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Sample records for hydrogenases related genes

  1. Transcription profiles of hydrogenases related genes in the cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula CCAP 1446/4

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Lyngbya majuscula CCAP 1446/4 is a N2-fixing filamentous nonheterocystous strain that contains two NiFe-hydrogenases: an uptake (encoded by hupSL) and a bidirectional enzyme (encoded by hoxEFUYH). The biosynthesis/maturation of NiFe-hydrogenases is a complex process requiring several accessory proteins for e.g. for the incorporation of metals and ligands in the active center (large subunit), and the insertion of the FeS clusters (small subunit). The last step in the maturation of the large subunit is the cleavage of a C-terminal peptide from its precursor by a specific endopeptidase. Subsequently, the mature large and small subunits can assemble forming a functional enzyme. Results In this work we demonstrated that, in L. majuscula, the structural genes encoding the bidirectional hydrogenase are cotranscribed, and that hoxW (the gene encoding its putative specific endopeptidase) is in the same chromosomal region but transcribed from a different promoter. The gene encoding the putative specific uptake hydrogenase endopeptidase, hupW, can be cotranscribed with the structural genes but it has its own promoter. hoxH, hupL, hoxW and hupW transcription was followed in L. majuscula cells grown under N2-fixing and non-N2-fixing conditions over a 12 h light/12 h dark cycle. The transcription of hoxH, hoxW and hupW did not vary remarkably in the conditions tested, while the hupL transcript levels are significantly higher under N2-fixing conditions with a peak occurring in the transition between the light and the dark phase. Furthermore, the putative endopeptidases transcript levels, in particular hoxW, are lower than those of the respective hydrogenase structural genes. Conclusion The data presented here indicate that in L. majuscula the genes encoding the putative hydrogenases specific endopeptidases, hoxW and hupW, are transcribed from their own promoters. Their transcript levels do not vary notably in the conditions tested, suggesting that HoxW and HupW are

  2. The hoxZ gene of the Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase operon is required for activation of hydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Sayavedra-Soto, L A; Arp, D J

    1992-01-01

    The roles of the product of the hoxZ gene immediately downstream of the hydrogenase gene (hoxKG) in Azotobacter vinelandii were investigated by constructing and characterizing a mutant with the center of the hoxZ gene deleted. The strain lacking the functional hoxZ gene product exhibited a low rate of H2 oxidation with O2 as the electron acceptor relative to that of the wild-type strain. Nevertheless, when the enzyme was exogenously activated and methylene blue was used as the electron acceptor from hydrogenase, rates of H2 oxidation comparable to those in the wild-type strain were observed. These results suggest that the gene product of hoxZ plays a role in activating and maintaining hydrogenase in a reduced active state. The product of hoxZ could also be the linkage necessary for transfer of electrons from H2 to the electron transport chain. Images PMID:1644756

  3. Identification of a locus within the hydrogenase gene cluster involved in intracellular nickel metabolism in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Changlin Fu; Maier, R.J. )

    1991-12-01

    A 0.6-kb fragment of DNA involved in intracellular Ni metabolism was isolated and cloned from a cosmid containing 23.2 kb of hydrogenase-related genes of Bradyrhizobium japonicum. This locus is located 8.3 kb upstream of the hydrogenase structural genes. The hydrogenase activity of a mutant with a gene-directed mutation at this locus (strain JHK7) showed dependency on nickel provided during hydrogenase depression. The hydrogenase activity was only 20% of that in the wild-type strain, JH, at a concentration of 0.5 {mu}M NiCl{sub 2}. The hydrogenase activity in JH reached its maximum at 3 {mu}M NiCl{sub 2}, whereas the mutant (JHK7) reached wild-type levels of hydrogenase activity when derepressed in 50 {mu}M NiCl{sub 2}. Studies with the hup-lacZ transcriptional fusion plasmid pSY7 in JHK7 showed that the mutant JHK7 expressed less promoter activity under low-nickel conditions than did strain JH. The mutant accumulated less nickel during a 45-h hydrogenase under low-nickel conditions than did strain JH. The mutant accumulated less nickel during a 45-h hydrogenase derepression period than did the wild type. However, both JHK7 and the JH wild-type strain had the same short-term Ni transport rates, and the K{sub m}s for Ni of both strains were about 62 {mu}M. When incubated under non-hydrogenase-derepression conditions, the mutant accumulated Ni at the same rate as strain JH. However, this stored source of nickel was unable to restore hydrogenase expression ability of the mutant to wild-type levels during derepression without nickel. The results that the locus identified in B. japonicum is not involved in nickel-specific transport.

  4. Hydrogenase Gene Distribution and H2 Consumption Ability within the Thiomicrospira Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Moritz; Perner, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    Thiomicrospira were originally characterized as sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. Attempts to grow them on hydrogen failed for many years. Only recently we demonstrated hydrogen consumption among two of three tested Thiomicrospira and posited that hydrogen consumption may be more widespread among Thiomicrospira than previously assumed. Here, we investigate and compare the hydrogen consumption ability and the presence of group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes (enzyme catalyzes H2↔2H+ + 2e-) for sixteen different Thiomicrospira species. Seven of these Thiomicrospira species encoded group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes and five of these species could also consume hydrogen. All Thiomicrospira species exhibiting hydrogen consumption were from hydrothermal vents along the Mid-Atlantic ridge or Eastern Pacific ridges. The tested Thiomicrospira from Mediterranean and Western Pacific vents could not consume hydrogen. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes were categorized into two clusters: those resembling the hydrogenase from Hydrogenovibrio are in cluster I and are related to those from Alpha- and other Gammaproteobacteria. In cluster II, hydrogenases found exclusively in Thiomicrospira crunogena strains are combined and form a monophyletic group with those from Epsilonproteobacteria suggesting they were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Hydrogen consumption appears to be common among some Thiomicrospira, given that five of the tested sixteen strains carried this trait. The hydrogen consumption ability expands their competitiveness within an environment. PMID:26903978

  5. Process and genes for expression and overexpression of active [FeFe] hydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, Michael; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Posewitz, Matthew C; Smolinski, Sharon L

    2014-09-16

    A process for expression of active [FeFe]-hydrogenase in a host organism that does not contain either the structural gene(s) for [FeFe]-hydrogenases and/or homologues for the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HyG, comprising: cloning the structural hydrogenase gene(s) and/or the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HydG from an organisms that contains these genes into expression plasmids; transferring the plasmids into an organism that lacks a native [FeFe]-hydrogenase or that has a disrupted [FeFe]-hydrogenase and culturing it aerobically; and inducing anaerobiosis to provide [FeFe] hydrogenase biosynthesis and H?2#191 production.

  6. Novel [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts indicative of active facultative aerobes and obligate anaerobes in earthworm gut contents.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver; Wüst, Pia K; Hellmuth, Susanne; Borst, Katharina; Horn, Marcus A; Drake, Harold L

    2011-09-01

    The concomitant occurrence of molecular hydrogen (H(2)) and organic acids along the alimentary canal of the earthworm is indicative of ongoing fermentation during gut passage. Fermentative H(2) production is catalyzed by [FeFe]-hydrogenases and group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenases in obligate anaerobes (e.g., Clostridiales) and facultative aerobes (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae), respectively, functional groups that might respond differently to contrasting redox conditions. Thus, the objectives of this study were to assess the redox potentials of the alimentary canal of Lumbricus terrestris and analyze the hydrogenase transcript diversities of H(2) producers in glucose-supplemented gut content microcosms. Although redox potentials in the core of the alimentary canal were variable on an individual worm basis, average redox potentials were similar. The lowest redox potentials occurred in the foregut and midgut regions, averaging 40 and 110 mV, respectively. Correlation plots between hydrogenase amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that closely related hydrogenases belonged to closely related taxa, whereas distantly related hydrogenases did not necessarily belong to distantly related taxa. Of 178 [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 177 clustered in 12 Clostridiales-affiliated operational taxonomic units, the majority of which were indicative of heretofore unknown hydrogenases. Of 86 group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 79% and 21% were affiliated with organisms in the Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonadaceae, respectively. The collective results (i) suggest that fermenters must cope with variable and moderately oxidative redox conditions along the alimentary canal, (ii) demonstrate that heretofore undetected hydrogenases are present in the earthworm gut, and (iii) corroborate previous findings implicating Clostridiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae as active fermentative taxa in earthworm gut content.

  7. A gene complex coding for the membrane-bound hydrogenase of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16.

    PubMed Central

    Kortlüke, C; Horstmann, K; Schwartz, E; Rohde, M; Binsack, R; Friedrich, B

    1992-01-01

    One of the key enzymes in the chemolithoautotrophic metabolism of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 is a dimeric, membrane-associated hydrogenase. The genetic determinants of this enzyme are located on the endogenous megaplasmid pHG1 (G. Eberz, C. Hogrefe, C. Kortlüke, A. Kamienski, and B. Friedrich, J. Bacteriol. 168:636-641, 1986). Complementation studies showed that the information required for the formation of active membrane-bound hydrogenase occupies more than 7.5 kb of megaplasmid DNA. We cloned and sequenced this region and identified the genes encoding the two hydrogenase subunits (hoxK and hoxG). The nucleotide sequence contains nine additional closely spaced open reading frames. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that the gene product of one of these open reading frames (hoxM) is involved in the process leading to the attachment of hydrogenase to the membrane. Other open reading frames may encode additional processing functions and components of a hydrogenase-linked electron transport chain. Analysis of Tn5-B21-mediated transcriptional fusions provided evidence that the structural genes and accessory functions belong to at least three coordinately regulated transcriptional units. Images PMID:1383192

  8. Genes involved in Sec-independent membrane targeting of hydrogenase in Azotobacter chroococcum.

    PubMed

    Maltempi de Souza, Emanuel; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio; Wassem, Roseli; Ford, Chris M; Yates, M Geoffrey

    2007-04-01

    Sec-independent translocation systems have been characterised in Escherichia coli and other bacteria and differ from the Sec-dependent system by transporting fully folded proteins using the transmembrane proton electrochemical gradient. Proteins transported by this system bear a twin-arginine motif (tat) in the N-terminal signal peptide and include several cofactor-containing proteins. Azotobacter chroococcum strain (MCD124) has a soluble hydrogenase, which exhibited low O(2)-dependent H(2) uptake, and a shift in the pH of the culture to a more alkaline range during growth. We show that the DNA region capable of complementing this strain contains the tatABC genes and that mutations in the tatA gene reproduced the soluble hydrogenase and the culture pH shift phenotypes. We also show that insertional mutation in the tatC gene at a position corresponding to its C-terminal region had no effect on hydrogenase activity, but induced the pH shift of the culture. Sequence and mutagenesis analyses of this genomic region suggest that these genes form an operon that does not contain a tatD-like gene. A mutation in hupZ of the main hup gene region, coding for a possible b-type cytochrome also yielded a soluble hydrogenase, but not the pH-shift phenotype.

  9. A hydrogenase-linked gene in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain delta H encodes a polyferredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, J N; Beckler, G S; Cram, D S; Hamilton, P T; Brown, J W; Krzycki, J A; Kolodziej, A F; Alex, L; Orme-Johnson, W H; Walsh, C T

    1989-01-01

    The genes mvhDGA, which encode the subunit polypeptides of the methyl viologen-reducing hydrogenase in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain delta H, have been cloned and sequenced. These genes, together with a fourth open reading frame designated mvhB, are tightly linked and appear to form an operon that is transcribed starting 42 base pairs upstream of mvhD. The organization and sequences of the mvhG and mvhA genes indicate a common evolutionary ancestry with genes encoding the small and large subunits of hydrogenases in eubacterial species. The product of the mvhB gene is predicted to contain six tandomly repeated bacterial-ferredoxin-like domains and, therefore, is predicted to be a polyferredoxin that could contain as many as 48 iron atoms in 12 Fe4S4 clusters. PMID:2654933

  10. Relating diffusion along the substrate tunnel and oxygen sensitivity in hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Leroux, Fanny; Burlat, Bénédicte; Dementin, Sébastien; Baffert, Carole; Lautier, Thomas; Fourmond, Vincent; Ceccaldi, Pierre; Cavazza, Christine; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan Carlos; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Bertrand, Patrick; Rousset, Marc; Léger, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    In hydrogenases and many other redox enzymes, the buried active site is connected to the solvent by a molecular channel whose structure may determine the enzyme's selectivity with respect to substrate and inhibitors. The role of these channels has been addressed using crystallography and molecular dynamics, but kinetic data are scarce. Using protein film voltammetry, we determined and then compared the rates of inhibition by CO and O2 in ten NiFe hydrogenase mutants and two FeFe hydrogenases. We found that the rate of inhibition by CO is a good proxy of the rate of diffusion of O2 toward the active site. Modifying amino acids whose side chains point inside the tunnel can slow this rate by orders of magnitude. We quantitatively define the relations between diffusion, the Michaelis constant for H2 and rates of inhibition, and we demonstrate that certain enzymes are slowly inactivated by O2 because access to the active site is slow.

  11. Discovery of [NiFe] hydrogenase genes in metagenomic DNA: cloning and heterologous expression in Thiocapsa roseopersicina.

    PubMed

    Maróti, Gergely; Tong, Yingkai; Yooseph, Shibu; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Smith, Hamilton O; Kovács, Kornél L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig; Xu, Qing

    2009-09-01

    Using a metagenomics approach, we have cloned a piece of environmental DNA from the Sargasso Sea that encodes an [NiFe] hydrogenase showing 60% identity to the large subunit and 64% to the small subunit of a Thiocapsa roseopersicina O2-tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenase. The DNA sequence of the hydrogenase identified by the metagenomic approach was subsequently found to be 99% identical to the hyaA and hyaB genes of an Alteromonas macleodii hydrogenase, indicating that it belongs to the Alteromonas clade. We were able to express our new Alteromonas hydrogenase in T. roseopersicina. Expression was accomplished by coexpressing only two accessory genes, hyaD and hupH, without the need to express any of the hyp accessory genes (hypABCDEF). These results suggest that the native accessory proteins in T. roseopersicina could substitute for the Alteromonas counterparts that are absent in the host to facilitate the assembly of a functional Alteromonas hydrogenase. To further compare the complex assembly machineries of these two [NiFe] hydrogenases, we performed complementation experiments by introducing the new Alteromonas hyaD gene into the T. roseopersicina hynD mutant. Interestingly, Alteromonas endopeptidase HyaD could complement T. roseopersicina HynD to cleave endoproteolytically the C-terminal end of the T. roseopersicina HynL hydrogenase large subunit and activate the enzyme. This study refines our knowledge on the selectivity and pleiotropy of the elements of the [NiFe] hydrogenase assembly machineries. It also provides a model for functionally analyzing novel enzymes from environmental microbes in a culture-independent manner.

  12. Evolutionary Significance of an Algal Gene Encoding an [FeFe]-Hydrogenase with F-Domain Homology and Hydrogenase Activity in Chlorella Variabilis NC64A

    SciTech Connect

    Meuser, J. E.; Boyd, E. S.; Ananyev, G.; Karns, D.; Radakovits, R.; Murthy, U. M. N.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Dismukes, G. C.; Peters, J. W.; Posewitz, M. C.

    2011-10-01

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA) link the production of molecular H{sub 2} to anaerobic metabolism in many green algae. Similar to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella variabilis NC64A (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta) exhibits [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HYDA) activity during anoxia. In contrast to C. reinhardtii and other chlorophycean algae, which contain hydrogenases with only the HYDA active site (H-cluster), C. variabilis NC64A is the only known green alga containing HYDA genes encoding accessory FeS cluster-binding domains (F-cluster). cDNA sequencing confirmed the presence of F-cluster HYDA1 mRNA transcripts, and identified deviations from the in silico splicing models. We show that HYDA activity in C. variabilis NC64A is coupled to anoxic photosynthetic electron transport (PSII linked, as well as PSII-independent) and dark fermentation. We also show that the in vivo H{sub 2}-photoproduction activity observed is as O2 sensitive as in C. reinhardtii. The two C. variabilis NC64A HYDA sequences are similar to homologs found in more deeply branching bacteria (Thermotogales), diatoms, and heterotrophic flagellates, suggesting that an F-cluster HYDA is the ancestral enzyme in algae. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the algal HYDA H-cluster domains are monophyletic, suggesting that they share a common origin, and evolved from a single ancestral F-cluster HYDA. Furthermore, phylogenetic reconstruction indicates that the multiple algal HYDA paralogs are the result of gene duplication events that occurred independently within each algal lineage. Collectively, comparative genomic, physiological, and phylogenetic analyses of the C. variabilis NC64A hydrogenase has provided new insights into the molecular evolution and diversity of algal [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

  13. Evolutionary significance of an algal gene encoding an [FeFe]-hydrogenase with F-domain homology and hydrogenase activity in Chlorella variabilis NC64A.

    PubMed

    Meuser, Jonathan E; Boyd, Eric S; Ananyev, Gennady; Karns, Devin; Radakovits, Randor; Narayana Murthy, U M; Ghirardi, Maria L; Dismukes, G Charles; Peters, John W; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2011-10-01

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA) link the production of molecular H(2) to anaerobic metabolism in many green algae. Similar to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella variabilis NC64A (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta) exhibits [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HYDA) activity during anoxia. In contrast to C. reinhardtii and other chlorophycean algae, which contain hydrogenases with only the HYDA active site (H-cluster), C. variabilis NC64A is the only known green alga containing HYDA genes encoding accessory FeS cluster-binding domains (F-cluster). cDNA sequencing confirmed the presence of F-cluster HYDA1 mRNA transcripts, and identified deviations from the in silico splicing models. We show that HYDA activity in C. variabilis NC64A is coupled to anoxic photosynthetic electron transport (PSII linked, as well as PSII-independent) and dark fermentation. We also show that the in vivo H(2)-photoproduction activity observed is as O(2) sensitive as in C. reinhardtii. The two C. variabilis NC64A HYDA sequences are similar to homologs found in more deeply branching bacteria (Thermotogales), diatoms, and heterotrophic flagellates, suggesting that an F-cluster HYDA is the ancestral enzyme in algae. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the algal HYDA H-cluster domains are monophyletic, suggesting that they share a common origin, and evolved from a single ancestral F-cluster HYDA. Furthermore, phylogenetic reconstruction indicates that the multiple algal HYDA paralogs are the result of gene duplication events that occurred independently within each algal lineage. Collectively, comparative genomic, physiological, and phylogenetic analyses of the C. variabilis NC64A hydrogenase has provided new insights into the molecular evolution and diversity of algal [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

  14. An analysis of the changes in soluble hydrogenase and global gene expression in Cupriavidus necator (Ralstonia eutropha) H16 grown in heterotrophic diauxic batch culture.

    PubMed

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Chen, Zhiliang; Ping, Darren Tan Tek; Lebhar, Helene; Welch, Jeffrey; Marquis, Christopher P

    2015-03-25

    Soluble hydrogenases (SH) are enzymes that catalyse the oxidation of molecular hydrogen. The SH enzyme from Cupriavidus necator H16 is relatively oxygen tolerant and makes an attractive target for potential application in biochemical hydrogen fuel cells. Expression of the enzyme can be mediated by derepression of the hox promoter system under heterotrophic conditions. However, the overall impact of hox derepression, from a transcriptomic perspective, has never been previously reported. Derepression of hydrogenase gene expression upon fructose depletion was confirmed in replicate experiments. Using qRT-PCR, hoxF was 4.6-fold up-regulated, hypF2 was up-regulated in the cells grown 2.2-fold and the regulatory gene hoxA was up-regulated by a mean factor of 4.5. A full transcriptomic evaluation revealed a substantial shift in the global pattern of gene expression. In addition to up-regulation of genes associated with hydrogenase expression, significant changes were observed in genes associated with energy transduction, amino acid metabolism, transcription and translation (and regulation thereof), genes associated with cell stress, lipid and cell wall biogenesis and other functions, including cell motility. We report the first full transcriptome analysis of C. necator H16 grown heterotrophically on fructose and glycerol in diauxic batch culture, which permits expression of soluble hydrogenase under heterotrophic conditions. The data presented deepens our understanding of the changes in global gene expression patterns that occur during the switch to growth on glycerol and suggests that energy deficit is a key driver for induction of hydrogenase expression in this organism.

  15. Enhancing hydrogen production of Enterobacter aerogenes by heterologous expression of hydrogenase genes originated from Synechocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenlu; Cheng, Jun; Zhao, Jinfang; Zhang, Chuanxi; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogenase genes (hoxEFUYH) of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were cloned and heterologously expressed in Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC13408 for the first time in this study, and the hydrogen yield was significantly enhanced using the recombinant strain. A recombinant plasmid containing the gene in-frame with Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) gene was transformed into E. aerogenes ATCC13408 to produce a GST-fusion protein. SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis confirm the successful expression of the hox genes. The hydrogenase activity of the recombinant strain is 237.6±9.3ml/(g-DW·h), which is 152% higher than the wild strain. The hydrogen yield of the recombinant strain is 298.3ml/g-glucose, which is 88% higher than the wild strain. During hydrogen fermentation, the recombinant strain produces more acetate and butyrate, but less ethanol. This is corresponding to the NADH metabolism in the cell due to the higher hydrogenase activity with the heterologous expression of hox genes.

  16. The Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 hoxX gene participates in hydrogenase regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, O.; Schwartz, E.; Dernedde, J.; Eitinger, M.; Friedrich, B.

    1994-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed a 1,791-bp open reading frame in the hox gene cluster of the gram-negative chemolithotroph Alcaligenes eutrophus H16. In order to investigate the biological role of this open reading frame, we generated an in-frame deletion allele via a gene replacement strategy. The resulting mutant grew significantly more slowly than the wild type under lithoautotrophic conditions (6.1 versus 4.2 h doubling time). A reduction in the level of the soluble NAD-reducing hydrogenase (60% of the wild-type activity) was shown to be the cause of the slow lithoautotrophic growth. We used plasmid-borne gene fusions to monitor the expression of the operons encoding the soluble and membrane-bound hydrogenases. The expression of both operons was lower in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. These results suggest that the newly identified gene, designated hoxX, encodes a regulatory component which, in conjunction with the transcriptional activator HoxA, controls hydrogenase synthesis. Images PMID:8021224

  17. Comprehensive phylogenetic diversity of [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes in termite gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Bodington, Dylan; Zhang, Chong; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Tanji, Yasunori; Hongoh, Yuichi; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic diversity of [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA) in termite guts was assessed by pyrosequencing PCR amplicons obtained using newly designed primers. Of 8,066 reads, 776 hydA phylotypes, defined with 97% nucleotide sequence identity, were recovered from the gut homogenates of three termite species, Hodotermopsis sjoestedti, Reticulitermes speratus, and Nasutitermes takasagoensis. The phylotype coverage was 92-98%, and the majority shared only low identity with database sequences. It was estimated that 194-745 hydA phylotypes existed in the gut of each termite species. Our results demonstrate that hydA gene diversity in the termite gut microbiota is much higher than previously estimated.

  18. Nucleotide sequence and characterization of four additional genes of the hydrogenase structural operon from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae.

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, E; Palacios, J M; Murillo, J; Ruiz-Argüeso, T

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 2.5-kbp region following the hydrogenase structural genes (hupSL) in the H2 uptake gene cluster from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae UPM791 was determined. Four closely linked genes encoding peptides of 27.9 (hupC), 22.1 (hupD), 19.0 (hupE), and 10.4 (hupF) kDa were identified immediately downstream of hupL. Proteins with comparable apparent molecular weights were detected by heterologous expression of these genes in Escherichia coli. The six genes, hupS to hupF, are arranged as an operon, and by mutant complementation analysis, it was shown that genes hupSLCD are cotranscribed. A transcription start site preceded by the -12 to -24 consensus sequence characteristic of NtrA-dependent promoters was identified upstream of hupS. On the basis of the lack of oxygen-dependent H2 uptake activity of a hupC::Tn5 mutant and on structural characteristics of the protein, we postulate that HupC is a b-type cytochrome involved in electron transfer from hydrogenase to oxygen. The product from hupE, which is needed for full hydrogenase activity, exhibited characteristics typical of a membrane protein. The features of HupC and HupE suggest that they form, together with the hydrogenase itself, a membrane-bound protein complex involved in hydrogen oxidation. Images PMID:1597428

  19. Symbiotic Expression of Cosmid-Borne Bradyrhizobium japonicum Hydrogenase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Grant R.; Harker, Alan R.; Cantrell, Michael A.; Hanus, F. Joe; Russell, Sterling A.; Haugland, Richard A.; Evans, Harold J.

    1987-01-01

    The expression of cosmid-borne Bradyrhizobium japonicum hydrogenase genes in alfalfa, clover, and soybean nodules harboring Rhizobium transconjugants was studied. Cosmid pHU52 conferred hydrogen uptake (Hup) activity in both free-living bacteria and in nodules on the different plant hosts, although in nodules the instability of the cosmid resulted in low levels of Hup activity. In contrast, cosmid pHU1, which does not confer Hup activity on free-living bacteria, gave a Hup+ phenotype in nodules on alfalfa and soybean. Nodules formed by B. japonicum USDA 123Spc(pHU1) recycled about 90% of nitrogenase-mediated hydrogen evolution. Both subunits of hydrogenase (30- and 60-kilodalton polypeptides) were detected in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of bacteroid preparations from nodules harboring B. japonicum strains with pHU1 or pHU52. Neither pHU53 nor pLAFR1 conferred detectable Hup activity in either nodules or free-living bacteria. Based on the physical maps of pHU1 and pHU52, it is suggested that a 5.5-kilobase EcoRI fragment unique to pHU52 contains a gene or part of a gene required for Hup activity in free-living bacteria but not in nodules. This conclusion is supported by the observation that two Tn5 insertions in the chromosome of B. japonicum USDA 122DES obtained by marker exchange with Tn5-mutagenized pHU1 abolished Hup activity in free-living bacteria but not in nodules. Images PMID:16347291

  20. Organization of the genes encoding [Fe] hydrogenase in Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. oxamicus Monticello.

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, G; Strang, J D; Wilson, F R

    1989-01-01

    The genes encoding the periplasmic [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. oxamicus Monticello were cloned by exploiting their homology with the hydAB genes from D. vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Hildenborough, in which this enzyme is present as a heterologous dimer of alpha and beta subunits. Nucleotide sequencing showed that the enzyme is encoded by an operon in which the gene for the 46-kilodalton (kDa) alpha subunit precedes that of the 13.5-kDa beta subunit, exactly as in the Hildenborough strain. The pairs of hydA and hydB genes are highly homologous; both alpha subunits (420 amino acid residues) share 79% sequence identity, while the unprocessed beta subunits (124 and 123 amino acid residues, respectively) share 71% sequence identity. In contrast, there appears to be no sequence homology outside these coding regions, with the exception of a possible promoter element, which was found approximately 90 base pairs upstream from the translational start of the hydA gene. The recently discovered hydC gene, which may code for a 65.8-kDa fusion protein (gamma) of the alpha and beta subunits and is present immediately downstream from the hydAB genes in the Hildenborough strain, was found to be absent from the Monticello strain. The implication of this result for the possible function of the hydC gene product in Desulfovibrio species is discussed. Images PMID:2661538

  1. A mutation in a Rhodobacter capsulatus gene encoding an integration host factor-like protein impairs in vivo hydrogenase expression.

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, B; Bosc, C; Richaud, P; Colbeau, A; Vignais, P M

    1991-01-01

    A gene capable of encoding a protein sharing 45% identical amino acids with the alpha subunit of the integration host factor (IHF) of Escherichia coli was isolated from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus strain B10 by complementation of a hydrogenase-deficient (Hup-) mutant, IR4. A DNA fragment of 274 base pairs containing an IHF binding consensus sequence, isolated from the promoter region of the hydrogenase structural genes (hupSL), was shown by gel retardation assays to bind the IHF protein from E. coli. The product of the R. capsulatus gene was shown to bind specifically to the 274-base-pair DNA fragment from the hupSL promoter. By analogy to the E. coli himA gene, which encodes the alpha subunit of IHF, the gene complementing the IR4 mutant was named himA of R. capsulatus. The wild-type himA gene, cloned in plasmid pBO2, was introduced into the IR4 strain and shown to restore, in trans, hydrogenase activity and autotrophic growth in the mutant. In IR4, a C----T transition mutation had replaced Arg-8 by Cys-8. Gel mobility shifts of the 274-base-pair DNA fragment, not observed with the himA gene product of IR4, were restored with extracts from IR4(pBO2) cells, containing the himA gene on the recombinant plasmid pBO2. Images PMID:1961742

  2. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Diversity of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Genes in Termite Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hao; Bodington, Dylan; Zhang, Chong; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Tanji, Yasunori; Hongoh, Yuichi; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic diversity of [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA) in termite guts was assessed by pyrosequencing PCR amplicons obtained using newly designed primers. Of 8,066 reads, 776 hydA phylotypes, defined with 97% nucleotide sequence identity, were recovered from the gut homogenates of three termite species, Hodotermopsis sjoestedti, Reticulitermes speratus, and Nasutitermes takasagoensis. The phylotype coverage was 92–98%, and the majority shared only low identity with database sequences. It was estimated that 194–745 hydA phylotypes existed in the gut of each termite species. Our results demonstrate that hydA gene diversity in the termite gut microbiota is much higher than previously estimated. PMID:24240187

  3. Use of hupS::lacZ gene fusion to study regulation of hydrogenase expression in Rhodobacter capsulatus: stimulation by H2.

    PubMed Central

    Colbeau, A; Vignais, P M

    1992-01-01

    The Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase enzyme was used as a reporter molecule for genetic fusions in Rhodobacter capsulatus. DNA fragments that were from the upstream region of the hydrogenase structural operon hupSLM and contained 5' hupS sequences were fused in frame to a promoterless lacZ gene, yielding fusion proteins comprising the putative signal sequence and the first 22 amino acids of the HupS protein joined to the eight amino acid of beta-galactosidase. We demonstrate the usefulness of the hupS::lacZ fusion in monitoring regulation of hydrogenase gene expression. The activities of plasmid-determined beta-galactosidase and chromosome-encoded hydrogenase changed in parallel in response to various growth conditions (light or dark, aerobiosis or anaerobiosis, and presence or absence of ammonia or of H2), showing that changes in hydrogenase activity were due to changes in enzyme synthesis. Molecular hydrogen stimulated hydrogenase synthesis in dark, aerobic cultures and in illuminated, anaerobic cultures. Analysis of hupS::lacZ expression in various mutants indicated that neither the hydrogenase structural genes nor NifR4 (sigma 54) was essential for hydrogen regulation of hydrogenase synthesis. PMID:1624420

  4. Fe-only hydrogenases: structure, function and evolution.

    PubMed

    Nicolet, Yvain; Cavazza, Christine; Fontecilla-Camps, J C

    2002-07-25

    Hydrogenases are enzymes capable of catalyzing the oxidation of molecular hydrogen or its production from protons and electrons according to the reversible reaction: H(2)<==>2H(+)+2e(-). Most of these enzymes fall into to major classes: NiFe and Fe-only hydrogenases. Extensive spectroscopic, electrochemical and structural studies have shed appreciable light on the catalytic mechanism of hydrogenases. Although evolutionarily unrelated, NiFe and Fe-hydrogenases share a common, unusual feature: an active site low-spin Fe center with CO and CN coordination. We have recently focused our attention on Fe-hydrogenases because from structural studies by us and others, it appears to be a simpler system than the NiFe counterpart. Thus the primary hydrogen binding site has been identified and plausible, electron, proton and hydrogen pathways from and to the buried active site may be proposed from the structural data. The extensive genome sequencing effort currently under way has shown that eukaryotic organisms contain putatively gene coding sequences that display significant homology to Fe-hydrogenases. Here, we summarize the available evidence concerning the mechanism of these enzymes and carry out a structural comparison between Fe-hydrogenases and related proteins of unknown metal content from yeast, plant, worm, insect and mammals.

  5. Cloning and nucleotide sequences of the genes for the subunits of NAD-reducing hydrogenase of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16.

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Betcke, A; Warnecke, U; Böcker, C; Zaborosch, C; Friedrich, B

    1990-01-01

    The genes hoxF, -U, -Y, and -H which encode the four subunit polypeptides alpha, gamma, delta, and beta of the NAD-reducing hydrogenase (HoxS) of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16, were cloned, expressed in Pseudomonas facilis, and sequenced. On the basis of the nucleotide sequence, the predicted amino acid sequences, and the N-terminal amino acid sequences, it was concluded that the structural genes are tightly linked and presumably organized as an operon, denoted hoxS. Two pairs of -24 and -12 consensus sequences resembling RpoN-activatable promoters lie upstream of hoxF, the first of the four genes. Primer extension experiments indicate that the second promoter is responsible for hoxS transcription. hoxF and hoxU code for the flavin-containing dimer (alpha and gamma subunits) of HoxS which exhibits NADH:oxidoreductase activity. A putative flavin-binding region is discussed. The 26.0-kilodalton (kDa) gamma subunit contains two cysteine clusters which may participate in the coordination of two [4F3-4S]centers. The genes hoxY and hoxH code for the small 22.9-kDa delta subunit and the nickel-containing 54.8-kDa beta subunit, respectively, of the hydrogenase dimer of HoxS. The latter dimer exhibits several conserved regions found in all nickel-containing hydrogenases. The roles of these regions in coordinating iron and nickel are discussed. Although the deduced amino acid sequences of the delta and beta subunits share some conserved regions with the corresponding polypeptides of other [NiFe] hydrogenases, the overall amino acid homology is marginal. Nevertheless, significant sequence homology (35%) to the corresponding polypeptides of the soluble methylviologen-reducing hydrogenase of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum was found. Unlike the small subunits of the membrane-bound and soluble periplasmic hydrogenases, the HoxS protein does not appear to be synthesized with an N-terminal leader peptide. Images PMID:2188945

  6. Artificial Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Bryan E.; Olsen, Matthew T.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Decades of biophysical study on the hydrogenase (H2ase) enzymes have yielded sufficient information to guide the synthesis of analogues of their active sites. Three families of enzymes serve as inspiration for this work: the [FeFe]-, [NiFe]-, and [Fe]-H2ases, all of which feature iron centers bound to both CO and thiolate. Artificial H2ases effect the oxidation of H2 of H2 and the reverse reaction, the reduction of protons. These reactions occur via the intermediacy of metal hydrides. The inclusion of amine bases within the catalysts is an important design feature that is emulated in related bioinspired catalysts. Continuing challenges are the low reactivity of H2 towards biomimetic H2ases. PMID:20356731

  7. Deletion of a gene cluster for [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase maturation in the anaerobic hyperthermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii identifies its role in hydrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cha, Minseok; Chung, Daehwan; Westpheling, Janet

    2016-02-01

    The anaerobic, hyperthermophlic, cellulolytic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii grows optimally at ∼80 °C and effectively degrades plant biomass without conventional pretreatment. It utilizes a variety of carbohydrate carbon sources, including both C5 and C6 sugars, released from plant biomass and produces lactate, acetate, CO2, and H2 as primary fermentation products. The C. bescii genome encodes two hydrogenases, a bifurcating [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase and a [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase. The [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase is the most widely distributed in nature and is predicted to catalyze hydrogen production and to pump protons across the cellular membrane creating proton motive force. Hydrogenases are the key enzymes in hydrogen metabolism and their crystal structure reveals complexity in the organization of their prosthetic groups suggesting extensive maturation of the primary protein. Here, we report the deletion of a cluster of genes, hypABFCDE, required for maturation of the [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase. These proteins are specific for the hydrogenases they modify and are required for hydrogenase activity. The deletion strain grew more slowly than the wild type or the parent strain and produced slightly less hydrogen overall, but more hydrogen per mole of cellobiose. Acetate yield per mole of cellobiose was increased ∼67 % and ethanol yield per mole of cellobiose was decreased ∼39 %. These data suggest that the primary role of the [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase is to generate a proton gradient in the membrane driving ATP synthesis and is not the primary enzyme for hydrogen catalysis. In its absence, ATP is generated from increased acetate production resulting in more hydrogen produced per mole of cellobiose.

  8. Cloning and sequencing of the genes encoding the large and small subunits of the periplasmic (NiFeSe) hydrogenase of Desulfovibrio baculatus

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, N.K.; Peck, H.D. Jr.; Le Gall, J.; Przybyla, A.E.

    1987-12-01

    The genes coding for the large and small subunits of the periplasmic hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio baculatus have been cloned and sequenced. The genes are arranged in an operon with the small subunit gene preceding the large subunit gene. The small subunit gene codes for a 32 amino acid leader sequence supporting the periplasmic localization of the protein, however no ferredoxin-like or other characteristic iron-sulfur coordination sites were observed. The periplasmic hydrogenases from D. baculatus (an NiFeSe protein) and D. vulgaris (an Fe protein) exhibit no homology suggesting that they are structurally different, unrelated entities.

  9. Cloning and sequencing of the genes encoding the large and small subunits of the periplasmic (NiFeSe) hydrogenase of Desulfovibrio baculatus.

    PubMed Central

    Menon, N K; Peck, H D; Gall, J L; Przybyla, A E

    1987-01-01

    The genes coding for the large and small subunits of the periplasmic hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio baculatus have been cloned and sequenced. The genes are arranged in an operon with the small subunit gene preceding the large subunit gene. The small subunit gene codes for a 32 amino acid leader sequence supporting the periplasmic localization of the protein, however no ferredoxin-like or other characteristic iron-sulfur coordination sites were observed. The periplasmic hydrogenases from D. baculatus (an NiFeSe protein) and D. vulgaris (an Fe protein) exhibit no homology suggesting that they are structurally different, unrelated entities. Images PMID:3316183

  10. Presence and expression of hydrogenase specific C-terminal endopeptidases in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wünschiers, Röbbe; Batur, Mehtap; Lindblad, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Background Hydrogenases catalyze the simplest of all chemical reactions: the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen or vice versa. Cyanobacteria can express an uptake, a bidirectional or both NiFe-hydrogenases. Maturation of those depends on accessory proteins encoded by hyp-genes. The last maturation step involves the cleavage of a ca. 30 amino acid long peptide from the large subunit by a C-terminal endopeptidase. Until know, nothing is known about the maturation of cyanobacterial NiFe-hydrogenases. The availability of three complete cyanobacterial genome sequences from strains with either only the uptake (Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133/PCC 73102), only the bidirectional (Synechocystis PCC 6803) or both NiFe-hydrogenases (Anabaena PCC 7120) prompted us to mine these genomes for hydrogenase maturation related genes. In this communication we focus on the presence and the expression of the NiFe-hydrogenases and the corresponding C-terminal endopeptidases, in the three strains mentioned above. Results We identified genes encoding putative cyanobacterial hydrogenase specific C-terminal endopeptidases in all analyzed cyanobacterial genomes. The genes are not part of any known hydrogenase related gene cluster. The derived amino acid sequences show only low similarity (28–41%) to the well-analyzed hydrogenase specific C-terminal endopeptidase HybD from Escherichia coli, the crystal structure of which is known. However, computational secondary and tertiary structure modeling revealed the presence of conserved structural patterns around the highly conserved active site. Gene expression analysis shows that the endopeptidase encoding genes are expressed under both nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing conditions. Conclusion Anabaena PCC 7120 possesses two NiFe-hydrogenases and two hydrogenase specific C-terminal endopeptidases but only one set of hyp-genes. Thus, in contrast to the Hyp-proteins, the C-terminal endopeptidases are the only known hydrogenase maturation

  11. Basic studies of hydrogen evolution by Escherichia coli containing a cloned Citrobacter freundii hydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Kanayama, H; Sode, K; Karube, I

    1987-08-01

    Citrobacter freundii genes that complemented Escherichia coli hyd-(hydrogenase activity) mutation were cloned in plasmids pCBH4 (6.2 kb) and pCBH6(5.7 kb). Hydrogen evolution by the transformant E. coli HK-8(pCBH4 or pCBH6) was investigated. The optimum culture temperature of recombinant E. coli cells for hydrogen evolution from glucose was in the neighborhood of 18 degrees C. The recombinant E. coli cells cultured at this condition showed a several-fold increase of hydrogen evolution, as compared with that of the wild-type cells. The plasmid-retention stability of this recombinant E. coli was extremely high, especially plasmid pCBH4, which was completely retained during 2 wk without any restriction. Hydrogen production by immobilized recombinant E. coli was then investigated using cells cultured at 18 degrees C. The hydrogen evolution rate from glucose and Lennox-broth were about twofold higher than that of E. coli C600, and this high hydrogen evolution rate was maintained for more than 1 mo.

  12. An [Fe] hydrogenase from the anaerobic hydrogenosome-containing fungus Neocallimastix frontalis L2.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Elizabeth A; van der Giezen, Mark; Horner, David S; Embley, T Martin; Howe, Christopher J

    2002-08-21

    Hydrogenases, oxygen-sensitive enzymes that can make hydrogen gas, are key to the function of hydrogen-producing organelles (hydrogenosomes), which occur in anaerobic eukaryotes scattered throughout the eukaryotic tree. All of the eukaryotic enzymes characterized so far are iron-only [Fe] hydrogenases. In contrast, it has previously been suggested that hydrogenosomes of the best-studied anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix frontalis L2 contain an unrelated iron-nickel-selenium [NiFeSe] hydrogenase. We have isolated a gene from strain L2 that encodes a putative protein containing all of the characteristic features of an iron-only [Fe] hydrogenase, including the cysteine residues required for the co-ordination of the unique 'hydrogen cluster'. As is the case for experimentally verified hydrogenosomal matrix enzymes from N. frontalis, the [Fe] hydrogenase encodes a plausible amino terminal extension that resembles mitochondrial targeting signals. Phylogenetic analyses of an expanded [Fe] hydrogenase dataset reveal a complicated picture that is difficult to interpret in the light of current ideas of species relationships. Nevertheless, our analyses cannot reject the hypothesis that the novel [Fe] hydrogenase gene of Neocallimastix is specifically related to other eukaryote [Fe] hydrogenases, and thus ultimately might be traced to the same ancestral source.

  13. Genetic diversity of Desulfovibrio spp. in environmental samples analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of [NiFe] hydrogenase gene fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Wawer, C; Muyzer, G

    1995-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Desulfovibrio species in environmental samples was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified [NiFe] hydrogenase gene fragments. Five different PCR primers were designed after comparative analysis of [NiFe] hydrogenase gene sequences from three Desulfovibrio species. These primers were tested in different combinations on the genomic DNAs of a variety of hydrogenase-containing and hydrogenase-lacking bacteria. One primer pair was found to be specific for Desulfovibrio species only, while the others gave positive results with other bacteria also. By using this specific primer pair, we were able to amplify the [NiFe] hydrogenase genes of DNAs isolated from environmental samples and to detect the presence of Desulfovibrio species in these samples. However, only after DGGE analysis of these PCR products could the number of different Desulfovibrio species within the samples be determined. DGGE analysis of PCR products from different bioreactors demonstrated up to two bands, while at least five distinguishable bands were detected in a microbial mat sample. Because these bands most likely represent as many Desulfovibrio species present in these samples, we conclude that the genetic diversity of Desulfovibrio species in the natural microbial mat is far greater than that in the experimental bioreactors. PMID:7793940

  14. Genetic determinants of a nickel-specific transport system are part of the plasmid-encoded hydrogenase gene cluster in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Eberz, G; Eitinger, T; Friedrich, B

    1989-01-01

    Nickel-deficient (Nic-) mutants of Alcaligenes eutrophus requiring high levels of nickel ions for autotrophic growth with hydrogen were characterized. The Nic- mutants carried defined deletions in the hydrogenase gene cluster of the indigenous pHG megaplasmid. Nickel deficiency correlated with a low level of the nickel-containing hydrogenase activity, a slow rate of nickel transport, and reduced activity of urease. The Nic+ phenotype was restored by a cloned DNA sequence (hoxN) of a megaplasmid pHG1 DNA library of A. eutrophus H16. hoxN is part of the hydrogenase gene cluster. The nickel requirement of Nic- mutants was enhanced by increasing the concentration of magnesium. This suggests that the Nic- mutants are impaired in the nickel-specific transport system and thus depend on the second transport activity which normally mediates the uptake of magnesium. PMID:2646280

  15. The product of the hypB gene, which is required for nickel incorporation into hydrogenases, is a novel guanine nucleotide-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Maier, T; Jacobi, A; Sauter, M; Böck, A

    1993-01-01

    The products of the hyp operon genes are essential for the formation of catalytically active hydrogenases in Escherichia coli. At least one of these auxiliary proteins, HYPB, appears to be involved in nickel liganding to the hydrogenase apoprotein, since mutations in hypB can be phenotypically suppressed by high nickel concentrations in the medium (R. Waugh and D. H. Boxer, Biochimie 68:157-166, 1986). To approach the identification of the specific function of HYPB, we overexpressed the hypB gene and purified and characterized the gene product. HYPB is a homodimer of 31.6-kDa subunits, and it binds guanine nucleotides, with a Kd for GDP of 1.2 microM. The protein displays a low level of GTPase activity, with a kcat of 0.17 min-1. The apparent Km for GTP, as measured in the GTP hydrolysis reaction, was determined to be 4 microM. A chromatography system was established to measure nickel insertion into hydrogenase 3 from E. coli and to determine the effects of lesions in hypB. Nickel appears to be associated only with the processed large subunit of hydrogenase 3 in the wild type, and hypB mutants accumulate the precursor form of this subunit, which is devoid of nickel. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which HYPB is involved in nickel donation to the hydrogenase apoprotein and in which GTP hydrolysis is thought to reverse the interaction between either HYPB or another nickel-binding protein and the hydrogenase apoprotein after the nickel has been released. Images PMID:8423137

  16. Sequence analysis and interposon mutagenesis of the hupT gene, which encodes a sensor protein involved in repression of hydrogenase synthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Elsen, S; Richaud, P; Colbeau, A; Vignais, P M

    1993-01-01

    The hupT gene, which represses hydrogenase gene expression in the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, has been identified and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of hupT and of the contiguous downstream open reading frame, hupU, is reported. The HupT protein of 456 amino acids (48,414 Da) has sequence similarity with the FixL, DctB, NtrB, and ArcB proteins and is predicted to be a soluble sensor kinase. Insertional inactivation of the hupT gene led to deregulation of transcriptional control, so that the hydrogenase structural operon hupSLC became overexpressed in cells grown anaerobically or aerobically. The HupT- mutants were complemented in trans by a plasmid containing an intact copy of the hupT gene. The hupU open reading frame, capable of encoding a protein of 84,879 Da, shared identity with [NiFe]hydrogenase subunits; the strongest similarity was observed with the periplasmic hydrogenase of Desulfovibrio baculatus. Images PMID:8226687

  17. Cloning of hydrogenase genes and fine structure analysis of an operon essential for H/sub 2/ metabolism in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, P.; Lee, J.H.; Shanmugam, K.T.

    1985-04-01

    Escherichia coli has two unlinked genes that code for hydrogenase synthesis and activity. The DNA fragments containing the two genes (hydA and hydB) were cloned into a plasmid vector, pBR322. The plasmids containing the hyd genes (pSE-290 and pSE-111 carrying the hydA and hydB genes, respectively) were used to genetically map a total of 51 mutant strains with defects in hydrogenase activity. A total of 37 mutants carried a mutation in the hydB gene, whereas the remaining 14 hyd were hydA. This complementation analysis also established the presence of two new genes, so far unidentified, one coding for formate dehydrogenase-2 (fdv) and another producing an electron transport protein (fhl) coupling formate dehydrogenase-2 to hydrogenase. Three of the four genes, hydB, fhl, and fdv, may constitute a single operon, and all three genes are carried by a 5.6-kilobase-pair chromosomal DNA insert in plasmid pSE-128. Plasmids carrying a part of this 5.6-kilobase-pair DNA (pSE-130) or fragments derived from this DNA in different orientations (pSE-126 and pSE-129) inhibited the production of active formate hydrogenlyase. This inhibition occurred even in a prototrophic E. coli, strain K-10, but only during an early induction period. These results, based on complementation analysis with cloned DNA fragments, show that both hydA and hydB genes are essential for the production of active hydrogenase. For the expression of active formate hydrogenlyase, two other gene products, fhl and fdv are also needed. All four genes map between 58 and 59 min in the E. coli chromosome.

  18. H2-Producing Bacterial Community during Rice Straw Decomposition in Paddy Field Soil: Estimation by an Analysis of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Gene Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Ryuko; Asakawa, Susumu; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    The transcription patterns of [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes (hydA), which encode the enzymes responsible for H2 production, were investigated during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil using molecular biological techniques. Paddy soil amended with and without rice straw was incubated under anoxic conditions. RNA was extracted from the soil, and three clone libraries of hydA were constructed using RNAs obtained from samples in the initial phase of rice straw decomposition (day 1 with rice straw), methanogenic phase of rice straw decomposition (day 14 with rice straw), and under a non-amended condition (day 14 without rice straw). hydA genes related to Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Thermotogae were mainly transcribed in paddy soil samples; however, their proportions markedly differed among the libraries. Deltaproteobacteria-related hydA genes were predominantly transcribed on day 1 with rice straw, while various types of hydA genes related to several phyla were transcribed on day 14 with rice straw. Although the diversity of transcribed hydA was significantly higher in the library on day 14 with rice straw than the other two libraries, the composition of hydA transcripts in the library was similar to that in the library on day 14 without rice straw. These results indicate that the composition of active H2 producers and/or H2 metabolic patterns dynamically change during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil. PMID:27319579

  19. H2-Producing Bacterial Community during Rice Straw Decomposition in Paddy Field Soil: Estimation by an Analysis of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Gene Transcripts.

    PubMed

    Baba, Ryuko; Asakawa, Susumu; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-09-29

    The transcription patterns of [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes (hydA), which encode the enzymes responsible for H2 production, were investigated during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil using molecular biological techniques. Paddy soil amended with and without rice straw was incubated under anoxic conditions. RNA was extracted from the soil, and three clone libraries of hydA were constructed using RNAs obtained from samples in the initial phase of rice straw decomposition (day 1 with rice straw), methanogenic phase of rice straw decomposition (day 14 with rice straw), and under a non-amended condition (day 14 without rice straw). hydA genes related to Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Thermotogae were mainly transcribed in paddy soil samples; however, their proportions markedly differed among the libraries. Deltaproteobacteria-related hydA genes were predominantly transcribed on day 1 with rice straw, while various types of hydA genes related to several phyla were transcribed on day 14 with rice straw. Although the diversity of transcribed hydA was significantly higher in the library on day 14 with rice straw than the other two libraries, the composition of hydA transcripts in the library was similar to that in the library on day 14 without rice straw. These results indicate that the composition of active H2 producers and/or H2 metabolic patterns dynamically change during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil.

  20. Fundamental Studies of Recombinant Hydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael W

    2014-01-25

    This research addressed the long term goals of understanding the assembly and organization of hydrogenase enzymes, of reducing them in size and complexity, of determining structure/function relationships, including energy conservation via charge separation across membranes, and in screening for novel H2 catalysts. A key overall goal of the proposed research was to define and characterize minimal hydrogenases that are produced in high yields and are oxygen-resistant. Remarkably, in spite of decades of research carried out on hydrogenases, it is not possible to readily manipulate or design the enzyme using molecular biology approaches since a recombinant form produced in a suitable host is not available. Such resources are essential if we are to understand what constitutes a “minimal” hydrogenase and design such catalysts with certain properties, such as resistance to oxygen, extreme stability and specificity for a given electron donor. The model system for our studies is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophile that grows optimally at 100°C, which contains three different nickel-iron [NiFe-] containing hydrogenases. Hydrogenases I and II are cytoplasmic while the other, MBH, is an integral membrane protein that functions to both evolve H2 and pump protons. Three important breakthroughs were made during the funding period with P. furiosus soluble hydrogenase I (SHI). First, we produced an active recombinant form of SHI in E. coli by the co-expression of sixteen genes using anaerobically-induced promoters. Second, we genetically-engineered P. furiosus to overexpress SHI by an order of magnitude compared to the wild type strain. Third, we generated the first ‘minimal’ form of SHI, one that contained two rather than four subunits. This dimeric form was stable and active, and directly interacted with a pyruvate-oxidizing enzyme with any intermediate electron carrier. The research resulted in five peer-reviewed publications.

  1. Regulation and genetic organization of hydrogenase: Final progress report for the period June 1, 1985--July 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Krasna, A.I.

    1988-10-01

    Hydrogenase is an enzyme which plays an important role in the anaerobic metabolism of many bacteria. The objectives of the research were to elucidate the regulation and genetic organization of hydrogenase in microorganisms. A mutation in the E. coli hydE gene leads to loss of all hydrogenase activities and isoenzymes as well as all formate-related activities. A 0.9 kb DNA fragment has been cloned from an E. coli genomic DNA library which restored all hydrogenase and formate activities to a hydE mutant strain. This gene coded for a polypeptide of subunit mw 36 kDa which is required for hydrogenase synthesis. It is involved in incorporation of nickel into hydrogenase. A mutation in the E coli hupB gene leads to the loss of the uptake of H/sub 2/ by dyes and the ability to grow on fumarate plus H/sub 2/, but expresses normal levels of hydrogenase when assayed by deuterium exchange. This mutation also leads to loss of all formate-related activities. The mutation mapped near minute 17 and a single mutation was responsible for loss of both activities. A 1.4 kb DNA fragment was isolated which restored the hydrogen uptake activities and coded for a polypeptide of subunit mw 30 kDa. Dna fragments have been isolated from Chromatium vinosum and Proteus vulgaris which restored hydrogenase activities to E. coli strains with mutations in the hydA or hydB regulatory genes and which lack all hydrogenase activities. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Immunological relationship among hydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, K L; Seefeldt, L C; Tigyi, G; Doyle, C M; Mortenson, L E; Arp, D J

    1989-01-01

    We examined the immunological cross-reactions of 11 different hydrogenase antigens with 9 different hydrogenase antibodies. Included were antibodies and antigens of both subunits of the hydrogenases of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Thiocapsa roseopersicina. The results showed a strong relationship among the Ni-Fe dimeric hydrogenases. The two subunits of Ni-Fe dimeric hydrogenases appeared immunologically distinct: specific interactions occurred only when antibodies to the 60- and 30-kilodalton subunits reacted with the 60- and 30-kilodalton-subunit antigens. The interspecies cross-reactions suggested that at least one conserved protein region exists among the large subunits of these enzymes, whereas the small subunits are less conserved. Antibodies to the Fe-only bidirectional hydrogenase of Clostridium pasteurianum reacted with the Desulfovibrio vulgaris bidirectional hydrogenase. Surprisingly, antibodies to the clostridial uptake hydrogenase did not react with any of the Fe-only bidirectional hydrogenases but did react with several of the Ni-Fe dimeric hydrogenases. The two hydrogenases from C. pasteurianum were found to be quite different immunologically. The possible relationship of these findings to the structure and catalytic functions of hydrogenase are discussed. Images PMID:2464579

  3. Relation between anaerobic inactivation and oxygen tolerance in a large series of NiFe hydrogenase mutants

    PubMed Central

    Abou Hamdan, Abbas; Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Fourmond, Vincent; Gutiérrez-Sanz, Oscar; De Lacey, Antonio L.; Infossi, Pascale; Rousset, Marc; Dementin, Sébastien; Léger, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Nickel-containing hydrogenases, the biological catalysts of oxidation and production, reversibly inactivate under anaerobic, oxidizing conditions. We aim at understanding the mechanism of (in)activation and what determines its kinetics, because there is a correlation between fast reductive reactivation and oxygen tolerance, a property of some hydrogenases that is very desirable from the point of view of biotechnology. Direct electrochemistry is potentially very useful for learning about the redox-dependent conversions between active and inactive forms of hydrogenase, but the voltammetric signals are complex and often misread. Here we describe simple analytical models that we used to characterize and compare 16 mutants, obtained by substituting the position-74 valine of the -sensitive NiFe hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans. We observed that this substitution can accelerate reactivation up to 1,000-fold, depending on the polarity of the position 74 amino acid side chain. In terms of kinetics of anaerobic (in)activation and oxygen tolerance, the valine-to-histidine mutation has the most spectacular effect: The V74H mutant compares favorably with the -tolerant hydrogenase from Aquifex aeolicus, which we use here as a benchmark. PMID:23169623

  4. Expression of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Genes in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Katrin; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Cornish, Adam J.; Wolk, C. Peter

    2012-01-01

    H2 generated from renewable resources holds promise as an environmentally innocuous fuel that releases only energy and water when consumed. In biotechnology, photoautotrophic oxygenic diazotrophs could produce H2 from water and sunlight using the cells' endogenous nitrogenases. However, nitrogenases have low turnover numbers and require large amounts of ATP. [FeFe]-hydrogenases found in other organisms can have 1,000-fold higher turnover numbers and no specific requirement for ATP but are very O2 sensitive. Certain filamentous cyanobacteria protect nitrogenase from O2 by sequestering the enzyme within internally micro-oxic, differentiated cells called heterocysts. We heterologously expressed the [FeFe]-hydrogenase operon from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 using the heterocyst-specific promoter PhetN. Active [FeFe]-hydrogenase was detected in and could be purified from aerobically grown Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, but only when the organism was grown under nitrate-depleted conditions that elicited heterocyst formation. These results suggest that the heterocysts protected the [FeFe]-hydrogenase against inactivation by O2. PMID:23023750

  5. Gene Products of the hupGHIJ Operon Are Involved in Maturation of the Iron-Sulfur Subunit of the [NiFe] Hydrogenase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae

    PubMed Central

    Manyani, Hamid; Rey, Luis; Palacios, José M.; Imperial, Juan; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the functions of the hupGHIJ operon in the synthesis of an active [NiFe] hydrogenase in the legume endosymbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae. These genes are clustered with 14 other genes including the hydrogenase structural genes hupSL. A set of isogenic mutants with in-frame deletions (ΔhupG, ΔhupH, ΔhupI, and ΔhupJ) was generated and tested for hydrogenase activity in cultures grown at different oxygen concentrations (0.2 to 2.0%) and in symbiosis with peas. In free-living cultures, deletions in these genes severely reduced hydrogenase activity. The ΔhupH mutant was totally devoid of hydrogenase activity at any of the O2 concentration tested, whereas the requirement of hupGIJ for hydrogenase activity varied with the O2 concentration, being more crucial at higher pO2. Pea bacteroids from the mutant strains affected in hupH, hupI, and hupJ exhibited reduced (20 to 50%) rates of hydrogenase activity compared to the wild type, whereas rates were not affected in the ΔhupG mutant. Immunoblot experiments with HupL- and HupS-specific antisera showed that free-living cultures from ΔhupH, ΔhupI, and ΔhupJ mutants synthesized a fully processed mature HupL protein and accumulated an unprocessed form of HupS (pre-HupS). Both the mature HupL and the pre-HupS forms were located in the cytoplasmic fraction of cultures from the ΔhupH mutant. Affinity chromatography experiments revealed that cytoplasmic pre-HupS binds to the HupH protein before the pre-HupS-HupL complex is formed. From these results we propose that hupGHIJ gene products are involved in the maturation of the HupS hydrogenase subunit. PMID:16199572

  6. Analysis and comparison of nucleotide sequences encoding the genes for [NiFe] and [NiFeSe] hydrogenases from Desulfovibrio gigas and Desulfovibrio baculatus.

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, G; Menon, N K; LeGall, J; Choi, E S; Peck, H D; Przybyla, A E

    1989-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences encoding the [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio gigas and the [NiFeSe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio baculatus (N.K. Menon, H.D. Peck, Jr., J. LeGall, and A.E. Przybyla, J. Bacteriol. 169:5401-5407, 1987; C. Li, H.D. Peck, Jr., J. LeGall, and A.E. Przybyla, DNA 6:539-551, 1987) were analyzed by the codon usage method of Staden and McLachlan. The reported reading frames were found to contain regions of low codon probability which are matched by more probable sequences in other frames. Renewed nucleotide sequencing showed the probable frames to be correct. The corrected sequences of the two small and large subunits share a significant degree of sequence homology. The small subunit, which contains 10 conserved cysteine residues, is likely to coordinate at least 2 iron-sulfur clusters, while the finding of a selenocysteine codon (TGA) near the 3' end of the [NiFeSe] large-subunit gene matched by a regular cysteine codon (TGC) in the [NiFe] large-subunit gene indicates the presence of some of the ligands to the active-site nickel in the large subunit. PMID:2651421

  7. Differential Expression of the Chlamydomonas [FeFe]-Hydrogenase-Encoding HYDA1 Gene Is Regulated by the COPPER RESPONSE REGULATOR11[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Miriam; Lambertz, Camilla; Happe, Thomas; Hemschemeier, Anja

    2012-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii adapts to anaerobic or hypoxic conditions by developing a complex fermentative metabolism including the production of molecular hydrogen by [FeFe]-hydrogenase isoform1 (HYDA1). HYDA1 transcript and hydrogenase protein accumulate in the absence of oxygen or copper (Cu). Factors regulating this differential gene expression have been unknown so far. In this study, we report on the isolation of a Chlamydomonas mutant strain impaired in HYDA1 gene expression by screening an insertional mutagenesis library for HYDA1 promoter activity using the arylsulfatase-encoding ARYLSULFATASE2 gene as a selection marker. The mutant strain has a deletion of the COPPER RESPONSE REGULATOR1 (CRR1) gene encoding for CRR1, indicating that this SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP) domain transcription factor is involved in the regulation of HYDA1 transcription. Treating the C. reinhardtii wild type with mercuric ions, which were shown to inhibit the binding of the SBP domain to DNA, prevented or deactivated HYDA1 gene expression. Reporter gene analyses of the HYDA1 promoter revealed that two GTAC motifs, which are known to be the cores of CRR1 binding sites, are necessary for full promoter activity in hypoxic conditions or upon Cu starvation. However, mutations of the GTAC sites had a much stronger impact on reporter gene expression in Cu-deficient cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the CRR1 SBP domain binds to one of the GTAC cores in vitro. These combined results prove that CRR1 is involved in HYDA1 promoter activation. PMID:22669892

  8. Transcriptional regulation of genes encoding the selenium-free [NiFe]-hydrogenases in the archaeon Methanococcus voltae involves positive and negative control elements.

    PubMed Central

    Noll, I; Müller, S; Klein, A

    1999-01-01

    Methanococcus voltae harbors genetic information for two pairs of homologous [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Two of the enzymes contain selenocysteine, while the other two gene groups encode apparent isoenzymes that carry cysteinyl residues in the homologous positions. The genes coding for the selenium-free enzymes, frc and vhc, are expressed only under selenium limitation. They are transcribed out of a common intergenic region. A series of deletions made in the intergenic region localized a common negative regulatory element for the vhc and frc promoters as well as two activator elements that are specific for each of the two transcription units. Repeated sequences, partially overlapping the frc promoter, were also detected. Mutations in these repeated heptanucleotide sequences led to a weak induction of a reporter gene under the control of the frc promoters in the presence of selenium. This result suggests that the heptamer repeats contribute to the negative regulation of the frc transcription unit. PMID:10430564

  9. Identification and sequence analysis of the hupR1 gene, which encodes a response regulator of the NtrC family required for hydrogenase expression in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Richaud, P; Colbeau, A; Toussaint, B; Vignais, P M

    1991-01-01

    The hupR1 gene from Rhodobacter capsulatus was cloned and sequenced. It can encode a protein of 53,843 Da which shares significant similarity with several transcriptional regulators and activates transcription of the structural hupSL genes of [NiFe]hydrogenase, as shown by the use of a translational fusion of lacZ with the hupSL promoter. A Hup- mutant having a point mutation in the hupR1 gene is described. PMID:1885559

  10. Rubredoxin-related Maturation Factor Guarantees Metal Cofactor Integrity during Aerobic Biosynthesis of Membrane-bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Johannes; Siebert, Elisabeth; Priebe, Jacqueline; Zebger, Ingo; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Teutloff, Christian; Friedrich, Bärbel; Lenz, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase (MBH) supports growth of Ralstonia eutropha H16 with H2 as the sole energy source. The enzyme undergoes a complex biosynthesis process that proceeds during cell growth even at ambient O2 levels and involves 14 specific maturation proteins. One of these is a rubredoxin-like protein, which is essential for biosynthesis of active MBH at high oxygen concentrations but dispensable under microaerobic growth conditions. To obtain insights into the function of HoxR, we investigated the MBH protein purified from the cytoplasmic membrane of hoxR mutant cells. Compared with wild-type MBH, the mutant enzyme displayed severely decreased hydrogenase activity. Electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopic analyses revealed features resembling those of O2-sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenases and/or oxidatively damaged protein. The catalytic center resided partially in an inactive Niu-A-like state, and the electron transfer chain consisting of three different Fe-S clusters showed marked alterations compared with wild-type enzyme. Purification of HoxR protein from its original host, R. eutropha, revealed only low protein amounts. Therefore, recombinant HoxR protein was isolated from Escherichia coli. Unlike common rubredoxins, the HoxR protein was colorless, rather unstable, and essentially metal-free. Conversion of the atypical iron-binding motif into a canonical one through genetic engineering led to a stable reddish rubredoxin. Remarkably, the modified HoxR protein did not support MBH-dependent growth at high O2. Analysis of MBH-associated protein complexes points toward a specific interaction of HoxR with the Fe-S cluster-bearing small subunit. This supports the previously made notion that HoxR avoids oxidative damage of the metal centers of the MBH, in particular the unprecedented Cys6[4Fe-3S] cluster. PMID:24448806

  11. Differential expression of hydrogenase isoenzymes in Escherichia coli K-12: evidence for a third isoenzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Sawers, R G; Ballantine, S P; Boxer, D H

    1985-01-01

    The cellular contents of the nickel-containing, membrane-bound hydrogenase isoenzymes 1 and 2 (hydrogenases 1 and 2) were analyzed by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Their expression was differentially influenced by nutritional and genetic factors. Hydrogenase 2 content was enhanced after growth with either hydrogen and fumarate or glycerol and fumarate and correlated reasonably with cellular hydrogen uptake capacity. Hydrogenase 1 content was negligible under the above conditions but was enhanced by exogenous formate. Its expression was greatly reduced in a pfl mutant, which is unable to synthesise formate, but was restored to normal levels when the growth medium included formate. A mutation in the anaerobic regulatory gene, fnr, led to low overall hydrogenase activity and greatly reduced levels of both isoenzymes and abolished the formate enhancement of hydrogenase 1 content. Formate hydrogenlyase activity was similarly reduced in the fnr strain but, in contrast, was restored, as was overall hydrogenase activity, to normal levels by growth in the presence of formate. Low H2 uptake activity was found for the fnr strain under all growth conditions examined. Hydrogenase 1 content, therefore, does not correlate with formate hydrogenlyase activity and its role is unclear. A third hydrogenase isoenzyme, immunologically distinct from hydrogenases 1 and 2, whose expression is enhanced by formate, is present and forms part of the formate hydrogenlyase. We suggest that the effect of the fnr gene product on formate hydrogenlyase expression is mediated via internal formate. Images PMID:3905769

  12. Polarized potential and electrode materials implication on electro-fermentative di-hydrogen production: Microbial assemblages and hydrogenase gene copy variation.

    PubMed

    Arunasri, Kotakonda; Annie Modestra, J; Yeruva, Dileep Kumar; Vamshi Krishna, K; Venkata Mohan, S

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the changes in microbial diversity in response to different electrode materials viz., stainless steel mesh (SS) and graphite plate as anodes in two microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) each poised at 0.2V, 0.4V, 0.6V and 0.8V. Changes in microbiota prior to and after pretreatment along with microbiota enriched in response to various poised potentials with SS and graphite are monitored by 16S rRNA gene based DGGE profiling. Significant shifts in microbial community were noticed at all these experimental conditions. Correspondingly, the level of hydrogenase belonging to genera Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Rhodopseudomonas and Clostridium was studied by quantitative real time PCR (RT-PCR) at various applied potentials. DGGE based 16S rRNA gene profiling revealed enriched members belonging to phylum Firmicutes predominantly present at 0.8V in both MECs contributing to high hydrogen production. This study first time explored the growth behavior of mixed consortia in response to poised potentials and electrode materials.

  13. Engineering Oxidoreductases: Utilization of an Unnatural Amino Acid to Create Artificial Hydrogenases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-30

    centers related to [ FeFe ]-hydrogenases, the biological catalysts for the reversible oxidation/production of hydrogen. Although a considerable number of...organometallic small molecule mimics of [ FeFe ]- hydrogenases have been reported, the exquisite functionality of the enzymes has yet to be replicated...metallocenters related to [ FeFe ]- hydrogenases to designed peptides/ proteins. Second, new approaches for interfacing peptides/proteins with electrodes

  14. Flexibility in Anaerobic Metabolism as Revealed in a Mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Lacking Hydrogenase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dubini, A.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Grossman, A. R.; Posewitz, M. C.

    2009-03-13

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has a network of fermentation pathways that become active when cells acclimate to anoxia. Hydrogenase activity is an important component of this metabolism, and we have compared metabolic and regulatory responses that accompany anaerobiosis in wild-type C. reinhardtii cells and a null mutant strain for the HYDEF gene (hydEF-1 mutant), which encodes an [FeFe] hydrogenase maturation protein. This mutant has no hydrogenase activity and exhibits elevated accumulation of succinate and diminished production of CO2 relative to the parental strain during dark, anaerobic metabolism. In the absence of hydrogenase activity, increased succinate accumulation suggests that the cells activate alternative pathways for pyruvate metabolism, which contribute to NAD(P)H reoxidation, and continued glycolysis and fermentation in the absence of O2. Fermentative succinate production potentially proceeds via the formation of malate, and increases in the abundance of mRNAs encoding two malateforming enzymes, pyruvate carboxylase and malic enzyme, are observed in the mutant relative to the parental strain following transfer of cells from oxic to anoxic conditions. Although C. reinhardtii has a single gene encoding pyruvate carboxylase, it has six genes encoding putative malic enzymes. Only one of the malic enzyme genes, MME4, shows a dramatic increase in expression (mRNA abundance) in the hydEF-1 mutant during anaerobiosis. Furthermore, there are marked increases in transcripts encoding fumarase and fumarate reductase, enzymes putatively required to convert malate to succinate. These results illustrate the marked metabolic flexibility of C. reinhardtii and contribute to the development of an informed model of anaerobic metabolism in this and potentially other algae.

  15. Distribution Analysis of Hydrogenases in Surface Waters of Marine and Freshwater Environments

    PubMed Central

    Barz, Martin; Beimgraben, Christian; Staller, Torsten; Germer, Frauke; Opitz, Friederike; Marquardt, Claudia; Schwarz, Christoph; Gutekunst, Kirstin; Vanselow, Klaus Heinrich; Schmitz, Ruth; LaRoche, Julie; Schulz, Rüdiger; Appel, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Background Surface waters of aquatic environments have been shown to both evolve and consume hydrogen and the ocean is estimated to be the principal natural source. In some marine habitats, H2 evolution and uptake are clearly due to biological activity, while contributions of abiotic sources must be considered in others. Until now the only known biological process involved in H2 metabolism in marine environments is nitrogen fixation. Principal Findings We analyzed marine and freshwater environments for the presence and distribution of genes of all known hydrogenases, the enzymes involved in biological hydrogen turnover. The total genomes and the available marine metagenome datasets were searched for hydrogenase sequences. Furthermore, we isolated DNA from samples from the North Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea, North Sea, Baltic Sea, and two fresh water lakes and amplified and sequenced part of the gene encoding the bidirectional NAD(P)-linked hydrogenase. In 21% of all marine heterotrophic bacterial genomes from surface waters, one or several hydrogenase genes were found, with the membrane-bound H2 uptake hydrogenase being the most widespread. A clear bias of hydrogenases to environments with terrestrial influence was found. This is exemplified by the cyanobacterial bidirectional NAD(P)-linked hydrogenase that was found in freshwater and coastal areas but not in the open ocean. Significance This study shows that hydrogenases are surprisingly abundant in marine environments. Due to its ecological distribution the primary function of the bidirectional NAD(P)-linked hydrogenase seems to be fermentative hydrogen evolution. Moreover, our data suggests that marine surface waters could be an interesting source of oxygen-resistant uptake hydrogenases. The respective genes occur in coastal as well as open ocean habitats and we presume that they are used as additional energy scavenging devices in otherwise nutrient limited environments. The membrane-bound H2-evolving

  16. Hydrogenases and Hydrogen Metabolism of Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tamagnini, Paula; Axelsson, Rikard; Lindberg, Pia; Oxelfelt, Fredrik; Wünschiers, Röbbe; Lindblad, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cyanobacteria may possess several enzymes that are directly involved in dihydrogen metabolism: nitrogenase(s) catalyzing the production of hydrogen concomitantly with the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia, an uptake hydrogenase (encoded by hupSL) catalyzing the consumption of hydrogen produced by the nitrogenase, and a bidirectional hydrogenase (encoded by hoxFUYH) which has the capacity to both take up and produce hydrogen. This review summarizes our knowledge about cyanobacterial hydrogenases, focusing on recent progress since the first molecular information was published in 1995. It presents the molecular knowledge about cyanobacterial hupSL and hoxFUYH, their corresponding gene products, and their accessory genes before finishing with an applied aspect—the use of cyanobacteria in a biological, renewable production of the future energy carrier molecular hydrogen. In addition to scientific publications, information from three cyanobacterial genomes, the unicellular Synechocystis strain PCC 6803 and the filamentous heterocystous Anabaena strain PCC 7120 and Nostoc punctiforme (PCC 73102/ATCC 29133) is included. PMID:11875125

  17. Enhancement of photoheterotrophic biohydrogen production at elevated temperatures by the expression of a thermophilic clostridial hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shou-Chen; Shih, Shau-Hua; Chang, Jui-Jen; Wang, Chun-Ying; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2012-08-01

    The working temperature of a photobioreactor under sunlight can be elevated above the optimal growth temperature of a microorganism. To improve the biohydrogen productivity of photosynthetic bacteria at higher temperatures, a [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene from the thermophile Clostridium thermocellum was expressed in the mesophile Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009 (strain CGA-CThydA) using a log-phase expression promoter P( pckA ) to drive the expression of heterogeneous hydrogenase gene. In contrast, a mesophilic Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene was also constructed and expressed in R. palustris (strain CGA-CAhydA). Both transgenic strains were tested for cell growth, in vivo hydrogen production rate, and in vitro hydrogenase activity at elevated temperatures. Although both CGA-CThydA and CGA-CAhydA strains demonstrated enhanced growth over the vector control at temperatures above 38 °C, CGA-CThydA produced more hydrogen than the other strains. The in vitro hydrogenase activity assay, measured at 40 °C, confirmed that the activity of the CGA-CThydA hydrogenase was higher than the CGA-CAhydA hydrogenase. These results showed that the expression of a thermophilic [FeFe]-hydrogenase in R. palustris increased the growth rate and biohydrogen production at elevated temperatures. This transgenic strategy can be applied to a broad range of purple photosynthetic bacteria used to produce biohydrogen under sunlight.

  18. Role of nickel in membrane-bound hydrogenase and nickel metabolism in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Stults, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane-bound hydrogenase of Rhizobium japonicum requires nickel for activity. Radioactive /sup 63/Ni co-migrates with hydrogenase activity in native gel systems and co-elutes with purified hydrogenase form an affinity matrix column. A simplified scheme for the purification of hydrogenase has been developed and constitutes the first report of the aerobic purification of this enzyme from R. japonicum. The aerobic purification utilizes the general affinity matrix. Reactive Red 120-agarose and results in higher specific activity and yield of enzyme than previously reported. The stability of aerobically purified hydrogenase to oxygen is substantially greater than that reported for anaerobically isolated enzyme. Reduction of the aerobically purified enzyme in the presence of oxygen, however, results in the rapid loss of activity. R. japonicum cells accumulate nickel during heterotrophic growth and as non-growing cells. The hydrogenase constitutive mutant SR470 accumulates substantially greater amounts of nickel under both conditions. Kinetic studies indicate that the nickel uptake system in the hydrogenase constitutive mutant SR470 is upregulated relative to SRwt cells. The uptake system is specific for nickel, although a 10-fold excess (relative to nickel) of copper or zinc inhibits nickel uptake. The nickel uptake system appears to require energy. Under nickel-free conditions hydrogenase protein is not synthesized as determined by cross-reactivity with antibodies directed against hydrogenase, indicating that nickel regulates the formation of the enzyme as well as being a constituent of the active protein.

  19. A new cumulene diiron complex related to the active site of Fe-only hydrogenases and its phosphine substituted derivatives: synthesis, electrochemistry and structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Wen, Na; Xu, Fenfen; Feng, Yanan; Du, Shaowu

    2011-09-01

    A new cumulene diiron complex related to the Fe-only hydrogenase active site [(μ-SCH(2)C(S)CCH(2))Fe(2)(CO)(6)] (1) was obtained by treatment of (μ-LiS)(2)Fe(2)(CO)(6) with excess 1,4-dichloro-2-butyne. By controllable CO displacement of 1 with PPh(3) and bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (dppm), mono- and di-substituted complexes, namely [(μ-SCH(2)C(S)CCH(2))Fe(2)(CO)(5)L] (2: L=PPh(3); 3: L=dppm) and [(μ-SCH(2)C(S)CCH(2))Fe(2)(CO)(4)L(2)] (4: L=PPh(3); 5: L=dppm) could be prepared in moderate yields. Treatment of 1 with bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (dppe) afforded a double butterfly complex [(μ-SCH(2)C(S)CCH(2))Fe(2)(CO)(5)](2)(μ-dppe) (7). With dppm in refluxing toluene, a dppm-bridged complex [(μ-SCH(2)C(S)CCH(2))Fe(2)(CO)(4)(μ-dppm)] (6) was obtained. These model complexes were characterized by IR, (1)H, (31)P NMR spectra and the molecular structures of 1, 2 and 5-7 were determined by single crystal X-ray analyses. The electrochemistry of 1-3 was studied and the electrocatalytic property of 1 was investigated for proton reduction in the presence of HOAc. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Isotopic fractionation associated with [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hui; Gandhi, Hasand; Cornish, Adam J.; Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ostrom, Nathaniel; Hegg, Eric L.

    2016-01-30

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible formation of H2 from electrons and protons with high efficiency. Understanding the relationships between H2 production, H2 uptake, and H2-H2O exchange can provide insight into the metabolism of microbial communities in which H2 is an essential component in energy cycling. In this manuscript, we used stable H isotopes (1H and 2H) to probe the isotope effects associated with three [FeFe]-hydrogenases and three [NiFe]-hydrogenases. All six hydrogenases displayed fractionation factors for H2 formation that were significantly less than 1, producing H2 that was severely depleted in 2H relative to the substrate, water. Consistent with differences in their active site structure, the fractionation factors for each class appear to cluster, with the three [NiFe]-hydrogenases (α = 0.27-0.40) generally having smaller values than the three [FeFe]-hydrogenases (α = 0.41-0.55). We also obtained isotopic fractionation factors associated with H2 uptake and H2-H2O exchange under conditions similar to those utilized for H2 production, providing us with a more complete picture of the three reactions catalyzed by hydrogenases. The fractionation factors determined in our studies can be used as signatures for different hydrogenases to probe their activity under different growth conditions and to ascertain which hydrogenases are most responsible for H2 production and/or uptake in complex microbial communities.

  1. Nickel availability to pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants limits hydrogenase activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae bacteroids by affecting the processing of the hydrogenase structural subunits.

    PubMed

    Brito, B; Palacios, J M; Hidalgo, E; Imperial, J; Ruiz-Argüeso, T

    1994-09-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae UPM791 induces the synthesis of an [NiFe] hydrogenase in pea (Pisum sativum L.) bacteroids which oxidizes the H2 generated by the nitrogenase complex inside the root nodules. The synthesis of this hydrogenase requires the genes for the small and large hydrogenase subunits (hupS and hupL, respectively) and 15 accessory genes clustered in a complex locus in the symbiotic plasmid. We show here that the bacteroid hydrogenase activity is limited by the availability of nickel to pea plants. Addition of Ni2+ to plant nutrient solutions (up to 10 mg/liter) resulted in sharp increases (up to 15-fold) in hydrogenase activity. This effect was not detected when other divalent cations (Zn2+, Co2+, Fe2+, and Mn2+) were added at the same concentrations. Determinations of the steady-state levels of hupSL-specific mRNA indicated that this increase in hydrogenase activity was not due to stimulation of transcription of structural genes. Immunoblot analysis with antibodies raised against the large and small subunits of the hydrogenase enzyme demonstrated that in the low-nickel situation, both subunits are mainly present in slow-migrating, unprocessed forms. Supplementation of the plant nutrient solution with increasing nickel concentrations caused the conversion of the slow-migrating forms of both subunits into fast-moving, mature forms. This nickel-dependent maturation process of the hydrogenase subunits is mediated by accessory gene products, since bacteroids from H2 uptake-deficient mutants carrying Tn5 insertions in hupG and hupK and in hypB and hypE accumulated the immature forms of both hydrogenase subunits even in the presence of high nickel levels.

  2. Nickel availability to pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants limits hydrogenase activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae bacteroids by affecting the processing of the hydrogenase structural subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Brito, B; Palacios, J M; Hidalgo, E; Imperial, J; Ruiz-Argüeso, T

    1994-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae UPM791 induces the synthesis of an [NiFe] hydrogenase in pea (Pisum sativum L.) bacteroids which oxidizes the H2 generated by the nitrogenase complex inside the root nodules. The synthesis of this hydrogenase requires the genes for the small and large hydrogenase subunits (hupS and hupL, respectively) and 15 accessory genes clustered in a complex locus in the symbiotic plasmid. We show here that the bacteroid hydrogenase activity is limited by the availability of nickel to pea plants. Addition of Ni2+ to plant nutrient solutions (up to 10 mg/liter) resulted in sharp increases (up to 15-fold) in hydrogenase activity. This effect was not detected when other divalent cations (Zn2+, Co2+, Fe2+, and Mn2+) were added at the same concentrations. Determinations of the steady-state levels of hupSL-specific mRNA indicated that this increase in hydrogenase activity was not due to stimulation of transcription of structural genes. Immunoblot analysis with antibodies raised against the large and small subunits of the hydrogenase enzyme demonstrated that in the low-nickel situation, both subunits are mainly present in slow-migrating, unprocessed forms. Supplementation of the plant nutrient solution with increasing nickel concentrations caused the conversion of the slow-migrating forms of both subunits into fast-moving, mature forms. This nickel-dependent maturation process of the hydrogenase subunits is mediated by accessory gene products, since bacteroids from H2 uptake-deficient mutants carrying Tn5 insertions in hupG and hupK and in hypB and hypE accumulated the immature forms of both hydrogenase subunits even in the presence of high nickel levels. Images PMID:8071205

  3. Elimination of hydrogenase active site assembly blocks H2 production and increases ethanol yield in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Ranjita; Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-02-01

    The native ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly consume cellulose and produce ethanol makes it a leading candidate for a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biofuel production strategy. C. thermocellum also synthesizes lactate, formate, acetate, H2, and amino acids that compete with ethanol production for carbon and electrons. Elimination of H2 production could redirect carbon flux towards ethanol production by making more electrons available for acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol. C. thermocellum encodes four hydrogenases and rather than delete each individually, we targeted a hydrogenase maturase gene (hydG), involved in converting the three [FeFe] hydrogenase apoenzymes into holoenzymes. Further deletion of the [NiFe] hydrogenase (ech) resulted in a mutant that functionally lacks all four hydrogenases. H2 production in hydG ech was undetectable and ethanol yield increased nearly 2-fold compared to wild type. Interestingly, mutant growth improved upon the addition of acetate, which led to increased expression of genes related to sulfate metabolism, suggesting these mutants may use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to balance redox reactions. Genomic analysis of hydG revealed a mutation in adhE, resulting in a strain with both NADH- and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. While this same adhE mutation is found in ethanol tolerant C. thermocellum strain E50C, hydG and hydG ech are not more ethanol tolerant than wild type, illustrating the complicated interactions between redox balancing and ethanol tolerance in C. thermocellum. The dramatic increase in ethanol production here suggests that targeting protein post-translational modification is a promising new approach for inactivation of multiple enzymes simultaneously for metabolic engineering.

  4. Elimination of hydrogenase active site assembly blocks H2 production and increases ethanol yield in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Biswas, Ranjita; Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; ...

    2015-02-01

    The native ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly consume cellulose and produce ethanol makes it a leading candidate for a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biofuel production strategy. C. thermocellum also synthesizes lactate, formate, acetate, H2, and amino acids that compete with ethanol production for carbon and electrons. Elimination of H2 production could redirect carbon flux towards ethanol production by making more electrons available for acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol. C. thermocellum encodes four hydrogenases and rather than delete each individually, we targeted a hydrogenase maturase gene (hydG), involved in converting the three [FeFe] hydrogenase apoenzymes into holoenzymes. Further deletion of the [NiFe]more » hydrogenase (ech) resulted in a mutant that functionally lacks all four hydrogenases. H2 production in hydG ech was undetectable and ethanol yield increased nearly 2-fold compared to wild type. Interestingly, mutant growth improved upon the addition of acetate, which led to increased expression of genes related to sulfate metabolism, suggesting these mutants may use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to balance redox reactions. Genomic analysis of hydG revealed a mutation in adhE, resulting in a strain with both NADH- and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. While this same adhE mutation is found in ethanol tolerant C. thermocellum strain E50C, hydG and hydG ech are not more ethanol tolerant than wild type, illustrating the complicated interactions between redox balancing and ethanol tolerance in C. thermocellum. The dramatic increase in ethanol production here suggests that targeting protein post-translational modification is a promising new approach for inactivation of multiple enzymes simultaneously for metabolic engineering.« less

  5. Compartmentalisation of [FeFe]-hydrogenase maturation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Anne; Bai, Yu; Lu, Yinghua; Hemschemeier, Anja; Happe, Thomas

    2017-03-13

    Molecular hydrogen (H2 ) can be produced in green microalgae by [FeFe]-hydrogenases as a direct product of photosynthesis. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hydrogenase HYDA1 contains a catalytic site comprising a classic [4Fe4S] cluster linked to a unique 2Fe sub-cluster. From in vitro studies it appears that the [4Fe4S] cluster is incorporated first by the housekeeping FeS cluster assembly machinery, followed by the 2Fe sub-cluster, whose biosynthesis requires the specific maturases HYDEF and HYDG. To investigate the maturation process in vivo, we expressed HYDA1 from the C. reinhardtii chloroplast and nuclear genomes (with and without a chloroplast transit peptide) in a hydrogenase-deficient mutant strain, and examined the cellular enzymatic hydrogenase activity, as well as in vivo H2 production. The transformants expressing HYDA1 from the chloroplast genome displayed H2 production levels comparable to the wild type, as did the transformants expressing full-length HYDA1 from the nuclear genome. In contrast, cells equipped with cytoplasm-targeted HYDA1 produced inactive enzyme, which could only be activated in vitro after reconstitution of the [4Fe4S] cluster. This indicates that the HYDA1 FeS cluster can only be built by the chloroplastic FeS cluster assembly machinery. Further, the expression of a bacterial hydrogenase gene, CPI, from the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome resulted in H2 -producing strains, demonstrating that a hydrogenase with a very different structure can fulfil the role of HYDA1 in vivo and that overexpression of foreign hydrogenases in C. reinhardtii is possible. All chloroplast transformants were stable and no toxic effects were seen from HYDA1 or CPI expression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel endo-hydrogenase activity recycles hydrogen produced by nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Ng, Gordon; Tom, Curtis G S; Park, Angela S; Zenad, Lounis; Ludwig, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen (N(2)) fixation also yields hydrogen (H(2)) at 1:1 stoichiometric amounts. In aerobic diazotrophic (able to grow on N(2) as sole N-source) bacteria, orthodox respiratory hupSL-encoded hydrogenase activity, associated with the cell membrane but facing the periplasm (exo-hydrogenase), has nevertheless been presumed responsible for recycling such endogenous hydrogen. As shown here, for Azorhizobium caulinodans diazotrophic cultures open to the atmosphere, exo-hydrogenase activity is of no consequence to hydrogen recycling. In a bioinformatic analysis, a novel seven-gene A. caulinodans hyq cluster encoding an integral-membrane, group-4, Ni,Fe-hydrogenase with homology to respiratory complex I (NADH: quinone dehydrogenase) was identified. By analogy, Hyq hydrogenase is also integral to the cell membrane, but its active site faces the cytoplasm (endo-hydrogenase). An A. caulinodans in-frame hyq operon deletion mutant, constructed by "crossover PCR", showed markedly decreased growth rates in diazotrophic cultures; normal growth was restored with added ammonium--as expected of an H(2)-recycling mutant phenotype. Using A. caulinodans hyq merodiploid strains expressing beta-glucuronidase as promoter-reporter, the hyq operon proved strongly and specifically induced in diazotrophic culture; as well, hyq operon induction required the NIFA transcriptional activator. Therefore, the hyq operon is constituent of the nif regulon. Representative of aerobic N(2)-fixing and H(2)-recycling alpha-proteobacteria, A. caulinodans possesses two respiratory Ni,Fe-hydrogenases: HupSL exo-hydrogenase activity drives exogenous H(2) respiration, and Hyq endo-hydrogenase activity recycles endogenous H(2), specifically that produced by N(2) fixation. To benefit human civilization, H(2) has generated considerable interest as potential renewable energy source as its makings are ubiquitous and its combustion yields no greenhouse gases. As such, the reversible, group-4 Ni,Fe-hydrogenases, such

  7. Evidence for a Third Uptake Hydrogenase Phenotype among the Soybean Bradyrhizobia

    PubMed Central

    van Berkum, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The existence of a hydrogen uptake host-regulated (Hup-hr) phenotype was established among the soybean bradyrhizobia. The Hup-hr phenotype is characterized by the expression of uptake hydrogenase activity in symbiosis with cowpea but not soybean. Uptake hydrogenase induction is not possible under free-living cultural conditions by using techniques developed for uptake hydrogenase-positive (Hup+) Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Hydrogen oxidation by Hup-hr phenotype USDA 61 in cowpea symbioses was significant because hydrogen evolution from nitrogen-fixing nodules was not detected. An examination for uptake hydrogenase activity in soybean and cowpea with 123 strains diverse in origin and serology identified 16 Hup+ and 28 Hup-hr phenotype strains; the remainder appeared to be Hup−. The Hup-hr phenotype was associated with serogroups 31, 76, and 94, while strains belonging to serogroups 6, 31, 110, 122, 123, and 38/115 were Hup+. Hup+ strains of the 123 serogroup typed positive with USDA 129-specific antiserum. The presence of the uptake hydrogenase protein in cowpea bacteroids of Hup+ strains was demonstrated with immunoblot analyses by using antibodies against the 65-kDa subunit of uptake hydrogenase purified from strain SR470. However, the hydrogenase protein of Hup-hr strains was not detected. Results of Southern hybridization analyses with pHU1 showed the region of DNA with hydrogenase genes among Hup+ strains to be similar. Hybridization was also obtained with Hup-hr strains by using a variety of cloned DNA as probes including hydrogenase structural genes. Both hydrogenase structural genes also hybridized with the DNA of four Hup− strains. Images PMID:16348383

  8. Development of a Rhodobacter capsulatus self-reporting model system for optimizing light-dependent, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-driven H2 production

    DOE PAGES

    Wecker, Matt S. A.; Beaton, Stephen E.; Chado, Robert A.; ...

    2016-08-17

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus normally photoproduces H2 as a by-product of its nitrogenase-catalyzed nitrogen-fixing activity. Such H2 production, however, is expensive from a metabolic perspective, requiring nearly four times as many photons as the equivalent algal hydrogenase-based system. Here we report the insertion of a Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase and its three attendant hydrogenase assembly proteins into an R. capsulatus strain lacking its native uptake hydrogenase. Further, this strain is modified to fluoresce upon sensing H2. The resulting strain photoproduces H2 and self-reports its own H2 production through fluorescence. Furthermore, this model system represents a unique method of developing hydrogenase-basedmore » H2 production in R. capsulatus, may serve as a powerful system for in vivo directed evolution of hydrogenases and hydrogenase-associated genes, and provides a means of screening for increased metabolic production of H2.« less

  9. Reversible oxygen-tolerant hydrogenase carried by free-living N2-fixing bacteria isolated from the rhizospheres of rice, maize, and wheat

    PubMed Central

    Roumagnac, Philippe; Richaud, Pierre; Barakat, Mohamed; Ortet, Philippe; Roncato, Marie-Anne; Heulin, Thierry; Peltier, Gilles; Achouak, Wafa; Cournac, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen production by microorganisms is often described as a promising sustainable and clean energy source, but still faces several obstacles, which prevent practical application. Among them, oxygen sensitivity of hydrogenases represents one of the major limitations hampering the biotechnological implementation of photobiological production processes. Here, we describe a hierarchical biodiversity-based approach, including a chemochromic screening of hydrogenase activity of hundreds of bacterial strains collected from several ecosystems, followed by mass spectrometry measurements of hydrogenase activity of a selection of the H2-oxidizing bacterial strains identified during the screen. In all, 131 of 1266 strains, isolated from cereal rhizospheres and basins containing irradiating waste, were scored as H2-oxidizing bacteria, including Pseudomonas sp., Serratia sp., Stenotrophomonas sp., Enterobacter sp., Rahnella sp., Burkholderia sp., and Ralstonia sp. isolates. Four free-living N2-fixing bacteria harbored a high and oxygen-tolerant hydrogenase activity, which was not fully inhibited within entire cells up to 150–250 μmol/L O2 concentration or within soluble protein extracts up to 25–30 μmol/L. The only hydrogenase-related genes that we could reveal in these strains were of the hyc type (subunits of formate hydrogenlyase complex). The four free-living N2-fixing bacteria were closely related to Enterobacter radicincitans based on the sequences of four genes (16S rRNA, rpoB, hsp60, and hycE genes). These results should bring interesting prospects for microbial biohydrogen production and might have ecophysiological significance for bacterial adaptation to the oxic–anoxic interfaces in the rhizosphere. PMID:23233392

  10. Hydrogenase electrodes for fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Karyakin, A A; Morozov, S V; Karyakina, E E; Zorin, N A; Perelygin, V V; Cosnier, S

    2005-02-01

    Considering crucial problems that limit use of platinum-based fuel cells, i.e. cost and availability, poisoning by fuel impurities and low selectivity, we propose electrocatalysis by enzymes as a valuable alternative to noble metals. Hydrogenase electrodes in neutral media achieve hydrogen equilibrium potential (providing 100% energy conversion), and display high activity in H(2) electrooxidation, which is similar to that of Pt-based electrodes in sulphuric acid. In contrast with platinum, enzyme electrodes are highly selective for their substrates, and are not poisoned by fuel impurities. Hydrogenase electrodes are capable of consuming hydrogen directly from microbial media, which ensures their use as fuel electrodes in treatment of organic wastes.

  11. The role of Hox hydrogenase in the H2 metabolism of Thiocapsa roseopersicina.

    PubMed

    Rákhely, Gábor; Laurinavichene, Tatyana V; Tsygankov, Anatoly A; Kovács, Kornél L

    2007-06-01

    The purple sulfur phototrophic bacterium Thiocapsa roseopersicina BBS synthesizes at least three NiFe hydrogenases (Hox, Hup, Hyn). We characterized the physiological H(2) consumption/evolution reactions in mutants having deletions of the structural genes of two hydrogenases in various combinations. This made possible the separation of the functionally distinct roles of the three hydrogenases. Data showed that Hox hydrogenase (unlike the Hup and Hyn hydrogenases) catalyzed the dark fermentative H(2) evolution and the light-dependent H(2) production in the presence of thiosulfate. Both Hox(+) and Hup(+) mutants demonstrated light-dependent H(2) uptake stimulated by CO(2) but only the Hup(+) mutant was able to mediate O(2)-dependent H(2) consumption in the dark. The ability of the Hox(+) mutant to evolve or consume hydrogen was found to depend on a number of interplaying factors including both growth and reaction conditions (availability of glucose, sulfur compounds, CO(2), H(2), light). The study of the redox properties of Hox hydrogenase supported the reversibility of its action. Based on the results a scheme is suggested to describe the role of Hox hydrogenase in light-dependent and dark hydrogen metabolism in T. roseopersicina BBS.

  12. Wiring-up hydrogenase with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Timothy J; Svedruzic, Drazenka; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Zhang, S B; King, Paul W; Heben, Michael J

    2007-11-01

    Many envision a future where hydrogen is the centerpiece of a sustainable, carbon-free energy supply. For example, the energy in sunlight may be stored by splitting water into H2 and O2 using inorganic semiconductors and photoelectrochemical approaches or with artificial photosynthetic systems that seek to mimic the light absorption, energy transfer, electron transfer, and redox catalysis that occurs in green plants. Unfortunately, large scale deployment of artificial water-splitting technologies may be impeded by the need for the large amounts of precious metals required to catalyze the multielectron water-splitting reactions. Nature provides a variety of microbes that can activate the dihydrogen bond through the catalytic activity of [NiFe] and [FeFe] hydrogenases, and photobiological approaches to water splitting have been advanced. One may also consider a biohybrid approach; however, it is difficult to interface these sensitive, metalloenzymes to other materials and systems. Here we show that surfactant-suspended carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) spontaneously self-assemble with [FeFe] hydrogenases in solution to form catalytically active biohybrids. Photoluminescence excitation and Raman spectroscopy studies show that SWNTs act as molecular wires to make electrical contact to the biocatalytic region of hydrogenase. Hydrogenase mediates electron injection into nanotubes having appropriately positioned lowest occupied molecular orbital levels when the H2 partial pressure is varied. The hydrogenase is strongly attached to the SWNTs, so mass transport effects are eliminated and the absolute potential of the electronic levels of the nanotubes can be unambiguously measured. Our findings reveal new nanotube physics and represent the first example of "wiring-up" an hydrogenase with another nanoscale material. This latter advance offers a nonprecious metal route to the design of new biohybrid architectures and building blocks for hydrogen-related technologies.

  13. Multiple and reversible hydrogenases for hydrogen production by Escherichia coli: dependence on fermentation substrate, pH and the F(0)F(1)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Trchounian, Karen; Poladyan, Anna; Vassilian, Anait; Trchounian, Armen

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H(2)) can be produced via hydrogenases during mixed-acid fermentation by bacteria. Escherichia coli possesses multiple (four) hydrogenases. Hydrogenase 3 (Hyd-3) and probably 4 (Hyd-4) with formate dehydrogenase H (Fdh-H) form two different H(2)-evolving formate hydrogen lyase (FHL) pathways during glucose fermentation. For both FHL forms, the hycB gene coding small subunit of Hyd-3 is required. Formation and activity of FHL also depends on the external pH ([pH](out)) and the presence of formate. FHL is related with the F(0)F(1)-ATPase by supplying reducing equivalents and depending on proton-motive force. Two other hydrogenases, 1 (Hyd-1) and 2 (Hyd-2), are H(2)-oxidizing enzymes during glucose fermentation at neutral and low [pH](out). They operate in a reverse, H(2)-producing mode during glycerol fermentation at neutral [pH](out). Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 activity depends on F(0)F(1). Moreover, Hyd-3 can also work in a reverse mode. Therefore, the operation direction and activity of all Hyd enzymes might determine H(2) production; some metabolic cross-talk between Hyd enzymes is proposed. Manipulating of different Hyd enzymes activity is an effective way to enhance H(2) production by bacteria in biotechnology. Moreover, a novel approach would be the use of glycerol as feedstock in fermentation processes leading to H(2) production, reduced fuels and other chemicals with higher yields than those obtained by common sugars.

  14. Towards artificial methanogenesis: biosynthesis of the [Fe]-hydrogenase cofactor and characterization of the semi-synthetic hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liping; Fujishiro, Takashi; Huang, Gangfeng; Koch, Jürgen; Takabayashi, Atsushi; Yokono, Makio; Tanaka, Ayumi; Xu, Tao; Hu, Xile; Ermler, Ulrich; Shima, Seigo

    2017-06-02

    The greenhouse gas and energy carrier methane is produced on Earth mainly by methanogenic archaea. In the hydrogenotrophic methanogenic pathway the reduction of one CO2 to one methane molecule requires four molecules of H2 containing eight electrons. Four of the electrons from two H2 are supplied for reduction of an electron carrier F420, which is catalyzed by F420-reducing [NiFe]-hydrogenase under nickel-sufficient conditions. The same reaction is catalysed under nickel-limiting conditions by [Fe]-hydrogenase coupled with a reaction catalyzed by F420-dependent methylene tetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase. [Fe]-hydrogenase contains an iron-guanylylpyridinol (FeGP) cofactor for H2 activation at the active site. Fe(II) of FeGP is coordinated to a pyridinol-nitrogen, an acyl-carbon, two CO and a cysteine-thiolate. We report here on comparative genomic analyses of biosynthetic genes of the FeGP cofactor, which are primarily located in a hmd-co-occurring (hcg) gene cluster. One of the gene products is HcgB which transfers the guanosine monophosphate (GMP) moiety from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to a pyridinol precursor. Crystal structure analysis of HcgB from Methanococcus maripaludis and its complex with 6-carboxymethyl-3,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-2-pyridinol confirmed the physiological guanylyltransferase reaction. Furthermore, we tested the properties of semi-synthetic [Fe]-hydrogenases using the [Fe]-hydrogenase apoenzyme from several methanogenic archaea and a mimic of the FeGP cofactor. On the basis of the enzymatic reactions involved in the methanogenic pathway, we came up with an idea how the methanogenic pathway could be simplified to develop an artificial methanogenesis system.

  15. Function of periplasmic hydrogenases in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Sean M; Park, Hyung-Soo; Voordouw, Johanna K; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-09-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough possesses four periplasmic hydrogenases to facilitate the oxidation of molecular hydrogen. These include an [Fe] hydrogenase, an [NiFeSe] hydrogenase, and two [NiFe] hydrogenases encoded by the hyd, hys, hyn1, and hyn2 genes, respectively. In order to understand their cellular functions, we have compared the growth rates of existing (hyd and hyn1) and newly constructed (hys and hyn-1 hyd) mutants to those of the wild type in defined media in which lactate or hydrogen at either 5 or 50% (vol/vol) was used as the sole electron donor for sulfate reduction. Only strains missing the [Fe] hydrogenase were significantly affected during growth with lactate or with 50% (vol/vol) hydrogen as the sole electron donor. When the cells were grown at low (5% [vol/vol]) hydrogen concentrations, those missing the [NiFeSe] hydrogenase suffered the greatest impairment. The growth rate data correlated strongly with gene expression results obtained from microarray hybridizations and real-time PCR using mRNA extracted from cells grown under the three conditions. Expression of the hys genes followed the order 5% hydrogen>50% hydrogen>lactate, whereas expression of the hyd genes followed the reverse order. These results suggest that growth with lactate and 50% hydrogen is associated with high intracellular hydrogen concentrations, which are best captured by the higher activity, lower affinity [Fe] hydrogenase. In contrast, growth with 5% hydrogen is associated with a low intracellular hydrogen concentration, requiring the lower activity, higher affinity [NiFeSe] hydrogenase.

  16. Function of Periplasmic Hydrogenases in the Sulfate-ReducingBacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung-Soo; Voordouw, Johanna K.; He,Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-09-24

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough possesses four periplasmic hydrogenases to facilitate theoxidation of molecular hydrogen. These include an [Fe]hydrogenase, an[NiFeSe]hydrogenase, and two [NiFe]hydrogenases encoded by the hyd,hys, hyn1, and hyn2 genes, respectively. In order to understand theircellular functions, we have compared the growth rates of existing (hydand hyn1) and newly constructed (hys and hyn-1 hyd) mutants to those ofthe wild type in defined media in which lactate or hydrogen at either 5or 50 percent (vol/vol) was used as the sole electron donor for sulfatereduction. Only strains missing the [Fe]hydrogenase were significantlyaffected during growth with lactate or with 50 percent (vol/vol) hydrogenas the sole electron donor. When the cells were grown at low (5 percent[vol/vol]) hydrogen concentrations, those missing the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase suffered the greatest impairment. The growth rate datacorrelated strongly with gene expression results obtained from microarrayhybridizations and real-time PCR using mRNA extracted from cells grownunder the three conditions. Expression of the hys genes followed theorder 5 percent hydrogen>50 percent hydrogen>lactate, whereasexpression of the hyd genes followed the reverse order. These resultssuggest that growth with lactate and 50 percent hydrogen is associatedwith high intracellular hydrogen concentrations, which are best capturedby the higher activity, lower affinity [Fe]hydrogenase. In contrast,growth with 5 percent hydrogen is associated with a low intracellularhydrogen concentration, requiring the lower activity, higher affinity[NiFeSe]hydrogenase.

  17. Function of Periplasmic Hydrogenases in the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung-Soo; Voordouw, Johanna K.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-01-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough possesses four periplasmic hydrogenases to facilitate the oxidation of molecular hydrogen. These include an [Fe] hydrogenase, an [NiFeSe] hydrogenase, and two [NiFe] hydrogenases encoded by the hyd, hys, hyn1, and hyn2 genes, respectively. In order to understand their cellular functions, we have compared the growth rates of existing (hyd and hyn1) and newly constructed (hys and hyn-1 hyd) mutants to those of the wild type in defined media in which lactate or hydrogen at either 5 or 50% (vol/vol) was used as the sole electron donor for sulfate reduction. Only strains missing the [Fe] hydrogenase were significantly affected during growth with lactate or with 50% (vol/vol) hydrogen as the sole electron donor. When the cells were grown at low (5% [vol/vol]) hydrogen concentrations, those missing the [NiFeSe] hydrogenase suffered the greatest impairment. The growth rate data correlated strongly with gene expression results obtained from microarray hybridizations and real-time PCR using mRNA extracted from cells grown under the three conditions. Expression of the hys genes followed the order 5% hydrogen > 50% hydrogen > lactate, whereas expression of the hyd genes followed the reverse order. These results suggest that growth with lactate and 50% hydrogen is associated with high intracellular hydrogen concentrations, which are best captured by the higher activity, lower affinity [Fe] hydrogenase. In contrast, growth with 5% hydrogen is associated with a low intracellular hydrogen concentration, requiring the lower activity, higher affinity [NiFeSe] hydrogenase. PMID:17601789

  18. Mutational analysis of the hyc-operon determining the relationship between hydrogenase-3 and NADH pathway in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Pi, Jian; Jawed, Muhammad; Wang, Jun; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the hydrogenase-3 gene cluster (hycDEFGH) was isolated and identified from Enterobacter aerogenes CCTCC AB91102. All gene products were highly homologous to the reported bacterial hydrogenase-3 (Hyd-3) proteins. The genes hycE, hycF, hycG encoding the subunits of hydrogenase-3 were targeted for genetic knockout to inhibit the FHL hydrogen production pathway via the Red recombination system, generating three mutant strains AB91102-E (ΔhycE), AB91102-F (ΔhycF) and AB91102-G (ΔhycG). Deletion of the three genes affected the integrity of hydrogenase-3. The hydrogen production experiments with the mutant strains showed that no hydrogen was detected compared with the wild type (0.886 mol/mol glucose), demonstrating that knocking out any of the three genes could inhibit NADH hydrogen production pathway. Meanwhile, the metabolites of the mutant strains were significantly changed in comparison with the wild type, indicating corresponding changes in metabolic flux by mutation. Additionally, the activity of NADH-mediated hydrogenase was found to be nil in the mutant strains. The chemostat experiments showed that the NADH/NAD(+) ratio of the mutant strains increased nearly 1.4-fold compared with the wild type. The NADH-mediated hydrogenase activity and NADH/NAD(+) ratio analysis both suggested that NADH pathway required the involvement of the electron transport chain of hydrogenase-3.

  19. Diversity and Evolution of Hydrogenase Systems in Rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    Baginsky, Cecilia; Brito, Belén; Imperial, Juan; Palacios, José-Manuel; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás

    2002-01-01

    Uptake hydrogenases allow rhizobia to recycle the hydrogen generated in the nitrogen fixation process within the legume nodule. Hydrogenase (hup) systems in Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae show highly conserved sequence and gene organization, but important differences exist in regulation and in the presence of specific genes. We have undertaken the characterization of hup gene clusters from Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus), Bradyrhizobium sp. (Vigna), and Rhizobium tropici and Azorhizobium caulinodans strains with the aim of defining the extent of diversity in hup gene composition and regulation in endosymbiotic bacteria. Genomic DNA hybridizations using hupS, hupE, hupUV, hypB, and hoxA probes showed a diversity of intraspecific hup profiles within Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Vigna) strains and homogeneous intraspecific patterns within R. tropici and A. caulinodans strains. The analysis also revealed differences regarding the possession of hydrogenase regulatory genes. Phylogenetic analyses using partial sequences of hupS and hupL clustered R. leguminosarum and R. tropici hup sequences together with those from B. japonicum and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) strains, suggesting a common origin. In contrast, Bradyrhizobium sp. (Vigna) hup sequences diverged from the rest of rhizobial sequences, which might indicate that those organisms have evolved independently and possibly have acquired the sequences by horizontal transfer from an unidentified source. PMID:12324339

  20. Cyanide inactivation of hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Seefeldt, L C; Arp, D J

    1989-01-01

    The effects of cyanide on membrane-associated and purified hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii were characterized. Inactivation of hydrogenase by cyanide was dependent on the activity (oxidation) state of the enzyme. Active (reduced) hydrogenase showed no inactivation when treated with cyanide over several hours. Treatment of reversibly inactive (oxidized) states of both membrane-associated and purified hydrogenase, however, resulted in a time-dependent, irreversible loss of hydrogenase activity. The rate of cyanide inactivation was dependent on the cyanide concentration and was an apparent first-order process for purified enzyme (bimolecular rate constant, 23.1 M-1 min-1 for CN-). The rate of inactivation decreased with decreasing pH. [14C]cyanide remained associated with cyanide-inactivated hydrogenase after gel filtration chromatography, with a stoichiometry of 1.7 mol of cyanide bound per mol of inactive enzyme. The presence of saturating concentrations of CO had no effect on the rate or extent of cyanide inactivation of hydrogenases. The results indicate that cyanide can cause a time-dependent, irreversible inactivation of hydrogenase in the oxidized, activatable state but has no effect when hydrogenase is in the reduced, active state. PMID:2656648

  1. Cyanide inactivation of hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii

    SciTech Connect

    Seefeldt, L.C.; Arp, D.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The effects of cyanide on membrane-associated and purified hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii were characterized. Inactivation of hydrogenase by cyanide was dependent on the activity (oxidation) state of the enzyme. Active (reduced) hydrogenase showed no inactivation when treated with cyanide over several hours. Treatment of reversibly inactive (oxidized) states of both membrane-associated and purified hydrogenase, however, resulted in a time-dependent, irreversible loss of hydrogenase activity. The rate of cyanide inactivation was dependent on the cyanide concentration and was an apparent first-order process for purified enzyme (bimolecular rate constant, 23.1 M{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} for CN{sup {minus}}). The rate of inactivation decreased with decreasing pH. ({sup 14}C)cyanide remained associated with cyanide-inactivated hydrogenase after gel filtration chromatography, with a stoichiometry of 1.7 mol of cyanide bound per mol of inactive enzyme. The presence of saturating concentrations of CO had no effect on the rate or extent of cyanide inactivation of hydrogenases. The results indicate that cyanide can cause a time-dependent, irreversible inactivation of hydrogenase in the oxidized, activatable state but has no effect when hydrogenase is in the reduced, active state.

  2. Three trans-acting regulatory functions control hydrogenase synthesis in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Eberz, G; Friedrich, B

    1991-01-01

    Random Tn5 mutagenesis of the regulatory region of megaplasmid pHG1 of Alcaligenes eutrophus led to the identification of three distinct loci designated hoxA, hoxD, and hoxE. Sequencing of the hoxA locus revealed an open reading frame which could code for a polypeptide of 482 amino acids with a molecular mass of 53.5 kDa. A protein of comparable apparent molecular mass was detected in heterologous expression studies with a plasmid-borne copy of the hoxA gene. Amino acid alignments revealed striking homologies between HoxA and the transcriptional activators NifA and NtrC of Klebsiella pneumoniae and HydG of Escherichia coli. HoxA- mutants of A. eutrophus lacked both NAD-reducing soluble hydrogenase and membrane-bound hydrogenase. In HoxA- mutants, the synthesis of beta-galactosidase from a hoxS'-'lacZ operon fusion was drastically reduced, indicating that HoxA is essential for the transcription of hydrogenase genes. Mutants defective in hoxD and hoxE also lacked the catalytic activities of the two hydrogenases; however, in contrast to HoxA- mutants, they contained immunologically detectable NAD-reducing soluble hydrogenase and membrane-bound hydrogenase proteins, although at a reduced level. The low hydrogenase content in the HoxD- and HoxE- mutants correlated with a decrease in beta-galactosidase synthesized under the direction of a hoxS'-'lacZ operon fusion. Thus, hoxD and hoxE apparently intervene both in the regulation of hydrogenase synthesis and in subsequent steps leading to the formation of catalytically active enzymes. Images PMID:2001989

  3. Dual role of HupF in the biosynthesis of [NiFe] hydrogenase in Rhizobium leguminosarum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background [NiFe] hydrogenases are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of hydrogen into protons and electrons, to use H2 as energy source, or the production of hydrogen through proton reduction, as an escape valve for the excess of reduction equivalents in anaerobic metabolism. Biosynthesis of [NiFe] hydrogenases is a complex process that occurs in the cytoplasm, where a number of auxiliary proteins are required to synthesize and insert the metal cofactors into the enzyme structural units. The endosymbiotic bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum requires the products of eighteen genes (hupSLCDEFGHIJKhypABFCDEX) to synthesize an active hydrogenase. hupF and hupK genes are found only in hydrogenase clusters from bacteria expressing hydrogenase in the presence of oxygen. Results HupF is a HypC paralogue with a similar predicted structure, except for the C-terminal domain present only in HupF. Deletion of hupF results in the inability to process the hydrogenase large subunit HupL, and also in reduced stability of this subunit when cells are exposed to high oxygen tensions. A ΔhupF mutant was fully complemented for hydrogenase activity by a C-terminal deletion derivative under symbiotic, ultra low-oxygen tensions, but only partial complementation was observed in free living cells under higher oxygen tensions (1% or 3%). Co-purification experiments using StrepTag-labelled HupF derivatives and mass spectrometry analysis indicate the existence of a major complex involving HupL and HupF, and a less abundant HupF-HupK complex. Conclusions The results indicate that HupF has a dual role during hydrogenase biosynthesis: it is required for hydrogenase large subunit processing and it also acts as a chaperone to stabilize HupL when hydrogenase is synthesized in the presence of oxygen. PMID:23136881

  4. Hydrogenase- and Outer Membrane c-Type Cytochrome-Facilitated Reduction of Technetium(VII) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Reed, Samantha B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Simonson, Cody J.; Liu, Chongxuan; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-01-15

    Pertechnetate, 99Tc(VII)O4-, is a highly mobile radionuclide contaminant at U.S. Department of Energy sites that can be enzymatically reduced by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble Tc(IV)O2(s). In other microorganisms, Tc(VII)O4- reduction is generally considered to be catalyzed by hydrogenase. Here, we provide evidence that although the NiFe hydrogenase of MR-1 was involved in the H2-driven reduction of Tc(VII)O4- (presumably through a direct coupling of H2 oxidation and Tc(VII) reduction), the deletion of both hydrogenase genes did not completely eliminate the ability of MR-1 to reduce Tc(VII). With lactate as the electron donor, mutants lacking the outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA or the proteins required for the maturation of c-type cytochromes were defective in reducing Tc(VII) to nanoparticulate TcO2·nH2O(s) relative to MR-1 or a NiFe hydrogenase mutant. In addition, reduced MtrC and OmcA were oxidized by Tc(VII)O4-, confirming the capacity for direct electron transfer from these OMCs to TcO4-. c-Type cytochrome-catalyzed Tc(VII) reduction could be a potentially important mechanism in environments where organic electron donor concentrations are sufficient to allow this reaction to dominate.

  5. Non-innocent bma ligand in a dissymetrically disubstituted diiron dithiolate related to the active site of the [FeFe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Si, Youtao; Charreteur, Kévin; Capon, Jean-François; Gloaguen, Frederic; Pétillon, François Y; Schollhammer, Philippe; Talarmin, Jean

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the use of a non-innocent ligand as a surrogate of the anchored [4Fe4S] cubane in a synthetic mimic of the [FeFe] hydrogenase active site. Reaction of 2,3-bis(diphenylphosphino) maleic anhydride (bma) with [Fe(2)(CO)(6)(mu-pdt)] (propanedithiolate, pdt=S(CH(2))(3)S) in the presence of Me(3)NO-2H(2)O afforded the monosubstituted derivative [Fe(2)(CO)(5)(Me(2)NCH(2)PPh(2))(mu-pdt)] (1). This results from the decomposition of the bma ligand and the apparent C-H bond cleavage in the released trimethylamine. Reaction under photolytic conditions afforded [Fe(2)(CO)(4)(bma)(mu-pdt)] (2). Compounds 1 and 2 were characterized by IR, NMR and X-ray diffraction. Voltammetric study indicated that the primary reduction of 2 is centered on the bma ligand.

  6. Effect of Hydrogenase and Mixed Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Populations on the Corrosion of Steel

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Richard D.; Jansen, Wayne; Boivin, Joe; Laishley, Edward J.; Costerton, J. William

    1991-01-01

    The importance of hydrogenase activity to corrosion of steel was assessed by using mixed populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria isolated from corroded and noncorroded oil pipelines. Biofilms which developed on the steel studs contained detectable numbers of sulfate-reducing bacteria (104 increasing to 107/0.5 cm2). However, the biofilm with active hydrogenase activity (i.e., corrosion pipeline organisms), as measured by a semiquantitative commercial kit, was associated with a significantly higher corrosion rate (7.79 mm/year) relative to noncorrosive biofilm (0.48 mm/year) with 105 sulfate-reducing bacteria per 0.5 cm2 but no measurable hydrogenase activity. The importance of hydrogenase and the microbial sulfate-reducing bacterial population making up the biofilm are discussed relative to biocorrosion. Images PMID:16348560

  7. Using directed evolution to improve hydrogen production in chimeric hydrogenases from Clostridia species.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Scott M; Plummer, Mark A; Merkel, Patricia A; Hagen, Moira; Biddle, Jennifer F; Waidner, Lisa A

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes that play a key role in controlling excess reducing equivalents in both photosynthetic and anaerobic organisms. This enzyme is viewed as potentially important for the industrial generation of hydrogen gas; however, insufficient hydrogen production has impeded its use in a commercial process. Here, we explore the potential to circumvent this problem by directly evolving the Fe-Fe hydrogenase genes from two species of Clostridia bacteria. In addition, a computational model based on these mutant sequences was developed and used as a predictive aid for the isolation of enzymes with even greater efficiency in hydrogen production. Two of the improved mutants have a logarithmic increase in hydrogen production in our in vitro assay. Furthermore, the model predicts hydrogenase sequences with hydrogen productions as high as 540-fold over the positive control. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of directed evolution to improve the native bacterial hydrogenases as a first step for improvement of hydrogenase activity, further in silico prediction, and finally, construction and demonstration of an improved algal hydrogenase in an in vivo assay of C. reinhardtii hydrogen production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Carboxy-terminal processing of the large subunit of [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 7757.

    PubMed

    Hatchikian, E C; Magro, V; Forget, N; Nicolet, Y; Fontecilla-Camps, J C

    1999-05-01

    hydA and hydB, the genes encoding the large (46-kDa) and small (13. 5-kDa) subunits of the periplasmic [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 7757, have been cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of the genes product showed complete identity to the sequence of the well-characterized [Fe] hydrogenase from the closely related species Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (G. Voordouw and S. Brenner, Eur. J. Biochem. 148:515-520, 1985). The data show that in addition to the well-known signal peptide preceding the NH2 terminus of the mature small subunit, the large subunit undergoes a carboxy-terminal processing involving the cleavage of a peptide of 24 residues, in agreement with the recently reported data on the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme (Y. Nicolet, C. Piras, P. Legrand, E. C. Hatchikian, and J. C. Fontecilla-Camps, Structure 7:13-23, 1999). We suggest that this C-terminal processing is involved in the export of the protein to the periplasm.

  9. hypD as a marker for [NiFe]-hydrogenases in microbial communities of surface waters.

    PubMed

    Beimgraben, Christian; Gutekunst, Kirstin; Opitz, Friederike; Appel, Jens

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen is an important trace gas in the atmosphere. Soil microorganisms are known to be an important part of the biogeochemical H2 cycle, contributing 80 to 90% of the annual hydrogen uptake. Different aquatic ecosystems act as either sources or sinks of hydrogen, but the contribution of their microbial communities is unknown. [NiFe]-hydrogenases are the best candidates for hydrogen turnover in these environments since they are able to cope with oxygen. As they lack sufficiently conserved sequence motifs, reliable markers for these enzymes are missing, and consequently, little is known about their environmental distribution. We analyzed the essential maturation genes of [NiFe]-hydrogenases, including their frequency of horizontal gene transfer, and found hypD to be an applicable marker for the detection of the different known hydrogenase groups. Investigation of two freshwater lakes showed that [NiFe]-hydrogenases occur in many prokaryotic orders. We found that the respective hypD genes cooccur with oxygen-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenases (groups 1 and 5) mainly of Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Burkholderiales; cyanobacterial uptake hydrogenases (group 2a) of cyanobacteria; H2-sensing hydrogenases (group 2b) of Burkholderiales, Rhizobiales, and Rhodobacterales; and two groups of multimeric soluble hydrogenases (groups 3b and 3d) of Legionellales and cyanobacteria. These findings support and expand a previous analysis of metagenomic data (M. Barz et al., PLoS One 5:e13846, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0013846) and further identify [NiFe]-hydrogenases that could be involved in hydrogen cycling in aquatic surface waters.

  10. hypD as a Marker for [NiFe]-Hydrogenases in Microbial Communities of Surface Waters

    PubMed Central

    Beimgraben, Christian; Gutekunst, Kirstin; Opitz, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen is an important trace gas in the atmosphere. Soil microorganisms are known to be an important part of the biogeochemical H2 cycle, contributing 80 to 90% of the annual hydrogen uptake. Different aquatic ecosystems act as either sources or sinks of hydrogen, but the contribution of their microbial communities is unknown. [NiFe]-hydrogenases are the best candidates for hydrogen turnover in these environments since they are able to cope with oxygen. As they lack sufficiently conserved sequence motifs, reliable markers for these enzymes are missing, and consequently, little is known about their environmental distribution. We analyzed the essential maturation genes of [NiFe]-hydrogenases, including their frequency of horizontal gene transfer, and found hypD to be an applicable marker for the detection of the different known hydrogenase groups. Investigation of two freshwater lakes showed that [NiFe]-hydrogenases occur in many prokaryotic orders. We found that the respective hypD genes cooccur with oxygen-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenases (groups 1 and 5) mainly of Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Burkholderiales; cyanobacterial uptake hydrogenases (group 2a) of cyanobacteria; H2-sensing hydrogenases (group 2b) of Burkholderiales, Rhizobiales, and Rhodobacterales; and two groups of multimeric soluble hydrogenases (groups 3b and 3d) of Legionellales and cyanobacteria. These findings support and expand a previous analysis of metagenomic data (M. Barz et al., PLoS One 5:e13846, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0013846) and further identify [NiFe]-hydrogenases that could be involved in hydrogen cycling in aquatic surface waters. PMID:24727276

  11. Diversity and transcription of proteases involved in the maturation of hydrogenases in Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The last step in the maturation process of the large subunit of [NiFe]-hydrogenases is a proteolytic cleavage of the C-terminal by a hydrogenase specific protease. Contrary to other accessory proteins these hydrogenase proteases are believed to be specific whereby one type of hydrogenases specific protease only cleaves one type of hydrogenase. In cyanobacteria this is achieved by the gene product of either hupW or hoxW, specific for the uptake or the bidirectional hydrogenase respectively. The filamentous cyanobacteria Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and Nostoc sp strain PCC 7120 may contain a single uptake hydrogenase or both an uptake and a bidirectional hydrogenase respectively. Results In order to examine these proteases in cyanobacteria, transcriptional analyses were performed of hupW in Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and hupW and hoxW in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120. These studies revealed numerous transcriptional start points together with putative binding sites for NtcA (hupW) and LexA (hoxW). In order to investigate the diversity and specificity among hydrogeanse specific proteases we constructed a phylogenetic tree which revealed several subgroups that showed a striking resemblance to the subgroups previously described for [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally the proteases specificity was also addressed by amino acid sequence analysis and protein-protein docking experiments with 3D-models derived from bioinformatic studies. These studies revealed a so called "HOXBOX"; an amino acid sequence specific for protease of Hox-type which might be involved in docking with the large subunit of the hydrogenase. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the hydrogenase specific proteases are under similar regulatory control as the hydrogenases they cleave. The result from the phylogenetic study also indicates that the hydrogenase and the protease have co-evolved since ancient time and suggests that at least one major horizontal gene transfer has occurred. This co

  12. Characterization and cloning of oxygen-tolerant hydrogenase from Klebsiella oxytoca HP1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaobing; Liang, Yi; Li, Qianyi; Zhou, Juan; Long, Minnan

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogenase from a hot spring bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca HP1 was purified and found to have a specific activity of 199.8 U/mg of protein and a yield of 7.3%. The purified enzyme was determined to consist of six subunits (65, 33, 28, 23, 21 and 18 kDa), similar to hydrogenase-3 from Escherichia coli, and therefore it was named Hyd3. The enzyme displayed remarkable oxygen tolerance. For the purified enzyme, 50% maximal activity was maintained following incubation for 24 h in air at room temperature. The hydrogenase gene cluster (hyc) was cloned and found to consist of hycD, hycE, hycF, hycdG, hycH and hycI genes. hycE and hycG genes encode for the large and small subunit of the hydrogenase, respectively. A hycE gene deletion mutant, ΔhycE, was constructed for elucidating the function of the hyc-operon in hydrogen metabolism. Compared with the wild type strain HP1, the mutant strain showed a dramatic decrease in hydrogen production in the presence of formate, sodium pyruvate and glucose under O(2)-stressed conditions, while substantial activity was detected under anaerobic conditions. This strongly suggests that K. oxytoca HP1 carries a number of hydrogenases or hydrogen metabolic pathways independently of Hyd3. However, Hyd3 is the main factor responsible for hydrogen production under O(2) stress conditions.

  13. Iron-sulfur clusters of hydrogenase I and hydrogenase II of Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, M W; Eccleston, E; Howard, J B

    1989-01-01

    The iron and acid-labile sulfide contents and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties of hydrogenase I (bidirectional) and hydrogenase II (uptake) of Clostridium pasteurianum (strain W5) have been determined on the basis of quantitative amino acid analyses. The iron and acid-labile sulfide values are approximately 20 and 18 atoms per molecule of hydrogenase I and 14 and 11 atoms per molecule of hydrogenase II, respectively. These amounts are substantially greater than previously reported values, which relied on protein concentration determined by colorimetric assay. The oxidized hydrogenases exhibit unusual EPR signals that originate from a novel type of iron-sulfur center, termed the hydrogenase or H cluster, which covalently binds the inhibitor CO. This EPR signal represents approximately one unpaired electron per molecule in each enzyme with and without bound CO, which is consistent with the presence of one oxidized H cluster (S = 1/2) per enzyme molecule. The two enzymes also contain ferredoxin-type four-iron centers or F clusters. The EPR signals from the F clusters observed in the reduced forms of hydrogenase I and hydrogenase II account for approximately four and one unpaired electron per molecule, respectively. We conclude from the iron determinations and the EPR results, together with a reevaluation of previous spectroscopic data, that in both hydrogenases the H cluster probably comprises six iron atoms. Mechanistic models of the two hydrogenases are presented that account for their cluster compositions and the dramatic differences in their catalytic activities. PMID:2544883

  14. Common cis-acting region responsible for transcriptional regulation of Bradyrhizobium japonicum hydrogenase by nickel, oxygen, and hydrogen.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H; Yu, C; Maier, R J

    1991-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum expresses hydrogenase in microaerophilic free-living conditions in the presence of nickel. Plasmid-borne hup-lacZ transcriptional fusion constructs were used to study the regulation of the hydrogenase gene. The hydrogenase gene was transcriptionally induced under microaerobic conditions (0.1 to 3.0% partial pressure O2). The hydrogenase gene was not transcribed or was poorly transcribed in strictly anaerobic conditions or conditions above 3.0% O2. Hydrogen gas at levels as low as 0.1% partial pressure induced hydrogenase transcription, and a high level of transcription was maintained up to at least 10% H2 concentration. No transcription was observed in the absence of H2. Hydrogenase was regulated by H2, O2, and Ni when the 5'-upstream sequence was pared down to include base number -168. However, when the upstream sequence was pared down to base number -118, the regulatory response to O2, H2, and Ni levels was negated. Thus, a common cis-acting regulatory region localized within 50 bp is critical for the regulation of hydrogenase by hydrogen, oxygen, and nickel. As a control, the B. japonicum hemA gene which codes for delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase was also fused to the promoterless lacZ gene, and its regulation was tested in the presence of various concentrations of O2 and H2. hemA-lacZ transcription was not dependent on levels of Ni, O2, or H2. Two different hup-lacZ fusions were tested in a Hup- background, strain JH47; these hup-lacZ constructs in JH47 demonstrated dependency on nickel, O2, and H2, indicating that the hydrogenase protein itself is not a sensor for regulation by O2, H2, or nickel. PMID:2061281

  15. Synthesis, structural characterization, and some properties of 2-acylmethyl-6-ester group-difunctionalized pyridine-containing iron complexes related to the active site of [Fe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Song, Li-Cheng; Hu, Fu-Qiang; Wang, Miao-Miao; Xie, Zhao-Jun; Xu, Kai-Kai; Song, Hai-Bin

    2014-06-07

    As biomimetic models for [Fe]-hydrogenase, the 2-acylmethyl-6-ester group-difunctionalized pyridine-containing iron(II) complexes 1-4 have been successfully prepared via the following three separate steps. In the first step, the acylation or esterification of difunctionalized pyridine 2-(p-MeC6H4SO3CH2)-6-HOCH2C5H3N with acetyl chloride or benzoic acid gives the corresponding pyridine derivatives 2-(p-MeC6H4SO3CH2)-6-RCO2CH2C5H3N (A, R = Me; B, R = Ph). The second step involves reaction of A or B with Na2Fe(CO)4 followed by treatment of the intermediate Fe(0) complexes [Na(2-CH2-6-RCO2CH2C5H3N)Fe(CO)4] (M1, R = Me; M2, R = Ph) with iodine to afford 2-acylmethyl-6-acetoxymethyl or 6-benzoyloxymethyl-difunctionalized pyridine-containing Fe(II) iodide complexes [2-C(O)CH2-6-RCO2CH2C5H3N]Fe(CO)2I (1, R = Me; 3, R = Ph). Finally, when 1 or 3 is treated with sodium 2-mercaptopyridinate, the corresponding difunctionalized pyridine-containing Fe(ii) mercaptopyridinate complexes [2-C(O)CH2-6-RCO2C5H3N]Fe(CO)2(2-SC5H4N) (2, R = Me; 4, R = Ph) are produced. While the structures of model complexes 1-4 are confirmed by X-ray crystallography, the electrochemical properties of 2 and 4 are compared with those of the two previously reported models. In addition, complexes 2 and 4 have been found to be catalysts for H2 production in the presence of TFA under CV conditions.

  16. [FeFe]-hydrogenase abundance and diversity along a vertical redox gradient in Great Salt Lake, USA.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Hamilton, Trinity L; Swanson, Kevin D; Howells, Alta E; Baxter, Bonnie K; Meuser, Jonathan E; Posewitz, Matthew C; Peters, John W

    2014-11-28

    The use of [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes for the biotechnological production of H2 or other reduced products has been limited by their sensitivity to oxygen (O2). Here, we apply a PCR-directed approach to determine the distribution, abundance, and diversity of hydA gene fragments along co-varying salinity and O2 gradients in a vertical water column of Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT. The distribution of hydA was constrained to water column transects that had high salt and relatively low O2 concentrations. Recovered HydA deduced amino acid sequences were enriched in hydrophilic amino acids relative to HydA from less saline environments. In addition, they harbored interesting variations in the amino acid environment of the complex H-cluster metalloenzyme active site and putative gas transfer channels that may be important for both H2 transfer and O2 susceptibility. A phylogenetic framework was created to infer the accessory cluster composition and quaternary structure of recovered HydA protein sequences based on phylogenetic relationships and the gene contexts of known complete HydA sequences. Numerous recovered HydA are predicted to harbor multiple N- and C-terminal accessory iron-sulfur cluster binding domains and are likely to exist as multisubunit complexes. This study indicates an important role for [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the functioning of the GSL ecosystem and provides new target genes and variants for use in identifying O2 tolerant enzymes for biotechnological applications.

  17. Occurrence of H2-Uptake Hydrogenases in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) and Their Expression in Nodules of Lupinus spp. and Ornithopus compressus1

    PubMed Central

    Murillo, Jesús; Villa, Ana; Chamber, Manuel; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-four strains of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) from worldwide collections were screened by a colony hybridization method for the presence of DNA sequences homologous to the structural genes of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum hydrogenase. Twelve strains exhibited strong colony hybridization signals, and subsequent Southern blot hybridization experiments showed that they fell into two different groups on the basis of the pattern of EcoRI fragments containing the homology to the hup probe. All strains in the first group (UPM860, UPM861, and 750) expressed uptake hydrogenase activity in symbiosis with Lupinus albus, Lupinus angustifolius, Lupinus luteus, and Ornithopus compressus, but both the rate of H2 uptake by bacteroids and the relative efficiency of N2 fixation (RE = 1 - [H2 evolved in air/acetylene reduced]) by nodules were markedly affected by the legume host. L. angustifolius was the less permissive host for hydrogenase expression in symbiosis with the three strains (average RE = 0.76), and O. compressus was the more permissive (average RE = 1.0). None of the strains in the second group expressed hydrogenase activity in lupine nodules, and only one exhibited low H2-uptake activity in symbiosis with O. compressus. The inability of these putative Hup+ strains to induce hydrogenase activity in lupine nodules is discussed on the basis of the legume host effect. Among the 42 strains showing no homology to the B. japonicum hup-specific probe in the colony hybridization assay, 10 were examined in symbiosis with L. angustifolius. The average RE for these strains was 0.51. However, one strain, IM43B, exhibited high RE values (higher than 0.80) and high levels of hydrogenase activity in symbiosis with L. angustifolius, L. albus, and L. luteus. In Southern blot hybridization experiments, no homology was detected between the B. japonicum hup-specific DNA probe and total DNA from vegetative cells or bacteroids from strain IM43B even under low stringency hybridization

  18. Heterologous Expression and Maturation of an NADP-Dependent [NiFe]-Hydrogenase: A Key Enzyme in Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Jenney, Francis E.; McTernan, Patrick M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a major biofuel and is metabolized by a wide range of microorganisms. Microbial hydrogen production is catalyzed by hydrogenase, an extremely complex, air-sensitive enzyme that utilizes a binuclear nickel-iron [NiFe] catalytic site. Production and engineering of recombinant [NiFe]-hydrogenases in a genetically-tractable organism, as with metalloprotein complexes in general, has met with limited success due to the elaborate maturation process that is required, primarily in the absence of oxygen, to assemble the catalytic center and functional enzyme. We report here the successful production in Escherichia coli of the recombinant form of a cytoplasmic, NADP-dependent hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus, an anaerobic hyperthermophile. This was achieved using novel expression vectors for the co-expression of thirteen P. furiosus genes (four structural genes encoding the hydrogenase and nine encoding maturation proteins). Remarkably, the native E. coli maturation machinery will also generate a functional hydrogenase when provided with only the genes encoding the hydrogenase subunits and a single protease from P. furiosus. Another novel feature is that their expression was induced by anaerobic conditions, whereby E. coli was grown aerobically and production of recombinant hydrogenase was achieved by simply changing the gas feed from air to an inert gas (N2). The recombinant enzyme was purified and shown to be functionally similar to the native enzyme purified from P. furiosus. The methodology to generate this key hydrogen-producing enzyme has dramatic implications for the production of hydrogen and NADPH as vehicles for energy storage and transport, for engineering hydrogenase to optimize production and catalysis, as well as for the general production of complex, oxygen-sensitive metalloproteins. PMID:20463892

  19. Genomic and metagenomic surveys of hydrogenase distribution indicate H2 is a widely utilised energy source for microbial growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Greening, Chris; Biswas, Ambarish; Carere, Carlo R; Jackson, Colin J; Taylor, Matthew C; Stott, Matthew B; Cook, Gregory M; Morales, Sergio E

    2016-03-01

    Recent physiological and ecological studies have challenged the long-held belief that microbial metabolism of molecular hydrogen (H2) is a niche process. To gain a broader insight into the importance of microbial H2 metabolism, we comprehensively surveyed the genomic and metagenomic distribution of hydrogenases, the reversible enzymes that catalyse the oxidation and evolution of H2. The protein sequences of 3286 non-redundant putative hydrogenases were curated from publicly available databases. These metalloenzymes were classified into multiple groups based on (1) amino acid sequence phylogeny, (2) metal-binding motifs, (3) predicted genetic organisation and (4) reported biochemical characteristics. Four groups (22 subgroups) of [NiFe]-hydrogenase, three groups (6 subtypes) of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and a small group of [Fe]-hydrogenases were identified. We predict that this hydrogenase diversity supports H2-based respiration, fermentation and carbon fixation processes in both oxic and anoxic environments, in addition to various H2-sensing, electron-bifurcation and energy-conversion mechanisms. Hydrogenase-encoding genes were identified in 51 bacterial and archaeal phyla, suggesting strong pressure for both vertical and lateral acquisition. Furthermore, hydrogenase genes could be recovered from diverse terrestrial, aquatic and host-associated metagenomes in varying proportions, indicating a broad ecological distribution and utilisation. Oxygen content (pO2) appears to be a central factor driving the phylum- and ecosystem-level distribution of these genes. In addition to compounding evidence that H2 was the first electron donor for life, our analysis suggests that the great diversification of hydrogenases has enabled H2 metabolism to sustain the growth or survival of microorganisms in a wide range of ecosystems to the present day. This work also provides a comprehensive expanded system for classifying hydrogenases and identifies new prospects for investigating H2

  20. Hydrogenase polypeptide and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Michael W.W.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Jenney, JR, Francis E.; Sun, Junsong

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are polypeptides having hydrogenase activity. The polypeptide may be multimeric, and may have hydrogenase activity of at least 0.05 micromoles H.sub.2 produced min.sup.-1 mg protein.sup.-1. Also provided herein are polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides, genetically modified microbes that include polynucleotides encoding one or more subunits of the multimeric polypeptide, and methods for making and using the polypeptides.

  1. Improving cyanobacterail O2-tolerance using CBS hydrogenase for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Maness, Pin-Ching; Eckert, Carrie; Wawrousek, Karen; Noble, Scott; Pennington, Grant; Yu, Jianping

    2016-11-11

    Cyanobacterial H2 production is a viable path to renewable H2 with water serving as the electron donor and sunlight the energy source. A grand challenge is the sensitivity of the underlying hydrogenase to O2, the latter an inherent byproduct of oxygenic photosynthesis. This challenge has been identified as a technical barrier in the Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) Multi-year Research, Development and Deployment Plan. One solution is to express in cyanobacterium an O2-tolerant hydrogenase to circumvent this barrier. We have uncovered an O2-tolerant hydrogenase from a photosynthetic bacterium Rubrivivax gelatinosus CBS (Casa Bonita Strain; hereafter “CBS”) with a half-life near 21 h when exposed to ambient O2. We sequenced the CBS genome and identified two sets of maturation machineries hyp1 and hyp2. Transcripts expression analysis and mutagenesis revealed that hyp1 is responsible for the assembly of the O2-tolerant CO-oxidation (Coo) hydrogenase and hyp2 is involved in the maturation of a H2-uptake hydrogenase. The structural genes encoding the O2-tolerant hydrogenase (cooLXUH) and maturation genes hyp1FABCDE were therefore cloned and expressed in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We obtained several recombinants displaying hydrogenase activity in a Synechocystis host lacking background activity, suggesting that the CBS hydrogenase is active in Synechocystis. Yet the activity is extremely low. To ensure balanced protein expression, we systematically optimized heterologous expression of 10 CBS genes by using stronger promoters and better ribosome binding site. Moreover we attempted the expression of cooM and cooK genes, verified to be important in CBS to afford activity. CooM is a very large protein and both CooM and CooK are membrane-associated. These properties limited our success in expressing both genes in Synechocystis, although they

  2. Roles of HynAB and Ech, the only two hydrogenases found in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio gigas.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, Fabio O; Santos, Catia I; Rodrigues, Rute; Pereira, Inês A C; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2013-10-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria are characterized by a high number of hydrogenases, which have been proposed to contribute to the overall energy metabolism of the cell, but exactly in what role is not clear. Desulfovibrio spp. can produce or consume H2 when growing on organic or inorganic substrates in the presence or absence of sulfate. Because of the presence of only two hydrogenases encoded in its genome, the periplasmic HynAB and cytoplasmic Ech hydrogenases, Desulfovibrio gigas is an excellent model organism for investigation of the specific function of each of these enzymes during growth. In this study, we analyzed the physiological response to the deletion of the genes that encode the two hydrogenases in D. gigas, through the generation of ΔechBC and ΔhynAB single mutant strains. These strains were analyzed for the ability to grow on different substrates, such as lactate, pyruvate, and hydrogen, under respiratory and fermentative conditions. Furthermore, the expression of both hydrogenase genes in the three strains studied was assessed through quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. The results demonstrate that neither hydrogenase is essential for growth on lactate-sulfate, indicating that hydrogen cycling is not indispensable. In addition, the periplasmic HynAB enzyme has a bifunctional activity and is required for growth on H2 or by fermentation of pyruvate. Therefore, this enzyme seems to play a dominant role in D. gigas hydrogen metabolism.

  3. Uptake Hydrogenase (Hup) in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Rosangela B.; Vargas, Alvaro A. T.; Schröder, Eduardo C.; van Berkum, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Strains of Rhizobium forming nitrogen-fixing symbioses with common bean were systematically examined for the presence of the uptake hydrogenase (hup) structural genes and expression of uptake hydrogenase (Hup) activity. DNA with homology to the hup structural genes of Bradyrhizobium japonicum was present in 100 of 248 strains examined. EcoRI fragments with molecular sizes of approximately 20.0 and 2.2 kb hybridized with an internal SacI fragment, which contains part of both bradyrhizobial hup structural genes. The DNA with homology to the hup genes was located on pSym of one of the bean rhizobia. Hup activity was observed in bean symbioses with 13 of 30 strains containing DNA homologous with the hup structural genes. However, the Hup activity was not sufficient to eliminate hydrogen evolution from the nodules. Varying the host plant with two of the Hup+ strains indicated that expression of Hup activity was host regulated, as has been reported with soybean, pea, and cowpea strains. Images PMID:16349115

  4. Hydrogenases in green algae: do they save the algae's life and solve our energy problems?

    PubMed

    Happe, Thomas; Hemschemeier, Anja; Winkler, Martin; Kaminski, Annette

    2002-06-01

    Green algae are the only known eukaryotes with both oxygenic photosynthesis and a hydrogen metabolism. Recent physiological and genetic discoveries indicate a close connection between these metabolic pathways. The anaerobically inducible hydA genes of algae encode a special type of highly active [Fe]-hydrogenase. Electrons from reducing equivalents generated during fermentation enter the photosynthetic electron transport chain via the plastoquinone pool. They are transferred to the hydrogenase by photosystem I and ferredoxin. Thus, the [Fe]-hydrogenase is an electron 'valve' that enables the algae to survive under anaerobic conditions. During sulfur deprivation, illuminated algal cultures evolve large quantities of hydrogen gas, and this promises to be an alternative future energy source.

  5. Genetic diversity of hydrogen-producing bacteria in an acidophilic ethanol-H2-coproducing system, analyzed using the [Fe]-hydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Xing, Defeng; Ren, Nanqi; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2008-02-01

    Hydrogen gas (H2) produced by bacterial fermentation of biomass can be a sustainable energy source. The ability to produce H2 gas during anaerobic fermentation was previously thought to be restricted to a few species within the genera Clostridium and Enterobacter. This work reports genomic evidence for the presence of novel H2-producing bacteria (HPB) in acidophilic ethanol-H2-coproducing communities that were enriched using molasses wastewater. The majority of the enriched dominant populations in the acidophilic ethanol-H2-coproducing system were affiliated with low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria, based on the 16S rRNA gene. However, PCR primers designed to specifically target bacterial hydA yielded 17 unique hydA sequences whose amino acid sequences differed from those of known HPB. The putative ethanol-H2-coproducing bacteria comprised 11 novel phylotypes closely related to Ethanoligenens harbinense, Clostridium thermocellum, and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum. Furthermore, analysis of the alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme also pointed to an E. harbinense-like organism, which is known to have a high conversion rate of carbohydrate to H2 and ethanol. We also found six novel HPB that were associated with lactate-, propionate-, and butyrate-oxidizing bacteria in the acidophilic H2-producing sludge. Thus, the microbial ecology of mesophilic and acidophilic H2 fermentation involves many other bacteria in addition to Clostridium and Enterobacter.

  6. Expression of a clostridial [FeFe]-hydrogenase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii prolongs photo-production of hydrogen from water splitting

    DOE PAGES

    Noone, Seth; Ratcliff, Kathleen; Davis, ReAnna; ...

    2016-12-24

    The high oxygen (O2) sensitivity of green algal [FeFe]-hydrogenases is a significant limitation for the sustained production of hydrogen gas (H2) from photosynthetic water splitting. To address this limitation we replaced the native [FeFe]-hydrogenases with a more O2-tolerant clostridial [FeFe]-hydrogenase CaI in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain D66ΔHYD (hydA1–hydA2–) that contains insertionally inactivated [FeFe]-hydrogenases genes. Expression and translocation of CaI in D66ΔHYD led to the recovery of H2 photoproduction at ~ 20% of the rates of the wild-type parent strain D66. We show for the first time that a bacterial [FeFe]-hydrogenase can be expressed, localized and matured to a catalytically active formmore » that couples to photosynthetic electron transport in the green alga C. reinhardtii. The lower rates of O2 inactivation of CaI led to more sustained H2 photoproduction when cultures were challenged with O2 or kept under prolonged illumination at solar intensities. Lastly, these results provide new insights into the requisites for attaining photobiological H2 production from water splitting using a more O2-tolerant hydrogenase.« less

  7. Purification and properties of the membrane-bound hydrogenase from N2-fixing Alcaligenes latus.

    PubMed

    Pinkwart, M; Schneider, K; Schlegel, H G

    1983-06-29

    The nitrogen-fixing, aerobic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium Alcaligenes latus forms hydrogenase when growing lithoautotrophically with hydrogen as electron donor and carbon dioxide as sole carbon source or when growing heterotrophically with N2 as sole nitrogen source. The hydrogenase is membrane-bound and relatively oxygen-sensitive. The enzymes formed under both conditions are identical on the basis of the following criteria: molecular mass, mobility in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Km value for hydrogen (methylene blue reduction), stability properties, localization, and cross-reactivity to antibodies raised against the 'autotrophic' hydrogenase. The hydrogenase was solubilized by Triton X-100 and deoxycholate treatment and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography on Phenyl-Sepharose C1-4B, DEAE-Sephacel and Matrix Gel Red A under hydrogen to homogeneity to a specific activity of 113 mumol H2 oxidized/min per mg protein (methylene blue reduction). SDS gel electrophoresis revealed two nonidentical subunits of molecular weights of 67 000 and 34 000, corresponding to a total molecular weight of 101 000. The pure enzyme was able to reduce FAD, FMN, riboflavin, flavodoxin isolated from Megasphaera elsdenii, menadione and horse heart cytochrome c as well as various artificial electron acceptors. The reversibility of the hydrogenase function was demonstrated by H2 evolution from reduced methyl viologen.

  8. Genomic analysis reveals multiple [FeFe] hydrogenases and hydrogen sensors encoded by treponemes from the H(2)-rich termite gut.

    PubMed

    Ballor, Nicholas R; Paulsen, Ian; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2012-02-01

    We have completed a bioinformatic analysis of the hydrogenases encoded in the genomes of three termite gut treponeme isolates: hydrogenotrophic, homoacetogenic Treponema primitia strains ZAS-1 and ZAS-2, and the hydrogen-producing, sugar-fermenting Treponema azotonutricium ZAS-9. H(2) is an important free intermediate in the breakdown of wood by termite gut microbial communities, reaching concentrations in some species exceeding those measured for any other biological system. The spirochetes encoded 4, 8, and 5 [FeFe] hydrogenase-like proteins, identified by their H domains, respectively, but no other recognizable hydrogenases. The [FeFe] hydrogenases represented many sequence families previously proposed in an analysis of termite gut metagenomic data. Each strain encoded both putative [FeFe] hydrogenase enzymes and evolutionarily related hydrogen sensor/transducer proteins likely involved in phosphorelay or methylation pathways, and possibly even chemotaxis. A new family of [FeFe] hydrogenases (FDH-Linked) is proposed that may form a multimeric complex with formate dehydrogenase to provide reducing equivalents for reductive acetogenesis in T. primitia. The many and diverse [FeFe] hydrogenase-like proteins encoded within the sequenced genomes of the termite gut treponemes has enabled the discovery of a putative new class of [FeFe] hydrogenase proteins potentially involved in acetogenesis and furthered present understanding of many families, including sensory, of H domain proteins beyond what was possible through the use of fragmentary termite gut metagenome sequence data alone, from which they were initially defined.

  9. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    PubMed

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  10. Crystallographic studies of nitrogenase and hydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolin, J. T.

    The long term goal of this project is to obtain detailed knowledge of the structure and function of nitrogenase and hydrogenase through the analysis of physical, chemical, and biological data with reference to three-dimensional, atomic resolution crystal structures of components of the enzyme and/or complexes of the components. The current objectives to determine the crystal structure of wild-type Av1, the nitrogenase MoFe protein from Azotobacter vinelandii; to refine this structure at high resolution; and to initiate studies of mutant MoFe proteins that express altered chemical and physical properties. Further we seek to determine the crystal structure of the bi-directional all-Fe hydrogenase from C. pasteurianum, Cp-hydrI, and to initiate studies of the uptake hydrogenase from the same organism, Cp-hydrii.

  11. Hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases of Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans.

    PubMed

    de Bok, F A M; Roze, E H A; Stams, A J M

    2002-08-01

    The syntrophic propionate-oxidizing bacterium Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans possesses two distinct formate dehydrogenases and at least three distinct hydrogenases. All of these reductases are either loosely membrane-associated or soluble proteins and at least one of the hydrogenases is located in the periplasm. These enzymes were expressed on all growth substrates tested, though the levels of each enzyme showed large variations. These findings suggest that both H2 and formate are involved in the central metabolism of the organism, and that both these compounds may serve as interspecies electron carriers during syntrophic growth on propionate.

  12. Evolutionary and Biotechnological Implications of Robust Hydrogenase Activity in Halophilic Strains of Tetraselmis

    PubMed Central

    D'Adamo, Sarah; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Boyd, Eric S.; Brown, Susan L.; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Peters, John W.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Although significant advances in H2 photoproduction have recently been realized in fresh water algae (e.g. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii), relatively few studies have focused on H2 production and hydrogenase adaptations in marine or halophilic algae. Salt water organisms likely offer several advantages for biotechnological H2 production due to the global abundance of salt water, decreased H2 and O2 solubility in saline and hypersaline systems, and the ability of extracellular NaCl levels to influence metabolism. We screened unialgal isolates obtained from hypersaline ecosystems in the southwest United States and identified two distinct halophilic strains of the genus Tetraselmis (GSL1 and QNM1) that exhibit both robust fermentative and photo H2-production activities. The influence of salinity (3.5%, 5.5% and 7.0% w/v NaCl) on H2 production was examined during anoxic acclimation, with the greatest in vivo H2-production rates observed at 7.0% NaCl. These Tetraselmis strains maintain robust hydrogenase activity even after 24 h of anoxic acclimation and show increased hydrogenase activity relative to C. reinhardtii after extended anoxia. Transcriptional analysis of Tetraselmis GSL1 enabled sequencing of the cDNA encoding the FeFe-hydrogenase structural enzyme (HYDA) and its maturation proteins (HYDE, HYDEF and HYDG). In contrast to freshwater Chlorophyceae, the halophilic Tetraselmis GSL1 strain likely encodes a single HYDA and two copies of HYDE, one of which is fused to HYDF. Phylogenetic analyses of HYDA and concatenated HYDA, HYDE, HYDF and HYDG in Tetraselmis GSL1 fill existing knowledge gaps in the evolution of algal hydrogenases and indicate that the algal hydrogenases sequenced to date are derived from a common ancestor. This is consistent with recent hypotheses that suggest fermentative metabolism in the majority of eukaryotes is derived from a common base set of enzymes that emerged early in eukaryotic evolution with subsequent losses in some organisms. PMID

  13. Development of a Rhodobacter capsulatus self-reporting model system for optimizing light-dependent, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-driven H2 production.

    PubMed

    Wecker, Matt S A; Beaton, Stephen E; Chado, Robert A; Ghirardi, Maria L

    2017-02-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus normally photoproduces H2 as a by-product of its nitrogenase-catalyzed nitrogen-fixing activity. Such H2 production, however, is expensive from a metabolic perspective, requiring nearly four times as many photons as the equivalent algal hydrogenase-based system (Ghirardi et al., 2009 Photobiological hydrogen-producing systems. Chem Soc Rev 38(1):52-61). Here, we report the insertion of a Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase and its three attendant hydrogenase assembly proteins into an R. capsulatus strain lacking its native uptake hydrogenase. Further, this strain is modified to fluoresce upon sensing H2 . The resulting strain photoproduces H2 and self-reports its own H2 production through fluorescence. This model system represents a unique method of developing hydrogenase-based H2 production in R. capsulatus, may serve as a powerful system for in vivo directed evolution of hydrogenases and hydrogenase-associated genes, and provides a means of screening for increased metabolic production of H2 . Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 291-297. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The quinone-reactive Ni/Fe-hydrogenase of Wolinella succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Dross, F; Geisler, V; Lenger, R; Theis, F; Krafft, T; Fahrenholz, F; Kojro, E; Duchêne, A; Tripier, D; Juvenal, K

    1992-05-15

    The hydrogenase (Hyd) isolated from the cytoplasmic membrane of Wolinella succinogenes consists of three polypeptides (HydA, HydB and HydC) and contains cytochrome b (6.4 mumol/g protein), which was reduced upon the addition of H2. The enzyme catalyzed the reduction of 2,3-dimethyl-1,4-naphthoquinone with H2, in contrast to an earlier preparation which was made up of HydA and HydB only and did not contain cytochrome b (Unden, G., Böcher, R., Knecht, J. & Kröger, A. (1982) FEBS Lett. 145, 230-234). This suggests that HydC is a cytochrome b which serves as a mediator in the electron transfer from H2 to the quinone. The hydrogenase genes were cloned, sequenced and identified by sequence comparison with the N-termini of the three subunits. The three genes were arranged in the order hydA, hydB, hydC, with the transcription start site in front of hydA, and were present only once on the genome. Separated by an intergene region of 69 nucleotides, hydC was followed by at least two more open reading frames of unknown function. The amino acid sequences derived from hydA, hydB and hydC were similar to those of the membrane Ni-hydrogenases of seven other bacteria. HydA and HydB also showed similarity to the small and the large subunits of periplasmic Ni-hydrogenases. HydC was predicted to contain four hydrophobic segments which might span the bacterial membrane. Two histidine residues located in hydrophobic segments are conserved in the corresponding sequences of the other membrane hydrogenases and might ligate the haem B.

  15. Development of an In Vitro Compartmentalization Screen for High-Throughput Directed Evolution of [FeFe] Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, James A.; Swartz, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Background [FeFe] hydrogenase enzymes catalyze the formation and dissociation of molecular hydrogen with the help of a complex prosthetic group composed of common elements. The development of energy conversion technologies based on these renewable catalysts has been hindered by their extreme oxygen sensitivity. Attempts to improve the enzymes by directed evolution have failed for want of a screening platform capable of throughputs high enough to adequately sample heavily mutated DNA libraries. In vitro compartmentalization (IVC) is a powerful method capable of screening for multiple-turnover enzymatic activity at very high throughputs. Recent advances have allowed [FeFe] hydrogenases to be expressed and activated in the cell-free protein synthesis reactions on which IVC is based; however, IVC is a demanding technique with which many enzymes have proven incompatible. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe an extremely high-throughput IVC screen for oxygen-tolerant [FeFe] hydrogenases. We demonstrate that the [FeFe] hydrogenase CpI can be expressed and activated within emulsion droplets, and identify a fluorogenic substrate that links activity after oxygen exposure to the generation of a fluorescent signal. We present a screening protocol in which attachment of mutant genes and the proteins they encode to the surfaces of microbeads is followed by three separate emulsion steps for amplification, expression, and evaluation of hydrogenase mutants. We show that beads displaying active hydrogenase can be isolated by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting, and we use the method to enrich such beads from a mock library. Conclusions/Significance [FeFe] hydrogenases are the most complex enzymes to be produced by cell-free protein synthesis, and the most challenging targets to which IVC has yet been applied. The technique described here is an enabling step towards the development of biocatalysts for a biological hydrogen economy. PMID:21151915

  16. Hydrogen Formation and Its Regulation in Ruminococcus albus: Involvement of an Electron-Bifurcating [FeFe]-Hydrogenase, of a Non-Electron-Bifurcating [FeFe]-Hydrogenase, and of a Putative Hydrogen-Sensing [FeFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanning; Kahnt, Jörg; Kwon, In Hyuk; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2014-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 7 has played a key role in the development of the concept of interspecies hydrogen transfer. The rumen bacterium ferments glucose to 1.3 acetate, 0.7 ethanol, 2 CO2, and 2.6 H2 when growing in batch culture and to 2 acetate, 2 CO2, and 4 H2 when growing in continuous culture in syntrophic association with H2-consuming microorganisms that keep the H2 partial pressure low. The organism uses NAD+ and ferredoxin for glucose oxidation to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and CO2, NADH for the reduction of acetyl-CoA to ethanol, and NADH and reduced ferredoxin for the reduction of protons to H2. Of all the enzymes involved, only the enzyme catalyzing the formation of H2 from NADH remained unknown. Here, we report that R. albus 7 grown in batch culture on glucose contained, besides a ferredoxin-dependent [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA2), a ferredoxin- and NAD-dependent electron-bifurcating [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydABC) that couples the endergonic formation of H2 from NADH to the exergonic formation of H2 from reduced ferredoxin. Interestingly, hydA2 is adjacent to the hydS gene, which is predicted to encode an [FeFe]-hydrogenase with a C-terminal PAS domain. We showed that hydS and hydA2 are part of a larger transcriptional unit also harboring putative genes for a bifunctional acetaldehyde/ethanol dehydrogenase (Aad), serine/threonine protein kinase, serine/threonine protein phosphatase, and a redox-sensing transcriptional repressor. Since HydA2 and Aad are required only when R. albus grows at high H2 partial pressures, HydS could be a H2-sensing [FeFe]-hydrogenase involved in the regulation of their biosynthesis. PMID:25157086

  17. Hydrogen formation and its regulation in Ruminococcus albus: involvement of an electron-bifurcating [FeFe]-hydrogenase, of a non-electron-bifurcating [FeFe]-hydrogenase, and of a putative hydrogen-sensing [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanning; Kahnt, Jörg; Kwon, In Hyuk; Mackie, Roderick I; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2014-11-01

    Ruminococcus albus 7 has played a key role in the development of the concept of interspecies hydrogen transfer. The rumen bacterium ferments glucose to 1.3 acetate, 0.7 ethanol, 2 CO2, and 2.6 H2 when growing in batch culture and to 2 acetate, 2 CO2, and 4 H2 when growing in continuous culture in syntrophic association with H2-consuming microorganisms that keep the H2 partial pressure low. The organism uses NAD(+) and ferredoxin for glucose oxidation to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and CO2, NADH for the reduction of acetyl-CoA to ethanol, and NADH and reduced ferredoxin for the reduction of protons to H2. Of all the enzymes involved, only the enzyme catalyzing the formation of H2 from NADH remained unknown. Here, we report that R. albus 7 grown in batch culture on glucose contained, besides a ferredoxin-dependent [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA2), a ferredoxin- and NAD-dependent electron-bifurcating [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydABC) that couples the endergonic formation of H2 from NADH to the exergonic formation of H2 from reduced ferredoxin. Interestingly, hydA2 is adjacent to the hydS gene, which is predicted to encode an [FeFe]-hydrogenase with a C-terminal PAS domain. We showed that hydS and hydA2 are part of a larger transcriptional unit also harboring putative genes for a bifunctional acetaldehyde/ethanol dehydrogenase (Aad), serine/threonine protein kinase, serine/threonine protein phosphatase, and a redox-sensing transcriptional repressor. Since HydA2 and Aad are required only when R. albus grows at high H2 partial pressures, HydS could be a H2-sensing [FeFe]-hydrogenase involved in the regulation of their biosynthesis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Elucidating hydrogenase surfaces and tracing the intramolecular tunnels for hydrogenase inhibition in microalgal species

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Kritika; Rahman, Md.Akhlaqur; Nath, Adi; Sundaram, Shanthy

    2016-01-01

    Intramolecular tunnels are majorly attracting attention as possible pathways for entry of inhibitors like oxygen and carbon monoxide to the active sites of the enzymes, hydrogenases. The results of homology modeling of the HydSL protein, a NiFe-hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris are presented in this work. Here we identify and describe molecular tunnels observed in HydSL hydrogenase enzyme systems. The possible determinant of the oxygen stability of already studied hydrogenases could be the lack of several intramolecular tunnels. The possible tunnels were traced out using MOLE 2 software, which showed several intramolecular pathways that may be connecting the active sites of the enzyme. The RMSD value showed a great deal of significance in the enzyme homology. This is the first report of its kind in which mapping of the intramolecular tunnels in the four-hydrogenase enzymes disclosed potential variations between designed models and acknowledged structures. We are seeking out the explanations for oxygen sensitivity of studied hydrogenases within the structure of intramolecular tunnels. Local and Global RMSD (Root mean square deviation) was calculated for models and templates, which showed value of 1.284 indicating a successful homology model. The tunnel tracing study by Mole 2 indicated two tunnels joined into one in C. reinhardtii model whereas C. vulgaris model showed one tunnel almost like two tunnels. Templates of both the A. vinosum and D. vulgaris hydrogenase consisted of six tunnels. For HydSL from Chlamydomonas and Chlorella Species the maximal potential was set to 250 kcal/mol (1,046 kJ/mol) and the positive potential areas were marked. Electrostatic studies define electrostatic potential (ESP) that help shuttle protons to the active site. PMID:28149051

  19. Structure and function of [NiFe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hideaki; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible conversion of molecular hydrogen to protons and electrons via a heterolytic splitting mechanism. The active sites of [NiFe] hydrogenases comprise a dinuclear Ni-Fe center carrying CO and CN(-) ligands. The catalytic activity of the standard (O2-sensitive) [NiFe] hydrogenases vanishes under aerobic conditions. The O2-tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenases can sustain H2 oxidation activity under atmospheric conditions. These hydrogenases have very similar active site structures that change the ligand sphere during the activation/catalytic process. An important structural difference between these hydrogenases has been found for the proximal iron-sulphur cluster located in the vicinity of the active site. This unprecedented [4Fe-3S]-6Cys cluster can supply two electrons, which lead to rapid recovery of the O2 inactivation, to the [NiFe] active site.

  20. The Hyb Hydrogenase Permits Hydrogen-Dependent Respiratory Growth of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane-Khadka, Reena; Kwiatkowski, Andrea; Maier, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contains three distinct respiratory hydrogenases, all of which contribute to virulence. Addition of H2 significantly enhanced the growth rate and yield of S. Typhimurium in an amino acid-containing medium; this occurred with three different terminal respiratory electron acceptors. Based on studies with site-specific double-hydrogenase mutant strains, most of this H2-dependent growth increase was attributed to the Hyb hydrogenase, rather than to the Hya or Hyd respiratory H2-oxidizing enzymes. The wild type strain with H2 had 4.0-fold greater uptake of 14C-labeled amino acids over a period of minutes than did cells incubated without H2. The double-uptake hydrogenase mutant containing only the Hyb hydrogenase transported amino acids H2 dependently like the wild type. The Hyb-only-containing strain produced a membrane potential comparable to that of the wild type. The H2-stimulated amino acid uptake of the wild type and the Hyb-only strain was inhibited by the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but was less affected by the ATP synthase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate. In the wild type, proteins TonB and ExbD, which are known to couple proton motive force (PMF) to transport processes, were induced by H2 exposure, as were the genes corresponding to these periplasmic PMF-coupling factors. However, studies on tonB and exbD single mutant strains could not confirm a major role for these proteins in amino acid transport. The results link H2 oxidation via the Hyb enzyme to growth, amino acid transport, and expression of periplasmic proteins that facilitate PMF-mediated transport across the outer membrane. PMID:21157514

  1. [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Abundance and Diversity along a Vertical Redox Gradient in Great Salt Lake, USA

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Swanson, Kevin D.; Howells, Alta E.; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Meuser, Jonathan E.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Peters, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes for the biotechnological production of H2 or other reduced products has been limited by their sensitivity to oxygen (O2). Here, we apply a PCR-directed approach to determine the distribution, abundance, and diversity of hydA gene fragments along co-varying salinity and O2 gradients in a vertical water column of Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT. The distribution of hydA was constrained to water column transects that had high salt and relatively low O2 concentrations. Recovered HydA deduced amino acid sequences were enriched in hydrophilic amino acids relative to HydA from less saline environments. In addition, they harbored interesting variations in the amino acid environment of the complex H-cluster metalloenzyme active site and putative gas transfer channels that may be important for both H2 transfer and O2 susceptibility. A phylogenetic framework was created to infer the accessory cluster composition and quaternary structure of recovered HydA protein sequences based on phylogenetic relationships and the gene contexts of known complete HydA sequences. Numerous recovered HydA are predicted to harbor multiple N- and C-terminal accessory iron-sulfur cluster binding domains and are likely to exist as multisubunit complexes. This study indicates an important role for [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the functioning of the GSL ecosystem and provides new target genes and variants for use in identifying O2 tolerant enzymes for biotechnological applications. PMID:25464382

  2. The surprising diversity of clostridial hydrogenases: a comparative genomic perspective.

    PubMed

    Calusinska, Magdalena; Happe, Thomas; Joris, Bernard; Wilmotte, Annick

    2010-06-01

    Among the large variety of micro-organisms capable of fermentative hydrogen production, strict anaerobes such as members of the genus Clostridium are the most widely studied. They can produce hydrogen by a reversible reduction of protons accumulated during fermentation to dihydrogen, a reaction which is catalysed by hydrogenases. Sequenced genomes provide completely new insights into the diversity of clostridial hydrogenases. Building on previous reports, we found that [FeFe] hydrogenases are not a homogeneous group of enzymes, but exist in multiple forms with different modular structures and are especially abundant in members of the genus Clostridium. This unusual diversity seems to support the central role of hydrogenases in cell metabolism. In particular, the presence of multiple putative operons encoding multisubunit [FeFe] hydrogenases highlights the fact that hydrogen metabolism is very complex in this genus. In contrast with [FeFe] hydrogenases, their [NiFe] hydrogenase counterparts, widely represented in other bacteria and archaea, are found in only a few clostridial species. Surprisingly, a heteromultimeric Ech hydrogenase, known to be an energy-converting [NiFe] hydrogenase and previously described only in methanogenic archaea and some sulfur-reducing bacteria, was found to be encoded by the genomes of four cellulolytic strains: Clostridum cellulolyticum, Clostridum papyrosolvens, Clostridum thermocellum and Clostridum phytofermentans.

  3. RAPD analysis and sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 and Fe-hydrogenase as tools for genetic classification of potentially pathogenic isolates of Trichomonas gallinae.

    PubMed

    Sansano-Maestre, José; Martínez-Herrero, María Del Carmen; Garijo-Toledo, María Magdalena; Gómez-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Trichomonas gallinae is a worldwide parasite that causes oropharyngeal avian trichomonosis. During eight years, 60 axenic isolates were obtained from different bird species and characterized by three molecular methods: RAPD analysis and PCR-sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 fragment and Fe-hydrogenase gene. We have found two genotypes of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 widely distributed among bird populations, a new variant and also two sequences with mixed pattern. Genotype ITS-OBT-Tg-1 was associated with the presence of gross lesions in birds. We have found eight genotypes of the Fe-hydrogenase (A1, A2, C2, C2.1, C4, C5, C6 and C7), three of them are new reports (C5, C6 and C7), and also three sequences with mixed pattern. Subtype A1 of the Fe-hydrogenase was also related with the presence of lesions. RAPD analyses included most of the strains isolated from animals with lesions in one of the sub-clusters. Potentially pathogenic isolates of T. gallinae obtained in this study fulfill the following criteria with one exception: isolated from lesions+ITS-OBT-Tg-1 genotype+FeHyd A1+RAPD sub-cluster I2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of anaerobic regulatory mutations and catabolite repression on regulation of hydrogen metabolism and hydrogenase isoenzyme composition in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, D J; Sawers, R G; Rugman, P A; Boxer, D H; Higgins, C F

    1986-10-01

    Hydrogen metabolism in Salmonella typhimurium is differentially regulated by mutations in the two anaerobic regulatory pathways, defined by the fnr (oxrA) and oxrC genes, and is controlled by catabolite repression. The synthesis of the individual hydrogenase isoenzymes is also specifically influenced by fnr and oxrC mutations and by catabolite repression in a manner entirely consistent with the proposed role for each isoenzyme in hydrogen metabolism. Synthesis of hydrogenase isoenzyme 2 was found to be fnr dependent and oxrC independent, consistent with a role in respiration-linked hydrogen uptake which was shown to be similarly regulated. Also in keeping with such a respiratory role was the finding that both hydrogen uptake and the expression of isoenzyme 2 are under catabolite repression. In contrast, formate hydrogenlyase-dependent hydrogen evolution, characteristic of fermentative growth, was reduced in oxrC strains but not in fnr strains. Hydrogenase 3 activity was similarly regulated, consistent with a role in hydrogen evolution. Unlike the expression of hydrogenases 2 and 3, hydrogenase 1 expression was both fnr and oxrC dependent. Hydrogen uptake during fermentative growth was also both fnr and oxrC dependent. This provided good evidence for a distinction between hydrogen uptake during fermentation- and respiration-dependent growth and for a hydrogen-recycling process. The pattern of anaerobic control of hydrogenase activities illustrated the functional diversity of the isoenzymes and, in addition, the physiological distinction between the two anaerobic regulatory pathways, anaerobic respiratory genes being fnr dependent and enzymes required during fermentative growth being oxrC dependent.

  5. A Bacterial Electron-bifurcating Hydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Schuchmann, Kai; Müller, Volker

    2012-01-01

    The Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of anaerobic CO2 fixation with hydrogen as reductant is considered a candidate for the first life-sustaining pathway on earth because it combines carbon dioxide fixation with the synthesis of ATP via a chemiosmotic mechanism. The acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii uses an ancient version of the pathway that has only one site to generate the electrochemical ion potential used to drive ATP synthesis, the ferredoxin-fueled, sodium-motive Rnf complex. However, hydrogen-based ferredoxin reduction is endergonic, and how the steep energy barrier is overcome has been an enigma for a long time. We have purified a multimeric [FeFe]-hydrogenase from A. woodii containing four subunits (HydABCD) which is predicted to have one [H]-cluster, three [2Fe2S]-, and six [4Fe4S]-clusters consistent with the experimental determination of 32 mol of Fe and 30 mol of acid-labile sulfur. The enzyme indeed catalyzed hydrogen-based ferredoxin reduction, but required NAD+ for this reaction. NAD+ was also reduced but only in the presence of ferredoxin. NAD+ and ferredoxin reduction both required flavin. Spectroscopic analyses revealed that NAD+ and ferredoxin reduction are strictly coupled and that they are reduced in a 1:1 stoichiometry. Apparently, the multimeric hydrogenase of A. woodii is a soluble energy-converting hydrogenase that uses electron bifurcation to drive the endergonic ferredoxin reduction by coupling it to the exergonic NAD+ reduction. PMID:22810230

  6. Insights into [FeFe]-hydrogenase structure, mechanism, and maturation.

    PubMed

    Mulder, David W; Shepard, Eric M; Meuser, Jonathan E; Joshi, Neelambari; King, Paul W; Posewitz, Matthew C; Broderick, Joan B; Peters, John W

    2011-08-10

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that are key to energy metabolism in a variety of microbial communities. Divided into three classes based on their metal content, the [Fe]-, [FeFe]-, and [NiFe]-hydrogenases are evolutionarily unrelated but share similar nonprotein ligand assemblies at their active site metal centers that are not observed elsewhere in biology. These nonprotein ligands are critical in tuning enzyme reactivity, and their synthesis and incorporation into the active site clusters require a number of specific maturation enzymes. The wealth of structural information on different classes and different states of hydrogenase enzymes, biosynthetic intermediates, and maturation enzymes has contributed significantly to understanding the biochemistry of hydrogen metabolism. This review highlights the unique structural features of hydrogenases and emphasizes the recent biochemical and structural work that has created a clearer picture of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase maturation pathway.

  7. Gene expression by the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough grown on an iron electrode under cathodic protection conditions.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Sean M; Park, Hyung Soo; Been, Jenny; Gordon, Paul; Sensen, Christoph W; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2008-04-01

    The genome sequence of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was reanalyzed to design unique 70-mer oligonucleotide probes against 2,824 probable protein-coding regions. These included three genes not previously annotated, including one that encodes a c-type cytochrome. Using microarrays printed with these 70-mer probes, we analyzed the gene expression profile of wild-type D. vulgaris grown on cathodic hydrogen, generated at an iron electrode surface with an imposed negative potential of -1.1 V (cathodic protection conditions). The gene expression profile of cells grown on cathodic hydrogen was compared to that of cells grown with gaseous hydrogen bubbling through the culture. Relative to the latter, the electrode-grown cells overexpressed two hydrogenases, the hyn-1 genes for [NiFe] hydrogenase 1 and the hyd genes, encoding [Fe] hydrogenase. The hmc genes for the high-molecular-weight cytochrome complex, which allows electron flow from the hydrogenases across the cytoplasmic membrane, were also overexpressed. In contrast, cells grown on gaseous hydrogen overexpressed the hys genes for [NiFeSe] hydrogenase. Cells growing on the electrode also overexpressed genes encoding proteins which promote biofilm formation. Although the gene expression profiles for these two modes of growth were distinct, they were more closely related to each other than to that for cells grown in a lactate- and sulfate-containing medium. Electrochemically measured corrosion rates were lower for iron electrodes covered with hyn-1, hyd, and hmc mutant biofilms than for wild-type biofilms. This confirms the importance, suggested by the gene expression studies, of the corresponding gene products in D. vulgaris-mediated iron corrosion.

  8. Activation of formate hydrogen-lyase via expression of uptake [NiFe]-hydrogenase in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3).

    PubMed

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-09-22

    Several recent studies have reported successful hydrogen (H2) production achieved via recombinant expression of uptake [NiFe]-hydrogenases from Hydrogenovibrio marinus, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and Escherichia coli (hydrogenase-1) in E. coli BL21(DE3), a strain that lacks H2-evolving activity. However, there are some unclear points that do not support the conclusion that the recombinant hydrogenases are responsible for the in vivo H2 production. Unlike wild-type BL21(DE3), the recombinant BL21(DE3) strains possessed formate hydrogen-lyase (FHL) activities. Through experiments using fdhF (formate dehydrogenase-H) or hycE (hydrogenase-3) mutants, it was shown that H2 production was almost exclusively dependent on FHL. Upon expression of hydrogenase, extracellular formate concentration was changed even in the mutant strains lacking FHL, indicating that formate metabolism other than FHL was also affected. The two subunits of H. marinus uptake [NiFe]-hydrogenase could activate FHL independently of each other, implying the presence of more than two different mechanisms for FHL activation in BL21(DE3). It was also revealed that the signal peptide in the small subunit was essential for activation of FHL via the small subunit. Herein, we demonstrated that the production of H2 was indeed induced via native FHL activated by the expression of recombinant hydrogenases. The recombinant strains with [NiFe]-hydrogenase appear to be unsuitable for practical in vivo H2 production due to their relatively low H2 yields and productivities. We suggest that an improved H2-producing cell factory could be designed by constructing a well characterized and overproduced synthetic H2 pathway and fully activating the native FHL in BL21(DE3).

  9. Development of a Rhodobacter capsulatus self-reporting model system for optimizing light-dependent, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-driven H2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Wecker, Matt S. A.; Beaton, Stephen E.; Chado, Robert A.; Ghirardi, Maria L.

    2016-08-17

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus normally photoproduces H2 as a by-product of its nitrogenase-catalyzed nitrogen-fixing activity. Such H2 production, however, is expensive from a metabolic perspective, requiring nearly four times as many photons as the equivalent algal hydrogenase-based system. Here we report the insertion of a Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase and its three attendant hydrogenase assembly proteins into an R. capsulatus strain lacking its native uptake hydrogenase. Further, this strain is modified to fluoresce upon sensing H2. The resulting strain photoproduces H2 and self-reports its own H2 production through fluorescence. Furthermore, this model system represents a unique method of developing hydrogenase-based H2 production in R. capsulatus, may serve as a powerful system for in vivo directed evolution of hydrogenases and hydrogenase-associated genes, and provides a means of screening for increased metabolic production of H2.

  10. Development of a Rhodobacter capsulatus self-reporting model system for optimizing light-dependent, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-driven H2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Wecker, Matt S. A.; Beaton, Stephen E.; Chado, Robert A.; Ghirardi, Maria L.

    2016-08-17

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus normally photoproduces H2 as a by-product of its nitrogenase-catalyzed nitrogen-fixing activity. Such H2 production, however, is expensive from a metabolic perspective, requiring nearly four times as many photons as the equivalent algal hydrogenase-based system. Here we report the insertion of a Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase and its three attendant hydrogenase assembly proteins into an R. capsulatus strain lacking its native uptake hydrogenase. Further, this strain is modified to fluoresce upon sensing H2. The resulting strain photoproduces H2 and self-reports its own H2 production through fluorescence. Furthermore, this model system represents a unique method of developing hydrogenase-based H2 production in R. capsulatus, may serve as a powerful system for in vivo directed evolution of hydrogenases and hydrogenase-associated genes, and provides a means of screening for increased metabolic production of H2.

  11. Development of a Rhodobacter capsulatus self-reporting model system for optimizing light-dependent, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-driven H 2 production: A Model System for Optimizing H 2 Production

    DOE PAGES

    Wecker, Matt S. A.; Beaton, Stephen E.; Chado, Robert A.; ...

    2016-08-23

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus normally photoproduces H2 as a by-product of its nitrogenase-catalyzed nitrogen-fixing activity. Such H2 production, however, is expensive from a metabolic perspective, requiring nearly four times as many photons as the equivalent algal hydrogenase-based system (Ghirardi et al. 2009). Here we report the insertion of a Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase and its three attendant hydrogenase assembly proteins into an R. capsulatus strain lacking its native uptake hydrogenase. Further, this strain is modified to fluoresce upon sensing H2. The resulting strain photoproduces H2 and self-reports its own H2 production through fluorescence. This model system represents a unique methodmore » of developing hydrogenase-based H2 production in R. capsulatus, may serve as a powerful system for in vivo directed evolution of hydrogenases and hydrogenase-associated genes, and provides a means of screening for increased metabolic production of H2.« less

  12. Initial cloning and sequencing of hydHG, an operon homologous to ntrBC and regulating the labile hydrogenase activity in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Stoker, K; Reijnders, W N; Oltmann, L F; Stouthamer, A H

    1989-01-01

    To isolate genes from Escherichia coli which regulate the labile hydrogenase activity, a plasmid library was used to transform hydL mutants lacking the labile hydrogenase. A single type of gene, designated hydG, was isolated. This gene also partially restored the hydrogenase activity in hydF mutants (which are defective in all hydrogenase isoenzymes), although the low hydrogenase 1 and 2 levels were not induced. Therefore, hydG apparently regulates, specifically, the labile hydrogenase activity. Restoration of this latter activity in hydF mutants was accompanied by a proportional increase of the H2 uptake activity, suggesting a functional relationship. H2:fumarate oxidoreductase activity was not restored in complemented hydL mutants. These latter strains may therefore lack, in addition to the labile hydrogenase, a second component (provisionally designated component R), possibly an electron carrier coupling H2 oxidation to the anerobic respiratory chain. Sequence analysis showed an open reading frame of 1,314 base pairs for hydG. It was preceded by a ribosome-binding site but apparently lacked a promoter. Minicell experiments revealed a single polypeptide of approximately 50 kilodaltons. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence with a protein sequence data base revealed strong homology to NtrC from Klebsiella pneumoniae, a DNA-binding transcriptional activator. The 411 base pairs upstream from pHG40 contained a second open reading frame overlapping hydG by four bases. The deduced amino acid sequence showed considerable homology with the C-terminal part of NtrB. This sequence was therefore assumed to be part of a second gene, encoding the NtrB-like component, and was designated hydH. The labile hydrogenase activity in E. coli is apparently regulated by a multicomponent system analogous to the NtrB-NtrC system. This conclusion is in agreement with the results of Birkmann et al. (A. Birkmann, R. G. Sawers, and A. Böck, Mol. Gen. Genet. 210:535-542, 1987), who

  13. Gene Expression by the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Grown on an Iron Electrode under Cathodic Protection Conditions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung Soo; Been, Jenny; Gordon, Paul; Sensen, Christoph W.; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2008-01-01

    The genome sequence of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was reanalyzed to design unique 70-mer oligonucleotide probes against 2,824 probable protein-coding regions. These included three genes not previously annotated, including one that encodes a c-type cytochrome. Using microarrays printed with these 70-mer probes, we analyzed the gene expression profile of wild-type D. vulgaris grown on cathodic hydrogen, generated at an iron electrode surface with an imposed negative potential of −1.1 V (cathodic protection conditions). The gene expression profile of cells grown on cathodic hydrogen was compared to that of cells grown with gaseous hydrogen bubbling through the culture. Relative to the latter, the electrode-grown cells overexpressed two hydrogenases, the hyn-1 genes for [NiFe] hydrogenase 1 and the hyd genes, encoding [Fe] hydrogenase. The hmc genes for the high-molecular-weight cytochrome complex, which allows electron flow from the hydrogenases across the cytoplasmic membrane, were also overexpressed. In contrast, cells grown on gaseous hydrogen overexpressed the hys genes for [NiFeSe] hydrogenase. Cells growing on the electrode also overexpressed genes encoding proteins which promote biofilm formation. Although the gene expression profiles for these two modes of growth were distinct, they were more closely related to each other than to that for cells grown in a lactate- and sulfate-containing medium. Electrochemically measured corrosion rates were lower for iron electrodes covered with hyn-1, hyd, and hmc mutant biofilms than for wild-type biofilms. This confirms the importance, suggested by the gene expression studies, of the corresponding gene products in D. vulgaris-mediated iron corrosion. PMID:18310429

  14. Activity-Based Screening of Metagenomic Libraries for Hydrogenase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Adam, Nicole; Perner, Mirjam

    2017-01-01

    Here we outline how to identify hydrogenase enzymes from metagenomic libraries through an activity-based screening approach. A metagenomic fosmid library is constructed in E. coli and the fosmids are transferred into a hydrogenase deletion mutant of Shewanella oneidensis (ΔhyaB) via triparental mating. If a fosmid exhibits hydrogen uptake activity, S. oneidensis' phenotype is restored and hydrogenase activity is indicated by a color change of the medium from yellow to colorless. This new method enables screening of 48 metagenomic fosmid clones in parallel.

  15. Hydrogenase in actinorhizal root nodules and root nodule homogenates.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, D R; Arp, D J; Burris, R H

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogenases were measured in intact actinorhizal root nodules and from disrupted nodules of Alnus glutinosa, Alnus rhombifolia, Alnus rubra, and Myrica pensylvanica. Whole nodules took up H2 in an O2-dependent reaction. Endophyte preparations oxidized H2 through the oxyhydrogen reaction, but rates were enhanced when hydrogen uptake was coupled to artificial electron acceptors. Oxygen inhibited artifical acceptor-dependent H2 uptake. The hydrogenase system from M. pensylvanica had a different pattern of coupling to various electron acceptors than the hydrogenase systems from the alders; only the bayberry system evolved H2 from reduced viologen dyes. PMID:6989799

  16. Comparison of carbon materials as electrodes for enzyme electrocatalysis: hydrogenase as a case study.

    PubMed

    Quinson, Jonathan; Hidalgo, Ricardo; Ash, Philip A; Dillon, Frank; Grobert, Nicole; Vincent, Kylie A

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of electrocatalysis by an enzyme adsorbed on a range of carbon materials, with different size, surface area, morphology and graphitic structure, which are either commercially available or prepared via simple, established protocols. We choose as our model enzyme the hydrogenase I from E. coli (Hyd-1), which is an active catalyst for H2 oxidation, is relatively robust and has been demonstrated in H2 fuel cells and H2-driven chemical synthesis. The carbon materials were characterised according to their surface area, surface morphology and graphitic character, and we use the electrocatalytic H2 oxidation current for Hyd-1 adsorbed on these materials to evaluate their effectiveness as enzyme electrodes. Here, we show that a variety of carbon materials are suitable for adsorbing hydrogenases in an electroactive configuration. This unified study provides insight into selection and design of carbon materials for study of redox enzymes and different applications of enzyme electrocatalysis.

  17. Genetic Analysis of the Hox Hydrogenase in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Reveals Subunit Roles in Association, Assembly, Maturation, and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Carrie; Boehm, Marko; Carrieri, Damian; Yu, Jianping; Dubini, Alexandra; Nixon, Peter J.; Maness, Pin-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that catalyze 2H+ + 2e− ↔ H2. A multisubunit, bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase has been identified and characterized in a number of bacteria, including cyanobacteria, where it is hypothesized to function as an electron valve, balancing reductant in the cell. In cyanobacteria, this Hox hydrogenase consists of five proteins in two functional moieties: a hydrogenase moiety (HoxYH) with homology to heterodimeric [NiFe]-hydrogenases and a diaphorase moiety (HoxEFU) with homology to NuoEFG of respiratory Complex I, linking NAD(P)H ↔ NAD(P)+ as a source/sink for electrons. Here, we present an extensive study of Hox hydrogenase in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We identify the presence of HoxEFUYH, HoxFUYH, HoxEFU, HoxFU, and HoxYH subcomplexes as well as association of the immature, unprocessed large subunit (HoxH) with other Hox subunits and unidentified factors, providing a basis for understanding Hox maturation and assembly. The analysis of mutants containing individual and combined hox gene deletions in a common parental strain reveals apparent alterations in subunit abundance and highlights an essential role for HoxF and HoxU in complex/subcomplex association. In addition, analysis of individual and combined hox mutant phenotypes in a single strain background provides a clear view of the function of each subunit in hydrogenase activity and presents evidence that its physiological function is more complicated than previously reported, with no outward defects apparent in growth or photosynthesis under various growth conditions. PMID:23139416

  18. Role of HoxE subunit in Synechocystis PCC6803 hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Aubert-Jousset, Emeline; Cano, Melissa; Guedeney, Geneviève; Richaud, Pierre; Cournac, Laurent

    2011-11-01

    Cyanobacterial NAD(P)(+)-reducing reversible hydrogenases comprise five subunits. Four of them (HoxF, HoxU, HoxY, and HoxH) are also found in the well-described related enzyme from Ralstonia eutropha. The fifth one (HoxE) is not encoded in the R. eutropha genome, but shares homology with the N-terminal part of R. eutropha HoxF. However, in cyanobacteria, HoxE contains a 2Fe-2S cluster-binding motif that is not found in the related R. eutropha sequence. In order to obtain some insights into the role of HoxE in cyanobacteria, we deleted this subunit in Synechocystis PCC6803. Three types of interaction of the cyanobacterial hydrogenase with pyridine nucleotides were tested: (a) reductive activation of the NiFe site, for which NADPH was found to be more efficient than NADH; (b) H(2) production, for which NADH appeared to be a more efficient electron donor than NADPH; and (c) H(2) oxidation, for which NAD(+) was a much better electron acceptor than NADP(+). Upon hoxE deletion, the Synechocystis hydrogenase active site remained functional with artificial electron donors or acceptors, but the enzyme became unable to catalyze H(2) production or uptake with NADH/NAD(+). However, activation of the electron transfer-independent H/D exchange reaction by NADPH was still observed in the absence of HoxE, whereas activation of this reaction by NADH was lost. These data suggest different mechanisms for diaphorase-mediated electron donation and catalytic site activation in cyanobacterial hydrogenase. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  19. Alpha proteobacterial ancestry of the [Fe-Fe]-hydrogenases in anaerobic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Degli Esposti, Mauro; Cortez, Diego; Lozano, Luis; Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Martinez Romero, Esperanza

    2016-07-30

    Eukaryogenesis, a major transition in evolution of life, originated from the symbiogenic fusion of an archaea with a metabolically versatile bacterium. By general consensus, the latter organism belonged to α proteobacteria, subsequently evolving into the mitochondrial organelle of our cells. The consensus is based upon genetic and metabolic similarities between mitochondria and aerobic α proteobacteria but fails to explain the origin of several enzymes found in the mitochondria-derived organelles of anaerobic eukaryotes such as Trichomonas and Entamoeba. These enzymes are thought to derive from bacterial lineages other than α proteobacteria, e.g., Clostridium - an obligate anaerobe. [FeFe]-hydrogenase constitues the characteristic enzyme of this anaerobic metabolism and is present in different types also in Entamoeba and other anaerobic eukaryotes. Here we show that α proteobacteria derived from metagenomic studies possess both the cytosolic and organellar type of [FeFe]-hydrogenase, as well as all the proteins required for hydrogenase maturation. These organisms are related to cultivated members of the Rhodospirillales order previously suggested to be close relatives of mitochondrial ancestors. For the first time, our evidence supports an α proteobacterial ancestry for both the anaerobic and the aerobic metabolism of eukaryotes. This article was reviewed by William Martin and Nick Lane, both suggested by the Authors.

  20. Photosensitized Production of Hydrogen by Hydrogenase in Reversed Micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilhorst, Riet; Laane, Colja; Veeger, Cees

    1982-06-01

    Hydrogenase (hydrogen:ferricytochrome c3 oxidoreductase, EC 1.12.2.1) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris was encapsulated in reversed micelles with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as surfactant and a chloroform/octane mixture as solvent. Reducing equivalents for hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production were provided by vectorial photosensitized electron transfer from a donor (thiophenol) in the organic phase through a surfactant-Ru2+ sensitizer located in the interphase to methyl viologen concentrated in the aqueous core of the reversed micelle. The results show that reversed micelles provide a microenvironment that (i) stabilizes hydrogenase against inactivation and (ii) allows an efficient vectorial photosensitized electron and proton flow from the organic phase to hydrogenase in the aqueous phase.

  1. Transcription and Regulation of the Bidirectional Hydrogenase in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120▿

    PubMed Central

    Sjöholm, Johannes; Oliveira, Paulo; Lindblad, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The filamentous, heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 (Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120) possesses an uptake hydrogenase and a bidirectional enzyme, the latter being capable of catalyzing both H2 production and evolution. The completely sequenced genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 reveals that the five structural genes encoding the bidirectional hydrogenase (hoxEFUYH) are separated in two clusters at a distance of approximately 8.8 kb. The transcription of the hox genes was examined under nitrogen-fixing conditions, and the results demonstrate that the cluster containing hoxE and hoxF can be transcribed as one polycistronic unit together with the open reading frame alr0750. The second cluster, containing hoxU, hoxY, and hoxH, is transcribed together with alr0763 and alr0765, located between the hox genes. Moreover, alr0760 and alr0761 form an additional larger operon. Nevertheless, Northern blot hybridizations revealed a rather complex transcription pattern in which the different hox genes are expressed differently. Transcriptional start points (TSPs) were identified 66 and 57 bp upstream from the start codon of alr0750 and hoxU, respectively. The transcriptions of the two clusters containing the hox genes are both induced under anaerobic conditions concomitantly with the induction of a higher level of hydrogenase activity. An additional TSP, within the annotated alr0760, 244 bp downstream from the suggested translation start codon, was identified. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified LexA from Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 demonstrated specific interactions between the transcriptional regulator and both hox promoter regions. However, when LexA from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was used, the purified protein interacted only with the promoter region of the alr0750-hoxE-hoxF operon. A search of the whole Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 genome demonstrated the presence of 216 putative LexA binding sites in total, including recA and rec

  2. Hydrogenases in sulfate-reducing bacteria function as chromium reductase.

    PubMed

    Chardin, B; Giudici-Orticoni, M-T; De Luca, G; Guigliarelli, B; Bruschi, M

    2003-12-01

    The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to reduce chromate VI has been studied for possible application to the decontamination of polluted environments. Metal reduction can be achieved both chemically, by H(2)S produced by the bacteria, and enzymatically, by polyhemic cytochromes c(3). We demonstrate that, in addition to low potential polyheme c-type cytochromes, the ability to reduce chromate is widespread among [Fe], [NiFe], and [NiFeSe] hydrogenases isolated from SRB of the genera Desulfovibrio and Desulfomicrobium. Among them, the [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough reduces Cr(VI) with the highest rate. Both [Fe] and [NiFeSe] enzymes exhibit the same K(m) towards Cr(VI), suggesting that Cr(VI) reduction rates are directly correlated with hydrogen consumption rates. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy enabled us to probe the oxidation by Cr(VI) of the various metal centers in both [NiFe] and [Fe] hydrogenases. These experiments showed that Cr(VI) is reduced to paramagnetic Cr(III), and revealed inhibition of the enzyme at high Cr(VI) concentrations. The significant decrease of both hydrogenase and Cr(VI)-reductase activities in a mutant lacking [Fe] hydrogenase demonstrated the involvement of this enzyme in Cr(VI) reduction in vivo. Experiments with [3Fe-4S] ferredoxin from Desulfovibrio gigas demonstrated that the low redox [Fe-S] (non-heme iron) clusters are involved in the mechanism of metal reduction by hydrogenases.

  3. Stepwise [FeFe]-hydrogenase H-cluster assembly revealed in the structure of HydA(DeltaEFG).

    PubMed

    Mulder, David W; Boyd, Eric S; Sarma, Ranjana; Lange, Rachel K; Endrizzi, James A; Broderick, Joan B; Peters, John W

    2010-05-13

    Complex enzymes containing Fe-S clusters are ubiquitous in nature, where they are involved in a number of fundamental processes including carbon dioxide fixation, nitrogen fixation and hydrogen metabolism. Hydrogen metabolism is facilitated by the activity of three evolutionarily and structurally unrelated enzymes: the [NiFe]-hydrogenases, [FeFe]-hydrogenases and [Fe]-hydrogenases (Hmd). The catalytic core of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA), termed the H-cluster, exists as a [4Fe-4S] subcluster linked by a cysteine thiolate to a modified 2Fe subcluster with unique non-protein ligands. The 2Fe subcluster and non-protein ligands are synthesized by the hydrogenase maturation enzymes HydE, HydF and HydG; however, the mechanism, synthesis and means of insertion of H-cluster components remain unclear. Here we show the structure of HydA(DeltaEFG) (HydA expressed in a genetic background devoid of the active site H-cluster biosynthetic genes hydE, hydF and hydG) revealing the presence of a [4Fe-4S] cluster and an open pocket for the 2Fe subcluster. The structure indicates that H-cluster synthesis occurs in a stepwise manner, first with synthesis and insertion of the [4Fe-4S] subcluster by generalized host-cell machinery and then with synthesis and insertion of the 2Fe subcluster by specialized hydE-, hydF- and hydG-encoded maturation machinery. Insertion of the 2Fe subcluster presumably occurs through a cationically charged channel that collapses following incorporation, as a result of conformational changes in two conserved loop regions. The structure, together with phylogenetic analysis, indicates that HydA emerged within bacteria most likely from a Nar1-like ancestor lacking the 2Fe subcluster, and that this was followed by acquisition in several unicellular eukaryotes.

  4. The NiFe Hydrogenases of the Tetrachloroethene-Respiring Epsilonproteobacterium Sulfurospirillum multivorans: Biochemical Studies and Transcription Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Stefan; Goris, Tobias; Wolf, Maria; Wei, Xi; Diekert, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    The organohalide-respiring Epsilonproteobacterium Sulfurospirillum multivorans is able to grow with hydrogen as electron donor and with tetrachloroethene (PCE) as electron acceptor; PCE is reductively dechlorinated to cis-1,2-dichloroethene. Recently, a genomic survey revealed the presence of four gene clusters encoding NiFe hydrogenases in its genome, one of which is presumably periplasmic and membrane-bound (MBH), whereas the remaining three are cytoplasmic. To explore the role and regulation of the four hydrogenases, quantitative real-time PCR and biochemical studies were performed with S. multivorans cells grown under different growth conditions. The large subunit genes of the MBH and of a cytoplasmic group 4 hydrogenase, which is assumed to be membrane-associated, show high transcript levels under nearly all growth conditions tested, pointing toward a constitutive expression in S. multivorans. The gene transcripts encoding the large subunits of the other two hydrogenases were either not detected at all or only present at very low amounts. The presence of MBH under all growth conditions tested, even with oxygen as electron acceptor under microoxic conditions, indicates that MBH gene transcription is not regulated in contrast to other facultative hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. The MBH showed quinone-reactivity and a characteristic UV/VIS spectrum implying a cytochrome b as membrane-integral subunit. Cell extracts of S. multivorans were subjected to native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and hydrogen oxidizing activity was tested by native staining. Only one band was detected at about 270 kDa in the particulate fraction of the extracts, indicating that there is only one hydrogen-oxidizing enzyme present in S. multivorans. An enrichment of this enzyme and SDS PAGE revealed a subunit composition corresponding to that of the MBH. From these findings we conclude that the MBH is the electron-donating enzyme system in the PCE respiratory chain. The roles for

  5. Structure of an Actinobacterial-Type [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Reveals Insight into O2-Tolerant H2 Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Caspar; Bommer, Martin; Hennig, Sandra E; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dobbek, Holger; Lenz, Oliver

    2016-02-02

    A novel group of bacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenases is responsible for high-affinity H2 uptake from the troposphere, and is therefore thought to play an important role in the global H2 cycle. Here we present the first crystal structure at 2.85-Å resolution of such an actinobacterial-type hydrogenase (AH), which was isolated from the dihydrogen oxidizing bacterium, Ralstonia eutropha. The enzyme has a dimeric structure carrying two active [NiFe] sites that are interconnected by six [4Fe4S] clusters over a range of approximately 90 Å. Unlike most other [NiFe]-hydrogenases, the [4Fe4S] cluster proximal to the [NiFe] site is coordinated by three cysteines and one aspartate. Mutagenesis experiments revealed that this aspartate residue is related to the apparent O2 insensitivity of the AH. Our data provide first structural insight into specialized hydrogenases that are supposed to consume atmospheric H2 under challenging conditions, i.e. at high O2 concentration and wide temperature and pH ranges.

  6. Characterization of the nickel-iron periplasmic hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans.

    PubMed

    Hatchikian, C E; Traore, A S; Fernandez, V M; Cammack, R

    1990-02-14

    The periplasmic hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans grown on fructose/sulfate medium was purified to homogeneity. It exhibits a molecular mass of 88 kDa and is composed of two different subunits of 60 kDa and 28.5 kDa. The absorption spectrum of the enzyme is characteristic of an iron-sulfur protein and its absorption coefficients at 400 and 280 nm are 50 and 180 mM-1 cm-1, respectively. D. fructosovorans hydrogenase contains 11 +/- 1 iron atoms, 0.9 +/- 0.15 nickel atom and 12 +/- 1 acid-labile sulfur atoms/molecule but does not contain selenium. The amino acid composition of the protein and of its subunits, as well as the N-terminal sequences of the small and large subunits, have been determined. The cysteine residues of the protein are distributed between the large (9 residues) and the small subunits (11 residues). Electron spin resonance (ESR) properties of the enzyme are consistent with the presence of nickel(III), [3Fe-4S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters. The hydrogenase of D. fructosovorans isolated under aerobic conditions required an incubation with hydrogen or other reductants in order to express its full catalytic activity. H2 uptake and H2 evolution activities doubled after a 3-h incubation under reducing conditions. Comparison with the (NiFe) hydrogenase from D. gigas shows great structural similarities between the two proteins. However, there are significant differences between the catalytic properties of the two enzymes which can be related to the respective state of their nickel atom. ESR showed a higher proportion of the Ni-B species (g = 2.33, 2.16, 2.01) which can be related to a more facile conversion to the ready state. The periplasmic location of the enzyme and the presence of hydrogenase activity in other cellular compartments are discussed in relation to the ability of D. fructosovorans to participate actively in interspecies hydrogen transfer.

  7. Exploring the microbially-mediated soil H2 sink: A lab-based study of the physiology and related H2 consumption of isolates from the Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D.; Meredith, L. K.; Bosak, T.; Hansel, C. M.; Ono, S.; Prinn, R. G.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric hydrogen (H2) is a secondary greenhouse gas because it attenuates the removal of methane (CH4) from the atmosphere. The largest and most uncertain term in the H2 biogeochemical cycle, microbe-mediated soil uptake, is responsible for about 80% of Earth's tropospheric H2 sink. Recently, the first H2-oxidizing soil microorganisms were discovered (genus Streptomyces) whose low-threshold, high-affinity NiFe-hydrogenase functions at ambient H2 levels (approx. 530 ppb). To better understand the ecological function of this hydrogenase, we conducted a controlled laboratory study of the H2 uptake behavior in accordance with the complex life cycle development of the streptomycetes. Several strains of the genus Streptomyces containing a high-affinity NiFe- hydrogenase were isolated from soil at the Harvard Forest. The presence of this hydrogenase, detected by PCR amplification of the hydrogenase large subunit, predicted H2 uptake behavior in wild-type streptomycetes and in phylogenetically different organisms containing more distantly related versions of the gene. H2 uptake depended on the streptomyces' life cycle, reaching a maximum during spore formation. These findings reveal connections between environmental conditions, organismal life cycle, and H2 uptake. With the rise of H2-based energy sources and a potential change in the tropospheric concentration of H2, understanding the sources and sinks of this trace gas is important for the future.

  8. Nucleotide sequence of the genetic loci encoding subunits of Bradyrhizobium japonicum uptake hydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Sayavedra-Soto, L A; Powell, G K; Evans, H J; Morris, R O

    1988-01-01

    An indispensable part of the hydrogen-recycling system in Bradyrhizobium japonicum is the uptake hydrogenase, which is composed of 34.5- and 65.9-kDa subunits. The gene encoding the large subunit is located on a 5.9-kilobase fragment of the H2-uptake-complementing cosmid pHU52 [Zuber, M., Harker, A.R., Sultana, M.A. & Evans, H.J. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 7668-7672]. We have now determined that the structural genes for both subunits are present on this fragment. Two open reading frames are present that correspond in size and deduced amino acid sequence to the hydrogenase subunits, except that the small-subunit coding region contains a leader peptide of 46 amino acids. The two genes are separated by a 32-nucleotide intergenic region and likely constitute an operon. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the B. japonicum genes with those from Desulfovibrio gigas, Desulfovibrio baculatus, and Rhodobacter capsulatus indicates significant sequence identity. Images PMID:3054886

  9. Gene ontology and KEGG enrichment analyses of genes related to age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Xing, ZhiHao; Ma, Mingming; Wang, Ning; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chen, Lei; Xu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Identifying disease genes is one of the most important topics in biomedicine and may facilitate studies on the mechanisms underlying disease. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a serious eye disease; it typically affects older adults and results in a loss of vision due to retina damage. In this study, we attempt to develop an effective method for distinguishing AMD-related genes. Gene ontology and KEGG enrichment analyses of known AMD-related genes were performed, and a classification system was established. In detail, each gene was encoded into a vector by extracting enrichment scores of the gene set, including it and its direct neighbors in STRING, and gene ontology terms or KEGG pathways. Then certain feature-selection methods, including minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, were adopted to extract key features for the classification system. As a result, 720 GO terms and 11 KEGG pathways were deemed the most important factors for predicting AMD-related genes.

  10. Solar powered biohydrogen production requires specific localization of the hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Burroughs, Nigel J.; Boehm, Marko; Eckert, Carrie; Mastroianni, Giulia; Spence, Edward M.; Yu, Jianfeng; Nixon, Peter J.; Appel, Jens; Mullineaux, Conrad W.; Bryan, Samantha J.

    2014-09-04

    Cyanobacteria contain a bidirectional [NiFe] hydrogenase which transiently produces hydrogen upon exposure of anoxic cells to light, potentially acting as a “valve” releasing excess electrons from the electron transport chain. However, its interaction with the photosynthetic electron transport chain remains unclear. By GFP-tagging the HoxF diaphorase subunit we show that the hydrogenase is thylakoid associated, comprising a population dispersed uniformly through the thylakoids and a subpopulation localized to discrete puncta in the distal thylakoid. Thylakoid localisation of both the HoxH and HoxY hydrogenase subunits is confirmed by immunogold electron microscopy. The diaphorase HoxE subunit is essential for recruitment to the dispersed thylakoid population, potentially anchoring the hydrogenase to the membrane, but aggregation to puncta occurs through a distinct HoxE-independent mechanism. Membrane association does not require NDH-1. Localization is dynamic on a scale of minutes, with anoxia and high light inducing a significant redistribution between these populations in favour of puncta. Lastly, since HoxE is essential for access to its electron donor, electron supply to the hydrogenase depends on a physiologically controlled localization, potentially offering a new avenue to enhance photosynthetic hydrogen production by exploiting localization/aggregation signals.

  11. Solar powered biohydrogen production requires specific localization of the hydrogenase

    DOE PAGES

    Burroughs, Nigel J.; Boehm, Marko; Eckert, Carrie; ...

    2014-09-04

    Cyanobacteria contain a bidirectional [NiFe] hydrogenase which transiently produces hydrogen upon exposure of anoxic cells to light, potentially acting as a “valve” releasing excess electrons from the electron transport chain. However, its interaction with the photosynthetic electron transport chain remains unclear. By GFP-tagging the HoxF diaphorase subunit we show that the hydrogenase is thylakoid associated, comprising a population dispersed uniformly through the thylakoids and a subpopulation localized to discrete puncta in the distal thylakoid. Thylakoid localisation of both the HoxH and HoxY hydrogenase subunits is confirmed by immunogold electron microscopy. The diaphorase HoxE subunit is essential for recruitment to themore » dispersed thylakoid population, potentially anchoring the hydrogenase to the membrane, but aggregation to puncta occurs through a distinct HoxE-independent mechanism. Membrane association does not require NDH-1. Localization is dynamic on a scale of minutes, with anoxia and high light inducing a significant redistribution between these populations in favour of puncta. Lastly, since HoxE is essential for access to its electron donor, electron supply to the hydrogenase depends on a physiologically controlled localization, potentially offering a new avenue to enhance photosynthetic hydrogen production by exploiting localization/aggregation signals.« less

  12. The Physiological Functions and Structural Determinants of Catalytic Bias in the [FeFe]-Hydrogenases CpI and CpII of Clostridium pasteurianum Strain W5

    DOE PAGES

    Therien, Jesse B.; Artz, Jacob H.; Poudel, Saroj; ...

    2017-07-12

    Here, the first generation of biochemical studies of complex, iron-sulfur-cluster-containing [FeFe]-hydrogenases and Mo-nitrogenase were carried out on enzymes purified from Clostridium pasteurianum (strain W5). Previous studies suggested that two distinct [FeFe]-hydrogenases are expressed differentially under nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing conditions. As a result, the first characterized [FeFe]-hydrogenase (CpI) is presumed to have a primary role in central metabolism, recycling reduced electron carriers that accumulate during fermentation via proton reduction. A role for capturing reducing equivalents released as hydrogen during nitrogen fixation has been proposed for the second hydrogenase, CpII. Biochemical characterization of CpI and CpII indicated CpI has extremely high hydrogenmore » production activity in comparison to CpII, while CpII has elevated hydrogen oxidation activity in comparison to CpI when assayed under the same conditions. This suggests that these enzymes have evolved a catalytic bias to support their respective physiological functions. Using the published genome of C. pasteurianum (strain W5) hydrogenase sequences were identified, including the already known [NiFe]-hydrogenase, CpI, and CpII sequences, and a third hydrogenase, CpIII was identified in the genome as well. Quantitative real-time PCR experiments were performed in order to analyze transcript abundance of the hydrogenases under diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic growth conditions. There is a markedly reduced level of CpI gene expression together with concomitant increases in CpII gene expression under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Structure-based analyses of the CpI and CpII sequences reveal variations in their catalytic sites that may contribute to their alternative physiological roles. This work demonstrates that the physiological roles of CpI and CpII are to evolve and to consume hydrogen, respectively, in concurrence with their catalytic activities in vitro, with Cp

  13. Expression of a clostridial [FeFe]-hydrogenase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii prolongs photo-production of hydrogen from water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Noone, Seth; Ratcliff, Kathleen; Davis, ReAnna; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Meuser, Jonathan; Posewitz, Matthew C.; King, Paul W.; Ghirardi, Maria L.

    2016-12-24

    The high oxygen (O2) sensitivity of green algal [FeFe]-hydrogenases is a significant limitation for the sustained production of hydrogen gas (H2) from photosynthetic water splitting. To address this limitation we replaced the native [FeFe]-hydrogenases with a more O2-tolerant clostridial [FeFe]-hydrogenase CaI in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain D66ΔHYD (hydA1hydA2) that contains insertionally inactivated [FeFe]-hydrogenases genes. Expression and translocation of CaI in D66ΔHYD led to the recovery of H2 photoproduction at ~ 20% of the rates of the wild-type parent strain D66. We show for the first time that a bacterial [FeFe]-hydrogenase can be expressed, localized and matured to a catalytically active form that couples to photosynthetic electron transport in the green alga C. reinhardtii. The lower rates of O2 inactivation of CaI led to more sustained H2 photoproduction when cultures were challenged with O2 or kept under prolonged illumination at solar intensities. Lastly, these results provide new insights into the requisites for attaining photobiological H2 production from water splitting using a more O2-tolerant hydrogenase.

  14. [FeFe]-hydrogenase in Yellowstone National Park: evidence for dispersal limitation and phylogenetic niche conservatism.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Hamilton, Trinity L; Spear, John R; Lavin, Matthew; Peters, John W

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogen (H₂) has an important role in the anaerobic degradation of organic carbon and is the basis for many syntrophic interactions that commonly occur in microbial communities. Little is known, however, with regard to the biotic and/or abiotic factors that control the distribution and phylogenetic diversity of organisms which produce H₂ in microbial communities. In this study, we examined the [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene (hydA) as a proxy for fermentative bacterial H₂ production along physical and chemical gradients in various geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA. The distribution of hydA in YNP geothermal springs was constrained by pH to environments co-inhabited by oxygenic phototrophs and to environments predicted to have low inputs of abiotic H₂. The individual HydA asssemblages from YNP springs were more closely related when compared with randomly assembled communities, which suggests ecological filtering. Model selection approaches revealed that geographic distance was the best explanatory variable to predict the phylogenetic relatedness of HydA communities. This evinces the dispersal limitation imposed by the geothermal spring environment on HydA phylogenetic diversity even at small spatial scales. pH differences between sites is the second highest ranked explanatory variable of HydA phylogenetic relatedness, which suggests that the ecology related to pH imposes strong phylogenetic niche conservatism. Collectively, these results indicate that pH has imposed strong niche conservatism on fermentative bacteria and that, within a narrow pH realm, YNP springs are dispersal limited with respect to fermentative bacterial communities.

  15. Evolutionary approach for relative gene expression algorithms.

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Marcin; Kretowski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    A Relative Expression Analysis (RXA) uses ordering relationships in a small collection of genes and is successfully applied to classiffication using microarray data. As checking all possible subsets of genes is computationally infeasible, the RXA algorithms require feature selection and multiple restrictive assumptions. Our main contribution is a specialized evolutionary algorithm (EA) for top-scoring pairs called EvoTSP which allows finding more advanced gene relations. We managed to unify the major variants of relative expression algorithms through EA and introduce weights to the top-scoring pairs. Experimental validation of EvoTSP on public available microarray datasets showed that the proposed solution significantly outperforms in terms of accuracy other relative expression algorithms and allows exploring much larger solution space.

  16. Evolutionary Approach for Relative Gene Expression Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Czajkowski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    A Relative Expression Analysis (RXA) uses ordering relationships in a small collection of genes and is successfully applied to classiffication using microarray data. As checking all possible subsets of genes is computationally infeasible, the RXA algorithms require feature selection and multiple restrictive assumptions. Our main contribution is a specialized evolutionary algorithm (EA) for top-scoring pairs called EvoTSP which allows finding more advanced gene relations. We managed to unify the major variants of relative expression algorithms through EA and introduce weights to the top-scoring pairs. Experimental validation of EvoTSP on public available microarray datasets showed that the proposed solution significantly outperforms in terms of accuracy other relative expression algorithms and allows exploring much larger solution space. PMID:24790574

  17. Oxygen-tolerant hydrogenases in hydrogen-based technologies.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Bärbel; Fritsch, Johannes; Lenz, Oliver

    2011-06-01

    To develop a viable H2 technology, production of H2 has to be significantly enlarged by using renewable resources. One option of generating H2 is the photosynthetic conversion of sunlight and water directly to H2 and O2. Photosystems and hydrogenases are currently being exploited for the design of efficient H2-producing systems that require highly active and O2-tolerant biocatalysts. This communication focuses on two challenging features: hydrogenases that produce H2 in the presence of O2, and direct electron transfer between photosystem I (PS I) and hydrogenase. The latter is accomplished by connecting both modules through a protein fusion or a synthetic molecular wire. These are first steps toward a photosynthetic microbial cell or a semi-synthetic system that may be employed in future H2-based technologies.

  18. Metagenomic and PCR-Based Diversity Surveys of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases Combined with Isolation of Alkaliphilic Hydrogen-Producing Bacteria from the Serpentinite-Hosted Prony Hydrothermal Field, New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Nan; Postec, Anne; Monnin, Christophe; Pelletier, Bernard; Payri, Claude E.; Ménez, Bénédicte; Frouin, Eléonore; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël; Quéméneur, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    High amounts of hydrogen are emitted in the serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay (PHF, New Caledonia), where high-pH (~11), low-temperature (< 40°C), and low-salinity fluids are discharged in both intertidal and shallow submarine environments. In this study, we investigated the diversity and distribution of potentially hydrogen-producing bacteria in Prony hyperalkaline springs by using metagenomic analyses and different PCR-amplified DNA sequencing methods. The retrieved sequences of hydA genes, encoding the catalytic subunit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and, used as a molecular marker of hydrogen-producing bacteria, were mainly related to those of Firmicutes and clustered into two distinct groups depending on sampling locations. Intertidal samples were dominated by new hydA sequences related to uncultured Firmicutes retrieved from paddy soils, while submarine samples were dominated by diverse hydA sequences affiliated with anaerobic and/or thermophilic submarine Firmicutes pertaining to the orders Thermoanaerobacterales or Clostridiales. The novelty and diversity of these [FeFe]-hydrogenases may reflect the unique environmental conditions prevailing in the PHF (i.e., high-pH, low-salt, mesothermic fluids). In addition, novel alkaliphilic hydrogen-producing Firmicutes (Clostridiales and Bacillales) were successfully isolated from both intertidal and submarine PHF chimney samples. Both molecular and cultivation-based data demonstrated the ability of Firmicutes originating from serpentinite-hosted environments to produce hydrogen by fermentation, potentially contributing to the molecular hydrogen balance in situ. PMID:27625634

  19. Survey of the distribution of different types of nitrogenases and hydrogenases in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Masukawa, Hajime; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yamazaki, Emi; Iwata, Syunsuke; Nakamura, Kensuke; Mochimaru, Mari; Inoue, Kazuhito; Sakurai, Hidehiro

    2009-01-01

    As a first step toward developing the methodology for screening large numbers of heterocyst-forming freshwater cyanobacteria strains for the presence of various types of nitrogenases and hydrogenases, we surveyed the distribution of these genes and their activities in 14 strains from culture collections. The nitrogenase genes include nif1 encoding a Mo-type nitrogenase expressed in heterocysts, nif2 expressed in vegetative cells and heterocysts under anaerobic conditions, and vnf encoding a V-type nitrogenase expressed in heterocysts. Two methods proved to be valuable in surveying the distribution of nitrogenase types. The first method was Southern blot hybridization of DNA digested with two different endonucleases and hybridized with nifD1, nifD2, and vnfD probes. The second method was ethane formation from acetylene to detect the presence of active V-nitrogenase. We found that all 14 strains have nifD1 genes, and eight strains also have nifD2 genes. Four of the strains have vnfD genes, in addition to nifD2 genes. It is curious that three of these four strains had similar hybridization patterns with all of the nifD1, nifD2, and vnfD probes, suggesting that there could be some bias in strains used in the present study or in strains held in culture collections. This point will need to be assessed in the future. For surveying the distribution of hydrogenases, Southern blot hybridization was an effective method. All strains surveyed had hup genes, with the majority of them also having hox genes.

  20. Recombinant antibodies for specific detection of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Mangayil, Rahul; Karp, Matti; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Santala, Ville

    2016-10-27

    Biological hydrogen production is based on activity of specific enzymes called hydrogenases. Hydrogenases are oxygen sensitive metalloenzymes containing Ni and/or Fe atoms at the active site, catalyzing reversible reduction of protons. Generally, [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases prefer proton reduction to molecular hydrogen, a potential energy carrier molecule that can be produced by bioprocesses in sustainable manner. Thus, monitoring tools have been developed to study the relationship between [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases and biohydrogen production in bioreactors at DNA and RNA levels. In the present study, novel molecular tools are introduced for quantitative monitoring of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases at the protein level. Aerobic and anaerobic biopanning (for inactive and active [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase, respectively) of phage displayed single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody libraries aided in isolating nine potential scFvs. The enriched antibodies demonstrated high specificity towards Clostridium spp. [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases allowing detection from pure and mixed cultures. Additionally, the antibodies showed different binding characteristics towards hydrogenase catalytic states, providing a possible means for functional detection of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases. From hydrogenase-antibody interaction studies we observed that though antibody binding reduced the enzyme catalytic activity, it facilitated to retain hydrogen evolution from oxygen exposed hydrogenases.

  1. Recombinant antibodies for specific detection of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Mangayil, Rahul; Karp, Matti; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Santala, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production is based on activity of specific enzymes called hydrogenases. Hydrogenases are oxygen sensitive metalloenzymes containing Ni and/or Fe atoms at the active site, catalyzing reversible reduction of protons. Generally, [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases prefer proton reduction to molecular hydrogen, a potential energy carrier molecule that can be produced by bioprocesses in sustainable manner. Thus, monitoring tools have been developed to study the relationship between [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases and biohydrogen production in bioreactors at DNA and RNA levels. In the present study, novel molecular tools are introduced for quantitative monitoring of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases at the protein level. Aerobic and anaerobic biopanning (for inactive and active [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase, respectively) of phage displayed single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody libraries aided in isolating nine potential scFvs. The enriched antibodies demonstrated high specificity towards Clostridium spp. [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases allowing detection from pure and mixed cultures. Additionally, the antibodies showed different binding characteristics towards hydrogenase catalytic states, providing a possible means for functional detection of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases. From hydrogenase-antibody interaction studies we observed that though antibody binding reduced the enzyme catalytic activity, it facilitated to retain hydrogen evolution from oxygen exposed hydrogenases. PMID:27786270

  2. Distribution and activity of hydrogenase enzymes in subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, R.; Nickel, J.; Glombitza, C.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Metabolically active microbial communities are present in a wide range of subsurface environments. Techniques like enumeration of microbial cells, activity measurements with radiotracer assays and the analysis of porewater constituents are currently being used to explore the subsurface biosphere, alongside with molecular biological analyses. However, many of these techniques reach their detection limits due to low microbial activity and abundance. Direct measurements of microbial turnover not just face issues of insufficient sensitivity, they only provide information about a single specific process rather than an overall microbial activity. Since hydrogenase enzymes are intracellular and ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, the enzyme activity represents a measure of total activity of the entire microbial community. A hydrogenase activity assay could quantify total metabolic activity without having to identify specific processes. This would be a major advantage in subsurface biosphere studies, where several metabolic processes can occur simultaneously. We quantified hydrogenase enzyme activity and distribution in sediment samples from different aquatic subsurface environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific and Gulf of Mexico) using a tritium-based assay. We found enzyme activity at all sites and depths. Volumetric hydrogenase activity did not show much variability between sites and sampling depths, whereas cell-specific activity ranged from 10-5 to 1 nmol H2 cell-1 d-1. Activity was lowest in sediment layers where nitrate was detected. Higher activity was associated with samples in which sulfate was the predominant electron acceptor. We found highest activity in samples from environments with >10 ppm methane in the pore water. The results show that cell-specific hydrogenase enzyme activity increases with decreasing energy yield of the electron acceptor used. It is not possible to convert volumetric or cell-specific hydrogenase activity into a

  3. Rhizobitoxine inhibition of hydrogenase synthesis in free-living Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Minamisawa, K; Fukai, K; Asami, T

    1990-01-01

    Rhizobitoxine produced by Bradyrhizobium species strongly prevented derepression of hydrogenase expression in free-living Bradyrhizobium japonicum, although the toxin had no effect on the activity of cells which had already synthesized hydrogenase protein. Dihydrorhizobitoxine, a structural analog of rhizobitoxine, proved to be a less potent inhibitor of hydrogenase derepression. Rhizobitoxine did not cause cell death at a concentration sufficient to eliminate hydrogenase expression. The large subunit of hydrogenase was not detectable with antibody after derepression in the presence of rhizobitoxine. The general pattern of proteins synthesized from 14C-labeled amino acids during derepression was not significantly different in the presence or absence of rhizobitoxine. These results indicated that rhizobitoxine inhibited hydrogenase synthesis in free-living B. japonicum. Cystathionine and methionine strongly prevented the inhibition of hydrogenase derepression by rhizobitoxine, suggesting that the inhibition involves the level of sulfur-containing amino acids in the cell. Images PMID:2198262

  4. [Computer databases on cancer-related genes].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, N; Minoshima, S

    2000-06-01

    A database of mutations in various cancer-related genes has been constructed and named as KMcancerDB (Keio Mutation DataBase for cancer-related genes). This KMcancerDB utilizes a database software called MutationView which we designed to compile various mutation data and to provide graphical presentation of data analysis through the network using ordinary internet browser softwares such as Netscape. Currently, the KMcancerDB accommodates 1261 mutation data of different genes for cancers in 9 different organs/tissues (breast, stomach, uterus, liver, prostate, colon, ovary, thymus and retinoblastoma). KMcancerDB is accessible through http:¿mutview.dmb.med.keio.ac.jp. OMIM is an important document database for human Mendelian traits and hereditary diseases. The information from OMIM is also used in MutationView/KMcancerDB. Some display windows of OMIM and KMcancerDB are presented.

  5. Gene Transfers Between Distantly Related Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2003-01-01

    With the completion of numerous microbial genome sequences, reports of individual gene transfers between distantly related prokaryotes have become commonplace. On the other hand, transfers between prokaryotes and eukaryotes still excite the imagination. Many of these claims may be premature, but some are certainly valid. In this chapter, the kinds of supporting data needed to propose transfers between distantly related organisms and cite some interesting examples are considered.

  6. Gene Transfers Between Distantly Related Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2003-01-01

    With the completion of numerous microbial genome sequences, reports of individual gene transfers between distantly related prokaryotes have become commonplace. On the other hand, transfers between prokaryotes and eukaryotes still excite the imagination. Many of these claims may be premature, but some are certainly valid. In this chapter, the kinds of supporting data needed to propose transfers between distantly related organisms and cite some interesting examples are considered.

  7. From enzyme maturation to synthetic chemistry: the case of hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Artero, Vincent; Berggren, Gustav; Atta, Mohamed; Caserta, Giorgio; Roy, Souvik; Pecqueur, Ludovic; Fontecave, Marc

    2015-08-18

    Water splitting into oxygen and hydrogen is one of the most attractive strategies for storing solar energy and electricity. Because the processes at work are multielectronic, there is a crucial need for efficient and stable catalysts, which in addition have to be cheap for future industrial developments (electrolyzers, photoelectrochemicals, and fuel cells). Specifically for the water/hydrogen interconversion, Nature is an exquisite source of inspiration since this chemistry contributes to the bioenergetic metabolism of a number of living organisms via the activity of fascinating metalloenzymes, the hydrogenases. In this Account, we first briefly describe the structure of the unique dinuclear organometallic active sites of the two classes of hydrogenases as well as the complex protein machineries involved in their biosynthesis, their so-called maturation processes. This knowledge allows for the development of a fruitful bioinspired chemistry approach, which has already led to a number of interesting and original catalysts mimicking the natural active sites. More specifically, we describe our own attempts to prepare artificial hydrogenases. This can be achieved via the standard bioinspired approach using the combination of a synthetic bioinspired catalyst and a polypeptide scaffold. Such hybrid complexes provide the opportunity to optimize the system by manipulating both the catalyst through chemical synthesis and the protein component through mutagenesis. We also raise the possibility to reach such artificial systems via an original strategy based on mimicking the enzyme maturation pathways. This is illustrated in this Account by two examples developed in our laboratory. First, we show how the preparation of a lysozyme-{Mn(I)(CO)3} hybrid and its clean reaction with a nickel complex led us to generate a new class of binuclear Ni-Mn H2-evolving catalysts mimicking the active site of [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Then we describe how we were able to rationally design and

  8. Genome data mining and soil survey for the novel group 5 [NiFe]-hydrogenase to explore the diversity and ecological importance of presumptive high-affinity H(2)-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Constant, Philippe; Chowdhury, Soumitra Paul; Hesse, Laura; Pratscher, Jennifer; Conrad, Ralf

    2011-09-01

    Streptomyces soil isolates exhibiting the unique ability to oxidize atmospheric H(2) possess genes specifying a putative high-affinity [NiFe]-hydrogenase. This study was undertaken to explore the taxonomic diversity and the ecological importance of this novel functional group. We propose to designate the genes encoding the small and large subunits of the putative high-affinity hydrogenase hhyS and hhyL, respectively. Genome data mining revealed that the hhyL gene is unevenly distributed in the phyla Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Acidobacteria. The hhyL gene sequences comprised a phylogenetically distinct group, namely, the group 5 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes. The presumptive high-affinity H(2)-oxidizing bacteria constituting group 5 were shown to possess a hydrogenase gene cluster, including the genes encoding auxiliary and structural components of the enzyme and four additional open reading frames (ORFs) of unknown function. A soil survey confirmed that both high-affinity H(2) oxidation activity and the hhyL gene are ubiquitous. A quantitative PCR assay revealed that soil contained 10(6) to 10(8) hhyL gene copies g (dry weight)(-1). Assuming one hhyL gene copy per genome, the abundance of presumptive high-affinity H(2)-oxidizing bacteria was higher than the maximal population size for which maintenance energy requirements would be fully supplied through the H(2) oxidation activity measured in soil. Our data indicate that the abundance of the hhyL gene should not be taken as a reliable proxy for the uptake of atmospheric H(2) by soil, because high-affinity H(2) oxidation is a facultatively mixotrophic metabolism, and microorganisms harboring a nonfunctional group 5 [NiFe]-hydrogenase may occur.

  9. Mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ćwikła, Jarosław; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kwiatek, Paweł; Szperl, Małgorzata; Michalski, Wojciech; Wyrwicz, Lucjan; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Maciejczyk, Anna; Roszczynko, Marta; Pęczkowska, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paragangliomas (PGLs) related to hereditary syndromes are rare mediastinal tumors. Paragangliomas are caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of succinate dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH). Aim To evaluate clinical, anatomical and functional characteristics of mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of 75 patients with confirmed SDHx gene mutations (24 patients with SDHB, 5 SDHC, 46 with SDHD mutations) was performed. Patients underwent evaluation using computed tomography (CT), somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) (99mTc-[HYNIC,Tyr3]-octreotide), 123I mIBG scintigraphy and urinary excretion of total methoxycatecholamines. Results Out of 75 patients, 16 (21%) patients (1 SDHB, 15 SDHD mutations) had 17 PGLs localized in the mediastinum. Fourteen PGLs were localized in the middle mediastinum (intrapericardial) and 3 PGLs in the posterior mediastinum. The median diameter of paragangliomas measured on the axial slice was 24.3 mm (interquartile range (IQR): 14.7–36.6), and the median volume was 2.78 ml (IQR: 0.87–16.16). Twelve out of 16 patients (75%) underwent SRS, and 11 of them (92.3%) had pathological uptake of the radiotracer. Eleven (68.75%) out of 16 patients underwent 123 I mIBG, with only 3 positive results. Symptoms of catecholamine excretion were observed in 3 patients with PGLs localized in the posterior mediastinum. All PGLs were benign except in 1 patient with the SDHB mutation and PGL detected in the posterior mediastinum, who had a metastatic disease. Conclusions Most mediastinal paragangliomas were related to SDHD gene mutations. They were asymptomatic, localized in the medial mediastinum, intrapericardially. PMID:27785149

  10. Photosensitivity of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F with visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Osuka, Hisao; Shomura, Yasuhito; Komori, Hirofumi; Shibata, Naoki; Nagao, Satoshi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase showed light sensitivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New FT-IR bands were observed with light irradiation of the Ni-A state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPR g-values of the Ni-A state shifted upon light irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The light-induced state converted back to the Ni-A state under the dark condition. -- Abstract: [NiFe] hydrogenase catalyzes reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen. Its active site is constructed of a hetero dinuclear Ni-Fe complex, and the oxidation state of the Ni ion changes according to the redox state of the enzyme. We found that the Ni-A state (an inactive unready, oxidized state) of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (DvMF) is light sensitive and forms a new state (Ni-AL) with irradiation of visible light. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) bands at 1956, 2084 and 2094 cm{sup -1} of the Ni-A state shifted to 1971, 2086 and 2098 cm{sup -1} in the Ni-AL state. The g-values of g{sub x} = 2.30, g{sub y} = 2.23 and g{sub z} = 2.01 for the signals in the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the Ni-A state at room temperature varied for -0.009, +0.012 and +0.010, respectively, upon light irradiation. The light-induced Ni-AL state converted back immediately to the Ni-A state under dark condition at room temperature. These results show that the coordination structure of the Fe site of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase is perturbed significantly by light irradiation with relatively small coordination change at the Ni site.

  11. Effect of 17O2 and 13CO on EPR spectra of nickel in hydrogenase from Chromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaan, J W; Coremans, J M; Bouwens, E C; Albracht, S P

    1990-11-15

    Oxygen, either molecular oxygen or a reduction adduct, can tightly bind in the vicinity of the two forms of trivalent nickel occurring in hydrogenase from Chromatium vinosum, as evident from studies with 17O-enriched O2. This oxygen is not in the first coordination sphere of nickel. As has been reported earlier for hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio gigas (Fernandez, V.M., Hatchikian, A.C., Patil, D.S. and Cammack, R. (1986) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 883, 145-154), also the relative activity of the C.vinosum enzyme correlates well with the presence of only one of the two Ni(III) forms in the oxidized preparation. These results make it less likely that a specific oxygenation of only one of the Ni(III) forms would be the reason for the reversible inactivation of nickel hydrogenases by oxygen. Reaction of H2-reduced enzyme with 13CO now demonstrated beyond doubt that: (i) One 13CO molecule is a direct ligand to nickel in axial position; and (ii) hydrogen binds at the same coordination site as CO. It can also be concluded that hydrogen is not bound as a hydride ion, but presumably as molecular hydrogen. A simple way to explain the EPR spectra from the 13CO-adduct of the enzyme is to assume a monovalent state for the nickel.

  12. Structure and function of photosystem I–[FeFe] hydrogenase protein fusions: An all-atom molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Bradley J.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Frymier, Paul

    2015-12-15

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study the solution dynamics and protein protein interactions of protein fusions of photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase (FeFe H2ase) from Clostridium pasteurianum, a unique complex capable of photocatalytic hydrogen production. This study involved fusions of these two proteins via dithiol linkers of different length including decanedithiol, octanedithiol, and hexanedithiol, for which experimental data had previously been obtained. Evaluation of root-mean-squared deviations (RMSDs) relative to the respective crystal structures of PSI and the FeFe H2ase shows that these fusion complexes approach stable equilibrium conformations during the MD simulations. Investigating protein mobility via root-mean-squared fluctuations (RMSFs) reveals that tethering via the shortest hexanedithiol linker results in increased atomic fluctuations of both PSI and the hydrogenase in these fusion complexes. Furthermore, evaluation of the inter- and intraprotein electron transfer distances in these fusion complexes indicates that the structural changes in the FeFe H2ase arising from ligation to PSI via the shortest hexanedithiol linker may hinder electron transport in the hydrogenase, thus providing a molecular level explanation for the observation that the medium-length octanedithiol linker gives the highest hydrogen production rate.

  13. Photosensitivity of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F with visible light.

    PubMed

    Osuka, Hisao; Shomura, Yasuhito; Komori, Hirofumi; Shibata, Naoki; Nagao, Satoshi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2013-01-04

    [NiFe] hydrogenase catalyzes reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen. Its active site is constructed of a hetero dinuclear Ni-Fe complex, and the oxidation state of the Ni ion changes according to the redox state of the enzyme. We found that the Ni-A state (an inactive unready, oxidized state) of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (DvMF) is light sensitive and forms a new state (Ni-AL) with irradiation of visible light. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) bands at 1956, 2084 and 2094 cm(-1) of the Ni-A state shifted to 1971, 2086 and 2098 cm(-1) in the Ni-AL state. The g-values of g(x)=2.30, g(y)=2.23 and g(z)=2.01 for the signals in the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the Ni-A state at room temperature varied for -0.009, +0.012 and +0.010, respectively, upon light irradiation. The light-induced Ni-AL state converted back immediately to the Ni-A state under dark condition at room temperature. These results show that the coordination structure of the Fe site of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase is perturbed significantly by light irradiation with relatively small coordination change at the Ni site.

  14. Structure and function of photosystem I–[FeFe] hydrogenase protein fusions: An all-atom molecular dynamics study

    DOE PAGES

    Harris, Bradley J.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Frymier, Paul

    2015-12-15

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study the solution dynamics and protein protein interactions of protein fusions of photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase (FeFe H2ase) from Clostridium pasteurianum, a unique complex capable of photocatalytic hydrogen production. This study involved fusions of these two proteins via dithiol linkers of different length including decanedithiol, octanedithiol, and hexanedithiol, for which experimental data had previously been obtained. Evaluation of root-mean-squared deviations (RMSDs) relative to the respective crystal structures of PSI and the FeFe H2ase shows that these fusion complexes approach stable equilibrium conformations during the MD simulations. Investigatingmore » protein mobility via root-mean-squared fluctuations (RMSFs) reveals that tethering via the shortest hexanedithiol linker results in increased atomic fluctuations of both PSI and the hydrogenase in these fusion complexes. Furthermore, evaluation of the inter- and intraprotein electron transfer distances in these fusion complexes indicates that the structural changes in the FeFe H2ase arising from ligation to PSI via the shortest hexanedithiol linker may hinder electron transport in the hydrogenase, thus providing a molecular level explanation for the observation that the medium-length octanedithiol linker gives the highest hydrogen production rate.« less

  15. Hydrogenase activity in aged, nonviable Desulfovibrio vulgaris cultures and its significance in anaerobic biocorrosion.

    PubMed Central

    Chatelus, C; Carrier, P; Saignes, P; Libert, M F; Berlier, Y; Lespinat, P A; Fauque, G; Legall, J

    1987-01-01

    Batch cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris stored at 32 degrees C for 10 months have been found to retain 50% of the hydrogenase activity of a 1-day culture. The hydrogenase found in old cultures needs reducing conditions for its activation. Viable cell counts are negative after 6 months, showing that the hydrogenase activity does not depend on the presence of viable cells. These observations are of importance in the understanding of anaerobic biocorrosion of metals caused by depolarization phenomena. PMID:3310883

  16. Nucleotide sequences and genetic analysis of hydrogen oxidation (hox) genes in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Menon, A L; Mortenson, L E; Robson, R L

    1992-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii contains a heterodimeric, membrane-bound [NiFe]hydrogenase capable of catalyzing the reversible oxidation of H2. The beta and alpha subunits of the enzyme are encoded by the structural genes hoxK and hoxG, respectively, which appear to form part of an operon that contains at least one further potential gene (open reading frame 3 [ORF3]). In this study, determination of the nucleotide sequence of a region of 2,344 bp downstream of ORF3 revealed four additional closely spaced or overlapping ORFs. These ORFs, ORF4 through ORF7, potentially encode polypeptides with predicted masses of 22.8, 11.4, 16.3, and 31 kDa, respectively. Mutagenesis of the chromosome of A. vinelandii in the area sequenced was carried out by introduction of antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. Disruption of hoxK and hoxG by a kanamycin resistance gene abolished whole-cell hydrogenase activity coupled to O2 and led to loss of the hydrogenase alpha subunit. Insertional mutagenesis of ORF3 through ORF7 with a promoterless lacZ-Kmr cassette established that the region is transcriptionally active and involved in H2 oxidation. We propose to call ORF3 through ORF7 hoxZ, hoxM, hoxL, hoxO, and hoxQ, respectively. The predicted hox gene products resemble those encoded by genes from hydrogenase-related operons in other bacteria, including Escherichia coli and Alcaligenes eutrophus. Images PMID:1624446

  17. Oxygen-resistant hydrogenases and methods for designing and making same

    SciTech Connect

    King, Paul; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Seibert, Michael

    2014-03-04

    The invention provides oxygen-resistant iron-hydrogenases ([Fe]-hydrogenases) for use in the production of H.sub.2. Methods used in the design and engineering of the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases are disclosed, as are the methods of transforming and culturing appropriate host cells with the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases. Finally, the invention provides methods for utilizing the transformed, oxygen insensitive, host cells in the bulk production of H.sub.2 in a light catalyzed reaction having water as the reactant.

  18. Oxygen-resistant hydrogenases and methods for designing and making same

    DOEpatents

    King, Paul [Golden, CO; Ghirardi, Maria L [Lakewood, CO; Seibert, Michael [Lakewood, CO

    2009-03-10

    The invention provides oxygen- resistant iron-hydrogenases ([Fe]-hydrogenases) for use in the production of H2. Methods used in the design and engineering of the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases are disclosed, as are the methods of transforming and culturing appropriate host cells with the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases. Finally, the invention provides methods for utilizing the transformed, oxygen insensitive, host cells in the bulk production of H.sub.2 in a light catalyzed reaction having water as the reactant.

  19. Spontaneous activation of [FeFe]-hydrogenases by an inorganic [2Fe] active site mimic

    PubMed Central

    Esselborn, Julian; Berggren, Gustav; Noth, Jens; Siebel, Judith; Hemschemeier, Anja; Artero, Vincent; Reijerse, Edward; Fontecave, Marc; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Happe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the formation of hydrogen. The cofactor (H-cluster) of [FeFe]-hydrogenases consists of a [4Fe-4S]-cluster bridged to a unique [2Fe]-subcluster whose biosynthesis in vivo requires hydrogenase-specific maturases. Here we show that a chemical mimic of the [2Fe]-subcluster can reconstitute apo-hydrogenase to full activity, independent of helper proteins. The assembled H-cluster is virtually indistinguishable from the native cofactor. This procedure will be a powerful tool for developing novel artificial H2-producing catalysts. PMID:23934246

  20. Electrochemistry of Simple Organometallic Models of Iron-Iron Hydrogenases in Organic Solvent and Water.

    PubMed

    Gloaguen, Frederic

    2016-01-19

    Synthetic models of the active site of iron-iron hydrogenases are currently the subjects of numerous studies aimed at developing H2-production catalysts based on cheap and abundant materials. In this context, the present report offers an electrochemist's view of the catalysis of proton reduction by simple binuclear iron(I) thiolate complexes. Although these complexes probably do not follow a biocatalytic pathway, we analyze and discuss the interplay between the reduction potential and basicity and how these antagonist properties impact the mechanisms of proton-coupled electron transfer to the metal centers. This question is central to any consideration of the activity at the molecular level of hydrogenases and related enzymes. In a second part, special attention is paid to iron thiolate complexes holding rigid and unsaturated bridging ligands. The complexes that enjoy mild reduction potentials and stabilized reduced forms are promising iron-based catalysts for the photodriven evolution of H2 in organic solvents and, more importantly, in water.

  1. Krypton Derivatization of an O2 -Tolerant Membrane-Bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reveals a Hydrophobic Tunnel Network for Gas Transport.

    PubMed

    Kalms, Jacqueline; Schmidt, Andrea; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; van der Linden, Peter; von Stetten, David; Lenz, Oliver; Carpentier, Philippe; Scheerer, Patrick

    2016-04-25

    [NiFe] hydrogenases are metalloenzymes catalyzing the reversible heterolytic cleavage of hydrogen into protons and electrons. Gas tunnels make the deeply buried active site accessible to substrates and inhibitors. Understanding the architecture and function of the tunnels is pivotal to modulating the feature of O2 tolerance in a subgroup of these [NiFe] hydrogenases, as they are interesting for developments in renewable energy technologies. Here we describe the crystal structure of the O2 -tolerant membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase of Ralstonia eutropha (ReMBH), using krypton-pressurized crystals. The positions of the krypton atoms allow a comprehensive description of the tunnel network within the enzyme. A detailed overview of tunnel sizes, lengths, and routes is presented from tunnel calculations. A comparison of the ReMBH tunnel characteristics with crystal structures of other O2 -tolerant and O2 -sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenases revealed considerable differences in tunnel size and quantity between the two groups, which might be related to the striking feature of O2 tolerance.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Proton Transport in Hydrogenase and Hydrogenase Mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Raugei, Simone; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2016-08-02

    Protons are used throughout the biological world for a number of functions, from charge balance to energy carriers. Metalloenzymes use protons as energy carriers and control proton movement both temporally and spatially. Despite the interest and need for controlled proton movement in other systems, the scientific community has not been able to develop extensive general rules for developing synthetic proton pathways. In part this is due to the challenging nature of studying these large and complex molecules experimentally, although experiments have gleaned extensive critical insight. While computational methods are also challenging because of the large size of the molecules, they have been critical in advancing our knowledge of proton movement through pathways, but even further, they have advanced our knowledge in how protonation and proton movement is correlated with large and small scale molecular motions and electron movement. These studies often complement experimental studies but provide insight and depth simply not possible in many cases in the absence of theory. In this chapter, we will discuss advances and methods used in understanding proton movement in hydrogenases.

  3. Artificial hydrogenase: biomimetic approaches controlling active molecular catalysts.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Akira; Hayashi, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogenase catalyses reversible transformation of H2 to H(+) using an active site which includes an iron or nickel atom. Synthetic model complexes and molecular catalysts inspired by nature have unveiled the structural and functional basis of the active site with remarkable accuracy and this has led to the discovery of active synthetic catalysts. To further improve the activity of such molecular catalysts, both the first and outer coordination spheres should be well-organized and harmonized for an efficient shuttling of H(+), electrons, and H2. This article reviews recent advances in the design and catalytic properties of artificial enzymes that mimic the hydrogenase active site and the outer coordination sphere in combination with a peptide or protein scaffold.

  4. Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M.; Walter, Mary E.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a potential renewable alternative energy carrier that could be used in the future to help supplement humanity's growing energy needs. Unfortunately, current industrial methods for hydrogen production are expensive or environmentally unfriendly. In recent years research has focused on biological mechanisms for hydrogen production and specifically on hydrogenases, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the reduction of protons to generate hydrogen. In particular, a better understanding of this enzyme might allow us to generate hydrogen that does not use expensive metals, such as platinum, as catalysts. The soluble hydrogenase I (SHI) from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, a member of the euryarchaeota, has been studied extensively and used in various biotechnological applications. This review summarizes the strategies used in engineering and characterizing three different forms of SHI and the properties of the recombinant enzymes. SHI has also been used in in vitro systems for hydrogen production and NADPH generation and these systems are also discussed. PMID:26543406

  5. Overproduction of the membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase in Thermococcus kodakarensis and its effect on hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Tamotsu; Simons, Jan-Robert; Tsukamoto, Ryohei; Nakajima, Akihito; Omori, Yoshiyuki; Matsuoka, Ryoji; Beppu, Haruki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2015-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis can utilize sugars or pyruvate for growth. In the absence of elemental sulfur, the electrons via oxidation of these substrates are accepted by protons, generating molecular hydrogen (H2). The hydrogenase responsible for this reaction is a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase (Mbh). In this study, we have examined several possibilities to increase the protein levels of Mbh in T. kodakarensis by genetic engineering. Highest levels of intracellular Mbh levels were achieved when the promoter of the entire mbh operon (TK2080-TK2093) was exchanged to a strong constitutive promoter from the glutamate dehydrogenase gene (TK1431) (strain MHG1). When MHG1 was cultivated under continuous culture conditions using pyruvate-based medium, a nearly 25% higher specific hydrogen production rate (SHPR) of 35.3 mmol H2 g-dcw(-1) h(-1) was observed at a dilution rate of 0.31 h(-1). We also combined mbh overexpression using an even stronger constitutive promoter from the cell surface glycoprotein gene (TK0895) with disruption of the genes encoding the cytosolic hydrogenase (Hyh) and an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT), both of which are involved in hydrogen consumption (strain MAH1). At a dilution rate of 0.30 h(-1), the SHPR was 36.2 mmol H2 g-dcw(-1) h(-1), corresponding to a 28% increase compared to that of the host T. kodakarensis strain. Increasing the dilution rate to 0.83 h(-1) or 1.07 h(-1) resulted in a SHPR of 120 mmol H2 g-dcw(-1) h(-1), which is one of the highest production rates observed in microbial fermentation.

  6. Overproduction of the membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase in Thermococcus kodakarensis and its effect on hydrogen production

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Tamotsu; Simons, Jan-Robert; Tsukamoto, Ryohei; Nakajima, Akihito; Omori, Yoshiyuki; Matsuoka, Ryoji; Beppu, Haruki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2015-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis can utilize sugars or pyruvate for growth. In the absence of elemental sulfur, the electrons via oxidation of these substrates are accepted by protons, generating molecular hydrogen (H2). The hydrogenase responsible for this reaction is a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase (Mbh). In this study, we have examined several possibilities to increase the protein levels of Mbh in T. kodakarensis by genetic engineering. Highest levels of intracellular Mbh levels were achieved when the promoter of the entire mbh operon (TK2080-TK2093) was exchanged to a strong constitutive promoter from the glutamate dehydrogenase gene (TK1431) (strain MHG1). When MHG1 was cultivated under continuous culture conditions using pyruvate-based medium, a nearly 25% higher specific hydrogen production rate (SHPR) of 35.3 mmol H2 g-dcw−1 h−1 was observed at a dilution rate of 0.31 h−1. We also combined mbh overexpression using an even stronger constitutive promoter from the cell surface glycoprotein gene (TK0895) with disruption of the genes encoding the cytosolic hydrogenase (Hyh) and an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT), both of which are involved in hydrogen consumption (strain MAH1). At a dilution rate of 0.30 h−1, the SHPR was 36.2 mmol H2 g-dcw−1 h−1, corresponding to a 28% increase compared to that of the host T. kodakarensis strain. Increasing the dilution rate to 0.83 h−1 or 1.07 h−1 resulted in a SHPR of 120 mmol H2 g-dcw−1 h−1, which is one of the highest production rates observed in microbial fermentation. PMID:26379632

  7. Comparative genomics of free-living Gammaproteobacteria: pathogenesis-related genes or interaction-related genes?

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Rosas-Landa, Mirna; Ponce-Soto, Gabriel Yaxal; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, V

    2017-07-31

    Bacteria have numerous strategies to interact with themselves and with their environment, but genes associated with these interactions are usually cataloged as pathogenic. To understand the role that these genes have not only in pathogenesis but also in bacterial interactions, we compared the genomes of eight bacteria from human-impacted environments with those of free-living bacteria from the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB), a relatively pristine oligotrophic site. Fifty-one genomes from CCB bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Vibrio, Photobacterium and Aeromonas, were analyzed. We found that the CCB strains had several virulence-related genes, 15 of which were common to all strains and were related to flagella and chemotaxis. We also identified the presence of Type III and VI secretion systems, which leads us to propose that these systems play an important role in interactions among bacterial communities beyond pathogenesis. None of the CCB strains had pathogenicity islands, despite having genes associated with antibiotics. Integrons were rare, while CRISPR elements were common. The idea that pathogenicity-related genes in many cases form part of a wider strategy used by bacteria to interact with other organisms could help us to understand the role of pathogenicity-related elements in an ecological and evolutionary framework leading toward a more inclusive One Health concept. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. De novo design of functional proteins: Toward artificial hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Faiella, Marina; Roy, Anindya; Sommer, Dayn; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2013-11-01

    Over the last 25 years, de novo design has proven to be a valid approach to generate novel, well-folded proteins, and most recently, functional proteins. In response to societal needs, this approach is been used increasingly to design functional proteins developed with an eye toward sustainable fuel production. This review surveys recent examples of bioinspired de novo designed peptide based catalysts, focusing in particular on artificial hydrogenases.

  9. Reduction of the amount of periplasmic hydrogenase in Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) with antisense RNA: direct evidence for an important role of this hydrogenase in lactate metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, W A; van Dongen, W M; Veeger, C

    1991-01-01

    To establish the function of the periplasmic Fe-only hydrogenase in the anaerobic sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough), derivatives with a reduced content of this enzyme were constructed by introduction of a plasmid that directs the synthesis of antisense RNA complementary to hydrogenase mRNA. It was demonstrated that the antisense RNA technique allowed specific suppression of the synthesis of this hydrogenase in D. vulgaris by decreasing the amount of hydrogenase mRNA but did not result in the complete elimination of the enzyme, as is usual with most conventional mutagenesis techniques. The hydrogenase content in these antisense RNA-producing D. vulgaris clones was two- to threefold lower than in the parental strain when the strains were grown in batch cultures with lactate as a substrate and sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor. Under these conditions, several differences in growth parameters were measured between the hydrogenase-suppressed clones and wild-type D. vulgaris: growth rates of the clones decreased two- to threefold, and at excess lactate, growth yields were reduced by 20%. Furthermore, the amount of hydrogen measured in the culture headspaces was reduced three- to fivefold for the clones. These observations indicate that this hydrogenase has an important function during growth on lactate and is involved in hydrogen production from protons and electrons originating from at least one of the two oxidation reactions in the conversion of lactate to acetate. The implications for the energy metabolism of D. vulgaris are discussed. Images PMID:1711025

  10. Molecular evolution of gas cavity in [NiFeSe] hydrogenases resurrected in silico

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Takashi; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Kenji; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Sato, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen tolerance of selenium-containing [NiFeSe] hydrogenases (Hases) is attributable to the high reducing power of the selenocysteine residue, which sustains the bimetallic Ni–Fe catalytic center in the large subunit. Genes encoding [NiFeSe] Hases are inherited by few sulphate-reducing δ-proteobacteria globally distributed under various anoxic conditions. Ancestral sequences of [NiFeSe] Hases were elucidated and their three-dimensional structures were recreated in silico using homology modelling and molecular dynamic simulation, which suggested that deep gas channels gradually developed in [NiFeSe] Hases under absolute anaerobic conditions, whereas the enzyme remained as a sealed edifice under environmental conditions of a higher oxygen exposure risk. The development of a gas cavity appears to be driven by non-synonymous mutations, which cause subtle conformational changes locally and distantly, even including highly conserved sequence regions. PMID:26818780

  11. Wiring of Photosystem II to Hydrogenase for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Mersch, Dirk; Lee, Chong-Yong; Zhang, Jenny Zhenqi; Brinkert, Katharina; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Rutherford, A William; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-07-08

    In natural photosynthesis, light is used for the production of chemical energy carriers to fuel biological activity. The re-engineering of natural photosynthetic pathways can provide inspiration for sustainable fuel production and insights for understanding the process itself. Here, we employ a semiartificial approach to study photobiological water splitting via a pathway unavailable to nature: the direct coupling of the water oxidation enzyme, photosystem II, to the H2 evolving enzyme, hydrogenase. Essential to this approach is the integration of the isolated enzymes into the artificial circuit of a photoelectrochemical cell. We therefore developed a tailor-made hierarchically structured indium-tin oxide electrode that gives rise to the excellent integration of both photosystem II and hydrogenase for performing the anodic and cathodic half-reactions, respectively. When connected together with the aid of an applied bias, the semiartificial cell demonstrated quantitative electron flow from photosystem II to the hydrogenase with the production of H2 and O2 being in the expected two-to-one ratio and a light-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 5.4% under low-intensity red-light irradiation. We thereby demonstrate efficient light-driven water splitting using a pathway inaccessible to biology and report on a widely applicable in vitro platform for the controlled coupling of enzymatic redox processes to meaningfully study photocatalytic reactions.

  12. Unusual reaction of [NiFe]-hydrogenases with cyanide.

    PubMed

    Hexter, Suzannah V; Chung, Min-Wen; Vincent, Kylie A; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2014-07-23

    Cyanide reacts rapidly with [NiFe]-hydrogenases (hydrogenase-1 and hydrogenase-2 from Escherichia coli) under mild oxidizing conditions, inhibiting the electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrogen as recorded by protein film electrochemistry. Electrochemical, EPR, and FTIR measurements show that the final enzyme product, formed within a second (even under 100% H2), is the resting state known as Ni-B, which contains a hydroxido-bridged species, Ni(III)-μ(OH)-Fe(II), at the active site. "Cyanide inhibition" is easily reversed because it is simply the reductive activation of Ni-B. This paper brings back into focus an observation originally made in the 1940s that cyanide inhibits microbial H2 oxidation and addresses the interesting mechanism by which cyanide promotes the formation of Ni-B. As a much stronger nucleophile than hydroxide, cyanide binds more rapidly and promotes oxidation of Ni(II) to Ni(III); however, it is quickly replaced by hydroxide which is a far superior bridging ligand.

  13. [FeFe]-hydrogenase models assembled into vesicular structures.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Kristin; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Wolter, Nonio; Rüger, Ronny; Alpermann, Theodor; Steiniger, Frank; Gabel, Detlef; Förster, Stephan; Weigand, Wolfgang; Fahr, Alfred

    2014-03-01

    Compartmentalization is a major prerequisite for the origin of life on earth according to Wächtershäuser "Iron-Sulfur-World". The hypothesis is mainly based on an autocatalytic inorganic energy reproducing redox system consisting of iron and sulfur as requirement for the subsequent synthesis of complex organic structures. Here, we modified [FeFe]-hydrogenase models by means of covalent coupling to either oleic acid or the amphiphilic block copolymer polybutadiene-polyethyleneoxide (PB-PEO) and incorporated those into the membranes of vesicles composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or the unmodified amphiphilic polymer (polymersomes). We employed a [2Fe-2S] cluster as a hydrogenase model, since these structures are known to be suitable catalysts for the generation of H2 in the presence of weak acids. Successful incorporation was confirmed by spectrophotometric iron quantification and the vesicles formed were characterized by size determination (photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS)), and zeta potential as well as by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). The modified models could be incorporated into liposomes or polymersomes up to molar proportions of 3.15% and 28%, respectively. Due to the immobilization in vesicular bilayers the [FeFe]-hydrogenase models can even exhibit catalytic action under the particular conditions of the intravesicular microenvironment. Our results suggest that the vesicular systems described may be applied as a nanoreactor for the reduction of encapsulated substances by generating hydrogen and thus as a minimal cell model.

  14. EPR Spectroscopic Studies of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Maturation.

    PubMed

    Suess, Daniel L M; Britt, R David

    2015-09-01

    Proton reduction and H2 oxidation are key elementary reactions for solar fuel production. Hydrogenases interconvert H(+) and H2 with remarkable efficiency and have therefore received much attention in this context. For [FeFe]-hydrogenases, catalysis occurs at a unique cofactor called the H-cluster. In this article, we discuss ways in which EPR spectroscopy has elucidated aspects of the bioassembly of the H-cluster, with a focus on four case studies: EPR spectroscopic identification of a radical en route to the CO and CN(-) ligands of the H-cluster, tracing (57)Fe from the maturase HydG into the H-cluster, characterization of the auxiliary Fe-S cluster in HydG, and isotopic labeling of the CN(-) ligands of HydA for electronic structure studies of its Hox state. Advances in cell-free maturation protocols have enabled several of these mechanistic studies, and understanding H-cluster maturation may in turn provide insights leading to improvements in hydrogenase production for biotechnological applications.

  15. Experimental approaches to kinetics of gas diffusion in hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Fanny; Dementin, Sébastien; Burlat, Bénédicte; Cournac, Laurent; Volbeda, Anne; Champ, Stéphanie; Martin, Lydie; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Bertrand, Patrick; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan; Rousset, Marc; Léger, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenases, which catalyze H2 to H+ conversion as part of the bioenergetic metabolism of many microorganisms, are among the metalloenzymes for which a gas-substrate tunnel has been described by using crystallography and molecular dynamics. However, the correlation between protein structure and gas-diffusion kinetics is unexplored. Here, we introduce two quantitative methods for probing the rates of diffusion within hydrogenases. One uses protein film voltammetry to resolve the kinetics of binding and release of the competitive inhibitor CO; the other is based on interpreting the yield in the isotope exchange assay. We study structurally characterized mutants of a NiFe hydrogenase, and we show that two mutations, which significantly narrow the tunnel near the entrance of the catalytic center, decrease the rates of diffusion of CO and H2 toward and from the active site by up to 2 orders of magnitude. This proves the existence of a functional channel, which matches the hydrophobic cavity found in the crystal. However, the changes in diffusion rates do not fully correlate with the obstruction induced by the mutation and deduced from the x-ray structures. Our results demonstrate the necessity of measuring diffusion rates and emphasize the role of side-chain dynamics in determining these. PMID:18685111

  16. Reconstitution of [Fe]-hydrogenase using model complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Seigo; Chen, Dafa; Xu, Tao; Wodrich, Matthew D.; Fujishiro, Takashi; Schultz, Katherine M.; Kahnt, Jörg; Ataka, Kenichi; Hu, Xile

    2015-12-01

    [Fe]-Hydrogenase catalyses the reversible hydrogenation of a methenyltetrahydromethanopterin substrate, which is an intermediate step during the methanogenesis from CO2 and H2. The active site contains an iron-guanylylpyridinol cofactor, in which Fe2+ is coordinated by two CO ligands, as well as an acyl carbon atom and a pyridinyl nitrogen atom from a 3,4,5,6-substituted 2-pyridinol ligand. However, the mechanism of H2 activation by [Fe]-hydrogenase is unclear. Here we report the reconstitution of [Fe]-hydrogenase from an apoenzyme using two FeGP cofactor mimics to create semisynthetic enzymes. The small-molecule mimics reproduce the ligand environment of the active site, but are inactive towards H2 binding and activation on their own. We show that reconstituting the enzyme using a mimic that contains a 2-hydroxypyridine group restores activity, whereas an analogous enzyme with a 2-methoxypyridine complex was essentially inactive. These findings, together with density functional theory computations, support a mechanism in which the 2-hydroxy group is deprotonated before it serves as an internal base for heterolytic H2 cleavage.

  17. Clustering of genes necessary for hydrogen oxidation in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H W; Wall, J D

    1991-01-01

    Three cosmids previously shown to contain information necessary for the expression of uptake of hydrogenase in Rhodobacter capsulatus were found to be present in a cluster on the chromosome. Earlier genetic experiments suggested the presence of at least six genes essential for hydrogenase activity that are now shown to be in a region of approximately 18 kb that includes the structural genes for the enzyme. A potential response regulator gene was sequenced as a part of the hup gene region. PMID:2007559

  18. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP)

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that manifests as a debilitating headache associated with altered sensory perception. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is now firmly established as a key player in migraine. Clinical trials carried out during the past decade have proved that CGRP receptor antagonists are effective for treating migraine, and antibodies to the receptor and CGRP are currently under investigation. Despite this progress in the clinical arena, the mechanisms by which CGRP triggers migraine remain uncertain. This review discusses mechanisms whereby CGRP enhances sensitivity to sensory input at multiple levels in both the periphery and central nervous system. Future studies on epistatic and epigenetic regulators of CGRP actions are expected to shed further light on CGRP actions in migraine. In conclusion, targeting CGRP represents an approachable therapeutic strategy for migraine. PMID:25340934

  19. Enhanced Hydrogen Production by Co-cultures of Hydrogenase and Nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Kim, Young Su; Park, Ju-Yong; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-03-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a bacterium that can produce hydrogen by interaction with hydrogenase and nitrogenase. We report a hydrogen production system using co-cultivation of hydrogenase in liquid medium and immobilized nitrogenase in Escherichia coli. The recombinant plasmid has been constructed to analyze the effect of hydrogen production on the expression of hupSL hydrogenase and nifHDK nitrogenase isolated from R. sphaeroides. All recombinant E. coli strains were cultured anaerobically, and cells for nitrogenase were immobilized in agar gel, whereas cells for hydrogenase were supplemented on the nitrogenase agar gel. The hupSL hydrogenase has been observed to enhance hydrogen production and hydrogenase activity under co-culture with nifHDK nitrogenase. The maximum hydrogen production has been obtained at an agar gel concentration and a cell concentration for co-culture of 2 % and 6.4 × 10(8) CFU. Thus, co-culture of hupSL hydrogenase and nifHDK nitrogenase provides a promising route for enhancing the hydrogen production and hydrogenase activity.

  20. Acetylene inhibition of Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase: Acetylene binds tightly to the large subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Jinhua Sun; Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J. )

    1992-03-31

    Acetylene is a slow-binding inhibitor of the Ni- and Fe-containing dimeric hydrogenase isolated from Azotobacter vinelandii. Acetylene was released from hydrogenase during the recovery from inhibition. This indicates that no transformation of acetylene to another compound occurred as a result of the interaction with hydrogenase. However, the release of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} proceeds more rapidly than the recovery of activity, which indicates that release of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} is not sufficient for recovery of activity. Acetylene binds tightly to native hydrogenase; hydrogenase and radioactivity coelute from a gel permeation column following inhibition with {sup 14}C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. Acetylene, or a derivative, remains bound to the large 65,000 MW subunit (and not to the small 35,000 MW subunit) of hydrogenase following denaturation as evidence by SDS-PAGE and fluorography of {sup 14}C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-inhibited hydrogenase. This result suggests that C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and by analogy H{sub 2}, binds to and is activated by the large subunit of this dimeric hydrogenase. Radioactivity is lost from {sup 14}C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-inhibited protein during recovery. The inhibition is remarkably specific for C{sub 2}H{sub 2}; propyne, butyne, and ethylene are not inhibitors.

  1. Cloning and sequencing of a putative Escherichia coli [NiFe] hydrogenase-1 operon containing six open reading frames.

    PubMed Central

    Menon, N K; Robbins, J; Peck, H D; Chatelus, C Y; Choi, E S; Przybyla, A E

    1990-01-01

    DNA encompassing the structural genes of an Escherichia coli [NiFe] hydrogenase has been cloned and sequenced. The genes were identified as those encoding the large and small subunits of hydrogenase isozyme 1 based on NH2-terminal sequences of purified subunits (kindly provided by K. Francis and K. T. Shanmugam). The structural genes formed part of a putative operon that contained four additional open reading frames. We have designated the operon hya and the six open reading frames hyaA through F. hyaA and hyaB encode the small and large structural subunits, respectively. The nucleotide-derived amino acid sequence of hyaC has a calculated molecular mass of 27.6 kilodaltons, contains 20% aromatic residues, and has four potential membrane-spanning regions. Open reading frames hyaD through F could encode polypeptides of 21.5, 14.9, and 31.5 kilodaltons, respectively. These putative peptides have no homology to other reported protein sequences, and their functions are unknown. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:2180913

  2. Brownian Dynamics and Molecular Dynamics Study of the Association between Hydrogenase and Ferredoxin from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hai; Chang, Christopher H.; King, Paul W.; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Kim, Kwiseon

    2008-01-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can catalyze the reduction of protons to hydrogen gas using electrons supplied from photosystem I and transferred via ferredoxin. To better understand the association of the hydrogenase and the ferredoxin, we have simulated the process over multiple timescales. A Brownian dynamics simulation method gave an initial thorough sampling of the rigid-body translational and rotational phase spaces, and the resulting trajectories were used to compute the occupancy and free-energy landscapes. Several important hydrogenase-ferredoxin encounter complexes were identified from this analysis, which were then individually simulated using atomistic molecular dynamics to provide more details of the hydrogenase and ferredoxin interaction. The ferredoxin appeared to form reasonable complexes with the hydrogenase in multiple orientations, some of which were good candidates for inclusion in a transition state ensemble of configurations for electron transfer. PMID:18621810

  3. Distinct redox behaviour of prosthetic groups in ready and unready hydrogenase from Chromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Coremans, J M; van der Zwaan, J W; Albracht, S P

    1992-02-26

    The redox behaviour of the Ni(III)/Ni(II) transition in hydrogenase from Chromatium vinosum is described and compared with the redox behaviour of the nickel ion in the F420-nonreducing hydrogenase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. Analogous to the situation in the oxidised hydrogenase of Desulfovibrio gigas (Fernandez, V.M., Hatchikian, E.C., Patil, D.S. and Cammack, R. (1986) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 883, 145-154), the C. vinosum enzyme can also exist in two forms: the 'unready' form (EPR characteristics of Ni(III): gx,y,z = 2.32, 2.24, 2.01) and the 'ready' form (EPR characteristics Ni(III): gx,y,z = 2.34, 2.16, 2.01). Like in the oxidised enzyme of M. thermoautotrophicum the Ni(III)/Ni(II) transition for the unready form titrated completely reversible (both at pH 6.0 and pH 8.0). In contrast, the reversibility of the Ni(III)/Ni(II) transition in the ready enzyme was strongly dependent on pH and temperature. At pH 6.0 and 2 degrees C reduction of Ni(III) in ready enzyme was completely irreversible, whereas at pH 8.0 and 30 degrees C Ni(III) in both ready and unready enzyme titrated with E0' = -115 mV (n = 1). Hampered redox equilibration between the ready enzyme and the mediating dyes is interpreted in terms of an obstruction of the electron transfer from nickel at the active site to the artificial electron acceptors in solution. The origin of this obstruction might be related to possible changes in the protein structure induced by the activation process. The E0'-value of the Ni(III)/Ni(II) equilibrium was pH sensitive (-60 mV/delta pH) indicating that reduction of nickel is coupled to a protonation. A similar pH-dependence was observed for the titration of the spin-spin interaction of Ni(III) and a special form of the [3Fe-4S]+ cluster (E0' = +150 mV, pH 8.0, 30 degrees C). Redox equilibration of this coupling was extremely sensitive to pH and temperature. The uncoupled [3Fe-4S]+ cluster titrated pH-independently with E0' = -10 mV (pH 8.0, 30 degrees C).

  4. Single crystal EPR study of the Ni center of NiFe hydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geßner, Ch.; Trofanchuk, O.; Kawagoe, K.; Higuchi, Y.; Yasuoka, N.; Lubitz, W.

    1996-07-01

    EPR spectra of single crystals of NiFe hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F were evaluated and yielded the g-tensors of the Ni center for two different states of enzyme. The g-values associated with these states are identical to those measured in frozen solutions for the ready (NiB) and the unready (NiA) form of the Ni center. Directions of the g-tensor axes were determined relative to the crystal symmetry axes. The obtained changes of g-values and tensor axes orientations between NiA and NiB can be explained by a structural difference involving modification of a cysteine sulfur ligand.

  5. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  6. HydDB: A web tool for hydrogenase classification and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Søndergaard, Dan; Pedersen, Christian N. S.; Greening, Chris

    2016-01-01

    H2 metabolism is proposed to be the most ancient and diverse mechanism of energy-conservation. The metalloenzymes mediating this metabolism, hydrogenases, are encoded by over 60 microbial phyla and are present in all major ecosystems. We developed a classification system and web tool, HydDB, for the structural and functional analysis of these enzymes. We show that hydrogenase function can be predicted by primary sequence alone using an expanded classification scheme (comprising 29 [NiFe], 8 [FeFe], and 1 [Fe] hydrogenase classes) that defines 11 new classes with distinct biological functions. Using this scheme, we built a web tool that rapidly and reliably classifies hydrogenase primary sequences using a combination of k-nearest neighbors’ algorithms and CDD referencing. Demonstrating its capacity, the tool reliably predicted hydrogenase content and function in 12 newly-sequenced bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. HydDB provides the capacity to browse the amino acid sequences of 3248 annotated hydrogenase catalytic subunits and also contains a detailed repository of physiological, biochemical, and structural information about the 38 hydrogenase classes defined here. The database and classifier are freely and publicly available at http://services.birc.au.dk/hyddb/ PMID:27670643

  7. Intracellular Location and O2 Sensitivity of Uptake Hydrogenase in Azospirillum spp

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Changlin; Knowles, Roger

    1989-01-01

    Uptake hydrogenase activity of Azospirillum brasilense in vitro (cell-free extract) was very much more sensitive to O2 than was that of A. amazonense, and the O2 pressure optima for uptake hydrogenase activities were 0.01 and 0.4 to 3 kPa for A. brasilense and A. amazonense, respectively. The addition of superoxide dismutase did not increase uptake hydrogenase activity of A. brasilense either in vivo or in vitro. The O2 uptake rates of A. brasilense and A. amazonense were nearly the same. Inhibition of A. brasilense O2-dependent uptake hydrogenase activity by O2 was highly reversible under the conditions tested. O2 also markedly inhibited in vitro methylene blue-dependent uptake hydrogenase activity of A. brasilense, and this inhibition was highly reversible. It is concluded that the difference in O2 tolerance of the uptake hydrogenases is not due to a difference in respiratory protection in the two species and may be due to inherent differences in the two enzymes. For the three species, A. brasilense, A. amazonense, and A. lipoferum, almost all the recovered methylene blue-dependent uptake hydrogenase activity was associated with the membrane fraction. PMID:16348011

  8. The direct role of selenocysteine in [NiFeSe] hydrogenase maturation and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Marques, Marta C; Tapia, Cristina; Gutiérrez-Sanz, Oscar; Ramos, Ana Raquel; Keller, Kimberly L; Wall, Judy D; De Lacey, Antonio L; Matias, Pedro M; Pereira, Inês A C

    2017-03-20

    Hydrogenases are highly active enzymes for hydrogen production and oxidation. [NiFeSe] hydrogenases, in which selenocysteine is a ligand to the active site Ni, have high catalytic activity and a bias for H2 production. In contrast to [NiFe] hydrogenases, they display reduced H2 inhibition and are rapidly reactivated after contact with oxygen. Here we report an expression system for production of recombinant [NiFeSe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and study of a selenocysteine-to-cysteine variant (Sec489Cys) in which, for the first time, a [NiFeSe] hydrogenase was converted to a [NiFe] type. This modification led to severely reduced Ni incorporation, revealing the direct involvement of this residue in the maturation process. The Ni-depleted protein could be partly reconstituted to generate an enzyme showing much lower activity and inactive states characteristic of [NiFe] hydrogenases. The Ni-Sec489Cys variant shows that selenium has a crucial role in protection against oxidative damage and the high catalytic activities of the [NiFeSe] hydrogenases.

  9. Characterization of [FeFe] Hydrogenase O2 Sensitivity Using a New, Physiological Approach.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jamin; Shiigi, Stacey; Rohovie, Marcus; Mehta, Kunal; Swartz, James R

    2016-10-07

    [FeFe] hydrogenases catalyze rapid H2 production but are highly O2-sensitive. Developing O2-tolerant enzymes is needed for sustainable H2 production technologies, but the lack of a quantitative and predictive assay for O2 tolerance has impeded progress. We describe a new approach to provide quantitative assessment of O2 sensitivity by using an assay employing ferredoxin NADP(+) reductase (FNR) to transfer electrons from NADPH to hydrogenase via ferredoxins (Fd). Hydrogenase inactivation is measured during H2 production in an O2-containing environment. An alternative assay uses dithionite (DTH) to provide reduced Fd. This second assay measures the remaining hydrogenase activity in periodic samples taken from the NADPH-driven reaction solutions. The second assay validates the more convenient NADPH-driven assay, which better mimics physiological conditions. During development of the NADPH-driven assay and while characterizing the Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp) [FeFe] hydrogenase, CpI, we detected significant rates of direct electron loss from reduced Fd to O2 However, this loss does not interfere with measurement of first order hydrogenase inactivation, providing rate constants insensitive to initial hydrogenase concentration. We show increased activity and O2 tolerance for a protein fusion between Cp ferredoxin (CpFd) and CpI mediated by a 15-amino acid linker but not for a longer linker. We suggest that this precise, solution phase assay for [FeFe] hydrogenase O2 sensitivity and the insights we provide constitute an important advance toward the discovery of the O2-tolerant [FeFe] hydrogenases required for photosynthetic, biological H2 production. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Hydrogen Production Catalyzed by Bidirectional, Biomimetic Models of the [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Active site mimics of [FeFe]-hydrogenase are shown to be bidirectional catalysts, producing H2 upon treatment with protons and reducing equivalents. This reactivity complements the previously reported oxidation of H2 by these same catalysts in the presence of oxidants. The complex Fe2(adtBn)(CO)3(dppv)(PFc*Et2) ([1]0; adtBn = (SCH2)2NBn, dppv = cis-1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethylene, PFc*Et2 = Et2PCH2C5Me4FeCp*) reacts with excess [H(OEt2)2]BArF4 (BArF4– = B(C6H3-3,5-(CF3)2)4–) to give ∼0.5 equiv of H2 and [Fe2(adtBnH)(CO)3(dppv)(PFc*Et2)]2+ ([1H]2+). The species [1H]2+ consists of a ferrocenium ligand, an N-protonated amine, and an FeIFeI core. In the presence of additional reducing equivalents in the form of decamethylferrocene (Fc*), hydrogen evolution is catalytic, albeit slow. The related catalyst Fe2(adtBn)(CO)3(dppv)(PMe3) (3) behaves similarly in the presence of Fc*, except that in the absence of excess reducing agent it converts to the catalytically inactive μ-hydride derivative [μ-H3]+. Replacement of the adt in [1]0 with propanedithiolate (pdt) results in a catalytically inactive complex. In the course of synthesizing [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimics, new routes to ferrocenylphosphine ligands and nonamethylferrocene were developed. PMID:25364093

  11. Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M.; Walter, Mary E.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a potential renewable alternative energy carrier that could be used in the future to help supplement humanity’s growing energy needs. Unfortunately, current industrial methods for hydrogen production are expensive or environmentally unfriendly. In recent years research has focused on biological mechanisms for hydrogen production and specifically on hydrogenases, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the reduction of protons to generate hydrogen. In particular, a better understanding of this enzyme might allow us to generate hydrogen that does not use expensive metals, such as platinum, as catalysts. The soluble hydrogenase I (SHI) from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus ,more » a member of the euryarchaeota, has been studied extensively and used in various biotechnological applications. This review summarizes the strategies used in engineering and characterizing three different forms of SHI and the properties of the recombinant enzymes. SHI has also been used in in vitro systems for hydrogen production and NADPH generation and these systems are also discussed.« less

  12. Turning Cellulose Waste Into Electricity: Hydrogen Conversion by a Hydrogenase Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Abramov, Sergey M.; Sadraddinova, Elmira R.; Shestakov, Andrey I.; Voronin, Oleg G.; Karyakin, Arkadiy A.; Zorin, Nikolay A.; Netrusov, Alexander I.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen-producing thermophilic cellulolytic microorganisms were isolated from cow faeces. Rates of cellulose hydrolysis and hydrogen formation were 0.2 mM L-1 h-1 and 1 mM L-1 h-1, respectively. An enzymatic fuel cell (EFC) with a hydrogenase anode was used to oxidise hydrogen produced in a microbial bioreactor. The hydrogenase electrode was exposed for 38 days (912 h) to a thermophilic fermentation medium. The hydrogenase activity remaining after continuous operation under load was 73% of the initial value. PMID:24312437

  13. Identification of cancer-related genes and motifs in the human gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Carson, Matthew B; Gu, Jianlei; Yu, Guangjun; Lu, Hui

    2015-08-01

    The authors investigated the regulatory network motifs and corresponding motif positions of cancer-related genes. First, they mapped disease-related genes to a transcription factor regulatory network. Next, they calculated statistically significant motifs and subsequently identified positions within these motifs that were enriched in cancer-related genes. Potential mechanisms of these motifs and positions are discussed. These results could be used to identify other disease- and cancer-related genes and could also suggest mechanisms for how these genes relate to co-occurring diseases.

  14. Fractionation of sulfur isotopes by Desulfovibrio vulgaris mutants lacking hydrogenases or type I tetraheme cytochrome c 3.

    PubMed

    Sim, Min Sub; Wang, David T; Zane, Grant M; Wall, Judy D; Bosak, Tanja; Ono, Shuhei

    2013-01-01

    The sulfur isotope effect produced by sulfate reducing microbes is commonly used to trace biogeochemical cycles of sulfur and carbon in aquatic and sedimentary environments. To test the contribution of intracellular coupling between carbon and sulfur metabolisms to the overall magnitude of the sulfur isotope effect, this study compared sulfur isotope fractionations by mutants of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. We tested mutant strains lacking one or two periplasmic (Hyd, Hyn-1, Hyn-2, and Hys) or cytoplasmic hydrogenases (Ech and CooL), and a mutant lacking type I tetraheme cytochrome (TpI-c 3). In batch culture, wild-type D. vulgaris and its hydrogenase mutants had comparable growth kinetics and produced the same sulfur isotope effects. This is consistent with the reported redundancy of hydrogenases in D. vulgaris. However, the TpI-c 3 mutant (ΔcycA) exhibited slower growth and sulfate reduction rates in batch culture, and produced more H2 and an approximately 50% larger sulfur isotope effect, compared to the wild type. The magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation in the CycA deletion strain, thus, increased due to the disrupted coupling of the carbon oxidation and sulfate reduction pathways. In continuous culture, wild-type D. vulgaris and the CycA mutant produced similar sulfur isotope effects, underscoring the influence of environmental conditions on the relative contribution of hydrogen cycling to the electron transport. The large sulfur isotope effects associated with the non-ideal stoichiometry of sulfate reduction in this study imply that simultaneous fermentation and sulfate reduction may be responsible for some of the large naturally-occurring sulfur isotope effects. Overall, mutant strains provide a powerful tool to test the effect of specific redox proteins and pathways on sulfur isotope fractionation.

  15. Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase promoter (PSH) fusion to gfp (green fluorescent protein).

    PubMed

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Welch, Jeffrey; Braidy, Nady; Marquis, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyse the oxidation or production of molecular hydrogen (H2). Amongst a number of promising candidates for application in the oxidation of H2 is a soluble [Ni-Fe] uptake hydrogenase (SH) produced by Cupriavidus necator H16. In the present study, molecular characterisation of the SH operon, responsible for functional SH synthesis, was investigated by developing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system to characterise PSH promoter activity using several gene cloning approaches. A PSH promoter-gfp fusion was successfully constructed and inducible GFP expression driven by the PSH promoter under de-repressing conditions in heterotrophic growth media was demonstrated in the recombinant C. necator H16 cells. Here we report the first successful fluorescent reporter system to study PSH promoter activity in C. necator H16. The fusion construct allowed for the design of a simple screening assay to evaluate PSH activity. Furthermore, the constructed reporter system can serve as a model to develop a rapid fluorescent based reporter for subsequent small-scale process optimisation experiments for SH expression.

  16. Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase promoter (PSH) fusion to gfp (green fluorescent protein)

    PubMed Central

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Welch, Jeffrey; Braidy, Nady

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyse the oxidation or production of molecular hydrogen (H2). Amongst a number of promising candidates for application in the oxidation of H2 is a soluble [Ni–Fe] uptake hydrogenase (SH) produced by Cupriavidus necator H16. In the present study, molecular characterisation of the SH operon, responsible for functional SH synthesis, was investigated by developing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system to characterise PSH promoter activity using several gene cloning approaches. A PSH promoter-gfp fusion was successfully constructed and inducible GFP expression driven by the PSH promoter under de-repressing conditions in heterotrophic growth media was demonstrated in the recombinant C. necator H16 cells. Here we report the first successful fluorescent reporter system to study PSH promoter activity in C. necator H16. The fusion construct allowed for the design of a simple screening assay to evaluate PSH activity. Furthermore, the constructed reporter system can serve as a model to develop a rapid fluorescent based reporter for subsequent small-scale process optimisation experiments for SH expression. PMID:27547572

  17. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis suggests hydrogenase- and nitrogenase-mediated hydrogen production in Clostridium butyricum CWBI 1009.

    PubMed

    Calusinska, Magdalena; Hamilton, Christopher; Monsieurs, Pieter; Mathy, Gregory; Leys, Natalie; Franck, Fabrice; Joris, Bernard; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Wilmotte, Annick

    2015-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen, given its pollution-free combustion, has great potential to replace fossil fuels in future transportation and energy production. However, current industrial hydrogen production processes, such as steam reforming of methane, contribute significantly to the greenhouse effect. Therefore alternative methods, in particular the use of fermentative microorganisms, have attracted scientific interest in recent years. However the low overall yield obtained is a major challenge in biological H2 production. Thus, a thorough and detailed understanding of the relationships between genome content, gene expression patterns, pathway utilisation and metabolite synthesis is required to optimise the yield of biohydrogen production pathways. In this study transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the hydrogen-producing bacterium Clostridium butyricum CWBI 1009 were carried out to provide a biomolecular overview of the changes that occur when the metabolism shifts to H2 production. The growth, H2-production, and glucose-fermentation profiles were monitored in 20 L batch bioreactors under unregulated-pH and fixed-pH conditions (pH 7.3 and 5.2). Conspicuous differences were observed in the bioreactor performances and cellular metabolisms for all the tested metabolites, and they were pH dependent. During unregulated-pH glucose fermentation increased H2 production was associated with concurrent strong up-regulation of the nitrogenase coding genes. However, no such concurrent up-regulation of the [FeFe] hydrogenase genes was observed. During the fixed pH 5.2 fermentation, by contrast, the expression levels for the [FeFe] hydrogenase coding genes were higher than during the unregulated-pH fermentation, while the nitrogenase transcripts were less abundant. The overall results suggest, for the first time, that environmental factors may determine whether H2 production in C. butyricum CWBI 1009 is mediated by the hydrogenases and/or the nitrogenase. This work, contributing to

  18. Physiological Factors Determining Hydrogenase Activity in Nitrogen-Fixing Heterocystous Cyanobacteria 1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Chung; Almon, Helmar; Böger, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Four species of nitrogen-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria were compared with respect to induction of hydrogenase activity. Two of the strains contained phycoerythrin and built up high levels of carbohydrate storage material when grown in batch culture under nitrogen-fixing conditions and continuous illumination. These strains did not exhibit hydrogenase activity. Lack of activity in the phycoerythrin-containing species was determined by cell-free assays measuring both hydrogen-evolving and hydrogen-uptake activities. Apparently, expression of hydrogenase is negatively correlated with the carbohydrate pool present and concurrent respiration. Furthermore, there is an apparent relationship between the presence of phycoerythrin, carbohydrate accumulation, and the absence of hydrogenase activity. PMID:16666659

  19. Interaction of [FeFe]-hydrogenases with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedruzic Chang, Drazenka; McDonald, Timothy J.; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Heben, Michael J.; King, Paul W.

    2007-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are promising candidates for use in energy conversion devices as an active photo-collecting elements, for dissociation of bound excitons and charge-transfer from photo-excited chromophores, or as molecular wires to transport charge. Hydrogenases are enzymes that efficiently catalyze the reduction of protons from a variety of electron donors to produce molecular hydrogen. Hydrogenases together with SWNT suggest a novel biohybrid material for direct conversion of sunlight into H II. Here, we report changes in SWNT optical properties upon addition of recombinant [FeFe] hydrogenases from Clostridium acetobutylicum and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We find evidence that novel and stable charge-transfer complexes are formed under conditions of the hydrogenase catalytic turnover, providing spectroscopic handles for further study and application of this hybrid system.

  20. Radical S-Adenosyl-L-methionine Chemistry in the Synthesis of Hydrogenase and Nitrogenase Metal Cofactors

    DOE PAGES

    Byer, Amanda S.; Shepard, Eric M.; Peters, John W.; ...

    2014-12-04

    Nitrogenase, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, and [Fe]-hydrogenase enzymes perform catalysis at metal cofactors with biologically unusual non-protein ligands. Furthermore, the FeMo cofactor of nitrogenase has a MoFe7S9 cluster with a central carbon, whereas the H-cluster of [FeFe]-hydrogenase contains a 2Fe subcluster coordinated by cyanide and CO ligands as well as dithiomethylamine; the [Fe]-hydrogenase cofactor has CO and guanylylpyridinol ligands at a mononuclear iron site. Intriguingly, radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine enzymes are vital for the assembly of all three of these diverse cofactors. Here, in this minireview, we present and discuss the current state of knowledge of the radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes required for synthesis of thesemore » remarkable metal cofactors.« less

  1. Biomimetic peptide-based models of [FeFe]-hydrogenases: utilization of phosphine-containing peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Souvik; Nguyen, Thuy-Ai D.; Gan, Lu; Jones, Anne K.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide based models for [FeFe]-hydrogenase were synthesized utilizing unnatural phosphine-amino acids and their electrocatalytic properties were investigated in mixed aqueous-organic solvents.

  2. Combining Hierarchical and Associative Gene Ontology Relations with Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2007-03-01

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the Gene Ontology, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology (GO) annotations associated with the genes or gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene subontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene subontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy, and demonstrate that further improvements can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  3. The uptake hydrogenase in the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7822 protects nitrogenase from oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Sherman, Debra M; Sherman, Louis A

    2014-02-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7822 is a unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that can produce large quantities of H2 when grown diazotrophically. This strain is also capable of genetic manipulations and can represent a good model for improving H2 production from cyanobacteria. To this end, a knockout mutation was made in the hupL gene (ΔhupL), and we determined how this would affect the amount of H2 produced. The ΔhupL mutant demonstrated virtually no nitrogenase activity or H2 production when grown under N2-fixing conditions. To ensure that this mutation only affected the hupL gene, a complementation strain was constructed readily with wild-type properties; this indicated that the original insertion was only in hupL. The mutant had no uptake hydrogenase activity but had increased bidirectional hydrogenase (Hox) activity. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry under the electron microscope indicated that the mutant had neither HupL nor NifHDK, although the nif genes were transcribed. Interestingly, biochemical analysis demonstrated that both HupL and NifH could be membrane associated. The results indicated that the nif genes were transcribed but that NifHDK was either not translated or was translated but rapidly degraded. We hypothesized that the Nif proteins were made but were unusually susceptible to O2 damage. Thus, we grew the mutant cells under anaerobic conditions and found that they grew well under N2-fixing conditions. We conclude that in unicellular diazotrophs, like Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7822, the HupLS complex helps remove oxygen from the nitrogenase, and that this is a more important function than merely oxidizing the H2 produced by the nitrogenase.

  4. The Uptake Hydrogenase in the Unicellular Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. Strain PCC 7822 Protects Nitrogenase from Oxygen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Sherman, Debra M.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7822 is a unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that can produce large quantities of H2 when grown diazotrophically. This strain is also capable of genetic manipulations and can represent a good model for improving H2 production from cyanobacteria. To this end, a knockout mutation was made in the hupL gene (ΔhupL), and we determined how this would affect the amount of H2 produced. The ΔhupL mutant demonstrated virtually no nitrogenase activity or H2 production when grown under N2-fixing conditions. To ensure that this mutation only affected the hupL gene, a complementation strain was constructed readily with wild-type properties; this indicated that the original insertion was only in hupL. The mutant had no uptake hydrogenase activity but had increased bidirectional hydrogenase (Hox) activity. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry under the electron microscope indicated that the mutant had neither HupL nor NifHDK, although the nif genes were transcribed. Interestingly, biochemical analysis demonstrated that both HupL and NifH could be membrane associated. The results indicated that the nif genes were transcribed but that NifHDK was either not translated or was translated but rapidly degraded. We hypothesized that the Nif proteins were made but were unusually susceptible to O2 damage. Thus, we grew the mutant cells under anaerobic conditions and found that they grew well under N2-fixing conditions. We conclude that in unicellular diazotrophs, like Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7822, the HupLS complex helps remove oxygen from the nitrogenase, and that this is a more important function than merely oxidizing the H2 produced by the nitrogenase. PMID:24317398

  5. Catalytic mechanism of hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Final technical report, August 1, 1994--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, D.J.

    1997-10-01

    This project is focused on investigations of the catalytic mechanism of the hydrogenase found in the aerobic, N{sub 2}-fixing microorganism Azotobacter vinelandii. This report summarizes the progress during the first two years of the current project and include the anticipated course of the research for the remaining year of the current project. Because the current proposal represents a change in direction, the authors also include a brief progress report of prior DOE-sponsored research dealing with hydrogenases.

  6. (Catalytic mechanism of hydrogenase from aerobic N sub 2 -fixing microorganisms)

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of this DOE-sponsored project have contributed to our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of A. vinelandii hydrogenase. A group of inhibitors have been characterized. These provide information about the different types of redox clusters involved in catalysis and the roles of each. One group has already used acetylene in a study of three desulfovibrian hydrogenases and shown that only the NiFe hydrogenases are inhibited. We have characterized a number of spectral properties of A. vinelandii hydrogenase. The EPR signals associated with this hydrogenase in the reduced state are reminiscent of other NiFe dimeric hydrogenases such as A. eutrophus, but distinctly difference from others such as D. gigas and Chromatium vinosum. Thus, while the NiFe dimeric hydrogenases are now recognized as a large group of similar enzymes, there are differences in the spectral and catalytic properties which are not explained by their similar redox inventories, identical subunit structures, immunological cross reactivity and conserved sequences. The inhibitors we have characterized are also proving of value in the spectral characterizations. Surprisingly, we only see a significant EP signal attributable to Ni after the enzyme has been inactivated with O{sub 2} and then reduced (though not reactivated). No spectral perterbations (EPR or UV-V is) of active enzyme can be attributed to binding of H{sub 2}, even though H{sub 2} clearly binds to this form of the enzyme. Acetylene, which does not substantially perterb the EPR signal of active hydrogenase, does result in a new absorption envelope in the UV-V is spectrum. Overall, the results of this project have revealed the complex interactions of the redox clusters in catalysis through studies of inhibitor mechanisms and spectral properties. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L.; King, Paul W.; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP+. Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:21606330

  8. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L; King, Paul W; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-06-07

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP(+)-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP(+). Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport.

  9. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE PAGES

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; ...

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore » is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  10. Studies of Hybrid Nano-Bio-System: Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Svedruzic-Chang, D.; Blackburn, J. L.; McDonald, T. J.; Heben, M. J.; King, P. W.

    2008-01-01

    We have examined changes in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) optical signals upon addition of recombinant [FeFe] hydrogenases from Clostridium acetobutylicum or Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We found evidence that novel and stable charge-transfer complexes are formed only under conditions of hydrogenase catalytic turnover. Formation of the complex sensitizes the nanotubes to the proton-to-hydrogen redox half-reaction. Thus, the experimental potential can be altered by changing the pH or molecular hydrogen concentration. In the presence of molecular hydrogen, hydrogenase mediates electron injection into the conduction band of semiconducting SWNT, which was observed as a quenching of the photoluminescence signals. Here, we will present recent Raman studies, which revealed that SWNTs in a complex with hydrogenase may undergo either oxidation or reduction, depending on the electronic structure of the SWNT and the oxidation state of the enzyme. In addition, we will describe our efforts to prepare stable, solubilized SWNT/hydrogenase complexes in the absence of detergent. This work shows that SWNT/hydrogenase complexes have potential applications as a component of an energy conversion device.

  11. Integration of an [FeFe]-hydrogenase into the anaerobic metabolism of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciarán L.; Pinske, Constanze; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Parkin, Alison; Armstrong, Fraser; Palmer, Tracy; Sargent, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Biohydrogen is a potentially useful product of microbial energy metabolism. One approach to engineering biohydrogen production in bacteria is the production of non-native hydrogenase activity in a host cell, for example Escherichia coli. In some microbes, hydrogenase enzymes are linked directly to central metabolism via diaphorase enzymes that utilise NAD+/NADH cofactors. In this work, it was hypothesised that heterologous production of an NAD+/NADH-linked hydrogenase could connect hydrogen production in an E. coli host directly to its central metabolism. To test this, a synthetic operon was designed and characterised encoding an apparently NADH-dependent, hydrogen-evolving [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Caldanaerobacter subterranus. The synthetic operon was stably integrated into the E. coli chromosome and shown to produce an active hydrogenase, however no H2 production was observed. Subsequently, it was found that heterologous co-production of a pyruvate::ferredoxin oxidoreductase and ferredoxin from Thermotoga maritima was found to be essential to drive H2 production by this system. This work provides genetic evidence that the Ca.subterranus [FeFe]-hydrogenase could be operating in vivo as an electron-confurcating enzyme. PMID:26839796

  12. (Catalytic mechanism of hydrogenase from aerobic N2-fixing microorganisms). [Azotobacter vinelandii:a1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The results of this DOE-sponsored project have contributed to our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of A. vinelandii hydrogenase. A group of inhibitors have been characterized. These provide information about the different types of redox clusters involved in catalysis and the roles of each. One group has already used acetylene in a study of three desulfovibrian hydrogenases and shown that onbly the NiFe hydrogenases are inhibited. The inhibitor studies are also being extended to other enzymes. We have characterized a number of special properties of A. vinelandii hydrogenase. While the NiFe dimeric hydrogenases are now recognized as a large group of similar enzymes, there are differences in the spectral and catalytic properties which are not explained by their similar redox inventories, identical subunit structures, immunological cross reactivity and conserved sequences. Surprisingly, we only see a significant EPR signal attributable to Ni after the enzyme has been inactivated with O{sub 2} and then re-reduced (though not reactivated). Acetylene, which does not substantially perterb the EPR signal of active hydrogenase, does result in a new absorption envelope in the UV-Vis spectrum. Overall, the results of this project have revealed the complex interactions of the redox clusters in catalysis through studies of inhibitor mechanisms and spectral properties. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Reproduction-related genes in the pearl oyster genome.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Toshie; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yoji; Satoh, Nori; Awaji, Masahiko

    2013-10-01

    Molluscan reproduction has been a target of biological research because of the various reproductive strategies that have evolved in this phylum. It has also been studied for the development of fisheries technologies, particularly aquaculture. Although fundamental processes of reproduction in other phyla, such as vertebrates and arthropods, have been well studied, information on the molecular mechanisms of molluscan reproduction remains limited. The recently released draft genome of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata provides a novel and powerful platform for obtaining structural information on the genes and proteins involved in bivalve reproduction. In the present study, we analyzed the pearl oyster draft genome to screen reproduction-related genes. Analysis was mainly conducted for genes reported from other molluscs for encoding orthologs of reproduction-related proteins in other phyla. The gene search in the P. fucata gene models (version 1.1) and genome assembly (version 1.0) were performed using Genome Browser and BLAST software. The obtained gene models were then BLASTP searched against a public database to confirm the best-hit sequences. As a result, more than 40 gene models were identified with high accuracy to encode reproduction-related genes reported for P. fucata and other molluscs. These include vasa, nanos, doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors, vitellogenin, estrogen receptor, and others. The set of reproduction-related genes of P. fucata identified in the present study constitute a new tool for research on bivalve reproduction at the molecular level.

  14. Structural Characterization of the Novel and Thermal Stable Hydrogenases from the Purple Sulfur Bacteria Thiocapsa Roseopersicina and Lamprobacter Modestohalophilus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    production activity achieved for hydrogenase encapsulated in sol–gel material doped with carbon nanotubes . J. Mater. Chem., 20, 1065 (2010). Abstract...Doping hydrogenase-containing sol-gel materials with multi-walled carbon nanotubes , polyethylene glycol and methyl viologen results in a greater than...homogeneous T. roseopersicina hydrogenase and of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in silica gel was studied. It is shown that in such material between the

  15. [Screening of environmental response genes related to dental fluorosis].

    PubMed

    Hou, Guo-Qiang; Liu, Jun-Ling; Yu, Yao-Yong; Xia, Tao

    2005-09-01

    To screen environmental response genes related to dental fluorosis, and to provide clues for further researches of the molecular mechanism of fluorosis. The leukocyte gene expression profiles of control group, high-loaded fluoride group and dental fluorosis group were tested using the gene chiR HG-U133A from Affymetrix company. The results were analyzed by bioinformatical methods. Compared with control group, a total of 1057 genes were differentially expressed in high-loaded fluoride group. Of these, 148 were robustly up-regulated and 61 were robustly down-regulated. A total of 964 genes were differentially expressed in dental fluorosis group as compared with control group, including 71 robustly up-regulated genes and 60 robustly down-regulated genes. Compared with high-loaded fluoride group, 633 genes were identified to be differentially expressed in dental fluorosis group. Of these, the number of robustly up-regulated genes and robustly down-regulated genes were respectively 15 and 67. Multiple genes are related to fluorosis.

  16. Fruit growth-related genes in tomato.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Lamia; Deluche, Cynthia; Gévaudant, Frédéric; Frangne, Nathalie; Delmas, Frédéric; Hernould, Michel; Chevalier, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.) represents a model species for all fleshy fruits due to its biological cycle and the availability of numerous genetic and molecular resources. Its importance in human nutrition has made it one of the most valuable worldwide commodities. Tomato fruit size results from the combination of cell number and cell size, which are determined by both cell division and expansion. As fruit growth is mainly driven by cell expansion, cells from the (fleshy) pericarp tissue become highly polyploid according to the endoreduplication process, reaching a DNA content rarely encountered in other plant species (between 2C and 512C). Both cell division and cell expansion are under the control of complex interactions between hormone signalling and carbon partitioning, which establish crucial determinants of the quality of ripe fruit, such as the final size, weight, and shape, and organoleptic and nutritional traits. This review describes the genes known to contribute to fruit growth in tomato.

  17. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  18. CO and CN− syntheses by [FeFe]-hydrogenase maturase HydG are catalytically differentiated events

    PubMed Central

    Pagnier, Adrien; Martin, Lydie; Zeppieri, Laura; Nicolet, Yvain; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and assembly of the active site [FeFe] unit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases require at least three maturases. The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine HydG, the best characterized of these proteins, is responsible for the synthesis of the hydrogenase CO and CN− ligands from tyrosine-derived dehydroglycine (DHG). We speculated that CN− and the CO precursor −:CO2H may be generated through an elimination reaction. We tested this hypothesis with both wild type and HydG variants defective in second iron-sulfur cluster coordination by measuring the in vitro production of CO, CN−, and −:CO2H-derived formate. We indeed observed formate production under these conditions. We conclude that HydG is a multifunctional enzyme that produces DHG, CN−, and CO at three well-differentiated catalytic sites. We also speculate that homocysteine, cysteine, or a related ligand could be involved in Fe(CO)x(CN)y transfer to the HydF carrier/scaffold. PMID:26699472

  19. CO and CN- syntheses by [FeFe]-hydrogenase maturase HydG are catalytically differentiated events.

    PubMed

    Pagnier, Adrien; Martin, Lydie; Zeppieri, Laura; Nicolet, Yvain; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C

    2016-01-05

    The synthesis and assembly of the active site [FeFe] unit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases require at least three maturases. The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine HydG, the best characterized of these proteins, is responsible for the synthesis of the hydrogenase CO and CN(-) ligands from tyrosine-derived dehydroglycine (DHG). We speculated that CN(-) and the CO precursor (-):CO2H may be generated through an elimination reaction. We tested this hypothesis with both wild type and HydG variants defective in second iron-sulfur cluster coordination by measuring the in vitro production of CO, CN(-), and (-):CO2H-derived formate. We indeed observed formate production under these conditions. We conclude that HydG is a multifunctional enzyme that produces DHG, CN(-), and CO at three well-differentiated catalytic sites. We also speculate that homocysteine, cysteine, or a related ligand could be involved in Fe(CO)x(CN)y transfer to the HydF carrier/scaffold.

  20. [Research progress in relative crystallin genes of congenital cataract].

    PubMed

    Wang, D D; Yang, H J; Yi, J L

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cataract is the common cause of visual disability in children. Nearly one third of congenital cataract cases may have a related genetic mutation. With the development of molecular genetics, especially gentechnik, more and more genes, such as crystallin genes, membrane protein genes, eytoskeletal protein genes and regulatory protein genes have been confirmed to participate in the process of congenital cataract. Furthermore, crystallin genes account for most of these genes and the crystallin has the highest amount of the whole protein in lens.It has been found that nearly one hundred mutations in crystallin genes are associated with the onset of congenital cataract. Researchers are exploring how these mutations further affect the function of cellular biology and eventually lead to cataract. Although more and more research results gradually reveal the pathogenesis of congenital cataract from the level of gene and protein, the specific pathogenesis is still unclear. The recent progression about inherited congenital cataract related with crysallin genes is summarized in this review.

  1. Sex-related genes, directional sexual selection, and speciation.

    PubMed

    Civetta, A; Singh, R S

    1998-07-01

    Reproductive isolation and speciation can result from the establishment of either premating or postmating barriers that restrict gene flow between populations. Recent studies of speciation have been dominated by a molecular approach to dissect the genetic basis of hybrid male sterility, a specific form of postmating reproductive isolation. However, relatively little attention has been paid to the evolution of genes involved in premating isolation and genes generally involved in other sex-related functions (e.g., mating behavior, fertilization, spermatogenesis, sex determination). We have assembled DNA sequences from 51 nuclear genes and classified them based on their functional characteristics. The proportion of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions were compared between Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila simulans, and Drosophila pseudoobscura, as well as between Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae. We found a high ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions for sex-related genes (i.e., genes involved in mating behavior, fertilization, spermatogenesis, or sex determination). The results suggest that directional sexual selection has shaped the evolution of sex-related genes and that these changes have more likely occurred during the early stages of speciation. It is possible that directional selection becomes relaxed after reproductive isolation has been completed between more distantly related species (e.g., D. melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura). However, a saturation in the number of nucleotide substitutions since the time of species separation may mask any sign of directional selection between more distantly related species.

  2. Identification of Development and Pathogenicity Related Gene in Botrytis cinerea via Digital Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bin; Si, He Long; Sun, Zhi Ying; Xu, Zheng; Chen, Zhan; Zhang, Jin lin; Xing, Ji Hong; Dong, Jin Gao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Botrytis cinerea, a haploid Euascomycete fungus that infects numerous crops, has been used as a model system for studying molecular phytopathology. Botrytis cinerea adopts various modes of infection, which are mediated by a number of pathogenicity and virulence-related genes. Many of these genes have not been reported previously. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate development and pathogenicity-related genes between a novel nonpathogenic mutant and the Wild Type (WT) in B. cinerea. Materials and Methods: Digital Gene Expression (DGE) tag profiling can reveal novel genes that may be involved in development and pathogenicity of plant pathogen. A large volume of B. cinerea tag-seq was generated to identify differential expressed genes by the Illumina DGE tag profiling technology. Results: A total of 4,182,944 and 4,182,021 clean tags were obtained from the WT and a nonpathogenic mutant stain (BCt89), respectively, and 10,410 differentially expressed genes were identified. In addition, 84 genes were expressed in the WT only while 34 genes were expressed in the mutant only. A total of 664 differentially expressed genes were involved in 91 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome pathways, including signaling and metabolic pathways. Conclusions: Expression levels of 1,426 genes were significantly up-regulated in the mutant compared to WT. Furthermore, 301 genes were down-regulated with False Discovery Rates (FDR) of < 0.001 and absolute value of log2 Ratio of ≥ 1. PMID:26034553

  3. Prediction and analysis of retinoblastoma related genes through gene ontology and KEGG.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Li, Bi-Qing; Jiang, Min; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Lin; Huang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important and challenging problems in biomedicine is how to predict the cancer related genes. Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary intraocular malignancy usually occurring in childhood. Early detection of RB could reduce the morbidity and promote the probability of disease-free survival. Therefore, it is of great importance to identify RB genes. In this study, we developed a computational method to predict RB related genes based on Dagging, with the maximum relevance minimum redundancy (mRMR) method followed by incremental feature selection (IFS). 119 RB genes were compiled from two previous RB related studies, while 5,500 non-RB genes were randomly selected from Ensemble genes. Ten datasets were constructed based on all these RB and non-RB genes. Each gene was encoded with a 13,126-dimensional vector including 12,887 Gene Ontology enrichment scores and 239 KEGG enrichment scores. Finally, an optimal feature set including 1061 GO terms and 8 KEGG pathways was obtained. Analysis showed that these features were closely related to RB. It is anticipated that the method can be applied to predict the other cancer related genes as well.

  4. Breathing air to save energy--new insights into the ecophysiological role of high-affinity [NiFe]-hydrogenase in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    PubMed

    Liot, Quentin; Constant, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The Streptomyces avermitilis genome encodes a putative high-affinity [NiFe]-hydrogenase conferring the ability to oxidize tropospheric H2 in mature spores. Here, we used a combination of transcriptomic and mutagenesis approaches to shed light on the potential ecophysiological role of the enzyme. First, S. avermitilis was either exposed to low or hydrogenase-saturating levels of H2 to investigate the impact of H2 on spore transcriptome. In total, 1293 genes were differentially expressed, with 1127 and 166 showing lower and higher expression under elevated H2 concentration, respectively. High H2 exposure lowered the expression of the Sec protein secretion pathway and ATP-binding cassette-transporters, with increased expression of genes encoding proteins directing carbon metabolism toward sugar anabolism and lower expression of NADH dehydrogenase in the respiratory chain. Overall, the expression of relA responsible for the synthesis of the pleiotropic alarmone ppGpp decreased upon elevated H2 exposure, which likely explained the reduced expression of antibiotic synthesis and stress response genes. Finally, deletion of hhySL genes resulted in a loss of H2 uptake activity and a dramatic loss of viability in spores. We propose that H2 is restricted to support the seed bank of Streptomyces under a unique survival-mixotrophic energy mode and discuss important ecological implications of this finding.

  5. The Investigation and Characterization of the Group 3 [Nickel-Iron]-Hydrogenases Using Protein Film Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Chelsea Lee

    Hydrogenases, the enzymes that reversibly convert protons and electrons to hydrogen, are used in all three domains of life. [NiFe]-hydrogenases are considered best suited for biotechnological applications because of their reversible inactivation with oxygen. Phylogenetically, there are four groups of [NiFe]-hydrogenases. The best characterized group, "uptake" hydrogenases, are membrane-bound and catalyze hydrogen oxidation in vivo. In contrast, the group 3 [NiFe]-hydrogenases are heteromultimeric, bifunctional enzymes that fulfill various cellular roles. In this dissertation, protein film electrochemistry (PFE) is used to characterize the catalytic properties of two group 3 [NiFe]-hydrogenases: HoxEFUYH from Synechocystsis sp. PCC 6803 and SHI from Pyrococcus furiosus. First, HoxEFUYH is shown to be biased towards hydrogen production. Upon exposure to oxygen, HoxEFUYH inactivates to two states, both of which can be reactivated on the timescale of seconds. Second, we show that PfSHI is the first example of an oxygen tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase that produces two inactive states upon exposure to oxygen. Both inactive states are analogous to those characterized for HoxEFUYH, but oxygen exposed PfSHI produces a greater fraction that reactivates at high potentials, enabling hydrogen oxidation in the presence of oxygen. Third, it is shown that removing the NAD(P)-reducing subunits from PfSHI leads to a decrease in bias towards hydrogen oxidation and renders the enzyme oxygen sensitive. Both traits are likely due to impaired intramolecular electron transfer. Mechanistic hypotheseses for these functional differences are considered.

  6. Hydrogenase Activity of Mineral-Associated and Suspended Populations of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Essex 6

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Reardon; T.S. Magnuson; E.S. Boyd; W.D. Leavitt; D.W. Reed; G.G. Geesey

    2014-02-01

    The interactions between sulfate-reducing microorganisms and iron oxides influence a number of important redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes including the formation of iron sulfides. Enzymes, such as hydrogenase which catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen, are known to mediate electron transfer to metals and may contribute to the formation and speciation of ferrous sulfides formed at the cell–mineral interface. In the present study, we compared the whole cell hydrogenase activity of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain Essex 6 growing as biofilms on hematite (hematite-associated) or as suspended populations using different metabolic pathways. Hematite-associated cells exhibited significantly greater hydrogenase activity than suspended populations during sulfate respiration but not during pyruvate fermentation. The enhanced activity of the hematite-associated, sulfate-grown cells appears to be dependent on iron availability rather than a general response to surface attachment since the activity of glass-associated cells did not differ from that of suspended populations. Hydrogenase activity of pyruvate-fermenting cells was stimulated by addition of iron as soluble Fe(II)Cl2 and, in the absence of added iron, both sulfate-reducing and pyruvate-fermenting cells displayed similar rates of hydrogenase activity. These data suggest that iron exerts a stronger influence on whole cell hydrogenase activity than either metabolic pathway or mode of growth. The location of hydrogenase to the cell envelope and the enhanced activity at the hematite surface in sulfate-reducing cells may influence the redox conditions that control the species of iron sulfides on the mineral surface.

  7. Rare disease relations through common genes and protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Novo, Sara; Pazos, Florencio; Chagoyen, Monica

    2016-06-01

    ODCs (Orphan Disease Connections), available at http://csbg.cnb.csic.es/odcs, is a novel resource to explore potential molecular relations between rare diseases. These molecular relations have been established through the integration of disease susceptibility genes and human protein-protein interactions. The database currently contains 54,941 relations between 3032 diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Relating significance and relations of differentially expressed genes in response to Aspergillus flavus infection in maize

    PubMed Central

    Asters, Matthew C.; Williams, W. Paul; Perkins, Andy D.; Mylroie, J. Erik; Windham, Gary L.; Shan, Xueyan

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a pathogenic fungus infecting maize and producing aflatoxins that are health hazards to humans and animals. Characterizing host defense mechanism and prioritizing candidate resistance genes are important to the development of resistant maize germplasm. We investigated methods amenable for the analysis of the significance and relations among maize candidate genes based on the empirical gene expression data obtained by RT-qPCR technique from maize inbred lines. We optimized a pipeline of analysis tools chosen from various programs to provide rigorous statistical analysis and state of the art data visualization. A network-based method was also explored to construct the empirical gene expression relational structures. Maize genes at the centers in the network were considered as important candidate genes for maize DNA marker studies. The methods in this research can be used to analyze large RT-qPCR datasets and establish complex empirical gene relational structures across multiple experimental conditions. PMID:24770700

  9. Artificially maturated [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a HYSCORE and ENDOR study of a non-natural H-cluster.

    PubMed

    Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Simmons, Trevor R; Siebel, Judith F; Artero, Vincent; Fontecave, Marc; Reijerse, Edward; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-02-21

    Hydrogenases are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of H2 as well as the reduction of protons to form H2. The active site of [FeFe] hydrogenase is referred to as the "H-cluster" and consists of a "classical" [4Fe-4S] cluster connected via a bridging cysteine thiol group to a unique [2Fe]H sub-cluster, containing CN(-) and CO ligands as well as a bidentate azadithiolate ligand. It has been recently shown that the biomimetic [Fe2(adt)(CO)4(CN)2](2-) (adt(2-) = azadithiolate) complex resembling the diiron sub-cluster can be inserted in vitro into the apo-protein of [FeFe] hydrogenase, which contains only the [4Fe-4S] part of the H-cluster, resulting in a fully active enzyme. This synthetic tool allows convenient incorporation of a variety of diiron mimics, thus generating hydrogenases with artificial active sites. [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii maturated with the biomimetic complex [Fe2(pdt)(CO)4(CN)2](2-) (pdt(2-) = propanedithiolate), in which the bridging adt(2-) ligand is replaced by pdt(2-), can be stabilized in a state strongly resembling the active oxidized (Hox) state of the native protein. This state is EPR active and the signal originates from the mixed valence Fe(I)Fe(II) state of the diiron sub-cluster. Taking advantage of the variant with (15)N and (13)C isotope labeled CN(-) ligands we performed HYSCORE and ENDOR studies on this hybrid protein. The (13)C hyperfine couplings originating from both CN(-) ligands were determined and assigned. Only the (15)N coupling from the CN(-) ligand bound to the terminal iron was observed. Detailed orientation selective ENDOR and HYSCORE experiments at multiple field positions enabled the extraction of accurate data for the relative orientations of the nitrogen and carbon hyperfine tensors. These data are consistent with the crystal structure assuming a g-tensor orientation following the local symmetry of the binuclear sub-cluster.

  10. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html.

  11. High-throughput comparison of gene fitness among related bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The contribution of a gene to the fitness of a bacterium can be assayed by whether and to what degree the bacterium tolerates transposon insertions in that gene. We use this fact to compare the fitness of syntenic homologous genes among related Salmonella strains and thereby reveal differences not apparent at the gene sequence level. Results A transposon Tn5 derivative was used to construct mutants in Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC14028 (STM1) and Salmonella Typhi Ty2 (STY1), which were then grown in rich media. The locations of 234,152 and 53,556 integration sites, respectively, were mapped by sequencing. These data were compared to similar data available for a different Ty2 isolate (STY2) and essential genes identified in E. coli K-12 (ECO). Of 277 genes considered essential in ECO, all had syntenic homologs in STM1, STY1, and STY2, and all but nine genes were either devoid of transposon insertions or had very few. For three of these nine genes, part of the annotated gene lacked transposon integrations (yejM, ftsN and murB). At least one of the other six genes, trpS, had a potentially functionally redundant gene encoded elsewhere in Salmonella but not in ECO. An additional 165 genes were almost entirely devoid of transposon integrations in all three Salmonella strains examined, including many genes associated with protein and DNA synthesis. Four of these genes (STM14_1498, STM14_2872, STM14_3360, and STM14_5442) are not found in E. coli. Notable differences in the extent of gene selection were also observed among the three different Salmonella isolates. Mutations in hns, for example, were selected against in STM1 but not in the two STY strains, which have a defect in rpoS rendering hns nonessential. Conclusions Comparisons among transposon integration profiles from different members of a species and among related species, all grown in similar conditions, identify differences in gene contributions to fitness among syntenic homologs. Further differences in

  12. Autophagy-related genes in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Uotani, Takahiro; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-06-01

    In vitro studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection induces autophagy in gastric epithelial cells. However, prolonged exposure to H. pylori reduces autophagy by preventing maturation of the autolysosome. The alterations of the autophagy-related genes in H. pylori infection are not yet fully understood. We analyzed autophagy-related gene expression in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa compared with uninfected gastric mucosa obtained from 136 Bhutanese volunteers with mild dyspeptic symptoms. We also studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of autophagy-related gene in 283 Bhutanese participants to identify the influence on susceptibility to H. pylori infection. Microarray analysis of 226 autophagy-related genes showed that 16 genes were upregulated (7%) and nine were downregulated (4%). We used quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to measure mRNA levels of the downregulated genes (ATG16L1, ATG5, ATG4D, and ATG9A) that were core molecules of autophagy. ATG16L1 and ATG5 mRNA levels in H. pylori-positive specimens (n=86) were significantly less than those in H. pylori-negative specimens (n=50). ATG16L1 mRNA levels were inversely related to H. pylori density. We also compared SNPs of ATG16L1 (rs2241880) among 206 H. pylori-positive and 77 H. pylori-negative subjects. The odds ratio for the presence of H. pylori in the GG genotype was 0.40 (95% CI: 0.18-0.91) relative to the AA/AG genotypes. Autophagy-related gene expression profiling using high-throughput microarray analysis indicated that downregulation of core autophagy machinery genes may depress autophagy functions and possibly provide a better intracellular habit for H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Spectroscopic and electrochemical characterization of the [NiFeSe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F: reversible redox behavior and interactions between electron transfer centers.

    PubMed

    Riethausen, Jana; Rüdiger, Olaf; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Shafaat, Hannah S

    2013-09-23

    Characterizing a new hydrogenase: The newly isolated [NiFeSe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F displays catalytic properties distinct from other hydrogenase proteins. Here we apply site-specific spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques to characterize these unique features at the molecular level.

  14. HupW Protease Specifically Required for Processing of the Catalytic Subunit of the Uptake Hydrogenase in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Pia; Devine, Ellenor; Stensjö, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The maturation process of [NiFe] hydrogenases includes a proteolytic cleavage of the large subunit. We constructed a mutant of Nostoc strain PCC 7120 in which hupW, encoding a putative hydrogenase-specific protease, is inactivated. Our results indicate that the protein product of hupW selectively cleaves the uptake hydrogenase in this cyanobacterium. PMID:22020512

  15. Unification of [FeFe]-hydrogenases into three structural and functional groups

    SciTech Connect

    Poudel, Saroj; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Colman, Daniel R.; Refai, Mohammed; Schut, Gerrit J.; King, Paul W.; Maness, Pin-Ching; Adams, Michael W. W.; Peters, John W.; Bothner, Brian; Boyd, Eric S.

    2016-05-27

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases (Hyd) are structurally diverse enzymes that catalyze the reversible oxidation of hydrogen (H2). Recent biochemical data demonstrate new functional roles for these enzymes, including those that function in electron bifurcation where an exergonic reaction is coupled with an endergonic reaction to drive the reversible oxidation/production of H2. To identify the structural determinants that underpin differences in enzyme functionality, a total of 714 homologous sequences of the catalytic subunit, HydA, were compiled. Bioinformatics approaches informed by biochemical data were then used to characterize differences in inferred quaternary structure, HydA active site protein environment, accessory iron-sulfur clusters in HydA, and regulatory proteins encoded in HydA gene neighborhoods. HydA homologs were clustered into one of three classification groups, Group 1 (G1), Group 2 (G2), and Group 3 (G3). G1 enzymes were predicted to be monomeric while those in G2 and G3 were predicted to be multimeric and include HydB, HydC (G2/G3) and HydD (G3) subunits. Variation in the HydA active site and accessory iron-sulfur clusters did not vary by group type. Group-specific regulatory genes were identified in the gene neighborhoods of both G2 and G3 Hyd. Analyses of purified G2 and G3 enzymes by mass spectrometry strongly suggests that they are post-translationally modified by phosphorylation. In conclusion, these results suggest that bifurcation capability is dictated primarily by the presence of both HydB and HydC in Hyd complexes, rather than by variation in HydA.

  16. Unification of [FeFe]-hydrogenases into three structural and functional groups

    DOE PAGES

    Poudel, Saroj; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Colman, Daniel R.; ...

    2016-05-27

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases (Hyd) are structurally diverse enzymes that catalyze the reversible oxidation of hydrogen (H2). Recent biochemical data demonstrate new functional roles for these enzymes, including those that function in electron bifurcation where an exergonic reaction is coupled with an endergonic reaction to drive the reversible oxidation/production of H2. To identify the structural determinants that underpin differences in enzyme functionality, a total of 714 homologous sequences of the catalytic subunit, HydA, were compiled. Bioinformatics approaches informed by biochemical data were then used to characterize differences in inferred quaternary structure, HydA active site protein environment, accessory iron-sulfur clusters in HydA, and regulatorymore » proteins encoded in HydA gene neighborhoods. HydA homologs were clustered into one of three classification groups, Group 1 (G1), Group 2 (G2), and Group 3 (G3). G1 enzymes were predicted to be monomeric while those in G2 and G3 were predicted to be multimeric and include HydB, HydC (G2/G3) and HydD (G3) subunits. Variation in the HydA active site and accessory iron-sulfur clusters did not vary by group type. Group-specific regulatory genes were identified in the gene neighborhoods of both G2 and G3 Hyd. Analyses of purified G2 and G3 enzymes by mass spectrometry strongly suggests that they are post-translationally modified by phosphorylation. In conclusion, these results suggest that bifurcation capability is dictated primarily by the presence of both HydB and HydC in Hyd complexes, rather than by variation in HydA.« less

  17. Distribution of Hydrogenases in Cyanobacteria: A Phylum-Wide Genomic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Puggioni, Vincenzo; Tempel, Sébastien; Latifi, Amel

    2016-01-01

    Microbial Molecular hydrogen (H2) cycling plays an important role in several ecological niches. Hydrogenases (H2ases), enzymes involved in H2 metabolism, are of great interest for investigating microbial communities, and producing BioH2. To obtain an overall picture of the genetic ability of Cyanobacteria to produce H2ases, we conducted a phylum wide analysis of the distribution of the genes encoding these enzymes in 130 cyanobacterial genomes. The concomitant presence of the H2ase and genes involved in the maturation process, and that of well-conserved catalytic sites in the enzymes were the three minimal criteria used to classify a strain as being able to produce a functional H2ase. The [NiFe] H2ases were found to be the only enzymes present in this phylum. Fifty-five strains were found to be potentially able produce the bidirectional Hox enzyme and 33 to produce the uptake (Hup) enzyme. H2 metabolism in Cyanobacteria has a broad ecological distribution, since only the genomes of strains collected from the open ocean do not possess hox genes. In addition, the presence of H2ase was found to increase in the late branching clades of the phylogenetic tree of the species. Surprisingly, five cyanobacterial genomes were found to possess homologs of oxygen tolerant H2ases belonging to groups 1, 3b, and 3d. Overall, these data show that H2ases are widely distributed, and are therefore probably of great functional importance in Cyanobacteria. The present finding that homologs to oxygen-tolerant H2ases are present in this phylum opens new perspectives for applying the process of photosynthesis in the field of H2 production. PMID:28083017

  18. Distribution of Hydrogenases in Cyanobacteria: A Phylum-Wide Genomic Survey.

    PubMed

    Puggioni, Vincenzo; Tempel, Sébastien; Latifi, Amel

    2016-01-01

    Microbial Molecular hydrogen (H2) cycling plays an important role in several ecological niches. Hydrogenases (H2ases), enzymes involved in H2 metabolism, are of great interest for investigating microbial communities, and producing BioH2. To obtain an overall picture of the genetic ability of Cyanobacteria to produce H2ases, we conducted a phylum wide analysis of the distribution of the genes encoding these enzymes in 130 cyanobacterial genomes. The concomitant presence of the H2ase and genes involved in the maturation process, and that of well-conserved catalytic sites in the enzymes were the three minimal criteria used to classify a strain as being able to produce a functional H2ase. The [NiFe] H2ases were found to be the only enzymes present in this phylum. Fifty-five strains were found to be potentially able produce the bidirectional Hox enzyme and 33 to produce the uptake (Hup) enzyme. H2 metabolism in Cyanobacteria has a broad ecological distribution, since only the genomes of strains collected from the open ocean do not possess hox genes. In addition, the presence of H2ase was found to increase in the late branching clades of the phylogenetic tree of the species. Surprisingly, five cyanobacterial genomes were found to possess homologs of oxygen tolerant H2ases belonging to groups 1, 3b, and 3d. Overall, these data show that H2ases are widely distributed, and are therefore probably of great functional importance in Cyanobacteria. The present finding that homologs to oxygen-tolerant H2ases are present in this phylum opens new perspectives for applying the process of photosynthesis in the field of H2 production.

  19. Unification of [FeFe]-hydrogenases into three structural and functional groups

    SciTech Connect

    Poudel, Saroj; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Colman, Daniel R.; Refai, Mohammed; Schut, Gerrit J.; King, Paul W.; Maness, Pin-Ching; Adams, Michael W. W.; Peters, John W.; Bothner, Brian; Boyd, Eric S.

    2016-05-27

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases (Hyd) are structurally diverse enzymes that catalyze the reversible oxidation of hydrogen (H2). Recent biochemical data demonstrate new functional roles for these enzymes, including those that function in electron bifurcation where an exergonic reaction is coupled with an endergonic reaction to drive the reversible oxidation/production of H2. To identify the structural determinants that underpin differences in enzyme functionality, a total of 714 homologous sequences of the catalytic subunit, HydA, were compiled. Bioinformatics approaches informed by biochemical data were then used to characterize differences in inferred quaternary structure, HydA active site protein environment, accessory iron-sulfur clusters in HydA, and regulatory proteins encoded in HydA gene neighborhoods. HydA homologs were clustered into one of three classification groups, Group 1 (G1), Group 2 (G2), and Group 3 (G3). G1 enzymes were predicted to be monomeric while those in G2 and G3 were predicted to be multimeric and include HydB, HydC (G2/G3) and HydD (G3) subunits. Variation in the HydA active site and accessory iron-sulfur clusters did not vary by group type. Group-specific regulatory genes were identified in the gene neighborhoods of both G2 and G3 Hyd. Analyses of purified G2 and G3 enzymes by mass spectrometry strongly suggests that they are post-translationally modified by phosphorylation. In conclusion, these results suggest that bifurcation capability is dictated primarily by the presence of both HydB and HydC in Hyd complexes, rather than by variation in HydA.

  20. Identification of feature genes for smoking-related lung adenocarcinoma based on gene expression profile data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Ni, Ran; Zhang, Hui; Miao, Lijun; Wang, Jing; Jia, Wenqing; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the genes and pathways associated with smoking-related lung adenocarcinoma. Three lung adenocarcinoma associated datasets (GSE43458, GSE10072, and GSE50081), the subjects of which included smokers and nonsmokers, were downloaded to screen the differentially expressed feature genes between smokers and nonsmokers. Based on the identified feature genes, we constructed the protein–protein interaction (PPI) network and optimized feature genes using closeness centrality (CC) algorithm. Then, the support vector machine (SVM) classification model was constructed based on the feature genes with higher CC values. Finally, pathway enrichment analysis of the feature genes was performed. A total of 213 down-regulated and 83 up-regulated differentially expressed genes were identified. In the constructed PPI network, the top ten nodes with higher degrees and CC values included ANK3, EPHA4, FGFR2, etc. The SVM classifier was constructed with 27 feature genes, which could accurately identify smokers and nonsmokers. Pathways enrichment analysis for the 27 feature genes revealed that they were significantly enriched in five pathways, including proteoglycans in cancer (EGFR, SDC4, SDC2, etc.), and Ras signaling pathway (FGFR2, PLA2G1B, EGFR, etc.). The 27 feature genes, such as EPHA4, FGFR2, and EGFR for SVM classifier construction and cancer-related pathways of Ras signaling pathway and proteoglycans in cancer may play key roles in the progression and development of smoking-related lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27994470

  1. Functional model for the [Fe] hydrogenase inspired by the frustrated Lewis pair concept.

    PubMed

    Kalz, Kai F; Brinkmeier, Alexander; Dechert, Sebastian; Mata, Ricardo A; Meyer, Franc

    2014-11-26

    [Fe] hydrogenase (Hmd) catalyzes the heterolytic splitting of H2 by using, in its active site, a unique organometallic iron-guanylylpyridinol (FeGP) cofactor and, as a hydride acceptor, the substrate methenyltetrahydromethanopterin (methenyl-H4MPT(+)). The combination FeGP/methenyl-H4MPT(+) and its reactivity bear resemblance to the concept of frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), some of which have been shown to heterolytically activate H2. The present work exploits this interpretation of Hmd reactivity by using the combination of Lewis basic ruthenium metalates, namely K[CpRu(CO)2] (KRp) and a related polymeric Cp/Ru/CO compound (Rs), with the new imidazolinium salt 1,3-bis(2,6-difluorophenyl)-2-(4-tolyl)imidazolinium bromide ([(Tol)Im(F4)](+)Br(-)) that was designed to emulate the hydride acceptor properties of methenyl-H4MPT(+). Solid-state structures of [(Tol)Im(F4)](+)Br(-) and the corresponding imidazolidine H(Tol)Im(F4) reveal that the heterocycle undergoes similar structural changes as in the biological substrate. DFT calculations indicate that heterolytic splitting of dihydrogen by the FLP Rp(-)/[(Tol)Im(F4)](+) is exothermic, but the formation of the initial Lewis pair should be unfavorable in polar solvents. Consequently the combination Rp(-)/[(Tol)Im(F4)](+) does not react with H2 but leads instead to side products from nucleophilic substitution (k = 4 × 10(-2) L mol (-1) s(-1) at room temperature). In contrast, the heterogeneous combination Rs/[(Tol)Im(F4)](+) does split H2 heterolytically to give H(Tol)Im(F4) and HRuCp(CO)2 (HRp) or D(Tol)Im(F4) and DRp when using D2. The reaction has been followed by (1)H/(2)H and (19)F NMR spectroscopy as well as by IR spectroscopy and reaches 96% conversion after 1 d. Formation of H(Tol)Im(F4) under these conditions demonstrates that superelectrophilic activation by protonation, which has been proposed for methenyl-H4MPT(+) to increase its carbocationic character, is not necessarily required for an imidazolinium ion to

  2. Relating Perturbation Magnitude to Temporal Gene Expression in Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J.; Parnell, John J.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Hashsham, Syed

    2009-03-19

    A method to quantitatively relate stress to response at the level of gene expression is described using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. Stress was defined as the magnitude of perturbation and strain was defined as the magnitude of cumulative response in terms of gene expression. Expression patterns of sixty genes previously reported to be significantly impacted by osmotic shock or belonging to the high-osmotic glycerol, glycerolipid metabolism, and glycolysis pathways were determined following perturbations of increasing sodium chloride concentrations (0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, 1.5, and 1.4 M). Expression of these genes was quantified temporally using reverse transcriptase real time polymerase chain reaction. The magnitude of cumulative response was obtained by calculating the total moment of area of the temporal response envelope for all the 60 genes, either together or for the set of genes related to each pathway. A non-linear relationship between stress and response was observed for the range of stress studied. This study examines a quantitative approach to quantify the strain at the level of gene expression to relate stress to strain in biological systems. The approach should be generally applicable to quantitatively evaluate the response of organisms to environmental change.

  3. Identification of highly related references about gene-disease association.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rey-Long; Shih, Chia-Chun

    2014-08-25

    Curation of gene-disease associations published in literature should be based on careful and frequent survey of the references that are highly related to specific gene-disease associations. Retrieval of the references is thus essential for timely and complete curation. We present a technique CRFref (Conclusive, Rich, and Focused References) that, given a gene-disease pair < g, d>, ranks high those biomedical references that are likely to provide conclusive, rich, and focused results about g and d. Such references are expected to be highly related to the association between g and d. CRFref ranks candidate references based on their scores. To estimate the score of a reference r, CRFref estimates and integrates three measures: degree of conclusiveness, degree of richness, and degree of focus of r with respect to < g, d>. To evaluate CRFref, experiments are conducted on over one hundred thousand references for over one thousand gene-disease pairs. Experimental results show that CRFref performs significantly better than several typical types of baselines in ranking high those references that expert curators select to develop the summaries for specific gene-disease associations. CRFref is a good technique to rank high those references that are highly related to specific gene-disease associations. It can be incorporated into existing search engines to prioritize biomedical references for curators and researchers, as well as those text mining systems that aim at the study of gene-disease associations.

  4. [NiFe]-hydrogenases: spectroscopic and electrochemical definition of reactions and intermediates.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Fraser A; Albracht, Simon P J

    2005-04-15

    Production and usage of di-hydrogen, H2, in micro-organisms is catalysed by highly active, 'ancient' metalloenzymes known as hydrogenases. Based on the number and identity of metal atoms in their active sites, hydrogenases fall into three main classes, [NiFe]-, [FeFe]- and [Fe]-. All contain the unusual ligand CO (and in most cases CN- as well) making them intriguing examples of 'organometallic' cofactors. These ligands render the active sites superbly 'visible' using infrared spectroscopy, which complements the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in studying mechanisms and identifying intermediates. Hydrogenases are becoming a focus of attention for research into future energy technologies, not only H2 production but also H2 oxidation in fuel cells. Hydrogenases immobilized on electrodes exhibit high electrocatalytic activity, providing not only an important new technique for their investigation, but also a basis for novel fuel cells either using the enzyme itself, or inspired synthetic catalysts. Favourable comparisons have been made with platinum electrocatalysts, an advantage of enzymes being their specificity for H2 and tolerance of CO. A challenge for exploiting hydrogenases is their sensitivity to O2, but some organisms are known to produce enzymes that overcome this problem by subtle alterations of the active site and gas access channels.

  5. (Catalytic mechanism of hydrogenase from aerobic N sub 2 -fixing microorganisms)

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes which catalyze reactions involving dihydrogen. They serve integral roles in a number of microbial metabolic pathways. Our research is focussed on investigations of the catalytic mechanism of the hydrogenases found in aerobic, N{sub 2}-fixing microorganisms such as Azotobacter vinelandii and the agronomically important Bradyrhizobium japonicum as well as microorganisms with similar hydrogenases. The hydrogenases isolated from these microorganisms are Ni- and Fe-containing heterodimers. Our work has focussed on three areas during the last grant period. In all cases, a central theme has been the role of inhibitors in the characteristics under investigation. In addition, a number of collaborative efforts have yielded interesting results. In metalloenzymes such as hydrogenase, inhibitors often influence the activity of the enzyme through ligand interactions with redox centers, often metals, within the enzyme. Therefore, investigations of the ability of various compounds to inhibit an enzyme's activity, as well as the mechanism of inhibition, can provide insight into the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme as well as the role of various redox centers in catalysis. We have investigated in detail four inhibitors of A. vinelandii and the results are summarized here. The influence of these inhibitors on the spectral properties of the enzyme are summarized. Electron paramagnetic resonance and ultraviolet spectra investigations are discussed. 9 figs.

  6. Oxygen effects on the nickel- and iron-containing hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii

    SciTech Connect

    Seefeldt, L.C.; Arp, D.J. )

    1989-02-21

    The effects of O{sub 2} on membrane-bound Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase in both the membrane-associated and purified states were characterized. O{sub 2} was a rapid-equilibrium, reversible inhibitor both of H{sub 2} oxidation/electron acceptor reduction activity and of the exchange activity. O{sub 2} inhibition was noncompetitive versus the electron acceptor methylene blue and uncompetitive versus the substrate H{sub 2}. O{sub 2} inhibition was rapidly reversed by removal of the O{sub 2}. In addition to an O{sub 2}-independent, reversible inhibition of hydrogenase, a time-dependent, irreversible inactivation by O{sub 2} of both H{sub 2} oxidation and exchange activities for this hydrogenase was demonstrated. The irreversible inactivation followed a first-order process. The inactivation by O{sub 2} was protected against by the substrate H{sub 2} in a concentration-dependent manner. This is the first report of H{sub 2} protection from O{sub 2}-dependent, irreversible inactivation for any hydrogenase. The competitive inhibitor CO did not affect the irreversible inactivation by O{sub 2} or the protection by H{sub 2}. A model is proposed that outlines various oxidation states of this hydrogenase and the effects of O{sub 2} on each state.

  7. Molecular dynamics and experimental investigation of H2 and O2 diffusion in [Fe]-hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jordi; Kim, Kwiseon; Posewitz, Matthew; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Schulten, Klaus; Seibert, Michael; King, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The [Fe]-hydrogenase enzymes are highly efficient H2 catalysts found in ecologically, and phylogenetically diverse microorganisms, including the photosynthetic green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Although these enzymes can occur in several forms, H2 catalysis takes place at a unique [FeS] prosthetic group, or H-cluster, located at the active site. Significant to the function of hydrogenases is how the surrounding protein structure facilitates substrate-product transfer, and protects the active site H-cluster from inactivation. To elucidate the role of protein structure in O2 inactivation of [Fe]-hydrogenases, experimental and theoretical investigations have been performed. Molecular dynamics was used to comparatively investigate O2 and H2 diffusion in [Fe]-hydrogenase CpI. The results are compared to initial investigations of H2 diffusion in [NiFe]-hydrogenase [1]. Our preliminary results suggest that H2 diffuses more easily and freely than O2, which is restricted to a small number of allowed pathways to and from the active site. These O2 pathways are located in the conserved active site domain, shown experimentally to have an essential role in active site protection. PMID:15667271

  8. Rhizobium leguminosarum Biovar viciae Symbiotic Hydrogenase Activity and Processing Are Limited by the Level of Nickel in Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Ureta, Ana-Claudia; Imperial, Juan; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Palacios, Jose M.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of levels of hydrogenase processing and activity in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae bacteroids from pea (Pisum sativum) plants showed that the oxidation of nitrogenase-evolved hydrogen is limited by the availability of nickel in agricultural soils. This limitation was overcome by using an inoculant strain engineered for higher hydrogenase expression. PMID:16269813

  9. Polymorphisms in genes involved in neurotransmission in relation to smoking.

    PubMed

    Arinami, T; Ishiguro, H; Onaivi, E S

    2000-12-27

    Smoking behavior is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic contribution to smoking behavior is at least as great as its contribution to alcoholism. Much progress has been achieved in genomic research related to cigarette-smoking within recent years. Linkage studies indicate that there are several loci linked to smoking, and candidate genes that are related to neurotransmission have been examined. Possible associated genes include cytochrome P450 subfamily polypeptide 6 (CYP2A6), dopamine D(1), D(2), and D(4) receptors, dopamine transporter, and serotonin transporter genes. There are other important candidate genes but studies evaluating the link with smoking have not been reported. These include genes encoding the dopamine D(3) and D(5) receptors, serotonin receptors, tyrosine hydroxylase, trytophan 2,3-dioxygenase, opioid receptors, and cannabinoid receptors. Since smoking-related factors are extremely complex, studies of diverse populations and of many aspects of smoking behavior including initiation, maintenance, cessation, relapse, and influence of environmental factors are needed to identify smoking-associated genes. We now review genetic polymorphisms reported to be involved in neurotransmission in relation to smoking.

  10. Transcription of functionally related constitutive genes is not coordinated.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Saumil J; Zenklusen, Daniel; Lionnet, Timothée; Singer, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Expression of an individual gene can vary considerably among genetically identical cells because of stochastic fluctuations in transcription. However, proteins comprising essential complexes or pathways have similar abundances and lower variability. It is not known whether coordination in the expression of subunits of essential complexes occurs at the level of transcription, mRNA abundance or protein expression. To directly measure the level of coordination in the expression of genes, we used highly sensitive fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to count individual mRNAs of functionally related and unrelated genes within single Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Our results revealed that transcript levels of temporally induced genes are highly correlated in individual cells. In contrast, transcription of constitutive genes encoding essential subunits of complexes is not coordinated because of stochastic fluctuations. The coordination of these functional complexes therefore must occur post-transcriptionally, and likely post-translationally.

  11. Regulation of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase in Rhodospirillum rubrum: effects of CO and oxygen on synthesis and activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bonam, D; Lehman, L; Roberts, G P; Ludden, P W

    1989-01-01

    Exposure of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum to carbon monoxide led to increased carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities due to de novo protein synthesis of both enzymes. Two-dimensional gels of [35S]methionine-pulse-labeled cells showed that induction of CO dehydrogenase synthesis was rapidly initiated (less than 5 min upon exposure to CO) and was inhibited by oxygen. Both CO dehydrogenase and the CO-induced hydrogenase were inactivated by oxygen in vivo and in vitro. In contrast to CO dehydrogenase, the CO-induced hydrogenase was 95% inactivated by heating at 70 degrees C for 5 min. Unlike other hydrogenases, this CO-induced hydrogenase was inhibited only 60% by a 100% CO gas phase. Images PMID:2498285

  12. Artificial hydrogenases based on cobaloximes and heme oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchi, Marine; Veinberg, Elias; Field, Martin J.; Niklas, Jens; Matsui, Toshitaka; Tiede, David M.; Poluektov, Oleg G.; Ikeda-Saito, Masao; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent

    2016-06-06

    The insertion of cobaloxime catalysts in the heme-binding pocket of heme oxygenase (HO) yields artificial hydrogenases active for H2 evolution in neutral aqueous solutions. These novel biohybrids have been purified and characterized by using UV/visible and EPR spectroscopy. These analyses revealed the presence of two distinct binding conformations, thereby providing the cobaloxime with hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments, respectively. Quantum chemical/molecular mechanical docking calculations found open and closed conformations of the binding pocket owing to mobile amino acid residues. HO-based biohybrids incorporating a {Co(dmgH)2} (dmgH2 = dimethylglyoxime) catalytic center displayed up to threefold increased turnover numbers with respect to the cobaloxime alone or to analogous sperm whale myoglobin adducts. Here, this study thus provides a strong basis for further improvement of such biohybrids, using well-designed modifications of the second and outer coordination spheres, through site-directed mutagenesis of the host protein.

  13. Artificial hydrogenases based on cobaloximes and heme oxygenase

    DOE PAGES

    Bacchi, Marine; Veinberg, Elias; Field, Martin J.; ...

    2016-06-06

    The insertion of cobaloxime catalysts in the heme-binding pocket of heme oxygenase (HO) yields artificial hydrogenases active for H2 evolution in neutral aqueous solutions. These novel biohybrids have been purified and characterized by using UV/visible and EPR spectroscopy. These analyses revealed the presence of two distinct binding conformations, thereby providing the cobaloxime with hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments, respectively. Quantum chemical/molecular mechanical docking calculations found open and closed conformations of the binding pocket owing to mobile amino acid residues. HO-based biohybrids incorporating a {Co(dmgH)2} (dmgH2 = dimethylglyoxime) catalytic center displayed up to threefold increased turnover numbers with respect to the cobaloximemore » alone or to analogous sperm whale myoglobin adducts. Here, this study thus provides a strong basis for further improvement of such biohybrids, using well-designed modifications of the second and outer coordination spheres, through site-directed mutagenesis of the host protein.« less

  14. Sunlight-Dependent Hydrogen Production by Photosensitizer/Hydrogenase Systems.

    PubMed

    Adam, David; Bösche, Lisa; Castañeda-Losada, Leonardo; Winkler, Martin; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Happe, Thomas

    2017-03-09

    We report a sustainable in vitro system for enzyme-based photohydrogen production. The [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was tested for photohydrogen production as a proton-reducing catalyst in combination with eight different photosensitizers. Using the organic dye 5-carboxyeosin as a photosensitizer and plant-type ferredoxin PetF as an electron mediator, HydA1 achieves the highest light-driven turnover number (TONHydA1 ) yet reported for an enzyme-based in vitro system (2.9×10(6)  mol(H2 ) mol(cat)(-1) ) and a maximum turnover frequency (TOFHydA1 ) of 550 mol(H2 ) mol(HydA1)(-1)  s(-1) . The system is fueled very effectively by ambient daylight and can be further simplified by using 5-carboxyeosin and HydA1 as a two-component photosensitizer/biocatalyst system without an additional redox mediator.

  15. Replication timing-related and gene body-specific methylation of active human genes.

    PubMed

    Aran, Dvir; Toperoff, Gidon; Rosenberg, Michael; Hellman, Asaf

    2011-02-15

    Understanding how the epigenetic blueprint of the genome shapes human phenotypes requires systematic evaluation of the complex interplay between gene activity and the different layers of the epigenome. Utilizing microarray-based techniques, we explored the relationships between DNA methylation, DNA replication timing and gene expression levels across a variety of human tissues and cell lines. The analyses revealed unequal methylation levels among early- and late-replicating fractions of the genome: late-replicating DNA was hypomethylated compared with early-replicating DNA. Moreover, late-replicating regions were gradually demethylated with cell divisions, whereas the methylation of early-replicating regions was better maintained. As active genes concentrate at early-replicating regions, they are overall hypermethylated relative to inactive genes. Accordingly, we show that the previously reported positive correlation between gene-body methylation (methylation of the transcribed portion of genes) and gene expression is restricted to proliferative tissues and cell lines, whereas in tissues containing few proliferating cells, active and inactive genes have similar methylation levels. We further show that active gene bodies are hypermethylated not only compared with inactive gene bodies, but also compared with their flanking sequences. This specific hypermethylation of the active gene bodies is severely disrupted in cells of an immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome patient bearing mutated DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B). Our data show that a high methylation level is preferentially maintained in active gene bodies through independent cellular processes. Rather than serving as a distinctive mark between active and inactive genes, gene-body methylation appears to serve a vital, currently unknown function in active genes.

  16. A complex network analysis of hypertension-related genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan; Xu, Chuan-Yun; Hu, Jing-Bo; Cao, Ke-Fei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a network of hypertension-related genes is constructed by analyzing the correlations of gene expression data among the Dahl salt-sensitive rat and two consomic rat strains. The numerical calculations show that this sparse and assortative network has small-world and scale-free properties. Further, 16 key hub genes (Col4a1, Lcn2, Cdk4, etc.) are determined by introducing an integrated centrality and have been confirmed by biological/medical research to play important roles in hypertension.

  17. Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race, and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    potential to provide insights into a chronically underserved population carrying an unequal burden of disease. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vitamin D, prostate...D status (as measured by plasma metabolites and by functional polymorphisms within genes related to vitamin D transport, metabolism and activity) is...ten genes involved in vitamin D transport, metabolism and activity will be examined to determine whether 1) allele and genotype frequencies differ by

  18. A Graphic Method for Identification of Novel Glioma Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Yang, Lei; He, Yi-Chun; Li, Li-Peng; Huang, GuaHua; Li, Hai-Peng

    2014-01-01

    Glioma, as the most common and lethal intracranial tumor, is a serious disease that causes many deaths every year. Good comprehension of the mechanism underlying this disease is very helpful to design effective treatments. However, up to now, the knowledge of this disease is still limited. It is an important step to understand the mechanism underlying this disease by uncovering its related genes. In this study, a graphic method was proposed to identify novel glioma related genes based on known glioma related genes. A weighted graph was constructed according to the protein-protein interaction information retrieved from STRING and the well-known shortest path algorithm was employed to discover novel genes. The following analysis suggests that some of them are related to the biological process of glioma, proving that our method was effective in identifying novel glioma related genes. We hope that the proposed method would be applied to study other diseases and provide useful information to medical workers, thereby designing effective treatments of different diseases. PMID:25050377

  19. A graphic method for identification of novel glioma related genes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Shu, Yang; Yang, Lei; He, Yi-Chun; Li, Li-Peng; Huang, GuaHua; Li, Hai-Peng; Jiang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Glioma, as the most common and lethal intracranial tumor, is a serious disease that causes many deaths every year. Good comprehension of the mechanism underlying this disease is very helpful to design effective treatments. However, up to now, the knowledge of this disease is still limited. It is an important step to understand the mechanism underlying this disease by uncovering its related genes. In this study, a graphic method was proposed to identify novel glioma related genes based on known glioma related genes. A weighted graph was constructed according to the protein-protein interaction information retrieved from STRING and the well-known shortest path algorithm was employed to discover novel genes. The following analysis suggests that some of them are related to the biological process of glioma, proving that our method was effective in identifying novel glioma related genes. We hope that the proposed method would be applied to study other diseases and provide useful information to medical workers, thereby designing effective treatments of different diseases.

  20. Consequences of recurrent gene flow from crops to wild relatives.

    PubMed Central

    Haygood, Ralph; Ives, Anthony R; Andow, David A

    2003-01-01

    Concern about gene flow from crops to wild relatives has become widespread with the increasing cultivation of transgenic crops. Possible consequences of such gene flow include genetic assimilation, wherein crop genes replace wild ones, and demographic swamping, wherein hybrids are less fertile than their wild parents, and wild populations shrink. Using mathematical models of a wild population recurrently receiving pollen from a genetically fixed crop, we find that the conditions for genetic assimilation are not stringent, and progress towards replacement can be fast, even for disfavoured crop genes. Demographic swamping and genetic drift relax the conditions for genetic assimilation and speed progress towards replacement. Genetic assimilation can involve thresholds and hysteresis, such that a small increase in immigration can lead to fixation of a disfavoured crop gene that had been maintained at a moderate frequency, even if the increase in immigration is cancelled before the gene fixes. Demographic swamping can give rise to 'migrational meltdown', such that a small increase in immigration can lead to not only fixation of a disfavoured crop gene but also drastic shrinkage of the wild population. These findings suggest that the spread of crop genes in wild populations should be monitored more closely. PMID:14561300

  1. Consequences of recurrent gene flow from crops to wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Haygood, Ralph; Ives, Anthony R; Andow, David A

    2003-09-22

    Concern about gene flow from crops to wild relatives has become widespread with the increasing cultivation of transgenic crops. Possible consequences of such gene flow include genetic assimilation, wherein crop genes replace wild ones, and demographic swamping, wherein hybrids are less fertile than their wild parents, and wild populations shrink. Using mathematical models of a wild population recurrently receiving pollen from a genetically fixed crop, we find that the conditions for genetic assimilation are not stringent, and progress towards replacement can be fast, even for disfavoured crop genes. Demographic swamping and genetic drift relax the conditions for genetic assimilation and speed progress towards replacement. Genetic assimilation can involve thresholds and hysteresis, such that a small increase in immigration can lead to fixation of a disfavoured crop gene that had been maintained at a moderate frequency, even if the increase in immigration is cancelled before the gene fixes. Demographic swamping can give rise to 'migrational meltdown', such that a small increase in immigration can lead to not only fixation of a disfavoured crop gene but also drastic shrinkage of the wild population. These findings suggest that the spread of crop genes in wild populations should be monitored more closely.

  2. Age-related vascular gene expression profiling in mice.

    PubMed

    Rammos, Christos; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Deenen, Rene; Pohl, Julia; Stock, Pia; Hinzmann, Christian; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2014-01-01

    Increasing age involves a number of detrimental changes in the cardiovascular system and particularly on the large arteries. It deteriorates vascular integrity and leads to increased vascular stiffness entailing hypertension with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The consequences of continuous oxidative stress and damages to biomolecules include altered gene expression, genomic instability, mutations, loss of cell division and cellular responses to increased stress. Many studies have been performed in aged C57BL/6 mice; however, analyses of the age-related changes that occur at a gene expression level and transcriptional profile in vascular tissue have not been elucidated in depth. To determine the changes of the vascular transcriptome, we conducted gene expression microarray experiments on aortas of adult and old mice, in which age-related vascular dysfunction was confirmed by increased stiffness and associated systolic hypertension. Our results highlight differentially expressed genes overrepresented in Gene Ontology categories. Molecular interaction and reaction pathways involved in vascular functions and disease, within the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway, the renin-angiotensin system and the detoxification systems are displayed. Our results provide insight to an altered gene expression profile related to age, thus offering useful clues to counteract or prevent vascular aging and its detrimental consequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional Analysis by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the NAD+-Reducing Hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Tanja; De Lacey, Antonio L.; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2002-01-01

    The tetrameric cytoplasmic [NiFe] hydrogenase (SH) of Ralstonia eutropha couples the oxidation of hydrogen to the reduction of NAD+ under aerobic conditions. In the catalytic subunit HoxH, all six conserved motifs surrounding the [NiFe] site are present. Five of these motifs were altered by site-directed mutagenesis in order to dissect the molecular mechanism of hydrogen activation. Based on phenotypic characterizations, 27 mutants were grouped into four different classes. Mutants of the major class, class I, failed to grow on hydrogen and were devoid of H2-oxidizing activity. In one of these isolates (HoxH I64A), H2 binding was impaired. Class II mutants revealed a high D2/H+ exchange rate relative to a low H2-oxidizing activity. A representative (HoxH H16L) displayed D2/H+ exchange but had lost electron acceptor-reducing activity. Both activities were equally affected in class III mutants. Mutants forming class IV showed a particularly interesting phenotype. They displayed O2-sensitive growth on hydrogen due to an O2-sensitive SH protein. PMID:12399498

  4. Electrocatalytic mechanism of reversible hydrogen cycling by enzymes and distinctions between the major classes of hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Hexter, Suzannah V.; Grey, Felix; Happe, Thomas; Climent, Victor; Armstrong, Fraser A.

    2012-01-01

    The extraordinary ability of Fe- and Ni-containing enzymes to catalyze rapid and efficient H+/H2 interconversion—a property otherwise exclusive to platinum metals—has been investigated in a series of experiments combining variable-temperature protein film voltammetry with mathematical modeling. The results highlight important differences between the catalytic performance of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and [NiFe]-hydrogenases and justify a simple model for reversible catalytic electron flow in enzymes and electrocatalysts that should be widely applicable in fields as diverse as electrochemistry, catalysis, and bioenergetics. The active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenases, an intricate Fe-carbonyl complex known as the “H cluster,” emerges as a supreme catalyst. PMID:22802675

  5. Acetylene is an active-site-directed, slow-binding, reversible inhibitor of Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J.

    1987-10-06

    The inhibition of purified and membrane-bound hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii by dihydrogen-free acetylene was investigated. The inhibition was a time-dependent process which exhibited first-order kinetics. Both H/sub 2/ and CO protected against the inhibition by acetylene. K/sub protect(app)/ values of 0.41 and 24 ..mu..M were derived for these gases, respectively. Both H/sub 2/-oxidizing activity and the tritium exchange capacity of the purified enzyme were inhibited at the same rate by acetylene. Removal of acetylene reversed the inhibition for both the purified and the membrane-associated form of the enzyme. The purified hydrogenases from both Rhizobium japonicum and Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 were also inhibited by acetylene in a time-dependent fashion. These findings suggest that acetylene is an active-site-directed, slow-binding, reversible inhibitor of some membrane-bound hydrogenases from aerobic bacteria.

  6. Crystallographic studies of nitrogenase and hydrogenase. Progress report, June 1, 1992--April 1, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bolin, J.T.

    1994-05-01

    The long term goal of this project is to obtain detailed knowledge of the structure and function of nitrogenase and hydrogenase through the analysis of physical, chemical, and biological data with reference to three-dimensional, atomic resolution crystal structures of components of the enzyme and/or complexes of the components. The current objectives to determine the crystal structure of wild-type Av1, the nitrogenase MoFe protein from Azotobacter vinelandii; to refine this structure at high resolution; and to initiate studies of mutant MoFe proteins that express altered chemical and physical properties. Further we seek to determine the crystal structure of the bi-directional all-Fe hydrogenase from C. pasteurianum, Cp-hydrI, and to initiate studies of the uptake hydrogenase from the same organism, Cp-hydrII.

  7. Cross-Ontological Analytics: Combining Associative and Hierarchical Relations in the Gene Ontologies to Assess Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Posse, Christian; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.

    2006-05-28

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the gene ontologies, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes/gene products is obtained by comparing gene ontology (GO) annotations associated with the gene/gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene ontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene ontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy.

  8. Automatic construction of gene relation networks using text mining and gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Karopka, Thomas; Scheel, Thomas; Bansemer, Sven; Glass, Anne

    2004-06-01

    Microarray gene expression analysis is a powerful high-throughput technique that enables researchers to monitor the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously. Using this methodology huge amounts of data are produced which have to be analysed. Clustering algorithms are used to group genes together based on a predefined distance measure. However, clustering algorithms do not necessarily group the genes in a biological meaningful way. Additional information is needed to improve the identification of disease relevant genes. The primary objective of our project is to support the analysis of microarray gene expression data by construction of gene relation networks (GRNs). Required information can not be found in a structured representation like a database. In contrast, a large number of relations are described in biomedical literature. The main outcome of this project is the implementation of a software system that provides clinicians and researchers with a tool that supports the analysis of microarray gene expression data by mapping known relationships from the biomedical literature to local gene expression experiments.

  9. [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenase diversity, mechanism, and maturation.

    PubMed

    Peters, John W; Schut, Gerrit J; Boyd, Eric S; Mulder, David W; Shepard, Eric M; Broderick, Joan B; King, Paul W; Adams, Michael W W

    2015-06-01

    The [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases catalyze the formal interconversion between hydrogen and protons and electrons, possess characteristic non-protein ligands at their catalytic sites and thus share common mechanistic features. Despite the similarities between these two types of hydrogenases, they clearly have distinct evolutionary origins and likely emerged from different selective pressures. [FeFe]-hydrogenases are widely distributed in fermentative anaerobic microorganisms and likely evolved under selective pressure to couple hydrogen production to the recycling of electron carriers that accumulate during anaerobic metabolism. In contrast, many [NiFe]-hydrogenases catalyze hydrogen oxidation as part of energy metabolism and were likely key enzymes in early life and arguably represent the predecessors of modern respiratory metabolism. Although the reversible combination of protons and electrons to generate hydrogen gas is the simplest of chemical reactions, the [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases have distinct mechanisms and differ in the fundamental chemistry associated with proton transfer and control of electron flow that also help to define catalytic bias. A unifying feature of these enzymes is that hydrogen activation itself has been restricted to one solution involving diatomic ligands (carbon monoxide and cyanide) bound to an Fe ion. On the other hand, and quite remarkably, the biosynthetic mechanisms to produce these ligands are exclusive to each type of enzyme. Furthermore, these mechanisms represent two independent solutions to the formation of complex bioinorganic active sites for catalyzing the simplest of chemical reactions, reversible hydrogen oxidation. As such, the [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases are arguably the most profound case of convergent evolution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases.

  10. Proton Transfer in the Catalytic Cycle of [NiFe] Hydrogenases: Insight from Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Catalysis of H2 production and oxidation reactions is critical in renewable energy systems based around H2 as a clean fuel, but the present reliance on platinum-based catalysts is not sustainable. In nature, H2 is oxidized at minimal overpotential and high turnover frequencies at [NiFe] catalytic sites in hydrogenase enzymes. Although an outline mechanism has been established for the [NiFe] hydrogenases involving heterolytic cleavage of H2 followed by a first and then second transfer of a proton and electron away from the active site, details remain vague concerning how the proton transfers are facilitated by the protein environment close to the active site. Furthermore, although [NiFe] hydrogenases from different organisms or cellular environments share a common active site, they exhibit a broad range of catalytic characteristics indicating the importance of subtle changes in the surrounding protein in controlling their behavior. Here we review recent time-resolved infrared (IR) spectroscopic studies and IR spectroelectrochemical studies carried out in situ during electrocatalytic turnover. Additionally, we re-evaluate the significant body of IR spectroscopic data on hydrogenase active site states determined through more conventional solution studies, in order to highlight mechanistic steps that seem to apply generally across the [NiFe] hydrogenases, as well as steps which so far seem limited to specific groups of these enzymes. This analysis is intended to help focus attention on the key open questions where further work is needed to assess important aspects of proton and electron transfer in the mechanism of [NiFe] hydrogenases.

  11. Purification and characterization of the hydrogen uptake hydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrodictium brockii.

    PubMed Central

    Pihl, T D; Maier, R J

    1991-01-01

    Pyrodictium brockii is a hyperthermophilic archaebacterium with an optimal growth temperature of 105 degrees C. P. brockii is also a chemolithotroph, requiring H2 and CO2 for growth. We have purified the hydrogen uptake hydrogenase from membranes of P. brockii by reactive red affinity chromatography and sucrose gradient centrifugation. The molecular mass of the holoenzyme was 118,000 +/- 19,000 Da in sucrose gradients. The holoenzyme consisted of two subunits by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The large subunit had a molecular mass of 66,000 Da, and the small subunit had a molecular mass of 45,000 Da. Colorometric analysis of Fe and S content in reactive red-purified hydrogenase revealed 8.7 +/- 0.6 mol of Fe and 6.2 +/- 1.2 mol of S per mol of hydrogenase. Growth of cells in 63NiCl2 resulted in label incorporation into reactive red-purified hydrogenase. Growth of cells in 63NiCl2 resulted in label incorporation into reactive red-purified hydrogenase. Temperature stability studies indicated that the membrane-bound form of the enzyme was more stable than the solubilized purified form over a period of minutes with respect to temperature. However, the membranes were not able to protect the enzyme from thermal inactivation over a period of hours. The artificial electron acceptor specificity of the pure enzyme was similar to that of the membrane-bound form, but the purified enzyme was able to evolve H2 in the presence of reduced methyl viologen. The Km of membrane-bound hydrogenase for H2 was approximately 19 microM with methylene blue as the electron acceptor, whereas the purified enzyme had a higher Km value. Images PMID:1900502

  12. Respiratory Membrane endo-Hydrogenase Activity in the Microaerophile Azorhizobium caulinodans Is Bidirectional

    PubMed Central

    Sprecher, Brittany N.; Gittings, Margo E.; Ludwig, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The microaerophilic bacterium Azorhizobium caulinodans, when fixing N2 both in pure cultures held at 20 µM dissolved O2 tension and as endosymbiont of Sesbania rostrata legume nodules, employs a novel, respiratory-membrane endo-hydrogenase to oxidize and recycle endogenous H2 produced by soluble Mo-dinitrogenase activity at the expense of O2. Methods and Findings From a bioinformatic analysis, this endo-hydrogenase is a core (6 subunit) version of (14 subunit) NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (respiratory complex I). In pure A. caulinodans liquid cultures, when O2 levels are lowered to <1 µM dissolved O2 tension (true microaerobic physiology), in vivo endo-hydrogenase activity reverses and continuously evolves H2 at high rates. In essence, H+ ions then supplement scarce O2 as respiratory-membrane electron acceptor. Paradoxically, from thermodynamic considerations, such hydrogenic respiratory-membrane electron transfer need largely uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, required for growth of non-phototrophic aerobic bacteria, A. caulinodans included. Conclusions A. caulinodans in vivo endo-hydrogenase catalytic activity is bidirectional. To our knowledge, this study is the first demonstration of hydrogenic respiratory-membrane electron transfer among aerobic (non-fermentative) bacteria. When compared with O2 tolerant hydrogenases in other organisms, A. caulinodans in vivo endo-hydrogenase mediated H2 production rates (50,000 pmol 109·cells−1 min−1) are at least one-thousandfold higher. Conceivably, A. caulinodans respiratory-membrane hydrogenesis might initiate H2 crossfeeding among spatially organized bacterial populations whose individual cells adopt distinct metabolic states in response to variant O2 availability. Such organized, physiologically heterogeneous cell populations might benefit from augmented energy transduction and growth rates of the populations, considered as a whole. PMID:22662125

  13. Novel, Oxygen-Insensitive Group 5 [NiFe]-Hydrogenase in Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Caspar; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a novel group of [NiFe]-hydrogenases has been defined that appear to have a great impact in the global hydrogen cycle. This so-called group 5 [NiFe]-hydrogenase is widespread in soil-living actinobacteria and can oxidize molecular hydrogen at atmospheric levels, which suggests a high affinity of the enzyme toward H2. Here, we provide a biochemical characterization of a group 5 hydrogenase from the betaproteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16. The hydrogenase was designated an actinobacterial hydrogenase (AH) and is catalytically active, as shown by the in vivo H2 uptake and by activity staining in native gels. However, the enzyme does not sustain autotrophic growth on H2. The AH was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography and consists of two subunits with molecular masses of 65 and 37 kDa. Among the electron acceptors tested, nitroblue tetrazolium chloride was reduced by the AH at highest rates. At 30°C and pH 8, the specific activity of the enzyme was 0.3 μmol of H2 per min and mg of protein. However, an unexpectedly high Michaelis constant (Km) for H2 of 3.6 ± 0.5 μM was determined, which is in contrast to the previously proposed low Km of group 5 hydrogenases and makes atmospheric H2 uptake by R. eutropha most unlikely. Amperometric activity measurements revealed that the AH maintains full H2 oxidation activity even at atmospheric oxygen concentrations, showing that the enzyme is insensitive toward O2. PMID:23793632

  14. Expression of Uptake Hydrogenase and Molybdenum Nitrogenase in Rhodobacter capsulatus Is Coregulated by the RegB-RegA Two-Component Regulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Elsen, Sylvie; Dischert, Wanda; Colbeau, Annette; Bauer, Carl E.

    2000-01-01

    Purple photosynthetic bacteria are capable of generating cellular energy from several sources, including photosynthesis, respiration, and H2 oxidation. Under nutrient-limiting conditions, cellular energy can be used to assimilate carbon and nitrogen. This study provides the first evidence of a molecular link for the coregulation of nitrogenase and hydrogenase biosynthesis in an anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium. We demonstrated that molybdenum nitrogenase biosynthesis is under the control of the RegB-RegA two-component regulatory system in Rhodobacter capsulatus. Footprint analyses and in vivo transcription studies showed that RegA indirectly activates nitrogenase synthesis by binding to and activating the expression of nifA2, which encodes one of the two functional copies of the nif-specific transcriptional activator, NifA. Expression of nifA2 but not nifA1 is reduced in the reg mutants up to eightfold under derepressing conditions and is also reduced under repressing conditions. Thus, although NtrC is absolutely required for nifA2 expression, RegA acts as a coactivator of nifA2. We also demonstrated that in reg mutants, [NiFe]hydrogenase synthesis and activity are increased up to sixfold. RegA binds to the promoter of the hydrogenase gene operon and therefore directly represses its expression. Thus, the RegB-RegA system controls such diverse processes as energy-generating photosynthesis and H2 oxidation, as well as the energy-demanding processes of N2 fixation and CO2 assimilation. PMID:10781552

  15. Estrogen-related genes and postmenopausal osteoporosis risk.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, N; Quereda, F; Presa, J; Salamanca, A; Sánchez-Borrego, R; Vázquez, F; Martínez Astorquiza, T

    2012-12-01

    To date, more than 150 candidate genes related to osteoporosis have been described, but osteoporosis has increasingly been considered a polygenic disease modulated by environmental factors. It is thought that osteoporosis predisposition, pathology, and treatment response depend on the interaction between different genes or between genes and environmental factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the estrogen metabolic pathway and the development of osteoporosis and to determine whether this relationship is monogenic or whether interactions between genes exist. A multicentric study with 1980 postmenopausal Spanish women in five Spanish communities was conducted. The women completed a specific questionnaire that inquired about risk factors for osteoporosis. Data on participants' bone mineral density were obtained with dual-energy X-ray densitometers, and genetic data were obtained from frozen peripheral blood. The digenic protection combinations indicated involvement of the wild-type genotype (WT) of the 3'UTR marker for the CYP19A1 gene, the IVS4 marker of the same gene, and the BMP15 and FSHR genes. Among patients who carried two or more of the genotypes considered 'risky', the triple combination among markers of the ESR2 and NRIP1 genes with any of the two mutations of the analyzed markers of the BMP15 gene gave a mean T-score value of -2.32±0.91 (p = 0.02). Variants of the new candidate genes (NRIP and BMP15) can predispose patients to osteoporosis.

  16. Age-related macular degeneration: Evidence of a major gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, S.; Warren, C.; Yang, H.

    1994-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness in developing countries. It remains a very poorly understood disorder. Although environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, none have been firmly implicated. The purpose of this study was to use pedigree analysis to evaluate the possible role of a major gene as a determinant of familial aggregation. Information was collected regarding occupation, smoking, sun exposure, associated medical problems and family history. 50 probands with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and 39 age, race and sex-matched controls were included in the study. In the ARMD group 15/50 (30%) of probands reported a positive family history; 22 out of 222 first degree relatives over age 60 were reported to be affected. In the control groups, none of the 138 first degree relatives over age 50 had a history of ARMD. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.0003), indicating that genetic factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ARMD. In the ARMD group more siblings as compared to parents (16/127 vs. 5/82) were affected. 5/50 (10%) of the ARMD probands also gave a history of a second degree relative affected with ARMD, compared to none known among the relatives of controls. Data from 50 pedigrees were analyzed by complex segregation analysis under a class A regressive logistic model using the REGD program implemented in the SAGE package. Preliminary results allow rejection of a polygenic model and suggest there is a major gene for ARMD in these families. The inheritance model most compatible with the observed familial aggregation is autosomal recessive. In conclusion, these results are suggestive of a major gene effect in the etiology of ARMD. Identification of a major gene effect is a first step to further pursue linkage analysis and to search for the gene(s) involved in the causation of ARMD.

  17. Hydrogen Production by a Hyperthermophilic Membrane-Bound Hydrogenase in Soluble Nanolipoprotein Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S E; Hopkins, R C; Blanchette, C; Walsworth, V; Sumbad, R; Fischer, N; Kuhn, E; Coleman, M; Chromy, B; Letant, S; Hoeprich, P; Adams, M W; Henderson, P T

    2008-10-22

    Hydrogenases constitute a promising class of enzymes for ex vivo hydrogen production. Implementation of such applications is currently hindered by oxygen sensitivity and, in the case of membrane-bound hydrogenases (MBH), poor water solubility. Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs), formed from apolipoproteins and phospholipids, offer a novel means to incorporate MBH into in a well-defined water-soluble matrix that maintains the enzymatic activity and is amenable to incorporation into more complex architectures. We report the synthesis, hydrogen-evolving activity and physical characterization of the first MBH-NLP assembly. This may ultimately lead to the development of biomimetic hydrogen production devices.

  18. Determination of the hydrogenase status of individual legume nodules by a methylene blue reduction assay.

    PubMed

    Lambert, G R; Hanus, F J; Russell, S A; Evans, H J

    1985-08-01

    We adapted a method for the rapid screening of colonies of free-living Rhizobium japonicum for hydrogenase activity to determine the hydrogenase status of individual soybean nodules. Crude bacteroid suspensions from nodules containing strains known to be hydrogen uptake positive (Hup) caused a localized decolorization of filter paper disks, whereas suspensions from nodules arising from inoculation with hydrogen uptake-negative (Hup) mutants or strains did not decolorize the disks. The reliability of the method was demonstrated by its successful application to 29 slow-growing rhizobia. The Hup phenotype on methylene blue filters agreed with that determined amperometrically with either methylene blue or oxygen as the electron acceptor.

  19. Gene therapy for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Moore, Nicholas A; Bracha, Peter; Hussain, Rehan M; Morral, Nuria; Ciulla, Thomas A

    2017-10-01

    In neovascular age related macular degeneration (nAMD), gene therapy to chronically express anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) proteins could ameliorate the treatment burden of chronic intravitreal therapy and improve limited visual outcomes associated with 'real world' undertreatment. Areas covered: In this review, the authors assess the evolution of gene therapy for AMD. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can transduce retinal pigment epithelium; one such early application was a phase I trial of AAV2-delivered pigment epithelium derived factor gene in advanced nAMD. Subsequently, gene therapy for AMD shifted to the investigation of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFLT-1), an endogenously expressed VEGF inhibitor, binding and neutralizing VEGF-A. After some disappointing results, research has centered on novel vectors, including optimized AAV2, AAV8 and lentivirus, as well as genes encoding other anti-angiogenic proteins, including ranibizumab, aflibercept, angiostatin and endostatin. Also, gene therapy targeting the complement system is being investigated for geographic atrophy due to non-neovascular AMD. Expert opinion: The success of gene therapy for AMD will depend on the selection of the most appropriate therapeutic protein and its level of chronic expression. Future investigations will center on optimizing vector, promoter and delivery methods, and evaluating the risks of the chronic expression of anti-angiogenic or anti-complement proteins.

  20. Production and purification of a soluble hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha H16 for potential hydrogen fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Lebhar, Helene; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Marquis, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    The soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha H16 is a promising candidate enzyme for H2-based biofuel application as it favours H2 oxidation and is relatively oxygen-tolerant. In this report, bioprocess development studies undertaken to produce and purify an active SH are described, based on the methods previously reported [1], [2], [3], [4]. Our modifications are: •Upstream method optimizations were undertaken on heterotrophic growth media and cell lysis involving ultrasonication.•Two anion exchangers (Q Sepharose and RESOURCE Q) and size exclusion chromatographic (Superdex 200) matrices were successfully employed for purification of a hexameric SH from R. eutropha.•The H2 oxidizing activity of the SH was demonstrated spectrophotometrically in solution and also immobilized on an EPG electrode using cyclic voltammetry.

  1. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-08-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC.

  2. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  3. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  4. Comparative and functional analysis of cardiovascular-related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-09-01

    The ability to detect putative cis-regulatory elements in cardiovascular-related genes has been accelerated by the availability of genomic sequence data from numerous vertebrate species and the recent development of comparative genomic tools. This improvement is anticipated to lead to a better understanding of the complex regulatory architecture of cardiovascular (CV) genes and how genetic variants in these non-coding regions can potentially play a role in cardiovascular disease. This manuscript reviews a recently established database dedicated to the comparative sequence analysis of 250 human CV genes of known importance, 37 of which currently contain sequence comparison data for organisms beyond those of human, mouse and rat. These data have provided a glimpse into the variety of possible insights from deep vertebrate sequence comparisons and the identification of putative gene regulatory elements.

  5. Characterization of Starch Degradation Related Genes in Postharvest Kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiong; Kuang, Sheng; Zhang, Ai-Di; Zhang, Wang-Shu; Chen, Miao-Jin; Yin, Xue-Ren; Chen, Kun-Song

    2016-12-15

    Starch is one of the most important storage carbohydrates in plants. Kiwifruit typically accumulate large amounts of starch during development. The fruit retain starch until commercial maturity, and its postharvest degradation is essential for consumer acceptance. The activity of genes related to starch degradation has, however, rarely been investigated. Based on the kiwifruit genome sequence and previously reported starch degradation-related genes, 17 novel genes were isolated and the relationship between their expression and starch degradation was examined using two sets of materials: ethylene-treated (100 µL/L, 20 °C; ETH) vs. control (20 °C; CK) and controlled atmosphere stored (CA, 5% CO₂ + 2% O₂, 0 °C) vs. normal atmosphere in cold storage (NA, 0 °C). Physiological analysis indicated that ETH accelerated starch degradation and increased soluble solids content (SSC) and soluble sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose), while CA inhibited starch reduction compared with NA. Using these materials, expression patterns of 24 genes that may contribute to starch degradation (seven previously reported and 17 newly isolated) were analyzed. Among the 24 genes, AdAMY1, AdAGL3 and AdBAM3.1/3L/9 were significantly induced by ETH and positively correlated with starch degradation. Furthermore, these five genes were also inhibited by CA, conforming the likely involvement of these genes in starch degradation. Thus, the present study has identified the genes with potential for involvement in starch degradation in postharvest kiwifruit, which will be useful for understanding the regulation of kiwifruit starch content and metabolism.

  6. Characterization of Starch Degradation Related Genes in Postharvest Kiwifruit

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiong; Kuang, Sheng; Zhang, Ai-Di; Zhang, Wang-Shu; Chen, Miao-Jin; Yin, Xue-Ren; Chen, Kun-Song

    2016-01-01

    Starch is one of the most important storage carbohydrates in plants. Kiwifruit typically accumulate large amounts of starch during development. The fruit retain starch until commercial maturity, and its postharvest degradation is essential for consumer acceptance. The activity of genes related to starch degradation has, however, rarely been investigated. Based on the kiwifruit genome sequence and previously reported starch degradation-related genes, 17 novel genes were isolated and the relationship between their expression and starch degradation was examined using two sets of materials: ethylene-treated (100 µL/L, 20 °C; ETH) vs. control (20 °C; CK) and controlled atmosphere stored (CA, 5% CO2 + 2% O2, 0 °C) vs. normal atmosphere in cold storage (NA, 0 °C). Physiological analysis indicated that ETH accelerated starch degradation and increased soluble solids content (SSC) and soluble sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose), while CA inhibited starch reduction compared with NA. Using these materials, expression patterns of 24 genes that may contribute to starch degradation (seven previously reported and 17 newly isolated) were analyzed. Among the 24 genes, AdAMY1, AdAGL3 and AdBAM3.1/3L/9 were significantly induced by ETH and positively correlated with starch degradation. Furthermore, these five genes were also inhibited by CA, conforming the likely involvement of these genes in starch degradation. Thus, the present study has identified the genes with potential for involvement in starch degradation in postharvest kiwifruit, which will be useful for understanding the regulation of kiwifruit starch content and metabolism. PMID:27983700

  7. Validation of internal reference genes for relative quantitation studies of gene expression in human laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; He, Jinting; Wang, Wei; Ren, Ming; Gao, Sujie; Zhao, Guanjie

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the expression stabilities of 12 common internal reference genes for the relative quantitation analysis of target gene expression performed by reverse transcription real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in human laryngeal cancer. Methods Hep-2 cells and 14 laryngeal cancer tissue samples were investigated. The expression characteristics of 12 internal reference gene candidates (18S rRNA, GAPDH, ACTB, HPRT1, RPL29, HMBS, PPIA, ALAS1, TBP, PUM1, GUSB, and B2M) were assessed by RT-qPCR. The data were analyzed by three commonly used software programs: geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. Results The use of the combination of four internal reference genes was more appropriate than the use of a single internal reference gene. The optimal combination was PPIA + GUSB + RPL29 + HPRT1 for both the cell line and tissues; while the most appropriate combination was GUSB + RPL29 + HPRT1 + HMBS for the tissues. Conclusions Our recommended internal reference genes may improve the accuracy of relative quantitation analysis of target gene expression performed by the RT-qPCR method in further gene expression research on laryngeal tumors. PMID:27957397

  8. The Innate Immune-Related Genes in Catfish

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; He, Chongbo; Liu, Xueguang; Su, Hao; Gao, Xianggang; Li, Yunfeng; Liu, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    Catfish is one of the most important aquaculture species in America (as well as in Asia and Africa). In recent years, the production of catfish has suffered massive financial losses due to pathogen spread and breakouts. Innate immunity plays a crucial role in increasing resistance to pathogenic organisms and has generated increasing interest in the past few years. This review summarizes the current understanding of innate immune-related genes in catfish, including pattern recognition receptors, antimicrobial peptides, complements, lectins, cytokines, transferrin and gene expression profiling using microarrays and next generation sequencing technologies. This review will benefit the understanding of innate immune system in catfish and further efforts in studying the innate immune-related genes in fish. PMID:23203058

  9. The prediction of candidate genes for cervix related cancer through gene ontology and graph theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Hindumathi, V; Kranthi, T; Rao, S B; Manimaran, P

    2014-06-01

    With rapidly changing technology, prediction of candidate genes has become an indispensable task in recent years mainly in the field of biological research. The empirical methods for candidate gene prioritization that succors to explore the potential pathway between genetic determinants and complex diseases are highly cumbersome and labor intensive. In such a scenario predicting potential targets for a disease state through in silico approaches are of researcher's interest. The prodigious availability of protein interaction data coupled with gene annotation renders an ease in the accurate determination of disease specific candidate genes. In our work we have prioritized the cervix related cancer candidate genes by employing Csaba Ortutay and his co-workers approach of identifying the candidate genes through graph theoretical centrality measures and gene ontology. With the advantage of the human protein interaction data, cervical cancer gene sets and the ontological terms, we were able to predict 15 novel candidates for cervical carcinogenesis. The disease relevance of the anticipated candidate genes was corroborated through a literature survey. Also the presence of the drugs for these candidates was detected through Therapeutic Target Database (TTD) and DrugMap Central (DMC) which affirms that they may be endowed as potential drug targets for cervical cancer.

  10. Structural aspects and immunolocalization of the F420-reducing and non-F420-reducing hydrogenases from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Marburg.

    PubMed Central

    Braks, I J; Hoppert, M; Roge, S; Mayer, F

    1994-01-01

    The F420-reducing hydrogenase and the non-F420-reducing hydrogenase (EC 1.12.99.1.) were isolated from a crude extract of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Marburg. Electron microscopy of the negatively stained F420-reducing hydrogenase revealed that the enzyme is a complex with a diameter of 15.6 nm. It consists of two ring-like, stacked, parallel layers each composed of three major protein masses arranged in rotational symmetry. Each of these masses appeared to be subdivided into smaller protein masses. Electron microscopy of negatively stained samples taken from intermediate steps of the purification process revealed the presence of enzyme particles bound to inside-out membrane vesicles. Linker particles of 10 to 20 kDa which mediate the attachment of the hydrogenase to the cytoplasmic membrane were seen. Immunogold labelling confirmed that the F420-reducing hydrogenase is a membrane-bound enzyme. Electron microscopy of the negatively stained purified non-F420-reducing hydrogenase revealed that the enzyme is composed of three subunits exhibiting different diameters (5, 4, and 2 to 3 nm). According to immunogold labelling experiments, approximately 70% of the non-F420-reducing hydrogenase protein molecules were located at the cell periphery; the remaining 30% were cytoplasmic. No linker particles were observed for this enzyme. Images PMID:8002593

  11. Gene-environment interactions of circadian-related genes for cardiometabolic traits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153, MTNR1B-rs1...

  12. Validation of commonly used reference genes for sleep-related gene expression studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kil S; Alvarenga, Tathiana A; Guindalini, Camila; Andersen, Monica L; Castro, Rosa MRPS; Tufik, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Background Sleep is a restorative process and is essential for maintenance of mental and physical health. In an attempt to understand the complexity of sleep, multidisciplinary strategies, including genetic approaches, have been applied to sleep research. Although quantitative real time PCR has been used in previous sleep-related gene expression studies, proper validation of reference genes is currently lacking. Thus, we examined the effect of total or paradoxical sleep deprivation (TSD or PSD) on the expression stability of the following frequently used reference genes in brain and blood: beta-actin (b-actin), beta-2-microglobulin (B2M), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT). Results Neither TSD nor PSD affected the expression stability of all tested genes in both tissues indicating that b-actin, B2M, GAPDH and HPRT are appropriate reference genes for the sleep-related gene expression studies. In order to further verify these results, the relative expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase1 (GPD1) was evaluated in brain and blood, respectively. The normalization with each of four reference genes produced similar pattern of expression in control and sleep deprived rats, but subtle differences in the magnitude of expression fold change were observed which might affect the statistical significance. Conclusion This study demonstrated that sleep deprivation does not alter the expression stability of commonly used reference genes in brain and blood. Nonetheless, the use of multiple reference genes in quantitative RT-PCR is required for the accurate results. PMID:19445681

  13. Comprehensive analysis of gene expression patterns of hedgehog-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Limin; Johnsen, Robert; Lauter, Gilbert; Baillie, David; Bürglin, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Background The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes ten proteins that share sequence similarity with the Hedgehog signaling molecule through their C-terminal autoprocessing Hint/Hog domain. These proteins contain novel N-terminal domains, and C. elegans encodes dozens of additional proteins containing only these N-terminal domains. These gene families are called warthog, groundhog, ground-like and quahog, collectively called hedgehog (hh)-related genes. Previously, the expression pattern of seventeen genes was examined, which showed that they are primarily expressed in the ectoderm. Results With the completion of the C. elegans genome sequence in November 2002, we reexamined and identified 61 hh-related ORFs. Further, we identified 49 hh-related ORFs in C. briggsae. ORF analysis revealed that 30% of the genes still had errors in their predictions and we improved these predictions here. We performed a comprehensive expression analysis using GFP fusions of the putative intergenic regulatory sequence with one or two transgenic lines for most genes. The hh-related genes are expressed in one or a few of the following tissues: hypodermis, seam cells, excretory duct and pore cells, vulval epithelial cells, rectal epithelial cells, pharyngeal muscle or marginal cells, arcade cells, support cells of sensory organs, and neuronal cells. Using time-lapse recordings, we discovered that some hh-related genes are expressed in a cyclical fashion in phase with molting during larval development. We also generated several translational GFP fusions, but they did not show any subcellular localization. In addition, we also studied the expression patterns of two genes with similarity to Drosophila frizzled, T23D8.1 and F27E11.3A, and the ortholog of the Drosophila gene dally-like, gpn-1, which is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. The two frizzled homologs are expressed in a few neurons in the head, and gpn-1 is expressed in the pharynx. Finally, we compare the efficacy of our GFP

  14. Comprehensive analysis of gene expression patterns of hedgehog-related genes.

    PubMed

    Hao, Limin; Johnsen, Robert; Lauter, Gilbert; Baillie, David; Bürglin, Thomas R

    2006-10-31

    The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes ten proteins that share sequence similarity with the Hedgehog signaling molecule through their C-terminal autoprocessing Hint/Hog domain. These proteins contain novel N-terminal domains, and C. elegans encodes dozens of additional proteins containing only these N-terminal domains. These gene families are called warthog, groundhog, ground-like and quahog, collectively called hedgehog (hh)-related genes. Previously, the expression pattern of seventeen genes was examined, which showed that they are primarily expressed in the ectoderm. With the completion of the C. elegans genome sequence in November 2002, we reexamined and identified 61 hh-related ORFs. Further, we identified 49 hh-related ORFs in C. briggsae. ORF analysis revealed that 30% of the genes still had errors in their predictions and we improved these predictions here. We performed a comprehensive expression analysis using GFP fusions of the putative intergenic regulatory sequence with one or two transgenic lines for most genes. The hh-related genes are expressed in one or a few of the following tissues: hypodermis, seam cells, excretory duct and pore cells, vulval epithelial cells, rectal epithelial cells, pharyngeal muscle or marginal cells, arcade cells, support cells of sensory organs, and neuronal cells. Using time-lapse recordings, we discovered that some hh-related genes are expressed in a cyclical fashion in phase with molting during larval development. We also generated several translational GFP fusions, but they did not show any subcellular localization. In addition, we also studied the expression patterns of two genes with similarity to Drosophila frizzled, T23D8.1 and F27E11.3A, and the ortholog of the Drosophila gene dally-like, gpn-1, which is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. The two frizzled homologs are expressed in a few neurons in the head, and gpn-1 is expressed in the pharynx. Finally, we compare the efficacy of our GFP expression effort with EST

  15. Gene expression profiles of autophagy-related genes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Igci, Mehri; Baysan, Mehmet; Yigiter, Remzi; Ulasli, Mustafa; Geyik, Sirma; Bayraktar, Recep; Bozgeyik, İbrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Bayram, Ali; Cakmak, Ecir Ali

    2016-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an imflammatory disease of central nervous system caused by genetic and environmental factors that remain largely unknown. Autophagy is the process of degradation and recycling of damaged cytoplasmic organelles, macromolecular aggregates, and long-lived proteins. Malfunction of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, and autophagy genes may modulate the T cell survival. We aimed to examine the expression levels of autophagy-related genes. The blood samples of 95 unrelated patients (aged 17-65years, 37 male, 58 female) diagnosed as MS and 95 healthy controls were used to extract the RNA samples. After conversion to single stranded cDNA using polyT priming: the targeted genes were pre-amplified, and 96×78 (samples×primers) qRT-PCR reactions were performed for each primer pair on each sample on a 96.96 array of Fluidigm BioMark™. Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, gene expression levels of ATG16L2, ATG9A, BCL2, FAS, GAA, HGS, PIK3R1, RAB24, RGS19, ULK1, FOXO1, HTT were significantly altered (false discovery rate<0.05). Thus, altered expression levels of several autophagy related genes may affect protein levels, which in turn would influence the activity of autophagy, or most probably, those genes might be acting independent of autophagy and contributing to MS pathogenesis as risk factors. The indeterminate genetic causes leading to alterations in gene expressions require further analysis.

  16. Highlights of glycosylation and adhesion related genes involved in myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Myogenesis is initiated by myoblast differentiation and fusion to form myotubes and muscle fibres. A population of myoblasts, known as satellite cells, is responsible for post-natal growth of muscle and for its regeneration. This differentiation requires many changes in cell behaviour and its surrounding environment. These modifications are tightly regulated over time and can be characterized through the study of changes in gene expression associated with this process. During the initial myogenesis steps, using the myoblast cell line C2C12 as a model, Janot et al. (2009) showed significant variations in expression for genes involved in pathways of glycolipid synthesis. In this study we used murine satellite cells (MSC) and their ability to differentiate into myotubes or early fat storage cells to select glycosylation related genes whose variation of expression is myogenesis specific. Results The comparison of variant genes in both MSC differentiation pathways identified 67 genes associated with myogenesis. Comparison with data obtained for C2C12 revealed that only 14 genes had similar expression profiles in both cell types and that 17 genes were specifically regulated in MSC. Results were validated statistically by without a priori clustering. Classification according to protein function encoded by these 31 genes showed that the main regulated cellular processes during this differentiation were (i) remodeling of the extracellular matrix, particularly, sulfated structures, (ii) down-regulation of O-mannosyl glycan biosynthesis, and (iii) an increase in adhesion protein expression. A functional study was performed on Itga11 and Chst5 encoding two highly up-regulated proteins. The inactivation of Chst5 by specific shRNA delayed the fusion of MSC. By contrast, the inactivation of Itga11 by specific shRNA dramatically decreased the fusion ability of MSC. This result was confirmed by neutralization of Itga11 product by specific antibodies. Conclusions Our

  17. The evolution of cancer-related genes in hominoids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lin; Michalak, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of cancer suppression is essential for the maintenance of multicellularity. The lack of correlation between body size and cancer risk across species, known as Peto's paradox, suggests that genetic variation in cancer resistance is sufficient to compensate for increases of cell numbers in bigger animals. To assess evolutionary dynamics of cancer-related genes, we analyzed Ka, Ks,and Ka/Ks values in 120 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSG) among seven hominoid species, including two extinct species, Neanderthal and Denisovan. Ka/Ks of tumor suppressor genes tended to be higher relative to that of oncogenes, consistent with relaxed purifying selection acting on the former. Ka/Ks values were positively correlated with TSG scores, but negatively correlated with oncogene scores, suggesting opposing selection pressures operating on the two groups of cancer-related genes. Additionally, we found 108 species-divergent substitutions that were prevalent germline genotypes in some species but in humans appeared only as somatic cancerous mutations. Better understanding the resistance to cancer may lead to new methods of cancer prevention in humans.

  18. Titanium nanotubes activate genes related to bone formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pozio, Alfonso; Palmieri, Annalisa; Girardi, Ambra; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Titanium is used worldwide to make osseointegrable devices, thanks to its favorable characteristics as mechanical proprieties and biocompatibility, demonstrated by in vivo studies with animal models and clinical trials over a forty-year period. However, the exact genetic effect of the titanium layer on cells is still not well characterized. Materials and Methods: To investigate how titanium nanotubes stimulate osteoblasts differentiation and proliferation, some osteoblast genes (SP7, RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL, SPP1 and FOSL1) were analyzed by quantitative Real Time RT- PCR. Results: After 15 days, osteoblasts cultivated on titanium naotube showed the up-regulation of bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and SPP1 and the down-regulation of RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, and ALPL. After 30 days of treatment, the bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and RUNX2 were up-regulated while COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL and SPP1 were down-regulated. Conclusions: Our results, demonstrates that titanium nanotubes can lead to osteoblast differentiation and extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization in dental pulp stem cells by the activation of osteoblast related genes SPP1, FOSL1 and RUNX2. PMID:23814577

  19. A widespread class of reverse transcriptase-related cellular genes.

    PubMed

    Gladyshev, Eugene A; Arkhipova, Irina R

    2011-12-20

    Reverse transcriptases (RTs) polymerize DNA on RNA templates. They fall into several structurally related but distinct classes and form an assemblage of RT-like enzymes that, in addition to RTs, also includes certain viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRP) synthesizing RNA on RNA templates. It is generally believed that most RT-like enzymes originate from retrotransposons or viruses and have no specific function in the host cell, with telomerases being the only notable exception. Here we report on the discovery and properties of a unique class of RT-related cellular genes collectively named rvt. We present evidence that rvts are not components of retrotransposons or viruses, but single-copy genes with a characteristic domain structure that may contain introns in evolutionarily conserved positions, occur in syntenic regions, and evolve under purifying selection. These genes can be found in all major taxonomic groups including protists, fungi, animals, plants, and even bacteria, although they exhibit patchy phylogenetic distribution in each kingdom. We also show that the RVT protein purified from one of its natural hosts, Neurospora crassa, exists in a multimeric form and has the ability to polymerize NTPs as well as dNTPs in vitro, with a strong preference for NTPs, using Mn(2+) as a cofactor. The existence of a previously unknown class of single-copy RT-related genes calls for reevaluation of the current views on evolution and functional roles of RNA-dependent polymerases in living cells.

  20. Combinatorial gene regulation by modulation of relative pulse timing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Sohn, Chang Ho; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Cai, Long; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of individual living cells have revealed that many transcription factors activate in dynamic, and often stochastic, pulses within the same cell. However, it has remained unclear whether cells might modulate the relative timing of these pulses to control gene expression. Here, using quantitative single-cell time-lapse imaging of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the pulsatile transcription factors Msn2 and Mig1 combinatorially regulate their target genes through modulation of their relative pulse timing. The activator Msn2 and repressor Mig1 pulsed in either a temporally overlapping or non-overlapping manner during their transient response to different inputs, with only the non-overlapping dynamics efficiently activating target gene expression. Similarly, under constant environmental conditions, where Msn2 and Mig1 exhibit sporadic pulsing, glucose concentration modulated the temporal overlap between pulses of the two factors. Together, these results reveal a time-based mode of combinatorial gene regulation. Regulation through relative signal timing is common in engineering and neurobiology, and these results suggest that it could also function broadly within the signaling and regulatory systems of the cell. PMID:26466562

  1. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration1234

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)–related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24829491

  2. Coordinate expression of hydrogenase and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase in Rhizobium japonicum Hupc mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Merberg, D; Maier, R J

    1984-01-01

    In contrast to the wild type, H2 uptake-constitutive mutants of Rhizobium japonicum expressed both hydrogenase and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activities when grown heterotrophically. However, as bacteroids from soybean root nodules, the H2 uptake-constitutive mutants, like the wild type, did not express ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. PMID:6384199

  3. Flexible plastic bioreactors for photobiological hydrogen production by hydrogenase-deficient cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kitashima, Masaharu; Masukawa, Hajime; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Inoue, Kazuhito

    2012-01-01

    Uptake hydrogenase mutant cells of the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7422 photobiologically produced H(2) catalyzed by nitrogenase for several days in H(2)-barrier transparent plastic bags, and accumulated H(2) in the presence of O(2) evolved by photosynthesis. Their H(2) production activity was higher in the sealed flexible bags than in stoppered serum bottles of fixed gas volume.

  4. Lyophilization protects [FeFe]-hydrogenases against O2-induced H-cluster degradation

    PubMed Central

    Noth, Jens; Kositzki, Ramona; Klein, Kathrin; Winkler, Martin; Haumann, Michael; Happe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nature has developed an impressive repertoire of metal-based enzymes that perform complex chemical reactions under moderate conditions. Catalysts that produce molecular hydrogen (H2) are particularly promising for renewable energy applications. Unfortunately, natural and chemical H2-catalysts are often irreversibly degraded by molecular oxygen (O2). Here we present a straightforward procedure based on freeze-drying (lyophilization), that turns [FeFe]-hydrogenases, which are excellent H2-producers, but typically extremely O2-sensitive in solution, into enzymes that are fully resistant against O2. Complete dryness protects and conserves both, the [FeFe]-hydrogenase proteins and their inorganic active-site cofactor (H-cluster), when exposed to 100% O2 for days. The full H2-formation capacity is restored after solvation of the lyophilized enzymes. However, even minimal moisturizing re-establishes O2-sensitivity. The dry [FeFe]-hydrogenase material is superior also for advanced spectroscopic investigations on the H-cluster reaction mechanism. Our method provides a convenient way for long-term storage and impacts on potential biotechnological hydrogen production applications of hydrogenase enzymes. PMID:26364994

  5. A kinetic and thermodynamic understanding of O2 tolerance in [NiFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Cracknell, James A; Wait, Annemarie F; Lenz, Oliver; Friedrich, Bärbel; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2009-12-08

    In biology, rapid oxidation and evolution of H(2) is catalyzed by metalloenzymes known as hydrogenases. These enzymes have unusual active sites, consisting of iron complexed by carbonyl, cyanide, and thiolate ligands, often together with nickel, and are typically inhibited or irreversibly damaged by O(2). The Knallgas bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 (Re) uses H(2) as an energy source with O(2) as a terminal electron acceptor, and its membrane-bound uptake [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MBH) is an important example of an "O(2)-tolerant" hydrogenase. The mechanism of O(2) tolerance of Re MBH has been probed by measuring H(2) oxidation activity in the presence of O(2) over a range of potential, pH and temperature, and comparing with the same dependencies for individual processes involved in the attack by O(2) and subsequent reactivation of the active site. Most significantly, O(2) tolerance increases with increasing temperature and decreasing potentials. These trends correlate with the trends observed for reactivation kinetics but not for H(2) affinity or the kinetics of O(2) attack. Clearly, the rate of recovery is a crucial factor. We present a kinetic and thermodynamic model to account for O(2) tolerance in Re MBH that may be more widely applied to other [NiFe]-hydrogenases.

  6. Alcaligenes Eutrophus as a Source of Hydrogenase: An Evaluation of Techniques for Its Large Scale Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    the Azotobacter and the Cynobacteria. K evolution by these micro-organisms are ATP-dependent and is catalyzed by nitrogenase but a hydrogenase Is...of Biochemistry and Biolhysics, Vol. 237, pp. 504- 512, 1985. 33 45. Seefeldt, Lance C. and Daniel J. Arp. Purification to homogeneity of Azotobacter

  7. The quest for a functional substrate access tunnel in FeFe hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Lautier, Thomas; Ezanno, Pierre; Baffert, Carole; Fourmond, Vincent; Cournac, Laurent; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Soucaille, Philippe; Bertrand, Patrick; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Léger, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    We investigated di-hydrogen transport between the solvent and the active site of FeFe hydrogenases. Substrate channels supposedly exist and serve various functions in certain redox enzymes which use or produce O2, H2, NO, CO, or N2, but the preferred paths have not always been unambiguously identified, and whether a continuous, permanent channel is an absolute requirement for transporting diatomic molecules is unknown. Here, we review the literature on gas channels in proteins and enzymes and we report on the use of site-directed mutagenesis and various kinetic methods, which proved useful for characterizing substrate access to the active site of NiFe hydrogenase to test the putative "static" H2 channel of FeFe hydrogenases. We designed 8 mutations in attempts to interfere with intramolecular diffusion by remodeling this putative route in Clostridium acetobutylicum FeFe hydrogenase, and we observed that none of them has a strong effect on any of the enzyme's kinetic properties. We suggest that H2 may diffuse either via transient cavities, or along a conserved water-filled channel. Nitrogenase sets a precedent for the involvement of a hydrophilic channel to conduct hydrophobic molecules.

  8. Hydrogenase activity of mineral-associated and suspended populations of Desulfovibrio Desulfuricans Essex 6

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The interactions between sulfate-reducing microorganisms and iron oxides influence a number of important redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes including the formation of iron sulfides. Enzymes, such as hydrogenase which catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen, are known to mediate...

  9. Structural and functional synthetic model of mono-iron hydrogenase featuring an anthracene scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Junhyeok; Manes, Taylor A.; Rose, Michael J.

    2017-06-01

    Mono-iron hydrogenase was the third type of hydrogenase discovered. Its Lewis acidic iron(II) centre promotes the heterolytic cleavage of the H-H bond and this non-redox H2 activation distinguishes it from the well-studied dinuclear [FeFe] and [NiFe] hydrogenases. Cleavage of the H-H bond is followed by hydride transfer to the enzyme's organic substrate, H4MPT+, which serves as a CO2 'carrier' in methanogenic pathways. Here we report a scaffold-based synthetic approach by which to model mono-iron hydrogenase using an anthracene framework, which supports a biomimetic fac-C,N,S coordination motif to an iron(II) centre. This arrangement includes the biomimetic and organometallic Fe-C σ bond, which enables bidirectional activity reminiscent of the native enzyme: the complex activates H2 under mild conditions, and catalyses C-H hydride abstraction plus H2 generation from a model substrate. Notably, neither H2 activation nor C-H hydride abstraction was observed in the analogous complex with a pincer-type mer-C,N,S ligation, emphasizing the importance of the fac-C,N,S-iron(II) motif in promoting enzyme-like reactivity.

  10. Role of the NiFe Hydrogenase Hya in Oxidative Stress Defense in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens, an Fe(III)-reducing deltaproteobacterium found in anoxic subsurface environments, contains 4 NiFe hydrogenases. Hyb, a periplasmically oriented membrane-bound NiFe hydrogenase, is essential for hydrogen-dependent growth. The functions of the three other hydrogenases are unknown. We show here that the other periplasmically oriented membrane-bound NiFe hydrogenase, Hya, is necessary for growth after exposure to oxidative stress when hydrogen or a highly limiting concentration of acetate is the electron source. The beneficial impact of Hya on growth was dependent on the presence of H2 in the atmosphere. Moreover, the Hya-deficient strain was more sensitive to the presence of superoxide or hydrogen peroxide. Hya was also required to safeguard Hyb hydrogen oxidation activity after exposure to O2. Overexpression studies demonstrated that Hya was more resistant to oxidative stress than Hyb. Overexpression of Hya also resulted in the creation of a recombinant strain better fitted for exposure to oxidative stress than wild-type G. sulfurreducens. These results demonstrate that one of the physiological roles of the O2-resistant Hya is to participate in the oxidative stress defense of G. sulfurreducens. PMID:22366414

  11. A Cell-Free Microtiter Plate Screen for Improved [FeFe] Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, James A.; Swartz, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Background [FeFe] hydrogenase enzymes catalyze the production and dissociation of H2, a potential renewable fuel. Attempts to exploit these catalysts in engineered systems have been hindered by the biotechnologically inconvenient properties of the natural enzymes, including their extreme oxygen sensitivity. Directed evolution has been used to improve the characteristics of a range of natural catalysts, but has been largely unsuccessful for [FeFe] hydrogenases because of a lack of convenient screening platforms. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe an in vitro screening technology for oxygen-tolerant and highly active [FeFe] hydrogenases. Despite the complexity of the protocol, we demonstrate a level of reproducibility that allows moderately improved mutants to be isolated. We have used the platform to identify a mutant of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [FeFe] hydrogenase HydA1 with a specific activity ∼4 times that of the wild-type enzyme. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using the screen presented here for large-scale efforts to identify improved biocatalysts for energy applications. The system is based on our ability to activate these complex enzymes in E. coli cell extracts, which allows unhindered access to the protein maturation and assay environment. PMID:20479937

  12. Gene-Diet Interactions in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Sheldon; Taylor, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prevalent blinding disease, accounting for roughly 50 % of blindness in developed nations. Very significant advances have been made in terms of discovering genetic susceptibilities to AMD as well as dietary risk factors. To date, nutritional supplementation is the only available treatment option for the dry form of the disease known to slow progression of AMD. Despite an excellent understanding of genes and nutrition in AMD, there is remarkably little known about gene-diet interactions that may identify efficacious approaches to treat individuals. This review will summarize our current understanding of gene-diet interactions in AMD with a focus on animal models and human epidemiological studies.

  13. Inflammation-related genes up-regulated in schizophrenia brains.

    PubMed

    Saetre, Peter; Emilsson, Lina; Axelsson, Elin; Kreuger, Johan; Lindholm, Eva; Jazin, Elena

    2007-09-06

    Multiple studies have shown that brain gene expression is disturbed in subjects suffering from schizophrenia. However, disentangling disease effects from alterations caused by medication is a challenging task. The main goal of this study is to find transcriptional alterations in schizophrenia that are independent of neuroleptic treatment. We compared the transcriptional profiles in brain autopsy samples from 55 control individuals with that from 55 schizophrenic subjects, subdivided according to the type of antipsychotic medication received. Using global and high-resolution mRNA quantification techniques, we show that genes involved in immune response (GO:0006955) are up regulated in all groups of patients, including those not treated at the time of death. In particular, IFITM2, IFITM3, SERPINA3, and GBP1 showed increased mRNA levels in schizophrenia (p-values from qPCR < or = 0.01). These four genes were co-expressed in both schizophrenic subjects and controls. In-vitro experiments suggest that these genes are expressed in both oligodendrocyte and endothelial cells, where transcription is inducible by the inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IFN-alpha and IFN-gamma. Although the modified genes are not classical indicators of chronic or acute inflammation, our results indicate alterations of inflammation-related pathways in schizophrenia. In addition, the observation in oligodendrocyte cells suggests that alterations in inflammatory-related genes may have consequences for myelination. Our findings encourage future research to explore whether anti-inflammatory agents can be used in combination with traditional antipsychotics for a more efficient treatment of schizophrenia.

  14. The dual effect of a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion protein in vivo: successful divergence of the photosynthetic electron flux towards hydrogen production and elevated oxygen tolerance.

    PubMed

    Eilenberg, Haviva; Weiner, Iddo; Ben-Zvi, Oren; Pundak, Carmel; Marmari, Abigail; Liran, Oded; Wecker, Matt S; Milrad, Yuval; Yacoby, Iftach

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen photo-production in green algae, catalyzed by the enzyme [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA), is considered a promising source of renewable clean energy. Yet, a significant increase in hydrogen production efficiency is necessary for industrial scale-up. We have previously shown that a major challenge to be resolved is the inferior competitiveness of HydA with NADPH production, catalyzed by ferredoxin-NADP(+)-reductase (FNR). In this work, we explored the in vivo hydrogen production efficiency of Fd-HydA, where the electron donor ferredoxin (Fd) is fused to HydA and expressed in the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that once the Fd-HydA fusion gene is expressed in micro-algal cells of C. reinhardtii, the fusion enzyme is able to intercept photosynthetic electrons and use them for efficient hydrogen production, thus supporting the previous observations made in vitro. We found that Fd-HydA has a ~4.5-fold greater photosynthetic hydrogen production rate standardized for hydrogenase amount (PHPRH) than that of the native HydA in vivo. Furthermore, we provide evidence suggesting that the fusion protein is more resistant to oxygen than the native HydA. The in vivo photosynthetic activity of the Fd-HydA enzyme surpasses that of the native HydA and shows higher oxygen tolerance. Therefore, our results provide a solid platform for further engineering efforts towards efficient hydrogen production in microalgae through the expression of synthetic enzymes.

  15. The soluble NAD+-Reducing [NiFe]-hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha H16 consists of six subunits and can be specifically activated by NADPH.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Tanja; van der Linden, Eddy; Bernhard, Michael; Yin, Qing Yuan; Back, Jaap W; Hartog, Aloysius F; Muijsers, Anton O; de Koster, Chris G; Albracht, Simon P J; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2005-05-01

    The soluble [NiFe]-hydrogenase (SH) of the facultative lithoautotrophic proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 has up to now been described as a heterotetrameric enzyme. The purified protein consists of two functionally distinct heterodimeric moieties. The HoxHY dimer represents the hydrogenase module, and the HoxFU dimer constitutes an NADH-dehydrogenase. In the bimodular form, the SH mediates reduction of NAD(+) at the expense of H(2). We have purified a new high-molecular-weight form of the SH which contains an additional subunit. This extra subunit was identified as the product of hoxI, a member of the SH gene cluster (hoxFUYHWI). Edman degradation, in combination with protein sequencing of the SH high-molecular-weight complex, established a subunit stoichiometry of HoxFUYHI(2). Cross-linking experiments indicated that the two HoxI subunits are the closest neighbors. The stability of the hexameric SH depended on the pH and the ionic strength of the buffer. The tetrameric form of the SH can be instantaneously activated with small amounts of NADH but not with NADPH. The hexameric form, however, was also activated by adding small amounts of NADPH. This suggests that HoxI provides a binding domain for NADPH. A specific reaction site for NADPH adds to the list of similarities between the SH and mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I).

  16. The Soluble NAD+-Reducing [NiFe]-Hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha H16 Consists of Six Subunits and Can Be Specifically Activated by NADPH

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Tanja; van der Linden, Eddy; Bernhard, Michael; Yuan Yin, Qing; Back, Jaap W.; Hartog, Aloysius F.; Muijsers, Anton O.; de Koster, Chris G.; Albracht, Simon P. J.; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2005-01-01

    The soluble [NiFe]-hydrogenase (SH) of the facultative lithoautotrophic proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 has up to now been described as a heterotetrameric enzyme. The purified protein consists of two functionally distinct heterodimeric moieties. The HoxHY dimer represents the hydrogenase module, and the HoxFU dimer constitutes an NADH-dehydrogenase. In the bimodular form, the SH mediates reduction of NAD+ at the expense of H2. We have purified a new high-molecular-weight form of the SH which contains an additional subunit. This extra subunit was identified as the product of hoxI, a member of the SH gene cluster (hoxFUYHWI). Edman degradation, in combination with protein sequencing of the SH high-molecular-weight complex, established a subunit stoichiometry of HoxFUYHI2. Cross-linking experiments indicated that the two HoxI subunits are the closest neighbors. The stability of the hexameric SH depended on the pH and the ionic strength of the buffer. The tetrameric form of the SH can be instantaneously activated with small amounts of NADH but not with NADPH. The hexameric form, however, was also activated by adding small amounts of NADPH. This suggests that HoxI provides a binding domain for NADPH. A specific reaction site for NADPH adds to the list of similarities between the SH and mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I). PMID:15838039

  17. Identification of three related human GRO genes encoding cytokine functions

    SciTech Connect

    Haskill, S.; Peace, A.; Morris, J.; Sporn, S.A. ); Anisowicz, A.; Lee, S.W.; Sager, R. ); Smith, T. ); Martin, G.; Ralph, P. )

    1990-10-01

    The product of the human GRO gene is a cytokine with inflammatory and growth-regulatory properties; GRO is also called MGSA for melanoma growth-stimulatory activity. The authors have identified two additional genes, GRO{beta} and GRO{gamma}, that share 90{percent} and 86{percent} identity at the deduced amino acid level with the original GRO{alpha} isolate. One amino acid substitution of proline in GRO{alpha} by leucine in GRO{beta} and GRO{gamma} leads to a large predicted change in protein conformation. Significant differences also exist in the 3' untranslated region, including different numbers of ATTTA repeats associated with mRNA instability. A 122-base-pair region in the 3' region is conserved among the three GRO genes, and a part of it is also conserved in the Chinese hamster genome, suggesting a role in regulation. DNA hybridization with oligonucleotide probes and partial sequence analysis of the genomic clones confirm that the three forms are derived from related but different genes. Only one chromosomal locus has been identified, at 4q21, by using a GRO{alpha} cDNA clone that hybridized to all three genes. Expression studies reveal tissue-specific regulation as well as regulation by specific inducing agents, including interleukin 1, tumor necrosis factor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and lipopolysaccharide.

  18. Th17-Related Genes and Celiac Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Luz María; García-Magariños, Manuel; Dema, Bárbara; Espino, Laura; Maluenda, Carlos; Polanco, Isabel; Figueredo, M. Ángeles; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Núñez, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Th17 cells are known to be involved in several autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In celiac disease (CD), recent studies suggest an implication of those cells in disease pathogenesis. We aimed at studying the role of genes relevant for the Th17 immune response in CD susceptibility. A total of 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), mainly selected to cover most of the variability present in 16 Th17-related genes (IL23R, RORC, IL6R, IL17A, IL17F, CCR6, IL6, JAK2, TNFSF15, IL23A, IL22, STAT3, TBX21, SOCS3, IL12RB1 and IL17RA), were genotyped in 735 CD patients and 549 ethnically matched healthy controls. Case-control comparisons for each SNP and for the haplotypes resulting from the SNPs studied in each gene were performed using chi-square tests. Gene-gene interactions were also evaluated following different methodological approaches. No significant results emerged after performing the appropriate statistical corrections. Our results seem to discard a relevant role of Th17 cells on CD risk. PMID:22359581

  19. Purification and properties of the membrane-associated coenzyme F420-reducing hydrogenase from Methanobacterium formicicum.

    PubMed Central

    Baron, S F; Ferry, J G

    1989-01-01

    The membrane-associated coenzyme F420-reducing hydrogenase of Methanobacterium formicicum was purified 87-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity. The enzyme contained alpha, beta, and gamma subunits (molecular weights of 43,000, 36,700, and 28,800, respectively) and formed aggregates (molecular weight, 1,020,000) of a coenzyme F420-active alpha 1 beta 1 gamma 1 trimer (molecular weight, 109,000). The hydrogenase contained 1 mol of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), 1 mol of nickel, 12 to 14 mol of iron, and 11 mol of acid-labile sulfide per mol of the 109,000-molecular-weight species, but no selenium. The isoelectric point was 5.6. The amino acid sequence I-N3-P-N2-R-N1-EGH-N6-V (where N is any amino acid) was conserved in the N-termini of the alpha subunits of the F420-hydrogenases from M. formicicum and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and of the largest subunits of nickel-containing hydrogenases from Desulfovibrio baculatus, Desulfovibrio gigas, and Rhodobacter capsulatus. The purified F420-hydrogenase required reductive reactivation before assay. FAD dissociated from the enzyme during reactivation unless potassium salts were present, yielding deflavoenzyme that was unable to reduce coenzyme F420. Maximal coenzyme F420-reducing activity was obtained at 55 degrees C and pH 7.0 to 7.5, and with 0.2 to 0.8 M KCl in the reaction mixture. The enzyme catalyzed H2 production at a rate threefold lower than that for H2 uptake and reduced coenzyme F420, methyl viologen, flavins, and 7,8-didemethyl-8-hydroxy-5-deazariboflavin. Specific antiserum inhibited the coenzyme F420-dependent but not the methyl viologen-dependent activity of the purified enzyme. Images PMID:2738024

  20. Novel H2-oxidizing [NiFeSe]hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Kyoshiro; Nguyen, Nga T; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2013-04-01

    [NiFeSe]hydrogenases are promising biocatalysts in H2-based technology due to their high catalytic activity and O2-stability. Here, we report purification and characterization of a new membrane-associated [NiFeSe]hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F ([NiFeSe]DvMF). The [NiFeSe]DvMF was composed of two subunits, corresponding to a large subunit of 58.3 kDa and a small subunit of 29.3 kDa determined by SDS-PAGE. Unlike conventional [NiFeSe]hydrogenases having catalytic bias toward H2-production, the [NiFeSe]DvMF showed 11-fold higher specific activity of H2-oxidation (2444 U/mg) than that of H2-production (217 U/mg). At the optimal reaction temperature of the enzyme (65°C), the specific activity of H2-oxidation could reach up to 21,553 U/mg. Amperometric assays of the [NiFeSe]DvMF clearly indicated that the enzyme had a remarkable O2-stability. According to the amino acid sequence alignment, the conserved cysteine residue at position 281 in medial cluster of other [NiFeSe]hydrogenases was specifically replaced by a serine residue (Ser281) in the [NiFeSe]DvMF. These results indicate that the [NiFeSe]DvMF can play as a new H2-oxidizing and O2-stable biocatalyst, along with providing helpful insights into the structure-function relationship of [NiFeSe]hydrogenases.

  1. Importance of the Protein Framework for Catalytic Activity of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Knörzer, Philipp; Silakov, Alexey; Foster, Carina E.; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Happe, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The active center (H-cluster) of [FeFe]-hydrogenases is embedded into a hydrophobic pocket within the protein. We analyzed several amino acids, located in the vicinity of this niche, by site-directed mutagenesis of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases from Clostridium pasteurianum (CpI) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrHydA1). These amino acids are highly conserved and predicted to be involved in H-cluster coordination. Characterization of two hydrogenase variants confirmed this hypothesis. The exchange of residues CrHydA1Met415 and CrHydA1Lys228 resulted in inactive proteins, which, according to EPR and FTIR analyses, contain no intact H-cluster. However, [FeFe]-hydrogenases in which CpIMet353 (CrHydA1Met223) and CpICys299 (CrHydA1Cys169) were exchanged to leucine and serine, respectively, showed a structurally intact H-cluster with catalytic activity either absent (CpIC299S) or strongly diminished (CpIM353L). In the case of CrHydA1C169S, the H-cluster was trapped in an inactive state exhibiting g values and vibrational frequencies that resembled the Htrans state of DdH from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. This cysteine residue, interacting with the bridge head nitrogen of the di(methyl)amine ligand, seems therefore to represent an essential contribution of the immediate protein environment to the reaction mechanism. Exchanging methionine CpIM353 (CrHydA1M223) to leucine led to a strong decrease in turnover without affecting the Km value of the electron donor. We suggest that this methionine constitutes a “fine-tuning” element of hydrogenase activity. PMID:22110126

  2. [Latest Research Advance of Myeloproliferative Diseases Related Genes-Review].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yu-Hong; Wang, Yi-Hao; Shao, Zong-Hong

    2017-08-01

    JAK2, MPL and CALR gene mutations play an important role in the onset of myeloproliferative disease(MPD). The latest researches show that the difference of ATP binding ability between the wild type JAK2 protein and mutated JAK2 protein can help us understand the pathogenesis of the MPD further, and the clinical manifestation is related to the mutation burden of the JAK2. In some ET and PMF patients, research find the expression of MPL mutation, which can affects the progress of the disease by collaborating with the JAK2 mutation. CALR mutation is a gene related with the MPD that has been found recently. The pathogenesis of the CALR is similar to that of the JAK2, while there are some features in clinical manifestation comparing with the other mutations.

  3. The Parkinson's disease-related genes act in mitochondrial homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sai, Yan; Zou, Zhongmin; Peng, Kaige; Dong, Zhaojun

    2012-10-01

    Neurons are metabolically active cells with high energy demands. Thus, neurons are particularly reliant on mitochondrial function, especially on the homeostasis properties of mitochondria. This is reflected by the observation that mitochondrial abnormalities have been well recognized to contribute to neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson's disease (PD). Mitochondria are highly complex and dynamic organelles continuously undergoing different alterations. The dynamic property of mitochondria is named as mitochondrial homeostasis. Imbalance of mitochondrial homeostasis is associated with neurodegenerative disease, such as Parkinson's diseases. Recently, the related genes of PD-familial, such as alpha-synuclein, Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and LRRK2, are observed to be associated with mitochondria, and capable of modulating normal mitochondrial integrity and functions under certain conditions. Therefore, in this review, we will focus on the action of PD-related genes in mitochondrial homeostasis. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. VDR Gene variation and insulin resistance related diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Fei-Fei; Lv, Ya-Li; Gong, Li-Li; Liu, He; Wan, Zi-Rui; Liu, Li-Hong

    2017-08-19

    Vitamin D status may influence the risk of Insulin resistance related diseases such as Type 2 diabetes (T2DM), metabolic syndrome (MetS), and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Several studies have assessed vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphism in relationship with these diseases; however, results remain inconsistent. Our study was conducted to elucidate whether VDR Gene polymorphisms could predict insulin resistance on a large scale. A meta-analysis using MEDLINE and EMBASE, was performed up to December 16th, 2016. Studies reporting association of vitamin D gene polymorphism with incident T2DM, MetS and PCOS outcomes were included and sub-group analysis by pigment of skin and latitude were performed. A total of 28 articles based on four gene variation, and comprising 9232 participants with 5193 Insulin resistance related diseases patients were included. No significant associations of the VDR ApaI, BsmI, FokI and TaqI variant with Insulin resistance related diseases were found. However, sub-group analysis analysis showed that PCOS in TaqI (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.03-2.09, P = 0.03) for T allele and MetS for G allele (OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.07-1.85, P = 0.01) in BsmI was significant association with VDR gene polymorphism. Simultaneously, sub-group analysis showed VDR ApaI rs7975232(G > T)variant was associated with insulin resistance related diseases in Asians (GG/GT + TT) (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.03-2.53; P = 0.04) and population who lived in middle latitude district (30-60°) (GG/GT + TT) (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.04-1.43; P = 0.02), VDR BsmI rs1544410 (A > G)and VDR Taq1rs731236 (T/C) variant were associated with insulin resistance related diseases in Caucasian (dark-pigmented). The results suggested that the association between insulin resistance related diseases and VDR ApaI, BsmI, FokI variant was more obvious in dark-pigmented Caucasians and Asians but not in Caucasian with white skin.

  5. Radical S-Adenosyl-L-methionine Chemistry in the Synthesis of Hydrogenase and Nitrogenase Metal Cofactors

    SciTech Connect

    Byer, Amanda S.; Shepard, Eric M.; Peters, John W.; Broderick, Joan B.

    2014-12-04

    Nitrogenase, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, and [Fe]-hydrogenase enzymes perform catalysis at metal cofactors with biologically unusual non-protein ligands. Furthermore, the FeMo cofactor of nitrogenase has a MoFe7S9 cluster with a central carbon, whereas the H-cluster of [FeFe]-hydrogenase contains a 2Fe subcluster coordinated by cyanide and CO ligands as well as dithiomethylamine; the [Fe]-hydrogenase cofactor has CO and guanylylpyridinol ligands at a mononuclear iron site. Intriguingly, radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine enzymes are vital for the assembly of all three of these diverse cofactors. Here, in this minireview, we present and discuss the current state of knowledge of the radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes required for synthesis of these remarkable metal cofactors.

  6. A redox hydrogel protects the O2 -sensitive [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Oughli, Alaa Alsheikh; Conzuelo, Felipe; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Rüdiger, Olaf; Plumeré, Nicolas

    2015-10-12

    The integration of sensitive catalysts in redox matrices opens up the possibility for their protection from deactivating molecules such as O2 . [FeFe]-hydrogenases are enzymes catalyzing H2 oxidation/production which are irreversibly deactivated by O2 . Therefore, their use under aerobic conditions has never been achieved. Integration of such hydrogenases in viologen-modified hydrogel films allows the enzyme to maintain catalytic current for H2 oxidation in the presence of O2 , demonstrating a protection mechanism independent of reactivation processes. Within the hydrogel, electrons from the hydrogenase-catalyzed H2 oxidation are shuttled to the hydrogel-solution interface for O2 reduction. Hence, the harmful O2 molecules do not reach the hydrogenase. We illustrate the potential applications of this protection concept with a biofuel cell under H2 /O2 mixed feed.

  7. Redox reactions of [FeFe]-hydrogenase models containing an internal amine and a pendant phosphine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dehua; Wang, Mei; Chen, Lin; Wang, Ning; Sun, Licheng

    2014-02-03

    A diiron dithiolate complex with a pendant phosphine coordinated to one of the iron centers, [(μ-SCH2)2N(CH2C6H4-o-PPh2){Fe2(CO)5}] (1), was prepared and structurally characterized. The pendant phosphine is dissociated together with a CO ligand in the presence of excess PMe3, to afford [(μ-SCH2)2N(CH2C6H4-o-PPh2){Fe(CO)2(PMe3)}2] (2). Redox reactions of 2 and related complexes were studied in detail by in situ IR spectroscopy. A series of new Fe(II)Fe(I) ([3](+) and [6](+)), Fe(II)Fe(II) ([4](2+)), and Fe(I)Fe(I) (5) complexes relevant to Hox, Hox(CO), and Hred states of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site were detected. Among these complexes, the molecular structures of the diferrous complex [4](2+) with the internal amine and the pendant phosphine co-coordinated to the same iron center and the triphosphine diiron complex 5 were determined by X-ray crystallography. To make a comparison, the redox reactions of an analogous complex, [(μ-SCH2)2N(CH2C6H5){Fe(CO)2(PMe3)}2] (7), were also investigated by in situ IR spectroscopy in the absence or presence of extrinsic PPh3, which has no influence on the oxidation reaction of 7. The pendant phosphine in the second coordination sphere makes the redox reaction of 2 different from that of its analogue 7.

  8. Deep evolutionary conservation of autism-related genes.

    PubMed

    Shpigler, Hagai Y; Saul, Michael C; Corona, Frida; Block, Lindsey; Cash Ahmed, Amy; Zhao, Sihai D; Robinson, Gene E

    2017-09-05

    E. O. Wilson proposed in Sociobiology that similarities between human and animal societies reflect common mechanistic and evolutionary roots. When introduced in 1975, this controversial hypothesis was beyond science's ability to test. We used genomic analyses to determine whether superficial behavioral similarities in humans and the highly social honey bee reflect common molecular mechanisms. Here, we report that gene expression signatures for individual bees unresponsive to various salient social stimuli are significantly enriched for autism spectrum disorder-related genes. These signatures occur in the mushroom bodies, a high-level integration center of the insect brain. Furthermore, our finding of enrichment was unique to autism spectrum disorders; brain gene expression signatures from other honey bee behaviors do not show this enrichment, nor do datasets from other human behavioral and health conditions. These results demonstrate deep conservation for genes associated with a human social pathology and individual differences in insect social behavior, thus providing an example of how comparative genomics can be used to test sociobiological theory.

  9. The AbrB2 autorepressor, expressed from an atypical promoter, represses the hydrogenase operon to regulate hydrogen production in Synechocystis strain PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Dutheil, Jérémy; Saenkham, Panatda; Sakr, Samer; Leplat, Christophe; Ortega-Ramos, Marcia; Bottin, Hervé; Cournac, Laurent; Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Chauvat, Franck

    2012-10-01

    We have thoroughly investigated the abrB2 gene (sll0822) encoding an AbrB-like regulator in the wild-type strain of the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis strain PCC6803. We report that abrB2 is expressed from an active but atypical promoter that possesses an extended -10 element (TGTAATAT) that compensates for the absence of a -35 box. Strengthening the biological significance of these data, we found that the occurrence of an extended -10 promoter box and the absence of a -35 element are two well-conserved features in abrB2 genes from other cyanobacteria. We also show that AbrB2 is an autorepressor that is dispensable to cell growth under standard laboratory conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that AbrB2 also represses the hox operon, which encodes the Ni-Fe hydrogenase of biotechnological interest, and that the hox operon is weakly expressed even though it possesses the two sequences resembling canonical -10 and -35 promoter boxes. In both the AbrB2-repressed promoters of the abrB2 gene and the hox operon, we found a repeated DNA motif [TT-(N(5))-AAC], which could be involved in AbrB2 repression. Supporting this hypothesis, we found that a TT-to-GG mutation of one of these elements increased the activity of the abrB2 promoter. We think that our abrB2-deleted mutant with increased expression of the hox operon and hydrogenase activity, together with the reporter plasmids we constructed to analyze the abrB2 gene and the hox operon, will serve as useful tools to decipher the function and the regulation of hydrogen production in Synechocystis.

  10. Molecular cloning of allelopathy related genes and their relation to HHO in Eupatorium adenophorum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiming; Pei, Xixiang; Wan, Fanghao; Cheng, Hongmei

    2011-10-01

    In this study, conserved sequence regions of HMGR, DXR, and CHS (encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase and chalcone synthase, respectively) were amplified by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR from Eupatorium adenophorum. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the expression of CHS was related to the level of HHO, an allelochemical isolated from E. adenophorum. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that there was no significant difference in expression of genes among three different tissues, except for CHS. Southern blotting indicated that at least three CHS genes are present in the E. adenophorum genome. A full-length cDNA from CHS genes (named EaCHS1, GenBank ID: FJ913888) was cloned. The 1,455 bp cDNA contained an open reading frame (1,206 bp) encoding a protein of 401 amino acids. Preliminary bioinformatics analysis of EaCHS1 revealed that EaCHS1 was a member of CHS family, the subcellular localization predicted that EaCHS1 was a cytoplasmic protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of conserved sequences of these genes and of a full-length EaCHS1 gene in E. adenophorum. The results indicated that CHS gene is related to allelopathy of E. adenophorum.

  11. International Hydrogenase Conference (7th) Held at the University of Reading on August 24th to 29th 2004.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-19

    Seibert T30 j The Tat protein transport system required for the biogenesis of extracytoplasmic hydrogenases. 13 7th International Hydrogenase Conference...Physiology and Nutrition , Polish Academy of Sciences, Jablonna, Poland. I Institute of Animal Physiology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice, Slovakia...nuclear, but not of mitochondrial, Fe/S proteins. Narl p-depleted cells do not accumulate iron in mitochondria , distinguishing these cells from mutants

  12. Impact of obesity-related genes in Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective was to investigate the association between BMI and single nucleotide polymorphisms previously identified of obesity-related genes in two Spanish populations. Forty SNPs in 23 obesity-related genes were evaluated in a rural population characterized by a high prevalence of obesity (869 subjects, mean age 46 yr, 62% women, 36% obese) and in an urban population (1425 subjects, mean age 54 yr, 50% women, 19% obese). Genotyping was assessed by using SNPlex and PLINK for the association analysis. Results Polymorphisms of the FTO were significantly associated with BMI, in the rural population (beta 0.87, p-value <0.001). None of the other SNPs showed significant association after Bonferroni correction in the two populations or in the pooled analysis. A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was constructed using the risk alleles of the Tag-SNPs with a positive Beta parameter in both populations. From the first to the fifth quintile of the score, the BMI increased 0.45 kg/m2 in Hortega and 2.0 kg/m2 in Pizarra. Overall, the obesity predictive value was low (less than 1%). Conclusion The risk associated with polymorphisms is low and the overall effect on BMI or obesity prediction is minimal. A weighted genetic risk score based on genes mainly acting through central nervous system mechanisms was associated with BMI but it yields minimal clinical prediction for the obesity risk in the general population. PMID:24267414

  13. Systematically characterizing and prioritizing chemosensitivity related gene based on Gene Ontology and protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Qianghu; Huang, Teng; Wang, Peng; Li, Yan; Chen, Xiaowen; Lv, Yingli; Li, Xia

    2012-10-02

    The identification of genes that predict in vitro cellular chemosensitivity of cancer cells is of great importance. Chemosensitivity related genes (CRGs) have been widely utilized to guide clinical and cancer chemotherapy decisions. In addition, CRGs potentially share functional characteristics and network features in protein interaction networks (PPIN). In this study, we proposed a method to identify CRGs based on Gene Ontology (GO) and PPIN. Firstly, we documented 150 pairs of drug-CCRG (curated chemosensitivity related gene) from 492 published papers. Secondly, we characterized CCRGs from the perspective of GO and PPIN. Thirdly, we prioritized CRGs based on CCRGs' GO and network characteristics. Lastly, we evaluated the performance of the proposed method. We found that CCRG enriched GO terms were most often related to chemosensitivity and exhibited higher similarity scores compared to randomly selected genes. Moreover, CCRGs played key roles in maintaining the connectivity and controlling the information flow of PPINs. We then prioritized CRGs using CCRG enriched GO terms and CCRG network characteristics in order to obtain a database of predicted drug-CRGs that included 53 CRGs, 32 of which have been reported to affect susceptibility to drugs. Our proposed method identifies a greater number of drug-CCRGs, and drug-CCRGs are much more significantly enriched in predicted drug-CRGs, compared to a method based on the correlation of gene expression and drug activity. The mean area under ROC curve (AUC) for our method is 65.2%, whereas that for the traditional method is 55.2%. Our method not only identifies CRGs with expression patterns strongly correlated with drug activity, but also identifies CRGs in which expression is weakly correlated with drug activity. This study provides the framework for the identification of signatures that predict in vitro cellular chemosensitivity and offers a valuable database for pharmacogenomics research.

  14. Purification and Characterization of the [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Hervé; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase) that has been implicated in H2 production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase were cloned and then expressed in an MR-1 mutant without hyaB and hydA genes. Expression of recombinant MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in trans restored the mutant's ability to produce H2 at 37% of that for the wild type. Following purification, MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase coupled H2 oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII)O4− and methyl viologen. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase-mediated reduction of Tc(VII)O4− but not methyl viologen. Under the conditions tested, all Tc(VII)O4− used was reduced in Tris buffer, while in HEPES buffer, only 20% of Tc(VII)O4− was reduced. The reduced products were soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc precipitates reduced in HEPES buffer were aggregates of crystallites with diameters of ∼5 nm. Measurements with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy revealed that the reduction products were a mixture of Tc(IV) and Tc(V) in Tris buffer but only Tc(IV) in HEPES buffer. Measurements with extended X-ray adsorption fine structure showed that while the Tc bonding environment in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O2·nH2O, which was also the product of Tc(VII)O4− reduction by MR-1 cells. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase catalyzes Tc(VII)O4− reduction directly by coupling to H2 oxidation. PMID:21724888

  15. Purification and characterization of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M; Plymale, Andrew E; Heald, Steve; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Hervé; Squier, Thomas C; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K

    2011-08-15

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase) that has been implicated in H(2) production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase were cloned and then expressed in an MR-1 mutant without hyaB and hydA genes. Expression of recombinant MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase in trans restored the mutant's ability to produce H(2) at 37% of that for the wild type. Following purification, MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase coupled H(2) oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) and methyl viologen. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase-mediated reduction of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) but not methyl viologen. Under the conditions tested, all Tc(VII)O(4)(-) used was reduced in Tris buffer, while in HEPES buffer, only 20% of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) was reduced. The reduced products were soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc precipitates reduced in HEPES buffer were aggregates of crystallites with diameters of ∼5 nm. Measurements with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy revealed that the reduction products were a mixture of Tc(IV) and Tc(V) in Tris buffer but only Tc(IV) in HEPES buffer. Measurements with extended X-ray adsorption fine structure showed that while the Tc bonding environment in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O(2)·nH(2)O, which was also the product of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) reduction by MR-1 cells. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase catalyzes Tc(VII)O(4)(-) reduction directly by coupling to H(2) oxidation.

  16. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, which is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.

  17. [Progress on the research of apomixis related genes in plant].

    PubMed

    Hu, Long-Xing

    2008-02-01

    Apomixis is a special asexual reproduction that plants can form embryo and produce progenies via seeds without sperm-egg fusion. Since apomitic embryo is a complete genetic clone of maternal parent without the participation of sperm, it is an ideal pathway to fix and utilize hybrid vigor and has unpredictable potential value in crop breeding, thus be called "the asexual revolution". According to the formation of the apomitic embryos, apomixis could be divided into three major types: diplospory, apospory and adventive embryony. This review is focused on the recent research progresses of related genes in the development of embryo, endosperm, and miosis, and several genes may involved in the regulation of apomitic development.

  18. Primary function analysis of human mental retardation related gene CRBN.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wang; Xiaohua, Ni; Peilin, Chen; Xin, Chen; Yaqiong, Sun; Qihan, Wu

    2008-06-01

    The mutation of human cereblon gene (CRBN) is revealed to be related with mild mental retardation. Since the molecular characteristics of CRBN have not been well presented, we investigated the general properties of CRBN. We analyzed its gene structure and protein homologues. The CRBN protein might belong to a family of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent Lon protease. We also found that CRBN was widely expressed in different tissues, and the expression level in testis is significantly higher than other tissues. This may suggested it could play some important roles in several other tissues besides brain. Transient transfection experiment in AD 293 cell lines suggested that both CRBN and CRBN mutant (nucleotide position 1,274(C > T)) are located in the whole cells. This may suggest new functions of CRBN in cell nucleolus besides its mitochondria protease activity in cytoplasm.

  19. Alternative RNA processing events in human calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, V; Lin, C R; Kawashima, E; Semon, D; Swanson, L W; Mermod, J J; Evans, R M; Rosenfeld, M G

    1985-01-01

    Two mRNAs generated as a consequence of alternative RNA processing events in expression of the human calcitonin gene encode the protein precursors of either calcitonin or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Both calcitonin and CGRP RNAs and their encoded peptide products are expressed in the human pituitary and in medullary thyroid tumors. On the basis of sequence comparison, it is suggested that both the calcitonin and CGRP exons arose from a common primordial sequence, suggesting that duplication and rearrangement events are responsible for the generation of this complex transcription unit. Images PMID:3872459

  20. Impact of the chemicals, essential for the purification process of strict Fe-hydrogenase, on the corrosion of mild steel.

    PubMed

    Rouvre, Ingrid; Gauquelin, Charles; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Basseguy, Régine

    2016-06-01

    The influence of additional chemical molecules, necessary for the purification process of [Fe]-hydrogenase from Clostridium acetobutylicum, was studied on the anaerobic corrosion of mild steel. At the end of the purification process, the pure [Fe-Fe]-hydrogenase was recovered in a Tris-HCl medium containing three other chemicals at low concentration: DTT, dithionite and desthiobiotin. Firstly, mild steel coupons were exposed in parallel to a 0.1 M pH7 Tris-HCl medium with or without pure hydrogenase. The results showed that hydrogenase and the additional molecules were in competition, and the electrochemical response could not be attributed solely to hydrogenase. Then, solutions with additional chemicals of different compositions were studied electrochemically. DTT polluted the electrochemical signal by increasing the Eoc by 35 mV 24 h after the injection of 300 μL of control solutions with DTT, whereas it drastically decreased the corrosion rate by increasing the charge transfer resistance (Rct 10 times the initial value). Thus, DTT was shown to have a strong antagonistic effect on corrosion and was removed from the purification process. An optimal composition of the medium was selected (0.5 mM dithionite, 7.5 mM desthiobiotin) that simultaneously allowed a high activity of hydrogenase and a lower impact on the electrochemical response for corrosion tests.

  1. Light-driven hydrogen production by a hybrid complex of a [NiFe]-hydrogenase and the cyanobacterial photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Masaki; Nishihara, Hirofumi; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Lenz, Oliver; Friedrich, Bärbel; Nakamoto, Hitoshi; Kojima, Kouji; Honma, Daisuke; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Okura, Ichiro

    2006-01-01

    In order to generate renewable and clean fuels, increasing efforts are focused on the exploitation of photosynthetic microorganisms for the production of molecular hydrogen from water and light. In this study we engineered a 'hard-wired' protein complex consisting of a hydrogenase and photosystem I (hydrogenase-PSI complex) as a direct light-to-hydrogen conversion system. The key component was an artificial fusion protein composed of the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase from the beta-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 and the peripheral PSI subunit PsaE of the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The resulting hydrogenase-PsaE fusion protein associated with PsaE-free PSI spontaneously, thereby forming a hydrogenase-PSI complex as confirmed by sucrose-gradient ultracentrifuge and immunoblot analysis. The hydrogenase-PSI complex displayed light-driven hydrogen production at a rate of 0.58 mumol H(2).mg chlorophyll(-1).h(-1). The complex maintained its accessibility to the native electron acceptor ferredoxin. This study provides the first example of a light-driven enzymatic reaction by an artificial complex between a redox enzyme and photosystem I and represents an important step on the way to design a photosynthetic organism that efficiently converts solar energy and water into hydrogen.

  2. A trimeric supercomplex of the oxygen-tolerant membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Frielingsdorf, Stefan; Schubert, Torsten; Pohlmann, Anne; Lenz, Oliver; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2011-12-20

    The oxygen-tolerant membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha H16 consists of three subunits. The large subunit HoxG carries the [NiFe] active site, and the small subunit HoxK contains three [FeS] clusters. Both subunits form the so-called hydrogenase module, which is oriented toward the periplasm. Membrane association is established by a membrane-integral cytochrome b subunit (HoxZ) that transfers the electrons from the hydrogenase module to the respiratory chain. So far, it was not possible to isolate the MBH in its native heterotrimeric state due to the loss of HoxZ during the process of protein solubilization. By using the very mild detergent digitonin, we were successful in isolating the MBH hydrogenase module in complex with the cytochrome b. H(2)-dependent reduction of the two HoxZ-stemming heme centers demonstrated that the hydrogenase module is productively connected to the cytochrome b. Further investigation provided evidence that the MBH exists in the membrane as a high molecular mass complex consisting of three heterotrimeric units. The lipids phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol were identified to play a role in the interaction of the hydrogenase module with the cytochrome b subunit.

  3. Aging related methylation influences the gene expression of key control genes in colorectal cancer and adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Patai, Árpád V; Leiszter, Katalin; Péterfia, Bálint; Wichmann, Barnabás; Valcz, Gábor; Veres, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze colorectal carcinogenesis and age-related DNA methylation alterations of gene sequences associated with epigenetic clock CpG sites. METHODS In silico DNA methylation analysis of 353 epigenetic clock CpG sites published by Steve Horvath was performed using methylation array data for a set of 123 colonic tissue samples [64 colorectal cancer (CRC), 42 adenoma, 17 normal; GEO accession number: GSE48684]. Among the differentially methylated age-related genes, secreted frizzled related protein 1 (SFRP1) promoter methylation was further investigated in colonic tissue from 8 healthy adults, 19 normal children, 20 adenoma and 8 CRC patients using bisulfite-specific PCR followed by methylation-specific high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis. mRNA expression of age-related “epigenetic clock” genes was studied using Affymetrix HGU133 Plus2.0 whole transcriptome data of 153 colonic biopsy samples (49 healthy adult, 49 adenoma, 49 CRC, 6 healthy children) (GEO accession numbers: GSE37364, GSE10714, GSE4183, GSE37267). Whole promoter methylation analysis of genes showing inverse DNA methylation-gene expression data was performed on 30 colonic samples using methyl capture sequencing. RESULTS Fifty-seven age-related CpG sites including hypermethylated PPP1R16B, SFRP1, SYNE1 and hypomethylated MGP, PIPOX were differentially methylated between CRC and normal tissues (P < 0.05, Δβ ≥ 10%). In the adenoma vs normal comparison, 70 CpG sites differed significantly, including hypermethylated DKK3, SDC2, SFRP1, SYNE1 and hypomethylated CEMIP, SPATA18 (P < 0.05, Δβ ≥ 10%). In MS-HRM analysis, the SFRP1 promoter region was significantly hypermethylated in CRC (55.0% ± 8.4 %) and adenoma tissue samples (49.9% ± 18.1%) compared to normal adult (5.2% ± 2.7%) and young (2.2% ± 0.7%) colonic tissue (P < 0.0001). DNA methylation of SFRP1 promoter was slightly, but significantly increased in healthy adults compared to normal young samples (P < 0.02). This correlated

  4. Aging related methylation influences the gene expression of key control genes in colorectal cancer and adenoma.

    PubMed

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Patai, Árpád V; Leiszter, Katalin; Péterfia, Bálint; Wichmann, Barnabás; Valcz, Gábor; Veres, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-12-21

    To analyze colorectal carcinogenesis and age-related DNA methylation alterations of gene sequences associated with epigenetic clock CpG sites. In silico DNA methylation analysis of 353 epigenetic clock CpG sites published by Steve Horvath was performed using methylation array data for a set of 123 colonic tissue samples [64 colorectal cancer (CRC), 42 adenoma, 17 normal; GEO accession number: GSE48684]. Among the differentially methylated age-related genes, secreted frizzled related protein 1 (SFRP1) promoter methylation was further investigated in colonic tissue from 8 healthy adults, 19 normal children, 20 adenoma and 8 CRC patients using bisulfite-specific PCR followed by methylation-specific high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis. mRNA expression of age-related "epigenetic clock" genes was studied using Affymetrix HGU133 Plus2.0 whole transcriptome data of 153 colonic biopsy samples (49 healthy adult, 49 adenoma, 49 CRC, 6 healthy children) (GEO accession numbers: GSE37364, GSE10714, GSE4183, GSE37267). Whole promoter methylation analysis of genes showing inverse DNA methylation-gene expression data was performed on 30 colonic samples using methyl capture sequencing. Fifty-seven age-related CpG sites including hypermethylated PPP1R16B, SFRP1, SYNE1 and hypomethylated MGP, PIPOX were differentially methylated between CRC and normal tissues (P < 0.05, Δβ ≥ 10%). In the adenoma vs normal comparison, 70 CpG sites differed significantly, including hypermethylated DKK3, SDC2, SFRP1, SYNE1 and hypomethylated CEMIP, SPATA18 (P < 0.05, Δβ ≥ 10%). In MS-HRM analysis, the SFRP1 promoter region was significantly hypermethylated in CRC (55.0% ± 8.4 %) and adenoma tissue samples (49.9% ± 18.1%) compared to normal adult (5.2% ± 2.7%) and young (2.2% ± 0.7%) colonic tissue (P < 0.0001). DNA methylation of SFRP1 promoter was slightly, but significantly increased in healthy adults compared to normal young samples (P < 0.02). This correlated with significantly

  5. Glycan-related gene expression signatures in breast cancer subtypes; relation to survival.

    PubMed

    Potapenko, Ivan O; Lüders, Torben; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Åslaug; Sørlie, Therese; Kristensen, Vessela N; Nord, Silje; Lingjærde, Ole C; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Haakensen, Vilde D

    2015-04-01

    Alterations in glycan structures are early signs of malignancy and have recently been proposed to be in part a driving force behind malignant transformation. Here, we explore whether differences in expression of genes related to the process of glycosylation exist between breast carcinoma subtypes - and look for their association to clinical parameters. Five expression datasets of 454 invasive breast carcinomas, 31 ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), and 79 non-malignant breast tissue samples were analysed. Results were validated in 1960 breast carcinomas. 419 genes encoding glycosylation-related proteins were selected. The DCIS samples appeared expression-wise similar to carcinomas, showing altered gene expression related to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and N-glycans when compared to non-malignant samples. In-situ lesions with different aggressiveness potentials demonstrated changes in glycosaminoglycan sulfation and adhesion proteins. Subtype-specific expression patterns revealed down-regulation of genes encoding glycan-binding proteins in the luminal A and B subtypes. Clustering basal-like samples using a consensus list of genes differentially expressed across discovery datasets produced two clusters with significantly differing prognosis in the validation dataset. Finally, our analyses suggest that glycolipids may play an important role in carcinogenesis of breast tumors - as demonstrated by association of B3GNT5 and UGCG genes to patient survival. In conclusion, most glycan-specific changes occur early in the carcinogenic process. We have identified glycan-related alterations specific to breast cancer subtypes including a prognostic signature for two basal-like subgroups. Future research in this area may potentially lead to markers for better prognostication and treatment stratification of breast cancer patients.

  6. Gene mutations in primary ciliary dyskinesia related to otitis media.

    PubMed

    Mata, Manuel; Milian, Lara; Armengot, Miguel; Carda, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the most common cause of conductive hearing loss in children and is strongly associated with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Approximately half of the children with PCD require otolaryngology care, posing a major problem in this population. Early diagnosis of PCD is critical in these patients to minimise the collateral damage related to OME. The current gold standard for PCD diagnosis requires determining ciliary structure defects by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or clearly documenting ciliary dysfunction via digital high-speed video microscopy (DHSV). Although both techniques are useful for PCD diagnosis, they have limitations and need to be supported by new methodologies, including genetic analysis of genes related to PCD. In this article, we review classical and recently associated mutations related to ciliary alterations leading to PCD, which can be useful for early diagnosis of the disease and subsequent early management of OME.

  7. Identifying redundant and missing relations in the gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Fleur

    2015-01-01

    Significant efforts have been undertaken for providing the Gene Ontology (GO) in a computable format as well as for enriching it with logical definitions. Automated approaches can thus be applied to GO for assisting its maintenance and for checking its internal coherence. However, inconsistencies may still remain within GO. In this frame, the objective of this work was to audit GO relationships. First, reasoning over relationships was exploited for detecting redundant relations existing between GO concepts. Missing necessary and sufficient conditions were then identified based on the compositional structure of the preferred names of GO concepts. More than one thousand redundant relations and 500 missing necessary and sufficient conditions were found. The proposed approach was thus successful for detecting inconsistencies within GO relations. The application of lexical approaches as well as the exploitation of synonyms and textual definitions could be useful for identifying additional necessary and sufficient conditions. Multiple necessary and sufficient conditions for a given GO concept may be indicative of inconsistencies.

  8. Identification of oral cancer related candidate genes by integrating protein-protein interactions, gene ontology, pathway analysis and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravindra; Samal, Sabindra K; Routray, Samapika; Dash, Rupesh; Dixit, Anshuman

    2017-05-30

    In the recent years, bioinformatics methods have been reported with a high degree of success for candidate gene identification. In this milieu, we have used an integrated bioinformatics approach assimilating information from gene ontologies (GO), protein-protein interaction (PPI) and network analysis to predict candidate genes related to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). A total of 40973 PPIs were considered for 4704 cancer-related genes to construct human cancer gene network (HCGN). The importance of each node was measured in HCGN by ten different centrality measures. We have shown that the top ranking genes are related to a significantly higher number of diseases as compared to other genes in HCGN. A total of 39 candidate oral cancer target genes were predicted by combining top ranked genes and the genes corresponding to significantly enriched oral cancer related GO terms. Initial verification using literature and available experimental data indicated that 29 genes were related with OSCC. A detailed pathway analysis led us to propose a role for the selected candidate genes in the invasion and metastasis in OSCC. We further validated our predictions using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and found that the gene FLNA was upregulated while the genes ARRB1 and HTT were downregulated in the OSCC tissue samples.

  9. Implication of synapse-related genes in bipolar disorder by linkage and gene expression analyses

    PubMed Central

    de Lara, Catalina Lopez; Jaitovich-Groisman, Iris; Cruceanu, Cristiana; Mamdani, Firoza; Lebel, Véronique; Yerko, Volodymyr; Beck, Angus; Young, L. Trevor; Rouleau, Guy; Grof, Paul; Alda, Martin; Turecki, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Several chromosomal regions have been linked to bipolar disorder (BD). However, the search for specific genes has been hampered by inconsistent findings, partly due to genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. We focused on lithium-responsive bipolar patients, a subgroup thought to be more homogeneous and conducted a multistage study including an initial linkage study followed up by fine mapping and gene expression. Our sample consisted of 36 families (275 genotyped individuals, 132 affected) recruited through probands who were responders to long-term lithium treatment. We conducted a genome-wide scan with 811 microsatellite markers followed by fine mapping. Gene expression studies of candidate regions were conducted on six post-mortem prefrontal brain regions of 20 individuals (8 BD and 12 controls). We identified regions 3p25, 3p14 and 14q11 as showing the highest genome-wide linkage signal (LOD 2.53, 2.04 and 3.19, respectively). Fine mapping provided further support for 3p25, while only modest support was found in the other two regions. We identified a group of synaptic, mitochondrial and apoptotic genes with altered expression patterns in BD. Analysis of an independent microarray dataset supported the implication of synapse-related and mitochondrial genes in BD. In conclusion, using two complementary strategies, we found evidence of linkage to lithium-responsive BD on 3p25, 3p14 and 14q11 as well as significantly dysregulated genes on these regions suggesting altered synaptic and mitochondrial function in BD. Further studies are warranted to demonstrate the functional role of these genes in BD. PMID:20667171

  10. Gene duplication, exon gain and neofunctionalization of OEP16-related genes in land plants.

    PubMed

    Drea, Sinéad C; Lao, Nga T; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2006-06-01

    OEP16, a channel protein of the outer membrane of chloroplasts, has been implicated in amino acid transport and in the substrate-dependent import of protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase A. Two major clades of OEP16-related sequences were identified in land plants (OEP16-L and OEP16-S), which arose by a gene duplication event predating the divergence of seed plants and bryophytes. Remarkably, in angiosperms, OEP16-S genes evolved by gaining an additional exon that extends an interhelical loop domain in the pore-forming region of the protein. We analysed the sequence, structure and expression of the corresponding Arabidopsis genes (atOEP16-S and atOEP16-L) and demonstrated that following duplication, both genes diverged in terms of expression patterns and coding sequence. AtOEP16-S, which contains multiple G-box ABA-responsive elements (ABREs) in the promoter region, is regulated by ABI3 and ABI5 and is strongly expressed during the maturation phase in seeds and pollen grains, both desiccation-tolerant tissues. In contrast, atOEP-L, which lacks promoter ABREs, is expressed predominantly in leaves, is induced strongly by low-temperature stress and shows weak induction in response to osmotic stress, salicylic acid and exogenous ABA. Our results indicate that gene duplication, exon gain and regulatory sequence evolution each played a role in the divergence of OEP16 homologues in plants.

  11. Tenm, a Drosophila gene related to tenascin, is a new pair-rule gene.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, S; Martin, D; Hagios, C; Chiquet-Ehrismann, R

    1994-01-01

    We describe the molecular characterization of the Drosophila gene tenm, a large transcription unit spanning > 110 kb of DNA. tenm encodes a large extracellular protein of 2515 amino acids related to the extracellular matrix molecule tenascin. The Tenm protein is found in seven stripes during the blastoderm stage, and each stripe overlaps with the even-skipped stripes. tenm mutants show a phenotype resembling that of odd-paired (opa), a member of the pair-rule class of segmentation genes. Thus, Tenm is the first example of a pair-rule gene product acting from outside the cell. While the Tenm protein is under the control of fushi tarazu and even-skipped, but not of opa, at least two pair-rule genes, paired (prd) and sloppy paired (slp), and all segment-polarity genes analysed to date are under the control of tenm. Our data suggest that Tenm initiates a signal transduction cascade which acts, via or in concert with opa, on downstream targets such as prd, slp, gooseberry, engrailed and wingless, leading to an opa-like phenotype. Images PMID:8070401

  12. A strenuous experimental journey searching for spectroscopic evidence of a bridging nickel–iron–hydride in [NiFe] hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Ogata, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Direct spectroscopic evidence for a hydride bridge in the Ni–R form of [NiFe] hydrogenase has been obtained using iron-specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). The Ni–H–Fe wag mode at 675 cm−1 is the first spectroscopic evidence for a bridging hydride in Ni–R as well as the first iron-hydride-related NRVS feature observed for a biological system. Although density function theory (DFT) calculation assisted the determination of the Ni–R structure, it did not predict the Ni–H–Fe wag mode at ∼675 cm−1 before NRVS. Instead, the observed Ni–H–Fe mode provided a critical reference for the DFT calculations. While the overall science about Ni–R is presented and discussed elsewhere, this article focuses on the long and strenuous experimental journey to search for and experimentally identify the Ni–H–Fe wag mode in a Ni–R sample. As a methodology, the results presented here will go beyond Ni–R and hydrogenase research and will also be of interest to other scientists who use synchrotron radiation for measuring dilute samples or weak spectroscopic features. PMID:26524296

  13. Phenotype-based clustering of glycosylation-related genes by RNAi-mediated gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Hino, Miki; Yoshida, Hideki; Ichimiya, Tomomi; Sakamura, Sho; Maeda, Megumi; Kimura, Yoshinobu; Sasaki, Norihiko; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Kinoshita-Toyoda, Akiko; Toyoda, Hidenao; Ueda, Ryu; Nishihara, Shoko; Goto, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Glycan structures are synthesized by a series of reactions conducted by glycosylation-related (GR) proteins such as glycosyltransferases, glycan-modifying enzymes, and nucleotide-sugar transporters. For example, the common core region of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is sequentially synthesized by peptide-O-xylosyltransferase, β1,4-galactosyltransferase I, β1,3-galactosyltransferase II, and β1,3-glucuronyltransferase. This raises the possibility that functional impairment of GR proteins involved in synthesis of the same glycan might result in the same phenotypic abnormality. To examine this possibility, comprehensive silencing of genes encoding GR and proteoglycan core proteins was conducted in Drosophila. Drosophila GR candidate genes (125) were classified into five functional groups for synthesis of GAGs, N-linked, O-linked, Notch-related, and unknown glycans. Spatiotemporally regulated silencing caused a range of malformed phenotypes that fell into three types: extra veins, thick veins, and depigmentation. The clustered phenotypes reflected the biosynthetic pathways of GAGs, Fringe-dependent glycan on Notch, and glycans placed at or near nonreducing ends (herein termed terminal domains of glycans). Based on the phenotypic clustering, CG33145 was predicted to be involved in formation of terminal domains. Our further analysis showed that CG33145 exhibited galactosyltransferase activity in synthesis of terminal N-linked glycans. Phenotypic clustering, therefore, has potential for the functional prediction of novel GR genes. © 2015 The Authors. Genes to Cells published by Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Estrogen-related receptor alpha modulates the expression of adipogenesis-related genes during adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Yagi, Ken; Okazaki, Yasushi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2007-07-06

    Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue. However, the physiological role of ERRalpha in adipogenesis and white adipose tissue development has not been well studied. Here, we show that ERRalpha and ERRalpha-related transcriptional coactivators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and PGC-1beta, can be up-regulated in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. Gene knockdown by ERRalpha-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, PPARgamma, and PGC-1alpha in 3T3-L1 cells in the adipogenesis medium. ERRalpha and PGC-1beta mRNA expression can be also up-regulated in another preadipocyte lineage DFAT-D1 cells and a pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 under the differentiation condition. Furthermore, stable expression of ERRalpha in 3T3-L1 cells up-regulates adipogenic marker genes and promotes triglyceride accumulation during 3T3-L1 differentiation. These results suggest that ERRalpha may play a critical role in adipocyte differentiation by modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes.

  15. Isolation, purification and characterization of the hydrogen evolution promoting factor of hydrogenase of Spirulina platensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Tian-Qing; Zhang, Hui-Miao; Sun, Shi-Hua

    1996-03-01

    A component (s-factor) with obvious promoting effect on hydrogen evolution of hydrogenase has been isolated and extracted from a cell-free preparation of Spirulina platensis. The effect of the s-factor in the reaction system is similar to that of Na2S2O4, but is coupled with light. The s-factor has the maximum absorption peak at 620 nm in the oxidized state, at 590 nm in the reduced state. The partially purified s-factor showed two bands by SDS-PAGE and is distinctly different from phycocyanin, which has no change of oxidized state and reduced state absorption spectra, and also has no promoting effect on hydrogenase of Spirulina platensis under the light.

  16. From hydrogenases to noble metal-free catalytic nanomaterials for H2 production and uptake.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Alan; Artero, Vincent; Jousselme, Bruno; Tran, Phong Dinh; Guillet, Nicolas; Métayé, Romain; Fihri, Aziz; Palacin, Serge; Fontecave, Marc

    2009-12-04

    Interconversion of water and hydrogen in unitized regenerative fuel cells is a promising energy storage framework for smoothing out the temporal fluctuations of solar and wind power. However, replacement of presently available platinum catalysts by lower-cost and more abundant materials is a requisite for this technology to become economically viable. Here, we show that the covalent attachment of a nickel bisdiphosphine-based mimic of the active site of hydrogenase enzymes onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes results in a high-surface area cathode material with high catalytic activity under the strongly acidic conditions required in proton exchange membrane technology. Hydrogen evolves from aqueous sulfuric acid solution with very low overvoltages (20 millivolts), and the catalyst exhibits exceptional stability (more than 100,000 turnovers). The same catalyst is also very efficient for hydrogen oxidation in this environment, exhibiting current densities similar to those observed for hydrogenase-based materials.

  17. Hydrogenase Enzymes and Their Synthetic Models: The Role of Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Schilter, David; Camara, James M; Huynh, Mioy T; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Rauchfuss, Thomas B

    2016-08-10

    Hydrogenase enzymes efficiently process H2 and protons at organometallic FeFe, NiFe, or Fe active sites. Synthetic modeling of the many H2ase states has provided insight into H2ase structure and mechanism, as well as afforded catalysts for the H2 energy vector. Particularly important are hydride-bearing states, with synthetic hydride analogues now known for each hydrogenase class. These hydrides are typically prepared by protonation of low-valent cores. Examples of FeFe and NiFe hydrides derived from H2 have also been prepared. Such chemistry is more developed than mimicry of the redox-inactive monoFe enzyme, although functional models of the latter are now emerging. Advances in physical and theoretical characterization of H2ase enzymes and synthetic models have proven key to the study of hydrides in particular, and will guide modeling efforts toward more robust and active species optimized for practical applications.

  18. Pathways of H2 toward the Active Site of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H.; Baptista, António M.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2), but little is known about the diffusion of H2 toward the active site. Here we analyze pathways for H2 permeation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent. Various MD simulation replicates were done, to improve the sampling of the system states. H2 easily permeates hydrogenase in every simulation and it moves preferentially in channels. All H2 molecules that reach the active site made their approach from the side of the Ni ion. H2 is able to reach distances of <4 Å from the active site, although after 6 Å permeation is difficult. In this region we mutated Val-67 into alanine and perform new MD simulations. These simulations show an increase of H2 inside the protein and at lower distances from the active site. This valine can be a control point in the H2 access to the active center. PMID:16731562

  19. Electrochemical insights into the mechanism of NiFe membrane-bound hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Lindsey A.; Parkin, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes of great biotechnological relevance because they catalyse the interconversion of H2, water (protons) and electricity using non-precious metal catalytic active sites. Electrochemical studies into the reactivity of NiFe membrane-bound hydrogenases (MBH) have provided a particularly detailed insight into the reactivity and mechanism of this group of enzymes. Significantly, the control centre for enabling O2 tolerance has been revealed as the electron-transfer relay of FeS clusters, rather than the NiFe bimetallic active site. The present review paper will discuss how electrochemistry results have complemented those obtained from structural and spectroscopic studies, to present a complete picture of our current understanding of NiFe MBH. PMID:26862221

  20. Mechanism of O2 diffusion and reduction in FeFe hydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubas, Adam; Orain, Christophe; de Sancho, David; Saujet, Laure; Sensi, Matteo; Gauquelin, Charles; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe; Bottin, Hervé; Baffert, Carole; Fourmond, Vincent; Best, Robert B.; Blumberger, Jochen; Léger, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    FeFe hydrogenases are the most efficient H2-producing enzymes. However, inactivation by O2 remains an obstacle that prevents them being used in many biotechnological devices. Here, we combine electrochemistry, site-directed mutagenesis, molecular dynamics and quantum chemical calculations to uncover the molecular mechanism of O2 diffusion within the enzyme and its reactions at the active site. We propose that the partial reversibility of the reaction with O2 results from the four-electron reduction of O2 to water. The third electron/proton transfer step is the bottleneck for water production, competing with formation of a highly reactive OH radical and hydroxylated cysteine. The rapid delivery of electrons and protons to the active site is therefore crucial to prevent the accumulation of these aggressive species during prolonged O2 exposure. These findings should provide important clues for the design of hydrogenase mutants with increased resistance to oxidative damage.

  1. Solution-phase photochemistry of a [FeFe]hydrogenase model compound: Evidence of photoinduced isomerisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kania, Rafal; Frederix, Pim W. J. M.; Wright, Joseph A.; Ulijn, Rein V.; Pickett, Christopher J.; Hunt, Neil T.

    2012-01-01

    The solution-phase photochemistry of the [FeFe] hydrogenase subsite model (μ-S(CH2)3S)Fe2(CO)4(PMe3)2 has been studied using ultrafast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy supported by density functional theory calculations. In three different solvents, n-heptane, methanol, and acetonitrile, relaxation of the tricarbonyl intermediate formed by UV photolysis of a carbonyl ligand leads to geminate recombination with a bias towards a thermodynamically less stable isomeric form, suggesting that facile interconversion of the ligand groups at the Fe center is possible in the unsaturated species. In a polar or hydrogen bonding solvent, this process competes with solvent substitution leading to the formation of stable solvent adduct species. The data provide further insight into the effect of incorporating non-carbonyl ligands on the dynamics and photochemistry of hydrogenase-derived biomimetic compounds.

  2. Solution-phase photochemistry of a [FeFe]hydrogenase model compound: evidence of photoinduced isomerisation.

    PubMed

    Kania, Rafal; Frederix, Pim W J M; Wright, Joseph A; Ulijn, Rein V; Pickett, Christopher J; Hunt, Neil T

    2012-01-28

    The solution-phase photochemistry of the [FeFe] hydrogenase subsite model (μ-S(CH(2))(3)S)Fe(2)(CO)(4)(PMe(3))(2) has been studied using ultrafast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy supported by density functional theory calculations. In three different solvents, n-heptane, methanol, and acetonitrile, relaxation of the tricarbonyl intermediate formed by UV photolysis of a carbonyl ligand leads to geminate recombination with a bias towards a thermodynamically less stable isomeric form, suggesting that facile interconversion of the ligand groups at the Fe center is possible in the unsaturated species. In a polar or hydrogen bonding solvent, this process competes with solvent substitution leading to the formation of stable solvent adduct species. The data provide further insight into the effect of incorporating non-carbonyl ligands on the dynamics and photochemistry of hydrogenase-derived biomimetic compounds. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  3. Solution-phase photochemistry of a [FeFe]hydrogenase model compound: Evidence of photoinduced isomerisation

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, Rafal; Hunt, Neil T.; Frederix, Pim W. J. M.; Wright, Joseph A.; Pickett, Christopher J.; Ulijn, Rein V.

    2012-01-28

    The solution-phase photochemistry of the [FeFe] hydrogenase subsite model ({mu}-S(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}S)Fe{sub 2}(CO){sub 4}(PMe{sub 3}){sub 2} has been studied using ultrafast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy supported by density functional theory calculations. In three different solvents, n-heptane, methanol, and acetonitrile, relaxation of the tricarbonyl intermediate formed by UV photolysis of a carbonyl ligand leads to geminate recombination with a bias towards a thermodynamically less stable isomeric form, suggesting that facile interconversion of the ligand groups at the Fe center is possible in the unsaturated species. In a polar or hydrogen bonding solvent, this process competes with solvent substitution leading to the formation of stable solvent adduct species. The data provide further insight into the effect of incorporating non-carbonyl ligands on the dynamics and photochemistry of hydrogenase-derived biomimetic compounds.

  4. Artificial hydrogenases: biohybrid and supramolecular systems for catalytic hydrogen production or uptake.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Giorgio; Roy, Souvik; Atta, Mohamed; Artero, Vincent; Fontecave, Marc

    2015-04-01

    There is an urgent need for cheap, abundant and efficient catalysts as an alternative to platinum for hydrogen production and oxidation in (photo)electrolyzers and fuel cells. Hydrogenases are attractive solutions. These enzymes use exclusively nickel and iron in their active sites and function with high catalytic rates at the thermodynamic equilibrium. As an alternative, a number of biomimetic and bioinspired catalysts for H2 production and/or uptake, based on Ni, Fe and Co, have been developed and shown to display encouraging performances. In this review we discuss specifically recent approaches aiming at incorporating these compounds within oligomeric and polymeric hosts. The latter are most often biological compounds (peptides, proteins, polysaccharides, etc.) but we also discuss non-biological scaffolds (synthetic polymers, Metal-organic-Frameworks, etc.) which can provide the appropriate environment to tune the activity and stability of the synthetic catalysts. These supramolecular catalytic systems thus define a class of original compounds so-called artificial hydrogenases.

  5. Tumor-related gene changes in immunosuppressive Syrian hamster cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Juasook, Amornrat; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Boonmars, Thidarut; Sudsarn, Pakkayanee; Wonkchalee, Nadchanan; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Sriraj, Pranee

    2013-10-01

    The results of a previous study demonstrated that prednisolone enhanced cholangiocarcinogenesis. Therefore, to clarify molecular changes during immunosuppressive cholangiocarcinogenesis, Syrian hamsters were divided into 8 groups: uninfected controls; immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters using prednisolone (P); normal Syrian hamsters administered N-nitrosodimethylamine (ND); immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters administered N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDis); normal Syrian hamsters infected with Opisthorchis viverrini (OV); immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters infected with O. viverrini (OVis); normal Syrian hamsters infected with O. viverrini and administered N-nitrosodimethylamine (CCA); and immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters infected with O. viverrini and administered N-nitrosodimethylamine (CCAis). Syrian hamster livers were used for analysis of tumor-related gene expression and immunohistochemistry through cytokeratin 19 (CK19) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining. The tumor-related gene expression results show that CCAis groups at all time points exhibited upregulation of COX-2, IL-6, SOD1, CAT and iNOS and downregulation of p53, which correlated with the predominant expression of CK19 and PCNA in liver tissue. These results suggest that prednisolone enhances cholangiocarcinoma development, which was confirmed by molecular changes.

  6. Transport of Magnesium by a Bacterial Nramp-Related Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Freedman, Benjamin G.; Senger, Ryan S.; Winkler, Wade C.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5–2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  7. Transport of magnesium by a bacterial Nramp-related gene.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Ho; Wakeman, Catherine A; Goodson, Jonathan R; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Freedman, Benjamin G; Senger, Ryan S; Winkler, Wade C

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5-2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes.

  8. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lima, William Gustavo; Marques-Oliveira, Gleuber Henrique; da Silva, Thaís Marques; Chaves, Valéria Ernestânia

    2017-09-07

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide produced by alternative tissue-specific splicing of the primary transcript of the CALC genes. CGRP is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system, as well as in several organs and tissues. The presence of CGRP in the liver and brown and white adipose tissue suggests an effect of this neuropeptide on regulation of energy homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the effect of CGRP on the control of energy metabolism, primarily focusing on food intake, thermoregulation and lipid metabolism in adipose tissue, liver and muscle. CGRP induces anorexia, stimulating anorexigenic neuropeptide and/or inhibiting orexigenic neuropeptide expression, through cAMP/PKA pathway activation. CGRP also induces energy expenditure, increasing the skin temperature and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis. It has been also suggested that information related to peripheral lipid stores may be conveyed to the brain via CGRP-sensory innervation from adipose tissue. More recently, it was demonstrated that mice lacking αCGRP are protected from obesity induced by high-fat diet and that CGRP regulates the content of lipid in liver, muscle and adipose tissue. It is unclear the receptor responsible by CGRP effects, as well as whether this neuropeptide acts directly or indirectly in liver, muscle and adipose tissue.

  9. Gene Therapy for Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Constable, Ian Jeffery; Blumenkranz, Mark Scott; Schwartz, Steven D; Barone, Sam; Lai, Chooi-May; Rakoczy, Elizabeth Piroska

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to evaluate safety and signals of efficacy of gene therapy with subretinal rAAV.sFlt-1 for wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD). A phase 1 dose-escalating single-center controlled unmasked human clinical trial was followed up by extension of the protocol to a phase 2A single-center trial. rAAV.sFlt-1 vector was used to deliver a naturally occurring anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agent, sFlt-1, into the subretinal space. In phase 1, step 1 randomized 3 subjects to low-dose rAAV.sFlt-1 (1 × 10 vector genomes) and 1 subject to the control arm; step 2 randomized an additional 3 subjects to treatment with high-dose rAAV.sFlt-1 (1 × 10 vector genomes) and 1 subject to the control arm. Follow-up studies demonstrated that rAAV.sFlt-1 was well tolerated with a favorable safety profile in these elderly subjects with wet AMD. Subretinal injection was highly reproducible, and no drug-related adverse events were reported. Procedure-related adverse events were mild and self-resolving. Two phakic patients developed cataract and underwent cataract surgery. Four of the 6 patients responded better than the small control group in this study and historical controls in terms of maintaining vision and a relatively dry retina with zero ranibizumab retreatments per annum. Two patients required 1 ranibizumab injection over the 52-week follow-up period. rAAV.sFlt-1 gene therapy may prove to be a potential adjunct or alternative to conventional intravitreal injection for patients with wet AMD by providing extended delivery of a naturally occurring antiangiogenic protein.

  10. Optimized Expression and Purification for High-Activity Preparations of Algal [FeFe]-Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Yacoby, I.; Tegler, L. T.; Pochekailov, S.; Zhang, S.; King, P. W.

    2012-04-01

    Recombinant expression and purification of metallo-enzymes, including hydrogenases, at high-yields is challenging due to complex, and enzyme specific, post-translational maturation processes. Low fidelities of maturation result in preparations containing a significant fraction of inactive, apo-protein that are not suitable for biophysical or crystallographic studies. We describe the construction, overexpression and high-yield purification of a fusion protein consisting of the algal [2Fe2S]-ferredoxin PetF (Fd) and [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1. The maturation of Fd-HydA1 was optimized through improvements in culture conditions and media components used for expression. We also demonstrated that fusion of Fd to the N-terminus of HydA1, in comparison to the C-terminus, led to increased expression levels that were 4-fold higher. Together, these improvements led to enhanced HydA1 activity and improved yield after purification. The strong binding-affinity of Fd for DEAE allowed for two-step purification by ion exchange and StrepTactin affinity chromatography. In addition, the incorporation of a TEV protease site in the Fd-HydA1 linker allowed for the proteolytic removal of Fd after DEAE step, and purification of HydA1 alone by StrepTactin. In combination, this process resulted in HydA1 purification yields of 5 mg L{sup -1} of culture from E. coli with specific activities of 1000 U (U = 1 {micro}mol hydrogen evolved mg{sup -1} min{sup -1}). The [FeFe]-hydrogenases are highly efficient enzymes and their catalytic sites provide model structures for synthetic efforts to develop robust hydrogen activation catalysts. In order to characterize their structure-function properties in greater detail, and to use hydrogenases for biotechnological applications, reliable methods for rapid, high-yield expression and purification are required.

  11. Optimized Expression and Purification for High-Activity Preparations of Algal [FeFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Yacoby, Iftach; Tegler, Lotta Tollstoy; Pochekailov, Sergii; Zhang, Shuguang; King, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recombinant expression and purification of metallo-enzymes, including hydrogenases, at high-yields is challenging due to complex, and enzyme specific, post-translational maturation processes. Low fidelities of maturation result in preparations containing a significant fraction of inactive, apo-protein that are not suitable for biophysical or crystallographic studies. Principal Findings We describe the construction, overexpression and high-yield purification of a fusion protein consisting of the algal [2Fe2S]-ferredoxin PetF (Fd) and [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1. The maturation of Fd-HydA1 was optimized through improvements in culture conditions and media components used for expression. We also demonstrated that fusion of Fd to the N-terminus of HydA1, in comparison to the C-terminus, led to increased expression levels that were 4-fold higher. Together, these improvements led to enhanced HydA1 activity and improved yield after purification. The strong binding-affinity of Fd for DEAE allowed for two-step purification by ion exchange and StrepTactin affinity chromatography. In addition, the incorporation of a TEV protease site in the Fd-HydA1 linker allowed for the proteolytic removal of Fd after DEAE step, and purification of HydA1 alone by StrepTactin. In combination, this process resulted in HydA1 purification yields of 5 mg L−1 of culture from E. coli with specific activities of 1000 U (U = 1 µmol hydrogen evolved mg−1 min−1). Significance The [FeFe]-hydrogenases are highly efficient enzymes and their catalytic sites provide model structures for synthetic efforts to develop robust hydrogen activation catalysts. In order to characterize their structure-function properties in greater detail, and to use hydrogenases for biotechnological applications, reliable methods for rapid, high-yield expression and purification are required. PMID:22563413

  12. Proton-coupled electron transfer dynamics in the catalytic mechanism of a [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Brandon L; Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M; Adams, Michael W W; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-04-08

    The movement of protons and electrons is common to the synthesis of all chemical fuels such as H2. Hydrogenases, which catalyze the reversible reduction of protons, necessitate transport and reactivity between protons and electrons, but a detailed mechanism has thus far been elusive. Here, we use a phototriggered chemical potential jump method to rapidly initiate the proton reduction activity of a [NiFe] hydrogenase. Coupling the photochemical initiation approach to nanosecond transient infrared and visible absorbance spectroscopy afforded direct observation of interfacial electron transfer and active site chemistry. Tuning of intramolecular proton transport by pH and isotopic substitution revealed distinct concerted and stepwise proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms in catalysis. The observed heterogeneity in the two sequential proton-associated reduction processes suggests a highly engineered protein environment modulating catalysis and implicates three new reaction intermediates; Nia-I, Nia-D, and Nia-SR(-). The results establish an elementary mechanistic understanding of catalysis in a [NiFe] hydrogenase with implications in enzymatic proton-coupled electron transfer and biomimetic catalyst design.

  13. Hydrogenase-independent uptake and metabolism of electrons by the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    PubMed

    Lohner, Svenja T; Deutzmann, Jörg S; Logan, Bruce E; Leigh, John; Spormann, Alfred M

    2014-08-01

    Direct, shuttle-free uptake of extracellular, cathode-derived electrons has been postulated as a novel mechanism of electron metabolism in some prokaryotes that may also be involved in syntrophic electron transport between two microorganisms. Experimental proof for direct uptake of cathodic electrons has been mostly indirect and has been based on the absence of detectable concentrations of molecular hydrogen. However, hydrogen can be formed as a transient intermediate abiotically at low cathodic potentials (<-414 mV) under conditions of electromethanogenesis. Here we provide genetic evidence for hydrogen-independent uptake of extracellular electrons. Methane formation from cathodic electrons was observed in a wild-type strain of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis as well as in a hydrogenase-deletion mutant lacking all catabolic hydrogenases, indicating the presence of a hydrogenase-independent mechanism of electron catabolism. In addition, we discovered a new route for hydrogen or formate production from cathodic electrons: Upon chemical inhibition of methanogenesis with 2-bromo-ethane sulfonate, hydrogen or formate accumulated in the bioelectrochemical cells instead of methane. These results have implications for our understanding on the diversity of microbial electron uptake and metabolism.

  14. Hydrogenase-independent uptake and metabolism of electrons by the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis

    PubMed Central

    Lohner, Svenja T; Deutzmann, Jörg S; Logan, Bruce E; Leigh, John; Spormann, Alfred M

    2014-01-01

    Direct, shuttle-free uptake of extracellular, cathode-derived electrons has been postulated as a novel mechanism of electron metabolism in some prokaryotes that may also be involved in syntrophic electron transport between two microorganisms. Experimental proof for direct uptake of cathodic electrons has been mostly indirect and has been based on the absence of detectable concentrations of molecular hydrogen. However, hydrogen can be formed as a transient intermediate abiotically at low cathodic potentials (<−414 mV) under conditions of electromethanogenesis. Here we provide genetic evidence for hydrogen-independent uptake of extracellular electrons. Methane formation from cathodic electrons was observed in a wild-type strain of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis as well as in a hydrogenase-deletion mutant lacking all catabolic hydrogenases, indicating the presence of a hydrogenase-independent mechanism of electron catabolism. In addition, we discovered a new route for hydrogen or formate production from cathodic electrons: Upon chemical inhibition of methanogenesis with 2-bromo-ethane sulfonate, hydrogen or formate accumulated in the bioelectrochemical cells instead of methane. These results have implications for our understanding on the diversity of microbial electron uptake and metabolism. PMID:24844759

  15. Proton Reduction Using a Hydrogenase-Modified Nanoporous Black Silicon Photoelectrode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yixin; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Ratzloff, Michael W.; Mulder, David W.; Zhu, Kai; Turner, John A.; Neale, Nathan R.; King, Paul W.; Branz, Howard M.

    2016-06-15

    Metalloenzymes featuring earth-abundant metal-based cores exhibit rates for catalytic processes such as hydrogen evolution comparable to those of noble metals. Realizing these superb catalytic properties in artificial systems is challenging owing to the difficulty of effectively interfacing metalloenzymes with an electrode surface in a manner that supports efficient charge-transfer. Here, we demonstrate that a nanoporous 'black' silicon (b-Si) photocathode provides a unique interface for binding an adsorbed [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzyme ([FeFe]-H2ase). The resulting [FeFe]-H2ase/b-Si photoelectrode displays a 280 mV more positive onset potential for hydrogen generation than bare b-Si without hydrogenase, similar to that observed for a b-Si/Pt photoelectrode at the same light intensity. Additionally, we show that this H2ase/b-Si electrode exhibits a turnover frequency of >/=1300 s-1 and a turnover number above 107 and sustains current densities of at least 1 mA/cm2 based on the actual surface area of the electrode (not the smaller projected geometric area), orders of magnitude greater than that observed for previous enzyme-catalyzed electrodes. While the long-term stability of hydrogenase on the b-Si surface remains too low for practical applications, this work extends the proof-of-concept that biologically derived metalloenzymes can be interfaced with inorganic substrates to support technologically relevant current densities.

  16. Electron microscopy of nickel-containing methanogenic enzymes: methyl reductase and F420-reducing hydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Wackett, L P; Hartwieg, E A; King, J A; Orme-Johnson, W H; Walsh, C T

    1987-01-01

    Methanogens catalyze the hydrogen-dependent eight-electron reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. Two of the key catalysts in the eight-electron reduction pathway are the nickel-containing enzymes F420-reducing hydrogenase and methyl reductase. In the present study, the structures of these archaebacterial enzymes from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum delta H have been determined by electron microscopy. By negative stain techniques, F420 hydrogenase was found to be a ring structure with a diameter of 15.7 nm and an inner channel 4 nm in diameter. Shadow-casting experiments demonstrated that the rings were 8.5 nm deep, indicating a holoenzyme molecular weight of 8.0 X 10(5). Methyl reductase appeared to be an oligomeric complex of dimensions 8.5 by 9 by 11 nm, with a central stain-penetrating region. The morphology and known subunit composition suggest a model in which the subunits are arranged as an eclipsed pair of open trimers. Methyl reductase was also found in the form of larger aggregates and in paracrystalline arrays derived from highly concentrated solutions. The extremely large size of F420 hydrogenase and the methyl reductase supramolecular assemblies may have relevance in vivo in the construction of multiprotein arrays that function in methane biogenesis. Images PMID:3804976

  17. Atomic resolution modeling of the ferredoxin:[FeFe] hydrogenase complex from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Chang, Christopher H; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria L; Kim, Kwiseon

    2007-11-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenases HydA1 and HydA2 in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii catalyze the final reaction in a remarkable metabolic pathway allowing this photosynthetic organism to produce H(2) from water in the chloroplast. A [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin is a critical branch point in electron flow from Photosystem I toward a variety of metabolic fates, including proton reduction by hydrogenases. To better understand the binding determinants involved in ferredoxin:hydrogenase interactions, we have modeled Chlamydomonas PetF1 and HydA2 based on amino-acid sequence homology, and produced two promising electron-transfer model complexes by computational docking. To characterize these models, quantitative free energy calculations at atomic resolution were carried out, and detailed analysis of the interprotein interactions undertaken. The protein complex model we propose for ferredoxin:HydA2 interaction is energetically favored over the alternative candidate by 20 kcal/mol. This proposed model of the electron-transfer complex between PetF1 and HydA2 permits a more detailed view of the molecular events leading up to H(2) evolution, and suggests potential mutagenic strategies to modulate electron flow to HydA2.

  18. Photosynthetic hydrogen production by a hybrid complex of photosystem I and [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Krassen, Henning; Schwarze, Alexander; Friedrich, Bärbel; Ataka, Kenichi; Lenz, Oliver; Heberle, Joachim

    2009-12-22

    Nature provides key components for generating fuels from renewable resources in the form of enzymatic nanomachines which catalyze crucial steps in biological energy conversion, for example, the photosynthetic apparatus, which transforms solar power into chemical energy, and hydrogenases, capable of generating molecular hydrogen. As sunlight is usually used to synthesize carbohydrates, direct generation of hydrogen from light represents an exception in nature. On the molecular level, the crucial step for conversion of solar energy into H(2) lies in the efficient electronic coupling of photosystem I and hydrogenase. Here we show the stepwise assembly of a hybrid complex consisting of photosystem I and hydrogenase on a solid gold surface. This device gave rise to light-induced H(2) evolution. Hydrogen production is possible at far higher potential and thus lower energy compared to those of previously described (bio)nanoelectronic devices that did not employ the photosynthesis apparatus. The successful demonstration of efficient solar-to-hydrogen conversion may serve as a blueprint for the establishment of this system in a living organism with the paramount advantage of self-replication.

  19. Cyanobacterial Hydrogenases and Hydrogen Metabolism Revisited: Recent Progress and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Namita; Lindblad, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have garnered interest as potential cell factories for hydrogen production. In conjunction with photosynthesis, these organisms can utilize inexpensive inorganic substrates and solar energy for simultaneous biosynthesis and hydrogen evolution. However, the hydrogen yield associated with these organisms remains far too low to compete with the existing chemical processes. Our limited understanding of the cellular hydrogen production pathway is a primary setback in the potential scale-up of this process. In this regard, the present review discusses the recent insight around ferredoxin/flavodoxin as the likely electron donor to the bidirectional Hox hydrogenase instead of the generally accepted NAD(P)H. This may have far reaching implications in powering solar driven hydrogen production. However, it is evident that a successful hydrogen-producing candidate would likely integrate enzymatic traits from different species. Engineering the [NiFe] hydrogenases for optimal catalytic efficiency or expression of a high turnover [FeFe] hydrogenase in these photo-autotrophs may facilitate the development of strains to reach target levels of biohydrogen production in cyanobacteria. The fundamental advancements achieved in these fields are also summarized in this review. PMID:26006225

  20. Accumulating the hydride state in the catalytic cycle of [FeFe]-hydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Martin; Senger, Moritz; Duan, Jifu; Esselborn, Julian; Wittkamp, Florian; Hofmann, Eckhard; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Stripp, Sven Timo; Happe, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    H2 turnover at the [FeFe]-hydrogenase cofactor (H-cluster) is assumed to follow a reversible heterolytic mechanism, first yielding a proton and a hydrido-species which again is double-oxidized to release another proton. Three of the four presumed catalytic intermediates (Hox, Hred/Hred and Hsred) were characterized, using various spectroscopic techniques. However, in catalytically active enzyme, the state containing the hydrido-species, which is eponymous for the proposed heterolytic mechanism, has yet only been speculated about. We use different strategies to trap and spectroscopically characterize this transient hydride state (Hhyd) for three wild-type [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Applying a novel set-up for real-time attenuated total-reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, we monitor compositional changes in the state-specific infrared signatures of [FeFe]-hydrogenases, varying buffer pH and gas composition. We selectively enrich the equilibrium concentration of Hhyd, applying Le Chatelier's principle by simultaneously increasing substrate and product concentrations (H2/H+). Site-directed manipulation, targeting either the proton-transfer pathway or the adt ligand, significantly enhances Hhyd accumulation independent of pH.

  1. Pathways and Thermodynamics of Oxygen Diffusion in [FeFe]-Hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mohammadjavad; Vashisth, Harish

    2017-10-04

    The H2 production potential of [FeFe]-hydrogenase, a hydrogen-producing enzyme from green algae, is reported to be promising for economical and large-scale production of H2 as an alternative source of renewable energy. The production of hydrogen takes place at the catalytic center buried in the enzyme core. Unfortunately, binding of O2 to the catalytic center of the enzyme irreversibly inactivates it, essentially blocking hydrogen production. Therefore, a better understanding of the mechanism of O2 entry/exit is necessary to develop strategies for designing oxygen-tolerant enzymes. In this work, we investigated the pathways and diffusion channels of O2 gas in this hydrogenase. Through exhaustive mapping of oxygen diffusion channels, we computed a full thermodynamic map of preferred binding locations of O2 gas within the enzyme interior, which showed that O2 can enter and exit the enzyme through multiple pathways along which are key residues that are known to perturb rates of O2 binding. The global minimum in the free-energy landscape is located near the H-cluster, a key metallic center within the enzyme. Along O2 diffusion channels, we further identified several residues that could be potential candidates for mutations to increase the oxygen tolerance of [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

  2. Force Field Development and Molecular Dynamics of [NiFe] Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Xiong, Yijia; Straatsma, TP; Rosso, Kevin M.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-05-09

    Classical molecular force-field parameters describing the structure and motion of metal clusters in [NiFe] hydrogenase enzymes can be used to compare the dynamics and thermodynamics of [NiFe] under different oxidation, protonation, and ligation circumstances. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations of small model clusters representative of the active site and the proximal, medial, and distal Fe/S metal centers and their attached protein side chains, we have calculated classical force-field parameters for [NiFe] in reduced and oxidized states, including internal coordinates, force constants, and atom-centered charges. Derived force constants revealed that cysteinate ligands bound to the metal ions are more flexible in the Ni-B active site, which has a bridging hydroxide ligand, than in the Ni-C active site, which has a bridging hydride. Ten nanosecond all-atom, explicit-solvent MD simulations of [NiFe] hydrogenase in oxidized and reduced catalytic states established the stability of the derived force-field parameters in terms of C{alpha} and metal cluster fluctuations. Average active site structures from the protein MD simulations are consistent with [NiFe] structures from the Protein Data Bank, suggesting that the derived force-field parameters are transferrable to other hydrogenases beyond the structure used for testing. A comparison of experimental H{sub 2}-production rates demonstrated a relationship between cysteinate side chain rotation and activity, justifying the use of a fully dynamic model of [NiFe] metal cluster motion.

  3. Atomic Resolution Modeling of the Ferredoxin:[FeFe] Hydrogenase Complex from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Christopher H.; King, Paul W.; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Kim, Kwiseon

    2007-01-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenases HydA1 and HydA2 in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii catalyze the final reaction in a remarkable metabolic pathway allowing this photosynthetic organism to produce H2 from water in the chloroplast. A [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin is a critical branch point in electron flow from Photosystem I toward a variety of metabolic fates, including proton reduction by hydrogenases. To better understand the binding determinants involved in ferredoxin:hydrogenase interactions, we have modeled Chlamydomonas PetF1 and HydA2 based on amino-acid sequence homology, and produced two promising electron-transfer model complexes by computational docking. To characterize these models, quantitative free energy calculations at atomic resolution were carried out, and detailed analysis of the interprotein interactions undertaken. The protein complex model we propose for ferredoxin:HydA2 interaction is energetically favored over the alternative candidate by 20 kcal/mol. This proposed model of the electron-transfer complex between PetF1 and HydA2 permits a more detailed view of the molecular events leading up to H2 evolution, and suggests potential mutagenic strategies to modulate electron flow to HydA2. PMID:17660315

  4. Inhibition of Desulfovibrio gigas hydrogenase with copper salts and other metal ions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, V M; Rua, M L; Reyes, P; Cammack, R; Hatchikian, E C

    1989-11-06

    The effect of several transition metals on the activity of Desulfovibrio gigas hydrogenase has been studied. Co(II) and Ni(II) at a concentration of 1 mM did not modify the activity of the enzyme; nor did they affect the pattern of activation/deactivation. Cu(II) inhibited the active hydrogenase, prepared by treatment with hydrogen, but had little effect on the 'unready' enzyme unless a reductant such as ascorbate was present, in which case inactivation took place either in air or under argon. Hg(II) also inactivated the enzyme irreversible in the 'unready' state without the requirement for reductants. The reaction of H2 uptake with methyl viologen was much more sensitive to inhibition than the H2/tritium exchange activity. EPR spectra of this preparation showed that the rates of decline were [3Fe-4S] signal greater than H2-uptake activity greater than Ni-A signal. Similar results were obtained when the protein was treated with Hg(II). The results demonstrate that the [3Fe-4S] cluster is not essential for H2-uptake activity with methyl viologen, but the integrity of [4Fe-4S] clusters is probably necessary to catalyze the reduction of methyl viologen with hydrogen. D. gigas hydrogenase was found to be highly resistant to digestion by proteases.

  5. Atomic Resolution Modeling of the Ferredoxin:[FeFe] Hydrogenase Complex from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. H.; King, P. W.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Kim, K.

    2007-11-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenases HydA1 and HydA2 in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii catalyze the final reaction in a remarkable metabolic pathway allowing this photosynthetic organism to produce H2 from water in the chloroplast. A [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin is a critical branch point in electron flow from Photosystem I toward a variety of metabolic fates, including proton reduction by hydrogenases. To better understand the binding determinants involved in ferredoxin:hydrogenase interactions, we have modeled Chlamydomonas PetF1 and HydA2 based on amino-acid sequence homology, and produced two promising electron-transfer model complexes by computational docking. To characterize these models, quantitative free energy calculations at atomic resolution were carried out, and detailed analysis of the interprotein interactions undertaken. The protein complex model we propose for ferredoxin:HydA2 interaction is energetically favored over the alternative candidate by 20kcal/mol. This proposed model of the electron-transfer complex between PetF1 and HydA2 permits a more detailed view of the molecular events leading up to H2 evolution, and suggests potential mutagenic strategies to modulate electron flow to HydA2.

  6. GeneKeyDB: a lightweight, gene-centric, relational database to support data mining environments.

    PubMed

    Kirov, S A; Peng, X; Baker, E; Schmoyer, D; Zhang, B; Snoddy, J

    2005-03-24

    The analysis of biological data is greatly enhanced by existing or emerging databases. Most existing databases, with few exceptions are not designed to easily support large scale computational analysis, but rather offer exclusively a web interface to the resource. We have recognized the growing need for a database which can be used successfully as a backend to computational analysis tools and pipelines. Such database should be sufficiently versatile to allow easy system integration. GeneKeyDB is a gene-centered relational database developed to enhance data mining in biological data sets. The system provides an underlying data layer for computational analysis tools and visualization tools. GeneKeyDB relies primarily on existing database identifiers derived from community databases (NCBI, GO, Ensembl, et al.) as well as the known relationships among those identifiers. It is a lightweight, portable, and extensible platform for integration with computational tools and analysis environments. GeneKeyDB can enable analysis tools and users to manipulate the intersections, unions, and differences among different data sets.

  7. Association and gene-gene interactions study of reelin signaling pathway related genes with autism in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yidong; Xun, Guanglei; Guo, Hui; He, Yiqun; Ou, Jianjun; Dong, Huixi; Xia, Kun; Zhao, Jingping

    2016-04-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with unclear etiology. Reelin had been proposed to participate in the etiology of autism due to its important role in brain development. The goal of this study was to explore the association and gene-gene interactions of reelin signaling pathway related genes (RELN, VLDLR, LRP8, DAB1, FYN, and CDK5) with autism in Han Chinese population. Genotyping data of the six genes were obtained from a recent genome-wide association study performed in 430 autistic children who fulfilled the DSM-IV-TR criteria for autistic disorder, and 1,074 healthy controls. Single marker case-control association analysis and haplotype case-control association analysis were conducted after the data was screened. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) was applied to further test gene-gene interactions. Neither the single marker nor the haplotype association tests found any significant difference between the autistic group and the control group after permutation test of 1,000 rounds. The 4-locus MDR model (comprising rs6143734, rs1858782, rs634500, and rs1924267 which belong to RELN and DAB1) was determined to be the model with the highest cross-validation consistency (CVC) and testing balanced accuracy. The results indicate that an interaction between RELN and DAB1 may increase the risk of autism in the Han Chinese population. Furthermore, it can also be inferred that the involvement of RELN in the etiology of autism would occur through interaction with DAB1. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Evolution of xyloglucan-related genes in green plants.

    PubMed

    Del Bem, Luiz Eduardo V; Vincentz, Michel G A

    2010-11-05

    The cell shape and morphology of plant tissues are intimately related to structural modifications in the primary cell wall that are associated with key processes in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. The primary cell wall is composed mainly of cellulose immersed in a matrix of hemicellulose, pectin, lignin and some structural proteins. Xyloglucan is a hemicellulose polysaccharide present in the cell walls of all land plants (Embryophyta) and is the main hemicellulose in non-graminaceous angiosperms. In this work, we used a comparative genomic approach to obtain new insights into the evolution of the xyloglucan-related enzymatic machinery in green plants. Detailed phylogenetic analyses were done for enzymes involved in xyloglucan synthesis (xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolase, α-xylosidase, β-galactosidase, β-glucosidase and α-fucosidase) and mobilization/degradation (β-(1→4)-glucan synthase, α-fucosyltransferases, β-galactosyltransferases and α-xylosyl transferase) based on 12 fully sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tags from 29 species of green plants. Evidence from Chlorophyta and Streptophyta green algae indicated that part of the Embryophyta xyloglucan-related machinery evolved in an aquatic environment, before land colonization. Streptophyte algae have at least three enzymes of the xyloglucan machinery: xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolase, β-(1→4)-glucan synthase from the cellulose synthase-like C family and α-xylosidase that is also present in chlorophytes. Interestingly, gymnosperm sequences orthologs to xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolases with exclusively hydrolytic activity were also detected, suggesting that such activity must have emerged within the last common ancestor of spermatophytes. There was a positive correlation between the numbers of founder genes within each gene family and the complexity of the plant cell wall. Our data support the idea that a primordial xyloglucan-like polymer emerged in

  9. Bcl-2-related protein family gene expression during oligodendroglial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takayuki; Itoh, Aki; Pleasure, David

    2003-06-01

    Oligodendroglial lineage cells (OLC) vary in susceptibility to both necrosis and apoptosis depending on their developmental stages, which might be regulated by differential expression of Bcl-2-related genes. As an initial step to test this hypothesis, we examined the expression of 19 Bcl-2-related genes in purified cultures of rat oligodendroglial progenitors, immature and mature oligodendrocytes. All 'multidomain' anti-apoptotic members (Bcl-x, Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-w and Bcl2l10/Diva/Boo) except Bcl2a1/A1 are expressed in OLC. Semiquantitative and real-time RT-PCR revealed that Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 mRNAs are the dominant anti-apoptotic members and increase four- and twofold, respectively, with maturation. Bcl-2 mRNA is less abundant than Bcl-xL mRNA in progenitors and falls an additional 10-fold during differentiation. Bcl-w mRNA also increases, with significant changes in its splicing pattern, as OLC mature. Transfection studies demonstrated that Bcl-xL overexpression protects against kainate-induced excitotoxicity, whereas Bcl-2 overexpression does not. As for 'multidomain' pro-apoptotic members (Bax, Bad and Bok/Mtd), Bax and Bak are highly expressed throughout differentiation. Among 'BH3 domain-only' members examined (Bim, Biklk, DP5/Hrk, Bad, Bid, Noxa, Puma/Bbc3, Bmf, BNip3 and BNip3L), BNip3 and Bmf mRNAs increase markedly during differentiation. These results provide basic information to guide further studies on the roles for Bcl-2-related family proteins in OLC death.

  10. Alternaria Toxins: Potential Virulence Factors and Genes Related to Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Mukesh; Gupta, Sanjay K.; Swapnil, Prashant; Zehra, Andleeb; Dubey, Manish K.; Upadhyay, Ram S.

    2017-01-01

    Alternaria is an important fungus to study due to their different life style from saprophytes to endophytes and a very successful fungal pathogen that causes diseases to a number of economically important crops. Alternaria species have been well-characterized for the production of different host-specific toxins (HSTs) and non-host specific toxins (nHSTs) which depend upon their physiological and morphological stages. The pathogenicity of Alternaria species depends on host susceptibility or resistance as well as quantitative production of HSTs and nHSTs. These toxins are chemically low molecular weight secondary metabolites (SMs). The effects of toxins are mainly on different parts of cells like mitochondria, chloroplast, plasma membrane, Golgi complex, nucleus, etc. Alternaria species produce several nHSTs such as brefeldin A, tenuazonic acid, tentoxin, and zinniol. HSTs that act in very low concentrations affect only certain plant varieties or genotype and play a role in determining the host range of specificity of plant pathogens. The commonly known HSTs are AAL-, AK-, AM-, AF-, ACR-, and ACT-toxins which are named by their host specificity and these toxins are classified into different family groups. The HSTs are differentiated on the basis of bio-statistical and other molecular analyses. All these toxins have different mode of action, biochemical reactions and signaling mechanisms to cause diseases. Different species of Alternaria produced toxins which reveal its biochemical and genetic effects on itself as well as on its host cells tissues. The genes responsible for the production of HSTs are found on the conditionally dispensable chromosomes (CDCs) which have been well characterized. Different bio-statistical methods like basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) data analysis used for the annotation of gene prediction, pathogenicity-related genes may provide surprising knowledge in present and future. PMID:28848500

  11. Clique-based data mining for related genes in a biomedical database

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Tsutomu; Yonemori, Chikara; Tomita, Etsuji; Muramatsu, Masaaki

    2009-01-01

    Background Progress in the life sciences cannot be made without integrating biomedical knowledge on numerous genes in order to help formulate hypotheses on the genetic mechanisms behind various biological phenomena, including diseases. There is thus a strong need for a way to automatically and comprehensively search from biomedical databases for related genes, such as genes in the same families and genes encoding components of the same pathways. Here we address the extraction of related genes by searching for densely-connected subgraphs, which are modeled as cliques, in a biomedical relational graph. Results We constructed a graph whose nodes were gene or disease pages, and edges were the hyperlink connections between those pages in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. We obtained over 20,000 sets of related genes (called 'gene modules') by enumerating cliques computationally. The modules included genes in the same family, genes for proteins that form a complex, and genes for components of the same signaling pathway. The results of experiments using 'metabolic syndrome'-related gene modules show that the gene modules can be used to get a coherent holistic picture helpful for interpreting relations among genes. Conclusion We presented a data mining approach extracting related genes by enumerating cliques. The extracted gene sets provide a holistic picture useful for comprehending complex disease mechanisms. PMID:19566964

  12. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Russell, F. A.; King, R.; Smillie, S.-J.; Kodji, X.; Brain, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide. Discovered 30 years ago, it is produced as a consequence of alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene. CGRP has two major forms (α and β). It belongs to a group of peptides that all act on an unusual receptor family. These receptors consist of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) linked to an essential receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP) that is necessary for full functionality. CGRP is a highly potent vasodilator and, partly as a consequence, possesses protective mechanisms that are important for physiological and pathological conditions involving the cardiovascular system and wound healing. CGRP is primarily released from sensory nerves and thus is implicated in pain pathways. The proven ability of CGRP antagonists to alleviate migraine has been of most interest in terms of drug development, and knowledge to date concerning this potential therapeutic area is discussed. Other areas covered, where there is less information known on CGRP, include arthritis, skin conditions, diabetes, and obesity. It is concluded that CGRP is an important peptide in mammalian biology, but it is too early at present to know if new medicines for disease treatment will emerge from our knowledge concerning this molecule. PMID:25287861

  13. Multifunction of autophagy-related genes in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Khan, Irshad Ali; Lu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Rehman, Abdur; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2012-06-20

    Autophagy (macroautophagy), a highly conserved eukaryotic mechanism, is a non-selective degradation process, helping to maintain a balance between the synthesis, degradation and subsequent recycling of macromolecules to overcome various stress conditions. The term autophagy denotes any cellular process which involves the delivery of cytoplasmic material to the lysosome for degradation. Autophagy, in filamentous fungi plays a critical role during cellular development and pathogenicity. Autophagy, like the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade and nutrient-sensing cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway, is also an important process for appressorium turgor accumulation in order to penetrate the leaf surface of host plant and destroy the plant defense. Yeast, an autophagy model, has been used to compare the multi-valued functions of ATG (autophagy-related genes) in different filamentous fungi. The autophagy machinery in both yeast and filamentous fungi is controlled by Tor kinase and both contain two distinct phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase complexes. In this review, we focus on the functions of ATG genes during pathogenic development in filamentous fungi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Breast and Prostate Cancer and Hormone-Related Gene Variant Study

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast and Prostate Cancer and Hormone-Related Gene Variant Study allows large-scale analyses of breast and prostate cancer risk in relation to genetic polymorphisms and gene-environment interactions that affect hormone metabolism.

  15. Gene Therapies for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pechan, Peter; Wadsworth, Samuel; Scaria, Abraham

    2014-12-18

    Pathological neovascularization is a key component of the neovascular form (also known as the wet form) of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Several preclinical studies have shown that antiangiogenesis strategies are effective for treating neovascular AMD in animal models. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the main inducers of ocular neovascularization, and several clinical trials have shown the benefits of neutralizing VEGF in patients with neovascular AMD or diabetic macular edema. In this review, we summarize several preclinical and early-stage clinical trials with intraocular gene therapies, which have the potential to reduce or eliminate the repeated intravitreal injections that are currently required for the treatment of neovascular AMD.

  16. Glia-related genes and their contribution to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenyao; Aleksic, Branko; Ozaki, Norio

    2015-08-01

    Schizophrenia, a debilitating disease with 1% prevalence in the general population, is characterized by major neuropsychiatric symptoms, including delusions, hallucinations, and deficits in emotional and social behavior. Previous studies have directed their investigations on the mechanism of schizophrenia towards neuronal dysfunction and have defined schizophrenia as a 'neuron-centric' disorder. However, along with the development of genetics and systematic biology approaches in recent years, the crucial role of glial cells in the brain has also been shown to contribute to the etiopathology of schizophrenia. Here, we summarize comprehensive data that support the involvement of glial cells (including oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglial cells) in schizophrenia and list several acknowledged glia-related genes or molecules associated with schizophrenia. Instead of purely an abnormality of neurons in schizophrenia, an additional 'glial perspective' provides us a novel and promising insight into the causal mechanisms and treatment for this disease.

  17. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} modulates the expression of adipogenesis-related genes during adipocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Yagi, Ken; Okazaki, Yasushi; Inoue, Satoshi . E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-07-06

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue. However, the physiological role of ERR{alpha} in adipogenesis and white adipose tissue development has not been well studied. Here, we show that ERR{alpha} and ERR{alpha}-related transcriptional coactivators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) and PGC-1{beta}, can be up-regulated in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. Gene knockdown by ERR{alpha}-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, PPAR{gamma}, and PGC-1{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells in the adipogenesis medium. ERR{alpha} and PGC-1{beta} mRNA expression can be also up-regulated in another preadipocyte lineage DFAT-D1 cells and a pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 under the differentiation condition. Furthermore, stable expression of ERR{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells up-regulates adipogenic marker genes and promotes triglyceride accumulation during 3T3-L1 differentiation. These results suggest that ERR{alpha} may play a critical role in adipocyte differentiation by modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes.

  18. Salt-tolerant and high-pH-resistant hydrogenase from the haloalkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-11-01

    Hydrogenase is the key enzyme of energetic metabolism in cells, catalyzing the converse reaction of hydrogen oxidation and responsible for the consumption and excretion of hydrogen in bacteria. Hydrogenases are proteins, most of which contain either nickel and iron or iron alone in their active center. Hydrogenases have been found in many microorganisms, such as methanogenic, acetogenic, nitrogen-fixing, sulfate-reducing, photosynthetic bacteria, and algae that use the hydrogen as an energy source or as an electron sink. Hydrogenases are the subject of wide physiological, biochemical, physico-chemical and genetic studies due to their abilities to produce molecular hydrogen as an alternative source of energy. Despite the large quantity of work dealing with the intracellular and extracellular enzymes of halophilic bacteria, the data about the response of hydrogenases to salts are practically absent. The study of hydrogenase in cell-free extracts of the extremely halophilic eubacterium Acetohalobium arabaticum showed a dramatic increase in the activity of the enzyme at high concentrations of NaCl and KCl (near saturated solutions). Here we present data about hydrogenase in a free-cell extract from the new halo-alkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans, which grows on a highly mineralized carbonate-bicarbonate medium in the salinity range from 1 to 7 % NaCl and at pH 8.0-10.0. The studied enzyme was active in concentration range from 0.0 to 4.3 M NaCl with the optimum at 1.0 M NaCl. At 1.0 M NaCl the enzyme expressed 20 % additional activity, with NaCl concentration changing from 2.1 M to 3.4 M, and then the activity decreased and reached a constant level. Although sodium bicarbonate decreases the hydrogenase activity, the enzyme still showed activity at 60 % of the maximum level at concentration in a near saturated solution (1.2 M NaHCO3). The maximum enzyme activity was observed at pH 9.5 with limits of 7.5 and 11.5, which is practically

  19. Halotolerant and Resistant to High pH Hydrogenase from Haloalkaliphilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogenase is the key enzyme of energetic metabolism in cells, it catalyzing the converse reaction of hydrogen oxidation and responsible for consumption and excretion of hydrogen in bacteria. Hydrogenases are proteins containing either Nickel and Iron, or the only Iron in theirs active center. Hydrogenases have been found in many microorganisms, such as Methanogenic, acetogenic, nitrogen-fixing, photosynthetic and sulfate-reducing bacteria that could utilize the hydrogen as energy source or use it as electron sink. Hydrogenases are subject for wide physiological, biochemical, physicochemical and genetic studies due to theirs abilities produce the molecular hydrogen as alternative source of pure energy. Notwithstanding on enough large quantity of works that deal with intracellular and extrasellular enzymes of halophilic bacteria, the data about hydrogenases and theirs functions of salts practically are absent. The study of hydrogenase in cell-free extracts of extremely halophilic eubacterium Acetohalobium mabaticum showed dramatic increasing activity of the enzyme at high concentrations of NaCl and KCI (close to saturated solution). Here we present the data of free-cells extracted hydrogenase from new haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans, which grow on highly miniralized carbonate-bicarbonate medium in salinity range 1 to 7 % and at pH 7.8 - 10.5. Studied enzyme was active in Concentration range from 0 to 4.3 M NaCl with optimum at 1.0 M NaCl. At 1.0 M NaCl the enzyme activity was increased on 20 %, but with changing concentration from 2.1 M to 3.4 M the activity decreased and was kept on constant level. NaHCO3 inhibited hydrogenase activity on more then 30 %. The maximum of enzyme activity was observed at pH 9.5 with limits 7.5 and 11.5 that practically equal to pH optimum of bacterial growth. Therefore the hydrogenase of Desulfanatronum thiodismutans is tolerant to high concentrations of sodium salts and it also resistant to

  20. Halotolerant and Resistant to High pH Hydrogenase from Haloalkaliphilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogenase is the key enzyme of energetic metabolism in cells, it catalyzing the converse reaction of hydrogen oxidation and responsible for consumption and excretion of hydrogen in bacteria. Hydrogenases are proteins containing either Nickel and Iron, or the only Iron in theirs active center. Hydrogenases have been found in many microorganisms, such as Methanogenic, acetogenic, nitrogen-fixing, photosynthetic and sulfate-reducing bacteria that could utilize the hydrogen as energy source or use it as electron sink. Hydrogenases are subject for wide physiological, biochemical, physicochemical and genetic studies due to theirs abilities produce the molecular hydrogen as alternative source of pure energy. Notwithstanding on enough large quantity of works that deal with intracellular and extrasellular enzymes of halophilic bacteria, the data about hydrogenases and theirs functions of salts practically are absent. The study of hydrogenase in cell-free extracts of extremely halophilic eubacterium Acetohalobium mabaticum showed dramatic increasing activity of the enzyme at high concentrations of NaCl and KCI (close to saturated solution). Here we present the data of free-cells extracted hydrogenase from new haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans, which grow on highly miniralized carbonate-bicarbonate medium in salinity range 1 to 7 % and at pH 7.8 - 10.5. Studied enzyme was active in Concentration range from 0 to 4.3 M NaCl with optimum at 1.0 M NaCl. At 1.0 M NaCl the enzyme activity was increased on 20 %, but with changing concentration from 2.1 M to 3.4 M the activity decreased and was kept on constant level. NaHCO3 inhibited hydrogenase activity on more then 30 %. The maximum of enzyme activity was observed at pH 9.5 with limits 7.5 and 11.5 that practically equal to pH optimum of bacterial growth. Therefore the hydrogenase of Desulfanatronum thiodismutans is tolerant to high concentrations of sodium salts and it also resistant to

  1. Connection between the membrane electron transport system and Hyn hydrogenase in the purple sulfur bacterium, Thiocapsa roseopersicina BBS.

    PubMed

    Tengölics, Roland; Mészáros, Lívia; Győri, E; Doffkay, Zsolt; Kovács, Kornél L; Rákhely, Gábor

    2014-10-01

    Thiocapsa. roseopersicina BBS has four active [NiFe] hydrogenases, providing an excellent opportunity to examine their metabolic linkages to the cellular redox processes. Hyn is a periplasmic membrane-associated hydrogenase harboring two additional electron transfer subunits: Isp1 is a transmembrane protein, while Isp2 is located on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. In this work, the connection of HynSL to various electron transport pathways is studied. During photoautotrophic growth, electrons, generated from the oxidation of thiosulfate and sulfur, are donated to the photosynthetic electron transport chain via cytochromes. Electrons formed from thiosulfate and sulfur oxidation might also be also used for Hyn-dependent hydrogen evolution which was shown to be light and proton motive force driven. Hyn-linked hydrogen uptake can be promoted by both sulfur and nitrate. The electron flow from/to HynSL requires the presence of Isp2 in both directions. Hydrogenase-linked sulfur reduction could be inhibited by a QB site competitive inhibitor, terbutryne, suggesting a redox coupling between the Hyn hydrogenase and the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Based on these findings, redox linkages of Hyn hydrogenase are modeled. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrogen-dependent growth of Escherichia coli in anaerobic respiration and the presence of hydrogenases with different functions.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, I; Ishimoto, M

    1978-09-01

    E. coli K10 was found to grow anaerobically on molecular hydrogen by reducing nitrate, fumarate, and trimethylamine N-oxide when peptone was added to the culture medium. Molar growth yields based on consumed hydrogen estimated from the amounts of reduction products were all 7.8 g cells/mol, suggesting that 1 mol of ATP was produced in the oxidation of 1 mol of hydrogen. Hydrogenase activity measured in terms of hydrogen evolution was several times higher in cells grown on glucose than in cells grown on hydrogen in the presence of fumarate and trimethylamine N-oxide, while hydrogenase activity measured in terms of hydrogen uptake was unchanged in both cases. The ratio of hydrogenase activities measured in terms of hydrogen uptake and evolution was also high in the extract and centrifugal fractions from cells grown in hydrogen. The soluble fraction and trypsin digest of the precipitate at 100,000 X g were subjected to polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis and hydrogenase bands were stained by reduction of benzyl viologen with hydrogen and by oxidation of reduced methyl viologen. The resulting patterns suggest that multiple forms of hydrogenase are present and that the amounts of forms functioning in hydrogen evolution were greatly decresed in cells grown on hydrogen in the presence of acceptors.

  3. Identification, cloning and heterologous expression of active [NiFe]-hydrogenase 2 from Citrobacter sp. SG in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Maier, Johannes A H; Ragozin, Sergey; Jeltsch, Albert

    2015-04-10

    Hydrogen (H2) is a potential alternative energy carrier which only produces water and heat upon combustion. Today, industrial hydrogen production mainly uses thermochemical processes based on fossil fuels or electrolysis of water. Therefore, biotechnological approaches to produce H2 from biomass are an interesting alternative. We introduce here a novel direct hydrogen measurement system using a semiconducting device specific for hydrogen detection. Using this device, a bacterium producing considerable amounts of hydrogen under aerobic cultivation was isolated and identified by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing as Citrobacter sp. The enzyme responsible for the observed hydrogenase activity was partially purified by 3 chromatographic purification steps and could be identified by peptide mass fingerprinting to be a type 2 [NiFe]-hydrogenase. Expression of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase 2 containing operon from Citrobacter sp. SG in Escherichia coli allowed recombinant hydrogen production. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase 2 identified here may be useful for biotechnological hydrogen production. We speculate that the expression of the hydrogenase in Citrobacter may be an adaptation to growth in acidic conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Controlled assembly of hydrogenase-CdTe nanocrystal hybrids for solar hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Brown, Katherine A; Dayal, Smita; Ai, Xin; Rumbles, Garry; King, Paul W

    2010-07-21

    We present a study of the self-assembly, charge-transfer kinetics, and catalytic properties of hybrid complexes of CdTe nanocrystals (nc-CdTe) and Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase I (H(2)ase). Molecular assembly of nc-CdTe and H(2)ase was mediated by electrostatic interactions and resulted in stable, enzymatically active complexes. The assembly kinetics was monitored by nc-CdTe photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and exhibited first-order Langmuir adsorption behavior. PL was also used to monitor the transfer of photogenerated electrons from nc-CdTe to H(2)ase. The extent to which the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) contributed to the relaxation of photoexcited nc-CdTe relative to the intrinsic radiative and nonradiative (heat dissipation and surface trapping) recombination pathways was shown by steady-state PL spectroscopy to be a function of the nc-CdTe/H(2)ase molar ratio. When the H(2)ase concentration was lower than the nc-CdTe concentration during assembly, the resulting contribution of ET to PL bleaching was enhanced, which resulted in maximal rates of H(2) photoproduction. Photoproduction of H(2) was also a function of the nc-CdTe PL quantum efficiency (PLQE), with higher-PLQE nanocrystals producing higher levels of H(2), suggesting that photogenerated electrons are transferred to H(2)ase directly from core nanocrystal states rather than from surface-trap states. The duration of H(2) photoproduction was limited by the stability of nc-CdTe under the reactions conditions. A first approach to optimization with ascorbic acid present as a sacrificial donor resulted in photon-to-H(2) efficiencies of 9% under monochromatic light and 1.8% under AM 1.5 white light. In summary, nc-CdTe and H(2)ase spontaneously assemble into complexes that upon illumination transfer photogenerated electrons from core nc-CdTe states to H(2)ase, with low H(2)ase coverages promoting optimal orientations for intramolecular ET and solar H(2) production.

  5. Odd-skipped related 2 regulates genes related to proliferation and development

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Shinji; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Amano, Atsuo

    2010-07-23

    Cell proliferation is a biological process in which chromosomes replicate in one cell and equally divide into two daughter cells. Our previous findings suggested that Odd-skipped related 2 (Osr2) plays an important role in cellular quiescence and proliferation under epigenetic regulation. However, the mechanism used by Osr2 to establish and maintain proliferation is unknown. To examine the functional role of Osr2 in cell proliferation, we analyzed its downstream target genes using microarray analysis following adenovirus-induced overexpression of Osr2 as well as knockdown with Osr2 siRNA, which showed that Osr2 regulates a multitude of genes involved in proliferation and the cell cycle, as well as development. Additional proliferation assays also indicated that Osr2 likely functions to elicit cell proliferation. Together, these results suggest that Osr2 plays important roles in proliferation and development.

  6. Evolution of xyloglucan-related genes in green plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The cell shape and morphology of plant tissues are intimately related to structural modifications in the primary cell wall that are associated with key processes in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. The primary cell wall is composed mainly of cellulose immersed in a matrix of hemicellulose, pectin, lignin and some structural proteins. Xyloglucan is a hemicellulose polysaccharide present in the cell walls of all land plants (Embryophyta) and is the main hemicellulose in non-graminaceous angiosperms. Results In this work, we used a comparative genomic approach to obtain new insights into the evolution of the xyloglucan-related enzymatic machinery in green plants. Detailed phylogenetic analyses were done for enzymes involved in xyloglucan synthesis (xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolase, α-xylosidase, β-galactosidase, β-glucosidase and α-fucosidase) and mobilization/degradation (β-(1→4)-glucan synthase, α-fucosyltransferases, β-galactosyltransferases and α-xylosyl transferase) based on 12 fully sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tags from 29 species of green plants. Evidence from Chlorophyta and Streptophyta green algae indicated that part of the Embryophyta xyloglucan-related machinery evolved in an aquatic environment, before land colonization. Streptophyte algae have at least three enzymes of the xyloglucan machinery: xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolase, β-(1→4)-glucan synthase from the celullose synthase-like C family and α-xylosidase that is also present in chlorophytes. Interestingly, gymnosperm sequences orthologs to xyloglucan transglycosylase/hydrolases with exclusively hydrolytic activity were also detected, suggesting that such activity must have emerged within the last common ancestor of spermatophytes. There was a positive correlation between the numbers of founder genes within each gene family and the complexity of the plant cell wall. Conclusions Our data support the idea that a primordial xyloglucan

  7. An Innovative Cloning Platform Enables Large-Scale Production and Maturation of an Oxygen-Tolerant [NiFe]-Hydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Schiffels, Johannes; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Schelden, Maximilian; Aboulnaga, El-Hussiny A. A.; Baumann, Marcus E. M.; Selmer, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Expression of multiple heterologous genes in a dedicated host is a prerequisite for approaches in synthetic biology, spanning from the production of recombinant multiprotein complexes to the transfer of tailor-made metabolic pathways. Such attempts are often exacerbated, due in most cases to a lack of proper directional, robust and readily accessible genetic tools. Here, we introduce an innovative system for cloning and expression of multiple genes in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Using the novel methodology, genes are equipped with individual promoters and terminators and subsequently assembled. The resulting multiple gene cassettes may either be placed in one vector or alternatively distributed among a set of compatible plasmids. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed tool by production and maturation of the NAD+reducing soluble [NiFe]-hydrogenase (SH) from Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly Ralstonia eutropha H16) in E. coli BL21Star™ (DE3). The SH (encoded in hoxFUYHI) was successfully matured by co-expression of a dedicated set of auxiliary genes, comprising seven hyp genes (hypC1D1E1A2B2F2X) along with hoxW, which encodes a specific endopeptidase. Deletion of genes involved in SH maturation reduced maturation efficiency substantially. Further addition of hoxN1, encoding a high-affinity nickel permease from C. necator, considerably increased maturation efficiency in E. coli. Carefully balanced growth conditions enabled hydrogenase production at high cell-densities, scoring mg·(Liter culture)−1 yields of purified functional SH. Specific activities of up to 7.2±1.15 U·mg−1 were obtained in cell-free extracts, which is in the range of the highest activities ever determined in C. necator extracts. The recombinant enzyme was isolated in equal purity and stability as previously achieved with the native form, yielding ultrapure preparations with anaerobic specific activities of up to 230 U·mg−1. Owing to the combinatorial power exhibited by the

  8. An innovative cloning platform enables large-scale production and maturation of an oxygen-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schiffels, Johannes; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Schelden, Maximilian; Aboulnaga, El-Hussiny A A; Baumann, Marcus E M; Selmer, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Expression of multiple heterologous genes in a dedicated host is a prerequisite for approaches in synthetic biology, spanning from the production of recombinant multiprotein complexes to the transfer of tailor-made metabolic pathways. Such attempts are often exacerbated, due in most cases to a lack of proper directional, robust and readily accessible genetic tools. Here, we introduce an innovative system for cloning and expression of multiple genes in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Using the novel methodology, genes are equipped with individual promoters and terminators and subsequently assembled. The resulting multiple gene cassettes may either be placed in one vector or alternatively distributed among a set of compatible plasmids. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed tool by production and maturation of the NAD(+)reducing soluble [NiFe]-hydrogenase (SH) from Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly Ralstonia eutropha H16) in E. coli BL21Star™ (DE3). The SH (encoded in hoxFUYHI) was successfully matured by co-expression of a dedicated set of auxiliary genes, comprising seven hyp genes (hypC1D1E1A2B2F2X) along with hoxW, which encodes a specific endopeptidase. Deletion of genes involved in SH maturation reduced maturation efficiency substantially. Further addition of hoxN1, encoding a high-affinity nickel permease from C. necator, considerably increased maturation efficiency in E. coli. Carefully balanced growth conditions enabled hydrogenase production at high cell-densities, scoring mg·(Liter culture)(-1) yields of purified functional SH. Specific activities of up to 7.2±1.15 U·mg(-1) were obtained in cell-free extracts, which is in the range of the highest activities ever determined in C. necator extracts. The recombinant enzyme was isolated in equal purity and stability as previously achieved with the native form, yielding ultrapure preparations with anaerobic specific activities of up to 230 U·mg(-1). Owing to the combinatorial power exhibited by the

  9. Molecular and biochemical characterization of two tungsten- and selenium-containing formate dehydrogenases from Eubacterium acidaminophilum that are associated with components of an iron-only hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Graentzdoerffer, Andrea; Rauh, David; Pich, Andreas; Andreesen, Jan R

    2003-01-01

    Two gene clusters encoding similar formate dehydrogenases (FDH) were identified in Eubacterium acidaminophilum. Each cluster is composed of one gene coding for a catalytic subunit ( fdhA-I, fdhA-II) and one for an electron-transferring subunit ( fdhB-I, fdhB-II). Both fdhA genes contain a TGA codon for selenocysteine incorporation and the encoded proteins harbor five putative iron-sulfur clusters in their N-terminal region. Both FdhB subunits resemble the N-terminal region of FdhA on the amino acid level and contain five putative iron-sulfur clusters. Four genes thought to encode the subunits of an iron-only hydrogenase are located upstream of the FDH gene cluster I. By sequence comparison, HymA and HymB are predicted to contain one and four iron-sulfur clusters, respectively, the latter protein also binding sites for FMN and NAD(P). Thus, HymA and HymB seem to represent electron-transferring subunits, and HymC the putative catalytic subunit containing motifs for four iron-sulfur clusters and one H-cluster specific for Fe-only hydrogenases. HymD has six predicted transmembrane helices and might be an integral membrane protein. Viologen-dependent FDH activity was purified from serine-grown cells of E. acidaminophilum and the purified protein complex contained four subunits, FdhA and FdhB, encoded by FDH gene cluster II, and HymA and HymB, identified after determination of their N-terminal sequences. Thus, this complex might represent the most simple type of a formate hydrogen lyase. The purified formate dehydrogenase fraction contained iron, tungsten, a pterin cofactor, and zinc, but no molybdenum. FDH-II had a two-fold higher K(m) for formate (0.37 mM) than FDH-I and also catalyzed CO(2) reduction to formate. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR pointed to increased expression of FDH-II in serine-grown cells, supporting the isolation of this FDH isoform. The fdhA-I gene was expressed as inactive protein in Escherichia coli. The in-frame UGA codon for selenocysteine

  10. Horizontally Acquired Genes Are Often Shared between Closely Related Bacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Bolotin, Evgeni; Hershberg, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) serves as an important source of innovation for bacterial species. We used a pangenome-based approach to identify genes that were horizontally acquired by four closely related bacterial species, belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family. This enabled us to examine the extent to which such closely related species tend to share horizontally acquired genes. We find that a high percent of horizontally acquired genes are shared among these closely related species. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the extent of sharing of horizontally acquired genes among these four closely related species is predictive of the extent to which these genes will be found in additional bacterial species. Finally, we show that acquired genes shared by more species tend to be better optimized for expression within the genomes of their new hosts. Combined, our results demonstrate the existence of a large pool of frequently horizontally acquired genes that have distinct characteristics from horizontally acquired genes that are less frequently shared between species.

  11. Identification of hepatic microvascular adhesion-related genes of human colon cancer cells using random homozygous gene perturbation.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Joana; Kohli, Manu; Arteta, Beatriz; Chang, Shaojing; Li, Wu-Bo; Goldblatt, Michael; Vidal-Vanaclocha, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Random homozygous gene perturbation (RHGP), in combination with liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) adhesion screening of clonal colon cancer cells with perturbed genes, was used to identify genes contributing to the hepatic microvascular adhesion of colon cancer cells. Plasmid vector encoding transactivator and gene search vector were transfected into HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells to create a HT-29 RHGP cell library; the adhesion of these library cells to primary cultured mouse LSEC significantly decreased in the presence of RSL1 ligand (inducer), indicating that most of the genes contributing to HT-29 adhesion to LSEC were altered. Next, HT-29 RHGP cell library fractions with upregulated or silenced LSEC adhesion-related genes were isolated. Around 160 clones having altered expression in LSEC adhesion-related genes were obtained, and nine relevant protein-coding genes were identified. Some were proadhesive genes detected because of their overexpression in adherent HT-29 cells (DGCR8 and EFEMP1 genes) and their silenced status in nonadherent HT-29 cells (DGKE, DPY19L1, KIAA0753, PVR and USP11 genes). Others were antiadhesive genes detected because of their overexpression in nonadherent HT-29 cells (ITPKC gene) and their silenced status in adherent HT-29 cells (PPP6R2 gene). Silencing of PVR, DGCR8 and EFEMP1 genes decreased adhesion to LSEC and hepatic microvascular retention of HT-29 cells. The results conclude that RHGP was a valuable strategy for the discovery of mechanisms regulating microvascular adhesion of circulating colon cancer cells before hepatic metastasis formation. Identified genes may contribute to understand the metastatic process of colon cancer and to discovering molecular targets for hepatic metastasis therapeutics.

  12. Cytologic atypia in the contralateral unaffected breast is related to parity and estrogen-related genes.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Denise A; Wang, Jun; Lee, Oukseub; Revesz, Elizabeth; Taft, Nancy; Ivancic, David; Hansen, Nora M; Bethke, Kevin P; Zalles, C; Khan, Seema A

    2016-12-01

    The contralateral unaffected breast (CUB) of women with unilateral breast cancer provides a model for the study of breast tissue-based risk factors. Using random fine needle aspiration (rFNA), we have investigated hormonal and gene expression patterns related to atypia in the CUBs of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. 83 women underwent rFNA of the CUB. Cytologic analysis was performed using the Masood Score (MS), atypia was defined as MS > 14. RNA was extracted using 80% of the sample. The expression of 20 hormone related genes was quantified using Taqman Low Density Arrays. Statistical analysis was performed using 2-tailed t tests and linear regression. Cytological atypia was more frequent in multiparous women (P = 0.0392), and was not associated with any tumor-related features in the affected breast. Masood Score was higher with shorter interval since last pregnancy (R = 0.204, P = 0.0417), higher number of births (R = 0.369, P = 0.0006), and estrogen receptor (ER) negativity of the index cancer (R = -0.203, P = 0.065). Individual cytologic features were associated with aspects of parity. Specifically, anisonucleosis was correlated with shorter interval since last pregnancy (R = 0.318, P = 0.0201), higher number of births (R = 0.382, P = 0.0004), and ER status (R = -0.314, P = 0.0038). Eight estrogen-regulated genes were increased in atypical samples (P < 0.005), including TFF1, AGT, PDZK1, PGR, GREB1, PRLR, CAMK2B, and CCND1. Cytologic atypia, and particularly anisonucleosis, is associated with recent and multiple births and ER negative status of the index tumor. Atypical samples showed increased expression of estrogen-related genes, consistent with the role of estrogen exposure in breast cancer development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. High-performance hydrogen production and oxidation electrodes with hydrogenase supported on metallic single-wall carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Svedružić, Draženka; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Tenent, Robert C; Rocha, John-David R; Vinzant, Todd B; Heben, Michael J; King, Paul W

    2011-03-30

    We studied the electrocatalytic activity of an [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Clostridium acetobutylicum (CaH2ase) immobilized on single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks. SWNT networks were prepared on carbon cloth by ultrasonic spraying of suspensions with predetermined ratios of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes. Current densities for both proton reduction and hydrogen oxidation electrocatalytic activities were at least 1 order of magnitude higher when hydrogenase was immobilized onto SWNT networks with high metallic tube (m-SWNT) content in comparison to hydrogenase supported on networks with low metallic tube content or when SWNTs were absent. We conclude that the increase in electrocatalytic activities in the presence of SWNTs was mainly due to the m-SWNT fraction and can be attributed to (i) substantial increases in the active electrode surface area, and (ii) improved electronic coupling between CaH2ase redox-active sites and the electrode surface.

  14. Beyond H₂: exploiting 2-hydroxypyridine as a design element from [Fe]-hydrogenase for energy-relevant catalysis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Cameron M; Dahl, Eric W; Szymczak, Nathaniel K

    2015-04-01

    The unique primary and secondary coordination environments surrounding the active site of hydrogenase enzymes play a crucial role in H2 activation and transfer reactions. [Fe]-hydrogenase contains a 2-hydroxypyridine ligand motif, and many researchers have incorporated this design element into synthetic catalysts. Transition metal complexes supported by 2-hydroxypyridine scaffolds are catalysts for chemical conversion schemes relevant to alternative energy applications and, in addition to hydrogenase-type reactivity, find new uses in other chemical domains. In this review, the current status of 2-hydroxypyridine-derived catalysts is described with an emphasis on design features that lead to lower energy catalytic pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identifying genes related with rheumatoid arthritis via system biology analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Lin, Xinmei; Yu, Hongjian

    2015-10-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory joint disease that mainly attacks synovial joints. However, the underlying systematic relationship among different genes and biological processes involved in the pathogenesis are still unclear. By analyzing and comparing the transcriptional profiles from RA, OA (osteoarthritis) patients as well as ND (normal donors) with bioinformatics methods, we tend to uncover the potential molecular networks and critical genes which play important roles in RA and OA development. Initially, hierarchical clustering was performed to classify the overall transcriptional profiles. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between ND and RA and OA patients were identified. Furthermore, PPI networks were constructed, functional modules were extracted, and functional annotation was also applied. Our functional analysis identifies 22 biological processes and 2 KEGG pathways enriched in the commonly-regulated gene set. However, we found that number of set of genes differentially expressed genes only between RA and ND reaches up to 244, indicating this gene set may specifically accounts for processing to disease of RA. Additionally, 142 biological processes and 19 KEGG pathways are over-represented by these 244 genes. Meanwhile, although another 21 genes were differentially expressed only in OA and ND, no biological process nor pathway is over-represented by them.

  16. Regulation of Gene Expression by Exercise-Related Micrornas.

    PubMed

    Masi, Laureane Nunes; Serdan, Tamires Duarte Afonso; Levada-Pires, Adriana Cristina; Hatanaka, Elaine; Silveira, Leonardo Dos Reis; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Pithon-Curi, Tania Cristina; Curi, Rui; Gorjão, Renata; Hirabara, Sandro Massao

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression control by microRNAs (miRs) is an important mechanism for maintenance of cellular homeostasis in physiological and pathological conditions as well as in response to different stimuli including nutritional factors and exercise. MiRs are involved in regulation of several processes such as growth and development, fuel metabolism, insulin secretion, immune function, miocardium remodeling, cell proliferation, differenciation, survival, and death. These molecules have also been proposed to be potential biomarkers and/or therapeutical targets in obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. MiRs are released by most cells and potentially act on intercellular communication to borderer or distant cells. Various studies have been performed to elucidate the involvement of miRs in exercise-induced effects. The aims of this review are: 1) to bring up the main advances for the comprehension of the mechanisms of action of miRs; 2) to present the main results on miR involvement in physical exercise; 3) to discuss the physiological effects of miRs modified by exercise. The state of the art and the perspectives on miRs associated with physical exercise will be presented. Thus, this review is important for updating recent advances and driving further strategies and studies on the exercise-related miR research.

  17. Gene transfer for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Campochiaro, Peter A

    2011-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease that has two phases: a degenerative phase often referred to as nonneovascular AMD (non-NVAMD) or dry AMD and a phase dominated by growth of new blood vessels in the subretinal space, referred to as NVAMD or wet AMD. Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of NVAMD have led to new drug therapies that have provided major benefits to patients. However, those treatments require frequent intraocular injections that in many patients must be continued indefinitely to maintain visual benefits. Gene transfer to augment expression of endogenous antiangiogenic proteins is an alternative approach that has the potential to provide long-term stability in patients with NVAMD. Studies in animal models that mimic aspects of NVAMD have identified several possible transgenes, and a clinical trial in patients with advanced NVAMD has suggested that the approach may be feasible. Many important questions remain, but the rationale and preliminary data are compelling. The results of two ongoing clinical trials may answer several of the questions and help direct future research.

  18. Calcitonin gene related peptide as inhibitory neurotransmitter in the ureter.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Giuliani, S; Meini, S; Santicioli, P

    1995-07-01

    A dense plexus of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) containing nerve fibres is present in the mammalian ureter, from which CGRP is released by depolarizing stimuli, including chemical normally present in the urine. CGRP exerts a profound, receptor-mediated, inhibitory effect on the evoked motility of the ureter by suppressing latent pacemakers in the smooth muscle. This effect is largely glibenclamide sensitive, indicating the activation of potassium (K) channels in its genesis. Electrical stimulation of intramural nerves in the guinea-pig ureter produces a transient membrane hyperpolarization, which is blocked by glibenclamide or by capsaicin pretreatment, enhanced in a low-K medium, and inhibited by a CGRP receptor antagonist. Thus endogenous CGRP acts as a neurotransmitter K channel opener in the ureter. The refractory period of the guinea-pig ureter is markedly and similarly reduced by capsaicin pretreatment or administration of a CGRP receptor antagonist, indicating that endogenous CGRP can modulate the maximal frequency of ureteral peristalsis. Using a three-chamber organ bath that enabled the separate perfusion of the renal, middle, and bladder regions of the organ, evidence was obtained that CGRP blocks propagation of impulses along the ureter through a glibenclamide-sensitive mechanism. These findings indicate a role of CGRP in the local regulation of ureteral motility and peristalsis.

  19. Calcitonin gene-related peptide as inflammatory mediator.

    PubMed

    Springer, Jochen; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Fischer, Axel; Groneberg, David A

    2003-01-01

    Sensory neuropeptides have been proposed to play a key role in the pathogenesis of a number of respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic cough. Next to prominent neuropeptides such as tachykinins or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has long been suggested to participate in airway physiology and pathophysiology. CGRP is a 37 amino-acid peptide which is expressed by nerve fibers projecting to the airways and by pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. The most prominent effects of CGRP in the airways are vasodilatation and in a few instances bronchoconstriction. A further pulmonary effect of CGRP is the induction of eosinophil migration and the stimulation of beta-integrin-mediated T cell adhesion to fibronectin at the site of inflammation. By contrast, CGRP inhibits macrophage secretion and the capacity of macrophages to activate T-cells, indicating a potential anti-inflammatory effect. Due to the complex pulmonary effects of CGRP with bronchoconstriction and vasodilatation and diverse immunomodulatory actions, potential anti-asthma drugs based on this peptide have not been established so far. However, targeting the effects of CGRP may be of value for future strategies in nerve modulation.

  20. Gene-Environment Interactions of Circadian-Related Genes for Cardiometabolic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Follis, Jack L.; Smith, Caren E.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Garaulet, Marta; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Hruby, Adela; Jacques, Paul F.; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Scheer, Frank A.J.L.; Bartz, Traci M.; Kovanen, Leena; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Jonsson, Anna; Muka, Taulant; Kalafati, Ioanna P.; Mikkilä, Vera; Ordovás, José M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153, MTNR1B-rs10830963, NR1D1-rs2314339) and cardiometabolic traits (fasting glucose [FG], HOMA-insulin resistance, BMI, waist circumference, and HDL-cholesterol) to facilitate personalized recommendations. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted inverse-variance weighted, fixed-effect meta-analyses of results of adjusted associations and interactions between dietary intake/sleep duration and selected variants on cardiometabolic traits from 15 cohort studies including up to 28,190 participants of European descent from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium. RESULTS We observed significant associations between relative macronutrient intakes and glycemic traits and short sleep duration (<7 h) and higher FG and replicated known MTNR1B associations with glycemic traits. No interactions were evident after accounting for multiple comparisons. However, we observed nominally significant interactions (all P < 0.01) between carbohydrate intake and MTNR1B-rs1387153 for FG with a 0.003 mmol/L higher FG with each additional 1% carbohydrate intake in the presence of the T allele, between sleep duration and CRY2-rs11605924 for HDL-cholesterol with a 0.010 mmol/L higher HDL-cholesterol with each additional hour of sleep in the presence of the A allele, and between long sleep duration (≥9 h) and MTNR1B-rs1387153 for BMI with a 0.60 kg/m2 higher BMI with long sleep duration in the presence of the T allele relative to normal sleep duration (≥7 to <9 h). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that lower carbohydrate intake and normal sleep duration may ameliorate cardiometabolic abnormalities conferred by common circadian-related genetic variants

  1. Gene-Environment Interactions of Circadian-Related Genes for Cardiometabolic Traits.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Hassan S; Follis, Jack L; Smith, Caren E; Tanaka, Toshiko; Garaulet, Marta; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Hruby, Adela; Jacques, Paul F; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Scheer, Frank A J L; Bartz, Traci M; Kovanen, Leena; Wojczynski, Mary K; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Jonsson, Anna; Muka, Taulant; Kalafati, Ioanna P; Mikkilä, Vera; Ordovás, José M

    2015-08-01

    Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153, MTNR1B-rs10830963, NR1D1-rs2314339) and cardiometabolic traits (fasting glucose [FG], HOMA-insulin resistance, BMI, waist circumference, and HDL-cholesterol) to facilitate personalized recommendations. We conducted inverse-variance weighted, fixed-effect meta-analyses of results of adjusted associations and interactions between dietary intake/sleep duration and selected variants on cardiometabolic traits from 15 cohort studies including up to 28,190 participants of European descent from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium. We observed significant associations between relative macronutrient intakes and glycemic traits and short sleep duration (<7 h) and higher FG and replicated known MTNR1B associations with glycemic traits. No interactions were evident after accounting for multiple comparisons. However, we observed nominally significant interactions (all P < 0.01) between carbohydrate intake and MTNR1B-rs1387153 for FG with a 0.003 mmol/L higher FG with each additional 1% carbohydrate intake in the presence of the T allele, between sleep duration and CRY2-rs11605924 for HDL-cholesterol with a 0.010 mmol/L higher HDL-cholesterol with each additional hour of sleep in the presence of the A allele, and between long sleep duration (≥9 h) and MTNR1B-rs1387153 for BMI with a 0.60 kg/m(2) higher BMI with long sleep duration in the presence of the T allele relative to normal sleep duration (≥7 to <9 h). Our results suggest that lower carbohydrate intake and normal sleep duration may ameliorate cardiometabolic abnormalities conferred by common circadian-related genetic variants. Until further mechanistic examination of the nominally

  2. Differential expression of genes related to gain and intake in the liver of beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: To better understand which genes play a role in cattle feed intake and gain, we evaluated differential expression of genes related to gain and intake in the liver of crossbred beef steers. Based on past transcriptomics studies on cattle liver, we hypothesized that genes related to metabo...

  3. Apoptosis-related genes change their expression with age and hearing loss in the mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Sherif F.; D’Souza, Mary; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2010-01-01

    To understand possible causative roles of apoptosis gene regulation in age-related hearing loss (presbycusis), apoptotic gene expression patterns in the CBA mouse cochlea of four different age and hearing loss groups were compared, using GeneChip and real-time (qPCR) microarrays. GeneChip transcriptional expression patterns of 318 apoptosis-related genes were analyzed. Thirty eight probes (35 genes) showed significant differences in expression. The significant gene families include Caspases, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma2 family, P53, Cal-pains, Mitogen activated protein kinase family, Jun oncogene, Nuclear factor of kappa light chain gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor-related and tumor necrosis factor-related genes. The GeneChip results of 31 genes were validated using the new TaqMan® Low Density Array (TLDA). Eight genes showed highly correlated results with the GeneChip data. These genes are: activating transcription factor3, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma2, Bcl2-like1, caspase4 apoptosis-related cysteine protease 4, Calpain2, dual specificity phosphatase9, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member12a, and Tumor necrosis factor superfamily member13b, suggesting they may play critical roles in inner ear aging. PMID:18839313

  4. Age-related changes in cellular protection, purification, and inflammation-related gene expression: role of dietary phytonutrients.

    PubMed

    Mastaloudis, Angela; Wood, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Oxidative injury and inflammation are intimately involved in the aging process and the development of age-related diseases. To date, most nutritional antiaging strategies have focused solely on the delivery of exogenous antioxidants to combat the negative effects of aging. A promising new strategy is to identify nutrients and phytochemicals that can directly target intrinsic cytoprotective mechanisms, including modulation of the expression of (1) genes involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics, (2) genes involved in the synthesis and regulation of intrinsic antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes, (3) genes involved in the regulation of inflammation, and (4) vitagenes. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the age-related changes in gene expression related to oxidative stress, detoxification, and inflammatory processes, and to discuss natural compounds with the potential to oppose age-related changes in gene expression related to these processes, which therefore may be suitable for use in human antiaging research.

  5. Guiding Principles of Hydrogenase Catalysis Instigated and Clarified by Protein Film Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Fraser A; Evans, Rhiannon M; Hexter, Suzannah V; Murphy, Bonnie J; Roessler, Maxie M; Wulff, Philip

    2016-05-17

    Protein film electrochemistry (PFE) is providing cutting-edge insight into the chemical principles underpinning biological hydrogen. Attached to an electrode, many enzymes exhibit "reversible" electrocatalytic behavior, meaning that a catalyzed redox reaction appears reversible or quasi-reversible when viewed by cyclic voltammetry. This efficiency is most relevant for enzymes that are inspiring advances in renewable energy, such as hydrogen-activating and CO2-reducing enzymes. Exploiting the rich repertoire of available instrumental methods, PFE experiments yield both a general snapshot and fine detail, all from tiny samples of enzyme. The dynamic electrochemical investigations blaze new trails and add exquisite detail to the information gained from structural and spectroscopic studies. This Account describes recent investigations of hydrogenases carried out in Oxford, including ideas initiated with PFE and followed through with complementary techniques, all contributing to an eventual complete picture of fast and efficient H2 activation without Pt. By immobilization of an enzyme on an electrode, catalytic electron flow and the chemistry controlling it can be addressed at the touch of a button. The buried nature of the active site means that structures that have been determined by crystallography or spectroscopy are likely to be protected, retained, and fully relevant in a PFE experiment. An electrocatalysis model formulated for the PFE of immobilized enzymes predicts interesting behavior and gives insight into why some hydrogenases are H2 producers and others are H2 oxidizers. Immobilization also allows for easy addition and removal of inhibitors along with precise potential control, one interesting outcome being that formaldehyde forms a reversible complex with reduced [FeFe]-hydrogenases, thereby providing insight into the order of electron and proton transfers. Experiments on O2-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenases show that O2 behaves like a reversible inhibitor: it

  6. The evolution of reproduction-related NLRP genes.

    PubMed

    Duéñez-Guzmán, Edgar A; Haig, David

    2014-04-01

    NLRP proteins are important components of inflammasomes with a major role in innate immunity. A subset of NLRP genes, with unknown functions, are expressed in oocytes and early embryos. Mutations of Nlrp5 in mice are associated with maternal-effect embryonic lethality and mutations of NLRP7 in women are associated with conception of biparental complete hydatidiform moles (biCHMs), suggesting perturbed processes of genomic imprinting. Recessive mutations on NLRP2/7 in humans are associated with reproductive disorders and appear to be induced by a demethylation of the maternal pronucleus. In this study, we find that radiation of NLRP genes occurred before the common ancestor of Afrotheria and Boreoeutheria, with the clade of oocyte-expressed genes originating before the divergence of marsupial and eutherian mammals. There have been multiple independent duplications of NLRP2 genes one of which produced the NLRP7 gene associated with biCHMs.

  7. Rates and Routes of Electron Transfer of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase in an Enzymatic Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Alexander; Stein, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Hydrogenase enzymes are being used in enzymatic fuel cells immobilized on a graphite or carbon electrode surface, for example. The enzyme is used for the anodic oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2) to produce protons and electrons. The association and orientation of the enzyme at the anode electrode for a direct electron transfer is not completely resolved. The distal FeS-cluster in [NiFe]-hydrogenases contains a histidine residue which is known to play a critical role in the intermolecular electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase graphite electrode association was investigated using Brownian Dynamics simulations. Residues that were shown to be in proximity to the electrode surface were identified (His184, Ser196, Glu461, Glu464), and electron transfer routes connecting the distal FeS-cluster with the surface residues were investigated. Several possible pathways for electron transfer between the distal FeS-cluster and the terminal amino acid residues were probed in terms of their rates of electron transfer using DFT methods. The reorganization energies λ of the distal iron-sulfur cluster and coronene as a molecular model for graphite were calculated. The reorganization energy of the distal (His)(Cys)3 cluster was found to be not very different from that of a standard cubane clusters with a (Cys)4 coordination. Electronic coupling matrix elements and rates of electron transfer for the different pathways were calculated according to the Marcus equation. The rates for glutamate-mediated electrode binding were found to be incompatible with experimental data. A direct electron transfer from the histidine ligand of the distal FeS-cluster to the electrode yielded rates of electron transfer in excellent agreement with experiment. A second pathway, however, from the distal FeS-cluster to the Ser196 residue was found to be equally efficient and feasible.

  8. A Redox Active [2Fe-2S] Cluster on the Hydrogenase Maturase HydF.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Eric M; Byer, Amanda S; Betz, Jeremiah N; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B

    2016-06-28

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are nature's most prolific hydrogen catalysts, excelling at facilely interconverting H2 and protons. The catalytic core common to all [FeFe]-hydrogenases is a complex metallocofactor, referred to as the H-cluster, which is composed of a standard [4Fe-4S] cluster linked through a bridging thiolate to a 2Fe subcluster harboring dithiomethylamine, carbon monoxide, and cyanide ligands. This 2Fe subcluster is synthesized and inserted into [FeFe]-hydrogenase by three maturase enzymes denoted HydE, HydF, and HydG. HydE and HydG are radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes and synthesize the nonprotein ligands of the H-cluster. HydF is a GTPase that functions as a scaffold or carrier for 2Fe subcluster production. Herein, we utilize UV-visible, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies to establish the existence of redox active [4Fe-4S] and [2Fe-2S] clusters bound to HydF. We have used spectroelectrochemical titrations to assign iron-sulfur cluster midpoint potentials, have shown that HydF purifies with a reduced [2Fe-2S] cluster in the absence of exogenous reducing agents, and have tracked iron-sulfur cluster spectroscopic changes with quaternary structural perturbations. Our results provide an important foundation for understanding the maturation process by defining the iron-sulfur cluster content of HydF prior to its interaction with HydE and HydG. We speculate that the [2Fe-2S] cluster of HydF either acts as a placeholder for HydG-derived Fe(CO)2CN species or serves as a scaffold for 2Fe subcluster assembly.

  9. Requirements for construction of a functional hybrid complex of photosystem I and [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Alexander; Kopczak, Marta J; Rögner, Matthias; Lenz, Oliver

    2010-04-01

    The development of cellular systems in which the enzyme hydrogenase is efficiently coupled to the oxygenic photosynthesis apparatus represents an attractive avenue to produce H(2) sustainably from light and water. Here we describe the molecular design of the individual components required for the direct coupling of the O(2)-tolerant membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha H16 to the acceptor site of photosystem I (PS I) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. By genetic engineering, the peripheral subunit PsaE of PS I was fused to the MBH, and the resulting hybrid protein was purified from R. eutropha to apparent homogeneity via two independent affinity chromatographical steps. The catalytically active MBH-PsaE (MBH(PsaE)) hybrid protein could be isolated only from the cytoplasmic fraction. This was surprising, since the MBH is a substrate of the twin-arginine translocation system and was expected to reside in the periplasm. We conclude that the attachment of the additional PsaE domain to the small, electron-transferring subunit of the MBH completely abolished the export competence of the protein. Activity measurements revealed that the H(2) production capacity of the purified MBH(PsaE) fusion protein was very similar to that of wild-type MBH. In order to analyze the specific interaction of MBH(PsaE) with PS I, His-tagged PS I lacking the PsaE subunit was purified via Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity and subsequent hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Formation of PS I-hydrogenase supercomplexes was demonstrated by blue native gel electrophoresis. The results indicate a vital prerequisite for the quantitative analysis of the MBH(PsaE)-PS I complex formation and its light-driven H(2) production capacity by means of spectroelectrochemistry.

  10. Frequency and potential dependence of reversible electrocatalytic hydrogen interconversion by [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Kavita; Islam, Shams T A; Happe, Thomas; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2017-04-11

    The kinetics of hydrogen oxidation and evolution by [FeFe]-hydrogenases have been investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy-resolving factors that determine the exceptional activity of these enzymes, and introducing an unusual and powerful way of analyzing their catalytic electron transport properties. Attached to an electrode, hydrogenases display reversible electrocatalytic behavior close to the 2H(+)/H2 potential, making them paradigms for efficiency: the electrocatalytic "exchange" rate (measured around zero driving force) is therefore an unusual parameter with theoretical and practical significance. Experiments were carried out on two [FeFe]-hydrogenases, CrHydA1 from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which contains only the active-site "H cluster," and CpI from the fermentative anaerobe Clostridium pasteurianum, which contains four low-potential FeS clusters that serve as an electron relay in addition to the H cluster. Data analysis yields catalytic exchange rates (at the formal 2H(+)/H2 potential, at 0 °C) of 157 electrons (78 molecules H2) per second for CpI and 25 electrons (12 molecules H2) per second for CrHydA1. The experiments show how the potential dependence of catalytic electron flow comprises frequency-dependent and frequency-independent terms that reflect the proficiencies of the catalytic site and the electron transfer pathway in each enzyme. The results highlight the "wire-like" behavior of the Fe-S electron relay in CpI and a low reorganization energy for electron transfer on/off the H cluster.

  11. A Transmissible Plant Shoot Factor Promotes Uptake Hydrogenase Activity in Rhizobium Symbionts 1

    PubMed Central

    Bedmar, Eulogio J.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1984-01-01

    Shoot/root grafting studies showed organ and host cultivar effects on net H2 evolution from Pisum sativum L. root nodules. Net H2 evolution from those nodules represents the sum of H2 formed by Rhizobium nitrogenase and H2 oxidized by any uptake hydrogenase present in the bacteria. Grafts between pea cultivars `JI1205' or `Alaska' and `Feltham First' in symbioses with R. leguminosarum 128C53 showed that shoots of both JI1205 and Alaska increased H2 uptake significantly (P ≤ 0.05) in Feltham First root nodules. The same plants also had less net H2 evolution at similar rates of C2H2 reduction than plants formed by grafting Feltham First shoots on Feltham First roots. Although JI1205 and Alaska shoots increased H2-uptake activity of Feltham First root nodules 28 days after the graft was made, intermediate to high levels of H2 uptake activity were still present in nodules on roots of both JI1205 and Alaska grafted to Feltham First shoots. These results indicate the presence of a transmissible shoot factor(s) which can increase uptake hydrogenase activity in a Rhizobium symbiont and show that root genotype also can influence that parameter. Parallel grafting experiments using the same pea cultivars in symbioses with R. leguminosarum strain 300, which lacks uptake hydrogenase activity, suggested that a transmissible shoot factor(s) altered H2 formation from nitrogenase by changing the electron allocation coefficient of that enzyme complex. The root and shoot factor(s) detected in this study had no permanent effect on strain 128C53. Bacterial cells isolated from Feltham First nodules with low H2 uptake activity formed root nodules on JI1205 and Alaska with high H2 uptake activity. Bacteroids isolated from nodules on intact JI1205, Alaska, or Feltham First plants with high, medium, or low H2 uptake activity, respectively, maintained those phenotypes during in vitro assays. PMID:16663677

  12. A transmissible plant shoot factor promotes uptake hydrogenase activity in Rhizobium symbionts.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Phillips, D A

    1984-07-01

    Shoot/root grafting studies showed organ and host cultivar effects on net H(2) evolution from Pisum sativum L. root nodules. Net H(2) evolution from those nodules represents the sum of H(2) formed by Rhizobium nitrogenase and H(2) oxidized by any uptake hydrogenase present in the bacteria. Grafts between pea cultivars ;JI1205' or ;Alaska' and ;Feltham First' in symbioses with R. leguminosarum 128C53 showed that shoots of both JI1205 and Alaska increased H(2) uptake significantly (P hydrogenase activity in a Rhizobium symbiont and show that root genotype also can influence that parameter.Parallel grafting experiments using the same pea cultivars in symbioses with R. leguminosarum strain 300, which lacks uptake hydrogenase activity, suggested that a transmissible shoot factor(s) altered H(2) formation from nitrogenase by changing the electron allocation coefficient of that enzyme complex.The root and shoot factor(s) detected in this study had no permanent effect on strain 128C53. Bacterial cells isolated from Feltham First nodules with low H(2) uptake activity formed root nodules on JI1205 and Alaska with high H(2) uptake activity. Bacteroids isolated from nodules on intact JI1205, Alaska, or Feltham First plants with high, medium, or low H(2) uptake activity, respectively, maintained those phenotypes during in vitro assays.

  13. The crystal structure of an oxygen-tolerant hydrogenase uncovers a novel iron-sulphur centre.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Johannes; Scheerer, Patrick; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; Kroschinsky, Sebastian; Friedrich, Bärbel; Lenz, Oliver; Spahn, Christian M T

    2011-10-16

    Hydrogenases are abundant enzymes that catalyse the reversible interconversion of H(2) into protons and electrons at high rates. Those hydrogenases maintaining their activity in the presence of O(2) are considered to be central to H(2)-based technologies, such as enzymatic fuel cells and for light-driven H(2) production. Despite comprehensive genetic, biochemical, electrochemical and spectroscopic investigations, the molecular background allowing a structural interpretation of how the catalytic centre is protected from irreversible inactivation by O(2) has remained unclear. Here we present the crystal structure of an O(2)-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase from the aerobic H(2) oxidizer Ralstonia eutropha H16 at 1.5 Å resolution. The heterodimeric enzyme consists of a large subunit harbouring the catalytic centre in the H(2)-reduced state and a small subunit containing an electron relay consisting of three different iron-sulphur clusters. The cluster proximal to the active site displays an unprecedented [4Fe-3S] structure and is coordinated by six cysteines. According to the current model, this cofactor operates as an electronic switch depending on the nature of the gas molecule approaching the active site. It serves as an electron acceptor in the course of H(2) oxidation and as an electron-delivering device upon O(2) attack at the active site. This dual function is supported by the capability of the novel iron-sulphur cluster to adopt three redox states at physiological redox potentials. The second structural feature is a network of extended water cavities that may act as a channel facilitating the removal of water produced at the [NiFe] active site. These discoveries will have an impact on the design of biological and chemical H(2)-converting catalysts that are capable of cycling H(2) in air.

  14. Mechanism of Hydrogen Production in [Fe-Fe]-Hydrogenase: A Density Functional Theory Study (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    iron hydrogenases from the sulfate-reducing microorganism Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ( DdH )3 and from the anaerobic soil microorganism Clostridium...34, structure represents an oxidized state and that the DdH structure represents a reduced state,6 while Nicolet, et ai.,7 suggested that the DdH crystal...moiety is the same for both CpI and DdH .9 For A, however, we used propane as the bridging moiety so that we could compare our results to previous work

  15. Three-dimensional structure of the nickel-containing hydrogenase from Thiocapsa roseopersicina.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, M B; Orlova, E V; Smirnova, E A; Hovmöller, S; Zorin, N A

    1991-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the nickel-containing hydrogenase from Thiocapsa roseopersicina has been determined at a resolution of 2 nm in the plane and 4 nm in the vertical direction by electron microscopy and computerized image processing on microcrystals of the enzyme. The enzyme forms a large ring-shaped complex containing six each of the large (62-kDa) and small (26-kDa) subunits. The complex is very open, with six well-separated dumbbell-shaped masses surrounding a large cylindrical hole. Each dumbbell is interpreted as consisting of one large and one small subunit. Images PMID:1901570

  16. Kinetics and thermodynamics of gas diffusion in a NiFe hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Topin, Jérémie; Rousset, Marc; Antonczak, Serge; Golebiowski, Jérôme

    2012-03-01

    We have investigated O₂ and H₂ transport across a NiFe hydrogenase at the atomic scale by means of computational methods. The Wild Type protein has been compared with the V74Q mutant. Two distinct methodologies have been applied to study the gas access to the active site. Temperature locally enhanced sampling simulations have emphasized the importance of protein dynamics on gas diffusion. The O₂ diffusion free energy profiles, obtained by umbrella sampling, are in agreement with the known kinetic data and show that in the V74Q mutant, the inhibition process is lowered from both a kinetic and a thermodynamic point of view. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Isolation and characterization of Agouti: a diabetes/obesity related gene

    DOEpatents

    Woychik, Richard P.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to the cloning and expression of the Agouti gene and analogous genes in transformed, transfected and transgenic mice. The present invention provides an animal model for the study of diabetes, obesity and tumors for the testing of potential therapeutic agents. The present invention provides oligonucleotide probes for the detection of the Agouti gene and mutations in the gene. The present invention also relates to the isolation and recombinant production of the Agouti gene product, production of antibodies to the Agouti gene product and their use as diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

  18. Isolation and characterization of Agouti: a diabetes/obesity related gene

    DOEpatents

    Woychik, Richard P.

    2000-06-27

    The present invent