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Sample records for hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces

  1. Reactions of Persistent Carbenes with Hydrogen-Terminated Silicon Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhukhovitskiy, Aleksandr V; Mavros, Michael G; Queeney, K T; Wu, Tony; Voorhis, Troy Van; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2016-07-13

    Surface passivation has enabled the development of silicon-based solar cells and microelectronics. However, a number of emerging applications require a paradigm shift from passivation to functionalization, wherein surface functionality is installed proximal to the silicon surface. To address this need, we report here the use of persistent aminocarbenes to functionalize hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces via Si-H insertion reactions. Through the use of model compounds (H-Si(TMS)3 and H-Si(OTMS)3), nanoparticles (H-SiNPs), and planar Si(111) wafers (H-Si(111)), we demonstrate that among different classes of persistent carbenes, the more electrophilic and nucleophilic ones, in particular, a cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbene (CAAC) and an acyclic diaminocarbene (ADAC), are able to undergo insertion into Si-H bonds at the silicon surface, forming persistent C-Si linkages and simultaneously installing amine or aminal functionality in proximity to the surface. The CAAC (6) is particularly notable for its clean insertion reactivity under mild conditions that produces monolayers with 21 ± 3% coverage of Si(111) atop sites, commensurate with the expected maximum of ∼20%. Atomic force and transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron, and infrared spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry provided evidence for the surface Si-H insertion process. Furthermore, computational studies shed light on the reaction energetics and indicated that CAAC 6 should be particularly effective at binding to silicon dihydride, trihydride, and coupled monohyride motifs, as well as oxidized surface sites. Our results pave the way for the further development of persistent carbenes as universal ligands for silicon and potentially other nonmetallic substrates. PMID:27366818

  2. Investigation of two-dimensional electron systems at low density on hydrogen-terminated silicon (111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Binhui; Kott, Tomasz M.; Kane, B. E.

    2013-03-01

    Two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs) on hydrogen-terminated Si(111) surfaces show very high quality. The peak electron mobility of 325,000 cm2/Vs can be reached at T =90 mK and 2D electron density n2 d = 4 . 15 ×1011 cm-2, and the device shows the fractional quantum hall effect[1]. 2DESs on H-Si(111) at lower densities may exhibit new physics, because both valley degeneracy and effective mass lead to a large Wigner-Seitz radius rs at accessible densities. In these devices, phosphorus ion implantation is used to defined the contacts to the 2DESs[2]. The contacts themselves work at low temperature. However, at lower 2D electron density (< 2 ×1011 cm-2) and low temperature (<1 K), the contact resistance to the 2DESs shows strong temperature dependence. This makes accurate Hall measurements difficult in this region. We have systematically investigated the contact resistance at different electron densities and temperatures. Different ion implantation annealing parameters are adjusted to mitigate the issue. Possible measurement technique is also explored to overcome the problem.

  3. Ferrocene-terminated monolayers covalently bound to hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces. Toward the development of charge storage and communication devices.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Bruno

    2010-12-21

    The combination of monocrystalline silicon's well-defined structure and the ability to prepare hydrogen-terminated surfaces (Si-H) easily and reproducibly has made this material a very attractive substrate for immobilizing functional molecules. The functionalization of Si-H using the covalent attachment of organic monolayers has received intense attention due to the numerous potential applications of controlled and robust organic/Si interfaces. Researchers have investigated these materials in diverse fields such as molecular electronics, chemistry, and bioanalytical chemistry. Applications include the preparation of surface insulators, the incorporation of chemical or biochemical functionality at interfaces for use in photovoltaic conversion, and the development of new chemical and biological sensing devices. Unlike those of gold, silicon's electronic properties are tunable, and researchers can directly integrate silicon-based devices within electronic circuitry. Moreover, the technological processes used for the micro- and nanopatterning of silicon are numerous and mature enough for producing highly miniaturized functional electronic components. In this Account, we describe a powerful approach that integrates redox-active molecules, such as ferrocene, onto silicon toward electrically addressable systems devoted to information storage or transfer. Ferrocene exhibits attractive electrochemical characteristics: fast electron-transfer rate, low oxidation potential, and two stable redox states (neutral ferrocene and oxidized ferrocenium). Accordingly, ferrocene-modified silicon surfaces could be used as charge storage components with the bound ferrocene center as the memory element. Upon application of a positive potential to silicon, ferrocene is oxidized to its corresponding ferrocenium form. This redox change is equivalent to the change of a bit of information from the "0" to "1" state. To erase the stored charge and return the device to its initial state, a low

  4. "Click" Patterning of Self-Assembled Monolayers on Hydrogen-Terminated Silicon Surfaces and Their Characterization Using Light-Addressable Potentiometric Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wu, Fan; Watkinson, Michael; Zhu, Jingyuan; Krause, Steffi

    2015-09-01

    Two potential strategies for chemically patterning alkyne-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on oxide-free silicon or silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) substrates were investigated and compared. The patterned surfaces were validated using a light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) for the first time. The first strategy involved an integration of photolithography with "click" chemistry. Detailed surface characterization (i.e. water contact angle, ellipsometry, AFM, and XPS) and LAPS measurements showed that photoresist processing not only decreases the coverage of organic monolayers but also introduces chemically bonded contaminants on the surfaces, thus significantly reducing the quality of the SAMs and the utility of "click" surface modification. The formation of chemical contaminants in photolithography was also observed on carboxylic acid- and alkyl-terminated monolayers using LAPS. In contrast, a second approach combined microcontact printing (μCP) with "click" chemistry; that is azide (azido-oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG)-NH2) inks were printed on alkyne-terminated SAMs on silicon or SOS through PDMS stamps. The surface characterization results for the sample printed with a flat featureless PDMS stamp demonstrated a nondestructive and efficient method of μCP to perform "click" reactions on alkyne-terminated, oxide-free silicon surfaces for the first time. For the sample printed with a featured PDMS stamp, LAPS imaging showed a good agreement with the pattern of the PDMS stamp, indicating the successful chemical patterning on non-oxidized silicon and SOS substrates and the capability of LAPS to image the molecular patterns with high sensitivity.

  5. Hydrogen-terminated silicon substrates for low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, P. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Fathauer, R. W.; Lin, T. L.; Hecht, M. H.; Bell, L. D.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    The preparation of hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces for use as starting substrates for low-temperature MBE growth is examined in detail. The procedure involves the ex situ removal under nitrogen of residual oxide from a silicon substrate using a spin-clean with HF in ethanol, followed by the in situ low-temperature desorption (150 C) of physisorbed etch residues. The critical steps and the chemical basis for these steps are examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Impurity residues at the epilayer-substrate interface following subsequent homoepitaxial growth are studied using AES, SIMS and TEM. Finally, scanning tunneling microscopy is used to examine the effect of cleaning methods on substrate morphology.

  6. Hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowire photocatalysis: Benzene oxidation and methyl red decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Suoyuan; Tsang, Chi Him A.; Kang, Zhenhui; Liu, Yang; Wong, Ningbew; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2011-12-15

    Graphical abstract: H-SiNWs can catalyze hydroxylation of benzene and degradation of methyl red under visible light irradiation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires were active photocatalyst in the hydroxylation of benzene under light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires were also effective in the decomposition of methyl red dye. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Si/SiO{sub x} core-shell structure is the main reason of the obtained high selectivity during the hydroxylation. -- Abstract: Hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires (H-SiNWs) were used as heterogeneous photocatalysts for the hydroxylation of benzene and for the decomposition of methyl red under visible light irradiation. The above reactions were monitored by GC-MS and UV-Vis spectrophotometry, respectively, which shows 100% selectivity for the transformation of benzene to phenol. A complete decomposition of a 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M methyl red solution was achieved within 30 min. The high selectivity for the hydroxylation of benzene and the photodecomposition demonstrate the catalytic activity of ultrafine H-SiNWs during nanocatalysis.

  7. Bonding Structure of Phenylacetylene on Hydrogen-Terminated Si(111) and Si(100): Surface Photoelectron Spectroscopy Analysis and Ab Initio Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    M Kondo; T Mates; D Fischer; F Wudl; E Kramer

    2011-12-31

    Interfaces between phenylacetylene (PA) monolayers and two silicon surfaces, Si(111) and Si(100), are probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and the results are analyzed using ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The monolayer systems are prepared via the surface hydrosilylation reaction between PA and hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces. The following spectral features are obtained for both of the PA-Si(111) and PA-Si(100) systems: a broad {pi}-{pi}* shakeup peak at 292 eV (XPS), a broad first ionization peak at 3.8 eV (UPS), and a low-energy C 1s {yields} {pi}* resonance peak at 284.3 eV (NEXAFS). These findings are ascribed to a styrene-like {pi}-conjugated molecular structure at the PA-Si interface by comparing the experimental data with theoretical analysis results. A conclusion is drawn that the vinyl group can keep its {pi}-conjugation character on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) [H:Si(100)] surface composed of the dihydride (SiH{sub 2}) groups as well as on hydrogen-terminated Si(111) having the monohydride (SiH) group. The formation mechanism of the PA-Si(100) interface is investigated within cluster ab initio calculations, and the possible structure of the H:Si(100) surface is discussed based on available data.

  8. Electronic Structure of Single-Crystal Monolayer Graphene on Hydrogen-Terminated Germanium Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sung Joon; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joung Real; Whang, Dongmok

    2015-03-01

    Graphene, atomically flat 2-Dimensional layered nano material, has a lot of interesting characteristics from its unusual electronic structure. Almost properties of graphene are influenced by its crystallinity, therefore the uniform growth of single crystal graphene and layer control over the wafer scale areas remains a challenge in the fields of electronic, photonic and other devices based on graphene. Here, we report the method to make wafer scale single crystal monolayer graphene on hydrogen terminated germanium(110) surface and properties and electronic band structure of the graphene by using the tool of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electron transport measurement, electron diffraction and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  9. DIET in highly charged ion interaction with silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Nagata, K.; Tona, M.; Sakurai, M.; Nakamura, N.; Yamada, C.; Ohtani, S.

    2005-11-01

    We have observed mass spectra of desorbed ions from a clean and a hydrogen terminated silicon surfaces by the impact of highly charged ions (Xe q+ , q = 26, 34, 44 and 50). The released ions mainly consist of proton for both surfaces, and the quantum yield of proton desorption for hydrogen terminated surface exceeds unity. It is seemed that charge state dependence of ion yield roughly follows q5 rule reported by Kuroki et al. in the experiments for lower charge states.

  10. Quantum Point Contacts and Valley Filters on a 6-fold Degenerate Hydrogen-terminated Si(111) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Luke D.; Hu, Binhui; Kane, B. E.

    Hydrogen-terminated Si(111) surfaces preserve the 6-fold valley degeneracy and anisotropic electron mass predicted in bulk Si, providing a unique environment for 2-D electron systems (2DESs). Our group has demonstrated high mobility as well as the fractional quantum Hall effect for electrons confined on the Si(111) surfaces, establishing evidence that they are ideal platforms for 2DESs and lower dimensional systems. Recently, we have succeeded in fabricating high mobility ambipolar devices and have found that heavily p-doped regions can be used as lateral depletion gates for confinement of 2DESs induced by a top gate. Here, we describe our efforts to extend this technology to the nanoscale and in particular towards the fabrication of quantum point contacts (QPCs). QPCs realized in materials with anisotropic electron mass may exhibit valley filter phenomena leading to extreme sensitivity to single donor occupancy, and thus are of interest to measurement schemes for donor-based quantum information processing. Preliminary measurements and fabrication techniques will be discussed

  11. Comparative investigation of surface transfer doping of hydrogen terminated diamond by high electron affinity insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verona, C.; Ciccognani, W.; Colangeli, S.; Limiti, E.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a comparative study of transfer doping of hydrogenated single crystal diamond surface by insulators featured by high electron affinity, such as Nb2O5, WO3, V2O5, and MoO3. The low electron affinity Al2O3 was also investigated for comparison. Hole transport properties were evaluated in the passivated hydrogenated diamond films by Hall effect measurements, and were compared to un-passivated diamond films (air-induced doping). A drastic improvement was observed in passivated samples in terms of conductivity, stability with time, and resistance to high temperatures. The efficiency of the investigated insulators, as electron accepting materials in hydrogenated diamond surface, is consistent with their electronic structure. These surface acceptor materials generate a higher hole sheet concentration, up to 6.5 × 1013 cm-2, and a lower sheet resistance, down to 2.6 kΩ/sq, in comparison to the atmosphere-induced values of about 1 × 1013 cm-2 and 10 kΩ/sq, respectively. On the other hand, hole mobilities were reduced by using high electron affinity insulator dopants. Hole mobility as a function of hole concentration in a hydrogenated diamond layer was also investigated, showing a well-defined monotonically decreasing trend.

  12. Polycrystalline domain structure of pentacene thin films epitaxially grown on a hydrogen-terminated Si(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikata, S.; Sadowski, J. T.; Al-Mahboob, A.; Nishihara, T.; Fujikawa, Y.; Sakurai, T.; Nakajima, K.; Sazaki, G.; Suto, S.

    2007-10-15

    Single-monolayer high pentacene (Pn) dendrites grown on a hydrogen-terminated Si(111) surface [H-Si(111)] under ultrahigh vacuum were observed by low-energy electron microscopy and microbeam low-energy electron diffraction analyses. We determined the epitaxial structure (type I) inside a unique polycrystalline domain structure of such dendrites, each of which has six equivalent epitaxial orientations of Pn two-dimensional (2D) unit cells. There are three sets of these cells, which are rotated {+-}120 deg. relative to each other. Domain boundaries inside each dendrite were successfully observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. In addition, we found another epitaxial relation (type II): the polycrystalline domain structure and lattice parameters are similar to those of the type-I dendrite; however, the 2D unit cells of the type-II dendrite are rotated approximately 90 deg. relative to those of the type-I dendrite. These results suggest that the crystal structure of the dendrites on H-Si(111) is determined mainly by the interaction between Pn molecules. Each dendrite is composed of domains that are exclusively of type I or II. The so-called point-on-line coincidences are found between the Pn 2D lattices of types I and II, and H-Si(111). The higher commensurability of the type-I dendrites than the type-II dendrites results in a higher probability of type-I dendrite formation. Moreover, for both the type-I and type-II dendrites, we found supercell structures. We estimated the minimum interface energy between the dendrite and H-Si(111) from an island's free energy, which is necessary to reproduce the growth of a single-monolayer high dendrite.

  13. Formation of stable Si–O–C submonolayers on hydrogen-terminated silicon(111) under low-temperature conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ngalim, Siti Hawa; Scaccabarozzi, Andrea; Narducci, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this letter, we report results of a hydrosilylation carried out on bifunctional molecules by using two different approaches, namely through thermal treatment and photochemical treatment through UV irradiation. Previously, our group also demonstrated that in a mixed alkyne/alcohol solution, surface coupling is biased towards the formation of Si–O–C linkages instead of Si–C linkages, thus indirectly supporting the kinetic model of hydrogen abstraction from the Si–H surface (Khung, Y. L. et al. Chem. – Eur. J. 2014, 20, 15151–15158). To further examine the probability of this kinetic model we compare the results from reactions with bifunctional alkynes carried out under thermal treatment (<130 °C) and under UV irradiation, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements showed that under thermal conditions, the Si–H surface predominately reacts to form Si–O–C bonds from ethynylbenzyl alcohol solution while the UV photochemical route ensures that the alcohol-based alkyne may also form Si–C bonds, thus producing a monolayer of mixed linkages. The results suggested the importance of surface radicals as well as the type of terminal group as being essential towards directing the nature of surface linkage. PMID:25671148

  14. Anisotropic surface phonon dispersion of the hydrogen-terminated Si(110)-(1×1) surface: One-dimensional phonons propagating along the glide planes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Stephane Yu; Matsui, Kazuki; Kato, Hiroki; Suto, Shozo; Yamada, Taro

    2014-03-14

    We have measured the surface phonon dispersion curves on the hydrogen-terminated Si(110)-(1×1) surface with the two-dimensional space group of p2mg along the two highly symmetric and rectangular directions of ΓX{sup ¯} and ΓX{sup ′¯} using high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. All the essential energy-loss peaks on H:Si(110) were assigned to the vibrational phonon modes by using the selection rules of inelastic electron scattering including the glide-plane symmetry. Actually, the surface phonon modes of even-symmetry to the glide plane (along ΓX{sup ¯}) were observed in the first Brillouin zone, and those of odd-symmetry to the glide plane were in the second Brillouin zone. The detailed assignment was made by referring to theoretical phonon dispersion curves of Gräschus et al. [Phys. Rev. B 56, 6482 (1997)]. We found that the H–Si stretching and bending modes, which exhibit highly anisotropic dispersion, propagate along ΓX{sup ¯} direction as a one-dimensional phonon. Judging from the surface structure as well as our classical and quantum mechanical estimations, the H–Si stretching phonon propagates by a direct repulsive interaction between the nearest neighbor H atoms facing each other along ΓX{sup ¯}, whereas the H–Si bending phonon propagates by indirect interaction through the substrate Si atomic linkage.

  15. Morphology, structure, and magnetism of FeCo thin films electrodeposited on hydrogen-terminated Si(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zarpellon, J; Jurca, H F; Mattoso, N; Klein, J J; Schreiner, W H; Ardisson, J D; Macedo, W A A; Mosca, D H

    2007-12-15

    In this work we describe the fabrication of FeCo alloy (less than 10 at% Co) thin films from aqueous ammonium sulfate solutions onto n-type Si(111) substrates using potentiostatic electrodeposition at room temperature. The incorporation of Co into the deposits tends to inhibit Fe silicide formation and to protect deposits against oxidation under air exposure. As the incorporation of Co was progressively increased, the sizes of nuclei consisting of FeCo alloy increased, leading to films with a highly oriented body-centered cubic structure with crystalline texture, where (110) planes remain preferentially oriented parallel to the film surface. PMID:17900605

  16. Morphology, structure, and magnetism of FeCo thin films electrodeposited on hydrogen-terminated Si(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zarpellon, J; Jurca, H F; Mattoso, N; Klein, J J; Schreiner, W H; Ardisson, J D; Macedo, W A A; Mosca, D H

    2007-12-15

    In this work we describe the fabrication of FeCo alloy (less than 10 at% Co) thin films from aqueous ammonium sulfate solutions onto n-type Si(111) substrates using potentiostatic electrodeposition at room temperature. The incorporation of Co into the deposits tends to inhibit Fe silicide formation and to protect deposits against oxidation under air exposure. As the incorporation of Co was progressively increased, the sizes of nuclei consisting of FeCo alloy increased, leading to films with a highly oriented body-centered cubic structure with crystalline texture, where (110) planes remain preferentially oriented parallel to the film surface.

  17. High-reliability passivation of hydrogen-terminated diamond surface by atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Daicho, Akira Saito, Tatsuya; Kurihara, Shinichiro; Kawarada, Hiroshi; Hiraiwa, Atsushi

    2014-06-14

    Although the two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) of a hydrogen-terminated diamond surface provides a unique p-type conducting layer for high-performance transistors, the conductivity is highly sensitive to its environment. Therefore, the surface must be passivated to preserve the 2DHG, especially at high temperature. We passivated the surface at high temperature (450 °C) without the loss of C-H surface bonds by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and investigated the thermal reliability of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film. As a result, C-H bonds were preserved, and the hole accumulation effect appeared after the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition by ALD with H{sub 2}O as an oxidant. The sheet resistivity and hole density were almost constant between room temperature and 500 °C by the passivation with thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film thicker than 38 nm deposited by ALD at 450 °C. After the annealing at 550 °C in air The sheet resistivity and hole density were preserved. These results indicate the possibility of high-temperature application of the C-H surface diamond device in air. In the case of lower deposition temperatures, the sheet resistivity increased after air annealing, suggesting an insufficient protection capability of these films. Given the result of sheet resistivity after annealing, the increase in the sheet resistivity of these samples was not greatly significant. However, bubble like patterns were observed in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films formed from 200 to 400 °C by air annealing at 550 °C for 1 h. On the other hand, the patterns were no longer observed at 450 °C deposition. Thus, this 450 °C deposition is the sole solution to enabling power device application, which requires high reliability at high temperatures.

  18. Highly Stable Bonding of Thiol Monolayers to Hydrogen-Terminated Si via Supercritical Carbon Dioxide: Toward a Super Hydrophobic and Bioresistant Surface.

    PubMed

    Bhartia, Bhavesh; Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Gandhimathi, Chinnasamy; Sharma, Mohit; Kuo, Yen-Chien; Chen, Chia-Hao; Reddy, Venugopal Jayarama; Troadec, Cedric; Srinivasan, Madapusi Palavedu

    2016-09-21

    Oxide-free silicon chemistry has been widely studied using wet-chemistry methods, but for emerging applications such as molecular electronics on silicon, nanowire-based sensors, and biochips, these methods may not be suitable as they can give rise to defects due to surface contamination, residual solvents, which in turn can affect the grafted monolayer devices for practical applications. Therefore, there is a need for a cleaner, reproducible, scalable, and environmentally benign monolayer grafting process. In this work, monolayers of alkylthiols were deposited on oxide-free semiconductor surfaces using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) as a carrier fluid owing to its favorable physical properties. The identity of grafted monolayers was monitored with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HRXPS), XPS, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle measurements, and ellipsometry. Monolayers on oxide-free silicon were able to passivate the surface for more than 50 days (10 times than the conventional methods) without any oxide formation in ambient atmosphere. Application of the SCCO2 process was further extended by depositing alkylthiol monolayers on fragile and brittle 1D silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and 2D germanium substrates. With the recent interest in SiNWs for biological applications, the thiol-passivated oxide-free silicon nanowire surfaces were also studied for their biological response. Alkylthiol-functionalized SiNWs showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation owing to their superhydrophobicity combined with the rough surface morphology. Furthermore, tribological studies showed a sharp decrease in the coefficient of friction, which was found to be dependent on the alkyl chain length and surface bond. These studies can be used for the development of cost-effective and highly stable monolayers for practical applications such as solar cells, biosensors, molecular electronics, micro- and nano

  19. Highly Stable Bonding of Thiol Monolayers to Hydrogen-Terminated Si via Supercritical Carbon Dioxide: Toward a Super Hydrophobic and Bioresistant Surface.

    PubMed

    Bhartia, Bhavesh; Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Gandhimathi, Chinnasamy; Sharma, Mohit; Kuo, Yen-Chien; Chen, Chia-Hao; Reddy, Venugopal Jayarama; Troadec, Cedric; Srinivasan, Madapusi Palavedu

    2016-09-21

    Oxide-free silicon chemistry has been widely studied using wet-chemistry methods, but for emerging applications such as molecular electronics on silicon, nanowire-based sensors, and biochips, these methods may not be suitable as they can give rise to defects due to surface contamination, residual solvents, which in turn can affect the grafted monolayer devices for practical applications. Therefore, there is a need for a cleaner, reproducible, scalable, and environmentally benign monolayer grafting process. In this work, monolayers of alkylthiols were deposited on oxide-free semiconductor surfaces using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) as a carrier fluid owing to its favorable physical properties. The identity of grafted monolayers was monitored with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HRXPS), XPS, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle measurements, and ellipsometry. Monolayers on oxide-free silicon were able to passivate the surface for more than 50 days (10 times than the conventional methods) without any oxide formation in ambient atmosphere. Application of the SCCO2 process was further extended by depositing alkylthiol monolayers on fragile and brittle 1D silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and 2D germanium substrates. With the recent interest in SiNWs for biological applications, the thiol-passivated oxide-free silicon nanowire surfaces were also studied for their biological response. Alkylthiol-functionalized SiNWs showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation owing to their superhydrophobicity combined with the rough surface morphology. Furthermore, tribological studies showed a sharp decrease in the coefficient of friction, which was found to be dependent on the alkyl chain length and surface bond. These studies can be used for the development of cost-effective and highly stable monolayers for practical applications such as solar cells, biosensors, molecular electronics, micro- and nano

  20. Active Acetylcholinesterase Immobilization on a Functionalized Silicon Surface.

    PubMed

    Khaldi, K; Sam, S; Gouget-Laemmel, A C; Henry de Villeneuve, C; Moraillon, A; Ozanam, F; Yang, J; Kermad, A; Ghellai, N; Gabouze, N

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we studied the attachment of active acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme on a silicon substrate as a potential biomarker for the detection of organophosphorous (OP) pesticides. A multistep functionalization strategy was developed on a crystalline silicon surface: a carboxylic acid-terminated monolayer was grafted onto a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface by photochemical hydrosilylation, and then AChE was covalently attached through amide bonds using an activation EDC/NHS process. Each step of the modification was quantitatively characterized by ex-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated-total-reflection geometry (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The kinetics of enzyme immobilization was investigated using in situ real-time infrared spectroscopy. The enzymatic activity of immobilized acetylcholinesterase enzymes was determined with a colorimetric test. The surface concentration of active AChE was estimated to be Γ = 1.72 × 10(10) cm(-2).

  1. High resolution core level spectroscopy of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Rietwyk, K. J.; Tadich, A.; Stacey, A.; Ley, L.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are presented that address a long standing inconsistency in the treatment of the C1s core level of hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond. Through a comparison of surface and bulk sensitive measurements we show that there is a surface related core level component to lower binding energy of the bulk diamond component; this component has a chemical shift of -0.16+/- 0.05 eV which has been attributed to carbon atoms which are part of the hydrogen termination. Additionally, our results indicate that the asymmetry of the hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond C1s core level is an intrinsic aspect of the bulk diamond peak which we have attributed to sub-surface carbon layers.

  2. Covalent attachment of bent-core mesogens to silicon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Scheres, Luc; Achten, Remko; Giesbers, Marcel; de Smet, Louis C P M; Arafat, Ahmed; Sudhölter, Ernst J R; Marcelis, Antonius T M; Zuilhof, Han

    2009-02-01

    Two vinyl-terminated bent core-shaped liquid crystalline molecules that exhibit thermotropic antiferroelectric SmCPA phases have been covalently attached onto a hydrogen-terminated silicon(111) surface. The surface attachment was achieved via a mild procedure from a mesitylene solution, using visible light at room temperature. AFM measurements indicate that a smooth monolayer has been formed. The thickness of the monolayer was evaluated with ellipsometry and X-ray reflectivity. Although the molecules differ in length by four carbon atoms, the thickness of the resulting monolayers was the same. The measured thicknesses correspond quite well with the smectic layer thickness in the bulk liquid crystalline material, suggesting a similar self-organization within the monolayer. From attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR), which clearly shows the C-H and C-O vibrations, a tilt angle of the mesogens is deduced that also corresponds well with the tilt angle in the liquid crystalline state. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements confirm the high quality of the monolayers, with only marginal silicon oxide formation. The elemental composition and amounts of different O and C atoms deduced from the high-resolution XPS correspond very well with the calculated compositions.

  3. Delta-Doping at Wafer Level for High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of Silicon Imaging Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shoulch (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Greer, Frank (Inventor); Carver, Alexander G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods for producing high quantum efficiency silicon devices. A silicon MBE has a preparation chamber that provides for cleaning silicon surfaces using an oxygen plasma to remove impurities and a gaseous (dry) NH3 + NF3 room temperature oxide removal process that leaves the silicon surface hydrogen terminated. Silicon wafers up to 8 inches in diameter have devices that can be fabricated using the cleaning procedures and MBE processing, including delta doping.

  4. Surface alloying of silicon into aluminum substrate.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.

    1998-10-28

    Aluminum alloys that are easily castable tend to have lower silicon content and hence lower wear resistance. The use of laser surface alloying to improve the surface wear resistance of 319 and 320 aluminum alloys was examined. A silicon layer was painted onto the surface to be treated. A high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiberoptic beam delivery was used to carry out the laser surface treatment to enhance the silicon content. Process parameters were varied to minimize the surface roughness from overlap of the laser beam treatment. The surface-alloyed layer was characterized and the silicon content was determined.

  5. Biofunctionalization on Alkylated Silicon Substrate Surfaces via “Click” Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guoting; Santos, Catherine; Zhang, Wen; Li, Yan; Kumar, Amit; Erasquin, Uriel J.; Liu, Kai; Muradov, Pavel; Trautner, Barbara Wells; Cai, Chengzhi

    2010-01-01

    Biofunctionalization of silicon substrates is important to the development of silicon-based biosensors and devices. Compared to conventional organosiloxane films on silicon oxide intermediate layers, organic monolayers directly bound to the non-oxidized silicon substrates via Si-C bonds enhance the sensitivity of detection and the stability against hydrolytic cleavage. Such monolayers presenting a high density of terminal alkynyl groups for bioconjugation via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC, a “click” reaction) were reported. However, yields of the CuAAC reactions on these monolayer platforms were low. Also, the non-specific adsorption of proteins on the resultant surfaces remained a major obstacle for many potential biological applications. Herein, we report a new type of “clickable” monolayers grown by selective, photo-activated surface hydrosilylation of α,ω-alkenynes, where the alkynyl terminal is protected with a trimethylgermanyl (TMG) group, on hydrogen-terminated silicon substrates. The TMG groups on the film are readily removed in aqueous solutions in the presence of Cu(I). Significantly, the degermanylation and the subsequent CuAAC reaction with various azides could be combined into a single step in good yields. Thus, oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) with an azido-tag was attached to the TMG-alkyne surfaces, leading to OEG-terminated surfaces that reduced the non-specific adsorption of protein (fibrinogen) by >98%. The CuAAC reaction could be performed in microarray format to generate arrays of mannose and biotin with varied densities on the protein-resistant OEG background. We also demonstrated that the monolayer platform could be functionalized with mannose for highly specific capturing of living targets (Escherichia coli expressing fimbriae) onto the silicon substrates. PMID:21033708

  6. Mechanisms and energetics of hydride dissociation reactions on surfaces of plasma-deposited silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Tejinder; Valipa, Mayur S.; Mountziaris, T. J.; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2007-11-01

    We report results from a detailed analysis of the fundamental silicon hydride dissociation processes on silicon surfaces and discuss their implications for the surface chemical composition of plasma-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films. The analysis is based on a synergistic combination of first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations of hydride dissociation on the hydrogen-terminated Si(001)-(2×1) surface and molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of adsorbed SiH3 radical precursor dissociation on surfaces of MD-grown a-Si :H films. Our DFT calculations reveal that, in the presence of fivefold coordinated surface Si atoms, surface trihydride species dissociate sequentially to form surface dihydrides and surface monohydrides via thermally activated pathways with reaction barriers of 0.40-0.55eV. The presence of dangling bonds (DBs) results in lowering the activation barrier for hydride dissociation to 0.15-0.20eV, but such DB-mediated reactions are infrequent. Our MD simulations on a-Si :H film growth surfaces indicate that surface hydride dissociation reactions are predominantly mediated by fivefold coordinated surface Si atoms, with resulting activation barriers of 0.35-0.50eV. The results are consistent with experimental measurements of a-Si :H film surface composition using in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, which indicate that the a-Si :H surface is predominantly covered with the higher hydrides at low temperatures, while the surface monohydride, SiH(s ), becomes increasingly more dominant as the temperature is increased.

  7. In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy of high-kappa oxide atomic layer deposition onto silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ming-Tsung

    Ultra-thin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) layers have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA) and tetrakis-ethyl-methyl-amino-hafnium (TEMAH) respectively with heavy water (D2O) as the oxidizing agent. Several different silicon surfaces were used as substrates such as hydrogen terminated silicon (H/Si), SC2 (or RCA 2) cleaned native silicon oxide (SiO 2/Si), and silicon (oxy)nitride. In-situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been adopted for the study of the growth mechanisms during ALD of these films. The vibrational spectra of gas phase TEMAH and its reaction byproducts with oxidants have also been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) normal mode calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when it is combined with linear wave-number scaling method and Fermi resonance mechanism. Ether (-C-O-C-) and tertiary alkylamine (N(R1R 2R3)) compounds are the two most dominant products of TEMAH reacting with oxygen gas and water. When ozone is used as the oxidant, gas phase CH2O, CH3NO2, CH3-N=C=O and other compounds containing -(C=O)- and --C-O-C- (or --O-C-) segments are observed. With substrate temperatures less than 400°C and 300°C for TMA and TEMAH respectively, Al oxide and Hf oxide ALD can be appropriately performed on silicon surfaces. Thin silicon (oxy)nitride thermally grown in ammonia on silicon substrate can significantly reduce silicon oxide interlayer formation during ALD and post-deposition annealing. The crystallization temperature of amorphous ALD grown HfO2 on nitridized silicon is 600°C, which is 100°C higher than on the other silicon surfaces. When HfO2 is grown on H/Si(111) at 100°C deposition temperature, minimum 5--10 ALD cycles are required for the full surface coverage. The steric effect can be seen by the evolution of the H-Si stretching mode at 2083 cm-1. The observed red shift of H-Si stretching to ˜ 2060 cm-1 can be caused by Si

  8. Hydrogen-terminated detonation nanodiamond: Impedance spectroscopy and thermal stability studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shi; Li, Jiangling; Kundrát, Vojtěch; Abbot, Andrew M.; Ye, Haitao

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effect of hydrogen termination on the electrical properties and impedance spectra of detonation nanodiamond. The impedance spectra revealed that the hydrogen-termination process increases the electrical conductivity by four orders of magnitude at room temperature. An equivalent circuit has been proposed to correlate with the conduction mechanism. Arrhenius plot showed that there were two different activation energy levels located at 0.089 eV and 0.63 eV between 50 °C and 400 °C. The possible physical mechanism corresponding to these activation energy levels has been discussed. Hydrogen-terminated detonation nanodiamond has been further annealed at different temperatures prior to FTIR and XPS measurements in order to understand their thermal stability. The results demonstrated that the surface oxidization occurred between 100 °C and 150 °C. However, the C-H bonds could partially survive when the temperature reaches 400 °C in air.

  9. Investigation of silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Sin sub x grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVO) for passivating silicon surfaces was studied. The application of PECVO SiN sub x films for passivations of silicon N+/P or P+/N solar cells is of particular interest. This program has involved the following areas of investigation: (1) Establishment of PECVO system and development of procedures for growth of SiN sub x; (2) Optical characterization of SiN sub x films; (3) Characterization of the SiN sub x/Si interface; (4) Surface recombination velocity deduced from photoresponse; (5) Current-Voltage analyses of silicon N+/P cells; and (6) Gated diode device studies.

  10. Fully methylated, atomically flat (111) silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidélis, A.; Ozanam, F.; Chazalviel, J.-N.

    2000-01-01

    The atomically flat hydrogenated (111) silicon surface has been methylated by anodization in a Grignard reagent and the surface obtained characterized by infrared spectroscopy. 100% substitution of the hydrogen atoms by methyl groups is observed. The resulting surface exhibits preserved ordering and superior chemical stability.

  11. Microtextured Silicon Surfaces for Detectors, Sensors & Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, JE; Mazur, E

    2005-05-19

    With support from this award we studied a novel silicon microtexturing process and its application in silicon-based infrared photodetectors. By irradiating the surface of a silicon wafer with intense femtosecond laser pulses in the presence of certain gases or liquids, the originally shiny, flat surface is transformed into a dark array of microstructures. The resulting microtextured surface has near-unity absorption from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths well below the band gap. The high, broad absorption of microtextured silicon could enable the production of silicon-based photodiodes for use as inexpensive, room-temperature multi-spectral photodetectors. Such detectors would find use in numerous applications including environmental sensors, solar energy, and infrared imaging. The goals of this study were to learn about microtextured surfaces and then develop and test prototype silicon detectors for the visible and infrared. We were extremely successful in achieving our goals. During the first two years of this award, we learned a great deal about how microtextured surfaces form and what leads to their remarkable optical properties. We used this knowledge to build prototype detectors with high sensitivity in both the visible and in the near-infrared. We obtained room-temperature responsivities as high as 100 A/W at 1064 nm, two orders of magnitude higher than standard silicon photodiodes. For wavelengths below the band gap, we obtained responsivities as high as 50 mA/W at 1330 nm and 35 mA/W at 1550 nm, close to the responsivity of InGaAs photodiodes and five orders of magnitude higher than silicon devices in this wavelength region.

  12. Systematic spatial and stoichiometric screening towards understanding the surface of ultrasmall oxygenated silicon nanocrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaz, Shanawer; Zdetsis, Aristides D.; Koukaras, Emmanuel N.; Gülseren, Oǧuz; Sadiq, Imran

    2016-11-01

    In most of the realistic ab initio and model calculations which have appeared on the emission of light from silicon nanocrystals, the role of surface oxygen has been usually ignored, underestimated or completely ruled out. We investigate theoretically, by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) possible modes of oxygen bonding in hydrogen terminated silicon quantum dots using as a representative case of the Si29 nanocrystal. We have considered Bridge-bonded oxygen (BBO), Doubly-bonded oxygen (DBO), hydroxyl (OH) and Mix of these oxidizing agents. Due to stoichiometry, all comparisons performed are unbiased with respect to composition whereas spatial distribution of oxygen species pointed out drastic change in electronic and cohesive characteristics of nanocrytals. From an overall perspective of this study, it is shown that bridge bonded oxygenated Si nanocrystals accompanied by Mix have higher binding energies and large electronic gap compared to nanocrystals with doubly bonded oxygen atoms. In addition, it is observed that the presence of OH along with BBO, DBO and mixed configurations further lowers electronic gaps and binding energies but trends in same fashion. It is also demonstrated that within same composition, oxidizing constituent, along with their spatial distribution substantially alters binding energy, highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap (up to 1.48 eV) and localization of frontier orbitals.

  13. Monitoring and optimization of silicon surface quality

    SciTech Connect

    M`saad, H.; Michel, J.; Reddy, A.; Kimerling, L.C.

    1995-08-01

    The authors have used contactless photoconductance decay measurements to monitor cleaning processes, surface contamination, and surface roughness. Changes in surface chemistry are evidenced by a degradation (increase) in the surface recombination velocity (decrease in measured decay time). The authors have applied the tool to monitor cleaning effectiveness, surface cleanliness, and roughness during cell processing. Iodine in methanol achieves a superior passivation of Si than H in 48% HF. The measured minority carrier lifetime in this solution is higher than in 48% HF. The authors illustrate that I-terminated silicon surfaces are more stable than H-terminated surfaces. They confirm that deionized water is responsible for the roughening of silicon surfaces. They show that NH{sub 4}F is a superior alternate clean to dilute HF.

  14. Charge carrier trapping at passivated silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiffe, Johannes; Hofmann, Marc; Rentsch, Jochen; Preu, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    Surface passivation has become an essential factor for translating high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cell concepts into industrial production schemes. In photovoltaics, a widespread method to determine the surface recombination is to measure the effective charge carrier lifetime from the photoconductance of symmetrically passivated silicon wafers in transient or quasi-static mode. In this work, it is shown how the injection history at the surface influences the transient effective lifetime measurement for several passivation layers. This dependence leads to systematic differences between quasi-static and transient measurements. The influence can be explained by charge trapping in slow surface states at the surface passivation layer. A model including slow surface states is used in a fit procedure to evaluate the capture cross sections of these traps. The observed effect is well-pronounced for silicon-rich passivation layers like a-Si:H, a-SiCx:H or silicon-rich a-SiOxNy:H. For PECVD-AlOx layers and for thermally grown SiO2 layers as well, however, the effective lifetime measurement could be influenced.

  15. Controlled Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Michael

    2000-03-01

    Opportunities exist for controllably enhancing the adhesion of silicone surfaces, ranging from modest enhancement of release force levels of pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) release liners by incorporation of adhesion promoters known as high release additives (HRA), to permanent bonding of silicone elastomers using surface modification techniques such as plasma or corona treatment. Although only a part of the complex interaction of factors contributing to adhesion, surface properties such as wettability are a critical component in the understanding and control of release and adhesion phenomena. Surface characterization studies of low-surface-energy silicones before and after various adhesion modification strategies are reviewed. The silicones include polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and fluorosiloxane elastomers and coatings. Techniques used include contact angle, the Johnson, Kendall and Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Topics addressed are: use of HRA in PDMS release liners, the interaction of PDMS PSAs with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and the effect of plasma treatment on PDMS and fluorosiloxane surfaces.

  16. Formation of metal nanoparticles in silicon nanopores: Plasmon resonance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisski, S.; Goller, B.; Heck, S. C.; Maier, S. A.; Fujii, M.; Kovalev, D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method for the formation of noble metal nanoparticle ensembles in nanostructured silicon. The key idea is based on the unique property of the large reduction potential of extended internal hydrogen-terminated porous silicon surfaces. The process of metal nanoparticle formation in porous silicon was experimentally traced using their optical plasmon resonance response. We also demonstrate that bimetallic compounds can be formed in porous silicon and that their composition can be controlled using this technique. Experimental results were found to contradict partially with considerations based on Mie theory.

  17. Nanoscale fabrication and characterization of chemically modified silicon surfaces using conductive atomic force microscopy in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinser, Christopher Reagan

    This dissertation examines the modification and characterization of hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces in organic liquids. Conductive atomic force microscope (cAFM) lithography is used to fabricate structures with sub-100 nm line width on H:Si(111) in n-alkanes, 1-alkenes, and 1-alkanes. Nanopatterning is accomplished by applying a positive (n-alkanes and 1-alkenes) or a negative (1-alkanes) voltage pulse to the silicon substrate with the cAFM tip connected to ground. The chemical and kinetic behavior of the patterned features is characterized using AFM, lateral force microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF SIMS), and chemical etching. Features patterned in hexadecane, 1-octadecene, and undecylenic acid methyl ester exhibited chemical and kinetic behavior consistent with AFM field induced oxidation. The oxide features are formed due to capillary condensation of a water meniscus at the AFM tip-sample junction. A space-charge limited growth model is proposed to explain the observed growth kinetics. Surface modifications produced in the presence of neat 1-dodecyne and 1-octadecyne exhibited a reduced lateral force compared to the background H:Si(111) substrate and were resistant to a hydrofluoric acid etch, characteristics which indicate that the patterned features are not due to field induced oxidation and which are consistent with the presence of the methyl-terminated 1-alkyne bound directly to the silicon surface through silicon-carbon bonds. In addition to the cAFM patterned surfaces, full monolayers of undecylenic acid methyl ester (SAM-1) and undec-10-enoic acid 2-bromoethyl ester (SAM-2) were grown on H:Si(111) substrates using ultraviolet light. The structure and chemistry of the monolayers were characterized using AFM, TOF SIMS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), X-ray standing waves (XSW), and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). These combined analyses provide evidence that SAM-1 and SAM-2 form dense monolayers

  18. Nanoparticle-based etching of silicon surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard; Duda, Anna; Ginley, David S.; Yost, Vernon; Meier, Daniel; Ward, James S.

    2011-12-13

    A method (300) of texturing silicon surfaces (116) such to reduce reflectivity of a silicon wafer (110) for use in solar cells. The method (300) includes filling (330, 340) a vessel (122) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface 116) of a wafer or substrate (112). The etching solution (124) is made up of a catalytic nanomaterial (140) and an oxidant-etchant solution (146). The catalytic nanomaterial (140) may include gold or silver nanoparticles or noble metal nanoparticles, each of which may be a colloidal solution. The oxidant-etchant solution (146) includes an etching agent (142), such as hydrofluoric acid, and an oxidizing agent (144), such as hydrogen peroxide. Etching (350) is performed for a period of time including agitating or stirring the etching solution (124). The etch time may be selected such that the etched silicon surface (116) has a reflectivity of less than about 15 percent such as 1 to 10 percent in a 350 to 1000 nanometer wavelength range.

  19. Surface modification and charge transfer studies at silicon and gallium arsenide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Ashish

    This thesis describes chemical modifications of Si and GaAs surfaces, as a means of gaining control over the physical, chemical and electrical properties of these surfaces and of the interfaces formed from these surfaces. The Current-voltage properties of n-GaAs photoanodes were evaluated in KOH-Sesp{-/2-}(aq), CHsb3CN-ferrocene (Fc)sp{+/0}, and CHsb3CN-methyl viologen (MV)sp{2+/+} solutions. Chemisorption of transition-metal ions (Rhsp{III},\\ Rhsp{III},\\ Cosp{III},\\ Ossp{III}) onto GaAs has been shown previously to effect improved photoanode behavior for n-GaAs/KOH-Sesp{-/2-}(aq) contacts, but it is not clear whether the chemisorbed metal forms a buried semiconductor/metal (Schottky) junction or results in a "hybrid" semiconductor/metal/liquid contact. Metal ion treated n-GaAs photoanodes displayed different open circuit voltages in contact with each electrolyte solution investigated. The role of the chemisorbed metal in the n-GaAs/KOH-Sesp{-/2-}(aq) system is, therefore, best described as catalyzing interfacial charge transfer at the semiconductor/liquid interface, as opposed to forming a semiconductor/metal or semiconductor/insulator/metal contact. The ability to modify Si surface without partial oxidation or formation of electrical defects is potentially important. However, little is known about the chemistry of these surfaces under ambient temperature and pressure. A two-step halogenation/alkylation route to chemical functionalization of Si(111) surface is described, that allows covalent attachment of alkyl functionalities without concomitant oxidation of the silicon surface. In the first step, a hydrogen terminated silicon surface is chlorinated to obtain a chlorine terminated silicon surface. In the second step, the chlorinated surface is reacted with alkyl lithium or alkyl Grignard to obtain an alkyl terminated surface. The surface of silicon is extensively analyzed using a number of techniques such as XPS, HREELS, IRS, AES, TPD etc. The alkyl terminated

  20. Oxide driven strength evolution of silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Milosevic, Erik; Boyce, Brad L.

    2015-11-21

    Previous experiments have shown a link between oxidation and strength changes in single crystal silicon nanostructures but provided no clues as to the mechanisms leading to this relationship. Using atomic force microscope-based fracture strength experiments, molecular dynamics modeling, and measurement of oxide development with angle resolved x-ray spectroscopy we study the evolution of strength of silicon (111) surfaces as they oxidize and with fully developed oxide layers. We find that strength drops with partial oxidation but recovers when a fully developed oxide is formed and that surfaces intentionally oxidized from the start maintain their high initial strengths. MD simulations show that strength decreases with the height of atomic layer steps on the surface. These results are corroborated by a completely separate line of testing using micro-scale, polysilicon devices, and the slack chain method in which strength recovers over a long period of exposure to the atmosphere. Combining our results with insights from prior experiments we conclude that previously described strength decrease is a result of oxidation induced roughening of an initially flat silicon (1 1 1) surface and that this effect is transient, a result consistent with the observation that surfaces flatten upon full oxidation.

  1. A surface code quantum computer in silicon

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Charles D.; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J.; House, Matthew G.; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel—posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited. PMID:26601310

  2. A surface code quantum computer in silicon.

    PubMed

    Hill, Charles D; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J; House, Matthew G; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2015-10-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel-posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited. PMID:26601310

  3. A surface code quantum computer in silicon.

    PubMed

    Hill, Charles D; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J; House, Matthew G; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2015-10-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel-posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited.

  4. Porosity-dependent fractal nature of the porous silicon surface

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmani, N.; Dariani, R. S.

    2015-07-15

    Porous silicon films with porosity ranging from 42% to 77% were fabricated by electrochemical anodization under different current density. We used atomic force microscopy and dynamic scaling theory for deriving the surface roughness profile and processing the topography of the porous silicon layers, respectively. We first compared the topography of bare silicon surface with porous silicon and then studied the effect of the porosity of porous silicon films on their scaling behavior by using their self-affinity nature. Our work demonstrated that silicon compared to the porous silicon films has the highest Hurst parameter, indicating that the formation of porous layer due to the anodization etching of silicon surface leads to an increase of its roughness. Fractal analysis revealed that the evolution of the nanocrystallites’ fractal dimension along with porosity. Also, we found that both interface width and Hurst parameter are affected by the increase of porosity.

  5. Electrical transport properties of silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Kwonjae

    The understanding and utilization of electronic transport phenomena in low-dimensional, quantum-confined structures is of enormous scientific and technological interest. We have studied the electrical transport properties of systems that are quantum confined in one dimension but periodic in the other two dimensions, namely surfaces and ultrathin film materials. The electrical conductance of atomically clean, reconstructed silicon surfaces and interfaces was measured as a function of temperature in ultrahigh vacuum using the classical four-point probe technique. We employed Silicon on Insulator (SOI) technology to enhance the surface sensitivity of the four-point probe measurements. High-quality ohmic contacts were fabricated using ion-implantation. The Si(100)2 x 1 surface reconstruction consists of a two-dimensional, anti-ferromagnetic c(4 x 2) array of buckled silicon dimers. The surface undergoes a c(4 x 2) → 2 x 1 order-disorder transition near T = 200 K. Above 200 K, dimers fluctuate rapidly and the long-range c(4 x 2) ordering is destroyed. The conductance of this two-dimensional system has a temperature-dependence that is characteristic of a metal. The surface conductance appears closely correlated with the order parameter of the low-temperature c(4 x 2) structure. Thermally activated flip-flop motion of the Si dimers thus appears to be the dominant scattering mechanism. Recent high-resolution photoemission experiments indicate that the Si(111)7 x 7 surface reconstruction is a two-dimensional, correlated metal. The surface electrical conductivity decreases with increasing temperature, thus confirming metallic transport. However, conductivity measurements on ultrathin SOI indicate insulating behavior. The origin of this discrepancy is not understood and requires further investigation of the sheet conductance as a function of the SOI layer thickness. The Ga/Si(112) interface consists of a self-assembled, mesoscopic array of atomic Ga wires on a high-index Si

  6. Copper-assisted, anti-reflection etching of silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard

    2014-08-26

    A method (300) for etching a silicon surface (116) to reduce reflectivity. The method (300) includes electroless deposition of copper nanoparticles about 20 nanometers in size on the silicon surface (116), with a particle-to-particle spacing of 3 to 8 nanometers. The method (300) includes positioning (310) the substrate (112) with a silicon surface (116) into a vessel (122). The vessel (122) is filled (340) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface (116). The etching solution (124) includes an oxidant-etchant solution (146), e.g., an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The silicon surface (116) is etched (350) by agitating the etching solution (124) with, for example, ultrasonic agitation, and the etching may include heating (360) the etching solution (124) and directing light (365) onto the silicon surface (116). During the etching, copper nanoparticles enhance or drive the etching process.

  7. Micro-and nanostructured silicon-based superomniphobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Phuong Nhung; Boukherroub, Rabah; Thomy, Vincent; Coffinier, Yannick

    2014-02-15

    We report on the fabrication of silicon nanostructured superhydrophobic and superoleophobic surfaces also called "superomniphobic" surfaces. For this purpose, silicon interfaces with different surface morphologies, single or double scale structuration, were investigated. These structured surfaces were chemically treated with perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (PFTS), a low surface energy molecule. The morphology of the resulting surfaces was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Their wetting properties: static contact angle (CA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) were investigated using liquids of various surface tensions. Despite that we found that all the different morphologies display a superhydrophobic character (CA>150° for water) and superoleophobic behavior (CA ≈ 140° for hexadecane), values of hysteresis are strongly dependent on the liquid surface tension and surface morphology. The best surface described in this study was composed of a dual scale texturation i.e. silicon micropillars covered by silicon nanowires. Indeed, this surface displayed high static contact angles and low hysteresis for all tested liquids.

  8. Covalent biofunctionalization of silicon nitride surfaces.

    PubMed

    Arafat, Ahmed; Giesbers, Marcel; Rosso, Michel; Sudhölter, Ernst J R; Schroën, Karin; White, Richard G; Yang, Li; Linford, Matthew R; Zuilhof, Han

    2007-05-22

    Covalently attached organic monolayers on etched silicon nitride (SixN4; x >/= 3) surfaces were prepared by reaction of SixN4-coated wafers with neat or solutions of 1-alkenes and 1-alkynes in refluxing mesitylene. The surface modification was monitored by measurement of the static water contact angle, XPS, IRRAS, AFM, and ToF-SIMS, and evidence for the formation of Si-C bonds is presented. The etching can be achieved by dilute HF solutions and yields both Si-H and N-H moieties. The resulting etched SixN4 surfaces are functionalized by terminal carboxylic acid groups in either of two ways: (a) via attachment of a 10-undecenoic acid 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl ester (trifluoro ethanol ester) and subsequent thermal acid hydrolysis; (b) through attachment of a photocleavable ester, and subsequent photochemical cleavage, as this would allow photopatterned functionalized SixN4. The carboxylic acids are successfully used for the attachment of oligopeptides (aspartame) and complete proteins using EDC/NHS chemistry. Finally, an amino-terminated organic monolayer can be formed by reaction of HF-treated SixN4 surfaces with a N-(omega-undecylenyl)phthalimide, which yields an amino-terminated surface upon deprotection with hydrazine.

  9. Electrical properties of covalently linked silicon/polypyrrole junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeir, Inge E.; Kim, Namyong Y.; Laibinis, Paul E.

    1999-06-01

    Electrodeposited polypyrrole films were formed on chemically modified hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces that expose tethered pyrrole units. Semiconductor/polypyrrole junctions on the native and modified substrates exhibit diode-like characteristics, with those on the latter substrate exhibiting higher current densities and better ideality factors. Impedance measurements revealed that the improved electrical properties of junctions on the modified substrates were not due to a change in barrier height but rather a consequence of incorporating sites on the silicon surface where the polymer and semiconductor have direct contact.

  10. Comparison of the surface charge behavior of commercial silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of protons from aqueous solution onto the surfaces of a variety of commercial silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders has been examined using a surface titration methodology. This method provides information on some colloidal characteristics, such as the point of zero charge (pzc) and the variation of proton adsorption with dispersion pH, useful for the prediction of optimal ceramic-processing conditions. Qualitatively, the magnitude of the proton adsorption from solution reveals small differences among all of the materials studied. However, the results show that the pzc for the various silicon nitride powders is affected by the powder synthesis route. Complementary investigations have shown that milling can also act to shift the pzc exhibited by silicon nitride powder. Also, studies of the role of the electrolyte in the development of surface charge have indicated no evidence of specific adsorption of ammonium ion on either silicon nitride or silicon carbide powders.

  11. Atomic Scale Flatness of Chemically Cleaned Silicon Surfaces Studied by Infrared Attenuated-Total-Reflection Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawara, Kenichi; Yasaka, Tatsuhiro; Miyazaki, Seiichi; Hirose, Masataka

    1992-07-01

    Hydrogen-terminated Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces obtained by aqueous HF or pH-modified (pH{=}5.3) buffered-HF (BHF) treatments have been characterized by a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) attenuated-total-reflection (ATR) technique. The BHF treatment provides better surface flatness than the HF treatment. Pure water rinse is effective for improving the Si(111) surface flatness, while this is not the case for Si(100) because the pure water acts as an alkaline etchant and promotes the formation of (111) microfacets or microdefects on the (100) surface.

  12. Review of literature surface tension data for molten silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the surface tension of molten silicon are reported. For marangoni flow, the important parameter is the variation of surface tension with temperature, not the absolute value of the surface tension. It is not possible to calculate temperature coefficients using surface tension measurements from different experiments because the systematic errors are usually larger than the changes in surface tension because of temperature variations. The lack of good surface tension data for liquid silicon is probably due to its extreme chemical reactivity. A material which resists attack by molten silicon is not found. It is suggested that all of the sessile drip surface tension measurements are probably for silicon which is contaminated by the substrate materials.

  13. Consequences of Atomic Oxygen Interaction With Silicone and Silicone Contamination on Surfaces in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Haytas, Christy A.

    1999-01-01

    The exposure of silicones to atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit causes oxidation of the surface, resulting in conversion of silicone to silica. This chemical conversion increases the elastic modulus of the surface and initiates the development of a tensile strain. Ultimately, with sufficient exposure, tensile strain leads to cracking of the surface enabling the underlying unexposed silicone to be converted to silica resulting in additional depth and extent of cracking. The use of silicone coatings for the protection of materials from atomic oxygen attack is limited because of the eventual exposure of underlying unprotected polymeric material due to deep tensile stress cracking of the oxidized silicone. The use of moderate to high volatility silicones in low Earth orbit has resulted in a silicone contamination arrival at surfaces which are simultaneously being bombarded with atomic oxygen, thus leading to conversion of the silicone contaminant to silica. As a result of these processes, a gradual accumulation of contamination occurs leading to deposits which at times have been up to several microns thick (as in the case of a Mir solar array after 10 years in space). The contamination species typically consist of silicon, oxygen and carbon. which in the synergistic environment of atomic oxygen and UV radiation leads to increased solar absorptance and reduced solar transmittance. A comparison of the results of atomic oxygen interaction with silicones and silicone contamination will be presented based on the LDEF, EOIM-111, Offeq-3 spacecraft and Mir solar array in-space results. The design of a contamination pin-hole camera space experiment which uses atomic oxygen to produce an image of the sources of silicone contamination will also be presented.

  14. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-05-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of frequencies. The samples show significant far-infrared absorption due to concentration of charge carriers and a sharp surface phonon-polariton peak. The Casimir interaction of SiC with different materials is calculated and discussed. As a result of the infrared structure and beyond to low frequencies, the Casimir force for SiC-SiC and SiC-Au approaches very slowly the limit of ideal metals, while it saturates significantly below this limit if interaction with insulators takes place (SiC-SiO2). At short separations (<10 nm) analysis of the van der Waals force yielded Hamaker constants for SiC-SiC interactions lower but comparable to those of metals, which is of significance to adhesion and surface assembly processes. Finally, bifurcation analysis of microelectromechanical system actuation indicated that SiC can enhance the regime of stable equilibria against stiction.

  15. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-02-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold- coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was measured to obtain information for the minimum separation distance upon contact. Ellipsometry data for both systems were used to extract optical properties needed for the calculation of the Casimir force via the Lifshitz theory and for comparison to the experiment. Special attention is devoted to the separation of the electrostatic contribution to the measured total force. Our measurements demonstrate large contact potential V0(≈0.67 V ) , and a relatively small density of charges trapped in SiC. Knowledge of both Casimir and electrostatic forces between interacting materials is not only important from the fundamental point of view, but also for device applications involving actuating components at separations of less than 200 nm where surface forces play dominant role.

  16. Design of highly oleophobic cellulose surfaces from structured silicon templates.

    PubMed

    Aulin, Christian; Yun, Sang Ho; Wågberg, Lars; Lindström, Tom

    2009-11-01

    Structured silicon surfaces, possessing hierarchical porous characteristics consisting of micrometer-sized cavities superimposed upon a network of nanometer-sized pillars or wires, have been fabricated by a plasma-etching process. These surfaces have superoleophobic properties, after being coated with fluorinated organic trichlorosilanes, on intrinsically oleophilic surfaces. By comparison with flat silicon surfaces, which are oleophilic, it has been demonstrated that a combination of low surface energy and the structured features of the plasma-etched surface is essential to prevent oil from penetrating the surface cavities and thus induce the observed macroscopic superoleophobic phenomena with very low contact-angle hysteresis and low roll-off angles. The structured silicon surfaces were coated with cellulose nanocrystals using the polyelectrolyte multilayer technique. The cellulose surfaces prepared in this way were then coated with a monolayer of fluorinated trichlorosilanes. These porous cellulose films displayed highly nonwetting properties against a number of liquids with low surface tension, including alkanes such as hexadecane and decane. The wettability and chemical composition of the cellulose/silicon surfaces were characterized with contact-angle goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The nano/microtexture features of the cellulose/silicon surfaces were also studied with field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The highly oleophobic structured cellulose surfaces are very interesting model surfaces for the development of biomimetic self-cleaning surfaces in a vast array of products, including green constructions, packaging materials, protection against environmental fouling, sports, and outdoor clothing, and microfluidic systems. PMID:20356113

  17. Design of highly oleophobic cellulose surfaces from structured silicon templates.

    PubMed

    Aulin, Christian; Yun, Sang Ho; Wågberg, Lars; Lindström, Tom

    2009-11-01

    Structured silicon surfaces, possessing hierarchical porous characteristics consisting of micrometer-sized cavities superimposed upon a network of nanometer-sized pillars or wires, have been fabricated by a plasma-etching process. These surfaces have superoleophobic properties, after being coated with fluorinated organic trichlorosilanes, on intrinsically oleophilic surfaces. By comparison with flat silicon surfaces, which are oleophilic, it has been demonstrated that a combination of low surface energy and the structured features of the plasma-etched surface is essential to prevent oil from penetrating the surface cavities and thus induce the observed macroscopic superoleophobic phenomena with very low contact-angle hysteresis and low roll-off angles. The structured silicon surfaces were coated with cellulose nanocrystals using the polyelectrolyte multilayer technique. The cellulose surfaces prepared in this way were then coated with a monolayer of fluorinated trichlorosilanes. These porous cellulose films displayed highly nonwetting properties against a number of liquids with low surface tension, including alkanes such as hexadecane and decane. The wettability and chemical composition of the cellulose/silicon surfaces were characterized with contact-angle goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The nano/microtexture features of the cellulose/silicon surfaces were also studied with field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The highly oleophobic structured cellulose surfaces are very interesting model surfaces for the development of biomimetic self-cleaning surfaces in a vast array of products, including green constructions, packaging materials, protection against environmental fouling, sports, and outdoor clothing, and microfluidic systems.

  18. Surface Behavior of Boronic Acid-Terminated Silicones.

    PubMed

    Mansuri, Erum; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Schmidt, Rolf; Brook, Michael A; DeWolf, Christine E

    2015-09-01

    Silicone polymers, with their high flexibility, lie in a monolayer at the air-water interface as they are compressed until a critical pressure is reached, at which point multilayers are formed. Surface pressure measurements demonstrate that, in contrast, silicones that are end-modified with polar groups take up lower surface areas under compression because the polar groups submerge into the water phase. Boronic acids have the ability to undergo coordination with Lewis bases. As part of a program to examine the surface properties of boronic acids, we have prepared boronic acid-modified silicones (SiBAs) and examined them at the air-water interface to better understand if they behave like other end-functional silicones. Monolayers of silicones, aminopropylsilicones, and SiBAs were characterized at the air-water interface as a function of end functionalization and silicone chain length. Brewster angle and atomic force microscopies confirm domain formation and similar film morphologies for both functionalized and non-functionalized silicone chains. There is a critical surface pressure (10 mN m(-1)) independent of chain length that corresponds to a first-order phase transition. Below this transition, the film appears to be a homogeneous monolayer, whose thickness is independent of the chain length. Ellipsometry at the air-water interface indicates that the boronic acid functionality leads to a significant increase of film thickness at low molecular areas that is not seen for non-functionalized silicone chains. What differentiates the boronic acids from simple silicones or other end-functionalized silicones, in particular, is the larger area occupied by the headgroup when under compression compared to other or non-end-functionalized silicones, which suggests an in-plane rather than submerged orientation that may be driven by boronic acid self-complexation. PMID:26263385

  19. Nanoscale Etching and Indentation of Silicon Surfaces with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzegilenko, Fedor N.; Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash

    1998-01-01

    The possibility of nanolithography of silicon and germanium surfaces with bare carbon nanotube tips of scanning probe microscopy devices is considered with large scale classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations employing Tersoff's reactive many-body potential for heteroatomic C/Si/Ge system. Lithography plays a key role in semiconductor manufacturing, and it is expected that future molecular and quantum electronic devices will be fabricated with nanolithographic and nanodeposition techniques. Carbon nanotubes, rolled up sheets of graphene made of carbon, are excellent candidates for use in nanolithography because they are extremely strong along axial direction and yet extremely elastic along radial direction. In the simulations, the interaction of a carbon nanotube tip with silicon surfaces is explored in two regimes. In the first scenario, the nanotubes barely touch the surface, while in the second they are pushed into the surface to make "nano holes". The first - gentle scenario mimics the nanotube-surface chemical reaction induced by the vertical mechanical manipulation of the nanotube. The second -digging - scenario intends to study the indentation profiles. The following results are reported in the two cases. In the first regime, depending on the surface impact site, two major outcomes outcomes are the selective removal of either a single surface atom or a surface dimer off the silicon surface. In the second regime, the indentation of a silicon substrate by the nanotube is observed. Upon the nanotube withdrawal, several surface silicon atoms are adsorbed at the tip of the nanotube causing significant rearrangements of atoms comprising the surface layer of the silicon substrate. The results are explained in terms of relative strength of C-C, C-Si, and Si-Si bonds. The proposed method is very robust and does not require applied voltage between the nanotube tips and the surface. The implications of the reported controllable etching and hole-creating for

  20. Discontinuous ion tracks on silicon oxide on silicon surfaces after grazing-angle heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, A. M. J. F.; Marinoni, M.; Touboul, A. D.; Guasch, C.; Lebius, H.; Ramonda, M.; Bonnet, J.; Saigne, F.

    2007-02-12

    Thin silicon oxide layers on silicon have been characterized by atomic force microscopy before and after swift heavy ion irradiation with 0.63 MeV/u Pb ions at grazing angle of incidence. In this letter, the authors report the observation of extended intermittent tracks at the silicon oxide (SiO{sub 2}) surface. As a result, this raises the question of the discontinuous energy deposition at the nanometric scale. This experimental overlook is of major interest for nanostructuring and surface nanoprocessing as well as with regard to reliability of electronic components and systems.

  1. Hydrogen-terminated diamond vertical-type metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors with a trench gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Masafumi; Muta, Tsubasa; Kobayashi, Mikinori; Saito, Toshiki; Shibata, Masanobu; Matsumura, Daisuke; Kudo, Takuya; Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    The hydrogen-terminated diamond surface (C-H diamond) has a two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) layer independent of the crystal orientation. A 2DHG layer is ubiquitously formed on the C-H diamond surface covered by atomic-layer-deposited-Al2O3. Using Al2O3 as a gate oxide, C-H diamond metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) operate in a trench gate structure where the diamond side-wall acts as a channel. MOSFETs with a side-wall channel exhibit equivalent performance to the lateral C-H diamond MOSFET without a side-wall channel. Here, a vertical-type MOSFET with a drain on the bottom is demonstrated in diamond with channel current modulation by the gate and pinch off.

  2. Diffusion of silver over atomically clean silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbak, A. E. Ol'shanetskii, B. Z.

    2013-06-15

    The diffusion of silver the (111), (100), and (110) silicon surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. The mechanisms of diffusion over the (111) and (110) surfaces are revealed, and the temperature dependences of diffusion coefficients are measured. An anisotropy of silver diffusion over the (110) surface is detected.

  3. The surface electronic structure of silicon terminated (100) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Tadich, A.; Sear, M. J.; Qi, D.; Wee, A. T. S.; Stacey, A.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-07-01

    A combination of synchrotron-based x-ray spectroscopy and contact potential difference measurements have been used to examine the electronic structure of the (3 × 1) silicon terminated (100) diamond surface under ultra high vacuum conditions. An occupied surface state which sits 1.75 eV below the valence band maximum has been identified, and indications of mid-gap unoccupied surface states have been found. Additionally, the pristine silicon terminated surface is shown to possess a negative electron affinity of ‑0.86 ± 0.1 eV.

  4. Atomic scale memory at a silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennewitz, R.; Crain, J. N.; Kirakosian, A.; Lin, J.-L.; McChesney, J. L.; Petrovykh, D. Y.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2002-08-01

    The limits of pushing storage density to the atomic scale are explored with a memory that stores a bit by the presence or absence of one silicon atom. These atoms are positioned at lattice sites along self-assembled tracks with a pitch of five atom rows. The memory can be initialized and reformatted by controlled deposition of silicon. The writing process involves the transfer of Si atoms to the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. The constraints on speed and reliability are compared with data storage in magnetic hard disks and DNA.

  5. Porous silicon nanocrystals in a silica aerogel matrix

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nanoparticles of three types (oxide-terminated silicon nanospheres, micron-sized hydrogen-terminated porous silicon grains and micron-size oxide-terminated porous silicon grains) were incorporated into silica aerogels at the gel preparation stage. Samples with a wide range of concentrations were prepared, resulting in aerogels that were translucent (but weakly coloured) through to completely opaque for visible light over sample thicknesses of several millimetres. The photoluminescence of these composite materials and of silica aerogel without silicon inclusions was studied in vacuum and in the presence of molecular oxygen in order to determine whether there is any evidence for non-radiative energy transfer from the silicon triplet exciton state to molecular oxygen adsorbed at the silicon surface. No sensitivity to oxygen was observed from the nanoparticles which had partially H-terminated surfaces before incorporation, and so we conclude that the silicon surface has become substantially oxidised. Finally, the FTIR and Raman scattering spectra of the composites were studied in order to establish the presence of crystalline silicon; by taking the ratio of intensities of the silicon and aerogel Raman bands, we were able to obtain a quantitative measure of the silicon nanoparticle concentration independent of the degree of optical attenuation. PMID:22805684

  6. Porous silicon nanocrystals in a silica aerogel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amonkosolpan, Jamaree; Wolverson, Daniel; Goller, Bernhard; Polisski, Sergej; Kovalev, Dmitry; Rollings, Matthew; Grogan, Michael D. W.; Birks, Timothy A.

    2012-07-01

    Silicon nanoparticles of three types (oxide-terminated silicon nanospheres, micron-sized hydrogen-terminated porous silicon grains and micron-size oxide-terminated porous silicon grains) were incorporated into silica aerogels at the gel preparation stage. Samples with a wide range of concentrations were prepared, resulting in aerogels that were translucent (but weakly coloured) through to completely opaque for visible light over sample thicknesses of several millimetres. The photoluminescence of these composite materials and of silica aerogel without silicon inclusions was studied in vacuum and in the presence of molecular oxygen in order to determine whether there is any evidence for non-radiative energy transfer from the silicon triplet exciton state to molecular oxygen adsorbed at the silicon surface. No sensitivity to oxygen was observed from the nanoparticles which had partially H-terminated surfaces before incorporation, and so we conclude that the silicon surface has become substantially oxidised. Finally, the FTIR and Raman scattering spectra of the composites were studied in order to establish the presence of crystalline silicon; by taking the ratio of intensities of the silicon and aerogel Raman bands, we were able to obtain a quantitative measure of the silicon nanoparticle concentration independent of the degree of optical attenuation.

  7. Solution-processed amorphous silicon surface passivation layers

    SciTech Connect

    Mews, Mathias Sontheimer, Tobias; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Mader, Christoph; Traut, Stephan; Wunnicke, Odo

    2014-09-22

    Amorphous silicon thin films, fabricated by thermal conversion of neopentasilane, were used to passivate crystalline silicon surfaces. The conversion is investigated using X-ray and constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, and minority charge carrier lifetime spectroscopy. Liquid processed amorphous silicon exhibits high Urbach energies from 90 to 120 meV and 200 meV lower optical band gaps than material prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Applying a hydrogen plasma treatment, a minority charge carrier lifetime of 1.37 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} enabling an implied open circuit voltage of 724 mV was achieved, demonstrating excellent silicon surface passivation.

  8. Surface Figure Measurement of Silicon Carbide Mirrors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Peter; Mink, Ronald G.; Chambers, John; Robinson, F. David; Content, David; Davila, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    The surface figure of a developmental silicon carbide mirror, cooled to 87 K and then 20 K within a cryostat, was measured with unusually high precision at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The concave spherical mirror, with a radius of 600 mm and a clear aperture of 150 mm, was fabricated of sintered silicon carbide. The mirror was mounted to an interface plate representative of an optical bench, made of the material Cesic@, a composite of silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide. The change in optical surface figure as the mirror and interface plate cooled from room temperature to 20 K was 3.7 nm rms, with a standard uncertainty of 0.23 nm in the rms statistic. Both the cryo-change figure and the uncertainty are among the lowest such figures yet published. This report describes the facilities, experimental methods, and uncertainty analysis of the measurements.

  9. Determination of surface recombination velocity in heavily doped silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, M.; Gatos, H. C.; Actor, G.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed and successfully tested for the determination of the effective surface recombination velocity of silicon layers doped by diffusion of phosphorus to a level of 10 to the 19th to 10 to the 21st per cu cm. The effective recombination velocity was obtained from the dependence of the electron-beam-induced current on the penetration of the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope. A special silicon diode was constructed which permitted the collection at the p-n junction of the carriers excited by the electron beam. This diode also permitted the study of the effects of surface preparation on the effective surface recombination velocity.

  10. Etching of silicon surfaces using atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzelt, H.; Böhm, G.; Arnold, Th

    2015-04-01

    Local plasma-assisted etching of crystalline silicon by fine focused plasma jets provides a method for high accuracy computer controlled surface waviness and figure error correction as well as free form processing and manufacturing. We investigate a radio-frequency powered atmospheric pressure He/N2/CF4 plasma jet for the local chemical etching of silicon using fluorine as reactive plasma gas component. This plasma jet tool has a typical tool function width of about 0.5 to 1.8 mm and a material removal rate up to 0.068 mm3 min-1. The relationship between etching rate and plasma jet parameters is discussed in detail regarding gas composition, working distance, scan velocity and RF power. Surface roughness after etching was characterized using atomic force microscopy and white light interferometry. A strong smoothing effect was observed for etching rough silicon surfaces like wet chemically-etched silicon wafer backsides. Using the dwell-time algorithm for a deterministic surface machining by superposition of the local removal function of the plasma tool we show a fast and efficient way for manufacturing complex silicon structures. In this article we present two examples of surface processing using small local plasma jets.

  11. Formation of a silicon terminated (100) diamond surface

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, Alex Sear, Michael; Pakes, Chris; Tadich, Anton; O'Donnell, Kane M.; Ley, Lothar; Stacey, Alastair

    2015-05-11

    We report the preparation of an ordered silicon terminated diamond (100) surface with a two domain 3 × 1 reconstruction as determined by low energy electron diffraction. Based on the dimensions of the surface unit cell and on chemical information provided by core level photoemission spectra, a model for the structure is proposed. The termination should provide a homogeneous, nuclear, and electron spin-free surface for the development of future near-surface diamond quantum device architectures.

  12. Investigation of silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1986-09-01

    During this last (3rd) year of the program, efforts concentrated on SiN/sub x/ passivation studies. In particular, the key objectives were: relate the density of states at SiN/sub x//Si interfaces to the substrate dopant concentration; characterize the SiN/sub x//Si interface on high efficiency cells; and identify dominant current loss mechanisms in high efficiency cells. The interface state density (D/sub ss/) at the SiN/sub x//Si interface of Al/SiN/sub x//Si MIS structures was determined using high frequency and slow ramp capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. Values of D/sub ss/ were obtained for a range of substrate resistivities, and for both N- and P-type material. The surfaces of high efficiency N/P and P/N solar cells were characterized by using a special structure which allows simultaneous measurement of the interface recombination velocity. Dominant current loss mechanisms were determined from temperature dependent I-V analyses. The remainder of this report consists of discussions of the following: surface characterization of homogeneously doped substrates and solar cells; studies of high efficiency cells; and conclusions concerning this year's effort.

  13. Silicon nanohybrid-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Houyu; Jiang, Xiangxu; Lee, Shuit-Tong; He, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Nanomaterial-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors are highly promising analytical tools, capable of ultrasensitive, multiplex, and nondestructive detection of chemical and biological species. Extensive efforts have been made to design various silicon nanohybrid-based SERS substrates such as gold/silver nanoparticle (NP)-decorated silicon nanowires, Au/Ag NP-decorated silicon wafers (AuNP@Si), and so forth. In comparison to free AuNP- and AgNP-based SERS sensors, the silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors feature higher enhancement factors (EFs) and excellent reproducibility, since SERS hot spots are efficiently coupled and stabilized through interconnection to the semiconducting silicon substrates. Consequently, in the past decade, giant advancements in the development of silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors have been witnessed for myriad sensing applications. In this review, the representative achievements related to the design of high-performance silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors and their use for chemical and biological analysis are reviewed in a detailed way. Furthermore, the major opportunities and challenges in this field are discussed from a broad perspective and possible future directions.

  14. Chemical method for producing smooth surfaces on silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad

    2003-01-01

    An improved method for producing optically smooth surfaces in silicon wafers during wet chemical etching involves a pre-treatment rinse of the wafers before etching and a post-etching rinse. The pre-treatment with an organic solvent provides a well-wetted surface that ensures uniform mass transfer during etching, which results in optically smooth surfaces. The post-etching treatment with an acetic acid solution stops the etching instantly, preventing any uneven etching that leads to surface roughness. This method can be used to etch silicon surfaces to a depth of 200 .mu.m or more, while the finished surfaces have a surface roughness of only 15-50 .ANG. (RMS).

  15. Secondary-electron emission from hydrogen-terminated diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Wang E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Dimitrov, D.A.; T. Xin, T.

    2012-05-20

    Diamond amplifiers demonstrably are an electron source with the potential to support high-brightness, high-average-current emission into a vacuum. We recently developed a reliable hydrogenation procedure for the diamond amplifier. The systematic study of hydrogenation resulted in the reproducible fabrication of high gain diamond amplifier. Furthermore, we measured the emission probability of diamond amplifier as a function of the external field and modelled the process with resulting changes in the vacuum level due to the Schottky effect. We demonstrated that the decrease in the secondary electrons average emission gain was a function of the pulse width and related this to the trapping of electrons by the effective NEA surface. The findings from the model agree well with our experimental measurements. As an application of the model, the energy spread of secondary electrons inside the diamond was estimated from the measured emission.

  16. Surface chemistry dependence of native oxidation formation on silicon nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Liptak, R. W.; Campbell, S. A.; Kortshagen, U.

    2009-09-15

    The growth of silicon oxide on bare and SF{sub 6}-etched silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs), which were synthesized by an all gas phase approach, was investigated by examining the surface chemistry and optical properties of the NCs over time. Consistent with previous work in the low temperature oxidation of silicon, the oxidation follows the Cabrera-Mott mechanism, and the measured data are well fitted to the Elovich equation. The use of the SF{sub 6} plasma is found to reduce the surface Si-H bond density and dramatically increase the monolayer growth rate. This is believed to be due to the much larger volatility of Si-F bonds compared to Si-H bonds on the surface of the NC.

  17. Tribological interaction between polytetrafluoroethylene and silicon oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Uçar, A.; Çopuroğlu, M.; Suzer, S.; Baykara, M. Z.; Arıkan, O.

    2014-10-28

    We investigated the tribological interaction between polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and silicon oxide surfaces. A simple rig was designed to bring about a friction between the surfaces via sliding a piece of PTFE on a thermally oxidized silicon wafer specimen. A very mild inclination (∼0.5°) along the sliding motion was also employed in order to monitor the tribological interaction in a gradual manner as a function of increasing contact force. Additionally, some patterns were sketched on the silicon oxide surface using the PTFE tip to investigate changes produced in the hydrophobicity of the surface, where the approximate water contact angle was 45° before the transfer. The nature of the transferred materials was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XPS results revealed that PTFE was faithfully transferred onto the silicon oxide surface upon even at the slightest contact and SEM images demonstrated that stable morphological changes could be imparted onto the surface. The minimum apparent contact pressure to realize the PTFE transfer is estimated as 5 kPa, much lower than reported previously. Stability of the patterns imparted towards many chemical washing processes lead us to postulate that the interaction is most likely to be chemical. Contact angle measurements, which were carried out to characterize and monitor the hydrophobicity of the silicon oxide surface, showed that upon PTFE transfer the hydrophobicity of the SiO{sub 2} surface could be significantly enhanced, which might also depend upon the pattern sketched onto the surface. Contact angle values above 100° were obtained.

  18. Formation of nanostructured silicon surfaces by stain etching

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of ordered silicon structures by chemical etching of silicon in vanadium oxide (V2O5)/hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution. The effects of the different etching parameters including the solution concentration, temperature, and the presence of metal catalyst film deposition (Pd) on the morphologies and reflective properties of the etched Si surfaces were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out to explore the morphologies of the etched surfaces with and without the presence of catalyst. In this case, the attack on the surfaces with a palladium deposit begins by creating uniform circular pores on silicon in which we distinguish the formation of pyramidal structures of silicon. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrates that the surfaces are H-terminated. A UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer was used to study the reflectance of the structures obtained. A reflectance of 2.21% from the etched Si surfaces in the wavelength range of 400 to 1,000 nm was obtained after 120 min of etching while it is of 4.33% from the Pd/Si surfaces etched for 15 min. PMID:25435830

  19. Surface acoustic wave/silicon monolithic sensor/processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowel, S. T.; Kornreich, P. G.; Nouhi, A.; Kilmer, R.; Fathimulla, M. A.; Mehter, E.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for sputter deposition of piezoelectric zinc oxide (ZnO) is described. An argon-ion milling system was converted to sputter zinc oxide films in an oxygen atmosphere using a pure zinc oxide target. Piezoelectric films were grown on silicon dioxide and silicon dioxide overlayed with gold. The sputtered films were evaluated using surface acoustic wave measurements, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and resistivity measurements. The effect of the sputtering conditions on the film quality and the result of post-deposition annealing are discussed. The application of these films to the generation of surface acoustic waves is also discussed.

  20. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of surface-engineered silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Somak; Švrček, Vladimir; Macias-Montero, Manual; Velusamy, Tamilselvan; Mariotti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report on temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements (15-300 K), which have allowed probing radiative transitions and understanding of the appearance of various transitions. We further demonstrate that transitions associated with oxide in SiNCs show characteristic vibronic peaks that vary with surface characteristics. In particular we study differences and similarities between silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) derived from porous silicon and SiNCs that were surface-treated using a radio-frequency (RF) microplasma system. PMID:27296771

  1. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of surface-engineered silicon nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Somak; Švrček, Vladimir; Macias-Montero, Manual; Velusamy, Tamilselvan; Mariotti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report on temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements (15–300 K), which have allowed probing radiative transitions and understanding of the appearance of various transitions. We further demonstrate that transitions associated with oxide in SiNCs show characteristic vibronic peaks that vary with surface characteristics. In particular we study differences and similarities between silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) derived from porous silicon and SiNCs that were surface-treated using a radio-frequency (RF) microplasma system. PMID:27296771

  2. Surface modification of silicon dioxide, silicon nitride and titanium oxynitride for lactate dehydrogenase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Saengdee, Pawasuth; Chaisriratanakul, Woraphan; Bunjongpru, Win; Sripumkhai, Witsaroot; Srisuwan, Awirut; Jeamsaksiri, Wutthinan; Hruanun, Charndet; Poyai, Amporn; Promptmas, Chamras

    2015-05-15

    Three different types of surface, silicon dioxide (SiO2), silicon nitride (Si3N4), and titanium oxynitride (TiON) were modified for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) immobilization using (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) to obtain an amino layer on each surface. The APTES modified surfaces can directly react with LDH via physical attachment. LDH can be chemically immobilized on those surfaces after incorporation with glutaraldehyde (GA) to obtain aldehyde layers of APTES-GA modified surfaces. The wetting properties, chemical bonding composition, and morphology of the modified surface were determined by contact angle (CA) measurement, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. In this experiment, the immobilized protein content and LDH activity on each modified surface was used as an indicator of surface modification achievement. The results revealed that both the APTES and APTES-GA treatments successfully link the LDH molecule to those surfaces while retaining its activity. All types of tested surfaces modified with APTES-GA gave better LDH immobilizing efficiency than APTES, especially the SiO2 surface. In addition, the SiO2 surface offered the highest LDH immobilization among tested surfaces, with both APTES and APTES-GA modification. However, TiON and Si3N4 surfaces could be used as alternative candidate materials in the preparation of ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) based biosensors, including lactate sensors using immobilized LDH on the ISFET surface.

  3. Passivation of c-Si surfaces by sub-nm amorphous silicon capped with silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yimao; Yan, Di; Bullock, James; Zhang, Xinyu; Cuevas, Andres

    2015-12-01

    A sub-nm hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film capped with silicon nitride (SiNx) is shown to provide a high level passivation to crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. When passivated by a 0.8 nm a-Si:H/75 nm SiNx stack, recombination current density J0 values of 9, 11, 47, and 87 fA/cm2 are obtained on 10 Ω.cm n-type, 0.8 Ω.cm p-type, 160 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused, and 120 Ω/sq boron-diffused silicon surfaces, respectively. The J0 on n-type 10 Ω.cm wafers is further reduced to 2.5 ± 0.5 fA/cm2 when the a-Si:H film thickness exceeds 2.5 nm. The passivation by the sub-nm a-Si:H/SiNx stack is thermally stable at 400 °C in N2 for 60 min on all four c-Si surfaces. Capacitance-voltage measurements reveal a reduction in interface defect density and film charge density with an increase in a-Si:H thickness. The nearly transparent sub-nm a-Si:H/SiNx stack is thus demonstrated to be a promising surface passivation and antireflection coating suitable for all types of surfaces encountered in high efficiency c-Si solar cells.

  4. Rapid Formation of Soft Hydrophilic Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Efimenko,K.; Crowe, J.; Manias, E.; Schwark, D.; Fischer, D.; Genzer, J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the rapid formation of hydrophilic silicone elastomer surfaces by ultraviolet/ozone (UVO) irradiation of poly(vinylmethylsiloxane) (PVMS) network films. Our results reveal that the PVMS network surfaces render hydrophilic upon only a short UVO exposure time (seconds to a few minutes). We also provide evidence that the brief UVO irradiation treatment does not cause dramatic changes in the surface modulus of the PVMS network. We compare the rate of formation of hydrophilic silicone elastomer surfaces made of PVMS to those of model poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) and commercial-grade PDMS (Sylgard-184). We find that relative to PVMS, 20 times longer UVO treatment times are needed to oxidize the PDMS network surfaces in order to achieve a comparable density of surface-bound hydrophilic moieties. The longer UVO treatment times for PDMS are in turn responsible for the dramatic increase in surface modulus of UVO treated PDMS, relative to PVMS. We also study the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) made of semifluorinated organosilane precursors on the PVMSUVO and PDMS-UVO network surfaces. By tuning the UVO treatment times and by utilizing mono- and tri-functional organosilanes we find that while mono-functionalized organosilanes attach directly to the substrate, SAMs of tri-functionalized organosilanes form in-plane networks on the underlying UVO-modified silicone elastomer surface, even with only short UVO exposure times.

  5. Terahertz localized surface plasmon resonance of periodic silicon microring arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J.; Shi, X.; Alton, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate the absorption characteristics of silicon microring resonators at terahertz frequencies. Simulation and experimental data show a dipolar localized surface plasmon resonance (DLSPR) absorption peak. We demonstrate that the frequency position and magnitude of the DLSPR peak may be tuned by varying the geometry and thickness of the microring or by modification of the silicon impurity concentration. Finite difference time domain simulations reveal that there is a strong enhancement of the electric field at the resonant frequency. The absorption properties of our resonator are described in terms of effective optical constants and reveal that the silicon microring is an electric resonator. Surface plasmon resonators are efficient terahertz absorbers and have potential applications in security imaging, biological analysis, spectroscopy and nondestructive testing.

  6. Superconductivity of metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    Recent progress in superconducting metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon is reviewed, mainly focusing on the results of the author’s group. After a brief introduction of an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV)-low-temperature (LT)-compatible electron transport measurement system, direct observation of the zero resistance state for the Si(111)-(\\sqrt{7} × \\sqrt{3} )-In surface is described, which demonstrates the existence of a superconducting transition in this class of two-dimensional (2D) materials. The measurement and analysis of the temperature dependence of the critical current density indicate that a surface atomic step works as a Josephson junction. This identification is further confirmed by LT-scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observation of Josephson vortices trapped at atomic steps on the Si(111)-(\\sqrt{7} × \\sqrt{3} )-In surface. These experiments reveal unique features of metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon that may be utilized to explore novel superconductivity.

  7. Self assembly of magnetic nanoparticles at silicon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Theis-Bröhl, Katharina; Gutfreund, Philipp; Vorobiev, Alexei; Wolff, Max; Toperverg, Boris P; Dura, Joseph A; Borchers, Julie A

    2015-06-21

    Neutron reflectometry was used to study the assembly of magnetite nanoparticles in a water-based ferrofluid close to a silicon surface. Under three conditions, static, under shear and with a magnetic field, the depth profile is extracted. The particles have an average diameter of 11 nm and a volume density of 5% in a D2O-H2O mixture. They are surrounded by a 4 nm thick bilayer of carboxylic acid for steric repulsion. The reflectivity data were fitted to a model using a least square routine based on the Parratt formalism. From the scattering length density depth profiles the following behavior is concluded: the fits indicate that excess carboxylic acid covers the silicon surface and almost eliminates the water in the densely packed wetting layer that forms close to the silicon surface. Under constant shear the wetting layer persists but a depletion layer forms between the wetting layer and the moving ferrofluid. Once the flow is stopped, the wetting layer becomes more pronounced with dense packing and is accompanied by a looser packed second layer. In the case of an applied magnetic field the prolate particles experience a torque and align with their long axes along the silicon surface which leads to a higher particle density. PMID:25971712

  8. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  9. Hydrogen Plasma Interactions with Silicon Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas Peter

    H-plasma interactions with Si surfaces are investigated with plasma, surface, and subsurface characterization. The H-plasma is characterized with a double Langmuir probe (DLP) and a catalytic probe (CP). The DLP results indicate that the plasma density ({~} 10^9 cm^{ -3}) in the discharge excitation region is essentially constant in the range 10-300 mTorr. In contrast, the plasma density in the sample region ({ ~}40 cm away) decreases with increasing pressure ({~}10 ^8 and {~}10 ^6 H^+ ions cm^{-3} at 15 and 300 mTorr, respectively). The CP measurements indicate that the atomic H density is {~}10 ^{11} cm^ {-3} and independent of pressure in the range 10-250 mTorr. By-products of the interaction between the H-plasma and the Si surface are detected by residual gas analysis (RGA). The RGA data indicates the formation of SiH_4 during H-plasma exposures which is attributed to etching. Peak intensity trends of the SiH_2 (30 amu) species indicates that increased surface temperature decreases the SiH _2 signal. Since the atomic H concentration is three to five orders of magnitude greater than the ion density, we conclude from the RGA data that the surface etching is due to the atomic H and the surface temperature. This effect is observed from Si (100), Si (110), and Si (111) surfaces. The Si surfaces are characterized with low energy electron diffraction (LEED), angle resolved uv-photoemission (ARUPS), and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The LEED results indicate that by varying the surface temperature and hydrogen pressure, the surface morphology can be described by 1 x 1, 3 x 1, or 2 x 1 surface reconstructions. The 1 x 1 and 2 x 1 symmetries are stable in the ranges 50 -200^circC and 300-400 ^circC, respectively, and 10-300 mTorr. The 3 x 1 symmetry is stable around 250^circ C and 150 mTorr. The ARUPS results indicate that the Si (100) 1 x 1 surface obtained after ex situ chemical cleaning exhibits disorganized electronic states. Following H

  10. DNA and protein microarray printing on silicon nitride waveguide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Hogrebe, Paul; Grainger, David W

    2006-01-15

    Sputtered silicon nitride optical waveguide surfaces were silanized and modified with a hetero-bifunctional crosslinker to facilitate thiol-reactive immobilization of contact-printed DNA probe oligonucleotides, streptavidin and murine anti-human interleukin-1 beta capture agents in microarray formats. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize each reaction sequence on the native silicon oxynitride surface. Thiol-terminated DNA probe oligonucleotides exhibited substantially higher surface printing immobilization and target hybridization efficiencies than non-thiolated DNA probe oligonucleotides: strong fluorescence signals from target DNA hybridization supported successful DNA oligonucleotide probe microarray fabrication and specific capture bioactivity. Analogously printed arrays of thiolated streptavidin and non-thiolated streptavidin did not exhibit noticeable differences in either surface immobilization or analyte capture assay signals. Non-thiolated anti-human interleukin-1 beta printed on modified silicon nitride surfaces reactive to thiol chemistry exhibited comparable performance for capturing human interleukin-1 beta analyte to commercial amine-reactive microarraying polymer surfaces in sandwich immunoassays, indicating substantial non-specific antibody-surface capture responsible for analyte capture signal.

  11. Surface Structures on Cleaved Silicon by Cleavage Luminescence Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongguang

    This paper reports on further research into the structure and properties of the cleaved surfaces of silicon, using vacuum cleavage luminescence detection methods. Results show resistance partially recovers during the cleavage process through "crack healing". When the elasticity of the parts transmitting the applied stress temporarily absorbs the initial rupture stress, the crack stops and partially re-closes until the applied force "catches up" and reapplies stress. The high resistance created by the two Schottky barriers prevents resistance recovery from mere surfaces re-contact. Instead, resistance recovery from the atom-to-atom re-closure surface healing is more likely, as expected from a Three Bond Scission Model (TBS) silicon surface structure.

  12. Silver diffusion over silicon surfaces with adsorbed tin atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbak, A. E. Olshanetskii, B. Z.

    2015-02-15

    Silver diffusion over the (111), (100), and (110) surfaces of silicon with preliminarily adsorbed tin atoms is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Diffusion is observed only on the surface of Si(111)-2√3 × 2√3-Sn. The diffusion mechanism is established. It is found that the diffusion coefficient depends on the concentration of diffusing atoms. The diffusion coefficient decreases with increasing silver concentration, while the activation energy and the preexponential factor increase.

  13. Defect distribution near the surface of electron-irradiated silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, K. L.; Lee, Y. H.; Corbett, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    The surface-defect distributions of electron-irradiated n-type silicon have been investigated using a transient capacitance technique. Schottky, p-n junction, and MOS structures were used in profiling the defect distributions. Surface depletions of defects observed were attributed to the vacancy distribution, but not that of oxygen, and other capture centers' distributions. The vacancy diffusion length at 300 K was estimated to be about 3-6 microns.

  14. Surface self-diffusion of silicon during high temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Alba, Pablo E.; Kononchuk, Oleg; Gourdel, Christophe; Claverie, Alain

    2014-04-01

    The atomic-scale mechanisms driving thermally activated self-diffusion on silicon surfaces are investigated by atomic force microscopy. The evolution of surface topography is quantified over a large spatial bandwidth by means of the Power Spectral Density functions. We propose a parametric model, based on the Mullins-Herring (M-H) diffusion equation, to describe the evolution of the surface topography of silicon during thermal annealing. Usually, a stochastic term is introduced into the M-H model in order to describe intrinsic random fluctuations of the system. In this work, we add two stochastic terms describing the surface thermal fluctuations and the oxidation-evaporation phenomenon. Using this extended model, surface evolution during thermal annealing in reducing atmosphere can be predicted for temperatures above the roughening transition. A very good agreement between experimental and theoretical data describing roughness evolution and self-diffusion phenomenon is obtained. The physical origin and time-evolution of these stochastic terms are discussed. Finally, using this model, we explore the limitations of the smoothening of the silicon surfaces by rapid thermal annealing.

  15. Surface self-diffusion of silicon during high temperature annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta-Alba, Pablo E.; Kononchuk, Oleg; Gourdel, Christophe; Claverie, Alain

    2014-04-07

    The atomic-scale mechanisms driving thermally activated self-diffusion on silicon surfaces are investigated by atomic force microscopy. The evolution of surface topography is quantified over a large spatial bandwidth by means of the Power Spectral Density functions. We propose a parametric model, based on the Mullins-Herring (M-H) diffusion equation, to describe the evolution of the surface topography of silicon during thermal annealing. Usually, a stochastic term is introduced into the M-H model in order to describe intrinsic random fluctuations of the system. In this work, we add two stochastic terms describing the surface thermal fluctuations and the oxidation-evaporation phenomenon. Using this extended model, surface evolution during thermal annealing in reducing atmosphere can be predicted for temperatures above the roughening transition. A very good agreement between experimental and theoretical data describing roughness evolution and self-diffusion phenomenon is obtained. The physical origin and time-evolution of these stochastic terms are discussed. Finally, using this model, we explore the limitations of the smoothening of the silicon surfaces by rapid thermal annealing.

  16. Spin Chains and Electron Transfer at Stepped Silicon Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aulbach, J; Erwin, S C; Claessen, R; Schäfer, J

    2016-04-13

    High-index surfaces of silicon with adsorbed gold can reconstruct to form highly ordered linear step arrays. These steps take the form of a narrow strip of graphitic silicon. In some cases--specifically, for Si(553)-Au and Si(557)-Au--a large fraction of the silicon atoms at the exposed edge of this strip are known to be spin-polarized and charge-ordered along the edge. The periodicity of this charge ordering is always commensurate with the structural periodicity along the step edge and hence leads to highly ordered arrays of local magnetic moments that can be regarded as "spin chains." Here, we demonstrate theoretically as well as experimentally that the closely related Si(775)-Au surface has--despite its very similar overall structure--zero spin polarization at its step edge. Using a combination of density-functional theory and scanning tunneling microscopy, we propose an electron-counting model that accounts for these differences. The model also predicts that unintentional defects and intentional dopants can create local spin moments at Si(hhk)-Au step edges. We analyze in detail one of these predictions and verify it experimentally. This finding opens the door to using techniques of surface chemistry and atom manipulation to create and control silicon spin chains.

  17. Spin Chains and Electron Transfer at Stepped Silicon Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aulbach, J; Erwin, S C; Claessen, R; Schäfer, J

    2016-04-13

    High-index surfaces of silicon with adsorbed gold can reconstruct to form highly ordered linear step arrays. These steps take the form of a narrow strip of graphitic silicon. In some cases--specifically, for Si(553)-Au and Si(557)-Au--a large fraction of the silicon atoms at the exposed edge of this strip are known to be spin-polarized and charge-ordered along the edge. The periodicity of this charge ordering is always commensurate with the structural periodicity along the step edge and hence leads to highly ordered arrays of local magnetic moments that can be regarded as "spin chains." Here, we demonstrate theoretically as well as experimentally that the closely related Si(775)-Au surface has--despite its very similar overall structure--zero spin polarization at its step edge. Using a combination of density-functional theory and scanning tunneling microscopy, we propose an electron-counting model that accounts for these differences. The model also predicts that unintentional defects and intentional dopants can create local spin moments at Si(hhk)-Au step edges. We analyze in detail one of these predictions and verify it experimentally. This finding opens the door to using techniques of surface chemistry and atom manipulation to create and control silicon spin chains. PMID:26974012

  18. Surface engineered porous silicon for stable, high performance electrochemical supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Landon; Westover, Andrew; Mares, Jeremy W.; Chatterjee, Shahana; Erwin, William R.; Bardhan, Rizia; Weiss, Sharon M.; Pint, Cary L.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon materials remain unused for supercapacitors due to extreme reactivity of silicon with electrolytes. However, doped silicon materials boast a low mass density, excellent conductivity, a controllably etched nanoporous structure, and combined earth abundance and technological presence appealing to diverse energy storage frameworks. Here, we demonstrate a universal route to transform porous silicon (P-Si) into stable electrodes for electrochemical devices through growth of an ultra-thin, conformal graphene coating on the P-Si surface. This graphene coating simultaneously passivates surface charge traps and provides an ideal electrode-electrolyte electrochemical interface. This leads to 10–40X improvement in energy density, and a 2X wider electrochemical window compared to identically-structured unpassivated P-Si. This work demonstrates a technique generalizable to mesoporous and nanoporous materials that decouples the engineering of electrode structure and electrochemical surface stability to engineer performance in electrochemical environments. Specifically, we demonstrate P-Si as a promising new platform for grid-scale and integrated electrochemical energy storage. PMID:24145684

  19. Studies of ion sputtered silicon(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ari-David

    A comprehensive study of morphological evolution of regular features formed on ion sputtered Si(111) surfaces was conducted. The physics governing feature formation was clarified, and the varieties of morphologies formed on these surfaces were explored. Energetic Ar+ ions directed at an oblique angle of incidence were used to sputter etch heated Si(111) substrates inside of an ultra-high vacuum chamber. Self-organization of highly regular sputter ripples possessing sub-micron lengthscales was observed, using in situ UV light scattering spectroscopy and ex situ atomic force microscopy techniques. Distinct rippling morphologies dependent upon ion fluence were produced on Si(111). For low fluence, the surface was characterized by highly ordered corrugations possessing wavevector parallel to the projected ion beam direction (parallel mode ripples). For high fluence, less highly ordered ripples possessing wavevector perpendicular to the ion beam (perpendicular mode ripples) dominated the morphology. At intermediate ion fluence, the surface morphology was best described as a quasi-rectangular array of sputter dots consisting of a superposition of both one-dimensional rippling modes. The transition between the two one-dimensional rippling morphologies occurred at higher fluence with increasing sample temperature or with decreasing ion flux. In addition, each ripple mode was observed to coarsen with increasing fluence. For low ion fluence, the surface evolution was explained using a standard linear theory of sputter rippling. An activation energy for adatom diffusion on Si(111) was extracted and found to equal 1.7 +/- 0.1 eV, and the steady-state adatom concentration was found to be of order 10% of surface sites. For high ion fluence, a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation incorporating a minimal model of sputter rippling was used to predict the formation of two mutually perpendicular ripple modes. The simulated surface also exhibited ripple coarsening, as a consequence

  20. Lattice thermal conductivity of a silicon nanowire under surface stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2011-06-01

    The effects of surface stress on the lattice thermal conductivity are investigated for a silicon nanowire. A phonon dispersion relation is derived based on a continuum approach for a nanowire under surface stress. The phonon Boltzmann equation and the relaxation time are employed to calculate the lattice thermal conductivity. Surface stress, which has a significant influence on the phonon dispersion and thus the Debye temperature, decreases the lattice thermal conductivity. The conductivity varies with changing surface stress, e.g., due to adsorption layers and material coatings. This suggests a phonon engineering approach to tune the conductivity of nanomaterials.

  1. Electron stimulated oxidation of silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, M.C.; Sacedon, J.L.

    1981-04-15

    Experimental evidence of electron stimulated oxidation (ESO) has been given for Si(111) 7 x 7 surface. In a first stage, the oxide thickness as a function of time shows a linear relationship; in a second stage, the growth rate quickly decreases and a pressure dependent saturation oxide thickness is reached. During the oxidation process an electrical potential does exist across the oxide, as is required in the Cabrera--Mott theory. The linear kinetics and the electrical potential are shown to be explicable in terms of a modified coupled-current approach based on the Cabrera--Mott theory, provided a semiphenomenological pressure dependent parameter is included. This represents a contribution of the surface reaction to the transport equation. The saturation has been explained as due to the decrease of the negative surface charge (donor levels) which produces a decrease of the electron current.

  2. Method For Silicon Surface Texturing Using Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, Nirag; Naczas, Sebastian; Bakhru, Hassaram; Huang, Mengbing

    2011-06-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to show more interest in the photovoltaic market, cheaper and readily integrable methods of silicon solar cell production are desired. One of these methods—ion implantation—is well-developed and optimized in all commercial semiconductor fabrication facilities. Here we have developed a silicon surface texturing technique predicated upon the phenomenon of surface blistering of H-implanted silicon, using only ion implantation and thermal annealing. We find that following the H implant with a second, heavier implant markedly enhances the surface blistering, causing large trenches that act as a surface texturing of c-Si. We have found that this method reduces total broadband Si reflectance from 35% to below 5percent;. In addition, we have used Rutherford backscattering/channeling measurements investigate the effect of ion implantation on the crystallinity of the sample. The data suggests that implantation-induced lattice damage is recovered upon annealing, reproducing the original monocrystalline structure in the previously amorphized region, while at the same time retaining the textured surface.

  3. Method For Silicon Surface Texturing Using Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadakia, Nirag; Naczas, Sebastian; Bakhru, Hassaram; Huang Mengbing

    2011-06-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to show more interest in the photovoltaic market, cheaper and readily integrable methods of silicon solar cell production are desired. One of these methods - ion implantation - is well-developed and optimized in all commercial semiconductor fabrication facilities. Here we have developed a silicon surface texturing technique predicated upon the phenomenon of surface blistering of H-implanted silicon, using only ion implantation and thermal annealing. We find that following the H implant with a second, heavier implant markedly enhances the surface blistering, causing large trenches that act as a surface texturing of c-Si. We have found that this method reduces total broadband Si reflectance from 35% to below 5percent;. In addition, we have used Rutherford backscattering/channeling measurements investigate the effect of ion implantation on the crystallinity of the sample. The data suggests that implantation-induced lattice damage is recovered upon annealing, reproducing the original monocrystalline structure in the previously amorphized region, while at the same time retaining the textured surface.

  4. Effect of surface treated silicon dioxide nanoparticles on some mechanical properties of maxillofacial silicone elastomer.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Sara M; Alshimy, Ahmad M; Fahmy, Amal E

    2014-01-01

    Current materials used for maxillofacial prostheses are far from ideal and there is a need for novel improved materials which mimic as close as possible the natural behavior of facial soft tissues. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of adding different concentrations of surface treated silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2) on clinically important mechanical properties of a maxillofacial silicone elastomer. 147 specimens of the silicone elastomer were prepared and divided into seven groups (n = 21). One control group was prepared without nanoparticles and six study groups with different concentrations of nanoparticles, from 0.5% to 3% by weight. Specimens were tested for tear strength (ASTM D624), tensile strength (ASTM D412), percent elongation, and shore A hardness. SEM was used to assess the dispersion of nano-SiO2 within the elastomer matrix. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Scheffe test (α = 0.05). Results revealed significant improvement in all mechanical properties tested, as the concentration of the nanoparticles increased. This was supported by the results of the SEM. Hence, it can be concluded that the incorporation of surface treated SiO2 nanoparticles at concentration of 3% enhanced the overall mechanical properties of A-2186 silicone elastomer. PMID:25574170

  5. Effect of Surface Treated Silicon Dioxide Nanoparticles on Some Mechanical Properties of Maxillofacial Silicone Elastomer

    PubMed Central

    Zayed, Sara M.; Alshimy, Ahmad M.; Fahmy, Amal E.

    2014-01-01

    Current materials used for maxillofacial prostheses are far from ideal and there is a need for novel improved materials which mimic as close as possible the natural behavior of facial soft tissues. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of adding different concentrations of surface treated silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2) on clinically important mechanical properties of a maxillofacial silicone elastomer. 147 specimens of the silicone elastomer were prepared and divided into seven groups (n = 21). One control group was prepared without nanoparticles and six study groups with different concentrations of nanoparticles, from 0.5% to 3% by weight. Specimens were tested for tear strength (ASTM D624), tensile strength (ASTM D412), percent elongation, and shore A hardness. SEM was used to assess the dispersion of nano-SiO2 within the elastomer matrix. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Scheffe test (α = 0.05). Results revealed significant improvement in all mechanical properties tested, as the concentration of the nanoparticles increased. This was supported by the results of the SEM. Hence, it can be concluded that the incorporation of surface treated SiO2 nanoparticles at concentration of 3% enhanced the overall mechanical properties of A-2186 silicone elastomer. PMID:25574170

  6. Effect of surface treated silicon dioxide nanoparticles on some mechanical properties of maxillofacial silicone elastomer.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Sara M; Alshimy, Ahmad M; Fahmy, Amal E

    2014-01-01

    Current materials used for maxillofacial prostheses are far from ideal and there is a need for novel improved materials which mimic as close as possible the natural behavior of facial soft tissues. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of adding different concentrations of surface treated silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2) on clinically important mechanical properties of a maxillofacial silicone elastomer. 147 specimens of the silicone elastomer were prepared and divided into seven groups (n = 21). One control group was prepared without nanoparticles and six study groups with different concentrations of nanoparticles, from 0.5% to 3% by weight. Specimens were tested for tear strength (ASTM D624), tensile strength (ASTM D412), percent elongation, and shore A hardness. SEM was used to assess the dispersion of nano-SiO2 within the elastomer matrix. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Scheffe test (α = 0.05). Results revealed significant improvement in all mechanical properties tested, as the concentration of the nanoparticles increased. This was supported by the results of the SEM. Hence, it can be concluded that the incorporation of surface treated SiO2 nanoparticles at concentration of 3% enhanced the overall mechanical properties of A-2186 silicone elastomer.

  7. A reclaiming process for solar cell silicon wafer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pa, P S

    2011-01-01

    The low yield of epoxy film and Si3N4 thin-film deposition is an important factor in semiconductor production. A new design system using a set of three lamination-shaped electrodes as a machining tool and micro electro-removal as a precision reclaiming process of the Si3N4 layer and epoxy film removal from silicon wafers of solar cells surface is presented. In the current experiment, the combination of the small thickness of the anode and cathodes corresponds to a higher removal rate for the thin films. The combination of the short length of the anode and cathodes combined with enough electric power produces fast electroremoval. A combination of the small edge radius of the anode and cathodes corresponds to a higher removal rate. A higher feed rate of silicon wafers of solar cells combined with enough electric power produces fast removal. A precise engineering technology constructed a clean production approach for the removal of surface microstructure layers from silicon wafers is to develop a mass production system for recycling defective or discarded silicon wafers from solar cells that can reduce pollution and lower cost. PMID:21446525

  8. Forming high efficiency silicon solar cells using density-graded anti-reflection surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Branz, Howard M.; Page, Matthew R.

    2014-09-09

    A method (50) is provided for processing a graded-density AR silicon surface (14) to provide effective surface passivation. The method (50) includes positioning a substrate or wafer (12) with a silicon surface (14) in a reaction or processing chamber (42). The silicon surface (14) has been processed (52) to be an AR surface with a density gradient or region of black silicon. The method (50) continues with heating (54) the chamber (42) to a high temperature for both doping and surface passivation. The method (50) includes forming (58), with a dopant-containing precursor in contact with the silicon surface (14) of the substrate (12), an emitter junction (16) proximate to the silicon surface (14) by doping the substrate (12). The method (50) further includes, while the chamber is maintained at the high or raised temperature, forming (62) a passivation layer (19) on the graded-density silicon anti-reflection surface (14).

  9. Forming high-efficiency silicon solar cells using density-graded anti-reflection surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Branz, Howard M.; Page, Matthew R.

    2015-07-07

    A method (50) is provided for processing a graded-density AR silicon surface (14) to provide effective surface passivation. The method (50) includes positioning a substrate or wafer (12) with a silicon surface (14) in a reaction or processing chamber (42). The silicon surface (14) has been processed (52) to be an AR surface with a density gradient or region of black silicon. The method (50) continues with heating (54) the chamber (42) to a high temperature for both doping and surface passivation. The method (50) includes forming (58), with a dopant-containing precursor in contact with the silicon surface (14) of the substrate (12), an emitter junction (16) proximate to the silicon surface (14) by doping the substrate (12). The method (50) further includes, while the chamber is maintained at the high or raised temperature, forming (62) a passivation layer (19) on the graded-density silicon anti-reflection surface (14).

  10. Passivation of c-Si surfaces by sub-nm amorphous silicon capped with silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao Yan, Di; Bullock, James; Zhang, Xinyu; Cuevas, Andres

    2015-12-07

    A sub-nm hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film capped with silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) is shown to provide a high level passivation to crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. When passivated by a 0.8 nm a-Si:H/75 nm SiN{sub x} stack, recombination current density J{sub 0} values of 9, 11, 47, and 87 fA/cm{sup 2} are obtained on 10 Ω·cm n-type, 0.8 Ω·cm p-type, 160 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused, and 120 Ω/sq boron-diffused silicon surfaces, respectively. The J{sub 0} on n-type 10 Ω·cm wafers is further reduced to 2.5 ± 0.5 fA/cm{sup 2} when the a-Si:H film thickness exceeds 2.5 nm. The passivation by the sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thermally stable at 400 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 min on all four c-Si surfaces. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal a reduction in interface defect density and film charge density with an increase in a-Si:H thickness. The nearly transparent sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thus demonstrated to be a promising surface passivation and antireflection coating suitable for all types of surfaces encountered in high efficiency c-Si solar cells.

  11. Direct modification of silicon surface by nanosecond laser interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Wang, Zuobin; Zhang, Ziang; Yue, Yong; Li, Dayou; Maple, Carsten

    2013-10-01

    Periodic and quasi-periodic structures on silicon surface have numerous significant applications in photoelectronics and surface engineering. A number of technologies have been developed to fabricate the structures in various research fields. In this work, we take the strategy of direct nanosecond laser interference lithography technology, and focus on the silicon material to create different well-defined surface structures based on theoretical analysis of the formation of laser interference patterns. Two, three and four-beam laser interference systems were set up to fabricate the grating, regular triangle and square structures on silicon surfaces, respectively. From the AFM micrographs, the critical features of structures have a dependence on laser fluences. For a relative low laser fluence, grating and dot structures formed with bumps due to the Marangoni Effect. With the increase of laser fluences, melt and evaporation behaviors can be responsible for the laser modification. By properly selecting the process parameters, well-defined grating and dot structures can been achieved. It can be demonstrated that direct laser interference lithography is a facile and efficient technology with the advantage of a single process procedure over macroscale areas for the fabrication of micro and nano structures.

  12. Biocompatible silicon surfaces through orthogonal click chemistries and a high affinity silicon oxide binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Hassert, Rayk; Pagel, Mareen; Ming, Zhou; Häupl, Tilmann; Abel, Bernd; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-10-17

    Multifunctionality is gaining more and more importance in the field of improved biomaterials. Especially peptides feature a broad chemical variability and are versatile mediators between inorganic surfaces and living cells. Here, we synthesized a unique peptide that binds to SiO(2) with nM affinity. We equipped the peptide with the bioactive integrin binding c[RGDfK]-ligand and a fluorescent probe by stepwise Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand and copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. For the first time, we report the generation of a multifunctional peptide by combining these innovative coupling reactions. The resulting peptide displayed an outstanding binding to silicon oxide and induced a significant increase in cell spreading and cell viability of osteoblasts on the oxidized silicon surface.

  13. Miniaturized proton exchange fuel cell in micromachined silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arrigo, Giuseppe; Spinella, Corrado; Rimini, Emanuele; Rubino, Loredana; Lorenti, Simona

    2004-01-01

    The increasing interest for light and movable electronic systems, cell phones and small digital devices, drives the technological research toward integrated regenerating power sources with small dimensions and great autonomy. Conventional batteries are already unable to deliver power in more and more shrunk volumes maintaining the requirements of long duration and lightweight. A possible solution to overcome these limits is the use of miniaturized fuel cell. The fuel cell offers a greater gravimetric energy density compared to conventional batteries. The micromachining technology of silicon is an important tool to reduce the fuel cell structure to micrometer sizes. The use of silicon also gives the opportunity to integrate the power source and the electronic circuits controlling the fuel cell on the same structure. This paper reports preliminary results concerning the micromachining procedure to fabricate an arrays of microchannels for a Si-based electrocatalytic membrane for miniaturized Si-based proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Several techniques are routinely used to fabricate arrays of microchannels embedded in crystalline silicon. In this paper we present an innovative microchannel formation process, entirely based on surface silicon micromachining, which allows us to produce rhomboidal microchannels embedded on (100) silicon wafers. Compared to the traditional techniques, the proposed process is extremely compatible with the standard microelectronics silicon technology. The kinetics of rhomboidal microchannel formation is monitored by cyclic voltammetry measurements and the results are compared with a detailed structural characterisation performed by scanning electron microscopy. The effectiveness of this process is discussed in view of the possible applications in the fuel cell application.

  14. Ion Beam Analysis Of Silicon-Based Surfaces And Correlation With Surface Energy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Qian; Herbots, N.; Hart, M.; Bradley, J. D.; Wilkens, B. J.; Sell, D. A.; Sell, Clive H.; Kwong, Henry Mark; Culbertson, R. J.; Whaley, S. D.

    2011-06-01

    The water affinity of Si-based surfaces is quantified by contact angle measurement and surface free energy to explain hydrophobic or hydrophilic behavior of silicone, silicates, and silicon surfaces. Surface defects such as dangling bonds, surface free energy including Lewis acid-base and Lifshitz-van der Waals components are discussed. Water nucleation and condensation is further explained by surface topography. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) provides statistical analysis of the topography of these Si-based surfaces. The correlation of the above two characteristics describes the behavior of water condensation at Si-based surfaces. Surface root mean square roughness increasing from several Å to several nm is found to provide nucleation sites that expedite water condensation visibly for silica and silicone. Hydrophilic surfaces have a condensation pattern that forms puddles of water while hydrophobic surfaces form water beads. Polymer adsorption on these surfaces alters the water affinity as well as the surface topography, and therefore controls condensation on Si-based surfaces including silicone intraocular lens (IOL). The polymer film is characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in conjunction with 4.265 MeV 12C(α, α)12C, 3.045 MeV 16O(α,α)16O nuclear resonance scattering (NRS), and 2.8 MeV elastic recoil detection (ERD) of hydrogen for high resolution composition and areal density measurements. The areal density of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) film ranges from 1018 atom/cm2 to 1019 atom/cm2 gives the silica or silicone surface a roughness of several Å and a wavelength of 0.16±0.02 μm, and prevents fogging by forming a complete wetting layer during water condensation.

  15. Ion Beam Analysis Of Silicon-Based Surfaces And Correlation With Surface Energy Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Qian; Herbots, N.; Hart, M.; Bradley, J. D.; Wilkens, B. J.; Sell, D. A.; Culbertson, R. J.; Whaley, S. D.; Sell, Clive H.; Kwong, Henry Mark Jr.

    2011-06-01

    The water affinity of Si-based surfaces is quantified by contact angle measurement and surface free energy to explain hydrophobic or hydrophilic behavior of silicone, silicates, and silicon surfaces. Surface defects such as dangling bonds, surface free energy including Lewis acid-base and Lifshitz-van der Waals components are discussed. Water nucleation and condensation is further explained by surface topography. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) provides statistical analysis of the topography of these Si-based surfaces. The correlation of the above two characteristics describes the behavior of water condensation at Si-based surfaces. Surface root mean square roughness increasing from several A ring to several nm is found to provide nucleation sites that expedite water condensation visibly for silica and silicone. Hydrophilic surfaces have a condensation pattern that forms puddles of water while hydrophobic surfaces form water beads. Polymer adsorption on these surfaces alters the water affinity as well as the surface topography, and therefore controls condensation on Si-based surfaces including silicone intraocular lens (IOL). The polymer film is characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in conjunction with 4.265 MeV {sup 12}C({alpha}, {alpha}){sup 12}C, 3.045 MeV {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}){sup 16}O nuclear resonance scattering (NRS), and 2.8 MeV elastic recoil detection (ERD) of hydrogen for high resolution composition and areal density measurements. The areal density of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) film ranges from 10{sup 18} atom/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 19} atom/cm{sup 2} gives the silica or silicone surface a roughness of several A ring and a wavelength of 0.16{+-}0.02 {mu}m, and prevents fogging by forming a complete wetting layer during water condensation.

  16. Silicon Nanotips Antireflection Surface for Micro Sun Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Sam Y.; Lee, Choonsup; Mobasser, Sohrab; Manohara, Harish

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new technique to fabricate antireflection surface using silicon nano-tips for use on a micro sun sensor for Mars rovers. We have achieved randomly distributed nano-tips of radius spanning from 20 nm to 100 nm and aspect ratio of 200 using a two-step dry etching process. The 30(deg) specular reflectance at the target wavelength of 1 (mu)m is only about 0.09 %, nearly three orders of magnitude lower than that of bare silicon, and the hemispherical reflectance is 8%. By changing the density and aspect ratio of these nanotips, the change in reflectance is demonstrated. Using surfaces covered with these nano-tips, the critical problem of ghost images that are caused by multiple internal reflections in a micro sun sensor was solved.

  17. Surface analysis of titanium coated silicone rubber biological implants

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, J.D.; Hutchinson, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    A wide variety of materials are used today in the fabrication of biomedical implants. Various plastics, ceramics, metals, and composites are found in dozens of applications as biomaterials. The biological interactions between the implant surfaces and the proteins and cells of the body sometimes cause problems such as inflammation, thrombosis, and encapsulation. Coating the implants with a biocompatible material such as titanium could alleviate these problems. In an effort to improve the biological compatibility of silicone rubber vascular grafts, thin layers of titanium were sputter deposited onto medical grade silicone rubber. The surfaces of two such samples were then characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), electron probe microanalysis (EPM), and ion microprobe mass analysis (IMMA).

  18. Quantum engineering at the silicon surface using dangling bonds

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, S. R.; Studer, P.; Hirjibehedin, C. F.; Curson, N. J.; Aeppli, G.; Bowler, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual atoms and ions are now routinely manipulated using scanning tunnelling microscopes or electromagnetic traps for the creation and control of artificial quantum states. For applications such as quantum information processing, the ability to introduce multiple atomic-scale defects deterministically in a semiconductor is highly desirable. Here we use a scanning tunnelling microscope to fabricate interacting chains of dangling bond defects on the hydrogen-passivated silicon (001) surface. We image both the ground-state and the excited-state probability distributions of the resulting artificial molecular orbitals, using the scanning tunnelling microscope tip bias and tip-sample separation as gates to control which states contribute to the image. Our results demonstrate that atomically precise quantum states can be fabricated on silicon, and suggest a general model of quantum-state fabrication using other chemically passivated semiconductor surfaces where single-atom depassivation can be achieved using scanning tunnelling microscopy. PMID:23552064

  19. Surface Breakdown Characteristics of Silicone Oil for Electric Power Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Junichi; Nakajima, Akitoshi; Miyahara, Hideyuki; Takuma, Tadasu; Okabe, Shigemitu; Kohtoh, Masanori; Yanabu, Satoru

    This paper describes the surface breakdown characteristics of the silicone oil which has the possibility of the application to innovative switchgear as an insulating medium. At the first step, we have experimentally studied on the impulse breakdown characteristics of the configuration with a triple-junction where a solid insulator is in contact with the electrode. The test configurations consist of solid material (Nomex and pressboard) and liquid insulation oil (silicone and mineral oil). We have discussed the experimental results based on the maximal electric field at a triple-junction. As the second step, we have studied the configuration which may improve the surface breakdown characteristics by lowering the electric field near the triple-junction.

  20. Materials and Device Analysis of Hydrogen Plasma Prepared Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeffrey Scott

    The effects of a hydrogen plasma on a single crystal silicon wafer were characterized using both surface analysis techniques and MOS transistor evaluation. Analysis of the silicon surface was focused on the effects of the H -plasma on (i) the surface structure and microroughness as revealed by atomic force microscopy, (ii) the elemental surface constituents as revealed by AES and SIMS, and (iii) the surface electronic structure as revealed by electron diffraction techniques. MOS field effect transistors were fabricated and evaluated following identical hydrogen plasma exposures prior to gate-oxide deposition. The devices were then characterized according to threshold voltage and peak mobility. The effective mobility of each device was calculated and fit to an empirical model which accounted for electron scattering in the inversion layer due to bulk ionized impurities, bulk and surface phonons, interface charges, and interface roughness. The interaction of atomic hydrogen and a silicon surface was found to be strongly dependent on the substrate temperature during processing. The rms roughness for the boron-doped silicon surfaces used in these experiments was calculated to be 2 +/- 1 A for surfaces subjected to only ex situ cleaning. Following a H-plasma treatment for 10 minutes at a substrate temperature of 200^circC, the surface roughness increased to 23 +/- 5 A. The autocorrelation function calculated for this sample exhibited long range surface structure. Samples treated at temperatures from 500 to 700^circC for 10 minutes exhibited little or no change in surface roughness or morphology. The 700^circC case resulted a slight increase in surface morphology to 4 +/- 1 A. Testing of the MOSFET devices revealed a significant reduction in device performance for H-plasma exposures in the gate region at substrate temperatures <=q 400^circC. Devices which were subjected to the H-plasma at substrate temperatures of 500-700^circC exhibited properties similar to the control

  1. Methods of Attaching or Grafting Carbon Nanotubes to Silicon Surfaces and Composite Structures Derived Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Chen, Bo (Inventor); Flatt, Austen K. (Inventor); Stewart, Michael P. (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Maya, Francisco (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of attaching or grafting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to silicon surfaces. In some embodiments, such attaching or grafting occurs via functional groups on either or both of the CNTs and silicon surface. In some embodiments, the methods of the present invention include: (1) reacting a silicon surface with a functionalizing agent (such as oligo(phenylene ethynylene)) to form a functionalized silicon surface; (2) dispersing a quantity of CNTs in a solvent to form dispersed CNTs; and (3) reacting the functionalized silicon surface with the dispersed CNTs. The present invention is also directed to the novel compositions produced by such methods.

  2. Integrated silicon photonic interconnect with surface-normal optical interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zanyun; Huang, Beiju; Zhang, Zan; Cheng, Chuantong; Liu, Hongwei; Li, Hongqiang; Chen, Hongda

    2016-05-01

    An integrated silicon photonic interconnect with surface-normal optical interface is demonstrated by connecting a bidirectional grating based E-O modulator and a germanium waveguide photodetector. To investigate this photonic interconnect, both static and dynamic performance of the discrete devices are characterized respectively. Based on the characterization work, data transmission experiment is carried out for the photonic interconnect. Eye diagram results indicate the photonic interconnect can operate up to 7 Gb/s.

  3. Current noise measurements of surface defect states in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    West, P.W.; Kakalios, J.

    1999-07-01

    Measurements of conductance fluctuations in coplanar hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are reported as a function of surface etching treatments. The noise power spectrum displays a broadened Lorentzian peak, associated with surface damage by CF{sub 4} reactive ion etching (RIE), whereas surface etches using ion milling or wet chemicals remove the Lorentzian spectral feature and only a 1/f spectral form for frequency f is observed. The Lorentzian spectral feature can be explained by trapping-detrapping from surface states induced by the RIE etch, which cause fluctuations in the depletion width of the space charge region near the film surface. The thermally activated Lorentzian corner frequency is a measure of the degree of band bending and the Fermi energy at the thin film surface.

  4. Influence of black silicon surfaces on the performance of back-contacted back silicon heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Johannes; Haschke, Jan; Käsebier, Thomas; Korte, Lars; Sprafke, Alexander N; Wehrspohn, Ralf B

    2014-10-20

    The influence of different black silicon (b-Si) front side textures prepared by inductively coupled reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE) on the performance of back-contacted back silicon heterojunction (BCB-SHJ) solar cells is investigated in detail regarding their optical performance, black silicon surface passivation and internal quantum efficiency. Under optimized conditions the effective minority carrier lifetime measured on black silicon surfaces passivated with Al(2)O(3) can be higher than lifetimes measured for the SiO(2)/SiN(x) passivation stack used in the reference cells with standard KOH textures. However, to outperform the electrical current of silicon back-contact cells, the black silicon back-contact cell process needs to be optimized with aspect to chemical and thermal stability of the used dielectric layer combination on the cell.

  5. Controlled thinning and surface smoothening of silicon nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Kalem, S; Werner, P; Nilsson, B; Talalaev, V G; Hagberg, M; Arthursson, O; Södervall, U

    2009-11-01

    A convenient method has been developed to thin electron beam fabricated silicon nanopillars under controlled surface manipulation by transforming the surface of the pillars to an oxide shell layer followed by the growth of sacrificial ammonium silicon fluoride coating. The results show the formation of an oxide shell and a silicon core without significantly changing the original length and shape of the pillars. The oxide shell layer thickness can be controlled from a few nanometers up to a few hundred nanometers. While downsizing in diameter, smooth Si pillar surfaces of less than 10 nm roughness within 2 microm were produced after exposure to vapors of HF and HNO3 mixture as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The attempt to expose for long durations leads to the growth of a thick oxide whose strain effect on pillars can be assessed by coupled LO-TO vibrational modes of Si-O bonds. Photoluminescence (PL) of the pillar structures which have been downsized exhibits visible and infrared emissions, which are attributable to microscopic pillars and to the confinement of excited carriers in the Si core, respectively. The formation of smooth core-shell structures while reducing the diameter of the Si pillars has a potential in fabricating nanoscale electronic devices and functional components.

  6. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection.

    PubMed

    Sam, Sabrina S; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F; Etcheberry, Arnaud A; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization.The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

  7. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Sabrina S.; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F.; Etcheberry, Arnaud A.; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl- N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

  8. Photophysical properties of luminescent silicon nanoparticles surface-modified with organic molecules via hydrosilylation.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Mari; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Wada, Satoshi; Kawashima, Akira; Nakajima, Ayako; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Ishioka, Junya; Shibayama, Tamaki; Watanabe, Seiichi; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent silicon nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention for their potential uses in various applications. Many approaches have been reported to protect the surface of silicon nanoparticles and prevent their easy oxidation. Various air-stable luminescent silicon nanoparticles have been successfully prepared. However, the effect of interactions of the π-electron system with the silicon surface on the excited state properties of silicon nanoparticles is unclear. In this study, we have successfully prepared silicon nanoparticles protected with three organic compounds (styrene, 1-decene, and 1-vinyl naphthalene) and have examined their photophysical properties. The ligand π-electron systems on the silicon surface promoted the light harvesting ability for the luminescence through a charge transfer transition between the protective molecules and silicon nanoparticles and also enhanced the radiative rate of the silicon nanoparticles.

  9. Ultraviolet Photostability of Adenine on Gold and Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo-Martí, Eva; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Martín-Gago, Jose-Angel

    2009-08-01

    The adenine molecule is a DNA nucleobase, an essential component of genetic material. Because of the important role of DNA nucleobases in terrestrial biochemistry, we have studied the molecular adsorption, orientation, and chemical binding of adenine on metallic and semiconducting surfaces, such as gold and silicon, respectively, and their stability toward ultraviolet radiation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) techniques. We have exposed the adenine surface system to UV radiation (200-400 nm) under a high-vacuum environment (10-7 mbar) to study the photostability and photochemistry of adenine on different surfaces. After 10 or 24 hours of exposure under interplanetary space conditions, UV radiation induces desorption and partial dissociation of the molecule, which is dependant on the nature of the surface. The electronic excitations, induced in the material by UV absorption, play a major role in the photodestruction of the absorbed molecules on the solid surfaces.

  10. Beam Simulation Studies of Plasma-Surface Interactions in Fluorocarbon Etching of Silicon and Silicon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A molecular beam apparatus has been constructed which allows the synthesis of dominant species fluxes to a wafer surface during fluorocarbon plasma etching. These species include atomic F as the primary etchant, CF _2 as a potential polymer forming precursor, and Ar^{+} or CF _{rm x}^{+} type ions. Ionic and neutral fluxes employed are within an order of magnitude of those typical of fluorocarbon plasmas and are well characterized through the use of in -situ probes. Etching yields and product distributions have been measured through the use of in-situ laser interferometry and line-of-sight mass spectrometry. XPS studies of etched surfaces were performed to assess surface chemical bonding states and average surface stoichiometry. A useful design guide was developed which allows optimal design of straight -tube molecular beam dosers in the collisionally-opaque regime. Ion-enhanced surface reaction kinetics have been studied as a function of the independently variable fluxes of free radicals and ions, as well as ion energy and substrate temperature. We have investigated the role of Ar ^{+} ions in enhancing the chemistries of F and CF_2 separately, and in combination on undoped silicon and silicon dioxide surfaces. We have employed both reactive and inert ions in the energy range most relevant to plasma etching processes, 20-500 eV, through the use of Kaufman and ECR type ion sources. The effect of increasing ion energy on the etching of fluorine saturated silicon and silicon dioxide surfaces was quantified through extensions of available low energy physical sputtering theory. Simple "site"-occupation models were developed for the quantification of the ion-enhanced fluorine etching kinetics in these systems. These models are suitable for use in topography evolution simulators (e.g. SAMPLE) for the predictive modeling of profile evolution in non-depositing fluorine-based plasmas such as NF_3 and SF_6. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14

  11. Surface and allied studies in silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1984-01-01

    Significant improvements were made in the short-circuit current-decay method of measuring the recombination lifetime tau and the back surface recombination velocity S of the quasineutral base of silicon solar cells. The improvements include a circuit implementation that increases the speed of switching from the forward-voltage to the short-circuit conditions. They also include a supplementation of this method by some newly developed techniques employing small-signal admittance as a function of frequency omega. This supplementation is highly effective for determining tau for cases in which the diffusion length L greatly exceeds the base thickness W. Representative results on different solar cells are reported. Some advances made in the understanding of passivation provided by the polysilicon/silicon heterojunction are outlined. Recent measurements demonstrate that S 10,000 cm/s derive from this method of passivation.

  12. Ionic Liquids Can Permanently Modify Porous Silicon Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Shruti; Coombs, Sidney G; Wagle, Durgesh V; Bhawawet, Nakara; Baker, Gary A; Bright, Frank V

    2016-08-01

    To develop ionic liquid/porous silicon (IL/pSi) microarrays we have contact pin-printed 20 hydrophobic and hydrophilic ionic liquids onto as-prepared, hydrogen-passivated porous silicon (ap-pSi) and then determined the individual IL spot size, shape and associated pSi surface chemistry. The results reveal that the hydrophobic ionic liquids oxidize the ap-pSi slightly. In contrast, the hydrophilic ionic liquids lead to heavily oxidized pSi (i.e., ox-pSi). The strong oxidation arises from residual water within the hydrophilic ILs that is delivered from these ILs into the ap-pSi matrix causing oxidation. This phenomenon is less of an issue in the hydrophobic ILs because their water solubility is substantially lower.

  13. Ionic Liquids Can Permanently Modify Porous Silicon Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Shruti; Coombs, Sidney G; Wagle, Durgesh V; Bhawawet, Nakara; Baker, Gary A; Bright, Frank V

    2016-08-01

    To develop ionic liquid/porous silicon (IL/pSi) microarrays we have contact pin-printed 20 hydrophobic and hydrophilic ionic liquids onto as-prepared, hydrogen-passivated porous silicon (ap-pSi) and then determined the individual IL spot size, shape and associated pSi surface chemistry. The results reveal that the hydrophobic ionic liquids oxidize the ap-pSi slightly. In contrast, the hydrophilic ionic liquids lead to heavily oxidized pSi (i.e., ox-pSi). The strong oxidation arises from residual water within the hydrophilic ILs that is delivered from these ILs into the ap-pSi matrix causing oxidation. This phenomenon is less of an issue in the hydrophobic ILs because their water solubility is substantially lower. PMID:27405109

  14. Silicon nanocrystal inks, films, and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Lance Michael; Kortshagen, Uwe Richard

    2015-09-01

    Silicon nanocrystal inks and films, and methods of making and using silicon nanocrystal inks and films, are disclosed herein. In certain embodiments the nanocrystal inks and films include halide-terminated (e.g., chloride-terminated) and/or halide and hydrogen-terminated nanocrystals of silicon or alloys thereof. Silicon nanocrystal inks and films can be used, for example, to prepare semiconductor devices.

  15. Instrumental studies on silicone oil adsorption to the surface of intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chun Ho; Joo, Choun-Ki; Chun, Heung Jae; Yoo, Bok Ryul; Noh, Dong Il; Shim, Young Bock

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the degree of adherence of silicone oil to various intraocular lenses (IOLs) through comparison of the physico-chemical properties of the oil and IOLs. Four kinds of IOLs comprising various biomaterials were examined: PMMA (720A™), PHEMA (IOGEL 1103™), Acrysof (MA60BM™), and silicone (SI30NB™). Each lens was immersed in silicone oil or carboxylated silicone (CS-PDMS) oil for 72 h. For determination of the changes in chemical and elemental compositions on the surfaces of IOLs caused by the contact with silicone oil, IOLs were washed and rinsed with n-pentane to remove as much of the adsorbed silicone oil as possible, then subjected to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses. The results of FTIR studies strongly indicate that washing with n-pentane completely removed the adhered silicone oil on the surfaces of PHEMA and Acrysof IOLs, whereas the residual silicone oil was detected on the surfaces of PMMA and silicone IOLs. XPS studies showed that silicone oil coverage of PMMA lenses was 12%, even after washing with n-pentane. In the case of silicone IOLs, the relative O1s peak area of carboxyl group in the residual CS-PDMS oil was found to be ˜2.7%. Considering that 2.8% carboxyl group-substituted silicone oil was used in the present study, CS-PDMS oil covered the entire surface of the silicone IOLs.

  16. Tantalum oxide/silicon nitride: A negatively charged surface passivation stack for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao Bullock, James; Cuevas, Andres

    2015-05-18

    This letter reports effective passivation of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces by thermal atomic layer deposited tantalum oxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) underneath plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}). Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy imaging shows an approximately 2 nm thick interfacial layer between Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and c-Si. Surface recombination velocities as low as 5.0 cm/s and 3.2 cm/s are attained on p-type 0.8 Ω·cm and n-type 1.0 Ω·cm c-Si wafers, respectively. Recombination current densities of 25 fA/cm{sup 2} and 68 fA/cm{sup 2} are measured on 150 Ω/sq boron-diffused p{sup +} and 120 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused n{sup +} c-Si, respectively. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal a negative fixed insulator charge density of −1.8 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} for the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} film and −1.0 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} for the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiN{sub x} stack. The Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiN{sub x} stack is demonstrated to be an excellent candidate for surface passivation of high efficiency silicon solar cells.

  17. Origin of complex impact craters on native oxide coated silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai; Popok, Vladimir N.; Campbell, Eleanor E. B.

    2008-02-01

    Crater structures induced by impact of keV-energy Arn+ cluster ions on silicon surfaces are measured with atomic force microscopy. Complex crater structures consisting of a central hillock and outer rim are observed more often on targets covered with a native silicon oxide layer than on targets without the oxide layer. To explain the formation of these complex crater structures, classical molecular dynamics simulations of Ar cluster impacts on oxide coated silicon surfaces, as well as on bulk amorphous silica, amorphous Si, and crystalline Si substrates, are carried out. The diameter of the simulated hillock structures in the silicon oxide layer is in agreement with the experimental results, but the simulations cannot directly explain the height of hillocks and the outer rim structures when the oxide coated silicon substrate is free of defects. However, in simulations of 5keV /atom Ar12 cluster impacts, transient displacements of the amorphous silicon or silicon oxide substrate surfaces are induced in an approximately 50nm wide area surrounding the impact point. In silicon oxide, the transient displacements induce small topographical changes on the surface in the vicinity of the central hillock. The comparison of cluster stopping mechanisms in the various silicon oxide and silicon structures shows that the largest lateral momentum is induced in the silicon oxide layer during the impact; thus, the transient displacements on the surface are stronger than in the other substrates. This can be a reason for the higher frequency of occurrence of the complex craters on oxide coated silicon.

  18. Surface Micromachined Silicon Carbide Accelerometers for Gas Turbine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeAnna, Russell G.

    1998-01-01

    A finite-element analysis of possible silicon carbide (SIC) folded-beam, lateral-resonating accelerometers is presented. Results include stiffness coefficients, acceleration sensitivities, resonant frequency versus temperature, and proof-mass displacements due to centripetal acceleration of a blade-mounted sensor. The surface micromachined devices, which are similar to the Analog Devices Inc., (Norwood, MA) air-bag crash detector, are etched from 2-pm thick, 3C-SiC films grown at 1600 K using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD). The substrate is a 500 gm-thick, (100) silicon wafer. Polysilicon or silicon dioxide is used as a sacrificial layer. The finite element analysis includes temperature-dependent properties, shape change due to volume expansion, and thermal stress caused by differential thermal expansion of the materials. The finite-element results are compared to experimental results for a SiC device of similar, but not identical, geometry. Along with changes in mechanical design, blade-mounted sensors would require on-chip circuitry to cancel displacements due to centripetal acceleration and improve sensitivity and bandwidth. These findings may result in better accelerometer designs for this application.

  19. Improved Silicon Carbide Crystals Grown From Atomically Flat Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is demonstrating that atomically flat (i.e., step-free) silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces are ideal for realizing greatly improved wide bandgap semiconductor films with lower crystal defect densities. Further development of these improved films could eventually enable harsh-environment electronics beneficial to jet engine and other aerospace and automotive applications, as well as much more efficient and compact power distribution and control. The technique demonstrated could also improve blue-light lasers and light-emitting-diode displays.

  20. Elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Xiong, Qiulin; Li, Xiaopeng; Ma, Junxian

    2015-08-10

    We researched an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide and evaluated its mode characteristics using the finite element method software COMSOL. The waveguide consists of three parts: an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire, a silver film layer, and a silica covering layer between them. All of the components are surrounded by air. After optimizing the geometrical parameters of the waveguide, we can achieve the waveguide's strong field confinement (ranging from λ2/270 to λ2/27) and long propagation distances (119-485 μm). In order to further understand the impact of the waveguide's architecture on its performance, we also studied the ridge hybrid waveguide. The results show that the ridge waveguide has moderate local field confinement ranging from λ2/190 to λ2/20 and its maximum propagation distance is about 340 μm. We compared the elliptic cylindrical and ridge nanowire hybrid waveguides with the cylindrical hybrid waveguide that we studied before. The elliptic cylindrical waveguide achieves a better trade-off between reasonable mode confinement and maximum propagation length in the three waveguides. The researched hybrid surface plasmon polaritons waveguides are useful to construct devices such as a directional coupler and may find potential applications in photonic integrated circuits or other novel SPP devices.

  1. Elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Xiong, Qiulin; Li, Xiaopeng; Ma, Junxian

    2015-08-10

    We researched an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide and evaluated its mode characteristics using the finite element method software COMSOL. The waveguide consists of three parts: an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire, a silver film layer, and a silica covering layer between them. All of the components are surrounded by air. After optimizing the geometrical parameters of the waveguide, we can achieve the waveguide's strong field confinement (ranging from λ2/270 to λ2/27) and long propagation distances (119-485 μm). In order to further understand the impact of the waveguide's architecture on its performance, we also studied the ridge hybrid waveguide. The results show that the ridge waveguide has moderate local field confinement ranging from λ2/190 to λ2/20 and its maximum propagation distance is about 340 μm. We compared the elliptic cylindrical and ridge nanowire hybrid waveguides with the cylindrical hybrid waveguide that we studied before. The elliptic cylindrical waveguide achieves a better trade-off between reasonable mode confinement and maximum propagation length in the three waveguides. The researched hybrid surface plasmon polaritons waveguides are useful to construct devices such as a directional coupler and may find potential applications in photonic integrated circuits or other novel SPP devices. PMID:26368373

  2. Impact of Surface Chemistry on Copper Deposition in Mesoporous Silicon.

    PubMed

    Darwich, Walid; Garron, Anthony; Bockowski, Piotr; Santini, Catherine; Gaillard, Frédéric; Haumesser, Paul-Henri

    2016-08-01

    An easy, efficient, and safe process is developed to metallize mesoporous silicon (PSi) with Cu from the decomposition of a solution of mesitylcopper (CuMes) in an imidazolium-based ionic liquid (IL), [C1C4Im][NTf2]. The impregnation of a solution of CuMes in IL affords the deposition of metallic islands not only on the surface but also deep within the pores of a mesoporous Si layer with small pores below 10 nm. Therefore, this process is well suited to efficiently and completely metallize PSi layers. An in-depth mechanistic study shows that metal deposition is due to the reduction of CuMes by surface silane groups rather than by Si oxidation as observed in aqueous or water-containing media. This could open a new route to the chemical metallization of PSi by less-noble metals difficult to attain by a conventional displacement reaction.

  3. Impact of Surface Chemistry on Copper Deposition in Mesoporous Silicon.

    PubMed

    Darwich, Walid; Garron, Anthony; Bockowski, Piotr; Santini, Catherine; Gaillard, Frédéric; Haumesser, Paul-Henri

    2016-08-01

    An easy, efficient, and safe process is developed to metallize mesoporous silicon (PSi) with Cu from the decomposition of a solution of mesitylcopper (CuMes) in an imidazolium-based ionic liquid (IL), [C1C4Im][NTf2]. The impregnation of a solution of CuMes in IL affords the deposition of metallic islands not only on the surface but also deep within the pores of a mesoporous Si layer with small pores below 10 nm. Therefore, this process is well suited to efficiently and completely metallize PSi layers. An in-depth mechanistic study shows that metal deposition is due to the reduction of CuMes by surface silane groups rather than by Si oxidation as observed in aqueous or water-containing media. This could open a new route to the chemical metallization of PSi by less-noble metals difficult to attain by a conventional displacement reaction. PMID:27368422

  4. Surface and allied studies in silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1984-01-01

    Measuring small-signal admittance versus frequency and forward bias voltage together with a new transient measurement apparently provides the most reliable and flexible method available for determining back surface recombination velocity and low-injection lifetime of the quasineutral base region of silicon solar cells. The new transient measurement reported here is called short-circuit-current decay (SCCD). In this method, forward voltage equal to about the open-circuit or the maximum power voltage establishes excess holes and electrons in the junction transition region and in the quasineutral regions. The sudden application of a short circuit causes an exiting of the excess holes and electrons in the transition region within about ten picoseconds. From observing the slope and intercept of the subsequent current decay, the base lifetime and surface recombination velocity can be determined. The admittance measurement previously mentioned then enters to increase accuracy particularly for devices for which the diffusion length exceeds the base thickness.

  5. Linear Stability and Instability Patterns in Ion Bombarded Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, Charbel Said

    2011-12-01

    This thesis is a combined experimental and theoretical study of the fundamental physical mechanisms governing nanoscale surface morphology evolution of Ar + ion bombarded silicon surfaces. I experimentally determined the topographical phase diagram resulting from Ar+ ion irradiation of Si surfaces at room temperature in the linear regime of surface dynamics as we vary the control parameters ion beam energy and incidence angle. At all energies, it is characterized by a diverging wavelength bifurcation from a smooth stable surface to parallel mode ripples (wavevector parallel to the projected ion beam on the surface) as the ion beam incidence angle is varied. At sufficiently high angles theta ≈ 85°, I observed perpendicular mode ripples (wavevector perpendicular to the ion beam). Through real-time Grazing-Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering, I have definitively established that ion-induced erosion, which is the consensus predominant cause of pattern formation, is not only of the wrong sign to explain the measured curvature coefficients responsible in driving the surface dynamics, but also is so small in magnitude as to be essentially negligible for pattern formation except possibly at the most grazing angles of incidence where both erosion and redistribution effects converge to zero. That the contribution of ion impact induced prompt atomic redistribution effects entirely overwhelms that of erosion in both the stabilizing and destabilizing regimes is of profound significance, as it overturns the erosion-based paradigm that has dominated the pattern formation field for over two decades. In situ wafer curvature measurements using the Multi-beam Optical Stress Sensor system were performed during amorphization of silicon by normal incidence 250 eV ion irradiation. An average compressive saturation stress built up in the amorphous layer was found to be as large as 1.5 GPa. By assuming the ion-induced amorphization layer to be modeled as a viscoelastic film that is

  6. Surface chemistry and friction behavior of the silicon carbide (0001) surface at temperatures to 1500 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analyses and friction studies were conducted with a silicon carbide (0001) surface in contact with iron at various temperatures to 1200 or 1500 C in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 8th power Pa. The results indicate that there is a significant temperature influence on both the surface chemistry and friction properties of silicon carbide. The principal contaminant of adsorbed amorphous carbon on the silicon carbide surface in the as received state is removed by simply heating to 400 C. Above 400 C, graphite and carbide type carbine are the primary species on the silicon carbide surface, in addition to silicon. The coefficients of friction of polycrystalline iron sliding against a single crystal silicon carbide (0001) surface were high at temperatures to 800 C. Similar coefficients of friction were obtained at room temperature after the silicon carbide was preheated at various temperatures up 800 C. When the friction experiments were conducted above 800 C or when the specimens were preheated to above 800 C, the coefficients of friction were dramatically lower. At 800 C the silicon and carbide type carbon are at a maximum intensity in the XPS spectra. With increasing temperature above 800 C, the concentration of the graphite increases rapidly on the surface, whereas those of the carbide type carbon and silicon decrease rapidly.

  7. Synthesis and oxidation of luminescent silicon nanocrystals from silicon tetrachloride by very high frequency nonthermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresback, Ryan; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Okazaki, Ken

    2011-07-01

    Silicon nanocrystals have recently attracted significant attention for applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and biological imaging due to their size-dependent optical and electronic properties. Here a method for synthesizing luminescent silicon nanocrystals from silicon tetrachloride with a nonthermal plasma is described. Silicon nanocrystals with mean diameters of 3-15 nm are synthesized and have a narrow size distribution with the standard deviation being less than 20% of the mean size. Control over crystallinity is achieved for plasma pressures of 1-12 Torr and hydrogen gas concentrations of 5-70% through adjustment of the plasma power. The size of nanocrystals, and resulting optical properties, is mainly dependent on the gas residence time in the plasma region. Additionally the surface of the nanocrystals is covered by both hydrogen and chlorine. Oxidation of the nanocrystals, which is found to follow the Cabrera-Mott mechanism under ambient conditions, is significantly faster than hydrogen terminated silicon due to partial termination of the nanocrystal surface by chlorine.

  8. Experimental study of thermodynamic surface characteristics and pH sensitivity of silicon dioxide and silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, H; Maaref, A; Jaffrezic-Renault, N

    2010-05-18

    In this report, we have introduced a revision of the chemical treatment influence on the surface thermodynamic properties of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) and silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) solid thin layers. Some characterization techniques might be used to quantify the thermodynamic properties of solid surface and predict its ability in the adhesion phenomenon. In this work, we have used static and dynamic contact angle (CA) measurements to characterize both dioxide solid surfaces being treated by using the two procedures of cleaning and chemical activation. Qualitative and quantitative concepts of analysis, using the Van Oss approach, are based on the determination of dioxide surface hydrophilic and hydrophobic features and the thermodynamic parameters such as free energy, acid, base, and Lewis acid-base surface tension components. Electrochemical capacitance-potential measurements were carried out to study the reactivity of both silicon dioxide and silicon nitride surfaces for pH variation. Furthermore, the surface roughness of these insulators was examined by using the contact angle hysteresis (CAH) measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was concluded that CA technique can be used as a suitable and base method for the understanding of surface wettability and for the control of surface wetting behavior.

  9. A silicon-based electrical source of surface plasmon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Walters, R J; van Loon, R V A; Brunets, I; Schmitz, J; Polman, A

    2010-01-01

    After decades of process scaling driven by Moore's law, the silicon microelectronics world is now defined by length scales that are many times smaller than the dimensions of typical micro-optical components. This size mismatch poses an important challenge for those working to integrate photonics with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics technology. One promising solution is to fabricate optical systems at metal/dielectric interfaces, where electromagnetic modes called surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) offer unique opportunities to confine and control light at length scales below 100 nm (refs 1, 2). Research groups working in the rapidly developing field of plasmonics have now demonstrated many passive components that suggest the potential of SPPs for applications in sensing and optical communication. Recently, active plasmonic devices based on III-V materials and organic materials have been reported. An electrical source of SPPs was recently demonstrated using organic semiconductors by Koller and colleagues. Here we show that a silicon-based electrical source for SPPs can be fabricated using established low-temperature microtechnology processes that are compatible with back-end CMOS technology.

  10. A silicon-based electrical source of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; van Loon, R. V. A.; Brunets, I.; Schmitz, J.; Polman, A.

    2010-01-01

    After decades of process scaling driven by Moore's law, the silicon microelectronics world is now defined by length scales that are many times smaller than the dimensions of typical micro-optical components. This size mismatch poses an important challenge for those working to integrate photonics with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics technology. One promising solution is to fabricate optical systems at metal/dielectric interfaces, where electromagnetic modes called surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) offer unique opportunities to confine and control light at length scales below 100nm (refs 1, 2). Research groups working in the rapidly developing field of plasmonics have now demonstrated many passive components that suggest the potential of SPPs for applications in sensing and optical communication. Recently, active plasmonic devices based on III-V materials and organic materials have been reported. An electrical source of SPPs was recently demonstrated using organic semiconductors by Koller and colleagues. Here we show that a silicon-based electrical source for SPPs can be fabricated using established low-temperature microtechnology processes that are compatible with back-end CMOS technology.

  11. Highly sensitive and reproducible silicon-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors for real applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Houyu; Jiang, Xiangxu; He, Yao

    2016-08-15

    During the past few decades, thanks to silicon nanomaterials' outstanding electronic/optical/mechanical properties, large surface-to-volume ratio, abundant surface chemistry, facile tailorability and good compatibility with modern semiconductor industry, different dimensional silicon nanostructures have been widely employed for rationally designing and fabricating high-performance surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors for the detection of various chemical and biological species. Among these, two-dimensional silicon nanostructures made of metal nanoparticle-modified silicon wafers and three-dimensional silicon nanostructures made of metal nanoparticle-decorated SiNW arrays are of particular interest, and have been extensively exploited as promising silicon-based SERS-active substrates for the construction of high-performance SERS sensors. With an aim to retrospect these important and exciting achievements, we herein focus on reviewing recent representative studies on silicon-based SERS sensors for sensing applications from a broad perspective and possible future direction, promoting readers' awareness of these novel powerful silicon-based SERS sensing technologies. Firstly, we summarize the two unique merits of silicon-based SERS sensors, and those are high sensitivity and good reproducibility. Next, we present recent advances of two- and three-dimensional silicon-based SERS sensors, especially for real applications. Finally, we discuss the major challenges and prospects for the development of silicon-based SERS sensors.

  12. Highly sensitive and reproducible silicon-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors for real applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Houyu; Jiang, Xiangxu; He, Yao

    2016-08-15

    During the past few decades, thanks to silicon nanomaterials' outstanding electronic/optical/mechanical properties, large surface-to-volume ratio, abundant surface chemistry, facile tailorability and good compatibility with modern semiconductor industry, different dimensional silicon nanostructures have been widely employed for rationally designing and fabricating high-performance surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors for the detection of various chemical and biological species. Among these, two-dimensional silicon nanostructures made of metal nanoparticle-modified silicon wafers and three-dimensional silicon nanostructures made of metal nanoparticle-decorated SiNW arrays are of particular interest, and have been extensively exploited as promising silicon-based SERS-active substrates for the construction of high-performance SERS sensors. With an aim to retrospect these important and exciting achievements, we herein focus on reviewing recent representative studies on silicon-based SERS sensors for sensing applications from a broad perspective and possible future direction, promoting readers' awareness of these novel powerful silicon-based SERS sensing technologies. Firstly, we summarize the two unique merits of silicon-based SERS sensors, and those are high sensitivity and good reproducibility. Next, we present recent advances of two- and three-dimensional silicon-based SERS sensors, especially for real applications. Finally, we discuss the major challenges and prospects for the development of silicon-based SERS sensors. PMID:27414500

  13. Novel antifouling surface with improved hemocompatibility by immobilization of polyzwitterions onto silicon via click chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sunxiang; Yang, Qian; Mi, Baoxia

    2016-02-01

    A novel procedure is presented to develop an antifouling silicon surface with improved hemocompatibility by using a zwitterionic polymer, poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (polySBMA). Functionalization of the silicon surface with polySBMA involved the following three steps: (1) an alkyne terminated polySBMA was synthesized by RAFT polymerization; (2) a self-assembled monolayer with bromine end groups was constructed on the silicon surface, and then the bromine end groups were replaced by azide groups; and (3) the polySBMA was attached to the silicon surface by azide-alkyne cycloaddition click reaction. Membrane characterization confirmed a successful silicon surface modification with almost 100% coverage by polySBMA and an extremely hydrophilic surface after such modification. The polySBMA-modified silicon surface was found to have excellent anti-nonspecific adsorption properties for both bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein and model bacterial cells. Whole blood adsorption experiments showed that the polySBMA-modified silicon surface exhibited excellent hemocompatibility and effective anti-adhesion to blood cells. Silicon membranes with such antifouling and hemocompatible surfaces can be advantageously used to drastically extend the service life of implantable medical devices such as artificial kidney devices.

  14. Surface recombination velocity of phosphorus-diffused silicon solar cell emitters passivated with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride and thermal silicon oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, M. J.; Schmidt, J.; Cuevas, A.; Bultman, J. H.

    2001-04-01

    The emitter saturation current density (JOe) and surface recombination velocity (Sp) of various high quality passivation schemes on phosphorus-diffused solar cell emitters have been determined and compared. The passivation schemes investigated were (i) stoichiometric plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride (SiN), (ii) forming gas annealed thermally grown silicon oxide, and (iii) aluminum annealed (alnealed) thermal silicon oxide. Emitters with sheet resistances ranging from 30 to 430 and 50 to 380 Ω/□ were investigated for planar and random-pyramid textured silicon surfaces, which covers both industrial and laboratory emitters. The electronic surface passivation quality provided by PECVD SiN films was found to be good, with Sp values ranging from 1400 to 25 000 cm/s for planar emitters. Thin thermal silicon oxides were found to provide superior passivation to PECVD SiN, with the best passivation provided by an alnealed thin oxide (Sp values between 250 and 21 000 cm/s). The optimized PECVD SiN films are, nevertheless, sufficiently good for most silicon solar cell applications.

  15. Laser annealing of silicon surface defects for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zeming; Gupta, Mool C.

    2016-10-01

    High power lasers are increasingly used for low cost fabrication of solar cell devices. High power laser processes generate crystal defects, which lower the cell efficiency. This study examines the effect of low power laser annealing for the removal of high power laser induced surface defects. The laser annealing behavior is demonstrated by the significant decrease of photoluminescence generated from dislocation-induced defects and the increase of band-to-band emission. This annealing effect is further confirmed by the X-ray diffraction peak reversal. The dislocation density is quantified by observing etch pits under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). For as-melted samples, the dislocation density is decreased to as low as 1.01 × 106 cm- 2 after laser annealing, resulting in an excellent surface carrier lifetime of 920 μs that is comparable to the value of 1240 μs for the silicon starting wafer. For severely defective samples, the dislocation density is decreased by 4 times and the surface carrier lifetime is increased by 5 times after laser annealing.

  16. Fluorinated alkyne-derived monolayers on oxide-free silicon nanowires via one-step hydrosilylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Minh, Quyen; Pujari, Sidharam P.; Wang, Bin; Wang, Zhanhua; Haick, Hossam; Zuilhof, Han; van Rijn, Cees J. M.

    2016-11-01

    Passivation of oxide-free silicon nanowires (Si NWs) by the formation of high-quality fluorinated 1-hexadecyne-derived monolayers with varying fluorine content has been investigated. Alkyl chain monolayers (C16H30-xFx) with a varying number of fluorine substituents (x = 0, 1, 3, 9, 17) were attached onto hydrogen-terminated silicon (Sisbnd H) surfaces with an effective one-step hydrosilylation. This surface chemistry gives well-defined monolayers on nanowires that have a cylindrical core-shell structure, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and static contact angle (SCA) analysis. The monolayers were stable under acidic and basic conditions, as well as under extreme conditions (such as UV exposure), and provide excellent surface passivation, which opens up applications in the fields of field effect transistors, optoelectronics and especially for disease diagnosis.

  17. Fabrication and application of porous silicon multilayered microparticles in sustained drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniya, Nalin H.; Patel, Sanjaykumar R.; Murthy, Z. V. P.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the ability of porous silicon (PSi) based distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) microparticles for sustained and observable delivery of the antiviral agent acyclovir (ACV) is demonstrated. DBR was fabricated by electrochemical etching of single crystal silicon wafers and ultrasonic fractured to prepare microparticles. The hydrogen-terminated native surface of DBR microparticles was modified by thermal oxidation and thermal hydrosilylation. Particles were loaded with ACV and drug release experiments were conducted in phosphate buffered saline. Drug loading and surface chemistry of particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Drug release profiles from PSi DBR particles show sustained release behavior from all three studied surface chemistries. Drug release from particles was also monitored from change in color of particles.

  18. Modeling the surface photovoltage of silicon slabs with varying thickness.

    PubMed

    Vazhappilly, Tijo; Kilin, Dmitri S; Micha, David A

    2015-04-10

    The variation with thickness of the energy band gap and photovoltage at the surface of a thin semiconductor film are of great interest in connection with their surface electronic structure and optical properties. In this work, the change of a surface photovoltage (SPV) with the number of layers of a crystalline silicon slab is extracted from models based on their atomic structure. Electronic properties of photoexcited slabs are investigated using generalized gradient and hybrid density functionals, and plane wave basis sets. Si(1 1 1) surfaces have been terminated by hydrogen atoms to compensate for dangling bonds and have been described by large supercells with periodic boundary conditions. Calculations of the SPV of the Si slabs have been done in terms of the reduced density matrix of the photoactive electrons including dissipative effects due to their interaction with medium phonons and excitons. Surface photovoltages have been calculated for model Si slabs with 4-12, and 16 layers, to determine convergence trends versus slab thickness. Band gaps and the inverse of the SPVs have been found to scale nearly linearly with the inverse thickness of the slab, while the electronic density of states increases quadratically with thickness. Our calculations show the same trends as experimental values indicating band gap reduction and absorption enhancement for Si films of increasing thickness. Simple arguments on confined electronic structures have been used to explain the main effects of changes with slab thickness. A procedure involving shifted electron excitation energies is described to improve results from generalized gradient functionals so they can be in better agreement with the more accurate but also more computer intensive values from screened exchange hybrid functionals.

  19. Electronic interface properties of silicon substrates after ozone based wet-chemical oxidation studied by SPV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angermann, Heike; Wolke, Klaus; Gottschalk, Christiane; Moldovan, Ana; Roczen, Maurizio; Fittkau, Jens; Zimmer, Martin; Rentsch, Jochen

    2012-08-01

    The preparation of ultra-thin oxide layers on mono-crystalline silicon substrate surfaces with ozone dissolved in ultra pure water at ambient temperature was investigated as a low cost alternative to current wet-chemical cleaning and passivation processes in solar cell manufacturing. Surface photovoltage technique was applied as fast, nondestructive, and surface sensitive method, to provide detailed information about the influence of oxidation rate and substrate surface morphology on electronic properties of the oxidised silicon interfaces and subsequently prepared hydrogen terminated surfaces. Sequences of wet-chemical oxidation in ozone containing ultra pure water and subsequent oxide removal in diluted hydrofluoric acid solution could be utilised to prepare hydrophobic substrates, which are predominantly required as starting point for layer deposition and contact formation. On so prepared hydrogen-terminated substrates values of interface state densities Dit,min ≈ 5 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2 could be achieved, comparable to values obtained on the same substrates by the standard RCA process followed by HF dip.

  20. Surface passivation and orientation dependence in the electronic properties of silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Keenan; Chou, Mei-Yin

    2013-04-10

    Various surface passivations for silicon nanowires have previously been investigated to extend their stability and utility. However, the fundamental mechanisms by which such passivations alter the electronic properties of silicon nanowires have not been clearly understood thus far. In this work, we address this issue through first-principles calculations on fluorine, methyl and hydrogen passivated [110] and [111] silicon nanowires. Comparing these results, we explain how passivations may alter the electronic structure through quantum confinement and strain and demonstrate how silicon nanowires may be modelled by an infinite circular quantum well. We also discuss why [110] nanowires are more strongly influenced by their surface passivation than [111] nanowires.

  1. Wave optical simulation of the light trapping properties of black silicon surface textures.

    PubMed

    Bett, Alexander Jürgen; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Höhn, Oliver; Repo, Päivikki; Savin, Hele; Bläsi, Benedikt; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph

    2016-03-21

    Due to their low reflectivity and effective light trapping properties black silicon nanostructured surfaces are promising front side structures for thin crystalline silicon solar cells. For further optimization of the light trapping effect, particularly in combination with rear side structures, it is necessary to simulate the optical properties of black silicon. Especially, the angular distribution of light in the silicon bulk after passage through the front side structure is relevant. In this paper, a rigorous coupled wave analysis of black silicon is presented, where the black silicon needle shaped structure is approximated by a randomized cone structure. The simulated absorptance agrees well with measurement data. Furthermore, the simulated angular light distribution within the silicon bulk shows that about 70% of the light can be subjected to internal reflection, highlighting the good light trapping properties.

  2. Wave optical simulation of the light trapping properties of black silicon surface textures.

    PubMed

    Bett, Alexander Jürgen; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Höhn, Oliver; Repo, Päivikki; Savin, Hele; Bläsi, Benedikt; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph

    2016-03-21

    Due to their low reflectivity and effective light trapping properties black silicon nanostructured surfaces are promising front side structures for thin crystalline silicon solar cells. For further optimization of the light trapping effect, particularly in combination with rear side structures, it is necessary to simulate the optical properties of black silicon. Especially, the angular distribution of light in the silicon bulk after passage through the front side structure is relevant. In this paper, a rigorous coupled wave analysis of black silicon is presented, where the black silicon needle shaped structure is approximated by a randomized cone structure. The simulated absorptance agrees well with measurement data. Furthermore, the simulated angular light distribution within the silicon bulk shows that about 70% of the light can be subjected to internal reflection, highlighting the good light trapping properties. PMID:27136865

  3. Origin of complex impact craters on native oxide coated silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai; Popok, Vladimir N.; Campbell, Eleanor E. B.

    2008-02-15

    Crater structures induced by impact of keV-energy Ar{sub n}{sup +} cluster ions on silicon surfaces are measured with atomic force microscopy. Complex crater structures consisting of a central hillock and outer rim are observed more often on targets covered with a native silicon oxide layer than on targets without the oxide layer. To explain the formation of these complex crater structures, classical molecular dynamics simulations of Ar cluster impacts on oxide coated silicon surfaces, as well as on bulk amorphous silica, amorphous Si, and crystalline Si substrates, are carried out. The diameter of the simulated hillock structures in the silicon oxide layer is in agreement with the experimental results, but the simulations cannot directly explain the height of hillocks and the outer rim structures when the oxide coated silicon substrate is free of defects. However, in simulations of 5 keV/atom Ar{sub 12} cluster impacts, transient displacements of the amorphous silicon or silicon oxide substrate surfaces are induced in an approximately 50 nm wide area surrounding the impact point. In silicon oxide, the transient displacements induce small topographical changes on the surface in the vicinity of the central hillock. The comparison of cluster stopping mechanisms in the various silicon oxide and silicon structures shows that the largest lateral momentum is induced in the silicon oxide layer during the impact; thus, the transient displacements on the surface are stronger than in the other substrates. This can be a reason for the higher frequency of occurrence of the complex craters on oxide coated silicon.

  4. Surface Structure and Surface Electronic States Related to Plasma Cleaning of Silicon and Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaewon

    This thesis discusses the surface structure and the surface electronic states of Si and Ge(100) surfaces as well as the effects of oxidation process on the silicon oxide/Si(100) interface structure. The H-plasma exposure was performed in situ at low temperatures. The active species, produced in the H-plasma by the rf-excitation of H_2 gas, not only remove microcontaminants such as oxygen and carbon from the surface, but also passivate the surface with atomic hydrogen by satisfying the dangling bonds of the surface atoms. The surfaces were characterized by Angle Resolved UV-Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARUPS) and Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED). In the case of Si(100), H-plasma exposure produced ordered H-terminated crystallographic structures with either a 2 x 1 or 1 x 1 LEED pattern. The hydride phases, found on the surfaces of the cleaned Si(100), were shown to depend on the temperature of the surface during H-plasma cleaning. The electronic states for the monohydride and dihydride phases were identified by ARUPS. When the plasma cleaned surface was annealed, the phase transition from the dihydride to monohydride was observed. The monohydride Si-H surface bond was stable up to 460^circC, and the dangling bond surface states were identified after annealing at 500^circC which was accompanied by the spectral shift. The H-terminated surface were characterized to have a flat band structure. For the Ge(100) surface, an ordered 2 x 1 monohydride phase was obtained from the surface cleaned at 180 ^circC. After plasma exposure at <=170^circC a 1 x 1 surface was observed, but the ARUPS indicated that the surface was predominantly composed of disordered monohydride structures. After annealing above the H-dissociation temperatures, the shift in the spectrum was shown to occur with the dangling bond surface states. The H-terminated surfaces were identified to be unpinned. The interface structure of silicon oxide/Si(100) was studied using ARUPS. Spectral shifts were

  5. Surface and Internal Structure of Pristine Presolar Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, Rhonda, M.; Bernatowicz, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon carbide is the most well-studied type of presolar grain. Isotope measurements of thousands [1,2] and structural data from over 500 individual grains have been reported [3]. The isotope data indicate that approximately 98% originated in asymptotic giant branch stars and 2% in supernovae. Although tens of different polytypes of SiC are known to form synthetically, only two polytypes have been reported for presolar grains. Daulton et al. [3] found that for SiC grains isolated from Murchison by acid treatments, 79.4% are 3C cubic beta-SiC, 2.7% are 2H hexagonal alpha-SiC, 17.1% are intergrowths of and , and 0.9% are heavily disordered. They report that the occurrence of only the and polytypes is consistent with the observed range of condensation temperatures of circumstellar dust for carbon stars. Further constraint on the formation and subsequent alteration of the grains can be obtained from studies of the surfaces and interior structure of grains in pristine form, i.e., prepared without acid treatments [4,5]. The acid treatments remove surface coatings, produce etch pits around defect sites and could remove some subgrains. Surface oxides have been predicted by theoretical modeling as a survival mechanism for SiC grains exposed to the hot oxidizing solar nebula [6]. Scanning electron microscopy studies of pristine SiC shows some evidence for the existence of oxide and organic coatings [4]. We report herein on transmission electron microscopy studies of the surface and internal structure of two pristine SiC grains, including definitive evidence of an oxide rim on one grain, and the presence of internal TiC and AlN grains.

  6. Surface Micromachined Flexural Plate Wave Device Integrable on Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, P.G.; Dimos, D.; Garino, T.J.; Martin, S.J.; Mitchell, M.A.; Olson, W.R.; Ruffner, J.A.; Schubert, W.K.; Tuttle, B.A.

    1999-01-01

    Small, reliable chemical sensors are needed for a wide range of applications, such as weapon state-of-health monitoring, nonproliferation activities, and manufacturing emission monitoring. Significant improvements in present surface acoustic wave sensors could be achieved by developing a flexural plate-wave (FPW) architecture, in which acoustic waves are excited in a thin sensor membrane. Further enhancement of device performance could be realized by integrating a piezoelectric thin film on top of the membrane. These new FPW-piezoelectric thin film devices would improve sensitivity, reduce size, enhance ruggedness and reduce the operating frequency so that the FPW devices would be compatible with standard digital microelectronics. Development of these piezoelectric thin film // FPW devices requires integration of (1) acoustic sensor technology, (2) silicon rnicromachining techniques to fabricate thin membranes, and (3) piezoelectric thin films. Two piezoelectric thin film technologies were emphasized in this study: Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) and AlN. PZT thin films were of sufficient quality such that the first high frequency SAW measurements on PZT thin films were measured during the course of this study. Further, reasonable ferroelectric properties were obtained from PZT films deposited on Si surface micromachined FPW device membranes. Fundamental understanding of the effect of nanodimension interfacial layers on AlN thin film domain configurations and piezoelectric response was developed. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Enhanced surface hardness in nitrogen-implanted silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Uslu, C.; Lee, D.H.; Berta, Y.

    1995-06-01

    Preliminary studies have been performed on the feasibility of carbon-silicon nitride formation ({beta}-Si{sub 1.5}C{sub 1.5}N{sub 4}, the homologue of equilibrium {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} or hypothetical {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) by high dose N{sup +}-implantation into polycrystalline {beta}-SiC (cubic). Thin films were formed using 100 keV implantations with varying ion doses in the range from 1.1 x 10{sup 17} to 27.1 x 10{sup 17} N/cm{sup 2}, and target temperatures between -196{degrees}C and 980{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction with a position-sensitive detector and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed that the as-implanted surfaces (up to 860{degrees}C) contained {approximately}0.1 {mu}m thick buried amorphous layers. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy showed that the peak concentration of nitrogen saturated up to approximately 54 at. % with increasing doses, suggesting formation of a new phase. Implantation to doses of 1.1 x 10{sup 17} and 2.3 x 10{sup 17} N/cm{sup 2} at 980{degrees}C caused enhanced surface hardness compared to SiC.

  8. Radical surface interactions in industrial silicon plasma etch reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, G.; Vempaire, D.; Ramos, R.; Touzeau, M.; Joubert, O.; Bodard, P.; Sadeghi, N.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon etching in Cl2-based plasmas is an important step for the fabrication of IC circuits but the plasma surface interactions involved in this process remain poorly understood. Based on the developments in plasma and reactor wall diagnostics, this paper reviews the recent progress in the understanding of radicals' interactions with surfaces during silicon etching processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the reactor walls shows that during Si etching in Cl2/O2 plasmas, the initial Al2O3 chamber walls are coated with a thin SiOCl layer. Broadband absorption spectroscopy with UV light emitting diodes is used to measure the densities of SiClX radicals (X = 0-2) and Cl2 molecules in steady state plasmas running with the chamber walls coated with different materials. To estimate the surface sticking/recombination probability of these radicals on different surfaces, we have performed time-resolved absorption measurements in the afterglow of pulsed discharges. Our work, in agreement with previous results, shows that the Cl2/Cl density ratio in the discharge is driven mainly by the chemical nature of the chamber walls explaining why process drifts are often observed in Cl2/O2 plasmas. The recombination coefficient of Cl atoms on SiOCl surfaces is about 0.007, while it is about 0.1 on clean walls (AlF3). Based on these results, we discuss the best strategy leading to reproducible process control, the present strategy being a systematic reactor cleaning/conditioning between wafers. The SiOCl layer deposition mechanism is then discussed in detail. The sticking coefficient of SiCl on this surface is near unity, while SiCl2 appears to be weakly reactive toward it. Therefore, SiCl (and SiCl+ ions) are the main vectors of Si deposition on the reactor walls, where their subsequent oxidization by O atoms leads to the formation of a SiOCl deposit. Furthermore, we show that SiCl reaction in the plasma volume with Cl2, through the exchange reaction SiCl + Cl2 → Si

  9. Influence of acetylcholinesterase immobilization on the photoluminescence properties of mesoporous silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Muhammad; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Lee, Ki Hwan

    2014-07-01

    Acetylcholinesterase immobilized p-type porous silicon surface was prepared by covalent attachment. The immobilization procedure was based on support surface chemical oxidation, silanization, surface activation with cyanuric chloride and finally covalent attachment of free enzyme on the cyanuric chloride activated porous silicon surface. Different pore diameter of porous silicon samples were prepared by electrochemical etching in HF based electrolyte solution and appropriate sample was selected suitable for enzyme immobilization with maximum trapping ability. The surface modification was studied through field emission scanning electron microscope, EDS, FT-IR analysis, and photoluminescence measurement by utilizing the fluctuation in the photoluminescence of virgin and enzyme immobilized porous silicon surface. Porous silicon showed strong photoluminescence with maximum emission at 643 nm and immobilization of acetylcholinesterase on porous silicon surface cause considerable increment on the photoluminescence of porous silicon material while acetylcholinesterase free counterpart did not exhibit any fluorescence in the range of 635-670 nm. The activities of the free and immobilized enzymes were evaluated by spectrophotometric method by using neostigmine methylsulfate as standard enzyme inhibitor. The immobilized enzyme exhibited considerable response toward neostigmine methylsulfate in a dose dependent manner comparable with that of its free counterpart alongside enhanced stability, easy separation from the reaction media and significant saving of enzyme. It was believed that immobilized enzyme can be exploited in organic and biomolecule synthesis possessing technical and economical prestige over free enzyme and prominence of easy separation from the reaction mixture.

  10. Surface chemistry dependent immunostimulative potential of porous silicon nanoplatforms.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Fernández, Tahia D; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Le Guével, Xavier; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Kaasalainen, Martti H; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested for immunotherapy applications in order to optimize the delivery of immuno-stimulative or -suppressive molecules. However, low attention towards the impact of the NPs' physicochemical properties has presented a major hurdle for developing efficient immunotherapeutic agents. Here, the effects of porous silicon (PSi) NPs with different surface chemistries were evaluated on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) and lymphocytes in order to highlight the importance of the NPs selection in immuno-stimulative or -suppressive treatment. Although all the PSi NPs showed high biocompatibility, only thermally oxidized PSi (TOPSi) and thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (THCPSi) NPs were able to induce very high rate of immunoactivation by enhancing the expression of surface co-stimulatory markers of the MDDCs (CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR), inducing T-cell proliferation, and also the secretion of interleukins (IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α). These results indicated a balanced increase in the secretion of Th1, Th2, and Treg cytokines. Moreover, undecylenic acid functionalized THCPSi, as well as poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid) conjugated to (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane functionalized thermally carbonized PSi and polyethyleneimine conjugated undecylenic acid functionalized THCPSi NPs showed moderate immunoactivation due to the mild increase in the above-mentioned markers. By contrast, thermally carbonized PSi (TCPSi) and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane functionalized TCPSi NPs did not induce any immunological responses, suggesting that their application could be in the delivery of immunosuppressive molecules. Overall, our findings suggest all the NPs containing more nitrogen or oxygen on the outermost backbone layer have lower immunostimulatory effect than NPs with higher C-H structures on the surface.

  11. Surface modifications of silicon nitride for cellular biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Johan; Altankov, George; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Samitier, Josep; Planell, Josep A; Engel, Elisabeth

    2008-04-01

    Thin films of silicon nitride (Si3N4) can be used in several kinds of micro-sized biosensors as a material to monitor fine environmental changes related to the process of bone formation in vitro. We found however that Si3N4 does not provide optimal conditions for osseointegration as osteoblast-like MG-63 cells tend to detach from the surface when cultured over confluence. Therefore Si3N4 was modified with self-assembled monolayers bearing functional end groups of primary amine (NH2) and carboxyl (COOH) respectively. Both these modifications enhanced the interaction with confluent cell layers and thus improve osseointegration over Si3N4. Furthermore it was observed that the NH2 functionality increased the adsorption of fibronectin (FN), promoted cell proliferation, but delayed the differentiation. We also studied the fate of pre-adsorbed and secreted FN from cells to learn more about the impact of above functionalities for the development of provisional extracellular matrix on materials interface. Taken together our data supports that Si3N4 has low tissue integration but good cellular biocompatibility and thus is appropriate in cellular biosensor applications such as the ion-sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET). COOH and NH2 chemistries generally improve the interfacial tissue interaction with the sensor and they are therefore suitable substrates for monitoring cellular growth or matrix deposition using electrical impedance spectroscopy.

  12. Surface and allied studies in silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1983-01-01

    Two main results are presented. The first deals with a simple method that determines the minority-carrier lifetime and the effective surface recombination velocity of the quasi-neutral base of silicon solar cells. The method requires the observation of only a single transient, and is amenable to automation for in-process monitoring in manufacturing. This method, which is called short-circuit current decay, avoids distortion in the observed transient and consequent inacccuracies that arise from the presence of mobile holes and electrons stored in the p/n junction spacecharge region at the initial instant of the transient. The second main result consists in a formulation of the relevant boundary-value problems that resembles that used in linear two-port network theory. This formulation enables comparisons to be made among various contending methods for measuring material parameters of p/n junction devices, and enables the option of putting the description in the time domain of the transient studies in the form of an infinite series, although closed-form solutions are also possible.

  13. Residual Silicone Detection. [external tank and solid rocket booster surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T.

    1980-01-01

    Both photoelectron emission and ellipsometry proved successful in detecting silicone contamination on unpainted and epoxy painted metal surfaces such as those of the external tank and the solid rocket booster. Great success was achieved using photoelectron emission (PEE). Panels were deliberately contaminated to controlled levels and then mapped with PEE to reveal the areas and levels that were contaminated. The panels were then tested with regard to adhesive properties. Tapes were bonded over the contaminated and uncontaminated regions and the peel force was measured, or the contaminated panels were bonded (with CPR 483 foam) to uncontaminated panels and made into lap shear specimens. Other panels were bonded and made into wedge specimens for hydrothermal stress endurance tests. Strong adhesion resulted if the PEE signal fell within an acceptance window, but was poor outside the acceptance window. A prototype instrument is being prepared which can automatically be scanned over the external liquid hydrogen tank and identify those regions that are contaminated and will cause bond degradation.

  14. Surface roughening during plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon on crystal silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanenbaum, D. M.; Laracuente, A. L.; Gallagher, Alan

    1997-08-01

    The morphology of a series of thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) grown by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) is studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. The substrates were atomically flat, oxide-free, single-crystal silicon. Films were grown in a PECVD chamber directly connected to a surface analysis chamber with no air exposure between growth and measurement. The homogeneous roughness of the films increases with film thickness. The quantification of this roughening is achieved by calculation of both rms roughness and lateral correlation lengths of the a-Si:H film surface from the height difference correlation functions of the measured topographs. Homogeneous roughening occurs over the film surface due to the collective behavior of the flux of depositing radical species and their interactions with the growth surface.

  15. Surface roughening during plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon on crystal silicon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, D.M.; Laracuente, A.L.; Gallagher, A.

    1997-08-01

    The morphology of a series of thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) grown by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) is studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. The substrates were atomically flat, oxide-free, single-crystal silicon. Films were grown in a PECVD chamber directly connected to a surface analysis chamber with no air exposure between growth and measurement. The homogeneous roughness of the films increases with film thickness. The quantification of this roughening is achieved by calculation of both rms roughness and lateral correlation lengths of the a-Si:H film surface from the height difference correlation functions of the measured topographs. Homogeneous roughening occurs over the film surface due to the collective behavior of the flux of depositing radical species and their interactions with the growth surface. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Investigation of the surface of implanted silicon crystal by the contact angle

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedeva, N.N.; Bakovets, V.V.; Sedymova, E.A.; Pridachin, N.B.

    1987-03-01

    The authors study the dependence of the critical contact angle of silicon upon the dose of its irradiation by argon and boron ions. It is established that the system of immiscible liquids ether-water can be successfully used to study the influence of ion implantation of silicon on its wettability by water. The change in the wettability of implanted silicon is related to the increase in the level of the defect state of the layer surface. Wetting of implanted silicon by melts at high temperatures can be used for studying the kinetics and the annealing mechanism of defects.

  17. Integrated freestanding single-crystal silicon nanowires: conductivity and surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hoon; Ritz, Clark S; Huang, Minghuang; Ziwisky, Michael W; Blise, Robert J; Lagally, Max G

    2011-02-01

    Integrated freestanding single-crystal silicon nanowires with typical dimension of 100 nm × 100 nm × 5 µm are fabricated by conventional 1:1 optical lithography and wet chemical silicon etching. The fabrication procedure can lead to wafer-scale integration of silicon nanowires in arrays. The measured electrical transport characteristics of the silicon nanowires covered with/without SiO(2) support a model of Fermi level pinning near the conduction band. The I-V curves of the nanowires reveal a current carrier polarity reversal depending on Si-SiO(2) and Si-H bonds on the nanowire surfaces.

  18. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Yu, C.M.; Raley, N.F.

    1999-03-16

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gases in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters. 9 figs.

  19. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Yu, Conrad M.; Raley, Norman F.

    1999-01-01

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gasses in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters.

  20. Surface trap mediated electronic transport in biofunctionalized silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puppo, F.; Traversa, F. L.; Di Ventra, M.; De Micheli, G.; Carrara, S.

    2016-08-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), fabricated via a top-down approach and then functionalized with biological probes, are used for electrically-based sensing of breast tumor markers. The SiNWs, featuring memristive-like behavior in bare conditions, show, in the presence of biomarkers, modified hysteresis and, more importantly, a voltage memory component, namely a voltage gap. The voltage gap is demonstrated to be a novel and powerful parameter of detection thanks to its high-resolution dependence on charges in proximity of the wire. This unique approach of sensing has never been studied and adopted before. Here, we propose a physical model of the surface electronic transport in Schottky barrier SiNW biosensors, aiming at reproducing and understanding the voltage gap based behavior. The implemented model describes well the experimental I–V characteristics of the device. It also links the modification of the voltage gap to the changing concentration of antigens by showing the decrease of this parameter in response to increasing concentrations of the molecules that are detected with femtomolar resolution in real human samples. Both experiments and simulations highlight the predominant role of the dynamic recombination of the nanowire surface states, with the incoming external charges from bio-species, in the appearance and modification of the voltage gap. Finally, thanks to its compactness, and strict correlation with the physics of the nanodevice, this model can be used to describe and predict the I–V characteristics in other nanostructured devices, for different than antibody-based sensing as well as electronic applications.

  1. Surface trap mediated electronic transport in biofunctionalized silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Puppo, F; Traversa, F L; Ventra, M Di; Micheli, G De; Carrara, S

    2016-08-26

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), fabricated via a top-down approach and then functionalized with biological probes, are used for electrically-based sensing of breast tumor markers. The SiNWs, featuring memristive-like behavior in bare conditions, show, in the presence of biomarkers, modified hysteresis and, more importantly, a voltage memory component, namely a voltage gap. The voltage gap is demonstrated to be a novel and powerful parameter of detection thanks to its high-resolution dependence on charges in proximity of the wire. This unique approach of sensing has never been studied and adopted before. Here, we propose a physical model of the surface electronic transport in Schottky barrier SiNW biosensors, aiming at reproducing and understanding the voltage gap based behavior. The implemented model describes well the experimental I-V characteristics of the device. It also links the modification of the voltage gap to the changing concentration of antigens by showing the decrease of this parameter in response to increasing concentrations of the molecules that are detected with femtomolar resolution in real human samples. Both experiments and simulations highlight the predominant role of the dynamic recombination of the nanowire surface states, with the incoming external charges from bio-species, in the appearance and modification of the voltage gap. Finally, thanks to its compactness, and strict correlation with the physics of the nanodevice, this model can be used to describe and predict the I-V characteristics in other nanostructured devices, for different than antibody-based sensing as well as electronic applications.

  2. Surface trap mediated electronic transport in biofunctionalized silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puppo, F.; Traversa, F. L.; Di Ventra, M.; De Micheli, G.; Carrara, S.

    2016-08-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), fabricated via a top-down approach and then functionalized with biological probes, are used for electrically-based sensing of breast tumor markers. The SiNWs, featuring memristive-like behavior in bare conditions, show, in the presence of biomarkers, modified hysteresis and, more importantly, a voltage memory component, namely a voltage gap. The voltage gap is demonstrated to be a novel and powerful parameter of detection thanks to its high-resolution dependence on charges in proximity of the wire. This unique approach of sensing has never been studied and adopted before. Here, we propose a physical model of the surface electronic transport in Schottky barrier SiNW biosensors, aiming at reproducing and understanding the voltage gap based behavior. The implemented model describes well the experimental I-V characteristics of the device. It also links the modification of the voltage gap to the changing concentration of antigens by showing the decrease of this parameter in response to increasing concentrations of the molecules that are detected with femtomolar resolution in real human samples. Both experiments and simulations highlight the predominant role of the dynamic recombination of the nanowire surface states, with the incoming external charges from bio-species, in the appearance and modification of the voltage gap. Finally, thanks to its compactness, and strict correlation with the physics of the nanodevice, this model can be used to describe and predict the I-V characteristics in other nanostructured devices, for different than antibody-based sensing as well as electronic applications.

  3. Surface trap mediated electronic transport in biofunctionalized silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Puppo, F; Traversa, F L; Ventra, M Di; Micheli, G De; Carrara, S

    2016-08-26

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), fabricated via a top-down approach and then functionalized with biological probes, are used for electrically-based sensing of breast tumor markers. The SiNWs, featuring memristive-like behavior in bare conditions, show, in the presence of biomarkers, modified hysteresis and, more importantly, a voltage memory component, namely a voltage gap. The voltage gap is demonstrated to be a novel and powerful parameter of detection thanks to its high-resolution dependence on charges in proximity of the wire. This unique approach of sensing has never been studied and adopted before. Here, we propose a physical model of the surface electronic transport in Schottky barrier SiNW biosensors, aiming at reproducing and understanding the voltage gap based behavior. The implemented model describes well the experimental I-V characteristics of the device. It also links the modification of the voltage gap to the changing concentration of antigens by showing the decrease of this parameter in response to increasing concentrations of the molecules that are detected with femtomolar resolution in real human samples. Both experiments and simulations highlight the predominant role of the dynamic recombination of the nanowire surface states, with the incoming external charges from bio-species, in the appearance and modification of the voltage gap. Finally, thanks to its compactness, and strict correlation with the physics of the nanodevice, this model can be used to describe and predict the I-V characteristics in other nanostructured devices, for different than antibody-based sensing as well as electronic applications. PMID:27418560

  4. Surface Area, and Oxidation Effects on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon Powder Compacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Palczer, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Commercially available silicon powders were wet-attrition-milled from 2 to 48 hr to achieve surface areas (SA's) ranging from 1.3 to 70 sq m/g. The surface area effects on the nitridation kinetics of silicon powder compacts were determined at 1250 or 1350 C for 4 hr. In addition, the influence of nitridation environment, and preoxidation on nitridation kinetics of a silicon powder of high surface area (approximately equals 63 sq m/g) was investigated. As the surface area increased, so did the percentage nitridation after 4 hr in N2 at 1250 or 1350 C. Silicon powders of high surface area (greater than 40 sq m/g) can be nitrided to greater than 70% at 1250 C in 4 hr. The nitridation kinetics of the high-surface-area powder compacts were significantly delayed by preoxidation treatment. Conversely, the nitridation environment had no significant influence on the nitridation kinetics of the same powder. Impurities present in the starting powder, and those accumulated during attrition milling, appeared to react with the silica layer on the surface of silicon particles to form a molten silicate layer, which provided a path for rapid diffusion of nitrogen and enhanced the nitridation kinetics of high surface area silicon powder.

  5. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  6. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J.; Herman, Herbert; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

  7. Surface morphological instability of silicon (100) crystals under microwave ion physical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yafarov, R. K.; Shanygin, V. Ya.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results of studies of the dynamics of relaxation modification of the morphological characteristics of atomically clean surfaces of silicon (100) crystals with different types of conductivity after microwave ion physical etching in an argon atmosphere. For the first time, the effect of the electronic properties on the morphological characteristics and the surface free energy of silicon crystals is experimentally shown and proven by physicochemical methods.

  8. Light-induced changes in silicon nanocrystal based solar cells: Modification of silicon-hydrogen bonding on silicon nanocrystal surface under illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ka-Hyun; Johnson, Erik V.; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) is a material consisting of a small volume fraction of nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. pm-Si:H solar cells demonstrate interesting initial degradation behaviors such as rapid initial change in photovoltaic parameters and self-healing after degradation during light-soaking. The precise dynamics of the light-induced degradation was studied in a series of light-soaking experiments under various illumination conditions such as AM1.5G and filtered 570 nm yellow light. Hydrogen effusion experiment before and after light-soaking further revealed that the initial degradation of pm-Si:H solar cells originate from the modification of silicon-hydrogen bonding on the surface of silicon nanocrystals in pm-Si:H.

  9. Creation of Electron Trap States in Silicon Dioxide By Local Electron Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, Dustin; Williams, Clayton

    2012-02-01

    Over a decade ago, the Scanning Tunneling Microscope was shown capable of desorbing single hydrogen atoms from the surface of hydrogen terminated silicon.ootnotetextT.C. Shen et. al. Science 268, 1590 (1995). The resultant dangling bonds can act as atomic scale quantum dots.ootnotetextM. B Haider et. al. PRL 102, 046805 (2009). Electrons trapped in such dangling bond states at the surface of crystalline silicon have short retention times at room temperature, due to the proximity of the occupied state energy level to the conduction band. Here we report on a method for creating electron trap states at the surface of a silicon dioxide film by electron injection from a metalized Atomic Force Microscope probe tip. Single Electron Tunneling Force measurementsootnotetextE. Bussmann, et. al. Appl. Phys. Lett., 85, 13 (2004). are employed to examine the existence of trap states in the silicon dioxide surface before and after the electron injection. Evidence for electron trap state creation, without topographic modification of the silicon dioxide surface, will be presented. The trap states created by this process have electron retention times which are greater than one second at room temperature. The methodology for trap state creation and detection will be presented.

  10. Monolayer contact doping of silicon surfaces and nanowires using organophosphorus compounds.

    PubMed

    Hazut, Ori; Agarwala, Arunava; Subramani, Thangavel; Waichman, Sharon; Yerushalmi, Roie

    2013-12-02

    Monolayer Contact Doping (MLCD) is a simple method for doping of surfaces and nanostructures(1). MLCD results in the formation of highly controlled, ultra shallow and sharp doping profiles at the nanometer scale. In MLCD process the dopant source is a monolayer containing dopant atoms. In this article a detailed procedure for surface doping of silicon substrate as well as silicon nanowires is demonstrated. Phosphorus dopant source was formed using tetraethyl methylenediphosphonate monolayer on a silicon substrate. This monolayer containing substrate was brought to contact with a pristine intrinsic silicon target substrate and annealed while in contact. Sheet resistance of the target substrate was measured using 4 point probe. Intrinsic silicon nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process using a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism; gold nanoparticles were used as catalyst for nanowire growth. The nanowires were suspended in ethanol by mild sonication. This suspension was used to dropcast the nanowires on silicon substrate with a silicon nitride dielectric top layer. These nanowires were doped with phosphorus in similar manner as used for the intrinsic silicon wafer. Standard photolithography process was used to fabricate metal electrodes for the formation of nanowire based field effect transistor (NW-FET). The electrical properties of a representative nanowire device were measured by a semiconductor device analyzer and a probe station.

  11. Surface States and Effective Surface Area on Photoluminescent P-Type Porous Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisz, S. Z.; Porras, A. Ramirez; Resto, O.; Goldstein, Y.; Many, A.; Savir, E.

    1997-01-01

    The present study is motivated by the possibility of utilizing porous silicon for spectral sensors. Pulse measurements on the porous-Si/electrolyte system are employed to determine the surface effective area and the surface-state density at various stages of the anodization process used to produce the porous material. Such measurements were combined with studies of the photoluminescence spectra. These spectra were found to shift progressively to the blue as a function of anodization time. The luminescence intensity increases initially with anodization time, reaches a maximum and then decreases with further anodization. The surface state density, on the other hand, increases with anodization time from an initial value of about 2 x 10(exp 12)/sq cm surface to about 1013 sq cm for the anodized surface. This value is attained already after -2 min anodization and upon further anodization remains fairly constant. In parallel, the effective surface area increases by a factor of 10-30. This behavior is markedly different from the one observed previously for n-type porous Si.

  12. Large area nanoscale patterning of silicon surfaces by parallel local oxidation.

    PubMed

    Losilla, N S; Martínez, J; García, R

    2009-11-25

    The homogeneity and the reproducibility of parallel local oxidation have been improved by introducing a thin film of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) between the stamp and the silicon surface. The flexibility of the polymer film enables a homogeneous contact of the stamp with the silicon surface to be achieved. The oxides obtained yield better aspect ratios compared with the ones created with no PMMA layer. The pattern is formed when a bias voltage is applied between the stamp and the silicon surface for 1 min. The patterning can be done by a step and repeat technique and is reproducible across a centimetre length scale. Once the oxide nanostructures have been created, the polymer is removed by etching in acetone. Finally, parallel local oxidation is applied to fabricate silicon nanostructures and templates for the growth of organic molecules.

  13. Pyramidal texturing of silicon surface via inorganic-organic hybrid alkaline liquor for heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengyou; Zhang, Xiaodan; Wang, Liguo; Jiang, Yuanjian; Wei, Changchun; Zhao, Ying

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate a new class of silicon texturing approach based on inorganic (sodium hydroxide, NaOH) and organic (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, TMAH) alkaline liquor etching processes for photovoltaic applications. The first stage of inorganic alkaline etching textures the silicon surface rapidly with large pyramids and reduces the cost. The subsequent organic alkaline second-etching improves the coverage of small pyramids on the silicon surface and strip off the metallic contaminants produced by the first etching step. In addition, it could smoothen the surface of the pyramids to yield good morphology. In this study, the texturing duration of both etching steps was controlled to optimize the optical and electrical properties as well as the surface morphology and passivation characteristics of the silicon substrates. Compared with traditional inorganic NaOH texturing, this hybrid process yields smoother (111) facets of the pyramids, fewer residual Na+ ions on the silicon surface, and a shorter processing period. It also offers the advantage of lower cost compared with the organic texturing method based on the use of only TMAH. We applied this hybrid texturing process to fabricate silicon heterojunction solar cells, which showed a remarkable improvement compared with the cells based on traditional alkaline texturing processes.

  14. Dwell Time and Surface Parameter Effects on Removal of Silicone Oil From D6ac Steel Using TCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothe, R. E.

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the impact of dwell time, surface roughness, and the surface activation state on 1,1,1-trichloroethane's (TCA's) effectiveness for removing silicone oil from D6ac steel. Silicone-contaminated test articles were washed with TCA solvent, and then the surfaces were analyzed for residue, using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The predominant factor affecting the ability to remove the silicone oil was surface roughness.

  15. Application of PECVD for bulk and surface passivation of high efficiency silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krygowski, T.; Doshi, P.; Cai, L.; Doolittle, A.; Rohatgi, A.

    1995-08-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) passivation of bulk and surface defects has been shown to be an important technique to improve the performance of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) and single crystalline silicon solar cells. In this paper, we report the status of our on-going investigation into the bulk and surface passivation properties of PECVD insulators for photovoltaic applications. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the ability of PECVD films to passivate the front (emitter) surface, bulk, and back surface by proper tailoring of deposition and post-PECVD annealing conditions.

  16. Improved plasma performance in TEXTOR with silicon coated surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.; Esser, H.G.; Jackson, G.L.; Koenen, L.; Messiaen, A.; Ongena, J.; Philipps, V.; Pospiesczcyk, A.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.; Unterberg, B.; the TEXTOR Team Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association EURATOM-Etat Belge, Associatie EURATOM-Belgische Staat, Ecole Royale Militaire, Koninklijke Militaire School, B-1040, Brussels General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-9784 )

    1993-09-06

    Coating of the walls of TEXTOR with silicon has led to improved tokamak plasma performance. Very low concentrations of C, B, and O are measured. Radiation from silicon is located at the plasma periphery at [ital r]/[ital a][ge]0.75 and decreases with increasing plasma density. Density limits are enhanced by 30% as compared to boronized conditions; large density gradients and low electron temperatures at the edge ([lt]10 eV) are obtained. The improved confinement regimes observed earlier at low densities [[tau][sub [ital E

  17. Initiation time of near-infrared laser-induced slip on the surface of silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sungho; Jhang, Kyung-Young

    2014-06-23

    We have determined the initiation time of laser-induced slip on a silicon wafer surface subjected to a near-infrared continuous-wave laser by numerical simulations and experiments. First, numerical analysis was performed based on the heat transfer and thermoelasticity model to calculate the resolved shear stress and the temperature-dependent yield stress. Slip initiation time was predicted by finding the time at which the resolved shear stress reached the yield stress. Experimentally, the slip initiation time was measured by using a laser scattering technique that collects scattered light from the silicon wafer surface and detects strong scattering when the surface slip is initiated. The surface morphology of the silicon wafer surface after laser irradiation was also observed using an optical microscope to confirm the occurrence of slip. The measured slip initiation times agreed well with the numerical predictions.

  18. Porous silicon reorganization: Influence on the structure, surface roughness and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenkovic, N.; Drießen, M.; Weiss, C.; Janz, S.

    2015-12-01

    Porous silicon and epitaxial thickening is a lift-off approach for silicon foil fabrication to avoid kerf losses and produce foils with thicknesses less than 50 μm. The crystal quality of the epitaxial silicon film strongly depends on the porous silicon template, which can be adapted through a reorganization process prior to epitaxy. In this work, we investigated the influence of reorganization on the structure of etched porous silicon layers. The reorganization processes were carried out in a quasi-inline Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition reactor. Variations on the temperatures and process durations for the reorganization step were examined. The cross-sections showed that porous silicon requires temperatures of approximately 1150 °C to produce an excellent template for epitaxy. Atomic Force Microscopy measurements on the samples annealed at different temperatures showed the evolution of the pores from as-etched to a closed surface. These measurements confirm that the surface is not yet closed after 30 min of reorganization at 1000 °C. Different durations of the reorganization step at a fixed temperature of 1150 °C all lead to a closed surface with a comparable roughness of less than 0.5 nm. X-ray diffraction measurements show a change in the strain in the porous layer from tensile to compressive when the reorganization temperature is increased from 800 °C to 1150 °C. A longer reorganization at a fixed temperature of 1150 °C leads to a reduction in the strain without reducing the quality of the surface roughness. Defect density measurements on silicon layers deposited on those templates confirm an improvement of the template for longer reorganization times. This study shows that our porous silicon templates achieve lower surface roughness and strain values than those reported in other publications.

  19. A useful method to overcome the difficulties of applying silicone gel sheet on irregular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Grella, Roberto; Nicoletti, Gianfranco; D'Ari, Antonio; Romanucci, Vincenza; Santoro, Mariangela; D'Andrea, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    To date, silicone gel and silicone occlusive plates are the most useful and effective treatment options for hypertrophic scars (surgical and traumatic). Use of silicone sheeting has also been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of minor keloids in association with corticosteroid intralesional infiltration. In our practice, we encountered four problems: maceration, rashes, pruritus and infection. Not all patients are able to tolerate the cushion, especially children, and certain anatomical regions as the face and the upper chest are not easy to dress for obvious social, psychological and aesthetic reasons. In other anatomical regions, it is also difficult to obtain adequate compression and occlusion of the scar. To overcome such problems of applying silicone gel sheeting, we tested the use of liquid silicone gel (LSG) in the treatment of 18 linear hypertrophic scars (HS group) and 12 minor keloids (KS group) as an alternative to silicone gel sheeting or cushion. Objective parameters (volume, thickness and colour) and subjective symptoms such as pain and pruritus were examined. Evaluations were made when the therapy started and after 30, 90 and 180 days of follow-up. After 90 days of treatment with silicone gel alone (two applications daily), HS group showed a significant improvement in terms of volume decrease, reduced inflammation and redness and improved elasticity. In conclusion, on the basis of our clinical data, we find LSG to be a useful method to overcome the difficulties of applying silicone gel sheeting on irregular surface.

  20. Modification of surface properties of cellulosic substrates by quaternized silicone emulsions.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Parag S; Somasundaran, P

    2014-07-15

    The present work describes the effect of quaternization of silicones as well as the relevant treatment parameter pH on the frictional, morphological and relaxation properties of fabric substrates. Due to their unique surface properties, silicone polymers are extensively used to modify surface properties of various materials, although the effects of functionalization of silicones and relevant process conditions on modification of substrates are not well understood. Specifically we show a considerable reduction in fabric friction, roughness and waviness upon treatment with quaternized silicones. The treatment at acidic pH results in better deposition of silicone polymers onto the fabric as confirmed through streaming potential measurements which show charge reversal of the fabric. Interestingly, Raman spectroscopy studies show the band of C-O ring stretching mode at ∼1095 cm(-1) shift towards higher wavenumber indicating lowering of stress in fibers upon appropriate silicone treatment. Thus along with the morphological and frictional properties being altered, silicone treatment can lead to a reduction in fabric strain. It is concluded that the electrostatic interactions play an initial role in modification of the fiber substrate followed by multilayer deposition of polymer. This multi-technique approach to study fiber properties upon treatment by combining macro to molecular level methods has helped in understanding of new functional coating materials. PMID:24863788

  1. Interactive effect of hysteresis and surface chemistry on gated silicon nanowire gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Paska, Yair; Haick, Hossam

    2012-05-01

    Gated silicon nanowire gas sensors have emerged as promising devices for chemical and biological sensing applications. Nevertheless, the performance of these devices is usually accompanied by a "hysteresis" phenomenon that limits their performance under real-world conditions. In this paper, we use a series of systematically changed trichlorosilane-based organic monolayers to study the interactive effect of hysteresis and surface chemistry on gated silicon nanowire gas sensors. The results show that the density of the exposed or unpassivated Si-OH groups (trap states) on the silicon nanowire surface play by far a crucial effect on the hysteresis characteristics of the gated silicon nanowire sensors, relative to the effect of hydrophobicity or molecular density of the organic monolayer. Based on these findings, we provide a tentative model-based understanding of (i) the relation between the adsorbed organic molecules, the hysteresis, and the related fundamental parameters of gated silicon nanowire characteristics and of (ii) the relation between the hysteresis drift and possible screening effect on gated silicon nanowire gas sensors upon exposure to different analytes at real-world conditions. The findings reported in this paper could be considered as a launching pad for extending the use of the gated silicon nanowire gas sensors for discriminations between polar and nonpolar analytes in complex, real-world gas mixtures.

  2. Pyramidal surface textures for light trapping and antireflection in perovskite-on-silicon tandem solar cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Bennett W; Lal, Niraj N; Baker-Finch, Simeon; White, Thomas P

    2014-10-20

    Perovskite-on-silicon tandem solar cells show potential to reach > 30% conversion efficiency, but require careful optical control. We introduce here an effective light-management scheme based on the established pyramidal texturing of crystalline silicon cells. Calculations show that conformal deposition of a thin film perovskite solar cell directly onto the textured front surface of a high efficiency silicon cell can yield front surface reflection losses as low as 0.52mA/cm(2). Combining this with a wavelength-selective intermediate reflector between the cells additionally provides effective light-trapping in the high-bandgap top cell, resulting in calculated absolute efficiency gains of 2 - 4%. This approach provides a practical and effective method to adapt existing high efficiency silicon cell designs for use in tandem cells, with conversion efficiencies approaching 35%.

  3. Surface wettability enhancement of silicone hydrogel lenses by processing with polar plastic molds.

    PubMed

    Lai, Y C; Friends, G D

    1997-06-01

    In the quest for hydrogel contact lenses with improved extended wear capability, the use of siloxane moieties in the lens materials was investigated. However, the introduction of hydrophobic siloxane groups gave rise to wettability and lipidlike deposit problems. It was found that when polysiloxane-based compositions for hydrogels were processed with polar plastic molds, such as those fabricated from an acrylonitrile-based polymer, the hydrogel lenses fabricated were wettable, with minimized lipidlike deposits. These findings were supported by the wettability of silicone hydrogel films, silicon, and nitrogen element contents near lens surfaces, as well as the results from clinical assessment of silicone hydrogel lenses. PMID:9138069

  4. Dehydrogenative silane coupling on silicon surfaces via early transition metal catalysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Hui; Buriak, Jillian M

    2006-02-01

    Derivatization of silicon surfaces is an area of intense interest due to the centrality of silicon in the microelectronics industry and because of potential promise for a myriad of other applications. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of Si-Si bond formation directly on the surface to contrast with the more widely studied Si-C and Si-O bond forming reactions. Functionalization of hydride-terminated silicon surfaces with silanes is carried out via early transition metal mediated dehydrogenative silane coupling reactions. Zirconocene and titanocene catalyst systems were evaluated for heterocoupling of a molecular silane, RSiH3, with a surface Si-H group on Si(s). The zirconocene catalysts proved to be much more reactive than the titanium system, and so the former was examined exclusively. The silanes, aromatic or aliphatic, are bonded to the silicon surface through direct Si-Si bonds, although the level of incorporation of the trihydroarylsilanes was substantially higher than that of the aliphatic silanes. The reaction proceeds on nanocrystalline hydride-terminated porous silicon surfaces, as well as flat Si(100)-H(x) and Si(111)-H interfaces. The reactions were studied by a variety of techniques, including FTIR, SIMS, and XPS.

  5. Fabrication of photoluminescent Si-based layers by air optical breakdown near the silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabashin, A. V.; Meunier, M.

    2002-01-01

    A novel "dry" method for the fabrication of Si/SiO x nanostructures exhibiting strong visible photoluminescence (PL) is introduced. The method consists in the treatment of a silicon target surface by air breakdown plasma produced by a CO 2 laser radiation in atmospheric air. The treatment leads to the formation of a thin porous layer on the silicon wafer, which exhibits a 1.9-2.0 eV PL. Possible mechanisms of nanostructure formation and PL origin are discussed.

  6. Surface roughening of silicon, thermal silicon dioxide, and low-k dielectric coral films in argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Yunpeng; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2008-01-15

    The surface roughness evolutions of single crystal silicon, thermal silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), and low dielectric constant film coral in argon plasma have been measured by atomic force microscopy as a function of ion bombardment energy, ion impingement angle, and etching time in an inductively coupled plasma beam chamber, in which the plasma chemistry, ion energy, ion flux, and ion incident angle can be adjusted independently. The sputtering yield (or etching rate) scales linearly with the square root of ion energy at normal impingement angle; additionally, the angular dependence of the etching yield of all films in argon plasma followed the typical sputtering yield curve, with a maximum around 60 deg. -70 deg. off-normal angle. All films stayed smooth after etching at normal angle but typically became rougher at grazing angles. In particular, at grazing angles the rms roughness level of all films increased if more material was removed; additionally, the striation structure formed at grazing angles can be either parallel or transverse to the beam impingement direction, which depends on the off-normal angle. More interestingly, the sputtering caused roughness evolution at different off-normal angles can be qualitatively explained by the corresponding angular dependent etching yield curve. In addition, the roughening at grazing angles is a strong function of the type of surface; specifically, coral suffers greater roughening compared to thermal silicon dioxide.

  7. Surface treatment of silicone rubber by carbon negative-ion implantation for nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Izukawa, Masayoshi; Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2004-07-01

    Surface treatment of silicone rubber by carbon negative ion-implantation was investigated for nerve regeneration by "tubulation". Silicone rubber had its surface property altered to be more hydrophilic by carbon negative-ion implantation. The extracellular matrices of proteins in culture medium adsorbed on the implanted surface rather than unimplanted ones. These improvements in wettability and adsorption properties of proteins were respected to contribute to the regeneration of a nerve-lacking system. An in vivo regeneration test of rat sciatic nerves with silicone-rubber tubes was performed. Using a tube in which the inner surface was implanted with carbon negative ions, the sciatic nerve was regenerated through the inter-stump gap of 15 mm between the proximal and distal nerve stumps and electrical stimulation was transported through the regenerated nerve. Thus, the nerve system was recovered. However, with the unimplanted tube, the nerve was not regenerated at all.

  8. Preparation and single molecule structure of electroactive polysilane end-grafted on a crystalline silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Kazuaki; Ebata, Keisuke

    2000-12-01

    Electrically active polysilanes of poly(methylphenylsilane) (PMPS) and poly[bis(p-n-butylphenyl)silane] (PBPS), which are, respectively, known as a good hole transporting material and a near-ultraviolet electroluminescent material, are end-grafted directly on a crystalline silicon surface. The single polysilane molecules are clearly distinguished one from the other on the surface by means of atomic force microscopy observations. End-grafted single molecules of PMPS are observed as dots while end-grafted PBPS appear as worms extending for more than 100 nm on the crystalline silicon surface.

  9. Characterization of hydrogen-plasma interactions with photoresist, silicon, and silicon nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Thedjoisworo, Bayu A.; Cheung, David; Zamani, Davoud

    2012-05-15

    For the 45 nm technology node and beyond, a major challenge is to achieve reasonably high photoresist ash rates while minimizing the loss of the silicon (Si) substrate and its nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). Accordingly, an objective of this work is to characterize the photoresist strip rate under varying conditions of H{sub 2} plasma and the effects of these conditions on Si and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} etch rates. In addition, we discuss in detail the fundamental mechanisms of the reactions between H atoms and the above substrates and successfully reconcile the process trends obtained with the reaction mechanisms. In this work, photoresist, Si, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} films were exposed to downstream pure-H{sub 2} discharges and their removal rates were characterized by ellipsometry as a function of the following parameters: substrate temperature, reactor pressure, H{sub 2} flow rate, and source power. The authors found that the H{sub 2}-based dry ash and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} etch are both thermally activated reactions, evidenced by the steady increase in etch rate as a function of temperature, with activation energies of {approx}5.0 and {approx}2.7 kcal/mol, respectively. The Si substrate exhibits a rather unique behavior where the etch rate increases initially to a maximum, which occurs at {approx}40 deg. C, and then decreases upon a further increase in temperature. The decrease in the Si etch rate at higher temperatures is attributed to the activation of competing side reactions that consume the chemisorbed H atoms on the Si surface, which then suppresses the Si-etch step. The photoresist and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} removal rates increase initially with increasing pressure, reaching maxima at {approx}800 and 2000 mTorr, respectively, beyond which the removal rates drop with increasing pressure. The initial increase in removal rate at the low-pressure regime is attributed to the increased atomic-hydrogen density, whereas the decrease in ash rate at the high-pressure regime could be

  10. Cytotoxicity of surface-functionalized silicon and germanium nanoparticles: the dominant role of surface charges.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Singh, Mani P; Atkins, Tonya M; Purkait, Tapas K; Xu, Zejing; Regli, Sarah; Shukaliak, Amber; Clark, Rhett J; Mitchell, Brian S; Alink, Gerrit M; Marcelis, Antonius T M; Fink, Mark J; Veinot, Jonathan G C; Kauzlarich, Susan M; Zuilhof, Han

    2013-06-01

    Although it is frequently hypothesized that surface (like surface charge) and physical characteristics (like particle size) play important roles in cellular interactions of nanoparticles (NPs), a systematic study probing this issue is missing. Hence, a comparative cytotoxicity study, quantifying nine different cellular endpoints, was performed with a broad series of monodisperse, well characterized silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) NPs with various surface functionalizations. Human colonic adenocarcinoma Caco-2 and rat alveolar macrophage NR8383 cells were used to clarify the toxicity of this series of NPs. The surface coatings on the NPs appeared to dominate the cytotoxicity: the cationic NPs exhibited cytotoxicity, whereas the carboxylic acid-terminated and hydrophilic PEG- or dextran-terminated NPs did not. Within the cationic Si NPs, smaller Si NPs were more toxic than bigger ones. Manganese-doped (1% Mn) Si NPs did not show any added toxicity, which favors their further development for bioimaging. Iron-doped (1% Fe) Si NPs showed some added toxicity, which may be due to the leaching of Fe(3+) ions from the core. A silica coating seemed to impart toxicity, in line with the reported toxicity of silica. Intracellular mitochondria seem to be the target for the toxic NPs since a dose-, surface charge- and size-dependent imbalance of the mitochondrial membrane potential was observed. Such an imbalance led to a series of other cellular events for cationic NPs, like decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and ATP production, induction of ROS generation, increased cytoplasmic Ca(2+) content, production of TNF-α and enhanced caspase-3 activity. Taken together, the results explain the toxicity of Si NPs/Ge NPs largely by their surface characteristics, provide insight into the mode of action underlying the observed cytotoxicity, and give directions on synthesizing biocompatible Si and Ge NPs, as this is crucial for bioimaging and other applications in for

  11. Rapid Covalent Modification of Silicon Oxide Surfaces through Microwave-Assisted Reactions with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Austin W H; Gates, Byron D

    2016-07-26

    We demonstrate the method of a rapid covalent modification of silicon oxide surfaces with alcohol-containing compounds with assistance by microwave reactions. Alcohol-containing compounds are prevalent reagents in the laboratory, which are also relatively easy to handle because of their stability against exposure to atmospheric moisture. The condensation of these alcohols with the surfaces of silicon oxides is often hindered by slow reaction kinetics. Microwave radiation effectively accelerates this condensation reaction by heating the substrates and/or solvents. A variety of substrates were modified in this demonstration, such as silicon oxide films of various thicknesses, glass substrates such as microscope slides (soda lime), and quartz. The monolayers prepared through this strategy demonstrated the successful formation of covalent surface modifications of silicon oxides with water contact angles of up to 110° and typical hysteresis values of 2° or less. An evaluation of the hydrolytic stability of these monolayers demonstrated their excellent stability under acidic conditions. The techniques introduced in this article were successfully applied to tune the surface chemistry of silicon oxides to achieve hydrophobic, oleophobic, and/or charged surfaces. PMID:27396288

  12. Surface charge effects in silicon wafer cleaning using surfactant-containing solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Joong-Suck; Raghavan, Srini; Lowell, John K.; Wenner, Valerie

    1994-09-01

    The adsorption of an anionic and a cationic surfactant onto a silicon surface was investigated using the technique of ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) FT-IR at pH values of 2.5 and 9.5. The surface charge development on silicon samples conditioned in these surfactant solutions was investigated using a SPV (Surface Photovoltage) technique. The adsorption of DTAB was found to be much higher at pH equals 9.5 than at pH equals 2.5. In contrast, adsorption of SDS was independent of pH. The surface charge of HF-last cleaned silicon p(100) wafers was almost the same as that of the as-received wafer. After conditioning in surfactant solutions, negatively charged silicon wafers showed an excess of positive charge except of silicon wafers conditioned in DTAB solution at pH equals 9.5. After a DI water rinsing step, the surface charge was returned to its original value.

  13. Rapid Covalent Modification of Silicon Oxide Surfaces through Microwave-Assisted Reactions with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Austin W H; Gates, Byron D

    2016-07-26

    We demonstrate the method of a rapid covalent modification of silicon oxide surfaces with alcohol-containing compounds with assistance by microwave reactions. Alcohol-containing compounds are prevalent reagents in the laboratory, which are also relatively easy to handle because of their stability against exposure to atmospheric moisture. The condensation of these alcohols with the surfaces of silicon oxides is often hindered by slow reaction kinetics. Microwave radiation effectively accelerates this condensation reaction by heating the substrates and/or solvents. A variety of substrates were modified in this demonstration, such as silicon oxide films of various thicknesses, glass substrates such as microscope slides (soda lime), and quartz. The monolayers prepared through this strategy demonstrated the successful formation of covalent surface modifications of silicon oxides with water contact angles of up to 110° and typical hysteresis values of 2° or less. An evaluation of the hydrolytic stability of these monolayers demonstrated their excellent stability under acidic conditions. The techniques introduced in this article were successfully applied to tune the surface chemistry of silicon oxides to achieve hydrophobic, oleophobic, and/or charged surfaces.

  14. Surface wave accelerator based on silicon carbide: theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, S.; Korobkin, D.; Neuner, B.; Shvets, G.

    2009-01-22

    Compact near-field solid-state accelerating structure powered by a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) laser is considered. The accelerating luminous transverse magnetic mode is excited in a few-micron wide evacuated planar channel between two silicon carbide (SiC) films grown on silicon (Si) wafers. Laser coupling to this mode is accomplished through the properly designed Si gratings. Operating wavelength is dictated by the frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity of SiC and the channel width. The geometric loss factor {kappa} of the accelerating mode is computed. It is found that the unwanted excitation of the guided modes in Si wafers reduces the laser coupling efficiency and increases the fields inside the Si wafer.

  15. Assembly, characterization, and electrochemical properties of immobilized metal bipyridyl complexes on silicon(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lattimer, Judith R C; Blakemore, James D; Sattler, Wesley; Gul, Sheraz; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Lewis, Nathan S; Gray, Harry B

    2014-10-28

    Silicon(111) surfaces have been functionalized with mixed monolayers consisting of submonolayer coverages of immobilized 4-vinyl-2,2'-bipyridyl (1, vbpy) moieties, with the remaining atop sites of the silicon surface passivated by methyl groups. As the immobilized bipyridyl ligands bind transition metal ions, metal complexes can be assembled on the silicon surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrates that bipyridyl complexes of [Cp*Rh], [Cp*Ir], and [Ru(acac)2] were formed on the surface (Cp* is pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, acac is acetylacetonate). For the surface prepared with Ir, X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ir LIII edge showed an edge energy as well as post-edge features that were essentially identical with those observed on a powder sample of [Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl]Cl (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridyl). Charge-carrier lifetime measurements confirmed that the silicon surfaces retain their highly favorable photoelectronic properties upon assembly of the metal complexes. Electrochemical data for surfaces prepared on highly doped, n-type Si(111) electrodes showed that the assembled molecular complexes were redox active. However the stability of the molecular complexes on the surfaces was limited to several cycles of voltammetry.

  16. Surface acoustic waves/silicon monolithic sensor processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowel, S. T.; Kornreich, P. G.; Fathimulla, M. A.; Mehter, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported in the creation of a two dimensional Fourier transformer for optical images based on the zinc oxide on silicon technology. The sputtering of zinc oxide films using a micro etch system and the possibility of a spray-on technique based on zinc chloride dissolved in alcohol solution are discussed. Refinements to techniques for making platinum silicide Schottky barrier junctions essential for constructing the ultimate convolver structure are described.

  17. Towards the characterization of silicon surfaces: Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caylor, Rebecca Anne

    One of the developing areas in silicon chemistry is in small silicon particles, primarily the nanoparticles regime. When on the 'nano' scale, silicon possesses very different properties and characteristics from bulk silicon. These properties include novel optical and electronic properties that are size dependent. Semiconductor nanoparticles possess a unique bright photoluminescence when in the nanoparticle regime. The photoluminescence in the nanoparticle regime answers the problem of inefficient emissions, which have previously been a problem in bulk silicon, for use in solar cells. Nanoparticle silicon (np-Si) is also biocompatible, allowing for the use in various biological applications including biological tracers, biosensors, delivery of medicine, as well as many others. Although np-Si is widely used, its surface structure still remains largely debated. The surface structure of np-Si is of critical importance as it affects the reactivity of the sample as well as the properties the samples possess. Relative to other silicon samples, np-Si lends itself to be studied by solid state NMR due to its higher surface area, although other types of silicon samples have been studied to some degree in this dissertation project. The surface structure and adjacent interior of np-Si, obtained as commercially available silicon nanopowder, were studied in this project using multinuclear, solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The results are consistent with an overall picture in which the bulk of the np-Si interior consists of highly ordered ('crystalline') silicon atoms, each bound tetrahedrally to four other silicon atoms. From a combination of 1H and 29Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR results and quantum mechanical 29Si chemical shift calculations, silicon atoms on the surface of 'as-received' np-Si were found to exist in a variety of chemical structures, including primarily structures of the types (Si-O-)n(Si-) 3-nSi-H (with n = 1--3) and (Si-O-)2Si(H)OH, where Si stands for a

  18. Evaporation and wetting dynamics of sessile water droplets on submicron-scale patterned silicon hydrophobic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chang Kyoung; Shin, Dong Hwan; Lee, Seong Hyuk; Retterer, Scott T

    2010-01-01

    The evaporation characteristics of 1 l sessile water droplets on hydrophobic surfaces are experimentally examined. The proposed hydrophobic surfaces are composed of submicron diameter and 4.2- m-height silicon post arrays. A digital image analysis algorithm was developed to obtain time-dependent contact angles, contact diameters, and center heights for both non-patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces and patterned post array surfaces, which have the same hydrophobic contact angles. While the contact angles exhibit three distinct stages during evaporation in the non-patterned surface case, those in the patterned silicon post array surface case decrease linearly. In the case of post array hydrophobic surfaces, the initial contact diameter remains unchanged until the portion of the droplet above the posts completely dries out. The edge shrinking velocity of the droplet shows nonlinear characteristics, and the velocity magnitude increases rapidly near the last stage of evaporation.

  19. Light-induced metal-like surface of silicon photonic waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Grillanda, Stefano; Morichetti, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The surface of a material may exhibit physical phenomena that do not occur in the bulk of the material itself. For this reason, the behaviour of nanoscale devices is expected to be conditioned, or even dominated, by the nature of their surface. Here, we show that in silicon photonic nanowaveguides, massive surface carrier generation is induced by light travelling in the waveguide, because of natural surface-state absorption at the core/cladding interface. At the typical light intensity used in linear applications, this effect makes the surface of the waveguide behave as a metal-like frame. A twofold impact is observed on the waveguide performance: the surface electric conductivity dominates over that of bulk silicon and an additional optical absorption mechanism arises, that we named surface free-carrier absorption. These results, applying to generic semiconductor photonic technologies, unveil the real picture of optical nanowaveguides that needs to be considered in the design of any integrated optoelectronic device. PMID:26359202

  20. Porous silicon photonic crystals for detection of infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, B.; Guan, B.; Reece, P. J.; Gooding, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the possibility of modifying porous silicon (PSi) particles with surface chemistry and immobilizing a biopolymer, gelatin for the detection of protease enzymes in solution. A rugate filter, a one-dimensional photonic crystal, is fabricated that exhibits a high-reflectivity optical resonance that is sensitive to small changes in the refractive index. To immobilize gelatin in the pores of the particles, the hydrogen-terminated silicon surface was first modified with an alkyne, 1,8-nonadiyne via hydrosilylation to protect the silicon surfaces from oxidation. This modification allows for further functionality to be added such as the coupling of gelatin. Exposure of the gelatin modified particles to the protease subtilisin in solution causes a change in the refractive index, resulting in a shift of the resonance to shorter wavelengths, indicating cleavage of organic material within the pores. The ability to monitor the spectroscopic properties of microparticles, and shifts in the optical signature due to changes in the refractive index of the material within the pore space, is demonstrated.

  1. GlyHisGlyHis immobilization on silicon surface for copper detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Sabrina; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël; Ozanam, François; Gabouze, Noureddine

    2013-03-01

    Hybrid nanomaterials based on organic layer covalently grafted on semi-conductor surfaces appear as promising systems for innovative applications, especially in sensor field. In this work, we focused on the functionalization of silicon surface by the peptide GlyHisGlyHis, which forms stable complexes with metal ions. This property is exploited to achieve heavy metals recognition in solution. The immobilization was achieved using multi-step reactions: GlyHisGlyHis was anchored on a previously prepared carboxyl-terminated silicon surface using N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) coupling agents. This scheme is compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity of the peptide. At each step of the functionalization, the surface was monitored by infrared spectroscopy Fourier transform (FTIR) in ATR (attenuated total reflexions) geometry and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Electrochemical behaviour of such prepared electrodes was carried out in the presence of copper ions by means of cyclic voltammetry. The recorded cyclic voltammograms showed a surface reversible process corresponding to the Cu2+/Cu+ couple in the complex Cu-GlyHisGlyHis immobilized on the silicon surface. Copper ions concentrations down than μM where detected. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptide-modified silicon electrodes in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of toxic metals in solution.

  2. Characterization of wet-chemically treated silicon interfaces by surface photovoltage measurements.

    PubMed

    Angermann, H

    2002-10-01

    A non-destructive and surface-sensitive surface photovoltage (SPV) technique was employed to investigate the influence of important wet-chemical treatments on the electronic surface properties. The preparation-induced surface roughness as well as the hydrogen and oxide coverage were additionally determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). High values of interface charge and a high density of rechargeable interface states were observed on atomically rough surfaces and interfaces after HF-treatment and conventional wet-chemical oxidation. Both interface charge and density of rechargeable interface states could be reduced significantly by preparing an atomically flat Si surface and a well-ordered silicon/silicon oxide interface by applying special H-termination and hot-water oxidation procedures.

  3. Incorporation of silicone oil into elastomers enhances barnacle detachment by active surface strain.

    PubMed

    Shivapooja, Phanindhar; Cao, Changyong; Orihuela, Beatriz; Levering, Vrad; Zhao, Xuanhe; Rittschof, Daniel; López, Gabriel P

    2016-10-01

    Silicone-oil additives are often used in fouling-release silicone coatings to reduce the adhesion strength of barnacles and other biofouling organisms. This study follows on from a recently reported active approach to detach barnacles, which was based on the surface strain of elastomeric materials, by investigating a new, dual-action approach to barnacle detachment using Ecoflex®-based elastomers incorporated with poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based oil additives. The experimental results support the hypothesis that silicone-oil additives reduce the amount of substratum strain required to detach barnacles. The study also de-coupled the two effects of silicone oils (ie surface-activity and alteration of the bulk modulus) and examined their contributions in reducing barnacle adhesion strength. Further, a finite element model based on fracture mechanics was employed to qualitatively understand the effects of surface strain and substratum modulus on barnacle adhesion strength. The study demonstrates that dynamic substratum deformation of elastomers with silicone-oil additives provides a bifunctional approach towards management of biofouling by barnacles. PMID:27560712

  4. Nanoporous Silicon Combustion: Observation of Shock Wave and Flame Synthesis of Nanoparticle Silica.

    PubMed

    Becker, Collin R; Gillen, Greg J; Staymates, Matthew E; Stoldt, Conrad R

    2015-11-18

    The persistent hydrogen termination present in nanoporous silicon (nPS) is unique compared to other forms of nanoscale silicon (Si) which typically readily form a silicon dioxide passivation layer. The hydrogen terminated surface combined with the extremely high surface area of nPS yields a material capable of powerful exothermic reactions when combined with strong oxidizers. Here, a galvanic etching mechanism is used to produce nPS both in bulk Si wafers as well as in patterned regions of Si wafers with microfabricated ignition wires. An explosive composite is generated by filling the pores with sodium perchlorate (NaClO4). Using high-speed video including Schlieren photography, a shock wave is observed to propagate through air at 1127 ± 116 m/s. Additionally, a fireball is observed above the region of nPS combustion which persists for nearly 3× as long when reacted in air compared to N2, indicating that highly reactive species are generated that can further combust with excess oxygen. Finally, reaction products from either nPS-NaClO4 composites or nPS alone combusted with only high pressure O2 (400 psig) gas as an oxidizer are captured in a calorimeter bomb. The products in both cases are similar and verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to include nano- to micrometer scale SiOx particles. This work highlights the complex oxidation mechanism of nPS composites and demonstrates the ability to use a solid state reaction to create a secondary gas phase combustion.

  5. Nanoporous Silicon Combustion: Observation of Shock Wave and Flame Synthesis of Nanoparticle Silica.

    PubMed

    Becker, Collin R; Gillen, Greg J; Staymates, Matthew E; Stoldt, Conrad R

    2015-11-18

    The persistent hydrogen termination present in nanoporous silicon (nPS) is unique compared to other forms of nanoscale silicon (Si) which typically readily form a silicon dioxide passivation layer. The hydrogen terminated surface combined with the extremely high surface area of nPS yields a material capable of powerful exothermic reactions when combined with strong oxidizers. Here, a galvanic etching mechanism is used to produce nPS both in bulk Si wafers as well as in patterned regions of Si wafers with microfabricated ignition wires. An explosive composite is generated by filling the pores with sodium perchlorate (NaClO4). Using high-speed video including Schlieren photography, a shock wave is observed to propagate through air at 1127 ± 116 m/s. Additionally, a fireball is observed above the region of nPS combustion which persists for nearly 3× as long when reacted in air compared to N2, indicating that highly reactive species are generated that can further combust with excess oxygen. Finally, reaction products from either nPS-NaClO4 composites or nPS alone combusted with only high pressure O2 (400 psig) gas as an oxidizer are captured in a calorimeter bomb. The products in both cases are similar and verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to include nano- to micrometer scale SiOx particles. This work highlights the complex oxidation mechanism of nPS composites and demonstrates the ability to use a solid state reaction to create a secondary gas phase combustion. PMID:26501940

  6. From zigzag to armchair: the energetic stability, electronic and magnetic properties of chiral graphene nanoribbons with hydrogen-terminated edges.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lili; Wei, Peng; Wei, Jianhua; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2011-10-26

    The energetic stability, electronic and magnetic properties of chiral graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with hydrogen-terminated edges are investigated using density functional theory. Our calculations show that the percentage of carbon atoms at the zigzag sites (P(z)) is the key factor determining the electronic and magnetic properties of chiral GNRs. Within the local spin density approximation, chiral GNRs with P(z) ≥ 50% have a semiconducting antiferromagnetic ground state. Otherwise, chiral GNRs are spin degenerate semiconductors. Thus, the critical chiral angle for the occurrence of spin polarization is determined to be 13.9°. In contrast to the antiferromagnetic state that is independent of the width of GNRs investigated, size effects occur for the ferromagnetic metastable state. These findings are helpful for the design of GNR-based spintronic devices.

  7. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF{sub 2}/hydrogen-terminated diamond heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Imura, M.; Koide, Y.

    2013-03-28

    CaF{sub 2} films are deposited on hydrogen-terminated diamond (H-diamond) by a radio-frequency sputter-deposition technique at room temperature. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunction are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is confirmed that there are only C-Ca bonds at the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterointerface. Valence and conductance band offsets of the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunciton are determined to be 3.7 {+-} 0.2 and 0.3 {+-} 0.2 eV, respectively. It shows a type I straddling band configuration. The large valence band offset suggests advantage of the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunciton for the development of high power and high frequency field effect transistors.

  8. Effect of surface cleanliness of aluminium substrates on silicone rubber adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, L.; Meier, P.; Kornmann, X.; Hillborg, H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the minimum surface cleanliness of aluminium substrates required for good and reproducible silicone rubber adhesion. Aluminium substrates were prepared, ranging from 'contaminated' to different degrees of 'cleaned'. The surface energy of the substrates was determined by contact angle measurements. The surfaces were also compared using simplified methods, such as a wettability test or by the use of inks with known surface tension. Silicone rubber was then compression moulded onto the cleaned and primed substrates. The silicone rubber adhesion was then evaluated by lap-shear testing, before and after ageing. The ageing step consisted of immersion of samples in boiling water for 100 h to evaluate the hydrolytic stability of the interfaces. The failure modes after lap-shear testing were determined using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy and were divided into three different categories: cohesive failure, adhesive failure or a mixture thereof. Energy dispersive x-ray mapping was useful in clarifying the failure modes by determining the position of the primer, which contained Ti. It was concluded that in order to obtain a strong and stable interface, exhibiting mainly cohesive failure between the aluminium substrate and silicone rubber, the surface energy of the substrate before priming should be >45 mJ m-2, including a polar component of >10 mJ m-2. This corresponded to a hydrophobicity class of the substrate of >=6, according to IEC 62073.

  9. Controlling optical properties and surface morphology of dry etched porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Maurice C.-K.; Roche, Philip J. R.; Hajj-Hassan, Mohamad; Kirk, Andrew G.; Mi, Zetian; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.

    2011-01-01

    Porous silicon is a potentially useful substrate for fluorescence and scattering enhancement, with a large surface to volume ratio and thermal stability providing a potentially regenerable host matrix for sensor development. A simple process using XeF2 gas phase etching for creating porous silicon is explained. Moreover, how pores diameter can be controlled reproducibly with commensurate effects upon the silicon reflection and pore distribution is discussed. In previous work with this new system, it was clear that control on pore size and morphology was required and a systematic optimization of process conditions was performed to produce greater consistency of the result. The influence of the duration of the pre-etching processing in HF, concentration of the HF in the pre-etching process, and the XeF2 exposure time during the dry etching on surface morphology, pore size, and optical reflectance is explored.

  10. Enhancement in photovoltaic properties of silicon solar cells by surface plasmon effect of palladium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaoui, Malek; Atyaoui, Atef; Khalifa, Marwen; Elyagoubi, Jalel; Dimassi, Wissem; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the surface Plasmon effect of Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) on the photovoltaic properties of silicon solar cells. Pd NPs were deposited on the p-type silicon base of the n+/p junction using a chemical deposition method in an aqueous solution containing Palladium (II) Nitrate (PdNO3)2 and Ammonium Hydroxide (NH4OH) followed by a thermal treatment at 500 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Chemical composition and surface morphology of the treated silicon base were examined by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The effect of the deposited Pd NPs on the electrical properties was evaluated by the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The results indicate that the formation of the Pd NPs is accompanied by an enhanced light absorption and improved photovoltaic parameters.

  11. Permanent fine tuning of silicon microring devices by femtosecond laser surface amorphization and ablation.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Daniel; Chen, Zhijiang; Fedosejevs, Robert; Tsui, Ying Y; Van, Vien

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate the fine tuning capability of femtosecond laser surface modification as a permanent trimming mechanism for silicon photonic components. Silicon microring resonators with a 15 µm radius were irradiated with single 400 nm wavelength laser pulses at varying fluences. Below the laser ablation threshold, surface amorphization of the crystalline silicon waveguides yielded a tuning rate of 20 ± 2 nm/J · cm(-2)with a minimum resonance wavelength shift of 0.10nm. Above that threshold, ablation yielded a minimum resonance shift of -1.7 nm. There was some increase in waveguide loss for both trimming mechanisms. We also demonstrated the application of the method by using it to permanently correct the resonance mismatch of a second-order microring filter.

  12. Surface kinetics modeling of silicon and silicon oxide plasma etching. III. Modeling of silicon oxide etching in fluorocarbon chemistry using translating mixed-layer representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ohseung; Bai Bo; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2006-09-15

    Silicon oxide etching was modeled using a translating mixed-layer model, a novel surface kinetic modeling technique, and the model showed good agreement with measured data. Carbon and fluorine were identified as the primary contributors to deposition and etching, respectively. Atomic fluorine flux is a major factor that determines the etching behavior. With a chemistry having a small amount of atomic fluorine (such as the C{sub 4}F{sub 8} chemistry), etching yield shows stronger dependence on the composition change in the gas flux.

  13. Multifunctional porous silicon nanopillar arrays: antireflection, superhydrophobicity, photoluminescence, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)

    PubMed Central

    Kiraly, Brian; Yang, Shikuan

    2014-01-01

    We have fabricated porous silicon nanopillar arrays over large areas with a rapid, simple, and low-cost technique. The porous silicon nanopillars show unique longitudinal features along their entire length and have porosity with dimensions on the single-nanometer scale. Both Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence data were used to determine the nanocrystallite size to be < 3 nm. The porous silicon nanopillar arrays also maintained excellent ensemble properties, reducing reflection nearly fivefold from planar silicon in the visible range without any optimization and approaching superhydrophobic behavior with increasing aspect ratio, demonstrating contact angles up to 138°. Finally, the porous silicon nanopillar arrays were made into sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates by depositing metal onto the pillars. The SERS performance of the substrates was demonstrated using a chemical dye Rhodamine 6G. With their multitude of properties (i.e., antireflection, superhydrophobicity, photoluminescence, and sensitive SERS), the porous silicon nanopillar arrays described here can be valuable in applications such as solar harvesting, electrochemical cells, self-cleaning devices, and dynamic biological monitoring. PMID:23703091

  14. Fabrication of superhydrophobic and highly oleophobic silicon-based surfaces via electroless etching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thi Phuong Nhung; Dufour, Renaud; Thomy, Vincent; Senez, Vincent; Boukherroub, Rabah; Coffinier, Yannick

    2014-03-01

    This study reports on a simple method for the preparation of superhydrophobic and highly oleophobic nanostructured silicon surfaces. The technique relies on metal-assisted electroless etching of silicon in sodium tetrafluoroborate (NaBF4) aqueous solution. Then, silver particles were deposited on the obtained surfaces, changing their overall physical morphology. Finally, the surfaces were coated by either C4F8, a fluoropolymer deposited by plasma, or by SiOx overlayers chemically modified with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (PFTS) through silanization reaction. All these surfaces exhibit a superhydrophobic character (large apparent contact angle and low hysteresis with respect to water). In addition, they present high oleophobic properties, i.e. a high repellency to low surface energy liquids with various contact angle hysteresis, both depending on the morphology and type of coating.

  15. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  16. Effects of surface grinding conditions on the reciprocating friction and wear behavior of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Zanoria, E.S.

    1997-12-31

    The relationship between two significantly different surface grinding conditions and the reciprocating ball-on-flat friction and wear behavior of a high-quality, structural silicon nitride material (GS-44) was investigated. The slider materials were silicon nitride NBD 200 and 440C stainless steel. Two machining conditions were selected based on extensive machining and flexural strength test data obtained under the auspices of an international, interlaboratory grinding study. The condition categorized as {open_quotes}low strength{close_quote} grinding used a coarse 80 grit wheel and produced low flexure strength due to machining-induced flaws in the surface. The other condition, regarded as {open_quotes}high strength grinding,{close_quotes} utilized a 320 grit wheel and produced a flexural strength nearly 70% greater. Grinding wheel surface speeds were 35 and 47 m/s. Reciprocating sliding tests were conducted following the procedure described in a newly-published ASTM standard (G- 133) for linearly-reciprocating wear. Tests were performed in directions both parallel and perpendicular to the grinding marks (lay) using a 25 N load, 5 Hz reciprocating frequency, 10 mm stroke length, and 100 m of sliding at room temperature. The effects of sliding direction relative to the lay were more pronounced for stainless steel than for silicon nitride sliders. The wear of stainless steel was less than the wear of the silicon nitride slider materials because of the formation of transfer particles which covered the sharp edges of the silicon nitride grinding grooves and reduced abrasive contact. The wear of the GS-44 material was much greater for the silicon nitride sliders than for the stainless steel sliders. The causes for the effects of surface-grinding severity and sliding direction on friction and wear of GS-44 and its counterface materials are explained.

  17. Role of Surface Termination in Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride.

    PubMed

    Ande, Chaitanya Krishna; Knoops, Harm C M; de Peuter, Koen; van Drunen, Maarten; Elliott, Simon D; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2015-09-17

    There is an urgent need to deposit uniform, high-quality, conformal SiN(x) thin films at a low-temperature. Conforming to these constraints, we recently developed a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) process with bis(tertiary-butyl-amino)silane (BTBAS) as the silicon precursor. However, deposition of high quality SiNx thin films at reasonable growth rates occurs only when N2 plasma is used as the coreactant; strongly reduced growth rates are observed when other coreactants like NH3 plasma, or N2-H2 plasma are used. Experiments reported in this Letter reveal that NH(x)- or H- containing plasmas suppress film deposition by terminating reactive surface sites with H and NH(x) groups and inhibiting precursor adsorption. To understand the role of these surface groups on precursor adsorption, we carried out first-principles calculations of precursor adsorption on the β-Si3N4(0001) surface with different surface terminations. They show that adsorption of the precursor is strong on surfaces with undercoordinated surface sites. In contrast, on surfaces with H, NH2 groups, or both, steric hindrance leads to weak precursor adsorption. Experimental and first-principles results together show that using an N2 plasma to generate reactive undercoordinated surface sites allows strong adsorption of the silicon precursor and, hence, is key to successful deposition of silicon nitride by ALD. PMID:26722730

  18. Sensitivity Enhancement of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides/Silicon Nanostructure-based Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Qingling; Zeng, Shuwen; Jiang, Li; Hong, Liying; Xu, Gaixia; Dinh, Xuan-Quyen; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing; Qu, Junle; Coquet, Philippe; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we designed a sensitivity-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor structure based on silicon nanosheet and two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. This configuration contains six components: SF10 triangular prism, gold thin film, silicon nanosheet, two-dimensional MoS2/MoSe2/WS2/WSe2 (defined as MX2) layers, biomolecular analyte layer and sensing medium. The minimum reflectivity, sensitivity as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum of SPR curve are systematically examined by using Fresnel equations and the transfer matrix method in the visible and near infrared wavelength range (600 nm to 1024 nm). The variation of the minimum reflectivity and the change in resonance angle as the function of the number of MX2 layers are presented respectively. The results show that silicon nanosheet and MX2 layers can be served as effective light absorption medium. Under resonance conditions, the electrons in these additional dielectric layers can be transferred to the surface of gold thin film. All silicon-MX2 enhanced sensing models show much better performance than that of the conventional sensing scheme where pure Au thin film is used, the highest sensitivity can be achieved by employing 600 nm excitation light wavelength with 35 nm gold thin film and 7 nm thickness silicon nanosheet coated with monolayer WS2.

  19. Sensitivity Enhancement of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides/Silicon Nanostructure-based Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Qingling; Zeng, Shuwen; Jiang, Li; Hong, Liying; Xu, Gaixia; Dinh, Xuan-Quyen; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing; Qu, Junle; Coquet, Philippe; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we designed a sensitivity-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor structure based on silicon nanosheet and two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. This configuration contains six components: SF10 triangular prism, gold thin film, silicon nanosheet, two-dimensional MoS2/MoSe2/WS2/WSe2 (defined as MX2) layers, biomolecular analyte layer and sensing medium. The minimum reflectivity, sensitivity as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum of SPR curve are systematically examined by using Fresnel equations and the transfer matrix method in the visible and near infrared wavelength range (600 nm to 1024 nm). The variation of the minimum reflectivity and the change in resonance angle as the function of the number of MX2 layers are presented respectively. The results show that silicon nanosheet and MX2 layers can be served as effective light absorption medium. Under resonance conditions, the electrons in these additional dielectric layers can be transferred to the surface of gold thin film. All silicon-MX2 enhanced sensing models show much better performance than that of the conventional sensing scheme where pure Au thin film is used, the highest sensitivity can be achieved by employing 600 nm excitation light wavelength with 35 nm gold thin film and 7 nm thickness silicon nanosheet coated with monolayer WS2. PMID:27305974

  20. Sensitivity Enhancement of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides/Silicon Nanostructure-based Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qingling; Zeng, Shuwen; Jiang, Li; Hong, Liying; Xu, Gaixia; Dinh, Xuan-Quyen; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing; Qu, Junle; Coquet, Philippe; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-06-16

    In this work, we designed a sensitivity-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor structure based on silicon nanosheet and two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. This configuration contains six components: SF10 triangular prism, gold thin film, silicon nanosheet, two-dimensional MoS2/MoSe2/WS2/WSe2 (defined as MX2) layers, biomolecular analyte layer and sensing medium. The minimum reflectivity, sensitivity as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum of SPR curve are systematically examined by using Fresnel equations and the transfer matrix method in the visible and near infrared wavelength range (600 nm to 1024 nm). The variation of the minimum reflectivity and the change in resonance angle as the function of the number of MX2 layers are presented respectively. The results show that silicon nanosheet and MX2 layers can be served as effective light absorption medium. Under resonance conditions, the electrons in these additional dielectric layers can be transferred to the surface of gold thin film. All silicon-MX2 enhanced sensing models show much better performance than that of the conventional sensing scheme where pure Au thin film is used, the highest sensitivity can be achieved by employing 600 nm excitation light wavelength with 35 nm gold thin film and 7 nm thickness silicon nanosheet coated with monolayer WS2.

  1. Interactions at the Peptide/Silicon Surfaces: Evidence of Peptide Multilayer Assembly.

    PubMed

    Pápa, Zsuzsanna; Ramakrishnan, Sathish Kumar; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Zimányi, László; Márquez, Jessica; Budai, Judit; Tóth, Zsolt; Gergely, Csilla

    2016-07-19

    Selective deposition of peptides from liquid solutions to n- and p-doped silicon has been demonstrated. The selectivity is governed by peptide/silicon adhesion differences. A noninvasive, fast characterization of the obtained peptide layers is required to promote their application for interfacing silicon-based devices with biological material. In this study we show that spectroscopic ellipsometry-a method increasingly used for the investigation of biointerfaces-can provide essential information about the amount of adsorbed peptide material and the degree of coverage on silicon surfaces. We observed the formation of peptide multilayers for a strongly binding adhesion peptide on p-doped silicon. Application of the patterned layer ellipsometric evaluation method combined with Sellmeier dispersion led to physically consistent results, which describe well the optical properties of peptide layers in the visible spectral range. This evaluation allowed the estimation of surface coverage, which is an important indicator of adsorption quality. The ellipsometric findings were well supported by atomic force microscopy results. PMID:27315212

  2. Improved the Surface Roughness of Silicon Nanophotonic Devices by Thermal Oxidation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zujun; Shao, Shiqian; Wang, Yi

    2011-02-01

    The transmission loss of the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide and the coupling loss of the SOI grating are determined to a large extent by the surface roughness. In order to obtain smaller loss, thermal oxidation is a good choice to reduce the surface roughness of the SOI waveguide and grating. Before the thermal oxidation, the root mean square of the surface roughness is over 11 nm. After the thermal oxidation, the SEM figure shows that the bottom of the grating is as smooth as quartz surface, while the AFM shows that the root mean square of the surface is less than 5 nm.

  3. Bactericidal effects of plasma-modified surface chemistry of silicon nanograss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrikov, Kola; Macgregor-Ramiasa, Melanie; Cavallaro, Alex; (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2016-08-01

    The surface chemistry and topography of biomaterials regulate the adhesion and growth of microorganisms in ways that are still poorly understood. Silicon nanograss structures prepared via inductively coupled plasma etching were coated with plasma deposited nanometer-thin polymeric films to produce substrates with controlled topography and defined surface chemistry. The influence of surface properties on Staphylococcus aureus proliferation is demonstrated and explained in terms of nanograss substrate wetting behaviour. With the combination of the nanograss topography; hydrophilic plasma polymer coatings enhanced antimicrobial activity while hydrophobic coatings reduced it. This study advances the understanding of the effects of surface wettability on the bactericidal properties of reactive nano-engineered surfaces.

  4. Improved photoluminescence and sensing stability of porous silicon nanowires by surface passivation.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; He, Haiping; Sun, Luwei; Ye, Zhizhen

    2014-01-21

    Core-shell structured silicon nanowires (Si NWs) were obtained by coating Si NWs with an HfO2 layer. Enhanced photoluminescence (PL) and a slightly decreased PL lifetime are achieved by HfO2 coating. Furthermore, the sensing stability is strongly improved. The improvement of PL properties is interpreted in terms of surface passivation and the Purcell effect.

  5. Influence of Surface Chemistry on the Release of an Antibacterial Drug from Nanostructured Porous Silicon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengjia; Hartman, Philip S; Loni, Armando; Canham, Leigh T; Bodiford, Nelli; Coffer, Jeffery L

    2015-06-01

    Nanostructured mesoporous silicon possesses important properties advantageous to drug loading and delivery. For controlled release of the antibacterial drug triclosan, and its associated activity versus Staphylococcus aureus, previous studies investigated the influence of porosity of the silicon matrix. In this work, we focus on the complementary issue of the influence of surface chemistry on such properties, with particular regard to drug loading and release kinetics that can be ideally adjusted by surface modification. Comparison between drug release from as-anodized, hydride-terminated hydrophobic porous silicon and the oxidized hydrophilic counterpart is complicated due to the rapid bioresorption of the former; hence, a hydrophobic interface with long-term biostability is desired, such as can be provided by a relatively long chain octyl moiety. To minimize possible thermal degradation of the surfaces or drug activity during loading of molten drug species, a solution loading method has been investigated. Such studies demonstrate that the ability of porous silicon to act as an effective carrier for sustained delivery of antibacterial agents can be sensitively altered by surface functionalization.

  6. Dopant gas effect on silicon chemical vapor depositions: A surface potential model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is proposed to consistently explain the known dopant gas effects on silicon chemical vapor deposition. This model predicts that the effects of the same dopant gases on the diamond deposition rate using methane and carbon tetrachloride should be opposite and similar to those of silane, respectively. Available data are in agreement with this prediction.

  7. Exclusively Gas-Phase Passivation of Native Oxide-Free Silicon(100) and Silicon(111) Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye; Hauert, Roland; Degen, Christian L

    2016-05-25

    Reactions in the gas phase are of primary technological importance for applications in nano- and microfabrication technology and in the semiconductor industry. We present exclusively gas-phase protocols to chemically passivate oxide-free Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces with short-chain alkynes. The resulting surfaces showed equal or better oxidation resistance than most existing liquid-phase-derived surfaces and rivaled the outstanding stability of a full-coverage Si(111)-propenyl surface.1,2 The most stable surface (Si(111)-ethenyl) grew one-fifth of a monolayer of oxide (0.04 nm) after 1 month of air exposure. We monitored the regrowth of oxides on passivated Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and observed a significant crystal-orientation dependence of initial rates when total oxide thickness was below approximately one monolayer (0.2 nm). This difference was correlated with the desorption kinetics of residual surface Si-F bonds formed during HF treatment. We discuss applications of the technology and suggest future directions for process optimization. PMID:27153212

  8. Conducting molecular nanostructures assembled from charge-transfer complexes grafted onto silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stires, John C., IV; Kasibhatla, Bala S. T.; Siegel, Dustin S.; Kwong, Jinny C.; Caballero, Jonathan B.; Labonte, Andre P.; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Datta, Supriyo; Kubiak, Clifford P.

    2003-12-01

    Heterodimeric electon-donor/electron-acceptor charge-transfer complexes chemisorbed onto Au(111) by attachment of the electron-donor to the surface have been characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy and Kelvin probe experiments. Conductance measurements exhibit nearly Ohmic I(V) responses at low bias. The electrical properties of the charge-transfer complex are vastly different than those of the electron-donor alone which exhibits insulating behavior at low bias. In an extension of this work, strategies are being developed for attachment of charge-transfer complexes to semiconducting or insulating surfaces. Fabrication of nanoscale molecular electronic devices is being investigated by attaching one component of a charge-transfer complex to a silicon surface by chemically directed self-assembly. The single component-functionalized surface is then used as a substrate on which the second component of the charge-transfer complex is deposited by the atomic force microscopy method, dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). Derivatives of hexamethylbenze (electron-donor) with terminal olefins attached to crystalline silicon surfaces via hydrosilylation form monolayer-functionalized silicon surfaces that are expected to have insulating properties. Well-defined features can be "drawn" onto the donor-functionalized surfaces by DPN using tetracyanoethylene (electron-acceptor) as the "ink." The resulting charge-transfer complex nanostructures have conducting properties suitable for device function and are flanked by an insulating monolayer, thus creating "wires" made from charge-transfer complexes.

  9. High efficiency silicon nanowire/organic hybrid solar cells with two-step surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxiong; Wang, Hao; Prakoso, Ari Bimo; Togonal, Alienor Svietlana; Hong, Lei; Jiang, Changyun; Rusli

    2015-03-14

    A simple two-step surface treatment process is proposed to boost the efficiency of silicon nanowire/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells. The Si nanowires (SiNWs) are first subjected to a low temperature ozone treatment to form a surface sacrificial oxide, followed by a HF etching process to partially remove the oxide. TEM investigation demonstrates that a clean SiNW surface is achieved after the treatment, in contrast to untreated SiNWs that have Ag nanoparticles left on the surface from the metal-catalyzed etching process that is used to form the SiNWs. The cleaner SiNW surface achieved and the thin layer of residual SiO2 on the SiNWs have been found to improve the performance of the hybrid solar cells. Overall, the surface recombination of the hybrid SiNW solar cells is greatly suppressed, resulting in a remarkably improved open circuit voltage of 0.58 V. The power conversion efficiency has also increased from about 10% to 12.4%. The two-step surface treatment method is promising in enhancing the photovoltaic performance of the hybrid silicon solar cells, and can also be applied to other silicon nanostructure based solar cells. PMID:25686737

  10. High efficiency silicon nanowire/organic hybrid solar cells with two-step surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxiong; Wang, Hao; Prakoso, Ari Bimo; Togonal, Alienor Svietlana; Hong, Lei; Jiang, Changyun; Rusli

    2015-03-14

    A simple two-step surface treatment process is proposed to boost the efficiency of silicon nanowire/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells. The Si nanowires (SiNWs) are first subjected to a low temperature ozone treatment to form a surface sacrificial oxide, followed by a HF etching process to partially remove the oxide. TEM investigation demonstrates that a clean SiNW surface is achieved after the treatment, in contrast to untreated SiNWs that have Ag nanoparticles left on the surface from the metal-catalyzed etching process that is used to form the SiNWs. The cleaner SiNW surface achieved and the thin layer of residual SiO2 on the SiNWs have been found to improve the performance of the hybrid solar cells. Overall, the surface recombination of the hybrid SiNW solar cells is greatly suppressed, resulting in a remarkably improved open circuit voltage of 0.58 V. The power conversion efficiency has also increased from about 10% to 12.4%. The two-step surface treatment method is promising in enhancing the photovoltaic performance of the hybrid silicon solar cells, and can also be applied to other silicon nanostructure based solar cells.

  11. Surface modification via wet chemical etching of single-crystalline silicon for photovoltaic application.

    PubMed

    Reshak, A H; Shahimin, M M; Shaari, S; Johan, N

    2013-11-01

    The potential of solar cells have not been fully tapped due to the lack of energy conversion efficiency. There are three important mechanisms in producing high efficiency cells to harvest solar energy; reduction of light reflectance, enhancement of light trapping in the cell and increment of light absorption. The current work represent studies conducted in surface modification of single-crystalline silicon solar cells using wet chemical etching techniques. Two etching types are applied; alkaline etching (KOH:IPA:DI) and acidic etching (HF:HNO3:DI). The alkaline solution resulted in anisotropic profile that leads to the formation of inverted pyramids. While acidic solution formed circular craters along the front surface of silicon wafer. This surface modification will leads to the reduction of light reflectance via texturizing the surface and thereby increases the short circuit current and conversion rate of the solar cells. PMID:24139943

  12. Surface modification via wet chemical etching of single-crystalline silicon for photovoltaic application.

    PubMed

    Reshak, A H; Shahimin, M M; Shaari, S; Johan, N

    2013-11-01

    The potential of solar cells have not been fully tapped due to the lack of energy conversion efficiency. There are three important mechanisms in producing high efficiency cells to harvest solar energy; reduction of light reflectance, enhancement of light trapping in the cell and increment of light absorption. The current work represent studies conducted in surface modification of single-crystalline silicon solar cells using wet chemical etching techniques. Two etching types are applied; alkaline etching (KOH:IPA:DI) and acidic etching (HF:HNO3:DI). The alkaline solution resulted in anisotropic profile that leads to the formation of inverted pyramids. While acidic solution formed circular craters along the front surface of silicon wafer. This surface modification will leads to the reduction of light reflectance via texturizing the surface and thereby increases the short circuit current and conversion rate of the solar cells.

  13. Method using laser irradiation for the production of atomically clean crystalline silicon and germanium surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ownby, G.W.; White, C.W.; Zehner, D.M.

    1979-12-28

    This invention relates to a new method for removing surface impurities from crystalline silicon or germanium articles, such as off-the-shelf p- or n-type wafers to be doped for use as junction devices. The principal contaminants on such wafers are oxygen and carbon. The new method comprises laser-irradiating the contaminated surface in a non-reactive atmosphere, using one or more of Q-switched laser pulses whose parameters are selected to effect melting of the surface without substantial vaporization thereof. In a typical application, a plurality of pulses is used to convert a surface region of an off-the-shelf silicon wafer to an atomically clean region. This can be accomplished in a system at a pressure below 10-/sup 8/ Torr, using Q-switched ruber-laser pulses having an energy density in the range of from about 60 to 190 MW/cm/sup 2/.

  14. Method using laser irradiation for the production of atomically clean crystalline silicon and germanium surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ownby, Gary W.; White, Clark W.; Zehner, David M.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to a new method for removing surface impurities from crystalline silicon or germanium articles, such as off-the-shelf p- or n-type wafers to be doped for use as junction devices. The principal contaminants on such wafers are oxygen and carbon. The new method comprises laser-irradiating the contaminated surface in a non-reactive atmosphere, using one or more of Q-switched laser pulses whose parameters are selected to effect melting of the surface without substantial vaporization thereof. In a typical application, a plurality of pulses is used to convert a surface region of an off-the-shelf silicon wafer to an automatically clean region. This can be accomplished in a system at a pressure below 10.sup.-8 Torr, using Q-switched ruby-laser pulses having an energy density in the range of from about 60 to 190 MW/cm.sup.2.

  15. Antireflection effect of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silicon.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, A Y; Guo, Chunlei

    2011-09-12

    Following direct femtosecond laser pulse irradiation, we produce a unique grating structure over a large area superimposed by finer nanostructures on a silicon wafer. We study, for the first time, the antireflection effect of this femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (FLIPSSs) in the wavelength range of 250 - 2500 nm. Our study shows that the FLIPSSs suppress both the total hemispherical and specular polarized reflectance of silicon surface significantly over the entire studied wavelength range. The total polarized reflectance of the processed surface is reduced by a factor of about 3.5 in the visible and 7 in the UV compared to an untreated sample. The antireflection effect of the FLIPSS surface is broadband and the suppression stays to the longest wavelength (2500 nm) studied here although the antireflection effect in the infrared is weaker than in the visible. Our FLIPSS structures are free of chemical contamination, highly durable, and easily controllable in size.

  16. Surface fingerprints of individual silicon nanocrystals in laser-annealed Si/SiO2 superlattice: Evidence of nanoeruptions of laser-pressurized silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Timur; Kemell, Marianna; Puukilainen, Esa; Boninelli, Simona; Iacona, Fabio; Räsänen, Markku; Ritala, Mikko; Novikov, Sergei; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2012-06-01

    Silicon nanocrystals prepared by continuous-wave laser annealing of a free-standing Si/SiO2 superlattice are studied for the first time by using methods of surface analysis (scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy). The surface topology and composition are compared with transmission electron microscopy images that show a projection through the whole film, allowing us to discriminate silicon nanocrystals located near the film surface. These nanocrystals have an unusual pear-like shape with the thinner part sticking out of the laser-illuminated surface. The non-spherical shape of these nanocrystals is explained by eruption of silicon pressurized at the stage of crystallization from the melt phase. This hypothesis is supported by the micro-Raman spectra which show low stress near the surface features, in contrast to the neighbouring regions having high compressive stress.

  17. Crystal structure of the growth surface of silicon carbide obtained by sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Babayants, G. I. Popenko, V. A.

    2007-03-15

    Structural study of polycrystalline silicon carbide obtained by sublimation performed via X-ray luminescence and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide results in the formation of grains with the (00.1), (01.1), and (12.3) crystallographic planes parallel to the growth surface. The grains with the (00.1) growth planes are characterized by perfect structure and by red luminescence. Domains with yellow luminescence have a mosaic structure with the (01.1) and (12.3) growth planes.

  18. LDA DFT simulations of an isolated silicon donor on the (110) surface of GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, F. J.; Roy, Mervyn; Maksym, P. A.

    2014-06-01

    The convergence of the band gap state of a single silicon dopant on the (110) surface of GaAs was investigated. By simulating different sized super-cells we were able to show that a 3x4 super-cell provides a well converged calculation for modelling an isolated dopant, with the total energy being converged to 1 part in 1000. The local density of the silicon band gap state was then checked against a number of more intensive calculations and was found to be well converged, with an eigenvalue accurate to within 3 meV.

  19. Surface studies relevant to silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinespring, C. D.; Wormhoudt, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Reactions of C2H4, C3H8, and CH4 on the Si(111) surface and C2H4 on the Si(100) surface were investigated for surface temperatures in the range of 1062-1495 K. Results led to the identification of the reaction products, a characterization of the solid-state transport process, a determination of the nucleation mechanism and growth kinetics, and an assessment of orientation effects. Based on these results and on the modeling studies of Stinespring and Wormhoudt (1988) on the associated gas phase chemistry, a physical model for the two-step beta-SiC CVD process is proposed.

  20. Silver- and Gold-Ordered Structures on Single-Crystal Silicon Surface After Thermal Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbivskyy, Vladimir; Karbivska, Love; Artemyuk, Viktor

    2016-02-01

    The formation mechanisms of Ag- and Au-ordered structures on single-crystal silicon (Si) (111) and Si (110) surfaces were researched using high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy method. It was shown that different patterns of self-assembled nanostructures with very precise and regular geometric shapes can be produced by controlling process parameters of thermal metal spraying on the substrate. The surfaces of nanorelieves at each stage of deposition were researched, and the main stages of morphological transformation were fixed.

  1. Adsorption of silicon on Au(110): An ordered two dimensional surface alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, Hanna; Mayne, Andrew; Dujardin, Gerald; Kara, Abdelkader; Vizzini, Sebastien; Roth, Silvan; Greber, Thomas; Lalmi, Boubekeur; Belkhou, Rachid; Seitsonen, Ari P; Aufray, Bernard; Oughaddou, Hamid

    2012-07-09

    We report on experimental evidence for the formation of a two dimensional Si/Au(110) surface alloy. In this study, we have used a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations based on density functional theory. A highly ordered and stable Si-Au surface alloy is observed subsequent to growth of a sub-monolayer of silicon on an Au(110) substrate kept above the eutectic temperature.

  2. Surface Quality Improvement of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Polishing (APPP) in Machining of Silicon Ultra-Smooth Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jufan; Li, Bing; Wang, Bo; Dong, Shen

    To produce ultra-smooth optical surfaces on hard brittle materials and functional crystal materials without surface damage, atmospheric pressure plasma polishing (APPP) is developed. And improvement of surface quality by APPP process is analyzed by theoretical simulation and experiments. Quantum chemistry simulation proves that convex topography is removed faster than concave topography, thus surface roughness can be reduced further to form ultra-smooth surface. Experiment on single crystal silicon wafer also shows the surface roughness decreases from Ra 1.179nm to Ra 0.483nm. AFM (atomic force microscope) measurement results of specified roughness index taken at different moment in machining process accord well with theoretical simulation. Average reduced-modulus measured by nano-mechanical test system rises from 14.65GPa to 36.10GPa which demonstrates the improvement of surface mechanical properties. Further calculation also indicates the average residual stress is reduced by 7.64 GPa after machining which reflects the elimination of former deformation layer. Element analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction indicates that chemical composition is also purified without new contamination introduced, and the overall status of machined surface goes closer to ideal silicon surface with better performance.

  3. Hydrogen desorption kinetics for aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma processed silicon (001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Carter, Richard J.; Schneider, Thomas P.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    The desorption kinetics of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from silicon (001) surfaces exposed to aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasmas were examined using temperature programmed desorption. Multiple H{sub 2} desorption states were observed and attributed to surface monohydride (SiH), di/trihydride (SiH{sub 2/3}), and hydroxide (SiOH) species, subsurface hydrogen trapped at defects, and hydrogen evolved during the desorption of surface oxides. The observed surface hydride species were dependent on the surface temperature during hydrogen plasma exposure with mono, di, and trihydride species being observed after low temperature exposure (150 °C), while predominantly monohydride species were observed after higher temperature exposure (450 °C). The ratio of surface versus subsurface H{sub 2} desorption was also found to be dependent on the substrate temperature with 150 °C remote hydrogen plasma exposure generally leading to more H{sub 2} evolved from subsurface states and 450 °C exposure leading to more H{sub 2} desorption from surface SiH{sub x} species. Additional surface desorption states were observed, which were attributed to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111) facets formed as a result of surface etching by the remote hydrogen plasma or aqueous hydrogen fluoride treatment. The kinetics of surface H{sub 2} desorption were found to be in excellent agreement with prior investigations of silicon surfaces exposed to thermally generated atomic hydrogen.

  4. Selective Patterning of Si-based Biosensor Surfaces Using Isotropic Silicon Etchants

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Bradley W.; Hunt, Heather K.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-sensitive, label-free biosensors have the potential to have a tremendous impact on fields like medical diagnostics. For the majority of these Si-based integrated devices, it is necessary to functionalize the surface with a targeting ligand in order to perform both specific biodetection. To do this, silane coupling agents are commonly used to immobilize the targeting ligand. However, this method typically results in the bioconjugation of the entire device surface, which is undesirable. To compensate for this effect, researchers have developed complex blocking strategies that result in selective patterning of the sensor surface. Recently, silane coupling agents were used to attach biomolecules to the surface of silica toroidal biosensors integrated on a silicon wafer. Interestingly, only the silica biosensor surface was conjugated. Here, we hypothesize why this selective patterning occurred. Specifically, the silicon etchant (xenon difluoride), which is used in the fabrication of the biosensor, appears to reduce the efficiency of the silane coupling attachment to the underlying silicon wafer. These results will enable future researchers to more easily control the bioconjugation of their sensor surfaces, thus improving biosensor device performance. PMID:22196345

  5. Morphology and electronic properties of silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shu

    2007-12-01

    Several issues related to SiC surfaces are studied in the thesis using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Specific surfaces examined include electropolished SiC, epitaxial graphene on SiC, and vicinal (i.e. slightly miscut from a low-index direction) SiC that have been subjected to high temperature hydrogen-etching. The electropolished surfaces are meant to mimic electrochemically etched SiC, which forms a porous network. The chemical treatment of the surface is similar between electropolishing and electrochemical etching, but the etching conditions are slightly different such that the former produces a flat surface (that is amenable to STM study) whereas the latter produces a complex 3-dimensional porous network. We have used these porous SiC layers as semi-permeable membranes in a biosensor, and we find that the material is quite biocompatible. The purpose of the STM/STS study is to investigate the surface properties of the SiC on the atomic scale in an effort to explain this biocompatibility. The observed tunneling spectra are found to be very asymmetric, with a usual amount of current at positive voltages but no observable current at negative voltages. We propose that this behavior is due to surface charge accumulating on an incompletely passivated surface. Measurements on SiC surfaces prepared by various amounts of hydrogen-etching are used to support this interpretation. Comparison with tunneling computations reveals a density of about 10 13 cm-2 fixed charges on both the electro-polished and the H-etched surfaces. The relatively insulating nature observed on the electro-polished SiC surface may provide an explanation for the biocompatibility of the surface. Graphene, a monolayer of carbon, is a new material for electronic devices. Epitaxial graphene on SiC is fabricated by the Si sublimation method in which a substrate is heated up to about 1350°C in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). The formation of the graphene is

  6. Study of silicon crystal surface formation based on molecular dynamics simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinovs, G.; Sabanskis, A.; Muiznieks, A.

    2014-04-01

    The equilibrium shape of <110>-oriented single crystal silicon nanowire, 8 nm in cross-section, was found from molecular dynamics simulations using LAMMPS molecular dynamics package. The calculated shape agrees well to the shape predicted from experimental observations of nanocavities in silicon crystals. By parametrization of the shape and scaling to a known value of {111} surface energy, Wulff form for solid-vapor interface was obtained. The Wulff form for solid-liquid interface was constructed using the same model of the shape as for the solid-vapor interface. The parameters describing solid-liquid interface shape were found using values of surface energies in low-index directions known from published molecular dynamics simulations. Using an experimental value of the liquid-vapor interface energy for silicon and graphical solution of Herring's equation, we constructed angular diagram showing relative equilibrium orientation of solid-liquid, liquid-vapor and solid-vapor interfaces at the triple phase line. The diagram gives quantitative predictions about growth angles for different growth directions and formation of facets on the solid-liquid and solid-vapor interfaces. The diagram can be used to describe growth ridges appearing on the crystal surface grown from a melt. Qualitative comparison to the ridges of a Float zone silicon crystal cone is given.

  7. In situ remote RF plasma cleaning and surface characterization after silicon dioxide/silicon RIE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Hong

    In IC fabrication, etching (patterning) technology is one of the fundamental techniques. Dry etching has replaced wet etching for patterning micron and submicron features in advanced microelectronics device fabrication. Due to the dry etching induced surface modifications and damage, post-etch cleanings are necessary and critical to device fabrication. Similarly, dry cleaning or gas phase cleaning technologies have shown promise in cleaning processes where conventional wet cleans are impractical or inadequate. The focus of this thesis is the investigation of dry surface cleaning and conditioning after reactive ion etching (RIE) of SiO2 on Si. The approach is to employ in situ remote RF H2 plasma and H2/SiH4 plasma processes for RIE induced CFx residue removal and a final H-passivation of the Si surface. The major scientific issue is to develop understanding of the plasma processes that effectively remove contaminants yet do not damage existing layers. Our investigation suggests that a remote H2 plasma process is effective in removing RIE induced CFx residue and chlorine-containing residue. With the addition of ˜0.1% of SiH4, the remote H 2/SiH4 plasma has proven to be more effective in removal of residual oxide contamination. The plasma cleaning processes have been successfully developed to be fully in situ and cluster tool compatible. The processes were optimized for surface residue and via residue removal on 150 mm interconnect patterned wafers. SEM images showed that a significant amount of surface and via residue were removed. Finally, by using the cobalt silicide formation process and the Schottky diode electrical properties as two test vehicles, we demonstrated the importance of post-RIE cleaning and evaluated the remote plasma cleaning techniques as dry surface cleaning processes.

  8. Porous silicon nanowire arrays decorated by Ag nanoparticles for surface enhanced Raman scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, L.; Xu, H. J.; Chan, Y. F.; Sun, X. M.

    2012-02-01

    A large scale and highly ordered Ag nanoparticle-decorated porous silicon nanowire array was fabricated for a uniform and reproducible surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate. The overall process for the proposed structure is simple and reliable with the use of only chemical etching and metal reduction processes. The SERS sensitivity of the novel substrate as low as 10-16 M for rhodamine 6G (R6G) and the Raman enhancement factor as high as 10^14 were obtained. The excellent SERS performances were mainly attributed to the strong local electromagnetic effect which is associated with the formation of large-quantity Ag nanoparticles on porous silicon nanowire array and the existence of semiconductor silicon nanowires. Significantly, the quadratic relation between the logarithmic concentrations and the logarithmic integrated Raman peak intensities provided quantitative detection of R6G. Our results open new possibilities for applying SERS to trace detection of low-concentration biomolecules.

  9. Effect of Organic Additive on Surface Roughness of Polycrystalline Silicon Film after Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hee-Sub; Park, Jin-Hyung; Yi, Sok-Ho; Paik, Ungyu; Park, Jea-Gun

    2010-01-01

    The effect of an organic additive on the surface roughness of a polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) film was investigated by chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). The surface roughness of the polished poly-Si film was markedly reduced by adding 0.001 wt % hydroxyl ethyl cellulose (HEC) and then decreased slightly with further addition of HEC. We concluded that the reduction of surface roughness was attributed to the formation of a hydroplane layer on the poly-Si surface. Evidence of the hydroplane layer was verified by contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements.

  10. Impurity concentrations and surface charge densities on the heavily doped face of a silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Hsu, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    Increased solar cell efficiencies are attained by reduction of surface recombination and variation of impurity concentration profiles at the n(+) surface of silicon solar cells. Diagnostic techniques are employed to evaluate the effects of specific materials preparation methodologies on surface and near surface concentrations. It is demonstrated that the MOS C-V method, when combined with a bulk measurement technique, yields more complete concentration data than are obtainable by either method alone. Specifically, new solar cell MOS C-V measurements are combined with bulk concentrations obtained by a successive layer removal technique utilizing measurements of sheet resistivity and Hall coefficient.

  11. Contact Angles and Surface Tension of Germanium-Silicon Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, A.; Kaiser, N.; Cobb, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Precise knowledge of material parameters is more and more important for improving crystal growth processes. Two important parameters are the contact (wetting) angle and the surface tension, determining meniscus shapes and surface-tension driven flows in a variety of methods (Czochralski, EFG, floating-zone, detached Bridgman growth). The sessile drop technique allows the measurement of both parameters simultaneously and has been used to measure the contact angles and the surface tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.3) alloys on various substrate materials. Fused quartz, Sapphire, glassy carbon, graphite, SiC, carbon-based aerogel, pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN), AIN, Si3N4, and polycrystalline CVD diamond were used as substrate materials. In addition, the effect of different cleaning procedures and surface treatments on the wetting behavior were investigated. Measurements were performed both under dynamic vacuum and gas atmospheres (argon or forming gas), with temperatures up to 1100 C. In some experiments, the sample was processed for longer times, up to a week, to investigate any changes of the contact angle and/or surface tension due to slow reactions with the substrate. For pure Ge, stable contact angles were found for carbon-based substrates and for pBN, for Ge(1-x)Si(x) only for pBN. The highest wetting angles were found for pBN substrates with angles around 170deg. For the surface tension of Ge, the most reliable values resulted in gamma(T) = (591- 0.077 (T-T(sub m)) 10(exp -3)N/m. The temperature dependence of the surface tension showed similar values for Ge(1-x)Si(x), around -0.08 x 10(exp -3)N/m K, and a compositional dependence of 2.2 x 10(exp -3)N/m at%Si.

  12. Anti- reflective device having an anti-reflection surface formed of silicon spikes with nano-tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsman (Inventor); Mooasser, Sohrab (Inventor); Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Bae, Kungsam (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Described is a device having an anti-reflection surface. The device comprises a silicon substrate with a plurality of silicon spikes formed on the substrate. A first metallic layer is formed on the silicon spikes to form the anti-reflection surface. The device further includes an aperture that extends through the substrate. A second metallic layer is formed on the substrate. The second metallic layer includes a hole that is aligned with the aperture. A spacer is attached with the silicon substrate to provide a gap between an attached sensor apparatus. Therefore, operating as a Micro-sun sensor, light entering the hole passes through the aperture to be sensed by the sensor apparatus. Additionally, light reflected by the sensor apparatus toward the first side of the silicon substrate is absorbed by the first metallic layer and silicon spikes and is thereby prevented from being reflected back toward the sensor apparatus.

  13. Anti-reflective device having an anti-reflective surface formed of silicon spikes with nano-tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam (Inventor); Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Mobasser, Sohrab (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Described is a device having an anti-reflection surface. The device comprises a silicon substrate with a plurality of silicon spikes formed on the substrate. A first metallic layer is formed on the silicon spikes to form the anti-reflection surface. The device further includes an aperture that extends through the substrate. A second metallic layer is formed on the substrate. The second metallic layer includes a hole that is aligned with the aperture. A spacer is attached with the silicon substrate to provide a gap between an attached sensor apparatus. Therefore, operating as a Micro-sun sensor, light entering the hole passes through the aperture to be sensed by the sensor apparatus. Additionally, light reflected by the sensor apparatus toward the first side of the silicon substrate is absorbed by the first metallic layer and silicon spikes and is thereby prevented from being reflected back toward the sensor apparatus.

  14. Diffusion and Phase Transformations of Transition Metals on Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Yi.

    The role of surface diffusion and surface phase reaction kinetics of nickel (Ni) and cobalt (Co) on Si(111) and Si(100) are investigated under Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) conditions using Auger Spectroscopy (AES), Reflection High Electron Energy Diffraction (RHEED) and surface X-ray diffraction. The surface segregation phenomenon and the formation conditions for Si(111)-sqrt{19 } x sqrt{19}- rm R+/-23.4^circ phase (hereafter called sqrt{19}) for Ni/Si(111) are studied by RHEED and AES. Quench cooling induces surface segregation which restores the total accumulated dose of Ni to two surfaces of the wafer. The coverage dependence of phases thus produced follows: 7 x 7 to 1 x 1-RC(0.05Ml) to sqrt{19} (0.16Ml) then to B-type NiSi_2. It is found that there are 3 Ni atoms in the sqrt{19 } unit cell. A "race" of bulk diffusion versus surface diffusion for Ni in/on Si(111) is studied by depositing a laterally confined dot of metal on one side of the double side polished and UHV cleaned Si wafer and then measuring the lateral Auger profile on the reverse side following annealing and quenching. Ni reaches the far side of the wafer at temperatures as low as 500C via bulk diffusion with no measurable contribution from the surface paths, which are short-circuited by numerous, fast bulk paths. Similar results are found for Ni and Co on Si(111) and Si(100). The diffusivity and solid solubility calculated from the experiments are close to the bulk values known from the literature. In addition, the thermal stability, phase transformation and different dissolution mechanisms of sqrt {19} and 1 x 1-RC surface phases of Ni/Si(111) are carefully examined. The activation energies of these processes are compared on an Arrhenius plot. These are discussed in terms of the migration and formation mechanisms involved in these phase transformations. An energy level diagram is used to summarize the atomistic kinetics.

  15. Uniform-sized silicone oil microemulsions: preparation, investigation of stability and deposition on hair surface.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Habiba; Lv, Piping; Wang, Lianyan; Lian, Guoping; Zhu, Shiping; Ma, Guanghui

    2011-12-01

    Emulsions are commonly used in foods, pharmaceuticals and home-personal-care products. For emulsion based products, it is highly desirable to control the droplet size distribution to improve storage stability, appearance and in-use property. We report preparation of uniform-sized silicone oil microemulsions with different droplets diameters (1.4-40.0 μm) using SPG membrane emulsification technique. These microemulsions were then added into model shampoos and conditioners to investigate the effects of size, uniformity, and storage stability on silicone oil deposition on hair surface. We observed much improved storage stability of uniform-sized microemulsions when the droplets diameter was ≤22.7 μm. The uniform-sized microemulsion of 40.0 μm was less stable but still more stable than non-uniform sized microemulsions prepared by conventional homogenizer. The results clearly indicated that uniform-sized droplets enhanced the deposition of silicone oil on hair and deposition increased with decreasing droplet size. Hair switches washed with small uniform-sized droplets had lower values of coefficient of friction compared with those washed with larger uniform and non-uniform droplets. Moreover the addition of alginate thickener in the shampoos and conditioners further enhanced the deposition of silicone oil on hair. The good correlation between silicone oil droplets stability, deposition on hair and resultant friction of hair support that droplet size and uniformity are important factors for controlling the stability and deposition property of emulsion based products such as shampoo and conditioner.

  16. Hopping conduction via ionic liquid induced silicon surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J.; Reich, K. V.; Sammon, M.; Shklovskii, B. I.; Goldman, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    In order to clarify the physics of the gating of solids by ionic liquids (ILs) we have gated lightly doped p -Si, which is so well studied that it can be called the "hydrogen atom of solid state physics" and can be used as a test bed for ionic liquids. We explore the case where the concentration of induced holes at the Si surface is below 1012cm-2 , hundreds of times smaller than record values. We find that in this case an excess negative ion binds a hole on the interface between the IL and Si becoming a surface acceptor. We study the surface conductance of holes hopping between such nearest neighbor acceptors. Analyzing the acceptor concentration dependence of this conductivity, we find that the localization length of a hole is in reasonable agreement with our direct variational calculation of its binding energy. The observed hopping conductivity resembles that of well studied Na+ implanted Si MOSFETs.

  17. Surface structural changes of naturally aged silicone and EPDM composite insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Vlastos, A.E. ); Gubanski, S.M. )

    1991-04-01

    In a long-term outdoor test with high direct and alternating voltages, silicone and EPDM rubber composite insulators have, at the beginning, shown a superior performance to that of glass and porcelain insulators. In the long-term test, however, the silicone rubber composite insulator has, in spite of the ageing of both insulator types, kept its good performance, while the performance of the EPDM rubber composite insulator was drastically deteriorated. In order to get a better insight into results obtained, the wettability and the surface structural changes of the insulators were studied by the drop deposition method (using a goniometer) and by advanced techniques such as SEM, ESCA, FTIR and SIMS respectively. The results show that the differences in performance have to be found in the differences in the surface structural changes and in the dynamic ability of the surface to compensate the ageing.

  18. Chemical modification of a porous silicon surface induced by nitrogen dioxide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Sharov, Constantine S; Konstantinova, Elizaveta A; Osminkina, Lyubov A; Timoshenko, Victor Yu; Kashkarov, Pavel K

    2005-03-17

    The effect of gaseous and liquid nitrogen dioxide on the composition and electronic properties of porous silicon (PS) is investigated by means of optical spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance. It is detected that the interaction process is weak and strong forms of chemisorption on the PS surface, and the process may be regarded as an actual chemical reaction between PS and NO(2). It is found that NO(2) adsorption consists in forming different surface nitrogen-containing molecular groups and dangling bonds of Si atoms (P(b)-centers) as well as in oxidizing and hydrating the PS surface. Also observed are the formation of ionic complexes of P(b)-centers with NO(2) molecules and the generation of free charge carriers (holes) in the volume of silicon nanocrystals forming PS. PMID:16851549

  19. Silicon surface passivation using thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gope, Jhuma; Vandana; Batra, Neha; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Maurya, K. K.; Srivastava, Ritu; Singh, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is a potential material for equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) scaling in microelectronics; however, its surface passivation properties particularly on silicon are not well explored. This paper reports investigation on passivation properties of thermally deposited thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition system (ALD) on silicon surface. As-deposited pristine film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with <100 cm/s surface recombination velocity (SRV) vis-à-vis thicker films. Further improvement in passivation quality is achieved with annealing at 400 °C for 10 min where the SRV reduces to ∼20 cm/s. Conductance measurements show that the interface defect density (Dit) increases with film thickness whereas its value decreases after annealing. XRR data corroborate with the observations made by FTIR and SRV data.

  20. Manufacture of silicon-based devices having disordered sulfur-doped surface layers

    DOEpatents

    Carey, III, James Edward; Mazur, Eric

    2008-04-08

    The present invention provides methods of fabricating a radiation-absorbing semiconductor wafer by irradiating at least one surface location of a silicon substrate, e.g., an n-doped crystalline silicon, by a plurality of temporally short laser pulses, e.g., femtosecond pulses, while exposing that location to a substance, e.g., SF.sub.6, having an electron-donating constituent so as to generate a substantially disordered surface layer (i.e., a microstructured layer) that incorporates a concentration of that electron-donating constituent, e.g., sulfur. The substrate is also annealed at an elevated temperature and for a duration selected to enhance the charge carrier density in the surface layer. For example, the substrate can be annealed at a temperature in a range of about 700 K to about 900 K.

  1. Interspecific variation in patterns of adhesion of marine fouling to silicone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Holm, Eric R; Kavanagh, Christopher J; Meyer, Anne E; Wiebe, Deborah; Nedved, Brian T; Wendt, Dean; Smith, Celia M; Hadfield, Michael G; Swain, Geoff; Wood, Christina Darkangelo; Truby, Kathryn; Stein, Judith; Montemarano, Jean

    2006-01-01

    The adhesion of six fouling organisms: the barnacle Balanus eburneus, the gastropod mollusc Crepidulafornicata, the bivalve molluscs Crassostrea virginica and Ostrea/Dendrostrea spp., and the serpulid tubeworms Hydroides dianthus and H. elegans, to 12 silicone fouling-release surfaces was examined. Removal stress (adhesion strength) varied among the fouling species and among the surfaces. Principal component analysis of the removal stress data revealed that the fouling species fell into two distinct groups, one comprising the bivalve molluscs and tubeworms, and the other the barnacle and the gastropod mollusc. None of the silicone materials generated a minimum in removal stress for all the organisms tested, although several surfaces produced low adhesion strengths for both groups of species. These results suggest that fouling-release materials do not rank (in terms of adhesion strength) identically for all fouling organisms, and thus development of a globally-effective hull coating will continue to require testing against a diversity of encrusting species. PMID:17290867

  2. Magnetic Dirac fermions and Chern insulator supported on pristine silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Huixia; Liu, Zheng; Lian, Chao; Zhang, Jin; Li, Hui; Sun, Jia-Tao; Meng, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Emergence of ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic semiconductors is strongly desirable, especially in topological materials because of the possibility of achieving the quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on first-principles calculations, we propose that for Si thin film grown on metal substrate, the pristine Si(111)-√{3 }×√{3 } surface with a spontaneous weak reconstruction has a strong tendency toward ferromagnetism and nontrivial topological properties, characterized by spin-polarized Dirac-fermion surface states. In contrast to conventional routes relying on introduction of alien charge carriers or specially patterned substrates, the spontaneous magnetic order and spin-orbit coupling on the pristine silicon surface together give rise to the quantized anomalous Hall effect with a finite Chern number C =-1 . This work suggests opportunities in silicon-based spintronics and quantum computing free from alien dopants or proximity effects.

  3. Surface acoustic wave diagnosis of vacancy orbital with electric quadrupoles in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, T.; Mitsumoto, K.; Akatsu, M.; Baba, S.; Okabe, K.; Takasu, R.; Nemoto, Y.; Yamada-Kaneta, H.; Furumura, Y.; Saito, H.; Kashima, K.; Saito, Y.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate ultrasonic diagnosis of vacancies in boron-doped silicon wafers currently used in device manufacturing. The low-temperature softening of elastic constants measured by surface acoustic waves (SAW) as well as bulk ultrasonic waves is caused by a coupling of elastic strains to electric quadrupoles of the vacancy orbital in silicon wafers. Using interdigital transducers with a comb gap of 2.5 μm on a piezoelectric ZnO film deposited on the (001) surface of the wafer, we observed the softening of 1.9×10-4 in relative amount of the elastic constant Cs below 2 K down to 23 mK. Taking account of the strong quadrupole-strain interaction, we deduced a small vacancy concentration 3.1×1012 cm-3 in the surface layer of the wafer within a penetration depth 3.5 μm of the SAW.

  4. Surface etching, chemical modification and characterization of silicon nitride and silicon oxide—selective functionalization of Si3N4 and SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li-Hong; Michalak, David J.; Chopra, Tatiana P.; Pujari, Sidharam P.; Cabrera, Wilfredo; Dick, Don; Veyan, Jean-François; Hourani, Rami; Halls, Mathew D.; Zuilhof, Han; Chabal, Yves J.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to selectively chemically functionalize silicon nitride (Si3N4) or silicon dioxide (SiO2) surfaces after cleaning would open interesting technological applications. In order to achieve this goal, the chemical composition of surfaces needs to be carefully characterized so that target chemical reactions can proceed on only one surface at a time. While wet-chemically cleaned silicon dioxide surfaces have been shown to be terminated with surficial Si-OH sites, chemical composition of the HF-etched silicon nitride surfaces is more controversial. In this work, we removed the native oxide under various aqueous HF-etching conditions and studied the chemical nature of the resulting Si3N4 surfaces using infrared absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy ion scattering (LEIS), and contact angle measurements. We find that HF-etched silicon nitride surfaces are terminated by surficial Si-F and Si-OH bonds, with slightly subsurface Si-OH, Si-O-Si, and Si-NH2 groups. The concentration of surficial Si-F sites is not dependent on HF concentration, but the distribution of oxygen and Si-NH2 displays a weak dependence. The Si-OH groups of the etched nitride surface are shown to react in a similar manner to the Si-OH sites on SiO2, and therefore no selectivity was found. Chemical selectivity was, however, demonstrated by first reacting the -NH2 groups on the etched nitride surface with aldehyde molecules, which do not react with the Si-OH sites on a SiO2 surface, and then using trichloro-organosilanes for selective reaction only on the SiO2 surface (no reactivity on the aldehyde-terminated Si3N4 surface).

  5. Modeling the growth of PECVD silicon nitride films for crystalline silicon solar cells using factorial design and response surface methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Nybergh, K.; Marjamaeki, T.; Skarp, E.

    1997-12-31

    Silicon nitride was grown on polished Si wafers by a parallel plate PECVD reactor. Reaction gases were NH{sub 3} and 3% SiH{sub 4} in Ar and the rf frequency was 13.56 MHz. The film thickness and refractive index were measured by an ellipsometer. The results were analyzed using response surface methodology. The results indicate that the silane-to-ammonia flow rate ratio is the dominating parameter when determining the refractive index and that the total gas flow rate and the chamber pressure dominate the growth rate, whereas rf power has a less strong impact on growth rate and no impact on refractive index. The previous results will be used when growing passivating antireflection coatings on three grain Si solar cells.

  6. Vacuum hydride epitaxy of silicon: kinetics of monosilane pyrolysis on the growth surface

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, L. K.; Ivin, S. V.

    2011-04-15

    Analytical expressions relating the rate of silicon atom incorporation into a growing crystal to the typical frequency of silane molecule pyrolysis on the silicon surface in the growth temperature range are derived. Based on currently available experimental data, the range of typical decomposition frequencies of hydride molecule radicals adsorbed at the silicon wafer surface in the temperature range of 450-700 Degree-Sign C is determined for the most widely used physicochemical models. It is shown that the most probable molecular decomposition model can be chosen based on the experimental study of the temperature dependence of the decomposition rate of adsorbed hydride molecules. A change in the silane molecule pyrolysis rate or the hydrogen desorption rate from the surface in principle makes it possible to increase the Si layer growth rate without additional substrate heating under conditions of low-temperature epitaxy (450-550 Degree-Sign C), but no larger than by a factor of 2-3 in the former case and up to 100 times in the latter case. The analysis performed shows that physicochemical pyrolysis models in which hydrogen is trapped by the surface, mostly at the stage of decomposition of silane radicals adsorbed by the surface, are more realistic.

  7. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  8. Plasma-enhanced deposition of antifouling layers on silicone rubber surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongquan

    In food processing and medical environments, biofilms serve as potential sources of contamination, and lead to food spoilage, transmission of diseases or infections. Because of its ubiquitous and recalcitrant nature, Listeria monocytogenes biofilm is especially hard to control. Generating antimicrobial surfaces provide a method to control the bacterial attachment. The difficulty of silver deposition on polymeric surfaces has been overcome by using a unique two-step plasma-mediated method. First silicone rubber surfaces were plasma-functionalized to generate aldehyde groups. Then thin silver layers were deposited onto the functionalized surfaces according to Tollen's reaction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that silver particles were deposited. By exposing the silver coated surfaces to L. monocytogenes, it was demonstrated that they were bactericidal to L. monocytogenes. No viable bacteria were detected after 12 to 18 h on silver-coated silicone rubber surfaces. Another antifouling approach is to generate polyethylene glycol (PEG) thin layer instead of silver on polymer surfaces. Covalent bond of PEG structures of various molecular weights to cold-plasma-functionalized polymer surfaces, such as silicone rubber, opens up a novel way for the generation of PEG brush-like or PEG branch-like anti-fouling layers. In this study, plasma-generated surface free radicals can react efficiently with dichlorosilane right after plasma treatment. With the generation of halo-silane groups, this enables PEG molecules to be grafted onto the modified surfaces. XPS data clearly demonstrated the presence of PEG molecules on plasma-functionalized silicone rubber surfaces. AFM images showed the changed surface morphologies as a result of covalent attachment to the surface of PEG molecules. Biofilm experiment results suggest that the PEG brush-like films have the potential ability to be the next

  9. Covalent and stable CuAAC modification of silicon surfaces for control of cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Vutti, Surendra; Buch-Månson, Nina; Schoffelen, Sanne; Bovet, Nicolas; Martinez, Karen L; Meldal, Morten

    2015-03-23

    Stable primary functionalization of metal surfaces plays a significant role in reliable secondary attachment of complex functional molecules used for the interfacing of metal objects and nanomaterials with biological systems. In principle, this can be achieved through chemical reactions either in the vapor or liquid phase. In this work, we compared these two methods for oxidized silicon surfaces and thoroughly characterized the functionalization steps by tagging and fluorescence imaging. We demonstrate that the vapor-phase functionalization only provided transient surface modification that was lost on extensive washing. For stable surface modification, a liquid-phase method was developed. In this method, silicon wafers were decorated with azides, either by silanization with (3-azidopropyl)triethoxysilane or by conversion of the amine groups of an aminopropylated surface by means of the azido-transfer reaction. Subsequently, D-amino acid adhesion peptides could be immobilized on the surface by use of Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry. This enabled the study of cell adhesion to the metal surface. In contrast to unmodified surfaces, the peptide-modified surfaces were able to maintain cell adhesion during significant flow velocities in a microflow reactor.

  10. Thermal analysis of the exothermic reaction between galvanic porous silicon and sodium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Becker, Collin R; Currano, Luke J; Churaman, Wayne A; Stoldt, Conrad R

    2010-11-01

    Porous silicon (PS) films up to ∼150 μm thick with specific surface area similar to 700 m(2)/g and pore diameters similar to 3 nm are fabricated using a galvanic corrosion etching mechanism that does not require a power supply. After fabrication, the pores are impregnated with the strong oxidizer sodium perchlorate (NaClO(4)) to create a composite that constitutes a highly energetic system capable of explosion. Using bomb calorimetry, the heat of reaction is determined to be 9.9 ± 1.8 and 27.3 ± 3.2 kJ/g of PS when ignited under N(2) and O(2), respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) reveals that the energy output is dependent on the hydrogen termination of the PS. PMID:21058647

  11. Thermal analysis of the exothermic reaction between galvanic porous silicon and sodium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Becker, Collin R; Currano, Luke J; Churaman, Wayne A; Stoldt, Conrad R

    2010-11-01

    Porous silicon (PS) films up to ∼150 μm thick with specific surface area similar to 700 m(2)/g and pore diameters similar to 3 nm are fabricated using a galvanic corrosion etching mechanism that does not require a power supply. After fabrication, the pores are impregnated with the strong oxidizer sodium perchlorate (NaClO(4)) to create a composite that constitutes a highly energetic system capable of explosion. Using bomb calorimetry, the heat of reaction is determined to be 9.9 ± 1.8 and 27.3 ± 3.2 kJ/g of PS when ignited under N(2) and O(2), respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) reveals that the energy output is dependent on the hydrogen termination of the PS.

  12. Silicon distribution on the lunar surface obtained by Kaguya GRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyeong Ja; Kobayashi, Masanori; Elphic, Richard; Karouji, Yuzuru; Hamara, Dave; Kobayashi, Shingo; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Rodriguez, Alexis; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Reedy, Robert; Hasebe, Nobuyuki

    Gamma ray spectrometry (GRS) provides a powerful tool to map and characterize the elemental composition of the upper tens centimeters of solid planetary surfaces. Elemental maps generated by the Kaguya GRS (KGRS) include natural radioactive as well as major elements maps (e.g., Fe, Ca, and Ti). Analysis of the Si gamma ray has been investigated using the 4934 keV Si peak produced by the thermal neutron interaction (28) Si(n,gammag) (29) Si, generated during the interaction of galactic cosmic rays and surface material containing Si. The emission rate of gamma rays is directly proportional to the abundance of Si from the lunar surface; however, it is also affected by the thermal neutron density in the lunar surface. Thus, we corrected the Si GRS data by a low energy neutron data (< 0.1 eV) obtained by Lunar Prospector because the Kaguya orbiter did not carry a neutron detector. We used the relative change in thermal neutron flux as a function of topography measured by Lunar Prospector. Normalization of Si elemental abundance using the Kaguya data was accomplished using Apollo 11, 12, 16, and 17 archive data. The normalized Si elemental abundance of the Kaguya GRS data ranged from about 15 to 27% Si. The lowest and highest SiO _{2} abundance correspond to mineral groups like pyroxene group (PKT region) and feldspar group (Northern highlands), respectively. The Si abundance permits the quantification of the relative abundance and distribution of mafic or non-mafic lunar surfaces materials. Our KGRS data analysis shows that highland terrains are Si-enriched relative to lower basins and plains regions, which appear to consist of primarily of mafic rocks. Our elemental map of Si using Kaguya GRS data shows that the highland areas of both near side and far side of the Moon have higher abundance of Si, and the mare regions of the near side of the Moon have the lowest Si abundance on the Moon. Our study clearly shows that there are a number of Si enriched areas compared to

  13. Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of Porous Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; del Río, J Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia

    2016-04-21

    Current research on porous silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce porous silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the porous silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant impact on the design of complex porous silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications.

  14. Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of Porous Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; del Río, J. Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Current research on porous silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce porous silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the porous silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant impact on the design of complex porous silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications. PMID:27097767

  15. A cochlear implant fabricated using a bulk silicon-surface micromachining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Tracy Elizabeth

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation presents the design and fabrication of two generations of a silicon microelectrode array for use in a cochlear implant. A cochlear implant is a device that is inserted into the inner ear and uses electrical stimulation to provide sound sensations to the profoundly deaf. The first-generation silicon cochlear implant is a passive device fabricated using silicon microprobe technology developed at the University of Michigan. It contains twenty-two iridium oxide (IrO) stimulating sites that are 250 mum in diameter and spaced at 750 mum intervals. In-vivo recordings were made in guinea pig auditory cortex in response to electrical stimulation with this device, verifying its ability to electrically evoke an auditory response. Auditory thresholds as low as 78 muA were recorded. The second-generation implant is a thirty-two site, four-channel device with on-chip CMOS site-selection circuitry and integrated position sensing. It was fabricated using a novel bulk silicon surface micromachining process which was developed as a part of this dissertation work. While the use of semiconductor technology offers many advantages in fabricating cochlear implants over the methods currently used, it was felt that even further advantages could be gained by developing a new micromachining process which would allow circuitry to be distributed along the full length of the cochlear implant substrate. The new process uses electropolishing of an n+ bulk silicon sacrificial layer to undercut and release n- epitaxial silicon structures from the wafer. An extremely abrupt etch-stop between the n+ and n- silicon is obtained, with no electropolishing taking place in the n-type silicon that is doped lower than 1 x 1017 cm-3 in concentration. Lateral electropolishing rates of up to 50 mum/min were measured using this technique, allowing one millimeter-wide structures to be fully undercut in as little as 10 minutes. The new micromachining process was integrated with a standard p

  16. A decade of silicone hydrogel development: surface properties, mechanical properties, and ocular compatibility.

    PubMed

    Tighe, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    Since the initial launch of silicone hydrogel lenses, there has been a considerable broadening in the range of available commercial material properties. The very mobile silicon-oxygen bonds convey distinctive surface and mechanical properties on silicone hydrogels, in which advantages of enhanced oxygen permeability, reduced protein deposition, and modest frictional interaction are balanced by increased lipid and elastic response. There are now some 15 silicone hydrogel material variants available to practitioners; arguably, the changes that have taken place have been strongly influenced by feedback based on clinical experience. Water content is one of the most influential properties, and the decade has seen a progressive rise from lotrafilcon-A (24%) to efrofilcon-A (74%). Moduli have decreased over the same period from 1.4 to 0.3 MPa, but not solely as a result of changes in water content. Surface properties do not correlate directly with water content, and ingenious approaches have been used to achieve desirable improvements (e.g., greater lubricity and lower contact angle hysteresis). This is demonstrated by comparing the hysteresis value of the earliest (lotrafilcon-A, >40°) and most recent (delefilcon-A, <10°) coated silicone hydrogels. Although wettability is important, it is not of itself a good predictor of ocular response because this involves a much wider range of physicochemical and biochemical factors. The interference of the lens with ocular dynamics is complex leading separately to tissue-material interactions involving anterior and posterior lens surfaces. The biochemical consequences of these interactions may hold the key to a greater understanding of ocular incompatibility and end of day discomfort. PMID:23292050

  17. Attenuation of 7 GHz surface acoustic waves on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongyao; Cahill, David G.

    2016-09-01

    We measured the attenuation of GHz frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on the Si (001) surface using an optical pump-probe technique at temperatures between 300 and 600 K. SAWs are generated and detected by a 700 nm Al grating fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. The grating for SAW generation is separated from the grating for SAW detection by ≈150 μ m . The amplitude of SAWs is attenuated by coupling to bulk waves created by the Al grating, diffraction due to the finite size of the source, and the intrinsic relaxational Akhiezer damping of elastic waves in Si. Thermal phonon relaxation time and Grüneisen parameters are fitted using temperature-dependent measurement. The f Q product of a hypothetical micromechanical oscillator limited by Akhiezer damping at this frequency is ˜3 ×1013 Hz.

  18. Ion irradiation of porous silicon : the role of surface states

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsohn, L. G.; Bennett, B. L.; Cooke, D. W.; Muenchausen, Ross E.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2004-01-01

    The summary and conclusions of this paper are: (1) Ion irradiation induces PL quenching from po-Si; (2) Interaction of the implanted ions with defects generated during the irradiation process plays a major role in the PL quenching mechanism; (3) Quenching was associated with the creation of nonradiative states within the gap; and (4) Exposition to air and consequently the oxidation of the surface is shown to enhance PL emission efficiency.

  19. Syntactomer Peptide Assembly on Deformable Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Julie N. L.; Genzer, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Surfaces of biocompatible poly(vinylmethylsiloxane) (PVMS) networks can be functionalized readily through modification of pendent vinyl groups. In this work, we also took advantage of network elasticity to examine how the conformation of surface-grafted peptides depended on their grafting density (i.e., the areal density of peptides). PVMS networks were cross-linked via reactive end groups, leaving the pendent vinyl groups available for peptide attachment via a carboxylic acid terminated thiol linker. To control grafting density, the networks were stretched uniaxially up to ~30% strain during the attachment of the thiol linker (via thiol-ene click chemistry) and the peptide (via sulfo-NHS/EDC coupling chemistry). After deposition, the strain was released. The resultant peptide-modified PVMS networks were imaged using scanning probe microscopy. The specific peptides of interest are called ``syntactomers'' because they are made up of repeating amino acid sequences much like a polymer is made up of repeating monomer units. In solution, these peptides display interesting pH-sensitive LCST and UCST phase behaviors that may impart surfaces with pH- and temperature-responsiveness in addition to biocompatibility.

  20. Mechanism of hole doping into hydrogen terminated diamond by the adsorption of inorganic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Yoshiteru; Shiraishi, Kenji; Kasu, Makoto; Sato, Hisashi

    2013-03-01

    We revealed a mechanism of hole doping into hydrogen (H) terminated diamond by the adsorption of inorganic molecules, based on first-principle calculation. Electron transfer from H-terminated diamond to adsorbate molecules was found in the case that the energy level of unoccupied molecular orbitals in an adsorbate molecule is below or around the valence band maximum of H-terminated diamond. The amount of doped hole carriers depends on the energy level of unoccupied molecular orbital of adsorbate molecules. The mechanism can explain the experimentally observed dependence of increasing hole sheet concentration at H-terminated diamond surface on the species of adsorbate molecule.

  1. In situ metalation of free base phthalocyanine covalently bonded to silicon surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Fabio; Tudisco, Cristina; Bertani, Federico; Dalcanale, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Summary Free 4-undecenoxyphthalocyanine molecules were covalently bonded to Si(100) and porous silicon through thermic hydrosilylation of the terminal double bonds of the undecenyl chains. The success of the anchoring strategy on both surfaces was demonstrated by the combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with control experiments performed adopting the commercially available 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy)-29H,31H-phthalocyanine, which is not suited for silicon anchoring. Moreover, the study of the shape of the XPS N 1s band gave relevant information on the interactions occurring between the anchored molecules and the substrates. The spectra suggest that the phthalocyanine ring interacts significantly with the flat Si surface, whilst ring–surface interactions are less relevant on porous Si. The surface-bonded molecules were then metalated in situ with Co by using wet chemistry. The efficiency of the metalation process was evaluated by XPS measurements and, in particular, on porous silicon, the complexation of cobalt was confirmed by the disappearance in the FTIR spectra of the band at 3290 cm−1 due to –NH stretches. Finally, XPS results revealed that the different surface–phthalocyanine interactions observed for flat and porous substrates affect the efficiency of the in situ metalation process. PMID:25551050

  2. Low temperature front surface passivation of interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Brent; Das, Ujjwal; Jani, Omkar; Hegedus, Steve; Birkmire, Robert

    2009-06-08

    The interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cell requires a low temperature front surface passivation/anti-reflection structure. Conventional silicon surface passivation using SiO2 or a-SiNx is performed at temperature higher than 400°C, which is not suitable for the IBC-SHJ cell. In this paper, we propose a PECVD a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H/a-SiC:H stack structure to passivate the front surface of crystalline silicon at low temperature. The optical properties and passivation quality of this structure are characterized and solar cells using this structure are fabricated. With 2 nm a-Si:H layer, the stack structure exhibits stable passivation with effective minority carrier lifetime higher than 2 ms, and compatible with IBC-SHJ solar cell processing. A critical advantage of this structure is that the SiC allows it to be HF resistant, thus it can be deposited as the first step in the process. This protects the a-Si/c-Si interface and maintains a low surface recombination velocity.

  3. Immobilization of [60]fullerene on silicon surfaces through a calix[8]arene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busolo, Filippo; Silvestrini, Simone; Armelao, Lidia; Maggini, Michele

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we report the functionalization of flat Si(100) surfaces with a calix[8]arene derivative through a thermal hydrosilylation process, followed by docking with [60]fullerene. Chemical grafting of calix[8]arene on silicon substrates was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, whereas host-guest immobilization of fullerene was demonstrated by atomic force microscopy and sessile drop water contact angle measurements. Surface topographical variations, modelled on the basis of calix[8]arene and [60]fullerene geometrical parameters, are consistent with the observed morphological features relative to surface functionalization and to non-covalent immobilization of [60]fullerene.

  4. Immobilization of [60]fullerene on silicon surfaces through a calix[8]arene layer

    SciTech Connect

    Busolo, Filippo; Silvestrini, Simone; Maggini, Michele; Armelao, Lidia

    2013-10-28

    In this work, we report the functionalization of flat Si(100) surfaces with a calix[8]arene derivative through a thermal hydrosilylation process, followed by docking with [60]fullerene. Chemical grafting of calix[8]arene on silicon substrates was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, whereas host-guest immobilization of fullerene was demonstrated by atomic force microscopy and sessile drop water contact angle measurements. Surface topographical variations, modelled on the basis of calix[8]arene and [60]fullerene geometrical parameters, are consistent with the observed morphological features relative to surface functionalization and to non-covalent immobilization of [60]fullerene.

  5. Oxide thickness dependence of swift heavy ion-induced surface tracks formation in silicon dioxide on silicon structures at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, A. M. J. F.; Touboul, A. D.; Marinoni, M.; Ramonda, M.; Guasch, C.; Saigne, F.; Bonnet, J.; Gasiot, J.

    2007-12-15

    The influence of the oxide thickness in the surface tracks formation in thin silicon dioxide layered-silicon substrate (SiO{sub 2}-Si) irradiated with swift heavy ion is dealt with. In this respect, SiO{sub 2}-Si samples with different oxide thicknesses have been characterized using atomic force microscopy before and after 7.51 MeV/u Xe ion irradiation at a grazing incident angle of 1 deg. relative to the surface plane. Experimental evidence of the existence of a threshold thickness in the formation of swift heavy ion-induced surface tracks has been addressed and discussed according to the thermal spike theory. This experimental upshot can be helpful when assessing metal-oxide-semiconductor ultrathin-gate oxide reliability issues and for growth of silicon-based nanostructures.

  6. Surface porosity of stone casts resulting from immersion of addition silicone rubber impressions in disinfectant solutions.

    PubMed

    Hiraguchi, Hisako; Kaketani, Masahiro; Hirose, Hideharu; Kikuchi, Hisaji; Yoneyama, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of immersion of addition silicone rubber impressions in disinfectant solutions on the surface porosity of the resulting stone casts. Five brands of type 2 and 3 addition silicone rubber impression materials and one brand of type 4 dental stone were used. Impressions of a master die designed to simulate an abutment tooth were immersed in disinfectant for 30 minutes. The disinfectants used were 2% glutaraldehyde solution and 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde solution. The surface porosities of stone casts obtained from two brands of impression materials immersed in disinfectant for 30 minutes were determined. Results suggest that impression materials immersed in disinfectant solutions need sufficient time before pouring into dental stone.

  7. Study of the amorphization of surface silicon layers implanted by low-energy helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, A. A.; Myakon'kikh, A. V.; Oreshko, A. P.; Shemukhin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural changes in surface layers of Si(001) substrates subjected to plasma-immersion implantation by (2-5)-keV helium ions to a dose of D = 6 × 1015-5 × 1017 cm-2 have been studied by highresolution X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering, and spectral ellipsometry. It is found that the joint application of these methods makes it possible to determine the density depth distribution ρ( z) in an implanted layer, its phase state, and elemental composition. Treatment of silicon substrates in helium plasma to doses of 6 × 1016 cm-2 leads to the formation of a 20- to 30-nm-thick amorphized surface layer with a density close to the silicon density. An increase in the helium dose causes the formation of an internal porous layer.

  8. A silicon-on-insulator surface plasmon interferometer for hydrogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Khai Q.; Ngo, Quang Minh

    2016-07-01

    A compact and integrated optical gas sensor on a silicon-on-insulator platform based on surface plasmon interference for hydrogen detection is theoretically introduced in this paper. The basic sensor element consists of a thin layer of palladium (Pd) embedded in a silicon waveguide. Two decoupled surface plasmon polariton waves propagate simultaneously on either side of the Pd layer, which combine and interfere at the end of the Pd layer. The interference mode can be either constructive or destructive, which is highly sensitive to volumetric hydrogen concentration. The proposed sensor is of great potential as a basic building block for lab-on-chip-scale devices owing to its high integration and compactness.

  9. Optical porous-silicon-based sensors with chemically modified surface for detection of organic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvojka, T.; Holec, T.; Jelinek, I.; Nemec, I.; Jindrich, J.; Lorenc, M.; Koutnikova, J.; Kral, V.; Dian, Juraj

    2003-07-01

    Photoluminescence quenching response of as prepared and surface modified porous silicon sensors in presence of organic analytes in gas phase was studied. Surface modification aimed at increasing of operational stability and modification of sensoric response was performed by a hydrosilylation reaction with various organic compounds - methyl 10-undecenoate, haemin, cinchonine and quinine. These sensors were tested for a homological set of aliphatic alcohols from methanol to hexanol. We have systematically measured changes in porous silicon photoluminescence intensity as a function of concentration of detected analytes and evaluated sensitivity, detection limit and linear dynamic range of our sensors. Speed of the sensoric response was of the order of seconds. The obtained sensoric parameters were correlated with chemical and physical properties of both the compounds used for derivatization and the detected analytes.

  10. Surface plasmon polaritons in a composite system of porous silicon and gold

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, J. S.; Goryachev, D. N.; Ken, O. S. Sreseli, O. M.

    2015-04-15

    A composite system of silicon quantum dots and gold particles with properties periodically changing along the surface (i.e., a system exhibiting the properties of a diffraction grating) is obtained by a one-step metal-assisted chemical etching. The spectral and angular dependences of the photoresponse for the composite system on single-crystal silicon are studied. The photoresponse peaks were observed, which behavior (the dependence on the parameters of the diffraction grating, wavelength and incidence angles of light) is attributed to the excitation of plasmon-polariton modes at the surface of the composite system with the diffraction grating. At the same time, the obtained values of the wave vectors for these modes are smaller than those calculated for plasmon polaritons excited at the interface between air and metal (gold) diffraction grating.

  11. Hypervalent surface interactions for colloidal stability and doping of silicon nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Neale, Nathan R.; Chen, Ting; Kortshagen, Uwe R.

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have attracted attention for cost-effective, solution-based deposition of quantum-confined thin films for optoelectronics. However, two significant challenges must be addressed before practical nanocrystal-based devices can be realized. The first is coping with the ligands that terminate the nanocrystal surfaces. Though ligands provide the colloidal stability needed to cast thin films from solution, these ligands dramatically hinder charge carrier transport in the resulting film. Second, after a conductive film is achieved, doping has proven difficult for further control of the optoelectronic properties of the film. Here we report the ability to confront both of these challenges by exploiting the ability of silicon to engage in hypervalent interactions with hard donor molecules. For the first time, we demonstrate the significant potential of applying the interaction to the nanocrystal surface. In this study, hypervalent interactions are shown to provide colloidal stability as well as doping of silicon nanocrystals. PMID:23893292

  12. Magnetic behaviour of TbPc2 single-molecule magnets chemically grafted on silicon surface

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Matteo; Bertani, Federico; Tudisco, Cristina; Malavolti, Luigi; Poggini, Lorenzo; Misztal, Kasjan; Menozzi, Daniela; Motta, Alessandro; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe; Sainctavit, Philippe; Condorelli, Guglielmo G.; Dalcanale, Enrico; Sessoli, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are among the most promising molecular systems for the development of novel molecular electronics based on the spin transport. Going beyond the investigations focused on physisorbed SMMs, in this work the robust grafting of Terbium(III) bis(phthalocyaninato) complexes to silicon surface from a diluted solution is achieved by rational chemical design yielding the formation of a partially oriented monolayer on the conducting substrate. Here, by exploiting the surface sensitivity of X-ray circular magnetic dichroism we evidence an enhancement of the magnetic bistability of this single-molecule magnet, in contrast to the dramatic reduction of the magnetic hysteresis that characterises monolayer deposits evaporated on noble and ferromagnetic metals. Photoelectron spectroscopy investigations and density functional theory analysis suggest a non-innocent role played by the silicon substrate, evidencing the potentiality of this approach for robust integration of bistable magnetic molecules in electronic devices. PMID:25109254

  13. Extremely low surface recombination velocities in black silicon passivated by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, Martin; Kroll, Matthias; Kaesebier, Thomas; Tuennermann, Andreas; Salzer, Roland; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2012-05-07

    We investigate the optical and opto-electronic properties of black silicon (b-Si) nanostructures passivated with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The b-Si nanostructures significantly improve the absorption of silicon due to superior anti-reflection and light trapping properties. By coating the b-Si nanostructures with a conformal layer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by atomic layer deposition, the surface recombination velocity can be effectively reduced. We show that control of plasma-induced subsurface damage is equally important to achieve low interface recombination. Surface recombination velocities of S{sub eff}<13 cm/s have been measured for an optimized structure which, like the polished reference, exhibits lifetimes in the millisecond range.

  14. Wurtzite-Phased InP Micropillars Grown on Silicon with Low Surface Recombination Velocity.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Ng, Kar Wei; Tran, Thai-Truong D; Sun, Hao; Lu, Fanglu; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2015-11-11

    The direct growth of III-V nanostructures on silicon has shown great promise in the integration of optoelectronics with silicon-based technologies. Our previous work showed that scaling up nanostructures to microsize while maintaining high quality heterogeneous integration opens a pathway toward a complete photonic integrated circuit and high-efficiency cost-effective solar cells. In this paper, we present a thorough material study of novel metastable InP micropillars monolithically grown on silicon, focusing on two enabling aspects of this technology-the stress relaxation mechanism at the heterogeneous interface and the microstructure surface quality. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy studies show that InP grows directly on silicon without any amorphous layer in between. A set of periodic dislocations was found at the heterointerface, relaxing the 8% lattice mismatch between InP and Si. Single crystalline InP therefore can grow on top of the fully relaxed template, yielding high-quality micropillars with diameters expanding beyond 1 μm. An interesting power-dependence trend of carrier recombination lifetimes was captured for these InP micropillars at room temperature, for the first time for micro/nanostructures. By simply combining internal quantum efficiency with carrier lifetime, we revealed the recombination dynamics of nonradiative and radiative portions separately. A very low surface recombination velocity of 1.1 × 10(3) cm/sec was obtained. In addition, we experimentally estimated the radiative recombination B coefficient of 2.0 × 10(-10) cm(3)/sec for pure wurtzite-phased InP. These values are comparable with those obtained from InP bulk. Exceeding the limits of conventional nanowires, our InP micropillars combine the strengths of both nanostructures and bulk materials and will provide an avenue in heterogeneous integration of III-V semiconductor materials onto silicon platforms.

  15. Formation of electronic junctions on molecularly modified surfaces by lift-and-float electrical contacts.

    PubMed

    Ikram, I Mohamed; Rabinal, M K; Kalasad, M N; Mulimani, B G

    2009-03-01

    Here, we report a simple method of forming electrical contacts on soft surfaces of organic monolayers and organically capped nanoparticles. It is based on the lift of predefined contacts of silver paste on a water surface and their pickup and float on a soft surface by capillary force. Three different surfaces of silicon--hydrogen terminated, covalently bonded organic molecules, and a thin film of organically capped CdSe nanoparticles--were used to constitute electronic junctions by lift and float of individual contacts. Charge transport measurements clearly demonstrate that these junctions are free from shorting and wrinkling of the top contact and damage of molecular films. Hence, the method is simple, effective, nondestructive, and economical to form electronic junctions on molecular surfaces.

  16. Chemical engineering of self-assembled Alzheimer's peptide on a silanized silicon surface.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Mehdi; Smadja, Claire; Ly, Giang Thi Phuong; Tandjigora, Diénaba; Vigneron, Jackie; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Taverna, Myriam; Dufour-Gergam, Elisabeth

    2014-05-27

    The aim of this work is to develop a sensitive and specific immune-sensing platform dedicated to the detection of potential biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in biological fluids. Accordingly, a controlled and adaptive surface functionalization of a silicon wafer with 7-octenyltrichlorosilane has been performed. The surface has extensively been characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM; morphology) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS; chemical composition) and contact angle measurements. The wettability of the grafted chemical groups demonstrated the gradual trend from hydrophilic to hydrophobic surface during functionalization. XPS evidenced the presence of silanes on the surface after silanization, and even carboxylic groups as products from the oxidation step of the functionalization process. The characterization results permitted us to define an optimal protocol to reach a high-quality grafting yield. The issue of the quality of controlled chemical preparation on bioreceiving surfaces was also investigated by the recognition of one AD biomarker, the amyloid peptide Aβ 1-42. We have therefore evaluated the biological activity of the grafted anti Aβ antibodies onto this silanized surface by fluorescent microscopy. In conclusion, we have shown, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the uniformity of the optimized functionalization on slightly oxidized silicon surfaces, providing a reliable and chemically stable procedure to determine specific biomarkers of Alzheimer disease. This work opens the route to the integration of controlled immune-sensing applications on lab-on-chip systems.

  17. Design and fabrication of non silicon substrate based MEMS energy harvester for arbitrary surface applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balpande, Suresh S.; Pande, Rajesh S.

    2016-04-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) uses MEMS sensor nodes and actuators to sense and control objects through Internet. IOT deploys millions of chemical battery driven sensors at different locations which are not reliable many times because of frequent requirement of charging & battery replacement in case of underground laying, placement at harsh environmental conditions, huge count and difference between demand (24 % per year) and availability (energy density growing rate 8% per year). Energy harvester fabricated on silicon wafers have been widely used in manufacturing MEMS structures. These devices require complex fabrication processes, costly chemicals & clean room. In addition to this silicon wafer based devices are not suitable for curved surfaces like pipes, human bodies, organisms, or other arbitrary surface like clothes, structure surfaces which does not have flat and smooth surface always. Therefore, devices based on rigid silicon wafers are not suitable for these applications. Flexible structures are the key solution for this problems. Energy transduction mechanism generates power from free surrounding vibrations or impact. Sensor nodes application has been purposefully selected due to discrete power requirement at low duty cycle. Such nodes require an average power budget in the range of about 0.1 microwatt to 1 mW over a period of 3-5 seconds. Energy harvester is the best alternate source in contrast with battery for sensor node application. Novel design of Energy Harvester based on cheapest flexible non silicon substrate i.e. cellulose acetate substrate have been modeled, simulated and analyzed on COMSOL multiphysics and fabricated using sol-gel spin coating setup. Single cantilever based harvester generates 60-75 mV peak electric potential at 22Hz frequency and approximately 22 µW power at 1K-Ohm load. Cantilever array can be employed for generating higher voltage by replicating this structure. This work covers design, optimization, fabrication of harvester and

  18. The evolution of the surface morphology of silicon during aqueous etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Theresa Anne

    The morphology of etched silicon surfaces is of great technological importance because silicon is widely used in the production of microelectronics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). In this thesis, I use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a kinetic Monte Carlo etching simulator, and micromachined test patterns to investigate the chemical reactions controlling aqueous etching of silicon. The kinetic dependence of the rate of Si(111) etching in NH4F on [HF] and [OH--] is measured. The etch rate is found to have an approximately first order dependence on [OH--] and essentially no dependence on [HF]. This rate dependence lends support to a proposed mechanism in which the rate-limiting step in NH4F etching of silicon is the oxidation of the surface site, followed by quick removal of the oxidized site by HF. The site-specific rates of isopropanol and ethanol reaction on a Si(111) surface are studied through a combination of kinetic competition with an etchant of known anisotropy and concentration-dependent morphological changes. These rates are quantified by comparing STM images with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of the etched surface. The isopropoxide ion binds to a surface site and slows etching at the bound site. This changes the anisotropy of the etchant. Ethanol induces similar morphological changes. The effect of alcohol pK a is also studied using a micromachined test pattern. Low p Ka halogenated alcohols are also studied. There is a strong correlation between the macroscopic and microscopic etch rate anisotropies of non-halogenated alcohols; however, halogenated alcohols had little effect on the macroscopic etch rate anisotropies. The sensitivity of surface vibrational spectroscopy to surface morphology is also studied. The variation in the lineshape of the Si--H stretch vibration of etched Si(111) surfaces due to atomic-scale etch pits, anisotropic etching, and surface steps is modeled through the use of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The in

  19. Dopant passivation and work function tuning through attachment of heterogeneous organic monolayers on silicon in ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Ashley J.; Keyvanfar, Kian; Deberardinis, Albert; Pu, Lin; Bean, John C.

    2011-05-01

    Electronic structures of silicon-organic interfaces were studied by the scanning Kelvin probe technique. These surfaces were fabricated by covalent bonding of a range of phenylacetylene-based molecules ( p-X-C 6H 4C tbnd CH, where X = CF 3, OCH 3, and H) onto a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface. Organic molecules were bound to the surface under high vacuum conditions by ultraviolet light-induced hydrosilylation. Changes in the electronic structure due to electron-donating ability and dipole moment were analyzed under dark and illuminated conditions. The origin of the silicon band bending was tested to separate the effects of molecular monolayers and unintended dopant passivation. In addition, heterogeneous monolayers were grown by controllably diluting the incoming vapor stream with acetylene during growth. The measured work functions follow a trend linked to dipole moment that can be further tuned by molecular dilution. These results suggest a way to use heterogeneous organic monolayers to tune the electron affinity of silicon and directly alter channel modulation in small semiconductor devices.

  20. Computational Study of Field Initiated Surface Reactions for Synthesis of Diamond and Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, Charles Bruce

    1999-01-01

    This project involves using quantum chemistry to simulate surface chemical reactions in the presence of an electric field for nanofabrication of diamond and silicon. A field delivered by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to a nanometer scale region of a surface affects chemical reaction potential energy surfaces (PES) to direct atomic scale surface modification to fabricate sub-nanometer structures. Our original hypothesis is that the applied voltage polarizes the charge distribution of the valence electrons and that these distorted molecular orbitals can be manipulated with the STM so as to change the relative stabilities of the electronic configurations over the reaction coordinates and thus the topology of the PES and reaction kinetics. Our objective is to investigate the effect of applied bias on surface reactions and the extent to which STM delivered fields can be used to direct surface chemical reactions on an atomic scale on diamond and silicon. To analyze the fundamentals of field induced chemistry and to investigate the application of this technique for the fabrication of nanostructures, we have employed methods capable of accurately describing molecular electronic structure. The methods we employ are density functional theory (DFT) quantum chemical (QC) methods. To determine the effect of applied bias on surface reactions we have calculated the QC PESs in various applied external fields for various reaction steps for depositing or etching diamond and silicon. We have chosen reactions which are thought to play a role in etching and the chemical vapor deposition growth of Si and diamond. The PESs of the elementary reaction steps involved are then calculated under the applied fields, which we vary in magnitude and configuration. We pay special attention to the change in the reaction barriers, and transition state locations, and search for low energy reaction channels which were inaccessible without the applied bias.

  1. Rippled area formed by surface plasmon polaritons upon femtosecond laser double-pulse irradiation of silicon.

    PubMed

    Derrien, Thibault J-Y; Krüger, Jörg; Itina, Tatiana E; Höhm, Sandra; Rosenfeld, Arkadi; Bonse, Jörn

    2013-12-01

    The formation of near-wavelength laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on silicon upon irradiation with sequences of Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser pulse pairs (pulse duration 150 fs, central wavelength 800 nm) is studied theoretically. For this purpose, the nonlinear generation of conduction band electrons in silicon and their relaxation is numerically calculated using a two-temperature model approach including intrapulse changes of optical properties, transport, diffusion and recombination effects. Following the idea that surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) can be excited when the material turns from semiconducting to metallic state, the "SPP active area" is calculated as function of fluence and double-pulse delay up to several picoseconds and compared to the experimentally observed rippled surface areas. Evidence is presented that multi-photon absorption explains the large increase of the rippled area for temporally overlapping pulses. For longer double-pulse delays, relevant relaxation processes are identified. The results demonstrate that femtosecond LIPSS on silicon are caused by the excitation of SPP and can be controlled by temporal pulse shaping. PMID:24514516

  2. Rippled area formed by surface plasmon polaritons upon femtosecond laser double-pulse irradiation of silicon.

    PubMed

    Derrien, Thibault J-Y; Krüger, Jörg; Itina, Tatiana E; Höhm, Sandra; Rosenfeld, Arkadi; Bonse, Jörn

    2013-12-01

    The formation of near-wavelength laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on silicon upon irradiation with sequences of Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser pulse pairs (pulse duration 150 fs, central wavelength 800 nm) is studied theoretically. For this purpose, the nonlinear generation of conduction band electrons in silicon and their relaxation is numerically calculated using a two-temperature model approach including intrapulse changes of optical properties, transport, diffusion and recombination effects. Following the idea that surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) can be excited when the material turns from semiconducting to metallic state, the "SPP active area" is calculated as function of fluence and double-pulse delay up to several picoseconds and compared to the experimentally observed rippled surface areas. Evidence is presented that multi-photon absorption explains the large increase of the rippled area for temporally overlapping pulses. For longer double-pulse delays, relevant relaxation processes are identified. The results demonstrate that femtosecond LIPSS on silicon are caused by the excitation of SPP and can be controlled by temporal pulse shaping.

  3. Cell adhesion response on femtosecond laser initiated liquid assisted silicon surface.

    PubMed

    Ulmeanu, M; Sima, L E; Ursescu, D; Enculescu, M; Bazan, X; Quintana, I

    2014-03-01

    Silicon substrates were irradiated at normal incidence with a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (Quatronix, 90 fs pulse duration, 1 kHz repetition rate, M(2) ~ 1.2, maximum energy peak 350 mJ ) operating at a wavelength of 400 nm and focused via a microscope objective (Newport; UV Objective Model, 37x 0.11 N.A.). The laser scanning was assisted by liquids precursors media such as methanol and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane. By altering the processing parameters, such as incident laser energy, scanning speed, and different irradiation media, various surface structures were produced on areas with 1 mm(2) dimensions. We analyzed the dependence of the surface morphology on laser pulse energy, scanning speed and irradiation media. Well ordered areas are developed without imposing any boundary conditions for the capillary waves that coarsens the ripple pattern. To assess biomaterial-driven cell adhesion response we investigated actin filaments organization and cell morphological changes following growth onto processed silicon substrates. Our study of bone cell progenitor interaction with laser nanoprocessed silicon lines has shown that cells anchor mainly to contact points along the nanostructured surface. Consequently, actin filaments are stretched towards the 15 µm wide parallel lines increasing lateral cell spreading and changing the bipolar shape of mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:24444164

  4. Investigation of surface passivation schemes for p-type monocrystalline silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Momtazur; Udoy, Ariful Banna

    2016-10-01

    This paper represents an experiment to analyze the dark saturation current densities of passivated surfaces for monocrystalline silicon solar cells. The samples are diffused at peak temperatures of 800-950 °C. Basically, symmetrical lifetime samples with different doping profiles are prepared with alkaline textured and saw damage etched (planar) surfaces. After POCl3 diffusion, the phosphorous silicate glass layers are removed in a wet chemical etching step. Several designs are chosen for the determination of the sheet resistance ( R sh), the concentration profile for excess charge carrier and the minority carrier effective lifetime of the diffused surfaces. The dark saturation current densities ( J o ) and the doping profiles are determined accordingly via quasi-steady state photoconductance decay measurement and electrochemical capacitance-voltage measurement. Three different passivation schemes are investigated as follows: silicon nitride (SiN x ) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique, silicon-rich oxynitride (SiriO x N y ) capped with a PECVD SiN x layer, and thin thermally grown oxide, capped with a PECVD SiN x layer.

  5. Cell adhesion response on femtosecond laser initiated liquid assisted silicon surface.

    PubMed

    Ulmeanu, M; Sima, L E; Ursescu, D; Enculescu, M; Bazan, X; Quintana, I

    2014-03-01

    Silicon substrates were irradiated at normal incidence with a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (Quatronix, 90 fs pulse duration, 1 kHz repetition rate, M(2) ~ 1.2, maximum energy peak 350 mJ ) operating at a wavelength of 400 nm and focused via a microscope objective (Newport; UV Objective Model, 37x 0.11 N.A.). The laser scanning was assisted by liquids precursors media such as methanol and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane. By altering the processing parameters, such as incident laser energy, scanning speed, and different irradiation media, various surface structures were produced on areas with 1 mm(2) dimensions. We analyzed the dependence of the surface morphology on laser pulse energy, scanning speed and irradiation media. Well ordered areas are developed without imposing any boundary conditions for the capillary waves that coarsens the ripple pattern. To assess biomaterial-driven cell adhesion response we investigated actin filaments organization and cell morphological changes following growth onto processed silicon substrates. Our study of bone cell progenitor interaction with laser nanoprocessed silicon lines has shown that cells anchor mainly to contact points along the nanostructured surface. Consequently, actin filaments are stretched towards the 15 µm wide parallel lines increasing lateral cell spreading and changing the bipolar shape of mesenchymal stem cells.

  6. Surface Engineering of Silicon and Carbon by Pulsed-Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, J.D.; Geohegan, D.B.; Jellison, G.E., Jr.; Lowndes, D.H.; Merkulov, V.I.; Pedraza, A.J.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1999-02-28

    Experiments are described in which a focused pulsed-excimer laser beam is used either to ablate a graphite target and deposit hydrogen-free amorphous carbon films, or to directly texture a silicon surface and produce arrays of high-aspect-ratio silicon microcolumns. In the first case, diamond-like carbon (or tetrahedral amorphous carbon, ta-C) films were deposited with the experimental conditions selected so that the masses and kinetic energies of incident carbon species were reasonably well controlled. Striking systematic changes in ta-C film properties were found. The sp{sup 3}-bonded carbon fraction, the valence electron density, and the optical (Tauc) energy gap ail reach their maximum values in films deposited at a carbon ion kinetic energy of {approximately}90 eV. Tapping-mode atomic force microscope measurements also reveal that films deposited at 90 eV are extremely smooth (rms roughness {approximately}1 {angstrom} over several hundred nm) and relatively free of particulate, while the surface roughness increases in films deposited at significantly lower energies. In the second set of experiments, dense arrays of high-aspect-ratio silicon microcolumns {approximately}20-40 {micro}m tall and {approximately}2 {micro}m in diameter were formed by cumulative nanosecond pulsed excimer laser irradiation of silicon wafers in air and other oxygen-containing atmospheres. It is proposed that microcolumn growth occurs through a combination of pulsed-laser melting of the tips of the columns and preferential redeposition of silicon on the molten tips from the ablated flux of silicon-rich vapor. The common theme in this research is that a focused pulsed-laser beam can be used quite generally to create an energetic flux, either the energetic carbon ions needed to form sp{sup 3} (diamond-like) bonds or the overpressure of silicon-rich species needed for microcolumn growth. Thus, new materials synthesis opportunities result from the access to nonequilibrium growth conditions

  7. Surface Strength of Silicon Nitride in Relation to Rolling Contact Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Hadfield, M.; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2009-01-01

    Silicon nitride material has been traditionally used as bearing material due to its superior performance against bearing steel. Its successful application as a bearing element has led to the development of rolling contact applications in turbomachinery and automotive industries. In the case of latter, this is especially true for the engine manufacturing industry where its excellent rolling contact performance can make significant savings on warranty cost for engine manufactures. In spite of these advantages, the remaining limitation for their broader application is the high component machining cost. Further understanding of rolling contact performance of silicon nitride in relation to its surface integrity will enable engine manufacturers to produce components that meet the design requirements while at the same time reduce the machining cost. In the present study, the relationship between the C-sphere strength of a silicon nitride and its rolling contact fatigue life is investigated. The C-sphere test is used here to compare the strengths of three batches of sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN) specimens with different subsurface quality induced by variation of machining parameters. In parallel, the rolling contact fatigue (RCF) performance of those machining conditions is studied on a modified four-ball tester. The results show that the most aggressively machined specimens have the weakest C-sphere strength and the shortest RCF life. This positive relationship can give component manufacturers a valuable reference when they make selections of candidate material and finishing standards.

  8. Preparation of rich handles soft cellulosic fabric using amino silicone based softener. Part-I: Surface smoothness and softness properties.

    PubMed

    Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Tabassum, Shazia; Barkaat-ul-Hasin, Syed; Zuber, Mohammad; Jamil, Tahir; Jamal, Muhammad Asghar

    2011-04-01

    A series of amino silicone based softeners with different emulsifiers were prepared and adsorbed onto the surfaces of cotton and blends of cotton/polyester fabrics. Factors affecting the performance properties of the finished substrate such as post-treatment with amino functional silicone based softener varying different emulsifiers in their formulations and its concentration on different processed fabrics were studied. Fixation of the amino-functional silicone softener onto/or within the cellulose structure is accompanied by the formation of semi-inter-penetrated network structure thereby enhancing both the extent of crosslinking and networking as well as providing very high softness. The results of the experiments indicate that the amino silicone can form a hydrophobic film on both cotton and blends of cotton/polyester fabrics and its coating reduces the surface roughness significantly. Furthermore, the roughness becomes lesser with an increase in the applied strength of amino silicone based softener. PMID:21255604

  9. Preablation electron and lattice dynamics on the silicon surface excited by a femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I. Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.

    2015-11-15

    The study of the time-resolved optical reflection from the silicon surface excited by single femtosecond laser pulses below and near the melting threshold reveals fast (less than 10 ps) Auger recombination of a photogenerated electron–hole plasma with simultaneous energy transfer to the lattice. The acoustic relaxation of the excited surface layer indicates (according to reported data) a characteristic depth of 150 nm of the introduction of the laser radiation energy, which is related to direct linear laser radiation absorption in the photoexcited material due to a decrease in the energy bandgap. The surface temperature, which is probed at a time delay of about 100 ps from the reflection thermomodulation of probe radiation and the integrated continuous thermal emission from the surface, increases with the laser fluence and, thus, favors a nonlinear increase in the fluorescence of sublimated silicon atoms. The surface temperature estimated near the picosecond melting threshold demonstrates a substantial (20%) overheating of the material with respect to the equilibrium melting temperature. Above the melting threshold, the delay of formation of the material melt decreases rapidly (from several tens of picoseconds to several fractions of a picosecond) when the laser fluence and, correspondingly, the surface temperature increase. In the times of acoustic relaxation of the absorbing layer and even later, the time modulation of the optical reflectivity of the material demonstrates acoustic reverberations with an increasing period, which are related to the formation of melt nuclei in the material.

  10. Guided Cell Patterning On Gold-Silicon Dioxide Substrates by Surface Molecular Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Veiseh, Mandana; Wickes, Bronwyn; Castner, David G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2004-07-01

    We report an effective approach to patterning cells on a gold-silicon substrate with high precision, selectivity, stability, and reproducibility. This technique is based on photolithography and surface molecular engineering and does not involve a cell positioning or delivery device, thus reducing potential damage to cells. Cell patterning is achieved by activating the gold regions with functionalized thiols that covalently bind proteins to guide the subsequent cell adhesion and passivating the silicon regions with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to resist cell adhesion. Time-of-light secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), a powerful surface chemical state imaging technique that allows simultaneous chemical and spatial characterization, was used to characterize the chemistry of the cell-adhesive and cell-resistant regions of the surface at key stages in the device fabrication. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy was used to verify the immobilization of proteins on model surfaces. Proteins were tagged with Rhodamine fluorescent probes to characterize patterned surfaces by fluorescence microscopy. Finally, the ability of the engineered surfaces to guide cell adhesion was illustrated by differential interference contrast (DIC) reflectance microscopy. The cell patterning technique introduced in this study is compatible with micro- and photo- electronics, and may have numerous medical, environmental, and defense applications.

  11. Uniform and selective CVD growth of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres on arbitrarily microstructured silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, A. J.; Boskovic, B. O.; Chuang, A. T. H.; Golovko, V. B.; Robertson, J.; Johnson, B. F. G.; Slocum, A. H.

    2006-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibres (CNFs) are grown on bulk-micromachined silicon surfaces by thermal and plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), with catalyst deposition by electron beam evaporation or from a colloidal solution of cobalt nanoparticles. Growth on the peaked topography of plasma-etched silicon 'micrograss' supports, as well as on sidewalls of vertical structures fabricated by deep-reactive ion etching demonstrates the performance of thermal CVD and PECVD in limiting cases of surface topography. In thermal CVD, uniform films of tangled single-walled CNTs (SWNTs) coat the structures despite oblique-angle effects on the thickness of the catalyst layers deposited by e-beam evaporation. In PECVD, forests of aligned CNFs protrude from areas which are favourably wet by the colloidal catalyst, demonstrating selective growth based on surface texture. These surface preparation principles can be used to grow a wide variety of nanostructures on microstructured surfaces having arbitrary topography, giving substrates with hierarchical microscale and nanoscale surface textures. Such substrates could be used to study cell and neuronal growth, influence liquid-solid wetting behaviour, and as functional elements in microelectronic and micromechanical devices.

  12. Influence of intermediate layers on the surface condition of laser crystallized silicon thin films and solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höger, Ingmar; Himmerlich, Marcel; Gawlik, Annett; Brückner, Uwe; Krischok, Stefan; Andrä, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The intermediate layer (IL) between glass substrate and silicon plays a significant role in the optimization of multicrystalline liquid phase crystallized silicon thin film solar cells on glass. This study deals with the influence of the IL on the surface condition and the required chemical surface treatment of the crystallized silicon (mc-Si), which is of particular interest for a-Si:H heterojunction thin film solar cells. Two types of IL were investigated: sputtered silicon nitride (SiN) and a layer stack consisting of silicon nitride and silicon oxide (SiN/SiO). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements revealed the formation of silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy) or silicon oxide (SiO2) layers at the surface of the mc-Si after liquid phase crystallization on SiN or SiN/SiO, respectively. We propose that SiOxNy formation is governed by dissolving nitrogen from the SiN layer in the silicon melt, which segregates at the crystallization front during crystallization. This process is successfully hindered, when additional SiO layers are introduced into the IL. In order to achieve solar cell open circuit voltages above 500 mV, a removal of the formed SiOxNy top layer is required using sophisticated cleaning of the crystallized silicon prior to a-Si:H deposition. However, solar cells crystallized on SiN/SiO yield high open circuit voltage even when a simple wet chemical surface treatment is applied. The implementation of SiN/SiO intermediate layers facilitates the production of mesa type solar cells with open circuit voltages above 600 mV and a power conversion efficiency of 10%.

  13. A multimodal optical and electrochemical device for monitoring surface reactions: redox active surfaces in porous silicon Rugate filters.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, Simone; Guan, Bin; Darwish, Nadim A; Zhu, Ying; Reece, Peter J; Gooding, J Justin

    2012-12-21

    Herein, mesoporous silicon (PSi) is configured as a single sensing device that has dual readouts; as a photonic crystal sensor in a Rugate filter configuration, and as a high surface area porous electrode. The as-prepared PSi is chemically modified to provide it with stability in aqueous media and to allow for the subsequent coupling of chemical species, such as via Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions between 1-alkynes and azides ("click" reactions). The utility of the bimodal capabilities of the PSi sensor for monitoring surface coupling procedures is demonstrated by the covalent coupling of a ferrocene derivative, as well as by demonstrating ligand-exchange reactions (LER) at the PSi surface. Both types of reactions were monitored through optical reflectivity measurements, as well as electrochemically via the oxidation/reduction of the surface tethered redox species.

  14. Fabrication of wear-resistant silicon microprobe tips for high-speed surface roughness scanning devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Yu, Feng; Doering, Lutz; Völlmeke, Stefan; Brand, Uwe; Bakin, Andrey; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2015-05-01

    Silicon microprobe tips are fabricated and integrated with piezoresistive cantilever sensors for high-speed surface roughness scanning systems. The fabrication steps of the high-aspect-ratio silicon microprobe tips were started with photolithography and wet etching of potassium hydroxide (KOH) resulting in crystal-dependent micropyramids. Subsequently, thin conformal wear-resistant layer coating of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) was demonstrated on the backside of the piezoresistive cantilever free end using atomic layer deposition (ALD) method in a binary reaction sequence with a low thermal process and precursors of trimethyl aluminum and water. The deposited Al2O3 layer had a thickness of 14 nm. The captured atomic force microscopy (AFM) image exhibits a root mean square deviation of 0.65 nm confirming the deposited Al2O3 surface quality. Furthermore, vacuum-evaporated 30-nm/200-nm-thick Au/Cr layers were patterned by lift-off and served as an etch mask for Al2O3 wet etching and in ICP cryogenic dry etching. By using SF6/O2 plasma during inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic dry etching, micropillar tips were obtained. From the preliminary friction and wear data, the developed silicon cantilever sensor has been successfully used in 100 fast measurements of 5- mm-long standard artifact surface with a speed of 15 mm/s and forces of 60-100 μN. Moreover, the results yielded by the fabricated silicon cantilever sensor are in very good agreement with those of calibrated profilometer. These tactile sensors are targeted for use in high-aspect-ratio microform metrology.

  15. Temperature Dependence of Lateral Charge Transport in Silicon Nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weiwei; Scott, Shelley; Jacobson, Rb; Sookchoo, Pornsatit; Savage, Donald; Eriksson, Mark; Lagally, Max

    2014-03-01

    Thin sheets of single-crystal silicon (nanomembranes), electrically isolated from a bulk substrate by a dielectric layer, are an exceptional tool for studying the electronic transport properties of surfaces in the absence of an extended bulk. Under UHV, we measure the conductivity, and a back gate allows us to look into the depletion region, where we can determine the minimum conductance. For hydrogen-terminated Si(001) NMs, for which the surface has no conductivity, the minimum conductance decreases with decreasing NM thickness (220-42nm), demonstrating the reduction in carriers for thinner NMs. For the clean Si(2 ×1)surface, mobile charge exists in the π* surface band. For thicknesses below 200nm surface conduction dominates, rendering the thickness independence of the minimum. We determine a surface charge mobility of ~50cm2V-1s-1. We have measured the temperature dependence of the conductance of a 42nm thick HF treated SiNM. The results show that the Fermi level is pinned 0.21 +/- 0 . 01 eV below the conduction band minimum, in agreement with XPS results. Supported by DOE.

  16. Organic molecules on silicon surface: A way to tune metal dependent Schottky barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinal, M. K.

    2016-09-01

    Effect of covalently bonded organic molecules on p-type Si surfaces, in controlling the performance of metal-silicon Schottky junctions, is studied. Monolayers of 1-dodecyne were formed on hydrated surfaces of p-type Si ((100) orientation) using weak Lewis acid. The chemical modification results in highly homogeneous surfaces. Gold-Si and Aluminum-Si junctions were prepared, both, on modified and unmodified Si surfaces, and I-V characteristics were studied. The results have been interpreted in terms of energy band diagrams. It is demonstrated that the molecular monolayer of 1-dodecyne is effective in controlling the surface states leading to unpinning of the Fermi level and junction responding to the work function of the metal, as expected from theoretical considerations. The simple method presented provides a unique technique to tune the electrical properties of devices with metal-semiconductor interfaces.

  17. Temporal evolution of a silicon surface subject to low energy ion irradiation and concurrent sample rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Tanmoy; Pearson, Daniel A.; Bradley, R. Mark; Som, Tapobrata

    2016-08-01

    We study the temporal evolution of silicon surfaces subject to low energy Ar+-ion bombardment and concurrent sample rotation. Systematic experiments are carried out in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. It is observed that an experiment which produces an anisotropic surface without sample rotation produces a statistically isotropic surface with a smaller surface roughness if the sample is rotated at a sufficiently high angular speed. Interrupted coarsening of the nanoscale mounds on the surface at long times t is observed without concurrent deposition of metal impurities for the first time. We find that the characteristic lateral size and height of the mounds increase as t 1 / 2 and t, respectively. Both our experiments and simulations show that azimuthally rotating ripples form at a sufficiently small rotational speeds, as predicted two decades ago. Finally, predictions from theories on rotating samples subject to ion bombardment are tested.

  18. Band engineering of amorphous silicon ruthenium thin film and its near-infrared absorption enhancement combined with nano-holes pattern on back surface of silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Anran; Zhong, Hao; Li, Wei; Gu, Deen; Jiang, Xiangdong; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-10-01

    Silicon is widely used in semiconductor industry but has poor performance in near-infrared photoelectronic devices because of its bandgap limit. In this study, a narrow bandgap silicon rich semiconductor is achieved by introducing ruthenium (Ru) into amorphous silicon (a-Si) to form amorphous silicon ruthenium (a-Si1-xRux) thin films through co-sputtering. The increase of Ru concentration leads to an enhancement of light absorption and a narrower bandgap. Meanwhile, a specific light trapping technique is employed to realize high absorption of a-Si1-xRux thin film in a finite thickness to avoid unnecessary carrier recombination. A double-layer absorber comprising of a-Si1-xRux thin film and silicon random nano-holes layer is formed on the back surface of silicon substrates, and significantly improves near-infrared absorption while the leaky light intensity is less than 5%. This novel absorber, combining narrow bandgap thin film with light trapping structure, may have a potential application in near-infrared photoelectronic devices.

  19. Surface modification of silicone medical materials by plasma-based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Yokota, Toshihiko; Kato, Rui; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Iwaki, Masaya; Terai, Takayuki; Takahashi, Noriyoshi; Miyasato, Tomonori; Ujiie, Hiroshi

    2007-04-01

    Silicone (polydimethylsiloxane) sheets and tubes for medical use were irradiated with inert gas ions using plasma-based ion implantation (PBII). The affinity of the surface with tissue examined by an animal test was improved by the irradiation at optimal conditions. The cell attachment percentage increased at an applied voltage of less than -7.5 kV; however, it decreased at higher voltage. The specimens irradiated at higher voltages were more hydrophobic than unirradiated specimens. The surface became rough with increasing voltage and textures, and small domains appeared. This effect was caused by different etching speeds in the amorphous and crystalline areas.

  20. Subnanosecond-laser-induced periodic surface structures on prescratched silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Motoharu; Matsuo, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were fabricated on a prescratched silicon surface by irradiation with subnanosecond laser pulses. Low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL) were observed in the central and peripheral regions; both had a period Λ close to the laser wavelength λ, and the wavevector orientation was parallel to the electric field of the laser beam. The LSFL in the peripheral region seemed to be growing, that is, expanding in length with increasing number of pulses, into the outer regions. In addition, high-spatial-frequency LIPSS, Λ ≲ λ /2, were found along the scratches, and their wavevector orientation was parallel to the scratches.

  1. Ultrasmooth growth of amorphous silicon films through ion-induced long-range surface correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo-Cubero, A.; Gago, R.; Vazquez, L.

    2011-01-03

    Ultrasmooth amorphous silicon films with a constant roughness below 0.2 nm were produced for film thickness up to {approx}1 {mu}m by magnetron sputtering under negative voltage substrate biasing (100-400 V). In contrast, under unbiased conditions the roughness of the resulting mounded films increased linearly with growth time due to shadowing effects. A detailed analysis of the amorphous film growth dynamics proves that the bias-induced ultrasmoothness is produced by a downhill mass transport process that leads to an extreme surface leveling inducing surface height correlations up to lateral distances close to 0.5 {mu}m.

  2. Silver nanoparticles deposited on porous silicon as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrate.

    PubMed

    Zeiri, Leila; Rechav, Katya; Porat, Ze'ev; Zeiri, Yehuda

    2012-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles were deposited spontaneously from their aqueous solution on a porous silicon (PS) layer. The PS acts both as a reducing agent and as the substrate on which the nanoparticles nucleate. At higher silver ion concentrations, layers of nanoparticle aggregates were formed on the PS surface. The morphology of the metallic layers and their SERS activity were influenced by the concentrations of the silver ion solutions used for deposition. Raman measurements of rhodamine 6G (R6G) and crystal violet (CV) adsorbed on these surfaces showed remarkable enhancement of up to about 10 orders of magnitude.

  3. Enhanced photothermal effect of surface oxidized silicon nanocrystals anchored to reduced graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshani, Parichehr; Moussa, Sherif; Atkinson, Garrett; Kisurin, Vitaly Y.; Samy El-Shall, M.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of the photothermal effects of silicon nanocrystals and graphene oxide (GO) dispersed in water. Using laser irradiation (532 nm or 355 nm) of suspended Si nanocrystals in an aqueous solution of GO, the synthesis of surface oxidized Si-reduced GO nanocomposites (SiOx/Si-RGO) is reported. The laser reduction of GO is accompanied by surface oxidation of the Si nanocrystals resulting in the formation of the SiOx/Si-RGO nanocomposites. The SiOx/Si-RGO nanocomposites are proposed as promising materials for photothermal therapy and for the efficient conversion of solar energy into usable heat for a variety of thermal and thermomechanical applications.

  4. Self-organizing microstructures orientation control in femtosecond laser patterning on silicon surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengjun; Jiang, Lan; Hu, Jie; Zhang, Shuai; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-07-14

    Self-organizing rippled microstructures are induced on silicon surface by linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulses. At a near threshold fluence, it is observed that ripple orientation is co-determined by the laser polarization direction and laser scanning parameters (scanning direction and scanning speed) in surface patterning process. Under fixed laser polarization, the ripple orientation can be controlled to rotate by about 40° through changing laser scanning parameters. In addition, it is also observed that the ripple morphology is sensitive to the laser scanning direction, and it is an optimal choice to obtain ordered ripple structures when the angle between laser scanning and laser polarization is less than 45°.

  5. Electronic detection of surface plasmon polaritons by metal-oxide-silicon capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peale, Robert E.; Smith, Evan; Smith, Christian W.; Khalilzadeh-Rezaie, Farnood; Ishigami, Masa; Nader, Nima; Vangala, Shiva; Cleary, Justin W.

    2016-09-01

    An electronic detector of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is reported. SPPs optically excited on a metal surface using a prism coupler are detected by using a close-coupled metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor. Incidence-angle dependence is explained by Fresnel transmittance calculations, which also are used to investigate the dependence of photo-response on structure dimensions. Electrodynamic simulations agree with theory and experiment and additionally provide spatial intensity distributions on and off the SPP excitation resonance. Experimental dependence of the photoresponse on substrate carrier type, carrier concentration, and back-contact biasing is qualitatively explained by simple theory of MOS capacitors.

  6. Model for oxygen recombination on silicon-dioxide surfaces. II - Implications toward reentry heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jumper, E. J.; Seward, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the model for recombination of oxygen on a silicon-dioxide surface presented in detail in a previous paper. New data supporting the model is also presented. The ramifications of the model toward the production of excited molecular oxygen is examined as it pertains to surface heating. A reentry simulation is given and compared to STS-2 reentry data, and conclusions are drawn as to the implications of the recombination model toward reentry heating. A possible buffering of the heating above a critical temperature associated with the physics of the model is also discussed.

  7. Uniform-sized silicone oil microemulsions: preparation, investigation of stability and deposition on hair surface.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Habiba; Lv, Piping; Wang, Lianyan; Lian, Guoping; Zhu, Shiping; Ma, Guanghui

    2011-12-01

    Emulsions are commonly used in foods, pharmaceuticals and home-personal-care products. For emulsion based products, it is highly desirable to control the droplet size distribution to improve storage stability, appearance and in-use property. We report preparation of uniform-sized silicone oil microemulsions with different droplets diameters (1.4-40.0 μm) using SPG membrane emulsification technique. These microemulsions were then added into model shampoos and conditioners to investigate the effects of size, uniformity, and storage stability on silicone oil deposition on hair surface. We observed much improved storage stability of uniform-sized microemulsions when the droplets diameter was ≤22.7 μm. The uniform-sized microemulsion of 40.0 μm was less stable but still more stable than non-uniform sized microemulsions prepared by conventional homogenizer. The results clearly indicated that uniform-sized droplets enhanced the deposition of silicone oil on hair and deposition increased with decreasing droplet size. Hair switches washed with small uniform-sized droplets had lower values of coefficient of friction compared with those washed with larger uniform and non-uniform droplets. Moreover the addition of alginate thickener in the shampoos and conditioners further enhanced the deposition of silicone oil on hair. The good correlation between silicone oil droplets stability, deposition on hair and resultant friction of hair support that droplet size and uniformity are important factors for controlling the stability and deposition property of emulsion based products such as shampoo and conditioner. PMID:21920528

  8. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Silicon Nanocrystals in a Silica Film

    PubMed Central

    Novikov, Sergei; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an intriguing effect, efficiency of which depends on many factors and whose applicability to a given system is not obvious before the experiment. The motivation of the present work is to demonstrate the SERS effect on silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) embedded in silica, the material of high technological importance. Using the Ag overlayer method, we have found the SERS effect for this material. The best result is obtained for Ag layers of a weight thickness of 12 nm, whose surface plasmons are in a resonance with the laser wavelength (488 nm). The enhancement obtained for the Raman signal from 3–4-nm Si-nc in a 40-nm SiOx film is above 100. The SERS effect is about twice stronger for ultra-small Si-nc (~1 nm) and/or disordered silicon compared to Si-nc with sizes of 3–4 nm. The SERS measurements with an Ag overlayer allow detecting silicon crystallization for ultra-thin SiOx films and/or for very low Si excess and suppress the Raman signal from the substrate and the photoluminescence of the film. PMID:27256615

  9. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Silicon Nanocrystals in a Silica Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Sergei; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2016-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an intriguing effect, efficiency of which depends on many factors and whose applicability to a given system is not obvious before the experiment. The motivation of the present work is to demonstrate the SERS effect on silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) embedded in silica, the material of high technological importance. Using the Ag overlayer method, we have found the SERS effect for this material. The best result is obtained for Ag layers of a weight thickness of 12 nm, whose surface plasmons are in a resonance with the laser wavelength (488 nm). The enhancement obtained for the Raman signal from 3–4-nm Si-nc in a 40-nm SiOx film is above 100. The SERS effect is about twice stronger for ultra-small Si-nc (~1 nm) and/or disordered silicon compared to Si-nc with sizes of 3–4 nm. The SERS measurements with an Ag overlayer allow detecting silicon crystallization for ultra-thin SiOx films and/or for very low Si excess and suppress the Raman signal from the substrate and the photoluminescence of the film.

  10. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Silicon Nanocrystals in a Silica Film.

    PubMed

    Novikov, Sergei; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an intriguing effect, efficiency of which depends on many factors and whose applicability to a given system is not obvious before the experiment. The motivation of the present work is to demonstrate the SERS effect on silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) embedded in silica, the material of high technological importance. Using the Ag overlayer method, we have found the SERS effect for this material. The best result is obtained for Ag layers of a weight thickness of 12 nm, whose surface plasmons are in a resonance with the laser wavelength (488 nm). The enhancement obtained for the Raman signal from 3-4-nm Si-nc in a 40-nm SiOx film is above 100. The SERS effect is about twice stronger for ultra-small Si-nc (~1 nm) and/or disordered silicon compared to Si-nc with sizes of 3-4 nm. The SERS measurements with an Ag overlayer allow detecting silicon crystallization for ultra-thin SiOx films and/or for very low Si excess and suppress the Raman signal from the substrate and the photoluminescence of the film. PMID:27256615

  11. High-Accuracy Surface Figure Measurement of Silicon Mirrors at 80 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Peter; Mink, Ronald G.; Chambers, John; Davila, Pamela; Robinson, F. David

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the equipment, experimental methods, and first results at a new facility for interferometric measurement of cryogenically-cooled spherical mirrors at the Goddard Space Flight Center Optics Branch. The procedure, using standard phase-shifting interferometry, has an standard combined uncertainty of 3.6 nm rms in its representation of the two-dimensional surface figure error at 80, and an uncertainty of plus or minus 1 nm in the rms statistic itself. The first mirror tested was a concave spherical silicon foam-core mirror, with a clear aperture of 120 mm. The optic surface was measured at room temperature using standard absolute techniques; and then the change in surface figure error from room temperature to 80 K was measured. The mirror was cooled within a cryostat. and its surface figure error measured through a fused-silica window. The facility and techniques will be used to measure the surface figure error at 20K of prototype lightweight silicon carbide and Cesic mirrors developed by Galileo Avionica (Italy) for the European Space Agency (ESA).

  12. Modeling of Transmittance Degradation Caused by Optical Surface Contamination by Atomic Oxygen Reaction with Adsorbed Silicones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Aaron; Banks, Bruce; Miller, Sharon; Stueber, Thomas; Sechkar, Edward

    2001-01-01

    A numerical procedure is presented to calculate transmittance degradation caused by contaminant films on spacecraft surfaces produced through the interaction of orbital atomic oxygen (AO) with volatile silicones and hydrocarbons from spacecraft components. In the model, contaminant accretion is dependent on the adsorption of species, depletion reactions due to gas-surface collisions, desorption, and surface reactions between AO and silicone producing SiO(x), (where x is near 2). A detailed description of the procedure used to calculate the constituents of the contaminant layer is presented, including the equations that govern the evolution of fractional coverage by specie type. As an illustrative example of film growth, calculation results using a prototype code that calculates the evolution of surface coverage by specie type is presented and discussed. An example of the transmittance degradation caused by surface interaction of AO with deposited contaminant is presented for the case of exponentially decaying contaminant flux. These examples are performed using hypothetical values for the process parameters.

  13. Surface composition analysis of HF vapour cleaned silicon by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolieff, A.; Martin, F.; Amouroux, A.; Marthon, S.; Westendorp, J. F. M.

    1991-06-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements on silicon surfaces treated by HF gaseous cleaning are described. Various cleaning recipes, which essentially differ by the amount of water present during the reaction were studied; the composition of the silicon surface was measured in terms of monolayer coverage of oxygen, fluorine and carbon. These gaseous cleaned surfaces are compared with those of commonly deglazed silicon samples by using an aqueous HF bath. The F(1s), O(1s), Si(2p), C(1s) photoelectron lines were monitored, and concentrations determined as usual by integration of the lines after removal of the non-linear backgroune. The F(1s), C(1s) and Si(2p) lines were decomposed into several components corresponding to different chemical bonds. The results show that the amount of fluorine is directly correlated with the amount of oxygen: the higher the oxygen level on the sample, the more important is the fluorine content till 0.7 ML, essentially in a O sbnd Si sbnd F bonding state. For more aggresive etching leaving less than one monolayer of oxygen, the Si sbnd F bond becomes predominant. The ratio of the SiF to OSiF concentrations is a significant signature of the deoxidation state of the surface. Hydrophobicity of the water appears in the range of 25% Si sbnd F bonds. With very aggresive etching processes, 67% Si sbnd F bonds and 33% O sbnd Si sbnd F bonds are reached and the total amount of fluoride drops below 0.3 ML. For comparison, only Si sbnd F bonds are observed after a wet etching in a dilute HF bath without a rinse with a much lower fluorine concentration. The balance between Si sbnd F and O sbnd Si sbnd F remains stable and seems to be representative of the surface states provided by the etching process.

  14. Silicon Wafer Surface-Temperature Monitoring System for Plasma Etching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Ishii, J.; Nakaoka, A.; Mizojiri, Y.

    2011-08-01

    A thermoreflectance temperature measuring system was developed with the aim to realize monitoring of the silicon wafer surface temperature during plasma etching. The thermoreflectance detects variations in temperature through changes in optical reflectance. To overcome such difficulties as low sensitivity and limitation in installation space and position for in situ measurements, the differential thermoreflectance utilizing two orthogonal polarizations was introduced. Noise such as fluctuations in the incident beam intensity or changes of loss in the optical path would affect both polarizations equally and would not affect the measurement. The large angle of incidence of the beam allows measurement to be performed from outside the viewing ports of existing plasma etching process chambers through the gap between the plasma electrode and the silicon wafer. In this article, an off-line measurement result is presented, with results for bare wafers as well as for wafers with metal depositions. A prototype system developed for tests in plasma etching facilities in a production line is described.

  15. Surface code architecture for donors and dots in silicon with imprecise and nonuniform qubit couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pica, G.; Lovett, B. W.; Bhatt, R. N.; Schenkel, T.; Lyon, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    A scaled quantum computer with donor spins in silicon would benefit from a viable semiconductor framework and a strong inherent decoupling of the qubits from the noisy environment. Coupling neighboring spins via the natural exchange interaction according to current designs requires gate control structures with extremely small length scales. We present a silicon architecture where bismuth donors with long coherence times are coupled to electrons that can shuttle between adjacent quantum dots, thus relaxing the pitch requirements and allowing space between donors for classical control devices. An adiabatic SWAP operation within each donor/dot pair solves the scalability issues intrinsic to exchange-based two-qubit gates, as it does not rely on subnanometer precision in donor placement and is robust against noise in the control fields. We use this SWAP together with well established global microwave Rabi pulses and parallel electron shuttling to construct a surface code that needs minimal, feasible local control.

  16. Hexagonal arrays of round-head silicon nanopillars for surface anti-reflection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wensheng; Dottermusch, Stephan; Reitz, Christian; Richards, Bryce S.

    2016-10-01

    We designed and fabricated an anti-reflection surface of hexagonal arrays of round-head silicon nanopillars. The measurements show a significant reduction in reflectivity across a broad spectral range. However, we then grew a conformal titanium dioxide coating via atomic layer deposition to achieve an extremely low weighted average reflection of 2.1% over the 460-1040 nm wavelength range. To understand the underlying reasons for the reduced reflectance, the simulations were conducted and showed that it is due to strong forward scattering of incident light into the silicon substrate. The calculated normalized scattering cross section demonstrates a broadband distribution feature, and the peak has a red-shift to longer wavelengths. Finally, we report two-dimensional weighted average reflectance as a function of both wavelength and angle of incidence and present the resulting analysis contour map.

  17. Rear surface spallation on single-crystal silicon in nanosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jun; Orlov, Sergei S.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2005-05-01

    Rear surface spallation of single-crystal silicon under 5-ns laser pulse ablation at intensities of 0.6-60GW/cm2 is studied through postablation examination of the ablated samples. The spallation threshold energy and the spallation depth's dependences on the energy and target thickness are measured. From the linear relation between the spallation threshold energy and the target thickness, an estimation of the material spall strength around 1.4GPa is obtained, in reasonable agreement with the spall strength estimation of 0.8-1.2GPa at a strain rate of 107s-1 using Grady's model for brittle materials. The experiment reveals the internal fracturing process over an extended zone in silicon, which is controlled by the competition between the shock pressure load and the laser ablation rate. The qualities of the laser microstructuring and micromachining results are greatly improved by using an acoustic impedance matching approach.

  18. Extraction of the surface recombination velocity of passivated phosphorus-doped silicon emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Cuevas, A.; Giroult-Matlakowski, G.; DuBols, C.; Basore, P.A.; King, R.R.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical procedure to extract the surface recombination velocity of the SiO{sub 2}/n type silicon interface, S{sub p}, from PCD measurements of emitter recombination currents is described. The analysis shows that the extracted values of S{sub p} are significantly affected by the assumed material parameters for highly doped silicon, t{sub p}, {mu}{sub p} and {Delta}E{sub g}{sup app}. Updated values for these parameters are used to obtain the dependence of S{sub p} on the phosphorus concentration, N{sub D}, using both previous and new experimental data. The new evidence supports the finding that S{sub p} increases strongly with N{sub D}.

  19. Vibrational Spectroscopic Studies of Adsorbates on Metal and Silicon Single Crystal Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Andrew B.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The design of an experiment to investigate the surface chemistry of silicon, with specific application to the study of intermediates formed during the chemical vapour deposition of silicon from silane homologues was considered in a theoretical manner using classical optical techniques, and experimental verification of the ability to detect multilayers of physically adsorbed species was performed. Both reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy and transmission infrared spectroscopy were investigated. Some of the steps involved in the cleaning of a silicon wafer were investigated. Chemical etching of the wafers was simulated using hydrofluoric acid solutions and hydrogen peroxide/sulphuric acid rinses and monitored using transmission infrared spectroscopy. Thermal annealing and argon ion sputter etching were investigated using transmission infrared spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. The adsorption of disilane, Si_{z}H_{rm e} on Si(100) was investigated at a variety of temperatures. Contamination was demonstrated to be significant in the passivation of the surface to a point where little reactivity could be observed at room temperature. Physical adsorption was seen to occur in a dynamic pressure of disilane at ca. 130K. The adsorption of disilane at temperatures ranging from 100K to 300K was investigated on Ru(0001). At low temperatures, disilane was seen to adsorb molecularly at 100K, with partial decomposition in the first layer. Annealing to higher temperatures and adsorption at 160K was seen to produce adsorbed SiH_{n } (n = 1-3), which desorbed above 270K. At room temperature, disilane adsorbed dissociatively to form an SiH species which formed a variety of structures at increasing coverage, evidenced by complex LEED patterns. At higher temperatures, the adsorbed silicon reacted with the ruthenium crystal to form a ruthenium silicide as an incommensurate

  20. Ionized dopant concentrations at the heavily doped surface of a silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Broder, J. D.; Mazaris, G. A., Jr.; Hsu, L.

    1978-01-01

    Data are combined with concentrations obtained by a bulk measurement method using successive layer removal with measurements of Hall effect and resistivity. From the MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) measurements it is found that the ionized dopant concentration N has the value (1.4 + or - 0.1) x 10 to the 20th power/cu cm at distances between 100 and 220 nm from the n(+) surface. The bulk measurement technique yields average values of N over layers whose thickness is 2000 nm. Results show that, at the higher concentrations encountered at the n(+) surface, the MOS C-V technique, when combined with a bulk measurement method, can be used to evaluate the effects of materials preparation methodologies on the surface and near surface concentrations of silicon cells.

  1. Thermoplastic deformation of silicon surfaces induced by ultrashort pulsed lasers in submelting conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsibidis, G. D.; Stratakis, E.; Aifantis, K. E.

    2012-03-01

    A hybrid theoretical model is presented to describe thermoplastic deformation effects on silicon surfaces induced by single and multiple ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation in submelting conditions. An approximation of the Boltzmann transport equation is adopted to describe the laser irradiation process. The evolution of the induced deformation field is described initially by adopting the differential equations of dynamic thermoelasticity while the onset of plastic yielding is described by the von Mises stress. Details of the resulting picometre sized crater, produced by irradiation with a single pulse, are discussed as a function of the imposed conditions and thresholds for the onset of plasticity are computed. Irradiation with multiple pulses leads to ripple formation of nanometre size that originates from the interference of the incident and a surface scattered wave. It is suggested that ultrafast laser induced surface modification in semiconductors is feasible in submelting conditions, and it may act as a precursor of the incubation effects observed at multiple pulse irradiation of materials surfaces.

  2. Elastic Softening of Surface Acoustic Wave Caused by Vacancy Orbital in Silicon Wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumoto, Keisuke; Akatsu, Mitsuhiro; Baba, Shotaro; Takasu, Rie; Nemoto, Yuichi; Goto, Terutaka; Yamada-Kaneta, Hiroshi; Furumura, Yuji; Saito, Hiroyuki; Kashima, Kazuhiko; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2014-03-01

    We have performed surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements to examine vacancies in a surface layer of a boron-doped silicon wafer currently used in semiconductor industry. A SAW with a frequency of fs = 517 MHz was optimally generated by an interdigital transducer with a comb gap of w=2.5 µm on a piezoelectric ZnO film deposited on the (001) silicon surface. The SAW propagating along the [100] axis with a velocity of vs=4.967 km/s is in agreement with the Rayleigh wave, which shows an ellipsoidal trajectory motion in the displacement components ux and uz within a penetration depth of λp = 3.5 µm. The elastic constant Cs of the SAW revealed the softening of ΔCs/Cs = 1.9 × 10-4 below 2 K down to 23 mK. Applied magnetic fields of up to 2 T completely suppress the softening. The quadrupole susceptibilities based on the coupling between the electric quadrupoles Ou, Ov, and Ozx of the vacancy orbital consisting of Γ8-Γ7 states and the symmetry strains ɛu, ɛv, and ɛzx associated with the SAW account for the softening and its field dependence on Cs. We deduced a low vacancy concentration N = 3.1 × 1012/cm3 in the surface layer within λp = 3.5 µm of the silicon wafer. This result promises an innovative technology for vacancy evaluation in the fabrication of high-density semiconductor devices in industry.

  3. Inhibition of Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis adhesion and biofilm formation on medical grade silicone surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Neoh, Koon Gee; Shi, Zhilong; Kang, En-Tang; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Chiong, Edmund

    2012-02-01

    Silicone has been utilized extensively for biomedical devices due to its excellent biocompatibility and biodurability properties. However, its surface is easily colonized by bacteria which will increase the probability of nosocomial infection. In the present work, a hydrophilic antimicrobial carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) layer has been grafted on medical grade silicone surface pre-treated with polydopamine (PDA). The increase in hydrophilicity was confirmed from contact angle measurement. Bacterial adhesion tests showed that the PDA-CMCS coating reduced the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis by ≥ 90%. The anti-adhesion property was preserved even after the aging of the functionalized surfaces for 21 days in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and also after autoclaving at 121°C for 20 min. Both E. coli and P. mirabilis readily form biofilms on the pristine surface under static and flow conditions but with the PDA-CMCS layer, biofilm formation is inhibited. The flow experiments indicated that it is more difficult to inhibit biofilm formation by the highly motile P. mirabilis as compared to E. coli. No significant cytotoxicity of the modified substrates was observed with 3T3 fibroblasts. PMID:21956834

  4. A Systematic Study of Plasma Activation of Silicon Surfaces for Self Assembly.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Savas; Rajan, Parthiban; Dasari, Harshita; Ingram, David C; Jadwisienczak, Wojciech; Rahman, Faiz

    2015-11-18

    We study the plasma activation systematically in an attempt to simplify and optimize the formation of hydrophilic silicon (Si) surface critical for self-assembly of nanostructures that typically uses piranha solution, a high molarity cocktail of sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide at elevated temperatures. In the proposed safer and simpler approach, O2 plasma is used under optimized process conditions in a capacitively coupled parallel-plate chamber to induce strong hydrophilic behavior on silicon surfaces associated with the formation of suboxide groups. Surface activation is validated and studied via contact angle measurements as well as XPS spectra and consequently optimized using a novel atomic force spectroscopy approach, which can streamline characterization. It is found that plasma power around 100 W and exposure duration of ∼65 s are the most effective parameters to enhance surface activation for the reactive ion etcher system used. Other optimum plasma process conditions for pressure and flow-rate are also reported along with temporal development of activation, which peaks within 1 h and wears off in 24 h scale in air. The applicability of the plasma approach to nanoassembly process was demonstrated using simple drop coating and spinning of polystyrene (d < 500 nm, 2.5-4.5% w/v) and inkjet printing on polydimethylsiloxane.

  5. Inhibition of Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis adhesion and biofilm formation on medical grade silicone surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Neoh, Koon Gee; Shi, Zhilong; Kang, En-Tang; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Chiong, Edmund

    2012-02-01

    Silicone has been utilized extensively for biomedical devices due to its excellent biocompatibility and biodurability properties. However, its surface is easily colonized by bacteria which will increase the probability of nosocomial infection. In the present work, a hydrophilic antimicrobial carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) layer has been grafted on medical grade silicone surface pre-treated with polydopamine (PDA). The increase in hydrophilicity was confirmed from contact angle measurement. Bacterial adhesion tests showed that the PDA-CMCS coating reduced the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis by ≥ 90%. The anti-adhesion property was preserved even after the aging of the functionalized surfaces for 21 days in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and also after autoclaving at 121°C for 20 min. Both E. coli and P. mirabilis readily form biofilms on the pristine surface under static and flow conditions but with the PDA-CMCS layer, biofilm formation is inhibited. The flow experiments indicated that it is more difficult to inhibit biofilm formation by the highly motile P. mirabilis as compared to E. coli. No significant cytotoxicity of the modified substrates was observed with 3T3 fibroblasts.

  6. TDAB-induced DNA plasmid condensation on the surface of a reconstructed boron doped silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, Antoine; Babak, Valéry G.; Palmino, Frank; Bêche, Eric; Baros, Francis; Hunting, Darel J.; Sanche, Léon; Fromm, Michel

    Our study aims at a better control and understanding of the transfer of a complex [DNA supercoiled plasmid - dodecyltrimethylammonium surfactant] layer from a liquid-vapour water interface onto a silicon surface without any additional cross-linker. The production of the complexed layer and its transfer from the aqueous subphase to the substrate is achieved with a Langmuir-Blodgett device. The substrate consists of a reconstructed boron doped silicon substrate with a nanometer-scale roughness. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements, it is shown that the DNA complexes are stretched in a disorderly manner throughout a 2-4 nm high net-like structure. This architecture is composed of tilted cationic surfactant molecules bound electrostatically to DNA, which exhibits a characteristic network arrangement with a measured average fiber diameter of about 45 ± 15 nm covering the entire surface. The mechanism of transfer of this layer onto the planar surface of the semi-conductor and the parameters of the process are analysed and illustrated by atomic force microscopy snapshots. The molecular layer exhibits the typical characteristics of a spinodal decomposition pattern or dewetting features. Plasmid molecules appear like long flattened fibers covering the surface, forming holes of various shapes and areas. The cluster-cluster aggregation of the complex structure gets very much denser on the substrate edge. The supercoiled DNA plasmids undergo conformational changes and a high degree of condensation and aggregation is observed. Perspectives and potential applications are considered.

  7. Tuning thermal transport ultra-thin silicon membranes: Influence of surface nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Sanghamitra; Donadio, Davide

    2015-03-01

    A detailed understanding of the behaviour of phonons in low-dimensional and nanostructured systems provides opportunities for thermal management at the nanoscale, efficient conversion of waste heat into electricity, and exploration of new paradigms in information and communication technologies. We elucidate the interplay between nanoscale surface structures and thermal transport properties in free-standing silicon membranes with thicknesses down to 4 nm. We demonstrate that whereas dimensional reduction affects the phonon dispersion, the surface nanostructures provide the main channel for phonon scattering leading to the dramatic reduction of thermal conductivity in ultra-thin silicon membranes. The presence of surface nanostructures, by means of pattern formation and surface oxidation, leads to a 40-fold reduction in the in-plane thermal conductivity of the thinnest membrane. We also investigate the effect of chemical substitution and the geometry of the nanostructures in the thermal transport properties of the membranes. We show that local strain induced by nanostructuring enables tuning of the thermal conductivity of these nanophononic metamaterials. Acknowledgment: This project is funded by the program FP7-ENERGY-2012-1-2STAGE under Contract Number 309150.

  8. Measurement of the friction between single polystyrene nanospheres and silicon surface using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan; Li, Jingnan; Chang, Li; Luo, Jianbin

    2013-06-11

    In the present work, the individual nanoparticles have been manipulated on a silicon surface, using atomic force microscope (AFM) techniques. As a model system, near-spherical polystyrene nanoparticles with radii from 28.85 nm to 228.2 nm were deposited on a nanosmooth silicon wafer. Experiments demonstrated that when the normal force is above a threshold load, nanoparticles could steadily be pushed by the tip of the AFM along the defined pathway. The tests allow us to quantitatively study the interfacial friction between the nanoparticle and the surface. It was found that the friction could be affected by various factors such as the load, the particle size, and the surface treatment. The results showed that the friction between particles and substrate is proportional to the two-third power of the radius, which is in agreement with the Hertzian theory. It can also be seen that the ratio between the kinetic and the static friction was slightly changed from 0.3 to 0.6, depending on the size of the particles. However, the value of the ratio was little affected by other factors such as the particles' location, the tip normal force and the surface modification. The results provided new insights into the intriguing friction phenomenon on the nanoscale.

  9. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling and thin-film evaporation on enhanced silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malla, Shailesh

    The present work consists of two major studies. The first study investigates the effects of surface energy or wettability on nucleate pool boiling and the second study investigates the thin-film evaporative cooling for near junction thermal management. For the first study, effects of surface energy or wettability on critical heat flux (CHF) and boiling heat transfer (BHT) of smooth heated surfaces was studied in saturated pool boiling of water at 1 atm. For this purpose hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces were created on one side of 1cm x 1cm double-side polished silicon substrates. A resistive heating layer was applied on the opposite side of each substrate. The surface energies of the created surfaces were characterized by measuring the static contact angles of water sessile drops. To provide a wide range of surface energies, surfaces were made of Teflon (hydrophobic), bare silicon (hydrophilic) and aluminum oxide (most hydrophilic). The measured contact angles on these surfaces were ˜108, ˜57 and ˜13 degrees respectively. The results of pool boiling tests on these surfaces clearly illustrate the connection between surface energy and CHF. CHF was shown to linearly decrease with contact angle increase, from ˜125 W/cm2 on aluminum oxide (most hydrophilic) to nearly one tenth of this value on Teflon (hydrophobic). The most hydrophilic surface also produced increasingly better BHT than plain silicon and Teflon as heat flux increased. However, below ˜5 W/cm2 the hydrophobic surface demonstrated better heat transfer due to earlier onset of nucleate boiling, reducing surface superheats by up to ˜5 degrees relative to the other two surfaces. Above ˜5 W/cm2 the BHT of the hydrophobic surface rapidly deteriorated as superheat increased towards the value at CHF. To further understand the effect of surface energy on pool boiling performance, the growth and departure of bubbles from single nucleating sites on each surface were analyzed from high-speed video recordings

  10. Influence of different solvents on the morphology of APTMS-modified silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakša, G.; Štefane, B.; Kovač, J.

    2014-10-01

    In this study 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) was used for the modification of single-crystal silicon wafers (1 1 1). We deposited the self-assembled layers from a solution of APTMS in five solvents with different polarities under various reaction conditions. The influence of the different solvents on the morphology of the modified surfaces was studied, since the possible heterogeneity may significantly influence the application of such surfaces. The surface composition and the chemical bonding were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the morphology of the modified surfaces was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Our results show that the amount of coatings and the morphology of the modified surface strongly depend on the type of solvent. Silanization carried out in acetonitrile and toluene leads to the formation of a rough surface with a large density of APTMS polymerized molecules in the form of islands. The surfaces modified in N,N-dimethylformamide were smoother, with a lower density of APTMS islands. When using acetone and ethanol as a solvent we prepared a smooth, thin, modified surface, with a very low density of the APTMS islands. We discuss the influence of the polarity/nature of the solvents on the morphology of the modified surfaces.

  11. Dynamic surface deformation of silicone elastomers for management of marine biofouling: laboratory and field studies using pneumatic actuation.

    PubMed

    Shivapooja, Phanindhar; Wang, Qiming; Szott, Lizzy M; Orihuela, Beatriz; Rittschof, Daniel; Zhao, Xuanhe; López, Gabriel P

    2015-01-01

    Many strategies have been developed to improve the fouling release (FR) performance of silicone coatings. However, biofilms inevitably build on these surfaces over time. Previous studies have shown that intentional deformation of silicone elastomers can be employed to detach biofouling species. In this study, inspired by the methods used in soft-robotic systems, controlled deformation of silicone elastomers via pneumatic actuation was employed to detach adherent biofilms. Using programmed surface deformation, it was possible to release > 90% of biofilm from surfaces in both laboratory and field environments. A higher substratum strain was required to remove biofilms accumulated in the field environment as compared with laboratory-grown biofilms. Further, the study indicated that substratum modulus influences the strain needed to de-bond biofilms. Surface deformation-based approaches have potential for use in the management of biofouling in a number of technological areas, including in niche applications where pneumatic actuation of surface deformation is feasible.

  12. Parametric study of dielectric loaded surface plasmon polariton add-drop filters for hybrid silicon/plasmonic optical circuitry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereux, A.; Hassan, K.; Weeber, J.-C.; Djellali, N.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Tsilipakos, O.; Pitilakis, A.; Kriezis, E.; Papaioannou, S.; Vyrsokinos, K.; Pleros, N.; Tekin, T.; Baus, M.; Kalavrouziotis, D.; Giannoulis, G.; Avramopoulos, H.

    2011-01-01

    Surface plasmons polaritons are electromagnetic waves propagating along the surface of a conductor. Surface plasmons photonics is a promising candidate to satisfy the constraints of miniaturization of optical interconnects. This contribution reviews an experimental parametric study of dielectric loaded surface plasmon waveguides ring resonators and add-drop filters within the perspective of the recently suggested hybrid technology merging plasmonic and silicon photonics on a single board (European FP7 project PLATON "Merging Plasmonic and Silicon Photonics Technology towards Tb/s routing in optical interconnects"). Conclusions relevant for dielectric loaded surface plasmon switches to be integrated in silicon photonic circuitry will be drawn. They rely on the opportunity offered by plasmonic circuitry to carry optical signals and electric currents through the same thin metal circuitry. The heating of the dielectric loading by the electric current enables to design low foot-print thermo-optical switches driving the optical signal flow.

  13. Numerical Study of TCO/Silicon Solar Cells with Novel Back Surface Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumaour, M.; Sali, S.; Bahfir, A.; Kermadi, S.; Zougar, L.; Ouarab, N.; Larabi, A.

    2016-08-01

    ZnS/Si/CuO heterostructure is investigated by a theoretical approach as a possible low-cost design for photovoltaic conversion in the track of the heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer solar cells. Our results indicate that, owing to perfect electron affinity and lattice matching properties, zinc sulfide with adequate Al doping can efficiently replace zinc oxide window layer as an emitter region for silicon-based solar cells. Lattice mismatch, energy band alignment at the interfaces and material resistivity are the framework parameters of the study. By focusing on the open circuit voltage parameter, the back metal/Si and silicon base doping were optimized so that the conversion efficiency was increased from 3.37% to 15.19%. The introduction of a cupric oxide (CuO) layer acting as a p + back surface field with a bandgap of 1.35 eV and appropriate doping as high as 7 × 1018 cm-3 can enhance the conversion efficiency to 17.30%, provided that the silicon material remains free from contamination by copper atoms and also by performing a suitable treatment of CuO to lower its resistivity.

  14. Efficient optical analysis of surface texture combinations for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucher, Nico; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Kiefel, Peter; Gebrewold, Habtamu; Höhn, Oliver; Hauser, Hubert; Müller, Claas; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph; Bläsi, Benedikt

    2016-04-01

    Surface textures can significantly improve anti-reflective and light trapping properties of silicon solar cells. Combining standard pyramidal front side textures with scattering or diffractive rear side textures has the potential to further increase the light path length inside the silicon and thereby increase the solar cell efficiency. In this work we introduce the OPTOS (Optical Properties of Textured Optical Sheets) simulation formalism and apply it to the modelling of silicon solar cells with different surface textures at front and rear side. OPTOS is a matrix-based method that allows for the computationally-efficient calculation of non-coherent light propagation within textured solar cells, featuring multiple textures that may operate in different optical regimes. After calculating redistribution matrices for each individual surface texture with the most appropriate technique, optical properties like angle dependent reflectance, transmittance or absorptance can be determined via matrix multiplications. Using OPTOS, we demonstrate for example that the integration of a diffractive grating at the rear side of solar cells with random pyramids at the front results in an absorptance gain that corresponds to a photocurrent density enhancement of 0.73 mA/cm2 for a 250 μm thick cell. The re-usability of matrices enables the investigation of different solar cell thicknesses within minutes. For thicknesses down to 50 μm the simulated gain increases up to 1.22 mA/cm2. The OPTOS formalism is furthermore not restricted with respect to the number of textured interfaces. By combining two or more textured sheets to effective interfaces, it is possible to optically model a complete photovoltaic module including EVA and potentially textured glass layers with one calculation tool.

  15. Modification of silicon nitride surfaces with GOPES and APTES for antibody immobilization: computational and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dien To, Thien; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Nhat Thanh Phan, Khoa; Thu Thi Truong, An; Doan, Tin Chanh Duc; Mau Dang, Chien

    2015-12-01

    Chemical modification of silicon nitride (SiN) surfaces by silanization has been widely studied especially with 3-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-(glycidyloxypropyl) dimethylethoxysilane (GOPES). However few reports performed the experimental and computational studies together. In this study, surface modification of SiN surfaces with GOPES and APTES covalently bound with glutaraldehyde (GTA) was investigated for antibody immobilization. The monoclonal anti-cytokeratin-FITC (MACF) antibody was immobilized on the modified SiN surfaces. The modified surfaces were characterized by water contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The FITC-fluorescent label indicated the existence of MACF antibody on the SiN surfaces and the efficiency of the silanization reaction. Absorption of APTES and GOPES on the oxidized SiN surfaces was computationally modeled and calculated by Materials Studio software. The computational and experimental results showed that modification of the SiN surfaces with APTES and GTA was more effective than the modification with GOPES.

  16. Adsorption Studies with AFM of Human Plasma Fibrinogen on Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gause, Sheena; Kong, Wendy; Rowe

    2007-11-01

    Fibrinogen (FGN) plays an important role in the clotting of blood. Human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) is a protein that readily adsorbs on biomaterial surfaces. The purpose of this experiment was to use the Atomic Force Microscope to study the adsorption of HPF molecules or FGN onto several silicon surfaces with different orientations and resistivities. The size of the FGN molecules found to be somewhat different of Si(111), (100) and (110) were compared to the size of the FGN molecules in solution (45 nm in length, the end dynodes measures to be 6.5 nm in diameter, and the middle dynode measures to be 5 nm in diameter. For this study, the CPR (Thermo-microscope) Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) was used to observe the amount of fibrinogen molecules adsorbed by Si (111) with a resistance of .0281-.0261 φ cm, Si (111) with a resistance of 1 φ cm, Si (100), and Si (110) surfaces. In finding any single fibrinogen molecules, the appropriate image scans and measurements were taken. After collection and analysis of the data, it was found from AFM that the fibrinogen molecules found on Si (110) mostly resembled fibrinogen molecules found in solution. The other images showed that the fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on Silicon substrates is significantly greater (˜10-20 %) than those in solution.

  17. Effect of different surface treatments on tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner.

    PubMed

    Akin, Hakan; Tugut, Faik; Mutaf, Burcu; Akin, Gulsah; Ozdemir, A Kemal

    2011-11-01

    Failure of the bond between the acrylic resin and resilient liner material is commonly encountered in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments (sandblasting, Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, and KTP lasers) on tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner. Polymethyl methacrylate test specimens were fabricated and each received one of eight surface treatments: untreated (control), sandblasted, Er:YAG laser irradiated, sandblasted + Er:YAG laser irradiated, Nd:YAG laser irradiated, sandblasted + Nd:YAG laser irradiated, KTP laser irradiated, and sandblasted + KTP laser irradiated. The resilient liner specimens (n = 15) were processed between two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) blocks. Bonding strength of the liners to PMMA were compared by tensile test with the use of a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze the data (α = 0.05). Altering the polymethyl methacrylate surface by Er:YAG laser significantly increased the bond strengths in polymethyl methacrylate/silicone specimens, however, sandblasting before applying a lining material had a weakening effect on the bond. In addition, Nd:YAG and KTP lasers were found to be ineffective for increasing the strength of the bond.

  18. Simplified fabrication of back surface electric field silicon cells and novel characteristics of such cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandelkorn, J.; Lamneck, J. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the characteristics and behavior of 10 ohm-cm silicon cells having abnormally high open-circuit voltages was made. The cells studied were made by a new, highly simplified, contact fabrication process which creates both a contact and a thin electric field region at the cell back surface without the need for phosphorus layer removal. These cells had open-circuit voltages of about 0.58 V and their performance as a function of thickness, temperature, and 1 MeV electron irradiation is detailed. The study showed that 10 ohm-cm back-surface-field cells can have the high initial efficiencies and desirable temperature behavior of low resistivity cells. Thin back-surface-field cells were made and showed, in addition, much greater radiation damage resistance. A mechanism is proposed to explain the results.

  19. Simplified fabrication of back surface electric field silicon cells and novel characteristics of such cells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandelkorn, J.; Lamneck, J. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the characteristics and behavior of 10 ohm-cm silicon cells having abnormally high open-circuit voltages was made. The cells studied were made by a new, highly simplified, contact fabrication process which creates both a contact and a thin electric field region at the cell back surface without the need for phosphorus layer removal. These cells had open-circuit voltages of about 0.58 V and their performance as a function of thickness, temperature, and 1 MeV electron irradiation is detailed. The study showed that 10 ohm-cm back-surface-field cells can have the high initial efficiencies and desirable temperature behavior of low resistivity cells. Thin back-surface-field cells were made and showed, in addition, much greater radiation damage resistance. A mechanism is proposed to explain the results.

  20. Surface state analysis of wet ground silicon nitride powders by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kameshima, Yoshikazu; Yasumori, Atsuo; Okada, Kiyoshi

    1995-09-01

    Three kinds of silicon nitride powders, i.e. as-prepared direct-nitridation powder, HF-treated direct-nitridation powder, and as-prepared imide decomposition powder, were wet ground by ball milling in water and the surface state change due to the grinding was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES). The thickness of the oxidized surface layer of the powder was calculated from the peak area ratio and the chemical composition was evaluated from the Auger parameter (AP). Surface oxidized phase amount gradually increased with longer milling time and the thickness increased almost three times after 7 days milling, compared to as those of the unground samples. Chemical composition of the oxidized phase formed by the grinding was pure silica irrespective to the samples, although those of the oxidized phase in the unground samples differed among the samples.

  1. Enhanced electron-hole droplet emission from surface-oxidized silicon photonic crystal nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Sumikura, Hisashi; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya

    2016-01-25

    We have observed electron-hole droplet (EHD) emission enhanced by silicon photonic crystal (Si PhC) nanocavities with a surface oxide. The EHD is employed as a massive emitter that remains inside the nanocavity to achieve efficient cavity-emitter coupling. Time-resolved emission measurements demonstrate that the surface oxide greatly reduces the nonradiative annihilation of the EHDs and maintains them in the PhC nanocavities. It is found that the surface-oxidized Si PhC nanocavity enhances EHD emission in addition to the Purcell enhancement of the resonant cavity, which will contribute to works on Si light emission and the cavity quantum electrodynamics of electron-hole condensates. PMID:26832491

  2. Formation mechanism of orderly structures in Au films deposited on silicone oil surfaces [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo

    2005-06-01

    An optical microscopy study of ordered structures, namely bands, and self-organized phenomena in a continuous gold film system deposited on silicone oil surfaces is presented. The bands are composed of a large number of parallel keys with different width w but nearly uniform length L; the characteristic length of the bands is of the order of 101 102 μm. After disturbed with an external force, the growth process of the bands is observed directly. The experiment indicates that the formation mechanism of bands can be explained in terms of the relaxation of the compressive stress, which mainly results from the characteristic boundary condition of the nearly free sustained films.

  3. Ultrathin coating of plasma polymer of methane applied on the surface of silicone contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Ho, C P; Yasuda, H

    1988-10-01

    Silicone rubber has great advantages as a contact lens material because of its very high oxygen permeability, softness, and excellent mechanical strength and durability. Practical application is hampered by inherent characteristics of elastomers, i.e., high tackiness and highly hydrophobic surface properties. By applying a thin layer, e.g., 5 nm, of plasma polymer of methane, it was found that all these disadvantages can be eliminated without sacrificing high oxygen permeation rate, e.g., less than 15% reduction. Optimization of operational parameters to achieve this task has been investigated. It was also found that under optimum conditions the coating withstood severe and repeated flexing of the contact lens. PMID:3220842

  4. Ultrathin coating of plasma polymer of methane applied on the surface of silicone contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Ho, C P; Yasuda, H

    1988-10-01

    Silicone rubber has great advantages as a contact lens material because of its very high oxygen permeability, softness, and excellent mechanical strength and durability. Practical application is hampered by inherent characteristics of elastomers, i.e., high tackiness and highly hydrophobic surface properties. By applying a thin layer, e.g., 5 nm, of plasma polymer of methane, it was found that all these disadvantages can be eliminated without sacrificing high oxygen permeation rate, e.g., less than 15% reduction. Optimization of operational parameters to achieve this task has been investigated. It was also found that under optimum conditions the coating withstood severe and repeated flexing of the contact lens.

  5. Influence of irradiation dose on laser-induced surface nanostructures on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamova, Olga; Bounhalli, Mourad; Reif, Juergen

    2013-08-01

    We report on the dependence of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on an increase of incident pulse number. On silicon, the patterns evolve from linear, parallel sub-wavelength ripples, grossly perpendicular to the laser polarization, via coalesced wider features parallel to the polarization, to a crater with periodically structured, pillar-like walls. Closer inspection of the patterns indicates that the different features always continue to exhibit reminiscence to the preceding lower-dose patterns, suggesting that, indeed, all patterns can be created by ONE single GENERAL formation process, as in self-organized structure formation, and the different structures/feature sizes are NOT due to DIFFERENT mechanisms.

  6. Reducing intrinsic loss in superconducting resonators by surface treatment and deep etching of silicon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, A.; Lange, G. de; Asaad, S.; Enden, K. L. van der; Langford, N. K.; DiCarlo, L.

    2015-05-04

    We present microwave-frequency NbTiN resonators on silicon, systematically achieving internal quality factors above 1 M in the quantum regime. We use two techniques to reduce losses associated with two-level systems: an additional substrate surface treatment prior to NbTiN deposition to optimize the metal-substrate interface and deep reactive-ion etching of the substrate to displace the substrate-vacuum interfaces away from high electric fields. The temperature and power dependence of resonator behavior indicate that two-level systems still contribute significantly to energy dissipation, suggesting that more interface optimization could further improve performance.

  7. Asymmetric electrostatic and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interaction forces between mica surfaces and silicone polymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Stephen H; Das, Saurabh; Gebbie, Matthew A; Rapp, Michael; Jones, Louis C; Roiter, Yuri; Koenig, Peter H; Gizaw, Yonas; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-11-26

    We have synthesized model hydrophobic silicone thin films on gold surfaces by a two-step covalent grafting procedure. An amino-functionalized gold surface reacts with monoepoxy-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) via a click reaction, resulting in a covalently attached nanoscale thin film of PDMS, and the click chemistry synthesis route provides great selectivity, reproducibility, and stability in the resulting model hydrophobic silicone thin films. The asymmetric interaction forces between the PDMS thin films and mica surfaces were measured with the surface forces apparatus in aqueous sodium chloride solutions. At an acidic pH of 3, attractive interactions are measured, resulting in instabilities during both approach (jump-in) and separation (jump-out from adhesive contact). Quantitative analysis of the results indicates that the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory alone, i.e., the combination of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attraction, cannot fully describe the measured forces and that the additional measured adhesion is likely due to hydrophobic interactions. The surface interactions are highly pH-dependent, and a basic pH of 10 results in fully repulsive interactions at all distances, due to repulsive electrostatic and steric-hydration interactions, indicating that the PDMS is negatively charged at high pH. We describe an interaction potential with a parameter, known as the Hydra parameter, that can account for the extra attraction (low pH) due to hydrophobicity as well as the extra repulsion (high pH) due to hydrophilic (steric-hydration) interactions. The interaction potential is general and provides a quantitative measure of interfacial hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity for any set of interacting surfaces in aqueous solution.

  8. From Molecules to Surfaces: Radical-Based Mechanisms of Si-S and Si-Se Bond Formation on Silicon.

    PubMed

    Buriak, Jillian M; Sikder, Md Delwar H

    2015-08-01

    The derivatization of silicon surfaces can have profound effects on the underlying electronic properties of the semiconductor. In this work, we investigate the radical surface chemistry of silicon with a range of organochalcogenide reagents (comprising S and Se) on a hydride-terminated silicon surface, to cleanly and efficiently produce surface Si-S and Si-Se bonds, at ambient temperature. Using a diazonium-based radical initiator, which induces formation of surface silicon radicals, a group of organochalcogenides were screened for reactivity at room temperature, including di-n-butyl disulfide, diphenyl disulfide, diphenyl diselenide, di-n-butyl sulfide, diphenyl selenide, diphenyl sulfide, 1-octadecanethiol, t-butyl disulfide, and t-butylthiol, which comprises the disulfide, diselenide, thiol, and thioether functionalities. The surface reactions were monitored by transmission mode Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry. Calculation of Si-Hx consumption, a semiquantitative measure of yield of production of surface-bound Si-E bonds (E = S, Se), was carried out via FTIR spectroscopy. Control experiments, sans the BBD diazonium radical initiator, were all negative for any evident incorporation, as determined by FTIR spectroscopy. The functional groups that did react with surface silicon radicals included the dialkyl/diphenyl disulfides, diphenyl diselenide, and 1-octadecanethiol, but not t-butylthiol, diphenyl sulfide/selenide, and di-n-butyl sulfide. Through a comparison with the rich body of literature regarding molecular radicals, and in particular, silyl radicals, reaction mechanisms were proposed for each. Armed with an understanding of the reaction mechanisms, much of the known chemistry within the extensive body of radical-based reactivity has the potential to be harnessed on silicon and could be extended to a range of technologically relevant semiconductor

  9. Modulated surface nanostructures for enhanced light trapping and reduced surface reflection of crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Hoshi, Yusuke; Hirai, Yuji; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Usami, Noritaka

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated the fabrication of modulated surface nanostructures as a new surface texture design for thin wafer solar cells. Using a combination of conventional alkali etching and colloidal lithography, we fabricated surface textures with micrometer and nanometre scales on a Si substrate. These modulated surface nanostructures exhibit reduced surface reflection in a broad spectral range, compared with conventional micrometer textures. We investigated optical absorption using a rigorous coupled wave analysis simulation, which revealed a significant reduction in surface reflection over a broad spectral range and efficient light trapping (comparable to that of conventional micrometer-scale textures) for the modulated nanostructures. We found that the modulated surface nanostructures have a high potential of improving the performance of thin wafer crystalline Si solar cells.

  10. Paraboloid Structured Silicon Surface for Enhanced Light Absorption: Experimental and Simulative Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Firoz; Baek, Seong-Ho; Kaur, Jasmeet; Fareed, Imran; Mobin, Abdul; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present an optical model that simulates the light trapping and scattering effects of a paraboloid texture surface first time. This model was experimentally verified by measuring the reflectance values of the periodically textured silicon (Si) surface with the shape of a paraboloid under different conditions. A paraboloid texture surface was obtained by electrochemical etching Si in the solution of hydrofluoric acid, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and deionized (DI) water. The paraboloid texture surface has the advantage of giving a lower reflectance value than the hemispherical, random pyramidal, and regular pyramidal texture surfaces. In the case of parabola, the light can be concentrated in the direction of the Si surface compared to the hemispherical, random pyramidal, and regular pyramidal textured surfaces. Furthermore, in a paraboloid textured surface, there can be a maximum value of 4 or even more by anisotropic etching duration compared to the hemispherical or pyramidal textured surfaces which have a maximum h/ D (depth and diameter of the texture) value of 0.5. The reflectance values were found to be strongly dependent on the h/ D ratio of the texture surface. The measured reflectance values were well matched with the simulated ones. The minimum reflectance value of ~4 % was obtained at a wavelength of 600 nm for an h/ D ratio of 3.75. The simulation results showed that the reflectance value for the h/ D ratio can be reduced to ~0.5 % by reducing the separations among the textures. This periodic paraboloidal structure can be applied to the surface texturing technique by substituting with a conventional pyramid textured surface or moth-eye antireflection coating.

  11. An experimental investigation of silicon wafer surface roughness and its effect on the full strength of plated metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, G. D.

    1981-01-01

    Plated silicon wafers with surface roughness ranging from 0.4 to 130 microinches were subjected to tensile pull strength tests. Electroless Ni/electroless Cu/electroplated Cu and electroless Ni/electroplated Cu were the two types of plate contacts tested. It was found that smoother surfaces had higher pull strength than rougher, chemically etched surfaces. The presence of the electroless Cu layer was found to be important to adhesion. The mode of fracture of the contact as it left the silicon was studied, and it was found that in almost all cases separation was due to fracture of the bulk silicon phase. The correlation between surface roughness and mode of contact failure is presented and interpreted.

  12. Ion-Step Method for Surface Potential Sensing of Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songyue; van Nieuwkasteele, Jan W; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2016-08-16

    This paper presents a novel stimulus-response method for surface potential sensing of silicon nanowire (Si-NW) field-effect transistors. When an "ion-step" from low to high ionic strength is given as a stimulus to the gate oxide surface, an increase of double layer capacitance is therefore expected. Thus, a change of conductance through the Si-NWs is measured. The surface potential on the Si-NW gate is changed from negative for a bare SiO2 surface to neutral/positive when there is poly-l-lysine adsorption at certain pH, which also indicates a shift of point-of-zero charge pH after surface modification. This change is measured by a drop of current variation at the ion-step. The ion-step is performed to the Si-NW through a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip with automatic sample switching. A reduction of the ion-step response from 2 nA to almost zero at pH 5.0 is observed by increasing the potassium ion concentration from 10 mM to 50 mM, which corresponds to a surface potential change of ∼12 mV. We show that this method can be used as an alternative method for surface potential sensing, making it less sensitive to drift.

  13. Ion-Step Method for Surface Potential Sensing of Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songyue; van Nieuwkasteele, Jan W; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2016-08-16

    This paper presents a novel stimulus-response method for surface potential sensing of silicon nanowire (Si-NW) field-effect transistors. When an "ion-step" from low to high ionic strength is given as a stimulus to the gate oxide surface, an increase of double layer capacitance is therefore expected. Thus, a change of conductance through the Si-NWs is measured. The surface potential on the Si-NW gate is changed from negative for a bare SiO2 surface to neutral/positive when there is poly-l-lysine adsorption at certain pH, which also indicates a shift of point-of-zero charge pH after surface modification. This change is measured by a drop of current variation at the ion-step. The ion-step is performed to the Si-NW through a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip with automatic sample switching. A reduction of the ion-step response from 2 nA to almost zero at pH 5.0 is observed by increasing the potassium ion concentration from 10 mM to 50 mM, which corresponds to a surface potential change of ∼12 mV. We show that this method can be used as an alternative method for surface potential sensing, making it less sensitive to drift. PMID:27457611

  14. Facile surface modification of silicone rubber with zwitterionic polymers for improving blood compatibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingsheng; Chen, Qiang; Yuan, Bo; Chen, Mengzhou; Wu, Shishan; Lin, Sicong; Shen, Jian

    2013-10-01

    A facile approach to modify silicone rubber (SR) membrane for improving the blood compatibility was investigated. The hydrophobic SR surface was firstly activated by air plasma, after which an initiator was immobilized on the activated surface for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Three zwitterionic polymers were then grafted from SR membrane via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The surface composition, wettability, and morphology of the membranes before and after modification were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), static water contact angle (WCA) measurement, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results showed that zwitterionic polymers were successfully grafted from SR surfaces, which remarkably improved the wettability of the SR surface. The blood compatibility of the membranes was evaluated by protein adsorption and platelet adhesion tests in vitro. As observed, all the zwitterionic polymer modified surfaces have improved resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption and have excellent resistance to platelet adhesion, showing significantly improved blood compatibility. This work should inspire many creative uses of SR based materials for biomedical applications such as vessel, catheter, and microfluidics. PMID:23910289

  15. Suppressing light reflection from polycrystalline silicon thin films through surface texturing and silver nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, Perveen; Huang, Mengbing Kadakia, Nirag; Spratt, William; Malladi, Girish; Bakhru, Hassarum

    2014-09-21

    This work demonstrates a novel method combining ion implantation and silver nanostructures for suppressing light reflection from polycrystalline silicon thin films. Samples were implanted with 20-keV hydrogen ions to a dose of 10¹⁷/cm², and some of them received an additional argon ion implant to a dose of 5×10¹⁵ /cm² at an energy between 30 and 300 keV. Compared to the case with a single H implant, the processing involved both H and Ar implants and post-implantation annealing has created a much higher degree of surface texturing, leading to a more dramatic reduction of light reflection from polycrystalline Si films over a broadband range between 300 and 1200 nm, e.g., optical reflection from the air/Si interface in the AM1.5 sunlight condition decreasing from ~30% with an untextured surface to below 5% for a highly textured surface after post-implantation annealing at 1000°C. Formation of Ag nanostructures on these ion beam processed surfaces further reduces light reflection, and surface texturing is expected to have the benefit of diminishing light absorption losses within large-size (>100 nm) Ag nanoparticles, yielding an increased light trapping efficiency within Si as opposed to the case with Ag nanostructures on a smooth surface. A discussion of the effects of surface textures and Ag nanoparticles on light trapping within Si thin films is also presented with the aid of computer simulations.

  16. Surface Passivation of Germanium Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, Hemant; Sun, Shiyu; Pianetta, Piero; Chidsey, Chirstopher E.D.; McIntyre, Paul C.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-05-13

    The surface of single crystal, cold-wall CVD-grown germanium nanowires was studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SR-PES) and also by conventional XPS. The as-grown germanium nanowires seem to be hydrogen terminated. Exposure to laboratory atmosphere leads to germanium oxide growth with oxidation states of Ge{sup 1+}, Ge{sup 2+}, Ge{sup 3+}, while exposure to UV light leads to a predominance of the Ge{sup 4+} oxidation state. Most of the surface oxide could be removed readily by aqueous HF treatment which putatively leaves the nanowire surface hydrogen terminated with limited stability in air. Alternatively, chlorine termination could be achieved by aq. HCl treatment of the native oxide-coated nanowires. Chlorine termination was found to be relatively more stable than the HF-last hydrogen termination.

  17. Combined Effect of Mechanical Grooving and Stain-Etched Surface on Optical and Electrical Properties of Crystalline Silicon Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarroug, Ahmed; Derbali, Lotfi; Ouertani, Rachid; Dimassi, Wissem; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the combined effect of mechanical grooving and porous silicon (PS) on the front surface reflectance and the electronic properties of crystalline silicon substrates. Mechanical surface texturization leads to reduce the cell reflectance, enhance the light trapping and augment the carrier collection probability. PS was introduced as an efficient antireflective coating (ARC) onto the front surface of crystalline silicon solar cell. Micro-periodic V-shaped grooves were made by means of a micro-groove machining process prior to junction formation. Subsequently, wafers were subjected to an isotropic potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching so that the V-shape would be turned to a U-shape. We found that the successive treatment of silicon surfaces with stain-etching, grooving then alkaline etching enhances the absorption of the textured surface, and decreases the reflectance from 35% to 7% in the 300-1200 nm wavelength range. We obtained a significant increase in the overall light path that generates the building up of the light trapping inside the substrate. We found an improvement in the illuminated I-V characteristics and an increase in the minority carrier lifetime τeff. Such a simple method was adopted to effectively reinforce the overall device performance of crystalline silicon-based solar cells.

  18. Porous silicon Bloch surface and sub-surface wave structure for simultaneous detection of small and large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Gilberto A.; Lonai, John D.; Mernaugh, Raymond L.; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2014-08-01

    A porous silicon (PSi) Bloch surface wave (BSW) and Bloch sub-surface wave (BSSW) composite biosensor is designed and used for the size-selective detection of both small and large molecules. The BSW/BSSW structure consists of a periodic stack of high and low refractive index PSi layers and a reduced optical thickness surface layer that gives rise to a BSW with an evanescent tail that extends above the surface to enable the detection of large surface-bound molecules. Small molecules were detected in the sensor by the BSSW, which is a large electric field intensity spatially localized to a desired region of the Bragg mirror and is generated by the implementation of a step or gradient refractive index profile within the Bragg mirror. The step and gradient BSW/BSSW sensors are designed to maximize both resonance reflectance intensity and sensitivity to large molecules. Size-selective detection of large molecules including latex nanospheres and the M13KO7 bacteriophage as well as small chemical linker molecules is reported.

  19. Spatial resolution in thin film deposition on silicon surfaces by combining silylation and UV/ozonolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Zaera, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    A simple procedure has been developed for the processing of silicon wafers in order to facilitate the spatially resolved growth of thin solid films on their surfaces. Specifically, a combination of silylation and UV/ozonolysis was tested as a way to control the concentration of the surface hydroxo groups required for subsequent atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metals or oxides. Water contact angle measurements were used to evaluate the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of the surface, a proxy for OH surface coverage, and to optimize the UV/ozonolysis treatment. Silylation with hexamethyldisilazane, trichloro(octadecyl)silane, or trimethylchlorosilane was found to be an efficient way to block the hydroxo sites and to passivate the underlying surface, and UV/O3 treatments were shown to effectively remove the silylation layer and to regain the surface reactivity. Both O3 and 185 nm UV radiation were determined necessary for the removal of the silylation layer, and additional 254 nm radiation was found to enhance the process. Attenuated total reflection-infrared absorption spectroscopy was employed to assess the success of the silylation and UV/O3 removal steps, and atomic force microscopy data provided evidence for the retention of the original smoothness of the surface. Selective growth of HfO2 films via TDMAHf + H2O ALD was seen only on the UV/O3 treated surfaces; total inhibition of the deposition was observed on the untreated silylated surfaces (as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry). Residual film growth was still detected on the latter if the ALD was carried out at high temperatures (250 °C), because the silylation layer deteriorates under such harsh conditions and forms surface defects that act as nucleation sites for the growth of oxide grains (as identified by electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). We believe that the silylation-UV/O3 procedure advanced here could be easily implemented for the patterning of surfaces

  20. The effects of oxygen plasma and humidity on surface roughness, water contact angle and hardness of silicon, silicon dioxide and glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, A. U.; Howlader, M. M. R.; Deen, M. J.

    2014-03-01

    For heterogeneous integration in many More-than-Moore applications, surface preparation is the key step to realizing well-bonded multiple substrates for electronics, photonics, fluidics and/or mechanical components without a degradation in performance. Therefore, it is critical to understand how various processing and environmental conditions affect their surface properties. In this paper, we investigate the effects of oxygen plasma and humidity on some key surface properties such as the water contact angle, roughness and hardness of three materials: silicon (Si), silicon dioxide (SiO2) and glass, and their impact on bondability. The low surface roughness, high surface reactivity and high hydrophilicity of Si, SiO2 and glass at lower activation times can result in better bondability. Although, the surface reactivity of plasma-ambient-humidity-treated Si and SiO2 is considerably reduced, their reduction of roughness and increase of hydrophilicity may enable good bonding at low temperature heating due to augmented hydroxyl groups. The decrease of hardness of Si and SiO2 with increased activation time is attributed to higher surface roughness and the formation of amorphous layers of Si. While contact angle and surface roughness results show a correlation with bondability, the role of hardness on bondability requires further investigation.

  1. A theoretical guide for fabricating a conductive molecular wire on a silicon surface via an in situ surface polymerization reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaojing; Wang, Jinlan; Yuan, Shijun; Zhang, Xiuyun; Wu, Gang; Wang, Xiaobai; Yang, Shuo-Wang

    2015-09-01

    It has been a long-standing goal to make conductive molecular wires or linear polymer chains on traditional semiconductors or insulator substrates to satisfy the ongoing miniaturization in electronic devices. Here, we have proposed a surface in situ polymerization reaction for a pre-absorbed molecule, 4-hydrazinyl-3-(pyridin-4-ylmethyl)-benzaldehyde (HPyMB), to produce a conductive molecular wire on a silicon surface. Our first-principles calculations show that HPyMB molecules can absorb alternatively on the exposed Si atoms created via ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy on a hydrogen passivated H-Si(001)2 × 1 surface along the [110] direction. The adsorption is exothermic and its generated energy is sufficient for the following intermolecular dehydration polymerization reaction to overcome the activation energy barriers and thereafter form a molecular wire on the surface. This polymerized molecular wire is mechanically stable since it is chemically bonded onto the surface. After polymerization, the system becomes conductive due to the charge transfer from the molecule-surface bonds to their pyridine rings. More importantly, by removing 1.1 electrons from the system, the surface polymer chain is the sole conductive channel. Furthermore, its conducting nature remains robust even under a large external electric field. Our findings open a new window for the fabrication of conductive molecular wires or polymer chains on semiconductor surfaces, and provide insights into the mechanism behind the molecular wire conductivity.It has been a long-standing goal to make conductive molecular wires or linear polymer chains on traditional semiconductors or insulator substrates to satisfy the ongoing miniaturization in electronic devices. Here, we have proposed a surface in situ polymerization reaction for a pre-absorbed molecule, 4-hydrazinyl-3-(pyridin-4-ylmethyl)-benzaldehyde (HPyMB), to produce a conductive molecular wire on a silicon surface. Our first

  2. Degradation of bare and silanized silicon wafer surfaces by constituents of biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Dekeyser, C M; Buron, C C; Derclaye, S R; Jonas, A M; Marchand-Brynaert, J; Rouxhet, P G

    2012-07-15

    The 24 h stability of bare silicon wafers as such or silanized with CH(3)O-(CH(2)-CH(2)-O)(n)-C(3)H(6)-trichlorosilane (n=6-9) was investigated in water, NaCl, phosphate and carbonate solutions, and in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 37 °C (close to biological conditions regarding temperature, high ionic strength, and pH). The resulting surfaces were analyzed using ellipsometry, X-ray Reflectometry (XRR), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Incubation of the silanized wafers in phosphate solution and PBS provokes a detachment of the silane layer. This is due to a hydrolysis of Si-O bonds which is favored by the action of phosphate, also responsible for a corrosion of non-silanized wafers. The surface alteration (detachment of silane layer and corrosion of the non-silanized wafer) is also important with carbonate solution, due to a higher pH (8.3). The protection of the silicon oxide layer brought by silane against the action of the salts is noticeable for phosphate but not for carbonate.

  3. Electronic passivation of silicon surfaces by thin films of atomic layer deposited gallium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. G. Cuevas, A.

    2014-07-21

    This paper proposes the application of gallium oxide (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films to crystalline silicon solar cells. Effective passivation of n- and p-type crystalline silicon surfaces has been achieved by the application of very thin Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films prepared by atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMGa) and ozone (O{sub 3}) as the reactants. Surface recombination velocities as low as 6.1 cm/s have been recorded with films less than 4.5 nm thick. A range of deposition parameters has been explored, with growth rates of approximately 0.2 Å/cycle providing optimum passivation. The thermal activation energy for passivation of the Si-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface has been found to be approximately 0.5 eV. Depassivation of the interface was observed for prolonged annealing at increased temperatures. The activation energy for depassivation was measured to be 1.9 eV.

  4. Efficient Black Silicon Solar Cells with Multi-Scale Surface Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toor, Fatima; Nemeth, William; Page, Matthew; Wang, Qi; Branz, Howard; Yuan, Hao-Chih

    2011-03-01

    A nanostructured, density-graded surface layer can replace conventional quarter-wavelength coatings as the anti-reflection layer in photovoltaics. If the layer is comprised of structures smaller than the wavelength of the incident light and the density is graded across more than about half the wavelength of the light, reflection is strongly suppressed (H. M. Branz et al., APL {94} 2009). We developed an inexpensive liquid etch technique for silicon to produce ``black Si'' based upon this physics. However, the problem of high carrier recombination within this nanostructured layer must be overcome to improve beyond the present best solar cell with its confirmed 16.8% black silicon sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiency (H-C. Yuan et al., APL {95} 2009). In this work, we combine the black Si layer with conventional KOH-etched pyramidal surface texture (Y. Xiu et al., Langmuir {24 }2008) at micron-scale. Pyramids contribute anti-reflection based on geometric optics. Combining the pyramids with nanostructures only 100 nm deep provides reflectivity below 2% across a wavelength range from 350 - 1000 nm. To-date, we have obtained a solar cell efficiency of 17% with a Voc of 613 mV, Jsc of 35 mA/cm2 and fill-factor of 78%. These cells have improved blue response compared to the best planar black Si cells.

  5. Full DFT-D description of a nanoporous supramolecular network on a silicon surface.

    PubMed

    Boukari, Khaoula; Duverger, Eric; Sonnet, Philippe

    2013-02-28

    We present a full density-functional-theory study taking into account the van der Waals interactions of a 2D supramolecular network adsorbed on the Si(111)√3x√3R30°-boron surface denoted SiB. We show that, contrarily to the previous calculations [B. Baris, V. Luzet, E. Duverger, Ph. Sonnet, F. Palmino, and F. Chérioux, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 50, 4094 (2011)] molecule-molecule interactions are attractive, thanks to van der Waals corrections which are essential to describe such systems. We confirm the importance of the substrate effect to achieve the molecular network on the boron doped silicon surface without covalent bond. Our simulated STM images, calculated in the framework of the bSKAN code, give better agreement with the experimental STM images than those obtained by the integrated LDOS calculations within the Tersoff-Hamann approximation. The tungsten tip presence is essential to retrieve three paired lobes as observed experimentally. The observed protrusions arise from the phenyl arms located above silicon adatoms.

  6. Designing a photoresponsive molecularly imprinted system on a silicon wafer substrate surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongsheng; Xie, Danyang; Shi, Wenbin; Sun, Shudong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2013-07-01

    A photoresponsive molecularly imprinted system was prepared on a silicon wafer substrate surface via the host-guest complex of grafted 4-(3-triethoxysilylpropyiureido)azobenzene (TSUA) and mono-6-deoxy-6-((p-chlorosulfonyl)-benzoic acid)-β-cyclodextrin (CBA-β-CD), and the acid-base pair interactions/hydrogen bonds between CBA-β-CD and the template molecules, including theophylline (TPE) and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HA). A molecular imprinting cycle "imprinting → extracting → uptaking → shuffling" was also defined in the study, the processes of uptaking and shuffling were investigated in detail by equilibrium binding experiments, and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and Scatchard equation were used to evaluate the binding affinity and the theoretical binding sites of the molecularly imprinted (MIS), nonimprinted (NIS), and pure (PS) silicon wafer substrates. Compared with the NISs and PSs, the MISs showed a significantly higher adsorption capacity for the template molecules. More importantly, the MISs showed a reimprinted ability; after the process of shuffling, the molecularly imprinted systems on the substrate surface were destroyed, and new imprinted systems could be fabricated for the recognition of other template molecules after washing the substrates under irradiation at 450 nm. Moreover, the selective adsorption for the MISs was investigated, which indicated that the MISs showed specific affinity to the template molecules (TPE or 4-HA). PMID:23745767

  7. Fabrication of self-supporting porous silicon membranes and tuning transport properties by surface functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velleman, Leonora; Shearer, Cameron James; Ellis, Amanda Vera; Losic, Dusan; Voelcker, Nicolas Hans; Shapter, Joseph George

    2010-09-01

    This study presents a simple approach to perform selective mass transport through freestanding porous silicon (pSi) membranes. pSi membranes were fabricated by the electrochemical etching of silicon to produce membranes with controlled structure and pore sizes close to molecular dimensions (~12 nm in diameter). While these membranes are capable of size-exclusion based separations, chemically specific filtration remains a great challenge especially in the biomedical field. Herein, we investigate the transport properties of chemically functionalized pSi membranes. The membranes were functionalized using silanes (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)dimethylchlorosilane (PFDS) and N-(triethoxysilylpropyl)-o-polyethylene oxide urethane (PEGS) to give membranes hydrophobic (PFDS) and hydrophilic (PEGS) properties. The transport of probe dyes tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(ii) hexahydrate (Rubpy) and Rose Bengal (RB) through these functionalized membranes was examined to determine the effect surface functionalization has on the selectivity and separation ability of pSi membranes. This study provides the basis for further investigation into more sophisticated surface functionalization and coupled with the biocompatibility of pSi will lead to new advances in membrane based bio-separations.

  8. Conditions for laser-induced plasma to effectively remove nano-particles on silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinghua; Luo, Li; Zhang, Yubo; Hu, Ruifeng; Feng, Guoying

    2016-09-01

    Particles can be removed from a silicon surface by means of irradiation and a laser plasma shock wave. The particles and silicon are heated by the irradiation and they will expand differently due to their different expansion coefficients, making the particles easier to be removed. Laser plasma can ionize and even vaporize particles more significantly than an incident laser and, therefore, it can remove the particles more efficiently. The laser plasma shock wave plays a dominant role in removing particles, which is attributed to its strong burst force. The pressure of the laser plasma shock wave is determined by the laser pulse energy and the gap between the focus of laser and substrate surface. In order to obtain the working conditions for particle removal, the removal mechanism, as well as the temporal and spatial characteristics of velocity, propagation distance and pressure of shock wave have been researched. On the basis of our results, the conditions for nano-particle removal are achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11574221).

  9. Hemocompatibility of surface-modified, silicon-incorporated, diamond-like carbon films.

    PubMed

    Roy, R K; Choi, H W; Yi, J W; Moon, M-W; Lee, K-R; Han, D K; Shin, J H; Kamijo, A; Hasebe, T

    2009-01-01

    The hemocompatibility of plasma-treated, silicon-incorporated, diamond-like carbon (Si-DLC) films was investigated. Si-DLC films with a Si concentration of 2at.% were prepared on Si (100) or Nitinol substrates using a capacitively coupled radiofrequency plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method using a mixed gas of benzene (C(6)H(6)) and diluted silane (SiH(4):H(2)=10:90). The Si-DLC films were then treated with O(2), CF(4) or N(2) glow discharge for surface modification. The plasma treatment revealed an intimate relationship between the polar component of the surface energy and its hemocompatibility. All in vitro characterizations, i.e. protein absorption behavior, activated partial thromboplastin time measurement and platelet adhesion behavior, showed improved hemocompatibility of the N(2-)- or O(2)-plasma-treated surfaces where the polar component of the surface energy was significantly increased. Si-O or Si-N surface bonds played an important role in improving hemocompatibility, as observed in a model experiment. These results support the importance of a negatively charged polar component of the surface in inhibiting fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion. PMID:18753025

  10. Silver- and Gold-Ordered Structures on Single-Crystal Silicon Surface After Thermal Deposition.

    PubMed

    Karbivskyy, Vladimir; Karbivska, Love; Artemyuk, Viktor

    2016-12-01

    The formation mechanisms of Ag- and Au-ordered structures on single-crystal silicon (Si) (111) and Si (110) surfaces were researched using high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy method. It was shown that different patterns of self-assembled nanostructures with very precise and regular geometric shapes can be produced by controlling process parameters of thermal metal spraying on the substrate. The surfaces of nanorelieves at each stage of deposition were researched, and the main stages of morphological transformation were fixed.Self-ordered hexagonal pyramid-shaped nanostructures were formed at thermal deposition of gold on the Si (111), whereas only monolayer hexagonal formation could be observed on the plane Si (110). Gold monolayer flake nanostructures were obtained under certain technological parameters.Atomically smooth Ag film cannot be obtained on the Si (111) surface by means of thermal spraying at room temperature. The formation of two-dimensional (2D) clusters takes place; heating of these clusters at several hundred degrees Celsius leads to their transformation into atomically smooth covering.The weak interaction between Ag multilayer coatings and substrate was established that allows to clear crystal surface from metal with reproduction of the reconstructed Si (111) 7 × 7 surface by slight warming. The offered method can be used for single-crystal surface protection from destruction.

  11. Role of roughness parameters on the tribology of randomly nano-textured silicon surface.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, E; Pugno, N; Rota, A; Spagni, A; Lepore, E; Valeri, S

    2011-10-01

    This experimental work is oriented to give a contribution to the knowledge of the relationship among surface roughness parameters and tribological properties of lubricated surfaces; it is well known that these surface properties are strictly related, but a complete comprehension of such correlations is still far to be reached. For this purpose, a mechanical polishing procedure was optimized in order to induce different, but well controlled, morphologies on Si(100) surfaces. The use of different abrasive papers and slurries enabled the formation of a wide spectrum of topographical irregularities (from the submicro- to the nano-scale) and a broad range of surface profiles. An AFM-based morphological and topographical campaign was carried out to characterize each silicon rough surface through a set of parameters. Samples were subsequently water lubricated and tribologically characterized through ball-on-disk tribometer measurements. Indeed, the wettability of each surface was investigated by measuring the water droplet contact angle, that revealed a hydrophilic character for all the surfaces, even if no clear correlation with roughness emerged. Nevertheless, this observation brings input to the purpose, as it allows to exclude that the differences in surface profile affect lubrication. So it is possible to link the dynamic friction coefficient of rough Si samples exclusively to the opportune set of surface roughness parameters that can exhaustively describe both height amplitude variations (Ra, Rdq) and profile periodicity (Rsk, Rku, Ic) that influence asperity-asperity interactions and hydrodynamic lift in different ways. For this main reason they cannot be treated separately, but with dependent approach through which it was possible to explain even counter intuitive results: the unexpected decreasing of friction coefficient with increasing Ra is justifiable by a more consistent increasing of kurtosis Rku.

  12. Atomic scale control and understanding of cubic silicon carbide surface reconstructions, nanostructures and nanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukiassian, Patrick G.; Enriquez, Hanna B.

    2004-05-01

    The atomic scale ordering and properties of cubic silicon carbide (bgr-SiC) surfaces and nanostructures are investigated by atom-resolved room and high-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS), synchrotron radiation-based valence band and core level photoelectron spectroscopy (VB-PES, CL-PES) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD). In this paper, we review the latest results on the atomic scale understanding of (i) the structure of bgr-SiC(100) surface reconstructions, (ii) temperature-induced metallic surface phase transition, (iii) one dimensional Si(C) self-organized nanostructures having unprecedented characteristics, and on (iv) nanochemistry at SiC surfaces with hydrogen. The organization of these surface reconstructions as well as the 1D nanostructures' self-organization are primarily driven by surface stress. In this paper, we address such important issues as (i) the structure of the Si-rich 3 × 2, the Si-terminated c (4 × 2), the C-terminated c (2 × 2) reconstructions of the bgr-SiC(100) surface, (ii) the temperature-induced reversible {\\mathrm {c}}(4\\times 2) \\Leftrightarrow 2\\times 1 metallic phase transition, (iii) the formation of highly stable (up to 900 °C) Si atomic and vacancy lines, (iv) the temperature-induced sp to sp3 diamond like surface transformation, and (v) the first example of H-induced semiconductor surface metallization on the bgr-SiC (100) 3 × 2 surface. The results are discussed and compared to other experimental and theoretical investigations.

  13. Automated fabrication of back surface field silicon solar cells with screen printed wraparound contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornhill, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a process for fabricating 2 x 4 cm back surface field silicon solar cells having screen printed wraparound contacts is described. This process was specifically designed to be amenable for incorporation into the automated nonvacuum production line. Techniques were developed to permit the use of screen printing for producing improved back surface field structures, wraparound dielectric layers, and wraparound contacts. The optimized process sequence was then used to produce 1852 finished cells. Tests indicated an average conversion efficiency of 11% at AMO and 28 C, with an average degradation of maximum power output of 1.5% after boiling water immersion or thermal shock cycling. Contact adherence was satisfactory after these tests, as well as long term storage at high temperature and high humidity.

  14. Ag-modified silicon nanowires substrate for ultrasensitive surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Ming-Wang; Zhang, Ming-Liang; Wong, Ning-Bew; Ma, Dorothy Duo-duo; Wang, Hui; Chen, Weiwei; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2008-12-01

    We report a unique substrate for surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on silver nanoparticles-embedded silicon nanowires (SiNWs). The SiNWs were prepared by thermal evaporation of SiO powder via oxide-assisted growth, oxide removed with HF, and then used to reduce silver ions to form a highly decorated Ag-embedded surface. Such modified SiNWs substrates yielded ultrahigh SERS sensitivity, which could detect 25μl of 1×10-16M Rhodamine 6G, 1×10-16M crystal violet, and 1×10-14M nicotine in methanol solutions. An Ag-modified SiNW strand could also enable SERS detection of 25μl of 1×10-8mg/ml calf thymus DNA. The possible mechanisms for the ultrahigh SERS sensitivity were discussed.

  15. Reduction of thermal conductivity by surface scattering of phonons in periodic silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufriev, Roman; Maire, Jeremie; Nomura, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the impact of various phonon-scattering mechanisms on the in-plane thermal conductivity of suspended silicon thin films with two-dimensional periodic arrays of holes, i.e., phononic crystal (PnC) nanostructures. A large amount of data on the PnC structures with square, hexagonal, and honeycomb lattices reveals that the thermal conductivity is mostly determined by the surface-to-volume ratio. However, as the characteristic size of the structure is reduced down to several tens of nanometers, thermal conductivity becomes independent of the surface-to-volume ratio, lattice type, and other geometrical parameters, being controlled solely by the distance between adjacent holes (neck size).

  16. Low temperature surface passivation of crystalline silicon and its application to interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (ibc-shj) solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Zhan

    With the absence of shading loss together with improved quality of surface passivation introduced by low temperature processed amorphous silicon crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) heterojunction, the interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cell exhibits a potential for higher conversion efficiency and lower cost than a traditional front contact diffused junction solar cell. In such solar cells, the front surface passivation is of great importance to achieve both high open-circuit voltage (Voc) and short-circuit current (Jsc). Therefore, the motivation of this work is to develop a low temperature processed structure for the front surface passivation of IBC-SHJ solar cells, which must have an excellent and stable passivation quality as well as a good anti-reflection property. Four different thin film materials/structures were studied and evaluated for this purpose, namely: amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H), thick amorphous silicon film (a-Si:H), amorphous silicon/silicon nitride/silicon carbide (a-Si:H/a-SiN x:H/a-SiC:H) stack structure with an ultra-thin a-Si:H layer, and zinc sulfide (ZnS). It was demonstrated that the a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H/a-SiC:H stack surpasses other candidates due to both of its excellent surface passivation quality (SRV<5 cm/s) and lower absorption losses. The low recombination rate at the stack structure passivated c-Si surface is found to be resulted from (i) field effect passivation due to the positive fixed charge (Q fix~1x1011 cm-2 with 5 nm a-Si:H layer) in a-SiNx:H as measured from capacitance-voltage technique, and (ii) reduced defect state density (mid-gap Dit~4x1010 cm-2eV-1) at a-Si:H/c-Si interface provided by a 5 nm thick a-Si:H layer, as characterized by conductance-frequency measurements. Paralleled with the experimental studies, a computer program was developed in this work based on the extended Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) model of surface recombination. With the help of this program, the experimental

  17. Silicone hydrogel contact lens surface analysis by atomic force microscopy: shape parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldez, M. J.; Garcia-Resua, C.; Lira, M.; Sánchez-Sellero, C.; Yebra-Pimentel, E.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Average roughness (Ra) is generally used to quantify roughness; however it makes no distinction between spikes and troughs. Shape parameters as kurtosis (Rku) and skewness (Rsk) serve to distinguish between two profiles with the same Ra. They have been reported in many biomedical fields, but they were no applied to contact lenses before. The aim of this study is to analyze surface properties of four silicone hydrogel contact lenses (CL) by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) evaluating Ra, Rku and Rsk. Methods: CL used in this study were disposable silicone hydrogel senofilcon A, comfilcon A, balafilcon A and lotrafilcon B. Unworn CL surfaces roughness and topography were measured by AFM (Veeco, multimode-nanoscope V) in tapping modeTM. Ra, Rku and Rsk for 25 and 196 μm2 areas were determined. Results: Surface topography and parameters showed different characteristics depending on the own nature of the contact lens (Ra/Rku/Rsk for 25 and 196 μm2 areas were: senofilcon A 3,33/3,74/0,74 and 3,76/18,16/1,75; comfilcon A: 1,56/31,09/2,93 and 2,76/45,82/3,60; balafilcon A: 2,01/33,62/-2,14 and 2,54/23,36/-1,96; lotrafilcon B: 26,97/4,11/-0,34 and 29,25/2,82/-0,23). In lotrafilcon B, with the highest Ra, Rku showed a lower degree of peakedness of its distribution. Negative Rsk value obtained for balafilcon A showed a clear predominance of valleys in this lens. Conclusions: Kku and Rsk are two statistical parameters useful to analyse CL surfaces, which complete information from Ra. Differences in values distribution and symmetry were observed between CL.

  18. Electronic states on silicon surface after deposition and annealing of SiO{sub x} films

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasenko, N. A. Oleksenko, P. F.; Denisova, Z. L.; Sopinskii, N. V.; Veligura, L. I.; Gule, E. G.; Litvin, O. S.; Mukhlyo, M. A.

    2011-05-15

    The spectrum of the photoconductivity induced by the polarization field of charges at surface states and traps in the film bulk has been analyzed to determine the energy band diagram at the c-Si-SiO{sub x} interface and the changes in the electronic states after the film annealing. It is found that the energy bands are bent at the Si-SiO{sub x} interface and the Si surface is enriched in electrons. In equilibrium the photocurrent peak at 1.1 eV is due to the band-to-band transitions in the silicon part of the interface. Annealing shifts the peak to higher energies; this shift increases with an increase in the annealing temperature from 650 to 1000 Degree-Sign C. This effect is accompanied by a decrease in the photocurrent at {<=}1.1 eV and weakening of the band-edge photoluminescence near the Si surface. The changes revealed are explained by the formation of an oxide layer with Si nanoclusters at the Si-SiO{sub x} interface upon annealing. This process is caused by oxygen diffusion from the SiO{sub x} film, which occurs mainly via defects on the Si wafer surface. The photoconductivity spectrum of the samples charged by short-term application of a negative potential to silicon exhibits electronic transitions in the SiO{sub x} film, both from the matrix electronic states and from the states of the defects and Si nanoclusters in the film.

  19. Analytical approximation of effective surface recombination velocity of dielectric-passivated p-type silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, Jed; Rohatgi, Ajeet

    2001-09-01

    New analytical equations are derived to approximate the effective surface recombination velocity ( Seff) on p-type silicon for three different cases: low-level injection (LLI) with surface hole concentration ( ps) much greater than surface electron concentration ( ns) and with silicon charge ( QSi) due primarily to ionized acceptors, LLI with ns≫ ps and QSi due primarily to ionized acceptors, and high-level injection with ns≫ ps and QSi due primarily to mobile electrons. The three new equations predict the dependence of Seff on individual parameters such as injection level ( Δn), doping level ( NA), and fixed dielectric charge ( Qf). The new equations complement a previously derived result (for LLI with ns≫ ps and QSi due primarily to mobile electrons) and together allow reasonable explanations to be given for all sections of all Seff vs. Δn and Seff vs. NA curves generated by a quasi-exact numerical method. The analytical approximations are compared with the full numerical solutions. Under appropriate conditions, the analytical approximations agree with the numerical solutions within a factor of 3. Guided by the analytical approximations, numerical solutions are fitted to two sets of experimental data: the injection level dependence of Seff for an oxide-passivated wafer; and the doping dependence of Seff for wafers passivated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited nitride (SiN x), conventional furnace oxide (CFO), and the SiN x/CFO stack. The SiN x/CFO stack not only provides surface passivation that is superior to either dielectric alone; it is also less doping dependent. The analytical approximations indicate that this suppressed doping dependence could be due to a lower interface state density or a higher fixed dielectric charge ( Qf).

  20. The importance of surface recombination and energy-bandgap narrowing in p-n-junction silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, J. G.; Lindholm, F. A.; Shibib, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data demonstrating the sensitivity of open-circuit voltage to front-surface conditions are presented for a variety of p-n-junction silicon solar cells. Analytical models accounting for the data are defined and supported by additional experiments. The models and the data imply that a) surface recombination significantly limits the open-circuit voltage (and the short-circuit current) of typical silicon cells, and b) energy-bandgap narrowing is important in the manifestation of these limitations. The models suggest modifications in both the structural design and the fabrication processing of the cells that would result in substantial improvements in cell performance. The benefits of one such modification - the addition of a thin thermal silicon-dioxide layer on the front surface - are indicated experimentally.

  1. Aggregation and Particle Formation of Therapeutic Proteins in Contact With a Novel Fluoropolymer Surface Versus Siliconized Surfaces: Effects of Agitation in Vials and in Prefilled Syringes.

    PubMed

    Teska, Brandon M; Brake, Jeffrey M; Tronto, Gregory S; Carpenter, John F

    2016-07-01

    We examined the effects of an accelerated agitation protocol on 2 protein therapeutics, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and Avastin (bevacizumab), in contact with a novel fluoropolymer surface and more typical siliconized surfaces. The fluoropolymer surface provides "solid-phase" lubrication for the syringe plunger-obviating the need for silicone oil lubrication in prefilled syringes. We tested the 2 surfaces in a vial system and in prefilled glass syringes. We also examined the effects of 2 buffers, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and 0.2-M glycine, with and without the addition of polysorbate 20, on agitation-induced aggregation of IVIG. Aggregation was monitored by measuring subvisible particle formation and soluble protein loss. In both vials and syringes, protein particle formation was much lower during agitation with the fluoropolymer surface than with the siliconized surface. Also, particle formation was greater in PBS than in glycine buffer, an effect attributed to lower colloidal stability of IVIG in PBS. Polysorbate 20 in the formulation greatly inhibited protein particle formation. Overall, the fluoropolymer plunger surface in an unsiliconized glass barrel was demonstrated to be a viable solution for eliminating silicone oil droplets from prefilled syringe formulations and providing a consistent system for rationale formulation development and simplified particle analysis. PMID:27233685

  2. Transitions from nanoscale to microscale dynamic friction mechanisms on polyethylene and silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederberger, S.; Gracias, D. H.; Komvopoulos, K.; Somorjai, G. A.

    2000-03-01

    The dynamic friction mechanisms of polyethylene and silicon were investigated for apparent contact pressures and contact areas in the ranges of 8 MPa-18 GPa and 17 nm2-9500 μm2, respectively. Friction force measurements were obtained with a friction force microscope, scanning force microscope, and pin-on-disk tribometer. Silicon and diamond tips with a nominal radius of curvature between 100 nm and 1.2 mm were slid against low- and high-density polyethylene and Si(100) substrates under contact loads in the range of 5 nN-0.27 N. The low friction coefficients obtained with all material systems at low contact pressures indicated that deformation at the sliding interface was primarily elastic. Alternatively, the significantly higher friction coefficients at higher contact pressures suggested that plastic deformation was the principal mode of deformation. The high friction coefficients of polyethylene observed with large apparent contact areas are interpreted in terms of the microstructure evolution involving the rearrangement of crystalline regions (lamellae) nearly parallel to the sliding direction, which reduces the surface resistance to plastic shearing. Such differences in the friction behavior of polyethylene resulting from stress-induced microstructural changes were found to occur over a relatively large range of the apparent contact area. The friction behavior of silicon was strongly affected by the presence of a native oxide film. Results are presented to demonstrate the effect of the scale of deformation at the contact interface on the dynamic friction behavior and the significance of contact parameters on the friction measurements obtained with different instruments.

  3. Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy on laser-doped silicon with different surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Young-Joon; Franklin, Evan; Fell, Andreas; Ernst, Marco; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Macdonald, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy (μ-PLS) is applied to investigate shallow layers of laser-processed silicon for solar cell applications. Micron-scale measurement (with spatial resolution down to 1 μm) enables investigation of the fundamental impact of laser processing on the electronic properties of silicon as a function of position within the laser-processed region, and in particular at specific positions such as at the boundary/edge of processed and unprocessed regions. Low-temperature μ-PLS enables qualitative analysis of laser-processed regions by identifying PLS signals corresponding to both laser-induced doping and laser-induced damage. We show that the position of particular luminescence peaks can be attributed to band-gap narrowing corresponding to different levels of subsurface laser doping, which is achieved via multiple 248 nm nanosecond excimer laser pulses with fluences in the range 1.5-4 J/cm2 and using commercially available boron-rich spin-on-dopant precursor films. We demonstrate that characteristic defect PL spectra can be observed subsequent to laser doping, providing evidence of laser-induced crystal damage. The impact of laser parameters such as fluence and number of repeat pulses on laser-induced damage is also analyzed by observing the relative level of defect PL spectra and absolute luminescence intensity. Luminescence owing to laser-induced damage is observed to be considerably larger at the boundaries of laser-doped regions than at the centers, highlighting the significant role of the edges of laser-doped region on laser doping quality. Furthermore, by comparing the damage signal observed after laser processing of two different substrate surface conditions (chemically-mechanically polished and tetramethylammonium hydroxide etched), we show that wafer preparation can be an important factor impacting the quality of laser-processed silicon and solar cells.

  4. Surface toughness of silicon nitride bioceramics: II, Comparison with commercial oxide materials.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Bryan J; Enomoto, Yuto; Zhu, Wenliang; Boffelli, Marco; Marin, Elia; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Raman microprobe-assisted indentation, a micromechanics method validated in a companion paper, was used to compare the surface toughening behaviors of silicon nitride (Si3N4) and alumina-based bioceramics employed in joint arthroplasty (i.e., monolithic alumina, Al2O3, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2)-toughened alumina, ZTA). Quantitative assessments of microscopic stress fields both ahead and behind the tip of Vickers indentation cracks propagated under increasing indentation loads were systematically made using a Raman microprobe with spatial resolution on the order of a single micrometer. Concurrently, crack opening displacement (COD) profiles were monitored on the same microcracks screened by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman eye clearly visualized different mechanisms operative in toughening Si3N4 and ZTA bioceramics (i.e., crack-face bridging and ZrO2 polymorphic transformation, respectively) as compared to the brittle behavior of monolithic Al2O3. Moreover, emphasis was placed on assessing not only the effectiveness but also the durability of such toughening effects when the biomaterials were aged in a hydrothermal environment. A significant degree of embrittlement at the biomaterial surface was recorded in the transformation-toughened ZTA, with the surface toughness reduced by exposure to the hydrothermal environment. Conversely, the Si3N4 biomaterial experienced a surface toughness value independent of hydrothermal attack. Crack-face bridging thus appears to be a durable surface toughening mechanism for biomaterials in joint arthroplasty. PMID:26437609

  5. Hybrid silicon honeycomb/organic solar cells with enhanced efficiency using surface etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruiyuan; Sun, Teng; Liu, Jiawei; Wu, Shan; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-06-01

    Silicon (Si) nanostructure-based photovoltaic devices are attractive for their excellent optical and electrical performance, but show lower efficiency than their planar counterparts due to the increased surface recombination associated with the high surface area and roughness. Here, we demonstrate an efficiency enhancement for hybrid nanostructured Si/polymer solar cells based on a novel Si honeycomb (SiHC) structure using a simple etching method. SiHC structures are fabricated using a combination of nanosphere lithography and plasma treatment followed by a wet chemical post-etching. SiHC has shown superior light-trapping ability in comparison with the other Si nanostructures, along with a robust structure. Anisotropic tetramethylammonium hydroxide etching not only tunes the final surface morphologies of the nanostructures, but also reduces the surface roughness leading to a lower recombination rate in the hybrid solar cells. The suppressed recombination loss, benefiting from the reduced surface-to-volume ratio and roughness, has resulted in a high open-circuit voltage of 600 mV, a short-circuit current of 31.46 mA cm-2 due to the light-trapping ability of the SiHCs, and yields a power conversion efficiency of 12.79% without any other device structure optimization.

  6. Hybrid silicon honeycomb/organic solar cells with enhanced efficiency using surface etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruiyuan; Sun, Teng; Liu, Jiawei; Wu, Shan; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-06-01

    Silicon (Si) nanostructure-based photovoltaic devices are attractive for their excellent optical and electrical performance, but show lower efficiency than their planar counterparts due to the increased surface recombination associated with the high surface area and roughness. Here, we demonstrate an efficiency enhancement for hybrid nanostructured Si/polymer solar cells based on a novel Si honeycomb (SiHC) structure using a simple etching method. SiHC structures are fabricated using a combination of nanosphere lithography and plasma treatment followed by a wet chemical post-etching. SiHC has shown superior light-trapping ability in comparison with the other Si nanostructures, along with a robust structure. Anisotropic tetramethylammonium hydroxide etching not only tunes the final surface morphologies of the nanostructures, but also reduces the surface roughness leading to a lower recombination rate in the hybrid solar cells. The suppressed recombination loss, benefiting from the reduced surface-to-volume ratio and roughness, has resulted in a high open-circuit voltage of 600 mV, a short-circuit current of 31.46 mA cm‑2 due to the light-trapping ability of the SiHCs, and yields a power conversion efficiency of 12.79% without any other device structure optimization.

  7. Hybrid silicon honeycomb/organic solar cells with enhanced efficiency using surface etching.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiyuan; Sun, Teng; Liu, Jiawei; Wu, Shan; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-06-24

    Silicon (Si) nanostructure-based photovoltaic devices are attractive for their excellent optical and electrical performance, but show lower efficiency than their planar counterparts due to the increased surface recombination associated with the high surface area and roughness. Here, we demonstrate an efficiency enhancement for hybrid nanostructured Si/polymer solar cells based on a novel Si honeycomb (SiHC) structure using a simple etching method. SiHC structures are fabricated using a combination of nanosphere lithography and plasma treatment followed by a wet chemical post-etching. SiHC has shown superior light-trapping ability in comparison with the other Si nanostructures, along with a robust structure. Anisotropic tetramethylammonium hydroxide etching not only tunes the final surface morphologies of the nanostructures, but also reduces the surface roughness leading to a lower recombination rate in the hybrid solar cells. The suppressed recombination loss, benefiting from the reduced surface-to-volume ratio and roughness, has resulted in a high open-circuit voltage of 600 mV, a short-circuit current of 31.46 mA cm(-2) due to the light-trapping ability of the SiHCs, and yields a power conversion efficiency of 12.79% without any other device structure optimization.

  8. Dissociation of Trinitrotoluene on the Surface of Porous Silicon Under Laser Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzishchin, Yury; Dovzhenko, Dmitriy; Martynov, Igor; Kotkovskii, Genadii; Chistyakov, Alexander

    Dissociation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) sorbed on porous silicon (pSi) surface under UV laser irradiation has been studied. A method based on ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been used in this study. Excitation and ionization of TNT molecules has been occurred at atmospheric pressure. A dependence of TNT ion spectrum on standing time of TNT molecules on pSi surface has been demonstrated. The ion type has changed from (TNT-H) - to (TNT-NO2) - which indicates a slow chemical reaction between pSi surface and TNT molecules. The first step of (TNT-NO2) - formation has been found to be a result of laser stimulated surface dissociation and subsequent desorption of a neutral TNT-NO2 fragment. The second step of (TNT-NO2) - formation is a capture of an electron emitted from the pSi surface under laser irradiation. The result of this study could be used in the area of explosive detection.

  9. A surface science investigation of silicon carbide: Oxidation, crystal growth and surface structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    For the semiconductor SiC to fulfill its potential as an electronic material, methods must be developed to produce insulating surface oxide layers in a reproducible fashion. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to investigate the oxidation of single crystal {alpha}-SiC over a wide temperature and O{sub 2} pressure range. The {alpha}-SiC surface becomes graphitic at high temperatures and low O{sub 2} pressures due to Si and SiO sublimation from the surface. Amorphous SiO{sub 2} surface layers from on {alpha}-SiC at elevated O{sub 2} pressures and temperatures. Both the graphitization and oxidation of {alpha}-SiC appears to be enhanced by surface roughness. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is currently the preferred method of producing single crystal SiC, although the method is slow and prone to contamination. We have attempted to produce SiC films at lower temperatures and higher deposition rates using plasma enhanced CVD with CH{sub 3}SiH{sub 3}. Scanning AES, XPS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to study the composition and morphology of the deposited Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films as a function of substrate temperature, plasma power and ion flux bombardment of the film during deposition. High energy ion bombardment during deposition was found to increase film density and substrate adhesion while simultaneously reducing hydrogen and oxygen incorporation in the film. Under all deposition conditions the Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films were found to be amorphous, with the ion bombarded films showing promise as hard protective coatings. Studies with LEED and AES have shown that {beta}-SiC (100) exhibits multiple surface reconstructions, depending on the surface composition. These surface reconstructions possess substantially different surface reactivities at elevated temperatures, which can complicate the fabrication of metal on SiC junctions.

  10. Origin of porous silicon photoluminescence: Evidence for a surface bound oxyhydride-like emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gole, James L.; Dudel, Frank P.; Grantier, David; Dixon, David A.

    1997-07-01

    Time-dependent excitation spectroscopy coupled with quantum chemical calculations is used to demonstrate that the photoluminescence (PL) resulting from the ultraviolet optical pumping of an etched porous silicon (PS) surface results from a silicon oxyhydride-like fluorophor bound to the PS surface. The time-dependent PL, in both aqueous (HF/H2O and HF/CH3OH/H2O) and nonaqueous [MeCN/HF (anhydrous)] etching media, has been monitored both in situ, during the etching cycle and before the PS sample is removed from the etching solution, and ex situ, after removal of the PS sample from the etching solution. The early appearance in time of the PS luminescence is consistent with the formation of a surface bound emitter created on a time scale (<=10 s) much shorter than that needed for pore formation. Laser excitation spectra (PLE) over the wavelength range extending from 193 to 400 nm produce an almost identical time-dependent PL emission feature between 550 and 700 nm. Influenced strongly by the chemical composition of the etch solution, an intermediate ``green'' emitter can be excited with select laser pumping wavelengths and observed to transform to the final ``orange-red'' luminescent product. In conjunction with experiments whose focus has been to compare the time-dependent PL after ArF (193 nm) and N2 (337 nm) laser excitation (PLE), the data suggest the pumping of an excited-state manifold for a molecule-like species followed by rapid relaxation via nonradiative transitions down the manifold and the subsequent emission of radiation at much longer wavelength. Detailed quantum chemical modeling supports this interpretation and suggests a correlation to changes in the bonding associated with electronic transitions that involve silanone-like ground electronic singlet states and their low-lying triplet excitons. Especially important are those changes involving SiO related bonds. A substantial shift in the excited-state manifold, relative to the ground state, correlates

  11. One-step Maskless Fabrication and Optical Characterization of Silicon Surfaces with Antireflective Properties and a White Color Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Ling; Feidenhans’l, Nikolaj A.; Telecka, Agnieszka; Taboryski, Rafael J.

    2016-01-01

    We report a simple one-step maskless fabrication of inverted pyramids on silicon wafers by reactive ion etching. The fabricated surface structures exhibit excellent anti-reflective properties: The total reflectance of the nano inverted pyramids fabricated by our method can be as low as 12% without any anti-reflective layers, and down to only 0.33% with a silicon nitride coating. The results from angle resolved scattering measurements indicate that the existence of triple reflections is responsible for the reduced reflectance. The surfaces with the nano inverted pyramids also exhibit a distinct milky white color. PMID:27725703

  12. One-step Maskless Fabrication and Optical Characterization of Silicon Surfaces with Antireflective Properties and a White Color Appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Ling; Feidenhans’L, Nikolaj A.; Telecka, Agnieszka; Taboryski, Rafael J.

    2016-10-01

    We report a simple one-step maskless fabrication of inverted pyramids on silicon wafers by reactive ion etching. The fabricated surface structures exhibit excellent anti-reflective properties: The total reflectance of the nano inverted pyramids fabricated by our method can be as low as 12% without any anti-reflective layers, and down to only 0.33% with a silicon nitride coating. The results from angle resolved scattering measurements indicate that the existence of triple reflections is responsible for the reduced reflectance. The surfaces with the nano inverted pyramids also exhibit a distinct milky white color.

  13. Influence of the surface termination on the light emission of crystalline silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botas, Alexandre M. P.; Anthony, Rebecca J.; Wu, Jeslin; Rowe, David J.; Silva, Nuno J. O.; Kortshagen, Uwe; Pereira, Rui N.; Ferreira, Rute A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The light emission properties of silicon crystalline nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been investigated using steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements carried out at 12 K and at room temperature. To enable a comparative study of the role of surface terminal groups on the optical properties, we investigated SiNPs-H ensembles with the same mean NP diameter but differing on the surface termination, namely organic-functionalized with 1-dodecene (SiNPs-C12) and H-terminated (SiNPs-H). We show that although the spectral dependence of the light emission is rather unaffected by surface termination, characterized by a single broad band peaking at ∼1.64 eV, both the exciton recombination lifetimes and quantum yields display a pronounced dependence on the surface termination. Exciton lifetimes and quantum yields are found to be significantly lower in SiNPs-H compared SiNPs-C12. This difference is due to distinct non-radiative recombination probabilities resulting from inter-NP exciton migration, which in SiNPs-C12 is inhibited by the energy barriers imposed by the bulky surface groups. The surface groups of organic-terminated SiPs are responsible for the inhibition of inter-NP exciton transfer, yielding a higher quantum yield compared to SiNPs-H. The surface oxidation of SiNPs-C12 leads to the appearance of a phenomenon of an exciton transference from to the Si core to oxide-related states that contribute to light emission. These excitons recombine radiatively, explaining why the emission quantum of the organic-terminated SiNPs is the same after surface oxidation of SiNPs-C12.

  14. Surface and morphological features of laser-irradiated silicon under vacuum, nitrogen and ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Asma; Bashir, Shazia; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced surface and structural modification of silicon (Si) has been investigated under three different environments of vacuum, nitrogen (100 Torr) and ethanol. The interaction of 1000 pulses of KrF (λ ≈ 248 nm, τ ≈ 18 ns, repetition rate ≈ 30 Hz) Excimer laser at two different fluences of 2.8 J/cm2 and 4 J/cm2 resulted in formation of various kinds of features such as laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), spikes, columns, cones and cracks. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets is explored by Raman spectroscopy. SEM analysis exhibits a non-uniform distribution of micro-scale pillars and spikes at the central ablated regime of silicon irradiated at low laser fluence of 2.8 J/cm2 under vacuum. Whereas cones, pits, cavities and ripples like features are seen at the boundaries. At higher fluence of 4 J/cm2, laser induced periodic structures as well as micro-columns are observed. In the case of ablation in nitrogen environment, melting, splashing, self-organized granular structures and cracks along with redeposition are observed at lower fluence. Such types of small scaled structures in nitrogen are attributed to confinement and shielding effects of nitrogen plasma. Whereas, a crater with multiple ablative layers is formed in the case of ablation at higher fluence. Significantly different surface morphology of Si is observed in the case of ablation in ethanol. It reveals the formation of cavities along with small scale pores and less redeposition. These results reveal that the growth of surface and morphological features of irradiated Si are strongly dependent upon the laser fluence as well as environmental conditions. The difference in surface morphology is attributable to cooling, confinement and shielding effects as well as difference in plasma temperature, density and pressure of environmental media that corresponds to different energy deposition

  15. Passivation of silicon surfaces by heat treatment in liquid water at 110 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Tomohiko; Sameshima, Toshiyuki; Hasumi, Masahiko; Mizuno, Tomohisa

    2015-10-01

    We report the effective passivation of silicon surfaces by heating single-crystalline silicon substrates in liquid water at 110 °C for 1 h. High photo-induced effective minority carrier lifetimes τeff were obtained ranging from 8.3 × 10-4 to 3.1 × 10-3 s and from 1.2 × 10-4 to 6.0 × 10-4 s for the n- and p-type samples, respectively, under 635 nm light illumination, while the τeff values of the initial bare samples were lower than 1.2 × 10-5 s. The heat treatment in liquid water at 110 °C for 1 h resulted in low surface recombination velocities ranging from 7 to 34 cm/s and from 49 to 250 cm/s for the n- and p-type samples, respectively. The photo-conductivity of the n-type sample was increased from 3.8 × 10-3 (initial) to 1.4 × 10-1 S/cm by the present heat treatment under air-mass (AM) 1.5 light illumination at 100 mW/cm2. The thickness of the passivation layer was estimated to be only approximately 0.7 nm. Metal-insulator-semiconductor-type solar cells were demonstrated with Al and Au metal formation on the passivated surface. Rectified current voltage and solar cell characteristics were observed. The open circuit voltages were obtained to be 0.52 and 0.49 V under AM 1.5 light illumination at 100 mW/cm2 for the n- and p-type samples, respectively.

  16. Black silicon SERS substrate: effect of surface morphology on SERS detection and application of single algal cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu-Luen; Juang, Yi-Je

    2014-03-15

    In this study, we have investigated the effect of the surface morphology of the black silicon substrate on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and explored its application of single algal cell detection. By adjusting the O2 and SF6 flow rates in the cryogenic plasma etching process, different surface morphologies of the black silicon substrate was produced without performing the lithographic process. It was found the Raman signals were better enhanced as the tip density of the black silicon substrate increased. In addition, as the thickness of the deposited gold layer increased, the SERS effect increased as well, which could be owing to the generation of more hot spots by bridging individual silicon tips through deposition of gold layer. For the black silicon substrate with tip density of 30 tips/μm(2) and covered by 400 nm deposited gold layer, the detection limit of 10 fM R6G solution concentration with uniform SERS effect across the substrate was achieved. Furthermore, detection of individual algal cell (Chlorella vulgaris) was performed at the SERS substrate as fabricated and the Raman signals of carotenoid and lipid were substantially enhanced.

  17. Containment of a silicone fluid free surface in reduced gravity using barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.; Jacobson, Thomas P.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment planned for flight aboard the Space Shuttle, tests were conducted under reduced gravity in the 2.2-sec Drop Tower and the 5.0-sec Zero-G facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The dynamics of controlling the test fluid, a 10-cSt viscosity silicone fluid in a low gravity environment were investigated using different container designs and barrier coatings. Three container edge designs were tested without a barrier coating; a square edge, a sharp edge with a 45-deg slope, and a sawtooth edge. All three edge designs were successful in containing the fluid below the edge. G-jitter experiments were made in scaled down containers subjected to horizontal accelerations. The data showed that a barrier coating is effective in containing silicone fluid under g-levels up to 10 sup -1 sub g sub 0. In addition, a second barrier coating was found which has similar anti-wetting characteristics and is also more durable.

  18. Effects of Hypervelocity Impacts on Silicone Elastomer Seals and Mating Aluminum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    While in space silicone based elastomer seals planned for use on NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) are exposed to threats from micrometeoroids and orbital debris (MMOD). An understanding of these threats is required to assess risks to the crew, the CEV orbiter, and missions. An Earth based campaign of hypervelocity impacts on small scale seal rings has been done to help estimate MMOD threats to the primary docking seal being developed for the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). LIDS is being developed to enable the CEV to dock to the ISS (International Space Station) or to Altair (NASA's next lunar lander). The silicone seal on LIDS seals against aluminum alloy flanges on ISS or Altair. Since the integrity of a seal depends on both sealing surfaces, aluminum targets were also impacted. The variables considered in this study included projectile mass, density, speed, incidence angle, seal materials, and target surface treatments and coatings. Most of the impacts used a velocity near 8 km/s and spherical aluminum projectiles (density = 2.7 g/cubic cm), however, a few tests were done near 5.6 km/s. Tests were also performed using projectile densities of 7.7, 2.79, 2.5 or 1.14 g/cubic cm. Projectile incidence angles examined included 0 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg from normal to the plane of the target. Elastomer compounds impacted include Parker's S0383-70 and Esterline's ELA-SA-401 in the as received condition, or after an atomic oxygen treatment. Bare, anodized and nickel coated aluminum targets were tested simulating the candidate mating seal surface materials. After impact, seals and aluminum plates were leak tested: damaged seals were tested against an undamaged aluminum plate; and undamaged seals were placed at various locations over craters in aluminum plates. It has been shown that silicone elastomer seals can withstand an impressive level of damage before leaking beyond allowable limits. In general on the tests performed to date, the diameter of the crater in

  19. Effects of Hypervelocity Impacts on Silicone Elastomer Seals and Mating Aluminum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    While in space silicone based elastomer seals planned for use on NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) are exposed to threats from micrometeoroids and orbital debris (MMOD). An understanding of these threats is required to assess risks to the crew, the CEV orbiter, and missions. An Earth based campaign of hypervelocity impacts on small scale seal rings has been done to help estimate MMOD threats to the primary docking seal being developed for the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). LIDS is being developed to enable the CEV to dock to the ISS (International Space Station) or to Altair (NASA's next lunar lander). The silicone seal on LIDS seals against aluminum alloy flanges on ISS or Altair. Since the integrity of a seal depends on both sealing surfaces, aluminum targets were also impacted. The variables considered in this study included projectile mass, density, speed, incidence angle, seal materials, and target surface treatments and coatings. Most of the impacts used a velocity near 8 km/s and spherical aluminum projectiles (density = 2.7 g/cubic centimeter), however, a few tests were done near 5.6 km/s. Tests were also performed using projectile densities of 7.7, 2.79, 2.5 or 1.14 g/cubic centimeter. Projectile incidence angles examined included 0 degrees, 45 degrees , and 60 degrees from normal to the plane of the target. Elastomer compounds impacted include Parker's S0383-70 and Esterline's ELA-SA-401 in the as received condition, or after an atomic oxygen treatment. Bare, anodized and nickel coated aluminum targets were tested simulating the candidate mating seal surface materials. After impact, seals and aluminum plates were leak tested: damaged seals were tested against an undamaged aluminum plate; and undamaged seals were placed at various locations over craters in aluminum plates. It has been shown that silicone elastomer seals can withstand an impressive level of damage before leaking beyond allowable limits. In general on the tests performed to date, the

  20. Decoration of silicon nanowires with silver nanoparticles for ultrasensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Cristiano; Faro, Maria J Lo; Bertino, Giulia; Ossi, Paolo M; Neri, Fortunato; Trusso, Sebastiano; Musumeci, Paolo; Galli, Matteo; Cioffi, Nicola; Irrera, Alessia; Priolo, Francesco; Fazio, Barbara

    2016-09-16

    Silicon nanowires (Si NWs), produced by the chemical etching technique, were decorated with silver nanoparticles (NPs) produced at room temperature by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Silver NPs were obtained by means of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a target in the presence of a controlled Ar atmosphere. Two different laser pulse numbers and Si NWs having different lengths were used to change the NP number density on the Si NW surface. The resulting Ag NP morphologies were studied by scanning electron microscopy imaging. The results show that this industrially compatible technological approach allows the coverage of the Si NW walls with Ag NPs with a strong control of the NP size distribution and spatial arrangement. The obtained Ag NP decorated Si NWs are free from chemicals contamination and there is no need of post deposition high temperature processes. The optical properties of Si NW arrays were investigated by reflectance spectroscopy that showed the presence of a plasmon related absorption peak, whose position and width is dependent on the Ag NP surface morphology. Coupling the huge surface-to-volume ratio of Si NW arrays with the plasmonic properties of silver nanoparticles resulted in a 3D structure suitable for very sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications, as demonstrated by the detection of Rhodamine 6G in aqueous solution at a concentration level of 10(-8) M. PMID:27504708

  1. Decoration of silicon nanowires with silver nanoparticles for ultrasensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D’Andrea, Cristiano; Lo Faro, Maria J.; Bertino, Giulia; Ossi, Paolo M.; Neri, Fortunato; Trusso, Sebastiano; Musumeci, Paolo; Galli, Matteo; Cioffi, Nicola; Irrera, Alessia; Priolo, Francesco; Fazio, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    Silicon nanowires (Si NWs), produced by the chemical etching technique, were decorated with silver nanoparticles (NPs) produced at room temperature by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Silver NPs were obtained by means of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a target in the presence of a controlled Ar atmosphere. Two different laser pulse numbers and Si NWs having different lengths were used to change the NP number density on the Si NW surface. The resulting Ag NP morphologies were studied by scanning electron microscopy imaging. The results show that this industrially compatible technological approach allows the coverage of the Si NW walls with Ag NPs with a strong control of the NP size distribution and spatial arrangement. The obtained Ag NP decorated Si NWs are free from chemicals contamination and there is no need of post deposition high temperature processes. The optical properties of Si NW arrays were investigated by reflectance spectroscopy that showed the presence of a plasmon related absorption peak, whose position and width is dependent on the Ag NP surface morphology. Coupling the huge surface-to-volume ratio of Si NW arrays with the plasmonic properties of silver nanoparticles resulted in a 3D structure suitable for very sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications, as demonstrated by the detection of Rhodamine 6G in aqueous solution at a concentration level of 10‑8 M.

  2. Low-damage surface smoothing of laser crystallized polycrystalline silicon using gas cluster ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokioka, H.; Yamarin, H.; Fujino, T.; Inoue, M.; Seki, T.; Matsuo, J.

    2007-04-01

    Surface smoothing of laser crystallized polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films using gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) technology has been studied. It is found that both SF6-GCIB and O2-GCIB decrease the height of hillocks and reduce the surface roughness of the irradiated films. The mean surface roughness value of poly-Si films was reduced from 10.8 nm to 2.8 nm by SF6-GCIB irradiation at 80°. Ultraviolet reflectance measurement reveals that GCIB irradiation causes damage near-surface of the poly-Si films. Formation of the damage, however, can be suppressed by using GCIB irradiation at high incident angle. Effect of GCIB irradiation in a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor has also been investigated. The capacitance-voltage curves of MIS capacitor with SF6-GCIB irradiation are distorted. On the contrary, the distortion is reduced by O2-GCIB irradiation at 80, which suggests that electrical-activated damage of the films can be decreased by using O2-GCIB irradiation.

  3. Fabrication of microlens array on silicon surface using electrochemical wet stamping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Lei-Jie; Zhou, Hang; Zhu, Li-Min

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on the fabrication of microlens array (MLA) on silicon surface by taking advantage of a novel micromachining approach, the electrochemical we stamping (E-WETS). The E-WETS allows the direct imprinting of MLA on an agarose stamp into the substrate through a selective anodic dissolution process. The pre-patterned agarose stamp can direct and supply the solution preferentially on the contact area between the agarose stamp and the substrate, to which the electrochemical reaction is confined. The anodic potential vs. saturated calomel electrode is optimized and 1.5 V is chosen as the optimum value for the electrochemical polishing of p-Si. A refractive MLA on a PMMA mold is successfully transferred onto the p-Si surface. The machining deviations of the fabricated MLA from those on the mold are 0.44% in diameter and 2.1% in height respectively, and the machining rate in HF is around 1.1 μm/h. The surface roughness of the fabricated MLA is less than 12 nm owing to the electrochemical polishing process. The results demonstrate that E-WETS is a promising approach to fabricate MLA on p-Si surface with high accuracy and efficiency.

  4. Decoration of silicon nanowires with silver nanoparticles for ultrasensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Cristiano; Faro, Maria J Lo; Bertino, Giulia; Ossi, Paolo M; Neri, Fortunato; Trusso, Sebastiano; Musumeci, Paolo; Galli, Matteo; Cioffi, Nicola; Irrera, Alessia; Priolo, Francesco; Fazio, Barbara

    2016-09-16

    Silicon nanowires (Si NWs), produced by the chemical etching technique, were decorated with silver nanoparticles (NPs) produced at room temperature by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Silver NPs were obtained by means of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a target in the presence of a controlled Ar atmosphere. Two different laser pulse numbers and Si NWs having different lengths were used to change the NP number density on the Si NW surface. The resulting Ag NP morphologies were studied by scanning electron microscopy imaging. The results show that this industrially compatible technological approach allows the coverage of the Si NW walls with Ag NPs with a strong control of the NP size distribution and spatial arrangement. The obtained Ag NP decorated Si NWs are free from chemicals contamination and there is no need of post deposition high temperature processes. The optical properties of Si NW arrays were investigated by reflectance spectroscopy that showed the presence of a plasmon related absorption peak, whose position and width is dependent on the Ag NP surface morphology. Coupling the huge surface-to-volume ratio of Si NW arrays with the plasmonic properties of silver nanoparticles resulted in a 3D structure suitable for very sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications, as demonstrated by the detection of Rhodamine 6G in aqueous solution at a concentration level of 10(-8) M.

  5. Decoration of silicon nanowires with silver nanoparticles for ultrasensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, Cristiano; Lo Faro, Maria J.; Bertino, Giulia; Ossi, Paolo M.; Neri, Fortunato; Trusso, Sebastiano; Musumeci, Paolo; Galli, Matteo; Cioffi, Nicola; Irrera, Alessia; Priolo, Francesco; Fazio, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    Silicon nanowires (Si NWs), produced by the chemical etching technique, were decorated with silver nanoparticles (NPs) produced at room temperature by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Silver NPs were obtained by means of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a target in the presence of a controlled Ar atmosphere. Two different laser pulse numbers and Si NWs having different lengths were used to change the NP number density on the Si NW surface. The resulting Ag NP morphologies were studied by scanning electron microscopy imaging. The results show that this industrially compatible technological approach allows the coverage of the Si NW walls with Ag NPs with a strong control of the NP size distribution and spatial arrangement. The obtained Ag NP decorated Si NWs are free from chemicals contamination and there is no need of post deposition high temperature processes. The optical properties of Si NW arrays were investigated by reflectance spectroscopy that showed the presence of a plasmon related absorption peak, whose position and width is dependent on the Ag NP surface morphology. Coupling the huge surface-to-volume ratio of Si NW arrays with the plasmonic properties of silver nanoparticles resulted in a 3D structure suitable for very sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications, as demonstrated by the detection of Rhodamine 6G in aqueous solution at a concentration level of 10-8 M.

  6. Optimization and characterization of a homogeneous carboxylic surface functionalization for silicon-based biosensing.

    PubMed

    Chiadò, Alessandro; Palmara, Gianluca; Ricciardi, Serena; Frascella, Francesca; Castellino, Micaela; Tortello, Mauro; Ricciardi, Carlo; Rivolo, Paola

    2016-07-01

    A well-organized immobilization of bio-receptors is a crucial goal in biosensing, especially to achieve high reproducibility, sensitivity and specificity. These requirements are usually attained with a controlled chemical/biochemical functionalization that creates a stable layer on a sensor surface. In this work, a chemical modification protocol for silicon-based surfaces to be applied in biosensing devices is presented. An anhydrous silanization step through 3-aminopropylsilane (APTES), followed by a further derivatization with succinic anhydride (SA), is optimized to generate an ordered flat layer of carboxylic groups. The properties of APTES/SA modified surface were compared with a functionalization in which glutaraldehyde (GA) is used as crosslinker instead of SA, in order to have a comparison with an established and largely applied procedure. Moreover, a functionalization based on the controlled deposition of a plasma polymerized acrylic acid (PPAA) thin film was used as a reference for carboxylic reactivity. Advantages and drawbacks of the considered methods are highlighted, through physico-chemical characterizations (OCA, XPS, and AFM) and by means of a functional Protein G/Antibody immunoassay. These analyses reveal that the most homogeneous, reproducible and active surface is achieved by using the optimized APTES/SA coupling. PMID:27022864

  7. Characterization of MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, Manickam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2011-12-01

    In this study, MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces under ambient condition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The radiation fluence used was 0.5 J/cm2 at a pulse repetition rate of 25 MHz with 1 ms interaction time. SEM analysis of the irradiated surfaces showed self-assembled intermingled weblike nanofibrous structure in and around the laser-irradiated spots. Further TEM investigation on this nanostructure revealed that the nanofibrous structure is formed due to aggregation of Au-Si/Si nanoparticles. The XRD peaks at 32.2°, 39.7°, and 62.5° were identified as (200), (211), and (321) reflections, respectively, corresponding to gold silicide. In addition, the observed chemical shift of Au 4 f and Si 2 p lines in XPS spectrum of the irradiated surface illustrated the presence of gold silicide at the irradiated surface. The generation of Si/Au-Si alloy fibrous nanoparticles aggregate is explained by the nucleation and subsequent condensation of vapor in the plasma plume during irradiation and expulsion of molten material due to high plasma pressure.

  8. Characterization of MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this study, MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces under ambient condition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The radiation fluence used was 0.5 J/cm2 at a pulse repetition rate of 25 MHz with 1 ms interaction time. SEM analysis of the irradiated surfaces showed self-assembled intermingled weblike nanofibrous structure in and around the laser-irradiated spots. Further TEM investigation on this nanostructure revealed that the nanofibrous structure is formed due to aggregation of Au-Si/Si nanoparticles. The XRD peaks at 32.2°, 39.7°, and 62.5° were identified as (200), (211), and (321) reflections, respectively, corresponding to gold silicide. In addition, the observed chemical shift of Au 4f and Si 2p lines in XPS spectrum of the irradiated surface illustrated the presence of gold silicide at the irradiated surface. The generation of Si/Au-Si alloy fibrous nanoparticles aggregate is explained by the nucleation and subsequent condensation of vapor in the plasma plume during irradiation and expulsion of molten material due to high plasma pressure. PMID:21711595

  9. Modification of epoxy resin, silicon and glass surfaces with alkyl- or fluoroalkylsilanes for hydrophobic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marczak, Jacek; Kargol, Marta; Psarski, Maciej; Celichowski, Grzegorz

    2016-09-01

    Preparation of superhydrophobic materials inspired by nature has attracted a great scientific interest in recent decades. Some of these materials have hierarchical lotus-like structures, i.e. micro- and nano-objects coated by hydrophobic compounds. A major challenge of applying the superhydrophobic surfaces for the self-cleaning coatings preparation is their improved efficiency in varying atmospheric conditions, e.g. UV light. The objective of this research work was to investigate the effect of the different chemical structure and the surface free energy on the hydrophobic and tribological properties of the alkylsilanes and fluoroalkylsilanes deposited on silicon wafers, glass slides and epoxy resin. Tribological and hydrophobic properties of the modified surfaces were correlated with their chemical structures. Chemical structures of the deposited materials were examined by using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and hydrophobic properties were investigated by water contact angle (WCA) and surface free energy (SFE) measurements. The modified surfaces exhibited water contact angles of above 100° for the selected modifiers. It was noticed that the replacement of hydrogen atoms by fluorine atoms in alkyl chain caused an increase in the water contact angle values and a decrease in friction coefficients. The obtained results showed that the carbon chain length of a modifier and its chemical structure can strongly affect the hydrophobic and tribological properties of the modified surfaces. The highest values of WCA, lowest values of SFE and coefficient of friction were obtained for samples covered by fluorinated compounds. Moreover, some preliminary aging test was performed to give an insight into the effectiveness of deposited alkylsilanes and fluoroalkylsilanes coatings. After accelerated UV exposure, no significant changes in the chemical structure, hydrophobic and tribological properties of the modified surfaces were noticed. The samples degradation

  10. A spin-Seebeck diode with a negative differential spin-Seebeck effect in a hydrogen-terminated zigzag silicene nanoribbon heterojunction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hua-Hua; Gu, Lei; Wu, Dan-Dan

    2016-05-14

    The spin-Seebeck effect (SSE), the central topic of spin caloritronics, provides a new direction for future low power consumption technology. To realize device applications of SSE, a spin-Seebeck diode (SSD) with a negative differential SSE is very desirable. To this end, we constructed a spin caloritronics device that was composed of a ferromagnetic double-single-hydrogen-terminated zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR-H2-H) and an antiferromagnetic double-double-hydrogen-terminated zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR-H2-H2). By using ab initio calculations combined with nonequilibrium Green's function technique, we found that thermally driven spin current through the heterojunction featured the SSD effect and negative differential SSE. The former originates from the asymmetrical thermal-driven conducting electrons and holes, and the latter ascribes to the thermal spin compensation effect. Their physical mechanisms are much different from the previous ones mainly relying on the spin-wave excitations in the interface between metals and magnetic insulators, supporting our study that puts forward a new route to realize the SSD with a negative differential SSE. PMID:27098900

  11. Hexagonal Ag nanoarrays induced enhancement of blue light emission from amorphous oxidized silicon nitride via localized surface plasmon coupling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongyuan; Ni, Xiaodong; Zhang, Wenping; Jiang, Xiaofan; Yang, Huafeng; Yu, Jie; Wang, Wen; Xu, Ling; Xu, Jun; Chen, Kunji; Feng, Duan

    2014-11-17

    A significant enhancement of blue light emission from amorphous oxidized silicon nitride (a-SiNx:O) films is achieved by introduction of ordered and size-controllable arrays of Ag nanoparticles between the silicon substrate and a-SiNx:O films. Using hexagonal arrays of Ag nanoparticles fabricated by nanosphere lithography, the localized surface plasmons (LSPs) resonance can effectively increase the internal quantum efficiency from 3.9% to 13.3%. Theoretical calculation confirms that the electromagnetic field-intensity enhancement is through the dipole surface plasma coupling with the excitons of a-SiNx:O films, which demonstrates a-SiNx:O films with enhanced blue emission are promising for silicon-based light-emitting applications by patterned Ag arrays.

  12. The behavior of silicon and boron in the surface of corroded nuclear waste glasses : an EFTEM study.

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E. C.; Smith, K. L.; Blackford, M. G.

    1999-11-23

    Using electron energy-loss filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), we have observed the formation of silicon-rich zones on the corroded surface of a West Valley (WV6) glass. This layer is approximately 100-200 nm thick and is directly underneath a precipitated smectite clay layer. Under conventional (C)TEM illumination, this layer is invisible; indeed, more commonly used analytical techniques, such as x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), have failed to describe fully the localized changes in the boron and silicon contents across this region. Similar silicon-rich and boron-depleted zones were not found on corroded Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) borosilicate glasses, including SRL-EA and SRL-51, although they possessed similar-looking clay layers. This study demonstrates a new tool for examining the corroded surfaces of materials.

  13. Improvement of the surface wettability of silicone hydrogel contact lenses via layer-by-layer self-assembly technique.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Hong; Cho, Hsien-Lung; Yeh, Yi-Hsing; Yang, Ming-Chien

    2015-12-01

    The surface wettability and anti-protein adsorption of a silicone-based hydrogel that was synthesized by a block copolymer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and poly (ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) was improved via polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) immobilization. Polysaccharide PEMs of chitosan (CS, as a positive-charged agent) and hyaluronic acid (HA, as a negative-charged and anti-adhesive agent) were successfully assembled on the PDMS-PU-PEGMA silicone hydrogel in a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly manner. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dyeing data verified the progressive buildup of the PEM silicone hydrogel. The results showed that the contact angle of the silicone hydrogel decreased with an increase in the number of PEM grafting layers. Furthermore, after immobilizing five layers of CS/HA, the protein adsorption decreased from 78 ± 11 to 26 ± 4 μg/cm(2) for HSA and from 55 ± 10 to 20 ± 4 μg/cm(2) for lysozymes. This indicates that CS/HA PEM-immobilized silicone hydrogels can resist protein adsorption. Furthermore, these hydrogels were non-cytotoxic according to an in vitro L929 fibroblast assay. Overall, the results demonstrated that the modified silicone hydrogels exhibited hydrophilicity and anti-protein adsorption, as well as relatively high oxygen permeability and optical transparency. Therefore, they would be applicable as a contact lens material. PMID:26519935

  14. Effect of surface morphology on laser-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lu; Jin, Jing; Wang, Guohua; Shi, Weimin; Yang, Weiguang; Yuan, Zhijun; Cao, Zechun; Zhou, Jun; Lou, Qihong; Liu, Jin; Wei, Guangpu

    2013-12-01

    The effect of surface morphology on laser-induced crystallization of hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited by PECVD is studied in this paper. The thin films are irritated by a frequency-doubled (λ=532 nm) Nd:YAG pulsed nanosecond laser. An effective melting model is built to identify the variation of melting regime influenced by laser crystallization. Based on the experimental results, the established correlation between the grain growth characterized by AFM and the crystalline fraction (Xc) obtained from Raman spectroscopy suggests that the crystallized process form amorphous phase to polycrystalline phase. Therefore, the highest crystalline fraction (Xc) is obtained by a optimized laser energy density.

  15. Formation Regularities of Plasmonic Silver Nanostructures on Porous Silicon for Effective Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandarenka, Hanna V.; Girel, Kseniya V.; Bondarenko, Vitaly P.; Khodasevich, Inna A.; Panarin, Andrei Yu.; Terekhov, Sergei N.

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures demonstrating an activity in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been fabricated by an immersion deposition of silver nanoparticles from silver salt solution on mesoporous silicon (meso-PS). The SERS signal intensity has been found to follow the periodical repacking of the silver nanoparticles, which grow according to the Volmer-Weber mechanism. The ratio of silver salt concentration and immersion time substantially manages the SERS intensity. It has been established that optimal conditions of nanostructured silver layers formation for a maximal Raman enhancement can be chosen taking into account a special parameter called effective time: a product of the silver salt concentration on the immersion deposition time. The detection limit for porphyrin molecules CuTMPyP4 adsorbed on the silvered PS has been evaluated as 10-11 M.

  16. Resonant surface enhancement of Raman scattering of Ag nanoparticles on silicon substrates fabricated by dc sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Yingcui; Li Xiaxi; Blinn, Kevin; Mahmoud, Mahmoud A.; Liu Meilin

    2012-09-15

    Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) were deposited onto silicon substrates by direct current (dc) magnetron sputtering. The influences of sputtering power and sputtering time on the AgNP film morphology were studied using atomic force microscopy. The particle size was successfully tuned from 19 nm to 53 nm by varying the sputtering time at a dc power of 10 W. When Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) was used as the probe molecule, the AgNP films showed significant surface enhanced Raman scattering effect. In particular, it is found that larger particles show stronger enhancement for lower concentrations of R6G while smaller particles display stronger enhancement for higher concentrations of R6G.

  17. Silicon and germanium nanoparticles with tailored surface chemistry as novel inorganic fiber brightening agents.

    PubMed

    Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Prabakar, Sujay; Krsinic, Gail; Dyer, Jolon M; Tilley, Richard D

    2013-07-31

    Low-molecular-weight organic molecules, such as coumarins and stilbenes, are used commercially as fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) to mask photoyellowing and to brighten colors in fabrics. FWAs achieve this by radiating extra blue light, thus changing the hue and also adding to the brightness. However, organic FWAs can rapidly photodegrade in the presence of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, exacerbating the yellowing process through a reaction involving singlet oxygen species. Inorganic nanoparticles, on the other hand, can provide a similar brightening effect with the added advantage of photostability. We report a targeted approach in designing new inorganic silicon- and germanium-based nanoparticles, functionalized with hydrophilic (amine) surface terminations as novel inorganic FWAs. When applied on wool, by incorporation in a sol-gel Si matrix, the inorganic FWAs improved brightness properties, demonstrated enhanced photostability toward UV radiation, especially the germanium nanoparticles, and also generated considerably lower levels of reactive oxygen species compared to a commercial stilbene-based organic FWA, Uvitex NFW.

  18. Formation Regularities of Plasmonic Silver Nanostructures on Porous Silicon for Effective Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    PubMed

    Bandarenka, Hanna V; Girel, Kseniya V; Bondarenko, Vitaly P; Khodasevich, Inna A; Panarin, Andrei Yu; Terekhov, Sergei N

    2016-12-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures demonstrating an activity in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been fabricated by an immersion deposition of silver nanoparticles from silver salt solution on mesoporous silicon (meso-PS). The SERS signal intensity has been found to follow the periodical repacking of the silver nanoparticles, which grow according to the Volmer-Weber mechanism. The ratio of silver salt concentration and immersion time substantially manages the SERS intensity. It has been established that optimal conditions of nanostructured silver layers formation for a maximal Raman enhancement can be chosen taking into account a special parameter called effective time: a product of the silver salt concentration on the immersion deposition time. The detection limit for porphyrin molecules CuTMPyP4 adsorbed on the silvered PS has been evaluated as 10(-11) M.

  19. Controllable surface-plasmon resonance in engineered nanometer epitaxial silicide particles embedded in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Ksendzov, A.; Iannelli, J. M.; George, T.

    1991-01-01

    Epitaxial CoSi2 particles in a single-crystal silicon matrix are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy using a technique that allows nanometer control over particle size in three dimensions. These composite layers exhibit resonant absorption predicted by effective-medium theory. Selection of the height and diameter of disklike particles through a choice of growth conditions allows tailoring of the depolarization factor and hence of the surface-plasmon resonance energy. Resonant absorption from 0.49 to 1.04 eV (2.5 to 1.2 micron) is demonstrated and shown to agree well with values predicted by the Garnett (1904, 1906) theory using the bulk dielectric constants for CoSi2 and Si.

  20. Surface recombination velocity and diffusion length of minority carriers in heavily doped silicon layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Watanabe, M.; Actor, G.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the electron beam-induced current and the dependence of the effective diffusion length of the minority carriers on the penetration depth of the electron beam were employed for the analysis of the carrier recombination characteristics in heavily doped silicon layers. The analysis is based on the concept of the effective excitation strength of the carriers which takes into consideration all possible recombination sources. Two dimensional mapping of the surface recombination velocity of P-diffused Si layers will be presented together with a three dimensional mapping of minority carrier lifetime in ion implanted Si. Layers heavily doped with As exhibit improved recombination characteristics as compared to those of the layers doped with P.

  1. Formation mechanism and ordered patterns in Cu films deposited on silicone oil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Miao-Gen; Xie, Jian-Ping; Ye, Gao-Xiang

    2006-12-01

    A copper (Cu) film system, deposited on silicone oil surfaces by vapor phase deposition method, has been fabricated and its formation mechanism as well as ordered patterns has been studied. The formation mechanism of the films obeys the two-stage growth model. The ordered patterns, which are composed of a large number of parallel keys with different width w but nearly uniform length L, are observed in the continuous Cu films. It is noted that, if the nominal film thickness d=120.0 nm, the value of α=L/(4w) reaches its maximum at the deposition rate f=0.05 nm/s. The experiment indicates that the ordered patterns mainly result from the ordered material aggregation, which depends closely on the internal stress in the nearly free sustained Cu film system.

  2. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Microstructural examination of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has shown that there is often a region adjacent to the as-nitrided surfaces that is even more porous than the interior of this already quite porous material. Because this layer of large porosity is considered detrimental to both the strength and oxidation resistance of RBSN, a study was undertaken to determine if its formation could be prevented during processing. All test bars studied were made from a single batch of Si powder which was milled for 4 hours in heptane in a vibratory mill using high density alumina cylinders as the grinding media. After air drying the powder, bars were compacted in a single acting die and hydropressed.

  3. Heat treatment in 110 °C liquid water used for passivating silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Tomohiko; Motoki, Takayuki; Ubukata, Junya; Sameshima, Toshiyuki; Hasumi, Masahiko; Mizuno, Tomohisa

    2016-04-01

    The simple passivation method of heat treatment in liquid water is discussed. Photo-induced effective minority carrier lifetime τ eff increased to 3.3 × 10-3 s above 110 °C for 1 h for 17-Ωcm n-type crystalline silicon. Increase in τ eff was observed ranging from 3.5 × 10-4 to 3.7 × 10-3 s for n-type silicon with resistivity ranging from 2 to 17 Ωcm. τ eff maintained high values ranging from 1.5 × 10-4 to 1.4 × 10-3 s for 1270 h. The metal-insulator-semiconductor-type diodes were formed on the top surfaces of the n-type and p-type substrates by forming Al and Au metals on the 0.7-nm-thin passivated layers. Rectified and Fowler-Nordheim current characteristics were observed in the dark field because of the difference of the work function between Al and Au. High photo-induced current density of 31.1 mA/cm2 and photovoltaic effect were observed in case of light illumination of AM 1.5 at 100 mW/cm2 to the rear surface. The recombination velocity in the regions under the metal electrode in the MIS structure was determined by lateral diffusion of photo-induced carriers. They were 1000 and 11,000 cm/s under Al and Au, respectively, in the n-type Si substrate.

  4. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  5. Electron-ion dynamics in laser-assisted desorption of hydrogen atoms from H-Si(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Varga, Kalman

    2011-09-15

    In the framework of real time real space time-dependent density functional theory we have studied the electron-ion dynamics of a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface H-Si(111) subjected to intense laser irradiation. Two surface fragments of different sizes have been used in the simulations. When the intensity and duration of the laser exceed certain levels (which depend on the wavelength) we observe the desorption of the hydrogen atoms, while the underlying silicon layer remains essentially undamaged. Upon further increase of the laser intensity, the chemical bonds between silicon atoms break as well. The results of the simulations suggest that with an appropriate choice of laser parameters it should be possible to remove the hydrogen layer from the H-Si(111) surface in a matter of a few tens of femtoseconds. We have also observed that at high laser field intensities (2-4 V/A in this work) the desorption occurs even when the laser frequency is smaller than the optical gap of the silicon surface fragments. Therefore, nonlinear phenomena must play an essential role in such desorption processes.

  6. Porous Silicon Covered with Silver Nanoparticles as Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Substrate for Ultra-Low Concentration Detection.

    PubMed

    Kosović, Marin; Balarin, Maja; Ivanda, Mile; Đerek, Vedran; Marciuš, Marijan; Ristić, Mira; Gamulin, Ozren

    2015-12-01

    Microporous and macro-mesoporous silicon templates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates were produced by anodization of low doped p-type silicon wafers. By immersion plating in AgNO3, the templates were covered with silver metallic film consisting of different silver nanostructures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs of these SERS substrates showed diverse morphology with significant difference in an average size and size distribution of silver nanoparticles. Ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) reflection spectroscopy showed plasmonic absorption at 398 and 469 nm, which is in accordance with the SEM findings. The activity of the SERS substrates was tested using rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules and 514.5 nm laser excitation. Contrary to the microporous silicon template, the SERS substrate prepared from macro-mesoporous silicon template showed significantly broader size distribution of irregular silver nanoparticles as well as localized surface plasmon resonance closer to excitation laser wavelength. Such silver morphology has high SERS sensitivity that enables ultralow concentration detection of R6G dye molecules up to 10(-15) M. To our knowledge, this is the lowest concentration detected of R6G dye molecules on porous silicon-based SERS substrates, which might even indicate possible single molecule detection.

  7. Enhancing the protein resistance of silicone via surface-restructuring PEO-silane amphiphiles with variable PEO length

    PubMed Central

    Rufin, M. A.; Gruetzner, J. A.; Hurley, M. J.; Hawkins, M. L.; Raymond, E. S.; Raymond, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Silicones with superior protein resistance were produced by bulk-modification with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-silane amphiphiles that demonstrated a higher capacity to restructure to the surface-water interface versus conventional non-amphiphilic PEO-silanes. The PEO-silane amphiphiles were prepared with a single siloxane tether length but variable PEO segment lengths: α-(EtO)3Si(CH2)2-oligodimethylsiloxane13-block-poly(ethylene oxide)n-OCH3 (n = 3, 8, and 16). Conventional PEO-silane analogues (n = 3, 8 and 16) as well as a siloxane tether-silane (i.e. no PEO segment) were prepared as controls. When surface-grafted onto silicon wafer, PEO-silane amphiphiles produced surfaces that were more hydrophobic and thus more adherent towards fibrinogen versus the corresponding PEO-silane. However, when blended into a silicone, PEO-silane amphiphiles exhibited rapid restructuring to the surface-water interface and excellent protein resistance whereas the PEO-silanes did not. Silicones modified with PEO-silane amphiphiles of PEO segment lengths n = 8 and 16 achieved the highest protein resistance. PMID:26339488

  8. Optimization of the optical properties of nanostructured silicon surfaces for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Di; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Cristini-Robbe, O.; Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Deblock, Y.; Faucher, M.; Stiévenard, D.

    2014-04-01

    Surface nanostructuration is an important challenge for the optimization of light trapping in solar cell. We present simulations on both the optical properties and the efficiency of micro pillars—MPs—or nanocones—NCs—silicon based solar cells together with measurements on their associated optical absorption. We address the simulation using the Finite Difference Time Domain method, well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of nanostructures. We study the effect of the period, the bottom diameter, the top diameter, and the height of the MPs or NCs on the efficiency, assuming that one absorbed photon induces one exciton. This allows us to give a kind of abacus involving all the geometrical parameters of the nanostructured surface with regard to the efficiency of the associated solar cell. We also show that for a given ratio of the diameter over the period, the best efficiency is obtained for small diameters. For small lengths, MPs are extended to NCs by changing the angle between the bottom surface and the vertical face of the MPs. The best efficiency is obtained for an angle of the order of 70°. Finally, nanostructures have been processed and allow comparing experimental results with simulations. In every case, a good agreement is found.

  9. Surface Coating Constraint Induced Self-Discharging of Silicon Nanoparticles as Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Luo, Langli; Zhao, Peng; Yang, Hui; Liu, Borui; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Cui, Yi; Yu, Guihua; Zhang, Sulin; Wang, Chong-Min

    2015-10-14

    One of the key challenges of Si-based anodes for lithium ion batteries is the large volume change upon lithiation and delithiation, which commonly leads to electrochemi-mechanical degradation and subsequent fast capacity fading. Recent studies have shown that applying nanometer-thick coating layers on Si nanoparticle (SiNPs) enhances cyclability and capacity retention. However, it is far from clear how the coating layer function from the point of view of both surface chemistry and electrochemi-mechanical effect. Herein, we use in situ transmission electron microscopy to investigate the lithiation/delithiation kinetics of SiNPs coated with a conductive polymer, polypyrrole (PPy). We discovered that this coating layer can lead to "self-delithiation" or "self-discharging" at different stages of lithiation. We rationalized that the self-discharging is driven by the internal compressive stress generated inside the lithiated SiNPs due to the constraint effect of the coating layer. We also noticed that the critical size of lithiation-induced fracture of SiNPs is increased from ∼150 nm for bare SiNPs to ∼380 nm for the PPy-coated SiNPs, showing a mechanically protective role of the coating layer. These observations demonstrate both beneficial and detrimental roles of the surface coatings, shedding light on rational design of surface coatings for silicon to retain high-power and high capacity as anode for lithium ion batteries. PMID:26414120

  10. Comparative Study of Solution Phase and Vapor Phase Deposition of Aminosilanes on Silicon Dioxide Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Amrita R.; Sriram, Rashmi; Carter, Jared A.; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    The uniformity of aminosilane layers typically used for the modification of hydroxyl bearing surfaces such as silicon dioxide is critical for a wide variety of applications, including biosensors. However, in spite of many studies that have been undertaken on surface silanization, there remains a paucity of easy-to-implement deposition methods reproducibly yielding smooth aminosilane monolayers. In this study, solution- and vapor-phase deposition methods for three aminoalkoxysilanes differing in the number of reactive groups (3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES), 3-aminopropyl methyl diethoxysilane (APMDES) and 3-aminopropyl dimethyl ethoxysilane (APDMES)) were assessed with the aim of identifying methods that yield highly uniform and reproducible silane layers that are resistant to minor procedural variations. Silane film quality was characterized based on measured thickness, hydrophilicity and surface roughness. Additionally, hydrolytic stability of the films was assessed via these thickness and contact angle values following desorption in water. We found that two simple solution-phase methods, an aqueous deposition of APTES and a toluene based deposition of APDMES, yielded high quality silane layers that exhibit comparable characteristics to those deposited via vapor-phase methods. PMID:24411379

  11. Surface Coating Constraint Induced Self-Discharging of Silicon Nanoparticles as Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Langli; Zhao, Peng; Yang, Hui; Liu, Borui; Zhang, Jiguang; Cui, Yi; Yu, Guihua; Zhang, Sulin; Wang, Chong M.

    2015-10-01

    One of the key challenges of Si-based anodes for lithium ion batteries is the large volume change upon lithiation and delithiation, which commonly leads to electrochemo-mechanical degradation and subsequent fast capacity fading. Recent studies have shown that applying nanometer-thick coating layers on Si nanoparticle (SiNPs) enhances cyclability and capacity retention. However, it is far from clear how the coating layer function from the point of view of both surface chemistry and electrochemo-mechanical effect. Herein, we use in situ transmission electron microscopy to investigate the lithiation/delithiation kinetics of SiNPs coated with a conductive polymer, polypyrrole (PPy). We discovered that this coating layer can lead to “self-delithiation” or “self-discharging” at different stages of lithiation. We rationalized that the self-discharging is driven by the internal compressive stress generated inside the lithiated SiNPs due to the constraint effect of the coating layer. We also noticed that the critical size of lithiation-induced fracture of SiNPs is increased from ~ 150 nm for bare SiNPs to ~ 380 nm for the PPy-coated SiNPs, showing a mechanically protective role of the coating layer. These observations demonstrate both beneficial and detrimental roles of the surface coatings, shedding light on rational design of surface coatings for silicon to retain high-power and high capacity as anode for lithium ion batteries.

  12. Calculations of Cleavage Processes, Surface Structures and Electronic Structure of Silicon and Germanium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo.

    The cleavage processes, surface and step structures, and electronic structure of Si and Ge (111)2 x 1 surfaces were studied. The ab initio quantum chemistry programs KGNMOL-89 and DMol were used to study the cleavage of silicon and germanium clusters in the diamond structure. It was found that the potential energy of stretching and shearing glide planes increases much faster than for shuffle planes. The cleavage process is discussed and it is shown how glide -plane cleavage can occur, with consequences for surface structure models. The Keating strain-energy method has been applied to estimate the energies of surface and step structures on Si(111)2 x 1. Two minimum strain-energy TBS (Three -Bond Scission) model structures were obtained. Since angular strains are involved which go beyond the applicability limits of the Keating formula, a correction factor is used, derived by comparing Keating-type calculations of particular surface models of Si(111) with the results of more extensive calculations. The use of a simple correction factor gives results that agree with a calculation for the Pandey ( pi-bonded chain) model and one for the TBS model. Using this factor, a model for a 3-substep structure of the (322) step on Si is found to be quite stable, while the 2-substep structures are moderately stable. The surface band structure of the TBS and Pandey models have been computed using an ab initio HF LCAO program CRYSTAL-92. In the case of the TBS model, the results showed valence band dispersion that could be compatible with experiments. For the Pandey model, the calculated valence band dispersion seemed large. The surface band gap for both TBS and Pandey models was greatly overestimated. The significance is discussed. The surface electron density of states was calculated for the TBS model and the valence band generally matched experimental results from STM (scanning tunneling microscopy). The electron charge density of various surface regions was calculated. The

  13. Oxidation of freestanding silicon nanocrystals probed with electron spin resonance of interfacial dangling bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, R. N.; Rowe, D. J.; Anthony, R. J.; Kortshagen, U.

    2011-04-01

    The oxidation of freestanding silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) passivated with Si-H bonds has been investigated for a wide range of oxidation times (from a few minutes to several months) by means of electron spin resonance (ESR) of dangling bonds (DBs) naturally incorporated at the interface between the NC core and the developing oxide shell. These measurements are complemented with surface chemistry analysis from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Two surface phenomena with initiation time thresholds of 15 min and 30 h are inferred from the dependence of ESR spectra on oxidation time. The first initiates before oxidation of surface Si-Si bonds and destruction of the NC hydrogen termination takes place (induction period) and results in a decrease of the DB density and a localization of the DB orbital at the central Si atom. Within the Cabrera-Mott oxidation mechanism, we associate this process with the formation of intermediate interfacial configurations, resulting from surface adsorption of water and oxygen molecules. The second surface phenomenon leads to a steep increase of the defect density and correlates with the formation of surface Si-O-Si bridges, lending experimental support to theoretically proposed mechanisms for interfacial defect formation involving the emission of Si interstitials at the interface between crystalline Si and the growing oxide.

  14. Patterned porous silicon photonic crystals with modular surface chemistry for spatial control of neural stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tiffany H.; Pei, Yi; Zhang, Douglas; Li, Yanfen; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a strategy to spatially define regions of gold and nanostructured silicon photonics, each with materials-specific surface chemistry, for azide-alkyne cycloaddition of different bioactive peptides. Neural stem cells are spatially directed to undergo neurogenesis and astrogenesis as a function of both surface properties and peptide identity.We present a strategy to spatially define regions of gold and nanostructured silicon photonics, each with materials-specific surface chemistry, for azide-alkyne cycloaddition of different bioactive peptides. Neural stem cells are spatially directed to undergo neurogenesis and astrogenesis as a function of both surface properties and peptide identity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08327c

  15. Fast characterization of functionalized silica materials by silicon-29 surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy using dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Lelli, Moreno; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; Caporini, Marc A; Vitzthum, Veronika; Miéville, Pascal; Héroguel, Florent; Rascón, Fernando; Roussey, Arthur; Thieuleux, Chloé; Boualleg, Malika; Veyre, Laurent; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Copéret, Christophe; Emsley, Lyndon

    2011-02-23

    We demonstrate fast characterization of the distribution of surface bonding modes and interactions in a series of functionalized materials via surface-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Surface-enhanced silicon-29 DNP NMR spectra were obtained by using incipient wetness impregnation of the sample with a solution containing a polarizing radical (TOTAPOL). We identify and compare the bonding topology of functional groups in materials obtained via a sol-gel process and in materials prepared by post-grafting reactions. Furthermore, the remarkable gain in time provided by surface-enhanced silicon-29 DNP NMR spectroscopy (typically on the order of a factor 400) allows the facile acquisition of two-dimensional correlation spectra. PMID:21280606

  16. Surface science studies on the interaction of nitrogen trifluoride ion beams and plasmas with silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Thomas William

    As microelectronic dimensions continue to shrink, the role of plasma etching assumes greater importance. Recently, there has been considerable interest in using nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) to replace perfluorocarbon (PFC) etchants in some applications. Nitrogen trifluoride is capable of high etching rates, environmentally more tolerable than PFCs, and eliminates buildup of macroscopic carbonaceous surface layers. Literature exists on NF3 etch rate, selectivity and profiles during plasma etching, but very little has been done in the way of detailed surface science examinations of the interaction of NF3 with silicon (Si) surfaces. Scientifically, NF3 offers an ideal tool to probe the surface science of plasma-Si interaction during etching. Previous studies of fluorine (F) etching of Si have relied on either F2, atomic F, or an inert gas compound such as XeF2. The present work employs a gas in which both atoms (N, F) are chemically active, and is one of the first surface science examinations of NF3-Si interaction. Through the complementary use of ion beams and actual plasmas, the effects of ions and neutrals inherent in the plasma have been separated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that the neutrals are responsible for Si-F bonding while ions are incorporated in complex Si-N-F moieties. The results show for the first time that N is incorporated in Si during the initial stages of etching. Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been used to augment the XPS results. Finally, severe plasma etching produces anomalous XPS results which can be attributed to differential charging. Mechanistically, the charging is caused by ion bombardment damage during etching as evidenced by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The differential charging behavior has been studied, and it is suggested that the phenomenon may be utilized to quantify plasma etch damage.

  17. Segregation of copper to (100) and (111) silicon surfaces from internal Cu{sub 3}Si precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W.R.

    1996-12-01

    Segregation of transition metal impurities to surfaces or interfaces can have detrimental or beneficial effects in silicon-based microelectronic devices. Controlled segregation of impurities to regions remote from device structures, i.e. gettering is routinely used to prevent uncontrolled segregation to critical regions which may cause failure. Internal gettering is a widely used process in which oxide precipitates and associated lattice defects provide sites for precipitation of metal-silicide phases. Segregation of impurities onto surfaces of internal microcavities has also been examined as a potential gettering process. It was observed that gettering to cavities can dissolve pre-existing internal metal silicide precipitates of Cu, Au and Ni. The energetics of copper segregation to silicon surfaces were examined by measuring the Cu coverage after equilibration between Cu on the surface and internal Cu{sub 3}Si, for which the Cu chemical potential is known. For oxide-free surfaces the Cu coverage was close to one monolayer on (111) surfaces but was much smaller on (100) surfaces. The Cu coverage was greatly reduced by oxide passivation of the surface. LEED showed the 7 x 7 structure of the clean (111) silicon surface converted to a quasiperiodic 5 x 5 structure after equilibrating with Cu{sub 3}Si. The 2 x 1 LEED patterns for (100) surfaces indicated no change in surface structure due to the Cu{sub 3}Si. These results show that the free energy of copper in Cu{sub 3}Si is higher than that of copper on (111) surfaces but lower than that of copper on (100) surfaces.

  18. Application of the MOS-C-V technique to determine impurity concentrations and surface parameters on the diffused face of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using the MOS C-V technique to obtain information regarding impurity and surface state concentrations on the diffused face of silicon solar cells with Ta2O5 coatings is studied. Results indicate that the MOS C-V technique yields useful information concerning surface parameters which contribute to the high, efficiency limiting, surface recombination velocities on the n+ surface of silicon solar cells.

  19. Direct metallization local Al-back surface field for high efficiency screen printed crystalline silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Park, Cheolmin; Dao, Vinh Ai; Lee, Youn-Jung; Ryu, Kyungyul; Choi, Gyuho; Kim, Bonggi; Ju, Minkyu; Jeong, Chaehwan; Yi, Junsin

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed study on the local back contact (LBC) formation of rear-surface-passivated silicon solar cells, where both the LBC opening and metallization are realized by one-step alloying of a dot of fine pattern screen-printed aluminum paste with the silicon substrate. Based on energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterizations, we suggest that the aluminum distribution and the silicon concentration determine the local-back-surface-field (Al-p+) layer thickness, resistivity of the Al-p+ and hence the quality of the Al-p+ formation. The highest penetration of silicon concentration of 78.17% in aluminum resulted in the formation of a 5 microm-deep Al-p+ layer, and the minimum LBC resistivity of 0.92 x 10-6 omega cm2. The degradation of the rear-surface passivation due to high temperature of the LBC formation process can be fully recovered by forming gas annealing (FGA) at temperature and hydrogen content of 450 degrees C and 15%, respectively. The application of the optimized LBC of rear-surface-passivated by a dot of fine pattern screen(-) printed aluminum paste resulted in efficiency of up to 19.98% for the p-type czochralski (CZ) silicon wafers with 10.24 cm2 cell size at 649 mV open circuit voltage. By FGA for rear-surface passivation recovery, efficiencies up to 20.35% with a V(OC) of 662 mV, FF of 82%, and J(SC) of 37.5 mA/cm2 were demonstrated.

  20. All-silicon Michelson instrument on chip: Distance and surface profile measurement and prospects for visible light spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Malak, M.; Marty, F.; Bourouina, T.; Nouira, H.; Vailleau, G.

    2013-04-08

    A miniature Michelson interferometer is analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The fabricated micro-interferometer is incorporated at the tip of a monolithic silicon probe to achieve contactless distance measurements and surface profilometry. For infrared operation, two approaches are studied, based on the use of monochromatic light and wavelength sweep, respectively. A theoretical model is devised to depict the system characteristics taking into account Gaussian beam divergence and light spot size. Furthermore, preliminary results using visible light demonstrate operation of the probe as a visible light spectrometer, despite silicon absorbance, thanks to the micrometer thickness involved in the beam splitter.

  1. Investigation of the topographical features of surface carrier concentrations in silicon solar cell material using electrolyte electroreflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollay, F. H.; Okeke, C. E.; Raccah, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    Topographical variations in carrier concentration delta N/N across the surface of n(+) on p diffused silicon solar cell material are studied by utilizing electrolyte electroreflectance with a spatial resolution of 100 microns within approximately 500 A of the surface. The topographical variations of delta N/N approximately 10 - 20% are found to be comparable to Czochralski grown material. The electroreflectance method can also be utilized to investigate other semiconductors such as GaAs.

  2. Silane Modification of Glass and Silica Surfaces to Obtain Equally Oil-Wet Surfaces in Glass-Covered Silicon Micromodel Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2013-08-05

    The wettability of silicon and glass surfaces can be modified by silanization. However, similar treatments of glass and silica surfaces using the same silane do not necessarily yield the same wettability as determined by the oil-water contact angle. In this technical note, surface cleaning pretreatments were investigated to determine conditions that would yield oil-wet surfaces on glass with similar wettability to silica surfaces treated with the same silane, and both air-water and oil-water contact angles were determined. Air-water contact angles were less sensitive to differences between silanized silica and glass surfaces, often yielding similar values while the oil-water contact angles were quite different. Borosilicate glass surfaces cleaned with standard cleaning solution 1 (SC1) yield intermediate-wet surfaces when silanized with hexamethyldisilazane, while the same cleaning and silanization yields oil-wet surfaces on silica. However, cleaning glass in boiling concentrated nitric acid creates a surface that can be silanized to obtain oil-wet surfaces using HDMS. Moreover, this method is effective on glass with prior thermal treatment at an elevated temperature of 400oC. In this way, silica and glass can be silanized to obtain equally oil-wet surfaces using HMDS. It is demonstrated that pretreatment and silanization is feasible in silicon-silica/glass micromodels previously assembled by anodic bonding, and that the change in wettability has a significant observable effect on immiscisble fluid displacements in the pore network.

  3. Characterization of a controlled electroless deposition of copper thin film on germanium and silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudiero, Louis; Fasasi, Ayuba; Griffiths, Peter R.

    2011-02-01

    Nanofilms of copper were deposited on silicon and, for the first time, on polycrystalline germanium substrates by electroless deposition. Germanium or silicon disks were immersed in a 10 mM copper sulfate solution containing dilute hydrofluoric acid at room temperature. This simple one-step deposition does not require the use of laborious operations or expensive equipment, that the reaction medium be degassed, or that the film be annealed. The copper film grows in a few minutes, producing a film on both Ge and Si that covers a very large area of the substrate in contrast to other metals such as Au, Ag, Pt and Pd for which deposition on Ge and Si produces islands or dendrites. Atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) were used to characterize the microstructure and confirmed the formation of elemental copper nanofilms. The AFM micrographs reveal a Stranski-Krastanov type of film growth (layers + islands) that varies with the length of time the Ge or Si substrate is immersed in the CuSO4 solution. Thicker films were observed on the Ge than on the Si substrate resulting in larger particles and rougher surface than on Si. XPS analysis shows that the elemental copper is deposited on both Ge and Si substrates and that the films oxidize over a period of weeks with air exposure at room temperature. Finally, PXRD data reveal two preferential orientations (1 1 1) and (2 0 0) for the copper crystallites grown on both Ge and Si. The same intensity of the (1 1 1)-texture was measured on both Ge and Si substrate which is an important result because it has been shown that the (1 1 1) texture reduces stress-induced voiding and increases resistance to electromigration in metal interconnects.

  4. Augmented cellular trafficking and endosomal escape of porous silicon nanoparticles via zwitterionic bilayer polymer surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Almeida, Patrick V; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Kaasalainen, Martti H; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-08-01

    The development of a stable vehicle with low toxicity, high cellular internalization, efficient endosomal escape, and optimal drug release profile is a key bottleneck in nanomedicine. To overcome all these problems, we have developed a successful layer-by-layer method to covalently conjugate polyethyleneimine (PEI) and poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic acid) (PMVE-MA) copolymer on the surface of undecylenic acid functionalized thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (UnTHCPSi NPs), forming a bilayer zwitterionic nanocomposite containing free positive charge groups of hyper-branched PEI disguised by the PMVE-MA polymer. The surface smoothness, charge and hydrophilicity of the developed NPs considerably improved the colloidal and plasma stabilities via enhanced suspensibility and charge repulsion. Furthermore, despite the surface negative charge of the bilayer polymer-conjugated NPs, the cellular trafficking and endosomal escape were significantly increased in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Remarkably, we also showed that the conjugation of surface free amine groups of the highly toxic UnTHCPSi-PEI (Un-P) NPs to the carboxylic groups of PMVE-MA renders acceptable safety features to the system and preserves the endosomal escape properties via proton sponge mechanism of the free available amine groups located inside the hyper-branched PEI layer. Moreover, the double layer protection not only controlled the aggregation of the NPs and reduced the toxicity, but also sustained the drug release of an anticancer drug, methotrexate, with further improved cytotoxicity profile of the drug-loaded particles. These results provide a proof-of-concept evidence that such zwitterionic polymer-based PSi nanocomposites can be extensively used as a promising candidate for cytosolic drug delivery.

  5. Silicon wafer surface patterning using femtosecond laser irradiation below ablation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalili, Alireza; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2010-03-01

    Surface patterning using femtosecond laser can be utilized for the fabrication of MEMS/NEMS, CMOS, 3D-microstructures, microtrenches, microchannels, microholes, periodical submicron gratings and nanophotonics. A unique high repetition rate femtosecond fiber laser system was used to study the effect of pulse width, repetition rate and pulse energy on the spacing of ripples as well as diameter of grains created during the surface patterning operations. Also, this report strides to identify the mechanisms that lead to ripple and grain formation at different pulse durations. In our experiments, the ripples formed at a lower laser fluence range 1.56-4.66 J/cm 2, whereas the grains were created at a higher laser fluence range 3.34-6.77 J/cm 2. The primary theory we used to explain the creation of ripples in the femtosecond regime was the Boson Condensation Hypothesis since mechanical and thermal forces are deemed to be negligible. For the picosecond pulse width range, the ripple formation can be based on any or a combination of the acoustic wave, surface tension gradient and interference between the incident light/surface wave mechanisms. The grain formation both in the femtosecond, as well as the picosecond span used in our experiments is due to the bond weakening and breaking in the silicon substrate and the short duration of the crystal lattice rearrangement following illumination by the laser. The small movements lead to the creation of new bonds between the atoms and eventual formation of grains. It was seen that for our pulse width, repetition rate and pulse energy range, the ripple spacing increased with laser pulse duration, while other parameters did not play an important role. In terms of grain diameter a similar trend was seen.

  6. Processes involved in the formation of silver clusters on silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S. R.; Chini, T. K.; Datta, D.; Hippler, R.; Shyjumon, I.; Smirnov, B. M.

    2008-12-01

    We analyze scanning electron microscopy measurements for structures formed in the deposition of solid silver clusters onto a silicon(100) substrate and consider theoretical models of cluster evolution onto a surface as a result of diffusion and formation of aggregates of merged clusters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data are presented in addition to energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) measurements of the these films. Solid silver clusters are produced by a DC magnetron sputtering source with a quadrupole filter for selection of cluster sizes (4.1 and 5.6 nm or 1900 and 5000 atoms per cluster in this experiment); the energy of cluster deposition is 0.7 eV/atom. Rapid thermal annealing of the grown films allows analysis of their behavior at high temperatures. The results exhibit formation of cluster aggregates via the diffusion of deposited solid clusters along the surface; an aggregate consists of up to hundreds of individual clusters. This process is essentially described by the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model, and thus a grown porous film consists of cluster aggregates joined by bridges. Subsequent annealing of this film leads to its melting at temperatures lower than to the melting point of bulk silver. Analysis of evaporation of this film at higher temperatures gives a binding energy in bulk silver of ɛ0= (2.74 ± 0.03) eV/atom.

  7. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Properties of Carbon Black/Silicone Rubber Coating by Frequency-Selective Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoning; Luo, Fa; Gao, Lu; Qing, Yuchang; Zhou, Wancheng; Zhu, Dongmei

    2016-10-01

    A square frequency-selective surface (FSS) design has been employed to improve the microwave absorption properties of carbon black/silicone rubber (CBSR) composite coating. The FSS is placed on the surface of the CBSR coating. The effects of FSS design parameters on the microwave absorption properties of the CBSR coating have been investigated, including the size and period of the FSS design, and the thickness and permittivity of the coating. Simulation results indicate that the absorption peak for the CBSR coating alone is related to its thickness and electromagnetic parameters, while the combination of the CBSR coating with a FSS can exhibit a new absorption peak in the reflection curve; the frequency of the new absorption peak is determined by the resonance of the square FSS design and tightly depends on the size of the squares, with larger squares in the FSS design leading to a lower frequency of the new absorption peak. The enhancement of the absorption performance depends on achievement of a new absorption peak using a suitable size and period of the FSS design. In addition, the FSS design has a stable frequency response for both transverse electromagnetic (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations as the incident angle varies from 0° to 40°. The optimized results indicate that the bandwidth with reflection loss below -5 dB can encompass the whole frequency range from 8 GHz to 18 GHz for thickness of the CBSR coating of only 1.8 mm. The simulation results are confirmed by experiments.

  8. Contact effects and quantum interference in engineered dangling bond loops on silicon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-09-01

    Dangling bond structures created on H-passivated silicon surfaces offer a novel platform for engineering planar nanoscale circuits, compatible with conventional semiconductor technologies. In this investigation we focus on the electronic structure and quantum transport signatures of dangling bond loops built on H-passivated Si(100) surfaces contacted by carbon nanoribbons, thus leading to a two-terminal planar, nanoscale setup. The computational studies were carried out to rationalize the influence of the local atomic-scale contacts of the dangling bond system to the mesoscopic electrodes as well as the possibility of revealing quantum interference effects in the dangling bond loops. Our results reveal a strong sensitivity of the low-energy quantum transmission to the loop topology and to the atomistic details of the electrode-loop contact. Varying the length of the loop or the spatial position of at least one of the electrodes has a drastic impact on the quantum interference pattern; depending on whether constructive or destructive interference within the loop takes place, the conductance of the system can be tuned over several orders of magnitude, thus suggesting the possibility of exploiting such quantum mechanical effects in the design of two-dimensional, atomic-scale electronic devices such as logic gates. PMID:26228007

  9. Surface profile measurement of highly reflective silicon wafer using wavelength tuning interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yangjin; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2016-03-01

    In phase-shifting Fizeau interferometers, phase-shift errors and multiple-beam interference are the most common sources of systematic error affecting high-precision phase measurements. Nonsinusoidal waveforms can be minimized by applying synchronous detection with more than four samples. However, when phase-shift calibration is inaccurate, these algorithms cannot eliminate the effects of nonsinusoidal characteristics. Moreover, when measuring the surface profile of highly reflective samples, the calculated phase is critically determined not only by the decrease in the fringe contrast, but also by the coupling error between the harmonics and phase-shift errors. In this study, we calculate phase errors using phase-shifting algorithms that take into account the coupling error. We show that the 4N - 3 algorithm, which consists of a polynomial window function and a discrete Fourier transform term, results in the smallest phase error. As a demonstration, the surface profile of a highly reflective silicon wafer is measured using a wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometer and the 4N - 3 algorithm.

  10. Significant thermal conductivity reduction of silicon nanowire forests through discrete surface doping of germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Ying; Hong, Guo; Raja, Shyamprasad N.; Zimmermann, Severin; Poulikakos, Dimos; Tiwari, Manish K.

    2015-03-02

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are promising materials for the realization of highly-efficient and cost effective thermoelectric devices. Reduction of the thermal conductivity of such materials is a necessary and viable pathway to achieve sufficiently high thermoelectric efficiencies, which are inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity. In this article, vertically aligned forests of SiNW and germanium (Ge)-doped SiNW with diameters around 100 nm have been fabricated, and their thermal conductivity has been measured. The results show that discrete surface doping of Ge on SiNW arrays can lead to 23% reduction in thermal conductivity at room temperature compared to uncoated SiNWs. Such reduction can be further enhanced to 44% following a thermal annealing step. By analyzing the binding energy changes of Ge-3d and Si-2p using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we demonstrate that surface doped Ge interacts strongly with Si, enhancing phonon scattering at the Si-Ge interface as has also been shown in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics studies of single nanowires. Overall, our results suggest a viable pathway to improve the energy conversion efficiency of nanowire-forest thermoelectric nanomaterials.

  11. Wettability of graphitic-carbon and silicon surfaces: MD modeling and theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2015-07-28

    The wettability of graphitic carbon and silicon surfaces was numerically and theoretically investigated. A multi-response method has been developed for the analysis of conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of droplets wettability. The contact angle and indicators of the quality of the computations are tracked as a function of the data sets analyzed over time. This method of analysis allows accurate calculations of the contact angle obtained from the MD simulations. Analytical models were also developed for the calculation of the work of adhesion using the mean-field theory, accounting for the interfacial entropy changes. A calibration method is proposed to provide better predictions of the respective contact angles under different solid-liquid interaction potentials. Estimations of the binding energy between a water monomer and graphite match those previously reported. In addition, a breakdown in the relationship between the binding energy and the contact angle was observed. The macroscopic contact angles obtained from the MD simulations were found to match those predicted by the mean-field model for graphite under different wettability conditions, as well as the contact angles of Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces. Finally, an assessment of the effect of the Lennard-Jones cutoff radius was conducted to provide guidelines for future comparisons between numerical simulations and analytical models of wettability.

  12. Effect of surface properties on the electrorheological response of hematite/silicone oil dispersions.

    PubMed

    Erol, Ozlem; Ramos-Tejada, María del Mar; Unal, Halil I; Delgado, Angel V

    2013-02-15

    In this work we present an investigation of the influence of particle surface characteristics on the electrorheological (ER) behavior of suspensions of either pure or modified hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) particles dispersed in silicone oil. The modification consisted of either dehydration or hydrophobization of the particles before preparing the suspensions. A comparison was performed between the electrorheological responses of suspensions with the same volume fraction of hematite particles having different surface properties. The effects of applied electric field strength on the viscosity, yield stress and dynamic moduli of these suspensions were examined. It was found that the usual positive ER response, that is, enhanced values of the yield stress and elastic modulus induced by the electric field were obtained for hematite and, to a lesser extent, for dried hematite suspensions. In contrast, a "negative ER effect", i.e., the reduction of yield stress and elastic modulus upon application of electric field was observed for hydrophobically modified (oleic acid coated) hematite. This means that the field produces destruction of structures rather than their build up, above a threshold electric field strength. PMID:23116854

  13. Surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence in amorphous silicon carbide films by adjusting Ag island film sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei; Wang, Xin-Zhan; Dai, Wan-Lei; Lu, Wan-Bing; Liu, Yu-Mei; Fu, Guang-Sheng

    2013-05-01

    Ag island films with different sizes are deposited on hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (α-SiC:H) films, and the influences of Ag island films on the optical properties of the α-SiC:H films are investigated. Atomic force microscope images show that Ag nanoislands are formed after Ag coating, and the size of the Ag islands increases with increasing Ag deposition time. The extinction spectra indicate that two resonance absorption peaks which correspond to out-of-plane and in-plane surface plasmon modes of the Ag island films are obtained, and the resonance peak shifts toward longer wavelength with increasing Ag island size. The photoluminescence (PL) enhancement or quenching depends on the size of Ag islands, and PL enhancement by 1.6 times on the main PL band is obtained when the sputtering time is 10 min. Analyses show that the influence of surface plasmons on the PL of α-SiC:H is determined by the competition between the scattering and absorption of Ag islands, and PL enhancement is obtained when scattering is the main interaction between the Ag islands and incident light.

  14. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    An effort was undertaken to determine if the formation of the generally observed layer of large porosity adjacent to the as-nitride surfaces of reaction bonded silicon nitrides could be prevented during processing. Isostatically pressed test bars were prepared from wet vibratory milled Si powder. Sintering and nitriding were each done under three different conditions:(1) bars directly exposed to the furnance atmosphere; (2) bars packed in Si powder; (3) bars packed in Si3N4 powder. Packing the bars in either Si of Si3N4 powder during sintering retarded formation of the layer of large porosity. Only packing the bars in Si prevented formation of the layer during nitridation. The strongest bars (316 MPa) were those sintered in Si and nitrided in Si3N4 despite their having a layer of large surface porosity; failure initiated at very large pores and inclusions. The alpha/beta ratio was found to be directly proportional to the oxygen content; a possible explanation for this relationship is discussed.

  15. Silicon epitaxy on H-terminated Si (100) surfaces at 250 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiao; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Li, Kai; Wang, Xiqiao; Stan, Gheorghe; Myers, Alline F.; Cheng, Xinbin; Li, Tongbao; Silver, Richard M.

    2016-08-01

    Low temperature Si epitaxy has become increasingly important due to its critical role in the encapsulation and performance of buried nanoscale dopant devices. We demonstrate epitaxial growth up to nominally 25 nm, at 250 °C, with analysis at successive growth steps using STM and cross section TEM to reveal the nature and quality of the epitaxial growth. STM images indicate that growth morphology of both Si on Si and Si on H-terminated Si (H: Si) is epitaxial in nature at temperatures as low as 250 °C. For Si on Si growth at 250 °C, we show that the Si epitaxial growth front maintains a constant morphology after reaching a specific thickness threshold. Although the in-plane mobility of silicon is affected on the H: Si surface due to the presence of H atoms during initial sub-monolayer growth, STM images reveal long range order and demonstrate that growth proceeds by epitaxial island growth albeit with noticeable surface roughening.

  16. Nanoparticles based laser-induced surface structures formation on mesoporous silicon by picosecond laser beam interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbi, A.; Petit, A.; Melhem, A.; Stolz, A.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Gautier, G.; Defforge, T.; Semmar, N.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, laser induced periodic surface structures were formed on mesoporous silicon by irradiation of Nd:YAG picosecond pulsed laser beam at 266 nm wavelength at 1 Hz repetition rate and with 42 ps pulse duration. The effects of laser processing parameters as laser beam fluence and laser pulse number on the formation of ripples were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to image the surface morphologies and the cross section of samples after laser irradiation. At relatively low fluence ∼20 mJ/cm2, ripples with period close to the laser beam wavelength (266 nm) and with an always controlled orientation (perpendicular to the polarization of ps laser beam) appeared after a large laser pulse number of 12,000. It has been found that an initial random distribution of SiOx nanoparticles is periodically structured with an increase of the laser pulse number. Finally, it is experimentally demonstrated that we formed a 100 nm liquid phase under the protusion zones including the pores in the picosecond regime.

  17. Contact effects and quantum interference in engineered dangling bond loops on silicon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-09-01

    Dangling bond structures created on H-passivated silicon surfaces offer a novel platform for engineering planar nanoscale circuits, compatible with conventional semiconductor technologies. In this investigation we focus on the electronic structure and quantum transport signatures of dangling bond loops built on H-passivated Si(100) surfaces contacted by carbon nanoribbons, thus leading to a two-terminal planar, nanoscale setup. The computational studies were carried out to rationalize the influence of the local atomic-scale contacts of the dangling bond system to the mesoscopic electrodes as well as the possibility of revealing quantum interference effects in the dangling bond loops. Our results reveal a strong sensitivity of the low-energy quantum transmission to the loop topology and to the atomistic details of the electrode-loop contact. Varying the length of the loop or the spatial position of at least one of the electrodes has a drastic impact on the quantum interference pattern; depending on whether constructive or destructive interference within the loop takes place, the conductance of the system can be tuned over several orders of magnitude, thus suggesting the possibility of exploiting such quantum mechanical effects in the design of two-dimensional, atomic-scale electronic devices such as logic gates.

  18. Surface enhanced fluorescence of anti-tumoral drug emodin adsorbed on silver nanoparticles and loaded on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Margarita; Recio, Gonzalo; Martin-Palma, Raul J.; Garcia-Ramos, Jose V.; Domingo, Concepcion; Sevilla, Paz

    2012-07-01

    Fluorescence spectra of anti-tumoral drug emodin loaded on nanostructured porous silicon have been recorded. The use of colloidal nanoparticles allowed embedding of the drug without previous porous silicon functionalization and leads to the observation of an enhancement of fluorescence of the drug. Mean pore size of porous silicon matrices was 60 nm, while silver nanoparticles mean diameter was 50 nm. Atmospheric and vacuum conditions at room temperature were used to infiltrate emodin-silver nanoparticles complexes into porous silicon matrices. The drug was loaded after adsorption on metal surface, alone, and bound to bovine serum albumin. Methanol and water were used as solvents. Spectra with 1 μm spatial resolution of cross-section of porous silicon layers were recorded to observe the penetration of the drug. A maximum fluorescence enhancement factor of 24 was obtained when protein was loaded bound to albumin, and atmospheric conditions of inclusion were used. A better penetration was obtained using methanol as solvent when comparing with water. Complexes of emodin remain loaded for 30 days after preparation without an apparent degradation of the drug, although a decrease in the enhancement factor is observed. The study reported here constitutes the basis for designing a new drug delivery system with future applications in medicine and pharmacy.

  19. Elimination of strength degrading effects caused by surface microdefect: A prevention achieved by silicon nanotexturing to avoid catastrophic brittle fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Kunal; Kumar, Amarendra; Huang, Chuan-Torng; Lin, Yu-Yun; Hou, Max T.; Andrew Yeh, J.

    2015-01-01

    The unavoidable occurrence of microdefects in silicon wafers increase the probability of catastrophic fracture of silicon-based devices, thus highlighting the need for a strengthening mechanism to minimize fractures resulting from defects. In this study, a novel mechanism for manufacturing silicon wafers was engineered based on nanoscale reinforcement through surface nanotexturing. Because of nanotexturing, different defect depths synthetically emulated as V-notches, demonstrated a bending strength enhancement by factors of 2.5, 3.2, and 6 for 2-, 7-, and 14-μm-deep V-notches, respectively. A very large increase in the number of fragments observed during silicon fracturing was also indicative of the strengthening effect. Nanotextures surrounding the V-notch reduced the stress concentration factor at the notch tip and saturated as the nanotexture depth approached 1.5 times the V-notch depth. The stress reduction at the V-notch tip measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed that nanotextures reduced the effective depth of the defect. Therefore, the nanotextured samples were able to sustain a larger fracture force. The enhancement in Weibull modulus, along with an increase in bending strength in the nanotextured samples compared to polished single-crystal silicon samples, demonstrated the reliability of the strengthening method. These results suggest that this method may be suitable for industrial implementation. PMID:26040924

  20. Plasma surface oxidation of 316L stainless steel for improving adhesion strength of silicone rubber coating to metal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifi, Afrooz; Imani, Mohammad; Khorasani, Mohammad Taghi; Daliri Joupari, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    Stainless steel 316L is one of the most widely used materials for fabricating of biomedical devices hence, improving its surface properties is still of great interest and challenging in biomaterial sciences. Plasma oxidation, in comparison to the conventional chemical or mechanical methods, is one of the most efficient methods recently used for surface treatment of biomaterials. Here, stainless steel specimens were surface oxidized by radio-frequency plasma irradiation operating at 34 MHz under pure oxygen atmosphere. Surface chemical composition of the samples was significantly changed after plasma oxidation by appearance of the chromium and iron oxides on the plasma-oxidized surface. A wettable surface, possessing high surface energy (83.19 mN m-1), was observed after plasma oxidation. Upon completion of the surface modification process, silicone rubber was spray coated on the plasma-treated stainless steel surface. Morphology of the silicone rubber coating was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A uniform coating was formed on the oxidized surface with no delamination at polymer-metal interface. Pull-off tests showed the lowest adhesion strength of coating to substrate (0.12 MPa) for untreated specimens and the highest (0.89 MPa) for plasma-oxidized ones.