in another paper.) Technologies and processes currently used in terrestrial Polar Regions are reviewed. One process with a long history of use on Earth and with potential application on Mars - the Rodriguez Well - is described and results of an analysis simulating the performance of such a well on Mars are presented. These results indicate that a Rodriguez Well capable of producing the quantities of water identified for a "water rich" human mission are within the capabilities assumed to be available on the Martian surface, as envisioned in other comparable Evolvable

  19. A Water Rich Mars Surface Mission Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Andrews, Alida; Joosten, B. Kent; Watts, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    In an on-going effort to make human Mars missions more affordable and sustainable, NASA continues to investigate the innovative leveraging of technological advances in conjunction with the use of accessible Martian resources directly applicable to these missions. One of the resources with the broadest utility for human missions is water. Many past studies of human Mars missions assumed a complete lack of water derivable from local sources. However, recent advances in our understanding of the Martian environment provides growing evidence that Mars may be more "water rich" than previously suspected. This is based on data indicating that substantial quantities of water are mixed with surface regolith, bound in minerals located at or near the surface, and buried in large glacier-like forms. This paper describes an assessment of what could be done in a "water rich" human Mars mission scenario. A description of what is meant by "water rich" in this context is provided, including a quantification of the water that would be used by crews in this scenario. The different types of potential feedstock that could be used to generate these quantities of water are described, drawing on the most recently available assessments of data being returned from Mars. This paper specifically focuses on sources that appear to be buried quantities of water ice. (An assessment of other potential feedstock materials is documented in another paper.) Technologies and processes currently used in terrestrial polar regions is reviewed. One process with a long history of use on Earth and with potential application on Mars - the Rodriguez Well - is described and results of an analysis simulating the performance of such a well on Mars are presented. These results indicate that a Rodriguez Well capable of producing the quantities of water identified for a "water rich" human mission are within the capabilities assumed to be available on the Martian surface, as envisioned in other comparable Evolvable

  20. Thermonuclear runaways in thick hydrogen rich envelopes of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S. G.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    A Lagrangian, fully implicit, one dimensional hydrodynamic computer code was used to evolve thermonuclear runaways in the accreted hydrogen rich envelopes of 1.0 Msub solar neutron stars with radii of 10 km and 20 km. Simulations produce outbursts which last from about 750 seconds to about one week. Peak effective temeratures and luninosities were 26 million K and 80 thousand Lsub solar for the 10 km study and 5.3 millison and 600 Lsub solar for the 20 km study. Hydrodynamic expansion on the 10 km neutron star produced a precursor lasting about one ten thousandth seconds.

  1. Drinking hydrogen water ameliorated cognitive impairment in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yeunhwa; Huang, Chien-Sheng; Inoue, Tota; Yamashita, Takenori; Ishida, Torao; Kang, Ki-Mun; Nakao, Atsunori

    2010-05-01

    Hydrogen has been reported to have neuron protective effects due to its antioxidant properties, but the effects of hydrogen on cognitive impairment due to senescence-related brain alterations and the underlying mechanisms have not been characterized. In this study, we investigated the efficacies of drinking hydrogen water for prevention of spatial memory decline and age-related brain alterations using senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 (SAMP8), which exhibits early aging syndromes including declining learning ability and memory. However, treatment with hydrogen water for 30 days prevented age-related declines in cognitive ability seen in SAMP8 as assessed by a water maze test and was associated with increased brain serotonin levels and elevated serum antioxidant activity. In addition, drinking hydrogen water for 18 weeks inhibited neurodegeneration in hippocampus, while marked loss of neurons was noted in control, aged brains of mice receiving regular water. On the basis of our results, hydrogen water merits further investigation for possible therapeutic/preventative use for age-related cognitive disorders.

  2. Oxidation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690: Experimentally Accelerated Study in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Tyler; Cao, Guoping; Was, Gary S.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether the oxidation of Alloys 600 and 690 in supercritical water occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical water. Coupons of Alloys 690 and 600 were exposed to hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 633 K to 673 K (360 °C to 400 °C) and the oxidation behavior was observed. By all measures of oxide character and behavior, the oxidation process is the same above and below the supercritical line. Similar oxide morphologies, structures, and chemistries were observed for each alloy across the critical point, indicating that the oxidation mechanism is the same in both subcritical and supercritical water. Oxidation results in a multi-layer oxide structure composed of particles of NiO and NiFe2O4 formed by precipitation on the outer surface and a chromium-rich inner oxide layer formed by diffusion of oxygen to the metal-oxide interface. The inner oxide on Alloy 600 is less chromium rich than that observed on Alloy 690 and is accompanied by preferential oxidation of grain boundaries. The inner oxide on Alloy 690 initially forms by internal oxidation before a protective layer of chromium-rich MO is formed with Cr2O3 at the metal-oxide interface. Grain boundaries in Alloy 690 act as fast diffusion paths for chromium that forms a protective Cr2O3 layer at the surface, preventing grain boundary oxidation from occurring.

  3. Effect of Treadmill Exercise and Hydrogen-rich Water Intake on Serum Oxidative and Anti-oxidative Metabolites in Serum of Thoroughbred Horses

    PubMed Central

    TSUBONE, Hirokazu; HANAFUSA, Masakazu; ENDO, Maiko; MANABE, Noboru; HIRAGA, Atsushi; OHMURA, Hajime; AIDA, Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify changes of oxidative stress and antioxidative functions in treadmill-exercised Thoroughbred horses (n=5, 3 to 7 years old), using recently developed techniques for measurement of serum d-ROMs for oxidative stress, and BAP for antioxidative markers. Also, the effect of nasogastric administration of hydrogen-rich water (HW) or placebo water preceding the treadmill exercise on these parameters was examined. Each horse was subjected to a maximum level of treadmill exercise in which the horses were exhausted at an average speed of 13.2 ± 0.84 m/sec. Blood samples were taken 4 times, immediately before the intake of HW or placebo water at 30 min preceding the treadmill exercise, immediately before the exercise (pre-exercise), immediately after the exercise (post-exercise) and at 30 min following the exercise. In all horses, both d-ROMs and BAP values significantly increased at post-exercise. The increase in d-ROMs tended to be lower in the HW trial, as compared to the placebo trial at pre-exercise. The increase in BAP was considerable at approximately 150% of the pre-exercise values in both the HW and placebo treatment trials. The BAP/d-ROMs ratio was significantly elevated at post-exercise in both treatment trials, while a significant elevation was also observed at pre-exercise in the HW trial. BAP, d-ROM, and the BAP/d-ROM ratio tended to decline at 30 min after the exercise, except BAP and BAP/d-ROMs in the placebo trial. These results demonstrate that the marked elevation of oxidative stress and anitioxidative functions occurred simultaneously in the intensively exercised horses, and suggest a possibility that HW has some antioxidative efficacy. PMID:24833996

  4. Effect of Treadmill Exercise and Hydrogen-rich Water Intake on Serum Oxidative and Anti-oxidative Metabolites in Serum of Thoroughbred Horses.

    PubMed

    Tsubone, Hirokazu; Hanafusa, Masakazu; Endo, Maiko; Manabe, Noboru; Hiraga, Atsushi; Ohmura, Hajime; Aida, Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify changes of oxidative stress and antioxidative functions in treadmill-exercised Thoroughbred horses (n=5, 3 to 7 years old), using recently developed techniques for measurement of serum d-ROMs for oxidative stress, and BAP for antioxidative markers. Also, the effect of nasogastric administration of hydrogen-rich water (HW) or placebo water preceding the treadmill exercise on these parameters was examined. Each horse was subjected to a maximum level of treadmill exercise in which the horses were exhausted at an average speed of 13.2 ± 0.84 m/sec. Blood samples were taken 4 times, immediately before the intake of HW or placebo water at 30 min preceding the treadmill exercise, immediately before the exercise (pre-exercise), immediately after the exercise (post-exercise) and at 30 min following the exercise. In all horses, both d-ROMs and BAP values significantly increased at post-exercise. The increase in d-ROMs tended to be lower in the HW trial, as compared to the placebo trial at pre-exercise. The increase in BAP was considerable at approximately 150% of the pre-exercise values in both the HW and placebo treatment trials. The BAP/d-ROMs ratio was significantly elevated at post-exercise in both treatment trials, while a significant elevation was also observed at pre-exercise in the HW trial. BAP, d-ROM, and the BAP/d-ROM ratio tended to decline at 30 min after the exercise, except BAP and BAP/d-ROMs in the placebo trial. These results demonstrate that the marked elevation of oxidative stress and anitioxidative functions occurred simultaneously in the intensively exercised horses, and suggest a possibility that HW has some antioxidative efficacy.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide kinetics in water radiolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamatsu, Kazuhiro; Sundin, Sara; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2018-04-01

    The kinetics of the formation and reaction of hydrogen peroxide in the long time γ- radiolysis of water is examined using a combination of experiment with model calculations. Escape yields of hydrogen peroxide on the microsecond time scale are easily measured with added radical scavengers even with substantial amounts of initial added hydrogen peroxide. The γ-radiolysis of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions without added radical scavengers reach a steady state limiting concentration of hydrogen peroxide with increasing dose, and that limit is directly proportional to the initial concentration of added hydrogen peroxide. The dose necessary to reach that limiting hydrogen peroxide concentration is also proportional to the initial concentration, but dose rate has a very small effect. The addition of molecular hydrogen to aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide leads to a decrease in the high dose limiting hydrogen peroxide concentration that is linear with the initial hydrogen concentration, but the amount of decrease is not stoichiometric. Proton irradiations of solutions with added hydrogen peroxide and hydrogen are more difficult to predict because of the decreased yields of radicals; however, with a substantial increase in dose rate there is a sufficient decrease in radical yields that hydrogen addition has little effect on hydrogen peroxide decay.

  6. Estimation of the hydrogen concentration in rat tissue using an airtight tube following the administration of hydrogen via various routes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi; Kurokawa, Ryosuke; Fujino, Masayuki; Hirano, Shinichi; Sato, Bunpei; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen exerts beneficial effects in disease animal models of ischemia-reperfusion injury as well as inflammatory and neurological disease. Additionally, molecular hydrogen is useful for various novel medical and therapeutic applications in the clinical setting. In the present study, the hydrogen concentration in rat blood and tissue was estimated. Wistar rats were orally administered hydrogen super-rich water (HSRW), intraperitoneal and intravenous administration of hydrogen super-rich saline (HSRS), and inhalation of hydrogen gas. A new method for determining the hydrogen concentration was then applied using high-quality sensor gas chromatography, after which the specimen was prepared via tissue homogenization in airtight tubes. This method allowed for the sensitive and stable determination of the hydrogen concentration. The hydrogen concentration reached a peak at 5 minutes after oral and intraperitoneal administration, compared to 1 minute after intravenous administration. Following inhalation of hydrogen gas, the hydrogen concentration was found to be significantly increased at 30 minutes and maintained the same level thereafter. These results demonstrate that accurately determining the hydrogen concentration in rat blood and organ tissue is very useful and important for the application of various novel medical and therapeutic therapies using molecular hydrogen. PMID:24975958

  7. Microstructure and hydrogen bonding in water-acetonitrile mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mountain, Raymond D

    2010-12-16

    The connection of hydrogen bonding between water and acetonitrile in determining the microheterogeneity of the liquid mixture is examined using NPT molecular dynamics simulations. Mixtures for six, rigid, three-site models for acetonitrile and one water model (SPC/E) were simulated to determine the amount of water-acetonitrile hydrogen bonding. Only one of the six acetonitrile models (TraPPE-UA) was able to reproduce both the liquid density and the experimental estimates of hydrogen bonding derived from Raman scattering of the CN stretch band or from NMR quadrupole relaxation measurements. A simple modification of the acetonitrile model parameters for the models that provided poor estimates produced hydrogen-bonding results consistent with experiments for two of the models. Of these, only one of the modified models also accurately determined the density of the mixtures. The self-diffusion coefficient of liquid acetonitrile provided a final winnowing of the modified model and the successful, unmodified model. The unmodified model is provisionally recommended for simulations of water-acetonitrile mixtures.

  8. Water: two liquids divided by a common hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Soper, Alan K

    2011-12-08

    The structure of water is the subject of a long and ongoing controversy. Unlike simpler liquids, where atomic interactions are dominated by strong repulsive forces at short distances and weaker attractive (van der Waals) forces at longer distances, giving rise to local atomic coordination numbers of order 12, water has pronounced and directional hydrogen bonds which cause the dense liquid close-packed structure to open out into a disordered and dynamic network, with coordination number 4-5. Here I show that water structure can be accurately represented as a mixture of two identical, interpenetrating, molecular species separated by common hydrogen bonds. Molecules of one type can form hydrogen bonds with molecules of the other type but cannot form hydrogen bonds with molecules of the same type. These hydrogen bonds are strong along the bond but weak with respect to changes in the angle between neighboring bonds. The observed pressure and temperature dependence of water structure and thermodynamic properties follow naturally from this choice of water model, and it also gives a simple explanation of the enduring claims based on spectroscopic evidence that water is a mixture of two components. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Analysis Sharpens Mars Hydrogen Map, Hinting Equatorial Water Ice

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Re-analysis of 2002-2009 data from a hydrogen-finding instrument on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter increased the resolution of maps of hydrogen abundance. The reprocessed data (lower map) shows more "water-equivalent hydrogen" (darker blue) in some parts of this equatorial region of Mars. Puzzingly, this suggests the possible presence of water ice just beneath the surface near the equator, though it would not be thermodynamically stable there. The upper map uses raw data from Odyssey's neutron spectrometer instrument, which senses the energy state of neutrons coming from Mars, providing an indication of how much hydrogen is present in the top 3 feet (1 meter) of the surface. Hydrogen detected by Odyssey at high latitudes of Mars in 2002 was confirmed to be in the form of water ice by the follow-up NASA Phoenix Mars Lander mission in 2008. A 2017 reprocessing of the older data applied image-reconstruction techniques often used to reduce blurring from medical imaging data. The results are shown here for an area straddling the equator for about one-fourth the circumference of the planet, centered at 175 degrees west longitude. The white contours outline lobes of a formation called Medusae Fossae, coinciding with some areas of higher hydrogen abundance in the enhanced-resolution analysis. The black line indicates the limit of a relatively young lava plain, coinciding with areas of lower hydrogen abundance in the enhanced-resolution analysis. The color-coding key for hydrogen abundance in both maps is indicated by the horizontal bar, in units expressed as how much water would be present in the ground if the hydrogen is all in the form of water. Units of the equivalent water weight, as a percentage of the material in the ground, are correlated with counts recorded by the spectrometer, ranging from less than 1 weight-percent water equivalent (red) to more than 30 percent (dark blue). https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21848

  10. Hydrogen production from carbonaceous material

    DOEpatents

    Lackner, Klaus S.; Ziock, Hans J.; Harrison, Douglas P.

    2004-09-14

    Hydrogen is produced from solid or liquid carbon-containing fuels in a two-step process. The fuel is gasified with hydrogen in a hydrogenation reaction to produce a methane-rich gaseous reaction product, which is then reacted with water and calcium oxide in a hydrogen production and carbonation reaction to produce hydrogen and calcium carbonate. The calcium carbonate may be continuously removed from the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction zone and calcined to regenerate calcium oxide, which may be reintroduced into the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction zone. Hydrogen produced in the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction is more than sufficient both to provide the energy necessary for the calcination reaction and also to sustain the hydrogenation of the coal in the gasification reaction. The excess hydrogen is available for energy production or other purposes. Substantially all of the carbon introduced as fuel ultimately emerges from the invention process in a stream of substantially pure carbon dioxide. The water necessary for the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction may be introduced into both the gasification and hydrogen production and carbonation reactions, and allocated so as transfer the exothermic heat of reaction of the gasification reaction to the endothermic hydrogen production and carbonation reaction.

  11. Comparison of formation mechanism of fresh-water and salt-water lacustrine organic-rich shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Senhu

    2017-04-01

    Based on the core and thin section observation, major, trace and rare earth elements test, carbon and oxygen isotopes content analysis and other geochemical methods, a detailed study was performed on formation mechanism of lacustrine organic-rich shale by taking the middle Permian salt-water shale in Zhungaer Basin and upper Triassic fresh-water shale in Ordos Basin as the research target. The results show that, the middle Permian salt-water shale was overall deposited in hot and dry climate. Long-term reductive environment and high biological abundance due to elevated temperature provides favorable conditions for formation and preservation of organic-rich shale. Within certain limits, the hotter climate, the organic-richer shale formed. These organic-rich shale was typically distributed in the area where palaeosalinity is relatively high. However, during the upper Triassic at Ordos Basin, organic-rich shale was formed in warm and moist environment. What's more, if the temperature, salinity or water depth rises, the TOC in shale decreases. In other words, relatively low temperature and salinity, stable lake level and strong reducing conditions benefits organic-rich shale deposits in fresh water. In this sense, looking for high-TOC shale in lacustrine basin needs to follow different rules depends on the palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironment during sedimentary period. There is reason to believe that the some other factors can also have significant impact on formation mechanism of organic-rich shale, which increases the complexity of shale oil and gas prediction.

  12. Hydrogen production by the decomposition of water

    DOEpatents

    Hollabaugh, Charles M.; Bowman, Melvin G.

    1981-01-01

    How to produce hydrogen from water was a problem addressed by this invention. The solution employs a combined electrolytical-thermochemical sulfuric acid process. Additionally, high purity sulfuric acid can be produced in the process. Water and SO.sub.2 react in electrolyzer (12) so that hydrogen is produced at the cathode and sulfuric acid is produced at the anode. Then the sulfuric acid is reacted with a particular compound M.sub.r X.sub.s so as to form at least one water insoluble sulfate and at least one water insoluble oxide of molybdenum, tungsten, or boron. Water is removed by filtration; and the sulfate is decomposed in the presence of the oxide in sulfate decomposition zone (21), thus forming SO.sub.3 and reforming M.sub.r X.sub.s. The M.sub.r X.sub.s is recycled to sulfate formation zone (16). If desired, the SO.sub.3 can be decomposed to SO.sub.2 and O.sub.2 ; and the SO.sub.2 can be recycled to electrolyzer (12) to provide a cycle for producing hydrogen.

  13. [Effect of hydrogen-rich saline on cardiomyocyte autophagy during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion in aged rats].

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhenhua; Zhao, Yue; Yu, Hongying; Liu, Dayi; Xu, Hua

    2015-07-07

    To investigate the effects of hydrogen-rich saline on cardiomyocyte autophagy during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion in aged rats. One hundred and fifty healthy male Sprague Dawley rats, 18 months old, weighing 400-540 g were selected. The rats were then randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 30): Normal control group (group I); Sham operation group (group II); Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion group (group III); Hydrogen-rich saline group (group IV); Normal saline group (group V). No any processing in group I. In group II, the anterior descending branch was only exposed but not ligated. Myocardial I/R was induced by occlusion of anterior descending branch of left coronary artery for 30 min followed by 12 h and 24 h of reperfusion with Bimbaum. Hydrogen-rich saline 1 ml/100 g were injected intraperitoneally 5 min before reperfusion in group IV. Normal saline 1 ml/100 g were injected intraperitoneally 5 min before reperfusion in group V. The rats were sacrificed at 12 h and 24 h of reperfusion and hearts were removed. The pathological changes of myocardial tissue were detected by HE staining. The rate of cardiomyocyte autophagy were detected by the MDC fluorescent dye and flow cytometry instrument. The expression of AMPK, mTOR, Beclin1, LC3 in myocardial tissue was investigated by Western blot. Compared with groups I and II, the rate of cardiomyocyte autophagy, the expression of AMPK, mTOR, Beclin1, LC3 in myocardial tissue were significantly increased at 12 h, 24 h in groups III, IV and V (F = 23.45, 26.65, 25.58; F = 23.16, 25.15, 27.85; F = 21.04, 24.83, 27.43; F = 22.15, 25.79, 29.05; F = 22.58, 27.25, 28.46), P < 0.05. Compared with group III and V, the rate of cardiomyocyte autophagy, the expression of AMPK, mTOR, Beclin1, LC3 were significantly decreased at 12 h, 24 h in group IV (F = 21.29, 24.71; F = 22.37, 25.84; F = 20.48, 22.38; F = 21.76, 28.43; F = 22.54, 27.21), P < 0.05. Hydrogen-rich saline can attenuate myocardial reperfusion injury through inhibiting

  14. Modulation of the oxidative plasmatic state in gastroesophageal reflux disease with the addition of rich water molecular hydrogen: A new biological vision.

    PubMed

    Franceschelli, Sara; Gatta, Daniela Maria Pia; Pesce, Mirko; Ferrone, Alessio; Di Martino, Giuseppe; Di Nicola, Marta; De Lutiis, Maria Anna; Vitacolonna, Ester; Patruno, Antonia; Grilli, Alfredo; Felaco, Mario; Speranza, Lorenza

    2018-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a clinical condition characterized by reflux of gastroduodenal contents in the oesophagus, has proved to demonstrate a strong link between oxidative stress and the development of GERD. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been universally accepted as first-line therapy for management of GERD. The potential benefits of electrolysed reduced water (ERW), rich in molecular hydrogen, in improving symptoms and systemic oxidative stress associated with GERD was assessed. The study was performed on 84 GERD patients undergoing control treatment (PPI + tap water) or experimental treatment (PPI + ERW) for 3 months. These patients were subjected to the GERD-Health Related Quality of Life Questionnaire as well as derivatives reactive oxigen metabolites (d-ROMs) test, biological antioxidant potential (BAP) test, superoxide anion, nitric oxide and malondialdehyde assays, which were all performed as a proxy for the oxidative/nitrosative stress and the antioxidant potential status. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation between scores and laboratory parameters. Overall results demonstrated that an optimal oxidative balance can be restored and GERD symptoms can be reduced rapidly via the integration of ERW in GERD patients. The relative variation of heartburn and regurgitation score was significantly correlated with laboratory parameters. Thus, in the selected patients, combination treatment with PPI and ERW improves the cellular redox state leading to the improvement of the quality of life as demonstrated by the correlation analysis between laboratory parameters and GERD symptoms. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  15. Hydrogen-rich saline prevents bone loss in diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jialiang; Dong, Weichong; Jin, Lin; Wang, Pengcheng; Hou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yingze

    2017-10-01

    As an antioxidant molecule, hydrogen has been received much more attention and reported to be used as the treatment strategy for various diseases. In this study, we hypothesize that systemic delivery of hydrogen saline water may improve the reservation of bone tissue in the tibias and femurs of osteoporotic rats caused by diabetes mellitus (DM), which is characterized by increased levels of oxidative stress and overproducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). The animals were divided into three groups of 12 animals and lavaged with normal saline (normal control and DM), or hydrogen saline water (DM + HRS). General status, blood glucose level, tibial and femoral mechanical strength, and micro-CT scans of the proximal tibia were recorded and analyzed. After 12 weeks, the glucose level was significantly decreased in the DM + HRS group compared with that of the DM group. Micro-CT scans showed that bone volume/total volume, connectivity density, trabecular thickness, and trabecular number were significantly increased compared with the DM group. Mechanical results of energy, stiffness and elastic modulus in the DM + HRS group were significantly higher than in the other groups for the tibia and femur. The results indicate that the systemic delivery of hydrogen saline water, which is safe and well tolerated, preserves bone volume and decreases fracture risks in streptozotocin-induced diabetic status rats, whose bone structure or inherent material properties of bone tissues are changed.

  16. Nuclear driven water decomposition plant for hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, G. H.; Brecher, L. E.; Farbman, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual design of a hydrogen production plant using a very-high-temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR) to energize a hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical system for water decomposition has been prepared. A graphite-moderated helium-cooled VHTR is used to produce 1850 F gas for electric power generation and 1600 F process heat for the water-decomposition process which uses sulfur compounds and promises performance superior to normal water electrolysis or other published thermochemical processes. The combined cycle operates at an overall thermal efficiency in excess of 45%, and the overall economics of hydrogen production by this plant have been evaluated predicated on a consistent set of economic ground rules. The conceptual design and evaluation efforts have indicated that development of this type of nuclear-driven water-decomposition plant will permit large-scale economic generation of hydrogen in the 1990s.

  17. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates anxiety-like behaviors in morphine-withdrawn mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Di; Zhao, Peng; Hui, Rongji; Wang, Jian; Shen, Qianchao; Gong, Miao; Guo, Hongyan; Cong, Bin; Ma, Chunling

    2017-05-15

    Hydrogen therapy is a new medical approach for a wide range of diseases. The effects of hydrogen on central nervous system-related diseases have recently become increasingly appreciated, but little is known about whether hydrogen affects the morphine withdrawal process. This study aims to investigate the potential effects of hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) administration on naloxone-precipitated withdrawal symptoms and morphine withdrawal-induced anxiety-like behaviors. Mice received gradually increasing doses (25-100 mg/kg, i.p.) of morphine over 3 days. In the naloxone-precipitated withdrawal procedure, the mice were treated with three HRS (20 μg/kg, i.p.) injections, and naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was given 30 min after HRS administration. Body weight, jumping behavior and wet-dog shakes were immediately assessed. In the spontaneous withdrawal procedure, the mice were treated with HRS (20 μg/kg, i.p.) every 8-h. Mice underwent naloxone-precipitated or spontaneous withdrawal were tested for anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and light/dark box (L/D box) paradigm, respectively. In addition, the levels of plasma corticosterone were measured. We found that HRS administration significantly reduced body weight loss, jumping behavior and wet-dog shakes in mice underwent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal, and attenuated anxiety-like behaviors in the EPM and L/D box tests after naloxone-precipitated withdrawal or a 2-day spontaneous withdrawal period. Hypo-activity or motor impairment after HRS administration was not observed in the locomotion tests. Furthermore, HRS administration significantly decreased the levels of corticosterone in morphine-withdrawn mice. These are the first findings to indicate that hydrogen might ameliorate withdrawal symptoms and exert an anxiolytic-like effect in morphine-withdrawal mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. XUV-exposed, non-hydrostatic hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets. Part II: hydrogen coronae and ion escape.

    PubMed

    Kislyakova, Kristina G; Lammer, Helmut; Holmström, Mats; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Odert, Petra; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Leitzinger, Martin; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Kulikov, Yuri N; Güdel, Manuel; Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2013-11-01

    We studied the interactions between the stellar wind plasma flow of a typical M star, such as GJ 436, and the hydrogen-rich upper atmosphere of an Earth-like planet and a "super-Earth" with a radius of 2 R(Earth) and a mass of 10 M(Earth), located within the habitable zone at ∼0.24 AU. We investigated the formation of extended atomic hydrogen coronae under the influences of the stellar XUV flux (soft X-rays and EUV), stellar wind density and velocity, shape of a planetary obstacle (e.g., magnetosphere, ionopause), and the loss of planetary pickup ions on the evolution of hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres. Stellar XUV fluxes that are 1, 10, 50, and 100 times higher compared to that of the present-day Sun were considered, and the formation of high-energy neutral hydrogen clouds around the planets due to the charge-exchange reaction under various stellar conditions was modeled. Charge-exchange between stellar wind protons with planetary hydrogen atoms, and photoionization, lead to the production of initially cold ions of planetary origin. We found that the ion production rates for the studied planets can vary over a wide range, from ∼1.0×10²⁵ s⁻¹ to ∼5.3×10³⁰ s⁻¹, depending on the stellar wind conditions and the assumed XUV exposure of the upper atmosphere. Our findings indicate that most likely the majority of these planetary ions are picked up by the stellar wind and lost from the planet. Finally, we estimated the long-time nonthermal ion pickup escape for the studied planets and compared them with the thermal escape. According to our estimates, nonthermal escape of picked-up ionized hydrogen atoms over a planet's lifetime within the habitable zone of an M dwarf varies between ∼0.4 Earth ocean equivalent amounts of hydrogen (EO(H)) to <3 EO(H) and usually is several times smaller in comparison to the thermal atmospheric escape rates.

  19. Exploring N-Rich Phases in Li(x)N(y) Clusters for Hydrogen Storage at Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Amrita; Bhattacharya, Saswata

    2015-09-17

    We have performed cascade genetic algorithm and ab initio atomistic thermodynamics under the framework of first-principles-based hybrid density functional theory to study the (meta-)stability of a wide range of Li(x)N(y) clusters. We found that hybrid xc-functional is essential to address this problem as a local/semilocal functional simply fails even to predict a qualitative prediction. Most importantly, we find that though in bulk lithium nitride, the Li-rich phase, that is, Li3N, is the stable stoichiometry; in small Li(x)N(y) clusters, N-rich phases are more stable at thermodynamic equilibrium. We further show that these N-rich clusters are promising hydrogen storage material because of their easy adsorption and desorption ability at respectively low (≤300 K) and moderately high temperature (≥600 K).

  20. Solubilities of Some Strong Electrolytes in the Hydrogen Peroxide-Water System. II. Rubidium and Cesium Nitrates

    SciTech Connect

    Everhard, Martin E.; Gross, Paul M.

    1962-03-01

    Solubilities of RbNO/sub 3/ and CsNO/sub 3/ were examined as well as the nature of the solid phases in equilibrium with these systems in order to study the possible role of cation size. The formation of hydroperoxidates and the increase in solibility of the salts with larger cations in hydrogen peroxide- rich solutions indicate preferential solvation of the ions by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ rather than by H/sub 2/O. Conversely, the formation of hydrates and lower solubility in hydrogen peroxide-rich solutions of the smaller cation salts indicate preferential solvation of the ions by water. The deviation of the molal solubility, M',more » of the alkali nitrates in H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ from that in H/sub 2/O (M/sub H /sub 2/O/sub 2/) at ' =33.5r - 39.7 ( plus or minus 0.03 in M'), where r is the radius of the cation. CsNO/sub 3/, however, did not fall on the line, which probably is due to the lower charge density of the cesium ion. (P.C.H.)« less

  1. Using permeable membranes to produce hydrogen and oxygen from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, A. P.; Williams, R. J.; Downs, W. R.; Mcbryar, H.

    1975-01-01

    Concept may make it profitable to obtain hydrogen fuel from water. Laboratory tests have demonstrated that method enables decomposition of water several orders of magnitude beyond equilibrium state where only small amounts of free hydrogen are present.

  2. Species richness patterns and water-energy dynamics in the drylands of Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Li, Liping; Wang, Zhiheng; Zerbe, Stefan; Abdusalih, Nurbay; Tang, Zhiyao; Ma, Ming; Yin, Linke; Mohammat, Anwar; Han, Wenxuan; Fang, Jingyun

    2013-01-01

    Dryland ecosystems are highly vulnerable to climatic and land-use changes, while the mechanisms underlying patterns of dryland species richness are still elusive. With distributions of 3637 native vascular plants, 154 mammals, and 425 birds in Xinjiang, China, we tested the water-energy dynamics hypothesis for species richness patterns in Central Asian drylands. Our results supported the water-energy dynamics hypothesis. We found that species richness of all three groups was a hump-shaped function of energy availability, but a linear function of water availability. We further found that water availability had stronger effects on plant richness, but weaker effects on vertebrate richness than energy availability. We conducted piecewise linear regressions to detect the breakpoints in the relationship between species richness and potential evapotranspiration which divided Xinjiang into low and high energy regions. The concordance between mammal and plant richness was stronger in high than in low energy regions, which was opposite to that between birds and plants. Plant richness had stronger effects than climate on mammal richness regardless of energy levels, but on bird richness only in high energy regions. The changes in the concordance between vertebrate and plant richness along the climatic gradient suggest that cautions are needed when using concordance between taxa in conservation planning.

  3. Species Richness Patterns and Water-Energy Dynamics in the Drylands of Northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Zerbe, Stefan; Abdusalih, Nurbay; Tang, Zhiyao; Ma, Ming; Yin, Linke; Mohammat, Anwar; Han, Wenxuan; Fang, Jingyun

    2013-01-01

    Dryland ecosystems are highly vulnerable to climatic and land-use changes, while the mechanisms underlying patterns of dryland species richness are still elusive. With distributions of 3637 native vascular plants, 154 mammals, and 425 birds in Xinjiang, China, we tested the water-energy dynamics hypothesis for species richness patterns in Central Asian drylands. Our results supported the water-energy dynamics hypothesis. We found that species richness of all three groups was a hump-shaped function of energy availability, but a linear function of water availability. We further found that water availability had stronger effects on plant richness, but weaker effects on vertebrate richness than energy availability. We conducted piecewise linear regressions to detect the breakpoints in the relationship between species richness and potential evapotranspiration which divided Xinjiang into low and high energy regions. The concordance between mammal and plant richness was stronger in high than in low energy regions, which was opposite to that between birds and plants. Plant richness had stronger effects than climate on mammal richness regardless of energy levels, but on bird richness only in high energy regions. The changes in the concordance between vertebrate and plant richness along the climatic gradient suggest that cautions are needed when using concordance between taxa in conservation planning. PMID:23840472

  4. Molecular cobalt pentapyridine catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    DOEpatents

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Sun, Yujie

    2013-11-05

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition including the moiety of the general formula. [(PY5Me.sub.2)CoL].sup.2+, where L can be H.sub.2O, OH.sup.-, a halide, alcohol, ether, amine, and the like. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water or sea water can be subject to low electric potentials, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen.

  5. Onboard hydrogen generation for automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Problems concerning the use of hydrogen as a fuel for motor vehicles are related to the storage of the hydrogen onboard a vehicle. The feasibility is investigated to use an approach based on onboard hydrogen generation as a means to avoid these storage difficulties. Two major chemical processes can be used to produce hydrogen from liquid hydrocarbons and methanol. In steam reforming, the fuel reacts with water on a catalytic surface to produce a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. In partial oxidation, the fuel reacts with air, either on a catalytic surface or in a flame front, to yield a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. There are many trade-offs in onboard hydrogen generation, both in the choice of fuels as well as in the choice of a chemical process. Attention is given to these alternatives, the results of some experimental work in this area, and the combustion of various hydrogen-rich gases in an internal combustion engine.

  6. Water-rich planets: How habitable is a water layer deeper than on Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, L.; Höning, D.; Rivoldini, A.; Heistracher, C.; Zimov, N.; Journaux, B.; Lammer, H.; Van Hoolst, T.; Bredehöft, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    Water is necessary for the origin and survival of life as we know it. In the search for life-friendly worlds, water-rich planets therefore are obvious candidates and have attracted increasing attention in recent years. The surface H2O layer on such planets (containing a liquid water ocean and possibly high-pressure ice below a specific depth) could potentially be hundreds of kilometres deep depending on the water content and the evolution of the proto-atmosphere. We study possible constraints for the habitability of deep water layers and introduce a new habitability classification relevant for water-rich planets (from Mars-size to super-Earth-size planets). A new ocean model has been developed that is coupled to a thermal evolution model of the mantle and core. Our interior structure model takes into account depth-dependent thermodynamic properties and the possible formation of high-pressure ice. We find that heat flowing out of the silicate mantle can melt an ice layer from below (in some cases episodically), depending mainly on the thickness of the ocean-ice shell, the mass of the planet, the surface temperature and the interior parameters (e.g. radioactive mantle heat sources). The high pressure at the bottom of deep water-ice layers could also impede volcanism at the water-mantle boundary for both stagnant lid and plate tectonics silicate shells. We conclude that water-rich planets with a deep ocean, a large planet mass, a high average density or a low surface temperature are likely less habitable than planets with an Earth-like ocean.

  7. Polymer formulation for removing hydrogen and liquid water from an enclosed space

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J [Livermore, CA

    2006-02-21

    This invention describes a solution to the particular problem of liquid water formation in hydrogen getters exposed to quantities of oxygen. Water formation is usually desired because the recombination reaction removes hydrogen without affecting gettering capacity and the oxygen removal reduces the chances for a hydrogen explosion once free oxygen is essentially removed. The present invention describes a getter incorporating a polyacrylate compound that can absorb up to 500% of its own weight in liquid water without significantly affecting its hydrogen gettering/recombination properties, but that also is insensitive to water vapor.

  8. Method for simultaneous recovery of hydrogen from water and from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Willms, R. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Method for simultaneous recovery of hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes from water and from hydrocarbons. A palladium membrane, when utilized in cooperation with a nickel catalyst in a reactor, has been found to drive reactions such as water gas shift, steam reforming and methane cracking to substantial completion by removing the product hydrogen from the reacting mixture. In addition, ultrapure hydrogen is produced, thereby eliminating the need for an additional processing step.

  9. Promotion of hydrogen-rich gas and phenolic-rich bio-oil production from green macroalgae Cladophora glomerata via pyrolysis over its bio-char.

    PubMed

    Norouzi, Omid; Jafarian, Sajedeh; Safari, Farid; Tavasoli, Ahmad; Nejati, Behnam

    2016-11-01

    Conversion of Cladophora glomerata (C. glomerata) as a Caspian Sea's green macroalgae into gaseous, liquid and solid products was carried out via pyrolysis at different temperatures to determine its potential for bio-oil and hydrogen-rich gas production for further industrial utilization. Non-catalytic tests were performed to determine the optimum condition for bio-oil production. The highest portion of bio-oil was retrieved at 500°C. The catalytic test was performed using the bio-char derived at 500°C as a catalyst. Effect of the addition of the algal bio-char on the composition of the bio-oil and also gaseous products was investigated. Pyrolysis derived bio-char was characterized by BET, FESEM and ICP method to show its surface area, porosity, and presence of inorganic metals on its surface, respectively. Phenols were increased from 8.5 to 20.76area% by the addition of bio-char. Moreover, the hydrogen concentration and hydrogen selectivity were also enhanced by the factors of 1.37, 1.59 respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. XUV-Exposed, Non-Hydrostatic Hydrogen-Rich Upper Atmospheres of Terrestrial Planets. Part II: Hydrogen Coronae and Ion Escape

    PubMed Central

    Lammer, Helmut; Holmström, Mats; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Odert, Petra; Erkaev, Nikolai V.; Leitzinger, Martin; Khodachenko, Maxim L.; Kulikov, Yuri N.; Güdel, Manuel; Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We studied the interactions between the stellar wind plasma flow of a typical M star, such as GJ 436, and the hydrogen-rich upper atmosphere of an Earth-like planet and a “super-Earth” with a radius of 2 REarth and a mass of 10 MEarth, located within the habitable zone at ∼0.24 AU. We investigated the formation of extended atomic hydrogen coronae under the influences of the stellar XUV flux (soft X-rays and EUV), stellar wind density and velocity, shape of a planetary obstacle (e.g., magnetosphere, ionopause), and the loss of planetary pickup ions on the evolution of hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres. Stellar XUV fluxes that are 1, 10, 50, and 100 times higher compared to that of the present-day Sun were considered, and the formation of high-energy neutral hydrogen clouds around the planets due to the charge-exchange reaction under various stellar conditions was modeled. Charge-exchange between stellar wind protons with planetary hydrogen atoms, and photoionization, lead to the production of initially cold ions of planetary origin. We found that the ion production rates for the studied planets can vary over a wide range, from ∼1.0×1025 s−1 to ∼5.3×1030 s−1, depending on the stellar wind conditions and the assumed XUV exposure of the upper atmosphere. Our findings indicate that most likely the majority of these planetary ions are picked up by the stellar wind and lost from the planet. Finally, we estimated the long-time nonthermal ion pickup escape for the studied planets and compared them with the thermal escape. According to our estimates, nonthermal escape of picked-up ionized hydrogen atoms over a planet's lifetime within the habitable zone of an M dwarf varies between ∼0.4 Earth ocean equivalent amounts of hydrogen (EOH) to <3 EOH and usually is several times smaller in comparison to the thermal atmospheric escape rates. Key Words: Stellar activity—Low-mass stars—Early atmospheres—Earth-like exoplanets—Energetic neutral

  11. A hydrogen-rich early Earth atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Toon, Owen B; Pavlov, Alexander A; De Sterck, H

    2005-05-13

    We show that the escape of hydrogen from early Earth's atmosphere likely occurred at rates slower by two orders of magnitude than previously thought. The balance between slow hydrogen escape and volcanic outgassing could have maintained a hydrogen mixing ratio of more than 30%. The production of prebiotic organic compounds in such an atmosphere would have been more efficient than either exogenous delivery or synthesis in hydrothermal systems. The organic soup in the oceans and ponds on early Earth would have been a more favorable place for the origin of life than previously thought.

  12. Imaging nanobubble nucleation and hydrogen spillover during electrocatalytic water splitting.

    PubMed

    Hao, Rui; Fan, Yunshan; Howard, Marco D; Vaughan, Joshua C; Zhang, Bo

    2018-06-05

    Nucleation and growth of hydrogen nanobubbles are key initial steps in electrochemical water splitting. These processes remain largely unexplored due to a lack of proper tools to probe the nanobubble's interfacial structure with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution. We report the use of superresolution microscopy to image transient formation and growth of single hydrogen nanobubbles at the electrode/solution interface during electrocatalytic water splitting. We found hydrogen nanobubbles can be generated even at very early stages in water electrolysis, i.e., ∼500 mV before reaching its thermodynamic reduction potential. The ability to image single nanobubbles on an electrode enabled us to observe in real time the process of hydrogen spillover from ultrathin gold nanocatalysts supported on indium-tin oxide.

  13. The constitution of the atmospheric layers and the extreme ultraviolet spectrum of hot hydrogen-rich white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vennes, Stephane

    1992-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the atmospheric properties of hot, H-rich, DA white dwarfs that is based on optical, UV, and X-ray observations aimed at predicting detailed spectral properties of these stars in the range 80-800 A. The divergences between observations from a sample of 15 hot DA white dwarfs emitting in the EUV/soft X-ray range and pure H synthetic spectra calculated from a grid of model atmospheres characterized by Teff and g are examined. Seven out of 15 DA stars are found to consistently exhibit pure hydrogen atmospheres, the remaining seven stars showing inconsistency between FUV and EUV/soft X-ray data that can be explained by the presence of trace EUV/soft X-ray absorbers. Synthetic data are computed assuming two other possible chemical structures: photospheric traces of radiatively levitated heavy elements and a stratified hydrogen/helium distribution. Predictions about forthcoming medium-resolution observations of the EUV spectrum of selected hot H-rich white dwarfs are made.

  14. Inhalation of water electrolysis-derived hydrogen ameliorates cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats - A possible new hydrogen resource for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jin; Chen, Xiao; Zhai, Xiao; Shi, Dongchen; Zhang, Rongjia; Zhi, Xin; Li, Xiaoqun; Gu, Zhengrong; Cao, Liehu; Weng, Weizong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Liping; Sun, Xuejun; Ji, Fang; Hou, Jiong; Su, Jiacan

    2016-10-29

    Hydrogen is a kind of noble gas with the character to selectively neutralize reactive oxygen species. Former researches proved that low-concentration of hydrogen can be used to ameliorating cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Hydrogen electrolyzed from water has a hydrogen concentration of 66.7%, which is much higher than that used in previous studies. And water electrolysis is a potential new hydrogen resource for regular clinical use. This study was designed and carried out for the determination of safety and neuroprotective effects of water electrolysis-derived hydrogen. Sprague-Dawley rats were used as experimental animals, and middle cerebral artery occlusion was used to make cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. Pathologically, tissues from rats in hydrogen inhalation group showed no significant difference compared with the control group in HE staining pictures. The blood biochemical findings matched the HE staining result. TTC, Nissl, and TUNEL staining showed the significant improvement of infarction volume, neuron morphology, and neuron apoptosis in rat with hydrogen treatment. Biochemically, hydrogen inhalation decreased brain caspase-3, 3-nitrotyrosine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine-positive cells and inflammation factors concentration. Water electrolysis-derived hydrogen inhalation had neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats with the effect of suppressing oxidative stress and inflammation, and it is a possible new hydrogen resource to electrolyze water at the bedside clinically. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Separation of gaseous hydrogen from a water-hydrogen mixture in a fuel cell power system operating in a weightless environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanowski, William E. (Inventor); Suljak, George T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A fuel cell power system for use in a weightless environment, such as in space, includes a device for removing water from a water-hydrogen mixture condensed from the exhaust from the fuel cell power section of the system. Water is removed from the mixture in a centrifugal separator, and is fed into a holding, pressure operated water discharge valve via a Pitot tube. Entrained nondissolved hydrogen is removed from the Pitot tube by a bleed orifice in the Pitot tube before the water reaches the water discharge valve. Water discharged from the valve thus has a substantially reduced hydrogen content.

  16. Thermochemical Production of Hydrogen from Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamberger, C. E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the possible advantages of decomposing water by means of thermochemical cycles. Explains that, if energy consumption can be minimized, this method is capable of producing hydrogen more efficiently than electrolysis. (GA)

  17. High Pressure Cosmochemistry of Major Planetary Interiors: Laboratory Studies of the Water-rich Region of the System Ammonia-water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, M.; Johnson, M.; Koumvakalis, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of gas-ice mixtures in major planets at very high pressures was studied. Some relevant pressure-temperature-composition (P-T-X) regions of the hydrogen (H2)-helium (He)-water (H2O-ammonia (NH3)-methane (CH4) phase diagram were determined. The studies, and theoretical model, of the relevant phases, are needed to interpret the compositions of ice-gas systems at conditions of planetary interest. The compositions and structures of a multiphase, multicomponent system at very high pressures care characterized, and the goal is to characterize this system over a wide range of low and high temperatures. The NH3-H2O compositions that are relevant to planetary problems yet are easy to prepare were applied. The P-T surface of water was examined and the corresponding surface for NH3 was determined. The T-X diagram of ammonia-water at atmospheric pressure was studied and two water-rich phases were found, NH3-2H2O (ammonia dihydrate), which melts incongruently, and NH3.H2O (ammonia monohydrate), which is nonstoichiometric and melts at a higher temperature than the dihydrate. It is suggested that a P-T surface at approximately the monohydrate composition and the P-X surface at room temperature is determined.

  18. Thermodynamics of hydrogen bond patterns in supramolecular assemblies of water molecules.

    PubMed

    Henry, Marc

    2002-07-02

    The PACHA (Partial Atomic Charges and Hardnesses Analysis) formalism is applied to various supramolecular assemblies of water molecules. After a detailed study of all available crystal structures for ice polymorphs, we shown that the hydrogen bond strength is roughly constant below 1 GPa and considerably weakened above that value. New hydrogen bond patterns are proposed for ice IV, V, and VI after (EB) (electrostatic balance) minimization. For other polymorphs, there is an almost perfect coincidence between experimental and predicted hydrogen bond patterns. The evolution of hydrogen bond energy as a function of molecular geometry in water clusters with up to 280 water molecules and in large supramolecular compounds is quantitatively described. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds are found to lie between -9 and -32 kJ mol-1, the stronger interaction occurs within the spherical fully disordered water droplet buried at the heart of Müller's superfullerene keplerate. The weakest one occurs in a chiral molecular snub cube built from six calix[4]resorcinarene and eight water molecules. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds are found in the range -10-100 kJ mol-1 and can thus be considerably stronger than intermolecular bonds. Finally, through the investigation of a clathrate type I compound, it was possible to obtain a deep insight of the host-guest interactions and self-assembly rules of water cages in these materials.

  19. Method and apparatus for hydrogen production from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method, apparatuses and chemical compositions are provided for producing high purity hydrogen from water. Metals or alloys capable of reacting with water and producing hydrogen in aqueous solutions at ambient conditions are reacted with one or more inorganic hydrides capable of releasing hydrogen in aqueous solutions at ambient conditions, one or more transition metal compounds are used to catalyze the reaction and, optionally, one or more alkali metal-based compounds. The metal or alloy is preferably aluminum. The inorganic hydride is from a family of complex inorganic hydrides; most preferably, NaBH.sub.4. The transition metal catalyst is from the groups VIII and IB; preferably, Cu and Fe. The alkali metal-based compounds are preferably NaOH, KOH, and the like. Hydrogen generated has a purity of at least 99.99 vol. % (dry basis), and is used without further purification in all types of fuel cells, including the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell.

  20. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Paul R.; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1981-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO.sub.2) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) to form sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO.sub.3) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.

  1. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Paul R.; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1982-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO.sub.2) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) to form sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO.sub.3) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.

  2. A novel method for high-pressure annealing experiments in a water-rich environment: hydrogen solubility and speciation in natural, gem-quality diopside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromiley, G. D.; Keppler, H.; Bromiley, F. A.; Jacobsen, S. D.

    2003-04-01

    Previous experimental invesitgations on the incorporation of structurally-bound hydrogen in nominally anhydrous minerals have either involved synthesis experiments or annealing of natural samples under hydrothermal conditions. For investigation of hydrogen incorporation using FTIR, large, good quality crystals are required. Because of experimental difficulties, synthesis experiments are limited to the investigation of end-member systems. Annealing experiments may be used to investigate chemically more complex systems. However, in previous investigations problems have arisen due to reaction of samples with chemical buffers and fluids at elevated pressures and temperatures, and run times have been limited to less than 48 hours, raising questions regarding attainment of equilbrium. In the present study, a novel method for conducting long duration (100 s of hours) annealing experiments to investigate hydrogen incorporation in samples at high-pressure has been developed. The method relies on the use of a semi-permeable platinum membrane, which protects the sample during the experiment. Samples, cut into 1×2×3 mm blocks, are surrounded by a thin platinum jacket, which is "shrink-wrapped" around the samples. The samples are then loaded into larger Pt10%Rh capsules with a buffer mixture of the same composition as the Cr-diopside, a large amount of excess water, excess silica and a Ni-NiO buffer to control oxygen fugacity. At elevated pressures and temperatures, hydrogen can diffuse freely through the platinum membrane, but the samples are protected from reaction with the surrounding buffer material and fluid. Capsules are loaded into a specially designed low-friction NaCl cells for use in piston-cylinder apparatus. Samples are recovered completely intact and crack-free. Several experiments have been performed at 1.5 GPa, with increasing run duration, to demonstrate the attainment of equilibrium hydrogen contents in the sample. Experiments have been performed at pressures

  3. Water's hydrogen bonds in the hydrophobic effect: a simple model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huafeng; Dill, Ken A

    2005-12-15

    We propose a simple analytical model to account for water's hydrogen bonds in the hydrophobic effect. It is based on computing a mean-field partition function for a water molecule in the first solvation shell around a solute molecule. The model treats the orientational restrictions from hydrogen bonding, and utilizes quantities that can be obtained from bulk water simulations. We illustrate the principles in a 2-dimensional Mercedes-Benz-like model. Our model gives good predictions for the heat capacity of hydrophobic solvation, reproduces the solvation energies and entropies at different temperatures with only one fitting parameter, and accounts for the solute size dependence of the hydrophobic effect. Our model supports the view that water's hydrogen bonding propensity determines the temperature dependence of the hydrophobic effect. It explains the puzzling experimental observation that dissolving a nonpolar solute in hot water has positive entropy.

  4. Role of interfacial water molecules in proline-rich ligand recognition by the Src homology 3 domain of Abl.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Andres; Camara-Artigas, Ana; Pisabarro, M Teresa; Martinez, Jose C; Luque, Irene

    2010-01-22

    The interaction of Abl-Src homology 3 domain (SH3) with the high affinity peptide p41 is the most notable example of the inconsistency existing between the currently accepted description of SH3 complexes and their binding thermodynamic signature. We had previously hypothesized that the presence of interfacial water molecules is partially responsible for this thermodynamic behavior. We present here a thermodynamic, structural, and molecular dynamics simulation study of the interaction of p41 with Abl-SH3 and a set of mutants designed to alter the water-mediated interaction network. Our results provide a detailed description of the dynamic properties of the interfacial water molecules and a molecular interpretation of the thermodynamic effects elicited by the mutations in terms of the modulation of the water-mediated hydrogen bond network. In the light of these results, a new dual binding mechanism is proposed that provides a better description of proline-rich ligand recognition by Abl-SH3 and that has important implications for rational design.

  5. Hydrogen bonding in water clusters and their ionized counterparts.

    PubMed

    Neela, Y Indra; Mahadevi, A Subha; Sastry, G Narahari

    2010-12-30

    Ab initio and DFT computations were carried out on four distinct hydrogen-bonded arrangements of water clusters (H(2)O)(n), n = 2-20, represented as W1D, W2D, W2DH, and W3D. The variation in the strength of hydrogen bond as a function of the chain length is studied. In all the four cases, there is a substantial cooperative interaction, albeit in different degrees. The effect of basis set superposition error (BSSE) on the complexation energy of water clusters has been analyzed. Atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis performed to evaluate the nature of the hydrogen bonding shows a high correlation between hydrogen bond strength and the trends in complexation energy. Solvated water clusters exhibit lower complexation energies compared to corresponding gas-phase geometries on PCM (polarized continuum model) optimization. The feasibility of stripping an electron or addition of an electron increases dramatically as the cluster size increases. Although W3D caged structures are stable for neutral clusters, the helical W2DH arrangement appeared to be an optimal choice for its ionized counterparts.

  6. Density functional theory (DFT) studies of hydrogen rich solids and boron carbide under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamp, Andrew James

    Since the first prediction that compressed hydrogen would metallize in 1935 and the further prediction that the metallic allotrope would be a superconductor at high temperatures, metallic hydrogen has been termed the "holy grail" of high-pressure science. A tremendous amount of theoretical and experimental research has been carried out, with the ultimate goal of metallizing hydrogen via the application of external pressure. It has been previously proposed that doping hydrogen with another element can lower the pressure at which metallization occurs. A number of experimental and theoretical studies have investigated doping hydrogen by either a group XIII or XIV element. Experiments in diamond anvil cells have illustrated that it is indeed possible to synthesize hydrogen-rich phases under conditions of extreme pressures, and SiH4 (H2)2, GeH4(H2) n, and Xe(H2)n have been shown to behave as true compounds. The focus herein is on the theoretical exploration of hydrogen-rich phases with novel stoichiometries, which contain a dopant element up to pressures of 350 GPa. In particular, the alkali-metal and alkaline Earth metal polyhydrides (MHn where n > 1) have been considered. Within this thesis the XtalOpt evolutionary algorithm was employed in order to complete this work, and predict the most stable structures of cesium and beryllium polyhydrides under pressure. In addition, we explore the possibility of mixing excess hydrogen with an electronegative element, iodine and phosphorus. The phases found are examined via detailed first principles calculations. In addition, because of its outstanding hardness, thermodynamic stability, low density, electronic properties, thermal stability, and high melting point boron carbide has many uses: i.e. as a refractory material, in abrasive powders and ballistics, as a neutron radiation absorbent, and in electronic applications. However, little is known about the behavior of boron carbide when under the external stress of pressure. The

  7. Approximate stoichiometry for rich hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Beans, E.W.

    1993-03-01

    The stoichiometry of lean mixtures can readily and accurately be determined from the assumption that all the carbon oxidizes to carbon dioxide and all the hydrogen oxidizes to water. This assumption is valid up to an equivalence ratio ([sigma]) of 0.8 and can be used with little error up to [sigma] = 1. The composition of the products of a hydrocarbon burnt in air under the foregoing assumption can be obtained from simple carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen balances. Given the composition, one can determine the energy released and/or the adiabatic flame temperature. For rich mixtures, the foregoing assumption, ofmore » course, is not valid. Hence, there is no easy way to determine the stoichiometry of the products of a rich mixture. The objective of this note is to present an equation' which will allow one to readily determine the composition of the products of rich hydrocarbon mixtures. The equation is based on equilibrium composition calculations and some assumptions regarding the characteristics of hydrocarbons. The equation gives approximate results. However, the results are sufficiently accurate for many situations. If more accuracy is wanted, one should use an equilibrium combustion program like the one by Gordon and McBride.« less

  8. Antioxidant activities of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water assessed by ESR and 2,2'-bipyridyl methods.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinya; Matsuoka, Daigo; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2015-08-01

    We prepared nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water (nano-H water) which contained hydrogen nano-bubbles of <717-nm diameter for 54% of total bubbles. In the DMPO-spin trap electron spin resonance (ESR) method, the DMPO-OH:MnO ratio, being attributed to amounts of hydroxyl radicals (OH), was 2.78 for pure water (dissolved hydrogen [DH]≤0.01 ppm, oxidation-reduction potential [ORP]=+324 mV), 2.73 for tap water (0.01 ppm, +286 mV), 2.93 for commercially available hydrogen water (0.075 ppm, +49 mV), and 2.66 for manufactured hydrogen water (0.788 ppm, -614 mV), whereas the nano-H water (0.678 ppm, -644 mV) exhibited 2.05, showing the superiority of nano-H water to other types of hydrogen water in terms of OH-scavenging activity. Then, the reduction activity of nano-H water was assessed spectrophotometrically by the 2,2'-bipyridyl method. Differential absorbance at 530 nm was in the order: 0.018 for pure water, 0.055 for tap water, 0.079 for nano-H water, 0.085 for commercially available hydrogen water, and 0.090 for manufactured hydrogen water, indicating a prominent reduction activity of hydrogen water and nano-H water against oxidation in ascorbate-coupled ferric ion-bipyridyl reaction. Thus, nano-H water has an improved antioxidant activity as compared to hydrogen water of similar DH-level, indicating the more marked importance of nano-bubbles rather than the concentration of hydrogen in terms of OH-scavenging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrogen-rich medium protects mouse embryonic fibroblasts from oxidative stress by activating LKB1-AMPK-FoxO1 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyun; Yang, Goowon; Kim, Young-Joo; Tran, Quynh Hoa; Choe, Wonchae; Kang, Insug; Kim, Sung Soo; Ha, Joohun

    2017-09-23

    Persistent oxidative stress is recognized as a major cause of many pathological conditions as well as ageing. However, most clinical trials of dietary antioxidants have failed to produce successful outcomes in treating oxidative stress-induced diseases. Molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) has recently received considerable attention as a therapeutic agent owing to its novel antioxidant properties, a selective scavenger of hydroxyl and peroxynitrite radicals. Beyond this, numerous reports support that H 2 can modulate the activity of various cellular signal pathways. However, its effect on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signal pathway, a central regulator of energy hemostasis, has remained almost elusive. Here, we report that hydrogen-rich medium activated LKB1-AMPK signal pathway without ATP depletion, which in turn induced FoxO1-dependent transcription of manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Moreover, hydrogen-rich media effectively reduced the level of reactive oxygen species in cells treated with hydrogen peroxide and protected these cells from apoptosis in an AMPK-dependent manner. These results suggest that the LKB1-AMPK-FoxO1 signaling pathway is a critical mediator of the antioxidant properties of H 2 , further supporting the idea that H 2 acts as a signaling molecule to serve various physiological functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydrogen-rich saline controls remifentanil-induced hypernociception and NMDA receptor NR1 subunit membrane trafficking through GSK-3β in the DRG in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linlin; Shu, Ruichen; Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Haiyun; Li, Nan; Wang, Guolin

    2014-07-01

    Although NMDAR trafficking mediated by GSK-3β involvement in transmission of pronociceptive messages in the spinal cord has been confirmed by our previous studies, whether NMDAR trafficking is implicated in peripheral sensitization remains equivocal. It is demonstrated that inflammation is associated with spinal NMDAR-containing nociceptive neurons activation and the maintenance of opioid induced pain hypersensitivity. However, whether and how hydrogen-rich saline, as an effective anti-inflammatory drug, could prevent hyperalgesia through affecting peripheral sensitization caused by NMDAR activation remains to be explored. To test these effects, hydrogen-rich saline (2.5, 5 or 10 ml/kg) was administrated intraperitoneally after remifentanil infusion, NMDAR antagonist MK-801 or GSK-3β inhibitor TDZD-8 was administrated intravenously before remifentanil infusion in rats. We examined time course of hydrogen concentration in blood after hydrogen-rich saline administration. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated by measuring PWT and PWL for 48 post-infusion hours, respectively. Western blotting and real-time qPCR assay were applied to analyze the NR1 membrane trafficking, GSK-3β expression and activity in DRG. Inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) expressions in DRG were also analyzed. We found that NR1 membrane trafficking in DRG increased, possibly due to GSK-3β activation after remifentanil infusion. We also discovered that hydrogen-rich saline not 2.5 ml/kg but 5 and 10 ml/kg could dose-dependently attenuate mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia without affecting baseline nociceptive threshold, reduce expressions of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and decrease NR1 trafficking mediated by GSK-3β, and minimal effective concentration was observed to be higher than 10 μmol/L, namely peak concentration in arterial blood after administration of HRS 2.5 ml/kg without any influence on hyperalgesia. Our results indicated that

  11. Contribution of Nutrient Pollution to Water Scarcity in the Water-Rich Northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, R. L.; Lopez, C.; Vorosmarty, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Most studies of water stress focus on water-scarce regions such as drylands. Yet, even water-rich regions can be water stressed due to local water withdrawals that exceed supply or due to water pollution that makes water unusable. The northeastern United States (NE) is a water-rich region relative to the rest of the country, as it concentrates about 50% of total renewable water of the country. Yes the NE features relatively high water withdrawals, ~50 km3/yr, for thermo-power generation, agriculture, and industry, as well as to support a human population of about 70 million. At the same time, rivers and streams in the NE suffer from nutrient pollution, largely from agricultural and urban land uses. We asked: to what extent is the NE water stressed, and how do water withdrawals and water quality each contribute to water scarcity across the NE? We used information on county-level water withdrawals and runoff to calculate a water scarcity index (WSI) for 200 hydrologic units across the NE from 1987 to 2002. We used data on surface water concentrations of nitrogen to calculate the additional water necessary to dilute surface water pollution to weak, moderate, and strong water quality standards derived from the literature. Only considering withdrawals, we found that approximately 10% of the NE was water stressed. Incorporating a moderate water quality standard, 25% of the NE was water stressed. We calculated a dilution burden by sectors of water users and found that public utilities faced 41% of the total dilution burden for the region, followed by irrigation users at 21%. Our results illustrate that even water rich regions can experience water stress and even scarcity, where withdrawals exceed surface water supplies. Water quality contributes to water stress and can change the spatial patterns of water stress across a region. The common approach to address scarcity has required the use of inter-basin water transfers, or in the case of water quality-caused scarcity

  12. Hydrogen by electrolysis of water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen production by electrolytic decomposition of water is explained. Power efficiency, efficient energy utilization, and costs were emphasized. Four systems were considered: two were based on current electrolyzer technology using present efficiency values for electrical generation by fossil fired and nuclear thermal stations, and two using projected electrolyzer technology with advanced fossil and nuclear plants.

  13. Water's Interfacial Hydrogen Bonding Structure Reveals the Effective Strength of Surface-Water Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sucheol; Willard, Adam P

    2018-06-05

    We combine all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with a mean field model of interfacial hydrogen bonding to analyze the effect of surface-water interactions on the structural and energetic properties of the liquid water interface. We show that the molecular structure of water at a weakly interacting ( i.e., hydrophobic) surface is resistant to change unless the strength of surface-water interactions are above a certain threshold. We find that below this threshold water's interfacial structure is homogeneous and insensitive to the details of the disordered surface, however, above this threshold water's interfacial structure is heterogeneous. Despite this heterogeneity, we demonstrate that the equilibrium distribution of molecular orientations can be used to quantify the energetic component of the surface-water interactions that contribute specifically to modifying the interfacial hydrogen bonding network. We identify this specific energetic component as a new measure of hydrophilicity, which we refer to as the intrinsic hydropathy.

  14. Carbon Dioxide-Free Hydrogen Production with Integrated Hydrogen Separation and Storage.

    PubMed

    Dürr, Stefan; Müller, Michael; Jorschick, Holger; Helmin, Marta; Bösmann, Andreas; Palkovits, Regina; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-10

    An integration of CO 2 -free hydrogen generation through methane decomposition coupled with hydrogen/methane separation and chemical hydrogen storage through liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) systems is demonstrated. A potential, very interesting application is the upgrading of stranded gas, for example, gas from a remote gas field or associated gas from off-shore oil drilling. Stranded gas can be effectively converted in a catalytic process by methane decomposition into solid carbon and a hydrogen/methane mixture that can be directly fed to a hydrogenation unit to load a LOHC with hydrogen. This allows for a straight-forward separation of hydrogen from CH 4 and conversion of hydrogen to a hydrogen-rich LOHC material. Both, the hydrogen-rich LOHC material and the generated carbon on metal can easily be transported to destinations of further industrial use by established transport systems, like ships or trucks. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-01-01

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH→Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH− oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion. PMID:27199009

  16. Effect Of Water On Permeation By Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomazic, William A.; Hulligan, David

    1988-01-01

    Water vapor in working fluid equilibrates with permeability-reducing oxides in metal parts. Report describes study of effects of water on permeation of heater-head tubes by hydrogen in Stirling engine. Experiments performed to determine minimum concentration of oxygen and/or oxygen-bearing gas maintaining oxide coverage adequate for low permeability. Tests showed 750 ppm or more of water effective in maintaining stable, low permeability.

  17. MISCIBILITY CALCULATIONS FOR WATER AND HYDROGEN IN GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Soubiran, François; Militzer, Burkhard

    2015-06-20

    We present results from ab initio simulations of liquid water–hydrogen mixtures in the range from 2 to 70 GPa and from 1000 to 6000 K, covering conditions in the interiors of ice giant planets and parts of the outer envelope of gas giant planets. In addition to computing the pressure and the internal energy, we derive the Gibbs free energy by performing a thermodynamic integration. For all conditions under consideration, our simulations predict hydrogen and water to mix in all proportions. The thermodynamic behavior of the mixture can be well described with an ideal mixing approximation. We suggest that amore » substantial fraction of water and hydrogen in giant planets may occur in homogeneously mixed form rather than in separate layers. The extent of mixing depends on the planet’s interior dynamics and its conditions of formation, in particular on how much hydrogen was present when icy planetesimals were delivered. Based on our results, we do not predict water–hydrogen mixtures to phase separate during any stage of the evolution of giant planets. We also show that the hydrogen content of an exoplanet is much higher if the mixed interior is assumed.« less

  18. Metal-Rich Transition Metal Diborides as Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reactions in a Wide Range of pH

    DOE PAGES

    Sitler, Steven J.; Raja, Krishnan S.; Charit, Indrajit

    2016-09-23

    Solid solutions of HfB 2-ZrB 2 mixtures were prepared by high-energy ball milling of diboride and additive powders followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). A mixture of stoichiometric 1:1 HfB 2-ZrB 2 borides was the base composition to which Hf, Zr, Ta, LaB 6 or Gd 2O 3 was added. Hf, Zr and Ta were added in order to bring the boron-to-metal ratio down to 1.86, rendering the boride as MeB 1.86. In the case of LaB 6 and Gd 2O 3, 1.8 mol% was added. Electroanalytical behavior of hydrogen evolution reactions was evaluated in 1 M H 2SO 4more » and 1 M NaOH solutions. The LaB 6 additive material showed Tafel slopes of 125 and 90 mV/decade in acidic and alkaline solutions respectively. The Hf and Zr rich samples showed Tafel slopes of about 120 mV/decade in both electrolytes. The over potentials of hydrogen evolution reactions (at 10 mA/cm 2) in the alkaline solution were about 100 mV lower than those in acidic solution. The metal-rich diborides and addition of LaB 6 showed better hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activities than the base 1:1 HfB 2-ZrB 2 stoichiometric diboride solid solution. Furthermore, the higher activity of metal-rich borides could be attributed to the increased electron population at the d-orbitals of the metal shown by band structure modeling calculations using the Density Functional Theory approach.« less

  19. Tetrahedrality and hydrogen bonds in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Székely, Eszter; Varga, Imre K.; Baranyai, András

    2016-06-01

    We carried out extensive calculations of liquid water at different temperatures and pressures using the BK3 model suggested recently [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204507 (2013)]. In particular, we were interested in undercooled regions to observe the propensity of water to form tetrahedral coordination of closest neighbors around a central molecule. We compared the found tetrahedral order with the number of hydrogen bonds and with the partial pair correlation functions unfolded as distributions of the closest, the second closest, etc. neighbors. We found that contrary to the number of hydrogen bonds, tetrahedrality changes substantially with state variables. Not only the number of tetrahedral arrangements increases with lowering the pressure, the density, and the temperature but the domain size of connecting tetrahedral structures as well. The difference in tetrahedrality is very pronounced between the two sides of the Widom line and even more so between the low density amorphous (LDA) and high density amorphous (HDA) phases. We observed that in liquid water and in HDA, the 5th water molecule, contrary to ice and LDA, is positioned between the first and the second coordination shell. We found no convincing evidence of structural heterogeneity or regions referring to structural transition.

  20. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of -20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of -0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production.

  1. Striving toward noble-metal-free photocatalytic water splitting: The hydrogenated-graphene-TiO 2 prototype

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen-Phan, Thuy -Duong; Luo, Si; Liu, Zongyuan; ...

    2015-08-20

    Graphane, graphone and hydrogenated graphene (HG) have been extensively studied in recent years due to their interesting properties and potential use in commercial and industrial applications. The present study reports investigation of hydrogenated graphene/TiO 2-x (HGT) nanocomposites as photocatalysts for H 2 and O 2 production from water without the assistance of a noble metal co-catalyst. By combination of several techniques, the morphologies, bulk/atomic structure and electronic properties of all the powders were exhaustively interrogated. Hydrogenation treatment efficiently reduces TiO 2 nanoparticles, while the graphene oxide sheets undergo the topotactic transformation from a graphene-like structure to a mixture of graphiticmore » and turbostratic carbon (amorphous/disordered) upon altering the calcination atmosphere from a mildly reducing to a H 2-abundant environment. Remarkably, the hydrogenated graphene-TiO 2-x composite that results upon H 2-rich reduction exhibits the highest photocatalytic H 2 evolution performance equivalent to low loading of Pt (~0.12 wt%), whereas the addition of HG suppresses the O 2 production. As a result, we propose that such an enhancement can be attributed to a combination of factors including the introduction of oxygen vacancies and Ti 3+ states, retarding the recombination of charge carriers and thus, facilitating the charge transfer from TiO 2-x to the carbonaceous sheet.« less

  2. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia by inhibiting reactive oxygen species production and inactivating the Ras-ERK1/2-MEK1/2 and Akt pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yali; Jiang, Jinyao; Miao, Huibing; Chen, Xingjuan; Sun, Xuejun; Li, Yongjun

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogen-rich saline has been reported to prevent neointimal hyperplasia induced by carotid balloon injury. The purpose of the present study was to further investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Daily injection of a hydrogen-rich saline solution (HRSS) in rats was employed to study the effect of hydrogen on balloon injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia and the neointima/media ratio was assessed. HRSS significantly decreased the neointima area and neointima/media ratio in a dose-dependent manner. In vitro effects of hydrogen on fetal bovine serum (FBS)-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation were also investigated. Hydrogen-rich medium (HRM) inhibited rat VSMC proliferation and migration induced by 10% FBS. FBS-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and activation of intracellular Ras, MEK1/2, ERK1/2, proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Akt were significantly inhibited by HRM. In addition, HRM blocked FBS-induced progression from the G0/G1 to the S-phase and increased the apoptosis rate of VSMCs. These results showed that hydrogen-rich saline was able to attenuate FBS-induced VSMC proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia by inhibiting ROS production and inactivating the Ras-ERK1/2-MEK1/2 and Akt pathways. Thus, HRSS may have potential therapeutic relevance for the prevention of human restenosis.

  3. Two-step gasification of cattle manure for hydrogen-rich gas production: Effect of biochar preparation temperature and gasification temperature.

    PubMed

    Xin, Ya; Cao, Hongliang; Yuan, Qiaoxia; Wang, Dianlong

    2017-10-01

    Two-step gasification process was proposed to dispose cattle manure for hydrogen rich gas production. The effect of temperature on product distribution and biochar properties were first studied in the pyrolysis-carbonization process. The steam gasification of biochar derived from different pyrolysis-carbonization temperatures was then performed at 750°C and 850°C. The biochar from the pyrolysis-carbonization temperatures of 500°C had high carbon content and low volatiles content. According to the results of gasification stage, the pyrolysis-carbonization temperature of 500°C and the gasification temperature of 850°C were identified as the suitable conditions for hydrogen production. We obtained 1.61m 3 /kg of syngas production, 0.93m 3 /kg of hydrogen yield and 57.58% of hydrogen concentration. This study shows that two-step gasification is an efficient waste-to-hydrogen energy process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Highly selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol over Pt nanoparticles supported on g-C3N4 nanosheets catalysts in water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiufang; Zhang, Ligang; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Xingcui; Mu, Xindong

    2016-06-22

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets were investigated for developing effective Pt catalyst supports for selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol in water. The nanosheets with an average thickness of about 3 nm were synthesized by a simple and green method through thermal oxidation etching of bulk g-C3N4 in air. Combined with the unique feature of nitrogen richness and locally conjugated structure, the g-C3N4 nanosheets with a high surface area of 142 m(2) g(-1) were demonstrated to be an excellent supports for loading small-size Pt nanoparticles. Superior furfural hydrogenation activity in water with complete conversion of furfural and high selectivity of furfuryl alcohol (>99%) was observed for g-C3N4 nanosheets supported Pt catalysts. The large specific surface area, uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles and the stronger furfural adsorption ability of nanosheets contributed to the considerable catalytic performance. The reusability tests showed that the novel Pt catalyst could maintain high activity and stability in the furfural hydrogenation reaction.

  5. Highly selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol over Pt nanoparticles supported on g-C3N4 nanosheets catalysts in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiufang; Zhang, Ligang; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Xingcui; Mu, Xindong

    2016-06-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets were investigated for developing effective Pt catalyst supports for selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol in water. The nanosheets with an average thickness of about 3 nm were synthesized by a simple and green method through thermal oxidation etching of bulk g-C3N4 in air. Combined with the unique feature of nitrogen richness and locally conjugated structure, the g-C3N4 nanosheets with a high surface area of 142 m2 g-1 were demonstrated to be an excellent supports for loading small-size Pt nanoparticles. Superior furfural hydrogenation activity in water with complete conversion of furfural and high selectivity of furfuryl alcohol (>99%) was observed for g-C3N4 nanosheets supported Pt catalysts. The large specific surface area, uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles and the stronger furfural adsorption ability of nanosheets contributed to the considerable catalytic performance. The reusability tests showed that the novel Pt catalyst could maintain high activity and stability in the furfural hydrogenation reaction.

  6. Highly selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol over Pt nanoparticles supported on g-C3N4 nanosheets catalysts in water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiufang; Zhang, Ligang; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Xingcui; Mu, Xindong

    2016-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets were investigated for developing effective Pt catalyst supports for selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol in water. The nanosheets with an average thickness of about 3 nm were synthesized by a simple and green method through thermal oxidation etching of bulk g-C3N4 in air. Combined with the unique feature of nitrogen richness and locally conjugated structure, the g-C3N4 nanosheets with a high surface area of 142 m2 g−1 were demonstrated to be an excellent supports for loading small-size Pt nanoparticles. Superior furfural hydrogenation activity in water with complete conversion of furfural and high selectivity of furfuryl alcohol (>99%) was observed for g-C3N4 nanosheets supported Pt catalysts. The large specific surface area, uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles and the stronger furfural adsorption ability of nanosheets contributed to the considerable catalytic performance. The reusability tests showed that the novel Pt catalyst could maintain high activity and stability in the furfural hydrogenation reaction. PMID:27328834

  7. Influence of the hydrogen bond quantum nature in liquid water and heavy water on stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fabing; Li, Zhanlong; Li, Shuo; Fang, Wenhui; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2018-06-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of liquid water and heavy water have been investigated using Nd:YAG laser. The SRS spectra of liquid heavy water indicate that ice-VII and ice-VIII structures are formed by shock-induced compression (SIC) in forward and backward directions, respectively. Simultaneously, the SRS spectra reveal of liquid water that only ice-VII structure is formed in the backward direction. The difference in ice structures formed by SIC in liquid water and heavy water could be attributed to the effect of the hydrogen bond quantum nature with H+. SRS spectra of 2 M NaOH water solution with ice-VII and ice-VIII structures have been successfully obtained in forward and backward, respectively, as OH- greatly reduce the quantum nature of hydrogen bonds by neutralizing H+ in water. The hydrogen bond quantum nature is important for understanding isotope calibration test structure and isotopic effect.

  8. Method of generating hydrogen by catalytic decomposition of water

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Dorris, Stephen E.; Bose, Arun C.; Stiegel, Gary J.; Lee, Tae-Hyun

    2002-01-01

    A method for producing hydrogen includes providing a feed stream comprising water; contacting at least one proton conducting membrane adapted to interact with the feed stream; splitting the water into hydrogen and oxygen at a predetermined temperature; and separating the hydrogen from the oxygen. Preferably the proton conducting membrane comprises a proton conductor and a second phase material. Preferable proton conductors suitable for use in a proton conducting membrane include a lanthanide element, a Group VIA element and a Group IA or Group IIA element such as barium, strontium, or combinations of these elements. More preferred proton conductors include yttrium. Preferable second phase materials include platinum, palladium, nickel, cobalt, chromium, manganese, vanadium, silver, gold, copper, rhodium, ruthenium, niobium, zirconium, tantalum, and combinations of these. More preferably second phase materials suitable for use in a proton conducting membrane include nickel, palladium, and combinations of these. The method for generating hydrogen is preferably preformed in the range between about 600.degree. C. and 1,700.degree. C.

  9. Ejection of the Massive Hydrogen-rich Envelope Timed with the Collapse of the Stripped SN 2014C

    PubMed Central

    Margutti, Raffaella; Kamble, A.; Milisavljevic, D.; Zapartas, E.; de Mink, S. E.; Drout, M.; Chornock, R.; Risaliti, G.; Zauderer, B. A.; Bietenholz, M.; Cantiello, M.; Chakraborti, S.; Chomiuk, L.; Fong, W.; Grefenstette, B.; Guidorzi, C.; Kirshner, R.; Parrent, J. T.; Patnaude, D.; Soderberg, A. M.; Gehrels, N. C.; Harrison, F.

    2017-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of SN 2014C during the first 500 days. These observations represent the first solid detection of a young extragalactic stripped-envelope SN out to high-energy X-rays ~40 keV. SN 2014C shows ordinary explosion parameters (Ek ~ 1.8 × 1051 erg and Mej ~ 1.7 M⊙). However, over an ~1 year timescale, SN 2014C evolved from an ordinary hydrogen-poor supernova into a strongly interacting, hydrogen-rich supernova, violating the traditional classification scheme of type-I versus type-II SNe. Signatures of the SN shock interaction with a dense medium are observed across the spectrum, from radio to hard X-rays, and revealed the presence of a massive shell of ~1 M⊙of hydrogen-rich material at ~6 × 1016 cm. The shell was ejected by the progenitor star in the decades to centuries before collapse. This result challenges current theories of massive star evolution, as it requires a physical mechanism responsible for the ejection of the deepest hydrogen layer of H-poor SN progenitors synchronized with the onset of stellar collapse. Theoretical investigations point at binary interactions and/or instabilities during the last nuclear burning stages as potential triggers of the highly time-dependent mass loss. We constrain these scenarios utilizing the sample of 183 SNe Ib/c with public radio observations. Our analysis identifies SN 2014C-like signatures in ~10% of SNe. This fraction is reasonably consistent with the expectation from the theory of recent envelope ejection due to binary evolution if the ejected material can survive in the close environment for 103–104 years. Alternatively, nuclear burning instabilities extending to core C-burning might play a critical role. PMID:28684881

  10. A second order thermodynamic perturbation theory for hydrogen bond cooperativity in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Bennett D.

    2017-05-01

    It has been extensively demonstrated through first principles quantum mechanics calculations that water exhibits strong hydrogen bond cooperativity. Equations of state developed from statistical mechanics typically assume pairwise additivity, meaning they cannot account for these 3-body and higher cooperative effects. In this paper, we extend a second order thermodynamic perturbation theory to correct for hydrogen bond cooperativity in 4 site water. We demonstrate that the theory predicts hydrogen bonding structure consistent spectroscopy, neutron diffraction, and molecular simulation data. Finally, we implement the approach into a general equation of state for water.

  11. Estimating explosion properties of normal hydrogen-rich core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondrej

    2017-08-01

    Recent parameterized 1D explosion models of hundreds of core-collapse supernova progenitors suggest that success and failure are intertwined in a complex pattern that is not a simple function of the progenitor initial mass. This rugged landscape is present also in other explosion properties, allowing for quantitative tests of the neutrino mechanism from observations of hundreds of supernovae discovered every year. We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of normal hydrogen-rich core-collapse supernovae based on their photometric measurements and expansion velocities. We construct SED and bolometric light curves, determine explosion energies, ejecta and nickel masses while taking into account all uncertainties and covariances of the model. We describe the efforts to compare the inferences to the predictions of the neutrino mechanim. The model can be adapted to include more physical assumptions to utilize primarily photometric data coming from surveys such as LSST.

  12. Role of Interfacial Water Molecules in Proline-rich Ligand Recognition by the Src Homology 3 Domain of Abl*

    PubMed Central

    Palencia, Andres; Camara-Artigas, Ana; Pisabarro, M. Teresa; Martinez, Jose C.; Luque, Irene

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of Abl-Src homology 3 domain (SH3) with the high affinity peptide p41 is the most notable example of the inconsistency existing between the currently accepted description of SH3 complexes and their binding thermodynamic signature. We had previously hypothesized that the presence of interfacial water molecules is partially responsible for this thermodynamic behavior. We present here a thermodynamic, structural, and molecular dynamics simulation study of the interaction of p41 with Abl-SH3 and a set of mutants designed to alter the water-mediated interaction network. Our results provide a detailed description of the dynamic properties of the interfacial water molecules and a molecular interpretation of the thermodynamic effects elicited by the mutations in terms of the modulation of the water-mediated hydrogen bond network. In the light of these results, a new dual binding mechanism is proposed that provides a better description of proline-rich ligand recognition by Abl-SH3 and that has important implications for rational design. PMID:19906645

  13. Water content and porosity effect on hydrogen radiolytic yields of geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupin, Frédéric; Dannoux-Papin, Adeline; Ngono Ravache, Yvette; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-10-01

    The behavior of geopolymers under irradiation is a topic that has not been thoroughly investigated so far. However, if geopolymers are considered to be used as radioactive waste embedding matrices, their chemical and mechanical stability under ionizing radiation as well as low hydrogen production must be demonstrated. For that purpose, a particular focus is put on water radiolysis. Various formulations of geopolymers have been irradiated either with γ-rays (60Co source) or 95 MeV/amu 36Ar18+ ions beams and the hydrogen production has been quantified. This paper presents the results of radiolytic gas analysis in order to identify important structural parameters that influence confined water radiolysis. A correlation between geopolymers nature, water content on the one side, and the hydrogen radiolytic yield (G(H2)) on the other side, has been demonstrated. For both types of irradiations, a strong influence of the water content on the hydrogen radiolytic yield G(H2) is evidenced. The geopolymers porosity effect has been only highlighted under γ-rays irradiation.

  14. Inferences on hydrogen bond networks in water from isopermitive frequency investigations.

    PubMed

    Geethu, P M; Ranganathan, Venketesh T; Satapathy, Dillip K Kumar

    2018-06-26

    Intermolecular hydrogen bonds play a crucial role in determining the unique characteristics of liquid water. We present low-frequency (1 Hz - 40 MHz) dielectric spectroscopic investigations on water in the presence and absence of added solutes at different temperatures from 10°C to 60°C. The intersection points of temperature dependent permittivity contours at the vicinity of isopermitive frequency (IPF) in water are recorded and its properties are presumed to be related to the extent of hydrogen bond networks in water. IPF is defined as the frequency at which the relative permittivity of water is almost independent of temperature. The set of intersection points of temperature dependent permittivity contours at the vicinity of IPF are characterized by the mean (M<sub>IPF</sub>) and root-mean-square deviation/standard deviation (σ<sub>IPF</sub> ) associated with IPF. The tunability of M<sub>IPF</sub> by the addition of NaCl salt emphasizes the strong correlation between the concentration of ions in water and the M<sub>IPF</sub> . The σ<sub>IPF</sub> is surmised to be related to the orientational correlations of water dipoles as well as to the intermolecular hydrogen bond networks in water. Further, alterations in σ<sub>IPF</sub> is observed with the addition of kosmotropic and chaotropic solutes into water and are thought to arise due to the restructuring of hydrogen bond networks in water in presence of added solutes. Notably, the solute induced reconfiguration of hydrogen bond networks in water or often-discussed structure making/breaking effects of the added solutes in water can be inferred, albeit qualitatively, by examining the M<sub>IPF</sub> and σ<sub>IPF</sub>. Further, the Gaussian deconvoluted OH-stretching modes present in the Raman Spectra of water and aqueous solutions of IPA and DMF strongly endorses the structural rearrangements occurring in water in

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and molecular hydrogen in oxygen-rich planetary nebulae: the case of NGC 6720

    PubMed Central

    Cox, N. L. J.; Pilleri, P.; Berné, O.; Cernicharo, J.; Joblin, C.

    2015-01-01

    Evolved stars are primary sources for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dust grains. Their circumstellar chemistry is usually designated as either oxygen-rich or carbon-rich, although dual-dust chemistry objects, whose infrared spectra reveal both silicate- and carbon-dust features, are also known. The exact origin and nature of this dual-dust chemistry is not yet understood. Spitzer-IRS mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging of the nearby, oxygen-rich planetary nebula NGC 6720 reveals the presence of the 11.3 μm aromatic (PAH) emission band. It is attributed to emission from neutral PAHs, since no band is observed in the 7–8 μm range. The spatial distribution of PAHs is found to closely follow that of the warm clumpy molecular hydrogen emission. Emission from both neutral PAHs and warm H2 is likely to arise from photo-dissociation regions associated with dense knots that are located within the main ring. The presence of PAHs together with the previously derived high abundance of free carbon (relative to CO) suggest that the local conditions in an oxygen-rich environment can also become conducive to in-situ formation of large carbonaceous molecules, such as PAHs, via a bottom-up chemical pathway. In this scenario, the same stellar source can enrich the interstellar medium with both oxygen-rich dust and large carbonaceous molecules. PMID:26924856

  16. Photocatalytic generation of hydrogen from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottoms, W. R.; Miles, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    A concept designed to overcome the problems encountered when using photodissociation for the generation of hydrogen is discussed. The problems limiting the efficiency of photodissociation of water are the separation of the photolysis products and the high energy photons necessary for the reaction. It is shown that the dissociation energy of a large number of molecules is catalytically reduced when these molecules are in intimate contact with the surface of certain metals. It is proposed to develop a surface which will take advantage of this catalytic shift in dissociation energies to reduce the photon energy required to produce hydrogen. This same catalytic surface can be used to separate the reaction products if it is made so that one of the dissociations products is soluble in the metal and others are not. This condition is met by many metal systems such as platinum group metals which have been used commercially to separate hydrogen from other gases and liquids.

  17. Hydrogen bonding at the water surface revealed by isotopic dilution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stiopkin, Igor V; Weeraman, Champika; Pieniazek, Piotr A; Shalhout, Fadel Y; Skinner, James L; Benderskii, Alexander V

    2011-06-08

    The air-water interface is perhaps the most common liquid interface. It covers more than 70 per cent of the Earth's surface and strongly affects atmospheric, aerosol and environmental chemistry. The air-water interface has also attracted much interest as a model system that allows rigorous tests of theory, with one fundamental question being just how thin it is. Theoretical studies have suggested a surprisingly short 'healing length' of about 3 ångströms (1 Å = 0.1 nm), with the bulk-phase properties of water recovered within the top few monolayers. However, direct experimental evidence has been elusive owing to the difficulty of depth-profiling the liquid surface on the ångström scale. Most physical, chemical and biological properties of water, such as viscosity, solvation, wetting and the hydrophobic effect, are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. This can be probed by observing the lineshape of the OH-stretch mode, the frequency shift of which is related to the hydrogen-bond strength. Here we report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the air-water interface using surface-selective heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy to focus on the 'free OD' transition found only in the topmost water layer. By using deuterated water and isotopic dilution to reveal the vibrational coupling mechanism, we find that the free OD stretch is affected only by intramolecular coupling to the stretching of the other OD group on the same molecule. The other OD stretch frequency indicates the strength of one of the first hydrogen bonds encountered at the surface; this is the donor hydrogen bond of the water molecule straddling the interface, which we find to be only slightly weaker than bulk-phase water hydrogen bonds. We infer from this observation a remarkably fast onset of bulk-phase behaviour on crossing from the air into the water phase.

  18. Beneficial Effects of Hydrogen-Rich Saline on Early Burn-Wound Progression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Song Xue; Jin, Yun Yun; Fang, Quan; You, Chuan Gang; Wang, Xin Gang; Hu, Xin Lei; Han, Chun-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Deep burn wounds undergo a dynamic process known as wound progression that results in a deepening and extension of the initial burn area. The zone of stasis is more likely to develop more severe during wound progression in the presence of hypoperfusion. Hydrogen has been reported to alleviate injury triggered by ischaemia/reperfusion and burns in various organs by selectively quenching oxygen free radicals. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective effects of hydrogen against early burn-wound progression. Methods Deep-burn models were established through contact with a boiled, rectangular, brass comb for 20 s. Fifty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham, burn plus saline, and burn plus hydrogen-rich saline (HS) groups with sacrifice and analysis at various time windows (6 h, 24 h, 48 h) post burn. Indexes of oxidative stress, apoptosis and autophagy were measured in each group. The zone of stasis was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining, ELISA, and Western blot to explore the underlying effects and mechanisms post burn. Results The burn-induced increase in malondialdehyde was markedly reduced with HS, while the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased. Moreover, HS treatment attenuated increases in apoptosis and autophagy postburn in wounds, according to the TUNEL staining results and the expression analysis of Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3, Beclin-1 and Atg-5 proteins. Additionally, HS lowered the level of myeloperoxidase and expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the zone of stasis while augmenting IL-10. The elevated levels of Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB p65 expression post burn were also downregulated by HS management. Conclusion Hydrogen can attenuate early wound progression following deep burn injury. The beneficial effect of hydrogen was mediated by attenuating oxidative stress, which inhibited apoptosis and inflammation, and the Akt/NF-κB signalling pathway may be

  19. Molecular evolution and expression of oxygen transport genes in livebearing fishes (Poeciliidae) from hydrogen sulfide rich springs.

    PubMed

    Barts, Nicholas; Greenway, Ryan; Passow, Courtney N; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Kelley, Joanna L; Tobler, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is a natural toxicant in some aquatic environments that has diverse molecular targets. It binds to oxygen transport proteins, rendering them non-functional by reducing oxygen-binding affinity. Hence, organisms permanently inhabiting H 2 S-rich environments are predicted to exhibit adaptive modifications to compensate for the reduced capacity to transport oxygen. We investigated 10 lineages of fish of the family Poeciliidae that have colonized freshwater springs rich in H 2 S-along with related lineages from non-sulfidic environments-to test hypotheses about the expression and evolution of oxygen transport genes in a phylogenetic context. We predicted shifts in the expression of and signatures of positive selection on oxygen transport genes upon colonization of H 2 S-rich habitats. Our analyses indicated significant shifts in gene expression for multiple hemoglobin genes in lineages that have colonized H 2 S-rich environments, and three hemoglobin genes exhibited relaxed selection in sulfidic compared to non-sulfidic lineages. However, neither changes in gene expression nor signatures of selection were consistent among all lineages in H 2 S-rich environments. Oxygen transport genes may consequently be predictable targets of selection during adaptation to sulfidic environments, but changes in gene expression and molecular evolution of oxygen transport genes in H 2 S-rich environments are not necessarily repeatable across replicated lineages.

  20. The structure and unconventional dihydrogen bonding of a pressure-stabilized hydrogen-rich (NH 3BH 3)(H 2) x(x = 1.5) compound

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Yu; Welchman, Evan; Thonhauser, Timo; ...

    2017-03-15

    Combining X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and ab initio simulations we characterize an extremely hydrogen-rich phase with the chemical formula (NH 3BH 3)(H 2) x (x = 1.5). This phase was formed by compressing ammonia borane (AB, NH 3BH 3) in an environment with an excess of molecular hydrogen (H 2). This compound can store a total of 26.8 wt% hydrogen, both as molecular hydrogen and chemically bonded hydrogen in AB, making it one of the most hydrogen-rich solids currently known. The new compound possesses a layered AB structure where additional H 2 molecules reside in channels created through the weavingmore » of AB layers. The unconventional dihydrogen bonding network of the new compound is significantly modified from its parent AB phase and contains H•••H contacts between adjacent AB molecules and between AB and H 2 molecules. H–H can be either a proton donor or a proton acceptor that forms new types of dihydrogen bonding with the host AB molecules, which are depicted as H–H•••H–B or H–H•••H–N, respectively. Furthermore, this study not only demonstrates the strategy and the promise of using pressure for new material synthesis, but also unleashes the power of combining experiments and ab initio calculations for elucidating novel structures and unusual bonding configurations in dense low-Z materials.« less

  1. The structure and unconventional dihydrogen bonding of a pressure-stabilized hydrogen-rich (NH 3BH 3)(H 2) x(x = 1.5) compound

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu; Welchman, Evan; Thonhauser, Timo

    Combining X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and ab initio simulations we characterize an extremely hydrogen-rich phase with the chemical formula (NH 3BH 3)(H 2) x (x = 1.5). This phase was formed by compressing ammonia borane (AB, NH 3BH 3) in an environment with an excess of molecular hydrogen (H 2). This compound can store a total of 26.8 wt% hydrogen, both as molecular hydrogen and chemically bonded hydrogen in AB, making it one of the most hydrogen-rich solids currently known. The new compound possesses a layered AB structure where additional H 2 molecules reside in channels created through the weavingmore » of AB layers. The unconventional dihydrogen bonding network of the new compound is significantly modified from its parent AB phase and contains H•••H contacts between adjacent AB molecules and between AB and H 2 molecules. H–H can be either a proton donor or a proton acceptor that forms new types of dihydrogen bonding with the host AB molecules, which are depicted as H–H•••H–B or H–H•••H–N, respectively. Furthermore, this study not only demonstrates the strategy and the promise of using pressure for new material synthesis, but also unleashes the power of combining experiments and ab initio calculations for elucidating novel structures and unusual bonding configurations in dense low-Z materials.« less

  2. Hydrogen production by high temperature water splitting using electron conducting membranes

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Wang, Shuangyan; Dorris, Stephen E.; Lee, Tae H.

    2006-08-08

    A device and method for separating water into hydrogen and oxygen is disclosed. A first substantially gas impervious solid electron-conducting membrane for selectively passing protons or hydrogen is provided and spaced from a second substantially gas impervious solid electron-conducting membrane for selectively passing oxygen. When steam is passed between the two membranes at dissociation temperatures the hydrogen from the dissociation of steam selectively and continuously passes through the first membrane and oxygen selectively and continuously passes through the second membrane, thereby continuously driving the dissociation of steam producing hydrogen and oxygen. The oxygen is thereafter reacted with methane to produce syngas which optimally may be reacted in a water gas shift reaction to produce CO2 and H2.

  3. Hydrogen production from salt water by Marine blue green algae and solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, A.; Rosner, D.; Kumazawa, S.; Barciela, S.; Phlips, E.

    1985-01-01

    Two marine bluegreen algae, Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7 and Synechococcus sp Miami 041511 have been selected as the result of over 10 years continuous and intensive effort of isolation, growth examination, and the screening of hydrogen photoproduction capability in this laboratory. Both strains photoproduced hydrogen for several days at high rates and a quantity of hydrogen was accumulated in a closed vessel. Overall hydrogen donor substance of the hydrogen photoproduction was found to be salt water. Using strain Miami BG 7, a two step method of hydrogen photoproduction from salt water was successfully developed and this was recycled several times over a one month period using both free cells and immobilized cells in both indoor and outdoor under natural sunlight. According to these experiments, a prototype floating hydrogen production system was designed for further development of the biosolar hydrogen production system.

  4. Hydrogen generation through static-feed water electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, F. C.; Schubert, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    A static-feed water electrolysis system (SFWES), developed under NASA sponsorship, is presented for potential applicability to terrestrial hydrogen production. The SFWES concept uses (1) an alkaline electrolyte to minimize power requirements and materials-compatibility problems, (2) a method where the electrolyte is retained in a thin porous matrix eliminating bulk electrolyte, and (3) a static water-feed mechanism to prevent electrode and electrolyte contamination and to promote system simplicity.

  5. Molecular metal-Oxo catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    DOEpatents

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2015-02-24

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition having the general formula [(PY5W.sub.2)MO].sup.2+, wherein PY5W.sub.2 is (NC.sub.5XYZ)(NC.sub.5H.sub.4).sub.4C.sub.2W.sub.2, M is a transition metal, and W, X, Y, and Z can be H, R, a halide, CF.sub.3, or SiR.sub.3, where R can be an alkyl or aryl group. The two accompanying counter anions, in one embodiment, can be selected from the following Cl.sup.-, I.sup.-, PF.sub.6.sup.-, and CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water containing electrolyte or straight sea water can be subject to an electric potential of between 1.0 V and 1.4 V relative to the standard hydrogen electrode, which at pH 7 corresponds to an overpotential of 0.6 to 1.0 V, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen with an optimal turnover frequency of ca. 1.5 million mol H.sub.2/mol catalyst per h.

  6. Water cavities of sH clathrate hydrate stabilized by molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Timothy A; Koh, Carolyn A; Sloan, E Dendy

    2008-02-21

    X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic measurements confirm that molecular hydrogen can be contained within the small water cavities of a binary sH clathrate hydrate using large guest molecules that stabilize the large cavity. The potential increase in hydrogen storage could be more than 40% when compared with binary sII hydrates. This work demonstrates the stabilization of hydrogen in a hydrate structure previously unknown for encapsulating molecular hydrogen, indicating the potential for other inclusion compound materials with even greater hydrogen storage capabilities.

  7. Hydrogen-rich saline promotes survival of retinal ganglion cells in a rat model of optic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing-chuan; Xu, Tao; Zuo, Qiao; Wang, Ruo-bing; Qi, Ai-qing; Cao, Wen-luo; Sun, Ai-jun; Sun, Xue-jun; Xu, Jiajun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of molecular hydrogen (H2) in a rat model subjected to optic nerve crush (ONC). We tested the hypothesis that after optic nerve crush (ONC), retinal ganglion cell (RGC) could be protected by H₂. Rats in different groups received saline or hydrogen-rich saline every day for 14 days after ONC. Retinas from animals in each group underwent measurements of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, cholera toxin beta (CTB) tracing, gamma synuclein staining, and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining 2 weeks post operation. Flash visual evoked potentials (FVEP) and pupillary light reflex (PLR) were then tested to evaluate the function of optic nerve. The malondialdehyde (MDA) level in retina was evaluated. H&E, gamma synuclein staining and CTB tracing showed that the survival rate of RGCs in hydrogen saline-treated group was significantly higher than that in saline-treated group. Apoptosis of RGCs assessed by TUNEL staining were less observed in hydrogen saline-treated group. The MDA level in retina of H₂ group was much lower than that in placebo group. Furthermore, animals treated with hydrogen saline showed better function of optic nerve in assessments of FVEP and PLR. These results demonstrated that H₂ protects RGCs and helps preserve the visual function after ONC and had a neuroprotective effect in a rat model subjected to ONC.

  8. Tritiated Water on Molecular Sieve without Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, R.T.

    2001-09-10

    Several molecular sieve beds loaded with tritiated water failed to generate hydrogen gas from tritium self-radiolysis at the expected rate. Preliminary gamma-ray irradiation experiments of 4A molecular sieve with varying amounts of oxygen in the over-gas evoke a quenching mechanism. The data suggest that the gas phase rate constant for the production of hydrogen gas is several orders of magnitude smaller than the third order rate constant for scavenging of radical fragments by oxygen.

  9. Influence of drinking water and diet on the stable-hydrogen isotope ratios of animal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Keith A.; Atwell, Lisa; Wassenaar, Leonard I.

    1999-01-01

    Despite considerable interest in using stable-hydrogen isotope ratio (δD) measurements in ecological research, it was previously unknown whether hydrogen derived from drinking water, in addition to that derived from diet, contributed to the nonexchangeable hydrogen in animal tissues. We raised four experimental groups of quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) from hatch on two isotopically distinct diets (mean nonexchangeable δD: −146 and −60‰, Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water Standard) and drinking waters (mean δD: −130 and +196‰, Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water Standard). Here we show that both dietary and drinking water hydrogen are incorporated into nonexchangeable hydrogen in both metabolically active (i.e., muscle, liver, blood, fat) and inactive (i.e., feather, nail) tissues. Approximately 20% of hydrogen in metabolically active quail tissues and 26–32% of feathers and nail was derived from drinking water. Our findings suggest environmental interpretations of δD values from modern and fossil animal tissues may need to account for potentially large isotopic differences between drinking water and food and require a good understanding of the physiological ecology of study organisms. PMID:10393937

  10. A molecular molybdenum-oxo catalyst for generating hydrogen from water.

    PubMed

    Karunadasa, Hemamala I; Chang, Christopher J; Long, Jeffrey R

    2010-04-29

    A growing awareness of issues related to anthropogenic climate change and an increase in global energy demand have made the search for viable carbon-neutral sources of renewable energy one of the most important challenges in science today. The chemical community is therefore seeking efficient and inexpensive catalysts that can produce large quantities of hydrogen gas from water. Here we identify a molybdenum-oxo complex that can catalytically generate gaseous hydrogen either from water at neutral pH or from sea water. This work shows that high-valency metal-oxo species can be used to create reduction catalysts that are robust and functional in water, a concept that has broad implications for the design of 'green' and sustainable chemistry cycles.

  11. The thermal evolution of large water-rich asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, B. E.; Castillo, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    Water and heat played a significant role in the formation and evolution of large main belt asteroids, including 1 Ceres, 2 Pallas, and 24 Themis, for which there is now evidence of surficial water ice (Rivkin & Emery, ACM 2008). Shape measurements indicate some differentiation of Ceres’ interior, which, in combination with geophysical modeling, may indicate compositional layering in a core made up of anhydrous and hydrated silicate and a water ice mantle (Castillo-Rogez & McCord, in press, Icarus). We extend these interior models now to other large, possibly water-rich main belt asteroids, namely Pallas, at mean radius 272 km, and the Themis family parent body, at mean radius 150 km. The purpose of this study is to compare geophysical models against available constraints on the physical properties of these objects and to offer constraints on the origin of these objects. Pallas is the largest B-type asteroid. Its surface of hydrated minerals and recent constraint on its density, 2.4-2.8 g/cm3, seems to imply that water strongly affected its evolution (Schmidt et al., in press, Science). 24 Themis is the largest member of the Themis family that now counts about 580 members, including some of the main belt comets. The large member 90 Antiope has a density of about 1.2 g/cm3, while 24 Themis has a density of about 2.7 +/-1.3 g/cm3. The apparent contrast in the densities and spectral properties of the Themis family members may reflect a compositional layering in the original parent body. In the absence of tidal heating and with little accretional heat, the evolution of these small water-rich objects is a function of their initial composition and temperature. The latter depends on the location of formation (in the inner or outer solar system) and most importantly on the time and duration of accretion, which determines the amount of short-lived radioisotopes available for early internal activity. New accretional models suggest that planetesimals grew rapidly throughout

  12. Stripped-envelope supernova SN 2004dk is now interacting with hydrogen-rich circumstellar material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauerhan, Jon C.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Zheng, WeiKang; Brink, Thomas; Graham, Melissa L.; Shivvers, Isaac; Clubb, Kelsey

    2018-05-01

    The dominant mechanism and time scales over which stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) progenitor stars shed their hydrogen envelopes are uncertain. Observations of Type Ib and Ic SNe at late phases could reveal the optical signatures of interaction with distant circumstellar material (CSM) providing important clues on the origin of the necessary pre-SN mass loss. We report deep late-time optical spectroscopy of the Type Ib explosion SN 2004dk 4684 days (13 years) after discovery. We detect strong Hα emission with an intermediate line width of ˜400 km s-1 and luminosity ˜2.5 × 1039 erg s-1, signaling that the SN blast wave has caught up with the hydrogen-rich CSM lost by the progenitor system. The line luminosity is the highest ever reported for a SN at this late stage. Prominent emission features of He I, Fe, and Ca are also detected. The spectral characteristics are consistent with CSM energized by the forward shock, and resemble the late-time spectra of the persistently interacting Type IIn SNe 2005ip and 1988Z. We suggest that the onset of interaction with H-rich CSM was associated with a previously reported radio rebrightening at ˜1700 days. The data indicate that the mode of pre-SN mass loss was a relatively slow dense wind that persisted millennia before the SN, followed by a short-lived Wolf-Rayet phase that preceded core-collapse and created a cavity within an extended distribution of CSM. We also present new spectra of SNe 2014C, PTF11iqb, and 2009ip, all of which also exhibit continued interaction with extended CSM distributions.

  13. [Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of lake water and geothermal spring water in arid area of south Tibet].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ke; Shen, Li-Cheng; Wang, Peng

    2014-08-01

    The condition of water cycles in Tibet Plateau is a complex process, and the hydrogen and oxygen isotopes contain important information of this process. Based on the analysis of isotopic composition of freshwater lake, saltwater lake and geothermal water in the southern Tibetan Plateau, this study investigated water cycling, composition and variation of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes and the influencing factors in the study area. The study found that the mean values of delta18O and deltaD in Daggyaima lake water (-17.0 per thousand for delta18O and -138. 6 per thousand for deltaD), Langcuo lake water (-6.4 per thousand for delta18O and -87.4 per thousand for deltaD) and Dagejia geothermal water (-19.2 per thousand for delta18 and -158.2 per thousand for deltaD) all showed negative delta18O and deltaD values in Tibetan Plateau by the influence of altitude effects. Lake water and geothermal water were influenced by evaporation effects in inland arid area, and the slope of evaporation line was less than 8. Deuterium excess parameters of lake water and geothermal water were all negative. The temperature of geothermal reservoirs in Dagejia geothermal field was high,and oxygen shift existed in the relationship of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes.

  14. Ejection of the Massive Hydrogen-rich Envelope Timed with the Collapse of the Stripped SN 2014C

    SciTech Connect

    Margutti, Raffaella; Kamble, A.; Milisavljevic, D.

    2017-02-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of SN 2014C during the first 500 days. These observations represent the first solid detection of a young extragalactic stripped-envelope SN out to high-energy X-rays ∼40 keV. SN 2014C shows ordinary explosion parameters ( E {sub k} ∼ 1.8 × 10{sup 51} erg and M {sub ej} ∼ 1.7 M{sub ⊙}). However, over an ∼1 year timescale, SN 2014C evolved from an ordinary hydrogen-poor supernova into a strongly interacting, hydrogen-rich supernova, violating the traditional classification scheme of type-I versus type-II SNe. Signatures of the SN shock interaction with a dense medium are observed across the spectrum,more » from radio to hard X-rays, and revealed the presence of a massive shell of ∼1 M {sub ⊙} of hydrogen-rich material at ∼6 × 10{sup 16} cm. The shell was ejected by the progenitor star in the decades to centuries before collapse. This result challenges current theories of massive star evolution, as it requires a physical mechanism responsible for the ejection of the deepest hydrogen layer of H-poor SN progenitors synchronized with the onset of stellar collapse. Theoretical investigations point at binary interactions and/or instabilities during the last nuclear burning stages as potential triggers of the highly time-dependent mass loss. We constrain these scenarios utilizing the sample of 183 SNe Ib/c with public radio observations. Our analysis identifies SN 2014C-like signatures in ∼10% of SNe. This fraction is reasonably consistent with the expectation from the theory of recent envelope ejection due to binary evolution if the ejected material can survive in the close environment for 10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} years. Alternatively, nuclear burning instabilities extending to core C-burning might play a critical role.« less

  15. Estimation of the degree of hydrogen bonding between quinoline and water by ultraviolet-visible absorbance spectroscopy in sub- and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Mitsumasa; Toyoshima, Katsunori; Mizutani, Takakazu; Minami, Kimitaka; Watanabe, Masaru; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Arai, Kunio

    2003-03-01

    UV-visible spectra of quinoline was measured in sub- and supercritical water (25 °Chydrogen bonding between quinoline and water was estimated from solvatochromic shifts in the π-π* absorbance band. Hydrogen bonding decreased with increasing temperature from 25 to 360 °C. At supercritical conditions (380 °Chydrogen bonding abruptly decreased where the isothermal compressibility of water was large (0.5<ρr<1.5). In this condition, local density around quinoline was lower than bulk density, namely negative solvation, and it led to the cleavage of hydrogen bonding between quinoline and water.

  16. On the nature of hydrogen bonding between the phosphatidylcholine head group and water and dimethylsulfoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Lawrence, M. Jayne; McLain, Sylvia E.; Lorenz, Christian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to provide a detailed investigation of the hydrogen bond networks around the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group in 1,2-dipropionyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine in pure water, 10 mol.% and 30 mol.% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-water solutions. Specifically, it is observed that DMSO replaces those water molecules that are within the first solvation shell of the choline, phosphate and ester groups of the PC head group, but are not hydrogen-bonded to the group. The effect of the presence of DMSO on the hydrogen bond network around the PC head groups of the lipid changes with the concentration of DMSO. In comparison to the hydrogen bond network observed in the pure water system, the number of hydrogen-bonded chains of solvent molecules increases slightly for the 10 mol.% DMSO system, while, in the 30 mol.% DMSO system, the number of hydrogen-bonded chains of solvent molecules decreases.

  17. Onset of hydrogen bonded collective network of water in 1,4-dioxane.

    PubMed

    Luong, Trung Quan; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Mitra, Rajib Kumar; Havenith, Martina

    2011-12-22

    We have studied the evolution of water hydrogen bonded collective network dynamics in mixtures of 1,4-dioxane (Dx) as the mole fraction of water (X(w)) increases from 0.005 to 0.54. The inter- and intramolecular vibrations of water have been observed using terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the frequency range 0.4-1.4 THz (13-47 cm(-1)) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in the far-infrared (30-650 cm(-1)) and mid-infrared (3000-3700 cm(-1)) regions. These results have been correlated with the reactivity of water in these mixtures as determined by kinetic studies of the solvolysis reaction of benzoyl chloride (BzCl). Our studies show an onset of intermolecular hydrogen bonded water network dynamics beyond X(w) ≥ 0.1. At the same concentration, we observe a rapid increase of the rate constant of solvolysis of BzCl in water-Dx mixtures. Our results establish a correlation between the onset of collective hydrogen bonded network with the solvation dynamics and the activity of clustered water.

  18. Energetic eruptions leading to a peculiar hydrogen-rich explosion of a massive star

    SciTech Connect

    Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D. Andrew; Kasen, Daniel

    Every supernova so far observed has been considered to be the terminal explosion of a star. Moreover, all supernovae with absorption lines in their spectra show those lines decreasing in velocity over time, as the ejecta expand and thin, revealing slower-moving material that was previously hidden. In addition, every supernova that exhibits the absorption lines of hydrogen has one main light-curve peak, or a plateau in luminosity, lasting approximately 100 days before declining. Here we report observations of iPTF14hls, an event that has spectra identical to a hydrogen-rich core-collapse supernova, but characteristics that differ extensively from those of known supernovae.more » The light curve has at least five peaks and remains bright for more than 600 days; the absorption lines show little to no decrease in velocity; and the radius of the line-forming region is more than an order of magnitude bigger than the radius of the photosphere derived from the continuum emission. These characteristics are consistent with a shell of several tens of solar masses ejected by the progenitor star at supernova-level energies a few hundred days before a terminal explosion. Another possible eruption was recorded at the same position in 1954. Multiple energetic pre-supernova eruptions are expected to occur in stars of 95 to 130 solar masses, which experience the pulsational pair instability. That model, however, does not account for the continued presence of hydrogen, or the energetics observed here. Another mechanism for the violent ejection of mass in massive stars may be required.« less

  19. Energetic eruptions leading to a peculiar hydrogen-rich explosion of a massive star.

    PubMed

    Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D Andrew; Kasen, Daniel; Bildsten, Lars; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; McCully, Curtis; Wong, Zheng Chuen; Katz, Sarah Rebekah; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Sollerman, Jesper; Taddia, Francesco; Leloudas, Giorgos; Fremling, Christoffer; Nugent, Peter E; Horesh, Assaf; Mooley, Kunal; Rumsey, Clare; Cenko, S Bradley; Graham, Melissa L; Perley, Daniel A; Nakar, Ehud; Shaviv, Nir J; Bromberg, Omer; Shen, Ken J; Ofek, Eran O; Cao, Yi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Fang; Rui, Liming; Zhang, Tianmeng; Li, Wenxiong; Li, Zhitong; Zhang, Jujia; Valenti, Stefano; Guevel, David; Shappee, Benjamin; Kochanek, Christopher S; Holoien, Thomas W-S; Filippenko, Alexei V; Fender, Rob; Nyholm, Anders; Yaron, Ofer; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Sullivan, Mark; Blagorodnova, Nadja; Walters, Richard S; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Khazov, Danny; Andreoni, Igor; Laher, Russ R; Konidaris, Nick; Wozniak, Przemek; Bue, Brian

    2017-11-08

    Every supernova so far observed has been considered to be the terminal explosion of a star. Moreover, all supernovae with absorption lines in their spectra show those lines decreasing in velocity over time, as the ejecta expand and thin, revealing slower-moving material that was previously hidden. In addition, every supernova that exhibits the absorption lines of hydrogen has one main light-curve peak, or a plateau in luminosity, lasting approximately 100 days before declining. Here we report observations of iPTF14hls, an event that has spectra identical to a hydrogen-rich core-collapse supernova, but characteristics that differ extensively from those of known supernovae. The light curve has at least five peaks and remains bright for more than 600 days; the absorption lines show little to no decrease in velocity; and the radius of the line-forming region is more than an order of magnitude bigger than the radius of the photosphere derived from the continuum emission. These characteristics are consistent with a shell of several tens of solar masses ejected by the progenitor star at supernova-level energies a few hundred days before a terminal explosion. Another possible eruption was recorded at the same position in 1954. Multiple energetic pre-supernova eruptions are expected to occur in stars of 95 to 130 solar masses, which experience the pulsational pair instability. That model, however, does not account for the continued presence of hydrogen, or the energetics observed here. Another mechanism for the violent ejection of mass in massive stars may be required.

  20. XUV-exposed, non-hydrostatic hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets. Part I: atmospheric expansion and thermal escape.

    PubMed

    Erkaev, Nikolai V; Lammer, Helmut; Odert, Petra; Kulikov, Yuri N; Kislyakova, Kristina G; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Güdel, Manuel; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Biernat, Helfried

    2013-11-01

    The recently discovered low-density "super-Earths" Kepler-11b, Kepler-11f, Kepler-11d, Kepler-11e, and planets such as GJ 1214b represent the most likely known planets that are surrounded by dense H/He envelopes or contain deep H₂O oceans also surrounded by dense hydrogen envelopes. Although these super-Earths are orbiting relatively close to their host stars, they have not lost their captured nebula-based hydrogen-rich or degassed volatile-rich steam protoatmospheres. Thus, it is interesting to estimate the maximum possible amount of atmospheric hydrogen loss from a terrestrial planet orbiting within the habitable zone of late main sequence host stars. For studying the thermosphere structure and escape, we apply a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model that solves the equations of mass, momentum, and energy conservation for a planet with the mass and size of Earth and for a super-Earth with a size of 2 R(Earth) and a mass of 10 M(Earth). We calculate volume heating rates by the stellar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) and expansion of the upper atmosphere, its temperature, density, and velocity structure and related thermal escape rates during the planet's lifetime. Moreover, we investigate under which conditions both planets enter the blow-off escape regime and may therefore experience loss rates that are close to the energy-limited escape. Finally, we discuss the results in the context of atmospheric evolution and implications for habitability of terrestrial planets in general.

  1. Hydrogen isotopes in individual amino acids reflect differentiated pools of hydrogen from food and water in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Marilyn L; Griffin, Patrick L; Newsome, Seth D

    2016-08-09

    Hydrogen isotope (δ(2)H) analysis is widely used in animal ecology to study continental-scale movement because δ(2)H can trace precipitation and climate. To understand the biochemical underpinnings of how hydrogen is incorporated into biomolecules, we measured the δ(2)H of individual amino acids (AAs) in Escherichia coli cultured in glucose-based or complex tryptone-based media in waters with δ(2)H values ranging from -55‰ to +1,070‰. The δ(2)H values of AAs in tryptone spanned a range of ∼250‰. In E. coli grown on glucose, the range of δ(2)H among AAs was nearly 200‰. The relative distributions of δ(2)H of AAs were upheld in cultures grown in enriched waters. In E. coli grown on tryptone, the δ(2)H of nonessential AAs varied linearly with the δ(2)H of media water, whereas δ(2)H of essential AAs was nearly identical to δ(2)H in diet. Model calculations determined that as much as 46% of hydrogen in some nonessential AAs originated from water, whereas no more than 12% of hydrogen in essential AAs originated from water. These findings demonstrate that δ(2)H can route directly at the molecular level. We conclude that the patterns and distributions in δ(2)H of AAs are determined through biosynthetic reactions, suggesting that δ(2)H could become a new biosignature for studying novel microbial pathways. Our results also show that δ(2)H of AAs in an organism's tissues provides a dual tracer for food and environmental (e.g., drinking) water.

  2. Hydrogen isotopes in individual amino acids reflect differentiated pools of hydrogen from food and water in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Marilyn L.; Griffin, Patrick L.; Newsome, Seth D.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope (δ2H) analysis is widely used in animal ecology to study continental-scale movement because δ2H can trace precipitation and climate. To understand the biochemical underpinnings of how hydrogen is incorporated into biomolecules, we measured the δ2H of individual amino acids (AAs) in Escherichia coli cultured in glucose-based or complex tryptone-based media in waters with δ2H values ranging from −55‰ to +1,070‰. The δ2H values of AAs in tryptone spanned a range of ∼250‰. In E. coli grown on glucose, the range of δ2H among AAs was nearly 200‰. The relative distributions of δ2H of AAs were upheld in cultures grown in enriched waters. In E. coli grown on tryptone, the δ2H of nonessential AAs varied linearly with the δ2H of media water, whereas δ2H of essential AAs was nearly identical to δ2H in diet. Model calculations determined that as much as 46% of hydrogen in some nonessential AAs originated from water, whereas no more than 12% of hydrogen in essential AAs originated from water. These findings demonstrate that δ2H can route directly at the molecular level. We conclude that the patterns and distributions in δ2H of AAs are determined through biosynthetic reactions, suggesting that δ2H could become a new biosignature for studying novel microbial pathways. Our results also show that δ2H of AAs in an organism’s tissues provides a dual tracer for food and environmental (e.g., drinking) water. PMID:27444017

  3. Hydrogen-Rich Gas Production by Cogasification of Coal and Biomass in an Intermittent Fluidized Bed

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Qun; Chen, Zhao-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of cogasification of coal and biomass in an intermittent fluidized bed reactor, aiming to investigate the influences of operation parameters such as gasification temperature (T), steam to biomass mass ratio (SBMR), and biomass to coal mass ratio (BCMR) on hydrogen-rich (H2-rich) gas production. The results show that H2-rich gas free of N2 dilution is produced and the H2 yield is in the range of 18.25~68.13 g/kg. The increases of T, SBMR, and BCMR are all favorable for promoting the H2 production. Higher temperature contributes to higher CO and H2 contents, as well as H2 yield. The BCMR has a weak influence on gas composition, but the yield and content of H2 increase with BCMR, reaching a peak at the BCMR of 4. The H2 content and yield in the product gas increase with SBMR, whilst the content of CO increases first and then decreases correspondingly. At a typical case, the relative linear sensitivity coefficients of H2 production efficiency to T, SBMR, and BCMR were calculated. The results reveal that the order of the influence of the operation parameters on H2 production efficiency is T > SBMR > BCMR. PMID:24174911

  4. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  5. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Borysow, Jacek, E-mail: jborysow@mtu.edu; Rosso, Leonardo del; Celli, Milva

    2014-04-28

    We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines weremore » narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.« less

  6. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa.

    PubMed

    Borysow, Jacek; del Rosso, Leonardo; Celli, Milva; Moraldi, Massimo; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2014-04-28

    We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

  7. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysow, Jacek; del Rosso, Leonardo; Celli, Milva; Moraldi, Massimo; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2014-04-01

    We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

  8. Control of microbially generated hydrogen sulfide in produced waters

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, E.D.; Vance, I.; Gammack, G.F.

    1995-12-31

    Production of hydrogen sulfide in produced waters due to the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a potentially serious problem. The hydrogen sulfide is not only a safety and environmental concern, it also contributes to corrosion, solids formation, a reduction in produced oil and gas values, and limitations on water discharge. Waters produced from seawater-flooded reservoirs typically contain all of the nutrients required to support SRB metabolism. Surface processing facilities provide a favorable environment in which SRB flourish, converting water-borne nutrients into biomass and H{sub 2}S. This paper will present results from a field trial in which a new technologymore » for the biochemical control of SRB metabolism was successfully applied. A slip stream of water downstream of separators on a produced water handling facility was routed through a bioreactor in a side-steam device where microbial growth was allowed to develop fully. This slip stream was then treated with slug doses of two forms of a proprietary, nonbiocidal metabolic modifier. Results indicated that H{sub 2}S production was halted almost immediately and that the residual effect of the treatment lasted for well over one week.« less

  9. New porous water ice metastable at atmospheric pressure obtained by emptying a hydrogen-filled ice

    PubMed Central

    del Rosso, Leonardo; Celli, Milva; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The properties of some forms of water ice reserve still intriguing surprises. Besides the several stable or metastable phases of pure ice, solid mixtures of water with gases are precursors of other ices, as in some cases they may be emptied, leaving a metastable hydrogen-bound water structure. We present here the first characterization of a new form of ice, obtained from the crystalline solid compound of water and molecular hydrogen called C0-structure filled ice. By means of Raman spectroscopy, we measure the hydrogen release at different temperatures and succeed in rapidly removing all the hydrogen molecules, obtaining a new form of ice (ice XVII). Its structure is determined by means of neutron diffraction measurements. Of paramount interest is that the emptied crystal can adsorb again hydrogen and release it repeatedly, showing a temperature-dependent hysteresis. PMID:27819265

  10. Protective effects of hydrogen-rich medium on lipopolysaccharide-induced monocytic adhesion and vascular endothelial permeability through regulation of vascular endothelial cadherin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Wang, W N; Han, H Z; Xie, K L; Wang, G L; Yu, Y H

    2015-06-11

    We observed the effect of hydrogen-rich medium on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), hyaline leukocyte conglutination, and permeability of the endothelium. Endotheliocytes were inoculated on 6-well plates and randomly divided into 4 groups: control, H2, LPS, LPS+H2, H2, and LPS+H2 in saturated hydrogen-rich medium. We applied Wright's stain-ing to observe conglutination of hyaline leukocytes and HUVECs, flow cytometry to determine the content of vascular cell adhesion protein 1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure the E-selectin concentration in the cell liquor, the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) to test the permeability of endothelial cells, and Western blot and immunofluorescence to test the expression and distribution of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. Compared with control cells, there was an increase in endothelium-hyaline leukocyte conglutination, a reduction in VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin, and the TEER value increased obviously. Compared with LPS, there was an obvious reduction in the conglutination of LPS+H2 cells, a reduction in VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin levels, and a reduction in the TEER-resistance value, while the expression of VE-cadherin increased. Fluorescence results showed that, compared with control cells, the VE-cadherin in LPS cells was in-complete at the cell joints. Compared with LPS cells, the VE-cadherin in LPS+H2 cells was even and complete at the cell joints. Liquid rich in hydrogen could reduce LPS-induced production of adhesion molecules and endothelium-hyaline leukocyte conglutination, and influence the expression and distribution of VE-cadherin to regulate the permeability of the endothelium.

  11. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  12. Research on Liquid Management Technology in Water Tank and Reactor for Propulsion System with Hydrogen Production System Utilizing Aluminum and Water Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Ryoji; Imamura, Takuya; Sugioka, Masatoshi; Higashino, Kazuyuki

    2017-12-01

    High pressure hydrogen produced by aluminum and water reaction is considered to be applied to space propulsion system. Water tank and hydrogen production reactor in this propulsion system require gas and liquid separation function under microgravity condition. We consider to install vane type liquid acquisition device (LAD) utilizing surface tension in the water tank, and install gas-liquid separation mechanism by centrifugal force which swirling flow creates in the hydrogen reactor. In water tank, hydrophilic coating was covered on both tank wall and vane surface to improve wettability. Function of LAD in water tank and gas-liquid separation in reaction vessel were evaluated by short duration microgravity experiments using drop tower facility. In the water tank, it was confirmed that liquid was driven and acquired on the outlet due to capillary force created by vanes. In addition of this, it was found that gas-liquid separation worked well by swirling flow in hydrogen production reactor. However, collection of hydrogen gas bubble was sometimes suppressed by aluminum alloy particles, which is open problem to be solved.

  13. Mars: A water-rich planet?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    Mars had outgassed at least 0.5 to 1 km of water, 10 to 20 bar of CO2, and 0.1 to 0.3 bar of N2. The volatiles that have been retained are mostly in the cratered uplands. Terrain softening, fretted channels, debris flows, and closed depressions indicate that at least the upper 2 km of the cratered uplands at high latitudes (>30??) contain ice in amounts that exceed the porosity, estimated to be 10-20%. Theoretical studies, and lack of these features in the cratered uplands at low latitudes, suggest that the upper 1 km of the uplands at low latitudes is ice poor. However, valley networks indicate that water was present near the surface early in the planet's history, although in amounts smaller than at high latitudes. The entire upper 1 km, planetwide is estimated to have contained 75-125 m of water at the end of heavy bombardment. The largest sink for water is the megaregolith below 1 km. Episodic eruption of water from the deep megaregolith cut many of the large outflow channels. From the volume of water needed to cut the circum-Chryse channels, and assuming uniform planetwide distribution of water, the deep megaregolith is estimated to have contained at least 350 m of water at the end of heavy bombardment, thereby giving a total minimum inventory of 424-475 m planetwide. Most of the water lost from the low-latitude uplands by diffusion and in cutting the valley networks is now believed to be in the polar layered terrains. Most of the water involved in cutting the outflow channels is in the low-lying northern plains where a variety of features that have been attributed to ground ice is present. A large fraction of the planet's surface has been overplated with water-poor volcanics, of which we have samples in the SNC meteorites. The younger volcanics have reacted extensively with the old volatile-rich basement. Some of the CO2 and N2 outgassed was lost during heavy bombardment by impact erosion of the atmosphere and other processes. The remaining was fixed

  14. Advances of zeolite based membrane for hydrogen production via water gas shift reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen is considered as a promising energy vector which can be obtained from various renewable sources. However, an efficient hydrogen production technology is still challenging. One technology to produce hydrogen with very high capacity with low cost is through water gas shift (WGS) reaction. Water gas shift reaction is an equilibrium reaction that produces hydrogen from syngas mixture by the introduction of steam. Conventional WGS reaction employs two or more reactors in series with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given volume of catalyst. Membrane reactor as new technology can cope several drawbacks of conventional reactor by removing reaction product and the reaction will favour towards product formation. Zeolite has properties namely high temperature, chemical resistant, and low price makes it suitable for membrane reactor applications. Moreover, it has been employed for years as hydrogen selective layer. This review paper is focusing on the development of membrane reactor for efficient water gas shift reaction to produce high purity hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Development of membrane reactor is discussed further related to its modification towards efficient reaction and separation from WGS reaction mixture. Moreover, zeolite framework suitable for WGS membrane reactor will be discussed more deeply.

  15. Small-scale, hydrogen-oxidizing-denitrifying bioreactor for treatment of nitrate-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard L; Buckwalter, Seanne P; Repert, Deborah A; Miller, Daniel N

    2005-05-01

    Nitrate removal by hydrogen-coupled denitrification was examined using flow-through, packed-bed bioreactors to develop a small-scale, cost effective system for treating nitrate-contaminated drinking-water supplies. Nitrate removal was accomplished using a Rhodocyclus sp., strain HOD 5, isolated from a sole-source drinking-water aquifer. The autotrophic capacity of the purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium made it particularly adept for this purpose. Initial tests used a commercial bioreactor filled with glass beads and countercurrent, non-sterile flow of an autotrophic, air-saturated, growth medium and hydrogen gas. Complete removal of 2 mM nitrate was achieved for more than 300 days of operation at a 2-h retention time. A low-cost hydrogen generator/bioreactor system was then constructed from readily available materials as a water treatment approach using the Rhodocyclus strain. After initial tests with the growth medium, the constructed system was tested using nitrate-amended drinking water obtained from fractured granite and sandstone aquifers, with moderate and low TDS loads, respectively. Incomplete nitrate removal was evident in both water types, with high-nitrite concentrations in the bioreactor output, due to a pH increase, which inhibited nitrite reduction. This was rectified by including carbon dioxide in the hydrogen stream. Additionally, complete nitrate removal was accomplished with wastewater-impacted surface water, with a concurrent decrease in dissolved organic carbon. The results of this study using three chemically distinct water supplies demonstrate that hydrogen-coupled denitrification can serve as the basis for small-scale remediation and that pilot-scale testing might be the next logical step.

  16. Small-scale, hydrogen-oxidizing-denitrifying bioreactor for treatment of nitrate-contaminated drinking water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Buckwalter, S.P.; Repert, D.A.; Miller, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    Nitrate removal by hydrogen-coupled denitrification was examined using flow-through, packed-bed bioreactors to develop a small-scale, cost effective system for treating nitrate-contaminated drinking-water supplies. Nitrate removal was accomplished using a Rhodocyclus sp., strain HOD 5, isolated from a sole-source drinking-water aquifer. The autotrophic capacity of the purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium made it particularly adept for this purpose. Initial tests used a commercial bioreactor filled with glass beads and countercurrent, non-sterile flow of an autotrophic, air-saturated, growth medium and hydrogen gas. Complete removal of 2 mM nitrate was achieved for more than 300 days of operation at a 2-h retention time. A low-cost hydrogen generator/bioreactor system was then constructed from readily available materials as a water treatment approach using the Rhodocyclus strain. After initial tests with the growth medium, the constructed system was tested using nitrate-amended drinking water obtained from fractured granite and sandstone aquifers, with moderate and low TDS loads, respectively. Incomplete nitrate removal was evident in both water types, with high-nitrite concentrations in the bioreactor output, due to a pH increase, which inhibited nitrite reduction. This was rectified by including carbon dioxide in the hydrogen stream. Additionally, complete nitrate removal was accomplished with wastewater-impacted surface water, with a concurrent decrease in dissolved organic carbon. The results of this study using three chemically distinct water supplies demonstrate that hydrogen-coupled denitrification can serve as the basis for small-scale remediation and that pilot-scale testing might be the next logical step.

  17. Cation–hydroxide–water coadsorption inhibits the alkaline hydrogen oxidation reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Martinez, Ulises; Matanovic, Ivana; ...

    2016-10-24

    Rotating disk electrode voltammograms and infrared reflection absorption spectra indicate that the hydrogen oxidation reaction of platinum in 0.1 M tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution is adversely impacted by time-dependent and potential-driven cation–hydroxide–water coadsorption. Impedance analysis suggests that the hydrogen oxidation reaction inhibition is mainly caused by the hydrogen diffusion barrier of the coadsorbed trilayer rather than intuitive catalyst site blocking by the adsorbed cation species. Finally, these results give useful insights on how to design ionomeric binders for advanced alkaline membrane fuel cells.

  18. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  19. Statics and dynamics of free and hydrogen-bonded OH groups at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vila Verde, Ana; Bolhuis, Peter G; Campen, R Kramer

    2012-08-09

    We use classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two water models (SPC/E and TIP4P/2005) to investigate the orientation and reorientation dynamics of two subpopulations of OH groups belonging to water molecules at the air/water interface at 300 K: those OH groups that donate a hydrogen bond (called "bonded") and those that do not (called "free"). Free interfacial OH groups reorient in two distinct regimes: a fast regime from 0 to 1 ps and a slow regime thereafter. Qualitatively similar behavior was reported by others for free OH groups near extended hydrophobic surfaces. In contrast, the net reorientation of bonded OH groups occurs at a rate similar to that of bulk water. This similarity in reorientation rate results from compensation of two effects: decreasing frequency of hydrogen-bond breaking/formation (i.e., hydrogen-bond exchange) and faster rotation of intact hydrogen bonds. Both changes result from the decrease in density at the air/water interface relative to the bulk. Interestingly, because of the presence of capillary waves, the slowdown of hydrogen-bond exchange is significantly smaller than that reported for water near extended hydrophobic surfaces, but it is almost identical to that reported for water near small hydrophobic solutes. In this sense water at the air/water interface has characteristics of water of hydration of both small and extended hydrophobic solutes.

  20. Hydrogen production by high-temperature water splitting using electron-conducting membranes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Tae H.; Wang, Shuangyan; Dorris, Stephen E.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2004-04-27

    A device and method for separating water into hydrogen and oxygen is disclosed. A first substantially gas impervious solid electron-conducting membrane for selectively passing hydrogen is provided and spaced from a second substantially gas impervious solid electron-conducting membrane for selectively passing oxygen. When steam is passed between the two membranes at disassociation temperatures the hydrogen from the disassociation of steam selectively and continuously passes through the first membrane and oxygen selectively and continuously passes through the second membrane, thereby continuously driving the disassociation of steam producing hydrogen and oxygen.

  1. On-line Differential Thermal Isotope Analysis: A New Method for Measuring Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotopes of Hydration Water in Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauska, T.; Hodell, D. A.; Walters, G.

    2016-12-01

    Oxygen (16O,17O,18O) and hydrogen (H,D) isotopes of hydration water in minerals provide a rich source of information about the conditions under which hydrated minerals form on Earth and other planetary bodies (e.g. Mars). We have developed a new method for measuring different types of bonded water (e.g., molecular, hydroxyl) contained in hydrated minerals by coupling a thermal gravimeter (TG) and a cavity ringdown laser spectrometer (CRDS). The method involves step heating a mineral sample, precisely measuring the weight loss and enthalpy as the sample undergoes dehydration and dehydroxylation, whilst simultaneously determining the oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of the water vapor evolved from the mineral sample by cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy (CRDS). Nitrogen carrier gas is used to transfer the sample from the TG to the CRDS via a heated line and interface box. The interface includes the capability of (i) cryogenic trapping discrete types of water for samples containing small amounts of water; (ii) injecting small quantities of water of known isotopic value for calibration; and (iii) converting volatile organic compounds to nascent amounts of water using a catalyst. The CRDS continually measures water vapor concentration in the optical cavity and hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios. Isotopic values are calculated by integrating the product of the water amount and its isotopic value for the separated peaks after correcting for background. Precision of the method was estimated by comparing isotope results of total water for gypsum measured by DTIA with our conventional method of extraction and analysis (Gázquez et al., 2015. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 29, 1997-2006). Errors for the isotopic values of total hydration water vary between ±0.08 and ±0.34 ‰ for δ18O and between ±0.16 and ±0.86 ‰ for δD. We demonstrate the application of the DTIA method to a variety of hydrous minerals and mineraloids including gypsum, clays, and amorphous

  2. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange reactions between clay minerals and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Kharaka, Y.K.

    1976-01-01

    The extent of hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange between clay minerals and water has been measured in the temperature range 100-350?? for bomb runs of up to almost 2 years. Hydrogen isotope exchange between water and the clays was demonstrable at 100??. Exchange rates were 3-5 times greater for montmorillonite than for kaolinite or illite and this is attributed to the presence of interlayer water in the montmorillonite structure. Negligible oxygen isotope exchange occurred at these low temperatures. The great disparity in D and O18 exchange rates observed in every experiment demonstrates that hydrogen isotope exchange occurred by a mechanism of proton exchange independent of the slower process of O18 exchange. At 350?? kaolinite reacted to form pyrophyllite and diaspore. This was accompanied by essentially complete D exchange but minor O18 exchange and implies that intact structural units in the pyrophyllite were inherited from the kaolinite precursor. ?? 1976.

  3. XUV-Exposed, Non-Hydrostatic Hydrogen-Rich Upper Atmospheres of Terrestrial Planets. Part I: Atmospheric Expansion and Thermal Escape

    PubMed Central

    Lammer, Helmut; Odert, Petra; Kulikov, Yuri N.; Kislyakova, Kristina G.; Khodachenko, Maxim L.; Güdel, Manuel; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Biernat, Helfried

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The recently discovered low-density “super-Earths” Kepler-11b, Kepler-11f, Kepler-11d, Kepler-11e, and planets such as GJ 1214b represent the most likely known planets that are surrounded by dense H/He envelopes or contain deep H2O oceans also surrounded by dense hydrogen envelopes. Although these super-Earths are orbiting relatively close to their host stars, they have not lost their captured nebula-based hydrogen-rich or degassed volatile-rich steam protoatmospheres. Thus, it is interesting to estimate the maximum possible amount of atmospheric hydrogen loss from a terrestrial planet orbiting within the habitable zone of late main sequence host stars. For studying the thermosphere structure and escape, we apply a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model that solves the equations of mass, momentum, and energy conservation for a planet with the mass and size of Earth and for a super-Earth with a size of 2 REarth and a mass of 10 MEarth. We calculate volume heating rates by the stellar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) and expansion of the upper atmosphere, its temperature, density, and velocity structure and related thermal escape rates during the planet's lifetime. Moreover, we investigate under which conditions both planets enter the blow-off escape regime and may therefore experience loss rates that are close to the energy-limited escape. Finally, we discuss the results in the context of atmospheric evolution and implications for habitability of terrestrial planets in general. Key Words: Stellar activity—Low-mass stars—Early atmospheres—Earth-like exoplanets—Energetic neutral atoms—Ion escape—Habitability. Astrobiology 13, 1011–1029. PMID:24251443

  4. Nano-ferrites for Water Splitting: Unprecedented High Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production under Visible Light

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the present investigation, hydrogen production via water splitting by nano ferrites has been studied using ethanol as the sacrificial donor. The nano ferrite has shown great potential in hydrogen generation with hydrogen yield of 8275 9moles/h/ g of photocatalyst under visible...

  5. (F)UV Spectral Analysis of Hot, Hydrogen-Rich Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, M.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Kruk, J. W.

    2010-11-01

    Metal abundances of CSPNe are not well known although they provide important constraints on AGB nucleosynthesis. We aim to determine metal abundances of two hot, hydrogen-rich CSPNe (namely of A35 and NGC3587, the latter also known as M97 or the Owl Nebula) and to derive Teff and log g precisely from high-resolution, high-S/N (far-) ultraviolet observations obtained with FUSE and HST/STIS. For this purpose, we utilize NLTE model atmospheres calculated with TMAP, the Tübingen Model Atmosphere Package. Due to strong line absorption of the ISM, simultaneous modeling of interstellar features has become a standard tool in our analyses. We present preliminary results, demonstrating the importance of combining stellar and interstellar models, in order to clearly identify and measure the strengths of strategic photospheric lines.

  6. Hydrogen generation from water using Mg nanopowder produced by arc plasma method.

    PubMed

    Uda, Masahiro; Okuyama, Hideo; Suzuki, Tohru S; Sakka, Yoshio

    2012-04-01

    We report that hydrogen gas can be easily produced from water at room temperature using a Mg nanopowder (30-1000 nm particles, average diameter 265 nm). The Mg nanopowder was produced by dc arc melting of a Mg ingot in a chamber with mixed-gas atmosphere (20% N 2 -80% Ar) at 0.1 MPa using custom-built nanopowder production equipment. The Mg nanopowder was passivated with a gas mixture of 1% O 2 in Ar for 12 h in the final step of the synthesis, after which the nanopowder could be safely handled in ambient air. The nanopowder vigorously reacted with water at room temperature, producing 110 ml of hydrogen gas per 1 g of powder in 600 s. This amount corresponds to 11% of the hydrogen that could be generated by the stoichiometric reaction between Mg and water. Mg(OH) 2 flakes formed on the surface of the Mg particles as a result of this reaction. They easily peeled off, and the generation of hydrogen continued until all the Mg was consumed.

  7. The Role of Water in the Storage of Hydrogen in Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Michael D.; Lomness, Janice K.; Giannuzzi, Lucille A.

    2001-01-01

    One major problem with the use of hydrogen is safe and efficient storage. In the pure form, bulky and heavy containers are required greatly reducing the efficiency of its use. Safety is also a great concern. Storage of hydrogen in the form of a metal hydride offers distinct advantages both in terms of volumetric efficiency and in terms of safety. As a result, an enormous amount of research is currently being done on metal-hydrogen systems. Practical application of these systems to storage of hydrogen can only occur when they are very well understood. In this paper, the preliminary results of a study of the surfaces of magnesium nickel alloys will be presented. Alloys that have been rendered totally unreactive with hydrogen as well as those that have been activated with liquid water and with water vapor were studied. Data obtained from XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer) analysis, with samples held in vacuum for the shortest possible time to minimize the hydroxide degradation will be presented. Furthermore, TEM data on samples prepared in a new way that largely protects the surface from the high vacuum will be discussed.

  8. Generating para-water from para-hydrogen: A Gedankenexperiment.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Konstantin L; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2018-07-01

    A novel conceptual approach is described that is based on the transfer of hyperpolarization from para-hydrogen in view of generating a population imbalance between the two spin isomers of H 2 O. The approach is analogous to SABRE (Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange) and makes use of the transfer of spin order from para-hydrogen to H 2 O in a hypothetical organometallic complex. The spin order transfer is expected to be most efficient at avoided level crossings. The highest achievable enrichment levels of para- and ortho-water are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Photocatalysts Based on Cobalt-Chelating Conjugated Polymers for Hydrogen Evolution from Water

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lianwei; Hadt, Ryan G.; Yao, Shiyu

    Developing photocatalytic systems for water splitting to generate oxygen and hydrogen is one of the biggest chemical challenges in solar energy utilization. In this work, we report the first example of heterogeneous photocatalysts for hydrogen evolution based on in-chain cobalt-chelating conjugated polymers. Four conjugated polymers chelated with earth abundant cobalt ions were synthesized and found to evolve hydrogen photocatalytically from water. These polymers are designed to combine functions of the conjugated backbone as light-harvesting antenna and electron transfer conduit with the in-chain bipyridyl chelated transition metal centers as catalytic active sites. In addition, these polymers are soluble in organic solvents,more » enabling effective interactions with the substrates as well as detailed characterization. We also found a polymer-dependent optimal cobalt chelating concentration at which the highest photocatalytic hydrogen production (PHP) activity can be achieved.« less

  10. The hydrogen issue.

    PubMed

    Armaroli, Nicola; Balzani, Vincenzo

    2011-01-17

    Hydrogen is often proposed as the fuel of the future, but the transformation from the present fossil fuel economy to a hydrogen economy will need the solution of numerous complex scientific and technological issues, which will require several decades to be accomplished. Hydrogen is not an alternative fuel, but an energy carrier that has to be produced by using energy, starting from hydrogen-rich compounds. Production from gasoline or natural gas does not offer any advantage over the direct use of such fuels. Production from coal by gasification techniques with capture and sequestration of CO₂ could be an interim solution. Water splitting by artificial photosynthesis, photobiological methods based on algae, and high temperatures obtained by nuclear or concentrated solar power plants are promising approaches, but still far from practical applications. In the next decades, the development of the hydrogen economy will most likely rely on water electrolysis by using enormous amounts of electric power, which in its turn has to be generated. Producing electricity by burning fossil fuels, of course, cannot be a rational solution. Hydroelectric power can give but a very modest contribution. Therefore, it will be necessary to generate large amounts of electric power by nuclear energy of by renewable energies. A hydrogen economy based on nuclear electricity would imply the construction of thousands of fission reactors, thereby magnifying all the problems related to the use of nuclear energy (e.g., safe disposal of radioactive waste, nuclear proliferation, plant decommissioning, uranium shortage). In principle, wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power have the potential to produce enormous amounts of electric power, but, except for wind, such technologies are too underdeveloped and expensive to tackle such a big task in a short period of time. A full development of a hydrogen economy needs also improvement in hydrogen storage, transportation and distribution

  11. Laser Induced Hydrogen Generation from Coal in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyitliyev, Dovletgeldi; Kholikov, Khomidkhodzha; Er, Ali

    We report an alternative way of obtaining hydrogen using nanosecond laser pulses and various ranks of coal and coke. SEM-EDS analysis shows the atomic concentrations of elements on each of the powders which also is in good agreement with calorimeter analysis. Coal and coke powders were irradiated with 1064nm IR and 532 nm green Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam for 45 minutes. The volume of the total gas generated after irradiation of each rank was measured using the water displacement method. The amount of gas generated increased when using 532 nm compared to 1064 nm. Post-irradiation SEM images show structural differences with samples before irradiation. The amount of gas generation with respect to laser energy density shows nonlinear correlation. Generated gas concentrations were then analyzed using gas chromatography (GC). Hydrogen and carbon monoxide were the two most highly generated gases, and the efficiency of each rank of coal was determined by analyzing the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio. The highest efficiency rank was anthracite, with hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio of 1.4. GC analysis also showed that the maximum hydrogen generation occurs at 100 mJ/pulse laser energy. The efficiency of each rank of coal was observed to correlate with carbon content. American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund.

  12. Hydrogen-rich water attenuates amyloid β-induced cytotoxicity through upregulation of Sirt1-FoxO3a by stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase in SK-N-MC cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Li; Huang, Wen-Nung; Li, Hsin-Hua; Huang, Chien-Ning; Hsieh, Sam; Lai, Copper; Lu, Fung-Jou

    2015-10-05

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are identified in cause of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous evidence suggests Aβ-induced neurotoxicity is linked to the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The accumulation of Aβ-induced ROS leads to increased mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers apoptotic cell death. This suggests antioxidant therapies may be beneficial for preventing ROS-related diseases such as AD. Recently, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) has been proven effective in treating oxidative stress-induced disorders because of its ROS-scavenging abilities. However, the precise molecular mechanisms whereby HRW prevents neuronal death are still unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the putative pathways by which HRW protects against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity. Our results indicated that HRW directly counteracts oxidative damage by neutralizing excessive ROS, leading to the alleviation of Aβ-induced cell death. In addition, HRW also stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in a sirtuin 1 (Sirt1)-dependent pathway, which upregulates forkhead box protein O3a (FoxO3a) downstream antioxidant response and diminishes Aβ-induced mitochondrial potential loss and oxidative stress. Taken together, our findings suggest that HRW may have potential therapeutic value to inhibit Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Communication: Hydrogen bonding interactions in water-alcohol mixtures from X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Royce K.; Smith, Jacob W.; Saykally, Richard J., E-mail: saykally@berkeley.edu

    While methanol and ethanol are macroscopically miscible with water, their mixtures exhibit negative excess entropies of mixing. Despite considerable effort in both experiment and theory, there remains significant disagreement regarding the origin of this effect. Different models for the liquid mixture structure have been proposed to address this behavior, including the enhancement of the water hydrogen bonding network around the alcohol hydrophobic groups and microscopic immiscibility or clustering. We have investigated mixtures of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol with water by liquid microjet X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the oxygen K-edge, an atom-specific probe providing details of both inter- and intra-molecular structure.more » The measured spectra evidence a significant enhancement of hydrogen bonding originating from the methanol and ethanol hydroxyl groups upon the addition of water. These additional hydrogen bonding interactions would strengthen the liquid-liquid interactions, resulting in additional ordering in the liquid structures and leading to a reduction in entropy and a negative enthalpy of mixing, consistent with existing thermodynamic data. In contrast, the spectra of the isopropanol-water mixtures exhibit an increase in the number of broken alcohol hydrogen bonds for mixtures containing up to 0.5 water mole fraction, an observation consistent with existing enthalpy of mixing data, suggesting that the measured negative excess entropy is a result of clustering or micro-immiscibility.« less

  14. Water in Earth's mantle: Hydrogen analysis of mantle olivine, pyroxenes and garnet using the SIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurosawa, Masanori; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Sueno, Shigeho

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen (or water) in the Earth's interior plays a key role in the evolution and dynamics of the planet. However, the abundance and the existence form of the hydrogen have scarcely been clear in practice. Hydrogen in the mantle was incorporated in the interior during the formation of the Earth. The incorporated hydrogen was hardly possible to concentrate locally inside the Earth considering its high mobility and high reactivity. The hydrogen, preferably, could be distributed homogeneously over the mantle and the core by the subsequent physical and chemical processes. Therefore, hydrogen in the mantle could be present in the form of trace hydrogen in nominally anhydrous mantle minerals. The hydrogen and the other trace elements in mantle olivines, orthopyroxenes, clinopyroxenes, and garnets were determined using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for elucidating (1) the exact hydrogen contents, (2) the correlation between the hydrogen and the other trace elements, (3) the dependence of the hydrogen contents on the depth, and (4) the dependence of the whole rock water contents on the depth.

  15. High-Yield Hydrogen Production from Starch and Water by a Synthetic Enzymatic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Evans, Barbara R.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Adams, Michael W.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background The future hydrogen economy offers a compelling energy vision, but there are four main obstacles: hydrogen production, storage, and distribution, as well as fuel cells. Hydrogen production from inexpensive abundant renewable biomass can produce cheaper hydrogen, decrease reliance on fossil fuels, and achieve zero net greenhouse gas emissions, but current chemical and biological means suffer from low hydrogen yields and/or severe reaction conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate a synthetic enzymatic pathway consisting of 13 enzymes for producing hydrogen from starch and water. The stoichiometric reaction is C6H10O5 (l)+7 H2O (l)→12 H2 (g)+6 CO2 (g). The overall process is spontaneous and unidirectional because of a negative Gibbs free energy and separation of the gaseous products with the aqueous reactants. Conclusions Enzymatic hydrogen production from starch and water mediated by 13 enzymes occurred at 30°C as expected, and the hydrogen yields were much higher than the theoretical limit (4 H2/glucose) of anaerobic fermentations. Significance The unique features, such as mild reaction conditions (30°C and atmospheric pressure), high hydrogen yields, likely low production costs ($∼2/kg H2), and a high energy-density carrier starch (14.8 H2-based mass%), provide great potential for mobile applications. With technology improvements and integration with fuel cells, this technology also solves the challenges associated with hydrogen storage, distribution, and infrastructure in the hydrogen economy. PMID:17520015

  16. Integral Field Spectroscopy of Supernova Remnant 1E0102–7219 Reveals Fast-moving Hydrogen and Sulfur-rich Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Terry, Jason P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Dopita, Michael A.; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2018-02-01

    We study the optical emission from heavy element ejecta in the oxygen-rich young supernova remnant 1E 0102.2–7219 (1E 0102) in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We have used the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer optical integral field spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope on Cerro Paranal and the wide field spectrograph (WiFeS) at the ANU 2.3 m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory to obtain deep observations of 1E 0102. Our observations cover the entire extent of the remnant from below 3500 Å to 9350 Å. Our observations unambiguously reveal the presence of fast-moving ejecta emitting in [S II], [S III], [Ar III], and [Cl II]. The sulfur-rich ejecta appear more asymmetrically distributed compared to oxygen or neon, a product of carbon burning. In addition to the forbidden line emission from products of oxygen burning (S, Ar, Cl), we have also discovered Hα and Hβ emission from several knots of low surface brightness, fast-moving ejecta. The presence of fast-moving hydrogen points toward a progenitor that had not entirely shed its hydrogen envelope prior to the supernova. The explosion that gave rise to 1E 0102 is therefore commensurate with a Type IIb supernova.

  17. Simulating Asymmetric Top Impurities in Superfluid Clusters: A para-Water Dopant in para-Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Li, Hui; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2013-01-03

    We present the first simulation study of bosonic clusters doped with an asymmetric top molecule. The path-integral Monte Carlo method with the latest methodological advance in treating rigid-body rotation [Noya, E. G.; Vega, C.; McBride, C. J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 054117] is employed to study a para-water impurity in para-hydrogen clusters with up to 20 para-hydrogen molecules. The growth pattern of the doped clusters is similar in nature to that of pure clusters. The para-water molecule appears to rotate freely in the cluster. The presence of para-water substantially quenches the superfluid response of para-hydrogen with respect to the space-fixed frame.

  18. Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Miguel Á.; Belmontes, Juan Alfonso; Hawkins, Bradford A.

    2005-07-01

    We used regression analyses to examine the relationships between reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe and 11 environmental variables related to five hypotheses for geographical patterns of species richness: (1) productivity; (2) ambient energy; (3) water-energy balance, (4) habitat heterogeneity; and (5) climatic variability. For reptiles, annual potential evapotranspiration (PET), a measure of the amount of atmospheric energy, explained 71% of the variance, with variability in log elevation explaining an additional 6%. For amphibians, annual actual evapotranspiration (AET), a measure of the joint availability of energy and water in the environment, and the global vegetation index, an estimate of plant biomass generated through satellite remote sensing, both described similar proportions of the variance (61% and 60%, respectively) and had partially independent effects on richness as indicated by multiple regression. The two-factor environmental models successfully removed most of the statistically detectable spatial autocorrelation in the richness data of both groups. Our results are consistent with reptile and amphibian environmental requirements, where the former depend strongly on solar energy and the latter require both warmth and moisture for reproduction. We conclude that ambient energy explains the reptile richness pattern, whereas for amphibians a combination of water-energy balance and productivity best explain the pattern.

  19. An ab initio cluster study of the chemisorption of atomic cesium and hydrogen on reconstructed surfaces of gallium rich gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schailey, Ronald

    1999-11-01

    Chemisorption properties of cesium and hydrogen atoms on the Ga-rich GaAs (100) (2 x 1), (2 x 2), and β(4 x 2) surfaces are investigated using ab initio self-consistent restricted open shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) total energy calculations with Hay- Wadt effective core potentials. The effects of electron correlation have been included using many-body perturbation theory through second order, with the exception of β(4 x 2) symmetry due to computational limitations. The semiconductor surface is modeled by finite sized hydrogen saturated clusters. The effects of surface relaxation and reconstruction have been investigated in detail. Results are given for the energetics of chemisorption, charge population analysis, HOMO-LUMO gaps, and consequent possibilities of metallization for atomic cesium adsorption. For the chemisorption of atomic hydrogen, the experimentally verified mechanism of surface dimer bond breaking is investigated in detail.

  20. In vitro genotoxicity of chlorinated drinking water processed from humus-rich surface water

    SciTech Connect

    Liimatainen, A.; Grummt, T.

    Chlorination by-products of drinking waters are capable of inducing sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosome aberrations (CA) in vitro, in addition to their mutagenic activity in the Ames test. Finnish drinking waters, processed from humus-rich surface water using chlorine disinfection, have been found to be highly mutagenic in the Ames' test. The highest activities have been found in the acidic, non-volatile fraction of the water concentrates using tester strain TA100 without metabolic activation by S9mix. The mutagenicities have varied between 500 and 14,000 induced revertants per liter. These figures are one to two magnitudes higher than those reported elsewhere. Themore » authors studied five Finnish drinking water samples for their potency to exert genotoxic effects, SCEs and CAs, in mammalian cells in vitro (human peripheral lymphocytes and Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts).« less

  1. Hydrogen production from alcohol reforming in a microwave ‘tornado’-type plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarova, E.; Bundaleska, N.; Dias, F. M.; Tsyganov, D.; Saavedra, R.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, an experimental investigation of microwave plasma-assisted reforming of different alcohols is presented. A microwave (2.45 GHz) ‘tornado’-type plasma with a high-speed tangential gas injection (swirl) at atmospheric pressure is applied to decompose alcohol molecules, namely methanol, ethanol and propanol, and to produce hydrogen-rich gas. The reforming efficiency is investigated both in Ar and Ar+ water vapor plasma environments. The hydrogen yield dependence on the partial alcohol flux is analyzed. Mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to detect the outlet gas products from the decomposition process. Hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and solid carbon are the main decomposition by-products. A significant increase in the hydrogen production rate is observed with the addition of a small amount of water. Furthermore, optical emission spectroscopy is applied to detect the radiation emitted by the plasma and to estimate the gas temperature and electron density.

  2. Hydrogen and oxygen in brine shrimp chitin reflect environmental water and dietary isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Kristine E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2010-03-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of the common structural biopolymer chitin are a potential recorder of ecological and environmental information, but our understanding of the mechanisms of incorporation of H and O from environmental substrates into chitin is limited. We report the results of a set of experiments in which the isotopic compositions of environmental water and diet were varied independently in order to assess the contribution of these variables to the H and O isotopic composition of Artemia franciscana chitin. Hydrogen isotope ratios of chitin were strongly linearly correlated with both food and water, with approximately 26% of the hydrogen signal reflecting food and approximately 38% reflecting water. Oxygen isotopes were also strongly correlated with the isotopic composition of water and food, but whereas 69% of oxygen in chitin exchanged with environmental water, only 10% was derived from food. We propose that these observations reflect the position-specific, partial exchange of H and O atoms with brine shrimp body water during the processes of digestion and chitin biosynthesis. Comparison of culture experiments with a set of natural samples collected from the Great Salt Lake, UT in 2006 shows that, with some exceptions, oxygen isotope compositions of chitin track those of water, whereas hydrogen isotopes vary inversely with those of lake water. The different behavior of the two isotopic systems can be explained in terms of a dietary shift from allochthonous particulate matter with relatively higher δ 2H values in the early spring to autochthonous particulate matter with significantly lower δ 2H values in the late summer to autumn. These results suggest oxygen in chitin may be a valuable proxy for the oxygen isotopic composition of environmental water, whereas hydrogen isotope values from the same molecule may reveal ecological and biogeochemical changes within lakes.

  3. Multisample conversion of water to hydrogen by zinc for stable isotope determination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, C.; Coplen, T.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two techniques for the conversion of water to hydrogen for stable isotope ratio determination have been developed that are especially suited for automated multisample analysis. Both procedures involve reaction of zinc shot with a water sample at 450 ??C. in one method designed for water samples in bottles, the water is put in capillaries and is reduced by zinc in reaction vessels; overall savings in sample preparation labor of 75% have been realized over the standard uranium reduction technique. The second technique is for waters evolved under vacuum and is a sealed-tube method employing 9 mm o.d. quartz tubing. Problems inherent with zinc reduction include surface inhomogeneity of the zinc and exchange of hydrogen both with the zinc and with the glass walls of the vessels. For best results, water/zinc and water/glass surface area ratios of vessels should be kept as large as possible.

  4. Molecular hydrogen consumption in the human body during the inhalation of hydrogen gas.

    PubMed

    Shimouchi, Akito; Nose, Kazutoshi; Mizukami, Tomoe; Che, Dock-Chil; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Inhaling or ingesting hydrogen (H2) gas improves oxidative stress-induced damage in animal models and humans. We previously reported that H2 was consumed throughout the human body after the ingestion of H2-rich water and that the H2 consumption rate ([Formula: see text]) was 1.0 μmol/min/m(2) body surface area. To confirm this result, we evaluated [Formula: see text]during the inhalation of low levels of H2 gas. After measuring the baseline levels of exhaled H2 during room air breathing via a one-way valve and a mouthpiece, the subject breathed low levels (160 ppm) of H2 gas mixed with purified artificial air. The H2 levels of their inspired and expired breath were measured by gas chromatography using a semiconductor sensor. [Formula: see text] was calculated using a ventilation equation derived from the inspired and expired concentrations of O2/CO2/H2, and the expired minute ventilation volume, which was measured with a respiromonitor. As a result, [Formula: see text] was found to be approximately 0.7 μmol/min/m(2)BSA, which was compatible with the findings we obtained using H2-rich water. [Formula: see text] varied markedly when pretreatment fasting to reduce colonic fermentation was not employed, i.e., when the subject's baseline breath hydrogen level was 10 ppm or greater. Our H2 inhalation method might be useful for the noninvasive monitoring of hydroxyl radical production in the human body.

  5. Hydrogen speciation in hydrated layers on nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R.D.; Weed, H.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1987-01-15

    The hydration of an outer layer on nuclear waste glasses is known to occur during leaching, but the actual speciation of hydrogen (as water or hydroxyl groups) in these layers has not been determined. As part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, we have used infrared spectroscopy to determine hydrogen speciations in three nuclear waste glass compositions (SRL-131 & 165, and PNL 76-68), which were leached at 90{sup 0}C (all glasses) or hydrated in a vapor-saturated atmosphere at 202{sup 0}C (SRL-131 only). Hydroxyl groups were found in the surface layers of all the glasses. Molecular water was foundmore » in the surface of SRL-131 and PNL 76-68 glasses that had been leached for several months in deionized water, and in the vapor-hydrated sample. The water/hydroxyl ratio increases with increasing reaction time; molecular water makes up most of the hydrogen in the thick reaction layers on vapor-phase hydrated glass while only hydroxyl occurs in the least reacted samples. Using the known molar absorptivities of water and hydroxyl in silica-rich glass the vapor-phase layer contained 4.8 moles/liter of molecular water, and 0.6 moles water in the form hydroxyl. A 15 {mu}m layer on SRL-131 glass formed by leaching at 90{sup 0}C contained a total of 4.9 moles/liter of water, 2/3 of which was as hydroxyl. The unreacted bulk glass contains about 0.018 moles/liter water, all as hydroxyl. The amount of hydrogen added to the SRL-131 glass was about 70% of the original Na + Li content, not the 300% that would result from alkali=hydronium ion interdiffusion. If all the hydrogen is then assumed to be added as the result of alkali-H{sup +} interdiffusion, the molecular water observed may have formed from condensation of the original hydroxyl groups.« less

  6. Assessment of shock effects on amphibole water contents and hydrogen isotope compositions: 1. Amphibolite experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minitti, Michelle E.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Taylor, Bruce E.; Dyar, M. Darby; Schultz, Peter H.

    2008-02-01

    Kaersutitic amphiboles found within a subset of the Martian meteorites have low water contents and variably heavy hydrogen isotope compositions. In order to assess if impact shock-induced devolatilization and hydrogen isotope fractionation were determining factors in these water and isotopic characteristics of the Martian kaersutites, we conducted impact shock experiments on samples of Gore Mountain amphibolite in the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). A parallel shock experiment conducted on an anorthosite sample indicated that contamination of shocked samples by the AVGR hydrogen propellant was unlikely. Petrographic study of the experimental amphibolite shock products indicates that only ˜ 10% of the shock products experienced levels of damage equivalent to those found in the most highly shocked kaersutite-bearing Martian meteorites (30-35 GPa). Ion microprobe studies of highly shocked hornblende from the amphibolite exhibited elevated water contents (ΔH 2O ˜ 0.1 wt.%) and enriched hydrogen isotope compositions (Δ D ˜ + 10‰) relative to unshocked hornblende. Water and hydrogen isotope analyses of tens of milligrams of unshocked, moderately shocked, and highly shocked hornblende samples by vacuum extraction/uranium reduction and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), respectively, are largely consistent with analyses of single grains from the ion microprobe. The mechanisms thought to have produced the excess water in most of the shocked hornblendes are shock-induced reduction of hornblende Fe and/or irreversible adsorption of hydrogen. Addition of the isotopically enriched Martian atmosphere to the Martian meteorite kaersutites via these mechanisms could explain their enriched and variable isotopic compositions. Alternatively, regrouping the water extraction and IRMS analyses on the basis of isotopic composition reveals a small, but consistent, degree of impact-induced devolatilization (˜ 0.1 wt.% H 2O) and H isotope enrichment (Δ D ˜ + 10

  7. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Cardiac and Hepatic Injury in Doxorubicin Rat Model by Inhibiting Inflammation and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) remains the most effective anticancer agent which is widely used in several adult and pediatric cancers, but its application is limited for its cardiotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. Hydrogen, as a selective antioxidant, is a promising potential therapeutic option for many diseases. In this study, we found that intraperitoneal injection of hydrogen-rich saline (H2 saline) ameliorated the mortality, cardiac dysfunction, and histopathological changes caused by DOX in rats. Meanwhile, serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), albumin (ALB), tissue reactive oxygen species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also attenuated after H2 saline treatment. What is more, we further demonstrated that H2 saline treatment could inhibit cardiac and hepatic inflammation and apoptosis relative proteins expressions by western blotting test. In conclusion, our results revealed a protective effect of H2 saline on DOX-induced cardiotoxicity and hepatotoxicity in rats by inhibiting inflammation and apoptosis. PMID:28104928

  8. Subseafloor microbial communities in hydrogen-rich vent fluids from hydrothermal systems along the Mid-Cayman Rise.

    PubMed

    Reveillaud, Julie; Reddington, Emily; McDermott, Jill; Algar, Christopher; Meyer, Julie L; Sylva, Sean; Seewald, Jeffrey; German, Christopher R; Huber, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Warm fluids emanating from hydrothermal vents can be used as windows into the rocky subseafloor habitat and its resident microbial community. Two new vent systems on the Mid-Cayman Rise each exhibits novel geologic settings and distinctively hydrogen-rich vent fluid compositions. We have determined and compared the chemistry, potential energy yielding reactions, abundance, community composition, diversity, and function of microbes in venting fluids from both sites: Piccard, the world's deepest vent site, hosted in mafic rocks; and Von Damm, an adjacent, ultramafic-influenced system. Von Damm hosted a wider diversity of lineages and metabolisms in comparison to Piccard, consistent with thermodynamic models that predict more numerous energy sources at ultramafic systems. There was little overlap in the phylotypes found at each site, although similar and dominant hydrogen-utilizing genera were present at both. Despite the differences in community structure, depth, geology, and fluid chemistry, energetic modelling and metagenomic analysis indicate near functional equivalence between Von Damm and Piccard, likely driven by the high hydrogen concentrations and elevated temperatures at both sites. Results are compared with hydrothermal sites worldwide to provide a global perspective on the distinctiveness of these newly discovered sites and the interplay among rocks, fluid composition and life in the subseafloor. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A simple pore water hydrogen diffusion syringe sampler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is an important intermediate product and electron donor in microbial metabolism. Concentrations of dissolved H 2 are often diagnostic of the predominant terminal electron-accepting processes in ground water systems or aquatic sediments. H2 concentrations are routinely measured in ground water monitoring wells but are rarely measured in saturated aquatic sediments due to a lack of simple and practical sampling methods. This report describes the design and development (including laboratory and field testing) of a simple, syringe-based H 2 sampler in (1) saturated, riparian sediments, (2) surface water bed sediments, and (3) packed intervals of a fractured bedrock borehole that are inaccessible by standard pumped methods. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  10. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation from water under visible light using core/shell nano-catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Shih, K; Li, X Y

    2010-01-01

    A microemulsion technique was employed to synthesize nano-sized photocatalysts with a core (CdS)/shell (ZnS) structure. The primary particles of the photocatalysts were around 10 nm, and the mean size of the catalyst clusters in water was about 100 nm. The band gaps of the catalysts ranged from 2.25 to 2.46 eV. The experiments of photocatalytic H(2) generation showed that the catalysts (CdS)(x)/(ZnS)(1-x) with x ranging from 0.1 to 1 were able to produce hydrogen from water photolysis under visible light. The catalyst with x=0.9 had the highest rate of hydrogen production. The catalyst loading density also influenced the photo-hydrogen production rate, and the best catalyst concentration in water was 1 g L(-1). The stability of the nano-catalysts in terms of size, morphology and activity was satisfactory during an extended test period for a specific hydrogen production rate of 2.38 mmol g(-1) L(-1) h(-1) and a quantum yield of 16.1% under visible light (165 W Xe lamp, lambda>420 nm). The results demonstrate that the (CdS)/(ZnS) core/shell nano-particles are a novel photo-catalyst for renewable hydrogen generation from water under visible light. This is attributable to the large band-gap ZnS shell that separates the electron/hole pairs generated by the CdS core and hence reduces their recombinations.

  11. Hydrogen bonding directed self-assembly of small-molecule amphiphiles in water.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiang-Fei; Niu, Li-Ya; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2014-08-01

    Compounds comprising one or two quadruply hydrogen bonding units, 2-ureido-4[1H]-pyrimidinone (UPy) and tris(tetraethylene glycol monomethyl ether) moieties, were reported to form highly stable hydrogen-bonded assemblies in water. Compound 1, containing one UPy, assembles into vesicles, and compound 2, containing two UPy units, forms micelles. The aggregates disassemble reversibly when the solution pH is raised to 9.0 or above. The results demonstrate the utility of hydrogen bonding to direct the self-assembly of small-molecule building blocks in aqueous media.

  12. On the nature of hydrogen-rich superluminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.; Gall, E. E. E.; Leloudas, G.; Chen, T.-W.; Schulze, S.; Jerkstrand, A.; Nicholl, M.; Anderson, J. P.; Arcavi, I.; Benetti, S.; Cartier, R. A.; Childress, M.; Della Valle, M.; Flewelling, H.; Fraser, M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Howell, D. A.; Huber, M.; Kankare, E.; Krühler, T.; Magnier, E. A.; Maguire, K.; McCully, C.; Prajs, S.; Primak, N.; Scalzo, R.; Schmidt, B. P.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Tucker, B. E.; Valenti, S.; Wilman, M.; Young, D. R.; Yuan, F.

    2018-03-01

    We present two hydrogen-rich superluminous supernovae (SLSNe): SN2103hx and PS15br. These objects, together with SN2008es, are the only SLSNe showing a distinct, broad H α feature during the photospheric phase; also, they show no sign of strong interaction between fast moving ejecta and circumstellar shells in their early spectra. Despite the fact that the peak luminosity of PS15br is fainter than that of the other two objects, the spectrophotometric evolution is similar to SN2103hx and different from any other supernova in a similar luminosity space. We group all of them as SLSNe II and hence they are distinct from the known class of SLSN IIn. Both transients show a strong, multicomponent H α emission after 200 d past maximum, which we interpret as an indication of the interaction of the ejecta with an asymmetric, clumpy circumstellar material. The spectra and photometric evolution of the two objects are similar to Type II supernovae, although they have much higher luminosity and evolve on slower time-scales. This is qualitatively similar to how SLSNe I compare with normal type Ic, in that the former are brighter and evolve more slowly. We apply a magnetar and an interaction semi-analytical code to fit the light curves of our two objects and SN2008es. The overall observational data set would tend to favour the magnetar, or central engine, model as the source of the peak luminosity, although the clear signature of late-time interaction indicates that interaction can play a role in the luminosity evolution of SLSNe II at some phases.

  13. Selective reduction of condensed N-heterocycles using water as a solvent and a hydrogen source.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyejin; Török, Fanni; Török, Béla

    2013-02-21

    The reduction of unprotected indoles and quinolines is described using water as a hydrogen source. The method is based on the application of a RANEY® type Ni-Al alloy in an aqueous medium. During the reaction the Al content of the alloy, used as reductants, reacts with water in situ providing hydrogen and a RANEY® Ni catalyst, thus the alloy serves as a hydrogen generator as well as a hydrogenation catalyst. The simplicity and efficacy of the method are illustrated by the selective reduction of a variety of substituted indoles and quinolines to indolines and tetrahydroquinolines, respectively.

  14. A ketone/alcohol polymer for cycle of electrolytic hydrogen-fixing with water and releasing under mild conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Ryo; Yoshimasa, Keisuke; Egashira, Tatsuya; Oya, Takahiro; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Finding a safe and efficient carrier of hydrogen is a major challenge. Recently, hydrogenated organic compounds have been studied as hydrogen storage materials because of their ability to stably and reversibly store hydrogen by forming chemical bonds; however, these compounds often suffer from safety issues and are usually hydrogenated with hydrogen at high pressure and/or temperature. Here we present a ketone (fluorenone) polymer that can be moulded as a plastic sheet and fixes hydrogen via a simple electrolytic hydrogenation at −1.5 V (versus Ag/AgCl) in water at room temperature. The hydrogenated alcohol derivative (the fluorenol polymer) reversibly releases hydrogen by heating (80 °C) in the presence of an aqueous iridium catalyst. Both the use of a ketone polymer and the efficient hydrogen fixing with water as a proton source are completely different from other (de)hydrogenated compounds and hydrogenation processes. The easy handling and mouldable polymers could suggest a pocketable hydrogen carrier. PMID:27687772

  15. Characterization of interfacial reactions and oxide films on 316L stainless steel in various simulated PWR primary water environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junjie; Xiao, Qian; Lu, Zhanpeng; Ru, Xiangkun; Peng, Hao; Xiong, Qi; Li, Hongjuan

    2017-06-01

    The effect of water chemistry on the electrochemical and oxidizing behaviors of 316L SS was investigated in hydrogenated, deaerated and oxygenated PWR primary water at 310 °C. Water chemistry significantly influenced the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy parameters. The highest charge-transfer resistance and oxide-film resistance occurred in oxygenated water. The highest electric double-layer capacitance and constant phase element of the oxide film were in hydrogenated water. The oxide films formed in deaerated and hydrogenated environments were similar in composition but different in morphology. An oxide film with spinel outer particles and a compact and Cr-rich inner layer was formed in both hydrogenated and deaerated water. Larger and more loosely distributed outer oxide particles were formed in deaerated water. In oxygenated water, an oxide film with hematite outer particles and a porous and Ni-rich inner layer was formed. The reaction kinetics parameters obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and oxidation film properties relating to the steady or quasi-steady state conditions in the time-period of measurements could provide fundamental information for understanding stress corrosion cracking processes and controlling parameters.

  16. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS{sub 2} layers

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, R. K., E-mail: r.joshi@unsw.edu.au, E-mail: alwarappan@cecri.res.in; Sahajwalla, V.; Shukla, S.

    2016-01-15

    Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D) MoS{sub 2}, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS{sub 2} layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS{sub 2} film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows thatmore » 2D MoS{sub 2} is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS{sub 2} shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS{sub 2} is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer.« less

  17. Rapid Diffusion and Nanosegregation of Hydrogen in Magnesium Alloys from Exposure to Water.

    PubMed

    Brady, Michael P; Ievlev, Anton V; Fayek, Mostafa; Leonard, Donovan N; Frith, Matthew G; Meyer, Harry M; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J; Daemen, Luke L; Cheng, Yongqiang; Guo, Wei; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Thomson, Jeffrey; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Rother, Gernot; Shin, Dongwon; Song, Guang-Ling; Davis, Bruce

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogen gas is formed when Mg corrodes in water; however, the manner and extent to which the hydrogen may also enter the Mg metal is poorly understood. Such knowledge is critical as stress corrosion cracking (SCC)/embrittlement phenomena limit many otherwise promising structural and functional uses of Mg. Here, we report via D 2 O/D isotopic tracer and H 2 O exposures with characterization by secondary ion mass spectrometry, inelastic neutron scattering vibrational spectrometry, electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography techniques direct evidence that hydrogen rapidly penetrated tens of micrometers into Mg metal after only 4 h of exposure to water at room temperature. Further, technologically important microalloying additions of <1 wt % Zr and Nd used to improve the manufacturability and mechanical properties of Mg significantly increased the extent of hydrogen ingress, whereas Al additions in the 2-3 wt % range did not. Segregation of hydrogen species was observed at regions of high Mg/Zr/Nd nanoprecipitate density and at Mg(Zr) metastable solid solution microstructural features. We also report evidence that this ingressed hydrogen was unexpectedly present in the alloy as nanoconfined, molecular H 2 . These new insights provide a basis for strategies to design Mg alloys to resist SCC in aqueous environments as well as potentially impact functional uses such as hydrogen storage where increased hydrogen uptake is desired.

  18. Rapid Diffusion and Nanosegregation of Hydrogen in Magnesium Alloys from Exposure to Water

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, Michael P.; Ievlev, Anton V.; Fayek, Mostafa; ...

    2017-10-10

    Hydrogen gas is formed when Mg corrodes in water; however, the manner and extent to which the hydrogen may also enter the Mg metal is poorly understood. Such knowledge is critical as stress corrosion cracking (SCC)/embrittlement phenomena limit many otherwise promising structural and functional uses of Mg. Here, we report via D 2O/D isotopic tracer and H 2O exposures with characterization by secondary ion mass spectrometry, inelastic neutron scattering vibrational spectrometry, electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography techniques direct evidence that hydrogen rapidly penetrated tens of micrometers into Mg metal after only 4 h of exposure to water at roommore » temperature. Further, technologically important microalloying additions of <1 wt % Zr and Nd used to improve the manufacturability and mechanical properties of Mg significantly increased the extent of hydrogen ingress, whereas Al additions in the 2–3 wt % range did not. Segregation of hydrogen species was observed at regions of high Mg/Zr/Nd nanoprecipitate density and at Mg(Zr) metastable solid solution microstructural features. We also report evidence that this ingressed hydrogen was unexpectedly present in the alloy as nanoconfined, molecular H 2. These new insights provide a basis for strategies to design Mg alloys to resist SCC in aqueous environments as well as potentially impact functional uses such as hydrogen storage where increased hydrogen uptake is desired.« less

  19. Preparation of water soluble chitosan by hydrolysis using hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhenqiang; Wu, Shengjun; Chen, Jinhua

    2013-08-01

    Chitosan is not soluble in water, which limits its wide application particularly in the medicine and food industry. In the present study, water soluble chitosan (WSC) was prepared by hydrolyzing chitosan using hydrogen peroxide under the catalysis of phosphotungstic acid in homogeneous phase. Factors affecting hydrolysis were investigated and the optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined. The WSC structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The resulting products were composed of chitooligosaccharides of DP 2-9. The WSC content of the product and the yield were 94.7% and 92.3% (w/w), respectively. The results indicate that WSC can be effectively prepared by hydrolysis of chitosan using hydrogen peroxide under the catalysis of phosphotungstic acid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Down the Tubes: Vetting the Apparent Water-rich Parent Body being Accreted by the White Dwarf GD 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, Carl

    2015-10-01

    How water is distributed in a planetary system critically affects the formation, evolution, and habitability of its constituent rocky bodies. White dwarf stars provide a unique method to probe the prevalence of water-rich rocky bodies outside of our Solar system and where they preferentially reside in a planetary system. However, as evidenced by the case of GD 362, some parent bodies that at first glance might appear to be water-rich can actually be quite water-scarce. At this time there are only a small number of plausibly water-rich rocky bodies that are being actively accreted by their host white dwarf star. Given such a sample size it is crucial to characterize each one in sufficient detail to remove interlopers like GD 362 that might otherwise affect future statistical analyses. In this proposal we seek to vet GD 16, a water-rich candidate yet to be observed with HST-COS that is the brightest remaining such target in the UV.

  1. 75 FR 17397 - Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kern County, CA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... and potable water pipelines, a transmission line, a natural gas supply pipeline, a CO 2 pipeline... line. HECA would also construct an approximately 8-mile natural gas supply pipeline extending southeast... produce synthesis gas (syngas), which would then be processed and purified to produce a hydrogen-rich fuel...

  2. Reversible geminate recombination of hydrogen-bonded water molecule pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovitch, Omer; Agmon, Noam

    2008-08-01

    The (history independent) autocorrelation function for a hydrogen-bonded water molecule pair, calculated from classical molecular dynamics trajectories of liquid water, exhibits a t-3/2 asymptotic tail. Its whole time dependence agrees quantitatively with the solution for reversible diffusion-influenced geminate recombination derived by Agmon and Weiss [J. Chem. Phys. 91, 6937 (1989)]. Agreement with diffusion theory is independent of the precise definition of the bound state. Given the water self-diffusion constant, this theory enables us to determine the dissociation and bimolecular recombination rate parameters for a water dimer. (The theory is indispensable for obtaining the bimolecular rate coefficient.) Interestingly, the activation energies obtained from the temperature dependence of these rate coefficients are similar, rather than differing by the hydrogen-bond (HB) strength. This suggests that recombination requires displacing another water molecule, which meanwhile occupied the binding site. Because these activation energies are about twice the HB strength, cleavage of two HBs may be required to allow pair separation. The autocorrelation function without the HB angular restriction yields a recombination rate coefficient that is larger than that for rebinding to all four tetrahedral water sites (with angular restrictions), suggesting the additional participation of interstitial sites. Following dissociation, the probability of the pair to be unbound but within the reaction sphere rises more slowly than expected, possibly because binding to the interstitial sites delays pair separation. An extended diffusion model, which includes an additional binding site, can account for this behavior.

  3. Characterization of the hydrogen-bond network of water around sucrose and trehalose: Microwave and terahertz spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraga, Keiichiro; Adachi, Aya; Nakamura, Masahito; Tajima, Takuro; Ajito, Katsuhiro; Ogawa, Yuichi

    2017-03-01

    Modification of the water hydrogen bond network imposed by disaccharides is known to serve as a bioprotective agent in living organisms, though its comprehensive understanding is still yet to be reached. In this study, aiming to characterize the dynamical slowing down and destructuring effect of disaccharides, we performed broadband dielectric spectroscopy, ranging from 0.5 GHz to 12 THz, of sucrose and trehalose aqueous solutions. The destructuring effect was examined in two ways (the hydrogen bond fragmentation and disordering) and our result showed that both sucrose and trehalose exhibit an obvious destructuring effect with a similar strength, by fragmenting hydrogen bonds and distorting the tetrahedral-like structure of water. This observation strongly supports a chaotropic (structure-breaking) aspect of disaccharides on the water structure. At the same time, hydration water was found to exhibit slower dynamics and a greater reorientational cooperativity than bulk water because of the strengthened hydrogen bonds. These results lead to the conclusion that strong disaccharide-water hydrogen bonds structurally incompatible with native water-water bonds lead to the rigid but destructured hydrogen bond network around disaccharides. Another important finding in this study is that the greater dynamical slowing down of trehalose was found compared with that of sucrose, at variance with the destructuring effect where no solute dependent difference was observed. This discovery suggests that the exceptionally greater bioprotective impact especially of trehalose among disaccharides is mainly associated with the dynamical slowing down (rather than the destructuring effect).

  4. Possible Role of Hydrogen in the Earth Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, E.; Imai, T.

    2011-12-01

    Possible role of hydrogen in the Earth core has been discussed by Stevenson (1977) and demonstrated experimentally by Fukai (1984), Okuchi (1997) and others. Planetary theory proposes a possibility of hydrogen incorporation in Earth's magma ocean from ambient solar nebula gas (Ikoma & Genda 2005, Genda & Ikoma 2008). More recently, migration of snow line during planet formation was examined (Min et al., 2010; Oka et al, 2011) and it was proposed that the Earth building material originally contained abundant water as ice and hydrous minerals. Therefore, it is very important to investigate the fate of water in the planet building process and clarify the role of hydrogen in the planetary core. Using SPring-8 synchrotron (NaCl capsule, LiAlH4 as hydrogen source), we determined the melting curve of FeH up to 20 GPa under hydrogen saturated conditions (Sakamaki, Takahashi et al, 2009). Observed melting point is below 1300C and has a very small dT/dP slope. By extrapolating the melting curve using Lindeman's law, we proposed that hydrogen could lower the melting temperature of the Earth core by more than 1500K than current estimate. Here we report our new experiments using SPring-8 synchrotron (single crystal diamond capsule, water as hydrogen source). Hydrogen concentration and melting temperature of FeHx that coexists with hydrous mantle minerals were determined at 15-20GPa and 1000-1600C. We show that 1) hydrogen concentration in FeHx at 1000C, coexisting with hydrous-B and ringwoodite is approximately X=0.6. 2) Upon heating, hydrous-B decomposes and hydrogen strongly partitions into FeHx (X=0.8~1.0) than ringwoodite. 3) FeHx that coexists with ringwoodite melts between ~1300C (solidus) and ~1600C (liquidus). Combined our new experiments with those by Sakamaki et al (2009) and Shibazaki et al (2009), partitioning of hydrogen between proto-core and primitive mantle is discussed. We propose that >90% of water in the source material may have entered the Earth core. Given

  5. Approaches to Plant Hydrogen and Oxygen Isoscapes Generation

    SciTech Connect

    West, Jason B.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Ehleringer, James

    2009-12-01

    Plant hydrogen and oxygen isoscapes have been utilized to address important and somewhat disparate research goals. The isotopic composition of leaf water affects the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2 and O2 and is a logical starting point for understanding the isotopic composition of plant organic compounds since photosynthesis occurs in the leaf water environment. Leaf water isoscapes have been produced largely as part of efforts to understand atmospheric gas isotopic composition. The isotopic composition of plant organic matter has also been targeted for its potential to serve as a proxy for past environmental conditions. Spatially distributed sampling and modeling ofmore » modern plant H & O isoscapes can improve our understanding of the controls of the isotope ratios of compounds such as cellulose or n-alkanes from plants and therefore their utility for paleoreconstructions. Spatially varying plant hydrogen and oxygen isotopes have promise for yielding geographic origin information for a variety of plant products, including objects of criminal forensic interest or food products. The future has rich opportunities for the continued development of mechanistic models, methodologies for the generation of hydrogen and oxygen isoscapes, and cross-disciplinary interactions as these tools for understanding are developed, shared, and utilized to answer large-scale questions.« less

  6. Water-Rich Fluid Material Containing Orderly Condensed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Tatsuya; Iyoda, Tomokazu

    2017-01-24

    A fluid material with high protein content (120-310 mg mL -1 ) was formed through the ordered self-assembly of native proteins segregated from water. This material is instantly prepared by the simple mixing of a protein solution with anionic and cationic surfactants. By changing the ratio of the surfactants based on the electrostatic characteristics of the target protein, we observed that the surfactants could function as a versatile molecular glue for protein assembly. Moreover, these protein assemblies could be disassembled back into an aqueous solution depending on the salt conditions. Owing to the water-retaining properties of the hydrophilic part of surfactants, the proteins in this material are in a water-rich environment, which maintains their native structure and function. The inclusion of water also provides functional extensibility to this material, as demonstrated by the preparation of an enzymatically active gel. We anticipate that the unique features of this material will permit the use of proteins not only in solution but also as elements of integrated functionalized materials. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Switching off hydrogen-bond-driven excitation modes in liquid methanol

    DOE PAGES

    Bellissima, Stefano; González, Miguel A.; Bafile, Ubaldo; ...

    2017-08-30

    Hydrogen bonding plays an essential role on intermolecular forces, and consequently on the thermodynamics of materials defined by this elusive bonding character. It determines the property of a vital liquid as water as well as many processes crucial for life. The longstanding controversy on the nature of the hydrogen bond (HB) can be settled by looking at the effect of a vanishing HB interaction on the microscopic properties of a given hydrogen-bonded fluid. This task suits the capabilities of computer simulations techniques, which allow to easily switch off HB interactions. We then use molecular dynamics to study the microscopic propertiesmore » of methanol, a prototypical HB liquid. Fundamental aspects of the dynamics of methanol at room temperature were contextualised only very recently and its rich dynamics was found to have striking analogies with that of water. The lower temperature (200 K) considered in the present study led us to observe that the molecular centre-of-mass dynamics is dominated by four modes. Most importantly, the computational ability to switch on and off hydrogen bonds permitted us to identify which, among these modes, have a pure HB-origin. This clarifies the role of hydrogen bonds in liquid dynamics, disclosing new research opportunities and unexplored interpretation schemes.« less

  8. Water-rich Martian mantle can account for the elastic thickness in Amazonian era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, I.; Matsuoka, Y.; Azuma, S.

    2016-12-01

    Although high water content in the Martian mantle is inferred from cosmochemistry, the direct measurements of water in the SNC meteorites are controversial, because hydrogen is a highly mobile element and the later terrestrial alteration can modify the primarily concentration in the Mars. On the one hand, water has a significant effect on the rock strength in both brittle and ductile fields; consequently, the presence of water can influence the elastic thickness that is primary controlled by stress distribution in the lithosphere. The Martian elastic lithosphere estimated from gravity and topography data indicates different thickness at the time of loading (e.g. McGovern et al. 2002). The increase of elastic thickness from Noachian to Hesperian is most likely related to the secular cooling in the Mars; however, the nearly constant elastic lithosphere in Amazonian cannot be explained by the thermal evolution alone. In this study, we applied recent rheological data to the Martian lithosphere and tested whether water can account for the elastic thickness seen in the Amazonian era. We incorporated the effect of pore fluid pressure in the brittle regime and Peierls mechanism in the ductile regime in the rheological model, which are not applied in the most previous calculation (e.g. Grott and Breuer 2008) but have a significant influence on the stress distribution in the lithosphere. Since the pore pressure reduces the effective normal stress on the fault plane, the maximum stress in the brittle regime is markedly decreased by the presence of pore fluid. The estimate of elastic lithosphere is dependent on thermal structure, and we used the heat production rate obtained from the Mars Odyssey spectrometry as thermal model (Hahn et al. 2011). Our results indicate the elastic thickness in Amazonian era of 120-170 km for dry condition and 80-110 km for wet condition. The thin elastic thickness calculated under wet environments is a result of significant reduction of flexure

  9. Advanced hydrogen electrode for hydrogen-bromide battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosek, Jack A.; Laconti, Anthony B.

    1987-01-01

    Binary platinum alloys are being developed as hydrogen electrocatalysts for use in a hydrogen bromide battery system. These alloys were varied in terms of alloy component mole ratio and heat treatment temperature. Electrocatalyst evaluation, performed in the absence and presence of bromide ion, includes floating half cell polarization studies, electrochemical surface area measurements, X ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy analysis and corrosion measurements. Results obtained to date indicate a platinum rich alloy has the best tolerance to bromide ion poisoning.

  10. Map of Martian Polar Hydrogen

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-13

    This gamma ray spectrometer map centered on the north pole of Mars is based on gamma-rays from the element hydrogen. In this region, hydrogen is mainly in the form of water ice. Regions of high ice content are shown in red and those low in ice content are shown in blue. The very ice-rich region at the north pole is due to a permanent polar cap of water ice on the surface. Elsewhere in this region, the ice is buried under several to a few tens of centimeters of dry soil. The sub-surface ice is not uniformly distributed in the north, but varies with both latitude and longitude. In the north, the soil is well over 50 percent ice, which is more than can be accommodated by just filling the pore space in pre-existing soil. This high ice content implies that the ice may have been slowly co-deposited with dust in the past when conditions were wetter. Deposition of ice by this process means it is more likely that the ice deposits are very thick and may even be deep enough to have liquid water at their base. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04254

  11. The bifurcated hydrogen-bond model of water and amorphous ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giguère, Paul A.

    1987-10-01

    The existence of bifurcated hydrogen bonds (BHB) between three molecules as a major feature of the structure of liquid water was postulated recently to account for the remarkable effect of temperature on the O-H stretching bands in the Raman spectra. As a corollary, there should be two kinds of HṡṡṡO distances in water: one, 1.85 Å, for the well-known linear bonds (LHB), prevalent in cold water, the other, 2.3 Å, for the weaker BHB. This is evident in the neutron diffraction studies of heavy water, which reveal important structural changes with temperature. For instance, the atom pair correlation functions, both in the first-order difference, and the isochoric temperature derivative methods, show two peaks at 1.8 and 2.3 Å, with inverse temperature dependence similar to that of the Raman bands at 3220 (LHB) and 3420 cm-1 (BHB). In the BHB the nearest-neighbor OṡṡṡO distances are the same as in the LHB, but the apex angle is much smaller than the tetrahedral, between 95° and 100°. This allows slightly shorter second neighbor OṡṡṡO distances, and a closer packing of the molecules. The increased average coordination of the H and O atoms creates an imbalance in the stoichiometry of hydrogen bonding. As a result, a few percent of the water molecules are left with one ``free,'' i.e., nonhydrogen-bonded OH group (NHB). The energy of the BHB is estimated at 2.5 kcal mol-1, i.e., half that of the LHB, and its proportion in the liquid, at nearly 30% at 0 °C. Amorphous ice prepared from the vapor may also contain BHB according to x-ray and neutron diffraction data. The BHB appears as a common feature of hydroxylic compounds; e.g., hydrogen peroxide, alcohols, etc.

  12. Method of controlling injection of oxygen into hydrogen-rich fuel cell feed stream

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark Alexander; Gutowski, Stanley; Weisbrod, Kirk

    2001-01-01

    A method of operating a H.sub.2 --O.sub.2 fuel cell fueled by hydrogen-rich fuel stream containing CO. The CO content is reduced to acceptable levels by injecting oxygen into the fuel gas stream. The amount of oxygen injected is controlled in relation to the CO content of the fuel gas, by a control strategy that involves (a) determining the CO content of the fuel stream at a first injection rate, (b) increasing the O.sub.2 injection rate, (c) determining the CO content of the stream at the higher injection rate, (d) further increasing the O.sub.2 injection rate if the second measured CO content is lower than the first measured CO content or reducing the O.sub.2 injection rate if the second measured CO content is greater than the first measured CO content, and (e) repeating steps a-d as needed to optimize CO consumption and minimize H.sub.2 consumption.

  13. Plasma promoted manufacturing of hydrogen and vehicular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Leslie

    2003-10-01

    Plasmas can be used for promoting reformation of fuels. Plasma-based reformers developed at MIT use a low temperature, low power, low current electrical discharge to promote partial oxidation conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into hydrogen and CO. The very fuel rich mixture is hard to ignite, and the plasmatron provides a volume-ignition. To minimize erosion and to simplify the power supply, a low current high voltage discharge is used, with wide area electrodes. The plasmatron fuel reformer operates at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. The plasma-based reformer technology provides the advantages of rapid startup and transient response; efficient conversion of the fuel to hydrogen rich gas; compact size; relaxation or elimination of reformer catalyst requirements; and capability to process difficult to reform fuels. These advantages enable use of hydrogen-manufacturing reformation technology in cars using available fuels, such as gasoline and diesel. This plasma-based reformer technology can provide substantial throughputs even without the use of a catalyst. The electrical power consumption of the device is minimized by design and operational characteristics (less than 500 W peak and 200 W average). The product from these plasma reactors is a hydrogen rich mixture that can be used for combustion enhancement and emissions aftertreatment in vehicular applications. By converting a small fraction of the fuel to hydrogen rich gas, in-cylinder combustion can be improved. With minor modification of the engine, use of hydrogen rich gas results in increased fuel efficiency and decreased emissions of smog producing gases. The status of plasma based reformer technology and its application to vehicles will be described.

  14. Effect of species, life stage, and water temperature on the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, J.J.; Schreier, Theresa M.; Howe, G.E.; Redman, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a drug of low regulatory priority status that is effective in treating fish and fish eggs infected by fungi. However, only limited information is available to guide fish culturists in administering hydrogen peroxide to diseased fish. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine (1) the sensitivity of brown trout Salmo trutta, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, walleye Stizostedion vitreum, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, and bluegill Lepomis, machrochirus to hydrogen peroxide treatments; (2) the sensitivity of various life stages of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to hydrogen peroxide treatments; and (3) the effect of water temperature on the acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to three fish species. Fish were exposed to hydrogen peroxide concentrations ranging from 100 to 5,000 mu L/L (ppm) for 15-min or 45-min treatments every other day for four consecutive treatments to determine the sensitivity of various species and life stages of fish. Except for walleye, most species of fish tested (less than or equal to 2 g) tolerated hydrogen peroxide of 1,000 mu L/L or greater. Walleyes were sensitive to hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 100 mu L/L. A correlation was found between the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide and the life stages of rainbow trout; larger fish were more sensitive. Generally, the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide increased for all species as water temperature increased. The results of these experiments demonstrate that it is important to consider the effects of species, life stage, and water temperature when conducting hydrogen peroxide treatments.

  15. Performance Improvement of V-Fe-Cr-Ti Solid State Hydrogen Storage Materials in Impure Hydrogen Gas.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Ulrich; Oertel, Daria; Diemant, Thomas; Bonatto Minella, Christian; Bergfeldt, Thomas; Dittmeyer, Roland; Behm, R Jürgen; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2018-01-17

    Two approaches of engineering surface structures of V-Ti-based solid solution hydrogen storage alloys are presented, which enable improved tolerance toward gaseous oxygen (O 2 ) impurities in hydrogen (H 2 ) gas. Surface modification is achieved through engineering lanthanum (La)- or nickel (Ni)-rich surface layers with enhanced cyclic stability in an H 2 /O 2 mixture. The formation of a Ni-rich surface layer does not improve the cycling stability in H 2 /O 2 mixtures. Mischmetal (Mm, a mixture of La and Ce) agglomerates are observed within the bulk and surface of the alloy when small amounts of this material are added during arc melting synthesis. These agglomerates provide hydrogen-transparent diffusion pathways into the bulk of the V-Ti-Cr-Fe hydrogen storage alloy when the remaining oxidized surface is already nontransparent for hydrogen. Thus, the cycling stability of the alloy is improved in an O 2 -containing hydrogen environment as compared to the same alloy without addition of Mm. The obtained surface-engineered storage material still absorbs hydrogen after 20 cycles in a hydrogen-oxygen mixture, while the original material is already deactivated after 4 cycles.

  16. Water footprint characteristic of less developed water-rich regions: Case of Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yiying; Dong, Huijuan; Geng, Yong; Zhong, Shaozhuo; Tian, Xu; Yu, Yanhong; Chen, Yihui; Moss, Dana Avery

    2018-03-30

    Rapid industrialization and urbanization pose pressure on water resources in China. Virtual water trade proves to be an increasingly useful tool in water stress alleviation for water-scarce regions, while bringing opportunities and challenges for less developed water-rich regions. In this study, Yunnan, a typical province in southwest China, was selected as the case study area to explore its potential in socio-economic development in the context of water sustainability. Both input-output analysis and structural decomposition analysis on Yunnan's water footprint for the period of 2002-2012 were performed at not only an aggregated level but also a sectoral level. Results show that although the virtual water content of all economic sectors decreased due to technological progress, Yunnan's total water footprint still increased as a result of economic scale expansion. From the sectoral perspective, sectors with large water footprints include construction sector, agriculture sector, food manufacturing & processing sector, and service sector, while metal products sector and food manufacturing & processing sector were the major virtual water exporters, and textile & clothing sector and construction sector were the major importers. Based on local conditions, policy suggestions were proposed, including economic structure and efficiency optimization, technology promotion and appropriate virtual water trade scheme. This study provides valuable insights for regions facing "resource curse" by exploring potential socio-economic progress while ensuring water security. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Simulation of the effect of hydrogen bonds on water activity of glucose and dextran using the Veytsman model.

    PubMed

    De Vito, Francesca; Veytsman, Boris; Painter, Paul; Kokini, Jozef L

    2015-03-06

    Carbohydrates exhibit either van der Waals and ionic interactions or strong hydrogen bonding interactions. The prominence and large number of hydrogen bonds results in major contributions to phase behavior. A thermodynamic framework that accounts for hydrogen bonding interactions is therefore necessary. We have developed an extension of the thermodynamic model based on the Veytsman association theory to predict the contribution of hydrogen bonds to the behavior of glucose-water and dextran-water systems and we have calculated the free energy of mixing and its derivative leading to chemical potential and water activity. We compared our calculations with experimental data of water activity for glucose and dextran and found excellent agreement far superior to the Flory-Huggins theory. The validation of our calculations using experimental data demonstrated the validity of the Veytsman model in properly accounting for the hydrogen bonding interactions and successfully predicting water activity of glucose and dextran. Our calculations of the concentration of hydrogen bonds using the Veytsman model were instrumental in our ability to explain the difference between glucose and dextran and the role that hydrogen bonds play in contributing to these differences. The miscibility predictions showed that the Veytsman model is also able to correctly describe the phase behavior of glucose and dextran. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Alloys For Corrosive, Hydrogen-Rich Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, William B.; Bhat, Biliyar N.; Chen, Po-Shou; Kuruvilla, A. K.; Panda, Binayak

    1993-01-01

    "NASA-23" denotes class of alloys resisting both embrittlement by hydrogen and corrosion. Weldable and castable and formed by such standard processes as rolling, forging, and wire drawing. Heat-treated to obtain desired combinations of strength and ductility in ranges of 100 to 180 kpsi yield strength, 120 to 200 kpsi ultimate tensile strength, and 10 to 30 percent elongation at break. Used in place of most common aerospace structural alloy, Inconel(R) 718.

  19. Lettuce facing microcystins-rich irrigation water at different developmental stages: Effects on plant performance and microcystins bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Levizou, Efi; Statiris, George; Papadimitriou, Theodoti; Laspidou, Chrysi S; Kormas, Konstantinos Ar

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the microcystins (MCs)-rich irrigation water effect on lettuce of different developmental stages, i.e. during a two months period, covering the whole period from seed germination to harvest at marketable size of the plant. We followed four lettuce plant groups receiving MCs-rich water (1.81μgl -1 of dissolved MCs), originating from the Karla Reservoir, central Greece: 1) from seeds, 2) the cotyledon, 3) two true leaves and 4) four true leaves stages, all of which were compared to control plants that received tap water. Lettuce growth, photosynthetic performance, biochemical and mineral characteristics, as well as MCs accumulation in leaves, roots and soil were measured. The overall performance of lettuce at various developmental stages pointed to increased tolerance since growth showed minor alterations and non-enzymatic antioxidants remained unaffected. Plants receiving MCs-rich water from the seed stage exhibited higher photosynthetic capacity, chlorophylls and leaf nitrogen content. Nevertheless, considerable MCs accumulation in various plant tissues occurred. The earlier in their development lettuce plants started receiving MCs-rich water, the more MCs they accumulated: roots and leaves of plants exposed to MCs-rich water from seeds and cotyledons stage exhibited doubled MCs concentrations compared to respective tissues of the 4 Leaves group. Furthermore, roots accumulated significantly higher MCs amounts than leaves of the same plant group. Concerning human health risk, the Estimated Daily Intake values (EDI) of Seed and Cotyledon groups leaves exceeded Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) by a factor of 6, while 2 Leaves and 4 Leaves groups exceeded TDI by a factor of 4.4 and 2.4 respectively. Our results indicate that irrigation of lettuce with MCs-rich water may constitute a serious public health risk, especially when contaminated water is received from the very early developmental stages (seed and cotyledon). Finally, results obtained for

  20. Modeling of biomass to hydrogen via the supercritical water pyrolysis process

    SciTech Connect

    Divilio, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    A heat transfer model has been developed to predict the temperature profile inside the University of Hawaii`s Supercritical Water Reactor. A series of heat transfer tests were conducted on the University of Hawaii`s apparatus to calibrate the model. Results of the model simulations are shown for several of the heat transfer tests. Tests with corn starch and wood pastes indicated that there are substantial differences between the thermal properties of the paste compared to pure water, particularly near the pseudo critical temperature. The assumption of constant thermal diffusivity in the temperature range of 250 to 450 C gave a reasonablemore » prediction of the reactor temperatures when paste is being fed. A literature review is presented for pyrolysis of biomass in water at elevated temperatures up to the supercritical range. Based on this review, a global reaction mechanism is proposed. Equilibrium calculations were performed on the test results from the University of Hawaii`s Supercritical Water Reactor when corn starch and corn starch and wood pastes were being fed. The calculations indicate that the data from the reactor falls both below and above the equilibrium hydrogen concentrations depending on test conditions. The data also indicates that faster heating rates may be beneficial to the hydrogen yield. Equilibrium calculations were also performed to examine the impact of wood concentration on the gas mixtures produced. This calculation showed that increasing wood concentrations favors the formation of methane at the expense of hydrogen.« less

  1. Hydrogen-bonding Interactions between Apigenin and Ethanol/Water: A Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Zhou, Yu; Liang, Qin; Chen, Da-Fu; Guo, Rui; Lai, Rong-Cai

    2016-10-01

    In this work, hydrogen-bonding interactions between apigenin and water/ethanol were investigated from a theoretical perspective using quantum chemical calculations. Two conformations of apigenin molecule were considered in this work. The following results were found. (1) For apigenin monomer, the molecular structure is non-planar, and all of the hydrogen and oxygen atoms can be hydrogen-bonding sites. (2) Eight and seven optimized geometries are obtained for apigenin (I)-H2O/CH3CH2OH and apigenin (II)-H2O/CH3CH2OH complexes, respectively. In apigenin, excluding the aromatic hydrogen atoms in the phenyl substituent, all other hydrogen atoms and the oxygen atoms form hydrogen-bonds with H2O and CH3CH2OH. (3) In apigenin-H2O/CH3CH2OH complexes, the electron density and the E(2) in the related localized anti-bonding orbital are increased upon hydrogen-bond formation. These are the cause of the elongation and red-shift of the X-H bond. The sum of the charge change transfers from the hydrogen-bond acceptor to donor. The stronger interaction makes the charge change more intense than in the less stable structures. (4) Most of the hydrogen-bonds in the complexes are electrostatic in nature. However, the C4-O5···H, C9-O4···H and C13-O2···H hydrogen-bonds have some degree of covalent character. Furthermore, the hydroxyl groups of the apigenin molecule are the preferred hydrogen-bonding sites.

  2. Characterization of the hydrogen-bond network of water around sucrose and trehalose: H-O-H bending analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraga, Keiichiro; Adachi, Aya; Ogawa, Yuichi

    2017-06-01

    The bioprotective properties of disaccharides have been linked to destructuring effect on the hydrogen-bond structure of the interfacial water around the disaccharide solute, but its detailed mechanisms are yet to be provided. In this study, we characterized the destructuring effect based on the complex dielectric constants of interfacial water around sucrose and trehalose in the H-O-H bending region. Our analysis showed that the destructuring effect around disaccharides involves substantial disordering of the hydrogen-bond structure and formation of strong disaccharide-water hydrogen-bond. Such a destructuring effect caused by disaccharides is totally distinct from what happens with temperature increases of neat water.

  3. Water vapor inhibits hydrogen sulfide detection in pulsed fluorescence sulfur monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhme, Anders B.; Ingemar, Jonas L.; Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2016-06-01

    The Thermo Scientific 450 Hydrogen Sulfide-Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures both hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Sulfur dioxide is measured by pulsed fluorescence, while H2S is converted to SO2 with a molybdenum catalyst prior to detection. The 450 is widely used to measure ambient concentrations, e.g., for emissions monitoring and pollution control. An air stream with a constant H2S concentration was generated and the output of the analyzer recorded as a function of relative humidity (RH). The analyzer underreported H2S as soon as the relative humidity was increased. The fraction of undetected H2S increased from 8.3 at 5.3 % RH (294 K) to over 34 % at RH > 80 %. Hydrogen sulfide mole fractions of 573, 1142, and 5145 ppb were tested. The findings indicate that previous results obtained with instruments using similar catalysts should be re-evaluated to correct for interference from water vapor. It is suspected that water decreases the efficiency of the converter unit and thereby reduces the measured H2S concentration.

  4. Fuel from water: the photochemical generation of hydrogen from water.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhiji; Eisenberg, Richard

    2014-08-19

    Hydrogen has been labeled the fuel of the future since it contains no carbon, has the highest specific enthalpy of combustion of any chemical fuel, yields only water upon complete oxidation, and is not limited by Carnot considerations in the amount of work obtained when used in a fuel cell. To be used on the scale needed for sustainable growth on a global scale, hydrogen must be produced by the light-driven splitting of water into its elements, as opposed to reforming of methane, as is currently done. The photochemical generation of H2, which is the reductive side of the water splitting reaction, is the focus of this Account, particularly with regard to work done in the senior author's laboratory over the last 5 years. Despite seminal work done more than 30 years ago and the extensive research conducted since then on all aspects of the process, no viable system has been developed for the efficient and robust photogeneration of H2 from water using only earth abundant elements. For the photogeneration of H2 from water, a system must contain a light absorber, a catalyst, and a source of electrons. In this Account, the discovery and study of new Co and Ni catalysts are described that suggest H2 forms via a heterocoupling mechanism from a metal-hydride and a ligand-bound proton. Several complexes with redox active dithiolene ligands are newly recognized to be effective in promoting the reaction. A major new development in the work described is the use of water-soluble CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as light absorbers for H2 generation in water. Both activity and robustness of the most successful systems are impressive with turnover numbers (TONs) approaching 10(6), activity maintained over 15 days, and a quantum yield for H2 of 36% with 520 nm light. The water solubilizing capping agent for the first system examined was dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) anion, and the catalyst was determined to be a DHLA complex of Ni(II) formed in situ. Dissociation of DHLA from the QD surface proved

  5. Preparation of organic and water hydrogen for stable isotope analysis. Effects due to reaction vessels and zinc reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmelmann, A.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1993-03-15

    Combustion of organic matter in sealed Pyrex, Vycor, and quartz ampules at temperatures between 520 and 900[degrees]C yields less than stoichiometric amounts of water. The loss of hydrogen to hydration reactions between water vapor and glass/quartz interferes with the determination of C/H and N/H elemental ratios in organic matter. The effect increases from quartz to Vycor to Pyrex, but the incomplete yield does not significantly affect the precision and accuracy of the determination of stable hydrogen isotope ratios. Reactions between water and Pyrex do not affect the conversion of water to hydrogen with zinc in Pyrex ampules at 500[degrees]C, whichmore » is quantitative, but even preoutgassed zinc contains a deuterium-depleted hydrogen blank. D/H ratios in hydrogen from the Zn method require a nonlinear correction to achieve compatibility with [delta]D values from the uranium method. 19 refs., 4 tabs.« less

  6. Solar hydrogen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Sabol, A. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus, using solar energy to manufacture hydrogen by dissociating water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen molecules is described. Solar energy is concentrated on a globe containing water thereby heating the water to its dissociation temperature. The globe is pervious to hydrogen molecules permitting them to pass through the globe while being essentially impervious to oxygen molecules. The hydrogen molecules are collected after passing through the globe and the oxygen molecules are removed from the globe.

  7. Hydrogen from renewable energy - Photovoltaic/water electrolysis as an exemplary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprafka, R. J.; Tison, R. R.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A feasibility study has been conducted for a NASA Kennedy Space Center liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen production facility using solar cell arrays as the power source for electrolysis. The 100 MW output of the facility would be split into 67.6 and 32 MW portions for electrolysis and liquefaction, respectively. The solar cell array would cover 1.65 sq miles, and would be made up of 249 modular 400-kW arrays. Hydrogen and oxygen are generated at either dispersed or centralized water electrolyzers. The yearly hydrogen output is projected to be 5.76 million lbs, with 8 times that much oxygen; these fuel volumes can support approximately 18 Space Shuttle launches/year.

  8. Hydrogen-water ameliorates radiation-induced gastrointestinal toxicity via MyD88’s effects on the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hui-wen; Li, Yuan; Luo, Dan; Dong, Jia-li; Zhou, Li-xin; Zhao, Shu-yi; Zheng, Qi-sheng; Wang, Hai-chao; Cui, Ming; Fan, Sai-jun

    2018-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern management of malignancies, various side effects are inevitably linked to abdominal and pelvic cancer after radiotherapy. Radiation-mediated gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity impairs the life quality of cancer survivors and even shortens their lifespan. Hydrogen has been shown to protect against tissue injuries caused by oxidative stress and excessive inflammation, but its effect on radiation-induced intestinal injury was previously unknown. In the present study, we found that oral gavage with hydrogen-water increased the survival rate and body weight of mice exposed to total abdominal irradiation (TAI); oral gavage with hydrogen-water was also associated with an improvement in GI tract function and the epithelial integrity of the small intestine. Mechanistically, microarray analysis revealed that hydrogen-water administration upregulated miR-1968-5p levels, thus resulting in parallel downregulation of MyD88 expression in the small intestine after TAI exposure. Additionally, high-throughput sequencing showed that hydrogen-water oral gavage resulted in retention of the TAI-shifted intestinal bacterial composition in mice. Collectively, our findings suggested that hydrogen-water might be used as a potential therapeutic to alleviate intestinal injury induced by radiotherapy for abdominal and pelvic cancer in preclinical settings. PMID:29371696

  9. Effect of the tocotrienol-rich fraction on the lifespan and oxidative biomarkers in Caenorhabditis elegans under oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Aan, Goon Jo; Zainudin, Mohd Shahril Aszrin; Karim, Noralisa Abdul; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to determine the effect of the tocotrienol-rich fraction on the lifespan and oxidative status of C. elegans under oxidative stress. METHOD: Lifespan was determined by counting the number of surviving nematodes daily under a dissecting microscope after treatment with hydrogen peroxide and the tocotrienol-rich fraction. The evaluated oxidative markers included lipofuscin, which was measured using a fluorescent microscope, and protein carbonyl and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, which were measured using commercially available kits. RESULTS: Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress significantly decreased the mean lifespan of C. elegans, which was restored to that of the control by the tocotrienol-rich fraction when administered before or both before and after the hydrogen peroxide. The accumulation of the age marker lipofuscin, which increased with hydrogen peroxide exposure, was decreased with upon treatment with the tocotrienol-rich fraction (p<0.05). The level of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine significantly increased in the hydrogen peroxide-induced group relative to the control. Treatment with the tocotrienol-rich fraction before or after hydrogen peroxide induction also increased the level of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine relative to the control. However, neither hydrogen peroxide nor the tocotrienol-rich fraction treatment affected the protein carbonyl content of the nematodes. CONCLUSION: The tocotrienol-rich fraction restored the lifespan of oxidative stress-induced C. elegans and reduced the accumulation of lipofuscin but did not affect protein damage. In addition, DNA oxidation was increased. PMID:23778402

  10. Effect of the tocotrienol-rich fraction on the lifespan and oxidative biomarkers in Caenorhabditis elegans under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Aan, Goon Jo; Zainudin, Mohd Shahril Aszrin; Karim, Noralisa Abdul; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2013-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effect of the tocotrienol-rich fraction on the lifespan and oxidative status of C. elegans under oxidative stress. Lifespan was determined by counting the number of surviving nematodes daily under a dissecting microscope after treatment with hydrogen peroxide and the tocotrienol-rich fraction. The evaluated oxidative markers included lipofuscin, which was measured using a fluorescent microscope, and protein carbonyl and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, which were measured using commercially available kits. Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress significantly decreased the mean lifespan of C. elegans, which was restored to that of the control by the tocotrienol-rich fraction when administered before or both before and after the hydrogen peroxide. The accumulation of the age marker lipofuscin, which increased with hydrogen peroxide exposure, was decreased with upon treatment with the tocotrienol-rich fraction (p<0.05). The level of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine significantly increased in the hydrogen peroxide-induced group relative to the control. Treatment with the tocotrienol-rich fraction before or after hydrogen peroxide induction also increased the level of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine relative to the control. However, neither hydrogen peroxide nor the tocotrienol-rich fraction treatment affected the protein carbonyl content of the nematodes. The tocotrienol-rich fraction restored the lifespan of oxidative stress-induced C. elegans and reduced the accumulation of lipofuscin but did not affect protein damage. In addition, DNA oxidation was increased.

  11. Fast Rotational Diffusion of Water Molecules in a 2D Hydrogen Bond Network at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisk, T. R.; Hoffmann, C.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Mamontov, E.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Wang, X.; Kent, P. R. C.; Anovitz, L. M.

    2018-05-01

    Individual water molecules or small clusters of water molecules contained within microporous minerals present an extreme case of confinement where the local structure of hydrogen bond networks are dramatically altered from bulk water. In the zinc silicate hemimorphite, the water molecules form a two-dimensional hydrogen bond network with hydroxyl groups in the crystal framework. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the structure and dynamics of water molecules within this network. The water molecules undergo a continuous phase transition in their orientational configuration analogous to a two-dimensional Ising model. The incoherent dynamic structure factor reveals two thermally activated relaxation processes, one on a subpicosecond timescale and another on a 10-100 ps timescale, between 70 and 130 K. The slow process is an in-plane reorientation of the water molecule involving the breaking of hydrogen bonds with a framework that, despite the low temperatures involved, is analogous to rotational diffusion of water molecules in the bulk liquid. The fast process is a localized motion of the water molecule with no apparent analogs among known bulk or confined phases of water.

  12. Fast Rotational Diffusion of Water Molecules in a 2D Hydrogen Bond Network at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Prisk, Timothy; Hoffmann, Christina; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.

    Individual water molecules or small clusters of water molecules contained within microporous minerals present an extreme case of confinement where the local structure of hydrogen bond networks are dramatically altered from bulk water. In the zinc silicate hemimorphite, the water molecules form a two-dimensional hydrogen bond network with hydroxyl groups in the crystal framework. Here in this paper, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the structure and dynamics of water molecules within this network. The water molecules undergo a continuous phase transition in their orientational configuration analogous to a two-dimensional Ising model. The incoherent dynamic structure factormore » reveals two thermally activated relaxation processes, one on a subpicosecond timescale and another on a 10–100 ps timescale, between 70 and 130 K. The slow process is an in-plane reorientation of the water molecule involving the breaking of hydrogen bonds with a framework that, despite the low temperatures involved, is analogous to rotational diffusion of water molecules in the bulk liquid. The fast process is a localized motion of the water molecule with no apparent analogs among known bulk or confined phases of water.« less

  13. Fast Rotational Diffusion of Water Molecules in a 2D Hydrogen Bond Network at Cryogenic Temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Prisk, Timothy; Hoffmann, Christina; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; ...

    2018-05-09

    Individual water molecules or small clusters of water molecules contained within microporous minerals present an extreme case of confinement where the local structure of hydrogen bond networks are dramatically altered from bulk water. In the zinc silicate hemimorphite, the water molecules form a two-dimensional hydrogen bond network with hydroxyl groups in the crystal framework. Here in this paper, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the structure and dynamics of water molecules within this network. The water molecules undergo a continuous phase transition in their orientational configuration analogous to a two-dimensional Ising model. The incoherent dynamic structure factormore » reveals two thermally activated relaxation processes, one on a subpicosecond timescale and another on a 10–100 ps timescale, between 70 and 130 K. The slow process is an in-plane reorientation of the water molecule involving the breaking of hydrogen bonds with a framework that, despite the low temperatures involved, is analogous to rotational diffusion of water molecules in the bulk liquid. The fast process is a localized motion of the water molecule with no apparent analogs among known bulk or confined phases of water.« less

  14. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22more » MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.« less

  15. In-Situ Formed Hydroxide Accelerating Water Dissociation Kinetics on Co3N for Hydrogen Production in Alkaline Solution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhe; Li, Wenchao; Yan, Yadong; Wang, HongXu; Zhu, Heng; Zhao, Meiming; Yan, Shicheng; Zou, Zhigang

    2018-06-21

    Sluggish water dissociation kinetics on nonprecious metal electrocatalysts limits the development of economical hydrogen production from water-alkali electrolyzers. Here, using Co 3 N electrocatalyst as a prototype, we find that during water splitting in alkaline electrolyte a cobalt-containing hydroxide formed on the surface of Co 3 N, which greatly decreased the activation energy of water dissociation (Volmer step, a main rate-determining step for water splitting in alkaline electrolytes). Combining the cobalt ion poisoning test and theoretical calculations, the efficient hydrogen production on Co 3 N electrocatalysts would benefit from favorable water dissociation on in-situ formed cobalt-containing hydroxide and low hydrogen production barrier on the nitrogen sites of Co 3 N. As a result, the Co 3 N catalyst exhibits a low water-splitting activation energy (26.57 kJ mol -1 ) that approaches the value of platinum electrodes (11.69 kJ mol -1 ). Our findings offer new insight into understanding the catalytic mechanism of nitride electrocatalysts, thus contributing to the development of economical hydrogen production in alkaline electrolytes.

  16. Oxygen tolerance of an in silico-designed bioinspired hydrogen-evolving catalyst in water.

    PubMed

    Sit, Patrick H-L; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2013-02-05

    Certain bacterial enzymes, the diiron hydrogenases, have turnover numbers for hydrogen production from water as large as 10(4)/s. Their much smaller common active site, composed of earth-abundant materials, has a structure that is an attractive starting point for the design of a practical catalyst for electrocatalytic or solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water. In earlier work, our group has reported the computational design of [FeFe](P)/FeS(2), a hydrogenase-inspired catalyst/electrode complex, which is efficient and stable throughout the production cycle. However, the diiron hydrogenases are highly sensitive to ambient oxygen by a mechanism not yet understood in detail. An issue critical for practical use of [FeFe](P)/FeS(2) is whether this catalyst/electrode complex is tolerant to the ambient oxygen. We report demonstration by ab initio simulations that the complex is indeed tolerant to dissolved oxygen over timescales long enough for practical application, reducing it efficiently. This promising hydrogen-producing catalyst, composed of earth-abundant materials and with a diffusion-limited rate in acidified water, is efficient as well as oxygen tolerant.

  17. Efficient hydrogen production on MoNi4 electrocatalysts with fast water dissociation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Tao; Liu, Pan; Liao, Zhongquan; Liu, Shaohua; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Chen, Mingwei; Zschech, Ehrenfried; Feng, Xinliang

    2017-05-01

    Various platinum-free electrocatalysts have been explored for hydrogen evolution reaction in acidic solutions. However, in economical water-alkali electrolysers, sluggish water dissociation kinetics (Volmer step) on platinum-free electrocatalysts results in poor hydrogen-production activities. Here we report a MoNi4 electrocatalyst supported by MoO2 cuboids on nickel foam (MoNi4/MoO2@Ni), which is constructed by controlling the outward diffusion of nickel atoms on annealing precursor NiMoO4 cuboids on nickel foam. Experimental and theoretical results confirm that a rapid Tafel-step-decided hydrogen evolution proceeds on MoNi4 electrocatalyst. As a result, the MoNi4 electrocatalyst exhibits zero onset overpotential, an overpotential of 15 mV at 10 mA cm-2 and a low Tafel slope of 30 mV per decade in 1 M potassium hydroxide electrolyte, which are comparable to the results for platinum and superior to those for state-of-the-art platinum-free electrocatalysts. Benefiting from its scalable preparation and stability, the MoNi4 electrocatalyst is promising for practical water-alkali electrolysers.

  18. Molecular hydrogen solvated in water – A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Śmiechowski, Maciej, E-mail: Maciej.Smiechowski@pg.gda.pl

    2015-12-28

    The aqueous hydrogen molecule is studied with molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature and pressure conditions, using a newly developed flexible and polarizable H{sub 2} molecule model. The design and implementation of this model, compatible with an existing flexible and polarizable force field for water, is presented in detail. The structure of the hydration layer suggests that first-shell water molecules accommodate the H{sub 2} molecule without major structural distortions and two-dimensional, radial-angular distribution functions indicate that as opposed to strictly tangential, the orientation of these water molecules is such that the solute is solvated with one of the free electronmore » pairs of H{sub 2}O. The calculated self-diffusion coefficient of H{sub 2}(aq) agrees very well with experimental results and the time dependence of mean square displacement suggests the presence of caging on a time scale corresponding to hydrogen bond network vibrations in liquid water. Orientational correlation function of H{sub 2} experiences an extremely short-scale decay, making the H{sub 2}–H{sub 2}O interaction potential essentially isotropic by virtue of rotational averaging. The inclusion of explicit polarizability in the model allows for the calculation of Raman spectra that agree very well with available experimental data on H{sub 2}(aq) under differing pressure conditions, including accurate reproduction of the experimentally noted trends with solute pressure or concentration.« less

  19. Interaction of hydrogen chloride and water with oxide surfaces. III - Titanium dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siriwardane, R. V.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen chloride and water vapors on five TiO2 powders in both the anatase and rutile crystalline forms was studied as a function of temperature, pressure, and outgas conditions. The adsorbents were characterized utilizing X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, surface area analysis, indicator method, microelectrophoresis, XPS, and infrared spectroscopy. It was found that both outgas temperature and adsorption temperature influenced the adsorption of water vapor on TiO2, while water vapor adsorption on TiO2 was completely reversible. It is argued that the number of hydroxyl groups present on the surface determines the adsorption capacity of water on the different titanium dioxides. It was found that heats of immersion in water were affected significantly by outgas temperature. Hydrogen chloride adsorption isotherms at 30 C measured on TiO2 after outgassing at 100-400 C showed that a part of the total HCl adsorbed was irreversibly adsorbed. The highest HCl adsorption capacity per unit area was exhibited by anatase, while pure rutile exhibited the lowest adsorption capacity.

  20. Observations of hydrogen-rich supernovae in the first days after explosion and new instruments to study them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Adam; PTF

    2018-01-01

    I will discuss our results studying light curves of hydrogen-rich supernovae during the first few days after explosion. The first days of emission encode important information about the physical system, and it is possible to relate the early-time light curve to the radius of the progenitor star by using shock-cooling models. I will show the first systematic application of these models to data from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We found that R-band data alone at PTF cadence cannot constrain the radius but can constrain the energy per unit mass of the explosion, uncovering new correlations with other supernova observables. We constrained the radii for events with multi-wavelength observations, and for two events observed with the Kepler mission at 30 min cadence. I will discuss improved observing strategies to obtain more constraining results in the future. Some tensions have arisen between our results and the expected radii from identified progenitors of hydrogen-rich supernovae. The resolution of these tensions may be related to the effect of circumstellar material on the light curves, motivating future systematic spectroscopic sequencing of these events. To this end, we have designed a new medium resolution UV-VIS spectrograph. The Multi-Imaging Transient Spectrograph (MITS) is the R~4500 UV-VIS arm of the Son Of X-Shooter (SOXS) spectrograph proposed for ESO’s 3.6 m New Technology Telescope. Our design divides the spectrum into several sub-bands, allowing optimization for each narrow part of the spectrum. We estimate a 50-100% improvement in throughput relative to a classical 4-C echelle design. Our design has passed a preliminary design review and is expected on the telescope in early 2021.

  1. Slow Strain Rate Testing for Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of Alloy 718 in Substitute Ocean Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCoursiere, M. P.; Aidun, D. K.; Morrison, D. J.

    2017-05-01

    The hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of near-peak-aged UNS N07718 (Alloy 718) was evaluated by performing slow strain rate tests at room temperature in air and substitute ocean water. Tests in substitute ocean water were accomplished in an environmental cell that enabled in situ cathodic charging under an applied potential of -1.1 V versus SCE. Some specimens were cathodically precharged for 4 or 16 weeks at the same potential in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl-distilled water solution at 50 °C. Unprecharged specimens tested in substitute ocean water exhibited only moderate embrittlement with plastic strain to failure decreasing by about 20% compared to unprecharged specimens tested in air. However, precharged specimens exhibited significant embrittlement with plastic strain to failure decreasing by about 70%. Test environment (air or substitute ocean water with in situ charging) and precharge time (4 or 16 weeks) had little effect on the results of the precharged specimens. Fracture surfaces of precharged specimens were typical of hydrogen embrittlement and consisted of an outer brittle ring related to the region in which hydrogen infused during precharging, a finely dimpled transition zone probably related to the region where hydrogen was drawn in by dislocation transport, and a central highly dimpled ductile region. Fracture surfaces of unprecharged specimens tested in substitute ocean water consisted of a finely dimpled outer ring and heavily dimpled central region typical of ductile fracture.

  2. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-08

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Testsmore » were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium

  3. Covariance of oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition in plant water: Species effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, L.W.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1989-12-01

    Leaf water becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen during evapotranspiration. The magnitude of the enrichment has been shown to be influenced by temperature and humidity, but the effects of species-specific factors on leaf water enrichment of D and {sup 18}O have not been studied for different plants growing together. To learn whether leaf water enrichment patterns and processes for D and {sup 18}O are different for individual species growing under the same environmental conditions the authors tested the proposal that leaf waters in plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) show high sloped (m in the leafmore » water equation {delta}D = m {delta}{sup 18}O + b) than in C{sub 3} plants. They determined the relationships between the stable hydrogen ({delta}D) and oxygen ({delta}{sup 18}O) isotope ratios of leaf waters collected during the diurnal cycle of evapotranspiration for Yucca schidigera, Ephedra aspera, Agave deserti, Prunus ilicifolia, Yucca whipplei, Heteromeles arbutifolia, Dyckia fosteriana, Simmondsia chinensis, and Encelia farinosa growing at two sites in southern California. The findings indicate that m in the aforementioned equation is related to the overall residence time for water in the leaf and proportions of water subjected to repeated evapotranspiration enrichments of heavy isotopes.« less

  4. Review of the methods to form hydrogen peroxide in electrical discharge plasma with liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Bruce R.; Shih, Kai-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature dealing with the formation of hydrogen peroxide from plasma processes. Energy yields for hydrogen peroxide generation by plasma from water span approximately three orders of magnitude from 4 × 10-2 to 80 g kWh-1. A wide range of plasma processes from rf to pulsed, ac, and dc discharges directly in the liquid phase have similar energy yields and may thus be limited by radical quenching processes at the plasma-liquid interface. Reactor modification using discharges in bubbles and discharges over the liquid phase can provide modest improvements in energy yield over direct discharge in the liquid, but the interpretation is complicated by additional chemical reactions of gas phase components such as ozone and nitrogen oxides. The highest efficiency plasma process utilizes liquid water droplets that may enhance efficiency by sequestering hydrogen peroxide in the liquid and by suppressing decomposition reactions by radicals from the gas and at the interface. Kinetic simulations of water vapor reported in the literature suggest that plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide should approach 45% of the thermodynamics limit, and this fact coupled with experimental studies demonstrating improvements with the presence of the condensed liquid phase suggest that further improvements in energy yield may be possible. Plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide directly from water compares favorably with a number of other methods including electron beam, ultrasound, electrochemical and photochemical methods, and other chemical processes.

  5. Solar Water Splitting at λ=600 nm: A Step Closer to Sustainable Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinshui; Wang, Xinchen

    2015-06-15

    Overall water splitting with a semiconductor photocatalyst under visible-light irradiation is considered as a "dream reaction" in chemistry. The development of a 600 nm photocatalyst for solar water splitting highlighted here is not only an important milestone towards sustainable hydrogen production, but also a new starting point for artificial photosynthesis. STH=solar-to-hydrogen energy conversion efficiency. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Progress in hydrogen energy; Proceedings of the National Workshop on Hydrogen Energy, New Delhi, India, July 4-6, 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, R. P.

    1987-06-01

    The present conference on the development status of hydrogen energy technologies considers electrolytic hydrogen production, photoelectrolytic hydrogen production, microorganic hydrogen production, OTEC hydrogen production, solid-state materials for hydrogen storage, and a thin-film hydrogen storage system. Also discussed are the cryogenic storage of hydrogen; liquid hydrogen fuel for ground, air, and naval vehicles; hydrogen-fuel internal combustion engines; the use of hydrogen for domestic, commercial, and industrial applications; hydrogen fuel-cell development; enzyme electrodes for the use of hydrogen-rich fuels in biochemical fuel cells; an analysis of H2-O2 MHD generators; and hydrogen energy technology characterization and evaluation on the basis of an input-output structure.

  7. Combustion characteristics of hydrogen. Carbon monoxide based gaseous fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, J. J.; White, D. J.; Kubasco, A. J.; Lecren, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental rig program was conducted with the objective of evaluating the combuston performance of a family of fuel gases based on a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These gases, in addition to being members of a family, were also representative of those secondary fuels that could be produced from coal by various gasification schemes. In particular, simulated Winkler, Lurgi, and Blue-water low and medium energy content gases were used as fuels in the experimental combustor rig. The combustor used was originally designed as a low NOx rich-lean system for burning liquid fuels with high bound nitrogen levels. When used with the above gaseous fuels this combustor was operated in a lean-lean mode with ultra long residence times. The Blue-water gas was also operated in a rich-lean mode. The results of these tests indicate the possibility of the existence of an 'optimum' gas turbine hydrogen - carbon monoxide based secondary fuel. Such a fuel would exhibit NOx and high efficiency over the entire engine operating range. It would also have sufficient stability range to allow normal light-off and engine acceleration. Solar Turbines Incorporated would like to emphasize that the results presented here have been obtained with experimental rig combustors. The technologies generated could, however, be utilized in future commercial gas turbines.

  8. Hydrogen-bond dynamics at the bio-water interface in hydrated proteins: a molecular-dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Prithwish K; English, Niall J; Futera, Zdenek; Benedetto, Antonio

    2016-12-21

    Water is fundamental to the biochemistry of enzymes. It is well known that without a minimum amount of water, enzymes are not biologically active. Bare minimal solvation for biological function corresponds to about a single layer of water covering enzymes' surfaces. Many contradictory studies on protein-hydration-water-coupled dynamics have been published in recent decades. Following prevailing wisdom, a dynamical crossover in hydration water (at around 220 K for hydrated lysozymes) can trigger larger-amplitude motions of the protein, activating, in turn, biological functions. Here, we present a molecular-dynamics-simulation study on a solvated model protein (hen egg-white lysozyme), in which we determine, inter alia, the relaxation dynamics of the hydrogen-bond network between the protein and its hydration water molecules on a residue-per-residue basis. Hydrogen-bond breakage/formation kinetics is rather heterogeneous in temperature dependence (due to the heterogeneity of the free-energy surface), and is driven by the magnitude of thermal motions of various different protein residues which provide enough thermal energy to overcome energy barriers to rupture their respective hydrogen bonds with water. In particular, arginine residues exhibit the highest number of such hydrogen bonds at low temperatures, losing almost completely such bonding above 230 K. This suggests that hydration water's dynamical crossover, observed experimentally for hydrated lysozymes at ∼220 K, lies not at the origin of the protein residues' larger-amplitude motions, but rather arises as a consequence thereof. This highlights the need for new experimental investigations, and new interpretations to link protein dynamics to functions, in the context of key interrelationships with the solvation layer.

  9. Abiotic hydrogen production in fresh and altered MSWI-residues: texture and microstructure investigation.

    PubMed

    Heuss-Assbichler, S; Magel, G; Fehr, K T

    2010-10-01

    Long-term hydrogen generation was observed in a Bavarian mono-landfill for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues. Hydration reactions of non-noble metals, especially aluminum, predominantly produce hydrogen at alkaline reaction conditions. Microscopic investigations show that aluminum metal may occur in different forms: as larger single grains, as small particles embedded in a vitrified matrix or less frequently in blowholes together with metallic silica. Four types of corrosion texture were observed, indicating different reaction mechanisms: aluminum hydroxide rims caused by hydration reactions at alkaline reaction conditions (reaction type 1) and multiphase rims with ettringite and hydrocalumite due to the reaction of aluminum hydroxide with sulfate and chloride ions which are solved in the pore water (reaction type 2). Galvanic corrosion textures due to the electric potential difference between aluminum and embedded intermetallic Fe- or Cu-rich exsolution phases lead to two further corrosion textures: Strong hydration effects of aluminum except a border of aluminum remnant directly beside the Fe- or Cu-rich segregations were only observed in fresh samples (reaction type 3). The reaction type 4 shows a network of Al-hydroxide veins occurring along the embedded intermetallic Fe- or Cu-rich exsolution segregation pattern within the metallic aluminum grain. Metal particles enclosed in vitrified particles offers the potential for future corrosion processes. The occurrence of corrosion types 1, 2 and 3 in fresh bottom ashes indicates that these reaction mechanisms predominate during the first reaction period in the presence of chlorine in an alkaline solution. Corrosion type 4, however, was additionally observed in aged samples. Here aluminum acts as sacrificed anode implying electrochemical reaction due to electrolytic pore water. Chloride in the system keeps the reaction alive as Al-hydroxide is solved which normally builds a protection shield around

  10. The chemical kinetics and thermodynamics of sodium species in oxygen-rich hydrogen flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, A. J.; Steinberg, M.; Schofield, K.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented which, it is claimed, lead to a correction of previous misconceptions over the relative importance and kinetics of NaO2. It is shown that its rapid conversion to NaO and NaOH is such that it can severely perturb the NaOH/Na ratio and produce significant concentration overshoots over that predicted from the balance of the reaction of Na with H2O. This becomes increasingly the case in flames of large O2 concentrations and temperatures below 2500 K; and the corresponding large rate constants for the termolecular formation of the other alkali peroxides imply that similar considerations will be necessary for them. Depending on the rate constants for the exothermic conversions of MO2 to MO or MOH, the steady-state concentrations of MO2 could be more or less significant than for sodium. Owing to numerous reactions that produce these conversions, the MOH species will probably be the dominant species in all cases in oxygen-rich hydrogen or hydrocarbon flames, with MO concentrations at not greater than 1 percent of the bound metal.

  11. Cobalt encapsulated N-doped defect-rich carbon nanotube as pH universal hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Suyun; Xiao, Xinxin; Lv, Taotao; Lv, Xiaomeng; Liu, Botao; Wei, Wei; Liu, Jun

    2018-07-01

    Exploring efficient and economical Pt-free electrocatalysts is of great significance for the electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the rational design on an industrial scale is a formidable challenge. Herein, we reported a facile calcination at controlled temperatures to fabricate rationally assembled cobalt nanoparticles embedded in defect-rich N-doped carbon nanotubes (Co-NCNTs), which was derived from low-cost dicyanadiamide thermally polymerized with cobalt precursor forming metal-organic frameworks, then further calculation leading to final products. The as-obtained samples were endowed with high content of N as electrocatalytic active site, defect-rich structure and excellent synergistic effect between cobalt nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes toward electrocatalytic HER. As expected, Co-NCNTs were highly active and long-term stable with onset potentials of c.a. 15 mV in acidic electrolytes (0.5 M H2SO4), 70 mV in alkaline (1 M KOH) and 300 mV in neutral media (pH 7). Specially, to achieve the current density of 10 mA cm-2, the overpotential of 103 mV in acid, 204 mV in alkaline and 337 mV in neutral media was obtained. The enhanced HER performance was discussed in detail by adjusting the molar ratio of precursor and metal species. Moreover, the present synthetic route is easy to scale up and expand to other non-noble metal and alloy.

  12. Hydrogen substituted graphdiyne as carbon-rich flexible electrode for lithium and sodium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    He, Jianjiang; Wang, Ning; Cui, Zili; Du, Huiping; Fu, Lin; Huang, Changshui; Yang, Ze; Shen, Xiangyan; Yi, Yuanping; Tu, Zeyi; Li, Yuliang

    2017-10-27

    Organic electrodes are potential alternatives to current inorganic electrode materials for lithium ion and sodium ion batteries powering portable and wearable electronics, in terms of their mechanical flexibility, function tunability and low cost. However, the low capacity, poor rate performance and rapid capacity degradation impede their practical application. Here, we concentrate on the molecular design for improved conductivity and capacity, and favorable bulk ion transport. Through an in situ cross-coupling reaction of triethynylbenzene on copper foil, the carbon-rich frame hydrogen substituted graphdiyne film is fabricated. The organic film can act as free-standing flexible electrode for both lithium ion and sodium ion batteries, and large reversible capacities of 1050 mAh g -1 for lithium ion batteries and 650 mAh g -1 for sodium ion batteries are achieved. The electrode also shows a superior rate and cycle performances owing to the extended π-conjugated system, and the hierarchical pore bulk with large surface area.

  13. Microbial control of silicate weathering in organic-rich ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hiebert, Franz K.; Bennett, Philip C.

    1992-01-01

    An in situ microcosm study of the influence of surface-adhering bacteria on silicate diagenesis in a shallow petroleum-contaminated aquifer showed that minerals were colonized by indigenous bacteria and chemically weathered at a rate faster than theoretically predicted. Feldspar and quartz fragments were placed in anoxic, organic-rich ground water, left for 14 months, recovered, and compared to unreacted controls with scanning electron microscopy. Ground-water geochemistry was characterized before and after the experiment. Localized mineral etching probably occurred in a reaction zone at the bacteria-mineral interface where high concentrations of organic acids, formed by bacteria during metabolism of hydrocarbon, selectively mobilized silica and aluminum from the mineral surface.

  14. Quantifying Hydrogen Bond Cooperativity in Water: VRT Spectroscopy of the Water Tetramer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzan, J. D.; Braly, L. B.; Liu, Kun; Brown, M. G.; Loeser, J. G.; Saykally, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of the far-infrared vibration-rotation tunneling spectrum of the perdeuterated water tetramer is described. Precisely determined rotational constants and relative intensity measurements indicate a cyclic quasi-planar minimum energy structure, which is in agreement with recent ab initio calculations. The O-O separation deduced from the data indicates a rapid exponential convergence to the ordered bulk value with increasing cluster size. Observed quantum tunneling splittings are interpreted in terms of hydrogen bond rearrangements connecting two degenerate structures.

  15. Laboratory Studies of Hydrogen Gas Generation Using the Cobalt Chloride Catalyzed Sodium Borohydride-Water Reaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    already use hydrogen for weather balloons . Besides cost, hydrogen has other advantages over helium. Hydrogen has more lift than helium, so larger...of water vapor entering the gas stream, and avoid damaging the balloon /aerostat (aerostats typically have an operational temperature range of -50 to...Aerostats: “Gepard” Tethered Aerostats with Mobile Mooring Systems. Available at http://rosaerosystems.com/aero/obj7. Accessed June 4, 2015. 11

  16. Response of anaerobic carbon cycling to water table manipulation in an Alaskan rich fen

    Treesearch

    E.S. Kane; M.R. Chivers; M.S. Turetsky; C.C. Treat; D.G. Petersen; M. Waldrop; J.W. Harden; A.D. McGuire

    2013-01-01

    To test the effects of altered hydrology on organic soil decomposition, we investigated CO2 and CH4 production potential of rich-fen peat (mean surface pH = 6.3) collected from a field water table manipulation experiment including control, raised and lowered water table treatments. Mean anaerobic CO2...

  17. Mechanism of conformational coupling in SecA: Key role of hydrogen-bonding networks and water interactions.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, Stefan; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta

    2016-02-01

    SecA uses the energy yielded by the binding and hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to push secretory pre-proteins across the plasma membrane in bacteria. Hydrolysis of ATP occurs at the nucleotide-binding site, which contains the conserved carboxylate groups of the DEAD-box helicases. Although crystal structures provide valuable snapshots of SecA along its reaction cycle, the mechanism that ensures conformational coupling between the nucleotide-binding site and the other domains of SecA remains unclear. The observation that SecA contains numerous hydrogen-bonding groups raises important questions about the role of hydrogen-bonding networks and hydrogen-bond dynamics in long-distance conformational couplings. To address these questions, we explored the molecular dynamics of SecA from three different organisms, with and without bound nucleotide, in water. By computing two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding maps we identify networks of hydrogen bonds that connect the nucleotide-binding site to remote regions of the protein, and sites in the protein that respond to specific perturbations. We find that the nucleotide-binding site of ADP-bound SecA has a preferred geometry whereby the first two carboxylates of the DEAD motif bridge via hydrogen-bonding water. Simulations of a mutant with perturbed ATP hydrolysis highlight the water-bridged geometry as a key structural element of the reaction path. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Oxygen tolerance of an in silico-designed bioinspired hydrogen-evolving catalyst in water

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Patrick H.-L.; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H.; Selloni, Annabella

    2013-01-01

    Certain bacterial enzymes, the diiron hydrogenases, have turnover numbers for hydrogen production from water as large as 104/s. Their much smaller common active site, composed of earth-abundant materials, has a structure that is an attractive starting point for the design of a practical catalyst for electrocatalytic or solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water. In earlier work, our group has reported the computational design of [FeFe]P/FeS2, a hydrogenase-inspired catalyst/electrode complex, which is efficient and stable throughout the production cycle. However, the diiron hydrogenases are highly sensitive to ambient oxygen by a mechanism not yet understood in detail. An issue critical for practical use of [FeFe]P/FeS2 is whether this catalyst/electrode complex is tolerant to the ambient oxygen. We report demonstration by ab initio simulations that the complex is indeed tolerant to dissolved oxygen over timescales long enough for practical application, reducing it efficiently. This promising hydrogen-producing catalyst, composed of earth-abundant materials and with a diffusion-limited rate in acidified water, is efficient as well as oxygen tolerant. PMID:23341607

  19. Hydrogen uptake causes molecular "avalanches" in palladium | Argonne

    Science.gov Websites

    experimental and calculated strain distributions in the hydrogen-poor phase. The strains are consistent with a trapped hydrogen-rich surface layer. Middle: Comparison between experimental and calculated strain transformation. Comparison between experimental and calculated strain distributions in the hydrogen-poor phase

  20. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the condensed phase.

    PubMed

    Elsaesser, Thomas

    2009-09-15

    Hydrogen bonding plays a key role in the structural, physical, and chemical properties of liquids such as water and in macromolecular structures such as proteins. Vibrational spectroscopy is an important tool for understanding hydrogen bonding because it provides a way to observe local molecular geometries and their interaction with the environment. Linear vibrational spectroscopy has mapped characteristic changes of vibrational spectra and the occurrence of new bands that form upon hydrogen bonding. However, linear vibrational spectroscopy gives very limited insight into ultrafast dynamics of the underlying molecular interactions, such as the motions of hydrogen-bonded groups, energy dissipation and delocalization, and the fluctuations within hydrogen-bonded structures that occur in the ultrafast time domain. Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy with its femtosecond time resolution can discern these dynamic processes in real time and has emerged as an important tool for unraveling molecular dynamics and for quantifying interactions that govern the vibrational and structural dynamics of hydrogen bonds. This Account reviews recent progress originating from third-order nonlinear methods of coherent multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy. Ultrafast dynamics of intermolecular hydrogen bonds are addressed for a number of prototype systems: hydrogen-bonded carboxylic acid dimers in an aprotic liquid environment, the disordered fluctuating hydrogen-bond network of liquid water, and DNA oligomers interacting with water. Cyclic carboxylic acid dimers display a rich scheme of vibrational couplings, resulting in OH stretching absorption bands with highly complex spectral envelopes. Two-dimensional spectroscopy of acetic acid dimers in a nonpolar liquid environment demonstrates that multiple Fermi resonances of the OH stretching mode with overtones and combination tones of fingerprint vibrations dominate both the 2D and linear absorption spectra. The coupling of the OH

  1. Inhibition of Radiolytic Molecular Hydrogen Formation by Quenching of Excited State Water

    DOE PAGES

    Horne, Gregory P.; Pimblott, Simon M.; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2017-05-11

    Comparison of experimental measurements of the yield of molecular hydrogen produced in the gamma radiolysis of water and aqueous nitrate solutions with predictions of a Monte Carlo track chemistry model shows that the nitrate anion scavenging of the hydrated electron, its precursor, and hydrogen atom cannot account for the observed decrease in the yield at high nitrate anion concentrations. Inclusion of the quenching of excited states of water (formed by either direct excitation or reaction of the water radical cation with the precursor to the hydrated electron) by the nitrate anion into the reaction scheme provides excellent agreement between themore » stochastic calculations and experiment demonstrating the existence of this short-lived species and its importance in water radiolysis. Energy transfer from the excited states of water to the nitrate anion producing an excited state provides an additional pathway for the production of nitrogen containing products not accounted for in traditional radiation chemistry scenarios. Such reactions are of central importance in predicting the behavior of liquors common in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and the storage of highly radioactive liquid waste prior to vitrification.« less

  2. SN 2017dio: A Type-Ic Supernova Exploding in a Hydrogen-rich Circumstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Maeda, Keiichi; Ashall, Christopher J.; Prentice, Simon J.; Mattila, Seppo; Kankare, Erkki; Fransson, Claes; Lundqvist, Peter; Pastorello, Andrea; Leloudas, Giorgos; Anderson, Joseph P.; Benetti, Stefano; Bersten, Melina C.; Cappellaro, Enrico; Cartier, Régis; Denneau, Larry; Della Valle, Massimo; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Folatelli, Gastón; Fraser, Morgan; Galbany, Lluís; Gall, Christa; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Hamanowicz, Aleksandra; Heinze, Ari; Inserra, Cosimo; Kangas, Tuomas; Mazzali, Paolo; Melandri, Andrea; Pignata, Giuliano; Rest, Armin; Reynolds, Thomas; Roy, Rupak; Smartt, Stephen J.; Smith, Ken W.; Sollerman, Jesper; Somero, Auni; Stalder, Brian; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Taddia, Francesco; Tomasella, Lina; Tonry, John; Weiland, Henry; Young, David R.

    2018-02-01

    SN 2017dio shows both spectral characteristics of a type-Ic supernova (SN) and signs of a hydrogen-rich circumstellar medium (CSM). Prominent, narrow emission lines of H and He are superposed on the continuum. Subsequent evolution revealed that the SN ejecta are interacting with the CSM. The initial SN Ic identification was confirmed by removing the CSM interaction component from the spectrum and comparing with known SNe Ic and, reversely, adding a CSM interaction component to the spectra of known SNe Ic and comparing them to SN 2017dio. Excellent agreement was obtained with both procedures, reinforcing the SN Ic classification. The light curve constrains the pre-interaction SN Ic peak absolute magnitude to be around {M}g=-17.6 mag. No evidence of significant extinction is found, ruling out a brighter luminosity required by an SN Ia classification. These pieces of evidence support the view that SN 2017dio is an SN Ic, and therefore the first firm case of an SN Ic with signatures of hydrogen-rich CSM in the early spectrum. The CSM is unlikely to have been shaped by steady-state stellar winds. The mass loss of the progenitor star must have been intense, \\dot{M}∼ 0.02{({ε }{{H}α }/0.01)}-1 ({v}{wind}/500 km s‑1) ({v}{shock}/10,000 km s‑1)‑3 M ⊙ yr‑1, peaking at a few decades before the SN. Such a high mass-loss rate might have been experienced by the progenitor through eruptions or binary stripping. Based on observations made with the NOT, operated by the Nordic Optical Telescope Scientific Association at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain, of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. This work is based (in part) on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile as part of PESSTO, (the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey for Transient Objects Survey) ESO program 188.D-3003, 191.D-0935, 197.D-1075. Based on observations made with the Liverpool Telescope operated on the

  3. Antitumor effects of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water are enhanced by coexistent platinum colloid and the combined hyperthermia with apoptosis-like cell death.

    PubMed

    Asada, Ryoko; Kageyama, Katsuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hisakazu; Kimura, Masatsugu; Saitoh, Yasukazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2010-12-01

    In order to erase reactive oxygen species (ROS) related with the proliferation of tumor cells by reducing activity of hydrogen, we developed functional water containing nano-bubbles (diameters: <900 nm for 71%/population) hydrogen of 1.1-1.5 ppm (the theoretical maximum: 1.6 ppm) with a reducing ability (an oxidation-reduction potential -650 mV, normal water: +100-200 mV) using a microporous-filter hydrogen-jetting device. We showed that hydrogen water erased ROS indispensable for tumor cell growth by ESR/spin trap, the redox indicator CDCFH-DA assay, and was cytotoxic to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells as assessed by WST-8 assay, crystal violet dye stain and scanning electron microscopy, after 24-h or 48-h incubation sequent to warming at 37°C or 42°C. Hydrogen water supplemented with platinum colloid (0.3 ppm Pt in 4% polyvinylpyrrolidone) had more antitumor activity than hydrogen water alone, mineral water alone (15.6%), hydrogen water plus mineral water, or platinum colloid alone as observed by decreased cell numbers, cell shrinkage and pycnosis (nuclear condensation)/karyorrhexis (nuclear fragmentation) indicative of apoptosis, together with cell deformation and disappearance of microvilli on the membrane surface. These antitumor effects were promoted by combination with hyperthermia at 42°C. Thus, the nano-bubble hydrogen water with platinum colloid is potent as an anti-tumor agent.

  4. Mechanisms Underlying Adaptation to Life in Hydrogen Sulfide–Rich Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Joanna L.; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Patacsil Martin, Dorrelyn; Yee, Muh-Ching; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Tobler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a potent toxicant interfering with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria and creating extreme environmental conditions in aquatic ecosystems. The mechanistic basis of adaptation to perpetual exposure to H2S remains poorly understood. We investigated evolutionarily independent lineages of livebearing fishes that have colonized and adapted to springs rich in H2S and compared their genome-wide gene expression patterns with closely related lineages from adjacent, nonsulfidic streams. Significant differences in gene expression were uncovered between all sulfidic and nonsulfidic population pairs. Variation in the number of differentially expressed genes among population pairs corresponded to differences in divergence times and rates of gene flow, which is consistent with neutral drift driving a substantial portion of gene expression variation among populations. Accordingly, there was little evidence for convergent evolution shaping large-scale gene expression patterns among independent sulfide spring populations. Nonetheless, we identified a small number of genes that was consistently differentially expressed in the same direction in all sulfidic and nonsulfidic population pairs. Functional annotation of shared differentially expressed genes indicated upregulation of genes associated with enzymatic H2S detoxification and transport of oxidized sulfur species, oxidative phosphorylation, energy metabolism, and pathways involved in responses to oxidative stress. Overall, our results suggest that modification of processes associated with H2S detoxification and toxicity likely complement each other to mediate elevated H2S tolerance in sulfide spring fishes. Our analyses allow for the development of novel hypotheses about biochemical and physiological mechanisms of adaptation to extreme environments. PMID:26861137

  5. Influence of hydrogen effusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride layers on the regeneration of boron-oxygen related defects in crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wilking, S., E-mail: Svenja.Wilking@uni-konstanz.de; Ebert, S.; Herguth, A.

    The degradation effect boron doped and oxygen-rich crystalline silicon materials suffer from under illumination can be neutralized in hydrogenated silicon by the application of a regeneration process consisting of a combination of slightly elevated temperature and carrier injection. In this paper, the influence of variations in short high temperature steps on the kinetics of the regeneration process is investigated. It is found that hotter and longer firing steps allowing an effective hydrogenation from a hydrogen-rich silicon nitride passivation layer result in an acceleration of the regeneration process. Additionally, a fast cool down from high temperature to around 550 °C seems tomore » be crucial for a fast regeneration process. It is suggested that high cooling rates suppress hydrogen effusion from the silicon bulk in a temperature range where the hydrogenated passivation layer cannot release hydrogen in considerable amounts. Thus, the hydrogen content of the silicon bulk after the complete high temperature step can be increased resulting in a faster regeneration process. Hence, the data presented here back up the theory that the regeneration process might be a hydrogen passivation of boron-oxygen related defects.« less

  6. Hydrogen production from water-glucose solution over NiO/La-NaTaO3 photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardian, R.; Husin, H.; Pontas, K.; Zaki, M.; Asnawi, T. M.; Ahmadi

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the evaluation of La-NaTaO3 photocatalyst performance in producing hydrogen from water-glucose solution. The main goal of the studies is to investigate the influence of glucose as a sacrificial reagent on the photocatalytic efficiency in water splitting reactions under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Photocatalyst has been fabricated via sol-gel method and being confirmed using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nickel loaded La-NaTaO3 photocatalyst are prepared by impregnation method. It was observed that the prepared photocatalysts displayed particle sizes in the 30-250 nm range with orthorhombic structure. Their photocatalytic activity for hydrogen production via water splitting was conducted in a Pyrex glass reactor under UV light irradiation. The aqueous solution contained glucose employed as a renewable organic scavenger. A significant improvement in hydrogen production was observed in glucose-water mixtures and NiO loaded photocatalyst. The prepared La-NaTaO3 showed that the highest activity for hydrogen generation of 35.1 mmol h-1.g-1 was obtained at 0.10 mol.L-1 glucose and 0.3 wt.% NiO. This suggests the important role played by the glucose as electron donor and loading nickel on La-NaTaO3 as a cocatalyst increasing electron storage and suppressing electron-hole recombination.

  7. Water Interfaces, Solvation, and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, Phillip L.

    2013-04-01

    Liquid water consistently expands our appreciation of the rich statistical mechanics that can emerge from simple molecular constituents. Here I review several interrelated areas of recent work on aqueous systems that aim to explore and explain this richness by revealing molecular arrangements, their thermodynamic origins, and the timescales on which they change. Vibrational spectroscopy of OH stretching features prominently in these discussions, with an emphasis on efforts to establish connections between spectroscopic signals and statistics of intermolecular structure. For bulk solutions, the results of these efforts largely verify and enrich existing physical pictures of hydrogen-bond network connectivity, dynamics, and response. For water at interfaces, such pictures are still emerging. As an important example I discuss the solvation of small ions at the air-water interface, whose surface propensities challenge a basic understanding of how aqueous fluctuations accommodate solutes in heterogeneous environments.

  8. Thallium-rich rust scales in drinkable water distribution systems: A case study from northern Tuscany, Italy.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Cristian; D'Orazio, Massimo; Lepore, Giovanni O; d'Acapito, Francesco; Vezzoni, Simone

    2017-06-01

    Following the detection of a severe thallium contamination of the drinkable water from the public distribution system of Valdicastello Carducci-Pietrasanta (northern Tuscany, Italy), and the identification of the source of contamination in the Molini di Sant'Anna spring (average Tl content≈15μgL -1 ), the replacement of the contaminated water with a virtually Tl-free one (Tl<0.10μgL -1 ) caused an increase in Tl concentration in the drinkable water. This suggested that the pipeline interior had become a secondary source of Tl contamination, promoting its mineralogical and geochemical study. Rust scales samples taken from several pipeline segments, as well as leaching products obtained from these samples, were investigated through scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence chemical analyses, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Thallium-rich rust scales (up to 5.3wt% Tl) have been found only in pipeline samples taken downstream the water treatment plant, whereas the sample taken upstream contains much less Tl (~90μgg -1 ). The Tl-rich nature of such scales is related to the occurrence of nano- and micro-spherules of Tl 2 O 3 and less abundant nanocrystalline μm-sized encrustations of TlCl. Leaching experiments on Tl-rich rust scales indicate that a fraction of the available Tl is easily dissolved in tap water; X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggests that monovalent thallium occurs in water equilibrated with the rust scales, probably related to the dissolution of TlCl encrustations. Therefore, Tl dissolved as Tl + only in the water from the Molini di Sant'Anna spring was partially removed through oxidative precipitation of Tl 2 O 3 and precipitation of TlCl. This highlights the critical role played by the addition of chlorine-based oxidants in water treatment plants that could favour the deposition of Tl-rich coatings within the pipelines, giving rise to unexpected secondary sources of

  9. A nanoparticle catalyst for heterogeneous phase para-hydrogen-induced polarization in water.

    PubMed

    Glöggler, Stefan; Grunfeld, Alexander M; Ertas, Yavuz N; McCormick, Jeffrey; Wagner, Shawn; Schleker, P Philipp M; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-02-16

    Para-hydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) is a technique capable of producing spin polarization at a magnitude far greater than state-of-the-art magnets. A significant application of PHIP is to generate contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Clinically viable and effective contrast agents not only require high levels of polarization but heterogeneous catalysts that can be used in water to eliminate the toxicity impact. Herein, we demonstrate the use of Pt nanoparticles capped with glutathione to induce heterogeneous PHIP in water. The ligand-inhibited surface diffusion on the nanoparticles resulted in a (1) H polarization of P=0.25% for hydroxyethyl propionate, a known contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography. Transferring the (1) H polarization to a (13) C nucleus using a para-hydrogen polarizer yielded a polarization of 0.013%. The nuclear-spin polarizations achieved in these experiments are the first reported to date involving heterogeneous reactions in water. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Microwave spectroscopy of 2-(trifluoromethyl)pyridine⋯water complex: Molecular structure and hydrogen bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolong; Zheng, Yang; Gou, Qian; Feng, Gang; Xia, Zhining

    2018-01-01

    In order to explore the -CF3 substitution effect on the complexation of pyridine, we investigated the 2-(trifluoromethyl)pyridine⋯water complex by using pulsed jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy complemented with quantum chemical calculations. Experimental assignment and ab initio calculations confirmed that the observed complex is stabilized through N⋯H-O and O⋯H-C hydrogen bonds forming a five-membered ring structure. The bonding distance in N⋯H-O is determined to be 2.027(2) Å, whilst that in O⋯H-C interaction is 2.728(2) Å. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis indicates that the interaction energy of N⋯H-O hydrogen bond is ˜22 kJ mol-1 and that for O⋯H-C hydrogen bond is ˜5 kJ mol-1. The water molecule lies almost in the plane of the aromatic ring in the complex. The -CF3 substitution to pyridine quenches the tunneling splitting path of the internal motion of water molecule.

  11. Orientation hydrogen-bonding effect on vibronic spectra of isoquinoline in water solvent: Franck-Condon simulation and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Hui; Wang, Shi-Ming; Wang, Chen-Wen; Zhu, Chaoyuan; Han, Ke-Li; Lin, Sheng-Hsien

    2016-10-01

    The excited-state orientation hydrogen-bonding dynamics, and vibronic spectra of isoquinoline (IQ) and its cationic form IQc in water have been investigated at the time-dependent density functional theory quantum chemistry level plus Franck-Condon simulation and interpretation. The excited-state orientation hydrogen bond strengthening has been found in IQ:H2O complex due to the charge redistribution upon excitation; this is interpreted by simulated 1:1 mixed absorption spectra of free IQ and IQ:H2O complex having best agreement with experimental results. Conversely, the orientation hydrogen bond in IQc:H2O complex would be strongly weakening in the S1 state and this is interpreted by simulated absorption spectra of free IQc having best agreement with experimental results. By performing Franck-Condon simulation, it reveals that several important vibrational normal modes with frequencies about 1250 cm-1 involving the wagging motion of the hydrogen atoms are very sensitive to the formation of the orientation hydrogen bond for the IQ/IQc:H2O complex and this is confirmed by damped Franck-Condon simulation with free IQ/IQc in water. However, the emission spectra of the IQ and IQc in water have been found differently. Upon the excitation, the simulated fluorescence of IQ in water is dominated by the IQ:H2O complex; thus hydrogen bond between IQ and H2O is much easier to form in the S1 state. While the weakened hydrogen bond in IQc:H2O complex is probably cleaved upon the laser pulse because the simulated emission spectrum of the free IQc is in better agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Hydrogen concentration in plagioclaes as a hygrometer of magmas: Approaches from melt inclusion analyses and hydrous melting experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, M.; Ushioda, M.; Fujii, T.; Takahashi, E.

    2012-12-01

    Plagioclase is one of the nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) which accommodates hundreds wt. ppm of hydrogen. Hydrogen in igneous plagioclase (OH) can act as a proxy of dissolved H2O in silicate melt. In order to use it as a practical hygrometer of magmas, we studied partitioning of hydrogen between plagioclase and basaltic melt dis-solving H2O (0.3˜5.5 wt.%) by two approaches: analyses of plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions (H2O≈0.3 wt.%) from mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) and hydrogen partitioning experiments between An96 plagioclase and hydrous basaltic melt (0.8 wt.%≦H2O≦5.5 wt.%) at 0.35 GPa. Concentration hydrogen in plagioclase and concentration of H2O in basaltic glasses were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. As a first series of this study, plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions in MORB (50.5% SiO2, 15.1% Al2O3, 7.4% MgO) from the Rodriguez triple junction in the Indian Ocean were analyzed. The hydrogen concentration of plagioclase is less than 50 wt. ppm water, and no correlation between hydrogen concentration and anorthite content is recognized. Average H2O concentrations in melt inclusions is 0.3 wt.%. Therefore, apparent partition coefficient of hydrogen between plagioclase and melt is ≈ 0.01 in molar basis. As a second series of this study, hydrous melting experiments of arc basaltic magma were performed at 350 MPa using internally-heated pressure vessel. Starting material was hydrous glass (0.8 wt.%≦H2O≦5.5 wt.%) of an undifferentiated rock from Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in Izu-arc (MTL rock: 50.5% SiO2, 18.1% Al2O3, 4.9% MgO). A grain of Ca-rich plagioclase (≈1 mg, about An96) and 10 mg of powdered glasses were sealed in Au80Pd20 alloy capsule, and then kept at temperature at around the liquidus. Liquidus phase of MTL rock at 350 MPa is always plagioclase with 0 to 5.5 wt.% H2O in melt, and therefore, a grain of plagioclase and hydrous melt were nearly in equilibrium. Oxygen fugacity (fO2) during the melting experiments

  13. Effects of human placental S9 and induced rat liver S9 on the mutagenicity of drinking waters processed from humus-rich surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Vartiainen, T.; Lampelo, S.

    The mutagenicity of chlorinated drinking waters processed from humus-rich surface waters has been shown to be very high. The effect of placental S9 on the mutagenicity of drinking waters has not been studied previously. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of human placental and rat liver microsomal fractions on the mutagenicity of drinking waters processed from humus-rich surface waters. The samples of 34 drinking and two raw waters from 26 localities in Finland were tested for mutagenicity in Ames Salmonella typhimurium tester strain TA100 with and without metabolic activations. Between the drinking water samples, clear differencesmore » were recorded in the presence of placental and rat liver S9, suggesting different mutagens in the drinking waters. Rat liver S9 decreased the mutagenicities of drinking water concentrates, but placental S9 increased, decreased, or had no effect. It is not known if placental mutagenicity enhancing system might cause any health hazard to a developing fetus.« less

  14. Disturbances to metal partitioning during toxicity testing of iron(II)-rich estuarine pore waters and whole sediments.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stuart L; Batley, Graeme E

    2003-02-01

    Metal partitioning is altered when suboxic estuarine sediments containing Fe(II)-rich pore waters are disturbed during collection, preparation, and toxicity testing. Experiments with model Fe(II)-rich pore waters demonstrated the rates at which adsorptive losses of Cd, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, and Zn occur upon exposure to air. Experiments with Zn-contaminated estuarine sediments demonstrated large and often unpredictable changes to metal partitioning during sediment storage, removal of organisms, and homogenization before testing. Small modifications to conditions, such as aeration of overlying waters, caused large changes to the metal partitioning. Disturbances caused by sediment collection required many weeks for reestablishment of equilibrium. Bioturbation by benthic organisms led to oxidation of pore-water Fe(II) and lower Zn fluxes because of the formation of Fe hydroxide precipitates that adsorb pore-water Zn. For five weeks after the addition of organisms to sediments, Zn fluxes increased slowly as the organisms established themselves in the sediments, indicating that the establishment of equilibrium was not rapid. The results are discussed in terms of the dynamic nature of suboxic, Fe(II)-rich estuarine sediments, how organisms perturb their environment, and the importance of understanding chemistry in toxicity testing with whole sediments or pore water. Recommendations are provided for the handling of sediments for toxicity testing.

  15. Direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from plasma-water interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiandi; He, Bangbang; Chen, Qiang; Li, Junshuai; Xiong, Qing; Yue, Guanghui; Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Size; Liu, Hai; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is usually considered to be an important reagent in green chemistry since water is the only by-product in H2O2 involved oxidation reactions. Early studies show that direct synthesis of H2O2 by plasma-water interactions is possible, while the factors affecting the H2O2 production in this method remain unclear. Herein, we present a study on the H2O2 synthesis by atmospheric pressure plasma-water interactions. The results indicate that the most important factors for the H2O2 production are the processes taking place at the plasma-water interface, including sputtering, electric field induced hydrated ion emission, and evaporation. The H2O2 production rate reaches ~1200 μmol/h when the liquid cathode is purified water or an aqueous solution of NaCl with an initial conductivity of 10500 μS cm−1. PMID:27917925

  16. Isotopic composition of hydrogen in insoluble organic matter from cherts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, S.

    1991-01-01

    Robert (1989) reported the presence of unusually enriched hydrogen in the insoluble HF-HCl residue extracted from two chert samples of Eocene and Pliocene ages. Since the presence of heavy hydrogen might be due to the incorporation of extraterrestrial materials, we desired to reexamine the same samples to isolate the D-rich components. Our experiments did not reveal any D-rich components, but the hydrogen isotope composition of the insoluble residue of the two chert samples was well within the range expected for terrestrial organic matter. We also describe a protocol that needs to be followed in the hydrogen isotope analysis of any insoluble organic matter.

  17. Cosolvent effect on the dynamics of water in aqueous binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Lu; Jin, Tan; Zhang, Qiang; Zhuang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Water rotational dynamics in the mixtures of water and amphiphilic molecules, such as acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), measured by femtosecond infrared, often vary non-monotonically as the amphiphilic molecule's molar fraction changes from 0 to 1. Recent study has attributed the non-ideal water rotation with concentration in DMSO-water mixtures to different microscopic hydrophilic-hydrophobic segregation structure in water-rich and water-poor mixtures. Interestingly, the acetone molecule has very similar molecular structure to DMSO, but the extremum of the water rotational time in the DMSO-water mixtures significantly shifts to lower concentration and the rotation of water is much faster than those in acetone-water mixtures. The simulation results here shows that the non-ideal rotational dynamics of water in both mixtures are due to the frame rotation during the interval of hydrogen bond (HB) switchings. A turnover of the frame rotation with concentration takes place as the structure transition of mixture from the hydrogen bond percolation structure to the hydrophobic percolation structure. The weak acetone-water hydrogen bond strengthens the hydrophobic aggregation and accelerates the relaxation of the hydrogen bond, so that the structure transition takes places at lower concentration and the rotation of water is faster in acetone-water mixture than in DMSO-water mixture. A generally microscopic picture on the mixing effect on the water dynamics in binary aqueous mixtures is presented here.

  18. Vibrational dephasing and frequency shifts of hydrogen-bonded pyridine-water complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalampounias, A. G.; Tsilomelekis, G.; Boghosian, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the picosecond vibrational dynamics and Raman shifts of hydrogen-bonded pyridine-water complexes present in aqueous solutions in a wide concentration range from dense to extreme dilute solutions. We studied the vibrational dephasing and vibrational frequency modulation by calculating time correlation functions of vibrational relaxation by fits in the frequency domain. The concentration induced variations in bandwidths, band frequencies and characteristic dephasing times have been estimated and interpreted as effects due to solute-solvent interactions. The time-correlation functions of vibrational dephasing were obtained for the ring breathing mode of both "free" and hydrogen-bonded pyridine molecules and it was found that sufficiently deviate from the Kubo model. There is a general agreement in the whole concentration range with the modeling proposed by the Rothschild approach, which applies to complex liquids. The results have shown that the reorientation of pyridine aqueous solutions is very slow and hence in both scattering geometries only vibrational dephasing is probed. It is proposed that the spectral changes depend on the perturbations induced by the dynamics of the water molecules in the first hydration cell and water in bulk, while at extreme dilution conditions, the number of bulk water molecules increases and the interchange between molecules belonging to the first hydration cell may not be the predominant modulation mechanism. The evolution of several parameters, such as the characteristic times, the percentage of Gaussian character in the peak shape and the a parameter are indicative of drastic variations at extreme dilution revealing changes in the vibrational relaxation of the pyridine complexes in the aqueous environment. The higher dilution is correlated to diffusion of water molecules into the reference pyridine system in agreement with the jump diffusion model, while at extreme dilutions, almost all pyridine molecules are

  19. Electron, proton and hydrogen-atom transfers in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Tommos, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    When photosynthetic organisms developed so that they could use water as an electron source to reduce carbon dioxide, the stage was set for efficient proliferation. Algae and plants spread globally and provided the foundation for our atmosphere and for O(2)-based chemistry in biological systems. Light-driven water oxidation is catalysed by photosystem II, the active site of which contains a redox-active tyrosine denoted Y(Z), a tetramanganese cluster, calcium and chloride. In 1995, Gerald Babcock and co-workers presented the hypothesis that photosynthetic water oxidation occurs as a metallo-radical catalysed process. In this model, the oxidized tyrosine radical is generated by coupled proton/electron transfer and re-reduced by abstracting hydrogen atoms from substrate water or hydroxide-ligated to the manganese cluster. The proposed function of Y(Z) requires proton transfer from the tyrosine site upon oxidation. The oxidation mechanism of Y(Z) in an inhibited and O(2)-evolving photosystem II is discussed. Domino-deprotonation from Y(Z) to the bulk solution is shown to be consistent with a variety of data obtained on metal-depleted samples. Experimental data that suggest that the oxidation of Y(Z) in O(2)-evolving samples is coupled to proton transfer in a hydrogen-bonding network are described. Finally, a dielectric-dependent model for the proton release that is associated with the catalytic cycle of photosystem II is discussed. PMID:12437877

  20. Low-temperature hydrogen production from water and methanol using Pt/α-MoC catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lili; Zhou, Wu; Gao, Rui; Yao, Siyu; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Wenqian; Zheng, Shijian; Jiang, Zheng; Yu, Qiaolin; Li, Yong-Wang; Shi, Chuan; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Ding

    2017-03-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) running on hydrogen are attractive alternative power supplies for a range of applications, with in situ release of the required hydrogen from a stable liquid offering one way of ensuring its safe storage and transportation before use. The use of methanol is particularly interesting in this regard, because it is inexpensive and can reform itself with water to release hydrogen with a high gravimetric density of 18.8 per cent by weight. But traditional reforming of methanol steam operates at relatively high temperatures (200-350 degrees Celsius), so the focus for vehicle and portable PEMFC applications has been on aqueous-phase reforming of methanol (APRM). This method requires less energy, and the simpler and more compact device design allows direct integration into PEMFC stacks. There remains, however, the need for an efficient APRM catalyst. Here we report that platinum (Pt) atomically dispersed on α-molybdenum carbide (α-MoC) enables low-temperature (150-190 degrees Celsius), base-free hydrogen production through APRM, with an average turnover frequency reaching 18,046 moles of hydrogen per mole of platinum per hour. We attribute this exceptional hydrogen production—which far exceeds that of previously reported low-temperature APRM catalysts—to the outstanding ability of α-MoC to induce water dissociation, and to the fact that platinum and α-MoC act in synergy to activate methanol and then to reform it.

  1. Low-temperature hydrogen production from water and methanol using Pt/α-MoC catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lili; Zhou, Wu; Gao, Rui; Yao, Siyu; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Wenqian; Zheng, Shijian; Jiang, Zheng; Yu, Qiaolin; Li, Yong-Wang; Shi, Chuan; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Ding

    2017-04-06

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) running on hydrogen are attractive alternative power supplies for a range of applications, with in situ release of the required hydrogen from a stable liquid offering one way of ensuring its safe storage and transportation before use. The use of methanol is particularly interesting in this regard, because it is inexpensive and can reform itself with water to release hydrogen with a high gravimetric density of 18.8 per cent by weight. But traditional reforming of methanol steam operates at relatively high temperatures (200-350 degrees Celsius), so the focus for vehicle and portable PEMFC applications has been on aqueous-phase reforming of methanol (APRM). This method requires less energy, and the simpler and more compact device design allows direct integration into PEMFC stacks. There remains, however, the need for an efficient APRM catalyst. Here we report that platinum (Pt) atomically dispersed on α-molybdenum carbide (α-MoC) enables low-temperature (150-190 degrees Celsius), base-free hydrogen production through APRM, with an average turnover frequency reaching 18,046 moles of hydrogen per mole of platinum per hour. We attribute this exceptional hydrogen production-which far exceeds that of previously reported low-temperature APRM catalysts-to the outstanding ability of α-MoC to induce water dissociation, and to the fact that platinum and α-MoC act in synergy to activate methanol and then to reform it.

  2. A dual origin for water in carbonaceous asteroids revealed by CM chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piani, Laurette; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Remusat, Laurent

    2018-04-01

    Carbonaceous asteroids represent the principal source of water in the inner Solar System and might correspond to the main contributors for the delivery of water to Earth. Hydrogen isotopes in water-bearing primitive meteorites, for example carbonaceous chondrites, constitute a unique tool for deciphering the sources of water reservoirs at the time of asteroid formation. However, fine-scale isotopic measurements are required to unravel the effects of parent-body processes on the pre-accretion isotopic distributions. Here, we report in situ micrometre-scale analyses of hydrogen isotopes in six CM-type carbonaceous chondrites, revealing a dominant deuterium-poor water component (δD = -350 ± 40‰) mixed with deuterium-rich organic matter. We suggest that this deuterium-poor water corresponds to a ubiquitous water reservoir in the inner protoplanetary disk. A deuterium-rich water signature has been preserved in the least altered part of the Paris chondrite (δDParis ≥ -69 ± 163‰) in hydrated phases possibly present in the CM rock before alteration. The presence of the deuterium-enriched water signature in Paris might indicate that transfers of ice from the outer to the inner Solar System were significant within the first million years of the history of the Solar System.

  3. The production of He-3 and heavy ion enrichment in He-3-rich flares by electromagnetic hydrogen cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temerin, M.; Roth, I.

    1992-01-01

    A new model is presented for the production of He-3 and heavy ion enrichments in He-3-rich flares using a direct single-stage mechanism. In analogy with the production of electromagnetic hydrogen cyclotron waves in earth's aurora by electron beams, it is suggested that such waves should exist in the electron acceleration region of impulsive solar flares. Both analytic and test-particle models of the effect of such waves in a nonuniform magnetic field show that these waves can selectively accelerate He-3 and heavy ions to MeV energies in a single-stage process, in contrast to other models which require a two-stage mechanism.

  4. Hydrogen bonding donation of N-methylformamide with dimethylsulfoxide and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Alexandre; Cordeiro, João M. M.

    2013-04-01

    20% N-methylformamide (NMF) mixtures with water and with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) have been studied. A comparison between the hydrogen bonding (H-bond) donation of N-methylformamide with both solvents in the mixtures is presented. Results of radial distribution functions, pair distribution energies, molecular dipole moment correlation, and geometry of the H-bonded species in each case are shown. The results indicate that the NMF - solvent H-bond is significantly stronger with DMSO than with water. The solvation shell is best organized in the DMSO mixture than in the aqueous one.

  5. Fuel-rich catalytic combustion: A soot-free technique for in situ hydrogen-like enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.; Olson, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental program on the catalytic oxidation of iso-octane demonstrated the feasibility of the two-stage combustion system for reducing particulate emissions. With a fuel-rich (phi = 4.8 to 7.8) catalytic combustion preburner as the first stage the combustion process was soot free at reactor outlet temperatures of 1200 K or less. Although soot was not measured directly, its absence was indicated. Reaction products collected at two positions downstream of the catalyst bed were analyzed on a gas chromatograph. Comparison of these products indicated that pyrolysis of the larger molecules continued along the drift tube and that benzene formation was a gas-phase reaction. The effective hydrogen-carbon ratio calculated from the reaction products increased by 20 to 68 percent over the range of equivalence ratios tested. The catalytic partial oxidation process also yielded a large number of smaller-containing molecules. The fraction of fuel carbon in compounds having two or fewer carbon atoms ranged from 30 percent at 1100 K to 80 percent at 1200 K.

  6. Distillation Kinetics of Solid Mixtures of Hydrogen Peroxide and Water and the Isolation of Pure Hydrogen Peroxide in Ultrahigh Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teolis, B. D.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    We present results of the growth of thin films of crystalline H2O2 and H2O2.2H2O (dihydrate) in ultrahigh vacuum by distilling an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. We traced the process using infrared reflectance spectroscopy, mass loss on a quartz crystal microbalance, and in a few cases ultraviolet-visible reflectance. We find that the different crystalline phases-water, dihydrate, and hydrogen peroxide-have very different sublimation rates, making distillation efficient to isolate the less volatile component, crystalline H2O2.

  7. FUSE Observations of He-rich sdB Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swiegart, A. V.; Lanz, T.; Brown, T. M.; Hubeny, I.; Landsman, W. B.

    2003-01-01

    Most subdwarf B stars are extremely deficient in helium and selected light elements, but a minority are helium-rich. New evolutionary calculations suggest that these helium-rich sdB stars are the result of a delayed helium-core flash on the white dwarf cooling curve, which leads to extensive mixing between the hydrogen envelope and helium core. Such mixed stars should show greatly enhanced helium and carbon with respect to the other heavy elements. We have recently obtained FUSE spectra of two helium-rich sdB stars, PG1544+488 and JL87, revealing huge C Ill lines at 977 and 1176 A. Our analysis shows that PG1544+488 has a surface composition of 97% He, 2% C, and 1% N, in agreement with the new evolutionary scenario. While JL87 also reveals a large enrichment in carbon and nitrogen (1.4% and 0.4%, respectively), there is still a significant amount of hydrogen in its atmosphere.

  8. Hydrogen therapy may reduce the risks related to radiation-induced oxidative stress in space flight.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Michael P; Ansari, Rafat R; Zakrajsek, June F; Billiar, Timothy R; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Wink, David A; Nakao, Atsunori

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic radiation is known to induce DNA and lipid damage associated with increased oxidative stress and remains a major concern in space travel. Hydrogen, recently discovered as a novel therapeutic medical gas in a variety of biomedical fields, has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. It is expected that space mission activities will increase in coming years both in numbers and duration. It is therefore important to estimate and prevent the risks encountered by astronauts due to oxidative stress prior to developing clinical symptoms of disease. We hypothesize that hydrogen administration to the astronauts by either inhalation or drinking hydrogen-rich water may potentially yield a novel and feasible preventative/therapeutic strategy to prevent radiation-induced adverse events. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carriers (LOHCs): Toward a Hydrogen-free Hydrogen Economy.

    PubMed

    Preuster, Patrick; Papp, Christian; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-17

    The need to drastically reduce CO 2 emissions will lead to the transformation of our current, carbon-based energy system to a more sustainable, renewable-based one. In this process, hydrogen will gain increasing importance as secondary energy vector. Energy storage requirements on the TWh scale (to bridge extended times of low wind and sun harvest) and global logistics of renewable energy equivalents will create additional driving forces toward a future hydrogen economy. However, the nature of hydrogen requires dedicated infrastructures, and this has prevented so far the introduction of elemental hydrogen into the energy sector to a large extent. Recent scientific and technological progress in handling hydrogen in chemically bound form as liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) supports the technological vision that a future hydrogen economy may work without handling large amounts of elemental hydrogen. LOHC systems are composed of pairs of hydrogen-lean and hydrogen-rich organic compounds that store hydrogen by repeated catalytic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation cycles. While hydrogen handling in the form of LOHCs allows for using the existing infrastructure for fuels, it also builds on the existing public confidence in dealing with liquid energy carriers. In contrast to hydrogen storage by hydrogenation of gases, such as CO 2 or N 2 , hydrogen release from LOHC systems produces pure hydrogen after condensation of the high-boiling carrier compounds. This Account highlights the current state-of-the-art in hydrogen storage using LOHC systems. It first introduces fundamental aspects of a future hydrogen economy and derives therefrom requirements for suitable LOHC compounds. Molecular structures that have been successfully applied in the literature are presented, and their property profiles are discussed. Fundamental and applied aspects of the involved hydrogenation and dehydrogenation catalysis are discussed, characteristic differences for the catalytic conversion of

  10. Modeling species richness and abundance of phytoplankton and zooplankton in radioactively contaminated water bodies.

    PubMed

    Shuryak, Igor

    2018-06-05

    Water bodies polluted by the Mayak nuclear plant in Russia provide valuable information on multi-generation effects of radioactive contamination on freshwater organisms. For example, lake Karachay was probably the most radioactive lake in the world: its water contained ∼2 × 10 7 Bq/L of radionuclides and estimated dose rates to plankton exceeded 5 Gy/h. We performed quantitative modeling of radiation effects on phytoplankton and zooplankton species richness and abundance in Mayak-contaminated water bodies. Due to collinearity between radioactive contamination, water body size and salinity, we combined these variables into one (called HabitatFactors). We employed a customized machine learning approach, where synthetic noise variables acted as benchmarks of predictor performance. HabitatFactors was the only predictor that outperformed noise variables and, therefore, we used it for parametric modeling of plankton responses. Best-fit model predictions suggested 50% species richness reduction at HabitatFactors values corresponding to dose rates of 10 4 -10 5  μGy/h for phytoplankton, and 10 3 -10 4  μGy/h for zooplankton. Under conditions similar to those in lake Karachay, best-fit models predicted 81-98% species richness reductions for various taxa (Cyanobacteria, Bacillariophyta, Chlorophyta, Rotifera, Cladocera and Copepoda), ∼20-300-fold abundance reduction for total zooplankton, but no abundance reduction for phytoplankton. Rotifera was the only taxon whose fractional abundance increased with contamination level, reaching 100% in lake Karachay, but Rotifera species richness declined with contamination level, as in other taxa. Under severe radioactive and chemical contamination, one species of Cyanobacteria (Geitlerinema amphibium) dominated phytoplankton, and rotifers from the genus Brachionus dominated zooplankton. The modeling approaches proposed here are applicable to other radioecological data sets. The results provide quantitative information

  11. A molecular dynamics study of ethanol-water hydrogen bonding in binary structure I clathrate hydrate with CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Ohmura, Ryo; Ripmeester, John A.

    2011-02-01

    Guest-host hydrogen bonding in clathrate hydrates occurs when in addition to the hydrophilic moiety which causes the molecule to form hydrates under high pressure-low temperature conditions, the guests contain a hydrophilic, hydrogen bonding functional group. In the presence of carbon dioxide, ethanol clathrate hydrate has been synthesized with 10% of large structure I (sI) cages occupied by ethanol. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study hydrogen bonding structure and dynamics in this binary sI clathrate hydrate in the temperature range of 100-250 K. We observe that ethanol forms long-lived (>500 ps) proton-donating and accepting hydrogen bonds with cage water molecules from both hexagonal and pentagonal faces of the large cages while maintaining the general cage integrity of the sI clathrate hydrate. The presence of the nondipolar CO2 molecules stabilizes the hydrate phase, despite the strong and prevalent alcohol-water hydrogen bonding. The distortions of the large cages from the ideal form, the radial distribution functions of the guest-host interactions, and the ethanol guest dynamics are characterized in this study. In previous work through dielectric and NMR relaxation time studies, single crystal x-ray diffraction, and molecular dynamics simulations we have observed guest-water hydrogen bonding in structure II and structure H clathrate hydrates. The present work extends the observation of hydrogen bonding to structure I hydrates.

  12. Molecular Hydrogen as an Emerging Therapeutic Medical Gas for Neurodegenerative and Other Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Kinji; Ito, Mikako; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Ito, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    Effects of molecular hydrogen on various diseases have been documented for 63 disease models and human diseases in the past four and a half years. Most studies have been performed on rodents including two models of Parkinson's disease and three models of Alzheimer's disease. Prominent effects are observed especially in oxidative stress-mediated diseases including neonatal cerebral hypoxia; Parkinson's disease; ischemia/reperfusion of spinal cord, heart, lung, liver, kidney, and intestine; transplantation of lung, heart, kidney, and intestine. Six human diseases have been studied to date: diabetes mellitus type 2, metabolic syndrome, hemodialysis, inflammatory and mitochondrial myopathies, brain stem infarction, and radiation-induced adverse effects. Two enigmas, however, remain to be solved. First, no dose-response effect is observed. Rodents and humans are able to take a small amount of hydrogen by drinking hydrogen-rich water, but marked effects are observed. Second, intestinal bacteria in humans and rodents produce a large amount of hydrogen, but an addition of a small amount of hydrogen exhibits marked effects. Further studies are required to elucidate molecular bases of prominent hydrogen effects and to determine the optimal frequency, amount, and method of hydrogen administration for each human disease. PMID:22720117

  13. A two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded water layer in the structure of a cobalt(III) cubane complex.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ji; Zhai, Xiang-Sheng; Zhu, Hong-Lin; Lin, Jian-Li

    2014-02-01

    A tetranuclear Co(III) oxide complex with cubane topology, tetrakis(2,2'-bipyridine-κ(2)N,N')di-μ2-carbonato-κ(4)O:O'-tetra-μ3-oxido-tetracobalt(III) pentadecahydrate, [Co4(CO3)2O4(C10H8N2)4]·15H2O, with an unbounded hydrogen-bonded water layer, has been synthesized by reaction of CoCO3 and 2,2'-bipyridine. The solvent water molecules form a hydrogen-bonded net with tetrameric and pentameric water clusters as subunits. The Co4O4 cubane-like cores are sandwiched between the water layers, which are further stacked into a three-dimensional metallo-supramolecular network.

  14. A Thermodynamic Model for Predicting Mineral Reactivity in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide: I. Phase Behavior of Carbon Dioxide - Water - Chloride Salt Systems Across the H2O-Rich to the CO2-Rich Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Ronald D.; Wang, Zheming; Anderko, Andre

    Phase equilibria in mixtures containing carbon dioxide, water, and chloride salts have been investigated using a combination of solubility measurements and thermodynamic modeling. The solubility of water in the CO2-rich phase of ternary mixtures of CO2, H2O and NaCl or CaCl2 was determined, using near infrared spectroscopy, at 90 atm and 40 to 100 °C. These measurements fill a gap in the experimental database for CO2 water salt systems, for which phase composition data have been available only for the H2O-rich phases. A thermodynamic model for CO2 water salt systems has been constructed on the basis of the previously developedmore » Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte (MSE) framework, which is capable of modeling aqueous solutions over broad ranges of temperature and pressure, is valid to high electrolyte concentrations, treats mixed-phase systems (with both scCO2 and water present) and can predict the thermodynamic properties of dry and partially water-saturated supercritical CO2 over broad ranges of temperature and pressure. Within the MSE framework the standard-state properties are calculated from the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state whereas the excess Gibbs energy includes a long-range electrostatic interaction term expressed by a Pitzer-Debye-Hückel equation, a virial coefficient-type term for interactions between ions and a short-range term for interactions involving neutral molecules. The parameters of the MSE model have been evaluated using literature data for both the H2O-rich and CO2-rich phases in the CO2 - H2O binary and for the H2O-rich phase in the CO2 - H2O - NaCl / KCl / CaCl2 / MgCl2 ternary and multicompontent systems. The model accurately represents the properties of these systems at temperatures from 0°C to 300 °C and pressures up to ~4000 atm. Further, the solubilities of H2O in CO2-rich phases that are predicted by the model are in agreement with the new measurements for the CO2 - H2O - NaCl and CO2 - H2O - CaCl2 systems. Thus, the model

  15. Hydrogen-water vapor mixtures: Control of hydrothermal atmospheres by hydrogen osmosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, H.R.

    1963-01-01

    Experiments at 700??C and 800 bars total pressure demonstrate positive deviations from ideality for mixtures of hydrogen and H2O gases. The deviations are greater than predicted with Stockmayer's method. The composition of the mixture and the fugacity of hydrogen are controlled by diffusing hydrogen through metallic membranes. The results give the fugacities of both H 2O and oxygen.

  16. Hydrogen production by the naked active site of the di-iron hydrogenases in water.

    PubMed

    Zipoli, Federico; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2009-10-01

    We explored the reactivity of the active center of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases detached from the enzyme and immersed in acidified water by first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics simulations. We focused on the identification of the structures that are stable and metastable in acidified water and on their activity for hydrogen production. Our calculations revealed that the naked active center could be an efficient catalyst provided that electrons are transferred to the cluster. We found that both bridging and terminal isomers are present at equilibrium and that the bridging configuration is essential for efficient hydrogen production. The formation of the hydrogen molecule occurs via sequential protonations of the distal iron and of the N-atom of the S-CH(2)-NH-CH(2)-S chelating group. H(2) desorption does not involve a significant energy barrier, making the process very efficient at room temperature. We established that the bottleneck in the reaction is the direct proton transfer from water to the vacant site of the distal iron. Moreover, we found that even if the terminal isomer is present at the equilibrium, its strong local hydrophobicity prevents poisoning of the cluster.

  17. Releve et analyse spectroscopiques d'etoiles naines blanches brillantes et riches en hydrogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianninas, Alexandros

    2011-04-01

    We present a spectroscopic survey and analysis of over 1300 bright (V ≤ 17.5), hydrogen-rich white dwarfs. High signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra were obtained and are then analyzed using our standard spectroscopic technique which compares the observed Balmer line profiles to synthetic spectra computed from the latest generation of model atmospheres. First, we present a detailed analysis 29 DAO white dwarfs using our new up-to-date model atmosphere grids in which we have included carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen at solar abundances. We demonstrate that the inclusion of these metals in the model atmospheres is essential in overcoming the Balmer-line problem, which manifests itself as an inability to fit all the Balmer lines simultaneously with consistent atmospheric parameters. We also identify 18 hot DA white dwarfs that also suffer from the Balmer-line problem. Far ultraviolet spectra from the FUSE archive are then examined to demonstrate that there exists a correlation between higher metallic abundances and instances of the Balmer-line problem. The implications of these findings for all hot, hydrogen-rich white dwarfs are discussed. Specifically, the possible evolutionary scenario for DAO white dwarfs is revised and post-EHB evolution need no longer be invoked to explain the evolution for the majority of the DAO stars. Finally, we discuss how the presence of metals might drive a weak stellar wind which in turn could explain the presence of helium in DAO white dwarfs. We then present the complete results from our survey, including the spectroscopic analysis of over 1200 DA white dwarfs. First we present the spectroscopic content of our sample which includes many misclassifications as well as several DAB, DAZ and magnetic white dwarfs. We then discuss the new model atmospheres we employ in our analysis. In addition, we use M dwarf templates to obtain better estimates of the atmospheric parameters for those white dwarfs which are in DA+dM binary systems. A handful

  18. Hydrogenation thermodynamics of melt-spun magnesium rich Mg-Ni nanocrystalline alloys with the addition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and TiF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiaojiang; Hu, Rui; Zhang, Tiebang; Kou, Hongchao; Li, Jinshan

    2016-02-01

    Based on the complexity of hydrogen absorption/desorption process and from the perspective of overall control, the as-cast Mg-10wt%Ni (Mg10Ni) alloy has been successively optimized by melt-spinning and surface catalyzed to realize the internal refinement as well as surface modification. The isothermal hydrogenation behavior of modified Mg-rich alloys has been investigated in this work. The results indicate that melt-spun Mg10Ni catalyzed by multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coupling with TiF3 possesses superior activation properties and can absorb 6.23 wt% at 250 °C under 2.5 MPa. It is worth mentioning that the hydrogenation capacities of Mg10Ni-MWCNTs-TiF3 are 5.93 wt% and 5.99 wt% within the initial 1 min and 5 min, respectively. Meanwhile, the catalytic effect of MWCNTs and TiF3 has been discussed. The improved activation performance as well as the thermodynamics properties of Mg10Ni catalyzed by MWCNTs and TiF3 is attributed to the synergistic effect on dissociation of H2 molecules, diffusion of H-atoms and heterogeneous nucleation of hydrides.

  19. Hydrodesulphurization of Light Gas Oil using hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghamdi, Abdulaziz

    2009-12-01

    The production of clean fuel faces the challenges of high production cost and complying with stricter environmental regulations. In this research, the ability of using a novel technology of upgrading heavy oil to treat Light Gas Oil (LGO) will be investigated. The target of this project is to produce cleaner transportation fuel with much lower cost of production. Recently, a novel process for upgrading of heavy oil has been developed at University of Waterloo. It is combining the two essential processes in bitumen upgrading; emulsion breaking and hydroprocessing into one process. The water in the emulsion is used to generate in situ hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). This hydrogen can be used for the hydrogenation and hydrotreating reaction which includes sulfur removal instead of the expensive molecular hydrogen. This process can be carried out for the upgrading of the bitumen emulsion which would improve its quality. In this study, the hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of LGO was conducted using in situ hydrogen produced via the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). The main objective of this experimental study is to evaluate the possibility of producing clean LGO over dispersed molybdenum sulphide catalyst and to evaluate the effect of different promoters and syn-gas on the activity of the dispersed Mo catalyst. Experiments were carried out in a 300 ml Autoclave batch reactor under 600 psi (initially) at 391°C for 1 to 3 hours and different amounts of water. After the hydrotreating reaction, the gas samples were collected and the conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen via WGSR was determined using a refinery gas analyzer. The sulphur content in liquid sample was analyzed via X-Ray Fluorescence. Experimental results showed that using more water will enhance WGSR but at the same time inhibits the HDS reaction. It was also shown that the amount of sulfur removed depends on the reaction time. The plan is to investigate the effect of synthesis gas (syngas

  20. Accelerated Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Tyler; Was, Gary S.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical and supercritical water. Tensile bars of Alloys 690 and 600 were strained in constant extension rate tensile experiments in hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 593 K to 723 K (320 °C to 450 °C), and the crack initiation behavior was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. Intergranular cracking was observed across the entire temperature range, and the morphology, structure, composition, and temperature dependence of initiated cracks in Alloy 690 were consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water. Crack initiation of Alloy 600 followed an Arrhenius relationship and did not exhibit a discontinuity or change in slope after crossing the critical temperature. The measured activation energy was 121 ± 13 kJ/mol. Stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690 was fit with a single activation energy of 92 ± 12 kJ/mol across the entire temperature range. Cracks were observed to propagate along grain boundaries adjacent to chromium-depleted metal, with Cr2O3 observed ahead of crack tips. All measures of the SCC behavior indicate that the mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 is consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water.

  1. Sustainable urban water systems in rich and poor cities--steps towards a new approach.

    PubMed

    Newman, P

    2001-01-01

    The 'big pipes in, big pipes out' approach to urban water management was developed in the 19th century for a particular linear urban form. Large, sprawling car-dependent cities are pushing this approach to new limits in rich cities and it has never worked in poor cities. An alternative which uses new small-scale technology and is more community-based, is suggested for both rich and poor countries. The Sydney Olympics and a demonstration project in Java show that the approach can work.

  2. Solute's perspective on how trimethylamine oxide, urea, and guanidine hydrochloride affect water's hydrogen bonding ability.

    PubMed

    Pazos, Ileana M; Gai, Feng

    2012-10-18

    While the thermodynamic effects of trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), urea, and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) on protein stability are well understood, the underlying mechanisms of action are less well characterized and, in some cases, even under debate. Herein, we employ the stretching vibration of two infrared (IR) reporters, i.e., nitrile (C≡N) and carbonyl (C═O), to directly probe how these cosolvents mediate the ability of water to form hydrogen bonds with the solute of interest, e.g., a peptide. Our results show that these three agents, despite having different effects on protein stability, all act to decrease the strength of the hydrogen bonds formed between water and the infrared probe. While the behavior of TMAO appears to be consistent with its protein-protecting ability, those of urea and GdnHCl are inconsistent with their role as protein denaturants. The latter is of particular interest as it provides strong evidence indicating that although urea and GdnHCl can perturb the hydrogen-bonding property of water their protein-denaturing ability does not arise from a simple indirect mechanism.

  3. Electrochemically hydrogenated TiO2 nanotubes with improved photoelectrochemical water splitting performance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    One-dimensional anodic titanium oxide (ATO) nanotube arrays hold great potential as photoanode for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. In this work, we report a facile and eco-friendly electrochemical hydrogenation method to modify the electronic and PEC properties of ATO nanotube films. The hydrogenated ATO (ATO-H) electrodes present a significantly improved photocurrent of 0.65 mA/cm2 in comparison with that of pristine ATO nanotubes (0.29 mA/cm2) recorded under air mass 1.5 global illumination. The incident photon-to-current efficiency measurement suggests that the enhanced photocurrent of ATO-H nanotubes is mainly ascribed to the improved photoactivity in the UV region. We propose that the electrochemical hydrogenation induced surface oxygen vacancies contribute to the substantially enhanced electrical conductivity and photoactivity. PMID:24047205

  4. Photogeneration of active formate decomposition catalysts to produce hydrogen from formate and water

    DOEpatents

    King, Jr., Allen D.; King, Robert B.; Sailers, III, Earl L.

    1983-02-08

    A process for producing hydrogen from formate and water by photogenerating an active formate decomposition catalyst from transition metal carbonyl precursor catalysts at relatively low temperatures and otherwise mild conditions is disclosed. Additionally, this process may be expanded to include the generation of formate from carbon monoxide and hydroxide such that the result is the water gas shift reaction.

  5. Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Bockris, John O’M.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech. PMID:28824125

  6. Electrically Conducting, Ca-Rich Brines, Rather Than Water, Expected in the Martian Subsurface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, D. M.; Knauth, L. P.

    2003-01-01

    If Mars ever possessed a salty liquid hydrosphere, which later partly evaporated and froze down, then any aqueous fluids left near the surface could have evolved to become dense eutectic brines. Eutectic brines, by definition, are the last to freeze and the first to melt. If CaC12-rich, such brines can remain liquid until temperatures below 220 K, close to the average surface temperature of Mars. In the Martian subsurface, in intimate contact with the Ca-rich basaltic regolith, NaC1-rich early brines should have reacted to become Ca-rich. Fractional crystallization (freezing) and partial melting would also drive brines toward CaC12-rich compositions. In other words, eutectic brine compositions could be present in the shallow subsurface of Mars, for the same reasons that eutectic magma compositions are common on Earth. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica, a CaC12-rich eutectic brine, provides a possible terrestrial analog, particularly because it is fed from a basaltic aquifer. Owing to their relative density and fluid nature, brines in the Martian regolith should eventually become sandwiched between ice above and salts beneath. A thawing brine sandwich provides one explanation (among many) for the young gullies recently attributed to seepage of liquid water on Mars. Whether or not brine seepage explains the gullies phenomenon, dense, CaC12-rich brines are to be expected in the deep subsurface of Mars, although they might be somewhat diluted (temperatures permitting) and of variable salt composition. In any case, they should be good conductors of electricity.

  7. Polarizability calculations on water, hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, S.; Adams, S.; Rein, R.

    1973-01-01

    A semiclassical model of damped oscillators is used as a basis for the calculation of the dispersion of the refractive index, polarizability, and dielectric permeability in water, hydrogen, and oxygen in liquid and gaseous states, and in gaseous carbon dioxide. The absorption coefficient and the imaginary part of the refractive index are also calculated at corresponding wavelengths. A good agreement is obtained between the observed and calculated values of refractive indices, and between those of absorption coefficients in the region of absorption bands. The calculated values of oscillator strengths and damping factors are also discussed. The value of the polarizability of liquid water was about 2.8 times that of previous calculations.

  8. Study of hydrogen bonding in ethanol-water binary solutions by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fabing; Men, Zhiwei; Li, Shuo; Wang, Shenghan; Li, Zhanlong; Sun, Chenglin

    2018-01-01

    Raman spectra of ethanol-water binary solutions have been observed at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. We find that with increasing ethanol concentration, the symmetric and asymmetric Osbnd H stretching vibrational mode (3286 and 3434 cm- 1) of water are shifted to lower frequency and the weak shoulder peak at 3615 cm- 1 (free OH) disappears. These results indicate that ethanol strengthens hydrogen bonds in water. Simultaneously, our experiment shows that Raman shifts of ethanol reverses when the volume ratio of ethanol and the overall solution is 0.2, which demonstrates that ethanol-water structure undergoes a phase transition.

  9. Hydrogen-fueled engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laumann, E. A.; Reynolds, R. K. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen fueled internal combustion engine is described, which utilizes an inert gas, such as argon, as a working fluid to increase the efficiency of the engine, eliminate pollution, and facilitate operation of a closed cycle energy system. In a system where sunlight or other intermittent energy source is available to separate hydrogen and oxygen from water, the oxygen and inert gas are taken into a diesel engine into which hydrogen is injected and ignited. The exhaust is cooled so that it contains only water and the inert gas. The inert gas in the exhaust is returned to the engine for use with fresh oxygen, while the water in the exhaust is returned to the intermittent energy source for reconversion to hydrogen and oxygen.

  10. Slow dielectric response of Debye-type in water and other hydrogen bonded liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, Helén; Bergman, Rikard; Swenson, Jan

    2010-05-01

    The slow dynamics of some hydrogen bonded glass-forming liquids has been investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy. We show that the polyalcohols glycerol, xylitol, and sorbitol, and mixtures of glycerol and water, and in fact, even pure water exhibit a process of Debye character at longer time-scales than the glass transition and viscosity related α-relaxation. Even if it is less pronounced, this process displays many similarities to the well-studied Debye-like process in monoalcohols. It can be observed in both the negative derivative of the real part of the permittivity or in the imaginary part of the permittivity, if the conductivity contribution is reduced. In the present study the conductivity contribution has been suppressed by use of a thin Teflon film placed between the sample and one of the electrodes. The new findings might have important implications for the structure and dynamics of hydrogen bonded liquids in general, and for water in particular.

  11. In situ generation of hydrogen from water by aluminum corrosion in solutions of sodium aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Lluís; Candela, Angélica María; Macanás, Jorge; Muñoz, Maria; Casado, Juan

    A new process to obtain hydrogen from water using aluminum in sodium aluminate solutions is described and compared with results obtained in aqueous sodium hydroxide. This process consumes only water and aluminum, which are raw materials much cheaper than other compounds used for in situ hydrogen generation, such as hydrocarbons and chemical hydrides, respectively. As a consequence, our process could be an economically feasible alternative for hydrogen to supply fuel cells. Results showed an improvement of the maximum rates and yields of hydrogen production when NaAlO 2 was used instead of NaOH in aqueous solutions. Yields of 100% have been reached using NaAlO 2 concentrations higher than 0.65 M and first order kinetics at concentrations below 0.75 M has been confirmed. Two different heterogeneous kinetic models are verified for NaAlO 2 aqueous solutions. The activation energy (E a) of the process with NaAlO 2 is 71 kJ mol -1, confirming a control by a chemical step. A mechanism unifying the behavior of Al corrosion in NaOH and NaAlO 2 solutions is presented. The application of this process could reduce costs in power sources based on fuel cells that nowadays use hydrides as raw material for hydrogen production.

  12. The Survival of Water Within Extrasolar Minor Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jura, M.; Xu, S.

    2010-11-01

    We compute that extrasolar minor planets can retain much of their internal H2O during their host star's red giant evolution. The eventual accretion of a water-rich body or bodies onto a helium white dwarf might supply an observable amount of atmospheric hydrogen, as seems likely for GD 362. More generally, if hydrogen pollution in helium white dwarfs typically results from accretion of large parent bodies rather than interstellar gas as previously supposed, then H2O probably constitutes at least 10% of the aggregate mass of extrasolar minor planets. One observational test of this possibility is to examine the atmospheres of externally polluted white dwarfs for oxygen in excess of that likely contributed by oxides such as SiO2. The relatively high oxygen abundance previously reported in GD 378 can be explained plausibly but not uniquely by accretion of an H2O-rich parent body or bodies. Future ultraviolet observations of white dwarf pollutions can serve to investigate the hypothesis that environments with liquid water that are suitable habitats for extremophiles are widespread in the Milky Way.

  13. Studies of Hydrogen Production by the Water Gas Shift Reaction and Related Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-15

    STUDIES OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY THE WATER GAS SHIFT REACTION AND RELATED CHEMISTRY Institution: The University of Rochester Department of Chemistry...been app-’.iv -7 for public release and sale; it di.,tribution is unlimited. Abstract Many systems have been investigated for the catalysis of the water ...temperatures (80 - 100’C). In addition aqueous acidic conditions for these systems have been pursued with particular interest in adopting water gas shift

  14. Hydrogen storage methods.

    PubMed

    Züttel, Andreas

    2004-04-01

    Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today's energy consumption. First of all, hydrogen is just an energy carrier. And, although it is the most abundant element in the universe, it has to be produced, since on earth it only occurs in the form of water and hydrocarbons. This implies that we have to pay for the energy, which results in a difficult economic dilemma because ever since the industrial revolution we have become used to consuming energy for free. The second difficulty with hydrogen as an energy carrier is its low critical temperature of 33 K (i.e. hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperature). For mobile and in many cases also for stationary applications the volumetric and gravimetric density of hydrogen in a storage material is crucial. Hydrogen can be stored using six different methods and phenomena: (1) high-pressure gas cylinders (up to 800 bar), (2) liquid hydrogen in cryogenic tanks (at 21 K), (3) adsorbed hydrogen on materials with a large specific surface area (at T<100 K), (4) absorbed on interstitial sites in a host metal (at ambient pressure and temperature), (5) chemically bonded in covalent and ionic compounds (at ambient pressure), or (6) through oxidation of reactive metals, e.g. Li, Na, Mg, Al, Zn with water. The most common storage systems are high-pressure gas cylinders with a maximum pressure of 20 MPa (200 bar). New lightweight composite cylinders have been developed which are able to withstand pressures up to 80 MPa (800 bar) and therefore the hydrogen gas can reach a volumetric density of 36 kg.m(-3), approximately half as much as in its liquid state. Liquid hydrogen is stored in cryogenic tanks at 21.2 K and ambient pressure. Due to the low critical temperature of hydrogen (33 K), liquid hydrogen can only be stored in open systems. The volumetric density of liquid hydrogen

  15. Hydrogen storage methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Züttel, Andreas

    Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today's energy consumption. First of all, hydrogen is just an energy carrier. And, although it is the most abundant element in the universe, it has to be produced, since on earth it only occurs in the form of water and hydrocarbons. This implies that we have to pay for the energy, which results in a difficult economic dilemma because ever since the industrial revolution we have become used to consuming energy for free. The second difficulty with hydrogen as an energy carrier is its low critical temperature of 33 K (i.e. hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperature). For mobile and in many cases also for stationary applications the volumetric and gravimetric density of hydrogen in a storage material is crucial. Hydrogen can be stored using six different methods and phenomena: (1) high-pressure gas cylinders (up to 800 bar), (2) liquid hydrogen in cryogenic tanks (at 21 K), (3) adsorbed hydrogen on materials with a large specific surface area (at T<100 K), (4) absorbed on interstitial sites in a host metal (at ambient pressure and temperature), (5) chemically bonded in covalent and ionic compounds (at ambient pressure), or (6) through oxidation of reactive metals, e.g. Li, Na, Mg, Al, Zn with water. The most common storage systems are high-pressure gas cylinders with a maximum pressure of 20 MPa (200 bar). New lightweight composite cylinders have been developed which are able to withstand pressures up to 80 MPa (800 bar) and therefore the hydrogen gas can reach a volumetric density of 36 kg.m-3, approximately half as much as in its liquid state. Liquid hydrogen is stored in cryogenic tanks at 21.2 K and ambient pressure. Due to the low critical temperature of hydrogen (33 K), liquid hydrogen can only be stored in open systems. The volumetric density of liquid hydrogen is

  16. Sodium-rich carbonated natural mineral water ingestion and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Santos, Alejandro; Martins, Maria João; Guimarães, João Tiago; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Isabel

    2010-02-01

    There is a strong positive correlation between sodium chloride intake and hypertension. In industrialized countries the ingestion of carbonated and non-carbonated mineral water is an important source of calorie-free fluids. The mineral content of these waters varies greatly, with many brands containing high levels of sodium. However, some mineral waters contain greater amounts of bicarbonate instead of chloride as the anion associated with the sodium cation. This is relevant because it is well established that the effect of sodium on blood pressure depends on the corresponding anion. Additionally the pressor effect of sodium bicarbonate is much lower than that of equivalent amounts of sodium chloride. The aim of our work was to evaluate the effect of ingesting a sodium-rich carbonated mineral water (Agua das Pedras) on blood pressure values in normotensive individuals. This crossover, non-blinded study evaluated 17 individuals (9 female and 8 male), aged 24-53 years, median body mass index (BMI) < 23, randomly allocated in two groups, ingesting 500 ml/day of Agua das Pedras or Agua Vitalis. Each arm of the study lasted 7 weeks, with 6 weeks of washout between them. Twenty-four hour urinary samples were collected at the beginning and end of each arm to determine pH and sodium and potassium excretion. Blood pressure and body weight were measured weekly throughout the study. A mixed-effects model was used to compare groups (p < 0.05). The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze electrolyte excretion. No differences were observed in blood pressure values between treatments or from baseline values. We found a positive correlation between BMI and blood pressure. The daily ingestion of 500 ml of Agua das Pedras had no effect on blood pressure. A study by Schorr and co-workers found that the ingestion of bicarbonate-rich water (1.5 l/day) had hypotensive effects in an elderly population. However, these results should be verified in hypertensive subjects, who are more likely to

  17. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  18. MUSE Integral Field Observations of the Oxygen-rich SNR 1E 0102.2-7219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Terry, Jason P.; Dopita, Michael A.; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2017-02-01

    We have observed the oxygen-rich SNR 1E 0102.2-7219 with the integral field spectrograph WiFeS at Siding Spring Observatory and discovered sulfur-rich ejecta for the first time. Follow-up deep DDT observations with MUSE on the VLT (8100 s on source) reaching down to a noise level of ~5 × 10-20ergs-1cm-2Å-1spaxel-1 have led to the additional discovery of fast-moving hydrogen as well as argon-rich and chlorine-rich material. The detection of fast-moving hydrogen knots challenges the interpretation that the progenitor of 1E 0102 was a compact core of a Wolf-Rayet star that had shed its entire envelope. In addition to the detection of hydrogen and the products of oxygen-burning, this unprecedented sharp (0.2'' spaxel size at ~0.7'' seeing) and deep MUSE view of an oxygen-rich SNR in the Magellanic Clouds reveals further exciting discoveries, including [Fe xiv]λ5303 and [Fe xi]λ7892 emission, which we associate with the forward shock. We present this exciting data set and discuss some of its implications for the explosion mechanism and nucleosynthesis of the associated supernova.

  19. Concept study of a hydrogen containment process during nuclear thermal engine ground testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric T.; Canabal, Francisco

    A new hydrogen containment process was proposed for ground testing of a nuclear thermal engine. It utilizes two thermophysical steps to contain the hydrogen exhaust. First, the decomposition of hydrogen through oxygen-rich combustion at higher temperature; second, the recombination of remaining hydrogen with radicals at low temperature. This is achieved with two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a tubular heat exchanger. A computational fluid dynamics methodology was used to analyze the entire process on a three-dimensional domain. The computed flammability at the exit of the heat exchanger was less than the lower flammability limit, confirming the hydrogen containment capability of the proposed process.

  20. Radiolytic hydrogen generation at silicon carbide-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Jennifer; Reiff, Sarah C.; Pimblott, Simon M.; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2016-02-01

    While many of the proposed uses of SiC in the nuclear industry involve systems that are assumed to be dry, almost all materials have dissociated chemisorbed water associated with their surface, which can undergo chemistry in radiation fields. Silicon carbide α-phase and β-phase nanoparticles with water were irradiated with γ-rays and 5 MeV 4He ions followed by the determination of the production of molecular hydrogen, H2, and characterization of changes in the particle surface. The yields of H2 from SiC-water slurries were always greater than expected from a simple mixture rule indicating that the presence of SiC was influencing the production of H2 from water, probably through an energy transfer from the solid to liquid phase. Although the increase in H2 yields was modest, a decrease in the water mass percentage led to an increase in H2 yields, especially for very low amounts of water. Surface analysis techniques included diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), nitrogen absorption with the Brunauer - Emmett - Teller (BET) methodology for surface area determination, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Little change in the SiC surface was observed following radiolysis except for some conversion of β-phase SiC to the α-phase and the formation of SiO2 with He ion radiolysis.

  1. Decoupling Hydrogen and Oxygen Production in Acidic Water Electrolysis Using a Polytriphenylamine-Based Battery Electrode.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2018-03-05

    Hydrogen production through water splitting is considered a promising approach for solar energy harvesting. However, the variable and intermittent nature of solar energy and the co-production of H 2 and O 2 significantly reduce the flexibility of this approach, increasing the costs of its use in practical applications. Herein, using the reversible n-type doping/de-doping reaction of the solid-state polytriphenylamine-based battery electrode, we decouple the H 2 and O 2 production in acid water electrolysis. In this architecture, the H 2 and O 2 production occur at different times, which eliminates the issue of gas mixing and adapts to the variable and intermittent nature of solar energy, facilitating the conversion of solar energy to hydrogen (STH). Furthermore, for the first time, we demonstrate a membrane-free solar water splitting through commercial photovoltaics and the decoupled acid water electrolysis, which potentially paves the way for a new approach for solar water splitting. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Theoretical study on electronic and vibrational properties of hydrogen bonds in glycine-water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yulei; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Jiang, Wanrun; Wang, Zhigang

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen bond (H-bond) in organic-water molecules is essential in nature, and it present unique properties distinct from those in pure water or organic clusters. Combining with the charge-transfer and energy decomposition analyses, we investigated the penetrating molecular-orbitals in glycine-water clusters, which give evidences of the covalent-like characteristics of H-bonds in this system. Besides, the infrared spectral features provide a rare opportunity to discover the exceedingly-evident redshifts of symmetric stretching modes (Symst) in water on forming H-bond, in contrast to the slightly-redshifted asymmetric stretching modes (Asyst) in water. To explain these intriguing behaviors, we further analyzed the nuclear vibrating patterns, which clearly reveal that H-bond retains two unexpected effects on nuclear motions in water: (i) Intensifying donor Symst, and (ii) Inhibiting donor Asyst. Furthermore, we also quantified the impact of anharmonic quantum fluctuations on each hydrogen bond. For the stretching modes involved in H-bonds, red shifts up to more than one hundred wave numbers are observed under anharmonic vibration, explicitly indicating the increased 'covalency' of H-bonds. These finds shed light on the essential understanding of H-bonding comprehensively, and should provide incentives for future experimental studies.

  3. Occurrence and distribution of color and hydrogen sulfide in water of the principal artesian aquifers in the Valdosta area, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krause, Richard E.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide and color occur in objectionable amounts in ground water from the principal artesian aquifer in the Valdosta , Ga., area. Generally, water from wells south of Valdosta is high in hydrogen sulfide; water from wells north of the city is high in color. Water with high sulfate is likely to be a problem in wells deeper than about 540 ft. Heavy pumpage concentrated in a small area may cause high-sulfate water to migrate vertically upward into shallower wells. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. An analysis of hydrogen production via closed-cycle schemes. [thermochemical processings from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, R. E.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis and state-of-the-art review of three basic schemes for production of hydrogen from water: electrolysis, thermal water-splitting, and multi-step thermochemical closed cycles is presented. Criteria for work-saving thermochemical closed-cycle processes are established, and several schemes are reviewed in light of such criteria. An economic analysis is also presented in the context of energy costs.

  5. Water availability determines the richness and density of fig trees within Brazilian semideciduous forest landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Luís Francisco Mello; Ribeiro, Milton Cezar; Pereira, Rodrigo Augusto Santinelo

    2014-05-01

    The success of fig trees in tropical ecosystems is evidenced by the great diversity (+750 species) and wide geographic distribution of the genus. We assessed the contribution of environmental variables on the species richness and density of fig trees in fragments of seasonal semideciduous forest (SSF) in Brazil. We assessed 20 forest fragments in three regions in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Fig tree richness and density was estimated in rectangular plots, comprising 31.4 ha sampled. Both richness and fig tree density were linearly modeled as function of variables representing (1) fragment metrics, (2) forest structure, and (3) landscape metrics expressing water drainage in the fragments. Model selection was performed by comparing the AIC values (Akaike Information Criterion) and the relative weight of each model (wAIC). Both species richness and fig tree density were better explained by the water availability in the fragment (meter of streams/ha): wAICrichness = 0.45, wAICdensity = 0.96. The remaining variables related to anthropic perturbation and forest structure were of little weight in the models. The rainfall seasonality in SSF seems to select for both establishment strategies and morphological adaptations in the hemiepiphytic fig tree species. In the studied SSF, hemiepiphytes established at lower heights in their host trees than reported for fig trees in evergreen rainforests. Some hemiepiphytic fig species evolved superficial roots extending up to 100 m from their trunks, resulting in hectare-scale root zones that allow them to efficiently forage water and soil nutrients. The community of fig trees was robust to variation in forest structure and conservation level of SSF fragments, making this group of plants an important element for the functioning of seasonal tropical forests.

  6. Heterogeneous water content in the lunar interior: insights from orbital detection of water in lunar pyroclastic deposits and silicic rich domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Milliken, R.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the distribution and abundance of water (H2O and/or OH) in the lunar interior is crucial for assessing the formation and evolution of the Moon. Deriving such information from returned lunar samples is the most direct approach, but only a few regions have been sampled. Reflectance spectra for the 3μm region, remotely sensed by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3), provide an alternative way to characterize lunar water at a global scale. Though such methods only probe the optical surface, hydration in some materials may result from internal processes instead of interaction with the solar wind. Constraining the volatile content of pyroclastic deposits and silicic rich domes, for example, can provide insight into volatile distribution and evolution related to magmatic processes. Thermally-corrected M3 data, constrained by Diviner temperatures and laboratory data, enable us to estimate the amount of water in these deposits. We find evidence for increased hydration signatures at nearly all large pyroclastic deposits relative to background values for surrounding terrains, suggestive of H2O-bearing magmas. Water contents for these deposits exhibit a linear correlation with the deposit range, largely consistent with lunar magma eruption models. In addition, the water content at inferred high-Ti deposits is higher than that of low-Ti pyroclastics for the same deposit range, which may reflect inherent differences in the water content or degassing history of the associated magmas. Our results also suggest that over half of the examined silicic-rich domes are very dry (no detectable water signature), which suggests either a volatile-poor source or a very different degassing history compared to pyroclastic deposits. Potential silicic-rich domes are inferred to have formed due to ascension of immiscible silicic melts in which volatiles may have been concentrated. Those silicic melts might cool slowly and allow extensive diffusion of water, whereas quenched glasses in

  7. Extensive, water-rich magma reservoir beneath southern Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M.; Kohn, S. C.; Hauri, E. H.; Humphreys, M. C. S.; Cassidy, M.

    2016-05-01

    South Soufrière Hills and Soufrière Hills volcanoes are 2 km apart at the southern end of the island of Montserrat, West Indies. Their magmas are distinct geochemically, despite these volcanoes having been active contemporaneously at 131-129 ka. We use the water content of pyroxenes and melt inclusion data to reconstruct the bulk water contents of magmas and their depth of storage prior to eruption. Pyroxenes contain up to 281 ppm H2O, with significant variability between crystals and from core to rim in individual crystals. The Al content of the enstatites from Soufrière Hills Volcano (SHV) is used to constrain melt-pyroxene partitioning for H2O. The SHV enstatite cores record melt water contents of 6-9 wt%. Pyroxene and melt inclusion water concentration pairs from South Soufriere Hills basalts independently constrain pyroxene-melt partitioning of water and produces a comparable range in melt water concentrations. Melt inclusions recorded in plagioclase and in pyroxene contain up to 6.3 wt% H2O. When combined with realistic melt CO2 contents, the depth of magma storage for both volcanoes ranges from 5 to 16 km. The data are consistent with a vertically protracted crystal mush in the upper crust beneath the southern part of Montserrat which contains heterogeneous bodies of eruptible magma. The high water contents of the magmas suggest that they contain a high proportion of exsolved fluids, which has implications for the rheology of the mush and timescales for mush reorganisation prior to eruption. A depletion in water in the outer 50-100 μm of a subset of pyroxenes from pumices from a Vulcanian explosion at Soufrière Hills in 2003 is consistent with diffusive loss of hydrogen during magma ascent over 5-13 h. These timescales are similar to the mean time periods between explosions in 1997 and in 2003, raising the possibility that the driving force for this repetitive explosive behaviour lies not in the shallow system, but in the deeper parts of a vertically

  8. Studies of Hydrogen Production by the Water Gas Shift Reaction and Related Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-15

    HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY THE WATER GAS SHIFT REACTION AND RELATED CHEMISTRY Institution: The University of Rochester Department of Chemistry -. Rochester...been in siated for the catalysis of the water gas shift reaction, W20 + CO H𔃼 + C02, and for electrocatalytic oxidation of CO, CO + H󈧘 C02 + 2H...particular interest in adopting water gas shift catalysts to act as electrocatalysts for the anode reaction of CO fuel cells. Under these conditions the best

  9. Ingestion of a natural mineral-rich water in an animal model of metabolic syndrome: effects in insulin signalling and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cidália D; Passos, Emanuel; Severo, Milton; Vitó, Isabel; Wen, Xiaogang; Carneiro, Fátima; Gomes, Pedro; Monteiro, Rosário; Martins, Maria J

    2016-05-01

    High-fructose and/or low-mineral diets are relevant in metabolic syndrome (MS) development. Insulin resistance (IR) represents a central mechanism in MS development. Glucocorticoid signalling dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stresses strongly contribute to IR and associate with MS. We have described that natural mineral-rich water ingestion delays fructose-induced MS development, modulates fructose effects on the redox state and glucocorticoid signalling and increases sirtuin 1 expression. Here, we investigated mineral-rich water ingestion effects on insulin signalling and ER homeostasis of fructose-fed rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats had free access to standard-chow diet and different drinking solutions (8 weeks): tap water (CONT), 10%-fructose/tap water (FRUCT) or 10%-fructose/mineral-rich water (FRUCTMIN). Hepatic and adipose (visceral, VAT) insulin signalling and hepatic ER homeostasis (Western blot or PCR) as well as hepatic lipid accumulation were evaluated. Hepatic p-IRS1Ser307/IRS1 (tendency), p-IRS1Ser307, total JNK and (activated IRE1α)/(activated JNK) decreased with fructose ingestion, while p-JNK tended to increase; mineral-rich water ingestion, totally or partially, reverted all these effects. Total PERK, p-eIF2α (tendency) and total IRS1 (tendency) decreased in both fructose-fed groups. p-ERK/ERK and total IRE1α increasing tendencies in FRUCT became significant in FRUCTMIN (similar pattern for lipid area). Additionally, unspliced-XBP1 increased with mineral-rich water. In VAT, total ERK fructose-induced increase was partially prevented in FRUCTMIN. Mineral-rich water modulation of fructose-induced effects on insulin signalling and ER homeostasis matches the better metabolic profile previously reported. Increased p-ERK/ERK, adding to decreased IRE1α activation, and increased unspliced-XBP1 and lipid area may protect against oxidative stress and IR development in FRUCTMIN.

  10. CO2-based hydrogen storage - Hydrogen generation from formaldehyde/water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trincado, Monica; Grützmacher, Hansjörg; Prechtl, Martin H. G.

    2018-04-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is the simplest and most significant industrially produced aldehyde. The global demand is about 30 megatons annually. Industrially it is produced by oxidation of methanol under energy intensive conditions. More recently, new fields of application for the use of formaldehyde and its derivatives as, i.e. cross-linker for resins or disinfectant, have been suggested. Dialkoxymethane has been envisioned as a combustion fuel for conventional engines or aqueous formaldehyde and paraformaldehyde may act as a liquid organic hydrogen carrier molecule (LOHC) for hydrogen generation to be used for hydrogen fuel cells. For the realization of these processes, it requires less energy-intensive technologies for the synthesis of formaldehyde. This overview summarizes the recent developments in low-temperature reductive synthesis of formaldehyde and its derivatives and low-temperature formaldehyde reforming. These aspects are important for the future demands on modern societies' energy management, in the form of a methanol and hydrogen economy, and the required formaldehyde feedstock for the manufacture of many formaldehyde-based daily products.

  11. Lineation-parallel c-axis Fabric of Quartz Formed Under Water-rich Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Li, P.

    2014-12-01

    The crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of quartz is of great significance because it records much valuable information pertinent to the deformation of quartz-rich rocks in the continental crust. The lineation-parallel c-axis CPO (i.e., c-axis forming a maximum parallel to the lineation) in naturally deformed quartz is generally considered to form under high temperature (> ~550 ºC) conditions. However, most laboratory deformation experiments on quartzite failed to produce such a CPO at high temperatures up to 1200 ºC. Here we reported a new occurrence of the lineation-parallel c-axis CPO of quartz from kyanite-quartz veins in eclogite. Optical microstructural observations, fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) techniques were integrated to illuminate the nature of quartz CPOs. Quartz exhibits mostly straight to slightly curved grain boundaries, modest intracrystalline plasticity, and significant shape preferred orientation (SPO) and CPOs, indicating dislocation creep dominated the deformation of quartz. Kyanite grains in the veins are mostly strain-free, suggestive of their higher strength than quartz. The pronounced SPO and CPOs in kyanite were interpreted to originate from anisotropic crystal growth and/or mechanical rotation during vein-parallel shearing. FTIR results show quartz contains a trivial amount of structurally bound water (several tens of H/106 Si), while kyanite has a water content of 384-729 H/106 Si; however, petrographic observations suggest quartz from the veins were practically deformed under water-rich conditions. We argue that the observed lineation-parallel c-axis fabric in quartz was inherited from preexisting CPOs as a result of anisotropic grain growth under stress facilitated by water, but rather than due to a dominant c-slip. The preservation of the quartz CPOs probably benefited from the preexisting quartz CPOs which renders most quartz grains unsuitably oriented for an easy a-slip at

  12. The Consumption of Bicarbonate-Rich Mineral Water Improves Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shinnosuke; Goto, Yasuaki; Ito, Kyo; Hayasaka, Shinya; Kurihara, Shigeo; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Fukuda, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Hot spring water and natural mineral water have been therapeutically used to prevent or improve various diseases. Specifically, consumption of bicarbonate-rich mineral water (BMW) has been reported to prevent or improve type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects behind mineral water consumption remain unclear. To elucidate the molecular level effects of BMW consumption on glycemic control, blood metabolome analysis and fecal microbiome analysis were applied to the BMW consumption test. During the study, 19 healthy volunteers drank 500 mL of commercially available tap water (TW) or BMW daily. TW consumption periods and BMW consumption periods lasted for a week each and this cycle was repeated twice. Biochemical tests indicated that serum glycoalbumin levels, one of the indexes of glycemic controls, decreased significantly after BMW consumption. Metabolome analysis of blood samples revealed that 19 metabolites including glycolysis-related metabolites and 3 amino acids were significantly different between TW and BMW consumption periods. Additionally, microbiome analysis demonstrated that composition of lean-inducible bacteria was increased after BMW consumption. Our results suggested that consumption of BMW has the possible potential to prevent and/or improve T2D through the alterations of host metabolism and gut microbiota composition. PMID:26798400

  13. The Evolution of Water in Martian Atmosphere, Hydrosphere, and Cryosphere: Insights from Hydrogen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, T.; Kurokawa, H.; Alexander, C.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Jones, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Mars exploration missions provide compelling evidence for the presence of liquid water during the earliest geologic era (Noachian: > 3.9 Ga) of Mars. The amount and stability of liquid water on the surface is strongly influenced by the composition and pressure of the atmosphere. However, the evolution of Noachian atmosphere has been poorly constrained due to uncertainties of atmospheric loss regimes and internal/external factors such as impact flux and volcanic degassing. We can trace the evolution of the early Martian atmosphere and its interaction with the hydrosphere and cryosphere with hydrogen isotope ratios (D/H) because they fractionate during atmospheric escape and during hydrological cycling between the atmosphere, surface waters, and the polar ice caps. This study reports D/H ratios of primordial and 4 Ga-old atmosphere by ion microprobe analyses of Martian meteorites. Analyses of olivine-hosted glass inclusions in the most primitive shergottite (Yamato 980459) provide a near-chondritic D/H ratio (1.3×SMOW) for the 4.5 Ga primordial water preserved in the mantle. On the other hand, carbonates in Allan Hills 84001 provide a D/H range (1.5-2.0×SMOW) for the Noachian surface water that was isotopically equilibrated with the 4 Ga atmosphere. The latter observation requires that even after the Noachian period the hydrogen isotopes were fractionated significantly to reach the present-day value of 6×SMOW. Using the one-reservoir model of Kurokawa et al. (2014) we can provide minimum estimates on the amounts of hydrogen loss before and after 4 Ga based on the D/H data from the meteorites (1.3×SMOW at 4.5 Ga and 1.5-2.0×SMOW at 4 Ga) assuming the volume of polar surface-ice (20-30 m global equivalent layers, GEL). The model indicates that the hydrogen loss during the first 0.5 billion years (16-54 m GEL) was comparable to those (42-93 mGEL) in the remaining Martian history. These values are distinctly lower than the geological estimates on the volumes of

  14. Towards a unified description of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water: A dynamics based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah, E-mail: abdullah.ozkanlar@wsu.edu; Zhou, Tiecheng; Clark, Aurora E., E-mail: auclark@wsu.edu

    2014-12-07

    The definition of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) is intimately related to the topological and dynamic properties of the hydrogen bond network within liquid water. The development of a universal H-bond definition for water is an active area of research as it would remove many ambiguities in the network properties that derive from the fixed definition employed to assign whether a water dimer is hydrogen bonded. This work investigates the impact that an electronic-structure based definition, an energetic, and a geometric definition of the H-bond has upon both topological and dynamic network behavior of simulated water. In each definition, the usemore » of a cutoff (either geometric or energetic) to assign the presence of a H-bond leads to the formation of transiently bonded or broken dimers, which have been quantified within the simulation data. The relative concentration of transient species, and their duration, results in two of the three definitions sharing similarities in either topological or dynamic features (H-bond distribution, H-bond lifetime, etc.), however no two definitions exhibit similar behavior for both classes of network properties. In fact, two networks with similar local network topology (as indicated by similar average H-bonds) can have dramatically different global network topology (as indicated by the defect state distributions) and altered H-bond lifetimes. A dynamics based correction scheme is then used to remove artificially transient H-bonds and to repair artificially broken bonds within the network such that the corrected network exhibits the same structural and dynamic properties for two H-bond definitions (the properties of the third definition being significantly improved). The algorithm described represents a significant step forward in the development of a unified hydrogen bond network whose properties are independent of the original hydrogen bond definition that is employed.« less

  15. Doubly labeled water method: in vivo oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeller, D.A.; Leitch, C.A.; Brown, C.

    The accuracy and precision of the doubly labeled water method for measuring energy expenditure are influenced by isotope fractionation during evaporative water loss and CO/sub 2/ excretion. To characterize in vivo isotope fractionation, we collected and isotopically analyzed physiological fluids and gases. Breath and transcutaneous water vapor were isotopically fractionated. The degree of fractionation indicated that the former was fractionated under equilibrium control at 37/sup 0/C, and the latter was kinetically fractionated. Sweat and urine were unfractionated. By use of isotopic balance models, the fraction of water lost via fractionating routes was estimated from the isotopic abundances of body water,more » local drinking water, and dietary solids. Fractionated water loss averaged 23% (SD = 10%) of water turnover, which agreed with our previous estimates based on metabolic rate, but there was a systematic difference between the results based on O/sub 2/ and hydrogen. Corrections for isotopic fractionation of water lost in breath and (nonsweat) transcutaneous loss should be made when using labeled water to measure water turnover or CO/sub 2/ production.« less

  16. Rapid water transportation through narrow one-dimensional channels by restricted hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Tomonori; Kaneko, Katsumi; Endo, Morinobu; Hata, Kenji; Kanoh, Hirofumi

    2013-01-29

    Water plays an important role in controlling chemical reactions and bioactivities. For example, water transportation through water channels in a biomembrane is a key factor in bioactivities. However, molecular-level mechanisms of water transportation are as yet unknown. Here, we investigate water transportation through narrow and wide one-dimensional (1D) channels on the basis of water-vapor adsorption rates and those determined by molecular dynamics simulations. We observed that water in narrow 1D channels was transported 3-5 times faster than that in wide 1D channels, although the narrow 1D channels provide fewer free nanospaces for water transportation. This rapid transportation is attributed to the formation of fewer hydrogen bonds between water molecules adsorbed in narrow 1D channels. The water-transportation mechanism provides the possibility of rapid communication through 1D channels and will be useful in controlling reactions and activities in water systems.

  17. The hydrolysis of epoxides catalyzed by inorganic ammonium salts in water: kinetic evidence for hydrogen bond catalysis.

    PubMed

    Nozière, B; Fache, F; Maxut, A; Fenet, B; Baudouin, A; Fine, L; Ferronato, C

    2018-01-17

    Naturally-occurring inorganic ammonium ions have been recently reported as efficient catalysts for some organic reactions in water, which contributes to the understanding of the chemistry in some natural environments (soils, seawater, atmospheric aerosols, …) and biological systems, and is also potentially interesting for green chemistry as many of their salts are cheap and non-toxic. In this work, the effect of NH 4 + ions on the hydrolysis of small epoxides in water was studied kinetically. The presence of NH 4 + increased the hydrolysis rate by a factor of 6 to 25 compared to pure water and these catalytic effects were shown not to result from other ions, counter-ions or from acid or base catalysis, general or specific. The small amounts of amino alcohols produced in the reactions were identified as the actual catalysts by obtaining a strong acceleration of the reactions when adding these compounds directly to the epoxides in water. Replacing the amino alcohols by other strong hydrogen-bond donors, such as trifluoroethanol (TFE) or hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) gave the same results, demonstrating that the kinetics of these reactions was driven by hydrogen-bond catalysis. Because of the presence of many hydrogen-bond donors in natural environments (for instance amines and hydroxy-containing compounds), hydrogen-bond catalysis is likely to contribute to many reaction rates in these environments.

  18. Effects of oxygenated or hydrogenated water on growth performance, blood parameters, and antioxidant enzyme activity of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Shin, D; Cho, E S R; Bang, H-T; Shim, K S

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of providing oxygenated and hydrogenated water on the growth performance, blood biochemical parameters, and immunoglobulin concentrations and antioxidant enzyme activity of broiler chickens. In our investigation, 144 Ross × Ross broiler chicks were randomly allotted to three different treatment groups with four replicates (treatment × replicate × bird = 3 × 4 × 12). All chicks were given one of the following types of water for five weeks: tap water (CON), hydrogenated water (HNW), and oxygenated water (ONW). ONW supplementation increased the final body weight and weight gain and also improved both feed intake and feed conversion of broiler chickens as compared to those of CON broiler chickens (P < 0.05). The abdominal fat and its ratio to the final body weight showed that fat accumulation in the broiler chicken abdomen was reduced when broiler chickens drank only ONW for five weeks (P < 0.05). ONW supplementation improved blood parameters, including triacylglyceride, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Additionally, in accordance with a globulin increase in broiler chickens, both IgG and IgM generation were significantly enhanced when ONW was supplied to broiler chickens (P < 0.05) but only a numerical advance was observed in the HNW group (P > 0.05). Both oxygenated and hydrogenated water supplementation significantly improved the antioxidant effects (P < 0.05), and it seems that superoxide dismutase refinement was completed due to oxygen and/or hydrogen enhancement of drinking water. These results indicate that oxygen enhancement of drinking water may be recommended to improve growth performance by increasing immunoglobulins mainly IgG and IgM. © Crown copyright 2016.

  19. Hydrogen Production Cost Analysis | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Analysis Hydrogen Production Cost Analysis This interactive map displays the results of a 2011 NREL analysis on the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis at potential sites across the United States. NREL analyzed the cost of hydrogen production via wind-based water electrolysis at 42 potential sites in 11

  20. Direct thermal water splitting by concentrated solar radiation for hydrogen production. Phase O: Proof of concept experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genequand, P.

    1980-01-01

    The direct production of hydrogen from water and solar energy concentrated into a high temperature aperture is described. A solar powered reactor able to dissociate water vapor and to separate the reaction product at high temperature was developed, and direct water splitting has been achieved in a laboratory reactor. Water vapor and radiative heating from a carbon dioxide laser are fed into the reactor, and water vapor enriched in hydrogen and water vapor enriched in oxygen are produced. The enriched water vapors are separated through a separation membrane, a small disc of zirconium dioxide heated to a range of 1800 k to 2800 k. To avoid water vapor condensation within the reactor, the total pressure within the reactor was limited to 0.15 torr. A few modifications would enable the reactor to be operated at an increased pressure of a few torrs. More substantial modifications would allow for a reaction pressure of 0.1 atmosphere.

  1. Water Hydrogen-Bonding Network Structure and Dynamics at Phospholipid Multibilayer Surface: Femtosecond Mid-IR Pump-Probe Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Achintya; Błasiak, Bartosz; Lim, Joon-Hyung; Kwak, Kyungwon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-03-03

    The water hydrogen-bonding network at a lipid bilayer surface is crucial to understanding membrane structures and its functional activities. With a phospholipid multibilayer mimicking a biological membrane, we study the temperature dependence of water hydrogen-bonding structure, distribution, and dynamics at a lipid multibilayer surface using femtosecond mid-IR pump-probe spectroscopy. We observe two distinguished vibrational lifetime components. The fast component (0.6 ps) is associated with water interacting with a phosphate part, whereas the slow component (1.9 ps) is with bulk-like choline-associated water. With increasing temperature, the vibrational lifetime of phosphate-associated water remains constant though its relative fraction dramatically increases. The OD stretch vibrational lifetime of choline-bound water slows down in a sigmoidal fashion with respect to temperature, indicating a noticeable change of the water environment upon the phase transition. The water structure and dynamics are thus shown to be in quantitative correlation with the structural change of liquid multibilayer upon the gel-to-liquid crystal phase transition.

  2. Copper Oxide Nanograss for Efficient and Stable Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production by Water Splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkar, Rajnikant; Dahake, Rashmi; Rayalu, Sadhana; Bansiwal, Amit

    2018-03-01

    A biphasic copper oxide thin film of grass-like appendage morphology is synthesized by two-step electro-deposition method and later investigated for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting for hydrogen production. Further, the thin film was characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and PEC techniques. The XRD analysis confirms formation of biphasic copper oxide phases, and SEM reveals high surface area grass appendage-like morphology. These grass appendage structures exhibit a high cathodic photocurrent of - 1.44 mAcm-2 at an applied bias of - 0.7 (versus Ag/AgCl) resulting in incident to photon current efficiency (IPCE) of ˜ 10% at 400 nm. The improved light harvesting and charge transport properties of grass appendage structured biphasic copper oxides makes it a potential candidate for PEC water splitting for hydrogen production.

  3. Hydrogen-enriched water restoration of impaired calcium propagation by arsenic in primary keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei-Tai; Chiu, Yi-Ching; Lee, Chih-Hung; Yoshioka, Tohru; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2013-11-01

    Endemic contamination of artesian water for drinking by arsenic is known to cause several human cancers, including cancers of the skin, bladder, and lungs. In skin, multiple arsenic-induced Bowen's disease (As-BD) can develop into invasive cancers after decades of arsenic exposure. The characteristic histological features of As-BD include full-layer epidermal dysplasia, apoptosis, and abnormal proliferation. Calcium propagation is an essential cellular event contributing to keratinocyte differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, all of which occur in As-BD. This study investigated how arsenic interferes calcium propagation of skin keratinocytes through ROS production and whether hydrogen-enriched water would restore arsenic-impaired calcium propagation. Arsenic was found to induce oxidative stress and inhibit ATP- and thapsigaragin-induced calcium propagation. Pretreatment of arsenic-treated keratinocytes by hydrogen-enriched water or beta-mercaptoethanol with potent anti-oxidative effects partially restored the propagation of calcium by ATP and by thapsigaragin. It was concluded that arsenic may impair calcium propagation, likely through oxidative stress and interactions with thiol groups in membrane proteins.

  4. Simultaneous purification and storage of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Weber, R.

    1998-08-01

    Specially coated magnesium particles have been shown to selectively absorb hydrogen from a hydrogen-rich gas stream such as reformate. These coated magnesium particles can store the absorbed hydrogen as required and subsequently deliver pure hydrogen, just as uncoated magnesium particles can. These coated magnesium particles could be used in a device that accepts a steady stream of reformate, as from a methane reformer, stores the selectively absorbed hydrogen indefinitely, and delivers purified hydrogen on demand. Unfortunately, this coating (magnesium nitride) has been shown to degrade over a period of several weeks, so that the magnesium within evidences progressively lower storagemore » capacity. The authors are investigating two other coatings, one of which might be applicable to hydridable metals other than magnesium, to replace magnesium nitride.« less

  5. Silicon based multilayer photoelectrodes for photoelectrolysis of water to produce hydrogen from the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruque, Faisal

    The main objective of this work is to study different materials for the direct photosynthesis of hydrogen from water. A variety of photocatalysts such as titanium dioxide, titanium oxy-nitride, silicon carbide, and gallium nitride are being investigated by others for the clean production of hydrogen for fuel cells and hydrogen economy. Our approach was to deposit suitable metallic regions on photocatalyst nanoparticles to direct the efficient synthesis of hydrogen to a particular site for convenient collection. We studied different electrode metals such as gold, platinum, titanium, palladium, and tungsten. We also studied different solar cell materials such as silicon (p- and n-types), silicon carbide and titanium dioxide semiconductors in order to efficiently generate electrons under illumination. We introduced a novel silicon-based multilayer photosynthesis device to take advantage of suitable properties of silicon and tungsten to efficiently produce hydrogen. The device consisted of a silicon (0.5mm) substrate, a deposited atomic layer of Al2O 3 (1nm), a doped polysilicon (0.1microm), and finally a tungsten nanoporous (5-10nm) layer acting as an interface electrode with water. The Al2O 3 layer was introduced to reduce leakage current and to prevent the spreading of the diffused p-n junction layer between the silicon and doped polysilicon layers. The surface of the photoelectrode was coated with nanotextured tungsten nanopores (TNP), which increased the surface area of the electrodes to the electrolyte, assisting in electron-hole mobility, and acting as a photocatalyst. The reported device exhibited a fill factor (%FF) of 27.22% and solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 0.03174%. This thesis describes the structures of the device, and offers a characterization and comparison between different photoelectrodes.

  6. Status of the DOE /STOR/-sponsored national program on hydrogen production from water via thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    A pure thermochemical cycle is a system of linked regenerative chemical reactions which accepts only water and heat and produces hydrogen. Thermochemical cycles are potentially a more efficient and cheaper means of producing hydrogen from water than is the generation of electricity followed by electrolysis. The Energy Storage Systems Division of the Department of Energy is currently funding a national program on thermochemical hydrogen production. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is responsible for the technical management of this program. The goal is to develop a cycle which can potentially operate with an efficiency greater than 40% using a heat source providing a maximum available temperature of 1150 K. A closed bench-scale demonstration of such a cycle would follow. This cycle would be labeled a 'reference cycle' and would serve as a baseline against which future cycles would be compared.

  7. Methane and Hydrogen Production from Anaerobic Fermentation of Municipal Solid Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takuro; Lee, Dong-Yeol; Xu, Kaiqin; Li, Yu-You; Inamori, Yuhei

    Methane and hydrogen production was investigated in batch experiments of thermophilic methane and hydrogen fermentation, using domestic garbage and food processing waste classified by fat/carbohydrate balance as a base material. Methane production per unit of VS added was significantly positively correlated with fat content and negatively correlated with carbohydrate content in the substrate, and the average value of the methane production per unit of VS added from fat-rich materials was twice as large as that from carbohydrate-rich materials. By contrast, hydrogen production per unit of VS added was significantly positively correlated with carbohydrate content and negatively correlated with fat content. Principal component analysis using the results obtained in this study enable an evaluation of substrates for methane and hydrogen fermentation based on nutrient composition.

  8. Electron-induced hydrogen loss in uracil in a water cluster environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, M.; Kohanoff, J.; Fabrikant, I. I.

    2014-05-01

    Low-energy electron-impact hydrogen loss due to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to the uracil and thymine molecules in a water cluster environment is investigated theoretically. Only the A'-resonance contribution, describing the near-threshold behavior of DEA, is incorporated. Calculations are based on the nonlocal complex potential theory and the multiple scattering theory, and are performed for a model target with basic properties of uracil and thymine, surrounded by five water molecules. The DEA cross section is strongly enhanced when the attaching molecule is embedded in a water cluster. This growth is due to two effects: the increase of the resonance lifetime and the negative shift in the resonance position due to interaction of the intermediate negative ion with the surrounding water molecules. A similar effect was earlier found in DEA to chlorofluorocarbons.

  9. Hydrogen bonding and transportation properties of water confined in the single-walled carbon nanotube in the pulse-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Hu, Ying; Liu, Jian-chuan; Cheng, Ke; Jia, Guo-zhu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the transportation and hydrogen bonding dynamics of water confined in (6, 6) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) in the absence and presence of time-dependent pulse-field. The effects of pulse-field range from microwave to ultraviolet frequency on the diffusivity and hydrogen bonding of confined water were analyzed. The significant confinement effect due to the narrow space inside SWCNT was observed.

  10. Solar water splitting by photovoltaic-electrolysis with a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency over 30%

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jieyang; Seitz, Linsey C.; Benck, Jesse D.; Huo, Yijie; Chen, Yusi; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Bilir, Taner; Harris, James S.; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen production via electrochemical water splitting is a promising approach for storing solar energy. For this technology to be economically competitive, it is critical to develop water splitting systems with high solar-to-hydrogen (STH) efficiencies. Here we report a photovoltaic-electrolysis system with the highest STH efficiency for any water splitting technology to date, to the best of our knowledge. Our system consists of two polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysers in series with one InGaP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb triple-junction solar cell, which produces a large-enough voltage to drive both electrolysers with no additional energy input. The solar concentration is adjusted such that the maximum power point of the photovoltaic is well matched to the operating capacity of the electrolysers to optimize the system efficiency. The system achieves a 48-h average STH efficiency of 30%. These results demonstrate the potential of photovoltaic-electrolysis systems for cost-effective solar energy storage. PMID:27796309

  11. Solar water splitting by photovoltaic-electrolysis with a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency over 30.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jieyang; Seitz, Linsey C; Benck, Jesse D; Huo, Yijie; Chen, Yusi; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Bilir, Taner; Harris, James S; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2016-10-31

    Hydrogen production via electrochemical water splitting is a promising approach for storing solar energy. For this technology to be economically competitive, it is critical to develop water splitting systems with high solar-to-hydrogen (STH) efficiencies. Here we report a photovoltaic-electrolysis system with the highest STH efficiency for any water splitting technology to date, to the best of our knowledge. Our system consists of two polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysers in series with one InGaP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb triple-junction solar cell, which produces a large-enough voltage to drive both electrolysers with no additional energy input. The solar concentration is adjusted such that the maximum power point of the photovoltaic is well matched to the operating capacity of the electrolysers to optimize the system efficiency. The system achieves a 48-h average STH efficiency of 30%. These results demonstrate the potential of photovoltaic-electrolysis systems for cost-effective solar energy storage.

  12. Composition and method for hydrogen storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method for hydrogen storage includes providing water and hydrogen gas to a containment volume, reducing the temperature of the water and hydrogen gas to form a hydrogen clathrate at a first cryogenic temperature and a first pressure and maintaining the hydrogen clathrate at second cryogenic temperature within a temperature range of up to 250 K to effect hydrogen storage. The low-pressure hydrogen hydrate includes H.sub.2 O molecules, H.sub.2 molecules and a unit cell including polyhedron cages of hydrogen-bonded frameworks of the H.sub.2 O molecules built around the H.sub.2 molecules.

  13. Feasibility of the Hydrogen Sulfide Test for the Assessment of Drinking Water Quality in Post-Earthquake Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Weppelmann, Thomas A.; Alam, Meer T.; Widmer, Jocelyn; Morrissey, David; Rashid, Mohammed H.; Beau De Rochars, Valery M.; Morris, J. Glenn; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010 a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti, severely damaging the drinking and waste water infrastructure and leaving millions homeless. Compounding this problem, the introduction of Vibrio cholera resulted in a massive cholera outbreak that infected over 700,000 people and threatened the safety of Haiti’s drinking water. To mitigate this public health crisis, non-government organizations installed thousands of wells to provide communities with safe drinking water. However, despite increased access, Haiti currently lacks the monitoring capacity to assure the microbial safety of any of its water resources. For these reasons, this study was designed to assess the feasibility of using a simple, low cost method to detect indicators of fecal contamination of drinking water that could be implemented at the community level. Water samples from 358 sources of drinking water in the Léogâne flood basin were screened with a commercially available hydrogen sulfide test and a standard membrane method for the enumeration of thermotolerant coliforms. When compared with the gold standard method, the hydrogen sulfide test had a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 93%. While the sensitivity of the assay increased at higher fecal coliform concentrations, it never exceeded 88%, even with fecal coliform concentrations greater than 100 colony forming units per 100 milliliters. While its simplicity makes the hydrogen sulfide test attractive for assessing water quality in low resource settings, the low sensitivity raises concerns about its use as the sole indicator of the presence or absence of fecal coliforms in individual or community water sources. PMID:25182685

  14. Dynamic light scattering measurements of mutual diffusion coefficients of water-rich 2-butoxyethanol/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, T.M.; Pecora, R.

    1988-03-24

    The mutual diffusion coefficients of the water-rich region of the 2-butoxyethanol (BE)water system were measured by dynamic light scattering at 10, 25, and 40/sup 0/C. At mole fraction of BE greater than 0.02 (X/sub BE/ greater than or equal to 0.02), the results were in good agreement with the work of T. Kato. Below X/sub BE/ = 0.02 an anomalous diffusion region appeared with particles of apparent hydrodynamic radius of up to 1000 A being observed in agreement with the work of S. Kato et al. Further investigations using BE from different sources did not show the anomalous diffusion regionmore » and indicate that the possible presence of small amounts of contaminants in the BE is the source of this anomalous diffusion data« less

  15. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, T.J.; Whinnery, L.L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition is described comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. 1 fig.

  16. Polymer system for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    2000-01-01

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  17. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  18. Sulfur mass-independent fractionation in subsurface fracture waters indicates a long-standing sulfur cycle in Precambrian rocks.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Wing, B A; Bui, T H; McDermott, J M; Slater, G F; Wei, S; Lacrampe-Couloume, G; Lollar, B Sherwood

    2016-10-27

    The discovery of hydrogen-rich waters preserved below the Earth's surface in Precambrian rocks worldwide expands our understanding of the habitability of the terrestrial subsurface. Many deep microbial ecosystems in these waters survive by coupling hydrogen oxidation to sulfate reduction. Hydrogen originates from water-rock reactions including serpentinization and radiolytic decomposition of water induced by decay of radioactive elements in the host rocks. The origin of dissolved sulfate, however, remains unknown. Here we report, from anoxic saline fracture waters ∼2.4 km below surface in the Canadian Shield, a sulfur mass-independent fractionation signal in dissolved sulfate. We demonstrate that this sulfate most likely originates from oxidation of sulfide minerals in the Archaean host rocks through the action of dissolved oxidants (for example, HO · and H 2 O 2 ) themselves derived from radiolysis of water, thereby providing a coherent long-term mechanism capable of supplying both an essential electron donor (H 2 ) and a complementary acceptor (sulfate) for the deep biosphere.

  19. Criegee intermediate-hydrogen sulfide chemistry at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Zhong, Jie; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao C

    2017-08-01

    We carry out Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic simulations to show that the reaction between the smallest Criegee intermediate, CH 2 OO, and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) at the air/water interface can be observed within few picoseconds. The reaction follows both concerted and stepwise mechanisms with former being the dominant reaction pathway. The concerted reaction proceeds with or without the involvement of one or two nearby water molecules. An important implication of the simulation results is that the Criegee-H 2 S reaction can provide a novel non-photochemical pathway for the formation of a C-S linkage in clouds and could be a new oxidation pathway for H 2 S in terrestrial, geothermal and volcanic regions.

  20. A New Solution Route to Hydrogen Terminated Silicon Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Functionalization, and Water Stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Neiner, Doinita; Wang, Shizhong; Louie, Angelique Y.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen capped silicon nanoparticles with strong blue photoluminescence were synthesized by the metathesis reaction of sodium silicide, NaSi, with NH4Br. The hydrogen capped Si nanoparticles were further terminated with octyl groups and then coated with a polymer to render them water soluble. The nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, FT-IR, UV-VIS absorption, and photoluminescence. The Si nanoparticles were shown to have an average diameter of 3.9 ±1.3 nm and exhibited room-temperature photoluminescence with a peak maximum at 438 nm with a quantum efficiency of 32% in hexane and 18% in water; the emission was stable in ambient air for up to 2 months. These nanoparticles could hold great potential as a non-heavy element containing quantum dot for applications in biology. PMID:25170189

  1. A New Solution Route to Hydrogen Terminated Silicon Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Functionalization, and Water Stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Neiner, Doinita; Wang, Shizhong; Louie, Angelique Y; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2007-01-24

    Hydrogen capped silicon nanoparticles with strong blue photoluminescence were synthesized by the metathesis reaction of sodium silicide, NaSi, with NH 4 Br. The hydrogen capped Si nanoparticles were further terminated with octyl groups and then coated with a polymer to render them water soluble. The nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, FT-IR, UV-VIS absorption, and photoluminescence. The Si nanoparticles were shown to have an average diameter of 3.9 ±1.3 nm and exhibited room-temperature photoluminescence with a peak maximum at 438 nm with a quantum efficiency of 32% in hexane and 18% in water; the emission was stable in ambient air for up to 2 months. These nanoparticles could hold great potential as a non-heavy element containing quantum dot for applications in biology.

  2. A new solution route to hydrogen-terminated silicon nanoparticles: synthesis, functionalization and water stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Neiner, Doinita; Wang, Shizhong; Louie, Angelique Y.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2007-03-01

    Hydrogen-capped silicon nanoparticles with strong blue photoluminescence were synthesized by the metathesis reaction of sodium silicide, NaSi, with NH4Br. The hydrogen-capped Si nanoparticles were further terminated with octyl groups and then coated with a polymer to render them water-soluble. The nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, FT-IR, UV-vis absorption and photoluminescence. The Si nanoparticles were shown to have an average diameter of 3.9 ± 1.3 nm and exhibited room temperature photoluminescence with a peak maximum at 438 nm with a quantum efficiency of 32% in hexane and 18% in water; the emission was stable in ambient air for up to 2 months. These nanoparticles could hold great potential as a non-heavy-element-containing quantum dot for applications in biology.

  3. Sims Analysis of Water Abundance and Hydrogen Isotope in Lunar Highland Plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Zhang, Youxue; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R.; Eiler, John M.; Neal, Clive R.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of indigenous water in mare basaltic glass beads has challenged the view established since the Apollo era of a "dry" Moon. Since this discovery, measurements of water in lunar apatite, olivine-hosted melt inclusions, agglutinates, and nominally anhydrous minerals have confirmed that lunar igneous materials contain water, implying that some parts of lunar mantle may have as much water as Earth's upper mantle. The interpretation of hydrogen (H) isotopes in lunar samples, however, is controversial. The large variation of H isotope ratios in lunar apatite (delta Deuterium = -202 to +1010 per mille) has been taken as evidence that water in the lunar interior comes from the lunar mantle, solar wind protons, and/or comets. The very low deuterium/H ratios in lunar agglutinates indicate that solar wind protons have contributed to their hydrogen content. Conversely, H isotopes in lunar volcanic glass beads and olivine-hosted melt inclusions being similar to those of common terrestrial igneous rocks, suggest a common origin for water in both Earth and Moon. Lunar water could be inherited from carbonaceous chondrites, consistent with the model of late accretion of chondrite-type materials to the Moon as proposed by. One complication about the sources of lunar water, is that geologic processes (e.g., late accretion and magmatic degassing) may have modified the H isotope signatures of lunar materials. Recent FTIR analyses have shown that plagioclases in lunar ferroan anorthosite contain approximately 6 ppm H2O. So far, ferroan anorthosite is the only available lithology that is believed to be a primary product of the lunar magma ocean (LMO). A possible consequence is that the LMO could have contained up to approximately 320 ppm H2O. Here we examine the possible sources of water in the LMO through measurements of water abundances and H isotopes in plagioclase of two ferroan anorthosites and one troctolite from lunar highlands.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  5. The role of molecular hydrogen and methane oxidation in the water vapour budget of the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Texier, H.; Solomon, S.; Garcia, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    The detailed photochemistry of methane oxidation has been studied in a coupled chemical/dynamical model of the middle atmosphere. The photochemistry of formaldehyde plays an important role in determining the production of water vapor from methane oxidation. At high latitudes, the production and transport of molecular hydrogen is particularly important in determining the water vapor distribution. It is shown that the ratio of the methane vertical gradient to the water vapor vertical gradient at any particular latitude should not be expected to be precisely 2, due both to photochemical and dynamical effects. Modeled H2O profiles are compared with measurements from the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment at various latitudes. Molecular hydrogen is shown to be responsible for the formation of a secondary maximum displayed by the model water vapor profiles in high latitude summer, a feature also found in the LIMS data.

  6. [Impacts of dominated landscape types on hydrogen and oxygen isotope effects of spring water in the Hani Rice Terraces].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuan Mei; Liu, Cheng Jing; Liu, Xin; Liu, Zhi Lin; Ding, Yin Ping

    2017-07-18

    Analysis of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes is an effective method to track the water cycle in watershed. Impact of landscape pattern on the isotope effects of spring water is a new interdisciplinary topic between landscape ecology and isotope hydrology. Taking the Quanfuzhuang River basin located in the core area of UNESCO World Cultural Heritage of Honghe Hani Rice Terrace as the object, collecting the monthly samples of 78 points of spring water and 39 precipitation at altitude of 1500 m (terraces), 1700 m (terraces) and 1900 m (forest) from March 2015 to March 2016, we analyzed the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes of water samples under the different landscape types. The results indicated that the dominated landscape types were forests and rice terraces, being 66.6% and 22.1% of the whole landscape area respectively, and they had a spatial vertical pattern of forest located at the mountain top and rice terraces at the down-slope. The correlation analysis showed that the spring water not only came from the precipitation, but also from other water sources which had a more positive δ 18 O and δD values, the spring water in up-slope forests mainly came from precipitation, while that in down-slope rice terraces came from precipitation, ri-ver water, rice terrace water and under ground water. Therefore, the mixing effects of spring water δ 18 O and δD were more significant in rice terraces. The overall altitude effect of the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes in spring water was obvious. The linear decreasing rates of δ 18 O and δD values were -0.125‰·(100 m) -1 and -0.688‰·(100 m) -1 , respectively. The deuterium surplus value increased with the altitude because of the impacts of landscape pattern and the local cycle of water isotopes. In summary, the dominant landscape types had a significant impact on the hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of spring water, which could be used as response indicator to reveal the impacts of landscape pattern on

  7. Map of Martian Polar Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This gamma ray spectrometer map centered on the north pole of Mars is based on gamma-rays from the element hydrogen. In this region, hydrogen is mainly in the form of water ice. Regions of high ice content are shown in red and those low in ice content are shown in blue. The very ice-rich region at the north pole is due to a permanent polar cap of water ice on the surface. Elsewhere in this region, the ice is buried under several to a few tens of centimeters of dry soil. The sub-surface ice is not uniformly distributed in the north, but varies with both latitude and longitude. In the north, the soil is well over 50 percent ice, which is more than can be accommodated by just filling the pore space in pre-existing soil. This high ice content implies that the ice may have been slowly co-deposited with dust in the past when conditions were wetter. Deposition of ice by this process means it is more likely that the ice deposits are very thick and may even be deep enough to have liquid water at their base.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The gamma ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona, Tucson. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, Colo., is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Hydrochemical characteristics of natural water and selenium-rich water resources in the Northern Daba Mountains, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao; Luo, Kunli; Du, Yajun; Tian, Yuan; Long, Jie; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Shixi

    2017-04-01

    The Northern Daba Mountains (NDM) of Shaanxi Province, China, are a well-known selenium (Se)-rich area, and the area is also known for endemic fluorine (F) and arsenic (As) poisoning. In order to study the hydrochemical characteristics and trace element contents of the natural waters of this region, 62 water samples were collected from Lan'gao area in the NDM. The hydrochemical composition was principally characterized by Ca·Mg-HCO 3 ·SO 4 . F and As concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 0.67 mg/L and from 0.33 to 6.29 μg/L, respectively, lower than Chinese national standard and international guidelines for drinking water quality. One year of monitoring proved that F and As in natural water were not the sources of the local fluorosis and arseniasis in the NDM. The average Se concentration in fissure water was 5.20 μg/L. The average Se content of river water was 2.82 μg/L, 14 times that of the world's surface level (0.2 μg/L). The Se content in eight samples reached the Chinese national standards for mineral drinking water quality (>10 μg/L). Contrasting the water samples of May, July, and September in 2015 shows that the Se content is relatively stable and the increase of humidity might be beneficial to increase the content of selenium and strontium in water.

  9. A Hydrogen-Evolving Hybrid-Electrolyte Battery with Electrochemical/Photoelectrochemical Charging from Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhaoyu; Li, Panpan; Xiao, Dan

    2017-02-08

    Decoupled hydrogen and oxygen production were successfully embedded into an aqueous dual-electrolyte (acid-base) battery for simultaneous energy storage and conversion. A three-electrode configuration was adopted, involving an electrocatalytic hydrogen-evolving electrode as cathode, an alkaline battery-type or capacitor-type anode as shuttle, and a charging-assisting electrode for electro-/photoelectrochemically catalyzing water oxidation. The conceptual battery not only synergistically outputs electricity and chemical fuels with tremendous specific energy and power densities, but also supports various approaches to be charged by pure or solar-assisted electricity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Feasibility of the hydrogen sulfide test for the assessment of drinking water quality in post-earthquake Haiti.

    PubMed

    Weppelmann, Thomas A; Alam, Meer T; Widmer, Jocelyn; Morrissey, David; Rashid, Mohammed H; De Rochars, Valery M Beau; Morris, J Glenn; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A

    2014-12-01

    In 2010, a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti, severely damaging the drinking and wastewater infrastructure and leaving millions homeless. Compounding this problem, the introduction of Vibrio cholerae resulted in a massive cholera outbreak that infected over 700,000 people and threatened the safety of Haiti's drinking water. To mitigate this public health crisis, non-government organizations installed thousands of wells to provide communities with safe drinking water. However, despite increased access, Haiti currently lacks the monitoring capacity to assure the microbial safety of any of its water resources. For these reasons, this study was designed to assess the feasibility of using a simple, low-cost method to detect indicators of fecal contamination of drinking water that could be implemented at the community level. Water samples from 358 sources of drinking water in the Léogâne flood basin were screened with a commercially available hydrogen sulfide test and a standard membrane method for the enumeration of thermotolerant coliforms. When compared with the gold standard method, the hydrogen sulfide test had a sensitivity of 65 % and a specificity of 93 %. While the sensitivity of the assay increased at higher fecal coliform concentrations, it never exceeded 88 %, even with fecal coliform concentrations greater than 100 colony-forming units per 100 ml. While its simplicity makes the hydrogen sulfide test attractive for assessing water quality in low-resource settings, the low sensitivity raises concerns about its use as the sole indicator of the presence or absence of fecal coliforms in individual or community water sources.

  11. Molecular molybdenum persulfide and related catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    DOEpatents

    Long, Jeffrey R.; Chang, Christopher J.; Karunadasa, Hemamala I.; Majda, Marcin

    2016-11-22

    New metal persulfido compositions of matter are described. In one embodiment the metal is molybdenum and the metal persulfido complex mimics the structure and function of the triangular active edge site fragments of MoS.sub.2, a material that is the current industry standard for petroleum hydro desulfurization, as well as a promising low-cost alternative to platinum for electrocatalytic hydrogen production. This molecular [(PY5W.sub.2)MoS.sub.2].sup.x+ containing catalyst is capable of generating hydrogen from acidic-buffered water or even seawater at very low overpotentials at a turnover frequency rate in excess of 500 moles H.sub.2 per mole catalyst per second, with a turnover number (over a 20 hour period) of at least 19,000,000 moles H.sub.2 per mole of catalyst.

  12. Hierarchical lattice models of hydrogen-bond networks in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, Rahul; Hassanali, Ali A.

    2018-06-01

    We develop a graph-based model of the hydrogen-bond network in water, with a view toward quantitatively modeling the molecular-level correlational structure of the network. The networks formed are studied by the constructing the model on two infinite-dimensional lattices. Our models are built bottom up, based on microscopic information coming from atomistic simulations, and we show that the predictions of the model are consistent with known results from ab initio simulations of liquid water. We show that simple entropic models can predict the correlations and clustering of local-coordination defects around tetrahedral waters observed in the atomistic simulations. We also find that orientational correlations between bonds are longer ranged than density correlations, determine the directional correlations within closed loops, and show that the patterns of water wires within these structures are also consistent with previous atomistic simulations. Our models show the existence of density and compressibility anomalies, as seen in the real liquid, and the phase diagram of these models is consistent with the singularity-free scenario previously proposed by Sastry and coworkers [Phys. Rev. E 53, 6144 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.53.6144].

  13. Lake Louise Water (USGS47): A new isotopic reference water for stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Lorenz, Jennifer M.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Tarbox, Lauren V.; Mayer, Bernhard; Taylor, Steve

    2014-01-01

    RESULTS: The δ2H and δ18O values of this reference water are –150.2 ± 0.5 ‰ and –19.80 ± 0.02 ‰, respectively, relative to VSMOW on scales normalized such that the δ2H and δ18O values of SLAP reference water are, respectively, –428 and –55.5 ‰. Each uncertainty is an estimated expanded uncertainty (U = 2uc) about the reference value that provides an interval that has about a 95-percent probability of encompassing the true value. CONCLUSION: This isotopic reference material, designated as USGS47, is intended as one of two isotopic reference waters for daily normalization of stable hydrogen and stable oxygen isotopic analysis of water with a mass spectrometer or a laser absorption spectrometer. "

  14. Analysis of Hydrogen Isotopic Exchange: Lava Creek Tuff Ash and Isotopically Labeled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. M.; Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.; Nolan, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Nolan and Bindeman (2013) placed secondarily hydrated ash from the 7.7 ka eruption of Mt. Mazama (δD=-149‰, 2.3wt% H2Ot) in isotopically labeled water (+650 ‰ δD, +56 ‰ δ18O) and observed that the H2Ot and δ18O values remained constant, but the δD values of ash increased with the surrounding water at 20, 40 and 70 °C. We expand on this work by conducting a similar experiment with ash from the 640 ka Lava Creek Tuff (LCT, δD of -128 ‰; 2.1 wt.% H2Ot) eruption of Yellowstone to see if significantly older glass (with a hypothesized gel layer on the surface shielding the interior from alteration) produces the same results. We have experiments running at 70, 24, and 5 °C, and periodically remove ~1.5 mg of glass to measure the δD (‰) and H2Ot (wt.%) of water extracted from the glass on a TC/EA MAT 253 continuous flow system. After 600 hours, the δD of the samples left at 5 and 24 °C remains at -128 ‰, but increased 8‰ for the 70 °C run series. However, there is no measurable change in wt.% of H2Ot, indicating that hydrogen exchange is not dictated by the addition of water. We are measuring and will report further progress of isotope exchange. We also plan to analyze the water in the LCT glass for δ18O (‰) to see if, as is the case for the Mt. Mazama glass, the δ18O (‰) remains constant. We also analyzed Mt. Mazama glass from the Nolan and Bindeman (2013) experiments that have now been sitting in isotopically labeled water at room temperature for ~5 years. The water concentration is still unchanged (2.3 wt.% H2Ot), and the δD of the water in the glass is now -111 ‰, causing an increase of 38 ‰. Our preliminary results show that exchange of hydrogen isotopes of hydrated glass is not limited by the age of the glass, and that the testing of hydrogen isotopes of secondarily hydrated glass, regardless of age, may not be a reliable paleoclimate indicator.

  15. The geochemistry of water near a surficial organic-rich uranium deposit, northeastern Washington State, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, R.A.; Otton, J.K.; Wanty, R.B.; Pierson, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    The chemistry of three stream, three spring and six near-surface waters in the vicinity of a Holocene organic-rich uranium deposit is described, with particular emphasis on the chemistry of U. Results characterize the solution behavior of uranium as U-bearing water interacts with relatively undecomposed, surficial organic matter. Of the measured major and trace chemical species, only U is consistently highly enriched (17-318 ppb) relative to reported values for regional waters, or to literature values for waters in largely granitic terrains. R-mode factor analysis of the chemical data suggests that most U is present in a soluble form, but that some U is also associated with fine suspended particulates of clay, organic matter, or hydrous oxides. Calculations that apply thermodynamic data to predict U speciation in solution indicate the relative importance of uranyl carbonate and uranyl phosphate complexes. Analysis of more finely filtered samples (0.05 ??m vs. 0.45 ??m), and direct radiographic observations using fission-track detectors suspended in the waters indicate the presence of some uraniferous particulate matter. Application of existing thermodynamic data for uranous- and uranyl-bearing minerals indicates that all waters are undersaturated with U minerals as long as ambient Eh ??? +0.1 v. If coexisting surface and near-surface waters are sufficiently oxidizing, initial fixation of U in the deposit should be by a mechanism of adsorption. Alternatively, more reducing conditions may prevail in deeper pore waters of the organic-rich host sediments, perhaps leading to direct precipitation or diagenetic formation of U4+ minerals. A 234U 238U alpha activity ratio of 1.08 ?? 0.02 in a spring issuing from a hillslope above the deposit suggests a relatively soluble source of U. In contrast, higher activity ratios of 234U 238U (??? 1.3) in waters in contact with the uraniferous valley-fill sediments suggest differences in the nature of interaction between groundwater

  16. Effect of sodium chloride- and sodium bicarbonate-rich mineral water on blood pressure and metabolic parameters in elderly normotensive individuals: a randomized double-blind crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Schorr, U; Distler, A; Sharma, A M

    1996-01-01

    To examine the effect of sodium chloride- and sodium bicarbonate-rich mineral water on blood pressure and parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism in elderly normotensive individuals. We examined 21 healthy men and women aged 60-72 years in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover trial. After reducing dietary salt intake to below 100 mmol/day, study participants were randomly assigned to drink 1.5 l daily of a sodium chloride-rich (sodium 84.5 mmol/l, chloride 63.7 mmol/l, bicarbonate 21.9 mmol/l), a sodium bicarbonate-rich (sodium 39.3 mmol/l, chloride 6.5 mmol/l, bicarbonate 48.8 mmol/l) and a low-sodium (placebo: sodium, chloride and bicarbonate < 0.02 mmol/l) mineral water for 4 weeks each in a three-phase crossover order. Each phase was separated by a 2-week washout period in which the study participants remained on a low-salt diet. Compliance was assessed by biweekly urinary electrolyte excretion and five study participants were excluded from analysis for failing to complete the trial or to fulfil the compliance criteria. Mean arterial blood pressure was significantly lower during the periods of consuming low-sodium -7.0 +/- 7.2 mmHg, P < 0.001) or sodium bicarbonate-rich (-5.7 +/- 6.4 mmHg, P < 0.05) water than at baseline. In contrast, blood pressure during the phase of drinking sodium chloride-rich water was identical to that at baseline. Ambulatory 24 h blood pressure, oral glucose tolerance and plasma lipids were not affected by the different regimens. Urinary calcium excretion was significantly reduced by drinking low-sodium or sodium bicarbonate-rich water but was unchanged under the sodium chloride-rich water. Consumption of sodium chloride-rich mineral water can abolish the blood pressure reduction induced by dietary salt restriction in elderly individuals. Sodium bicarbonate-rich mineral water in conjunction with a low-salt diet may have a beneficial effect on calcium homeostasis.

  17. A thermodynamic description for water, hydrogen fluoride and hydrogen dissolutions in cryolite-base molten salts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Chartrand, Patrice

    2018-06-15

    This paper presents a quantitative thermodynamic description for water, hydrogen fluoride and hydrogen dissolutions in cryolite-base molten salts, which is of technological importance to the Hall-Héroult electrolytic aluminum extraction cell. The Modified Quasichemical Model in the Quadruplet Approximation (MQMQA), as used to treat a large variety of molten salt systems, was adopted to thermodynamically describe the present liquid phase; all solid solutions were modeled using the Compound Energy Formalism (CEF); the gas phase was thermodynamically treated as an ideal mixture of all possible species. The model parameters were mainly obtained by critical evaluations and optimizations of thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data available from relative experimental measurements and theoretical predictions (first-principles calculations and empirical estimations) for the lower-order subsystems. These optimized model parameters were thereafter merged within the Kohler/Toop interpolation scheme, facilitating the prediction of gas solubility (H2O, HF and H2) in multicomponent cryolite-base molten salts using the FactSage thermochemical software. Several interesting diagrams were finally obtained in order to provide useful information for the industrial partners dedicated to the Hall-Héroult electrolytic aluminum production or other molten-salt technologies (the purification process and electroslag refining).

  18. Hydrogen generation during serpentinisation in ophiolite complexes: A comparison of H2-rich gases from Oman, Philippines and Turkey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Valérie; Vacquand, Christèle; Deville, Eric; Prinzhofer, Alain

    2013-04-01

    H2-rich gas seepages in ultrabasic to basic contexts both in marine and continental environment are by-products of serpentinisation. Hydrothermal systems at MOR expose ultrabasic rocks to thermodynamic conditions favouring oxidation of FeII bearing minerals and water reduction. In continental context such thermodynamic conditions do not exist although active serpentinisation occurs in all known ophiolitic complexes (Barnes et al., 1978; Bruni et al., 2002; Cipolli et al., 2004; Boschetti and Toscani, 2008; Marques et al., 2008). Hyperalkaline springs are reported in these contexts as evidence of this active serpentinisation (Barnes et al., 1967) and are often associated with seepages of reduced gases (Neal and Stanger, 1983; Sano et al., 1993). Dry gas seepages are also observed (Abrajano et al., 1988, 1990; Hosgörmez, 2007; Etiope et al., 2011) Such H2-rich gases from ophiolite complexes were sampled in the Sultanate of Oman, the Philippines and Turkey and were analysed for chemical composition, noble gases contents, stable isotopes of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen. The conditions for present-day serpentinisation in ophiolites were recognised as low temperature processes in Oman with high rock/water ratios (Neal and Stanger, 1985), while the origin of gases is not as univocal for Philippines and Turkey gas seepages. Although, H2 generation is directly linked with FeII oxidation, different reactions can occur during peridotite hydration (McCollom and Bach, 2009; Marcaillou et al., 2011) and serpentine weathering. Produced H2 can react with carbonate species to produce methane via processes that could be biological or abiotic, while carbon availability depends on water recharge chemistry. In the present study, the geochemical properties of gases sampled from three different ophiolite complexes are compared and provide evidence that weathering reactions producing H2 depend on structural, geological, geomorphologic and hydrological local features. REFERENCES Abrajano

  19. Rational Design of Antifouling Polymeric Nanocomposite for Sustainable Fluoride Removal from NOM-Rich Water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Lu; Li, Zhixian; Jiang, Zhao; Zheng, Qi; Lin, Bin; Pan, Bingcai

    2017-11-21

    The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) exerts adverse effects on adsorptive removal of various pollutants including fluoride from water. Herein, we designed a novel nanocomposite adsorbent for preferable and sustainable defluoridation from NOM-rich water. The nanocomposite (HZO@HCA) is obtained by encapsulating hydrous zirconium oxide nanoparticles (HZO NPs) inside hyper-cross-linked polystyrene anion exchanger (HCA) binding tertiary amine groups. Another commercially available nanocomposite HZO@D201, with the host of a cross-linked polystyrene anion exchanger (D201) binding ammonium groups, was involved for comparison. HZO@HCA features with abundant micropores instead of meso-/macropores of HZO@D201, resulting in the inaccessible sites for NOM due to the size exclusion. Also, the tertiary amine groups of HCA favor an efficient desorption of the slightly loaded NOM from HZO@HCA. As expected, Sigma-Aldrich humic acid even at 20 mg of DOC/L did not exert any observable effect on fluoride sequestration by HZO@HCA, whereas a significant inhibition was observed for HZO@D201. Cyclic adsorption runs further verified the superior reusability of HZO@HCA for defluoridation from NOM-rich water. In addition, the HZO@HCA column could generate ∼80 bed volume (BV) effluent from a synthetic fluoride-containing groundwater to meet the drinking water standard (<1.5 mg F/L), whereas HCA and HZO@D201 columns could only generate <5 and ∼40 BV effluents, respectively. This study is believed to shed new light on how to rationally design antifouling nanocomposites for water remediation.

  20. Equilibrium carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [1-3]) have suggested that Si- and Fe-isotopic signatures can be used to characterize the compositions and conditions of segregation of metallic cores in planetary interiors. This study expands the theoretical framework to include carbon and hydrogen, which may also be alloying elements. Hydrogen (D/H) and carbon (13C/12C) fractionations in iron-rich metallic melts are estimated by modeling analogous iron-rich crystals, i.e., dhcp-FeH and η-Fe2C. C- and H-atoms in these crystals are completely coordinated by iron. The driving energy for equilibrium fractionation is assumed to come from the reduction of vibrational frequencies when heavy isotopes are substituted for light ones; vibrations are assumed to be harmonic. This treatment is crude at high temperature, and for the relatively anharmonic vibrations typical of hydrogen-bearing substances, but may provide a reasonably accurate, semi-quantitative approximation of real fractionation behavior. Vibrational frequencies of all crystals are modeled with density functional theory, using gradient-corrected functionals and ultrasoft pseudopotentials. For both carbon and hydrogen, the models suggest that the metal phase will be strongly depleted in heavy isotopes. At 2000 K, 1 atm, η-Fe2C will have 3‰ lower 13C/12C than coexisting diamond. Combining this result with previous high-temperature theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [4]), metal-graphite fractionation is expected to be very similar, while metal-CO2 fractionation will be almost twice as large, ca. -5‰. Deuterium/hydrogen fractionations are expected to be an order of magnitude larger, with 50-70‰ lower D/H in dhcp-FeH than in coexisting H2 gas at 2000 K, and approximately 100‰ lower D/H than water vapor. These fractionations are much larger than those inferred for silicon and iron, as expected given the differences in atomic mass. References: 1. Georg et al. (2007) Nature 447:1102; 2. Rustad & Yin

  1. Process for thermochemically producing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, Donald M.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen is produced by the reaction of water with chromium sesquioxide and strontium oxide. The hydrogen producing reaction is combined with other reactions to produce a closed chemical cycle for the thermal decomposition of water.

  2. Hydrogen production by the decomposition of water

    DOEpatents

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Bowman, M.G.

    A process is described for the production of hydrogen from water by a sulfuric acid process employing electrolysis and thermo-chemical decomposition. The water containing SO/sub 2/ is electrolyzed to produce H/sub 2/ at the cathode and to oxidize the SO/sub 2/ to form H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at the anode. After the H/sub 2/ has been separated, a compound of the type M/sub r/X/sub s/ is added to produce a water insoluble sulfate of M and a water insoluble oxide of the metal in the radical X. In the compound M/sub r/X/sub s/, M is at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Ba/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Sr/sup 2 +/, La/sup 2 +/, and Pb/sup 2 +/; X is at least one radical selected from the group consisting of molybdate (MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), tungstate (WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and metaborate (BO/sub 2//sup 1 -/); and r and s are either 1, 2, or 3 depending upon the valence of M and X. The precipitated mixture is filtered and heated to a temperature sufficiently high to form SO/sub 3/ gas and to reform M/sub r/X/sub s/. The SO/sub 3/ is dissolved in a small amount of H/sub 2/O to produce concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the M/sub r/X/sub s/ is recycled to the process. Alternatively, the SO/sub 3/ gas can be recycled to the beginning of the process to provide a continuous process for the production of H/sub 2/ in which only water need be added in a substantial amount. (BLM)

  3. Synthesis of DHA/EPA-rich phosphatidylcholine by immobilized phospholipase A1: effect of water addition and vacuum condition.

    PubMed

    Li, Daoming; Qin, Xiaoli; Wang, Weifei; Li, Zhigang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-08-01

    DHA/EPA-rich phosphatidylcholine (PC) was successfully synthesized by immobilized phospholipase A1 (PLA1)-catalyzed transesterification of PC and DHA/EPA-rich ethyl esters in a solvent-free system. Effects of reaction temperature, water addition and substrate mass ratio on the incorporation of DHA/EPA were evaluated using response surface methods (RSM). Water addition had most significant effect on the incorporation. Reaction temperature and substrate mass ratio, however, had no significant effect on the incorporation. The maximal incorporation was 19.09 % (24 h) under the following conditions: temperature 55.7 °C, water addition 1.1 wt % and substrate mass ratio (ethyl esters/PC) 6.8:1. Furthermore, effects of water addition (from 0 to 1.25 wt %) on DHA/EPA incorporation and the composition of products were further investigated. The immobilized PLA1 was more active when water addition was above 0.5 wt %. By monitoring the reaction processes with different water addition, a possible reaction scheme was proposed for transesterification of PC with DHA/EPA-rich ethyl esters. In summary, PC and sn2-lysophosphatidylocholine (LPC) were predominant in the mixtures at early stages of reaction, whereas sn1-LPC and glycerophosphocholine (GPC) predominant at later stages. The vacuum employed after 24 h significantly increased the incorporation of DHA/EPA and the composition of PC, and the highest incorporation (30.31 %) of DHA/EPA was obtained at 72 h and the yield of PC was 47.2 %.

  4. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water. [NaMnO/sub 2/ and TiO/sub 2/

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, P.R.; Bamberger, C.E.

    1980-02-08

    A thermochemical cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO/sub 2/) and titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) to form sodium titanate (Na/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO/sub 3/) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.

  5. Hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope signatures of goethite hydration waters by thermogravimetry-enabled laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oerter, Erik; Singleton, Michael; Davisson, Lee

    The hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope composition (δ 2H and δ 18O values) of mineral hydration waters can give information on the environment of mineral formation. Here we present and validate an approach for the stable isotope analysis of mineral hydration waters based on coupling a thermogravimetric analyzer with a laser-based isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy instrument (Picarro L-2130i), which we abbreviate as TGA-IRIS. TGA-IRIS generates δ 2H and δ 18O values of liquid water samples with precision for δ 2H of ± 1.2‰, and for δ 18O of ± 0.17‰. For hydration waters in goethite, precision for δ 2H rangesmore » from ± 0.3‰ to 1.6‰, and for δ 18O ranges from ± 0.17‰ to 0.27‰. The ability of TGA-IRIS to generate detailed water yield data and δ 2H and δ 18O values of water at varying temperatures allows for the differentiation of water in varying states of binding on mineral surfaces and within the mineral matrix. TGA-IRIS analyses of hydrogen isotopes in goethite yields δ 2H values that reflect the hydrogen of the OH – phase in the mineral and are comparable to that made by IRMS and found in the literature. In contrast, δ 18O values on goethite reflect the oxygen in OH – groups bound to Fe (Fe-OH group), and not the oxygen bound only to Fe (Fe-O group) in the mineral crystal lattice, and may not be comparable to literature δ 18O values made by IRMS that reflect the total O in the mineral. TGA-IRIS presents the possibility to isotopically differentiate the various oxygen reservoirs in goethite, which may allow the mineral to be used as a single mineral geothermometer. As a result, TGA-IRIS measurements of hydration waters are likely to open new avenues and possibilities for research on hydrated minerals.« less

  6. Hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope signatures of goethite hydration waters by thermogravimetry-enabled laser spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Oerter, Erik; Singleton, Michael; Davisson, Lee

    2017-10-22

    The hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope composition (δ 2H and δ 18O values) of mineral hydration waters can give information on the environment of mineral formation. Here we present and validate an approach for the stable isotope analysis of mineral hydration waters based on coupling a thermogravimetric analyzer with a laser-based isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy instrument (Picarro L-2130i), which we abbreviate as TGA-IRIS. TGA-IRIS generates δ 2H and δ 18O values of liquid water samples with precision for δ 2H of ± 1.2‰, and for δ 18O of ± 0.17‰. For hydration waters in goethite, precision for δ 2H rangesmore » from ± 0.3‰ to 1.6‰, and for δ 18O ranges from ± 0.17‰ to 0.27‰. The ability of TGA-IRIS to generate detailed water yield data and δ 2H and δ 18O values of water at varying temperatures allows for the differentiation of water in varying states of binding on mineral surfaces and within the mineral matrix. TGA-IRIS analyses of hydrogen isotopes in goethite yields δ 2H values that reflect the hydrogen of the OH – phase in the mineral and are comparable to that made by IRMS and found in the literature. In contrast, δ 18O values on goethite reflect the oxygen in OH – groups bound to Fe (Fe-OH group), and not the oxygen bound only to Fe (Fe-O group) in the mineral crystal lattice, and may not be comparable to literature δ 18O values made by IRMS that reflect the total O in the mineral. TGA-IRIS presents the possibility to isotopically differentiate the various oxygen reservoirs in goethite, which may allow the mineral to be used as a single mineral geothermometer. As a result, TGA-IRIS measurements of hydration waters are likely to open new avenues and possibilities for research on hydrated minerals.« less

  7. Sulfur mass-independent fractionation in subsurface fracture waters indicates a long-standing sulfur cycle in Precambrian rocks

    PubMed Central

    Li, L.; Wing, B. A.; Bui, T. H.; McDermott, J. M.; Slater, G. F.; Wei, S.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Lollar, B. Sherwood

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of hydrogen-rich waters preserved below the Earth's surface in Precambrian rocks worldwide expands our understanding of the habitability of the terrestrial subsurface. Many deep microbial ecosystems in these waters survive by coupling hydrogen oxidation to sulfate reduction. Hydrogen originates from water–rock reactions including serpentinization and radiolytic decomposition of water induced by decay of radioactive elements in the host rocks. The origin of dissolved sulfate, however, remains unknown. Here we report, from anoxic saline fracture waters ∼2.4 km below surface in the Canadian Shield, a sulfur mass-independent fractionation signal in dissolved sulfate. We demonstrate that this sulfate most likely originates from oxidation of sulfide minerals in the Archaean host rocks through the action of dissolved oxidants (for example, HO· and H2O2) themselves derived from radiolysis of water, thereby providing a coherent long-term mechanism capable of supplying both an essential electron donor (H2) and a complementary acceptor (sulfate) for the deep biosphere. PMID:27807346

  8. Conformational stability of the propylene oxide-water adduct: direct spectroscopic detection of O-H...O hydrogen bonded conformers.

    PubMed

    Su, Zheng; Wen, Qing; Xu, Yunjie

    2006-05-24

    The 1:1 molecular adduct of propylene oxide and water (PO-H(2)O) was studied using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and high level ab initio methods. Two distinct structural conformers with the water molecule acting as a proton donor were detected experimentally: one with the water on the same side as the methyl group with respect to the ether ring, i.e., syn-PO-H(2)O, the other with the water molecule binding to the O-atom from the opposite side of the methyl group, i.e., anti-PO-H(2)O. The nonbonded hydrogen is entgegen to the ether ring in both conformers. Rotational spectra of four isotopic species, namely PO-H(2)O, PO-DOH, PO-HOD, and PO-D(2)O, were recorded for the two conformers. The hydrogen bond parameters: r(O(epoxy)...H), angle(ring-O(epoxy)...H), and angle(O(epoxy)...H-O) are 1.908 A, 112 degrees, and 177 degrees for syn-PO-H(2)O, and 1.885 A, 104.3 degrees, and 161.7 degrees for anti-PO-H(2)O, respectively. The experimental results suggest that the hydrogen bond in syn-PO-H(2)O is stronger and the monomer subunits are more rigidly locked in their positions than in the ethylene oxide-water adduct. The stabilizing effect of the methyl group to the intermolecular hydrogen bond is discussed in terms of the experimentally estimated binding energies, the structural parameters, and the ab initio calculations.

  9. Comparison of Vibrio parahaemolyticus grown in estuarine water and rich medium.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, J; Chai, T J

    1989-01-01

    Cell envelope composition and selected physiological traits of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were studied in regard to the Kanagawa phenomenon and growth conditions. Cell envelopes were prepared from cells cultured in Proteose Peptone-beef extract (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.) medium or filtered estuarine water. Protein, phospholipid, and lipopolysaccharide contents varied with culture conditions. The phospholipids present in the cell envelopes were identified as phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin. Phosphatidylethanolamine decreased and phosphatidylglycerol increased in cells grown in estuarine water. Profiles of proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated numerous protein species, with four to six predominant proteins ranging from 26,000 to 120,000 in molecular weight. The profile of V. parahaemolyticus cell envelope proteins was unique and might be useful in the identification of the organism. Alkaline phosphatase activity was slightly higher in Kanagawa-negative strains and was higher in cells grown in estuarine water than in cells grown in rich laboratory medium. The DNA levels in estuarine water-grown cells increased, while RNA levels and cell volume decreased. Bacteriophage sensitivity typing demonstrated a close intraspecies relationship. Results indicated that Kanagawa-positive and -negative strains were closely related, but they could be grouped separately and may have undergone starvation-related physiological changes when cultured in estuarine water. Images PMID:2782869

  10. Molecular Hydrogen in Drinking Water Protects against Neurodegenerative Changes Induced by Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dohi, Kenji; Kraemer, Brian C.; Erickson, Michelle A.; McMillan, Pamela J.; Kovac, Andrej; Flachbartova, Zuzana; Hansen, Kim M.; Shah, Gul N.; Sheibani, Nader; Salameh, Therese; Banks, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in its various forms has emerged as a major problem for modern society. Acute TBI can transform into a chronic condition and be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, probably through induction of oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Here, we examined the ability of the antioxidant molecular hydrogen given in drinking water (molecular hydrogen water; mHW) to alter the acute changes induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI), a commonly used experimental model of TBI. We found that mHW reversed CCI-induced edema by about half, completely blocked pathological tau expression, accentuated an early increase seen in several cytokines but attenuated that increase by day 7, reversed changes seen in the protein levels of aquaporin-4, HIF-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9, but not for amyloid beta peptide 1–40 or 1–42. Treatment with mHW also reversed the increase seen 4 h after CCI in gene expression related to oxidation/carbohydrate metabolism, cytokine release, leukocyte or cell migration, cytokine transport, ATP and nucleotide binding. Finally, we found that mHW preserved or increased ATP levels and propose a new mechanism for mHW, that of ATP production through the Jagendorf reaction. These results show that molecular hydrogen given in drinking water reverses many of the sequelae of CCI and suggests that it could be an easily administered, highly effective treatment for TBI. PMID:25251220

  11. Molecular hydrogen in drinking water protects against neurodegenerative changes induced by traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Dohi, Kenji; Kraemer, Brian C; Erickson, Michelle A; McMillan, Pamela J; Kovac, Andrej; Flachbartova, Zuzana; Hansen, Kim M; Shah, Gul N; Sheibani, Nader; Salameh, Therese; Banks, William A

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in its various forms has emerged as a major problem for modern society. Acute TBI can transform into a chronic condition and be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, probably through induction of oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Here, we examined the ability of the antioxidant molecular hydrogen given in drinking water (molecular hydrogen water; mHW) to alter the acute changes induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI), a commonly used experimental model of TBI. We found that mHW reversed CCI-induced edema by about half, completely blocked pathological tau expression, accentuated an early increase seen in several cytokines but attenuated that increase by day 7, reversed changes seen in the protein levels of aquaporin-4, HIF-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9, but not for amyloid beta peptide 1-40 or 1-42. Treatment with mHW also reversed the increase seen 4 h after CCI in gene expression related to oxidation/carbohydrate metabolism, cytokine release, leukocyte or cell migration, cytokine transport, ATP and nucleotide binding. Finally, we found that mHW preserved or increased ATP levels and propose a new mechanism for mHW, that of ATP production through the Jagendorf reaction. These results show that molecular hydrogen given in drinking water reverses many of the sequelae of CCI and suggests that it could be an easily administered, highly effective treatment for TBI.

  12. Structure of hydrogen-rich transverse jets in a vitiated turbulent flow

    DOE PAGES

    Lyra, Sgouria; Wilde, Benjamin; Kolla, Hemanth; ...

    2014-11-24

    Our paper reports the results of a joint experimental and numerical study of the flow characteristics and flame structure of a hydrogen rich jet injected normal to a turbulent, vitiated crossflow of lean methane combustion products. Simultaneous high-speed stereoscopic PIV and OH PLIF measurements were obtained and analyzed alongside three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of inert and reacting JICF with detailed H2/COH2/CO chemistry. Both the experiment and the simulation reveal that, contrary to most previous studies of reacting JICF stabilized in low-to-moderate temperature air crossflow, the present conditions lead to a burner-attached flame that initiates uniformly around the burner edge. Significantmore » asymmetry is observed, however, between the reaction zones located on the windward and leeward sides of the jet, due to the substantially different scalar dissipation rates. The windward reaction zone is much thinner in the near field, while also exhibiting significantly higher local and global heat release than the much broader reaction zone found on the leeward side of the jet. The unsteady dynamics of the windward shear layer, which largely control the important jet/crossflow mixing processes in that region, are explored in order to elucidate the important flow stability implications arising in the inert and reacting JICF. The paper concludes with an analysis of the ignition, flame characteristics, and global structure of the burner-attached flame. FurthermoreChemical explosive mode analysis (CEMA) shows that the entire windward shear layer, and a large region on the leeward side of the jet, are highly explosive prior to ignition and are dominated by non-premixed flame structures after ignition. The predominantly mixing limited nature of the flow after ignition is examined by computing the Takeno flame index, which shows that ~70% of the heat release occurs in non-premixed regions.« less

  13. A Spectroscopic Survey and Analysis of Bright, Hydrogen-rich White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianninas, A.; Bergeron, P.; Ruiz, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    We have conducted a spectroscopic survey of over 1300 bright (V <= 17.5), hydrogen-rich white dwarfs based largely on the last published version of the McCook & Sion catalog. The complete results from our survey, including the spectroscopic analysis of over 1100 DA white dwarfs, are presented. High signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra were obtained for each star and were subsequently analyzed using our standard spectroscopic technique where the observed Balmer line profiles are compared to synthetic spectra computed from the latest generation of model atmospheres appropriate for these stars. First, we present the spectroscopic content of our sample, which includes many misclassifications as well as several DAB, DAZ, and magnetic white dwarfs. Next, we look at how the new Stark broadening profiles affect the determination of the atmospheric parameters. When necessary, specific models and analysis techniques are used to derive the most accurate atmospheric parameters possible. In particular, we employ M dwarf templates to obtain better estimates of the atmospheric parameters for those white dwarfs that are in DA+dM binary systems. Certain unique white dwarfs and double-degenerate binary systems are also analyzed in greater detail. We then examine the global properties of our sample including the mass distribution and their distribution as a function of temperature. We then proceed to test the accuracy and robustness of our method by comparing our results to those of other surveys such as SPY and Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Finally, we revisit the ZZ Ceti instability strip and examine how the determination of its empirical boundaries is affected by the latest line profile calculations. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla or Paranal Observatories under program ID 078.D-0824(A).

  14. Hydrogen bond dynamics of superheated water and methanol by ultrafast IR-pump and EUV-photoelectron probe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer-Martinez, E; Link, O; Lugovoy, E; Siefermann, K R; Wiederschein, F; Grubmüller, H; Abel, B

    2014-09-28

    Supercritical water and methanol have recently drawn much attention in the field of green chemistry. It is crucial to an understanding of supercritical solvents to know their dynamics and to what extent hydrogen (H) bonds persist in these fluids. Here, we show that with femtosecond infrared (IR) laser pulses water and methanol can be heated to temperatures near and above their critical temperature Tc and their molecular dynamics can be studied via ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy at liquid jet interfaces with high harmonics radiation. As opposed to previous studies, the main focus here is the comparison between the hydrogen bonded systems of methanol and water and their interpretation by theory. Superheated water initially forms a dense hot phase with spectral features resembling those of monomers in gas phase water. On longer timescales, this phase was found to build hot aggregates, whose size increases as a function of time. In contrast, methanol heated to temperatures near Tc initially forms a broad distribution of aggregate sizes and some gas. These experimental features are also found and analyzed in extended molecular dynamics simulations. Additionally, the simulations enabled us to relate the origin of the different behavior of these two hydrogen-bonded liquids to the nature of the intermolecular potentials. The combined experimental and theoretical approach delivers new insights into both superheated phases and may contribute to understand their different chemical reactivities.

  15. The corrosion behavior of Alloy 52 weld metal in cyclic hydrogenated and oxygenated water chemistry in high temperature aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of Alloy 52 weld metal in cyclic hydrogenated and oxygenated water chemistry in high temperature water is studied by in situ monitoring corrosion potential (Ecorr), contact electric resistance (CER) and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS), and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The Ecorr and film resistance show large change when the environment is changed from hydrogenated water to oxygenated water and changeable with changing environment while the morphology and composition only show obvious distinction in the first cycle. The main factor controlling the electric/electrochemical properties of the oxide film is Ecorr.

  16. Water Splitting Using Porous Silicon Photo-electrodes for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M.; Starkov, V. V.; Gosteva, E. A.; Druzhinin, A. V.; Sattar, S.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the efficiency study results of using gradient-porous silicon structures with different morphology, as photo-anodes for photo-electrochemical dissociation of water. The results of a study of the physicochemical properties of gradient-porous silicon structures show the relatively low cost and simplicity of the technological process, as well as the possibility of forming structures with predefined properties, allow the creation of effective devices for artificial photosynthesis based on porous silicon for subsequent use in hydrogen energy.

  17. Combustion Characteristics of Nanoaluminum, Liquid Water, and Hydrogen Peroxide Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Sabourin a, Richard A. Yetter a, Grant A. Risha b, Steven F. Son c and B. C. Tappan d a The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA b...www.elsevier.com/locate/combustflame Combustion characteristics of nanoaluminum, liquid water, and <