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Sample records for hydrogen transfer reactions

  1. Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogen Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Ourida; Williams, Jonathan M. J.

    This chapter describes the application of iridium complexes to catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions. Transfer hydrogenation reactions provide an alternative to direct hydrogenation for the reduction of a range of substrates. A hydrogen donor, typically an alcohol or formic acid, can be used as the source of hydrogen for the reduction of carbonyl compounds, imines, and alkenes. Heteroaromatic compounds and even carbon dioxide have also been reduced by transfer hydrogenation reactions. In the reverse process, the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds can be achieved by iridium-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions, where a ketone or alkene is used as a suitable hydrogen acceptor. The reversible nature of many hydrogen transfer processes has been exploited for the racemization of alcohols, where temporary removal of hydrogen generates an achiral ketone intermediate. In addition, there is a growing body of work where temporary removal of hydrogen provides an opportunity for using alcohols as alkylating agents. In this chemistry, an iridium catalyst "borrows" hydrogen from an alcohol to give an aldehyde or ketone intermediate, which can be transformed into either an imine or alkene under the reaction conditions. Return of the hydrogen from the catalyst provides methodology for the formation of amines or C-C bonds where the only by-product is typically water.

  2. Hydrogen transfer reactions of interstellar Complex Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Barcia, S.; Russ, P.; Kästner, J.; Lamberts, T.

    2018-06-01

    Radical recombination has been proposed to lead to the formation of complex organic molecules (COMs) in CO-rich ices in the early stages of star formation. These COMs can then undergo hydrogen addition and abstraction reactions leading to a higher or lower degree of saturation. Here, we have studied 14 hydrogen transfer reactions for the molecules glyoxal, glycoaldehyde, ethylene glycol, and methylformate and an additional three reactions where CHnO fragments are involved. Over-the-barrier reactions are possible only if tunneling is invoked in the description at low temperature. Therefore the rate constants for the studied reactions are calculated using instanton theory that takes quantum effects into account inherently. The reactions were characterized in the gas phase, but this is expected to yield meaningful results for CO-rich ices due to the minimal alteration of reaction landscapes by the CO molecules. We found that rate constants should not be extrapolated based on the height of the barrier alone, since the shape of the barrier plays an increasingly larger role at decreasing temperature. It is neither possible to predict rate constants based only on considering the type of reaction, the specific reactants and functional groups play a crucial role. Within a single molecule, though, hydrogen abstraction from an aldehyde group seems to be always faster than hydrogen addition to the same carbon atom. Reactions that involve heavy-atom tunneling, e.g., breaking or forming a C-C or C-O bond, have rate constants that are much lower than those where H transfer is involved.

  3. Hydrogen Transfer during Liquefaction of Elbistan Lignite to Biomass; Total Reaction Transformation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyunoglu, Cemil; Karaca, Hüseyin

    2017-12-01

    Given the high cost of the tetraline solvent commonly used in liquefaction, the use of manure with EL is an important factor when considering the high cost of using tetraline as a hydrogen transfer source. In addition, due to the another cost factor which is the catalyst prices, red mud (commonly used, produced as a byproduct in the production of aluminium) is reduced cost in the work of liquefaction of coal, biomass, even coal combined biomass, corresponding that making the EL liquefaction an agenda for our country is another important factor. Conditions for liquefaction experiments conducted for hydrogen transfer from manure to coal; Catalyst concentration of 9%, liquid/solid ratio of 3/1, reaction time of 60 min, fertilizer/lignite ratio of 1/3, and the reaction temperature of 400 °C, the stirred speed of 400 rpm and the initial nitrogen pressure of 20 bar was fixed. In order to demonstrate the hydrogen, transfer from manure to coal, coal is used solely, by using tetraline (also known as a hydrogen carrier) and distilled water which is not hydrogen donor as a solvent in the co-liquefaction of experiments, and also the liquefaction conditions are carried out under an inert (N2) gas atmosphere. According to the results of the obtained liquefaction test; using tetraline solvent the total liquid product conversion percentage of the oil + gas conversion was 38.3 %, however, the results of oil+gas conversion obtained using distilled water and EL combined with manure the total liquid product conversion percentage was 7.4 %. According to the results of calorific value and elemental analysis, only the ratio of (H/C)atomic of coal obtained by using tetraline increased with the liquefaction of manure and distilled water. The reason of the increase in the amount of hydrogen due to hydrogen transfer from the manure on the solid surface of the coal, and also on the surface of the inner pore of the coal during the liquefaction, brings about the evaluation of the coal as a

  4. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Hydrogen Atom Transfer (Tautomerization) Reactions for the DNA Base Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Salter, Latasha M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for four different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest single excited state potential energy surface are studied. The energetic order of the tautomers on the ground state potential surface is 9H less than 7H less than 3H less than 1H, while on the excited state surface this order is found to be different: 3H less than 1H less than 9H less than 7H. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (9 yields 3 tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic state. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic state, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. The barrier for this reaction in the excited state may become very low in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules, and therefore such tautomerization reaction may play an important role in the solution phase photochemistry of adenine.

  5. Nitroxyl Radical plus Hydroxylamine Pseudo Self-Exchange Reactions: Tunneling in Hydrogen Atom Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Adam; Mader, Elizabeth A.; Datta, Ayan; Hrovat, David A.; Borden, Weston Thatcher; Mayer, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Bimolecular rate constants have been measured for reactions that involve hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from hydroxylamines to nitroxyl radicals, using the stable radicals TEMPO• (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical), 4-oxo-TEMPO• (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxo-piperidine-1-oxyl radical), di-tert-butylnitroxyl (tBu2NO•), and the hydroxylamines TEMPO-H, 4-oxo-TEMPO-H, 4-MeO-TEMPO-H (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-N-hydroxy-4-methoxy-piperidine), and tBu2NOH. The reactions have been monitored by UV-vis stopped-flow methods, using the different optical spectra of nitroxyl radicals. The HAT reactions all have |ΔGo| ≤ 1.4 kcal mol−1 and therefore are close to self-exchange reactions. The reaction of 4-oxo-TEMPO• + TEMPO-H → 4-oxo-TEMPO-H + TEMPO• occurs with k2H,MeCN = 10 ± 1 M−1 s−1 in MeCN at 298 K (K2H,MeCN = 4.5 ± 1.8). Surprisingly, the rate constant for the analogous deuterium atom transfer reaction is much slower: k2D,MeCN = 0.44 ± 0.05 M−1 s−1 with k2H,MeCN/k2D,MeCN = 23 ± 3 at 298 K. The same large kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is found in CH2Cl2, 23 ± 4, suggesting that the large KIE is not caused by solvent dynamics or hydrogen bonding to solvent. The related reaction of 4-oxo-TEMPO• with 4-MeO-TEMPO-H(D) also has a large KIE, k3H/k3D = 21 ± 3 in MeCN. For these three reactions, the EaD – EaH values, between 0.3 ± 0.6 and 1.3 ± 0.6 kcal mol−1, and the log(AH/AD) values, between 0.5 ± 0.7 and 1.1 ± 0.6, indicate that hydrogen tunneling plays an important role. The related reaction of tBu2NO• + TEMPO-H(D) in MeCN has a large KIE, 16 ± 3 in MeCN, and very unusual isotopic activation parameters, EaD – EaH = −2.6 ± 0.4 and log(AH/AD) = 3.1 ± 0.6. Computational studies, using POLYRATE, also indicate substantial tunneling in the (CH3)2NO• + (CH3)2NOH model reaction for the experimental self-exchange processes. Additional calculations on TEMPO(•/H), tBu2NO(•/H), and Ph2NO(•/H) self-exchange reactions reveal why the

  6. Manganese-Oxygen Intermediates in O-O Bond Activation and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Rice, Derek B; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A

    2017-11-21

    Biological systems capitalize on the redox versatility of manganese to perform reactions involving dioxygen and its derivatives superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and water. The reactions of manganese enzymes influence both human health and the global energy cycle. Important examples include the detoxification of reactive oxygen species by manganese superoxide dismutase, biosynthesis by manganese ribonucleotide reductase and manganese lipoxygenase, and water splitting by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. Although these enzymes perform very different reactions and employ structurally distinct active sites, manganese intermediates with peroxo, hydroxo, and oxo ligation are commonly proposed in catalytic mechanisms. These intermediates are also postulated in mechanisms of synthetic manganese oxidation catalysts, which are of interest due to the earth abundance of manganese. In this Account, we describe our recent efforts toward understanding O-O bond activation pathways of Mn III -peroxo adducts and hydrogen-atom transfer reactivity of Mn IV -oxo and Mn III -hydroxo complexes. In biological and synthetic catalysts, peroxomanganese intermediates are commonly proposed to decay by either Mn-O or O-O cleavage pathways, although it is often unclear how the local coordination environment influences the decay mechanism. To address this matter, we generated a variety of Mn III -peroxo adducts with varied ligand environments. Using parallel-mode EPR and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption techniques, the decay pathway of one Mn III -peroxo complex bearing a bulky macrocylic ligand was investigated. Unlike many Mn III -peroxo model complexes that decay to oxo-bridged-Mn III Mn IV dimers, decay of this Mn III -peroxo adduct yielded mononuclear Mn III -hydroxo and Mn IV -oxo products, potentially resulting from O-O bond activation of the Mn III -peroxo unit. These results highlight the role of ligand sterics in promoting the formation of mononuclear products and mark an important

  7. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D; Tulk, Christopher A; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Ivanov, Ilia N; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-09-19

    Acetonitrile (CH3 CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. It is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp(2) and sp(3) bonded carbon. Finally, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH 3 to CN under Extreme Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D.; ...

    2016-08-25

    Acetonitrile (CH 3CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. In this study, it is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH 3 to CN along the CH···N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed spmore » 2 and sp 3 bonded carbon. Lastly, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst.« less

  9. Hydrogen atom transfer reactions in thiophenol: photogeneration of two new thione isomers.

    PubMed

    Reva, Igor; Nowak, Maciej J; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui

    2015-02-21

    Photoisomerization reactions of monomeric thiophenol have been investigated for the compound isolated in low-temperature argon matrices. The initial thiophenol population consists exclusively of the thermodynamically most stable thiol form. Phototransformations were induced by irradiation of the matrices with narrowband tunable UV light. Irradiation at λ > 290 nm did not induce any changes in isolated thiophenol molecules. Upon irradiation at 290-285 nm, the initial thiol form of thiophenol converted into its thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione. This conversion occurs by transfer of an H atom from the SH group to a carbon atom at the ortho position of the ring. Subsequent irradiation at longer wavelengths (300-427 nm) demonstrated that this UV-induced hydrogen-atom transfer is photoreversible. Moreover, upon irradiation at 400-425 nm, the cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione product converts, by transfer of a hydrogen atom from the ortho to para position, into another thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,5-diene-1-thione. The latter thione isomer is also photoreactive and is consumed if irradiated at λ < 332 nm. The obtained results clearly show that H-atom-transfer isomerization reactions dominate the unimolecular photochemistry of thiophenol confined in a solid argon matrix. A set of low-intensity infrared bands, observed in the spectra of UV irradiated thiophenol, indicates the presence of a phenylthiyl radical with an H- atom detached from the SH group. Alongside the H-atom-transfer and H-atom-detachment processes, the ring-opening photoreaction occurred in cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione by the cleavage of the C-C bond at the alpha position with respect to the thiocarbonyl C[double bond, length as m-dash]S group. The resulting open-ring conjugated thioketene adopts several isomeric forms, differing by orientations around single and double bonds. The species photogenerated upon UV irradiation of thiophenol were identified by comparison of their experimental infrared

  10. Imino Transfer Hydrogenation Reductions.

    PubMed

    Wills, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This review contains a summary of recent developments in the transfer hydrogenation of C=N bonds, with a particularly focus on reports from within the last 10 years and asymmetric transformations. However, earlier work in the area is also discussed in order to provide context for the more recent results described. I focus strongly on the Ru/TsDPEN class of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reactions originally reported by Noyori et al., together with examples of their applications, particularly to medically valuable target molecules. The recent developments in the area of highly active imine-reduction catalysts, notably those based on iridium, are also described in some detail. I discuss diastereoselective reduction methods as a route to the synthesis of chiral amines using transfer hydrogenation. The recent development of a methodology for positioning reduction complexes within chiral proteins, permitting the generation of asymmetric reduction products through a directed modification of the protein environment in a controlled manner, is also discussed.

  11. Trends in Ground-State Entropies for Transition Metal Based Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Elizabeth A.; Manner, Virginia W.; Markle, Todd F.; Wu, Adam; Franz, James A.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Reported herein are thermochemical studies of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions involving transition metal H-atom donors MIILH and oxyl radicals. [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, [FeII(H2bim)3]2+, [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ and RuII(acac)2(py-imH) [H2bip = 2,2’-bi-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine, H2bim = 2,2’-bi-imidazoline, acac = 2,4-pentandionato, py-imH = 2-(2’-pyridyl)-imidazole)] each react with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl) or tBu3PhO• (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) to give the deprotonated, oxidized metal complex MIIIL, and TEMPOH or tBu3PhOH. Solution equilibrium measurements for the reaction of [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ with TEMPO show a large, negative ground-state entropy for hydrogen atom transfer, −41 ± 2 cal mol−1 K−1. This is even more negative than the ΔSoHAT = −30 ± 2 cal mol−1 K−1 for the two iron complexes and the ΔSoHAT for RuII(acac)2(py-imH) + TEMPO, 4.9 ± 1.1 cal mol−1 K−1, as reported earlier. Calorimetric measurements quantitatively confirm the enthalpy of reaction for [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ + TEMPO, thus also confirming ΔSoHAT. Calorimetry on TEMPOH + tBu3PhO• gives ΔHoHAT = −11.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol−1 which matches the enthalpy predicted from the difference in literature solution BDEs. A brief evaluation of the literature thermochemistry of TEMPOH and tBu3PhOH supports the common assumption that ΔSoHAT ≈ 0 for HAT reactions of organic and small gas-phase molecules. However, this assumption does not hold for transition metal based HAT reactions. The trend in magnitude of |ΔSoHAT| for reactions with TEMPO, RuII(acac)2(py-imH) << [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ = [FeII(H2bim)3]2+ < [CoII(H2bim)3]2+, is surprisingly well predicted by the trends for electron transfer half-reaction entropies, ΔSoET, in aprotic solvents. This is because both ΔSoET and ΔSoHAT have substantial contributions from vibrational entropy, which varies significantly with the metal center involved. The close connection between ΔSoHAT and ΔSoET provides an important

  12. Dehydrogenation, disproportionation and transfer hydrogenation reactions of formic acid catalyzed by molybdenum hydride compounds.

    PubMed

    Neary, Michelle C; Parkin, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    The cyclopentadienyl molybdenum hydride compounds, Cp R Mo(PMe 3 ) 3- x (CO) x H (Cp R = Cp, Cp*; x = 0, 1, 2 or 3), are catalysts for the dehydrogenation of formic acid, with the most active catalysts having the composition Cp R Mo(PMe 3 ) 2 (CO)H. The mechanism of the catalytic cycle is proposed to involve (i) protonation of the molybdenum hydride complex, (ii) elimination of H 2 and coordination of formate, and (iii) decarboxylation of the formate ligand to regenerate the hydride species. NMR spectroscopy indicates that the nature of the resting state depends on the composition of the catalyst. For example, (i) the resting states for the CpMo(CO) 3 H and CpMo(PMe 3 )(CO) 2 H systems are the hydride complexes themselves, (ii) the resting state for the CpMo(PMe 3 ) 3 H system is the protonated species [CpMo(PMe 3 ) 3 H 2 ] + , and (iii) the resting state for the CpMo(PMe 3 ) 2 (CO)H system is the formate complex, CpMo(PMe 3 ) 2 (CO)(κ 1 -O 2 CH), in the presence of a high concentration of formic acid, but CpMo(PMe 3 ) 2 (CO)H when the concentration of acid is low. While CO 2 and H 2 are the principal products of the catalytic reaction induced by Cp R Mo(PMe 3 ) 3- x (CO) x H, methanol and methyl formate are also observed. The generation of methanol is a consequence of disproportionation of formic acid, while methyl formate is a product of subsequent esterification. The disproportionation of formic acid is a manifestation of a transfer hydrogenation reaction, which may also be applied to the reduction of aldehydes and ketones. Thus, CpMo(CO) 3 H also catalyzes the reduction of a variety of ketones and aldehydes to alcohols by formic acid, via a mechanism that involves ionic hydrogenation.

  13. Kinetics of self-decomposition and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of substituted phthalimide N-oxyl radicals in acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yang; Koshino, Nobuyoshi; Saha, Basudeb; Espenson, James H

    2005-01-07

    Kinetic data have been obtained for three distinct types of reactions of phthalimide N-oxyl radicals (PINO(.)) and N-hydroxyphthalimide (NHPI) derivatives. The first is the self-decomposition of PINO(.) which was found to follow second-order kinetics. In the self-decomposition of 4-methyl-N-hydroxyphthalimide (4-Me-NHPI), H-atom abstraction competes with self-decomposition in the presence of excess 4-Me-NHPI. The second set of reactions studied is hydrogen atom transfer from NHPI to PINO(.), e.g., PINO(.) + 4-Me-NHPI <=> NHPI + 4-Me-PINO(.). The substantial KIE, k(H)/k(D) = 11 for both forward and reverse reactions, supports the assignment of H-atom transfer rather than stepwise electron-proton transfer. These data were correlated with the Marcus cross relation for hydrogen-atom transfer, and good agreement between the experimental and the calculated rate constants was obtained. The third reaction studied is hydrogen abstraction by PINO(.) from p-xylene and toluene. The reaction becomes regularly slower as the ring substituent on PINO(.) is more electron donating. Analysis by the Hammett equation gave rho = 1.1 and 1.8 for the reactions of PINO(.) with p-xylene and toluene, respectively.

  14. Efficient and Adaptive Methods for Computing Accurate Potential Surfaces for Quantum Nuclear Effects: Applications to Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    DeGregorio, Nicole; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2018-01-09

    We present two sampling measures to gauge critical regions of potential energy surfaces. These sampling measures employ (a) the instantaneous quantum wavepacket density, an approximation to the (b) potential surface, its (c) gradients, and (d) a Shannon information theory based expression that estimates the local entropy associated with the quantum wavepacket. These four criteria together enable a directed sampling of potential surfaces that appears to correctly describe the local oscillation frequencies, or the local Nyquist frequency, of a potential surface. The sampling functions are then utilized to derive a tessellation scheme that discretizes the multidimensional space to enable efficient sampling of potential surfaces. The sampled potential surface is then combined with four different interpolation procedures, namely, (a) local Hermite curve interpolation, (b) low-pass filtered Lagrange interpolation, (c) the monomial symmetrization approximation (MSA) developed by Bowman and co-workers, and (d) a modified Shepard algorithm. The sampling procedure and the fitting schemes are used to compute (a) potential surfaces in highly anharmonic hydrogen-bonded systems and (b) study hydrogen-transfer reactions in biogenic volatile organic compounds (isoprene) where the transferring hydrogen atom is found to demonstrate critical quantum nuclear effects. In the case of isoprene, the algorithm discussed here is used to derive multidimensional potential surfaces along a hydrogen-transfer reaction path to gauge the effect of quantum-nuclear degrees of freedom on the hydrogen-transfer process. Based on the decreased computational effort, facilitated by the optimal sampling of the potential surfaces through the use of sampling functions discussed here, and the accuracy of the associated potential surfaces, we believe the method will find great utility in the study of quantum nuclear dynamics problems, of which application to hydrogen-transfer reactions and hydrogen

  15. Hydrogen-transfer and charge-transfer in photochemical and radiation induced reactions. Progress report, November 1, 1975--October 31, 1976

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.G.

    The relative importance of light absorption, quenching of triplet, and hydrogen transfer repair has been examined in retardation by mercaptans of photoreduction of aromatic ketones by alcohols. In the reduction of benzophenone by 2-propanol, retardation is efficient and, after correction for the first two effects, is due entirely to hydrogen-transfer repair, as indicated by deuterium labeling. In reduction of acetophenone by ..cap alpha..-methylbenzyl alcohol, repair by hydrogen transfer is also operative. In reduction of benzophenone by benzhydrol, retardation is less efficient and is due to quenching, as the ketyl radical does not abstract hydrogen from mercaptan rapidly in competition withmore » coupling. Deuterium isotope effects are discussed in terms of competitive reactions. Photoreduction of benzophenone by 2-butylamine and by triethylamine is retarded by aromatic mercaptans and disulfides. Of the retardation not due to light absorption and triplet quenching by the sulfur compounds, half is due to hydrogen-transfer repair, as indicated by racemization and deuterium labeling. The remainder is attributed to quenching by the sulfur compound of the charge-transfer-complex intermediate. Photoreduction by primary and secondary amines, but not by tertiary amines, is accelerated by aliphatic mercaptans. The acceleration is attributed to catalysis of hydrogen transfer by the mercaptan in the charge-transfer complex. The effect is large in hydrocarbon solvent, less in polar organic solvents and absent in water.« less

  16. Density functional tight-binding and infrequent metadynamics can capture entropic effects in intramolecular hydrogen transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Luiz F. L.; Fu, Christopher D.; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2018-04-01

    Infrequent metadynamics uses biased simulations to estimate the unbiased kinetics of a system, facilitating the calculation of rates and barriers. Here the method is applied to study intramolecular hydrogen transfer reactions involving peroxy radicals, a class of reactions that is challenging to model due to the entropic contributions of the formation of ring structures in the transition state. Using the self-consistent charge density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB) method, we applied infrequent metadynamics to the study of four intramolecular H-transfer reactions, demonstrating that the method can qualitatively reproduce these high entropic contributions, as observed in experiments and those predicted by transition state theory modeled by higher levels of theory. We also show that infrequent metadynamics and DFTB are successful in describing the relationship between transition state ring size and kinetic coefficients (e.g., activation energies and the pre-exponential factors).

  17. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  18. Salt-assisted clean transfer of continuous monolayer MoS2 film for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Heung-Yeol; Nguyen, Tri Khoa; Ullah, Farman; Yun, Jong-Won; Nguyen, Cao Khang; Kim, Yong Soo

    2018-03-01

    The transfer of two-dimensional (2D) materials from one substrate to another is challenging but of great importance for technological applications. Here, we propose a facile etching and residue-free method for transferring a large-area monolayer MoS2 film continuously grown on a SiO2/Si by chemical vapor deposition. Prior to synthesis, the substrate is dropped with water- soluble perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic acid tetrapotassium salt (PTAS). The as-grown MoS2 on the substrate is simply dipped in water to quickly dissolve PTAS to yield the MoS2 film floating on the water surface, which is subsequently transferred to the desired substrate. The morphological, optical and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic results show that our method is useful for fast and clean transfer of the MoS2 film. Specially, we demonstrate that monolayer MoS2 film transferred onto a conducting substrate leads to excellent performance for hydrogen evolution reaction with low overpotential (0.29 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode) and Tafel slope (85.5 mV/decade).

  19. Catalytic biorefining of plant biomass to non-pyrolytic lignin bio-oil and carbohydrates through hydrogen transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Ferrini, Paola; Rinaldi, Roberto

    2014-08-11

    Through catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions, a new biorefining method results in the isolation of depolymerized lignin--a non-pyrolytic lignin bio-oil--in addition to pulps that are amenable to enzymatic hydrolysis. Compared with organosolv lignin, the lignin bio-oil is highly susceptible to further hydrodeoxygenation under low-severity conditions and therefore establishes a unique platform for lignin valorization by heterogeneous catalysis. Overall, the potential of a catalytic biorefining method designed from the perspective of lignin utilization is reported. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Anharmonicity in a double hydrogen transfer reaction studied in a single porphycene molecule on a Cu(110) surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Baugh, D; Motobayashi, K; Zhao, X; Levchenko, S V; Gawinkowski, S; Waluk, J; Grill, L; Persson, M; Kumagai, T

    2018-05-07

    Anharmonicity plays a crucial role in hydrogen transfer reactions in hydrogen-bonding systems, which leads to a peculiar spectral line shape of the hydrogen stretching mode as well as highly complex intra/intermolecular vibrational energy relaxation. Single-molecule study with a well-defined model is necessary to elucidate a fundamental mechanism. Recent low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) experiments revealed that the cis↔cis tautomerization in a single porphycene molecule on Cu(110) at 5 K can be induced by vibrational excitation via an inelastic electron tunnelling process and the N-H(D) stretching mode couples with the tautomerization coordinate [Kumagai et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2013, 111, 246101]. Here we discuss a pronounced anharmonicity of the N-H stretching mode observed in the STM action spectra and the conductance spectra. Density functional theory calculations find a strong intermode coupling of the N-H stretching with an in-plane bending mode within porphycene on Cu(110).

  1. Role of pendant proton relays and proton-coupled electron transfer on the hydrogen evolution reaction by nickel hangman porphyrins

    DOE PAGES

    Bediako, D. Kwabena; Solis, Brian H.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; ...

    2014-10-08

    Here, the hangman motif provides mechanistic insights into the role of pendant proton relays in governing proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) involved in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We now show improved HER activity of Ni compared with Co hangman porphyrins. Cyclic voltammogram data and simulations, together with computational studies using density functional theory, implicate a shift in electrokinetic zone between Co and Ni hangman porphyrins due to a change in the PCET mechanism. Unlike the Co hangman porphyrin, the Ni hangman porphyrin does not require reduction to the formally metal(0) species before protonation by weak acids in acetonitrile. We concludemore » that protonation likely occurs at the Ni(I) state followed by reduction, in a stepwise proton transfer–electron transfer pathway. Spectroelectrochemical and computational studies reveal that upon reduction of the Ni(II) compound, the first electron is transferred to a metal-based orbital, whereas the second electron is transferred to a molecular orbital on the porphyrin ring.« less

  2. Role of pendant proton relays and proton-coupled electron transfer on the hydrogen evolution reaction by nickel hangman porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Bediako, D. Kwabena; Solis, Brian H.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Roubelakis, Manolis M.; Maher, Andrew G.; Lee, Chang Hoon; Chambers, Matthew B.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    The hangman motif provides mechanistic insights into the role of pendant proton relays in governing proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) involved in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We now show improved HER activity of Ni compared with Co hangman porphyrins. Cyclic voltammogram data and simulations, together with computational studies using density functional theory, implicate a shift in electrokinetic zone between Co and Ni hangman porphyrins due to a change in the PCET mechanism. Unlike the Co hangman porphyrin, the Ni hangman porphyrin does not require reduction to the formally metal(0) species before protonation by weak acids in acetonitrile. We conclude that protonation likely occurs at the Ni(I) state followed by reduction, in a stepwise proton transfer–electron transfer pathway. Spectroelectrochemical and computational studies reveal that upon reduction of the Ni(II) compound, the first electron is transferred to a metal-based orbital, whereas the second electron is transferred to a molecular orbital on the porphyrin ring. PMID:25298534

  3. Hybrid Quantum/Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Proton Transfer Reactions Catalyzed by Ketosteroid Isomerase: Analysis of Hydrogen Bonding, Conformational Motions, and Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the two proton transfer reactions catalyzed by ketosteroid isomerase are presented. The potential energy surfaces for the proton transfer reactions are described with the empirical valence bond method. Nuclear quantum effects of the transferring hydrogen increase the rates by a factor of ~8, and dynamical barrier recrossings decrease the rates by a factor of 3–4. For both proton transfer reactions, the donor-acceptor distance decreases substantially at the transition state. The carboxylate group of the Asp38 side chain, which serves as the proton acceptor and donor in the first and second steps, respectively, rotates significantly between the two proton transfer reactions. The hydrogen bonding interactions within the active site are consistent with the hydrogen bonding of both Asp99 and Tyr14 to the substrate. The simulations suggest that a hydrogen bond between Asp99 and the substrate is present from the beginning of the first proton transfer step, whereas the hydrogen bond between Tyr14 and the substrate is virtually absent in the first part of this step but forms nearly concurrently with the formation of the transition state. Both hydrogen bonds are present throughout the second proton transfer step until partial dissociation of the product. The hydrogen bond between Tyr14 and Tyr55 is present throughout both proton transfer steps. The active site residues are more mobile during the first step than during the second step. The van der Waals interaction energy between the substrate and the enzyme remains virtually constant along the reaction pathway, but the electrostatic interaction energy is significantly stronger for the dienolate intermediate than for the reactant and product. Mobile loop regions distal to the active site exhibit significant structural rearrangements and, in some cases, qualitative changes in the electrostatic potential during the catalytic reaction. These results suggest that

  4. Intramolecular Hydrogen Transfer Reactions Catalyzed by Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl Rhodium and Cobalt Olefin Complexes: Mechanistic Studies.

    PubMed

    Bolig, Andrew D; Lyons, Thomas W; DiSalvo, Darren T; Brookhart, Maurice

    2016-01-08

    The mechanism of intramolecular transfer dehydrogenation catalyzed by [Cp * M(VTMS) 2 ] ( 1 , M=Rh, 2 , M=Co, Cp* = C 5 Me 5 , VTMS = vinyltrimethylsilane) complexes has been studied using vinyl silane protected alcohols as substrates. Deuterium-labeled substrates have been synthesized and the regioselectivity of H/D transfers investigated using 1 H and 2 H NMR spectroscopy. The labeling studies establish a regioselective pathway consisting of alkene directed α C-H activation, 2,1 alkene insertion, and finally β-hydride elimination to give silyl enol ether products.

  5. Use of 5-deazaFAD to study hydrogen transfer in the D-amino acid oxidase reaction.

    PubMed

    Hersh, L B; Jorns, M S

    1975-11-25

    The apoprotein of hog kidney D-amino acid oxidase was reconstituted with 5-deazaflavin adenine dinucleotide (5-deazaFAD) to yield a protein which contains 1.5 mol of 5-deazaFAD/mol of enzyme. The deazaFAD-containing enzyme forms complexes with benzoate, 2-amino benzoate, and 4-aminobenzoate which are both qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those observed with native enzyme. The complex with 2-aminobenzoate exhibits a new long wavelength absorption band characteristic of a flavin charge-transfer complex. The reconstituted enzyme exhibits no activity when assayed by D-alanine oxidation. However, the bound chromophore can be reduced by alanine, phenylalanine, proline, methionine, and valine, but not by glutamate or aspartate, indicating the deazaFAD enzyme retains the substrate specificity of the native enzyme. Reduction of the enzyme by D-alanine exhibits a 1.6-fold deuterium isotope effect. Reoxidation of the reduced enzyme occurred in the presence of pyruvate plus ammonia, but not with pyruvate alone or ammonia alone. beta-Phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketobutyrate, but not alpha-ketoglutarate could replace pyruvate. Reduced enzyme isolated following reaction with [alpha-3H]alanine was found to contain 0.5 mol of tritium/mol of deazaFADH2. After denaturation of the tritium-labeled enzyme, the radioactivity was identified as deazaFADH2. Reaction of the reduced tritium-labeled enzyme with pyruvate plus ammonia prior to denaturation yields [alpha-3H]alanine and unlabeled deazaFAD. These results suggest that reduction and reoxidation of enzyme-bound deazaFAD involves the stereo-specific transfer of alpha-hydrogen from substrate to deazaFAD.

  6. Single step synthesis of gold-amino acid composite, with the evidence of the catalytic hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reaction, for the electrochemical recognition of Serotonin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Meenakshi; Siwal, Samarjeet; Nandi, Debkumar; Mallick, Kaushik

    2016-03-01

    A composite architecture of amino acid and gold nanoparticles has been synthesized using a generic route of 'in-situ polymerization and composite formation (IPCF)' [1,2]. The formation mechanism of the composite has been supported by a model hydrogen atom (H•≡H++e-) transfer (HAT) type of reaction which belongs to the proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism. The 'gold-amino acid composite' was used as a catalyst for the electrochemical recognition of Serotonin.

  7. Isotope Effects as Probes for Enzyme Catalyzed Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Daniel; Islam, Zahidul; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic Isotope effects (KIEs) have long served as a probe for the mechanisms of both enzymatic and solution reactions. Here, we discuss various models for the physical sources of KIEs, how experimentalists can use those models to interpret their data, and how the focus of traditional models has grown to a model that includes motion of the enzyme and quantum mechanical nuclear tunneling. We then present two case studies of enzymes, thymidylate synthase and alcohol dehydrogenase, and discuss how KIEs have shed light on the C-H bond cleavages those enzymes catalyze. We will show how the combination of both experimental and computational studieshas changed our notion of how these enzymes exert their catalytic powers. PMID:23673528

  8. Site-selective oxidation, amination and epimerization reactions of complex polyols enabled by transfer hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Christopher K.; Hartwig, John F.

    2017-12-01

    Polyoxygenated hydrocarbons that bear one or more hydroxyl groups comprise a large set of natural and synthetic compounds, often with potent biological activity. In synthetic chemistry, alcohols are important precursors to carbonyl groups, which then can be converted into a wide range of oxygen- or nitrogen-based functionality. Therefore, the selective conversion of a single hydroxyl group in natural products into a ketone would enable the selective introduction of unnatural functionality. However, the methods known to convert a simple alcohol, or even an alcohol in a molecule that contains multiple protected functional groups, are not suitable for selective reactions of complex polyol structures. We present a new ruthenium catalyst with a unique efficacy for the selective oxidation of a single hydroxyl group among many in unprotected polyol natural products. This oxidation enables the introduction of nitrogen-based functional groups into such structures that lack nitrogen atoms and enables a selective alcohol epimerization by stepwise or reversible oxidation and reduction.

  9. Role of bonding mechanisms during transfer hydrogenation reaction on heterogeneous catalysts of platinum nanoparticles supported on zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Alawi, Reem A.; Laxman, Karthik; Dastgir, Sarim; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-07-01

    For supported heterogeneous catalysis, the interface between a metal nanoparticle and the support plays an important role. In this work the dependency of the catalytic efficiency on the bonding chemistry of platinum nanoparticles supported on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods is studied. Platinum nanoparticles were deposited on ZnO nanorods (ZnO NR) using thermal and photochemical processes and the effects on the size, distribution, density and chemical state of the metal nanoparticles upon the catalytic activities are presented. The obtained results indicate that the bonding at Pt-ZnO interface depends on the deposition scheme which can be utilized to modulate the surface chemistry and thus the activity of the supported catalysts. Additionally, uniform distribution of metal on the catalyst support was observed to be more important than the loading density. It is also found that oxidized platinum Pt(IV) (platinum hydroxide) provided a more suitable surface for enhancing the transfer hydrogenation reaction of cyclohexanone with isopropanol compared to zero valent platinum. Photochemically synthesized ZnO supported nanocatalysts were efficient and potentially viable for upscaling to industrial applications.

  10. Reversible Hydrogen Transfer Reactions in Thiyl Radicals From Cysteine and Related Molecules: Absolute Kinetics and Equilibrium Constants Determined by Pulse Radiolysis

    PubMed Central

    Koppenol, Willem H.

    2013-01-01

    The mercapto group of cysteine (Cys) is a predominant target for oxidative modification, where one-electron oxidation leads to the formation of Cys thiyl radicals, CysS•. These Cys thiyl radicals enter 1,2- and 1,3-hydrogen transfer reactions, for which rate constants are reported in this paper. The products of these 1,2- and 1,3-hydrogen transfer reactions are carbon-centered radicals at position C3 (α-mercaptoalkyl radicals) and C2 (•Cα radicals) of Cys, respectively. Both processes can be monitored separately in Cys analogues such as cysteamine (CyaSH) and penicillamine (PenSH). At acidic pH, thiyl radicals from CyaSH permit only the 1,2-hydrogen transfer according to equilibrium 12, +H3NCH2CH2S• ⇌ +H3NCH2 •CH–SH, where rate constants for forward and reverse reaction are k12 ≈ 105 s−1 and k−12 ≈ 1.5 × 105s−1, respectively. In contrast, only the 1,3-hydrogen transfer is possible for thiyl radicals from PenSH according to equilibrium 14, (+H3N/CO2H)Cα–C(CH3)2–S• ⇌ (+H3N/CO2H)•Cα–C(CH3)2–SH, where rate constants for the forward and the reverse reaction are k14 = 8 × 104 s−1 and k−14 = 1.4 × 106 s−1. The •Cα radicals from PenSH and Cys have the additional opportunity for β-elimination of HS•/S•−, which proceeds with k39 ≈ (3 ± 1) × 104 s−1 from •Cα radicals from PenSH and k−34 ≈ 5 × 103 s−1 from •Cα radicals from Cys. The rate constants quantified for the 1,2- and 1,3-hydrogen transfer reactions can be used as a basis to calculate similar processes for Cys thiyl radicals in proteins, where hydrogen transfer reactions, followed by the addition of oxygen, may lead to the irreversible modification of target proteins. PMID:22483034

  11. Reactions of the phthalimide N-oxyl radical (PINO) with activated phenols: the contribution of π-stacking interactions to hydrogen atom transfer rates.

    PubMed

    D'Alfonso, Claudio; Bietti, Massimo; DiLabio, Gino A; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Salamone, Michela

    2013-02-01

    The kinetics of reactions of the phthalimide N-oxyl radical (PINO) with a series of activated phenols (2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman-6-ol (PMC), 2,6-dimethyl- and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-substituted phenols) were investigated by laser flash photolysis in CH(3)CN and PhCl in order to establish if the reactions with PINO can provide a useful tool for evaluating the radical scavenging ability of phenolic antioxidants. On the basis of the small values of deuterium kinetic isotope effects, the relatively high and negative ρ values in the Hammett correlations and the results of theoretical calculations, we suggest that these reactions proceed by a hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanism having a significant degree of charge transfer resulting from a π-stacked conformation between PINO and the aromatic ring of the phenols. Kinetic solvent effects were analyzed in detail for the hydrogen transfer from 2,4,6-trimethylphenol to PINO and the data obtained are in accordance with the Snelgrove-Ingold equation for HAT. Experimental rate constants for the reactions of PINO with activated phenols are in accordance with those predicted by applying the Marcus cross relation.

  12. Reversible hydrogen transfer reactions of cysteine thiyl radicals in peptides: the conversion of cysteine into dehydroalanine and alanine, and of alanine into dehydroalanine

    PubMed Central

    Mozziconacci, Olivier; Kerwin, Bruce A.; Schöneich, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The photodissociation of disulfide bonds in model peptides containing Ala and Ala-d3 generates a series of photoproducts following the generation of a CysS• thiyl radical pair. These photoproducts include transformations of Cys to dehydroalanine (Dha) and Ala, as well as Ala to Dha. Intramolecular Michael addition of an intact Cys with a photolytically generated Dha results in the formation of cyclic thioethers. The conversion of Cys into Dha likely involves a 1,3-H-shift from the Cys αC-H bond to the thiyl radical, followed by elimination of HS•. The conversion of Dha into Ala most likely involves hydrated electrons, which are generated through the photolysis of Cys, the photoproduct of disulfide photolysis. Prior to stable product formation, CysS• radicals engage in reversible hydrogen transfer reactions with αC-H and βC-H bonds of the surrounding amino acids. Especially for the βC-H bonds of Ala such hydrogen transfer reactions are unexpected based on thermodynamic grounds; however, the replacement of deuterons in Ala-d3 by hydrogens in H2O provides strong experimental evidence for such reactions. PMID:21895001

  13. Group transfer and electron transfer reactions of organometallic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, Jim D.

    During 1994, despite the disruptions, the authors have made progress in several aspects of their research on electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes. This summary covers three areas that are relatively complete: (1) reactions between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl halides, (2) reactions of hydrido- and alkyl-containing anions (RFe(CO)4(-) and RW(CO)5(-) with metal carbonyl cations; and (3) reactions of a seventeen-electron complex (Cp* Cr(CO)3*) with metal carbonyl derivatives. Two areas of examination that have just begun (possible carbene transfer and the possible role of metal carbonyl anions in carbon-hydrogen bond activation) will also be described.

  14. Charge Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennerl, Konrad

    2010-12-01

    Charge transfer, or charge exchange, describes a process in which an ion takes one or more electrons from another atom. Investigations of this fundamental process have accompanied atomic physics from its very beginning, and have been extended to astrophysical scenarios already many decades ago. Yet one important aspect of this process, i.e. its high efficiency in generating X-rays, was only revealed in 1996, when comets were discovered as a new class of X-ray sources. This finding has opened up an entirely new field of X-ray studies, with great impact due to the richness of the underlying atomic physics, as the X-rays are not generated by hot electrons, but by ions picking up electrons from cold gas. While comets still represent the best astrophysical laboratory for investigating the physics of charge transfer, various studies have already spotted a variety of other astrophysical locations, within and beyond our solar system, where X-rays may be generated by this process. They range from planetary atmospheres, the heliosphere, the interstellar medium and stars to galaxies and clusters of galaxies, where charge transfer may even be observationally linked to dark matter. This review attempts to put the various aspects of the study of charge transfer reactions into a broader historical context, with special emphasis on X-ray astrophysics, where the discovery of cometary X-ray emission may have stimulated a novel look at our universe.

  15. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  16. Deformed transition-state theory: Deviation from Arrhenius behavior and application to bimolecular hydrogen transfer reaction rates in the tunneling regime.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Silva, Valter H; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Mundim, Kleber C

    2017-01-30

    A formulation is presented for the application of tools from quantum chemistry and transition-state theory to phenomenologically cover cases where reaction rates deviate from Arrhenius law at low temperatures. A parameter d is introduced to describe the deviation for the systems from reaching the thermodynamic limit and is identified as the linearizing coefficient in the dependence of the inverse activation energy with inverse temperature. Its physical meaning is given and when deviation can be ascribed to quantum mechanical tunneling its value is calculated explicitly. Here, a new derivation is given of the previously established relationship of the parameter d with features of the barrier in the potential energy surface. The proposed variant of transition state theory permits comparison with experiments and tests against alternative formulations. Prescriptions are provided and implemented to three hydrogen transfer reactions: CH 4  + OH → CH 3  + H 2 O, CH 3 Cl + OH → CH 2 Cl + H 2 O and H 2  + CN → H + HCN, widely investigated both experimentally and theoretically. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Tandem ring-closing metathesis/transfer hydrogenation: practical chemoselective hydrogenation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Timothy; Wang, Zhongyu; Walker, Michael A; McDonald, Ivar M; Peese, Kevin M

    2014-09-05

    An operationally simple chemoselective transfer hydrogenation of alkenes using ruthenium metathesis catalysts is presented. Of great practicality, the transfer hydrogenation reagents can be added directly to a metathesis reaction and effect hydrogenation of the product alkene in a single pot at ambient temperature without the need to seal the vessel to prevent hydrogen gas escape. The reduction is applicable to a range of alkenes and can be performed in the presence of aryl halides and benzyl groups, a notable weakness of Pd-catalyzed hydrogenations. Scope and mechanistic considerations are presented.

  18. High-performance liquid chromatographic method to evaluate the hydrogen atom transfer during reaction between 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Boudier, Ariane; Tournebize, Juliana; Bartosz, Grzegorz; El Hani, Safae; Bengueddour, Rachid; Sapin-Minet, Anne; Leroy, Pierre

    2012-01-20

    1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·) is a stable nitrogen centred radical widely used to evaluate direct radical scavenging properties of various synthetic or natural antioxidants (AOs). The bleaching rate of DPPH· absorbance at 515nm is usually monitored for this purpose. In order to avoid the interference of complex coloured natural products used as antioxidant supplements or cosmetics, HPLC systems have been reported as alternative techniques to spectrophotometry. They also rely upon measurement of DPPH· quenching rate and none of them permits to identify and measure 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine (DPPH-H), the reduced product of DPPH· resulting from hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which is the main mechanism of the reaction between DPPH· and AOs. We presently report an HPLC method devoted to the simultaneous measurement of DPPH· and DPPH-H. Both were fully separated on a C18 column eluted with acetonitrile-10 mM ammonium citrate buffer pH 6.8 (70:30, v/v) and detected at 330 nm. Adsorption process of DPPH· onto materials of the HPLC system was pointed out. Consequently, the linearity range observed for DPPH· was restricted, thus a much lower limit of detection was obtained for DPPH-H than for DPPH· using standards (0.02 and 14 μM, respectively). The method was applied to three commonly used AOs, i.e. Trolox(®), ascorbic acid and GSH, and compared with spectrophotometry. Further application to complex matrices (cell culture media, vegetal extracts) and nanomaterials demonstrated (i) its usefulness because of higher selectivity than colorimetry, and (ii) its help to investigate the mechanisms occurring with the free radical. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A classical but new kinetic equation for hydride transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Deng, Fei-Huang; Yang, Jin-Dong; Li, Xiu-Tao; Chen, Qiang; Lei, Nan-Ping; Meng, Fan-Kun; Zhao, Xiao-Peng; Han, Su-Hui; Hao, Er-Jun; Mu, Yuan-Yuan

    2013-09-28

    A classical but new kinetic equation to estimate activation energies of various hydride transfer reactions was developed according to transition state theory using the Morse-type free energy curves of hydride donors to release a hydride anion and hydride acceptors to capture a hydride anion and by which the activation energies of 187 typical hydride self-exchange reactions and more than thirty thousand hydride cross transfer reactions in acetonitrile were safely estimated in this work. Since the development of the kinetic equation is only on the basis of the related chemical bond changes of the hydride transfer reactants, the kinetic equation should be also suitable for proton transfer reactions, hydrogen atom transfer reactions and all the other chemical reactions involved with breaking and formation of chemical bonds. One of the most important contributions of this work is to have achieved the perfect unity of the kinetic equation and thermodynamic equation for hydride transfer reactions.

  20. Coupling Glucose Dehydrogenation with CO2 Hydrogenation by Hydrogen Transfer in Aqueous Media at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guodong; Su, Ji; Zhang, Cheng; Tang, Kan; Yang, Lisha; Lin, Hongfei

    2018-05-08

    Conversion of carbon dioxide into value-added chemicals and fuels provides a direct solution to reduce excessive CO2 in the atmosphere. Herein, a novel catalytic reaction system is presented by coupling the dehydrogenation of glucose with the hydrogenation of a CO2 derived salt, ammonium carbonate, in the ethanol-water mixture. For the first time, the hydrogenation of CO2 into formate by glucose has been achieved under ambient conditions. Under the optimal reaction conditions, the highest yield of formate reached ~ 46 %. We find that the apparent pH value in the ethanol-water mixture plays a central role in determining the performance of the hydrogen transfer reaction. Based on the 13C NMR and ESI-MS results, a possible pathway of the coupled glucose dehydrogenation and CO2 hydrogenation reactions was proposed. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Mechanism of Pd(NHC)-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Hauwert, Peter; Boerleider, Romilda; Warsink, Stefan; Weigand, Jan J; Elsevier, Cornelis J

    2010-12-01

    The transfer semihydrogenation of alkynes to (Z)-alkenes shows excellent chemo- and stereoselectivity when using a zerovalent palladium(NHC)(maleic anhydride)-complex as precatalyst and triethylammonium formate as hydrogen donor. Studies on the kinetics under reaction conditions showed a broken positive order in substrate and first order in catalyst and hydrogen donor. Deuterium-labeling studies on the hydrogen donor showed that both hydrogens of formic acid display a primary kinetic isotope effect, indicating that proton and hydride transfers are separate rate-determining steps. By monitoring the reaction with NMR, we observed the presence of a coordinated formate anion and found that part of the maleic anhydride remains coordinated during the reaction. From these observations, we propose a mechanism in which hydrogen transfer from coordinated formate anion to zerovalent palladium(NHC)(MA)(alkyne)-complex is followed by migratory insertion of hydride, after which the product alkene is liberated by proton transfer from the triethylammonium cation. The explanation for the high selectivity observed lies in the competition between strongly coordinating solvent and alkyne for a Pd(alkene)-intermediate.

  2. Ruthenium(II) carbonyl complexes bearing CCC-pincer bis-(carbene) ligands: synthesis, structures and activities toward recycle transfer hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Naziruddin, Abbas Raja; Huang, Zhao-Jiunn; Lai, Wei-Chih; Lin, Wan-Jung; Hwang, Wen-Shu

    2013-09-28

    A new series of ruthenium(II) carbonyl complexes with benzene-based CCC-pincer bis-(carbene) ligands, [((R)CCC(R))Ru(CO)2(X)](0/+) and [((R)CCC(R))Ru(CO)(NN)](+) ((R)CCC(R) = 2,6-bis-(1-alkylimidazolylidene)benzene, R = Me or (n)Bu; X = I, Br, CH3CN, or 6-(aminomethyl)pyridine (ampy); NN = 2·CH3CN, or chelating ampy or bipyridine), was synthesized and fully characterized. X-Ray structure determinations revealed that these eight complexes have pseudo-octahedral configurations around the ruthenium center with the pincer ligand occupying three meridional sites. These complexes prove to be efficient precatalysts demonstrating very good activity and reusability for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones.

  3. Reaction of atomic hydrogen with formic acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qian; Berski, Slawomir; Latajka, Zdzislaw; Räsänen, Markku; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2014-04-07

    We study the reaction of atomic hydrogen with formic acid and characterize the radical products using IR spectroscopy in a Kr matrix and quantum chemical calculations. The reaction first leads to the formation of an intermediate radical trans-H2COOH, which converts to the more stable radical trans-cis-HC(OH)2via hydrogen atom tunneling on a timescale of hours at 4.3 K. These open-shell species are observed for the first time as well as a reaction between atomic hydrogen and formic acid. The structural assignment is aided by extensive deuteration experiments and ab initio calculations at the UMP2 and UCCSD(T) levels of theory. The simplest geminal diol radical trans-cis-HC(OH)2 identified in the present work as the final product of the reaction should be very reactive, and further reaction channels are of particular interest. These reactions and species may constitute new channels for the initiation and propagation of more complex organic species in the interstellar clouds.

  4. Hydrogen/Chlorine exchange reactions of gaseous carbanions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Cooks, R Graham; Meurer, Eduardo C; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2005-12-01

    Gas-phase reactions of three typical carbanions CH(2)NO(2)(-), CH(2)CN(-), and CH(2)S(O)CH(3)(-) with the chloromethanes CH(2)Cl(2), CHCl(3), and CCl(4), examined by tandem mass spectrometry, show a novel hydrogen/chlorine exchange reaction. For example, reaction between the nitromethyl anion CH(2)NO(2)(-) and carbon tetrachloride CCl(4) forms the ion CHClNO(2)(-). The suggested reaction mechanism involves nucleophilic attack by CH(2)NO(2)(-) at the chlorine of CCl(4) followed by proton transfer within the resulting complex [CH(2)ClNO(2) + CCl(3)(-)] to form CHClNO(2)(-) and CHCl(3). Two other carbanions CH(2)CN(-) and CH(2)S(O)CH(3)(-) also undergo the novel hydrogen/chlorine exchange reactions with CCl(4) but to a much smaller extent, their higher nucleophilicities favoring competitive nucleophilic attack reactions. Proton abstraction is the exclusive pathway in the reactions of these carbanions with CHCl(3). While CH(2)CN(-) and CH(2)S(O)CH(3)(-) promote mainly proton abstraction and nucleophilic displacement in reactions with CH(2)Cl(2), CH(2)NO(2)(-) does not react.

  5. Nucleon transfer reactions with radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, K.

    2018-03-01

    Transfer reactions are a valuable tool to study the single-particle structure of nuclei. At radioactive beam facilities transfer reactions have to be performed in inverse kinematics. This creates a number of experimental challenges, but it also has some advantages over normal kinematics measurements. An overview of the experimental and theoretical methods for transfer reactions, especially with radioactive beams, is presented. Recent experimental results and highlights on shell evolution in exotic nuclei are discussed.

  6. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion.

  7. The unusually strong hydrogen bond between the carbonyl of Q(A) and His M219 in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center is not essential for efficient electron transfer from Q(A)(-) to Q(B).

    PubMed

    Breton, Jacques; Lavergne, Jérôme; Wakeham, Marion C; Nabedryk, Eliane; Jones, Michael R

    2007-06-05

    In native reaction centers (RCs) from photosynthetic purple bacteria the primary quinone (QA) and the secondary quinone (QB) are interconnected via a specific His-Fe-His bridge. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs the C4=O carbonyl of QA forms a very strong hydrogen bond with the protonated Npi of His M219, and the Ntau of this residue is in turn coordinated to the non-heme iron atom. The second carbonyl of QA is engaged in a much weaker hydrogen bond with the backbone N-H of Ala M260. In previous work, a Trp side chain was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at the M260 position in the RC of Rb. sphaeroides, resulting in a complex that is completely devoid of QA and therefore nonfunctional. A photochemically competent derivative of the AM260W mutant was isolated that contains a Cys side chain at the M260 position (denoted AM260(W-->C)). In the present work, the interactions between the carbonyl groups of QA and the protein in the AM260(W-->C) suppressor mutant have been characterized by light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy of the photoreduction of QA. The QA-/QA difference spectrum demonstrates that the strong interaction between the C4=O carbonyl of QA and His M219 is lost in the mutant, and the coupled CO and CC modes of the QA- semiquinone are also strongly perturbed. In parallel, a band assigned to the perturbation of the C5-Ntau mode of His M219 upon QA- formation in the native RC is lacking in the spectrum of the mutant. Furthermore, a positive band between 2900 and 2400 cm-1 that is related to protons fluctuating within a network of highly polarizable hydrogen bonds in the native RC is reduced in amplitude in the mutant. On the other hand, the QB-/QB FTIR difference spectrum is essentially the same as for the native RC. The kinetics of electron transfer from QA- to QB were measured by the flash-induced absorption changes at 780 nm. Compared to native RCs the absorption transients are slowed by a factor of about 2 for both the slow phase (in the

  8. Incomplete Combustion of Hydrogen: Trapping a Reaction Intermediate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce; Hoette, Trisha

    2007-01-01

    The combustion of hydrogen in air is quite complex with at least 28 mechanistic steps and twelve reaction species. Most of the species involved are radicals (having unpaired electrons) in nature. Among the various species generated, a few are stable, including hydrogen peroxide. In a normal hydrogen flame, the hydrogen peroxide goes on to further…

  9. Proton-coupled electron transfer versus hydrogen atom transfer: generation of charge-localized diabatic states.

    PubMed

    Sirjoosingh, Andrew; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-03-24

    The distinction between proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms is important for the characterization of many chemical and biological processes. PCET and HAT mechanisms can be differentiated in terms of electronically nonadiabatic and adiabatic proton transfer, respectively. In this paper, quantitative diagnostics to evaluate the degree of electron-proton nonadiabaticity are presented. Moreover, the connection between the degree of electron-proton nonadiabaticity and the physical characteristics distinguishing PCET from HAT, namely, the extent of electronic charge redistribution, is clarified. In addition, a rigorous diabatization scheme for transforming the adiabatic electronic states into charge-localized diabatic states for PCET reactions is presented. These diabatic states are constructed to ensure that the first-order nonadiabatic couplings with respect to the one-dimensional transferring hydrogen coordinate vanish exactly. Application of these approaches to the phenoxyl-phenol and benzyl-toluene systems characterizes the former as PCET and the latter as HAT. The diabatic states generated for the phenoxyl-phenol system possess physically meaningful, localized electronic charge distributions that are relatively invariant along the hydrogen coordinate. These diabatic electronic states can be combined with the associated proton vibrational states to generate the reactant and product electron-proton vibronic states that form the basis of nonadiabatic PCET theories. Furthermore, these vibronic states and the corresponding vibronic couplings may be used to calculate rate constants and kinetic isotope effects of PCET reactions.

  10. High-power CW laser using hydrogen-fluorine reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, P. I.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous-wave laser has been proposed based on reaction of hydrogen and fluorine. Hydrogen is produced by dissociation of hydrazine, which can be stored as liquid in light containers at room temperature.

  11. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of -20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of -0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production.

  12. Catalytic Silylation of N 2 and Synthesis of NH 3 and N 2H 4 by Net Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions Using a Chromium P 4 Macrocycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Alexander J.; Johnson, Samantha I.; Bullock, R. Morris

    We report the first discrete molecular Cr-based catalysts for the reduction of N2. This study is focused on the reactivity of the Cr-N2 complex, trans-[Cr(N2)2(PPh4NBn4)] P4Cr(N2)2, bearing a 16-membered tetraphosphine macrocycle. The architecture of the [16]-PPh4NBn4 ligand is critical to preserve the structural integrity of the catalyst. P4Cr(N2)2 was found to mediate the reduction of N2 by three complementary reaction pathways: (1) Cr-catalyzed reduction of N2 to N(SiMe3)3 by Na and Me3SiCl affording up to 34 equiv N(SiMe3)3; (2) stoichiometric reduction of N2 by protons and electrons. For example, the reaction of cobaltocene (CoCp2) and collidinium triflate (ColH[OTf]) at roommore » temperature to afforded 1.9 equiv of NH3, or at -78 °C to afforded a mixture of NH3 and N2H4; (3) the first example of NH3 formation from the reaction of a terminally bound N2 ligand with a traditional H atom source, TEMPOH, (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-ol). We found that trans-[Cr(15N2)2(PPh4NBn4)] reacts with excess TEMPOH to afford a 1.4 equiv of 15NH3.« less

  13. Catalytic Silylation of N2 and Synthesis of NH3 and N2H4 by Net Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions Using a Chromium P4 Macrocycle.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Alexander J; Johnson, Samantha I; Bullock, R Morris; Mock, Michael T

    2018-02-21

    We report the first discrete molecular Cr-based catalysts for the reduction of N 2 . This study is focused on the reactivity of the Cr-N 2 complex, trans-[Cr(N 2 ) 2 (P Ph 4 N Bn 4 )] (P 4 Cr(N 2 ) 2 ), bearing a 16-membered tetraphosphine macrocycle. The architecture of the [16]-P Ph 4 N Bn 4 ligand is critical to preserve the structural integrity of the catalyst. P 4 Cr(N 2 ) 2 was found to mediate the reduction of N 2 at room temperature and 1 atm pressure by three complementary reaction pathways: (1) Cr-catalyzed reduction of N 2 to N(SiMe 3 ) 3 by Na and Me 3 SiCl, affording up to 34 equiv N(SiMe 3 ) 3 ; (2) stoichiometric reduction of N 2 by protons and electrons (for example, the reaction of cobaltocene and collidinium triflate at room temperature afforded 1.9 equiv of NH 3 , or at -78 °C afforded a mixture of NH 3 and N 2 H 4 ); and (3) the first example of NH 3 formation from the reaction of a terminally bound N 2 ligand with a traditional H atom source, TEMPOH (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-ol). We found that trans-[Cr( 15 N 2 ) 2 (P Ph 4 N Bn 4 )] reacts with excess TEMPOH to afford 1.4 equiv of 15 NH 3 . Isotopic labeling studies using TEMPOD afforded ND 3 as the product of N 2 reduction, confirming that the H atoms are provided by TEMPOH.

  14. Thermally-generated reactive intermediates: Trapping of the parent ferrocene-based o-quinodimethane and reactions of diradicals generated by hydrogen-atom transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, John Michael

    1993-09-01

    Ferrocenocyclobutene is prepared by flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of the N-amino-2-phenylaziridine hydrazone of 2-methylferrocenealdehyde. In the second section of this dissertation, a series of hydrocarbon rearrangements were observed. FVP of o-allyltoluene at 0.1 Torr (700--900 C) gives 2-methylindan and indene, accompanied by o-propenyltoluene. FVP of 2-methyl-2`-vinylbiphenyl gives 9-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, which fits the proposed mechanism. However, FVP of 2-(o-methylbenzyl)styrene gives mainly anthracene and 1-methylanthracene. This cyclization reaction was also successful with o-allylphenol and o-(2-methylallyl)phenol.

  15. Reaction pathways of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded phenol-carboxylate complexes explored by combined UV-vis and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, Benjamin; Tolstoy, Peter M; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2011-05-25

    Combined low-temperature NMR/UV-vis spectroscopy (UVNMR), where optical and NMR spectra are measured in the NMR spectrometer under the same conditions, has been set up and applied to the study of H-bonded anions A··H··X(-) (AH = 1-(13)C-2-chloro-4-nitrophenol, X(-) = 15 carboxylic acid anions, 5 phenolates, Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), and BF(4)(-)). In this series, H is shifted from A to X, modeling the proton-transfer pathway. The (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and the H/D isotope effects on the latter provide information about averaged H-bond geometries. At the same time, red shifts of the π-π* UV-vis absorption bands are observed which correlate with the averaged H-bond geometries. However, on the UV-vis time scale, different tautomeric states and solvent configurations are in slow exchange. The combined data sets indicate that the proton transfer starts with a H-bond compression and a displacement of the proton toward the H-bond center, involving single-well configurations A-H···X(-). In the strong H-bond regime, coexisting tautomers A··H···X(-) and A(-)···H··X are observed by UV. Their geometries and statistical weights change continuously when the basicity of X(-) is increased. Finally, again a series of single-well structures of the type A(-)···H-X is observed. Interestingly, the UV-vis absorption bands are broadened inhomogeneously because of a distribution of H-bond geometries arising from different solvent configurations.

  16. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  17. What's new in the proton transfer reaction from pyranine to water? A femtosecond study of the proton transfer dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Prayer, C.; Gustavsson, T.; Tran-Thi, T.-H.

    1996-04-01

    The proton transfer from excited pyranine to water is studied by the femtosecond fluorescence upconversion technique. It is shown for the first time that the proton transfer reaction in water proceeds by three successive steps: the solvent cage relaxation, the specific solute-solvent hydrogen-bond formation and finally the ion pair dissociation/diffusion.

  18. CNN pincer ruthenium catalysts for hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation of ketones: experimental and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Walter; Baldino, Salvatore; Calhorda, Maria José; Costa, Paulo J; Esposito, Gennaro; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Magnolia, Santo; Mealli, Carlo; Messaoudi, Abdelatif; Mason, Sax A; Veiros, Luis F

    2014-10-13

    Reaction of [RuCl(CNN)(dppb)] (1-Cl) (HCNN=2-aminomethyl-6-(4-methylphenyl)pyridine; dppb=Ph2 P(CH2 )4 PPh2 ) with NaOCH2 CF3 leads to the amine-alkoxide [Ru(CNN)(OCH2 CF3 )(dppb)] (1-OCH2 CF3 ), whose neutron diffraction study reveals a short RuO⋅⋅⋅HN bond length. Treatment of 1-Cl with NaOEt and EtOH affords the alkoxide [Ru(CNN)(OEt)(dppb)]⋅(EtOH)n (1-OEt⋅n EtOH), which equilibrates with the hydride [RuH(CNN)(dppb)] (1-H) and acetaldehyde. Compound 1-OEt⋅n EtOH reacts reversibly with H2 leading to 1-H and EtOH through dihydrogen splitting. NMR spectroscopic studies on 1-OEt⋅n EtOH and 1-H reveal hydrogen bond interactions and exchange processes. The chloride 1-Cl catalyzes the hydrogenation (5 atm of H2 ) of ketones to alcohols (turnover frequency (TOF) up to 6.5×10(4) h(-1) , 40 °C). DFT calculations were performed on the reaction of [RuH(CNN')(dmpb)] (2-H) (HCNN'=2-aminomethyl-6-(phenyl)pyridine; dmpb=Me2 P(CH2 )4 PMe2 ) with acetone and with one molecule of 2-propanol, in alcohol, with the alkoxide complex being the most stable species. In the first step, the Ru-hydride transfers one hydrogen atom to the carbon of the ketone, whereas the second hydrogen transfer from NH2 is mediated by the alcohol and leads to the key "amide" intermediate. Regeneration of the hydride complex may occur by reaction with 2-propanol or with H2 ; both pathways have low barriers and are alcohol assisted. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Transfer reactions induced by lithium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ogloblin, A.A.

    The review deals with nuclear reactions induced by /sup 6/Li and /sup 7/ Li io ns having energies between 10 and 30 MeV. Due to the cluster structure of / sup 6/Li (/sup 6/Li= alpha +d) and /sup 7/Li (/sup 7/Li= alpha +t) and the low bindi ng energy of these nuclei, one of the clustcr is directly transferred in (/ sup 6/Li, d), (/sup 7/Li, t) (/sup 6/Li alpha ) and (/sup 7/Li, alpha ) reactions, i.e., the alpha p article, the deuteron, or the triton is directly transferred. Particular attention is paid to the (/sup 6/Li, d) andmore » (/sup 7/Li, t) reactions, in which the cluster-transfe r mechanism (alpha-particle transfer) appear in ita purest fomn. These reactions can be used to study the alpha- particle or quartet states of light nuclei, which are difficult or impossible to excite in any other way. The present state of the theory of multinucleon transfcr reactions is considered and the application of the theory to thc analysis of reactions induced by lithium atoms is discussed. (auth)« less

  20. Alpha-transfer reactions with large energy transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Froehlich, H.; Shimoda, T.; Ishihara, M.

    1979-06-04

    Alpha-transfer reactions (/sup 20/Ne,/sup 16/O), (/sup 14/N,/sup 10/B), and (/sup 13/C,/sup 9/Be) on a /sup 40/Ca target were studied at 262, 153, 149 MeV, respectively. Analysis in terms of the direction-reaction theory reproduced the observed continuum spectra and angular distributions well, except for the cross section of the reaction (/sup 20/Ne,/sup 16/O) at small angles, which is attributed to a projectile breakup process.

  1. Organocatalytic Transfer Hydrogenation and Hydrosilylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Raquel P

    2016-06-01

    The reduction of different carbon-carbon or carbon-heteroatom double bonds is a powerful tool that generates in many cases new stereogenic centers. In the last decade, the organocatalytic version of these transformations has attracted more attention, and remarkable progress has been made in this way. Organocatalysts such as chiral Brønsted acids, thioureas, chiral secondary amines or Lewis bases have been successfully used for this purpose. In this context, this chapter will cover pioneering and seminal examples using Hantzsch dihydropyridines 1 and trichlorosilane 2 as reducing agents. More recent examples will be also cited in order to cover as much as possible the complete research in this field.

  2. Transfer Reactions Near the Coulomb Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorso, Angela

    1999-05-01

    In this talk I give a brief review of the latest experimental and theoretical developments towards the understanding of the nuclear surface via `quasi-elastic transfer reactions' which are among the best tools for such study since they are very localized both in energy and in impact parameter. There are also comments on how the discovery and study of the so called ``halo'' nuclei has changed or confirmed our previous understanding. The continuous transition towards more complicated reactions like two and multinucleon transfer and fusion is also discussed. Since the problem is still far from being solved I will try to point out the direction for further research, discussing the relative advantages and disadvantages of using reactions with light vs. heavy nuclei and low vs. high beam energies. Special attention is paid to the near to the barrier energies which are the main topic of the conference.

  3. Fast reductive amination by transfer hydrogenation "on water".

    PubMed

    Lei, Qian; Wei, Yawen; Talwar, Dinesh; Wang, Chao; Xue, Dong; Xiao, Jianliang

    2013-03-18

    Reductive amination of various ketones and aldehydes by transfer hydrogenation under aqueous conditions has been developed, by using cyclometallated iridium complexes as catalysts and formate as hydrogen source. The pH value of the solution is shown to be critical for a high catalytic chemoselectivity and activity, with the best pH value being 4.8. In comparison with that in organic solvents, the reductive amination in an aqueous phase is faster, and the molar ratio of the substrate to the catalyst (S/C) can be set as high as 1×10(5) , the highest S/C value ever reported in reductive amination reactions. The catalyst is easy to access and the reaction is operationally simple, allowing a wide range of ketones and aldehydes to react with various amines in high yields. The protocol provides a practical and environmental friendly new method for the synthesis of amine compounds. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Hydrogen generation by reaction of Si nanopowder with neutral water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Matsuda, Shinsuke; Imamura, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2017-05-01

    Si and its oxide are nonpoisonous materials, and thus, it can be taken for medical effects. We have developed a method of generation of hydrogen by use of reactions of Si nanopowder with water in the neutral pH region. Si nanopowder is fabricated by the simple bead milling method. Si nanopowder reacts with water to generate hydrogen even in cases where pH is set at the neutral region between 7.0 and 8.6. The hydrogen generation rate strongly depends on pH and in the case of pH 8.0, ˜55 ml/g hydrogen which corresponds to that contained in approximately 3 L saturated hydrogen-rich water is generated in 1 h. The reaction rate for hydrogen generation greatly increases with pH, indicating that the reacting species is hydroxide ions. The change of pH after the hydrogen generation reaction is negligibly low compared with that estimated assuming that hydroxide ions are consumed by the reaction. From these results, we conclude the following reaction mechanism: Si nanopowder reacts with hydroxide ions in the rate-determining reaction to form hydrogen molecules, SiO2, and electrons in the conduction band. Then, generated electrons are accepted by water molecules, resulting in production of hydrogen molecules and hydroxide ions. The hydrogen generation rate strongly depends on the crystallite size of Si nanopowder, but not on the size of aggregates of Si nanopowder. The present study shows a possibility to use Si nanopowder for hydrogen generation in the body in order to eliminate hydroxyl radicals which cause various diseases.

  5. Insights into the Hydrogen-Atom Transfer of the Blue Aroxyl.

    PubMed

    Bächle, Josua; Marković, Marijana; Kelterer, Anne-Marie; Grampp, Günter

    2017-10-19

    An experimental and theoretical study on hydrogen-atom transfer dynamics in the hydrogen-bonded substituted phenol/phenoxyl complex of the blue aroxyl (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) is presented. The experimental exchange dynamics is determined in different organic solvents from the temperature-dependent alternating line-width effect in the continuous-wave ESR spectrum. From bent Arrhenius plots, effective tunnelling contributions with parallel heavy-atom motion are concluded. To clarify the transfer mechanism, reaction paths for different conformers of the substituted phenol/phenoxyl complex are modelled theoretically. Various DFT and post-Hartree-Fock methods including multireference methods are applied. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical data it is concluded that the system favours concerted hydrogen-atom transfer along a parabolic reaction path caused by heavy-atom motion. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Kinetic Characteristics of Hydrogen Transfer Through Palladium-Modified Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petriev, I. S.; Frolov, V. Yu.; Bolotin, S. N.; Baryshev, M. G.; Kopytov, G. F.

    2018-01-01

    The paper deals with hydrogen transfer through Pd-23%Ag alloy membrane, the surface of which is modified by the electrolytic deposition of highly dispersed palladium. The dependence between the density of hydrogen flow and its excess pressure on the input surface of membrane is well approximated by the first-order curve. This fact indicates that the process of hydrogen permeability is defined by its dissociation on the input surface. Activation energy of this process is 47.9 kJ/mol which considerably exceeds that of the process of hydrogen transfer through palladium (22-30 kJ/mol). This confirms the fact that the chemisorption is a rate-controlling step of the hydrogen transfer through membrane.

  7. Thermophysicochemical Reaction of ZrCo-Hydrogen-Helium System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kwangjin; Kang, Hee-Seok; Yun, Sei-Hun; Chung, Hongsuk

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear fusion energy, which is clean and infinite, has been studied for more than half a century. Efforts are in progress worldwide for the demonstration and validation of nuclear fusion energy. Korea has been developing hydrogen isotope storage and delivery system (SDS) technologies including a basic scientific study on a hydrogen storage medium. An SDS bed, which is a key component of the SDS, is used for storing hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride form and supplying them to a tokamak. Thermophysicochemical properties of the ZrCo-H2-He system are investigated for the practical utilization of a hydriding alloy system. The hydriding reaction, in which ZrCoHx is composed as ZrCo absorbing hydrogen, is exothermic. The dehydriding reaction, in which ZrCoHx decomposes into ZrCo and hydrogen, is endothermic. The heat generated through the hydriding reaction interrupts the hydriding progress. The heat loss by a dehydriding reaction impedes the dehydriding progress. The tritium decay product, helium-3, covers the ZrCo and keeps the hydrogen from contact with ZrCo in the SDS bed. In this study, we designed and fabricated a ZrCo bed and its performance test rig. The helium blanketing effect on a ZrCo hydrogen reaction with 0 % to 20 % helium content in a gaseous phase and a helium blanket removal method were studied experimentally. In addition, the volumetric flow rates and temperature at the beginning of a ZrCo hydrogen reaction in a hydrogen or helium atmosphere, and the cooling of the SDS bed by radiation only and by both radiation and natural convection related to the reuse cycle, were obtained.

  8. Transfer reaction code with nonlocal interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Titus, L. J.; Ross, A.; Nunes, F. M.

    2016-07-14

    We present a suite of codes (NLAT for nonlocal adiabatic transfer) to calculate the transfer cross section for single-nucleon transfer reactions, (d,N)(d,N) or (N,d)(N,d), including nonlocal nucleon–target interactions, within the adiabatic distorted wave approximation. For this purpose, we implement an iterative method for solving the second order nonlocal differential equation, for both scattering and bound states. The final observables that can be obtained with NLAT are differential angular distributions for the cross sections of A(d,N)BA(d,N)B or B(N,d)AB(N,d)A. Details on the implementation of the TT-matrix to obtain the final cross sections within the adiabatic distorted wave approximation method are also provided.more » This code is suitable to be applied for deuteron induced reactions in the range of View the MathML sourceEd=10–70MeV, and provides cross sections with 4% accuracy.« less

  9. Regio-Selective Intramolecular Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange in Gas-Phase Electron Transfer Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-05-01

    Protein backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) typically utilizes enzymatic digestion after the exchange reaction and before MS analysis to improve data resolution. Gas-phase fragmentation of a peptic fragment prior to MS analysis is a promising technique to further increase the resolution. The biggest technical challenge for this method is elimination of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange (scrambling) in the gas phase. The scrambling obscures the location of deuterium. Jørgensen's group pioneered a method to minimize the scrambling in gas-phase electron capture/transfer dissociation. Despite active investigation, the mechanism of hydrogen scrambling is not well-understood. The difficulty stems from the fact that the degree of hydrogen scrambling depends on instruments, various parameters of mass analysis, and peptide analyzed. In most hydrogen scrambling investigations, the hydrogen scrambling is measured by the percentage of scrambling in a whole molecule. This paper demonstrates that the degree of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange depends on the nature of exchangeable hydrogen sites. The deuterium on Tyr amide of neurotensin (9-13), Arg-Pro-Tyr-Ile-Leu, migrated significantly faster than that on Ile or Leu amides, indicating the loss of deuterium from the original sites is not mere randomization of hydrogen and deuterium but more site-specific phenomena. This more precise approach may help understand the mechanism of intramolecular hydrogen exchange and provide higher confidence for the parameter optimization to eliminate intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange during gas-phase fragmentation. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Regio-Selective Intramolecular Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange in Gas-Phase Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-05-01

    Protein backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) typically utilizes enzymatic digestion after the exchange reaction and before MS analysis to improve data resolution. Gas-phase fragmentation of a peptic fragment prior to MS analysis is a promising technique to further increase the resolution. The biggest technical challenge for this method is elimination of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange (scrambling) in the gas phase. The scrambling obscures the location of deuterium. Jørgensen's group pioneered a method to minimize the scrambling in gas-phase electron capture/transfer dissociation. Despite active investigation, the mechanism of hydrogen scrambling is not well-understood. The difficulty stems from the fact that the degree of hydrogen scrambling depends on instruments, various parameters of mass analysis, and peptide analyzed. In most hydrogen scrambling investigations, the hydrogen scrambling is measured by the percentage of scrambling in a whole molecule. This paper demonstrates that the degree of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange depends on the nature of exchangeable hydrogen sites. The deuterium on Tyr amide of neurotensin (9-13), Arg-Pro-Tyr-Ile-Leu, migrated significantly faster than that on Ile or Leu amides, indicating the loss of deuterium from the original sites is not mere randomization of hydrogen and deuterium but more site-specific phenomena. This more precise approach may help understand the mechanism of intramolecular hydrogen exchange and provide higher confidence for the parameter optimization to eliminate intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange during gas-phase fragmentation.

  11. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  12. REACTION OF PERFLUOROALKYL RADICALS WITH MOLECULAR HYDROGEN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    reactions with D2 and HD) in which R is some free radical. The discussion below is developed with those systems in mind in which R is a perfluoroalkyl ...photolysis of the appropriate perfluoroketone was used as the radical source. Recently an investigation was made of the reaction, with R = C2F5 and C3F7

  13. Diels-Alder reactions onto fluorinated and hydrogenated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, Pablo A.

    2017-09-01

    We studied Diels-Alder (DA) reactions onto functionalized graphene. When fluorine, hydrogen or oxygen functional groups are present on one side of the sheet, the DA cycloadditions become significantly more exergonic when performed on the opposite side. Hydrogen is more effective than fluorine and oxygen to promote these cycloadditions. In contrast with the results obtained for perfect graphene, the functionalization with H, F or O turns the DA reactions exergonic, with ΔG°298 = -127.2 kcal/mol. The reaction barriers are expected to be considerably lowered with respect to perfect graphene because the functional groups significantly reduce the distortion energy.

  14. Hydrogen generation from caustic aluminum reaction

    SciTech Connect

    REYNOLDS, D.A.

    2001-10-23

    A ''crawler'' is to enter the AY farm annulus to clean the metal surface for corrosion measurements. The ''crawler'' weighs about 190 pounds of which 150 pounds are aluminum. (These values are supplied by the vender of the ''crawler''.) There is a potential that cleaning the surface of the metal may cause a leak to occur in the primary tank wall and the waste may contact the aluminum. The hydroxide in the waste may react with the aluminum and form hydrogen gas. The purpose of this analysis is to estimate the rate of hydrogen gas generation and the time tomore » reach the lower flammable limit (LFL) in the annulus. Surface area of the aluminum piece is estimated to be 2 sq.ft. (This value was given by the vender.) SA:= 2 {center_dot} ft{sup 2}.« less

  15. Overview of Light Hydrogen-Based Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Shrestha, Prajakti J.

    This paper reviews light water and hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) including the different methodologies used to study these reactions and the results obtained. Reports of excess heat production, transmutation reactions, and nuclear radiation emission are cited. An aim of this review is to present a summary of the present status of light water LENR research and provide some insight into where this research is heading.

  16. Tension-Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on Vanadium Disulfide Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Water electrolysis is an efficient way for hydrogen production. Finding efficient, cheap, and eco-friendly electrocatalysts is essential to the development of this technology. In the work, we present a first-principles study on the effects of tension on the hydrogen evolution reaction of a novel electrocatalyst, vanadium disulfide (VS2) monolayer. Two electrocatalytic processes, individual and collective processes, are investigated. We show that the catalytic ability of VS2 monolayer at higher hydrogen coverage can be efficiently improved by escalating tension. We find that the individual process is easier to occur in a wide range of hydrogen coverage and the collective process is possible at a certain hydrogen coverage under the same tension. The best hydrogen evolution reaction with near-zero Gibbs free energy can be achieved by tuning tension. We further show that the change of catalytic activity with tension and hydrogen coverage is induced by the change of free carrier density around the Fermi level, that is, higher carrier density, better catalytic performance. It is expected that tension can be a simple way to improve the catalytic activity, leading to the design of novel electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production from water electrolysis.

  17. Hydrogen addition reactions of aliphatic hydrocarbons in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hitomi; Watanabe, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Fukushima, T.; Kawakita, H.

    2013-10-01

    Comets are thought as remnants of early solar nebula. Their chemical compositions are precious clue to chemical and physical evolution of the proto-planetary disk. Some hydrocarbons such as C2H6, C2H2 and CH4 in comets have been observed by using near-infrared spectroscopy. Although the compositions of C2H6 were about 1% relative to the water in normal comets, there are few reports on the detection of C2H6 in ISM. Some formation mechanisms of C2H6 in ISM have been proposed, and there are two leading hypotheses; one is the dimerizations of CH3 and another is the hydrogen addition reactions of C2H2 on cold icy grains. To evaluate these formation mechanisms for cometary C2H6 quantitatively, it is important to search the C2H4 in comets, which is the intermediate product of the hydrogen addition reactions toward C2H6. However, it is very difficult to detect the C2H4 in comets in NIR (3 microns) regions because of observing circumstances. The hydrogen addition reactions of C2H2 at low temperature conditions are not well characterized both theoretically and experimentally. For example, there are no reports on the reaction rate coefficients of those reaction system. To determine the production rates of those hydrogen addition reactions, we performed the laboratory experiments of the hydrogenation of C2H2 and C2H4. We used four types of the initial composition of the ices: pure C2H4, pure C2H2, C2H2 on amorphous solid water (ASW) and C2H4 on ASW at three different temperatures of 10, 20, and 30K. We found 1) reactions are more efficient when there are ASW in the initial compositions of the ice; 2) hydrogenation of C2H4 occur more rapid than that of C2H2.

  18. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  19. Core-shell rhodium sulfide catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction / hydrogen oxidation reaction in hydrogen-bromine reversible fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanchao; Nguyen, Trung Van

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis and characterization of high electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) core-shell RhxSy catalysts for hydrogen evolution oxidation (HER)/hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in H2-Br2 fuel cell are discussed. Catalysts with RhxSy as shell and different percentages (5%, 10%, and 20%) of platinum on carbon as core materials are synthesized. Cyclic voltammetry is used to evaluate the Pt-equivalent mass specific ECSA and durability of these catalysts. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) techniques are utilized to characterize the bulk and surface compositions and to confirm the core-shell structure of the catalysts, respectively. Cycling test and polarization curve measurements in the H2-Br2 fuel cell are used to assess the catalyst stability and performance in a fuel cell. The results show that the catalysts with core-shell structure have higher mass specific ECSA (50 m2 gm-Rh-1) compared to a commercial catalyst (RhxSy/C catalyst from BASF, 6.9 m2 gm-Rh-1). It also shows better HOR/HER performance in the fuel cell. Compared to the platinum catalyst, the core-shell catalysts show more stable performance in the fuel cell cycling test.

  20. Gas Requirements in Pressurized Transfer of Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluck, D. F.; Kline, J. F.

    1961-01-01

    Of late, liquid hydrogen has become a very popular fuel for space missions. It is being used in such programs as Centaur and Saturn. Furthermore, hydrogen is the ideal working fluid for nuclear powered space vehicles currently under development. In these applications, liquid hydrogen fuel is generally transferred to the combustion chamber by a combination of pumping and pressurization. The pump forces the liquid propellant from the fuel tank to the combustion chamber; gaseous pressurant holds tank pressure sufficiently high to prevent cavitation at the pump inlet and to maintain the structural rigidity of the tank. The pressurizing system, composed of pressurant, tankage, and associated hardware can be a large portion of the total vehicle weight. Pressurant weight can be reduced by introducing the pressurizing gas at temperatures substantially greater than those of liquid hydrogen. Heat and mass transfer processes thereby induced complicate gas requirements during discharge. These requirements must be known to insure proper design of the pressurizing system. The aim of this paper is to develop from basic mass and energy transfer processes a general method to predict helium and hydrogen gas usage for the pressurized transfer of liquid hydrogen. This required an analytical and experimental investigation, the results of which are described in this paper.

  1. Hydrogen transport membranes for dehydrogenation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran,; Uthamalingam, [Hinsdale, IL

    2008-02-12

    A method of converting C.sub.2 and/or higher alkanes to olefins by contacting a feedstock containing C.sub.2 and/or higher alkanes with a first surface of a metal composite membrane of a sintered homogenous mixture of an Al oxide or stabilized or partially stabilized Zr oxide ceramic powder and a metal powder of one or more of Pd, Nb, V, Zr, Ta and/or alloys or mixtures thereof. The alkanes dehydrogenate to olefins by contact with the first surface with substantially only atomic hydrogen from the dehydrogenation of the alkanes passing through the metal composite membrane. Apparatus for effecting the conversion and separation is also disclosed.

  2. Solvent dynamics and electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaiah, Jayendran C.; Zhu, Jianjun

    1994-02-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies of the influence of solvent dynamics on electron transfer (ET) reactions are discussed. It is seen that the survival probabilities of the reactants and products can be obtained as the solution to an integral equation using experimental or simulation data on the solvation dynamics. The theory developed for ET between thermally equilibrated reactants in solution, in which the ligand vibrations were treated classically, is extended to include quantum effects on the inner-shell ligand vibration and electron transfer from a nonequilibrium initial state prepared, for example, by laser excitation. This leads to a slight modification of the integral equation which is easily solved on a personal computer to provide results that can be directly compared with experiment. Analytic approximations to the solutions of the integral equation, ranging from a single exponential to multiexponential time dependence of the survival probabilities are discussed. The rate constant for the single exponential decay of the reactants interpolates between the thermal equilibrium rate constant kie (that is independent of solvent dynamics) and a diffusion controlled rate constant kid (determined by solvent dynamics) and also between the wide (A=0) and narrow (A=1) window limits dominated by inner-sphere ligand vibration and outer-sphere solvent reorganization respectively. The explicit dependence of the integral equation solutions on solvation dynamics S(t), the free energy of reaction ΔG0, the total reorganization energy λ and its partitioning between ligand vibration λq and solvent polarization fluctuations λ0, and the nature of the initial state should be useful in the analysis and design of ET experiments in different solvents.

  3. Electron transfer and reaction mechanism of laccases.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephen M; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-03-01

    Laccases are part of the family of multicopper oxidases (MCOs), which couple the oxidation of substrates to the four electron reduction of O2 to H2O. MCOs contain a minimum of four Cu's divided into Type 1 (T1), Type 2 (T2), and binuclear Type 3 (T3) Cu sites that are distinguished based on unique spectroscopic features. Substrate oxidation occurs near the T1, and electrons are transferred approximately 13 Å through the protein via the Cys-His pathway to the T2/T3 trinuclear copper cluster (TNC), where dioxygen reduction occurs. This review outlines the electron transfer (ET) process in laccases, and the mechanism of O2 reduction as elucidated through spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational data. Marcus theory is used to describe the relevant factors which impact ET rates including the driving force, reorganization energy, and electronic coupling matrix element. Then, the mechanism of O2 reaction is detailed with particular focus on the intermediates formed during the two 2e(-) reduction steps. The first 2e(-) step forms the peroxide intermediate, followed by the second 2e(-) step to form the native intermediate, which has been shown to be the catalytically relevant fully oxidized form of the enzyme.

  4. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  5. Replacing precious metals with carbide catalysts for hydrogenation reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Ruijun, Hou; Chen, Jingguang G.; Chang, Kuan; ...

    2015-03-03

    Molybdenum carbide (Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C) catalysts were compared with Pd/SiO₂ for the hydrogenation of several diene molecules, 1,3- butadiene, 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD). Compared to Pd/SiO₂, Mo₂C showed similar hydrogenation rate for 1,3-butadiene and 1,3-CHD and even higher rate for 1,4-CHD, but with significant deactivation rate for 1,3-CHD hydrogenation. However, the hydrogenation activity of Mo₂C could be completely regenerated by H₂ treatment at 723 K for the three molecules. The Ni modified Mo₂C catalysts retained similar activity for 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation with significantly enhanced selectivity for 1-butene production. The 1-butene selectivity increased with increasing Ni loading below 15%. Among the Nimore » modified Mo₂C catalysts, 8.6%Ni/Mo₂C showed the highest selectivity to 1-butene, which was even higher selectivity than that over Pd/SiO₂. Compared to Pd/SiO₂, both Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C showed combined advantages in hydrogenation activity and catalyst cost reduction, demonstrating the potential to use less expensive carbide catalysts to replace precious metals for hydrogenation reactions.« less

  6. Heat and mass transfer rates during flow of dissociated hydrogen gas over graphite surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nema, V. K.; Sharma, O. P.

    1986-01-01

    To improve upon the performance of chemical rockets, the nuclear reactor has been applied to a rocket propulsion system using hydrogen gas as working fluid and a graphite-composite forming a part of the structure. Under the boundary layer approximation, theoretical predictions of skin friction coefficient, surface heat transfer rate and surface regression rate have been made for laminar/turbulent dissociated hydrogen gas flowing over a flat graphite surface. The external stream is assumed to be frozen. The analysis is restricted to Mach numbers low enough to deal with the situation of only surface-reaction between hydrogen and graphite. Empirical correlations of displacement thickness, local skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local non-dimensional heat transfer rate have been obtained. The magnitude of the surface regression rate is found low enough to ensure the use of graphite as a linear or a component of the system over an extended period without loss of performance.

  7. Gas diffusion electrodes improve hydrogen gas mass transfer for a hydrogen oxidizing bioanode

    PubMed Central

    Rodenas, Pau; Zhu, Fangqi; Sleutels, Tom; Saakes, Michel; Buisman, Cees

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are capable of recovery of metals at a cathode through oxidation of organic substrate at an anode. Recently, also hydrogen gas was used as an electron donor for recovery of copper in BESs. Oxidation of hydrogen gas produced a current density of 0.8 A m‐2 and combined with Cu2+ reduction at the cathode, produced 0.25 W m‐2. The main factor limiting current production was the mass transfer of hydrogen to the biofilm due to the low solubility of hydrogen in the anolyte. Here, the mass transfer of hydrogen gas to the bioanode was improved by use of a gas diffusion electrode (GDE). Results With the GDE, hydrogen was oxidized to produce a current density of 2.9 A m‐2 at an anode potential of –0.2 V. Addition of bicarbonate to the influent led to production of acetate, in addition to current. At a bicarbonate concentration of 50 mmol L‐1, current density increased to 10.7 A m‐2 at an anode potential of –0.2 V. This increase in current density could be due to oxidation of formed acetate in addition to oxidation of hydrogen, or enhanced growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria due to the availability of acetate as carbon source. The effect of mass transfer was further assessed through enhanced mixing and in combination with the addition of bicarbonate (50 mmol L‐1) current density increased further to 17.1 A m‐2. Conclusion Hydrogen gas may offer opportunities as electron donor for bioanodes, with acetate as potential intermediate, at locations where excess hydrogen and no organics are available. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:29200586

  8. Investigating inner-sphere reorganization via secondary kinetic isotope effects in the C-H cleavage reaction catalyzed by soybean lipoxygenase: tunneling in the substrate backbone as well as the transferred hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Matthew P; Klinman, Judith P

    2011-01-26

    This work describes the application of NMR to the measurement of secondary deuterium (2° (2)H) and carbon-13 ((13)C) kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) at positions 9-13 within the substrate linoleic acid (LA) of soybean lipoxygenase-1. The KIEs have been measured using LA labeled with either protium (11,11-h2-LA) or deuterium (11,11-d2-LA) at the reactive C11 position, which has been previously shown to yield a primary deuterium isotope effect of ca. 80. The conditions of measurement yield the intrinsic 2° (2)H and (13)C KIEs on k(cat)/K(m) directly for 11,11-d2-LA, whereas the values for the 2° (2)H KIEs for 11,11-h2-LA are obtained after correction for a kinetic commitment. The pattern of the resulting 2° (2)H and (13)C isotope effects reveals values that lie far above those predicted from changes in local force constants. Additionally, many of the experimental values cannot be modeled by electronic effects, torsional strain, or the simple inclusion of a tunneling correction to the rate. Although previous studies have shown the importance of extensive tunneling for cleavage of the primary hydrogen at C11 of LA, the present findings can only be interpreted by extending the conclusion of nonclassical behavior to the secondary hydrogens and carbons that flank the position undergoing C-H bond cleavage. A quantum mechanical method introduced by Buhks et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 1981, 85, 3763] to model the inner-sphere reorganization that accompanies electron transfer has been shown to be able to reproduce the scale of the 2° (2)H KIEs.

  9. Impact of mutation on proton transfer reactions in ketosteroid isomerase: insights from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-06-02

    The two proton transfer reactions catalyzed by ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) involve a dienolate intermediate stabilized by hydrogen bonds with Tyr14 and Asp99. Molecular dynamics simulations based on an empirical valence bond model are used to examine the impact of mutating these residues on the hydrogen-bonding patterns, conformational changes, and van der Waals and electrostatic interactions during the proton transfer reactions. While the rate constants for the two proton transfer steps are similar for wild-type (WT) KSI, the simulations suggest that the rate constant for the first proton transfer step is smaller in the mutants due to the significantly higher free energy of the dienolate intermediate relative to the reactant. The calculated rate constants for the mutants D99L, Y14F, and Y14F/D99L relative to WT KSI are qualitatively consistent with the kinetic experiments indicating a significant reduction in the catalytic rates along the series of mutants. In the simulations, WT KSI retained two hydrogen-bonding interactions between the substrate and the active site, while the mutants typically retained only one hydrogen-bonding interaction. A new hydrogen-bonding interaction between the substrate and Tyr55 was observed in the double mutant, leading to the prediction that mutation of Tyr55 will have a greater impact on the proton transfer rate constants for the double mutant than for WT KSI. The electrostatic stabilization of the dienolate intermediate relative to the reactant was greater for WT KSI than for the mutants, providing a qualitative explanation for the significantly reduced rates of the mutants. The active site exhibited restricted motion during the proton transfer reactions, but small conformational changes occurred to facilitate the proton transfer reactions by strengthening the hydrogen-bonding interactions and by bringing the proton donor and acceptor closer to each other with the proper orientation for proton transfer. Thus, these calculations

  10. Microscale Synthesis of Chiral Alcohols via Asymmetric Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeters, Christine M.; Deliever, Rik; De Vos, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of pure enantiomers is a key issue in industry, especially in areas connected to life sciences. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis has emerged as a powerful and practical tool. Here we describe an experiment on racemic reduction and asymmetric reduction via a catalytic hydrogen transfer process. Acetophenone and substituted acetophenones are…

  11. Kinetic Isotope Effects as a Probe of Hydrogen Transfers to and from Common Enzymatic Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Daniel; Islam, Zahidul; Kohen, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes use a number of common cofactors as sources of hydrogen to drive biological processes, but the physics of the hydrogen transfers to and from these cofactors is not fully understood. Researchers study the mechanistically important contributions from quantum tunneling and enzyme dynamics and connect those processes to the catalytic power of enzymes that use these cofactors. Here we describe some progress that has been made in studying these reactions, particularly through the use of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). We first discuss the general theoretical framework necessary to interpret experimental KIEs, and then describe practical uses for KIEs in the context of two case studies. The first example is alcohol dehydrogenase, which uses a nicotinamide cofactor to catalyze a hydride transfer, and the second example is thymidylate synthase, which uses a folate cofactor to catalyze both a hydride and a proton transfer. PMID:24161942

  12. Design principles for hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst materials

    DOE PAGES

    Strmcnik, Dusan; Lopes, Pietro Papa; Genorio, Bostjan; ...

    2016-04-19

    Design and synthesis of active, stable and cost-effective materials for efficient hydrogen production (hydrogen evolution reaction, HER) is of paramount importance for the successful deployment of hydrogen -based alternative energy technologies. The HER, seemingly one of the simplest electrochemical reactions, has served for decades to bridge the gap between fundamental electrocatalysis and practical catalyst design. However, there are still many open questions that need to be answered before it would be possible to claim that design principles of catalyst materials are fully developed for the efficient hydrogen production. Here in this review, by summarizing key results for the HER onmore » well-characterized electrochemical interfaces in acidic and alkaline media, we have broadened our understanding of the HER in the whole range of pH by considering three main parameters: the nature of the proton donor (H 3O + in acid and H 2O in alkaline), the energy of adsorption of H ad and OH ad, and the presence of spectator species. Simply by considering these three parameters we show that great deal has already been learned and new trends are beginning to emerge, giving some predictive ability with respect to the nature of electrochemical interface and electrocatalytic activity of the HER.« less

  13. Analysis of Thermal and Reaction Times for Hydrogen Reduction of Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, U.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Gokoglu, S.

    2008-01-01

    System analysis of oxygen production by hydrogen reduction of lunar regolith has shown the importance of the relative time scales for regolith heating and chemical reaction to overall performance. These values determine the sizing and power requirements of the system and also impact the number and operational phasing of reaction chambers. In this paper, a Nusselt number correlation analysis is performed to determine the heat transfer rates and regolith heat up times in a fluidized bed reactor heated by a central heating element (e.g., a resistively heated rod, or a solar concentrator heat pipe). A coupled chemical and transport model has also been developed for the chemical reduction of regolith by a continuous flow of hydrogen. The regolith conversion occurs on the surfaces of and within the regolith particles. Several important quantities are identified as a result of the above analyses. Reactor scale parameters include the void fraction (i.e., the fraction of the reactor volume not occupied by the regolith particles) and the residence time of hydrogen in the reactor. Particle scale quantities include the particle Reynolds number, the Archimedes number, and the time needed for hydrogen to diffuse into the pores of the regolith particles. The analysis is used to determine the heat up and reaction times and its application to NASA s oxygen production system modeling tool is noted.

  14. Analysis of Thermal and Reaction Times for Hydrogen Reduction of Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, U.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Gokoglu, S.

    2009-01-01

    System analysis of oxygen production by hydrogen reduction of lunar regolith has shown the importance of the relative time scales for regolith heating and chemical reaction to overall performance. These values determine the sizing and power requirements of the system and also impact the number and operational phasing of reaction chambers. In this paper, a Nusselt number correlation analysis is performed to determine the heat transfer rates and regolith heat up times in a fluidized bed reactor heated by a central heating element (e.g., a resistively heated rod, or a solar concentrator heat pipe). A coupled chemical and transport model has also been developed for the chemical reduction of regolith by a continuous flow of hydrogen. The regolith conversion occurs on the surfaces of and within the regolith particles. Several important quantities are identified as a result of the above analyses. Reactor scale parameters include the void fraction (i.e., the fraction of the reactor volume not occupied by the regolith particles) and the residence time of hydrogen in the reactor. Particle scale quantities include the particle Reynolds number, the Archimedes number, and the time needed for hydrogen to diffuse into the pores of the regolith particles. The analysis is used to determine the heat up and reaction times and its application to NASA s oxygen production system modeling tool is noted.

  15. Geometric phase effects in ultracold hydrogen exchange reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Hazra, Jisha; Kendrick, Brian K.; Balakrishnan, Naduvalath

    2016-10-14

    The role of the geometric phase effect on chemical reaction dynamics is explored by examining the hydrogen exchange process in the fundamental H+HD reaction. Results are presented for vibrationally excited HD molecules in the v = 4 vibrational level and for collision energies ranging from 1 μK to 100 K. It is found that, for collision energies below 3 K, inclusion of the geometric phase leads to dramatic enhancement or suppression of the reaction rates depending on the final quantum state of the HD molecule. The effect was found to be the most prominent for rotationally resolved integral and differential cross sections but it persists to a lesser extent in the vibrationally resolved and total reaction rate coefficients. However, no significant GP effect is present in the reactive channel leading to the D+H 2 product or in the D+H 2more » $$(v=4,j=0)\\,\\to $$ HD+H reaction. A simple interference mechanism involving inelastic (nonreactive) and exchange scattering amplitudes is invoked to account for the observed GP effects. The computed results also reveal a shape resonance in the H+HD reaction near 1 K and the GP effect is found to influence the magnitude of the resonant part of the cross section. In conclusion, experimental detection of the resonance may allow a sensitive probe of the GP effect in the H+HD reaction.« less

  16. Bimolecular reactions of carbenes: Proton transfer mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Saleh, Abd Al-Aziz A.; Almatarneh, Mansour H.; Poirier, Raymond A.

    2018-04-01

    Here we report the bimolecular reaction of trifluoromethylhydroxycarbene conformers and the water-mediated mechanism of the 1,2-proton shift for the unimolecular trans-conformer by using quantum chemical calculations. The CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/cc-pVDZ potential-energy profile of the bimolecular reaction of cis- and trans-trifluoromethylhydroxycarbene, shows the lowest gas-phase barrier height of 13 kJ mol-1 compared to the recently reported value of 128 kJ mol-1 for the unimolecular reaction. We expect bimolecular reactions of carbene's stereoisomers will open a valuable field for new and useful synthetic strategies.

  17. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Engineering Development Unit Hydrogen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werkheiser, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) project has been a long-running program in the Space Technology Mission Directorate to enhance the knowledge and technology related to handling cryogenic propellants, specifically liquid hydrogen. This particular effort, the CPST engineering development unit (EDU), was a proof of manufacturability effort in support of a flight article. The EDU was built to find and overcome issues related to manufacturability and collect data to anchor the thermal models for use on the flight design.

  18. Individual breathing reactions measured in hemoglobin by hydrogen exchange methods.

    PubMed Central

    Englander, S W; Calhoun, D B; Englander, J J; Kallenbach, N R; Liem, R K; Malin, E L; Mandal, C; Rogero, J R

    1980-01-01

    Protein hydrogen exchange is generally believed to register some aspects of internal protein dynamics, but the kind of motion at work is not clear. Experiments are being done to identify the determinants of protein hydrogen exchange and to distinguish between local unfolding and accessibility-penetration mechanisms. Results with small molecules, polynucleotides, and proteins demonstrate that solvent accessibility is by no means sufficient for fast exchange. H-exchange slowing is quite generally connected with intramolecular H-bonding, and the exchange process depends pivotally on transient H-bond cleavage. At least in alpha-helical structures, the cooperative aspect of H-bond cleavage must be expressed in local unfolding reactions. Results obtained by use of a difference hydrogen exchange method appear to provide a direct measurement of transient, cooperative, local unfolding reactions in hemoglobin. The reality of these supposed coherent breathing units is being tested by using the difference H-exchange approach to tritium label the units one at a time and then attempting to locate the tritium by fragmenting the protein, separating the fragments, and testing them for label. Early results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. PMID:7248462

  19. A reaction-diffusion model of cytosolic hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joseph B; Langford, Troy F; Huang, Beijing K; Deen, William M; Sikes, Hadley D

    2016-01-01

    As a signaling molecule in mammalian cells, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) determines the thiol/disulfide oxidation state of several key proteins in the cytosol. Localization is a key concept in redox signaling; the concentrations of signaling molecules within the cell are expected to vary in time and in space in manner that is essential for function. However, as a simplification, all theoretical studies of intracellular hydrogen peroxide and many experimental studies to date have treated the cytosol as a well-mixed compartment. In this work, we incorporate our previously reported reduced kinetic model of the network of reactions that metabolize hydrogen peroxide in the cytosol into a model that explicitly treats diffusion along with reaction. We modeled a bolus addition experiment, solved the model analytically, and used the resulting equations to quantify the spatiotemporal variations in intracellular H2O2 that result from this kind of perturbation to the extracellular H2O2 concentration. We predict that micromolar bolus additions of H2O2 to suspensions of HeLa cells (0.8 × 10(9)cells/l) result in increases in the intracellular concentration that are localized near the membrane. These findings challenge the assumption that intracellular concentrations of H2O2 are increased uniformly throughout the cell during bolus addition experiments and provide a theoretical basis for differing phenotypic responses of cells to intracellular versus extracellular perturbations to H2O2 levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Signatures of a quantum diffusion limited hydrogen atom tunneling reaction.

    PubMed

    Balabanoff, Morgan E; Ruzi, Mahmut; Anderson, David T

    2017-12-20

    We are studying the details of hydrogen atom (H atom) quantum diffusion in highly enriched parahydrogen (pH 2 ) quantum solids doped with chemical species in an effort to better understand H atom transport and reactivity under these conditions. In this work we present kinetic studies of the 193 nm photo-induced chemistry of methanol (CH 3 OH) isolated in solid pH 2 . Short-term irradiation of CH 3 OH at 1.8 K readily produces CH 2 O and CO which we detect using FTIR spectroscopy. The in situ photochemistry also produces CH 3 O and H atoms which we can infer from the post-photolysis reaction kinetics that display significant CH 2 OH growth. The CH 2 OH growth kinetics indicate at least three separate tunneling reactions contribute; (i) reactions of photoproduced CH 3 O with the pH 2 host, (ii) H atom reactions with the CH 2 O photofragment, and (iii) long-range migration of H atoms and reaction with CH 3 OH. We assign the rapid CH 2 OH growth to the following CH 3 O + H 2 → CH 3 OH + H → CH 2 OH + H 2 two-step sequential tunneling mechanism by conducting analogous kinetic measurements using deuterated methanol (CD 3 OD). By performing photolysis experiments at 1.8 and 4.3 K, we show the post-photolysis reaction kinetics change qualitatively over this small temperature range. We use this qualitative change in the reaction kinetics with temperature to identify reactions that are quantum diffusion limited. While these results are specific to the conditions that exist in pH 2 quantum solids, they have direct implications on the analogous low temperature H atom tunneling reactions that occur on metal surfaces and on interstellar grains.

  1. [Mechanism of oxidation reaction of NADH models and phynylglyoxal with hydrogen peroxide. Hypothesis on separate transport of hydrogen and electron atom in certain enzymatic reactions with the participation of NADH and NADPH].

    PubMed

    Iasnikov, A A; Ponomarenko, S P

    1976-05-01

    Kinetics of co-oxidation of 1-benzen-3-carbamido-1,4-dihydropyridine (BDN) and phenylglyoxal (PG) with hydrogen peroxide is studied. Dimeric product (di-e11-benzen-5-carbamido-1,2-dihydropyridyl-2]) is found to be formed at pH 9, and quaternal pyridinium salt (BNA)--at pH 7. Molecular oxigen is determined to participate in the reaction at pH 7. Copper (II) ions catalyze this process. Significant catalytic effect of p-dinitrobenzen (p-DNB) is found. The reaction mechanism is postulated to form hydroperoxide from PG and hydrogen peroxide which are capable to split the hydrogen attom from dihydropyridine, molecular oxigen or p-DNB being an acceptor of the electrone. Hypothesis on separate transfer of hydrogen atom and electrone in biological systems are proposed.

  2. Revisiting the Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley Reduction: A Sustainable Protocol for Transfer Hydrogenation of Aldehydes and Ketones

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metal-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds has received much interest because of the immense number of opportunities that exist to prepare high-value products. This reaction is featured in numerous multi-step organic syntheses and is arguably the most import...

  3. Metal-organic frameworks as selectivity regulators for hydrogenation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meiting; Yuan, Kuo; Wang, Yun; Li, Guodong; Guo, Jun; Gu, Lin; Hu, Wenping; Zhao, Huijun; Tang, Zhiyong

    2016-11-01

    Owing to the limited availability of natural sources, the widespread demand of the flavouring, perfume and pharmaceutical industries for unsaturated alcohols is met by producing them from α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, through the selective hydrogenation of the carbon-oxygen group (in preference to the carbon-carbon group). However, developing effective catalysts for this transformation is challenging, because hydrogenation of the carbon-carbon group is thermodynamically favoured. This difficulty is particularly relevant for one major category of heterogeneous catalyst: metal nanoparticles supported on metal oxides. These systems are generally incapable of significantly enhancing the selectivity towards thermodynamically unfavoured reactions, because only the edges of nanoparticles that are in direct contact with the metal-oxide support possess selective catalytic properties; most of the exposed nanoparticle surfaces do not. This has inspired the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to encapsulate metal nanoparticles within their layers or inside their channels, to influence the activity of the entire nanoparticle surface while maintaining efficient reactant and product transport owing to the porous nature of the material. Here we show that MOFs can also serve as effective selectivity regulators for the hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. Sandwiching platinum nanoparticles between an inner core and an outer shell composed of an MOF with metal nodes of Fe3+, Cr3+ or both (known as MIL-101; refs 19, 20, 21) results in stable catalysts that convert a range of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes with high efficiency and with significantly enhanced selectivity towards unsaturated alcohols. Calculations reveal that preferential interaction of MOF metal sites with the carbon-oxygen rather than the carbon-carbon group renders hydrogenation of the former by the embedded platinum nanoparticles a thermodynamically favoured reaction. We anticipate that our basic design

  4. Metal-organic frameworks as selectivity regulators for hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meiting; Yuan, Kuo; Wang, Yun; Li, Guodong; Guo, Jun; Gu, Lin; Hu, Wenping; Zhao, Huijun; Tang, Zhiyong

    2016-11-03

    Owing to the limited availability of natural sources, the widespread demand of the flavouring, perfume and pharmaceutical industries for unsaturated alcohols is met by producing them from α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, through the selective hydrogenation of the carbon-oxygen group (in preference to the carbon-carbon group). However, developing effective catalysts for this transformation is challenging, because hydrogenation of the carbon-carbon group is thermodynamically favoured. This difficulty is particularly relevant for one major category of heterogeneous catalyst: metal nanoparticles supported on metal oxides. These systems are generally incapable of significantly enhancing the selectivity towards thermodynamically unfavoured reactions, because only the edges of nanoparticles that are in direct contact with the metal-oxide support possess selective catalytic properties; most of the exposed nanoparticle surfaces do not. This has inspired the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to encapsulate metal nanoparticles within their layers or inside their channels, to influence the activity of the entire nanoparticle surface while maintaining efficient reactant and product transport owing to the porous nature of the material. Here we show that MOFs can also serve as effective selectivity regulators for the hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. Sandwiching platinum nanoparticles between an inner core and an outer shell composed of an MOF with metal nodes of Fe 3+ , Cr 3+ or both (known as MIL-101; refs 19, 20, 21) results in stable catalysts that convert a range of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes with high efficiency and with significantly enhanced selectivity towards unsaturated alcohols. Calculations reveal that preferential interaction of MOF metal sites with the carbon-oxygen rather than the carbon-carbon group renders hydrogenation of the former by the embedded platinum nanoparticles a thermodynamically favoured reaction. We anticipate that our basic design

  5. When hydroquinone meets methoxy radical: Hydrogen abstraction reaction from the viewpoint of interacting quantum atoms.

    PubMed

    Petković, Milena; Nakarada, Đura; Etinski, Mihajlo

    2018-05-25

    Interacting Quantum Atoms methodology is used for a detailed analysis of hydrogen abstraction reaction from hydroquinone by methoxy radical. Two pathways are analyzed, which differ in the orientation of the reactants at the corresponding transition states. Although the discrepancy between the two barriers amounts to only 2 kJ/mol, which implies that the two pathways are of comparable probability, the extent of intra-atomic and inter-atomic energy changes differs considerably. We thus demonstrated that Interacting Quantum Atoms procedure can be applied to unravel distinct energy transfer routes in seemingly similar mechanisms. Identification of energy components with the greatest contribution to the variation of the overall energy (intra-atomic and inter-atomic terms that involve hydroquinone's oxygen and the carbon atom covalently bound to it, the transferring hydrogen and methoxy radical's oxygen), is performed using the Relative energy gradient method. Additionally, the Interacting Quantum Fragments approach shed light on the nature of dominant interactions among selected fragments: both Coulomb and exchange-correlation contributions are of comparable importance when considering interactions of the transferring hydrogen atom with all other atoms, whereas the exchange-correlation term dominates interaction between methoxy radical's methyl group and hydroquinone's aromatic ring. This study represents one of the first applications of Interacting Quantum Fragments approach on first order saddle points. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Arrhenius curves of hydrogen transfers: tunnel effects, isotope effects and effects of pre-equilibria

    PubMed Central

    Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Miguel Lopez, Juan; Kohen, Amnon

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the Arrhenius curves of selected hydrogen-transfer reactions for which kinetic data are available in a large temperature range are reviewed. The curves are discussed in terms of the one-dimensional Bell–Limbach tunnelling model. The main parameters of this model are the barrier heights of the isotopic reactions, barrier width of the H-reaction, tunnelling masses, pre-exponential factor and minimum energy for tunnelling to occur. The model allows one to compare different reactions in a simple way and prepare the kinetic data for more-dimensional treatments. The first type of reactions is concerned with reactions where the geometries of the reacting molecules are well established and the kinetic data of the isotopic reactions are available in a large temperature range. Here, it is possible to study the relation between kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and chemical structure. Examples are the tautomerism of porphyrin, the porphyrin anion and related compounds exhibiting intramolecular hydrogen bonds of medium strength. We observe pre-exponential factors of the order of kT/h≅1013 s−1 corresponding to vanishing activation entropies in terms of transition state theory. This result is important for the second type of reactions discussed in this paper, referring mostly to liquid solutions. Here, the reacting molecular configurations may be involved in equilibria with non- or less-reactive forms. Several cases are discussed, where the less-reactive forms dominate at low or at high temperature, leading to unusual Arrhenius curves. These cases include examples from small molecule solution chemistry like the base-catalysed intramolecular H-transfer in diaryltriazene, 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)-benzoxazole, 2-hydroxy-phenoxyl radicals, as well as in the case of an enzymatic system, thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase. In the latter case, temperature-dependent KIEs are interpreted in terms of a transition between two regimes with different temperature

  7. Arrhenius curves of hydrogen transfers: tunnel effects, isotope effects and effects of pre-equilibria.

    PubMed

    Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Miguel Lopez, Juan; Kohen, Amnon

    2006-08-29

    In this paper, the Arrhenius curves of selected hydrogen-transfer reactions for which kinetic data are available in a large temperature range are reviewed. The curves are discussed in terms of the one-dimensional Bell-Limbach tunnelling model. The main parameters of this model are the barrier heights of the isotopic reactions, barrier width of the H-reaction, tunnelling masses, pre-exponential factor and minimum energy for tunnelling to occur. The model allows one to compare different reactions in a simple way and prepare the kinetic data for more-dimensional treatments. The first type of reactions is concerned with reactions where the geometries of the reacting molecules are well established and the kinetic data of the isotopic reactions are available in a large temperature range. Here, it is possible to study the relation between kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and chemical structure. Examples are the tautomerism of porphyrin, the porphyrin anion and related compounds exhibiting intramolecular hydrogen bonds of medium strength. We observe pre-exponential factors of the order of kT/h congruent with 10(13) s-1 corresponding to vanishing activation entropies in terms of transition state theory. This result is important for the second type of reactions discussed in this paper, referring mostly to liquid solutions. Here, the reacting molecular configurations may be involved in equilibria with non- or less-reactive forms. Several cases are discussed, where the less-reactive forms dominate at low or at high temperature, leading to unusual Arrhenius curves. These cases include examples from small molecule solution chemistry like the base-catalysed intramolecular H-transfer in diaryltriazene, 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-benzoxazole, 2-hydroxy-phenoxyl radicals, as well as in the case of an enzymatic system, thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase. In the latter case, temperature-dependent KIEs are interpreted in terms of a transition between two regimes with different temperature

  8. Graphene Derivative in Magnetically Recoverable Catalyst Determines Catalytic Properties in Transfer Hydrogenation of Nitroarenes to Anilines with 2-Propanol.

    PubMed

    Das, Vijay Kumar; Mazhar, Sumaira; Gregor, Lennon; Stein, Barry D; Morgan, David Gene; Maciulis, Nicholas A; Pink, Maren; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Bronstein, Lyudmila M

    2018-06-14

    Here, we report transfer hydrogenation of nitroarenes to aminoarenes using 2-propanol as a hydrogen source and Ag-containing magnetically recoverable catalysts based on partially reduced graphene oxide (pRGO) sheets. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data demonstrated that, during the one-pot catalyst synthesis, formation of magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) is accompanied by the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) to pRGO. The formation of Ag 0 NPs on top of magnetite nanoparticles does not change the pRGO structure. At the same time, the catalyst structure is further modified during the transfer hydrogenation, leading to a noticeable increase of sp 2 carbons. These carbons are responsible for the adsorption of substrate and intermediates, facilitating a hydrogen transfer from Ag NPs and creating synergy between the components of the catalyst. The nitroarenes with electron withdrawing and electron donating substituents allow for excellent yields of aniline derivatives with high regio and chemoselectivity, indicating that the reaction is not disfavored by these functionalities. The versatility of the catalyst synthetic protocol was demonstrated by a synthesis of an Ru-containing graphene derivative based catalyst, also allowing for efficient transfer hydrogenation. Easy magnetic separation and stable catalyst performance in the transfer hydrogenation make this catalyst promising for future applications.

  9. Extracting Spectroscopic Factors of Argon Isotopes from Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredi, Juan; Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Brown, K. W.; Cerizza, G.; Barney, J.; Estee, J.; Loelius, C.; Sweany, S.; Anderson, C.; Setiawan, H.; Winkelbauer, J.; Smith, K.; Lee, J.; Xu, Z.; Rogers, A.; Pruitt, C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chen, G.; Langer, C.; Xiao, Z.; Li, Z.; Niu, C.

    2017-09-01

    A spectroscopic factor (SF) quantifies the single particle structure of a given state in a nucleus. There is a discrepancy in extracted SF's between studies that use transfer reactions and those that use knockout reactions. Resolving this discrepancy is important both for understanding reaction probes as well as constraining nuclear structure theory. Kinematically complete measurements of the transfer reactions 34Ar(p,d) and 46Ar(p,d) were performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The same beam energy (70 MeV/u) was used as in a previous knockout measurement to account for energy dependence in the relevant optical potentials. Preliminary results will be presented. In addition, findings from measurement of the two-neutron transfer reactions 34Ar(p,t) and 4 6 Ar(p,t) will be discussed. This work was supported by the NSF (PHY 1565546) and the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship.

  10. Incomplete mass transfer processes in 28Si +93Nb reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R.; Sodaye, S.; Ramachandran, K.; Sharma, S. K.; Pujari, P. K.

    Cross sections of reaction products were measured in 28Si +93Nb reaction using recoil catcher technique involving by off-line gamma-ray spectrometry at beam energies of 105 and 155MeV. At Elab = 155MeV, the contribution from different incomplete mass transfer processes is investigated. Results of the present studies show the contribution from deep inelastic collision (DIC), massive transfer or incomplete fusion (ICF) and quasi-elastic transfer (QET). The contribution from massive transfer reactions was confirmed from the fractional yield of the reaction products in the forward catcher foil. The present results are different from those from the reactions with comparatively higher entrance channel mass asymmetry with lighter projectiles, for which dominant transfer processes are ICF and QET which involve mass transfer predominantly from projectile to target. The N/Z values of the products close to the target mass were observed to be in a wide range, starting from N/Z of the target (93Nb) and extending slightly below the N/Z of the composite system, consistent with the contribution from DIC and QET reactions. At Elab = 105MeV, a small contribution from QET was observed in addition to complete fusion.

  11. Catalytic transfer hydrogenation for stabilization of bio-oil oxygenates: reduction of p-cresol and furfural over bimetallic Ni-Cu catalysts using isopropanol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transfer hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of model bio-oil compounds (p-cresol and furfural) and bio-oils derived from biomass via traditional pyrolysis and tail-gas reactive pyrolysis (TGRP) were conducted. Mild batch reaction conditions were employed, using isopropanol as a hydrogen donor over...

  12. Quantum mechanical hydrogen tunneling in bacterial copper amine oxidase reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Murakawa, Takeshi; Okajima, Toshihide; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    A key step decisively affecting the catalytic efficiency of copper amine oxidase is stereospecific abstraction of substrate {alpha}-proton by a conserved Asp residue. We analyzed this step by pre-steady-state kinetics using a bacterial enzyme and stereospecifically deuterium-labeled substrates, 2-phenylethylamine and tyramine. A small and temperature-dependent kinetic isotope effect (KIE) was observed with 2-phenylethylamine, whereas a large and temperature-independent KIE was observed with tyramine in the {alpha}-proton abstraction step, showing that this step is driven by quantum mechanical hydrogen tunneling rather than the classical transition-state mechanism. Furthermore, an Arrhenius-type preexponential factor ratio approaching a transition-state value was obtained in the reactionmore » of a mutant enzyme lacking the critical Asp. These results provide strong evidence for enzyme-enhanced hydrogen tunneling. X-ray crystallographic structures of the reaction intermediates revealed a small difference in the binding mode of distal parts of substrates, which would modulate hydrogen tunneling proceeding through either active or passive dynamics.« less

  13. Rydberg phases of Hydrogen and low energy nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsson, Sveinn; Holmlid, Leif

    2016-03-01

    For over the last 26 years the science of cold fusion/LENR has been researched around the world with slow pace of progress. Modest quantity of excess heat and signatures of nuclear transmutation and helium production have been confirmed in experiments and theoretical work has only resulted in a large flora of inadequate theoretical scenarios. Here we review current state of research in Rydberg matter of Hydrogen that is showing strong signature of nuclear processes. In the presentation experimental behavior of Rydberg matter of hydrogen is described. An extensive collaboration effort of surface physics, catalysis, atomic physics, solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum information is need to tackle the surprising experimental results that have so far been obtained. Rydberg matter of Hydrogen is the only known state of matter that is able to bring huge collection of protons to so short distances and for so long time that tunneling becomes a reasonable process for making low energy nuclear reactions. Nuclear quantum entanglement can also become realistic process at theses conditions.

  14. Reactivity of hydropersulfides toward the hydroxyl radical unraveled: disulfide bond cleavage, hydrogen atom transfer, and proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Anglada, Josep M; Crehuet, Ramon; Adhikari, Sarju; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2018-02-14

    Hydropersulfides (RSSH) are highly reactive as nucleophiles and hydrogen atom transfer reagents. These chemical properties are believed to be key for them to act as antioxidants in cells. The reaction involving the radical species and the disulfide bond (S-S) in RSSH, a known redox-active group, however, has been scarcely studied, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the chemical nature of RSSH. We have performed a high-level theoretical investigation on the reactions of the hydroxyl radical (˙OH) toward a set of RSSH (R = -H, -CH 3 , -NH 2 , -C(O)OH, -CN, and -NO 2 ). The results show that S-S cleavage and H-atom abstraction are the two competing channels. The electron inductive effect of R induces selective ˙OH substitution at one sulfur atom upon S-S cleavage, forming RSOH and ˙SH for the electron donating groups (EDGs), whereas producing HSOH and ˙SR for the electron withdrawing groups (EWGs). The H-Atom abstraction by ˙OH follows a classical hydrogen atom transfer (hat) mechanism, producing RSS˙ and H 2 O. Surprisingly, a proton-coupled electron transfer (pcet) process also occurs for R being an EDG. Although for RSSH having EWGs hat is the leading channel, S-S cleavage can be competitive or even dominant for the EDGs. The overall reactivity of RSSH toward ˙OH attack is greatly enhanced with the presence of an EDG, with CH 3 SSH being the most reactive species found in this study (overall rate constant: 4.55 × 10 12 M -1 s -1 ). Our results highlight the complexity in RSSH reaction chemistry, the extent of which is closely modulated by the inductive effect of the substituents in the case of the oxidation by hydroxyl radicals.

  15. Fluctuating hydrogen-bond networks govern anomalous electron transfer kinetics in a blue copper protein.

    PubMed

    Kretchmer, Joshua S; Boekelheide, Nicholas; Warren, Jeffrey J; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B; Miller, Thomas F

    2018-06-12

    We combine experimental and computational methods to address the anomalous kinetics of long-range electron transfer (ET) in mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin. ET rates and driving forces for wild type (WT) and three N47X mutants (X = L, S, and D) of Ru(2,2'-bipyridine) 2 (imidazole)(His83) azurin are reported. An enhanced ET rate for the N47L mutant suggests either an increase of the donor-acceptor (DA) electronic coupling or a decrease in the reorganization energy for the reaction. The underlying atomistic features are investigated using a recently developed nonadiabatic molecular dynamics method to simulate ET in each of the azurin mutants, revealing unexpected aspects of DA electronic coupling. In particular, WT azurin and all studied mutants exhibit more DA compression during ET (>2 Å) than previously recognized. Moreover, it is found that DA compression involves an extended network of hydrogen bonds, the fluctuations of which gate the ET reaction, such that DA compression is facilitated by transiently rupturing hydrogen bonds. It is found that the N47L mutant intrinsically disrupts this hydrogen-bond network, enabling particularly facile DA compression. This work, which reveals the surprisingly fluctional nature of ET in azurin, suggests that hydrogen-bond networks can modulate the efficiency of long-range biological ET. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  16. Counter-transference reactions contributing to completed suicide.

    PubMed

    Modestin, J

    1987-12-01

    Counter-transference reactions are frequently elicited while treating suicidal patients and they may contribute to the patient's committing suicide. Therapeutic constellations including the failure of the therapist to (1) cope with the patient's aggressiveness, (2) tolerate the patient's dependency, (3) handle the erotic transference adequately and (4) preserve loyalty towards the patient; they have all been identified as being responsible for a therapeutic impasse with fatal consequences. Knowledge of the therapeutic constellations especially prone to facilitate negative counter-transference reactions may help the therapist to master them effectively.

  17. Substrate mass transfer: analytical approach for immobilized enzyme reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthamarai, R.; Saibavani, T. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the boundary value problem in immobilized enzyme reactions is formulated and approximate expression for substrate concentration without external mass transfer resistance is presented. He’s variational iteration method is used to give approximate and analytical solutions of non-linear differential equation containing a non linear term related to enzymatic reaction. The relevant analytical solution for the dimensionless substrate concentration profile is discussed in terms of dimensionless reaction parameters α and β.

  18. A qualitative quantum rate model for hydrogen transfer in soybean lipoxygenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jevtic, S.; Anders, J.

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen transfer reaction catalysed by soybean lipoxygenase (SLO) has been the focus of intense study following observations of a high kinetic isotope effect (KIE). Today high KIEs are generally thought to indicate departure from classical rate theory and are seen as a strong signature of tunnelling of the transferring particle, hydrogen or one of its isotopes, through the reaction energy barrier. In this paper, we build a qualitative quantum rate model with few free parameters that describes the dynamics of the transferring particle when it is exposed to energetic potentials exerted by the donor and the acceptor. The enzyme's impact on the dynamics is modelled by an additional energetic term, an oscillatory contribution known as "gating." By varying two key parameters, the gating frequency and the mean donor-acceptor separation, the model is able to reproduce well the KIE data for SLO wild-type and a variety of SLO mutants over the experimentally accessible temperature range. While SLO-specific constants have been considered here, it is possible to adapt these for other enzymes.

  19. Easy To Synthesize, Robust Organo‐osmium Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Coverdale, James P. C.; Sanchez‐Cano, Carlos; Clarkson, Guy J.; Soni, Rina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) is an important process in organic synthesis for which the Noyori‐type RuII catalysts [(arene)Ru(Tsdiamine)] are now well established and widely used. We now demonstrate for the first time the catalytic activity of the osmium analogues. X‐ray crystal structures of the 16‐electron OsII catalysts are almost identical to those of RuII. Intriguingly the precursor complex was isolated as a dichlorido complex with a monodentate amine ligand. The OsII catalysts are readily synthesised (within 1 h) and exhibit excellent enantioselectivity in ATH reactions of ketones. PMID:25853228

  20. Hydrogen transfer reduction of polyketones catalyzed by iridium complexes: a novel route towards more biocompatible materials.

    PubMed

    Milani, Barbara; Crottib, Corrado; Farnetti, Erica

    2008-09-14

    Transfer hydrogenation from 2-propanol to CO/4-methylstyrene and CO/styrene polyketones was catalyzed by [Ir(diene)(N-N)X] (N-N = nitrogen chelating ligand; X = halogen) in the presence of a basic cocatalyst. The reactions were performed using dioxane as cosolvent, in order to overcome problems due to low polyketone solubility. The polyalcohols were obtained in yields up to 95%, the conversions being markedly dependent on the nature of the ligands coordinated to iridium as well as on the experimental conditions.

  1. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes.

    PubMed

    Westlake, Brittany C; Brennaman, M Kyle; Concepcion, Javier J; Paul, Jared J; Bettis, Stephanie E; Hampton, Shaun D; Miller, Stephen A; Lebedeva, Natalia V; Forbes, Malcolm D E; Moran, Andrew M; Meyer, Thomas J; Papanikolas, John M

    2011-05-24

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons--electron-proton transfer (EPT)--is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4'-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H(+) is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck-Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated (+)H ─ B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state.

  2. Graphene Charge Transfer, Spectroscopy, and Photochemical Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Brus, Louis

    This project focused on the special electronic and optical properties of graphene and adsorbed molecular species. Graphene makes an excellent substrate for current collection in nanostructured photovoltaic designs. Graphene is almost transparent, and can be used as a solar cell window. It also has no surface states, and thus current is efficiently transported over long distances. Progress in graphene synthesis indicates that there will soon be practical methods for making large pieces of graphene for devices. We now need to understand exactly what happens to both ground state and electronically excited molecules and Qdots near graphene, if we are goingmore » to use them to absorb light in a nano-structured photovoltaic device using graphene to collect photocurrent. We also need to understand how to shift the graphene Fermi level, to optimize the kinetics of electron transfer to graphene. And we need to learn how to convert local graphene areas to semiconductor structure, to make useful spatially patterned graphenes. In this final report, we describe how we addressed these goals. We explored the question of possible Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy from molecular Charge Transfer onto Graphene substrates. We observed strong hole doping of graphene by adsorbed halogens as indicated by the shift of the graphene G Raman band. In the case of iodine adsorption, we also observed the anionic species made by hole doping. At low frequency in the Raman spectrum, we saw quite intense lines from I 3 - and I 5 - , suggesting possible SERS. We reported on Fresnel calculations on this thin film system, which did not show any net electromagnetic field enhancement.« less

  3. Non-catalytic transfer hydrogenation in supercritical CO2 for coal liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhussien, Hussien

    This thesis presents the results of the investigation on developing and evaluating a low temperature (<150°C) non - catalytic process using a hydrogen transfer agent (instead of molecu-lar hydrogen) for coal dissolution in supercritical CO2. The main idea behind the thesis was that one hydrogen atom from water and one hydrogen atom from the hydrogen transfer agent (HTA) were used to hydrogenate the coal. The products of coal dissolution were non-polar and polar while the supercritical CO2, which enhanced the rates of hydrogenation and dissolution of the non-polar molecules and removal from the reaction site, was non-polar. The polar modifier (PM) for CO2 was added to the freed to aid in the dissolution and removal of the polar components. The addition of a phase transfer agent (PTA) allowed a seamless transport of the ions and by-product between the aqueous and organic phases. DDAB, used as the PTA, is an effective phase transfer catalyst and showed enhancement to the coal dissolution process. COAL + DH- +H 2O → COAL.H2 + DHO-- This process has a great feature due to the fact that the chemicals were obtained without requir-ing to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The experiments were conducted in a unique reactor set up that can be connected through two lines. one line to feed the reactor with supercritical CO 2 and the other connected to gas chromatograph. The use of the supercritical CO2 enhanced the solvent option due to the chemical extraction, in addition to the low environmental impact and energy cost. In this thesis the experiment were conducted at five different temperatures from atmos-pheric to 140°C, 3000 - 6000 psi with five component of feed mixture, namely water, HTA, PTA, coal, and PM in semi batch vessels reactor system with a volume of 100 mL. The results show that the chemicals were obtained without requiring to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The results show that

  4. Neutron Spectroscopic Factors from Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jenny; Tsang, M. B.

    2007-05-01

    We have extracted the ground state to ground state neutron spectroscopic factors for 80 nuclei ranging in Z from 3 to 24 by analyzing the past measurements of the angular distributions from (d,p) and (p,d) reactions. We demonstrate an approach that provides systematic and consistent values with a minimum of assumptions. A three-body model with global optical potentials and standard geometry of n-potential is applied. For the 60 nuclei where modern shell model calculations are available, such analysis reproduces, to within 20%, the experimental spectroscopic factors for most nuclei. If we constraint the nucleon-target optical potential and the geometries of the bound neutron-wave function with the modern Hartree-Fock calculations, our deduced neutron spectroscopic factors are reduced by 30% on average.

  5. Single Platinum Atoms Electrocatalysts: Oxygen Reduction and Hydrogen Oxidation Reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Vukmirovic, Miomir B.; Teeluck, Krishani M.; Liu, Ping; ...

    2017-08-08

    We prepared atomically dispersed catalyst consisting of Pt atoms arranged in a c(2 × 2) array on RuO2(110) substrate. A large interatomic distance of Pt atoms in a c(2 × 2) phase precludes the reactants to interact with more than one Pt atoms. A strong bond of Pt atoms with RuO2 prevents agglomeration of Pt atoms to form 2D-islands or 3D-clusters. The activities of single Pt atom catalyst for the oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation reactions were determined and compared with those of bulk Pt. It has lower catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction and similar activity for hydrogenmore » oxidation reaction compared to Pt(111). This was explained by a large calculated up-shift of the dband center of Pt atoms and larger Pt-Pt interatomic distance than that of Pt(111). Our information is of considerable interest for further development of electrocatalysis.« less

  6. Experimental and theoretical study of hydrogen thiocarbonate for heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong

    2009-04-09

    In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy combined with derivative spectroscopy analysis, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy analysis, and quantum chemical calculations were used to investigate the infrared absorbance assignment and the molecular structure of hydrogen thiocarbonate on magnesium oxide. The bands at 1283 and 1257 cm(-1), which had the typical characteristic of intermediate, were observed in experiments for the heterogeneous reaction of COS on MgO. On the basis of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy analysis and quantum chemical calculations, the band at 1283 cm(-1) was assigned to the v(s) band of bridged thiocarbonate which formed on the two neighboring Mg atoms in the (100) face of MgO crystal, and the band at 1257 cm(-1) was the v(s) band of monodentate thiocarbonate on MgO. The v(as)(OCO) band of thiocarbonates was invisible in the experiment due to their weak absorbance and the interruption of surface carbonate. The formation mechanism of thiocarbonates is proposed, which occurred through a nucleophilic attack of preadsorbed COS by surface -OH groups followed by hydrogen atom transfer from the -OH group to the sulfur atom of preadsorbed COS. The activation energy for the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction of bridged thiocarbonate was calculated to be 18.52 kcal x mol(-1) at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory.

  7. Alkyl hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of the CN radical with ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2018-04-01

    We present a study of the abstraction of alkyl hydrogen atoms from the β and α positions of ethanol by the CN radical in solution using the Empirical Valence Bond (EVB) method. We have built separate 2 × 2 EVB models for the Hβ and Hα reactions, where the atom transfer is parameterized using ab initio calculations. The intra- and intermolecular potentials of the reactant and product molecules were modelled with the General AMBER Force Field, with some modifications. We have carried out the dynamics in water and chloroform, which are solvents of contrasting polarity. We have computed the potential of mean force for both abstractions in each of the solvents. They are found to have a small and early barrier along the reaction coordinate with a large energy release. Analyzing the solvent structure around the reaction system, we have found two solvents to have little effect on either reaction. Simulating the dynamics from the transition state, we also study the fate of the energies in the HCN vibrational modes. The HCN molecule is born vibrationally hot in the CH stretch in both reactions and additionally in the HCN bends for the Hα abstraction reaction. In the early stage of the dynamics, we find that the CN stretch mode gains energy at the expense of the energy in CH stretch mode.

  8. Path Sampling Methods for Enzymatic Quantum Particle Transfer Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Dzierlenga, M.W.; Varga, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are studied via a host of computational techniques. While previous methods have been used successfully, many fail to incorporate the full dynamical properties of enzymatic systems. This can lead to misleading results in cases where enzyme motion plays a significant role in the reaction coordinate, which is especially relevant in particle transfer reactions where nuclear tunneling may occur. In this chapter, we outline previous methods, as well as discuss newly developed dynamical methods to interrogate mechanisms of enzymatic particle transfer reactions. These new methods allow for the calculation of free energy barriers and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with the incorporation of quantum effects through centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and the full complement of enzyme dynamics through transition path sampling (TPS). Recent work, summarized in this chapter, applied the method for calculation of free energy barriers to reaction in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). It was found that tunneling plays an insignificant role in YADH but plays a more significant role in LDH, though not dominant over classical transfer. Additionally, we summarize the application of a TPS algorithm for the calculation of reaction rates in tandem with CMD to calculate the primary H/D KIE of YADH from first principles. It was found that the computationally obtained KIE is within the margin of error of experimentally determined KIEs, and corresponds to the KIE of particle transfer in the enzyme. These methods provide new ways to investigate enzyme mechanism with the inclusion of protein and quantum dynamics. PMID:27497161

  9. Graphite oxide and molybdenum disulfide composite for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyitanga, Theophile; Jeong, Hae Kyung

    2017-10-01

    Graphite oxide and molybdenum disulfide (GO-MoS2) composite is prepared through a wet process by using hydrolysis of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and it exhibits excellent catalytic activity of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with a low overpotential of -0.47 V, which is almost two and three times lower than those of precursor MoS2 and GO. The high performance of HER of the composite attributes to the reduced GO supporting MoS2, providing a conducting network for fast electron transport from MoS2 to electrodes. The composite also shows high stability after 500 cycles, demonstrating a synergistic effect of MoS2 and GO for efficient HER.

  10. Exclusive Reactions at High Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, Anatoly; Stoler, Paul

    2008-03-01

    Hard exclusive scattering at JLab / P. Kroll -- AdS/CFT and exclusive processes in QCD / S. J. Brodsky and G. F. de Téramond -- Hadron structure matters in collisions at high energy and momentum / A. W. Thomas -- Inclusive perspectives / P. Hoyer -- Fitting DVCS at NLO and beyond / K. Kumericki, D. Müller and K. Passek-Kumericki -- Spin-orbit correlations and single-spin asymmetries / M. Burkardt -- Electroproduction of soft pions at large momentum transfers / V. M. Braun, D. Yu. Ivanov and A. Peters -- Color transparency: 33 years and still running / M. Strikman -- Meson clouds and nucleon electromagnetic form factors / G. A. Miller -- Covariance, dynamics and symmetries, and hadron form factors / M. S. Bhagwat, I. C. Cloët and C. D. Roberts -- N to [symbol] electromagnetic and axial form factors in full QCD / C. Alexandrou -- Real and virtual compton scattering in perturbative QCD / C.-R. Ji and R. Thomson -- Deeply virtual compton scattering at Jefferson Lab / F. Sabatie -- DVCS at HERMES: recent results / F. Ellinghaus -- Deeply virtual compton scattering with CLAS / F. X. Girod -- Deeply virtual compton scattering off the neutron at JLab Hall A / M. Mazouz -- The future DVCS experiments in Hall A at JLab / J. Roche -- Deeply virtual compton scattering with CLAS12 / L. Elouadrhiri -- Quark helicity flip and the transverse spin dependence of inclusive DIS / A. Afanasev, M. Strikman and C. Weiss -- Deeply virtual pseudoscalar meson production / V. Kubarovsky and P. Stoler -- Exclusive p[symbol] electroproduction on the proton: GPDs or not GPDs? / M. Guidal and S. Morrow -- p[symbol] transverse target spin asymmetry at HERMES / A. Airapetian -- Electroproduction of ø(1020) mesons / J. P. Santoro and E. S. Smith -- Generalized parton distributions from hadronic observables / S. Ahmad ... [et al.] -- Imaging the proton via hard exclusive production in diffractive pp scattering / G. E. Hyde ... [et al.] -- Regge contributions to exclusive electro-production / A

  11. Mechanism of Action of Sulforaphane as a Superoxide Radical Anion and Hydrogen Peroxide Scavenger by Double Hydrogen Transfer: A Model for Iron Superoxide Dismutase.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ajit Kumar; Mishra, P C

    2015-06-25

    The mechanism of action of sulforaphane as a scavenger of superoxide radical anion (O2(•-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) in both gas phase and aqueous media. Iron superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) involved in scavenging superoxide radical anion from biological media was modeled by a complex consisting of the ferric ion (Fe(3+)) attached to three histidine rings. Reactions related to scavenging of superoxide radical anion by sulforaphane were studied using DFT in the presence and absence of Fe-SOD represented by this model in both gas phase and aqueous media. The scavenging action of sulforaphane toward both superoxide radical anion and hydrogen peroxide was found to involve the unusual mechanism of double hydrogen transfer. It was found that sulforaphane alone, without Fe-SOD, cannot scavenge superoxide radical anion in gas phase or aqueous media efficiently as the corresponding reaction barriers are very high. However, in the presence of Fe-SOD represented by the above-mentioned model, the scavenging reactions become barrierless, and so sulforaphane scavenges superoxide radical anion by converting it to hydrogen peroxide efficiently. Further, sulforaphane was found to scavenge hydrogen peroxide also very efficiently by converting it into water. Thus, the mechanism of action of sulforaphane as an excellent antioxidant has been unravelled.

  12. Study of fission using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Mark, Vermeulen; Makii, Hiroyuki; Orlandi, Riccardo; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Toyoshima, Atsushi; Sato, Tetsuya K.; Nagame, Yuichiro; Chiba, Satoshi; Aritomo, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shouya; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Tsekhanovich, Igor; Petrache, Costel M.; Andreyev, Andrei

    2017-11-01

    It is shown that multi-nucleon transfer reaction is a powerful tool to study fission of exotic neutronrich actinide nuclei, which cannot be accessed by particle-capture or heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, multi-nucleon transfer channels of the reactions of 18O+232Th, 18O+238U, 18O+248Cm, and 18O+237Np were used to measure fission-fragment mass distribution for each transfer channel. Predominantly asymmetric fission is observed at low excitation energies for all the studied cases, with an increase of the symmetric fission towards high excitation energies. Experimental data are compared with predictions of the fluctuation-dissipation model, where effects of multi-chance fission (neutron evaporation prior to fission) was introduced. It is shown that mass-asymmetric structure remaining at high excitation energies originates from low-excited and less neutronrich excited nuclei due to higher-order chance fissions.

  13. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural to 2-Methylfuran and 2-Methyltetrahydrofuran over Bimetallic Copper-Palladium Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xin; Liu, An-Feng; Cai, Bo; Luo, Jin-Yue; Pan, Hui; Huang, Yao-Bing

    2016-12-08

    The catalytic transfer hydrogenation of furfural to the fuel additives 2-methylfuran (2-MF) and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF) was investigated over various bimetallic catalysts in the presence of the hydrogen donor 2-propanol. Of all the as-prepared catalysts, bimetallic Cu-Pd catalysts showed the highest catalytic activities towards the formation of 2-MF and 2-MTHF with a total yield of up to 83.9 % yield at 220 °C in 4 h. By modifying the Pd ratios in the Cu-Pd catalyst, 2-MF or 2-MTHF could be obtained selectively as the prevailing product. The other reaction conditions also had a great influence on the product distribution. Mechanistic studies by reaction monitoring and intermediate conversion revealed that the reaction proceeded mainly through the hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol, which was followed by deoxygenation to 2-MF in parallel to deoxygenation/ring hydrogenation to 2-MTHF. Finally, the catalyst showed a high reactivity and stability in five catalyst recycling runs, which represents a significant step forward toward the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of furfural. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Femtochemistry of Intramolecular Charge and Proton Transfer Reactions in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Douhal, Abderrazzak; Sanz, Mikel; Carranza, Maria Angeles

    2005-03-17

    We report on the first observation of ultrafast intramolecular charge- and proton-transfer reactions in 4'-dimethylaminoflavonol (DAMF) in solution. Upon femtosecond excitation of a non-planar structure of DMAF in apolar medium, the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) does not occur, and a slow (2 ps) proton motion takes place. However, in polar solvents, the ICT is very fast (100-200 fs) and the produced structure is stabilized that proton motion takes place in few or tens of ps.

  15. Insight into association reactions on metal surfaces: Density-functional theory studies of hydrogenation reactions on Rh(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-Pan; Hu, P.; Lee, Ming-Hsien

    2003-09-01

    Hydrogenation reaction, as one of the simplest association reactions on surfaces, is of great importance both scientifically and technologically. They are essential steps in many industrial processes in heterogeneous catalysis, such as ammonia synthesis (N2+3H2→2NH3). Many issues in hydrogenation reactions remain largely elusive. In this work, the NHx (x=0,1,2) hydrogenation reactions (N+H→NH, NH+H→NH2 and NH2+H→NH3) on Rh(111) are used as a model system to study the hydrogenation reactions on metal surfaces in general using density-functional theory. In addition, C and O hydrogenation (C+H→CH and O+H→OH) and several oxygenation reactions, i.e., C+O, N+O, O+O reactions, are also calculated in order to provide a further understanding of the barrier of association reactions. The reaction pathways and the barriers of all these reactions are determined and reported. For the C, N, NH, and O hydrogenation reactions, it is found that there is a linear relationship between the barrier and the valency of R (R=C, N, NH, and O). Detailed analyses are carried out to rationalize the barriers of the reactions, which shows that: (i) The interaction energy between two reactants in the transition state plays an important role in determining the trend in the barriers; (ii) there are two major components in the interaction energy: The bonding competition and the direct Pauli repulsion; and (iii) the Pauli repulsion effect is responsible for the linear valency-barrier trend in the C, N, NH, and O hydrogenation reactions. For the NH2+H reaction, which is different from other hydrogenation reactions studied, the energy cost of the NH2 activation from the IS to the TS is the main part of the barrier. The potential energy surface of the NH2 on metal surfaces is thus crucial to the barrier of NH2+H reaction. Three important factors that can affect the barrier of association reactions are generalized: (i) The bonding competition effect; (ii) the local charge densities of the

  16. Performance of Frozen Density Embedding for Modeling Hole Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Pablo; Papadakis, Markos; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-06-18

    We have carried out a thorough benchmark of the frozen density-embedding (FDE) method for calculating hole transfer couplings. We have considered 10 exchange-correlation functionals, 3 nonadditive kinetic energy functionals, and 3 basis sets. Overall, we conclude that with a 7% mean relative unsigned error, the PBE and PW91 functionals coupled with the PW91k nonadditive kinetic energy functional and a TZP basis set constitute the most stable and accurate levels of theory for hole transfer coupling calculations. The FDE-ET method is found to be an excellent tool for computing diabatic couplings for hole transfer reactions.

  17. Study of ring influence and electronic response to proton transfer reactions. Reaction electronic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Barbara

    2011-05-01

    In this article, a theoretical study of 1-5 proton transfers is presented. Two model systems which represent 1-5 proton transfer, 3-hidroxy-2-propenimine and salicyldenaniline have been studied as shown in Fig. 1. For this purpose, a DFT/B3LYP/6-311+G**, reaction force and reaction electronic flux analysis is made. The obtained results indicate that both proton transfers exhibit energetic and electronic differences emphasizing the role of the neighbor ring and the impact of conjugation on electronic properties.

  18. Ruthenium supported on magnetic nanoparticles: An efficient and recoverable catalyst for hydrogenation of alkynes and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium supported on surface modified magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and applied for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The ...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10445 - 2-Propen-1-ol, reaction products with hydrogen sulfide, distn. residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide, distn. residues. 721.10445 Section 721.10445 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... hydrogen sulfide, distn. residues. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2-propen-1-ol, reaction products with hydrogen sulfide, distn...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10445 - 2-Propen-1-ol, reaction products with hydrogen sulfide, distn. residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide, distn. residues. 721.10445 Section 721.10445 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... hydrogen sulfide, distn. residues. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2-propen-1-ol, reaction products with hydrogen sulfide, distn...

  1. Charge transfer of O3+ ions with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.; Stancil, P. C.; Turner, A. R.; Cooper, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground state O3+(2s22p 2P) ions with atomic hydrogen are investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) method. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial and rotational coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. Total and state-selective cross sections and rate coefficients are presented. Comparison with existing experimental and theoretical data shows our results to be in better agreement with the measurements than the previous calculations, although problems with some of the state-selective measurements are noted. Our calculations demonstrate that rotational coupling is not important for the total cross section, but for state-selective cross sections, its relevance increases with energy. For the ratios of triplet to singlet cross sections, significant departures from a statistical value are found, generally in harmony with experiment.

  2. Transfer hydrogenation catalysis in cells as a new approach to anticancer drug design

    PubMed Central

    Soldevila-Barreda, Joan J.; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Habtemariam, Abraha; Sadler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Organometallic complexes are effective hydrogenation catalysts for organic reactions. For example, Noyori-type ruthenium complexes catalyse reduction of ketones by transfer of hydride from formate. Here we show that such catalytic reactions can be achieved in cancer cells, offering a new strategy for the design of safe metal-based anticancer drugs. The activity of ruthenium(II) sulfonamido ethyleneamine complexes towards human ovarian cancer cells is enhanced by up to 50 × in the presence of low non-toxic doses of formate. The extent of conversion of coenzyme NAD+ to NADH in cells is dependent on formate concentration. This novel reductive stress mechanism of cell death does not involve apoptosis or perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potentials. In contrast, iridium cyclopentadienyl catalysts cause cancer cell death by oxidative stress. Organometallic complexes therefore have an extraordinary ability to modulate the redox status of cancer cells. PMID:25791197

  3. Selective conversion of polyenes to monoenes by RuCl(3) -catalyzed transfer hydrogenation: the case of cashew nutshell liquid.

    PubMed

    Perdriau, Sébastien; Harder, Sjoerd; Heeres, Hero J; de Vries, Johannes G

    2012-12-01

    Cardanol, a constituent of cashew nutshell liquid (CNSL), was subjected to transfer hydrogenation catalyzed by RuCl(3) using isopropanol as a reductant. The side chain of cardanol, which is a mixture of a triene, a diene, and a monoene, was selectively reduced to the monoene. Surprisingly, it is the C8-C9 double bond that is retained with high selectivity. A similar transfer hydrogenation of linoleic acid derivatives succeeded only if the substrate contained an aromatic ring, such as a benzyl ester. TEM and a negative mercury test showed that the catalyst was homogeneous. By using ESI-MS, ruthenium complexes were identified that contained one, two, or even three molecules of substrate, most likely as allyl complexes. The interaction between ruthenium and the aromatic ring determines selectivity in the hydrogenation reaction. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Saponification reaction system: a detailed mass transfer coefficient determination.

    PubMed

    Pečar, Darja; Goršek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The saponification of an aromatic ester with an aqueous sodium hydroxide was studied within a heterogeneous reaction medium in order to determine the overall kinetics of the selected system. The extended thermo-kinetic model was developed compared to the previously used simple one. The reaction rate within a heterogeneous liquid-liquid system incorporates a chemical kinetics term as well as mass transfer between both phases. Chemical rate constant was obtained from experiments within a homogeneous medium, whilst the mass-transfer coefficient was determined separately. The measured thermal profiles were then the bases for determining the overall reaction-rate. This study presents the development of an extended kinetic model for considering mass transfer regarding the saponification of ethyl benzoate with sodium hydroxide within a heterogeneous reaction medium. The time-dependences are presented for the mass transfer coefficient and the interfacial areas at different heterogeneous stages and temperatures. The results indicated an important role of reliable kinetic model, as significant difference in k(L)a product was obtained with extended and simple approach.

  5. Defects Engineered Monolayer MoS 2 for Improved Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Gonglan; Gong, Yongji; Lin, Junhao; ...

    2016-01-13

    MoS 2 is a promising, low-cost material for electrochemical hydrogen production due to its high activity and stability during the reaction. Our work represents an easy method to increase the hydrogen production in electrochemical reaction of MoS 2 via defect engineering, and helps to understand the catalytic properties of MoS 2.

  6. Extracting Spectroscopic Factors of Argon Isotopes from Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredi, Juan; Lee, J.; Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Barney, J.; Estee, J.; Sweany, S.; Brown, K. W.; Cerizza, G.; Anderson, C.; Setiawan, H.; Loelius, C.; Xu, Z.; Rogers, A. M.; Pruitt, C.; Sobotka, L. G.; Elson, J. M.; Langer, C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chen, G.; Jones, K. L.; Smith, K.; Xiao, Z.; Li, Z.; Winkelbauer, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    A spectroscopic factor (SF) quantifies the single particle occupancy of a given state in a nucleus. For the argon isotopes, there is a discrepancy of the SF between studies that use transfer reactions and knockout reactions. Understanding the SFs of these isotopes, and in particular how the SF changes across the isotopic chain, is important for understanding how single particle structure changes with neutron number. The transfer reactions 34Ar(p,d) and 46Ar(p,d) were measured at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) using the same beam energy (70 MeV/u) as from the previous knockout measurement. Spectroscopic factors were extracted from measured angular distributions via ADWA calculations. Preliminary findings will be presented. The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory is supported by the NSF (PHY 1102511), and Juan Manfredi is supported by the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship.

  7. Liquid-phase hydrogenation of citral over Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalysts. 2. Hydrogenation of reaction intermediate compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, U.K.; Sysak, M.N.; Vannice, M.A.

    2000-04-01

    Liquid-phase hydrogenation of the four principal reaction intermediates formed during citral hydrogenation, i.e., nerol, geraniol, citronellal, and citronellol, was studied at 298 and 373 K under 20 atm H{sub 2} at concentrations of 0.5 to 1.0 M in hexane. A decrease in the initial reaction rate as temperature increased from 298 to 373 K was exhibited during the hydrogenation of all four compounds, just as reported earlier for citral; however, the decrease in rate at 373 K was only one-half for citronellal whereas it was orders of magnitude greater for nerol and geraniol. Furthermore, simultaneous hydrogenation of citronellal and geraniolmore » at 298 K resulted in a continuous decrease in the rate of citronellal disappearance in contrast to the nearly constant rate of disappearance observed during hydrogenation of citronellal alone. Competitive hydrogenation of citral with either geraniol or citronellal showed that geraniol hydrogenation to citronellol is kinetically insignificant during citral hydrogenation at 373 K. The initial activity for hydrogenation of the intermediates at 298 K follows the following trend: geraniol > nerol < citronellol < E-citral, citronellal > Z-citral. Based on the relative hydrogenation rates of the intermediate alone versus its hydrogenation in the presence of other reactants, the relative size of the adsorption equilibrium constants for the various organic compounds appears to be as follows: citral > citronellal > geraniol, nerol > citronellol > 3,7-dimethyloctanol. This study indicates that activation of the C{double_bond}O bond should be performed at higher reaction temperatures to maximize selectivity to the unsaturated alcohols.« less

  8. Reactions of hydrogen with V-Cr-Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Chitwood, L.D.

    In the absence of increases in oxygen concentration, additions of up to 400 ppm hydrogen to V-4 Cr-4 Ti did not result in significant embrittlement as determined by room temperature tensile tests. However, when hydrogen approached 700 ppm after exposure at 325 C, rapid embrittlement occurred. In this latter case, hydride formation is the presumed embrittlement cause. When oxygen was added during or prior to hydrogen exposure, synergistic effects led to significant embrittlement by 100 ppm hydrogen.

  9. Noncovalent Organocatalysis Based on Hydrogen Bonding: Elucidation of Reaction Paths by Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzenbach-Effers, Kerstin; Berkessel, Albrecht

    In this article, the functions of hydrogen bonds in organocatalytic reactions are discussed on atomic level by presenting DFT studies of selected examples. Theoretical investigation provides a detailed insight in the mechanism of substrate activation and orientation, and the stabilization of transition states and intermediates by hydrogen bonding (e.g. oxyanion hole). The examples selected comprise stereoselective catalysis by bifunctional thioureas, solvent catalysis by fluorinated alcohols in epoxidation by hydrogen peroxide, and intramolecular cooperative hydrogen bonding in TADDOL-type catalysts.

  10. Charge transfer between O6+ and atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Stancil, P. C.; Liebermann, H. P.; Buenker, R. J.; Schultz, D. R.; Hui, Y.

    2011-05-01

    The charge exchange process has been found to play a dominant role in the production of X-rays and/or EUV photons observed in cometary and planetary atmospheres and from the heliosphere. Charge transfer cross sections, especially state-selective cross sections, are necessary parameters in simulations of X-ray emission. In the present work, charge transfer due to collisions of ground state O6+(1s2 1 S) with atomic hydrogen has been investigated theoretically using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling method (QMOCC). The multi-reference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction approach (MRDCI) has been applied to compute the adiabatic potential and nonadiabatic couplings, and the atomic basis sets used have been optimized with the method proposed previously to obtain precise potential data. Total and state-selective cross sections are calculated for energies between 10 meV/u and 10 keV/u. The QMOCC results are compared to available experimental and theoretical data as well as to new atomic-orbital close-coupling (AOCC) and classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) calculations. A recommended set of cross sections, based on the MOCC, AOCC, and CTMC calculations, is deduced which should aid in X-ray modeling studies.

  11. Deactivation of Ceria Supported Palladium through C–C Scission during Transfer Hydrogenation of Phenol with Alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Nicholas C.; Manzano, J. Sebastián; Slowing, Igor I.

    The stability of palladium supported on ceria (Pd/CeO 2) was studied during liquid flow transfer hydrogenation using primary and secondary alcohols as hydrogen donors. For primary alcohols, the ceria support was reduced to cerium hydroxy carbonate within 14 h and was a contributing factor toward catalyst deactivation. For secondary alcohols, cerium hydroxy carbonate was not observed during the same time period and the catalyst was stable upon prolonged reaction. Regeneration through oxidation/reduction does not restore initial activity likely due to irreversible catalyst restructuring. Lastly, a deactivation mechanism involving C–C scission of acyl and carboxylate intermediates is proposed.

  12. Deactivation of Ceria Supported Palladium through C–C Scission during Transfer Hydrogenation of Phenol with Alcohols

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Nicholas C.; Manzano, J. Sebastián; Slowing, Igor I.

    2016-11-21

    The stability of palladium supported on ceria (Pd/CeO 2) was studied during liquid flow transfer hydrogenation using primary and secondary alcohols as hydrogen donors. For primary alcohols, the ceria support was reduced to cerium hydroxy carbonate within 14 h and was a contributing factor toward catalyst deactivation. For secondary alcohols, cerium hydroxy carbonate was not observed during the same time period and the catalyst was stable upon prolonged reaction. Regeneration through oxidation/reduction does not restore initial activity likely due to irreversible catalyst restructuring. Lastly, a deactivation mechanism involving C–C scission of acyl and carboxylate intermediates is proposed.

  13. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for the production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.; Gaffney, T.

    1998-08-01

    The novel Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process has the potential to decrease the cost of hydrogen production by steam methane reforming. Current effort for development of this technology has focused on adsorbent development, experimental process concept testing, and process development and design. A preferred CO{sub 2} adsorbent, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted hydrotalcite, satisfies all of the performance targets and it has been scaled up for process testing. A separate class of adsorbents has been identified which could potentially improve the performance of the H{sub 2}-SER process. Although this material exhibits improved CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the HTC adsorbent, itsmore » hydrothermal stability must be improved. Single-step process experiments (not cyclic) indicate that the H{sub 2}-SER reactor performance during the reaction step improves with decreasing pressure and increasing temperature and steam to methane ratio in the feed. Methane conversion in the H{sub 2}-SER reactor is higher than for a conventional catalyst-only reactor operated at similar temperature and pressure. The reactor effluent gas consists of 90+% H{sub 2}, balance CH{sub 4}, with only trace levels (< 50 ppm) of carbon oxides. A best-case process design (2.5 MMSCFD of 99.9+% H{sub 2}) based on the HTC adsorbent properties and a revised SER process cycle has been generated. Economic analysis of this design indicates the process has the potential to reduce the H{sub 2} product cost by 25--31% compared to conventional steam methane reforming.« less

  14. Reactions of Persistent Carbenes with Hydrogen-Terminated Silicon Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhukhovitskiy, Aleksandr V; Mavros, Michael G; Queeney, K T; Wu, Tony; Voorhis, Troy Van; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2016-07-13

    Surface passivation has enabled the development of silicon-based solar cells and microelectronics. However, a number of emerging applications require a paradigm shift from passivation to functionalization, wherein surface functionality is installed proximal to the silicon surface. To address this need, we report here the use of persistent aminocarbenes to functionalize hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces via Si-H insertion reactions. Through the use of model compounds (H-Si(TMS)3 and H-Si(OTMS)3), nanoparticles (H-SiNPs), and planar Si(111) wafers (H-Si(111)), we demonstrate that among different classes of persistent carbenes, the more electrophilic and nucleophilic ones, in particular, a cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbene (CAAC) and an acyclic diaminocarbene (ADAC), are able to undergo insertion into Si-H bonds at the silicon surface, forming persistent C-Si linkages and simultaneously installing amine or aminal functionality in proximity to the surface. The CAAC (6) is particularly notable for its clean insertion reactivity under mild conditions that produces monolayers with 21 ± 3% coverage of Si(111) atop sites, commensurate with the expected maximum of ∼20%. Atomic force and transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron, and infrared spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry provided evidence for the surface Si-H insertion process. Furthermore, computational studies shed light on the reaction energetics and indicated that CAAC 6 should be particularly effective at binding to silicon dihydride, trihydride, and coupled monohyride motifs, as well as oxidized surface sites. Our results pave the way for the further development of persistent carbenes as universal ligands for silicon and potentially other nonmetallic substrates.

  15. Flat Graphene-Enhanced Electron Transfer Involved in Redox Reactions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Meilan; Zhang, Yanyang; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Gao, Guandao; Pan, Bingcai

    2017-08-01

    Graphene is easily warped in the out-of-plane direction because of its high in-plane Young's modulus, and exploring the influence of wrinkled graphene on its properties is essential for the design of graphene-based materials for environmental applications. Herein, we prepared wrinkled graphene (WGN-1 and WGN-2) by thermal treatment and compared their electrochemical properties with those of flat graphene nanosheets (FGN). FGN exhibit activities that are much better than those of wrinkled graphene nanosheets (WGN), not only in the electrochemical oxidation of methylene blue (MB) but also in the electrochemical reduction of nitrobenzene (NB). Transformation ratios of MB and NB in FGN, WGN-1, and WGN-2 were 97.5, 80.1, and 57.9% and 94.6, 92.1, and 81.2%, respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and the surface resistance of the graphene samples increased in the following order: FGN < WGN-1 < WGN-2. This suggests that the reaction charges transfer faster across the reaction interfaces and along the surface of FGN than that of WGN, and wrinkles restrict reaction charge transfer and reduce the reaction rates. This study reveals that the morphology of the graphene (flat or wrinkle) greatly affects redox reaction activities and may have important implications for the design of novel graphene-based nanostructures and for our understanding of graphene wrinkle-dependent redox reactions in environmental processes.

  16. Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Reactions on Nanostructured Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) Electrocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digraskar, Renuka V.; Mulik, Balaji B.; Walke, Pravin S.; Ghule, Anil V.; Sathe, Bhaskar R.

    2017-08-01

    A novel and facile one-step sonochemical method is used to synthesize Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanoparticles (2.6 ± 0.4 nm) as cathode electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reactions. The detailed morphology, crystal and surface structure, and composition of the CZTS nanostructures were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), Selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements, Electron dispersive analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy respectively. Electrocatalytic abilities of the nanoparticles toward Hydrogen Evolution Reactions (HER) were verified through cyclic voltammograms (CV) and Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Tafel polarization measurements. It reveals enhanced activity at lower onset potential 300 mV v/s RHE, achieved at exceptionally high current density -130 mA/cm2, which is higher than the existing non-nobel metal based cathodes. Further result exhibits Tafel slope of 85 mV/dec, exchange current density of 882 mA/cm2, excellent stability (> 500 cycles) and lower charge transfer resistance. This sonochemically fabricated CZTSs nanoparticles are leading to significantly reduce cell cost and simplification of preparation process over existing high efficiency Pt and other nobel metal-free cathode electrocatalyst.

  17. Stepwise vs concerted excited state tautomerization of 2-hydroxypyridine: Ammonia dimer wire mediated hydrogen/proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Esboui, Mounir, E-mail: mounir.esboui@fst.rnu.tn; Technical and Vocational Training Corporation, Hail College of Technology, P.O. Box 1960, Hail 81441

    The stepwise and concerted excited state intermolecular proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen transfer (HT) reactions in 2-hydroxypyridine-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} complex in the gas phase under Cs symmetry constraint and without any symmetry constraints were performed using quantum chemical calculations. It shows that upon excitation, the hydrogen bonded in 2HP-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} cluster facilitates the releasing of both hydrogen and proton transfer reactions along ammonia wire leading to the formation of the 2-pyridone tautomer. For the stepwise mechanism, it has been found that the proton and the hydrogen may transfer consecutively. These processes are distinguished from each other through charge translocationmore » analysis and the coupling between the motion of the proton and the electron density distribution along ammonia wire. For the complex under Cs symmetry, the excited state HT occurs on the A″({sup 1}πσ{sup ∗}) and A′({sup 1}nσ{sup ∗}) states over two accessible energy barriers along reaction coordinates, and excited state PT proceeds mainly through the A′({sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}) and A″({sup 1}nπ{sup ∗}) potential energy surfaces. For the unconstrained complex, potential energy profiles show two {sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}-{sup 1}πσ{sup ∗} conical intersections along enol → keto reaction path indicating that proton and H atom are localized, respectively, on the first and second ammonia of the wire. Moreover, the concerted excited state PT is competitive to take place with the stepwise process, because it proceeds over low barriers of 0.14 eV and 0.11 eV with respect to the Franck-Condon excitation of enol tautomer, respectively, under Cs symmetry and without any symmetry constraints. These barriers can be probably overcome through tunneling effect.« less

  18. A RhxSy/C Catalyst for the Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions in HBr

    SciTech Connect

    Masud, J; Nguyen, TV; Singh, N

    Rhodium sulfide (Rh2S3) on carbon support was synthesized by refluxing rhodium chloride with ammonium thiosulfate. Thermal treatment of Rh2S3 at high temperatures (600 degrees C to 850 degrees C) in presence of argon resulted in the transformation of Rh2S3 into Rh3S4, Rh17S15 and Rh which were characterized by TGA/DTA, XRD, EDX, and deconvolved XPS analyses. The catalyst particle size distribution ranged from 3 to 12 nm. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode measurements were used to evaluate the catalytic activity for hydrogen oxidation and evolution reactions in H2SO4 and HBr solutions. The thermally treated catalysts show high activity for themore » hydrogen reactions. The exchange current densities (i(o)) of the synthesized RhxSy catalysts in H-2-saturated 1M H2SO4 and 1M HBr for HER and HOR were 0.9 mA/cm(2) to 1.0 mA/cm(2) and 0.8 to 0.9 mA/cm(2), respectively. The lower i(o) values obtained in 1M HBr solution compared to in H2SO4 might be due to the adsorption of Br- on the active surface. Stable electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) of RhxSy catalyst was obtained for CV scan limits between 0 V and 0.65 V vs. RHE. Scans with upper voltage limit beyond 0.65 V led to decreased and unreproducible ECSA measurements. (C) The Author(s) 2015. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.« less

  19. Chemically Reversible Reactions of Hydrogen Sulfide with Metal Phthalocyanines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important signaling molecule that exerts action on various bioinorganic targets. Despite this importance, few studies have investigated the differential reactivity of the physiologically relevant H2S and HS– protonation states with metal complexes. Here we report the distinct reactivity of H2S and HS– with zinc(II) and cobalt(II) phthalocyanine (Pc) complexes and highlight the chemical reversibility and cyclability of each metal. ZnPc reacts with HS–, but not H2S, to generate [ZnPc-SH]−, which can be converted back to ZnPc by protonation. CoPc reacts with HS–, but not H2S, to form [CoIPc]−, which can be reoxidized to CoPc by air. Taken together, these results demonstrate the chemically reversible reaction of HS– with metal phthalocyanine complexes and highlight the importance of H2S protonation state in understanding the reactivity profile of H2S with biologically relevant metal scaffolds. PMID:24785654

  20. Conformational dependence of a protein kinase phosphate transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Henkelman, Graeme; LaBute, Montiago X; Tung, Chang-Shung; Fenimore, P W; McMahon, Benjamin H

    2005-10-25

    Atomic motions and energetics for a phosphate transfer reaction catalyzed by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase are calculated by plane-wave density functional theory, starting from structures of proteins crystallized in both the reactant conformation (RC) and the transition-state conformation (TC). In TC, we calculate that the reactants and products are nearly isoenergetic with a 20-kJ/mol barrier, whereas phosphate transfer is unfavorable by 120 kJ/mol in the RC, with an even higher barrier. With the protein in TC, the motions involved in reaction are small, with only P(gamma) and the catalytic proton moving >0.5 A. Examination of the structures reveals that in the RC the active site cleft is not completely closed and there is insufficient space for the phosphorylated serine residue in the product state. Together, these observations imply that the phosphate transfer reaction occurs rapidly and reversibly in a particular conformation of the protein, and that the reaction can be gated by changes of a few tenths of an angstrom in the catalytic site.

  1. Explicit inclusion of nonlocality in ( d , p ) transfer reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Titus, L. J.; Nunes, F. M.; Potel, G.

    2016-01-06

    Traditionally, nucleon-nucleus optical potentials are made local for convenience. In recent work we studied the effects of including nonlocal interactions explicitly in the final state for (d,p) reactions, within the distorted wave Born approximation. Our goal in this work is to develop an improved formalism for nonlocal interactions that includes deuteron breakup and to use it to study the effects of including nonlocal interactions in transfer (d,p) reactions, in both the deuteron and the proton channel. We extend the finite-range adiabatic distorted wave approximation to include nonlocal nucleon optical potentials. We apply our method to (d,p) reactions on 16O, 40Ca,more » 48Ca, 126Sn, 132Sn, and 208Pb at 10, 20 and 50 MeV. Here, we find that nonlocality in the deuteron scattering state reduces the amplitude of the wave function in the nuclear interior, and shifts the wave function outward. In many cases, this has the effect of increasing the transfer cross section at the first peak of the angular distributions. This increase was most significant for heavy targets and for reactions at high energies. Lastly, our systematic study shows that, if only local optical potentials are used in the analysis of experimental (d, p) transfer cross sections, the extracted spectroscopic factors may be incorrect by up to 40% due to the local approximation.« less

  2. Competition between Hydrogen Bonding and Proton Transfer during Specific Anion Recognition by Dihomooxacalix[4]arene Bidentate Ureas.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Eduardo; González, Felipe J; Ascenso, José R; Marcos, Paula M; Frontana, Carlos

    2016-08-05

    Competition between hydrogen bonding and proton transfer reactions was studied for systems composed of electrogenerated dianionic species from dinitrobenzene isomers and substituted dihomooxacalix[4]arene bidentate urea derivatives. To analyze this competition, a second-order ErCrCi mechanism was considered where the binding process is succeeded by proton transfer and the voltammetric responses depend on two dimensionless parameters: the first related to hydrogen bonding reactions, and the second one to proton transfer processes. Experimental results indicated that, upon an increase in the concentration of phenyl-substituted dihomooxacalix[4]arene bidentate urea, voltammetric responses evolve from diffusion-controlled waves (where the binding process is at chemical equilibrium) into irreversible kinetic responses associated with proton transfer. In particular, the 1,3-dinitrobenzene isomer showed a higher proton transfer rate constant (∼25 M(-1) s(-1)) compared to that of the 1,2-dinitrobenzene (∼5 M(-1) s(-1)), whereas the 1,4-dinitrobenzene did not show any proton transfer effect in the experimental conditions employed.

  3. An integrated experimental and theoretical reaction path search: analyses of the multistage reaction of an ionized diethylether dimer involving isomerization, proton transfer, and dissociation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Xie, Min; Fujii, Asuka

    2018-05-30

    An ionization-induced multistage reaction of an ionized diethylether (DEE) dimer involving isomerization, proton transfer, and dissociation is investigated by combining infrared (IR) spectroscopy, tandem mass spectrometry, and a theoretical reaction path search. The vertically-ionized DEE dimer isomerizes to a hydrogen-bonded cluster of protonated DEE and the [DEE-H] radical through barrierless intermolecular proton transfer from the CH bond of the ionized moiety. This isomerization process is confirmed by IR spectroscopy and the theoretical reaction path search. The multiple dissociation pathways following the isomerization are analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. The isomerized cluster dissociates stepwise into a [protonated DEE-acetaldehyde (AA)] cluster, protonated DEE, and protonated AA. The structure of the fragment ion is also analyzed by IR spectroscopy. The reaction map of the multistage processes is revealed through a harmony of these experimental and theoretical methods.

  4. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, Kevin; Jovanovic, Goran; Paul, Brian

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  5. Factors affecting hydrogen-tunneling contribution in hydroxylation reactions promoted by oxoiron(IV) porphyrin π-cation radical complexes.

    PubMed

    Cong, Zhiqi; Kinemuchi, Haruki; Kurahashi, Takuya; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2014-10-06

    Hydrogen atom transfer with a tunneling effect (H-tunneling) has been proposed to be involved in aliphatic hydroxylation reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P450 and synthetic heme complexes as a result of the observation of large hydrogen/deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). In the present work, we investigate the factors controlling the H-tunneling contribution to the H-transfer process in hydroxylation reaction by examining the kinetics of hydroxylation reactions at the benzylic positions of xanthene and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene by oxoiron(IV) 5,10,15,20-tetramesitylporphyrin π-cation radical complexes ((TMP(+•))Fe(IV)O(L)) under single-turnover conditions. The Arrhenius plots for these hydroxylation reactions of H-isotopomers have upwardly concave profiles. The Arrhenius plots of D-isotopomers, clear isosbestic points, and product analysis rule out the participation of thermally dependent other reaction processes in the concave profiles. These results provide evidence for the involvement of H-tunneling in the rate-limiting H-transfer process. These profiles are simulated using an equation derived from Bell's tunneling model. The temperature dependence of the KIE values (k(H)/k(D)) determined for these reactions indicates that the KIE value increases as the reaction temperature becomes lower, the bond dissociation energy (BDE) of the C-H bond of a substrate becomes higher, and the reactivity of (TMP(+•))Fe(IV)O(L) decreases. In addition, we found correlation of the slope of the ln(k(H)/k(D)) - 1/T plot and the bond strengths of the Fe═O bond of (TMP(+•))Fe(IV)O(L) estimated from resonance Raman spectroscopy. These observations indicate that these factors modulate the extent of the H-tunneling contribution by modulating the ratio of the height and thickness of the reaction barrier.

  6. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Westlake, Brittany C.; Brennaman, Kyle M.; Concepcion, Javier J.

    2011-05-24

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons—electron-proton transfer (EPT)—is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4'-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectralmore » measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H⁺ is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck–Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated ⁺H–B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state.« less

  7. Advances of zeolite based membrane for hydrogen production via water gas shift reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen is considered as a promising energy vector which can be obtained from various renewable sources. However, an efficient hydrogen production technology is still challenging. One technology to produce hydrogen with very high capacity with low cost is through water gas shift (WGS) reaction. Water gas shift reaction is an equilibrium reaction that produces hydrogen from syngas mixture by the introduction of steam. Conventional WGS reaction employs two or more reactors in series with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given volume of catalyst. Membrane reactor as new technology can cope several drawbacks of conventional reactor by removing reaction product and the reaction will favour towards product formation. Zeolite has properties namely high temperature, chemical resistant, and low price makes it suitable for membrane reactor applications. Moreover, it has been employed for years as hydrogen selective layer. This review paper is focusing on the development of membrane reactor for efficient water gas shift reaction to produce high purity hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Development of membrane reactor is discussed further related to its modification towards efficient reaction and separation from WGS reaction mixture. Moreover, zeolite framework suitable for WGS membrane reactor will be discussed more deeply.

  8. Molecular modeling of the reaction pathway and hydride transfer reactions of HMG-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Haines, Brandon E; Steussy, C Nicklaus; Stauffacher, Cynthia V; Wiest, Olaf

    2012-10-09

    HMG-CoA reductase catalyzes the four-electron reduction of HMG-CoA to mevalonate and is an enzyme of considerable biomedical relevance because of the impact of its statin inhibitors on public health. Although the reaction has been studied extensively using X-ray crystallography, there are surprisingly no computational studies that test the mechanistic hypotheses suggested for this complex reaction. Theozyme and quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) calculations up to the B3LYP/6-31g(d,p)//B3LYP/6-311++g(2d,2p) level of theory were employed to generate an atomistic description of the enzymatic reaction process and its energy profile. The models generated here predict that the catalytically important Glu83 is protonated prior to hydride transfer and that it acts as the general acid or base in the reaction. With Glu83 protonated, the activation energies calculated for the sequential hydride transfer reactions, 21.8 and 19.3 kcal/mol, are in qualitative agreement with the experimentally determined rate constant for the entire reaction (1 s(-1) to 1 min(-1)). When Glu83 is not protonated, the first hydride transfer reaction is predicted to be disfavored by >20 kcal/mol, and the activation energy is predicted to be higher by >10 kcal/mol. While not involved in the reaction as an acid or base, Lys267 is critical for stabilization of the transition state in forming an oxyanion hole with the protonated Glu83. Molecular dynamics simulations and MM/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area free energy calculations predict that the enzyme active site stabilizes the hemithioacetal intermediate better than the aldehyde intermediate. This suggests a mechanism in which cofactor exchange occurs before the breakdown of the hemithioacetal. Slowing the conversion to aldehyde would provide the enzyme with a mechanism to protect it from solvent and explain why the free aldehyde is not observed experimentally. Our results support the hypothesis that the pK(a) of an active site acidic

  9. Liquid-Phase Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural over Homogeneous Lewis Acid-Ru/C Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, Paraskevi; Martin, Nickolas; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2015-06-22

    The catalytic performance of homogeneous Lewis acid catalysts and their interaction with Ru/C catalyst are studied in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of furfural by using 2-propanol as a solvent and hydrogen donor. We find that Lewis acid catalysts hydrogenate the furfural to furfuryl alcohol, which is then etherified with 2-propanol. The catalytic activity is correlated with an empirical scale of Lewis acid strength and exhibits a volcano behavior. Lanthanides are the most active, with DyCl3 giving complete furfural conversion and a 97 % yield of furfuryl alcohol at 180 °C after 3 h. The combination of Lewis acid and Ru/C catalysts results in synergy for the stronger Lewis acid catalysts, with a significant increase in the furfural conversion and methyl furan yield. Optimum results are obtained by using Ru/C combined with VCl3 , AlCl3 , SnCl4 , YbCl3 , and RuCl3 . Our results indicate that the combination of Lewis acid/metal catalysts is a general strategy for performing tandem reactions in the upgrade of furans. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Transfer hydrogenation over sodium-modified ceria: Enrichment of redox sites active for alcohol dehydrogenation

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Nicholas C.; Boote, Brett W.; Naik, Pranjali; ...

    2017-01-17

    Ceria (CeO 2) and sodium-modified ceria (Ce-Na) were prepared through combustion synthesis. Palladium was deposited onto the supports (Pd/CeO 2 and Pd/Ce-Na) and their activity for the aqueous-phase transfer hydrogenation of phenol using 2-propanol under liquid flow conditions was studied. Pd/Ce-Na showed a marked increase (6×) in transfer hydrogenation activity over Pd/CeO 2. Material characterization indicated that water-stable sodium species were not doped into the ceria lattice, but rather existed as subsurface carbonates. Modification of ceria by sodium provided more adsorption and redox active sites (i.e. defects) for 2-propanol dehydrogenation. This effect was an intrinsic property of the Ce-Na supportmore » and independent of Pd. The redox sites active for 2-propanol dehydrogenation were thermodynamically equivalent on both supports/catalysts. At high phenol concentrations, the reaction was limited by 2-propanol adsorption. Furthermore, the difference in catalytic activity was attributed to the different numbers of 2-propanol adsorption and redox active sites on each catalyst.« less

  11. Transfer Hydrogenation and Antiproliferative Activity of Tethered Half-Sandwich Organoruthenium Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of four neutral organometallic tethered complexes, [Ru(η6-Ph(CH2)3-ethylenediamine-N-R)Cl], where R = methanesulfonyl (Ms, 1), toluenesulfonyl (Ts, 2), 4-trifluoromethylbenzenesulfonyl (Tf, 3), and 4-nitrobenzenesulfonyl (Nb, 4), including their X-ray crystal structures. These complexes exhibit moderate antiproliferative activity toward human ovarian, lung, hepatocellular, and breast cancer cell lines. Complex 2 in particular exhibits a low cross-resistance with cisplatin. The complexes show potent catalytic activity in the transfer hydrogenation of NAD+ to NADH with formate as hydride donor in aqueous solution (310 K, pH 7). Substituents on the chelated ligand decreased the turnover frequency in the order Nb > Tf > Ts > Ms. An enhancement of antiproliferative activity (up to 22%) was observed on coadministration with nontoxic concentrations of sodium formate (0.5–2 mM). Complex 2 binds to nucleobase guanine (9-EtG), but DNA appears not to be the target, as little binding to calf thymus DNA or bacterial plasmid DNA was observed. In addition, complex 2 reacts rapidly with glutathione (GSH), which might hamper transfer hydrogenation reactions in cells. Complex 2 induced a dose-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest after 24 h exposure in A2780 human ovarian cancer cells while promoting an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is likely to contribute to its antiproliferative activity.

  12. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism.

    PubMed

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two π-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5'-GG-3' and 5'-GT-3'. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  13. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionalsmore » are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.« less

  14. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  15. Momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions yield fragments (Delta-Z = + 1) whose longitudinal momentum distributions are downshifted by larger values than those associated with the remaining fragments (Delta-Z = 1, -2,...). Kinematics alone cannot account for the observed downshifts; therefore, an additional contribution from collision dynamics must be included. In this work, an optical model description of collision momentum transfer is used to estimate the additional dynamical momentum downshift. Good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data is obtained.

  16. Fission of actinide nuclei using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léguillon, Romain; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Makii, Hiroyuki; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Ishii, Tetsuro; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Chiba, Satoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Araki, Shohei; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Tatsuzawa, Ryotaro; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2014-09-01

    We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. Present study is supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  17. Experimental fission study using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Léguillon, Romain; Makii, Hiroyuki; Orlandi, Riccardo; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Smallcombe, James; Chiba, Satoshi; Aritomo, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shouya; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Tsekhanovich, Igor; Petrache, Costel M.; Andreyev, Andrei

    2017-09-01

    It is shown that the multi-nucleon transfer reactions is a powerful tool to study fission of exotic neutron-rich actinide nuclei, which cannot be accessed by particle-capture or heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, multi-nucleon transfer channels of the reactions of 18O+232Th, 18O+238U and 18O+248Cm are used to study fission for various nuclei from many excited states. Identification of fissioning nuclei and of their excitation energy is performed on an event-by-event basis, through the measurement of outgoing ejectile particle in coincidence with fission fragments. Fission fragment mass distributions are measured for each transfer channel. Predominantly asymmetric fission is observed at low excitation energies for all studied cases, with a gradual increase of the symmetric mode towards higher excitation energy. The experimental distributions are found to be in general agreement with predictions of the fluctuation-dissipation model. Role of multi-chance fission in fission fragment mass distributions is discussed, where it is shown that mass-asymmetric structure remaining at high excitation energies originates from low-excited nuclei by evaporation of neutrons.

  18. Conformational dependence of a protein kinase phosphate transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labute, Montiago; Henkelman, Graeme; Tung, Chang-Shung; Fenimore, Paul; McMahon, Ben

    2007-03-01

    Atomic motions and energetics for a phosphate transfer reaction catalyzed by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase have been calculated using plane-wave density functional theory, starting from structures of proteins crystallized in both the reactant conformation (RC) and the transition-state conformation (TC). In TC, we calculate that the reactants and products are nearly isoenergetic with a 20-kJ/mol barrier, whereas phosphate transfer is unfavorable by 120 kJ/mol in the RC, with an even higher barrier. Our results demonstrate that the phosphate transfer reaction occurs rapidly and reversibly in a particular conformation of the protein, and that the reaction can be gated by changes of a few tenths of an angstrom in the catalytic site [1]. [1] G.H. Henkelman, M.X. LaBute, C.-S. Tung, P.W. Fenimore, B.H. McMahon, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA vol. 102, no. 43:15347-15351 (2005).

  19. Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation by synthetic catalysts in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coverdale, James P. C.; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Clarkson, Guy J.; Habtemariam, Abraha; Wills, Martin; Sadler, Peter J.

    2018-03-01

    Catalytic anticancer metallodrugs active at low doses could minimize side-effects, introduce novel mechanisms of action that combat resistance and widen the spectrum of anticancer-drug activity. Here we use highly stable chiral half-sandwich organometallic Os(II) arene sulfonyl diamine complexes, [Os(arene)(TsDPEN)] (TsDPEN, N-(p-toluenesulfonyl)-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine), to achieve a highly enantioselective reduction of pyruvate, a key intermediate in metabolic pathways. Reduction is shown both in aqueous model systems and in human cancer cells, with non-toxic concentrations of sodium formate used as a hydride source. The catalytic mechanism generates selectivity towards ovarian cancer cells versus non-cancerous fibroblasts (both ovarian and lung), which are commonly used as models of healthy proliferating cells. The formate precursor N-formylmethionine was explored as an alternative to formate in PC3 prostate cancer cells, which are known to overexpress a deformylase enzyme. Transfer-hydrogenation catalysts that generate reductive stress in cancer cells offer a new approach to cancer therapy.

  20. H NMR studies of substrate hydrogen exchange reactions catalyzed by L-methionine gamma-lyase

    SciTech Connect

    Esaki, N.; Nakayama, T.; Sawada, S.

    Hydrogen exchange reactions of various L-amino acids catalyzed by L-methionine gamma-lyase (EC 4.4.1.11) have been studied. The enzyme catalyzes the rapid exchange of the alpha- and beta-hydrogens of L-methionine and S-methyl-L-cysteine with deuterium from the solvent. The rate of alpha-hydrogen exchange was about 40 times faster than that of the enzymatic elimination reaction of the sulfur-containing amino acids. The enzyme also catalyzes the exchange reaction of alpha- and beta-hydrogens of the straight-chain L-amino acids which are not susceptible to elimination. The exchange rates of the alpha-hydrogen and the total beta-hydrogens of L-alanine and L-alpha-aminobutyrate with deuterium followed first-order kinetics. Formore » L-norvaline, L-norleucine, S-methyl-L-cysteine, and L-methionine, the rate of alpha-hydrogen exchange followed first-order kinetics, but the rate of total beta-hydrogen exchange decreased due to a primary isotope effect at the alpha-position. L-Phenylalanine and L-tryptophan slowly underwent alpha-hydrogen exchange. The pro-R hydrogen of glycine was deuterated stereospecifically.« less

  1. 40 CFR 721.10325 - Cyclosilazanes, di-Me, Me hydrogen, polymers with di-Me, Me hydrogen silazanes, reaction products...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cyclosilazanes, di-Me, Me hydrogen, polymers with di-Me, Me hydrogen silazanes, reaction products with 3-(triethoxysilyl)-1-propanamine. 721... Substances § 721.10325 Cyclosilazanes, di-Me, Me hydrogen, polymers with di-Me, Me hydrogen silazanes...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10325 - Cyclosilazanes, di-Me, Me hydrogen, polymers with di-Me, Me hydrogen silazanes, reaction products...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cyclosilazanes, di-Me, Me hydrogen, polymers with di-Me, Me hydrogen silazanes, reaction products with 3-(triethoxysilyl)-1-propanamine. 721... Substances § 721.10325 Cyclosilazanes, di-Me, Me hydrogen, polymers with di-Me, Me hydrogen silazanes...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10325 - Cyclosilazanes, di-Me, Me hydrogen, polymers with di-Me, Me hydrogen silazanes, reaction products...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cyclosilazanes, di-Me, Me hydrogen, polymers with di-Me, Me hydrogen silazanes, reaction products with 3-(triethoxysilyl)-1-propanamine. 721... Substances § 721.10325 Cyclosilazanes, di-Me, Me hydrogen, polymers with di-Me, Me hydrogen silazanes...

  4. Stretchable hydrogen sensors employing palladium nanosheets transferred onto an elastomeric substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgung, Gitae; Ta, Qui Thanh Hoai; Noh, Jin-Seo

    2018-07-01

    Stretchable hydrogen sensors were fabricated from Pd nanosheets that were transferred onto a PDMS substrate. To prepare the Pd nanosheets, a Pd thin film on PDMS was first biaxially stretched and then PDMS substrate was etched off. The size of Pd nanosheets decreased as the applied strain increased and the film thickness decreased. A transfer technique was utilized to implement the stretchable hydrogen sensors. The stretchable sensors exhibited negative response behaviors upon the exposure to hydrogen gas. Interestingly, the sensors worked even under large strains up to 30%, demonstrating a potential as a high-strain-tolerable hydrogen sensor for the first time.

  5. Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material

    SciTech Connect

    Guterl, Jerome, E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu; Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    Desorption phase of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments performed on tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion relevant conditions is analyzed using a reaction-diffusion model describing hydrogen retention in material bulk. Two regimes of hydrogen desorption are identified depending on whether hydrogen trapping rate is faster than hydrogen diffusion rate in material during TDS experiments. In both regimes, a majority of hydrogen released from material defects is immediately outgassed instead of diffusing deeply in material bulk when the evolution of hydrogen concentration in material is quasi-static, which is the case during TDS experiments performed with tungsten samplesmore » exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion related conditions. In this context, analytical expressions of the hydrogen outgassing flux as a function of the material temperature are obtained with sufficient accuracy to describe main features of thermal desorption spectra (TDSP). These expressions are then used to highlight how characteristic temperatures of TDSP depend on hydrogen retention parameters, such as trap concentration or activation energy of detrapping processes. The use of Arrhenius plots to characterize retention processes is then revisited when hydrogen trapping takes place during TDS experiments. Retention processes are also characterized using the shape of desorption peaks in TDSP, and it is shown that diffusion of hydrogen in material during TDS experiment can induce long desorption tails visible aside desorption peaks at high temperature in TDSP. These desorption tails can be used to estimate activation energy of diffusion of hydrogen in material.« less

  6. Organic-Solvent-Free Phase-Transfer Oxidation of Alcohols Using Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulce, Martin; Marks, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Organic-solvent-free oxidations of alcohols using aqueous hydrogen peroxide in the presence of sodium tungstate and phase-transfer catalysts provide a general, safe, simple, and cost-effective means to prepare ketones. Six representative alcohols, 1-phenylethanol, 1-phenylpropanol, benzhydrol, 4-methylbenzhydrol, cis,trans-4-tert-butylcyclohexanol, and benzyl alcohol are oxidized to the corresponding aldehyde or ketone over 1-3 hours in 81-99% yields. Purities are very high, with only small to trace amounts of starting alcohol remaining. Experiments can be readily designed for one or two 3-hour laboratory periods, integrating the various techniques of extraction, drying, filtration, column chromatography, gas chromatography, NMR and IR spectroscopy, and reaction kinetics.

  7. Acetylene chain reaction on hydrogenated boron nitride monolayers: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Pérez, R; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2017-11-28

    Spin-polarized first-principles total-energy calculations have been performed to investigate the possible chain reaction of acetylene molecules mediated by hydrogen abstraction on hydrogenated hexagonal boron nitride monolayers. Calculations have been done within the periodic density functional theory (DFT), employing the PBE exchange correlation potential, with van der Waals corrections (vdW-DF). Reactions at two different sites have been considered: hydrogen vacancies on top of boron and on top of nitrogen atoms. As previously calculated, at the intermediate state of the reaction, when the acetylene molecule is attached to the surface, the adsorption energy is of the order of -0.82 eV and -0.20 eV (measured with respect to the energy of the non interacting molecule-substrate system) for adsorption on top of boron and nitrogen atoms, respectively. After the hydrogen abstraction takes place, the system gains additional energy, resulting in adsorption energies of -1.52 eV and -1.30 eV, respectively. These results suggest that the chain reaction is energetically favorable. The calculated minimum energy path (MEP) for hydrogen abstraction shows very small energy barriers of the order of 5 meV and 22 meV for the reaction on top of boron and nitrogen atoms, respectively. Finally, the density of states (DOS) evolution study helps to understand the chain reaction mechanism. Graphical abstract Acetylene chain reaction on hydrogenated boron nitride monolayers.

  8. Computational study of chain transfer to monomer reactions in high-temperature polymerization of alkyl acrylates.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Nazanin; Liu, Shi; Srinivasan, Sriraj; Grady, Michael C; Soroush, Masoud; Rappe, Andrew M

    2013-03-28

    This article presents a computational study of chain transfer to monomer (CTM) reactions in self-initiated high-temperature homopolymerization of alkyl acrylates (methyl, ethyl, and n-butyl acrylate). Several mechanisms of CTM are studied. The effects of the length of live polymer chains and the type of monoradical that initiated the live polymer chains on the energy barriers and rate constants of the involved reaction steps are investigated theoretically. All calculations are carried out using density functional theory. Three types of hybrid functionals (B3LYP, X3LYP, and M06-2X) and four basis sets (6-31G(d), 6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d), and 6-311G(d,p)) are applied to predict the molecular geometries of the reactants, products and transition sates, and energy barriers. Transition state theory is used to estimate rate constants. The results indicate that abstraction of a hydrogen atom (by live polymer chains) from the methyl group in methyl acrylate, the methylene group in ethyl acrylate, and methylene groups in n-butyl acrylate are the most likely mechanisms of CTM. Also, the rate constants of CTM reactions calculated using M06-2X are in good agreement with those estimated from polymer sample measurements using macroscopic mechanistic models. The rate constant values do not change significantly with the length of live polymer chains. Abstraction of a hydrogen atom by a tertiary radical has a higher energy barrier than abstraction by a secondary radical, which agrees with experimental findings. The calculated and experimental NMR spectra of dead polymer chains produced by CTM reactions are comparable. This theoretical/computational study reveals that CTM occurs most likely via hydrogen abstraction by live polymer chains from the methyl group of methyl acrylate and methylene group(s) of ethyl (n-butyl) acrylate.

  9. Numerical Radiative Transfer and the Hydrogen Reionization of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, M.

    2011-03-01

    ) simulation code GADGET. It is based on a fast, robust and photon-conserving integration scheme where the radiation transport problem is approximated in terms of moments of the transfer equation and by using a variable Eddington tensor as a closure relation, following the "OTVET"-suggestion of Gnedin & Abel. We derive a suitable anisotropic diffusion operator for use in the SPH discretization of the local photon transport, and we combine this with an implicit solver that guarantees robustness and photon conservation. This entails a matrix inversion problem of a huge, sparsely populated matrix that is distributed in memory in our parallel code. We solve this task iteratively with a conjugate gradient scheme. Finally, to model photon sink processes we consider ionization and recombination processes of hydrogen, which is represented with a chemical network that is evolved with an implicit time integration scheme. We present several tests of our implementation, including single and multiple sources in static uniform density fields with and without temperature evolution, shadowing by a dense clump, and multiple sources in a static cosmological density field. All tests agree quite well with analytical computations or with predictions from other radiative transfer codes, except for shadowing. However, unlike most other radiative transfer codes presently in use for studying reionization, our new method can be used on-the-fly during dynamical cosmological simulations, allowing simultaneous treatments of galaxy formation and the reionization process of the Universe. We carry out hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation that simultaneously follow radiative transfer of hydrogen-ionizing photons, based on the optically-thin variable Eddington tensor approximation as implemented in the GADGET code. We consider only star-forming galaxies as sources and examine to what extent they can yield a reasonable reionization history and thermal state of the intergalactic medium at redshifts

  10. Liquid composition having ammonia borane and decomposing to form hydrogen and liquid reaction product

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Benjamin L; Rekken, Brian D

    2014-04-01

    Liquid compositions of ammonia borane and a suitably chosen amine borane material were prepared and subjected to conditions suitable for their thermal decomposition in a closed system that resulted in hydrogen and a liquid reaction product.

  11. Role of intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the excited-state intramolecular double proton transfer (ESIDPT) of calix[4]arene: A TDDFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Se; Wang, Zhuang; Hao, Ce

    2016-01-01

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method was performed to investigate the excited-state intramolecular double proton transfer (ESIDPT) reaction of calix[4] arene (C4A) and the role of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the ESIDPT process. The geometries of C4A in the ground state and excited states (S1, S2 and T1) were optimized. Four intramolecular hydrogen bonds formed in the C4A are strengthened or weakened in the S2 and T1 states compared to those in the ground state. Interestingly, upon excitation to the S1 state of C4A, two protons H1 and H2 transfer along the two intramolecular hydrogen bonds O1-H1···O2 and O2-H2···O3, while the other two protons do not transfer. The ESIDPT reaction breaks the primary symmetry of C4A in the ground state. The potential energy curves of proton transfer demonstrate that the ESIDPT process follows the stepwise mechanism but not the concerted mechanism. Findings indicate that intramolecular hydrogen bonding is critical to the ESIDPT reactions in intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems.

  12. Electronic and Vibrational Coherence in Charge-Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Norbert

    1996-03-01

    The ultrafast dynamics associated with optically-induced intervalence charge-transfer reactions in solution and protein environments are reported. These studies include the Fe^(II)-Fe^(III) MMCT complex Prussian blue and the mixed valence dimer (CN)_5Ru^(II)CNRuRu^(III)(NH_3)_5. The protein systems include blue copper proteins and the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. The experimental approaches include photon echo, wavelength-resolved pump-probe and anisotropy measurements performed with 12-16fs duration optical pulses. Complicated time-domain waveforms reflect the several different p[rocesses and time scales for relaxation of coherences (both electronic and vibrational) and populations within these systems. The photon echo and anisotropy results probe electronic coherence and dephasing prior to back electron transfer. Wavelength-resolved pump-probe results reveal vibrational modes coupled to the CT-coordinate as well as formation of new product states or vibrational cooling in the ground state following back electron transfer.

  13. Protein control of true, gated, and coupled electron transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Victor L

    2008-06-01

    Electron transfer (ET) through and between proteins is a fundamental biological process. The rates of ET depend upon the thermodynamic driving force, the reorganization energy, and the degree of electronic coupling between the reactant and product states. The analysis of protein ET reactions is complicated by the fact that non-ET processes might influence the observed ET rate in kinetically complex biological systems. This Account describes studies of the methylamine dehydrogenase-amicyanin-cytochrome c-551i protein ET complex that have revealed the influence of several features of the protein structure on the magnitudes of the physical parameters for true ET reactions and how they dictate the kinetic mechanisms of non-ET processes that sometimes influence protein ET reactions. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies, coupled with structural information and biochemical data, are necessary to fully describe the ET reactions of proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis can be used to elucidate specific structure-function relationships. When mutations selectively alter the electronic coupling, reorganization energy, or driving force for the ET reaction, it becomes possible to use the parameters of the ET process to determine how specific amino acid residues and other features of the protein structure influence the ET rates. When mutations alter the kinetic mechanism for ET, one can determine the mechanisms by which non-ET processes, such as protein conformational changes or proton transfers, control the rates of ET reactions and how specific amino acid residues and certain features of the protein structure influence these non-ET reactions. A complete description of the mechanism of regulation of biological ET reactions enhances our understanding of metabolism, respiration, and photosynthesis at the molecular level. Such information has important medical relevance. Defective protein ET leads to production of the reactive oxygen species and free radicals that are associated with

  14. Hydrogenolysis Of 5-Carbon Sugars, Sugar Alcohols And Compositions For Reactions Involving Hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd A.; Frye, Jr., John G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Miller, Dennis J.

    2004-01-13

    Methods and compositions for reactions of hydrogen over a Re-containing catalyst with compositions containing a 5-carbon sugar, sugar alcohol, or lactic acid are described. It has been surprisingly discovered that reaction with hydrogen over a Re-containing multimetallic catalyst resulted in superior conversion and selectivity to desired products such as propylene glycol. A process for the synthesis of PG from lactate or lactic acid is also described.

  15. Hydrogenolysis of 5-carbon sugars, sugar alcohols, and other methods and compositions for reactions involving hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd A [West Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H [Kennewick, WA

    2002-11-12

    Methods and compositions for reactions of hydrogen over a Re-containing catalyst with compositions containing a 5-carbon sugar, sugar alcohol, or lactic acid are described. It has been surprisingly discovered that reaction with hydrogen over a Re-containing multimetallic catalyst resulted in superior conversion and selectivity to desired products such as propylene glycol. A process for the synthesis of PG from lactate or lactic acid is also described.

  16. Reactivity of propene, n-butene, and isobutene in the hydrogen transfer steps of n-hexane cracking over zeolites of different structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, D.B.

    The reaction of n-hexane cracking over HZSM-5, HY zeolite and mordenite (HM) was studied in accordance with the procedure of the [beta]-test recently proposed for quantitative characterization of zeolite hydrogen transfer activity. It is shown that this procedure allows one to obtain quantitative data on propene, n-butene, and isobutene reactivities in the hydrogen transfer steps of the reaction. The results demonstrate that in the absence of steric constraints (large pore HY and HM zeolites) isobutene is approximately 5 times more reactive in hydrogen transfer than n-butene. The latter, in turn, is about 1.3 times more reactive than propene. With mediummore » pore HZSM-5, steric inhibition of the hydrogen transfer between n-hexane and isobutene is observed. This results in a sharp decrease in the isobutene reactivity: over HZSM-5 zeolites isobutene is only 1.2 times more reactive in hydrogen transfer than n-butene. On the basis of these data it is concluded that the [beta]-test measures the [open quotes]real[close quotes] hydrogen transfer activity of zeolites, i.e., the activity that summarizes the effects of the acidic and structural properties of zeolites. An attempt is made to estimate the [open quotes]ideal[close quotes] zeolite hydrogen transfer activity, i.e., the activity determined by the zeolite acidic properties only. The estimations obtained show that this activity is approximately 1.8 and 1.6 times higher for HM zeolite in comparison with HZSM-5 and HY zeolites, respectively. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  17. Post-prior equivalence for transfer reactions with complex potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jin; Moro, Antonio M.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of the post-prior equivalence in the calculation of inclusive breakup and transfer cross sections. For that, we employ the model proposed by Ichimura et al. [Phys. Rev. C 32, 431 (1985), 10.1103/PhysRevC.32.431], conveniently generalized to include the part of the cross section corresponding the transfer to bound states. We pay particular attention to the case in which the unobserved particle is left in a bound state of the residual nucleus, in which case the theory prescribes the use of a complex potential, responsible for the spreading width of the populated single-particle states. We see that the introduction of this complex potential gives rise to an additional term in the prior cross-section formula, not present in the usual case of real binding potentials. The equivalence is numerically tested for the 58Ni(d ,p X ) reaction.

  18. Noncatalytic hydrogenation of naphthalene in nanosized membrane reactors with accumulated hydrogen and controlled adjustment of their reaction zone volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    As part of ongoing studies aimed at designing the next generation of nanosized membrane reactors (NMRs) with accumulated hydrogen, the noncatalytic hydrogenation of naphthalene in pores of ceramic membranes (TRUMEM ultrafiltration membranes with D av = 50 and 90 nm) is performed for the first time, using hydrogen preadsorbed in a hybrid carbon nanostructure: mono- and multilayered oriented carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs) that form on inner pore surfaces. In this technique, the reaction proceeds in the temperature range of 330-390°C at contact times of 10-16 h. The feedstock is an 8% naphthalene solution in decane. The products are analyzed via chromatography on a quartz capillary column coated with polydimethylsiloxane (SE-30). It is established for the first time that in NMRs, the noncatalytic hydrogenation of naphthalene occurs at 370-390°C, forming 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene in amounts of up to 0.61%. The rate constants and activation energy (123.5 kJ/mol) of the noncatalytic hydrogenation reaction are determined for the first time. The possibility of designing an NMR with an adjustable reaction zone volume is explored. Changes in the pore structure of the membranes after their modification with pyrocarbon nanosized crystallites (PNCs) are therefore studied as well. It is shown that lengthening the process time reduces pore size: within 23 h after the deposition of PNCs, the average pore radius ( r av) falls from 25 to 3.1 nm. The proposed approach would allow us to design nanoreactors of molecular size and conduct hydrogenation reactions within certain guidelines to synthesize new chemical compounds.

  19. Chemical reaction fouling model for single-phase heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Watkinson, A.P.

    1993-08-01

    A fouling model was developed on the premise that the chemical reaction for generation of precursor can take place in the bulk fluid, in the thermalboundary layer, or at the fluid/wall interface, depending upon the interactive effects of flu id dynamics, heat and mass transfer, and the controlling chemical reaction. The analysis was used to examine the experimental data for fouling deposition of polyperoxides produced by autoxidation of indene in kerosene. The effects of fluid and wall temperatures for two flow geometries were analyzed. The results showed that the relative effects of physical parameters on the fouling rate would differmore » for the three fouling mechanisms; therefore, it is important to identify the controlling mechanism in applying the closed-flow-loop data to industrial conditions.« less

  20. Transfer Reactions and the Structure of Neutron-rich Nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Kay, B. P.; Alcorta, M.; Back, B. B.; ...

    2013-01-01

    The study of transfer reactions in inverse kinematics is a major focus of existing and future radioactive-ion-beam facilities. One of the obstacles in such measurements is poor Q-value resolution, often several hundred keV, which can prevent the extraction of useful information. At Argonne National Laboratory, it has recently been demonstrated that good Q-value resolution can be achieved by transporting the outgoing ions through a high-field solenoid, measuring their position as a function of energy. Furthermore, this provides several advantages over conventional Si arrays, such as large acceptance, good particle identification, and most importantly a Q-value resolution of better than 100more » keV in most cases, including reactions with moderately heavy beams. In this paper, the concept of the solenoidal spectrometer, called HELIOS, will be discussed along with highlights of recent results.« less

  1. Mechanistic Insights and Computational Design of Transition-Metal Catalysts for Hydrogenation and Dehydrogenation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangyang; Yang, Xinzheng

    2016-10-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions are fundamentally important in chemical synthesis and industrial processes, as well as potential applications in the storage and conversion of renewable energy. Modern computational quantum chemistry has already become a powerful tool in understanding the structures and properties of compounds and elucidating mechanistic insights of chemical reactions, and therefore, holds great promise in the design of new catalysts. Herein, we review our computational studies on the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and small organic carbonyl compounds, and on the dehydrogenation of amine-borane and alcohols with an emphasis on elucidating reaction mechanisms and predicting new catalytic reactions, and in return provide some general ideas for the design of high-efficiency, low-cost transition-metal complexes for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions. © 2016 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction in RNA in Alkaline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bertran, Joan; Oliva, Antoni; Branchadell, Vicenç; Acosta-Silva, Carles

    2018-06-25

    In this work we have studied the phosphoryl transfer reaction in RNA in alkaline conditions by theoretically exploring the influence of several solvents. The calculations have been carried out using the M06-2X functional while the solvents are taken as a continuum using the SMD method. The main results are that the O2'-P-O5' angle in the reactants, the free activation energies and the reaction mechanism are clearly dependent on the dielectric constant of the environment, thus showing that the electrostatic term is determining for this chemical system with two negative charges. Our study seems to indicate that water, the solvent with the greatest dielectric constant, would be the one that mostly increases the reaction rate. As this is not the case in enzymatic catalysis, one has to conclude that, in the case of proteins as well as in the case of ribozymes, the enzymatic catalysis is not mainly due to the solvent reaction field, but to local electrical fields due to the enzyme preorganization. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Cation–hydroxide–water coadsorption inhibits the alkaline hydrogen oxidation reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Martinez, Ulises; Matanovic, Ivana; ...

    2016-10-24

    Rotating disk electrode voltammograms and infrared reflection absorption spectra indicate that the hydrogen oxidation reaction of platinum in 0.1 M tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution is adversely impacted by time-dependent and potential-driven cation–hydroxide–water coadsorption. Impedance analysis suggests that the hydrogen oxidation reaction inhibition is mainly caused by the hydrogen diffusion barrier of the coadsorbed trilayer rather than intuitive catalyst site blocking by the adsorbed cation species. Finally, these results give useful insights on how to design ionomeric binders for advanced alkaline membrane fuel cells.

  4. Correlation of Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction Efficiencies for Aryl Radicals with their Vertical Electron Affinities and the Vertical Ionization Energies of the Hydrogen Atom Donors

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Linhong; Nash, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The factors that control the reactivities of aryl radicals toward hydrogen-atom donors were studied by using a dual-cell Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT – ICR). Hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for two substrates, cyclohexane and isopropanol, were measured for twenty-three structurally different, positively-charged aryl radicals, which included dehydrobenzenes, dehydronaphthalenes, dehydropyridines, and dehydro(iso)quinolines. A logarithmic correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) vertical electron affinities (EA) of the aryl radicals. Transition state energies calculated for three of the aryl radicals with isopropanol were found to correlate linearly with their (calculated) EAs. No correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) enthalpy changes for the reactions. Measurement of the reaction efficiencies for the reactions of several different hydrogen-atom donors with a few selected aryl radicals revealed a logarithmic correlation between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the vertical ionization energies (IE) of the hydrogen-atom donors, but not the lowest homolytic X – H (X = heavy atom) bond dissociation energies of the hydrogen-atom donors. Examination of the hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions of twenty-nine different aryl radicals and eighteen different hydrogen-atom donors showed that the reaction efficiency increases (logarithmically) as the difference between the IE of the hydrogen-atom donor and the EA of the aryl radical decreases. This dependence is likely to result from the increasing polarization, and concomitant stabilization, of the transition state as the energy difference between the neutral and ionic reactants decreases. Thus, the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiency for an aryl radical can be “tuned” by structural changes that influence either

  5. Hydrogen production from carbonaceous material

    DOEpatents

    Lackner, Klaus S.; Ziock, Hans J.; Harrison, Douglas P.

    2004-09-14

    Hydrogen is produced from solid or liquid carbon-containing fuels in a two-step process. The fuel is gasified with hydrogen in a hydrogenation reaction to produce a methane-rich gaseous reaction product, which is then reacted with water and calcium oxide in a hydrogen production and carbonation reaction to produce hydrogen and calcium carbonate. The calcium carbonate may be continuously removed from the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction zone and calcined to regenerate calcium oxide, which may be reintroduced into the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction zone. Hydrogen produced in the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction is more than sufficient both to provide the energy necessary for the calcination reaction and also to sustain the hydrogenation of the coal in the gasification reaction. The excess hydrogen is available for energy production or other purposes. Substantially all of the carbon introduced as fuel ultimately emerges from the invention process in a stream of substantially pure carbon dioxide. The water necessary for the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction may be introduced into both the gasification and hydrogen production and carbonation reactions, and allocated so as transfer the exothermic heat of reaction of the gasification reaction to the endothermic hydrogen production and carbonation reaction.

  6. Theoretical study of chain transfer to solvent reactions of alkyl acrylates.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Nazanin; Srinivasan, Sriraj; Grady, Michael C; Rappe, Andrew M; Soroush, Masoud

    2014-07-24

    This computational and theoretical study deals with chain transfer to solvent (CTS) reactions of methyl acrylate (MA), ethyl acrylate (EA), and n-butyl acrylate (n-BA) self-initiated homopolymerization in solvents such as butanol (polar, protic), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) (polar, aprotic), and p-xylene (nonpolar). The results indicate that abstraction of a hydrogen atom from the methylene group next to the oxygen atom in n-butanol, from the methylene group in MEK, and from a methyl group in p-xylene by a live polymer chain are the most likely mechanisms of CTS reactions in MA, EA, and n-BA. Energy barriers and molecular geometries of reactants, products, and transition states are predicted. The sensitivity of the predictions to three hybrid functionals (B3LYP, X3LYP, and M06-2X) and three different basis sets (6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d), and 6-311G(d,p)) is investigated. Among n-butanol, sec-butanol, and tert-butanol, tert-butanol has the highest CTS energy barrier and the lowest rate constant. Although the application of the conductor-like screening model (COSMO) does not affect the predicted CTS kinetic parameter values, the application of the polarizable continuum model (PCM) results in higher CTS energy barriers. This increase in the predicted CTS energy barriers is larger for butanol and MEK than for p-xylene. The higher rate constants of chain transfer to n-butanol reactions compared to those of chain transfer to MEK and p-xylene reactions suggest the higher CTS reactivity of n-butanol.

  7. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jianjun; Wang Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-28

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying themore » solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.« less

  8. Variable photosynthetic units, energy transfer and light-induced evolution of hydrogen in algae and bacteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffron, H.

    1971-01-01

    The present state of knowledge regarding the truly photochemical reactions in photosynthesis is considered. Nine-tenths of the available knowledge is of a biochemical nature. Questions regarding the activities of the chlorophyll system are examined. The simplest photochemical response observed in living hydrogen-adapted algal cells is the release of molecular hydrogen, which continues even after all other known natural reactions have been eliminated either by heating or the action of poisons.

  9. CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PRODUCTS FROM THE REACTION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is of biological significance and may be implicated in the overall toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenic. The course of the reaction in aqueous phase was monitored and an initial product, dimethylthioarsin...

  10. Measuring one nucleon transfer reaction 24Mg( p, d)23Mg for astrophysical reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.

    2017-12-01

    The level structure of a radionuclide 23Mg has been studied by using the 24Mg( p, d)23Mg one nucleon transfer reaction measurement for the astrophysical 19Ne(α, γ)23Mg reaction rate. A 41 MeV proton beam was produced and accelerated at the 25 MV tandem accelerator of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the United States. The beam particles impinged on an isotopically-enriched 24Mg solid target. Angular distributions of recoiling deuterons were extracted by using a large area silicon strip detector array. By comparing the experimentally-obtained angular distributions with zero range distorted wave Born approximation calculations, spins and parities of three energy levels of 23Mg could be constrained for the first time, which is very important information needed to understand the 19Ne(α, γ)23Mg reaction rate.

  11. Photocurrent generation by direct electron transfer using photosynthetic reaction centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudzadeh, A.; Saer, R.; Jun, D.; Mirvakili, S. M.; Takshi, A.; Iranpour, B.; Ouellet, E.; Lagally, E. T.; Madden, J. D. W.; Beatty, J. T.

    2011-09-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centres (RCs) convert light into separated charges with nearly perfect quantum efficiency, and have been used to generate photocurrent. Previous work has shown that electron tunnelling rates between redox centres in proteins depend exponentially on the tunnelling distance. In this work the RC from Rhodobacter sphaeroides was genetically modified with the aim of achieving the shortest tunnelling distances yet demonstrated between the RC's electron-accepting P site and underlying graphite and gold electrodes, and between the electron donor Q site and graphite electrodes. Opposite charges are carried to counter electrodes using mobile mediators, as in dye-sensitised solar cells. Native RCs are bound to graphite surfaces through N-(1-pyrene)iodoacetamide. Although the linker's length is only 4 Å, the electron transfer pathway between the Q electron donor site on the RC and the electrode surface is still too large for current to be significant. A mutant version with the electron acceptor P side close to the graphite surface produced currents of 15 nA cm-2 upon illumination. Direct binding of RCs to a gold surface is shown, resulting in currents of 5 nA cm-2. In both cases the current was unaffected by mediator concentration but increased with illumination, suggesting that direct electron transfer was achieved. The engineering of an RC to achieve direct electron transfer will help with long term efforts to demonstrate RC-based photovoltaic devices.

  12. Study of the Characteristics of Elementary Processes in a Chain Hydrogen Burning Reaction in Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, M. E.; Petrushevich, Yu. V.; Starostin, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    The characteristics of possible chain explosive hydrogen burning reactions in an oxidizing medium are calculated on the potential energy surface. Specifically, reactions H2 + O2 → H2O + O, H2 + O2 → HO2 + H, and H2 + O2 → OH + OH are considered. Special attention is devoted to the production of a pair of fast highly reactive OH radicals. Because of the high activation threshold, this reaction is often excluded from the known kinetic scheme of hydrogen burning. However, a spread in estimates of kinetic characteristics and a disagreement between theoretical predictions with experimental results suggest that the kinetic scheme should be refined.

  13. Uncertainty Analysis of Heat Transfer to Supercritical Hydrogen in Cooling Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, Justin M.; Landrum, D. Brian

    2005-01-01

    Sound understanding of the cooling efficiency of supercritical hydrogen is crucial to the development of high pressure thrust chambers for regeneratively cooled LOX/LH2 rocket engines. This paper examines historical heat transfer correlations for supercritical hydrogen and the effects of uncertainties in hydrogen property data. It is shown that uncertainty due to property data alone can be as high as 10%. Previous heated tube experiments with supercritical hydrogen are summarized, and data from a number of heated tube experiments are analyzed to evaluate conditions for which the available correlations are valid.

  14. Ab Initio Vibrational Levels For HO2 and Vibrational Splittings for Hydrogen Atom Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, V. J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Hamilton, I. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We calculate vibrational levels and wave functions for HO2 using the recently reported ab initio potential energy surface of Walch and Duchovic. There is intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer when the hydrogen atom tunnels through a T-shaped saddle point separating two equivalent equilibrium geometries, and correspondingly, the energy levels are split. We focus on vibrational levels and wave functions with significant splitting. The first three vibrational levels with splitting greater than 2/cm are (15 0), (0 7 1) and (0 8 0) where V(sub 2) is the O-O-H bend quantum number. We discuss the dynamics of hydrogen atom transfer; in particular, the O-O distances at which hydrogen atom transfer is most probable for these vibrational levels. The material of the proposed presentation was reviewed and the technical content will not reveal any information not already in the public domain and will not give any foreign industry or government a competitive advantage.

  15. Reaction Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from C4-C6 Alkenes by the Hydrogen Atom and Methyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan-De; Liu, Zi-Wu

    2018-06-14

    Alkenes are important ingredients of realistic fuels and are also critical intermediates during the combustion of a series of other fuels including alkanes, cycloalkanes, and biofuels. To provide insights into the combustion behavior of alkenes, detailed quantum chemical studies for crucial reactions are desired. Hydrogen abstractions of alkenes play a very important role in determining the reactivity of fuel molecules. This work is motivated by previous experimental and modeling evidence that current literature rate coefficients for the abstraction reactions of alkenes are still in need of refinement and/or redetermination. In light of this, this work reports a theoretical and kinetic study of hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from C4-C6 alkenes by the hydrogen (H) atom and methyl (CH 3 ) radical. A series of C4-C6 alkene molecules with enough structural diversity are taken into consideration. Geometry and vibrational properties are determined at the B3LYP/6-31G(2df,p) level implemented in the Gaussian-4 (G4) composite method. The G4 level of theory is used to calculate the electronic single point energies for all species to determine the energy barriers. Conventional transition state theory with Eckart tunneling corrections is used to determine the high-pressure-limit rate constants for 47 elementary reaction rate coefficients. To faciliate their applications in kinetic modeling, the obtained rate constants are given in the Arrhenius expression and rate coefficients for typical reaction classes are recommended. The overall rate coefficients for the reaction of H atom and CH 3 radical with all the studied alkenes are also compared. Branching ratios of these reaction channels for certain alkenes have also been analyzed.

  16. Catalytic transfer hydrogenation with terdentate CNN ruthenium complexes: the influence of the base.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Walter; Siega, Katia; Rigo, Pierluigi

    2007-01-01

    The catalytic activity of the terdentate complex [RuCl(CNN)(dppb)] (A) [dppb=Ph(2)P(CH(2))(4)PPh(2); HCNN=6-(4'-methylphenyl)-2-pyridylmethylamine] in the transfer hydrogenation of acetophenone (S) with 2-propanol has been found to be dependent on the base concentration. The limit rate has been observed when NaOiPr is used in high excess (A/base molar ratio > 10). The amino-isopropoxide species [Ru(OiPr)(CNN)(dppb)] (B), which forms by reaction of A with sodium isopropoxide via displacement of the chloride, is catalytically active. The rate of conversion of acetophenone obeys second-order kinetics v=k[S][B] with the rate constants in the range 218+/-8 (40 degrees C) to 3000+/-70 M(-1) s(-1) (80 degrees C). The activation parameters, evaluated from the Eyring equation are DeltaH(++)=14.0+/-0.2 kcal mol(-1) and DeltaS(++)=-3.2 +/-0.5 eu. In a pre-equilibrium reaction with 2-propanol complex B gives the cationic species [Ru(CNN)(dppb)(HOiPr)](+)[OiPr](-) (C) with K approximately 2x10(-5) M. The hydride species [RuH(CNN)(dppb)] (H), which forms from B via beta-hydrogen elimination process, catalyzes the reduction of S and, importantly, its activity increases by addition of base. The catalytic behavior of the hydride H has been compared to that of the system A/NaOiPr (1:1 molar ratio) and indicates that the two systems are equivalent.

  17. Direct Observation of Double Hydrogen Transfer via Quantum Tunneling in a Single Porphycene Molecule on a Ag(110) Surface.

    PubMed

    Koch, Matthias; Pagan, Mark; Persson, Mats; Gawinkowski, Sylwester; Waluk, Jacek; Kumagai, Takashi

    2017-09-13

    Quantum tunneling of hydrogen atoms (or protons) plays a crucial role in many chemical and biological reactions. Although tunneling of a single particle has been examined extensively in various one-dimensional potentials, many-particle tunneling in high-dimensional potential energy surfaces remains poorly understood. Here we present a direct observation of a double hydrogen atom transfer (tautomerization) within a single porphycene molecule on a Ag(110) surface using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tautomerization rates are temperature independent below ∼10 K, and a large kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is observed upon substituting the transferred hydrogen atoms by deuterium, indicating that the process is governed by tunneling. The observed KIE for three isotopologues and density functional theory calculations reveal that a stepwise transfer mechanism is dominant in the tautomerization. It is also found that the tautomerization rate is increased by vibrational excitation via an inelastic electron tunneling process. Moreover, the STM tip can be used to manipulate the tunneling dynamics through modification of the potential landscape.

  18. Platinum Monolayer Shell on Non-Noble Metal Core Electrocatalysts for the Hydrogen Oxidation Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeluck, Krishani Malini

    According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, as of 2015, transportation accounted for 32% of the carbon dioxide emissions in the United States (and all carbon dioxide emissions in the U.S. accounted for 82.2% of all greenhouse gases from human activity). A hydrogen fuel cell is a device that efficiently produces electrical energy directly from a chemical reaction, with zero carbon emissions, and therefore holds great promise in alleviating our dependence on harmful use of energy sources. Due to their clean emissions and high efficiencies, there has been focus on the hydrogen fuel cell for vehicle applications using proton exchange membrane and alkaline fuel cells. Although the proton exchange membrane fuel cell is currently being used in vehicles, their high cost limits their feasibility in the market. This has inspired the development of the alkaline fuel cell whose efficiency and simplicity suggest the possibility of manufacturing high power fuel cell vehicles at a low cost, since the electrocatalysts in the alkaline fuel cell can be made from non-noble metals. Although the hydrogen oxidation reaction is one of the fastest electrochemical reactions in acidic media, it is two orders of magnitude slower in alkaline media, which hinders the overall efficiency of the alkaline fuel cell. Pure platinum is currently the best catalyst for the hydrogen oxidation reaction, but platinum’s high cost and rarity yields economic issues, rendering the technology futile if it cannot be commercialized. Furthermore, platinum’s hydrogen binding energy is slightly stronger than the optimal hydrogen binding energy. As the hydrogen oxidation reaction happens only on the surface of the catalyst, there is no need for platinum content beyond the exterior. Since tungsten and nickel are cheap, as well as abundant, they are ideal elements to replace the core of the catalyst with, while leaving a platinum shell surrounding this core. The activity of the hydrogen

  19. Rate constant for reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1990-01-01

    Due to the interest in the chemistry of germane in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and because previously reported kinetic reaction rate studies at 298 K gave results differing by a factor of 200, laboratory measurements were performed to determine the reaction rate constant for H + GeH4. Results of the study at 298 K, obtained via the direct technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence, yield the reaction rate constant, k = (4.08 + or - 0.22) x 10(exp -12) cu cm/s.

  20. Studies of Hydrogen Production by the Water Gas Shift Reaction and Related Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-15

    HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY THE WATER GAS SHIFT REACTION AND RELATED CHEMISTRY Institution: The University of Rochester Department of Chemistry -. Rochester...been in siated for the catalysis of the water gas shift reaction, W20 + CO H𔃼 + C02, and for electrocatalytic oxidation of CO, CO + H󈧘 C02 + 2H...particular interest in adopting water gas shift catalysts to act as electrocatalysts for the anode reaction of CO fuel cells. Under these conditions the best

  1. Transition-state charge transfer reveals electrophilic, ambiphilic, and nucleophilic carbon-hydrogen bond activation.

    PubMed

    Ess, Daniel H; Nielsen, Robert J; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

    2009-08-26

    Absolutely localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis of C-H activation transition states (TSs), including Pt, Au, Ir, Ru, W, Sc, and Re metal centers, shows an electrophilic, ambiphilic, and nucleophilic charge transfer (CT) continuum irrespective of the bonding paradigm (oxidative addition, sigma-bond metathesis, oxidative hydrogen migration, 1,2-substitution). Pt(II) insertion and Au(III) substitution TSs are highly electrophilic and dominated by C-H bond to metal/ligand orbital stabilization, while Ir-X and Ru-X (X = R, NH(2), OR, or BOR(2)) substitution TSs are ambiphilic in nature. In this ambiphilic activation regime, an increase in one direction of CT typically leads to a decrease in the reverse direction. Comparison of Tp(CO)Ru-OH and Tp(CO)Ru-NH(2) complexes showed no evidence for the classic d(pi)-p(pi) repulsion model. Complexes such as and Cp(CO)(2)W-B(OR)(2), (PNP)Ir(I), Cp(2)ScMe, and (acac-kappaO,kappaO)(2)Re(III)-OH were found to mediate nucleophilic C-H activation, where the CT is dominated by the metal/ligand orbital to C-H antibonding orbital interaction. This CT continuum ultimately affects the metal-alkyl intermediate polarization and possible functionalization reactions. This analysis will impact the design of new activation reactions and stimulate the discovery of more nucleophilic activation complexes.

  2. In-situ diagnostic tools for hydrogen transfer leak characterization in PEM fuel cell stacks part II: Operational applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niroumand, Amir M.; Homayouni, Hooman; DeVaal, Jake; Golnaraghi, Farid; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a diagnostic tool for in-situ characterization of the rate and distribution of hydrogen transfer leaks in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell stacks. The method is based on reducing the air flow rate from a high to low value at a fixed current, while maintaining an anode overpressure. At high air flow rates, the reduction in air flow results in lower oxygen concentration in the cathode and therefore reduction in cell voltages. Once the air flow rate in each cell reaches a low value at which the cell oxygen-starves, the voltage of the corresponding cell drops to zero. However, oxygen starvation results from two processes: 1) the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction which produces current; and 2) the chemical reaction between oxygen and the crossed over hydrogen. In this work, a diagnostic technique has been developed that accounts for the effect of the electrochemical reaction on cell voltage to identify the hydrogen leak rate and number of leaky cells in a fuel cell stack. This technique is suitable for leak characterization during fuel cell operation, as it only requires stack air flow and voltage measurements, which are readily available in an operational fuel cell system.

  3. Modeling the reaction kinetics of a hydrogen generator onboard a fuel cell -- Electric hybrid motorcycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Karthik

    Owing to the perceived decline of the fossil fuel reserves in the world and environmental issues like pollution, conventional fuels may be replaced by cleaner alternative fuels. The potential of hydrogen as a fuel in vehicular applications is being explored. Hydrogen as an energy carrier potentially finds applications in internal combustion engines and fuel cells because it is considered a clean fuel and has high specific energy. However, at 6 to 8 per kilogram, not only is hydrogen produced from conventional methods like steam reforming expensive, but also there are storage and handling issues, safety concerns and lack of hydrogen refilling stations across the country. The purpose of this research is to suggest a cheap and viable system that generates hydrogen on demand through a chemical reaction between an aluminum-water slurry and an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution to power a 2 kW fuel cell on a fuel cell hybrid motorcycle. This reaction is essentially an aluminum-water reaction where sodium hydroxide acts as a reaction promoter or catalyst. The Horizon 2000 fuel cell used for this purpose has a maximum hydrogen intake rate of 28 lpm. The study focuses on studying the exothermic reaction between the reactants and proposes a rate law that best describes the rate of generation of hydrogen in connection to the surface area of aluminum available for the certain reaction and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution. Further, the proposed rate law is used in the simulation model of the chemical reactor onboard the hybrid motorcycle to determine the hydrogen flow rate to the fuel cell with time. Based on the simulated rate of production of hydrogen from the chemical system, its feasibility of use on different drive cycles is analyzed. The rate of production of hydrogen with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide and smaller aluminum powder size was found to enable the installation of the chemical reactor on urban cycles with frequent stops and starts

  4. Gas-Phase Reaction Pathways and Rate Coefficients for the Dichlorosilane-Hydrogen and Trichlorosilane-Hydrogen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Walch, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    As part of NASA Ames Research Center's Integrated Process Team on Device/Process Modeling and Nanotechnology our goal is to create/contribute to a gas-phase chemical database for use in modeling microelectronics devices. In particular, we use ab initio methods to determine chemical reaction pathways and to evaluate reaction rate coefficients. Our initial studies concern reactions involved in the dichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H2--H2) and trichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H-H2) systems. Reactant, saddle point (transition state), and product geometries and their vibrational harmonic frequencies are determined using the complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure method with the correlation consistent polarized valence double-zeta basis set (cc-pVDZ). Reaction pathways are constructed by following the imaginary frequency mode of the saddle point to both the reactant and product. Accurate energetics are determined using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations (CCSD(T)) extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Using the data from the electronic structure calculations, reaction rate coefficients are obtained using conventional and variational transition state and RRKM theories.

  5. Intramolecular energy transfer and mode-specific effects in unimolecular reactions of 1,2-difluoroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    1989-06-01

    The unimolecular decomposition reactions of 1,2-difluoroethane upon mode-specific excitation to a total internal energy of 7.5 eV are investigated using classical trajectory methods and a previously formulated empirical potential-energy surface. The decomposition channels for 1,2-difluoroethane are, in order of importance, four-center HF elimination, C-C bond rupture, and hydrogen-atom dissociation. This order is found to be independent of the particular vibrational mode excited. Neither fluorine-atom nor F2 elimination reactions are ever observed even though these dissociation channels are energetically open. For four-center HF elimination, the average fraction of the total energy partitioned into internal HF motion varies between 0.115-0.181 depending upon the particular vibrational mode initially excited. The internal energy of the fluoroethylene product lies in the range 0.716-0.776. Comparison of the present results with those previously obtained for a random distribution of the initial 1,2-difluoroethane internal energy [J. Phys. Chem. 92, 5111 (1988)], shows that numerous mode-specific effects are present in these reactions in spite of the fact that intramolecular energy transfer rates for this system are 5.88-25.5 times faster than any of the unimolecular reaction rates. Mode-specific excitation always leads to a total decomposition rate significantly larger than that obtained for a random distribution of the internal energy. Excitation of different 1,2-difluoroethane vibrational modes is found to produce as much as a 51% change in the total decomposition rate. Mode-specific effects are also seen in the product energy partitioning. The rate coefficients for decomposition into the various channels are very sensitive to the particular mode excited. A comparison of the calculated mode-specific effects with the previously determined mode-to-mode energy transfer rate coefficients [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 5680 (1988)] shows that, to some extent, the presence of mode

  6. Energy-transfer processes in neon-hydrogen mixtures excited by electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A.; Kruecken, R.; Ulrich, A.

    2005-12-15

    Energy- and charge-transfer processes in neon-hydrogen mixtures (500-1400 hPa neon and 0.001-3 hPa hydrogen partial pressures) excited by a pulsed low-energy ({approx}10 keV) electron beam were investigated using time-resolved spectroscopy. Time spectra of the hydrogen Lyman-{alpha} line, neon excimer emission (second continuum), and neon atomic lines (3p-3s transitions) were recorded. The time-integrated intensity of the Lyman-{alpha} emission was measured for the same range of gas mixtures. It is shown that direct energy transfer from Ne{sub 2}* excimers and neon atoms in the four lowest excited states as well as recombination of H{sub 3}{sup +} ions are the main channels populatingmore » atomic hydrogen in the n=2 state. A rate constant of (4.2{+-}1.4)x10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} was obtained for the charge transfer from Ne{sub 2}{sup +} ions to molecular hydrogen. A lower limit for the depopulation rate constant of Ne{sub 2}* excimers by molecular hydrogen (combination of energy transfer and ionization) was found to be 1.0x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}.« less

  7. Ni-C-N Nanosheets as Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Fan, Qiaohui; Li, Yuxuan; Cheng, Fangyi; Zhou, Panpan; Xi, Pinxian; Sun, Shouheng

    2016-11-09

    We report a facile nitrogenation/exfoliation process to prepare hybrid Ni-C-N nanosheets. These nanosheets are <2 nm thin, chemically stable, and metallically conductive. They serve as a robust catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 , or 1.0 M KOH or 1.0 M PBS (pH = 7). For example, they catalyze the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 at an onset potential of 34.7 mV, an overpotential of 60.9 mV (at j = 10 mA cm -2 ) and with remarkable long-term stability (∼10% current drop after 70 h testing period). They are promising as a non-Pt catalyst for practical hydrogen evolution reaction.

  8. Role of the Edge Properties in the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on MoS2.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Petr; Otyepka, Michal

    2017-04-06

    Molybdenum disulfide, in particular its edges, has attracted considerable attention as possible substitute for platinum catalysts in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The complex nature of the reaction complicates its detailed experimental investigations, which are mostly indirect and sample dependent. Therefore, density functional theory calculations were employed to study how the properties of the MoS 2 Mo-edge influence the thermodynamics of hydrogen adsorption onto the edge. The effect of the computational model (one-dimensional nanostripe), border symmetry imposed by its length, sulfur saturation of the edge, and dimensionality of the material are discussed. Hydrogen adsorption was found to depend critically on the coverage of extra sulfur at the Mo edge. The bare Mo-edge and fully sulfur-covered Mo-edge are catalytically inactive. The most favorable hydrogen binding towards HER was found for the Mo-edge covered by sulfur monomers. This edge provides hydrogen adsorption free energies positioned around -0.25 eV at up to 50 % hydrogen coverage, close to the experimental values of overpotential needed for the HER reaction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Hollow Pd/MOF Nanosphere with Double Shells as Multifunctional Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wan, Mingming; Zhang, Xinlu; Li, Meiyan; Chen, Bo; Yin, Jie; Jin, Haichao; Lin, Lin; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Ning

    2017-10-01

    A new type of hollow nanostructure featured double metal-organic frameworks shells with metal nanoparticles (MNPs) is designed and fabricated by the methods of ship in a bottle and bottle around the ship. The nanostructure material, hereinafter denoted as Void@HKUST-1/Pd@ZIF-8, is confirmed by the analyses of photograph, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma, and N 2 sorption. It possesses various multifunctionally structural characteristics such as hollow cavity which can improve mass transfer, the adjacent of the inner HKUST-1 shell to the void which enables the matrix of the shell to host and well disperse MNPs, and an outer ZIF-8 shell which acts as protective layer against the leaching of MNPs and a sieve to guarantee molecular-size selectivity. This makes the material eligible candidates for the heterogeneous catalyst. As a proof of concept, the liquid-phase hydrogenation of olefins with different molecular sizes as a model reaction is employed. It demonstrates the efficient catalytic activity and size-selectivity of Void@HKUST-1/Pd@ZIF-8. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Mitina, E. A.; Odinokov, A. V.

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, whichmore » describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ{sub 0}=ℏω{sub 0}/k{sub B}T where ω{sub 0} is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ{sub 0} < 1 − 3) and for low (ξ{sub 0}≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T→ 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate

  11. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Titov, S. V.; Mitina, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/kBT where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 < 1 - 3) and for low (ξ0 ≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T → 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually

  12. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: the microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Basilevsky, M V; Odinokov, A V; Titov, S V; Mitina, E A

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/k(B)T where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 < 1 - 3) and for low (ξ0 ≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T → 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually

  13. Reactions of electron-transfer flavoprotein and electron-transfer flavoprotein: ubiquinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, R R; Steenkamp, D J; Husain, M

    1987-01-01

    Electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-Q oxidoreductase) catalyses the re-oxidation of reduced electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) with ubiquinone-1 (Q-1) as the electron acceptor. A kinetic assay for the enzyme was devised in which glutaryl-CoA in the presence of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase was used to reduce ETFox. and the reduction of Q-1 was monitored at 275 nm. The partial reactions involved in the overall assay system were examined. Glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase catalyses the rapid reduction of ETFox. to the anionic semiquinone (ETF.-), but reduces ETF.- to the fully reduced form (ETFhq) at a rate that is about 6-fold lower. ETF.-, but not ETFhq, is directly re-oxidized by Q-1 at a rate that, depending on the steady-state concentration of ETF.-, may contribute significantly to the overall reaction. ETF-Q oxidoreductase catalyses rapid disproportionation of ETF.- with an equilibrium constant of about 1.0 at pH 7.8. In the presence of Q-1 it also catalyses the re-oxidation of ETFhq at a rate that is faster than that of the overall reaction. Rapid-scan experiments indicated the formation of ETF.-, but its fractional concentration in the early stages of the re-oxidation of ETFhq is low. The data indicate that the re-oxidation of ETFhq proceeds at a rate that is adequate to account for the overall rate of electron transfer from glutaryl-CoA to Q-1. An unusual property of ETF-Q oxidoreductase seems to be that it not only catalyses the re-oxidation of the reduced forms of ETF but also facilitates the complete reduction of ETFox. to ETFhq by disproportionation of the radical. PMID:3593226

  14. High yield of secondary B-side electron transfer in mutant Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, Lucas; Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Wander, Marc J.

    2014-08-01

    From the crystal structures of reaction centers (RCs) from purple photosynthetic bacteria, two pathways for electron transfer (ET) are apparent but only one pathway (the A side) operates in the native protein-cofactor complex. Partial activation of the B-side pathway has unveiled the true inefficiencies of ET processes on that side in comparison to analogous reactions on the A side. Of significance are the relative rate constants for forward ET and the competing charge recombination reactions. On the B side, these rate constants are nearly equal for the secondary charge-separation step (ET from bacteriopheophytin to quinone), relegating the yield of thismore » process to < 50%. Herein we report efforts to optimize this step. In surveying all possible residues at position 131 in the M subunit, we discovered that when glutamic acid replaces the native valine the efficiency of the secondary ET is nearly two-fold higher than in the wild-type RC. The positive effect of M131 Glu is likely due to formation of a hydrogen bond with the ring V keto group of the B-side bacteriopheophytin leading to stabilization of the charge-separated state involving this cofactor. In conclusion, this change slows charge recombination by roughly a factor of two and affords the improved yield of the desired forward ET to the B-side quinone terminal acceptor.« less

  15. Experimental Studies of Hydrogenation and Other Reactions on Surfaces Under Astrophysically Relevant Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidali, Gianfranco

    1998-01-01

    The goal of our project is to study hydrogen recombination reactions on solid surfaces under conditions that are relevant in astrophysics. Laboratory experiments were conducted using low-flux, cold atomic H and D beams impinging on a sample kept under ultra high vacuum conditions. Realistic analogues of interstellar dust grains were used. Our results show that current models for hydrogen recombination reactions have to be modified to take into account the role of activated diffusion of H on surfaces even at low temperature.

  16. Middle atmosphere heating by exothermic chemical reactions involving odd-hydrogen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Solomon, Susan

    1991-01-01

    The rate of heating which occurs in the middle atmosphere due to four exothermic reactions involving members of the odd-hydrogen family is calculated. The following reactions are considered: O + OH yields O2 + H; H + O2 + M yields HO2 + M; H + O3 yields OH + O2; and O + HO2 yields OH + O2. It is shown that the heating rates due to these reactions rival the oxygen-related heating rates conventionally considered in middle-atmosphere models. The conversion of chemical potential energy into molecular translational energy (heat) by these odd-hydrogen reactions is shown to be a significant energy source in the middle atmosphere that has not been previously considered.

  17. Why are sec-alkylperoxyl bimolecular self-reactions orders of magnitude faster than the analogous reactions of tert-alkylperoxyls? The unanticipated role of CH hydrogen bond donation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richmond; Gryn'ova, Ganna; Ingold, K U; Coote, Michelle L

    2016-08-24

    High-level ab initio calculations are used to identify the mechanism of secondary (and primary) alkylperoxyl radical termination and explain why their reactions are much faster than their tertiary counterparts. Contrary to existing literature, the decomposition of both tertiary and non-tertiary tetroxides follows the same asymmetric two-step bond cleavage pathway to form a caged intermediate of overall singlet multiplicity comprising triplet oxygen and two alkoxyl radicals. The alpha hydrogen atoms of non-tertiary species facilitate this process by forming unexpected CHO hydrogen bonds to the evolving O2. For non-tertiary peroxyls, subsequent alpha hydrogen atom transfer then yields the experimentally observed non-radical products, ketone, alcohol and O2, whereas for tertiary species, this reaction is precluded and cage escape of the (unpaired) alkoxyl radicals is a likely outcome with important consequences for autoxidation.

  18. Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol: Computational Study of the Hydrogen Transfer on Lewis Acidic BEA Zeolites and Effects of Cation Exchange and Tetravalent Metal Substitution.

    PubMed

    Prasertsab, Anittha; Maihom, Thana; Probst, Michael; Wattanakit, Chularat; Limtrakul, Jumras

    2018-06-04

    The hydrogen transfer of furfural to furfuryl alcohol with i-propanol as the hydrogen source over cation-exchanged Lewis acidic BEA zeolite has been investigated by means of density functional calculations. The reaction proceeds in three steps. First the O-H bond of i-propanol is broken to form a propoxide intermediate. After that, the furylmethoxy intermediate is formed via hydrogen transfer process, and finally furylmethoxy abstracts the proton to form the furfuryl alcohol product. The second step is rate-determining by requiring the highest activation energy (23.8 kcal/mol) if the reaction takes place on Li-Sn-BEA zeolite. We find that the catalytic activity of various cation-exchanged Sn-BEA zeolites is in the order Li-Sn-BEA > Na-Sn-BEA > K-Sn-BEA. The lower activation energy for Li-Sn-BEA compared to Na-Sn-BEA and K-Sn-BEA can be explained by the larger charge transfer from the carbonyl bond to the catalyst, leading to its activation and to the attraction of the hydrogen being transferred. The larger charge transfer in turn is due to the smaller gap between the energies of furfural HOMO and the zeolite LUMO in Li-Sn-BEA, compared to both Na-Sn-BEA and K-Sn-BEA. In a similar way, we also compare the catalytic activity of tetravalent metal centers (Sn, Zr, and Hf) substituted into BEA and find in the order Zr ≥ Hf > Sn, based on activation energies. Finally we investigate statistically which property of the reactants is a suitable descriptor for an approximative prediction of the reaction rate in order to be able to quickly screen promising catalytic materials for this reaction.

  19. Evidence for Coherent Transfer of para-Hydrogen-Induced Polarization at Low Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Kiryutin, Alexey S; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Kaptein, Robert; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L

    2013-08-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of para-hydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) transfer from the original strongly aligned protons to other nuclei at low external magnetic fields. Although it is known that PHIP is efficiently transferred at low fields, the nature of the transfer mechanism, that is, coherent spin mixing or cross-relaxation, is not well established. Polarization transfer kinetics for individual protons of styrene was, for the first time, measured and modeled theoretically. Pronounced oscillations were observed indicating a coherent transfer mechanism. Spin coherences were excited by passing through an avoided level crossing of the nuclear spin energy levels. Transfer at avoided level crossings is selective with respect to spin order. Our work provides evidence that the coherent PHIP transfer mechanism is dominant at low magnetic fields.

  20. Ultrafast forward and backward electron transfer dynamics of coumarin 337 in hydrogen-bonded anilines as studied with femtosecond UV-pump/IR-probe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Hirendra N; Verma, Sandeep; Nibbering, Erik T J

    2011-02-10

    Femtosecond infrared spectroscopy is used to study both forward and backward electron transfer (ET) dynamics between coumarin 337 (C337) and the aromatic amine solvents aniline (AN), N-methylaniline (MAN), and N,N-dimethylaniline (DMAN), where all the aniline solvents can donate an electron but only AN and MAN can form hydrogen bonds with C337. The formation of a hydrogen bond with AN and MAN is confirmed with steady state FT-IR spectroscopy, where the C═O stretching vibration is a direct marker mode for hydrogen bond formation. Transient IR absorption measurements in all solvents show an absorption band at 2166 cm(-1), which has been attributed to the C≡N stretching vibration of the C337 radical anion formed after ET. Forward electron transfer dynamics is found to be biexponential with time constants τ(ET)(1) = 500 fs, τ(ET)(2) = 7 ps in all solvents. Despite the presence of hydrogen bonds of C337 with the solvents AN and MAN, no effect has been found on the forward electron transfer step. Because of the absence of an H/D isotope effect on the forward electron transfer reaction of C337 in AN, hydrogen bonds are understood to play a minor role in mediating electron transfer. In contrast, direct π-orbital overlap between C337 and the aromatic amine solvents causes ultrafast forward electron transfer dynamics. Backward electron transfer dynamics, in contrast, is dependent on the solvent used. Standard Marcus theory explains the observed backward electron transfer rates.

  1. Geometric phase effects in ultracold hydrogen exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naduvalath, Balakrishnan; Croft, James F. E.; Hazra, Jisha; Kendrick, Brian K.

    2017-04-01

    Electronically non-adiabatic effects play an important role in many chemical reactions. The geometric phase, also known as the Berry's phase, arises from the adiabatic transport of the electronic wave function around a conical intersection between two electronic potential energy surfaces. It is shown that in ultracold collisions of H and D atoms with vibrationally excited HD, inclusion of the geometric phase leads to constructive and destructive interferences between non-reactive and exchange components of the wave function. This results in strong enhancement or suppression of reactivity depending on the final rovibrational levels of the scattered HD molecules. The effect is illustrated for non-rotating and rotationally excited HD molecules in the v = 4 vibrational level for which the H+HD and D+HD reactions occur through a barrierless path. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1505557 (N.B.), ARO MURI Grant No. W911NF-12-1-0476 (N.B.), and DOE LDRD Grant No. 20170221ER (B.K.).

  2. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at highmore » temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to

  3. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-17

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency regimes for the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term does not significantly impact the rate constants derived using the cumulant expansion approachmore » in any of the regimes studied. The effects of the quadratic term may become significant when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant, however, particularly at high temperatures and for proton transfer interfaces with extremely soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with extraordinarily weak hydrogen bonds. Even with the thermal averaging procedure, the effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances, and the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer in chemical and biological processes. We are grateful for support from National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (applications to enzymes) and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of

  4. High Performance Electrocatalytic Reaction of Hydrogen and Oxygen on Ruthenium Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Ruquan; Liu, Yuanyue; Peng, Zhiwei

    2017-01-18

    The development of catalytic materials for the hydrogen oxidation, hydrogen evolution, oxygen reduction or oxygen evolution reactions with high reaction rates and low overpotentials are key goals for the development of renewable energy. We report here Ru(0) nanoclusters supported on nitrogen-doped graphene as high-performance multifunctional catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), showing activities similar to that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline solution. For HER performance in alkaline media, sample Ru/NG-750 reaches 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 8 mV with a Tafel slope of 30 mV dec-1. The high HER performance in alkalinemore » solution is advantageous because most catalysts for ORR and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) also prefer alkaline solution environment whereas degrade in acidic electrolytes. For ORR performance, Ru/NG effectively catalyzes the conversion of O2 into OH- via a 4e process at a current density comparable to that of Pt/C. The unusual catalytic activities of Ru(0) nanoclusters reported here are important discoveries for the advancement of renewable energy conversion reactions.« less

  5. Altering intra- to inter-molecular hydrogen bonding by dimethylsulfoxide: A TDDFT study of charge transfer for coumarin 343

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaochun; Yin, Hang; Li, Hui; Shi, Ying

    2017-04-01

    DFT and TDDFT methods were carried out to investigate the influences of intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding on excited state charge transfer for coumarin 343 (C343). Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is formed between carboxylic acid group and carbonyl group in C343 monomer. However, in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution, DMSO 'opens up' the intramolecular hydrogen bonding and forms solute-solvent intermolecular hydrogen bonded C343-DMSO complex. Analysis of frontier molecular orbitals reveals that intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) occurs in the first excited state both for C343 monomer and complex. The results of optimized geometric structures indicate that the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction is strengthened while the intermolecular hydrogen bonding is weakened in excited state, which is confirmed again by monitoring the shifts of characteristic peaks of infrared spectra. We demonstrated that DMSO solvent can not only break the intramolecular hydrogen bonding to form intermolecular hydrogen bonding with C343 but also alter the mechanism of excited state hydrogen bonding strengthening.

  6. Reaction propagation test. Evaluation of the behavior of nonmetallic materials in hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. D.

    1972-01-01

    Results of tests conducted to evaluate the behavior of nonmetallic materials in hydrogen are described. The reaction propagation test simulates the conditions resulting from the interaction of an electrical wire in an overload condition in contract with a material in the test medium. The test is designed to evaluate the behavior of a material subjected to an energy input (usually heat) sufficient to cause a reaction which propagates to consume larger quantities of the material. Ten nonmetallic materials were evaluated to establish baseline data on the behavior of nonmetallic materials in hydrogen and to characterize, on an initial basis, one mode of material failure considered to be a factor pertinent to the safe use of a material in hydrogen.

  7. Modeling of hydrogen evolution reaction on the surface of GaInP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woon Ih; Wood, Brandon; Schwegler, Eric; Ogitsu, Tadashi

    2012-02-01

    GaInP2 is promising candidate material for hydrogen production using sunlight. It reduces solvated proton into hydrogen molecule using light-induced excited electrons in the photoelectrochemical cell. However, it is challenging to model hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) using first-principles molecular dynamics. Instead, we use Anderson-Newns model and generalized solvent coordinate in Marcus-Hush theory to describe adiabatic free energy surface of HER. Model parameters are fitted from the DFT calculations. We model Volmer-Heyrovsky reaction path on the surfaces of CuPt phase of GaInP2. We also discuss effects of surface oxide and catalyst atoms that exist on top of bare surfaces in experimental circumstances.

  8. Thermometric titration of cadmium with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, with oxidation by hydrogen peroxide as indicator reaction.

    PubMed

    Hattori, T; Yoshida, H

    1987-08-01

    A new method of end-point indication is described for thermometric titration of cadmium with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC). It is based on the redox reaction between hydrogen peroxide added to the system before titration, and the first excess of DDTC. Amounts of cadmium in the range 10-50 mumoles are titrated within 1% error.

  9. Learning about Regiochemistry from a Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears-Dundes, Christopher; Huon, Yoeup; Hotz, Richard P.; Pinhas, Allan R.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment has been developed in which the hydrogen-atom abstraction and the coupling of propionitrile, using Fenton's reagent, are investigated. Students learn about the regiochemistry of radical formation, the stereochemistry of product formation, and the interpretation of GC-MS data, in a safe reaction that can be easily completed in one…

  10. Determination of the Molar Volume of Hydrogen from the Metal-Acid Reaction: An Experimental Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin; Chapman, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Describes an alternative technique for determining the molar volume of hydrogen from the metal-acid reaction in which the metal sample is encased in a specially prepared cage and a pipette filler is used to fill an inverted burette with water. Eliminates some difficulties encountered with the conventional technique. (JRH)

  11. Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for excitation-induced hydrogen dissociation on hydrogenated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Junhyeok; Meng, Sheng; Sun, Yi-Yang; West, Damien; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Zhang, S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding and controlling of excited carrier dynamics is of fundamental and practical importance, particularly in photochemistry and solar energy applications. However, theory of energy relaxation of excited carriers is still in its early stage. Here, using ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) coupled with time-dependent density functional theory, we show a coverage-dependent energy transfer of photoexcited carriers in hydrogenated graphene, giving rise to distinctively different ion dynamics. Graphene with sparsely populated H is difficult to dissociate due to inefficient transfer of the excitation energy into kinetic energy of the H. In contrast, H can easily desorb from fully hydrogenated graphane. The key is to bring down the H antibonding state to the conduction band minimum as the band gap increases. These results can be contrasted to those of standard ground-state MD that predict H in the sparse case should be much less stable than that in fully hydrogenated graphane. Our findings thus signify the importance of carrying out explicit electronic dynamics in excited-state simulations. PMID:23277576

  12. Communication: Charge transfer dominates over proton transfer in the reaction of nitric acid with gas-phase hydrated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengyel, Jozef; Med, Jakub; Slavíček, Petr; Beyer, Martin K.

    2017-09-01

    The reaction of HNO3 with hydrated electrons (H2O)n- (n = 35-65) in the gas phase was studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetic analysis of the experimental data shows that OH-(H2O)m is formed primarily via a reaction of the hydrated electron with HNO3 inside the cluster, while proton transfer is not observed and NO3-(H2O)m is just a secondary product. The reaction enthalpy was determined using nanocalorimetry, revealing a quite exothermic charge transfer with -241 ± 69 kJ mol-1. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that proton transfer is an allowed reaction pathway, but the overall thermochemistry favors charge transfer.

  13. Energy, Electron Transfer and Photocatalytic Reactions of Visible Light Absorbing Transition Metal Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Schmehl, Russell H.

    2016-03-02

    This is the final technical report for a project carried out at Tulane University of New Orleans that describes the development of light induced (solar) reactions geared toward decomposing water into its component elements : hydrogen and oxygen. Much of the work involved optimizing systems for absorbing visible light and undergoing light promoted reactions to generate very strong reducing agents that are capable of reacting with water to produce hydrogen. Additional portions of the research were collaborative efforts to put the strong reducing agents to work in reaction with hydrogen generation catalysts prepared elsewhere. Time resolved laser spectroscopic methods weremore » used to evaluate the light induced reactions and characterize very reactive intermediate substances formed during the reactions.« less

  14. Enantioselective synthesis of anti-β-hydroxy-α-amido esters via transfer hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Seashore-Ludlow, Brinton; Villo, Piret; Häcker, Christine; Somfai, Peter

    2010-11-19

    The asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of α-amido-β-keto esters to provide the corresponding anti-β-hydroxy-α-amido esters in good to excellent yields, diastereoselectivity, and enantioselectivity is reported. The procedure is operationally simple, and delicate handling of the catalyst is not necessary.

  15. Laboratory Measurements of Charge Transfer on Atomic Hydrogen at Thermal Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havener, C. C.; Vane, C. R.; Krause, H. F.; Stancil, P. C.; Mroczkowski, T.; Savin, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    We describe our ongoing program to measure velocity dependent charge transfer (CT) cross sections for selected ions on atomic hydrogen using the ion-aloin merged-beams apparatus at Oak Ridge Natioiial Laboralory. Our focus is on those ions for which CT plays an important role in determining the ionization structure, line emis sion, and thermal structure of observed cosmic photoionized plasmas.

  16. Magnetic Silica-Supported Ruthenium Nanoparticles: An Efficient Catalyst for Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium nano particles immobilization; the hydration of nitriles and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds occurs in hi...

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure, antimicrobial activity and DNA-binding of hydrogen-bonded proton-transfer complex of 2,6-diaminopyridine with picric acid.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ishaat M; Ahmad, Afaq; Ullah, M F

    2011-04-04

    A proton-transfer (charge transfer) complex formed on the reaction between 2,6-diaminopyridine (donor) and picric acid (acceptor) was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR, thermal and elemental analysis. The crystal structure determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicates that cation and anion are joined together by strong N(+)-H- -O(-) type hydrogen bonds. The hydrogen-bonded charge transfer (HBCT) complex was screened for its pharmacology such as antimicrobial activity against various fungal and bacterial strains and Calf thymus DNA-binding. The results showed that HBCT complex (100μg/ml) exhibited good antibacterial antifungal activity as that of standard antibiotics Tetracycline and Nystatin. A molecular frame work through H-bonding interactions between neighboring moieties is found to be responsible for high melting point of resulting complex. This has been attributed to the formation of 1:1 HBCT complex. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Reaction engineering for materials processing in space: Reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shadman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is a consumable material which needs to be produced continuously in most space missions. Its use for propulsion as well as life support makes oxygen one of the largest volume chemicals to be produced in space. Production of oxygen from lunar materials is of particular interest and is very attractive possibility. The kinetics and mechanism of reduction of ilmenite by carbon monoxide and hydrogen at 800 to 1100 C were investigated. The temporal profiles of conversion for carbon monoxide have a sigmoidal shape and indicate the presence of three different stages (induction, acceleration, and deceleration) during the reduction reaction. The apparent activation energy decreases from 18 kcal/mole at 10 percent conversion to 10 kcal/mole at 50 percent conversion. The reaction is first order with respect to carbon monoxide under the experimental conditions studied. Both SEM and EDX analysis show that the diffusion of Fe product away from the reaction front and through the TiO2 phase, followed by the nucleation and growth of a separate Fe phase are important steps affecting the process kinetics. The results from hydrogen reduction show that the mechanism of ilmenite reduction by hydrogen is similar to that by carbon monoxide. However, the titanium dioxide can be further reduced by hydrogen at 800 to 1000 C. The detailed comparison and theoretical modeling of both reduction processes is presented.

  19. Hydrogen loss during N-15 nuclear reaction analysis of high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larochelle, J. S.; Désilets-Benoit, A.; Borduas, G.; Laliberté-Riverin, S.; Roorda, S.; Brochu, M.

    2017-10-01

    High strength steel samples were analysed by N-15 nuclear reaction analysis in order to detect hydrogen that may have been introduced by electroplating process. The NRA signal decreased during exposure of the ion beam and residual gas analysis showed that the gas was desorbed by the beam interaction. The variable hydrogen signal could be well described as the sum of a constant concentration and a fraction susceptible to second order desorption. A mechanically polished bevel allowed measurements to be extended to a depth of 0.2 mm.

  20. Direct reductive amination of aromatic aldehydes catalyzed by gold(I) complex under transfer hydrogenation conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Yang, Hongwei; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Chengjian; Li, Wei; Cheng, Yixiang; Hu, Hongwen

    2011-06-21

    The direct reductive amination of aromatic aldehydes has been achieved with excellent isolated yields (89-96%) using readily accessible Ph(3)PAuCl/AgOTf catalyst along with ethyl Hantzsch ester as hydrogen source under mild reaction conditions. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  1. Reversible interactions with para-hydrogen enhance NMR sensitivity by polarization transfer.

    PubMed

    Adams, Ralph W; Aguilar, Juan A; Atkinson, Kevin D; Cowley, Michael J; Elliott, Paul I P; Duckett, Simon B; Green, Gary G R; Khazal, Iman G; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Williamson, David C

    2009-03-27

    The sensitivity of both nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging is very low because the detected signal strength depends on the small population difference between spin states even in high magnetic fields. Hyperpolarization methods can be used to increase this difference and thereby enhance signal strength. This has been achieved previously by incorporating the molecular spin singlet para-hydrogen into hydrogenation reaction products. We show here that a metal complex can facilitate the reversible interaction of para-hydrogen with a suitable organic substrate such that up to an 800-fold increase in proton, carbon, and nitrogen signal strengths are seen for the substrate without its hydrogenation. These polarized signals can be selectively detected when combined with methods that suppress background signals.

  2. Numerical simulation of hydrogen-air reacting flows in rectangular channels with catalytic surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Ryoichi S.; Abou-Ellail, Mohsen M.; Elhaw, Samer; Saeed Ibrahim, Mohamed

    2013-09-01

    In this work a prediction was numerically modeled for a catalytically stabilized thermal combustion of a lean homogeneous mixture of air and hydrogen. The mixture flows in a narrow rectangular channel lined with a thin coating of platinum catalyst. The solution using an in-house code is based on the steady state partial differential continuity, momentum and energy conservation equations for the mixture and species involved in the reactions. A marching technique is used along the streamwise direction to solve the 2-D plane-symmetric laminar flow of the gas. Two chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms were included; one for the gas phase reactions consisting of 17 elementary reactions; of which 7 are forward-backward reactions while the other mechanism is for the surface reactions—which are the prime mover of the combustion under a lean mixture condition—consisting of 16 elementary reactions. The results were compared with a former congruent experimental work where temperature was measured using thermocouples, while using PLIF laser for measuring water and hydrogen mole fractions. The comparison showed good agreement. More results for the velocities, mole fractions of other species were carried out across the transverse and along the streamwise directions providing a complete picture of overall mechanism—gas and surface—and on the production, consumptions and travel of the different species. The variations of the average OH mole fraction with the streamwise direction showed a sudden increase in the region where the ignition occurred. Also the rate of reactions of the entire surface species were calculated along the streamwise direction and a surface water production flux equation was derived by calculating the law of mass action's constants from the concentrations of hydrogen, oxygen and the rate of formation of water near the surface.

  3. Reaction of H + HONO in solid para-hydrogen: infrared spectrum of ˙ONH(OH).

    PubMed

    Haupa, Karolina Anna; Tielens, Alexander Godfried Gerardus Maria; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2017-06-21

    Hydrogenation reactions in the N/O chemical network are important for an understanding of the mechanism of formation of organic molecules in dark interstellar clouds, but many reactions remain unknown. We present the results of the reaction H + HONO in solid para-hydrogen (p-H 2 ) at 3.3 K investigated with infrared spectra. Two methods that produced hydrogen atoms were the irradiation of HONO molecules in p-H 2 at 365 nm to produce OH radicals that reacted readily with nearby H 2 to produce mobile H atoms, and irradiation of Cl 2 molecules (co-deposited with HONO) in p-H 2 at 405 nm to produce Cl atoms that reacted, upon IR irradiation of the p-H 2 matrix, readily with nearby H 2 to produce mobile H atoms. In both experiments, we assigned IR lines at 3549.6 (ν 1 ), 1465.0 (ν 3 ), 1372.2 (ν 4 ), 898.5/895.6 (ν 6 ), and 630.9 (ν 7 ) cm -1 to hydroxy(oxido)-λ 5 -azanyl radical [˙ONH(OH)], the primary product of HONO hydrogenation. Two weak lines at 3603.4 and 991.0 cm -1 are tentatively assigned to the dihydroxy-λ 5 -azanyl radical, ˙N(OH) 2 . The assignments were derived according to the consideration of possible reactions and comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers and their IR intensities with values predicted quantum-chemically with the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ method. The agreement between observed and calculated D/H- and 15 N/ 14 N-isotopic ratios further supports these assignments. The role of this reaction in the N/O chemical network in dark interstellar clouds is discussed.

  4. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for the role of hydrogen in catalytic reactions of furfural on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Wenhua; Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Jentoft, Friederike; Resasco, Daniel; Wang, Sanwu

    2014-03-01

    In the study of catalytic reactions of biomass, furfural conversion over metal catalysts with the presence of hydrogen has attracted wide attention. We report ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for furfural and hydrogen on the Pd(111) surface at finite temperatures. The simulations demonstrate that the presence of hydrogen is important in promoting furfural conversion. In particular, hydrogen molecules dissociate rapidly on the Pd(111) surface. As a result of such dissociation, atomic hydrogen participates in the reactions with furfural. The simulations also provide detailed information about the possible reactions of hydrogen with furfural. Supported by DOE (DE-SC0004600). This research used the supercomputer resources of the XSEDE, the NERSC Center, and the Tandy Supercomputing Center.

  5. Vibrational Product States from Reactions of CN(-) with the Hydrogen Halides and Hydrogen Atoms,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-15

    in these Several of the postulated schemes to synthesize CNH distributions. Each distribution is normalized to 1.0 ignoring in outer space are based on...been observed in interstellar space . 22-24 (3) One major advantage of studying HCN instead of, say, CO 2 is that the V3 mode of HCN is very anharmonic... Nebula by radio emission. 22,54-58 (Table IV) for the P3 modes of HCN and CNH in Reactions to- (6). The hatched areas are indications of the errors

  6. Amine-Modulated/Engineered Interfaces of NiMo Electrocatalysts for Improved Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Solutions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Gou, Wangyan; Zhou, Xuemei; Ho, Johnny C; Ma, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yongquan

    2018-01-17

    The interface between electrolytes and electrocatalysts would largely determine their corresponding activity and stability. Herein, modulating the surface characteristics of NiMo nanoparticles by various adsorbed amines gives the tunability on their interfacial properties and subsequently improves their catalytic performance for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline solutions. Diamines can significantly improve their HER activity by decreasing the charge-transfer resistance and modulating the electronic structures of interfacial active sites. Importantly, among various amines, ethylenediamine facilitates the HER activity of NiMo with a remarkable decrease of 268 mV in the overpotential to reach 10 mA cm -2 as compared with that of the unmodified NiMo in 1.0 M KOH. This method provides a novel strategy of regulating the interfacial properties to strengthen the catalytic performance of electrocatalysts.

  7. CdS/TiO2 photoanodes via solution ion transfer method for highly efficient solar hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Karuturi, Siva; Yew, Rowena; Reddy Narangari, Parvathala; Wong-Leung, Jennifer; Li, Li; Vora, Kaushal; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2018-03-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is a unique semiconducting material for solar hydrogen generation applications with a tunable, narrow bandgap that straddles water redox potentials. However, its potential towards efficient solar hydrogen generation has not yet been realized due to low photon-to-current conversions, high charge carrier recombination and the lack of controlled preparation methods. In this work, we demonstrate a highly efficient CdS/TiO2 heterostructured photoelectrode using atomic layer deposition and solution ion transfer reactions. Enabled by the well-controlled deposition of CdS nanocrystals on TiO2 inverse opal (TiIO) nanostructures using the proposed method, a saturation photocurrent density of 9.1 mA cm-2 is realized which is the highest ever reported for CdS-based photoelectrodes. We further demonstrate that the passivation of a CdS surface with an ultrathin amorphous layer (˜1.5 nm) of TiO2 improves the charge collection efficiency at low applied potentials paving the way for unassisted solar hydrogen generation.

  8. Complementary Strategies for Directed C(sp3 )-H Functionalization: A Comparison of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Activation, Hydrogen Atom Transfer, and Carbene/Nitrene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Chu, John C K; Rovis, Tomislav

    2018-01-02

    The functionalization of C(sp 3 )-H bonds streamlines chemical synthesis by allowing the use of simple molecules and providing novel synthetic disconnections. Intensive recent efforts in the development of new reactions based on C-H functionalization have led to its wider adoption across a range of research areas. This Review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of three main approaches: transition-metal-catalyzed C-H activation, 1,n-hydrogen atom transfer, and transition-metal-catalyzed carbene/nitrene transfer, for the directed functionalization of unactivated C(sp 3 )-H bonds. For each strategy, the scope, the reactivity of different C-H bonds, the position of the reacting C-H bonds relative to the directing group, and stereochemical outcomes are illustrated with examples in the literature. The aim of this Review is to provide guidance for the use of C-H functionalization reactions and inspire future research in this area. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility: Initial hydrogen and nitrogen no-vent fill data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Nyland, Ted W.; Papell, S. Stephen

    1990-03-01

    The Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility is a versatile testbed for ground-based cryogenic fluid storage, handling, and transfer experimentation. The test rig contains two well instrumented tanks, and a third interchangeable tank, designed to accommodate liquid nitrogen or liquid hydrogen testing. The internal tank volumes are approx. 18, 5, and 1.2 cu. ft. Tank pressures can be varied from 2 to 30 psia. Preliminary no vent fill tests with nitrogen and hydrogen were successfully completed with the test rig. Initial results indicate that no vent fills of nitrogen above 90 percent full are achievable using this test configuration, in a 1-g environment, and with inlet liquid temperatures as high as 143 R, and an average tank wall temperature of nearly 300 R. This inlet temperature corresponds to a saturation pressure of 19 psia for nitrogen. Hydrogen proved considerably more difficult to transfer between tanks without venting. The highest temperature conditions resulting in a fill level greater than 90 percent were with an inlet liquid temperature of 34 R, and an estimated tank wall temperature of slightly more than 100 R. Saturation pressure for hydrogen at this inlet temperature is 10 psia. All preliminary no vent fill tests were performed with a top mounted full cone nozzle for liquid injection. The nozzle produces a 120 degree conical droplet spray at a differential pressure of 10 psi. Pressure in the receiving tank was held to less than 30 psia for all tests.

  10. Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility: Initial hydrogen and nitrogen no-vent fill data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Nyland, Ted W.; Papell, S. Stephen

    1990-01-01

    The Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility is a versatile testbed for ground-based cryogenic fluid storage, handling, and transfer experimentation. The test rig contains two well instrumented tanks, and a third interchangeable tank, designed to accommodate liquid nitrogen or liquid hydrogen testing. The internal tank volumes are approx. 18, 5, and 1.2 cu. ft. Tank pressures can be varied from 2 to 30 psia. Preliminary no vent fill tests with nitrogen and hydrogen were successfully completed with the test rig. Initial results indicate that no vent fills of nitrogen above 90 percent full are achievable using this test configuration, in a 1-g environment, and with inlet liquid temperatures as high as 143 R, and an average tank wall temperature of nearly 300 R. This inlet temperature corresponds to a saturation pressure of 19 psia for nitrogen. Hydrogen proved considerably more difficult to transfer between tanks without venting. The highest temperature conditions resulting in a fill level greater than 90 percent were with an inlet liquid temperature of 34 R, and an estimated tank wall temperature of slightly more than 100 R. Saturation pressure for hydrogen at this inlet temperature is 10 psia. All preliminary no vent fill tests were performed with a top mounted full cone nozzle for liquid injection. The nozzle produces a 120 degree conical droplet spray at a differential pressure of 10 psi. Pressure in the receiving tank was held to less than 30 psia for all tests.

  11. Temperature-Dependent Rate Coefficients for the Reaction of CH2OO with Hydrogen Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mica C; Chao, Wen; Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S; Takahashi, Kaito; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2017-02-09

    The reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO with hydrogen sulfide was measured with transient UV absorption spectroscopy in a temperature-controlled flow reactor, and bimolecular rate coefficients were obtained from 278 to 318 K and from 100 to 500 Torr. The average rate coefficient at 298 K and 100 Torr was (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10 -13 cm 3 s -1 . The reaction was found to be independent of pressure and exhibited a weak negative temperature dependence. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of the temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficient at the QCISD(T)/CBS level are in reasonable agreement with the experiment. The reaction of CH 2 OO with H 2 S is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than the reaction with H 2 O monomer. Though rates of CH 2 OO scavenging by water vapor under atmospheric conditions are primarily controlled by the reaction with water dimer, the H 2 S loss pathway will be dominated by the reaction with monomer. The agreement between experiment and theory for the CH 2 OO + H 2 S reaction lends credence to theoretical descriptions of other Criegee intermediate reactions that cannot easily be probed experimentally.

  12. Intermolecular hydrogen bond complexes by in situ charge transfer complexation of o-tolidine with picric and chloranilic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Saad, Hosam A.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2011-08-01

    A two new charge transfer complexes formed from the interactions between o-tolidine (o-TOL) and picric (PA) or chloranilic (CA) acids, with the compositions, [(o-TOL)(PA) 2] and [(o-TOL)(CA) 2] have been prepared. The 13C NMR, 1H NMR, 1H-Cosy, and IR show that the charge-transfer chelation occurs via the formation of chain structures O-H⋯N intermolecular hydrogen bond between 2NH 2 groups of o-TOL molecule and OH group in each PA or CA units. Photometric titration measurements concerning the two reactions in methanol were performed and the measurements show that the donor-acceptor molar ratio was found to be 1:2 using the modified Benesi-Hildebrand equation. The spectroscopic data were discussed in terms of formation constant, molar extinction coefficient, oscillator strength, dipole moment, standard free energy, and ionization potential. Thermal behavior of both charge transfer complexes showed that the complexes were more stable than their parents. The thermodynamic parameters were estimated from the differential thermogravimetric curves. The results indicated that the formation of molecular charge transfer complexes is spontaneous and endothermic.

  13. Intermolecular hydrogen bond complexes by in situ charge transfer complexation of o-tolidine with picric and chloranilic acids.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Saad, Hosam A; Adam, Abdel Majid A

    2011-08-01

    A two new charge transfer complexes formed from the interactions between o-tolidine (o-TOL) and picric (PA) or chloranilic (CA) acids, with the compositions, [(o-TOL)(PA)(2)] and [(o-TOL)(CA)(2)] have been prepared. The (13)C NMR, (1)H NMR, (1)H-Cosy, and IR show that the charge-transfer chelation occurs via the formation of chain structures O-H⋯N intermolecular hydrogen bond between 2NH(2) groups of o-TOL molecule and OH group in each PA or CA units. Photometric titration measurements concerning the two reactions in methanol were performed and the measurements show that the donor-acceptor molar ratio was found to be 1:2 using the modified Benesi-Hildebrand equation. The spectroscopic data were discussed in terms of formation constant, molar extinction coefficient, oscillator strength, dipole moment, standard free energy, and ionization potential. Thermal behavior of both charge transfer complexes showed that the complexes were more stable than their parents. The thermodynamic parameters were estimated from the differential thermogravimetric curves. The results indicated that the formation of molecular charge transfer complexes is spontaneous and endothermic. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimation of free energy barriers in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase reactions probed by hydrogen-exchange kinetics of C alpha-labeled amino acids with solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, D.A.; Wiesinger, H.; Toney, M.D.

    1989-05-02

    The existence of the postulated quinonoid intermediate in the cytoplasmic aspartate amino-transferase catalyzed transamination of aspartate to oxaloacetate was probed by determining the extent of transfer of tritium from the C alpha position of tritiated L-aspartate to pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate in single turnover experiments in which washout from the back-reaction was obviated by product trapping. The maximum amount of transferred tritium observed was 0.7%, consistent either with a mechanism in which a fraction of the net transamination reaction proceeds through a quinonoid intermediate or with a mechanism in which this intermediate is formed off the main reaction pathway. It is shownmore » that transfer of labeled hydrogen from the amino acid to cofactor cannot be used to differentiate a stepwise from a concerted transamination mechanism. The amount of tritium transferred is a function of the rate constant for torsional equilibration about the epsilon-amino group of Lys-258, the presumptive abstractor of the C alpha proton; the relative rate constants for hydrogen exchange with solvent versus cofactor protonation; and the tritium isotope effect on this ratio. The free energy barriers facing the covalent intermediate between aldimine and keto acid product (i.e., ketimine and possibly quinonoid) were evaluated relatively by comparing the rates of C alpha-hydrogen exchange in starting amino acid with the rates of keto acid formation. The value of theta (= kexge/kprod) was found to be 2.6 for the reaction of cytoplasmic isozyme with aspartate and ca. 0.5 for that of the mitochondrial form with glutamate.« less

  15. Laser ion source for multi-nucleon transfer reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Y.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Imai, N.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Miyatake, H.; Oyaizu, M.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Sonoda, T.; Wada, M.; Huyse, M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Van Duppen, P.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a laser ion source for the target-like fragments (TLFs) produced in multi-nucleon transfer (MNT) reactions. The operation principle of the source is based on the in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) approach. In the source TLFs are thermalized and neutralized in high pressure and high purity argon gas, and are extracted after being selectively re-ionized in a multi-step laser resonance ionization process. The laser ion source has been implemented at the KEK Isotope Separation System (KISS) for β-decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich isotopes with N = 126 of nuclear astrophysical interest. The simulations of gas flow and ion-beam optics have been performed to optimize the gas cell for efficient thermalization and fast transporting the TLFs, and the mass-separator for efficient transport with high mass-resolving power, respectively. To confirm the performances expected at the design stage, off-line experiments have been performed by using 56Fe atoms evaporated from a filament in the gas cell. The gas-transport time of 230 ms in the argon cell and the measured KISS mass-resolving power of 900 are consistent with the designed values. The high purity of the gas-cell system, which is extremely important for efficient and highly-selective production of laser ions, was achieved and confirmed from the mass distribution of the extracted ions. After the off-line tests, on-line experiments were conducted by directly injecting energetic 56Fe beam into the gas cell. After thermalization of the injected 56Fe beam, laser-produced singly-charged 56Fe+ ions were extracted. The extraction efficiency and selectivity of the gas cell in the presence of plasma induced by 56Fe beam injection as well as the time profile of the extracted ions were investigated; extraction efficiency of 0.25%, a beam purity of >99% and an extraction time of 270 ms. It has been confirmed that the performance of the KISS laser ion source is satisfactory to start the measurements of

  16. Role of hydrogen bonds in the reaction mechanism of chalcone isomerase.

    PubMed

    Jez, Joseph M; Bowman, Marianne E; Noel, Joseph P

    2002-04-23

    In flavonoid, isoflavonoid, and anthocyanin biosynthesis, chalcone isomerase (CHI) catalyzes the intramolecular cyclization of chalcones into (S)-flavanones with a second-order rate constant that approaches the diffusion-controlled limit. The three-dimensional structures of alfalfa CHI complexed with different flavanones indicate that two sets of hydrogen bonds may possess critical roles in catalysis. The first set of interactions includes two conserved amino acids (Thr48 and Tyr106) that mediate a hydrogen bond network with two active site water molecules. The second set of hydrogen bonds occurs between the flavanone 7-hydroxyl group and two active site residues (Asn113 and Thr190). Comparison of the steady-state kinetic parameters of wild-type and mutant CHIs demonstrates that efficient cyclization of various chalcones into their respective flavanones requires both sets of contacts. For example, the T48A, T48S, Y106F, N113A, and T190A mutants exhibit 1550-, 3-, 30-, 7-, and 6-fold reductions in k(cat) and 2-3-fold changes in K(m) with 4,2',4'-trihydroxychalcone as a substrate. Kinetic comparisons of the pH-dependence of the reactions catalyzed by wild-type and mutant enzymes indicate that the active site hydrogen bonds contributed by these four residues do not significantly alter the pK(a) of the intramolecular cyclization reaction. Determinations of solvent kinetic isotope and solvent viscosity effects for wild-type and mutant enzymes reveal a change from a diffusion-controlled reaction to one limited by chemistry in the T48A and Y106F mutants. The X-ray crystal structures of the T48A and Y106F mutants support the assertion that the observed kinetic effects result from the loss of key hydrogen bonds at the CHI active site. Our results are consistent with a reaction mechanism for CHI in which Thr48 polarizes the ketone of the substrate and Tyr106 stabilizes a key catalytic water molecule. Hydrogen bonds contributed by Asn113 and Thr190 provide additional

  17. Two-dimensional boron: Lightest catalyst for hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mir, Showkat H.; Chakraborty, Sudip, E-mail: sudiphys@gmail.com, E-mail: prakash.jha@cug.ac.in; Wärnå, John

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) have been envisaged on a two-dimensional (2D) boron sheet through electronic structure calculations based on a density functional theory framework. To date, boron sheets are the lightest 2D material and, therefore, exploring the catalytic activity of such a monolayer system would be quite intuitive both from fundamental and application perspectives. We have functionalized the boron sheet (BS) with different elemental dopants like carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, sulphur, and lithium and determined the adsorption energy for each case while hydrogen and oxygen are on top of the doping site of themore » boron sheet. The free energy calculated from the individual adsorption energy for each functionalized BS subsequently guides us to predict which case of functionalization serves better for the HER or the OER.« less

  18. Platinum single-atom and cluster catalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Niancai; Stambula, Samantha; Wang, Da; Banis, Mohammad Norouzi; Liu, Jian; Riese, Adam; Xiao, Biwei; Li, Ruying; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Liu, Li-Min; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Sun, Xueliang

    2016-11-01

    Platinum-based catalysts have been considered the most effective electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction in water splitting. However, platinum utilization in these electrocatalysts is extremely low, as the active sites are only located on the surface of the catalyst particles. Downsizing catalyst nanoparticles to single atoms is highly desirable to maximize their efficiency by utilizing nearly all platinum atoms. Here we report on a practical synthesis method to produce isolated single platinum atoms and clusters using the atomic layer deposition technique. The single platinum atom catalysts are investigated for the hydrogen evolution reaction, where they exhibit significantly enhanced catalytic activity (up to 37 times) and high stability in comparison with the state-of-the-art commercial platinum/carbon catalysts. The X-ray absorption fine structure and density functional theory analyses indicate that the partially unoccupied density of states of the platinum atoms' 5d orbitals on the nitrogen-doped graphene are responsible for the excellent performance.

  19. Inner reorganization limiting electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding: intra- vs. intermolecular effects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Eduardo; Frontana, Carlos

    2014-05-07

    In this work, experimental evidence of the influence of the electron transfer kinetics during electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding between anion radicals of metronidazole and ornidazole, derivatives of 5-nitro-imidazole, and 1,3-diethylurea as the hydrogen bond donor, is presented. Analysis of the variations of voltammetric EpIcvs. log KB[DH], where KB is the binding constant, allowed us to determine the values of the binding constant and also the electron transfer rate k, confirmed by experiments obtained at different scan rates. Electronic structure calculations at the BHandHLYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level for metronidazole, including the solvent effect by the Cramer/Truhlar model, suggested that the minimum energy conformer is stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In this structure, the inner reorganization energy, λi,j, contributes significantly (0.5 eV) to the total reorganization energy of electron transfer, thus leading to a diminishment of the experimental k.

  20. Zinc electrodeposition from flowing alkaline zincate solutions: Role of hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dundálek, Jan; Šnajdr, Ivo; Libánský, Ondřej; Vrána, Jiří; Pocedič, Jaromír; Mazúr, Petr; Kosek, Juraj

    2017-12-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction is known as a parasitic reaction during the zinc electrodeposition from alkaline zincate solutions and is thus responsible for current efficiency losses during the electrolysis. Besides that, the rising hydrogen bubbles may cause an extra convection within a diffusion layer, which leads to an enhanced mass transport of zincate ions to an electrode surface. In this work, the mentioned phenomena were studied experimentally in a flow through electrolyzer and the obtained data were subsequently evaluated by mathematical models. The results prove the indisputable influence of the rising hydrogen bubbles on the additional mixing of the diffusion layer, which partially compensates the drop of the current efficiency of the zinc deposition at higher current flows. Moreover, the results show that the current density ratio (i.e., the ratio of an overall current density to a zinc limiting current density) is not suitable for the description of the zinc deposition, because the hydrogen evolution current density is always involved in the overall current density.

  1. Continuous-flow processes for the catalytic partial hydrogenation reaction of alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Marrodan, Carmen; Liguori, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    The catalytic partial hydrogenation of substituted alkynes to alkenes is a process of high importance in the manufacture of several market chemicals. The present paper shortly reviews the heterogeneous catalytic systems engineered for this reaction under continuous flow and in the liquid phase. The main contributions appeared in the literature from 1997 up to August 2016 are discussed in terms of reactor design. A comparison with batch and industrial processes is provided whenever possible. PMID:28503209

  2. Studies of Hydrogen Production by the Water Gas Shift Reaction and Related Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-15

    STUDIES OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY THE WATER GAS SHIFT REACTION AND RELATED CHEMISTRY Institution: The University of Rochester Department of Chemistry...been app-’.iv -7 for public release and sale; it di.,tribution is unlimited. Abstract Many systems have been investigated for the catalysis of the water ...temperatures (80 - 100’C). In addition aqueous acidic conditions for these systems have been pursued with particular interest in adopting water gas shift

  3. Integration of Photothermal Effect and Heat Insulation to Efficiently Reduce Reaction Temperature of CO2 Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbo; Wang, Liangbing; Wang, Kaiwen; Khan, Munir Ullah; Wang, Menglin; Li, Hongliang; Zeng, Jie

    2017-02-01

    The photothermal effect is applied in CO 2 hydrogenation to reduce the reaction temperature under illumination by encapsulating Pt nanocubes and Au nanocages into a zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8). Under illumination, the heat generated by the photothermal effect of Au nanocages is mainly insulated in the ZIF-8 to form a localized high-temperature region, thereby improving the catalytic activity of Pt nanocubes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Hydrodesulphurization of Light Gas Oil using hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghamdi, Abdulaziz

    2009-12-01

    The production of clean fuel faces the challenges of high production cost and complying with stricter environmental regulations. In this research, the ability of using a novel technology of upgrading heavy oil to treat Light Gas Oil (LGO) will be investigated. The target of this project is to produce cleaner transportation fuel with much lower cost of production. Recently, a novel process for upgrading of heavy oil has been developed at University of Waterloo. It is combining the two essential processes in bitumen upgrading; emulsion breaking and hydroprocessing into one process. The water in the emulsion is used to generate in situ hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). This hydrogen can be used for the hydrogenation and hydrotreating reaction which includes sulfur removal instead of the expensive molecular hydrogen. This process can be carried out for the upgrading of the bitumen emulsion which would improve its quality. In this study, the hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of LGO was conducted using in situ hydrogen produced via the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). The main objective of this experimental study is to evaluate the possibility of producing clean LGO over dispersed molybdenum sulphide catalyst and to evaluate the effect of different promoters and syn-gas on the activity of the dispersed Mo catalyst. Experiments were carried out in a 300 ml Autoclave batch reactor under 600 psi (initially) at 391°C for 1 to 3 hours and different amounts of water. After the hydrotreating reaction, the gas samples were collected and the conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen via WGSR was determined using a refinery gas analyzer. The sulphur content in liquid sample was analyzed via X-Ray Fluorescence. Experimental results showed that using more water will enhance WGSR but at the same time inhibits the HDS reaction. It was also shown that the amount of sulfur removed depends on the reaction time. The plan is to investigate the effect of synthesis gas (syngas

  5. TePtFe Nanotubes as High-Performing Bifunctional Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction and Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenqiang; Amiinu, Ibrahim Saana; Ye, Bei; Wang, Zhe; Zhu, Jiawei; Kou, Zongkui; Mu, Shichun

    2018-04-25

    Currently, a multicomponent platinum-based alloy has been applied as a promising electrocatalyst to improve catalysis and lower the usage of the noble metal platinum. Herein, a tellurium nanowire (NW)-derived ternary TePtFe nanotube (NT) electrocatalyst has been prepared by the Kirkendall effect. The TePtFe NT formed consists of small single-crystal nanoparticles and voids with an open-end and hollow structure. The TePtFe NT electrocatalyst presents an impressive catalytic activity and stability for both the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Its ORR specific activity and mass activity are 8.5 and 2.4 times, respectively, improved relative to those of commercial platinum catalysts. It is also impressive that, for the HER, a very low overpotential of 28.1 mV at 10 mA cm -2 can be achieved; this is lower than that of platinum (51.8 mV) catalysts in 0.1 m HClO 4 , and the activity is improved, even after 5000 cycles. This work reveals that TePtFe NTs can be employed as nanocatalysts with an impressive catalytic activity and stability for application in fuel cells and hydrogen production. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Interplay between Reaction and Phase Behaviour in Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation to Methanol.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Helena; Amado-Blanco, Victor; Lauper, Andreas; Rudolf von Rohr, Philipp

    2017-03-22

    Condensation promotes CO 2 hydrogenation to CH 3 OH beyond equilibrium through in situ product separation. Although primordial for catalyst and reactor design, triggering conditions as well as the impact on sub-equilibrium reaction behaviour remain unclear. Herein we used an in-house designed micro-view-cell to gain chemical and physical insights into reaction and phase behaviour under high-pressure conditions over a commercial Cu/ZnO/Al 2 O 3 catalyst. Raman microscopy and video monitoring, combined with online gas chromatography analysis, allowed the complete characterisation of the reaction bulk up to 450 bar (1 bar=0.1 MPa) and 350 °C. Dew points of typical effluent streams related to a parametric study suggest that the improving reaction performance and reverting selectivities observed from 230 °C strongly correlate with (i) a regime transition from kinetic to thermodynamic, and (ii) a phase transition from a single supercritical to a biphasic reaction mixture. Our results advance a rationale behind transitioning CH 3 OH selectivities for an improved understanding of CO 2 hydrogenation under high pressure. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams: A spectroscopic tool for neutron-rich nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Bottoni, S.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; ...

    2015-08-27

    An exploratory experiment performed at REX-ISOLDE to investigate cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics is presented. The aim of the experiment was to test the potential of cluster-transfer reactions at the Coulomb barrier as a mechanism to explore the structure of exotic neutron-rich nuclei. The reactions 7Li( 98Rb,αxn) and 7Li( 98Rb,txn) were studied through particle-γ coincidence measurements, and the results are presented in terms of the observed excitation energies and spins. Moreover, the reaction mechanism is qualitatively discussed as a transfer of a clusterlike particle within a distorted-wave Born approximation framework. The results indicate that cluster-transfer reactions canmore » be described well as a direct process and that they can be an efficient method to investigate the structure of neutron-rich nuclei at medium-high excitation energies and spins.« less

  8. Reaction kinetics in open reactors and serial transfers between closed reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhuis, Alex; Lacoste, David; Gaspard, Pierre

    2018-04-01

    Kinetic theory and thermodynamics of reaction networks are extended to the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of continuous-flow stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and serial transfers. On the basis of their stoichiometry matrix, the conservation laws and the cycles of the network are determined for both dynamics. It is shown that the CSTR and serial transfer dynamics are equivalent in the limit where the time interval between the transfers tends to zero proportionally to the ratio of the fractions of fresh to transferred solutions. These results are illustrated with a finite cross-catalytic reaction network and an infinite reaction network describing mass exchange between polymers. Serial transfer dynamics is typically used in molecular evolution experiments in the context of research on the origins of life. The present study is shedding a new light on the role played by serial transfer parameters in these experiments.

  9. Mass spectrometric measurement of hydrogen isotope fractionation for the reactions of chloromethane with OH and Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppler, Frank; Bahlmann, Enno; Greule, Markus; Schöler, Heinz Friedrich; Wittmer, Julian; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2018-05-01

    Chloromethane (CH3Cl) is an important provider of chlorine to the stratosphere but detailed knowledge of its budget is missing. Stable isotope analysis is a potentially powerful tool to constrain CH3Cl flux estimates. The largest degree of isotope fractionation is expected to occur for deuterium in CH3Cl in the hydrogen abstraction reactions with its main sink reactant tropospheric OH and its minor sink reactant Cl atoms. We determined the isotope fractionation by stable hydrogen isotope analysis of the fraction of CH3Cl remaining after reaction with hydroxyl and chlorine radicals in a 3.5 m3 Teflon smog chamber at 293 ± 1 K. We measured the stable hydrogen isotope values of the unreacted CH3Cl using compound-specific thermal conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The isotope fractionations of CH3Cl for the reactions with hydroxyl and chlorine radicals were found to be -264±45 and -280±11 ‰, respectively. For comparison, we performed similar experiments using methane (CH4) as the target compound with OH and obtained a fractionation constant of -205±6 ‰ which is in good agreement with values previously reported. The observed large kinetic isotope effects are helpful when employing isotopic analyses of CH3Cl in the atmosphere to improve our knowledge of its atmospheric budget.

  10. The H2 + + He proton transfer reaction: quantum reactive differential cross sections to be linked with future velocity mapping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Vera, Mario; Wester, Roland; Gianturco, Francesco Antonio

    2018-01-01

    We construct the velocity map images of the proton transfer reaction between helium and molecular hydrogen ion {{{H}}}2+. We perform simulations of imaging experiments at one representative total collision energy taking into account the inherent aberrations of the velocity mapping in order to explore the feasibility of direct comparisons between theory and future experiments planned in our laboratory. The asymptotic angular distributions of the fragments in a 3D velocity space is determined from the quantum state-to-state differential reactive cross sections and reaction probabilities which are computed by using the time-independent coupled channel hyperspherical coordinate method. The calculations employ an earlier ab initio potential energy surface computed at the FCI/cc-pVQZ level of theory. The present simulations indicate that the planned experiments would be selective enough to differentiate between product distributions resulting from different initial internal states of the reactants.

  11. A Rh xS y/C Catalyst for the Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions in HBr

    DOE PAGES

    Masud, Jahangir; Nguyena, Trung V.; Singh, Nirala; ...

    2015-02-01

    Rhodium sulfide (Rh 2S 3) on carbon support was synthesized by refluxing rhodium chloride with ammonium thiosulfate. Thermal treatment of Rh 2S 3 at high temperatures (600°C to 850°C) in presence of argon resulted in the transformation of Rh 2S 3 into Rh 3S 4, Rh 17S 15 and Rh which were characterized by TGA/DTA, XRD, EDX, and deconvolved XPS analyses. The catalyst particle size distribution ranged from 3 to 12 nm. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode measurements were used to evaluate the catalytic activity for hydrogen oxidation and evolution reactions in H 2SO 4 and HBr solutions. Themore » thermally treated catalysts show high activity for the hydrogen reactions. The exchange current densities (i o) of the synthesized Rh xS y catalysts in H 2-saturated 1M H 2SO 4 and 1M HBr for HER and HOR were 0.9 mA/cm 2 to 1.0 mA/cm 2 and 0.8 to 0.9 mA/cm 2, respectively. The lower i o values obtained in 1M HBr solution compared to in H 2SO 4 might be due to the adsorption of Br - on the active surface. Stable electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) of Rh xS y catalyst was obtained for CV scan limits between 0 V and 0.65 V vs. RHE. Scans with upper voltage limit beyond 0.65 V led to decreased and unreproducible ECSA measurements.« less

  12. Concise synthesis of the bryostatin A-ring via consecutive C-C bond forming transfer hydrogenations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu; Krische, Michael J

    2009-07-16

    Under the conditions of C-C bond forming transfer hydrogenation, 1,3-propanediol 1 engages in double asymmetric carbonyl allylation to furnish the C(2)-symmetric diol 2. Double ozonolysis of 2 followed by TBS protection delivers aldehyde 3, which is subject to catalyst directed carbonyl reverse prenylation via transfer hydrogenation to deliver neopentyl alcohol 4 and, ultimately, the bryostatin A-ring 7. Through use of two consecutive C-C bond forming transfer hydrogenations, the Evans' bryostatin A-ring 7 is prepared in less than half the manipulations previously reported.

  13. Enantio-Relay Catalysis Constructs Chiral Biaryl Alcohols over Cascade Suzuki Cross-Coupling-Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dacheng; Gao, Xiaoshuang; Cheng, Tanyu; Liu, Guohua

    2014-05-01

    The construction of chiral biaryl alcohols using enantio-relay catalysis is a particularly attractive synthetic method in organic synthesis. However, overcoming the intrinsic incompatibility of distinct organometallic complexes and the reaction conditions used are significant challenges in asymmetric catalysis. To overcome these barriers, we have taken advantage of an enantio-relay catalysis strategy and a combined dual-immobilization approach. We report the use of an imidazolium-based organopalladium-functionalized organic-inorganic hybrid silica and ethylene-coated chiral organoruthenium-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to catalyze a cascade Suzuki cross-coupling-asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reaction to prepare chiral biaryl alcohols in a two-step, one-pot process. As expected, the site-isolated active species, salient imidazolium phase-transfer character and high ethylene-coated hydrophobicity can synergistically boost the catalytic performance. Furthermore, enantio-relay catalysis has the potential to efficiently prepare a variety of chiral biaryl alcohols. Our synthetic strategy is a general method that shows the potential of developing enantio-relay catalysis towards environmentally benign and sustainable organic synthesis.

  14. Quantitative dissection of hydrogen bond-mediated proton transfer in the ketosteroid isomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sigala, Paul A.; Fafarman, Aaron T.; Schwans, Jason P.; Fried, Stephen D.; Fenn, Timothy D.; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Pybus, Brandon; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.; Boxer, Steven G.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen bond networks are key elements of protein structure and function but have been challenging to study within the complex protein environment. We have carried out in-depth interrogations of the proton transfer equilibrium within a hydrogen bond network formed to bound phenols in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase. We systematically varied the proton affinity of the phenol using differing electron-withdrawing substituents and incorporated site-specific NMR and IR probes to quantitatively map the proton and charge rearrangements within the network that accompany incremental increases in phenol proton affinity. The observed ionization changes were accurately described by a simple equilibrium proton transfer model that strongly suggests the intrinsic proton affinity of one of the Tyr residues in the network, Tyr16, does not remain constant but rather systematically increases due to weakening of the phenol–Tyr16 anion hydrogen bond with increasing phenol proton affinity. Using vibrational Stark spectroscopy, we quantified the electrostatic field changes within the surrounding active site that accompany these rearrangements within the network. We were able to model these changes accurately using continuum electrostatic calculations, suggesting a high degree of conformational restriction within the protein matrix. Our study affords direct insight into the physical and energetic properties of a hydrogen bond network within a protein interior and provides an example of a highly controlled system with minimal conformational rearrangements in which the observed physical changes can be accurately modeled by theoretical calculations. PMID:23798390

  15. An abnormally slow proton transfer reaction in a simple HBO derivative due to ultrafast intramolecular-charge transfer events.

    PubMed

    Alarcos, Noemí; Gutierrez, Mario; Liras, Marta; Sánchez, Félix; Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2015-07-07

    We report on the steady-state, picosecond and femtosecond time-resolved studies of a charge and proton transfer dye 6-amino-2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (6A-HBO) and its methylated derivative 6-amino-2-(2'-methoxyphenyl)benzoxazole (6A-MBO), in different solvents. With femtosecond resolution and comparison with the photobehaviour of 6A-MBO, we demonstrate for 6A-HBO in solution, the photoproduction of an intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) process at S1 taking place in ∼140 fs or shorter, followed by solvent relaxation in the charge transferred species. The generated structure (syn-enol charge transfer conformer) experiences an excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) reaction to produce a keto-type tautomer. This subsequent proton motion occurs in 1.2 ps (n-heptane), 14 ps (DCM) and 35 ps (MeOH). In MeOH, it is assisted by the solvent molecules and occurs through tunneling for which we got a large kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of about 13. For the 6A-DBO (deuterated sample in CD3OD) the global proton-transfer reaction takes place in 200 ps, showing a remarkable slow KIE regime. The slow ESIPT reaction in DCM (14 ps), not through tunnelling as it is not sensitive to OH/OD exchange, has however to overcome an energy barrier using intramolecular as well as solvent coordinates. The rich ESIPT dynamics of 6A-HBO in the used solutions is governed by an ICT reaction, triggered by the amino group, and it is solvent dependent. Thus, the charge injection to a 6A-HBO molecular frame makes the ICT species more stable, and the phenol group less acidic, slowing down the subsequent ESIPT reaction. Our findings bring new insights into the coupling between ICT and ESIPT reactions on the potential-energy surfaces of several barriers.

  16. Photoinduced triplet-triplet energy transfer in a 2-ureido-4(1H)-pyrimidinone-bridged, quadruply hydrogen-bonded ferrocene-fullerene assembly.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ke; Yu, Mao-Lin; Wang, Su-Min; Wang, Ge-Xia; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2013-01-14

    2-Ureido-4(1H)-pyrimidinone-bridged ferrocene-fullerene assembly I is designed and synthesized for elaborating the photoinduced electron-transfer processes in self-complementary quadruply hydrogen-bonded modules. Unexpectedly, steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy reveal an inefficient electron-transfer process from the ferrocene to the singlet or triplet excited state of the fullerene, although the electron-transfer reactions are thermodynamically feasible. Instead, an effective intra-assembly triplet-triplet energy-transfer process is found to be operative in assembly I with a rate constant of 9.2×10(5) s(-1) and an efficiency of 73% in CH(2)Cl(2) at room temperature. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Role of core excitation in (d ,p ) transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deltuva, A.; Ross, A.; Norvaišas, E.; Nunes, F. M.

    2016-10-01

    Background: Recent work found that core excitations can be important in extracting structure information from (d ,p ) reactions. Purpose: Our objective is to systematically explore the role of core excitation in (d ,p ) reactions and to understand the origin of the dynamical effects. Method: Based on the particle-rotor model of n +10Be , we generate a number of models with a range of separation energies (Sn=0.1 -5.0 MeV), while maintaining a significant core excited component. We then apply the latest extension of the momentum-space-based Faddeev method, including dynamical core excitation in the reaction mechanism to all orders, to the 10Be(d ,p )11Be -like reactions, and study the excitation effects for beam energies Ed=15 -90 MeV. Results: We study the resulting angular distributions and the differences between the spectroscopic factor that would be extracted from the cross sections, when including dynamical core excitation in the reaction, and that of the original structure model. We also explore how different partial waves affect the final cross section. Conclusions: Our results show a strong beam-energy dependence of the extracted spectroscopic factors that become smaller for intermediate beam energies. This dependence increases for loosely bound systems.

  18. Role of core excitation in ( d , p ) transfer reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Deltuva, A.; Ross, A.; Norvaišas, E.; ...

    2016-10-24

    In our recent work we found that core excitations can be important in extracting structure information from (d,p) reactions. Our objective is to systematically explore the role of core excitation in (d,p) reactions and to understand the origin of the dynamical effects. Based on the particle-rotor model of n+Be 10, we generate a number of models with a range of separation energies (S n=0.1–5.0 MeV), while maintaining a significant core excited component. We then apply the latest extension of the momentum-space-based Faddeev method, including dynamical core excitation in the reaction mechanism to all orders, to the Be 10(d,p)Be 11-like reactions,more » and study the excitation effects for beam energies E d=15–90 MeV. We study the resulting angular distributions and the differences between the spectroscopic factor that would be extracted from the cross sections, when including dynamical core excitation in the reaction, and that of the original structure model. We also explore how different partial waves affect the final cross section. Our results show a strong beam-energy dependence of the extracted spectroscopic factors that become smaller for intermediate beam energies. Finally, this dependence increases for loosely bound systems.« less

  19. Cobalt nanoparticles on charcoal: a versatile catalyst in the Pauson-Khand reaction, hydrogenation, and the reductive Pauson-Khand reaction.

    PubMed

    Son, Seung Uk; Park, Kang Hyun; Chung, Young Keun

    2002-10-31

    [formula: see text] Dispersions of nanometer-sized cobalt particles with very high stability were prepared in charcoal and analyzed by electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. The resulting cobalt nanoparticles on charcoal (CNC) were successfully used as a catalyst for the carbonylative cycloaddition of alkyne, alkene, and carbon monoxide (Pauson-Khand reaction), hydrogenation, and the reductive Pauson-Khand reaction.

  20. Reaction of an Iron(IV) Nitrido Complex with Cyclohexadienes: Cycloaddition and Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The iron(IV) nitrido complex PhB(MesIm)3Fe≡N reacts with 1,3-cyclohexadiene to yield the iron(II) pyrrolide complex PhB(MesIm)3Fe(η5-C4H4N) in high yield. The mechanism of product formation is proposed to involve sequential [4 + 1] cycloaddition and retro Diels–Alder reactions. Surprisingly, reaction with 1,4-cyclohexadiene yields the same iron-containing product, albeit in substantially lower yield. The proposed reaction mechanism, supported by electronic structure calculations, involves hydrogen-atom abstraction from 1,4-cyclohexadiene to provide the cyclohexadienyl radical. This radical is an intermediate in substrate isomerization to 1,3-cyclohexadiene, leading to formation of the pyrrolide product. PMID:25068927

  1. Rational design of competitive electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in hydrogen fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbov, Sergey; Alcántara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2012-02-01

    The large-scale application of one of the most promising clean and renewable sources of energy, hydrogen fuel cells, still awaits efficient and cost-effective electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) occurring on the cathode. We demonstrate that truly rational design renders electrocatalysts possessing both qualities. By unifying the knowledge on surface morphology, composition, electronic structure and reactivity, we solve that sandwich-like structures are an excellent choice for optimization. Their constituting species couple synergistically yielding reaction-environment stability, cost-effectiveness and tunable reactivity. This cooperative-action concept enabled us to predict two advantageous ORR electrocatalysts. Density functional theory calculations of the reaction free-energy diagrams confirm that these materials are more active toward ORR than the so far best Pt-based catalysts. Our designing concept advances also a general approach for engineering materials in heterogeneous catalysis.

  2. Investigation of the reaction of liquid hydrogen with liquid air in a pressure tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karb, Erich H.

    1987-01-01

    A pressure tube should protect the FR-2 reactor from the consequences of a hydrogen-air reaction, which is conceivable in the breakdown of several safety devices of the planned cold neutron source Project FR-2/16. The magnitudes and time pattern of the pressures to be expected were investigated. In the geometry used and the ignition mechanism selected, which is comparable to the strongest ignition process conceivable in the reactor, the reaction proceeds with greater probability than combustion. The combustion is possibly smaller if local limited partial detonations are superimposed. The magnitude of the pressure was determined by the masses of the reaction partners, liquid H2 and liquid air, and determines their ratio to each other.

  3. Rudolph A. Marcus and His Theory of Electron Transfer Reactions

    Science.gov Websites

    early 1950s and soon discovered ... a strong experimental program at Brookhaven on electron-transfer experimental work provided the first verification of several of the predictions of his theory. This, in turn Marcus theory, namely, experimental evidence for the so-called "inverted region" where rates

  4. MoS2 @HKUST-1 Flower-Like Nanohybrids for Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengli; Su, Yingchun; Zhao, Xiaole; Tong, Shanshan; Han, Xiaojun

    2018-01-24

    A novel MoS 2 -based flower-like nanohybrid for hydrogen evolution was fabricated through coating the Cu-containing metal-organic framework (HKUST-1) onto MoS 2 nanosheets. It is the first time that MoS 2 @HKUST-1 nanohybrids have been reported for the enhanced electrochemical performance of HER. The morphologies and components of the MoS 2 @HKUST-1 flower-like nanohybrids were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Compared with pure MoS 2 , the MoS 2 @HKUST-1 hybrids exhibit enhanced performance on hydrogen evolution reaction with an onset potential of -99 mV, a smaller Tafel slope of 69 mV dec -1 , and a Faradaic efficiency of nearly 100 %. The MoS 2 @HKUST-1 flower-like nanohybrids exhibit excellent stability in acidic media. This design opens new possibilities to effectively synthesize non-noble metal catalysts with high performance for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. 7Li(d,p)8Li transfer reaction in the NCSM/RGM approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, F.; Hupin, G.; Navrátil, P.; Quaglioni, S.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, we applied an ab initio method, the no-core shell model combined with the resonating group method, to the transfer reactions with light p-shell nuclei as targets and deuteron as the projectile. In particular, we studied the elastic scattering of deuterium on 7Li and the 7Li(d,p)8Li transfer reaction starting from a realistic two-nucleon interaction. In this contribution, we review of our main results on the 7Li(d,p)8Li transfer reaction, and we extend the study of the relevant reaction channels, by showing the dominant resonant phase shifts of the scattering matrix. We assess also the impact of the polarization effects of the deuteron below the breakup on the positive-parity resonant states in the reaction. For this purpose, we perform an analysis of the convergence trend of the phase and eigenphase shifts, with respect to the number of deuteron pseudostates included in the model space.

  6. Proton Transfer and Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bonding: a Shifting Vibrational Landscape Dictated by Large Amplitude Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vealey, Zachary; Foguel, Lidor; Vaccaro, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Our fundamental understanding of synergistic hydrogen-bonding and proton-transfer phenomena has been advanced immensely by studies of model systems in which the coherent transduction of hydrons is mediated by two degenerate equilibrium configurations that are isolated from one another by a potential barrier of substantial height. This topography advantageously affords unambiguous signatures for the underlying state-resolved dynamics in the form of tunneling-induced spectral bifurcations, the magnitudes of which encode both the overall efficacy and the detailed mechanism of the unimolecular transformation. As a prototypical member of this class of compounds, 6-hydroxy-2-formylfulvene (HFF) supports an unusual quasi-linear O-H...O \\leftrightarrow O...H-O reaction coordinate that presents a minimal impediment to proton migration - a situation commensurate with the concepts of low-barrier hydrogen bonding (which are characterized by great strength, short distance, and a vanishingly small barrier for hydron migration). A variety of fluorescence-based, laser-spectroscopic probes have been deployed in a cold supersonic free-jet expansion to explore the vibrational landscape and anomalously large tunneling-induced shifts that dominate the ˜{X}^{1}A_{1} potential-energy surface of HFF, thus revealing the most rapid proton tunneling ever reported for a molecular ground state (τ_{pt}≤120fs). The surprising efficiency of such tunneling-mediated processes stems from proximity of the zero-point level to the barrier crest and produces a dramatic alteration in the canonical pattern of vibrational features that reflects, in part, the subtle transition from quantum-mechanical barrier penetration to classical over-the-barrier dynamics. The ultrafast proton-transfer regime that characterizes the ˜{X}^{1}A_{1} manifold will be juxtaposed against analogous findings for the lowest-lying singlet excited state ˜{A}^{1}B_{2} (π*←π), where a marked change in the nature of the

  7. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solutions based upon mixed quantum-classical approximation. I. Proton transfer reaction in water

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Atsushi; Kojima, Hidekazu; Okazaki, Susumu, E-mail: okazaki@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2014-08-28

    In order to investigate proton transfer reaction in solution, mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations have been carried out based on our previously proposed quantum equation of motion for the reacting system [A. Yamada and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 044507 (2008)]. Surface hopping method was applied to describe forces acting on the solvent classical degrees of freedom. In a series of our studies, quantum and solvent effects on the reaction dynamics in solutions have been analysed in detail. Here, we report our mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations for intramolecular proton transfer of malonaldehyde in water. Thermally activated proton transfermore » process, i.e., vibrational excitation in the reactant state followed by transition to the product state and vibrational relaxation in the product state, as well as tunneling reaction can be described by solving the equation of motion. Zero point energy is, of course, included, too. The quantum simulation in water has been compared with the fully classical one and the wave packet calculation in vacuum. The calculated quantum reaction rate in water was 0.70 ps{sup −1}, which is about 2.5 times faster than that in vacuum, 0.27 ps{sup −1}. This indicates that the solvent water accelerates the reaction. Further, the quantum calculation resulted in the reaction rate about 2 times faster than the fully classical calculation, which indicates that quantum effect enhances the reaction rate, too. Contribution from three reaction mechanisms, i.e., tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing reactions, is 33:46:21 in the mixed quantum-classical calculations. This clearly shows that the tunneling effect is important in the reaction.« less

  8. Design of electrocatalysts for oxygen- and hydrogen-involving energy conversion reactions.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yan; Zheng, Yao; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2015-04-21

    A fundamental change has been achieved in understanding surface electrochemistry due to the profound knowledge of the nature of electrocatalytic processes accumulated over the past several decades and to the recent technological advances in spectroscopy and high resolution imaging. Nowadays one can preferably design electrocatalysts based on the deep theoretical knowledge of electronic structures, via computer-guided engineering of the surface and (electro)chemical properties of materials, followed by the synthesis of practical materials with high performance for specific reactions. This review provides insights into both theoretical and experimental electrochemistry toward a better understanding of a series of key clean energy conversion reactions including oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), oxygen evolution reaction (OER), and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The emphasis of this review is on the origin of the electrocatalytic activity of nanostructured catalysts toward the aforementioned reactions by correlating the apparent electrode performance with their intrinsic electrochemical properties. Also, a rational design of electrocatalysts is proposed starting from the most fundamental aspects of the electronic structure engineering to a more practical level of nanotechnological fabrication.

  9. Chemical kinetic analysis of hydrogen-air ignition and reaction times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. C.; Schexnayder, C. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An anaytical study of hydrogen air kinetics was performed. Calculations were made over a range of pressure from 0.2 to 4.0 atm, temperatures from 850 to 2000 K, and mixture equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 2.0. The finite rate chemistry model included 60 reactions in 20 species of the H2-O2-N2 system. The calculations also included an assessment of how small amounts of the chemicals H2O, NOx, H2O2, and O3 in the initial mixture affect ignition and reaction times, and how the variation of the third body efficiency of H2O relative of N2 in certain key reactions may affect reaction time. The results indicate that for mixture equivalence ratios between 0.5 and 1.7, ignition times are nearly constant; however, the presence of H2O and NO can have significant effects on ignition times, depending on the mixture temperature. Reaction time is dominantly influenced by pressure but is nearly independent of initial temperature, equivalence ratio, and the addition of chemicals. Effects of kinetics on reaction at supersonic combustor conditions are discussed.

  10. Isotope effects associated with tunneling and double proton transfer in the hydrogen bonds of benzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Q.; Horsewill, A. J.; Johnson, M. R.; Trommsdorff, H. P.

    2004-06-01

    The isotope effects associated with double proton transfer in the hydrogen bonds of benzoic acid (BA) dimers have been measured using field-cycling 1H NMR relaxometry and quasielastic neutron scattering. By studying mixed isotope (hydrogen and deuterium) samples, the dynamics of three isotopologues, BA-HH, BA-HD, and BA-DD, have been investigated. Low temperature measurements provide accurate measurements of the incoherent tunneling rate, k0. This parameter scales accurately with the mass number, m, according to the formula k0=(E/m)e-F√m providing conclusive evidence that the proton transfer process is a strongly correlated motion of two hydrons. Furthermore, we conclude that the tunneling pathway is the same for the three isotopologue species. Measurements at higher temperatures illuminate the through barrier processes that are mediated via intermediate or excited vibrational states. In parallel with the investigation of proton transfer dynamics, the theoretical and experimental aspects of studying spin-lattice relaxation in single crystals of mixed isotope samples are investigated in depth. Heteronuclear dipolar interactions between 1H and 2H isotopes contribute significantly to the overall proton spin-lattice relaxation and it is shown that these must be modeled correctly to obtain accurate values for the proton transfer rates. Since the sample used in the NMR measurements was a single crystal, full account of the orientation dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation with respect to the applied B field was incorporated into the data analysis.

  11. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Acuña, A Ulises; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.

  12. Kinetics and the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide removal by biochar derived from rice hull.

    PubMed

    Shang, Guofeng; Liu, Liang; Chen, Ping; Shen, Guoqing; Li, Qiwu

    2016-05-01

    The biochar derived from rice hull was evaluated for its abilities to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The biochar derived from rice hull was evaluated for its abilities to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The different pyrolysis temperature has great influence on the adsorption of H2S. At the different pyrolysis temperature, the H2S removal efficiency of rice hull-derived biochar was different. The adsorption capacities of biochar were 2.09 mg·g(-1), 2.65 mg·g(-1), 16.30 mg·g(-1), 20.80 mg·g(-1), and 382.70 mg·g(-1), which their pyrolysis temperatures were 100 °C, 200 °C, 300 °C, 400 °C and 500 °C respectively. Based on the Yoon-Nelson model, it analyzed the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochar. The paper focuses on the biochar derived from rice hull-removed hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The different pyrolysis temperatures have great influence on the adsorption of H2S. At the different pyrolysis temperatures, the H2S removal efficiency of rice hull-derived biohar was different. The adsorption capacities of biochar were 2.09, 2.65, 16.30, 20.80, and 382.70 mg·g(-1), and their pyrolysis temperatures were 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 °C, respectively. Based on the Yoon-Nelson model, the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochar was analyzed.

  13. Liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen boost/vane pump for the advanced orbit transfer vehicles auxiliary propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluzek, F.; Mokadam, R. G.; To, I. H.; Stanitz, J. D.; Wollschlager, J.

    1979-01-01

    A rotating, positive displacement vane pump with an integral boost stage was designed to pump saturated liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen for auxiliary propulsion system of orbit transfer vehicle. This unit is designed to ingest 10% vapor by volume, contamination free liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. The final pump configuration and the predicted performance are included.

  14. The reduction of carbon dioxide in iron biocatalyst catalytic hydrogenation reaction: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Longhua; Wang, Hongming; Zhang, Ning; Hong, Sanguo

    2013-08-21

    The reaction mechanism of CO₂ hydrogenation catalyzed by [FeH(PP₃)]BF₄ (PP₃ = P(CH₂CH₂PPh₂)₃) had been investigated by DFT calculations. Our calculations indicated that the reduction of carbon dioxide could be carried out via two spin states, the high-spin (HS) triplet state and the low-spin (LS) singlet state. The minimum energy crossing points (MECPs) on the seam of two intersecting PESs (potential energy surfaces) were searched out. Some interesting phenomena, such as the open-loop phenomenon, and the O-rebound process, were demonstrated to be the important causes of the spin crossover. All these calculations gave us insight into the essence of the related experiment from the macro point of view, and helped to verify which spin states the related complexes pertinent were in. All of these researches would help advance the development of efficient and structurally tailorable CO₂ hydrogenation catalysts.

  15. Enhanced hydrogen evolution reaction on hybrids of cobalt phosphide and molybdenum phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Si-Ling; Chou, Tsu-Chin; Samireddi, Satyanarayana; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chen, Wei-Fu

    2017-03-01

    Production of hydrogen from water electrolysis has stimulated the search of sustainable electrocatalysts as possible alternatives. Recently, cobalt phosphide (CoP) and molybdenum phosphide (MoP) received great attention owing to their superior catalytic activity and stability towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) which rivals platinum catalysts. In this study, we synthesize and study a series of catalysts based on hybrids of CoP and MoP with different Co/Mo ratio. The HER activity shows a volcano shape and reaches a maximum for Co/Mo = 1. Tafel analysis indicates a change in the dominating step of Volmer-Hyrovský mechanism. Interestingly, X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed a major ternary interstitial hexagonal CoMoP2 crystal phase is formed which enhances the electrochemical activity.

  16. Iodine oxidation by hydrogen peroxide and Bray-Liebhafsky oscillating reaction: effect of the temperature.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Guy

    2011-04-21

    This work presents a new experimental kinetic study at 39° and 50° of the iodine oxidation by hydrogen peroxide. The results allow us to obtain the temperature effect on the rate constants previously proposed at 25° for our model of the Bray-Liebhafsky oscillating reaction (G. Schmitz, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2010, 12, 6605.). The values calculated with the model are in good agreement with many experimental results obtained under very different experimental conditions. Numerical simulations of the oscillations observed formerly by different authors are presented, including the evolutions of the iodine, hydrogen peroxide, iodide ions and oxygen concentrations. Special attention is paid to the perturbing effects of oxygen and of the iodine loss to the gas phase.

  17. State-To Chemical Dynamics of the Hydrogen Atom Plus Hydrogen R Groups/deuterium R Groups Goes to Hydrogen/hydrogen Deuteride Plus R Group Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germann, Geoffrey James

    1990-01-01

    The rotational and vibrational quantum state population distributions of the H_2/HD products of the H + HR/DR to H_2 /HD + R reactions (HD/DR = CD_4, C_2H_6, C _3H_8) have been measured using CARS spectroscopy. Very little of the available energy is partitioned to the H_2 /HD products of these reactions, although more rotational energy is found in the hydrogen product molecule as the size of the R radical increases, f_{ rm int}/f_{rm v}/f_{rm r} is 0.15/0.06/0.09, 0.18/0.06/0.12 and 0.20/0.06/0.14 for the H + CD_4, C_2 H_6, and C_3 H_8 reactions, respectively. Some anomalous behavior is exhibited in the rotational distributions of the reactions. The quantum state distributions show that more rotational energy is partitioned to those molecules formed in v^' = 1, the vibrationally excited state, than is partitioned to the product molecules formed in v^' = 0, the vibrational ground state. Of the energy that is available to produce product rotation 8(15), 11(22) and 12(27)% is partitioned to rotationally excite the H _2/HD product molecules formed in the v^' = 0(v ^' = 1) quantum states in the H + CD_4, C_2H _6, and C_3H _8 reactions, respectively. Finally, the H_2 product quantum state population distributions of the H + C_2H _6 and H + C_3H _8 reactions are observed to become less energetic, both vibrationally and rotationally, more rapidly than the HD product of the H + CD_4 reaction as the H atom reactant is allowed to undergo a greater number of collisions. This final observation could be the result of the differences in structure of the C _2H_6, and C_3H_8 and the CD_4 molecules and/or the differences in the barriers to reaction in each of the reactions.

  18. Coolant-side heat-transfer rates for a hydrogen-oxygen rocket and a new technique for data correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schacht, R. L.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the coolant-side, heat transfer coefficients for a liquid cooled, hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chamber. Heat transfer rates were determined from measurements of local hot gas wall temperature, local coolant temperature, and local coolant pressure. A correlation incorporating an integration technique for the transport properties needed near the pseudocritical temperature of liquid hydrogen gives a satisfactory prediction of hot gas wall temperatures.

  19. Dodecahedral W@WC Composite as Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution and Nitrobenzene Reduction Reactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao-Yang; Duan, Long-Fa; Sheng, Tian; Lin, Xiao; Chen, Ya-Feng; Chu, You-Qun; Sun, Shi-Gang; Lin, Wen-Feng

    2017-06-21

    Core-shell composites with strong phase-phase contact could provide an incentive for catalytic activity. A simple, yet efficient, H 2 O-mediated method has been developed to synthesize a mesoscopic core-shell W@WC architecture with a dodecahedral microstructure, via a one-pot reaction. The H 2 O plays an important role in the resistance of carbon diffusion, resulting in the formation of the W core and W-terminated WC shell. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that adding W as core reduced the oxygen adsorption energy and provided the W-terminated WC surface. The W@WC exhibits significant electrocatalytic activities toward hydrogen evolution and nitrobenzene electroreduction reactions, which are comparable to those found for commercial Pt/C, and substantially higher than those found for meso- and nano-WC materials. The experimental results were explained by DFT calculations based on the energy profiles in the hydrogen evolution reactions over WC, W@WC, and Pt model surfaces. The W@WC also shows a high thermal stability and thus may serve as a promising more economical alternative to Pt catalysts in these important energy conversion and environmental protection applications. The current approach can also be extended or adapted to various metals and carbides, allowing for the design and fabrication of a wide range of catalytic and other multifunctional composites.

  20. An analytical study of the hydrogen-air reaction mechanism with application to scramjet combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, Casimir J.

    1988-01-01

    A chemical kinetic mechanism for the combustion of hydrogen has been assembled and optimized by comparing the observed behavior as determined in shock tube and flame studies with that predicted by the mechanism. The reactions contained in the mechanism reflect the current state of knowledge of the chemistry of the hydrogen/air system, and the assigned rate coefficients are consistent with accepted values. It was determined that the mechanism is capable of satisfactorily reproducing the experimental results for a range of conditions relevant to scramjet combustion. Calculations made with the reaction mechanism for representative scramjet combustor conditions at Mach 8, 16, and 25 showed that chemical kinetic effects can be important and that combustor models which use nonequilibrium chemistry should be used in preference to models that assume equilibrium chemistry. For the conditions examined the results also showed the importance of including the HO2 chemistry in the mechanism. For Mach numbers less than 16, the studies suggest that an ignition source will most likely be required to overcome slow ignition chemistry. At Mach 25, the initial temperature and pressure was high enough that ignition was rapid and the presence of an ignition source did not significantly affect reaction rates.

  1. Development of the (d,n) Proton-transfer Reaction in Inverse Kinematics for Structure Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. L.; Thornsberry, C.; Allen, J.; Atencio, A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blankstein, D.; Burcher, S.; Carter, A. B.; Chipps, K. A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Cox, I.; Elledge, Z.; Febbraro, M.; Fijałkowska, A.; Grzywacz, R.; Hall, M. R.; King, T. T.; Lepailleur, A.; Madurga, M.; Marley, S. T.; O'Malley, P. D.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Reingold, C.; Smith, K.; Taylor, S.; Tan, W.; Vostinar, M.; Walter, D.

    Transfer reactions have provided exciting opportunities to study the structure of exotic nuclei and are often used to inform studies relating to nucleosynthesis and applications. In order to benefit from these reactions and their application to rare ion beams (RIBs) it is necessary to develop the tools and techniques to perform and analyze the data from reactions performed in inverse kinematics, that is with targets of light nuclei and heavier beams. We are continuing to expand the transfer reaction toolbox in preparation for the next generation of facilities, such as the Facility for Rare Ion Beams (FRIB), which is scheduled for completion in 2022. An important step in this process is to perform the (d,n) reaction in inverse kinematics, with analyses that include Q-value spectra and differential cross sections. In this way, proton-transfer reactions can be placed on the same level as the more commonly used neutron-transfer reactions, such as (d,p), (9Be,8Be), and (13C,12C). Here we present an overview of the techniques used in (d,p) and (d,n), and some recent data from (d,n) reactions in inverse kinematics using stable beams of 12C and 16O.

  2. C-C bond formation and related reactions at the CNC backbone in (smif)FeX (smif = 1,3-di-(2-pyridyl)-2-azaallyl): dimerizations, 3 + 2 cyclization, and nucleophilic attack; transfer hydrogenations and alkyne trimerization (X = N(TMS)2, dpma = (di-(2-pyridyl-methyl)-amide)).

    PubMed

    Frazier, Brenda A; Williams, Valerie A; Wolczanski, Peter T; Bart, Suzanne C; Meyer, Karsten; Cundari, Thomas R; Lobkovsky, Emil B

    2013-03-18

    Molecular orbital analysis depicts the CNC(nb) backbone of the smif (1,3-di-(2-pyridyl)-2-azaallyl) ligand as having singlet diradical and/or ionic character where electrophilic or nucleophilic attack is plausible. Reversible dimerization of (smif)Fe{N(SiMe3)2} (1) to [{(Me3Si)2N}Fe]2(μ-κ(3),κ(3)-N,py2-smif,smif) (2) may be construed as diradical coupling. A proton transfer within the backbone-methylated, and o-pyridine-methylated smif of putative ((b)Me2(o)Me2smif)FeN(SiMe3)2 (8) provides a route to [{(Me3Si)2N}Fe]2(μ-κ(4),κ(4)-N,py2,C-((b)Me,(b)CH2,(o)Me2(smif)H))2 (9). A 3 + 2 cyclization of ditolyl-acetylene occurs with 1, leading to the dimer [{2,5-di(pyridin-2-yl)-3,4-di-(p-tolyl-2,5-dihydropyrrol-1-ide)}FeN(SiMe3)2]2 (11), and the collateral discovery of alkyne cyclotrimerization led to a brief study that identified Fe(N(SiMe3)2(THF) as an effective catalyst. Nucleophilic attack by (smif)2Fe (13) on (t)BuNCO and (2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)NCO afforded (RNHCO-smif)2Fe (14a, R = (t)Bu; 14b, 2,6-(i)PrC6H3). Calculations suggested that (dpma)2Fe (15) would favorably lose dihydrogen to afford (smif)2Fe (13). H2-transfer to alkynes, olefins, imines, PhN═NPh, and ketones was explored, but only stoichiometric reactions were affected. Some physical properties of the compounds were examined, and X-ray structural studies on several dinuclear species were conducted.

  3. Ultrafast Spectroscopy Reveals Electron-Transfer Cascade That Improves Hydrogen Evolution with Carbon Nitride Photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Corp, Kathryn L; Schlenker, Cody W

    2017-06-14

    Solar hydrogen generation from water represents a compelling component of a future sustainable energy portfolio. Recently, chemically robust heptazine-based polymers known as graphitic carbon nitrides (g-C 3 N 4 ) have emerged as promising photocatalysts for hydrogen evolution using visible light while withstanding harsh chemical environments. However, since g-C 3 N 4 electron-transfer dynamics are poorly understood, rational design rules for improving activity remain unclear. Here, we use visible and near-infrared femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy to reveal an electron-transfer cascade that correlates with a near-doubling in photocatalytic activity from 2050 to 3810 μmol h -1 g -1 when we infuse a suspension of bulk g-C 3 N 4 with 10% mass loading of chemically exfoliated carbon nitride. TA spectroscopy indicates that exfoliated carbon nitride quenches photogenerated electrons on g-C 3 N 4 at rates approaching the molecular diffusion limit. The TA signal for photogenerated electrons on g-C 3 N 4 decays with a time constant of 1/k e ' = 660 ps in the mixture versus 1/k e = 4.1 ns in g-C 3 N 4 alone. Our TA measurements suggest that the charge generation efficiency in g-C 3 N 4 is greater than 65%. Exfoliated carbon nitride, which liberates only trace hydrogen levels when photoexcited directly, does not appear to independently sustain appreciable long-lived charge generation. Thus, the activity enhancement in the two-component infusion evidently results from a cooperative effect in which charge is generated on g-C 3 N 4 , followed by electron transfer to exfoliated carbon nitride containing photocatalytic chain terminations. This correlation between electron transfer and photocatalytic activity provides new insight into structural modifications for controlling charge separation dynamics and activity of carbon-based photocatalysts.

  4. Numerical and experimental analysis of heat transfer in injector plate of hydrogen peroxide hybrid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guobiao; Li, Chengen; Tian, Hui

    2016-11-01

    This paper is aimed to analyze heat transfer in injector plate of hydrogen peroxide hybrid rocket motor by two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulations and full-scale firing tests. Long-time working, which is an advantage of hybrid rocket motor over conventional solid rocket motor, puts forward new challenges for thermal protection. Thermal environments of full-scale hybrid rocket motors designed for long-time firing tests are studied through steady-state coupled numerical simulations of flow field and heat transfer in chamber head. The motor adopts 98% hydrogen peroxide (98HP) oxidizer and hydroxyl-terminated poly-butadiene (HTPB) based fuel as the propellants. Simulation results reveal that flowing liquid 98HP in head oxidizer chamber could cool the injector plate of the motor. The cooling of 98HP is similar to the regenerative cooling in liquid rocket engines. However, the temperature of the 98HP in periphery portion of the head oxidizer chamber is higher than its boiling point. In order to prevent the liquid 98HP from unexpected decomposition, a thermal protection method for chamber head utilizing silica-phenolics annular insulating board is proposed. The simulation results show that the annular insulating board could effectively decrease the temperature of the 98HP in head oxidizer chamber. Besides, the thermal protection method for long-time working hydrogen peroxide hybrid rocket motor is verified through full-scale firing tests. The ablation of the insulating board in oxygen-rich environment is also analyzed.

  5. STM observation of the chemical reaction of atomic hydrogen on the N-adsorbed Cu(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Takuma; Yamada, Masamichi; Komori, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reaction of atomic hydrogen with the N-adsorbed Cu(001) surfaces was investigated at room temperature by scanning tunnel microscopy. At the low exposure of atomic hydrogen, it reacted with the N atoms and turned to be the NH species on the surface. The reaction rate is proportional to the amount of the unreacted N atoms. By increasing the exposure of atomic hydrogen from this condition, the amount of nitrogen species on the surface decreased. This is attributed to the formation of ammonia and its desorption from the surface. The NH species on the surface turn to NH3 through the surface NH2 species by atomic hydrogen. Coexistence of the clean Cu surface enhances the rate of ammonia formation owing to atomic hydrogen migrating on the clean surface.

  6. Preparation of organic and water hydrogen for stable isotope analysis. Effects due to reaction vessels and zinc reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmelmann, A.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1993-03-15

    Combustion of organic matter in sealed Pyrex, Vycor, and quartz ampules at temperatures between 520 and 900[degrees]C yields less than stoichiometric amounts of water. The loss of hydrogen to hydration reactions between water vapor and glass/quartz interferes with the determination of C/H and N/H elemental ratios in organic matter. The effect increases from quartz to Vycor to Pyrex, but the incomplete yield does not significantly affect the precision and accuracy of the determination of stable hydrogen isotope ratios. Reactions between water and Pyrex do not affect the conversion of water to hydrogen with zinc in Pyrex ampules at 500[degrees]C, whichmore » is quantitative, but even preoutgassed zinc contains a deuterium-depleted hydrogen blank. D/H ratios in hydrogen from the Zn method require a nonlinear correction to achieve compatibility with [delta]D values from the uranium method. 19 refs., 4 tabs.« less

  7. Recent advances in transition metal-catalyzed N -atom transfer reactions of azides

    PubMed Central

    Driver, Tom G.

    2011-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed N-atom transfer reactions of azides provide efficient ways to construct new carbon–nitrogen and sulfur–nitrogen bonds. These reactions are inherently green: no additive besides catalyst is needed to form the nitrenoid reactive intermediate, and the by-product of the reaction is environmentally benign N2 gas. As such, azides can be useful precursors for transition metal-catalyzed N-atom transfer to sulfides, olefins and C–H bonds. These methods offer competitive selectivities and comparable substrate scope as alternative processes to generate metal nitrenoids. PMID:20617243

  8. Mass correlation between light and heavy reaction products in multinucleon transfer 197Au+130Te collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtarossa, F.; Corradi, L.; Szilner, S.; Fioretto, E.; Pollarolo, G.; Mijatović, T.; Montanari, D.; Ackermann, D.; Bourgin, D.; Courtin, S.; Fruet, G.; Goasduff, A.; Grebosz, J.; Haas, F.; Jelavić Malenica, D.; Jeong, S. C.; Jia, H. M.; John, P. R.; Mengoni, D.; Milin, M.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Skukan, N.; Soić, N.; Stefanini, A. M.; Strano, E.; Tokić, V.; Ur, C. A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Watanabe, Y. X.

    2018-05-01

    We studied multinucleon transfer reactions in the 197Au+130Te system at Elab=1.07 GeV by employing the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer coupled to a coincident detector. For each light fragment we constructed, in coincidence, the distribution in mass of the heavy partner of the reaction. With a Monte Carlo method, starting from the binary character of the reaction, we simulated the de-excitation process of the produced heavy fragments to be able to understand their final mass distribution. The total cross sections for pure neutron transfer channels have also been extracted and compared with calculations performed with the grazing code.

  9. MOF-Derived Ultrathin Cobalt Phosphide Nanosheets as Efficient Bifunctional Hydrogen Evolution Reaction and Oxygen Evolution Reaction Electrocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Ke, Fei; Zhu, Junfa

    2018-01-01

    The development of a highly efficient and stable bifunctional electrocatalyst for water splitting is still a challenging issue in obtaining clean and sustainable chemical fuels. Herein, a novel bifunctional catalyst consisting of 2D transition-metal phosphide nanosheets with abundant reactive sites templated by Co-centered metal−organic framework nanosheets, denoted as CoP-NS/C, has been developed through a facile one-step low-temperature phosphidation process. The as-prepared CoP-NS/C has large specific surface area and ultrathin nanosheets morphology providing rich catalytic active sites. It shows excellent electrocatalytic performances for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in acidic and alkaline media, with the Tafel slopes of 59 and 64 mV/dec and a current density of 10 mA/cm2 at the overpotentials of 140 and 292 mV, respectively, which are remarkably superior to those of CoP/C, CoP particles, and comparable to those of commercial noble-metal catalysts. In addition, the CoP-NS/C also shows good durability after a long-term test. PMID:29414838

  10. Conversion of ammonia into hydrogen and nitrogen by reaction with a sulfided catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A method is provided for removing ammonia from the sour water stream of a coal gasification process. The basic steps comprise stripping the ammonia from the sour water; heating the stripped ammonia to a temperature from between 400.degree. to 1,000.degree. F; passing the gaseous ammonia through a reactor containing a sulfided catalyst to produce elemental hydrogen and nitrogen; and scrubbing the reaction product to obtain an ammonia-free gas. The residual equilibrium ammonia produced by the reactor is recycled into the stripper. The ammonia-free gas may be advantageously treated in a Claus process to recover elemental sulfur. Iron sulfide or cobalt molybdenum sulfide catalysts are used.

  11. Modification of molybdenum disulfide in methanol solvent for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyitanga, Theophile; Jeong, Hae Kyung

    2018-05-01

    Molybdenum disulfide is a promising catalyst to replace the expensive platinum as an electrocatalyst but needs to be modified to present excellent electrocatalytic properties. Herein, we successfully modify molybdenum disulfide in methanol solvent for hydrogen evolution reaction by using a simple hydrothermal method. Overpotential reduced to -0.6 V from -1.5 V, and energy band gap decreased from 1.73 eV to 1.58 eV after the modification. The modified molybdenum disulfide also demonstrated lower resistance (42 Ω) at high frequency (1000 kHz) compared with that (240 Ω) of the precursor, showing that conductivity of the modified molybdenum disulfide has improved.

  12. Liquid Acquisition Device Hydrogen Outflow Testing on the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Engineering Design Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Greg; Statham, Geoff; Garces, Rachel; Cartagena, Will

    2015-01-01

    As part of the NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Engineering Design Unit (EDU) testing with liquid hydrogen, screen-channel liquid acquisition devices (LADs) were tested during liquid hydrogen outflow from the EDU tank. A stainless steel screen mesh (325x2300 Dutch T will weave) was welded to a rectangular cross-section channel to form the basic LAD channel. Three LAD channels were tested, each having unique variations in the basic design. The LADs fed a common outflow sump at the aft end of the 151 cu. ft. volume aluminum tank, and included a curved section along the aft end and a straight section along the barrel section of the tank. Wet-dry sensors were mounted inside the LAD channels to detect when vapor was ingested into the LADs during outflow. The use of warm helium pressurant during liquid hydrogen outflow, supplied through a diffuser at the top of the tank, always led to early breakdown of the liquid column. When the tank was pressurized through an aft diffuser, resulting in cold helium in the ullage, LAD column hold-times as long as 60 minutes were achieved, which was the longest duration tested. The highest liquid column height at breakdown was 58 cm, which is 23 less than the isothermal bubble-point model value of 75 cm. This paper discusses details of the design, construction, operation and analysis of LAD test data from the CPST EDU liquid hydrogen test.

  13. Comparative investigation of surface transfer doping of hydrogen terminated diamond by high electron affinity insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Verona, C.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G.

    We report on a comparative study of transfer doping of hydrogenated single crystal diamond surface by insulators featured by high electron affinity, such as Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, WO{sub 3}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and MoO{sub 3}. The low electron affinity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was also investigated for comparison. Hole transport properties were evaluated in the passivated hydrogenated diamond films by Hall effect measurements, and were compared to un-passivated diamond films (air-induced doping). A drastic improvement was observed in passivated samples in terms of conductivity, stability with time, and resistance to high temperatures. The efficiency of the investigated insulators, as electron acceptingmore » materials in hydrogenated diamond surface, is consistent with their electronic structure. These surface acceptor materials generate a higher hole sheet concentration, up to 6.5 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}, and a lower sheet resistance, down to 2.6 kΩ/sq, in comparison to the atmosphere-induced values of about 1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} and 10 kΩ/sq, respectively. On the other hand, hole mobilities were reduced by using high electron affinity insulator dopants. Hole mobility as a function of hole concentration in a hydrogenated diamond layer was also investigated, showing a well-defined monotonically decreasing trend.« less

  14. Electron, proton and hydrogen-atom transfers in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Tommos, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    When photosynthetic organisms developed so that they could use water as an electron source to reduce carbon dioxide, the stage was set for efficient proliferation. Algae and plants spread globally and provided the foundation for our atmosphere and for O(2)-based chemistry in biological systems. Light-driven water oxidation is catalysed by photosystem II, the active site of which contains a redox-active tyrosine denoted Y(Z), a tetramanganese cluster, calcium and chloride. In 1995, Gerald Babcock and co-workers presented the hypothesis that photosynthetic water oxidation occurs as a metallo-radical catalysed process. In this model, the oxidized tyrosine radical is generated by coupled proton/electron transfer and re-reduced by abstracting hydrogen atoms from substrate water or hydroxide-ligated to the manganese cluster. The proposed function of Y(Z) requires proton transfer from the tyrosine site upon oxidation. The oxidation mechanism of Y(Z) in an inhibited and O(2)-evolving photosystem II is discussed. Domino-deprotonation from Y(Z) to the bulk solution is shown to be consistent with a variety of data obtained on metal-depleted samples. Experimental data that suggest that the oxidation of Y(Z) in O(2)-evolving samples is coupled to proton transfer in a hydrogen-bonding network are described. Finally, a dielectric-dependent model for the proton release that is associated with the catalytic cycle of photosystem II is discussed. PMID:12437877

  15. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, P. S.

    2018-05-01

    Data for inelastic processes due to hydrogen atom collisions with iron are needed for accurate modelling of the iron spectrum in late-type stars. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy Fe+H collisions is studied theoretically using a previously presented method based on an asymptotic two-electron linear combination of atomic orbitals model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen-atom system, together with the multi-channel Landau-Zener model. An extensive calculation including 166 covalent states and 25 ionic states is presented and rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20 000 K. The largest rates are found for charge transfer processes to and from two clusters of states around 6.3 and 6.6 eV excitation, corresponding in both cases to active 4d and 5p electrons undergoing transfer. Excitation and de-excitation processes among these two sets of states are also significant. Full Tables and rate coefficient data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/612/A90

  16. Interface confined hydrogen evolution reaction in zero valent metal nanoparticles-intercalated molybdenum disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongxin; Leng, Kai; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Malkhandi, Souradip; Tang, Wei; Tian, Bingbing; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Lirong; Lin, Ming; Yeo, Boon Siang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-01-01

    Interface confined reactions, which can modulate the bonding of reactants with catalytic centres and influence the rate of the mass transport from bulk solution, have emerged as a viable strategy for achieving highly stable and selective catalysis. Here we demonstrate that 1T′-enriched lithiated molybdenum disulfide is a highly powerful reducing agent, which can be exploited for the in-situ reduction of metal ions within the inner planes of lithiated molybdenum disulfide to form a zero valent metal-intercalated molybdenum disulfide. The confinement of platinum nanoparticles within the molybdenum disulfide layered structure leads to enhanced hydrogen evolution reaction activity and stability compared to catalysts dispersed on carbon support. In particular, the inner platinum surface is accessible to charged species like proton and metal ions, while blocking poisoning by larger sized pollutants or neutral molecules. This points a way forward for using bulk intercalated compounds for energy related applications. PMID:28230105

  17. Electrodeposition of Amorphous Molybdenum Chalcogenides from Ionic Liquids and Their Activity for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Redman, Daniel W; Rose, Michael J; Stevenson, Keith J

    2017-09-19

    This work reports on the general electrodeposition mechanism of tetrachalcogenmetallates from 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide. Both tetrathio- and tetraselenomolybdate underwent anodic electrodeposition and cathodic corrosion reactions as determined by UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry. Electrodeposition was carried out by cycling the potential between the anodic and cathodic regimes. This resulted in a film of densely packed nanoparticles of amorphous MoS x or MoSe x as determined by SEM, Raman, and XPS. The films were shown to have high activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The onset potential (J = 1 mA/cm 2 ) of the MoS x film was E = -0.208 V vs RHE, and that of MoSe x was E = -0.230 V vs RHE. The Tafel slope of MoS x was 42 mV/decade, and that of MoSe x was 59 mV/decade.

  18. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen... Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine... identified as siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2...

  19. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen... Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine... identified as siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2...

  20. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen... Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine... identified as siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2...

  1. In Vivo Lighted Fluorescence via Fenton Reaction: Approach for Imaging of Hydrogen Peroxide in Living Systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changhui; Chen, Weiju; Qing, Zhihe; Zheng, Jing; Xiao, Yue; Yang, Sheng; Wang, Lili; Li, Yinhui; Yang, Ronghua

    2016-04-05

    By virtue of its high sensitivity and rapidity, Fenton reaction has been demonstrated as a powerful tool for in vitro biochemical analysis; however, in vivo applications of Fenton reaction still remain to be exploited. Herein, we report, for the first time, the design, formation and testing of Fenton reaction for in vivo fluorescence imaging of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). To realize in vivo fluorescence imaging of H2O2 via Fenton reaction, a functional nanosphere, Fc@MSN-FDNA/PTAD, is fabricated from mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN), a Fenton reagent of ferrocene (Fc), ROX-labeled DNA (FDNA), and a cationic perylene derivative (PTAD). The ferrocene molecules are locked in the pore entrances of MSN, and exterior of MSN is covalently immobilized with FDNA. As a key part, PTAD acts as not only the gatekeeper of MSN but also the efficient quencher of ROX. H2O2 can permeate into the nanosphere and react with ferrocene to product hydroxyl radical (·OH) via Fenton reaction, which cleaves FDNA to detach ROX from PTAD, thus in turn, lights the ROX fluorescence. Under physiological condition, H2O2 can be determined from 5.0 nM to 1.0 μM with a detection limit of 2.4 nM. Because of the rapid kinetics of Fenton reaction and high specificity for H2O2, the proposed method meets the requirement for real applications. The feasibility of Fc@MSN-FDNA/PTAD for in vivo applications is demonstrated for fluorescence imaging of exogenous and endogenous H2O2 in cells and mice. We expect that this work will not only contribute to the H2O2-releated studies but also open up a new way to exploit in vivo Fenton reaction for biochemical research.

  2. Understanding the reaction between muonium atoms and hydrogen molecules: zero point energy, tunnelling, and vibrational adiabaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldegunde, J.; Jambrina, P. G.; García, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Sáez-Rábanos, V.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2013-11-01

    The advent of very precise measurements of rate coefficients in reactions of muonium (Mu), the lightest hydrogen isotope, with H2 in its ground and first vibrational state and of kinetic isotope effects with respect to heavier isotopes has triggered a renewed interests in the field of muonic chemistry. The aim of the present article is to review the most recent results about the dynamics and mechanism of the reaction Mu+H2 to shed light on the importance of quantum effects such as tunnelling, the preservation of the zero point energy, and the vibrational adiabaticity. In addition to accurate quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, quasiclassical trajectories (QCT) have been run in order to check the reliability of this method for this isotopic variant. It has been found that the reaction with H2(v=0) is dominated by the high zero point energy (ZPE) of the products and that tunnelling is largely irrelevant. Accordingly, both QCT calculations that preserve the products' ZPE as well as those based on the Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics methodology can reproduce the QM rate coefficients. However, when the hydrogen molecule is vibrationally excited, QCT calculations fail completely in the prediction of the huge vibrational enhancement of the reactivity. This failure is attributed to tunnelling, which plays a decisive role breaking the vibrational adiabaticity when v=1. By means of the analysis of the results, it can be concluded that the tunnelling takes place through the ν1=1 collinear barrier. Somehow, the tunnelling that is missing in the Mu+H2(v=0) reaction is found in Mu+H2(v=1).

  3. Platinum Group Metal-free Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Microbial Electrolysis Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Heyang; He, Zhen

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen gas is a green energy carrier with great environmental benefits. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can convert low-grade organic matter to hydrogen gas with low energy consumption and have gained a growing interest in the past decade. Cathode catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) present a major challenge for the development and future applications of MECs. An ideal cathode catalyst should be catalytically active, simple to synthesize, durable in a complex environment, and cost-effective. A variety of noble-metal free catalysts have been developed and investigated for HER in MECs, including Nickel and its alloys, MoS 2 , carbon-based catalysts and biocatalysts. MECs in turn can serve as a research platform to study the durability of the HER catalysts. This personal account has reviewed, analyzed, and discussed those catalysts with an emphasis on synthesis and modification, system performance and potential for practical applications. It is expected to provide insights into the development of HER catalysts towards MEC applications. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Nickel supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in alkaline electrolyte

    DOE PAGES

    Zhuang, Zhongbin; Giles, Stephen A.; Zheng, Jie; ...

    2016-01-14

    The development of a low-cost, high-performance platinum-group-metal-free hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell is hindered by the lack of a hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst at the anode. Here we report that a composite catalyst, nickel nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, has hydrogen oxidation activity similar to platinum-group metals in alkaline electrolyte. Although nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes are a very poor hydrogen oxidation catalyst, as a support, it increases the catalytic performance of nickel nanoparticles by a factor of 33 (mass activity) or 21 (exchange current density) relative to unsupported nickel nanoparticles. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the nitrogen-doped support stabilizesmore » the nanoparticle against reconstruction, while nitrogen located at the edge of the nanoparticle tunes local adsorption sites by affecting the d-orbitals of nickel. Here, owing to its high activity and low cost, our catalyst shows significant potential for use in low-cost, high-performance fuel cells.« less

  5. Nickel supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in alkaline electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhongbin; Giles, Stephen A.; Zheng, Jie; Jenness, Glen R.; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, high-performance platinum-group-metal-free hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell is hindered by the lack of a hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst at the anode. Here we report that a composite catalyst, nickel nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, has hydrogen oxidation activity similar to platinum-group metals in alkaline electrolyte. Although nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes are a very poor hydrogen oxidation catalyst, as a support, it increases the catalytic performance of nickel nanoparticles by a factor of 33 (mass activity) or 21 (exchange current density) relative to unsupported nickel nanoparticles. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the nitrogen-doped support stabilizes the nanoparticle against reconstruction, while nitrogen located at the edge of the nanoparticle tunes local adsorption sites by affecting the d-orbitals of nickel. Owing to its high activity and low cost, our catalyst shows significant potential for use in low-cost, high-performance fuel cells. PMID:26762466

  6. Mechanism of multinucleon transfer reaction based on the GRAZING model and DNS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Pei-wei; Li, Cheng; Zhu, Long; Lin, Cheng-jian; Zhang, Feng-shou

    2017-11-01

    Multinucleon transfer (MNT) reactions have been studied by either the GRAZING model or dinuclear system (DNS) model before. MNT reactions in the grazing regime have been described quite well by the GRAZING model. The DNS model is able to deal with MNT reactions, which happen in the closer overlapped regime after contact of two colliding nuclei. Since MNT reactions can happen in both areas and cannot be distinguished in view of experimental work, it is beneficial to compare these two models to clarify mechanism of MNT reactions. In this study, the mechanism of the MNT reaction has been studied by comparing the GRAZING model and DNS model for the first time. Reaction systems 136Xe+208Pb at {E}{{c}.{{m}}.}=450 MeV and 64Ni+238U at {E}{{c}.{{m}}.}=307 MeV are taken as examples in this paper. It is found that the gradients of transfer cross sections with respect to the impact parameter of the GRAZING model and DNS model are mainly concentrated on two different areas, which represents two kinds of transfer mechanisms. The theoretical framework of these two models are exclusive according to whether capture happens, which guarantees that the theoretical results calculated by these two models have no overlap and can be added up. Results indicate that the description of experimental MNT reaction cross sections can be significantly improved if calculations of the GRAZING model and DNS model are both considered.

  7. Role of partial linear momentum transfer on incomplete fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sabir; Ahmad, Tauseef; Kumar, Kamal; Gull, Muntazir; Rizvi, I. A.; Agarwal, Avinash; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Chaubey, A. K.

    2018-04-01

    Measurements of forward recoil range distributions (FRRDs) of the evaporation residues, populated in the 20Ne+51V reaction at E_{lab}≈ 145 MeV, have been carried out using the offline characteristic γ-ray detection method. The observation does corroborate the presence of complete fusion (CF) process in the population of p xn channel residues and both complete as well as incomplete fusion (ICF) processes in the population of α emitting channel residues. The FRRDs of p xn channel residues comprise single peak only, whereas α emitting channel residues have multiple peaks in their FRRDs. CF cross section data were used to extract the fusion functions. Extracted fusion functions were found to be suppressed with respect to the universal fusion function which is used as a uniform standard reference. The observed contribution arising from the ICF process in the population of α emitting channel residues is explained in terms of breakup fusion model.

  8. Characterization of hydrogen responsive nanoporous palladium films synthesized via a spontaneous galvanic displacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Patton, J F; Lavrik, N V; Joy, D C; Hunter, S R; Datskos, P G; Smith, D B; Sepaniak, M J

    2012-11-23

    A model is presented regarding the mechanistic properties associated with the interaction of hydrogen with nanoporous palladium (np-Pd) films prepared using a spontaneous galvanic displacement reaction (SGDR), which involves PdCl(2) reduction by atomic Ag. Characterization of these films shows both chemical and morphological factors, which influence the performance characteristics of np-Pd microcantilever (MC) nanomechanical sensing devices. Raman spectroscopy, uniquely complemented with MC response profiles, is used to explore the chemical influence of palladium oxide (PdO). These combined techniques support a reaction mechanism that provides for rapid response to H(2) and recovery in the presence of O(2). Post-SGDR processing via reduction of PdCl(2)(s) in a H(2) environment results in a segregated nanoparticle three-dimensional matrix dispersed in a silver layer. The porous nature of the reduced material is shown by high resolution scanning electron microscopy. Extended grain boundaries, typical of these materials, result in a greater surface area conducive to fast sorption/desorption of hydrogen, encouraged by the presence of PdO. X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy are employed to study changes in morphology and chemistry occurring in these nanoporous films under different processing conditions. The unique nature of chemical/morphological effects, as demonstrated by the above characterization methods, provides evidence in support of observed nanomechanical response/recovery profiles offering insight for catalysis, H(2) storage and improved sensing applications.

  9. Molecular hydrogen interacts more strongly when rotationally excited at low temperatures leading to faster reactions.

    PubMed

    Shagam, Yuval; Klein, Ayelet; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Yun, Renjie; Averbukh, Vitali; Koch, Christiane P; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2015-11-01

    The role of internal molecular degrees of freedom, such as rotation, has scarcely been explored experimentally in low-energy collisions despite their significance to cold and ultracold chemistry. Particularly important to astrochemistry is the case of the most abundant molecule in interstellar space, hydrogen, for which two spin isomers have been detected, one of which exists in its rotational ground state whereas the other is rotationally excited. Here we demonstrate that quantization of molecular rotation plays a key role in cold reaction dynamics, where rotationally excited ortho-hydrogen reacts faster due to a stronger long-range attraction. We observe rotational state-dependent non-Arrhenius universal scaling laws in chemi-ionization reactions of para-H2 and ortho-H2 by He(2(3)P2), spanning three orders of magnitude in temperature. Different scaling laws serve as a sensitive gauge that enables us to directly determine the exact nature of the long-range intermolecular interactions. Our results show that the quantum state of the molecular rotor determines whether or not anisotropic long-range interactions dominate cold collisions.

  10. Platinum single-atom and cluster catalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Niancai; Stambula, Samantha; Wang, Da; Banis, Mohammad Norouzi; Liu, Jian; Riese, Adam; Xiao, Biwei; Li, Ruying; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Liu, Li-Min; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Sun, Xueliang

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-based catalysts have been considered the most effective electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction in water splitting. However, platinum utilization in these electrocatalysts is extremely low, as the active sites are only located on the surface of the catalyst particles. Downsizing catalyst nanoparticles to single atoms is highly desirable to maximize their efficiency by utilizing nearly all platinum atoms. Here we report on a practical synthesis method to produce isolated single platinum atoms and clusters using the atomic layer deposition technique. The single platinum atom catalysts are investigated for the hydrogen evolution reaction, where they exhibit significantly enhanced catalytic activity (up to 37 times) and high stability in comparison with the state-of-the-art commercial platinum/carbon catalysts. The X-ray absorption fine structure and density functional theory analyses indicate that the partially unoccupied density of states of the platinum atoms' 5d orbitals on the nitrogen-doped graphene are responsible for the excellent performance. PMID:27901129

  11. Probing the Surface of Platinum during the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey A.; Favaro, Marco; Ross, Philip N.

    Understanding the surface chemistry of electrocatalysts in operando can bring insight into the reaction mechanism, and ultimately the design of more efficient materials for sustainable energy storage and conversion. Recent progress in synchrotron based X-ray spectroscopies for in operando characterization allows us to probe the solid/liquid interface directly while applying an external potential, applied here to the model system of Pt in alkaline electrolyte for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We employ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) to identify the oxidation and reduction of Pt-oxides and hydroxides on the surface as a function of applied potential, and further assessmore » the potential for hydrogen adsorption and absorption (hydride formation) during and after the HER. This new window into the surface chemistry of Pt in alkaline brings insight into the nature of the rate limiting step, the extent of H ad/absorption and it’s persistence at more anodic potentials.« less

  12. Electron transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions under dense quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayek, Sujay; Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, Mohd Zahurin Mohamed; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, Kurunathan

    2017-09-01

    The effects of dense quantum plasma on 1 s → nlm charge transfer, for arbitrary n,l,m, in proton-hydrogen collisions have been studied by employing a distorted wave approximation. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by modified Debye-Huckel potentials. A detailed study has been made to explore the effects of background plasma environment on the differential and total cross sections for electron capture into different angular momentum states for the incident energy in the range 10-1000 keV. For the unscreened case, our results agree well with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  13. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol over Nitrogen-Doped Carbon-Supported Iron Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Liu, Jun-Ling; Zhou, Hong-Jun; Fu, Yao

    2016-06-08

    Iron-based heterogeneous catalysts, which were generally prepared by pyrolysis of iron complexes on supports at elevated temperature, were found to be capable of catalyzing the transfer hydrogenation of furfural (FF) to furfuryl alcohol (FFA). The effects of metal precursor, nitrogen precursor, pyrolysis temperature, and support on catalytic performance were examined thoroughly, and a comprehensive study of the reaction parameters was also performed. The highest selectivity of FFA reached 83.0 % with a FF conversion of 91.6 % under the optimal reaction condition. Catalyst characterization suggested that iron cations coordinated by pyridinic nitrogen functionalities were responsible for the enhanced catalytic activity. The iron catalyst could be recycled without significant loss of catalytic activity for five runs, and the destruction of the nitrogen-iron species, the presence of crystallized Fe2 O3 phase, and the pore structure change were the main reasons for catalyst deactivation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Characterization of electrochemically deposited films from aqueous and ionic liquid cobalt precursors toward hydrogen evolution reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushatinski, Thomas; Huff, Clay; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2016-11-01

    Electrodepositions of cobalt films were achieved using an aqueous or an ethylene glycol based non-aqueous solution containing choline chloride (vitamin B4) with cobalt chloride hexahydrate precursor toward hydrogen evolution reactions from sodium borohydride (NaBH4) as solid hydrogen feedstock (SHF). The resulting cobalt films had reflectivity at 550 nm of 2.2% for aqueously deposited films (ACoF) and 1.3% for non-aqueously deposited films (NCoF). Surface morphology studied by scanning electron microscopy showed a positive correlation between particle size and thickness. The film thicknesses were tunable between >100 μm and <300 μm for each film. The roughness (Ra) value measurements by Dektak surface profiling showed that the NCoF (Ra = 165 nm) was smoother than the ACoF (Ra = 418 nm). The NCoFs and ACoFs contained only α phase (FCC) crystallites. The NCoFs were crystalline while the ACoFs were largely amorphous from X-ray diffraction analysis. The NCoF had an average Vickers hardness value of 84 MPa as compared to 176 MPa for ACoF. The aqueous precursor has a single absorption maximum at 510 nm and the non-aqueous precursor had three absorption maxima at 630, 670, and 695 nm. The hydrogen evolution reactions over a 1 cm2 catalytic surface with aqueous NaBH4 solutions generated rate constants (K) = equal to 4.9 × 10-3 min-1, 4.6 × 10-3 min-1, and 3.3 × 10-3 min-1 for ACoF, NCoF, and copper substrate respectively.

  15. Ultrafast Electron Transfer Kinetics in the LM Dimer of Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chang; Carey, Anne-Marie; Gao, Bing-Rong; Wraight, Colin A; Woodbury, Neal W; Lin, Su

    2016-06-23

    It has become increasingly clear that dynamics plays a major role in the function of many protein systems. One system that has proven particularly facile for studying the effects of dynamics on protein-mediated chemistry is the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Previous experimental and computational analysis have suggested that the dynamics of the protein matrix surrounding the primary quinone acceptor, QA, may be particularly important in electron transfer involving this cofactor. One can substantially increase the flexibility of this region by removing one of the reaction center subunits, the H-subunit. Even with this large change in structure, photoinduced electron transfer to the quinone still takes place. To evaluate the effect of H-subunit removal on electron transfer to QA, we have compared the kinetics of electron transfer and associated spectral evolution for the LM dimer with that of the intact reaction center complex on picosecond to millisecond time scales. The transient absorption spectra associated with all measured electron transfer reactions are similar, with the exception of a broadening in the QX transition and a blue-shift in the QY transition bands of the special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P) in the LM dimer. The kinetics of the electron transfer reactions not involving quinones are unaffected. There is, however, a 4-fold decrease in the electron transfer rate from the reduced bacteriopheophytin to QA in the LM dimer compared to the intact reaction center and a similar decrease in the recombination rate of the resulting charge-separated state (P(+)QA(-)). These results are consistent with the concept that the removal of the H-subunit results in increased flexibility in the region around the quinone and an associated shift in the reorganization energy associated with charge separation and recombination.

  16. Theoretical kinetics study of the F((2)P) + NH3 hydrogen abstraction reaction.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Garcia, J; Fernandez-Ramos, A; Suleimanov, Y V; Corchado, J C

    2014-01-23

    The hydrogen abstraction reaction of fluorine with ammonia represents a true chemical challenge because it is very fast, is followed by secondary abstraction reactions, which are also extremely fast, and presents an experimental/theoretical controversy about rate coefficients. Using a previously developed full-dimensional analytical potential energy surface, we found that the F + NH3 → HF + NH2 system is a barrierless reaction with intermediate complexes in the entry and exit channels. In order to understand the reactivity of the title reaction, thermal rate coefficidents were calculated using two approaches: ring polymer molecular dynamics and quasi-classical trajectory calculations, and these were compared with available experimental data for the common temperature range 276-327 K. The theoretical results obtained show behavior practically independent of temperature, reproducing Walther-Wagner's experiment, but in contrast with Persky's more recent experiment. However, quantitatively, our results are 1 order of magnitude larger than those of Walther-Wagner and reasonably agree with the Persky at the lowest temperature, questioning so Walther-Wagner's older data. At present, the reason for this discrepancy is not clear, although we point out some possible reasons in the light of current theoretical calculations.

  17. Methylation reactions, the redox balance and atherothrombosis: the search for a link with hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Lupoli, Roberta; Di Minno, Alessandro; Spadarella, Gaia; Franchini, Massimo; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Cirino, Giuseppe; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    It is now clear that homocysteine (Hcy) is irreversibly degraded to hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), an endogenous gasotransmitter that causes in vivo platelet activation via upregulation of phospholipase A2 and downstream boost of the arachidonate cascade. This mechanism involves a transsulfuration pathway. Based on these new data, clinical and experimental models on the relationships between Hcy and folate pathways in vascular disease and information on the Hcy controversy have been reanalyzed in the present review. Most interventional trials focused on Hcy lowering by folate administration did not exclude patients routinely taking the arachidonate inhibitor aspirin. This may have influenced the results of some of these trials. It is also clear that nutritional intake of folate affects several enzymatic reactions of the methionine-Hcy cycle and associated one-carbon metabolism and, thereby, both methylation reactions and redox balance. Hence, it is conceivable that the abnormally high Hcy levels seen in pathologic states reflect a poorly elucidated perturbation of such reactions and of such balance. While it is unknown whether there is an interplay between H2S, methylation reactions, and redox balance, measuring the sole reduction of blood Hcy that follows folate administration may well be an oversimplified approach to a complex biologic perturbation. The need to investigate this complex framework is thoroughly discussed in this article. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Symmetry and the geometric phase in ultracold hydrogen-exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, J. F. E.; Hazra, J.; Balakrishnan, N.; Kendrick, B. K.

    2017-08-01

    Quantum reactive scattering calculations are reported for the ultracold hydrogen-exchange reaction and its non-reactive atom-exchange isotopic counterparts, proceeding from excited rotational states. It is shown that while the geometric phase (GP) does not necessarily control the reaction to all final states, one can always find final states where it does. For the isotopic counterpart reactions, these states can be used to make a measurement of the GP effect by separately measuring the even and odd symmetry contributions, which experimentally requires nuclear-spin final-state resolution. This follows from symmetry considerations that make the even and odd identical-particle exchange symmetry wavefunctions which include the GP locally equivalent to the opposite symmetry wavefunctions which do not. It is shown how this equivalence can be used to define a constant which quantifies the GP effect and can be obtained solely from experimentally observable rates. This equivalence reflects the important role that discrete symmetries play in ultracold chemistry and highlights the key role that ultracold reactions can play in understanding fundamental aspects of chemical reactivity more generally.

  19. Mechanism and kinetics of the electrocatalytic reaction responsible for the high cost of hydrogen fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tao; Goddard, William A; An, Qi; Xiao, Hai; Merinov, Boris; Morozov, Sergey

    2017-01-25

    The sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a major impediment to the economic use of hydrogen fuel cells in transportation. In this work, we report the full ORR reaction mechanism for Pt(111) based on Quantum Mechanics (QM) based Reactive metadynamics (RμD) simulations including explicit water to obtain free energy reaction barriers at 298 K. The lowest energy pathway for 4 e - water formation is: first, *OOH formation; second, *OOH reduction to H 2 O and O*; third, O* hydrolysis using surface water to produce two *OH and finally *OH hydration to water. Water formation is the rate-determining step (RDS) for potentials above 0.87 Volt, the normal operating range. Considering the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism involving protons from the solvent, we predict the free energy reaction barrier at 298 K for water formation to be 0.25 eV for an external potential below U = 0.87 V and 0.41 eV at U = 1.23 V, in good agreement with experimental values of 0.22 eV and 0.44 eV, respectively. With the mechanism now fully understood, we can use this now validated methodology to examine the changes upon alloying and surface modifications to increase the rate by reducing the barrier for water formation.

  20. Chemical Evolution of Groundwater Near a Sinkhole Lake, Northern Florida: 2. Chemical Patterns, Mass Transfer Modeling, and Rates of Mass Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Brian G.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Revesz, Kinga M.; Jones, Blair F.; Lee, Terrie M.

    1995-06-01

    Chemical patterns along evolutionary groundwater flow paths in silicate and carbonate aquifers were interpreted using solute tracers, carbon and sulfur isotopes, and mass balance reaction modeling for a complex hydrologic system involving groundwater inflow to and outflow from a sinkhole lake in northern Florida. Rates of dominant reactions along defined flow paths were estimated from modeled mass transfer and ages obtained from CFC-modeled recharge dates. Groundwater upgradient from Lake Barco remains oxic as it moves downward, reacting with silicate minerals in a system open to carbon dioxide (CO2), producing only small increases in dissolved species. Beneath and downgradient of Lake Barco the oxic groundwater mixes with lake water leakage in a highly reducing, silicate-carbonate mineral environment. A mixing model, developed for anoxic groundwater downgradient from the lake, accounted for the observed chemical and isotopic composition by combining different proportions of lake water leakage and infiltrating meteoric water. The evolution of major ion chemistry and the 13C isotopic composition of dissolved carbon species in groundwater downgradient from the lake can be explained by the aerobic oxidation of organic matter in the lake, anaerobic microbial oxidation of organic carbon, and incongruent dissolution of smectite minerals to kaolinite. The dominant process for the generation of methane was by the CO2 reduction pathway based on the isotopic composition of hydrogen (δ2H(CH4) = -186 to -234‰) and carbon (δ13C(CH4) = -65.7 to -72.3‰). Rates of microbial metabolism of organic matter, estimated from the mass transfer reaction models, ranged from 0.0047 to 0.039 mmol L-1 yr-1 for groundwater downgradient from the lake.

  1. Absolute rate of the reaction of Cl(p-2) with molecular hydrogen from 200 - 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whytock, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen are measured from 200 - 500 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The results are compared with previous work and are discussed with particular reference to the equilibrium constant for the reaction and to relative rate data for chlorine atom reactions. Theoretical calculations, using the BEBO method with tunneling, give excellent agreement with experiment.

  2. Synthesis, spectral and thermal studies of the newly hydrogen bonded charge transfer complex of o-phenylenediamine with pi acceptor picric acid.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ishaat M; Ahmad, Afaq

    2010-10-01

    Newly proton or charge transfer complex [(OPDH)(+)(PA)(-)] was synthesized by the reaction of the donor, o-phenylenediamine (OPD) with acceptor, 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (PAH). The chemical reaction has occurred via strong hydrogen bonding followed by migration of proton from acceptor to donor. UV-vis, (1)H NMR and FTIR spectra, in addition to the thermal and elemental analysis were used to confirm the proposed occurrence of the chemical reaction and to investigate the newly synthesized solid CT complex. The stoichiometry of the CT complex was found to be 1:1. The formation constant and molar extinction coefficient of the CT complex were evaluated by the Benesi-Hildebrand equation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis, spectral and thermal studies of the newly hydrogen bonded charge transfer complex of o-phenylenediamine with π acceptor picric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ishaat M.; Ahmad, Afaq

    2010-10-01

    Newly proton or charge transfer complex [(OPDH) +(PA) -] was synthesized by the reaction of the donor, o-phenylenediamine (OPD) with acceptor, 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (PAH). The chemical reaction has occurred via strong hydrogen bonding followed by migration of proton from acceptor to donor. UV-vis, 1H NMR and FTIR spectra, in addition to the thermal and elemental analysis were used to confirm the proposed occurrence of the chemical reaction and to investigate the newly synthesized solid CT complex. The stoichiometry of the CT complex was found to be 1:1. The formation constant and molar extinction coefficient of the CT complex were evaluated by the Benesi-Hildebrand equation.

  4. Hydrogenation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Joseph [Encino, CA; Oberg, Carl L [Canoga Park, CA; Russell, Larry H [Agoura, CA

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1100.degree. to 1900.degree. C., while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products.

  5. Vibrational non-equilibrium in the hydrogen-oxygen reaction. Comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrebkov, Oleg V.

    2015-03-01

    A theoretical model is proposed for the chemical and vibrational kinetics of hydrogen oxidation based on consistent accounting of the vibrational non-equilibrium of the HO2 radical that forms as a result of the bimolecular recombination H+O2 → HO2. In the proposed model, the chain branching H+O2 = O+OH and inhibiting H+O2+M = HO2+M formal reactions are treated (in the terms of elementary processes) as a single multi-channel process of forming, intramolecular energy redistribution between modes, relaxation, and unimolecular decay of the comparatively long-lived vibrationally excited HO2 radical, which is able to react and exchange energy with the other components of the mixture. The model takes into account the vibrational non-equilibrium of the starting (primary) H2 and O2 molecules, as well as the most important molecular intermediates HO2, OH, O2(1Δ), and the main reaction product H2O. It is shown that the hydrogen-oxygen reaction proceeds in the absence of vibrational equilibrium, and the vibrationally excited HO2(v) radical acts as a key intermediate in a fundamentally important chain branching process and in the generation of electronically excited species O2(1Δ), O(1D), and OH(2Σ+). The calculated results are compared with the shock tube experimental data for strongly diluted H2-O2 mixtures at 1000 < T < 2500 K, 0.5 < p < 4 atm. It is demonstrated that this approach is promising from the standpoint of reconciling the predictions of the theoretical model with experimental data obtained by different authors for various compositions and conditions using different methods. For T < 1500 K, the nature of the hydrogen-oxygen reaction is especially non-equilibrium, and the vibrational non-equilibrium of the HO2 radical is the essence of this process. The quantitative estimation of the vibrational relaxation characteristic time of the HO2 radical in its collisions with H2 molecules has been obtained as a result of the comparison of different experimental data on

  6. Test of an orbiting hydrogen maser clock system using laser time transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.; Mattison, Edward M.; Nystrom, G. U.; Decher, Rudolph

    1992-01-01

    We describe a joint Smithsonian Astrophysical Laboratory/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (SAO/NASA) program for flight testing a atomic hydrogen maser clock system designed for long-term operation in space. The clock system will be carried by a shuttle-launched EURECA spacecraft. Comparisons with earth clocks to measure the clock's long-term frequency stability (tau = 10(exp 4) seconds) will be made using laser time transfer from existing NASA laser tracking stations. We describe the design of the maser clock and its control systems, and the laser timing technique. We describe the precision of station time synchronization and the limitations in the comparison between the earth and space time scales owing to gravitational and relativistic effects. We will explore the implications of determining the spacecraft's location by an on-board Global Position System (GPS) receiver, and of using microwave techniques for time and frequency transfer.

  7. The role of quantum effects in proton transfer reactions in enzymes: quantum tunneling in a noisy environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothma, Jacques P.; Gilmore, Joel B.; McKenzie, Ross H.

    2010-05-01

    We consider the role of quantum effects in the transfer of hydrogen-like species in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. This review is stimulated by claims that the observed magnitude and temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) implies that quantum tunneling below the energy barrier associated with the transition state significantly enhances the reaction rate in many enzymes. We review the path integral approach and the Caldeira-Leggett model, which provides a general framework to describe and understand tunneling in a quantum system that interacts with a noisy environment at nonzero temperature. Here the quantum system is the active site of the enzyme, and the environment is the surrounding protein and water. Tunneling well below the barrier only occurs for temperatures less than a temperature T0, which is determined by the curvature of the potential energy surface near the top of the barrier. We argue that for most enzymes this temperature is less than room temperature. We review typical values for the parameters in the Caldeira-Leggett Hamiltonian, including the frequency-dependent friction and noise due to the environment. For physically reasonable parameters, we show that quantum transition state theory gives a quantitative description of the temperature dependence and magnitude of KIEs for two classes of enzymes that have been claimed to exhibit signatures of quantum tunneling. The only quantum effects are those associated with the transition state, both reflection at the barrier top and tunneling just below the barrier. We establish that the friction and noise due to the environment are weak and only slightly modify the reaction rate. Furthermore, at room temperature and for typical energy barriers environmental fluctuations with frequencies much less than 1000 cm-1 do not have a significant effect on quantum corrections to the reaction rate. This is essentially because the time scales associated with the dynamics of proton transfer are faster than

  8. High-performance Platinum-free oxygen reduction reaction and hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Priji; Ghosh, Arpita; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2018-02-26

    The integration of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack into vehicles necessitates the replacement of high-priced platinum (Pt)-based electrocatalyst, which contributes to about 45% of the cost of the stack. The implementation of high-performance and durable Pt metal-free catalyst for both oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) could significantly enable large-scale commercialization of fuel cell-powered vehicles. Towards this goal, a simple, scalable, single-step synthesis method was adopted to develop palladium-cobalt alloy supported on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (Pd 3 Co/NG) nanocomposite. Rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) studies for the electrochemical activity towards ORR indicates that ORR proceeds via nearly four-electron mechanism. Besides, the mass activity of Pd 3 Co/NG shows an enhancement of 1.6 times compared to that of Pd/NG. The full fuel cell measurements were carried out using Pd 3 Co/NG at the anode, cathode in conjunction with Pt/C and simultaneously at both anode and cathode. A maximum power density of 68 mW/cm 2 is accomplished from the simultaneous use of Pd 3 Co/NG as both anode and cathode electrocatalyst with individual loading of 0.5 mg/cm 2 at 60 °C without any backpressure. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first of its kind of a fully non-Pt based PEM full cell.

  9. High Throughput Engineering to Revitalize a Vestigial Electron Transfer Pathway in Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers*

    PubMed Central

    Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Kressel, Lucas L.; Wander, Marc J.; Holten, Dewey; Laible, Philip D.; Kirmaier, Christine; Hanson, Deborah K.

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers convert light energy into chemical energy in a series of transmembrane electron transfer reactions, each with near 100% yield. The structures of reaction centers reveal two symmetry-related branches of cofactors (denoted A and B) that are functionally asymmetric; purple bacterial reaction centers use the A pathway exclusively. Previously, site-specific mutagenesis has yielded reaction centers capable of transmembrane charge separation solely via the B branch cofactors, but the best overall electron transfer yields are still low. In an attempt to better realize the architectural and energetic factors that underlie the directionality and yields of electron transfer, sites within the protein-cofactor complex were targeted in a directed molecular evolution strategy that implements streamlined mutagenesis and high throughput spectroscopic screening. The polycistronic approach enables efficient construction and expression of a large number of variants of a heteroligomeric complex that has two intimately regulated subunits with high sequence similarity, common features of many prokaryotic and eukaryotic transmembrane protein assemblies. The strategy has succeeded in the discovery of several mutant reaction centers with increased efficiency of the B pathway; they carry multiple substitutions that have not been explored or linked using traditional approaches. This work expands our understanding of the structure-function relationships that dictate the efficiency of biological energy-conversion reactions, concepts that will aid the design of bio-inspired assemblies capable of both efficient charge separation and charge stabilization. PMID:22247556

  10. Multinucleon transfer reactions – a pathway to new heavy and superheavy nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Sophie

    2018-05-01

    Recently, we reported the observation of several new neutron-deficient isotopes with proton numbers Z ≥ 92 in collisions of 48Ca + 248Cm at the Coulomb barrier. The peculiarity is that these nuclei were produced in deep inelastic multinucleon transfer reactions, a method which is presently discussed as a possible new pathway to enter so far unknown regions in the upper part of the Chart of Nuclides. Of particular interest are multinucleon transfer reactions as a possible means to produce neutron-rich superheavy nuclei and nuclei along the magic neutron shell N = 126. Based on present-day physical and technical state-of-the art, we will discuss the question how big are our chances to enter these regions by applying multinucleon transfer reactions.

  11. High pressure reaction cell and transfer mechanism for ultrahigh vacuum spectroscopic chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, A. E.; Schulz, K. H.

    2000-06-01

    A novel high pressure reaction cell and sample transfer mechanism for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) spectroscopic chambers is described. The design employs a unique modification of a commercial load-lock transfer system to emulate a tractable microreactor. The reaction cell has an operating pressure range of <1×10-4 to 1000 Torr and can be evacuated to UHV conditions to enable sample transfer into the spectroscopic chamber. Additionally, a newly designed sample holder equipped with electrical and thermocouple contacts is described. The sample holder is capable of resistive specimen heating to 400 and 800 °C with current requirements of 14 A (2 V) and 25 A (3.5 V), respectively. The design enables thorough material science characterization of catalytic reactions and the surface chemistry of catalytic materials without exposing the specimen to atmospheric contaminants. The system is constructed primarily from readily available commercial equipment allowing its rapid implementation into existing laboratories.

  12. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine. 721.6170 Section 721.6170 Protection... Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine... identified as siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2...

  13. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine. 721.6170 Section 721.6170 Protection... Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine... identified as siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2...

  14. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, P. S.

    2018-02-01

    Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy O+H collisions is studied; it is a problem of importance for modelling stellar spectra and obtaining accurate oxygen abundances in late-type stars including the Sun. The collisions have been studied theoretically using a previously presented method based on an asymptotic two-electron linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen-atom system, together with the multichannel Landau-Zener model. The method has been extended to include configurations involving excited states of hydrogen using an estimate for the two-electron transition coupling, but this extension was found to not lead to any remarkably high rates. Rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20 000 K, and charge transfer and (de)excitation processes involving the first excited S-states, 4s.5So and 4s.3So, are found to have the highest rates. Data are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/vizbin/qcat?J/A+A/610/A57. The data are also available at http://https://github.com/barklem/public-data

  15. Evidence of 9Be  +  p nuclear reactions during 2ω CH and hydrogen minority ICRH in JET-ILW hydrogen and deuterium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kiptily, V.; Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.; Afanasyev, V. I.; Giroud, C.; Goloborodko, V.; Hellesen, C.; Popovichev, S. V.; Mironov, M. I.; contributors, JET

    2018-02-01

    The intensity of 9Be  +  p nuclear fusion reactions was experimentally studied during second harmonic (2ω CH) ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and further analyzed during fundamental hydrogen minority ICRH of JET-ILW hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. In relatively low-density plasmas with a high ICRH power, a population of fast H+ ions was created and measured by neutral particle analyzers. Primary and secondary nuclear reaction products, due to 9Be  +  p interaction, were observed with fast ion loss detectors, γ-ray spectrometers and neutron flux monitors and spectrometers. The possibility of using 9Be(p, d)2α and 9Be(p, α)6Li nuclear reactions to create a population of fast alpha particles and study their behaviour in non-active stage of ITER operation is discussed in the paper.

  16. Ion-atom charge-transfer reactions and a hot intercloud medium. [in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the ionization equilibrium of carbon in a hot intercloud medium (ICM), taking into account various charge-transfer reactions. Attention is given to problems related to observations of carbon along the lines of sight to several unreddened stars. It is pointed out that the observed underabundance of C III and overabundance of C I can be consistent with the presence of a hot, partially ionized ICM, provided that two of the charge-transfer reactions considered are rapid at thermal energies.

  17. Two-proton transfer reactions on even Ni and Zn isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Boucenna, A.; Kraus, L.; Linck, I.

    New levels strongly excited by 112-MeV {sup 12}C ions on even Ni and Zn isotopes are {ital J}{sup {pi}} assigned on kinematical and geometrical arguments, crude shell-model calculations, and distorted-wave Born approximation angular-distribution analysis. These tentative assignments are supported by the Bansal-French model. Because of the contribution of additional collective effects, the two-proton transfer reaction spectra are less selectively fed than those obtained with the analogous two-neutron transfer reactions induced on the same targets in a similar energy range.

  18. Two-proton transfer reactions on even Ni and Zn isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucenna, A.; Kraus, L.; Linck, I.; Chan, Tsan Ung

    1990-10-01

    New levels strongly excited by 112-MeV 12C ions on even Ni and Zn isotopes are Jπ assigned on kinematical and geometrical arguments, crude shell-model calculations, and distorted-wave Born approximation angular-distribution analysis. These tentative assignments are supported by the Bansal-French model. Because of the contribution of additional collective effects, the two-proton transfer reaction spectra are less selectively fed than those obtained with the analogous two-neutron transfer reactions induced on the same targets in a similar energy range.

  19. Optimal control of fuel overpressure in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell with hydrogen transfer leak during load change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadighajari, Alireza; DeVaal, Jake; Golnaraghi, Farid

    2017-02-01

    Formation of membrane pinholes is a common defect in fuel cells, inflicting more cost and making less durable cells. This work focuses on mitigating this issue, and offers a continuous online treatment instead of attempting to dynamically model the hydrogen transfer leak rate. This is achieved by controlling the differential pressure between the anode and cathode compartments at the inlet side of the fuel cell stack, known as the fuel overpressure. The model predictive control approach is used to attain the objectives in a Ballard 9-cell Mk1100 polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with inclusion of hydrogen transfer leak. Furthermore, the pneumatic modeling technique is used to model the entire anode side of a fuel cell station. The hydrogen transfer leak is embedded in the model in a novel way, and is considered as a disturbance during the controller design. Experimental results for different sizes of hydrogen transfer leaks are provided to show the benefits of fuel overpressure control system in alleviating the effects of membrane pinholes, which in turn increases membrane longevity, and reduces hydrogen emissions in the eventual presence of transfer leaks. Moreover, the model predictive controller provides an optimal control input while satisfying the problem constraints.

  20. Diagnostic criteria for the characterization of quasireversible electron transfer reactions by cyclic square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Mann, Megan A; Helfrick, John C; Bottomley, Lawrence A

    2014-08-19

    Theory for cyclic square wave voltammetry of quasireversible electron transfer reactions is presented and experimentally verified. The impact of empirical parameters on the shape of the current-voltage curve is examined. From the trends, diagnostic criteria enabling the use of this waveform as a tool for mechanistic analysis of electrode reaction processes are presented. These criteria were experimentally confirmed using Eu(3+)/Eu(2+), a well-established quasireversible analyte. Using cyclic square wave voltammetry, both the electron transfer coefficient and rate were calculated for this analyte and found to be in excellent agreement with literature. When properly applied, these criteria will enable nonexperts in voltammetry to assign the electrode reaction mechanism and accurately measure electrode reaction kinetics.

  1. Mechanisms of proton transfer in Nafion: elementary reactions at the sulfonic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Sagarik, Kritsana; Phonyiem, Mayuree; Lao-ngam, Charoensak; Chaiwongwattana, Sermsiri

    2008-04-21

    Proton transfer reactions at the sulfonic acid groups in Nafion were theoretically studied, using complexes formed from triflic acid (CF3SO3H), H3O+ and H2O, as model systems. The investigations began with searching for potential precursors and transition states at low hydration levels, using the test-particle model (T-model), density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio calculations. They were employed as starting configurations in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations at 298 K, from which elementary reactions were analyzed and categorized. For the H3O+-H2O complexes, BOMD simulations suggested that a quasi-dynamic equilibrium could be established between the Eigen and Zundel complexes, and that was considered to be one of the most important elementary reactions in the proton transfer process. The average lifetime of H3O+ obtained from BOMD simulations is close to the lowest limit, estimated from low-frequency vibrational spectroscopy. It was demonstrated that proton transfer reactions at -SO3H are not concerted, due to the thermal energy fluctuation and the existence of various quasi-dynamic equilibria, and -SO3H could directly and indirectly mediate proton transfer reactions through the formation of proton defects, as well as the -SO3- and -SO3H2+ transition states.

  2. Tandem Payne/Dakin Reaction: A New Strategy for Hydrogen Peroxide Detection and Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan; Ye, Sen; Hu, Jun Jacob

    2018-06-22

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been recognized as one of the most significant ROS (reactive oxygen species) in human health and disease. Due to the intrinsic attributes of H2O2 such as low reactivity under physiological pH, it is exceedingly challenging to develop small molecule fluorescent probes with high selectivity and sensitivity to visualize H2O2 in intricate biological milieux. To address this gap, we report a rationally designed tandem Payne/Dakin reaction that is specific to molecular recognition of H2O2, and demonstrate its application in developing novel biocompatible fluorescent probes. New H2O2 probes based on this unique chemical strategy can be facilely synthesized by a general coupling reaction, and the practical applicability of those probes has been confirmed by the visualization of endogenously produced H2O2 in living cells. In particular, starvation induced H2O2 production in mouse macrophages has been detected by our novel probe in both confocal imaging and flow cytometry. This tandem Payne/Dakin reaction provides a basis for developing more sophisticated molecular tools to interrogate H2O2 functions in biological phenomena. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A study on the reaction of Zircaloy-4 tube with hydrogen/steam mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Min; Kook, Dong-Hak; Cho, Il-Je; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2017-08-01

    In order to fundamentally understand the secondary hydriding mechanism of zirconium alloy cladding, the reaction of commercial Zircaloy-4 tubes with hydrogen and steam mixture was studied using a thermo-gravimetric analyser with two variables, H2/H2O ratio and temperature. Phenomenological analysis revealed that in the steam starvation condition, i.e., when the H2/H2O ratio is greater than 104, hydriding is the dominant reaction and the weight gain increases linearly after a short incubation time. On the other hand, when the gas ratio is 5 × 102 or 103, both hydriding and oxidation reactions take place simultaneously, leading to three distinct regimes: primary hydriding, enhanced oxidation, and massive hydriding. Microstructural changes of oxide demonstrate that when the weight gain exceeds a certain critical value, massive hydriding takes place due to the significant localized crack development within the oxide, which possibly simulates the secondary hydriding failure in a defective fuel operation. This study reveals that the steam starvation condition above the critical H2/H2O ratio is only a necessary condition for the secondary hydriding failure and, as a sufficient condition, oxide needs to grow sufficiently to reach the critical thickness that produces substantial crack development. In other words, in a real defective fuel operation incident, the secondary failure is initiated only when both steam starvation and oxide degradation conditions are simultaneously met. Therefore, it is concluded that the indispensable time for the critical oxide growth primarily determines the triggering time of massive hydriding failure.

  4. Half-sandwich rhodium(III) transfer hydrogenation catalysts: Reduction of NAD(+) and pyruvate, and antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Soldevila-Barreda, Joan J; Habtemariam, Abraha; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Sadler, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Organometallic complexes have the potential to behave as catalytic drugs. We investigate here Rh(III) complexes of general formula [(Cp(x))Rh(N,N')(Cl)], where N,N' is ethylenediamine (en), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzenesulfonamide (TfEn), and Cp(x) is pentamethylcyclopentadienyl (Cp*), 1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetramethylcyclopentadienyl (Cp(xPh)) or 1-biphenyl-2,3,4,5-tetramethyl cyclopentadienyl (Cp(xPhPh)). These complexes can reduce NAD(+) to NADH using formate as a hydride source under biologically-relevant conditions. The catalytic activity decreased in the order of N,N-chelated ligand bpy > phen > en with Cp* as the η(5)-donor. The en complexes (1-3) became more active with extension to the Cp(X) ring, whereas the activity of the phen (7-9) and bpy (4-6) compounds decreased. [Cp*Rh(bpy)Cl](+) (4) showed the highest catalytic activity, with a TOF of 37.4±2h(-1). Fast hydrolysis of the chlorido complexes 1-10 was observed by (1)H NMR (<10min at 310K). The pKa* values for the aqua adducts were determined to be ca. 8-10. Complexes 1-9 also catalysed the reduction of pyruvate to lactate using formate as the hydride donor. The efficiency of the transfer hydrogenation reactions was highly dependent on the nature of the chelating ligand and the Cp(x) ring. Competition reactions between NAD(+) and pyruvate for reduction by formate catalysed by 4 showed a preference for reduction of NAD(+). The antiproliferative activity of complex 3 towards A2780 human ovarian cancer cells increased by up to 50% when administered in combination with non-toxic doses of formate, suggesting that transfer hydrogenation can induce reductive stress in cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Three-dimensional Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Supported Molybdenum Disulfide Nanoparticles as an Advanced Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Haifeng; Liu, Conghui; Ye, Haitao; Hu, Linping; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Dai, Wenhao; Cao, Yu; Qi, Xueqiang; Lu, Huiting; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-01-01

    An efficient three-dimensional (3D) hybrid material of nitrogen-doped graphene sheets (N-RGO) supporting molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoparticles with high-performance electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is fabricated by using a facile hydrothermal route. Comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic characterizations confirm the resulting hybrid material possesses a 3D crumpled few-layered graphene network structure decorated with MoS2 nanoparticles. Electrochemical characterization analysis reveals that the resulting hybrid material exhibits efficient electrocatalytic activity toward HER under acidic conditions with a low onset potential of 112 mV and a small Tafel slope of 44 mV per decade. The enhanced mechanism of electrocatalytic activity has been investigated in detail by controlling the elemental composition, electrical conductance and surface morphology of the 3D hybrid as well as Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. This demonstrates that the abundance of exposed active sulfur edge sites in the MoS2 and nitrogen active functional moieties in N-RGO are synergistically responsible for the catalytic activity, whilst the distinguished and coherent interface in MoS2/N-RGO facilitates the electron transfer during electrocatalysis. Our study gives insights into the physical/chemical mechanism of enhanced HER performance in MoS2/N-RGO hybrids and illustrates how to design and construct a 3D hybrid to maximize the catalytic efficiency. PMID:26639026

  6. Role of basic and acidic centers of MgO and modified MgO in catalytic transfer hydrogenation of ketones studied by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szöllösi, György; Bartók, Mihály

    1999-05-01

    In this study our aim was to identify the active sites and the surface species responsible for deactivation of MgO during catalytic transfer hydrogenations (CTH) of ketones using alcohols as hydrogen donors. Our previous studies showed that deactivation of MgO could be prevented by previous treatment with chloromethanes. Therefore the surface species formed during the reaction were studied before and after treatment with chloroform or chloroform- d by in situ infrared spectroscopy (IR). As a result, it was concluded that the reaction requires the presence of surface basic and acidic centers. The presence of Lewis acid centers was not necessary, the reaction could proceed on weakly acidic surface Brönsted sites, as the alterations in intensity and position of the ν(OH) bands indicated. Modification with chloroform resulted also in the generation of surface OH groups with a proper acidity for the reaction. The shift in carbonyl vibrations led us to the conclusion that Lewis acid and base centers were responsible for the catalyst poisoning, so covering these acid sites by Cl - led to a stable catalyst.

  7. Kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of chemical reactions coupled with heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Castonguay, Thomas C; Wang, Feng

    2008-03-28

    In this paper, we describe two types of effective events for describing heat transfer in a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation that may involve stochastic chemical reactions. Simulations employing these events are referred to as KMC-TBT and KMC-PHE. In KMC-TBT, heat transfer is modeled as the stochastic transfer of "thermal bits" between adjacent grid points. In KMC-PHE, heat transfer is modeled by integrating the Poisson heat equation for a short time. Either approach is capable of capturing the time dependent system behavior exactly. Both KMC-PHE and KMC-TBT are validated by simulating pure heat transfer in a rod and a square and modeling a heated desorption problem where exact numerical results are available. KMC-PHE is much faster than KMC-TBT and is used to study the endothermic desorption of a lattice gas. Interesting findings from this study are reported.

  8. Kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of chemical reactions coupled with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castonguay, Thomas C.; Wang, Feng

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we describe two types of effective events for describing heat transfer in a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation that may involve stochastic chemical reactions. Simulations employing these events are referred to as KMC-TBT and KMC-PHE. In KMC-TBT, heat transfer is modeled as the stochastic transfer of "thermal bits" between adjacent grid points. In KMC-PHE, heat transfer is modeled by integrating the Poisson heat equation for a short time. Either approach is capable of capturing the time dependent system behavior exactly. Both KMC-PHE and KMC-TBT are validated by simulating pure heat transfer in a rod and a square and modeling a heated desorption problem where exact numerical results are available. KMC-PHE is much faster than KMC-TBT and is used to study the endothermic desorption of a lattice gas. Interesting findings from this study are reported.

  9. Efficient hydrogen evolution in transition metal dichalcogenides via a simple one-step hydrazine reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Dustin R.; Martinez, Ulises; Sherehiy, Andriy; Kappera, Rajesh; Martinez-Garcia, Alejandro; Schulze, Roland K.; Jasinski, Jacek; Zhang, Jing; Gupta, Ram K.; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Mohite, Aditya D.; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Gupta, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen evolution reaction is catalysed efficiently with precious metals, such as platinum; however, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as a promising class of materials for electrocatalysis, but these materials still have low activity and durability when compared with precious metals. Here we report a simple one-step scalable approach, where MoOx/MoS2 core-shell nanowires and molybdenum disulfide sheets are exposed to dilute aqueous hydrazine at room temperature, which results in marked improvement in electrocatalytic performance. The nanowires exhibit ∼100 mV improvement in overpotential following exposure to dilute hydrazine, while also showing a 10-fold increase in current density and a significant change in Tafel slope. In situ electrical, gate-dependent measurements and spectroscopic investigations reveal that hydrazine acts as an electron dopant in molybdenum disulfide, increasing its conductivity, while also reducing the MoOx core in the core-shell nanowires, which leads to improved electrocatalytic performance. PMID:27282871

  10. Multiple exciton generation for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution reactions with quantum yields exceeding 100%

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Yong; Crisp, Ryan W.; Gu, Jing; ...

    2017-04-03

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in quantum dots (QDs) has the potential to greatly increase the power conversion efficiency in solar cells and in solar-fuel production. During the MEG process, two electron-hole pairs (excitons) are created from the absorption of one high-energy photon, bypassing hot-carrier cooling via phonon emission. Here we demonstrate that extra carriers produced via MEG can be used to drive a chemical reaction with quantum efficiency above 100%. We developed a lead sulfide (PbS) QD photoelectrochemical cell that is able to drive hydrogen evolution from aqueous Na 2S solution with a peak external quantum efficiency exceeding 100%. QDmore » photoelectrodes that were measured all demonstrated MEG when the incident photon energy was larger than 2.7 times the bandgap energy. Finally, our results demonstrate a new direction in exploring high-efficiency approaches to solar fuels.« less

  11. Monocrystalline platinum-nickel branched nanocages with enhanced catalytic performance towards the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhenming; Li, Huiqi; Zhan, Chenyang; Zhang, Jiawei; Wang, Wei; Xu, Binbin; Lu, Fa; Jiang, Yaqi; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2018-03-15

    Single crystalline noble metal nanocages are the most promising candidates for heterogeneous catalysis due to their large specific surface area, well-defined structure and enhanced structural stability. Herein, based on the observation of an unexpected phenomenon that the alloying of Pt and transition metals by co-reduction is more preferential than the formation of pure Pt NCs, we propose a feasible one-pot strategy to synthesize a uniformly epitaxial core-shell Pt-Ni structure with a Ni-rich alloy as the core and a Pt-rich alloy as the shell. The as-prepared Pt-Ni core-shell structures are subsequently etched into monocrystalline Pt-Ni branched nanocages with the wall thickness being 2.8 nm. This unique structure exhibits excellent catalytic performance and stability for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline solution which is of great significance for the energy-intensive water-alkali and chlor-alkali industry.

  12. Graphite carbon nitride/boron-doped graphene hybrid for efficient hydrogen generation reaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Wang, Xin; Wang, Juan; Cui, Guomin; Liu, Daoping

    2018-08-24

    Metal-free carbon materials, with tuned surface chemical and electronic properties, hold great potential for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We designed and synthesized a CN/BG hybrid electrocatalytic system with a porous and active graphite carbon nitride (CN) layer on boron-doped graphene (BG). A porous CN layer on graphene could provide exposed defects and edges that act as active sites for proton adsorption and reduction. The composition, structure, surface electronics, and chemical properties of this CN/BG hybrid system were tuned to obtain excellent HER activity and stability. Detailed surface chemical, morphological, and structural analyses demonstrated the synergetic effect arising from the electronic interaction between CN and BG, which contributed to the enhanced electrocatalytic performances.

  13. Efficient hydrogen evolution in transition metal dichalcogenides via a simple one-step hydrazine reaction.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Dustin R; Martinez, Ulises; Sherehiy, Andriy; Kappera, Rajesh; Martinez-Garcia, Alejandro; Schulze, Roland K; Jasinski, Jacek; Zhang, Jing; Gupta, Ram K; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Mohite, Aditya D; Sunkara, Mahendra K; Gupta, Gautam

    2016-06-10

    Hydrogen evolution reaction is catalysed efficiently with precious metals, such as platinum; however, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as a promising class of materials for electrocatalysis, but these materials still have low activity and durability when compared with precious metals. Here we report a simple one-step scalable approach, where MoOx/MoS2 core-shell nanowires and molybdenum disulfide sheets are exposed to dilute aqueous hydrazine at room temperature, which results in marked improvement in electrocatalytic performance. The nanowires exhibit ∼100 mV improvement in overpotential following exposure to dilute hydrazine, while also showing a 10-fold increase in current density and a significant change in Tafel slope. In situ electrical, gate-dependent measurements and spectroscopic investigations reveal that hydrazine acts as an electron dopant in molybdenum disulfide, increasing its conductivity, while also reducing the MoOx core in the core-shell nanowires, which leads to improved electrocatalytic performance.

  14. Molecular hydrogen formation on interstellar PAHs through Eley-Rideal abstraction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Nolan; Cazaux, S.; Egorov, D.; Boschman, L. M. P. V.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2018-06-01

    We present experimental data on H2 formation processes on gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cations. This process was studied by exposing coronene radical cations, confined in a radio-frequency ion trap, to gas phase H atoms. Sequential attachment of up to 23 hydrogen atoms has been observed. Exposure to atomic D instead of H allows one to distinguish attachment from competing abstraction reactions, as the latter now leave a unique fingerprint in the measured mass spectra. Modeling of the experimental results using realistic cross sections and barriers for attachment and abstraction yield a 1:2 ratio of abstraction to attachment cross sections. The strong contribution of abstraction indicates that H2 formation on interstellar PAH cations is an order of magnitude more relevant than previously thought.

  15. Effect of Organic Cations on Hydrogen Oxidation Reaction of Carbon Supported Platinum

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Choe, Yong-Kee; Martinez, Ulises; ...

    2016-11-02

    Effect of organic cations on hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) of carbon supported platinum (Pt/C) is investigated using three 0.1 M alkaline electrolytes, tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH), tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH) and tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide (TBPOH). Rotating disk electrode experiments indicate that the HOR of Pt/C is adversely impacted by time-dependent and potential-driven chemisorption of organic cations. In-situ infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy experiments indicated that the specific chemisorption of organic cations drives the hydroxide co-adsorption on Pt surface. The co-adsorption of TMA + and hydroxide at 0.1 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode is the strongest; consequently, complete removal of the co-adsorbed layer from Ptmore » surface is difficult even after exposure the Pt surface to 1.2 V. Conversely, the chemisorption of TBP+ is the weakest, yet notable decrease of HOR current density is still observed. The adsorption energies, ΔE, for TMA +, TBA +, and TBP + on Pt (111) surface from density functional theory are computed to be -2.79, -2.42 and -2.00 eV, respectively. The relatively low adsorption energy of TBP + is explained by the steric hindrance and electronic effect. This study emphasizes the importance of cationic group on HOR activity of alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cells.« less

  16. 2D Transition-Metal-Dichalcogenide-Nanosheet-Based Composites for Photocatalytic and Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qipeng; Yu, Yifu; Ma, Qinglang; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Hua

    2016-03-09

    Hydrogen (H2) is one of the most important clean and renewable energy sources for future energy sustainability. Nowadays, photocatalytic and electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reactions (HERs) from water splitting are considered as two of the most efficient methods to convert sustainable energy to the clean energy carrier, H2. Catalysts based on transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are recognized as greatly promising substitutes for noble-metal-based catalysts for HER. The photocatalytic and electrocatalytic activities of TMD nanosheets for the HER can be further improved after hybridization with many kinds of nanomaterials, such as metals, oxides, sulfides, and carbon materials, through different methods including the in situ reduction method, the hot-injection method, the heating-up method, the hydro(solvo)thermal method, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and thermal annealing. Here, recent progress in photocatalytic and electrocatalytic HERs using 2D TMD-based composites as catalysts is discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Investigation of fusion reactions in palladium and titanium tritide using galvanostatic, coulometric, and hydrogen permeation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilinger, T. R.; Kelly, M. J.; Scully, J. R.; Christensen, T. M.; Ingersoll, D.; Knapp, J. A.; Ewing, R. I.; Casey, W. H.; Tsao, S. S.

    1990-09-01

    We describe several electrochemical methods used to investigate the possibility of cold fusion phenomena in palladium and titanium tritide cathodes. We performed long-term (up to 77 days) electrolysis experiments with electrochemical cells of the University of Utah type at current densities as high as 1 A/cm2, while monitoring neutron and tritium levels. With some cells, we pulsed the current to determine if neutron bursts would result. In another cell, we used titanium tritide as the cathode to determine if D-T reactions yielding neutrons would occur. In no instance were levels of neutrons or tritium significantly above background except in the titanium tritide cell where isotopic exchange, occcurring between the electrode and the electrolyte, resulted in significant tritium levels. We also combined x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical hydrogen permeation experiments to determine the effectiveness of various Pd surface treatment procedures on the resultant electrochemical hydrogen absorption efficiency. Electroanalytical and thermal desorption/gas analysis techniques indicated the maximum loading of H in Pd was to a ratio of H∶Pd=0.8.

  18. Augmented reality experimentation on oxygen gas generation from hydrogen peroxide and bleach reaction.

    PubMed

    Gan, Hong Seng; Tee, Nicholas Yee Kwang; Bin Mamtaz, Mohammad Raziun; Xiao, Kevin; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Liew, Oi Wah; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2018-05-01

    The appreciation and understanding of gas generation through processes is vital in biochemical education. In this work, an augmented reality tool is reported to depict the redox reaction between hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite solutions, two ubiquitous oxidizing agents, to create oxygen, a combustible gas. As it operates out of smartphones or tablets, students are able to conduct the exercise collaboratively, respond in a manner similar to an actual physical experiment, and able to depict the oxygen volume changes in relation to the volume of hydrogen peroxide of different concentrations used. The tool offers to help students acquire bench skills by limiting handing risks and to mitigate possible student anxiety on handling chemical materials and implements in the laboratory. The feedback received from Year 11 and 12 high school student participants in an outreach exercise indicate the overall effectiveness of this tool. © 2018 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 46(3):245-252, 2018. © 2018 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Facile Synthesis of Single Crystal Vanadium Disulfide Nanosheets by Chemical Vapor Deposition for Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiangtan; Wu, Jingjie; Hardy, Will J; Loya, Philip; Lou, Minhan; Yang, Yingchao; Najmaei, Sina; Jiang, Menglei; Qin, Fan; Keyshar, Kunttal; Ji, Heng; Gao, Weilu; Bao, Jiming; Kono, Junichiro; Natelson, Douglas; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun

    2015-10-07

    A facile chemical vapor deposition method to prepare single-crystalline VS2 nanosheets for the hydrogen evolution reaction is reported. The electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activities of VS2 show an extremely low overpotential of -68 mV at 10 mA cm(-2), small Tafel slopes of ≈34 mV decade(-1), as well as high stability, demonstrating its potential as a candidate non-noble-metal catalyst for the HER. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; ...

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more » From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  1. Electrodeposition of Nickel Nanoparticles for the Alkaline Hydrogen Evolution Reaction: Correlating Electrocatalytic Behavior and Chemical Composition.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shasha; Yang, Florent; Schuch, Jona; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Kaiser, Bernhard

    2018-03-09

    Ni nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of Ni, NiO, and Ni(OH) 2 were formed on Ti substrates by electrodeposition as electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline solution. Additionally, the deposition parameters including the potential range and the scan rate were varied, and the resulting NPs were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemical composition of the NPs changed upon using different conditions, and it was found that the catalytic activity increased with an increase in the amount of NiO. From these data, optimized NPs were synthesized; the best sample showed an onset potential of approximately 0 V and an overpotential of 197 mV at a cathodic current density of 10 mA cm -2 as well as a small Tafel slope of 88 mV dec -1 in 1 m KOH, values that are comparable to those of Pt foil. These NPs consist of approximately 25 % Ni and Ni(OH) 2 each, as well as approximately 50 % NiO. This implies that to obtain a successful HER electrocatalyst, active sites with differing compositions have to be close to each other to promote the different reaction steps. Long-time measurements (30 h) showed almost complete transformation of the highly active catalyst compound consisting of Ni 0 , NiO, and Ni(OH) 2 into the less active Ni(OH) 2 phase. Nevertheless, the here-employed electrodeposition of nonprecious metal/metal-oxide combination compounds represents a promising alternative to Pt-based electrocatalysts for water reduction to hydrogen. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Understanding the hydrogen transfer mechanism for the biodegradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene catalyzed by pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilin; Chen, Junxian; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Hui; Xu, Dingguo; Zhang, Chaoyang

    2018-05-03

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a highly toxic pollutant. Biodegradation is inevitably one of the most cost-effective and enviromentally friendly means of removing TNT pollution. However, the aromatic derivatives from the reduction of nitro groups by several classic enzymes are still toxic. Besides the reduction of nitro groups, pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase (PETNR) offers a potential route to ring fission and complete degradation of TNT through the pathway of the Meisenheimer complex. This work is devoted to deeply understand the essence of the Meisenheimer pathway and mainly focus on the crucial hydrogen-transfer reaction by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We obtain three valuable findings. Firstly, the parallel π-π stacking between TNT and the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor is a precondition. The key residue controlling this conformation is His181. Although His184 does not interact with TNT, the mutation from His184 to Asn184 would abolish the π-π structure. Secondly, the data of the empirical valence bond (EVB) show that the Meisenheimer pathway is predominant because its activation barrier is 6.7 kcal mol-1 far less than that of nitro reduction (26.6 kcal mol-1). Finally, based on the results of thermodynamic integration (TI), the type of transferred hydrogen is also ensured, that is, the H anion (H-) for the Meisenheimer complex and the H radical (H˙) for nitro reduction. Our findings provide an exhaustive understanding for the first hydrogen transfer reaction that has a decisive effect on two competing pathways, and help in searching for and designing new enzymes that can effectively degrade TNT.

  3. Intramolecular H-transfer reactions in Si 2H n (for n=3-5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, M. C.; Sax, A. F.; Kalcher, J.

    1993-12-01

    Intramolecular rearrangement reactions for doublet Si 2H 5 and Si 2H 3, quartet Si 2H 3, and singlet Si 2H 4 have been studied. aim of the study was to characterize a series of intramolecular H-transfer reactions in silicon hydrides with vrying degrees of saturation. The transition states belonging to the reactions presented in this work possess a monobridged Si 2H moiety. Structural features of the transition states and relative barrier heights have been examined; the geometry optimizations were performed with the use of CAS-SCF wavefunctions and the barrier height estimates were obtained with single-point CI calculations.

  4. Stepwise Hydrogen Atom and Proton Transfers in Dioxygen Reduction by Aryl-Alcohol Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Carro, Juan; Ferreira, Patricia; Martínez, Angel T; Gadda, Giovanni

    2018-03-20

    The mechanism of dioxygen reduction by the flavoenzyme aryl-alcohol oxidase was investigated with kinetic isotope, viscosity, and pL (pH/pD) effects in rapid kinetics experiments by stopped-flow spectrophotometry of the oxidative half-reaction of the enzyme. Double mixing of the enzyme in a stopped-flow spectrophotometer with [α- 2 H 2 ]- p-methoxybenzyl alcohol and oxygen at varying aging times established a slow rate constant of 0.0023 s -1 for the wash-out of the D atom from the N5 atom of the reduced flavin. Thus, the deuterated substrate could be used to probe the cleavage of the N-H bond of the reduced flavin in the oxidative half-reaction. A significant and pH-independent substrate kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 1.5 between pH 5.0 and 8.0 demonstrated that H transfer is partially limiting the oxidative half-reaction of the enzyme; a negligible solvent KIE of 1.0 between pD 5.0 and 8.0 proved a fast H + transfer reaction that does not contribute to determining the flavin oxidation rates. Thus, a mechanism for dioxygen reduction in which the H atom originating from the reduced flavin and a H + from a solvent exchangeable site are transferred in separate kinetic steps is proposed. The spectroscopic and kinetic data presented also showed a lack of stabilization of transient flavin intermediates. The substantial differences in the mechanistic details of O 2 reduction by aryl-alcohol oxidase with respect to other alcohol oxidases like choline oxidase, pyranose 2-oxidase, and glucose oxidase further demonstrate the high level of versatility of the flavin cofactor in flavoenzymes.

  5. Single-drop reactive extraction/extractive reaction with forced convective diffusion and interphase mass transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, Leonid S.; Red, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for time-dependent forced convective diffusion-reaction having convection by a recirculating flow field within the drop that is hydrodynamically coupled at the interface with a convective external flow field that at infinity becomes a uniform free-streaming flow. The concentration field inside the droplet is likewise coupled with that outside by boundary conditions at the interface. A chemical reaction can take place either inside or outside the droplet, or reactions can take place in both phases. The algorithm has been implemented, and for comparison results are shown here for the case of no reaction in either phase and for the case of an external first order reaction, both for unsteady behavior. For pure interphase mass transfer, concentration isocontours, local and average Sherwood numbers, and average droplet concentrations have been obtained as a function of the physical properties and external flow field. For mass transfer enhanced by an external reaction, in addition to the above forms of results, we present the enhancement factor, with the results now also depending upon the (dimensionless) rate of reaction.

  6. Single-drop reactive extraction/extractive reaction with forced convective diffusion and interphase mass transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, Leonid S.; Reed, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the forced convective diffusion-reaction problem for convection inside and outside a droplet by a recirculating flow field hydrodynamically coupled at the droplet interface with an external flow field that at infinity becomes a uniform streaming flow. The concentration field inside the droplet is likewise coupled with that outside by boundary conditions at the interface. A chemical reaction can take place either inside or outside the droplet or reactions can take place in both phases. The algorithm has been implemented and results are shown here for the case of no reaction and for the case of an external first order reaction, both for unsteady behavior. For pure interphase mass transfer, concentration isocontours, local and average Sherwood numbers, and average droplet concentrations have been obtained as a function of the physical properties and external flow field. For mass transfer enhanced by an external reaction, in addition to the above forms of results, we present the enhancement factor, with the results now also depending upon the (dimensionless) rate of reaction.

  7. Dechlorination of chloropicrin and 1,3-dichloropropene by hydrogen sulfide species: redox and nucleophilic substitution reactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Yates, Scott R; Papiernik, Sharon K; Guo, Mingxin; Gan, Jianying

    2006-03-22

    The chlorinated fumigants chloropicrin (trichloronitromethane) and 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) are extensively used in agricultural production for the control of soilborne pests. The reaction of these two fumigants with hydrogen sulfide species (H2S and HS-) was examined in well-defined anoxic aqueous solutions. Chloropicrin underwent an extremely rapid redox reaction in the hydrogen sulfide solution. Transformation products indicated reductive dechlorination of chloropicrin by hydrogen sulfide species to produce dichloro- and chloronitromethane. The transformation of chloropicrin in hydrogen sulfide solution significantly increased with increasing pH, indicating that H2S is less reactive toward chloropicrin than HS- is. For both 1,3-D isomers, kinetics and transformation products analysis revealed that the reaction between 1,3-D and hydrogen sulfide species is an S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution process, in which the chlorine at C3 of 1,3-D is substituted by the sulfur nucleophile to form corresponding mercaptans. The 50% disappearance time (DT50) of 1,3-D decreased with increasing hydrogen sulfide species concentration at a constant pH. Transformation of 1,3-D was more rapid at high pH, suggesting that the reactivity of hydrogen sulfide species in the experimental system stems primarily from HS-. Because of the relatively low smell threshold values and potential environmental persistence of organic sulfur products yielded by the reaction of 1,3-D and HS-, the effects of reduced sulfide species should be considered in the development of alternative fumigation practices, especially in the integrated application of sulfur-containing fertilizers.

  8. Integration of Light Trapping Silver Nanostructures in Hydrogenated Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells by Transfer Printing

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Hidenori; Sai, Hitoshi; Matsubara, Koji; Takato, Hidetaka; Kondo, Michio

    2015-01-01

    One of the potential applications of metal nanostructures is light trapping in solar cells, where unique optical properties of nanosized metals, commonly known as plasmonic effects, play an important role. Research in this field has, however, been impeded owing to the difficulty of fabricating devices containing the desired functional metal nanostructures. In order to provide a viable strategy to this issue, we herein show a transfer printing-based approach that allows the quick and low-cost integration of designed metal nanostructures with a variety of device architectures, including solar cells. Nanopillar poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps were fabricated from a commercially available nanohole plastic film as a master mold. On this nanopatterned PDMS stamps, Ag films were deposited, which were then transfer-printed onto block copolymer (binding layer)-coated hydrogenated microcrystalline Si (µc-Si:H) surface to afford ordered Ag nanodisk structures. It was confirmed that the resulting Ag nanodisk-incorporated µc-Si:H solar cells show higher performances compared to a cell without the transfer-printed Ag nanodisks, thanks to plasmonic light trapping effect derived from the Ag nanodisks. Because of the simplicity and versatility, further device application would also be feasible thorough this approach. PMID:26575244

  9. Marcus Theory: Thermodynamics CAN Control the Kinetics of Electron Transfer Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is generally true that thermodynamics do not influence kinetics, this is NOT the case for electron transfer reactions in solution. Marcus Theory explains why this is so, using straightforward physical chemical principles such as transition state theory, Arrhenius' Law, and the Franck-Condon Principle. Here the background and…

  10. Annite stability revised. 1. Hydrogen-sensor data for the reaction annite = sanidine + magnetite + H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachs, E.

    1994-08-01

    In P - T - log fO2 space, the stability of annite (ideally KFe{3/2+}(OH)2AlSi3O10) at high fO2 (low fH2) is limited by the reaction: annite = sanidine + magnetite + H2. Using the hydrogen-sensor technique, the equilibrium fH2 of this reaction was measured between 500 and 800° C at 2.8 kbar in 50° C intervals. Microbrobe analyses of the reacted annite+sanidine+magnetite mixtures show that tetrahedral positions of annite have a lower Si/Al ratio than the ideal value of 3/1. Silicon decreases from ˜2.9 per formula unit at low temperatures to ˜2.76 at high temperatures. As determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy in three experimental runs, the Fe3+ content of annite in the equilibrium assemblage is 11%±3. A least squares fit to the hydrogensensor data gives Δ H {R/0} = 50.269 ± 3.987 kJ and Δ S {R/0} = 83.01 ± 4.35 J/K for equilibrium (1). The hydrogene-sensor data are consistent with temperature half brackets determined in the classical way along the nickel-nickel oxide (NNO) and quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffers with a mixture of annite+sanidine+magnetite for control. Compared to published oxygen buffer reversals, agreement is only found at high temperature and possible reasons for that discrepancy are discussed. The resulting slope of equilibrium (1) in log fO2 - T dimensions is considerably steeper than previously determined and between 400 and 800°C only intersects with the QFM buffer curve. Based on the hydrogen-sensor data and on the thermodynamic dataset of Berman (1988, and TWEEQ data base) for sanidine, magnetite and H2, the deduced standard-state properties of annite are: H {f/0}=-5127.376±5.279 kJ and S 0=422.84±5.29 J/(mol K). From the recently published unit cell refinements of annites and their Fe3+ contents, determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy (Redhammer et al. 1993), the molar volume of pure annite was constrained as 15.568±0.030 J/bar. A revised stability field for annite is presented, calculated between 400 and 800°C.

  11. Palladium-Catalyzed Atom-Transfer Radical Cyclization at Remote Unactivated C(sp3 )-H Sites: Hydrogen-Atom Transfer of Hybrid Vinyl Palladium Radical Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Ratushnyy, Maxim; Parasram, Marvin; Wang, Yang; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2018-03-01

    A novel mild, visible-light-induced palladium-catalyzed hydrogen atom translocation/atom-transfer radical cyclization (HAT/ATRC) cascade has been developed. This protocol involves a 1,5-HAT process of previously unknown hybrid vinyl palladium radical intermediates, thus leading to iodomethyl carbo- and heterocyclic structures. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Hydrodehalogenation of alkyl iodides with base-mediated hydrogenation and catalytic transfer hydrogenation: application to the asymmetric synthesis of N-protected α-methylamines.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Pijus K; Birtwistle, J Sanderson; McMurray, John S

    2014-09-05

    We report a very mild synthesis of N-protected α-methylamines from the corresponding amino acids. Carboxyl groups of amino acids are reduced to iodomethyl groups via hydroxymethyl intermediates. Reductive deiodination to methyl groups is achieved by hydrogenation or catalytic transfer hydrogenation under alkaline conditions. Basic hydrodehalogenation is selective for the iodomethyl group over hydrogenolysis-labile protecting groups, such as benzyloxycarbonyl, benzyl ester, benzyl ether, and 9-fluorenyloxymethyl, thus allowing the conversion of virtually any protected amino acid into the corresponding N-protected α-methylamine.

  13. Hydrodehalogenation of Alkyl Iodides with Base-Mediated Hydrogenation and Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation: Application to the Asymmetric Synthesis of N-Protected α-Methylamines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a very mild synthesis of N-protected α-methylamines from the corresponding amino acids. Carboxyl groups of amino acids are reduced to iodomethyl groups via hydroxymethyl intermediates. Reductive deiodination to methyl groups is achieved by hydrogenation or catalytic transfer hydrogenation under alkaline conditions. Basic hydrodehalogenation is selective for the iodomethyl group over hydrogenolysis-labile protecting groups, such as benzyloxycarbonyl, benzyl ester, benzyl ether, and 9-fluorenyloxymethyl, thus allowing the conversion of virtually any protected amino acid into the corresponding N-protected α-methylamine. PMID:25116734

  14. Numerical modeling of heat transfer during hydrogen absorption in thin double-layered annular ZrCo beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yehui; Zeng, Xiangguo; Kou, Huaqin; Ding, Jun; Wang, Fang

    2018-06-01

    In this work a three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen absorption model was proposed to study the heat transfer behavior in thin double-layered annular ZrCo beds. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the effects of conversion layer thickness, thermal conductivity, cooling medium and its flow velocity on the efficiency of heat transfer. Results reveal that decreasing the layer thickness and improving the thermal conductivity enhance the ability of heat transfer. Compared with nitrogen and helium, water appears to be a better medium for cooling. In order to achieve the best efficiency of heat transfer, the flow velocity needs to be maximized.

  15. Fine structure in the transition region: reaction force analyses of water-assisted proton transfers.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Diana; Murray, Jane S; Santos, Juan C; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Politzer, Peter; Jaque, Pablo

    2013-07-01

    We have analyzed the variation of the reaction force F(ξ) and the reaction force constant κ(ξ) along the intrinsic reaction coordinates ξ of the water-assisted proton transfer reactions of HX-N = Y (X,Y = O,S). The profile of the force constant of the vibration associated with the reactive mode, k ξ (ξ), was also determined. We compare our results to the corresponding intramolecular proton transfers in the absence of a water molecule. The presence of water promotes the proton transfers, decreasing the energy barriers by about 12 - 15 kcal mol(-1). This is due in part to much smaller bond angle changes being needed than when water is absent. The κ(ξ) profiles along the intrinsic reaction coordinates for the water-assisted processes show striking and intriguing differences in the transition regions. For the HS-N = S and HO-N = S systems, two κ(ξ) minima are obtained, whereas for HO-N = O only one minimum is found. The k ξ (ξ) show similar behavior in the transition regions. We propose that this fine structure reflects the degree of synchronicity of the two proton migrations in each case.

  16. Production of heavy neutron-rich nuclei in transfer reactions within the dinuclear system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Long; Feng, Zhao-Qing; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2015-08-01

    The dynamics of nucleon transfer processes in heavy-ion collisions is investigated within the dinuclear system model. The production cross sections of nuclei in the reactions 136Xe+208Pb and 238U+248Cm are calculated, and the calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. The transfer cross sections for the 58Ni+208Pb reaction are calculated and compared with the experimental data. We predict the production cross sections of neutron-rich nuclei 165-168 Eu, 169-173 Tb, 173-178 Ho, and 181-185Yb based on the reaction 176Yb+238U. It can be seen that the production cross sections of the neutron-rich nuclei 165Eu, 169Tb, 173Ho, and 181Yb are 2.84 μb, 6.90 μb, 46.24 μb, and 53.61 μb, respectively, which could be synthesized in experiment.

  17. Elastic, inelastic, and 1 n transfer cross sections for the 10B+120Sn reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasques, L. R.; Freitas, A. S.; Chamon, L. C.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Medina, N. H.; Scarduelli, V.; Rossi, E. S.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Zagatto, V. A. B.; Lubian, J.; Nobre, G. P. A.; Padron, I.; Carlson, B. V.

    2018-03-01

    The 10B+120Sn reaction has been investigated at ELab=37.5 MeV. The cross sections for different channels, such as the elastic scattering, the excitation of the 2+ and 3-120Sn states, the excitation of the 1+ state of 10B, and the 1 n pick-up transfer, have been measured. One-step distorted-wave Born approximation and coupled-reaction-channels calculations have been performed in the context of the double-folding São Paulo potential. The effect of coupling the inelastic and transfer states on the angular distributions is discussed in the paper. In general, the theoretical calculations within the coupled-reaction-channels formalism yield a satisfactory agreement with the corresponding experimental angular distributions.

  18. Elastic, inelastic, and 1 n transfer cross sections for the B 10 + Sn 120 reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Gasques, L. R.; Freitas, A. S.; Chamon, L. C.; ...

    2018-03-30

    The 10B+ 120Sn reaction has been investigated at E Lab=37.5 MeV. The cross sections for different channels, such as the elastic scattering, the excitation of the 2 + and 3 -120Sn states, the excitation of the 1 + state of 10B, and the 1n pick-up transfer, have been measured. One-step distorted-wave Born approximation and coupled-reaction-channels calculations have been performed in the context of the double-folding São Paulo potential. Here, the effect of coupling the inelastic and transfer states on the angular distributions is discussed in the paper. In general, the theoretical calculations within the coupled-reaction-channels formalism yield a satisfactory agreementmore » with the corresponding experimental angular distributions.« less

  19. A spectroscopist's view of energy states, energy transfers, and chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Moore, C Bradley

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes a research career beginning at Berkeley in 1960, shortly after Sputnik and the invention of the laser. Following thesis work on vibrational spectroscopy and the chemical reactivity of small molecules, we studied vibrational energy transfers in my own lab. Collision-induced transfers among vibrations of a single molecule, from one molecule to another, and from vibration to rotation and translation were elucidated. My research group also studied the competition between vibrational relaxation and chemical reaction for potentially reactive collisions with one molecule vibrationally excited. Lasers were used to enrich isotopes by the excitation of a predissociative transition of a selected isotopomer. We also tested the hypotheses of transition-state theory for unimolecular reactions of ketene, formaldehyde, and formyl fluoride by (a) resolving individual molecular eigenstates above a dissociation threshold, (b) locating vibrational levels at the transition state, (c) observing quantum resonances in the barrier region for motion along a reaction coordinate, and (d) studying energy release to fragments.

  20. Elastic, inelastic, and 1 n transfer cross sections for the B 10 + Sn 120 reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gasques, L. R.; Freitas, A. S.; Chamon, L. C.

    The 10B+ 120Sn reaction has been investigated at E Lab=37.5 MeV. The cross sections for different channels, such as the elastic scattering, the excitation of the 2 + and 3 -120Sn states, the excitation of the 1 + state of 10B, and the 1n pick-up transfer, have been measured. One-step distorted-wave Born approximation and coupled-reaction-channels calculations have been performed in the context of the double-folding São Paulo potential. Here, the effect of coupling the inelastic and transfer states on the angular distributions is discussed in the paper. In general, the theoretical calculations within the coupled-reaction-channels formalism yield a satisfactory agreementmore » with the corresponding experimental angular distributions.« less

  1. Associative desorption of hydrogen isotopologues from copper surfaces: Characterization of two reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Sven; Shuai, Quan; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Schwarzer, Dirk; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2018-05-01

    We report quantum-state resolved measurements of angular and velocity distributions of the associative desorption of H2, HD, and D2 from Cu(111) and Cu(211) surfaces. The desorbing molecules have bimodal velocity distributions comprising a "fast" channel and a "slow" channel on both facets. The "fast channel" is promoted by both hydrogen incidence translational and vibrational energy, while the "slow channel" is promoted by vibrational energy but inhibited by translational energy. Using detailed balance, we determine state-specific reaction probabilities for dissociative adsorption and compare these to theoretical calculations. The results for the activation barrier for the "fast channel" on Cu(111) are in agreement with theory within "chemical accuracy" (1 kcal/mole). Results on the Cu(211) facet provide direct information on the effect of increasing step density, which is commonly believed to increase reactivity. Differences in reactivity on the (111) and (211) facets are subtle - quantum state specific reactivity on the (211) surface is characterized by a broader distribution of barrier heights whose average values are higher than for reaction on (111). We fully characterize the "slow channel," which has not been found in theoretical calculations although it makes up a large fraction of the reactivity in these experiments.

  2. Cobalt Phosphide Hollow Polyhedron as Efficient Bifunctional Electrocatalysts for the Evolution Reaction of Hydrogen and Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengjia; Li, Jinghong

    2016-01-27

    The development of efficient and low-cost hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) electrocatalysts for renewable-energy conversion techniques is highly desired. A kind of hollow polyhedral cobalt phosphide (CoP hollow polyhedron) is developed as efficient bifunctional electrocatalysts for HER and OER templated by Co-centered metal-organic frameworks. The as-prepared CoP hollow polyhedron, which have large specific surface area and high porosity providing rich catalytic active sites, show excellent electrocatalytic performances for both HER and OER in acidic and alkaline media, respectively, with onset overpotentials of 35 and 300 mV, Tafel slopes of 59 and 57 mV dec(-1), and a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at overpotentials of 159 and 400 mV for HER and OER, respectively, which are remarkably superior to those of particulate CoP (CoP particles) and comparable to those of commercial noble-metal catalysts. In addition, the CoP hollow polyhedron also show good durability after long-term operations.

  3. Hydrogen-deuterium substitution in solid ethanol by surface reactions at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Osaka, Kazuya; Chigai, Takeshi; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Ethanol (CH3CH2OH) is one of the most abundant complex organic molecules in star-forming regions. Despite its detection in the gas phase only, ethanol is believed to be formed by low-temperature grain-surface reactions. Methanol, the simplest alcohol, has been a target for observational, experimental, and theoretical studies in view of its deuterium enrichment in the interstellar medium; however, the deuterium chemistry of ethanol has not yet been an area of focus. Recently, deuterated dimethyl ether, a structural isomer of ethanol, was found in star-forming regions, indicating that deuterated ethanol can also be present in those environments. In this study, we performed laboratory experiments on the deuterium fractionation of solid ethanol at low temperatures through a reaction with deuterium (D) atoms at 10 K. Hydrogen (H)-D substitution, which increases the deuteration level, was found to occur on the ethyl group but not on the hydroxyl group. In addition, when deuterated ethanol (e.g. CD3CD2OD) solid was exposed to H atoms at 10 K, D-H substitution that reduced the deuteration level occurred on the ethyl group. Based on the results, it is likely that deuterated ethanol is present even under H-atom-dominant conditions in the interstellar medium.

  4. Hydrogenation Reactions on Au/TiC(001): Effects of Au-C Interactions on the Dissociation of H-2

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Florez, E.; Gomez, T.

    2010-10-01

    Density functional calculations carried out for realistic models evidence that Au particles supported on TiC(001) are very active towards H2 dissociation. The molecular mechanisms show that the support is not a mere spectator but plays a major role in the catalyzed reaction and acts as a reservoir of atomic H, making this system an excellent candidate as a catalyst for the hydrogenation of olefins and hydrodesulfurization reactions.

  5. Compact hydrogenator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, P. G. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of a hydrogenating apparatus are described. The device consists of a reaction chamber which is selectively permeable to atomic hydrogen and catalytically active to a hydrogenating reaction. In one device, hydrogen is pumped out of the reaction chamber while the reactant remains inside to remove molecular hydrogen so that more atomic hydrogen can pass through the walls. In another device, the reactant is pumped through the reaction chamber, and the hydrogen is removed from the material leaving the chamber. The reactant is then cycled through the chamber.

  6. Generation of Hydrogen and Methane during Experimental Low-Temperature Reaction of Ultramafic Rocks with Water.

    PubMed

    McCollom, Thomas M; Donaldson, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks is widely recognized as a source of molecular hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) to support microbial activity, but the extent and rates of formation of these compounds in low-temperature, near-surface environments are poorly understood. Laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature reaction of water with ultramafic rocks and minerals. Experiments were performed by heating olivine or harzburgite with aqueous solutions at 90°C for up to 213 days in glass bottles sealed with butyl rubber stoppers. Although H2 and CH4 increased steadily throughout the experiments, the levels were very similar to those found in mineral-free controls, indicating that the rubber stoppers were the predominant source of these compounds. Levels of H2 above background were observed only during the first few days of reaction of harzburgite when CO2 was added to the headspace, with no detectable production of H2 or CH4 above background during further heating of the harzburgite or in experiments with other mineral reactants. Consequently, our results indicate that production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature alteration of ultramafic rocks may be much more limited than some recent experimental studies have suggested. We also found no evidence to support a recent report suggesting that spinels in ultramafic rocks may stimulate H2 production. While secondary silicates were observed to precipitate during the experiments, formation of these deposits was dominated by Si released by dissolution of the glass bottles, and reaction of the primary silicate minerals appeared to be very limited. While use of glass bottles and rubber stoppers has become commonplace in experiments intended to study processes that occur during serpentinization of ultramafic rocks at low temperatures, the high levels of H2, CH4, and SiO2 released during heating indicate that these reactor materials are unsuitable for this purpose

  7. High Precision Time Transfer in Space with a Hydrogen Maser on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1996-01-01

    An atomic hydrogen maser clock system designed for long term operation in space will be installed on the Russian space station Mir, in late 1997. The H-maser's frequency stability will be measured using pulsed laser time transfer techniques. Daily time comparisons made with a precision of better than 100 picoseconds will allow an assessment of the long term stability of the space maser at a level on the order of 1 part in 10(sup 15) or better. Laser pulse arrival times at the spacecraft will be recorded with a resolution of 10 picoseconds relative to the space clock's time scale. Cube corner reflectors will reflect the pulses back to the Earth laser station to determine the propagation delay and enable comparison with the Earth-based time scale. Data for relativistic and gravitational frequency corrections will be obtained from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver.

  8. Study of Thermodynamic Vent and Screen Baffle Integration for Orbital Storage and Transfer of Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical and experimental program was performed to determine the feasibility of integrating an internal thermodynamic vent system and a full wall-screen liner for the orbital storage and transfer of liquid hydrogen (LH2). Ten screens were selected from a comprehensive screen survey. The experimental study determined the screen bubble point, flow-through pressure loss, and pressure loss along rectangular channels lined with screen on one side, for the 10 screens using LH2 saturated at 34.5 N/cm2 (50 psia). The correlated experimental data were used in an analysis to determine the optimum system characteristics in terms of minimum weight for 6 tanks ranging from 141.6 m3 (5,000 ft3) to 1.416 m3 (50 ft3) for orbital storage times of 30 and 300 days.

  9. Low-energy charge transfer for collisions of Si3+ with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhns, H.; Kreckel, H.; Savin, D. W.; Seely, D. G.; Havener, C. C.

    2008-06-01

    Cross sections of charge transfer for Si3+ ions with atomic hydrogen at collision energies of ≈40-2500eV/u were carried out using a merged-beam technique at the Multicharged Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The data span an energy range in which both molecular orbital close coupling (MOCC) and classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) calculations are available. The influence of quantum mechanical effects of the ionic core as predicted by MOCC is clearly seen in our results. However, discrepancies between our experiment and MOCC results toward higher collision energies are observed. At energies above 1000 eV/u good agreement is found with CTMC results.

  10. Hydrogen bonding effects on the reorganization energy for photoinduced charge separation reaction between porphyrin and quinone studied by nanosecond laser flash photolysis.

    PubMed

    Yago, Tomoaki; Gohdo, Masao; Wakasa, Masanobu

    2010-02-25

    Alcohol concentration dependences of photoinduced charge separation (CS) reaction of zinc tetraphenyl-porphyrin (ZnTPP) and duroquinone (DQ) were investigated in benzonitrile by a nanosecond laser flash photolysis technique. The photoinduced CS reaction was accelerated by the addition of alcohols, whereas the addition of acetonitrile caused little effect on the CS reactions. The simple theory was developed to calculate an increase in reorganization energies induced by the hydrogen bonding interactions between DQ and alcohols using the chemical equilibrium constants for the hydrogen bonding complexes through the concerted pathway and the stepwise one. The experimental results were analyzed by using the Marcus equation where we took into account the hydrogen bonding effects on the reorganization energy and the reaction free energy for the CS reaction. The observed alcohol concentration dependence of the CS reaction rates was well explained by the formation of the hydrogen bonding complexes through the concerted pathway, demonstrating the increase in the reorganization energy by the hydrogen bonding interactions.

  11. Structural integrity of callosal midbody influences intermanual transfer in a motor reaction-time task.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Laura; Tacchino, Andrea; Roccatagliata, Luca; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Bove, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Training one hand on a motor task results in performance improvements in the other hand, also when stimuli are randomly presented (nonspecific transfer). Corpus callosum (CC) is the main structure involved in interhemispheric information transfer; CC pathology occurs in patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and is related to altered performance of tasks requiring interhemispheric transfer of sensorimotor information. To investigate the role of CC in nonspecific transfer during a pure motor reaction-time task, we combined motor behavior with diffusion tensor imaging analysis in PwMS. Twenty-two PwMS and 10 controls, all right-handed, were asked to respond to random stimuli with appropriate finger opposition movements with the right (learning) and then the left (transfer) hand. PwMS were able to improve motor performance reducing response times with practice with a trend similar to controls and preserved the ability to transfer the acquired motor information from the learning to the transfer hand. A higher variability in the transfer process, indicated by a significantly larger standard deviation of mean nonspecific transfer, was found in the PwMS group with respect to the control group, suggesting the presence of subtle impairments in interhemispheric communication in some patients. Then, we correlated the amount of nonspecific transfer with mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values, indicative of microstructural damage, obtained in five CC subregions identified on PwMS's FA maps. A significant correlation was found only in the subregion including posterior midbody (Pearson's r = 0.74, P = 0.003), which thus seems to be essential for the interhemispheric transfer of information related to pure sensorimotor tasks. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Effects of mass transfer and hydrogen pressure on the fixed-bed pyrolysis of sunflower bagasse

    SciTech Connect

    Putun, E.; Kockar, O.M.; Gercel, F.

    1994-12-31

    There are a number of waste and biomass sources being considered as potential sources of fuels and chemical feedstocks. The economics for biomass pyrolysis are generally considered to be most favourable for (1) plants which grow abundantly and require little cultivation in and lands and (2) wastes available in relatively large quantities from agricultural plants, for example, sunflower and hazel nuts. For the former, one such group of plants is Euphorbiaceae which are characterised by their ability to produce a milky latex, an emulsion of about 30% w/w terpenoids in water. One species in the family, Euphorbia Rigida from Southwesternmore » Anatolia, Turkey is cultivated in close proximity to the sunflower growing regions and their oil extraction plants. The Turkish sunflower oil industry generates 800,000 tons of extraction residue (bagasse) per annum. Thus, both sunflower wastes and latex-producing plants are being considered as feedstocks for a future thermochemical demonstration unit in Turkey. Pyrolysis at relatively high hydrogen pressures (hydropyrolysis) has not been widely investigated for biomass. A potential advantage of hydropyrolysis is the ability to upgrade tar vapours over hydroprocessing catalysts. Fixed-bed pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis experiments have been conducted on sunflower bagasse to assess the effects of mass transfer and hydrogen pressure on oil yield and quality.« less

  13. Evaluation of industrially applied heat-transfer fluids as liquid organic hydrogen carrier systems.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Nicole; Obesser, Katharina; Bösmann, Andreas; Teichmann, Daniel; Arlt, Wolfgang; Dungs, Jennifer; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) systems offer a very attractive method for the decentralized storage of renewable excess energy. In this contribution, industrially well-established heat-transfer oils (typically sold under trade names, e.g., Marlotherm) are proposed as a new class of LOHC systems. It is demonstrated that the liquid mixture of isomeric dibenzyltoluenes (m.p. -39 to -34 °C, b.p. 390 °C) can be readily hydrogenated to the corresponding mixture of perhydrogenated analogues by binding 6.2 wt% of H2. The liquid H2 -rich form can be stored and transported similarly to diesel fuel. It readily undergoes catalytic dehydrogenation at temperatures above 260 °C, which proves its applicability as a reversible H2 carrier. The presented LOHC systems are further characterized by their excellent technical availability at comparably low prices, full registration of the H2 -lean forms, and excellent thermal stabilities. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Hydrogen bonded charge transfer molecular salt (4-chloro anilinium-3-nitrophthalate) for photophysical and pharmacological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelan, K.; Chandramohan, A.; Saravanabhavan, M.; Muthu Vijayan Enoch, I. V.; Suganthi, V. S.

    2017-09-01

    Radical scavenging activity against DPPH radical and binding properties of a hydrogen bonded charge transfer molecular salt 4-chloro anilinium-3-nitrophthalate(CANP) with calf thymus DNA has been studied by electronic absorption and emission spectroscopy. The molecular structure and crystallinity of the CANP salt have been established by carried out powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis which indicated that cation and anion are linked through strong N+sbnd H…O- type of hydrogen bond. FTIR spectroscopic study was carried out to know the various functional groups present in the crystal. 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded to further confirm the molecular structure of the salt crystal. The thermal stability of the title salt was established by TG/DTA analyses simultaneously on the powdered sample of the title crystal. Further, the CANP salt was examined against various bacteria and fungi strains which showed a remarkable antimicrobial activity compared to that of the standards Ciproflaxin and Clotrimazole. The results showed that the CANP salt could interact with CT-DNA through intercalation. Antioxidant studies of the substrates alone and synthesized CANP salt showed that the latter has been better radical scavenging activity than that of the former against DPPH radical. The third order nonlinear susceptibility of the CANP salt was established by the Z-scan study.

  15. Tunneling in hydrogen-transfer isomerization of n-alkyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Sirjean, Baptiste; Dames, Enoch; Wang, Hai; Tsang, Wing

    2012-01-12

    The role of quantum tunneling in hydrogen shift in linear heptyl radicals is explored using multidimensional, small-curvature tunneling method for the transmission coefficients and a potential energy surface computed at the CBS-QB3 level of theory. Several one-dimensional approximations (Wigner, Skodje and Truhlar, and Eckart methods) were compared to the multidimensional results. The Eckart method was found to be sufficiently accurate in comparison to the small-curvature tunneling results for a wide range of temperature, but this agreement is in fact fortuitous and caused by error cancellations. High-pressure limit rate constants were calculated using the transition state theory with treatment of hindered rotations and Eckart transmission coefficients for all hydrogen-transfer isomerizations in n-pentyl to n-octyl radicals. Rate constants are found in good agreement with experimental kinetic data available for n-pentyl and n-hexyl radicals. In the case of n-heptyl and n-octyl, our calculated rates agree well with limited experimentally derived data. Several conclusions made in the experimental studies of Tsang et al. (Tsang, W.; McGivern, W. S.; Manion, J. A. Proc. Combust. Inst. 2009, 32, 131-138) are confirmed theoretically: older low-temperature experimental data, characterized by small pre-exponential factors and activation energies, can be reconciled with high-temperature data by taking into account tunneling; at low temperatures, transmission coefficients are substantially larger for H-atom transfers through a five-membered ring transition state than those with six-membered rings; channels with transition ring structures involving greater than 8 atoms can be neglected because of entropic effects that inhibit such transitions. The set of computational kinetic rates were used to derive a general rate rule that explicitly accounts for tunneling. The rate rule is shown to reproduce closely the theoretical rate constants.

  16. Doing the Limbo with a Low Barrier: Hydrogen Bonding and Proton Transfer in Hydroxyformylfulvene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vealey, Zachary; Nemchick, Deacon; Vaccaro, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Model compounds continue to play crucial roles for elucidating the ubiquitous phenomena of hydrogen bonding and proton transfer, often yielding invaluable insights into kindred processes taking place in substantially larger species. The symmetric double-minimum topography that characterizes the potential-energy landscape for an important subset of these systems allows unambiguous signatures of molecular dynamics (in the form of tunneling-induced bifurcations) to be extracted directly from spectral measurements. As a relatively unexplored member of this class, 6-hydroxy-2-formylfulvene (HFF) contains an intramolecular O-H···O interaction that has participating atoms from the hydroxylic (donor) and ketonic (acceptor) moieties closely spaced in a quasi-linear configuration. This unusual arrangement suggests proton transduction to occur with minimal encumbrance, possibly leading to a pronounced dislocation of the shuttling hydron commensurate with the concepts of low-barrier hydrogen bonding (which are distinguished by great strength, short distance, and vanishingly small potential barriers). A variety of spectroscopic probes built primarily upon the techniques of laser-induced fluorescence and dispersed fluorescence have been enlisted to acquire the first vibronically resolved information reported for the ground [tilde{X}1A1] and lowest-lying singlet excited [tilde{A}1B{2} (π*π)] electronic manifolds of HFF entrained in a cold supersonic free-jet expansion. These experimental findings will be discussed and compared to those obtained for related proton-transfer systems, with complimentary quantum-chemical calculations serving to unravel the unique bonding motifs and reactive pathways inherent to HFF.

  17. Reaction Dynamics of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer from Reduced ZnO Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Braten, Miles N; Gamelin, Daniel R; Mayer, James M

    2015-10-27

    The creation of systems that efficiently interconvert chemical and electrical energies will be aided by understanding proton-coupled electron transfers at solution-semiconductor interfaces. Steps in developing that understanding are described here through kinetic studies of reactions of photoreduced colloidal zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals (NCs) with the nitroxyl radical TEMPO. These reactions proceed by proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) to give the hydroxylamine TEMPOH. They occur on the submillisecond to seconds time scale, as monitored by stopped-flow optical spectroscopy. Under conditions of excess TEMPO, the reactions are multiexponential in character. One of the contributors to this multiexponential kinetics may be a distribution of reactive proton sites. A graphical overlay method shows the reaction to be first order in [TEMPO]. Different electron concentrations in otherwise identical NC samples were achieved by three different methods: differing photolysis times, premixing with an unphotolyzed sample, or prereaction with TEMPO. The reaction velocities were consistently higher for NCs with higher numbers of electrons. For instance, NCs with an average of 2.6 e(-)/NC reacted faster than otherwise identical samples containing ≤1 e(-)/NC. Surprisingly, NC samples with the same average number of electrons but prepared in different ways often had different reaction profiles. These results show that properties beyond electron content determine PCET reactivity of the particles.

  18. Generation of Hydrogen and Methane during Experimental Low-Temperature Reaction of Ultramafic Rocks with Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Donaldson, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks is widely recognized as a source of molecular hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) to support microbial activity, but the extent and rates of formation of these compounds in low-temperature, near-surface environments are poorly understood. Laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature reaction of water with ultramafic rocks and minerals. Experiments were performed by heating olivine or harzburgite with aqueous solutions at 90°C for up to 213 days in glass bottles sealed with butyl rubber stoppers. Although H2 and CH4 increased steadily throughout the experiments, the levels were very similar to those found in mineral-free controls, indicating that the rubber stoppers were the predominant source of these compounds. Levels of H2 above background were observed only during the first few days of reaction of harzburgite when CO2 was added to the headspace, with no detectable production of H2 or CH4 above background during further heating of the harzburgite or in experiments with other mineral reactants. Consequently, our results indicate that production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature alteration of ultramafic rocks may be much more limited than some recent experimental studies have suggested. We also found no evidence to support a recent report suggesting that spinels in ultramafic rocks may stimulate H2 production. While secondary silicates were observed to precipitate during the experiments, formation of these deposits was dominated by Si released by dissolution of the glass bottles, and reaction of the primary silicate minerals appeared to be very limited. While use of glass bottles and rubber stoppers has become commonplace in experiments intended to study processes that occur during serpentinization of ultramafic rocks at low temperatures, the high levels of H2, CH4, and SiO2 released during heating indicate that these reactor materials are unsuitable for this purpose.

  19. Hydrogen concentrations as an indicator of the predominant terminal electron-accepting reactions in aquatic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Goodwin, S.

    1988-01-01

    Factors controlling the concentration of dissolved hydrogen gas in anaerobic sedimentary environments were investigated. Results, presented here or previously, demonstrated that, in sediments, only microorganisms catalyze the oxidation of H2 coupled to the reduction of nitrate, Mn(IV), Fe(III), sulfate, or carbon dioxide. Theoretical considerations suggested that, at steady-state conditions, H2 concentrations are primarily dependent upon the physiological characteristics of the microorganism(s) consuming the H2 and that organisms catalyzing H2 oxidation, with the reduction of a more electrochemically positive electron acceptor, can maintain lower H2 concentrations than organisms using electron acceptors which yield less energy from H2 oxidation. The H2 concentrations associated with the specified predominant terminal electron-accepting reactions in bottom sediments of a variety of surface water environments were: methanogenesis, 7-10 nM; sulfate reduction, 1-1.5 nM; Fe(III) reduction, 0.2 nM; Mn(IV) or nitrate reduction, less than 0.05 nM. Sediments with the same terminal electron acceptor for organic matter oxidation had comparable H2 concentrations, despite variations in the rate of organic matter decomposition, pH, and salinity. Thus, each terminal electron-accepting reaction had a unique range of steady-state H2 concentrations associated with it. Preliminary studies in a coastal plain aquifer indicated that H2 concentrations also vary in response to changes in the predominant terminal electron-accepting process in deep subsurface environments. These studies suggest that H2 measurements may aid in determining which terminal electron-accepting reactions are taking place in surface and subsurface sedimentary environments. ?? 1988.

  20. Stereochemistry of 1,2-elimination and proton-transfer reactions: toward a unified understanding.

    PubMed

    Mohrig, Jerry R

    2013-07-16

    Many mechanistic and stereochemical studies have focused on the breaking of the C-H bond through base-catalyzed elimination reactions. When we began our research, however, chemists knew almost nothing about the stereospecificity of addition-elimination reactions involving conjugated acyclic carbonyl compounds, even though the carbonyl group is a pivotal functional group in organic chemistry. Over the last 25 years, we have studied the addition-elimination reactions of β-substituted acyclic esters, thioesters, and ketones in order to reach a comprehensive understanding of how electronic effects influence their stereochemistry. This Account brings together our understanding of the stereochemistry of 1,2-elimination and proton-transfer reactions, describing how each study has built upon previous work and contributed to our understanding of this field. When we began, chemists thought that anti stereospecificity in base-catalyzed 1,2-elimination reactions occurred via concerted E2 mechanisms, which provide a smooth path for anti elimination. Unexpectedly, we discovered that some E1cBirrev reactions produce the same anti stereospecificity as E2 reactions even though they proceed through diffusionally equilibrated, "free" enolate-anion intermediates. This result calls into question the conventional wisdom that anti stereochemistry must result from a concerted mechanism. While carrying out our research, we developed insights ranging from the role of historical contingency in the evolution of hydratase-dehydratase enzymes to the influence of buffers on the stereochemistry of H/D exchange in D2O. Negative hyperconjugation is the most important concept for understanding our results. This idea provides a unifying view for the largely anti stereochemistry in E1cBirrev elimination reactions and a basis for understanding the stereoelectronic influence of electron-withdrawing β-substituents on proton-transfer reactions.

  1. Reaction pathway in vapour phase hydrogenation of maleic anhydride and its esters to {gamma}-butyrolactone

    SciTech Connect

    Messori, M.; Vaccari, A.

    1994-11-01

    The catalytic reactivity of maleic anhydride (MA), succinic anhydride (SA) and their dimethyl esters (dimethyl maleate and dimethyl succinate) in the vapour phase hydrogenation to {gamma}-butyrolacetone (GBL) was investigated. In order to obtain general data, both a multicomponent catalyst (CAT 1: Cu/Zn/Mg/Cr = 40:5:5:50, atomic ratio %), obtained by reduction of a nonstoichiometric spinel-type precursor, and a commercial catalyst (CAT 2: Cu/Mn/Ba/Cr = 44:8:1:47, atomic ratio %) were used. The MA/GBL solution exhibited the highest GBL production, while the SA/GBL solution was converted only partially due to a competitive adsorption of GBL on the active sites, as evidenced by themore » similar reactivities observed with pure anhydrides. The best carbon balances were observed with the esters, probably the result of lowest light hydrocarbon synthesis and tar formation. With all the feedstocks, the activity of CAT 2 is higher than that of CAT 1, which, however, gives the best yield in GBL due its lower activity in the overhydrogenation and hydrogenolysis reaction. It was found that n-butanol (BuOH) and butyric acid (BuA) derived mainly from GBL. On this basis, the reactivities of the main products observed were investigated separately, confirming the stability of tetrahydrofuran (THF), which reacted only at high temperature with low conversions to ethanol. On the other hand, GBL gave rise to overhydrogenation and/or hydrogenolysis, with high conversion (mainly with CAT 2), confirming its key role in both reactions. Furthermore, the formation in the catalytic tests with BuA and BuOH of n-butanal, notwithstanding the high H{sub 2}/organic ratio, implies that it is the main intermediate in the hydrogenolysis reactions. A new reaction scheme is proposed, pointing out the key role of GBL as the {open_quotes}intersection{close_quotes} of two possible reaction pathways, giving rise to THF or overhydrogenation and hydrogenolysis products, respectively. 44 refs., 4 figs., 6

  2. The influence of reaction time on hydrogen sulphide removal from air by means of Fe(III)-EDTA/Fiban catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasag, H.; Cel, W.; Chomczynska, M.; Kujawska, J.

    2018-05-01

    The paper deals with a new method of hydrogen sulphide removal from air by its filtration and selective catalytic oxidation with the use of fibrous carriers of Fe(III)-EDTA complex. The basis of these filtering materials includes fibrous ion exchangers with the complex immobilized on their functional groups. It has been established that the degree of catalytic hydrogen sulphide decomposition depends on the reaction time. Thus, the required degree of hydrogen sulphide removal from air could be easily controlled by applying appropriate thickness of the filtering layer under a given filtering velocity. It allows applying very thin filtering layers of the Fe(III)-EDTA/Fiban AK-22 or Fiban A-6 catalysts. The obtained results of the research confirm the applicability of these materials for deep air purification from hydrogen sulphide.

  3. Electron-stimulated reactions in layered CO/H2O films: Hydrogen atom diffusion and the sequential hydrogenation of CO to methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Petrik, Nikolay G.; Monckton, Rhiannon J.; Koehler, Sven

    Low-energy (100 eV) electron-stimulated reactions in layered H2O/CO/H2O ices are investigated. For CO trapped within approximately 50 ML of the vacuum interface in the amorphous solid water (ASW) films, both oxidation and reduction reactions are observed. However for CO buried more deeply in the film, only the reduction of CO to methanol is observed. Experiments with layered films of H2O and D2O show that the hydrogen atoms participating in the reduction of the buried CO originate in region from ~10 – 40 ML below the surface of the ASW films and subsequently diffuse through the film. For deeply buried COmore » layers, the CO reduction reactions quickly increase with temperature above ~60 K. We present a simple chemical kinetic model that treats the diffusion of hydrogen atoms in the ASW and sequential hydrogenation of the CO to methanol that accounts for the observations.« less

  4. Coupled sensitizer-catalyst dyads: electron-transfer reactions in a perylene-polyoxometalate conjugate.

    PubMed

    Odobel, Fabrice; Séverac, Marjorie; Pellegrin, Yann; Blart, Errol; Fosse, Céline; Cannizzo, Caroline; Mayer, Cédric R; Elliott, Kristopher J; Harriman, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast discharge of a single-electron capacitor: A variety of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions are apparent for polyoxometalates functionalized with covalently attached perylene monoimide chromophores, but these are restricted to single-electron events. (et=electron transfer, cr=charge recombination, csr=charge-shift reaction, PER=perylene, POM=polyoxometalate).A new strategy is introduced that permits covalent attachment of an organic chromophore to a polyoxometalate (POM) cluster. Two examples are reported that differ according to the nature of the anchoring group and the flexibility of the linker. Both POMs are functionalized with perylene monoimide units, which function as photon collectors and form a relatively long-lived charge-transfer state under illumination. They are reduced to a stable pi-radical anion by electrolysis or to a protonated dianion under photolysis in the presence of aqueous triethanolamine. The presence of the POM opens up an intramolecular electron-transfer route by which the charge-transfer state reduces the POM. The rate of this process depends on the molecular conformation and appears to involve through-space interactions. Prior reduction of the POM leads to efficient fluorescence quenching, again due to intramolecular electron transfer. In most cases, it is difficult to resolve the electron-transfer products because of relatively fast reverse charge shift that occurs within a closed conformer. Although the POM can store multiple electrons, it has not proved possible to use these systems as molecular-scale capacitors because of efficient electron transfer from the one-electron-reduced POM to the excited singlet state of the perylene monoimide.

  5. Correcting reaction rates measured by saturation-transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabr, Refaat E.; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2008-04-01

    Off-resonance or spillover irradiation and incomplete saturation can introduce significant errors in the estimates of chemical rate constants measured by saturation-transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Existing methods of correction are effective only over a limited parameter range. Here, a general approach of numerically solving the Bloch-McConnell equations to calculate exchange rates, relaxation times and concentrations for the saturation-transfer experiment is investigated, but found to require more measurements and higher signal-to-noise ratios than in vivo studies can practically afford. As an alternative, correction formulae for the reaction rate are provided which account for the expected parameter ranges and limited measurements available in vivo. The correction term is a quadratic function of experimental measurements. In computer simulations, the new formulae showed negligible bias and reduced the maximum error in the rate constants by about 3-fold compared to traditional formulae, and the error scatter by about 4-fold, over a wide range of parameters for conventional saturation transfer employing progressive saturation, and for the four-angle saturation-transfer method applied to the creatine kinase (CK) reaction in the human heart at 1.5 T. In normal in vivo spectra affected by spillover, the correction increases the mean calculated forward CK reaction rate by 6-16% over traditional and prior correction formulae.

  6. Mass Transfer from Gas Bubbles to Impinging Flow of Biological Fluids with Chemical Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Jei; Echigo, R.; Wotton, D. R.; Ou, J. W.; Hwang, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The rates of mass transfer from a gas bubble to an impinging flow of a biological fluid such as whole blood and plasma are investigated analytically and experimentally. Gases commonly found dissolved in body fluids are included. Consideration is given to the effects of the chemical reaction between the dissolved gas and the liquid on the rate of mass transfer. Through the application of boundary layer theory the over-all transfer is found to be Sh/(Re)1/2 = 0.845 Sc1/3 in the absence of chemical reaction, and Sh/(Re) 1/2 = F′ (0) in the presence of chemical reaction, where Sh, Re, and Sc are the Sherwood, Reynolds, and Schmidt numbers, respectively, and F′ (0) is a function of Sc and the dimensionless reaction rate constant. Analytical results are also obtained for the bubble lifetime and the bubble radius-time history. These results, which are not incompatible with experimental results, can be applied to predict the dissolution of the entrapped gas emboli in the circulatory system of the human body. PMID:4642218

  7. Composite Ni/NiO-Cr2O3 Catalyst for Alkaline Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Michael K.; Jia, Qingying; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Allen, Robert J.; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    We report a Ni–Cr/C electrocatalyst with unprecedented mass-activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline electrolyte. The HER kinetics of numerous binary and ternary Ni-alloys and composite Ni/metal-oxide/C samples were evaluated in aqueous 0.1 M KOH electrolyte. The highest HER mass-activity was observed for Ni–Cr materials which exhibit metallic Ni as well as NiOx and Cr2O3 phases as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis. The onset of the HER is significantly improved compared to numerous binary and ternary Ni-alloys, including Ni–Mo materials. It is likely that at adjacent Ni/NiOx sites, the oxide acts as a sink for OHads, while the metallic Ni acts as a sink for the Hads intermediate of the HER, thus minimizing the high activation energy of hydrogen evolution via water reduction. This is confirmed by in situ XAS studies that show that the synergistic HER enhancement is due to NiOx content and that the Cr2O3 appears to stabilize the composite NiOx component under HER conditions (where NiOx would typically be reduced to metallic Ni0). Furthermore, in contrast to Pt, the Ni(Ox)/Cr2O3 catalyst appears resistant to poisoning by the anion exchange ionomer (AEI), a serious consideration when applied to an anionic polymer electrolyte interface. Furthermore, we report a detailed model of the double layer interface which helps explain the observed ensemble effect in the presence of AEI. PMID:26191118

  8. 17O excess transfer during the NO2 + O3 → NO3 + O2 reaction.

    PubMed

    Berhanu, Tesfaye Ayalneh; Savarino, Joël; Bhattacharya, S K; Vicars, Willliam C

    2012-01-28

    The ozone molecule possesses a unique and distinctive (17)O excess (Δ(17)O), which can be transferred to some of the atmospheric molecules via oxidation. This isotopic signal can be used to trace oxidation reactions in the atmosphere. However, such an approach depends on a robust and quantitative understanding of the oxygen transfer mechanism, which is currently lacking for the gas-phase NO(2) + O(3) reaction, an important step in the nocturnal production of atmospheric nitrate. In the present study, the transfer of Δ(17)O from ozone to nitrate radical (NO(3)) during the gas-phase NO(2) + O(3) → NO(3) + O(2) reaction was investigated in a series of laboratory experiments. The isotopic composition (δ(17)O, δ(18)O) of the bulk ozone and the oxygen gas produced in the reaction was determined via isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The Δ(17)O transfer function for the NO(2) + O(3) reaction was determined to be: Δ(17)O(O(3)∗) = (1.23 ± 0.19) × Δ(17)O(O(3))(bulk) + (9.02 ± 0.99). The intramolecular oxygen isotope distribution of ozone was evaluated and results suggest that the excess enrichment resides predominantly on the terminal oxygen atoms of ozone. The results obtained in this study will be useful in the interpretation of high Δ(17)O values measured for atmospheric nitrate, thus leading to a better understanding of the natural cycling of atmospheric reactive nitrogen. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  9. Inhibitions by hydrogen-occluding silica microcluster to melanogenesis in human pigment cells and tyrosinase reaction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinya; Saitoh, Yasukazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-melanogenetic efficacy of hydrogen-occluding silica microcluster (H2-Silica), which is a silsesquioxane-based compound with hydrogen interstitially embedded in a matrix of caged silica, against melanogenesis in HMV-II human melanoma cells and L-DOPA-tyrosinase reaction [EC1.14.18.1]. HMV-II cells were subjected to oxidative stress by ultraviolet ray-A (UVA) exposure of 3-times of 0.65 J/cm2 summed up to 1.95 J/cm2. After UVA irradiation, HMV-II cells were stimulated to produce melanin by 2.72-fold more abundantly than unirradiated control. When HMV-II cells were treated with H2-Silica of 20 ppm or kojic acid of 28.4 ppm before and after UVA-irradiation, the amount of melanin was repressed to 12.2% or 14.5% as compared to that of UVA-irradiated control, respectively. That is, H2-Silica exhibited a comparable efficacy to the whitening agent kojic acid. The H2-Silica could prevent melanogenesis in HMV-II cells by low-level doses at 1-10 ppm, and cell viability and apoptosis event did not change even by high-level doses at 100-1000 ppm. On the contrary, kojic acid was cytotoxic at the concentration of 14-28 ppm or more. By microscopic observation, H2-Silica suppressed such properties indicative of melanin-rich cells as cellular hypertrophy, cell process formation, and melanogenesis around the outside of nuclei. The enzymatic assay using L-DOPA and mushroom tyrosinase demonstrated that H2-Silica restrained UVA-mediated melanin formation owing to down-regulation of tyrosinase activity, which could be attributed to scavenging of free radicals and inhibition of L-DOPA-to-dopachrome oxidation by hydrogen released from H2-Silica. Thus H2-Silica has a potential to prevent melanin production against UVA and serves as a skin-lightening ingredient for supplements or cosmetics.

  10. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.

    2015-12-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  11. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfermore » processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.« less

  12. Probing the mechanism of proton coupled electron transfer to dioxygen: the oxidative half-reaction of bovine serum amine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Su, Q; Klinman, J P

    1998-09-08

    Bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of primary amines, concomitant with the reduction of molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide via a ping-pong mechanism. A protocol has been developed for an analysis of chemical and kinetic mechanisms in the conversion of dioxygen to hydrogen peroxide. Steady-state kinetics show that two groups need to be deprotonated to facilitate the oxidative half-reaction. The pH dependence of Vmax/Km(O2) reveals pKa's of 6.2 +/- 0.3 and 7.0 +/- 0.2, respectively. A pKa of 7.2 +/- 0.1 has been obtained from a titration of anaerobically reduced BSAO using UV-vis spectrophotometry. The near identity of the pKa obtained from the reduced enzyme titration with the second pKa from steady-state kinetics suggests that this second pKa arises from the reduced cofactor. The assignment of pKa is supported by the observed pH dependence for formation of the cofactor semiquinone signal, detected by EPR spectroscopy under anaerobic conditions. To address the nature of rate-limiting steps in the oxidative half-reaction, the solvent isotope effect, viscosity effect, and O-18 isotope effect on Vmax/Km(O2) have been determined. The solvent isotope effect is indistinguishable from unity, ruling out a proton transfer as a rate-determining step. Use of glucose as a solvent viscosogen shows no viscosity effect, indicating that binding of oxygen is not in the rate-determining step. The O-18 kinetic isotope effect is independent of pH with an average value of 18(V/K) = 1.0097 +/- 0. 0010. This has been compared to calculated equilibrium O-18 isotope effects for various dioxygen intermediate species [Tian and Klinman (1993) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 115, 8891], leading to the conclusion that either the first electron transfer to dioxygen or the desorption of product peroxide from a Cu(II)-OOH complex could be the rate-limiting step. The distribution of steady-state enzyme species was, therefore, analyzed through a combination of stopped

  13. Metal phosphonate coordination networks and frameworks as precursors of electrocatalysts for the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; El-Refaei, Sayed M.; Russo, Patrícia A.; Pinna, Nicola

    2018-05-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) play key roles in the conversion of energy derived from renewable energy sources into chemical energy. Efficient, robust, and inexpensive electrocatalysts are necessary for driving these reactions at high rates at low overpotentials and minimize energetic losses. Recently, electrocatalysts derived from hybrid metal phosphonate compounds have shown high activity for the HER or OER. We review here the utilization of metal phosphonate coordination networks and metal-organic frameworks as precursors/templates for transition-metal phosphides, phosphates, or oxyhydroxides generated in situ in alkaline solutions, and their electrocatalytic performance in HER or OER.

  14. Stable hydrogen production from ethanol through steam reforming reaction over nickel-containing smectite-derived catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Ryohei; Arai, Masahiko

    2014-12-25

    Hydrogen production through steam reforming of ethanol was investigated with conventional supported nickel catalysts and a Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst. The former is initially active, but significant catalyst deactivation occurs during the reaction due to carbon deposition. Side reactions of the decomposition of CO and CH4 are the main reason for the catalyst deactivation, and these reactions can relatively be suppressed by the use of the Ni-containing smectite. The Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst contains, after H2 reduction, stable and active Ni nanocrystallites, and as a result, it shows a stable and high catalytic performance for the steam reforming of ethanol, producing H2.

  15. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Natural Isoflavans: Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation/Deoxygenation of Isoflavanones with Dynamic Kinetic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Keßberg, Anton; Lübken, Tilo; Metz, Peter

    2018-05-02

    A concise and highly enantioselective synthesis of structurally diverse isoflavans from a single chromone is described. The key transformation is a single-step conversion of racemic isoflavanones into virtually enantiopure isoflavans by domino asymmetric transfer hydrogenation/deoxygenation with dynamic kinetic resolution.

  16. Synthetic use of the primary kinetic isotope effect in hydrogen atom transfer 2: generation of captodatively stabilised radicals.

    PubMed

    Wood, Mark E; Bissiriou, Sabine; Lowe, Christopher; Windeatt, Kim M

    2013-04-28

    Using C-3 di-deuterated morpholin-2-ones bearing N-2-iodobenzyl and N-3-bromobut-3-enyl radical generating groups, only products derived from the more stabilised C-3, rather than the less stabilised C-5 translocated radicals, were formed after intramolecular 1,5-hydrogen atom transfer, suggesting that any kinetic isotope effect present was not sufficient to offset captodative stabilisation.

  17. An efficient and pH-universal ruthenium-based catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Javeed; Li, Feng; Jung, Sun-Min; Okyay, Mahmut Sait; Ahmad, Ishfaq; Kim, Seok-Jin; Park, Noejung; Jeong, Hu Young; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2017-05-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is a crucial step in electrochemical water splitting and demands an efficient, durable and cheap catalyst if it is to succeed in real applications. For an energy-efficient HER, a catalyst must be able to trigger proton reduction with minimal overpotential and have fast kinetics. The most efficient catalysts in acidic media are platinum-based, as the strength of the Pt-H bond is associated with the fastest reaction rate for the HER. The use of platinum, however, raises issues linked to cost and stability in non-acidic media. Recently, non-precious-metal-based catalysts have been reported, but these are susceptible to acid corrosion and are typically much inferior to Pt-based catalysts, exhibiting higher overpotentials and lower stability. As a cheaper alternative to platinum, ruthenium possesses a similar bond strength with hydrogen (˜65 kcal mol-1), but has never been studied as a viable alternative for a HER catalyst. Here, we report a Ru-based catalyst for the HER that can operate both in acidic and alkaline media. Our catalyst is made of Ru nanoparticles dispersed within a nitrogenated holey two-dimensional carbon structure (Ru@C2N). The Ru@C2N electrocatalyst exhibits high turnover frequencies at 25 mV (0.67 H2 s-1 in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution; 0.75 H2 s-1 in 1.0 M KOH solution) and small overpotentials at 10 mA cm-2 (13.5 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution; 17.0 mV in 1.0 M KOH solution) as well as superior stability in both acidic and alkaline media. These performances are comparable to, or even better than, the Pt/C catalyst for the HER.

  18. Reaction kinetics of hydrogen atom abstraction from isopentanol by the H atom and HO2˙ radical.

    PubMed

    Parab, Prajakta Rajaram; Heufer, K Alexander; Fernandes, Ravi Xavier

    2018-04-25

    Isopentanol is a potential next-generation biofuel for future applications to Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine concepts. To provide insights into the combustion behavior of isopentanol, especially to its auto-ignition behavior which is linked both to efficiency and pollutant formation in real combustion systems, detailed quantum chemical studies for crucial reactions are desired. H-Abstraction reaction rates from fuel molecules are key initiation steps for chain branching required for auto-ignition. In this study, rate constants are determined for the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from isopentanol by the H atom and HO2˙ radical by implementing the CBS-QB3 composite method. For the treatment of the internal rotors, a Pitzer-Gwinn-like approximation is applied. On comparing the computed reaction energies, the highest exothermicity (ΔE = -46 kJ mol-1) is depicted for Hα abstraction by the H atom whereas the lowest endothermicity (ΔE = 29 kJ mol-1) is shown for the abstraction of Hα by the HO2˙ radical. The formation of hydrogen bonding is found to affect the kinetics of the H atom abstraction reactions by the HO2˙ radical. Further above 750 K, the calculated high pressure limit rate constants indicate that the total contribution from delta carbon sites (Cδ) is predominant for hydrogen atom abstraction by the H atom and HO2˙ radical.

  19. Chemicals from Biomass: Combining Ring-Opening Tautomerization and Hydrogenation Reactions to Produce 1,5-Pentanediol from Furfural.

    PubMed

    Brentzel, Zachary J; Barnett, Kevin J; Huang, Kefeng; Maravelias, Christos T; Dumesic, James A; Huber, George W

    2017-04-10

    A process for the synthesis of 1,5-pentanediol (1,5-PD) with 84 % yield from furfural is developed, utilizing dehydration/hydration, ring-opening tautomerization, and hydrogenation reactions. Although this process has more reaction steps than the traditional direct hydrogenolysis of tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA), techno-economic analyses demonstrate that this process is the economically preferred route for the synthesis of biorenewable 1,5-PD. 2-Hydroxytetrahydropyran (2-HY-THP) is the key reaction pathway intermediate that allows for a decrease in the minimum selling price of 1,5-PD. The reactivity of 2-HY-THP is 80 times greater than that of THFA over a bimetallic hydrogenolysis catalyst. This enhanced reactivity is a result of the ring-opening tautomerization to 5-hydoxyvaleraldehyde and subsequent hydrogenation to 1,5-PD. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Cobalt-embedded nitrogen-rich carbon nanotubes efficiently catalyze hydrogen evolution reaction at all pH values.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoxin; Huang, Xiaoxi; Goswami, Anandarup; Silva, Rafael; Sathe, Bhaskar R; Mikmeková, Eliška; Asefa, Tewodros

    2014-04-22

    Despite being technically possible, splitting water to generate hydrogen is still practically unfeasible due mainly to the lack of sustainable and efficient catalysts for the half reactions involved. Herein we report the synthesis of cobalt-embedded nitrogen-rich carbon nanotubes (NRCNTs) that 1) can efficiently electrocatalyze the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with activities close to that of Pt and 2) function well under acidic, neutral or basic media alike, allowing them to be coupled with the best available oxygen-evolving catalysts-which also play crucial roles in the overall water-splitting reaction. The materials are synthesized by a simple, easily scalable synthetic route involving thermal treatment of Co(2+) -embedded graphitic carbon nitride derived from inexpensive starting materials (dicyandiamide and CoCl2 ). The materials' efficient catalytic activity is mainly attributed to their nitrogen dopants and concomitant structural defects. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Visualization of Proton and Electron Transfer Processes of a Biochemical Reaction by μSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyotani, Tamiko; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    For the last several years, we have discussed and conducted experiments toward realization of visualization of electron and proton transfer process in an enzyme reaction using muon. As the first step for exploring the useful application of the μSR for the biological system, which is "μSR in Biology". A first μSR experiment on biochemical reaction was conducted using the complex of a digestive enzyme, a kind of serine-protease and the inhibitor at J-PARC and PSI.

  2. Identical acyl transfer reactions between pyridine N-oxides and their N-acylonium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybachenko, V. I.; Shroeder, G.; Chotii, K. Yu.; Kovalenko, V. V.; Red'Ko, A. N.; Gierzyk, B.

    2007-10-01

    28 identical acyl exchange reactions R-CO-Nu+, X- + Nu between pyridine N-oxides in acetonitrile were studied. Here, X- = BPh{4/-} and R = methyl, N,N-dimethylamino, N,N-diethylamino, 4-morpholino, 1-piperidino, N-methyl, N-phenylamino, or N,N-diphenylamino group. The IR and NMR spectroscopic characteristics of acyloxypyridinium salts were determined, and the quantum-chemical parameters of all reagents calculated. The results were subjected to correlation analysis. It was found that the rate of identical acyl transfer reactions was controlled by the interaction of frontier orbitals in the transition state.

  3. Hydrogen incorporation and radiation induced dynamics in metal-oxide-silicon structures: A study using nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briere, M. A.

    Resonant Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA), using the H-1/N-15, alpha gamma/c-12 reaction at 6.4 MeV, is successfully applied to the investigation of hydrogen incorporation and radiation induced migration in metal oxide silicon structures. The influence of processing parameters on the H content of thermal oxides, with and without gate material present, is studied. Hydrogen accumulation at the Si-SiO2 interface is reproducibly demonstrated for as-oxidized samples, as well as for oxides exposed to H2 containing atmospheres during subsequent thermal processing. The migration of hydrogen, from the bulk oxide to the silicon oxide interface during NRA, is investigated. It is found that the cross section for this migration, per incident N-15 ion, depends on the sample processing history. It is argued that the release is due to electron capture at Si-OH sites and that the migration is driven by reductions in the interfacial free energy associated with the incorporation of hydrogen within the strained oxide region. A similar migration of hydrogen during irradiation with 2.5 MeV electrons is presented, which suggests that the migration occurs preferentially under applied fields which are directed to the silicon interface. It is argued that this bias effect is due to holes, which modify the interfacial region so as to increase hydrogen solubility, that is explained by the diffusivity of the hydrogen species during N-15 irradiation, which suggest identification as neutral atomic hydrogen. The spatial distribution of hydrogen at the Si-SiO2 interface is shown to be confined to within ca. 2 nm of the metallurgical boundary, in agreement with measurements of the location of oxide charge states, paramagnetic centers, as well as the width of the strained transition region in the neighborhood of this interface. A direct correlation between the hydrogen content of the bulk oxide and the radiation generated oxide charges and interface states is presented. These data provide strong

  4. Mechanistic Study of Nitric Oxide Reduction by Hydrogen on Pt(100) (I): A DFT Analysis of the Reaction Network

    DOE PAGES

    Bai, Yunhai; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2017-05-08

    Periodic, self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA, PW91) calculations are used to study the reaction mechanism for nitric oxide (NO) reduction by hydrogen (H 2) on Pt(100). Energetics of various N–O activation paths, including both direct and hydrogen-assisted N–O bond-breaking paths, and the formation of three different N-containing products (N 2, N 2O, and NH3), are systematically studied. On the basis of our analysis, NO* dissociation has a lower barrier than NO* hydrogenation to HNO* or NOH*, and therefore, the direct NO dissociation path is predicted to dominate N–O activation on clean Pt(100). The reaction of atomic N* with N* andmore » NO* is proposed as the mechanism for N 2 and N 2O formation, respectively. NH 3 formation from N* via three successive hydrogenation steps is also studied and is found to be kinetically more difficult than N 2 and N 2O formation from N*. Finally, NO adsorption phase diagrams on Pt(100) are constructed, and these phase diagrams suggest that, at low temperatures (e.g., 400 K), the Pt(100) surface may be covered by half a monolayer of NO. We propose that high NO coverage might affect the NO + H 2 reaction mechanism, and therefore, one should explicitly take the NO coverage into consideration in first-principles studies to determine the reaction mechanism on catalyst surfaces under reaction conditions. In conclusion, a detailed analysis of high NO coverage effects on the reaction mechanism will be presented in a separate contribution.« less

  5. Mechanistic Study of Nitric Oxide Reduction by Hydrogen on Pt(100) (I): A DFT Analysis of the Reaction Network

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yunhai; Mavrikakis, Manos

    Periodic, self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA, PW91) calculations are used to study the reaction mechanism for nitric oxide (NO) reduction by hydrogen (H 2) on Pt(100). Energetics of various N–O activation paths, including both direct and hydrogen-assisted N–O bond-breaking paths, and the formation of three different N-containing products (N 2, N 2O, and NH3), are systematically studied. On the basis of our analysis, NO* dissociation has a lower barrier than NO* hydrogenation to HNO* or NOH*, and therefore, the direct NO dissociation path is predicted to dominate N–O activation on clean Pt(100). The reaction of atomic N* with N* andmore » NO* is proposed as the mechanism for N 2 and N 2O formation, respectively. NH 3 formation from N* via three successive hydrogenation steps is also studied and is found to be kinetically more difficult than N 2 and N 2O formation from N*. Finally, NO adsorption phase diagrams on Pt(100) are constructed, and these phase diagrams suggest that, at low temperatures (e.g., 400 K), the Pt(100) surface may be covered by half a monolayer of NO. We propose that high NO coverage might affect the NO + H 2 reaction mechanism, and therefore, one should explicitly take the NO coverage into consideration in first-principles studies to determine the reaction mechanism on catalyst surfaces under reaction conditions. In conclusion, a detailed analysis of high NO coverage effects on the reaction mechanism will be presented in a separate contribution.« less

  6. 2D nanosheet molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J.; Brownson, Dale A. C.; Smith, Graham C.; Sawtell, David A. G.; Kelly, Peter J.; Banks, Craig E.

    2015-10-01

    We explore the use of two-dimensional (2D) MoS2 nanosheets as an electrocatalyst for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER). Using four commonly employed commercially available carbon based electrode support materials, namely edge plane pyrolytic graphite (EPPG), glassy carbon (GC), boron-doped diamond (BDD) and screen-printed graphite electrodes (SPE), we critically evaluate the reported electrocatalytic performance of unmodified and MoS2 modified electrodes towards the HER. Surprisingly, current literature focuses almost exclusively on the use of GC as an underlying support electrode upon which HER materials are immobilised. 2D MoS2 nanosheet modified electrodes are found to exhibit a coverage dependant electrocatalytic effect towards the HER. Modification of the supporting electrode surface with an optimal mass of 2D MoS2 nanosheets results in a lowering of the HER onset potential by ca. 0.33, 0.57, 0.29 and 0.31 V at EPPG, GC, SPE and BDD electrodes compared to their unmodified counterparts respectively. The lowering of the HER onset potential is associated with each supporting electrode's individual electron transfer kinetics/properties and is thus distinct. The effect of MoS2 coverage is also explored. We reveal that its ability to catalyse the HER is dependent on the mass deposited until a critical mass of 2D MoS2 nanosheets is achieved, after which its electrocatalytic benefits and/or surface stability curtail. The active surface site density and turn over frequency for the 2D MoS2 nanosheets is determined, characterised and found to be dependent on both the coverage of 2D MoS2 nanosheets and the underlying/supporting substrate. This work is essential for those designing, fabricating and consequently electrochemically testing 2D nanosheet materials for the HER.We explore the use of two-dimensional (2D) MoS2 nanosheets as an electrocatalyst for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER). Using four commonly employed commercially available carbon based electrode

  7. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry: on-line trace gas analysis at the ppb level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, A.; Jordan, A.; Holzinger, R.; Prazeller, P.; Vogel, W.; Lindinger, W.

    1995-11-01

    A system for trace gas analysis using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been developed which allows for on-line measurements of components with concentrations as low as 1 ppb. The method is based on reactions of H3O+ ions, which perform non-dissociative proton transfer to most of the common organic trace constituents but do not react with any of the components present in clean air. Examples of analysis of breath taken from smokers and non-smokers as well as from patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver, and of air in buildings as well as of ambient air taken at a road crossing demonstrate the wide range of applicability of this method. An enhanced level of acetonitrile in the breath is a most suitable indicator that a person is a smoker. Enhanced levels of propanol strongly indicate that a person has a severe liver deficiency.

  8. Balancing the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction, Surface Energetics, and Stability of Metallic MoS 2 Nanosheets via Covalent Functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Eric E.; Zhang, Hanyu; Schuman, Samuel A.

    We modify the fundamental electronic properties of metallic (1T phase) nanosheets of molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2) through covalent chemical functionalization, and thereby directly influence the kinetics of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), surface energetics, and stability. Chemically exfoliated, metallic MoS 2 nanosheets are functionalized with organic phenyl rings containing electron donating or withdrawing groups. We find that MoS 2 functionalized with the most electron donating functional group (p-(CH 3CH 2) 2NPh-MoS 2) is the most efficient catalyst for HER in this series, with initial activity that is slightly worse compared to the pristine metallic phase of MoS 2. The p-(CHmore » 3CH 2) 2NPh-MoS 2 is more stable than unfunctionalized metallic MoS 2 and outperforms unfunctionalized metallic MoS 2 for continuous H 2 evolution within 10 min under the same conditions. With regards to the entire studied series, the overpotential and Tafel slope for catalytic HER are both directly correlated with the electron donating strength of the functional group. The results are consistent with a mechanism involving ground-state electron donation or withdrawal to/from the MoS 2 nanosheets, which modifies the electron transfer kinetics and catalytic activity of the MoS 2 nanosheet. The functional groups preserve the metallic nature of the MoS 2 nanosheets, inhibiting conversion to the thermodynamically stable semiconducting state (2H) when mildly annealed in a nitrogen atmosphere. We propose that the electron density and, therefore, reactivity of the MoS 2 nanosheets are controlled by the attached functional groups. Functionalizing nanosheets of MoS 2 and other transition metal dichalcogenides provides a synthetic chemical route for controlling the electronic properties and stability within the traditionally thermally unstable metallic state.« less

  9. Balancing the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction, Surface Energetics, and Stability of Metallic MoS 2 Nanosheets via Covalent Functionalization

    DOE PAGES

    Benson, Eric E.; Zhang, Hanyu; Schuman, Samuel A.; ...

    2017-12-27

    We modify the fundamental electronic properties of metallic (1T phase) nanosheets of molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2) through covalent chemical functionalization, and thereby directly influence the kinetics of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), surface energetics, and stability. Chemically exfoliated, metallic MoS 2 nanosheets are functionalized with organic phenyl rings containing electron donating or withdrawing groups. We find that MoS 2 functionalized with the most electron donating functional group (p-(CH 3CH 2) 2NPh-MoS 2) is the most efficient catalyst for HER in this series, with initial activity that is slightly worse compared to the pristine metallic phase of MoS 2. The p-(CHmore » 3CH 2) 2NPh-MoS 2 is more stable than unfunctionalized metallic MoS 2 and outperforms unfunctionalized metallic MoS 2 for continuous H 2 evolution within 10 min under the same conditions. With regards to the entire studied series, the overpotential and Tafel slope for catalytic HER are both directly correlated with the electron donating strength of the functional group. The results are consistent with a mechanism involving ground-state electron donation or withdrawal to/from the MoS 2 nanosheets, which modifies the electron transfer kinetics and catalytic activity of the MoS 2 nanosheet. The functional groups preserve the metallic nature of the MoS 2 nanosheets, inhibiting conversion to the thermodynamically stable semiconducting state (2H) when mildly annealed in a nitrogen atmosphere. We propose that the electron density and, therefore, reactivity of the MoS 2 nanosheets are controlled by the attached functional groups. Functionalizing nanosheets of MoS 2 and other transition metal dichalcogenides provides a synthetic chemical route for controlling the electronic properties and stability within the traditionally thermally unstable metallic state.« less

  10. Balancing the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction, Surface Energetics, and Stability of Metallic MoS2 Nanosheets via Covalent Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Benson, Eric E; Zhang, Hanyu; Schuman, Samuel A; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U; Bronstein, Noah D; Ferrere, Suzanne; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Miller, Elisa M

    2018-01-10

    We modify the fundamental electronic properties of metallic (1T phase) nanosheets of molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) through covalent chemical functionalization, and thereby directly influence the kinetics of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), surface energetics, and stability. Chemically exfoliated, metallic MoS 2 nanosheets are functionalized with organic phenyl rings containing electron donating or withdrawing groups. We find that MoS 2 functionalized with the most electron donating functional group (p-(CH 3 CH 2 ) 2 NPh-MoS 2 ) is the most efficient catalyst for HER in this series, with initial activity that is slightly worse compared to the pristine metallic phase of MoS 2 . The p-(CH 3 CH 2 ) 2 NPh-MoS 2 is more stable than unfunctionalized metallic MoS 2 and outperforms unfunctionalized metallic MoS 2 for continuous H 2 evolution within 10 min under the same conditions. With regards to the entire studied series, the overpotential and Tafel slope for catalytic HER are both directly correlated with the electron donating strength of the functional group. The results are consistent with a mechanism involving ground-state electron donation or withdrawal to/from the MoS 2 nanosheets, which modifies the electron transfer kinetics and catalytic activity of the MoS 2 nanosheet. The functional groups preserve the metallic nature of the MoS 2 nanosheets, inhibiting conversion to the thermodynamically stable semiconducting state (2H) when mildly annealed in a nitrogen atmosphere. We propose that the electron density and, therefore, reactivity of the MoS 2 nanosheets are controlled by the attached functional groups. Functionalizing nanosheets of MoS 2 and other transition metal dichalcogenides provides a synthetic chemical route for controlling the electronic properties and stability within the traditionally thermally unstable metallic state.

  11. 2D nanosheet molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J; Brownson, Dale A C; Smith, Graham C; Sawtell, David A G; Kelly, Peter J; Banks, Craig E

    2015-11-21

    We explore the use of two-dimensional (2D) MoS2 nanosheets as an electrocatalyst for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER). Using four commonly employed commercially available carbon based electrode support materials, namely edge plane pyrolytic graphite (EPPG), glassy carbon (GC), boron-doped diamond (BDD) and screen-printed graphite electrodes (SPE), we critically evaluate the reported electrocatalytic performance of unmodified and MoS2 modified electrodes towards the HER. Surprisingly, current literature focuses almost exclusively on the use of GC as an underlying support electrode upon which HER materials are immobilised. 2D MoS2 nanosheet modified electrodes are found to exhibit a coverage dependant electrocatalytic effect towards the HER. Modification of the supporting electrode surface with an optimal mass of 2D MoS2 nanosheets results in a lowering of the HER onset potential by ca. 0.33, 0.57, 0.29 and 0.31 V at EPPG, GC, SPE and BDD electrodes compared to their unmodified counterparts respectively. The lowering of the HER onset potential is associated with each supporting electrode's individual electron transfer kinetics/properties and is thus distinct. The effect of MoS2 coverage is also explored. We reveal that its ability to catalyse the HER is dependent on the mass deposited until a critical mass of 2D MoS2 nanosheets is achieved, after which its electrocatalytic benefits and/or surface stability curtail. The active surface site density and turn over frequency for the 2D MoS2 nanosheets is determined, characterised and found to be dependent on both the coverage of 2D MoS2 nanosheets and the underlying/supporting substrate. This work is essential for those designing, fabricating and consequently electrochemically testing 2D nanosheet materials for the HER.

  12. Benzene Adsorption - A Significant Inhibitor for the Hydrogen Oxidation Reaction in Alkaline Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Gonzales, Ivana; Chung, Hoon Taek; Kim, Yu Seung

    2017-09-25

    Slow hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) kinetics on Pt under alkaline conditions is a significant technical barrier for the development of high-performance hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells. Here we report that benzene adsorption on Pt is a major factor responsible for the sluggish HOR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that bimetallic catalysts, such as PtMo/C, PtNi/C, and PtRu/C, can reduce the adsorption of benzene and thereby improve HOR activity. In particular, the HOR voltammogram of PtRu/C in 0.1 M benzyl ammonium showed minimal benzene adsorption. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the adsorption of benzyl ammonium on the bimetallic PtRu is endergonic formore » all four possible orientations of the cation, which explains the significantly better HOR activity observed for the bimetallic catalysts. In conclusion, the new HOR inhibition mechanism described here provides insights for the design of future polymer electrolytes and electrocatalysts for better-performing polymer membrane-based fuel cells.« less

  13. Tuning Selectivity of CO 2 Hydrogenation Reactions at the Metal/Oxide Interface

    DOE PAGES

    Kattel, Shyam; Liu, Ping; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2017-06-26

    The chemical transformation of CO 2 not only mitigates the anthropogenic CO 2 emission into the Earth’s atmosphere but also produces carbon compounds that can be used as precursors for the production of chemicals and fuels. The activation and conversion of CO 2 can be achieved on multifunctional catalytic sites available at the metal/oxide interface by taking advantage of the synergy between the metal nanoparticles and oxide support. In this paper, we look at the recent progress in mechanistic studies of CO 2 hydrogenation to C1 (CO, CH 3OH, and CH 4) compounds on metal/oxide catalysts. On this basis, wemore » are able to provide a better understanding of the complex reaction network, grasp the capability of manipulating structure and combination of metal and oxide at the interface in tuning selectivity, and identify the key descriptors to control the activity and, in particular, the selectivity of catalysts. In conclusion, we also discuss challenges and future research opportunities for tuning the selective conversion of CO 2 on metal/oxide catalysts.« less

  14. Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

  15. Operando Spectroscopic Analysis of CoP Films Electrocatalyzing the Hydrogen-Evolution Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Saadi, Fadl H.; Carim, Azhar I.; Drisdell, Walter S.; ...

    2017-08-28

    Transition metal phosphides exhibit high catalytic activity toward the electrochemical hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) and resist chemical corrosion in acidic solutions. For example, an electrodeposited CoP catalyst exhibited an overpotential, η of -η < 100 mV at a current density of -10 mA cm -2 in 0.500 M H 2SO 4 (aq). To obtain a chemical description of the material as-prepared and also while effecting the HER in acidic media, such electrocatalyst films were investigated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy both ex situ as well as under in situ and operando conditions in 0.500 M H 2SO 4 (aq).more » Ex situ analysis using the tandem spectroscopies indicated the presence of multiple ordered and disordered phases that contained both near-zerovalent and oxidized Co species, in addition to reduced and oxygenated P species. Lastly, operando analysis indicated that the active electrocatalyst was primarily amorphous and predominantly consisted of near-zerovalent Co as well as reduced P.« less

  16. Dealloyed Pt3Co nanoparticles with higher geometric strain for superior hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saquib, Mohammad; Halder, Aditi

    2018-06-01

    In the present work, the effect of surface strain in the carbon supported Pt3Co dealloy catalyst towards hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has been reported. Dealloying process is adopted to generate the geometric strain in Pt3Co/C alloy by preferential dissolution of non-noble metal (Co) from the alloy. The developed geometric strain has been estimated by different microstructural characterization techniques. Electrochemical studies showed that the highest current density for HER was obtained for Pt3Co/C dealloy catalyst and it was nearly 2 and 5 times higher than Pt3Co/C alloy and Pt/C respectively. Tafel slope for HER was improved from 49 (Pt/C) to 34 mV dec-1 (Pt3Co/C dealloy), indicating that the surface strain plays important role in the improvement of the catalytic activity of Pt3Co catalyst. The chronoamperometry data, LSV curves and ECSA values before and after chronoamperometry confirmed that Pt3Co/C dealloy catalyst was a stable as well as a durable electrocatalyst for HER.

  17. Construction of Polarized Carbon-Nickel Catalytic Surfaces for Potent, Durable, and Economic Hydrogen Evolution Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Weng, Qunhong; Popov, Zakhar I; Yang, Yijun; Antipina, Liubov Yu; Sorokin, Pavel B; Wang, Xi; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2018-05-22

    Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline solution is hindered by its sluggish kinetics toward water dissociation. Nickel-based catalysts, as low-cost and effective candidates, show great potentials to replace platinum (Pt)-based materials in the alkaline media. The main challenge regarding this type of catalysts is their relatively poor durability. In this work, we conceive and construct a charge-polarized carbon layer derived from carbon quantum dots (CQDs) on Ni 3 N nanostructure (Ni 3 N@CQDs) surfaces, which simultaneously exhibit durable and enhanced catalytic activity. The Ni 3 N@CQDs shows an overpotential of 69 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm -2 in a 1 M KOH aqueous solution, lower than that of Pt electrode (116 mV) at the same conditions. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations reveal that Ni 3 N and interfacial oxygen polarize charge distributions between originally equal C-C bonds in CQDs. The partially negatively charged C sites become effective catalytic centers for the key water dissociation step via the formation of new C-H bond (Volmer step) and thus boost the HER activity. Furthermore, the coated carbon is also found to protect interior Ni 3 N from oxidization/hydroxylation and therefore guarantees its durability. This work provides a practical design of robust and durable HER electrocatalysts based on nonprecious metals.

  18. Improving the catalytic activity of amorphous molybdenum sulfide for hydrogen evolution reaction using polydihydroxyphenylalanine modified MWCNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maoguo; Yu, Muping; Li, Xiang

    2018-05-01

    Molybdenum sulfides are promising electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acid medium due to their unique properties. In order to improve their HER activity, different strategies have been developed. In this study, amorphous molybdenum sulfide was prepared by a simple wet chemical method and its HER activity was further improved by using polydihydroxyphenylalanine (PDOPA) modified MWCNTs as supports. It was found that the PDOPA can effectively improve the hydrophilic properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and amorphous MoSx can uniformly grow on the surface of PDOPA@MWCNTs. Compared with MoSx and MoSx/MWCNTs, MoSx/PDOPA@MWCNTs show obviously enhanced HER activities due to the superior electrical conductivity and more exposed active sites. In addition, the effect of the ratio of MoSx and PDOPA@MWCNTs and the loading amount of catalysts on the electrodes are also investigated in detail. At the optimum conditions, MoSx/PDOPA@MWCNTs display an overpotential of 198 mV at 10 mA/cm2, a Tafel slope of 53 mV/dec and a good long-term stability in 0.5 M H2SO4, which make them promising candidates for HER application.

  19. Electrodeposition of Ni and CeO₂/Ni Nanotubes for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Electrode.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoqing; Yang, Yumeng; Yi, Chenxi; Chen, Yu; Cai, Chao; Zhang, Zhao

    2018-07-01

    Ni NTs and CeO2-Ni nanotubes (NTs) have been prepared by galvanostatic electrodeposition in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) Templates. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) are used to characterize the prepared NTs. The results showed that the preparation process of CeO2-Ni NTs was accompanied by the formation of many new phases CeNix (x = 1, 2, 3.5 or 5) and preferential orientation crystal face of Ni in CeO2-Ni NTs is 〈111〉, which is different from that Ni 〈200〉 in Ni NTs. Then linear scan voltammetry (LSV) is applied to test the electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen revolution reaction (HER) of the two electrodes in 1 M NaCl aqueous solution and find that both of the two materials exhibited good performance. Finally, the kinetics analyses from the HER process showed that Tafel slope b was mainly dependent on phase composition and electric conductivity of the electrode, while j0 was mainly dependent on its real specific surface area.

  20. Controllable Surface Reorganization Engineering on Cobalt Phosphide Nanowire Arrays for Efficient Alkaline Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Cheng, Han; Lv, Haifeng; Wang, Jingyu; Liu, Linqi; Liu, Si; Wu, Xiaojun; Chu, Wangsheng; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Developing highly efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts in alkaline media is considered significant and valuable for water splitting. Herein, it is demonstrated that surface reorganization engineering by oxygen plasma engraving on electocatalysts successfully realizes a dramatically enhanced alkaline HER activity. Taking CoP nanowire arrays grown on carbon cloth (denoted as CoP NWs/CC) as an example, the oxygen plasma engraving can trigger moderate CoO x species formation on the surface of the CoP NWs/CC, which is visually verified by the X-ray absorption fine structure, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) mapping. Benefiting from the moderate CoO x species formed on the surface, which can promote the water dissociation in alkaline HER, the surface reorganization of the CoP NWs/CC realizes almost fourfold enhanced alkaline HER activity and a 180 mV decreased overpotential at 100 mA cm -2 , compared with the pristine ones. More interestingly, this surface reorganization strategy by oxygen plasma engraving can also be effective to other electrocatalysts such as free-standing CoP, Co 4 N, O-CoSe 2 , and C-CoSe 2 nanowires, which verifies the universality of the strategy. This work thus opens up new avenues for designing alkaline HER electrocatalysts based on oxygen plasma engraving. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Correlation between Gas Bubble Formation and Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Kinetics at Nanoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qianjin; Luo, Long

    2018-04-17

    We report the correlation between H 2 gas bubble formation potential and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activity for Au and Pt nanodisk electrodes (NEs). Microkinetic models were formulated to obtain the HER kinetic information for individual Au and Pt NEs. We found that the rate-determining steps for the HER at Au and Pt NEs were the Volmer step and the Heyrovsky step, respectively. More interestingly, the standard rate constant ( k 0 ) of the rate-determining step was found to vary over 2 orders of magnitude for the same type of NEs. The observed variations indicate the HER activity heterogeneity at the nanoscale. Furthermore, we discovered a linear relationship between bubble formation potential ( E bubble ) and log( k 0 ) with a slope of 125 mV/decade for both Au and Pt NEs. As log ( k 0 ) increases, E bubble shifts linearly to more positive potentials, meaning NEs with higher HER activities form H 2 bubbles at less negative potentials. Our theoretical model suggests that such linear relationship is caused by the similar critical bubble formation condition for Au and Pt NEs with varied sizes. Our results have potential implications for using gas bubble formation to evaluate the HER activity distribution of nanoparticles in an ensemble.

  2. Efficient hydrogen evolution in transition metal dichalcogenides via a simple one-step hydrazine reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Cummins, Dustin R.; Martinez, Ulises; Sherehiy, Andriy; ...

    2016-06-10

    In this study, hydrogen evolution reaction is catalyzed efficiently with precious metals, such as platinum; however, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as a promising class of materials for electrocatalysis, but these materials still have low activity and durability when compared with precious metals. Here we report a simple one-step scalable approach, where MoO x/MoS 2 core-shell nanowires and molybdenum disulfide sheets are exposed to dilute aqueous hydrazine at room temperature, which results in marked improvement in electrocatalytic performance. The nanowires exhibit ~100 mV improvement in over potential following exposure to dilute hydrazine, while also showing a 10-fold increase inmore » current density and a significant change in Tafel slope. In situ electrical, gate-dependent measurements and spectroscopic investigations reveal that hydrazine acts as an electron dopant in molybdenum disulfide, increasing its conductivity, while also reducing the MoO x core in the core-shell nanowires, which leads to improved electrocatalytic performance.« less

  3. Analysis of turbulent free-jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.; Evans, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of the nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of an axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel ambient air stream. The effective turbulent transport properties are determined by means of a two-equation model of turbulence. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight elementary reactions among six chemical species: H, O, H2O, OH, O2 and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations was solved by using an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions were obtained at two downstream locations for some important variables affecting the flow development, such as the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The results show that these variables attain their peak values on the axis of symmetry. The computed distribution of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of the chemical species gives a complete description of the flow field. The numerical predictions were compared with two sets of experimental data. Good qualitative agreement was obtained.

  4. Intramolecular allyl transfer reaction from allyl ether to aldehyde groups: experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Franco, Delphine; Wenger, Karine; Antonczak, Serge; Cabrol-Bass, Daniel; Duñach, Elisabet; Rocamora, Mercè; Gomez, Montserrat; Muller, Guillermo

    2002-02-02

    The intramolecular transfer of the allyl group of functionalized allyl aryl ethers to an aldehyde group in the presence of Ni0 complexes was studied from chemical, electrochemical and theoretical points of view. The chemical reaction involves the addition of Ni0 to the allyl ether followed by stoichiometric allylation. The electrochemical process is catalytic in nickel and involves the reduction of intermediate eta3-allylnickel(II) complexes.

  5. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER.

  6. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER. PMID:27034988

  7. Deep-inelastic multinucleon transfer processes in the 16O+27Al reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, B. J.; Sawant, Y.; Patwari, P.; Santra, S.; Pal, A.; Kundu, A.; Chattopadhyay, D.; Jha, V.; Pandit, S. K.; Parkar, V. V.; Ramachandran, K.; Mahata, K.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Kailas, S.; Nag, T. N.; Sahoo, R. N.; Singh, P. P.; Sekizawa, K.

    2018-03-01

    The reaction mechanism of deep-inelastic multinucleon transfer processes in the 16O+27Al reaction at an incident 16O energy (Elab=134 MeV) substantially above the Coulomb barrier has been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Elastic-scattering angular distribution, total kinetic energy loss spectra, and angular distributions for various transfer channels have been measured. The Q -value- and angle-integrated isotope production cross sections have been deduced. To obtain deeper insight into the underlying reaction mechanism, we have carried out a detailed analysis based on the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. A recently developed method, TDHF+GEMINI, has been applied to evaluate production cross sections for secondary products. From a comparison between the experimental and theoretical cross sections, we find that the theory qualitatively reproduces the experimental data. Significant effects of secondary light-particle emissions are demonstrated. Possible interplay among fusion-fission, deep-inelastic, multinucleon transfer, and particle evaporation processes is discussed.

  8. Infrared Spectrum of N-Oxidohydroxylamine [ONH(OH)] Produced in Reaction H + Hono in Solid Para-Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupa, Karolina Anna; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogenation reactions in the N/O chemical network are important for an understanding of the mechanism of formation of organic molecules in dark interstellar clouds, but many reactions remain unknown. We present the results of the reaction H + HONO in solid {para}-hydrogen ({p}-H_{2}) at 3.3 K investigated with infrared spectra. Two methods that produced hydrogen atoms were the irradiation of HONO molecules in {p}-H_{2} at 365 nm to produce OH radicals that reacted readily with nearby H_{2} to produce mobile H atoms, and irradiation of Cl_{2} molecules (co-deposited with HONO) in {p}-H_{2} at 405 nm to produce Cl atoms that reacted readily with nearby H_{2} to produce mobile H atoms. In both experiments, we assigned IR lines at 3549.6 (νb{1}), 1465.0 (νb{3}), 1372.2 (νb{4}), 895.6/898.5 (νb{6}), and 630.9 (νb{7}) \\wn to N-oxidohydroxylamine [ONH(OH)], the primary product of HONO hydrogenation. The assignments were derived according to the consideration of possible reactions and comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers and their IR intensities with values predicted with the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ method of quantum-chemical calculations. The agreement between observed and calculated D/H- and ^{15}N/^{14}N-isotopic ratios further supports these assignments. The role of this reaction in the N/O chemical network in dark interstellar clouds is discussed.

  9. Theoretical insights of proton transfer and hydrogen bonded charge transfer complex of 1,2-dimethylimidazolium-3,5-dinitrobenzoate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afroz, Ziya; Faizan, Mohd.; Alam, Mohammad Jane; Ahmad, Shabbir; Ahmad, Afaq

    2018-04-01

    Proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen bonded charge transfer (HBCT) 1:1 complex of 1,2-dimethylimidazole (DMI) and 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid (DNBA) have been theoretically analyzed and compared with reported experimental results. Both the structures in the isolated gaseous state have been optimized at DFT/B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory and further, the PT energy barrier has been calculated from potential energy surface scan. Along with structural investigations, theoretical vibrational spectra have been inspected and compared with the FTIR spectrum. Moreover, frontier molecular analysis has also been carried out.

  10. Variational RRKM theory calculation of thermal rate constant for carbon—hydrogen bond fission reaction of nitro benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manesh, Afshin Taghva; Heidarnezhad, Zabi alah; Masnabadi, Nasrin

    2013-07-01

    The present work provides quantitative results for the rate of unimolecular carbon-hydrogen bond fission reaction of benzene and nitro benzene at elevated temperatures up to 2000 K. The potential energy surface for each C-H (in the ortho, meta, and para sites) bond fission reaction of nitro benzene was investigated by ab initio calculations. The geometry and vibrational frequencies of the species involved in this process were optimized at the MP2 level of theory, using the cc-pvdz basis set. Since C-H bond fission channel is barrier less reaction, we have used variational RRKM theory to predict rate constants. By means of calculated rate constant at the different temperatures, the activation energy and exponential factor were determined. The Arrhenius expression for C-H bond fission reaction of nitro benzene on the ortho, meta and para sites are k( T) = 2.1 × 1017exp(-56575.98/ T), k( T) = 2.1 × 1017exp(-57587.45/ T), and k( T) = 3.3 × 1016exp(-57594.79/ T) respectively. The Arrhenius expression for C-H bond fission reaction of benzene is k( T) = 2 × 1018exp(-59343.48.18/ T). The effect of NO2 group, location of hydrogen atoms on the substituted benzene ring, reaction degeneracy, benzene ring resonance and tunneling effect on the rate expression have been discussed.

  11. Investigation of the reaction of 5Al-2.5Sn titanium with hydrogen at subzero temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. N.; Wood, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of temperature on the surface hydriding reaction of 5Al-2.5Sn titanium exposed to hydrogen at 250 psig was made. The temperature range studied extended from 160 F to -160 F. Reaction conditions were controlled so as to expose a vacuum-cleaned, oxide-free alloy surface to an ultrapure hydrogen atmosphere. Reaction times up to 1458 hours were studied. The hydriding reaction was extremely sensitive to experimental variables and the reproducibility of reaction behavior was poor. However, it was demonstrated that the reaction proceeded quite rapidly at 160 F; as much as 1 mil surface hydriding being observed after exposure for 162 hours. The amount of hydriding appeared to decrease with decreasing temperature at 75 F, -36 F, and -76 F. No surface hydriding was detected either by vacuum fusion analysis or by metallographic examination after exposure for 1458 hours at -110 F or -160 F. Tensile properties were unaffected by surface hydriding of the severity developed in this program (up to 1 mil thick) as determined by slow strain rate testing of hydrided sheet tensile samples.

  12. Effect of friction on electron transfer: The two reaction coordinate case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuchic, José Nelson

    1987-04-01

    Electron transfer is a very important reaction in many biological processes such as photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation. In many of these reactions, most of the interesting dynamics can be included by using two reaction coordinates: one fast (local high frequency vibration modes) and one slow (outersphere modes such as solvent polarization). We report a model to describe this problem, which uses path integral techniques to calculate electron transfer rates, and also to obtain the Fokker-Planck equations associated with this model. Different limiting cases lead to qualitatively different results such as exponential or nonexponential time decay for the donor survival probability. Conditions for the validity of the adiabatic or the nonadiabatic limits will be discussed. Application of this model to real systems is proposed, in particular for a porphyrin rigidly linked to a quinone, which is a very interesting model compound for primary events of photosynthesis. This model can also be used for other multicoordinate biological reactions such as ligand binding to heme proteins. Also, in the concluding part of Sec. III, we discuss the important limit where the fast vibronic mode is much faster than all the other nuclear modes coupled to the problem. In this limit the fast mode ``renormalizes'' the electronic matrix element, and this considerably simplifies the treatment of the problem, reducing it to coupling only to the slow modes.

  13. Dynamics of the F(-) + CH3I → HF + CH2I(-) Proton Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaxu; Xie, Jing; Hase, William L

    2015-12-17

    Direct chemical dynamics simulations, at collision energies Erel of 0.32 and 1.53 eV, were performed to obtain an atomistic understanding of the F(-) + CH3I reaction dynamics. There is only the F(-) + CH3I → CH3F + I(-) bimolecular nucleophilic substitution SN2 product channel at 0.32 eV. Increasing Erel to 1.53 eV opens the endothermic F(-) + CH3I → HF + CH2I(-) proton transfer reaction, which is less competitive than the SN2 reaction. The simulations reveal proton transfer occurs by two direct atomic-level mechanisms, rebound and stripping, and indirect mechanisms, involving formation of the F(-)···HCH2I complex and the roundabout. For the indirect trajectories all of the CH2I(-) is formed with zero-point energy (ZPE), while for the direct trajectories 50% form CH2I(-) without ZPE. Without a ZPE constraint for CH2I(-), the reaction cross sections for the rebound, stripping, and indirect mechanisms are 0.2 ± 0.1, 1.2 ± 0.4, and 0.7 ± 0.2 Å(2), respectively. Discarding trajectories that do not form CH2I(-) with ZPE reduces the rebound and stripping cross sections to 0.1 ± 0.1 and 0.7 ± 0.5 Å(2). The HF product is formed rotationally and vibrationally unexcited. The average value of J is 2.6 and with histogram binning n = 0. CH2I(-) is formed rotationally excited. The partitioning between CH2I(-) vibration and HF + CH2I(-) relative translation energy depends on the treatment of CH2I(-) ZPE. Without a CH2I(-) ZPE constraint the energy partitioning is primarily to relative translation with little CH2I(-) vibration. With a ZPE constraint, energy partitioning to CH2I(-) rotation, CH2I(-) vibration, and relative translation are statistically the same. The overall F(-) + CH3I rate constant at Erel of both 0.32 and 1.53 eV is in good agreement with experiment and negligibly affected by the treatment of CH2I(-) ZPE, since the SN2 reaction is the major contributor to the total reaction rate constant. The potential energy surface and reaction dynamics for F

  14. Investigating pyridazine and phthalazine exchange in a series of iridium complexes in order to define their role in the catalytic transfer of magnetisation from para-hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Kate M; Mewis, Ryan E; Olaru, Alexandra M; Green, Gary G R; Fairlamb, Ian J S; Duckett, Simon B

    2015-07-01

    The reaction of [Ir(IMes)(COD)Cl], [IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene, COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene] with pyridazine (pdz) and phthalazine (phth) results in the formation of [Ir(COD)(IMes)(pdz)]Cl and [Ir(COD)(IMes)(phth)]Cl. These two complexes are shown by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies to undergo a haptotropic shift which interchanges pairs of protons within the bound ligands. When these complexes are exposed to hydrogen, they react to form [Ir(H) 2 (COD)(IMes)(pdz)]Cl and [Ir(H) 2 (COD)(IMes)(phth)]Cl, respectively, which ultimately convert to [Ir(H) 2 (IMes)(pdz) 3 ]Cl and [Ir(H) 2 (IMes)(phth) 3 ]Cl, as the COD is hydrogenated to form cyclooctane. These two dihydride complexes are shown, by NMR, to undergo both full N-heterocycle dissociation and a haptotropic shift, the rates of which are affected by both steric interactions and free ligand p K a values. The use of these complexes as catalysts in the transfer of polarisation from para -hydrogen to pyridazine and phthalazine via signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is explored. The possible future use of drugs which contain pyridazine and phthalazine motifs as in vivo or clinical magnetic resonance imaging probes is demonstrated; a range of NMR and phantom-based MRI measurements are reported.

  15. Nuclear structure studies performed using the (18O,16O) two-neutron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, D.; Agodi, C.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Ferreira, J. L.; Foti, A.; Gargano, A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Linares, R.; Lubian, J.; Santagati, G.

    2018-02-01

    Excitation energy spectra and absolute cross section angular distributions were measured for the 13C(18O,16O)15C two-neutron transfer reaction at 84 MeV incident energy. This reaction selectively populates two-neutron configurations in the states of the residual nucleus. Exact finite-range coupled reaction channel calculations are used to analyse the data. Two approaches are discussed: the extreme cluster and the newly introduced microscopic cluster. The latter makes use of spectroscopic amplitudes in the centre of mass reference frame, derived from shell-model calc