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Sample records for hydrolysis oftriglyceride-rich lipoproteins

  1. Give me A5 for lipoprotein hydrolysis!

    PubMed

    Merkel, Martin; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-10-01

    APOA5 is a newly identified apolipoprotein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of plasma triglyceride levels. In several human studies, common APOA5 single nucleotide polymorphisms have been strongly associated with elevated plasma triglyceride levels. In this issue of the JCI, Marçais et al. report that the rare Q139X mutation in APOA5 leads to severe hypertriglyceridemia by exerting a dominant-negative effect on the plasma lipolytic system for triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. The presented data support the idea that the molecular mechanism of APOA5 function may include the enhancement of binding between lipoproteins and proteoglycans at the vascular wall and activation of proteoglycan-bound lipoprotein lipase.

  2. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Inhibits Subsequent Hydrolysis Of Lipoprotein Cholesteryl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, W. Gray; Cox, Brian E.; Griffin, Evelyn E.; Ullery, Jody C.

    2010-01-01

    Human macrophages incubated for prolonged periods with mildly oxidized LDL (oxLDL) or cholesteryl ester-rich lipid dispersions (DISP) accumulate free and esterified cholesterol within large, swollen lysosomes similar to those in foam cells of atherosclerosis. The cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation is, in part, the result of inhibition of lysosomal hydrolysis due to increased lysosomal pH mediated by excessive lysosomal free cholesterol (FC). To determine if the inhibition of hydrolysis was long lived and further define the extent of the lysosomal defect, we incubated THP-1 macrophages with oxLDL or DISP to produce lysosome sterol engorgement and then chased with acetylated LDL (acLDL). Unlike oxLDL or DISP, CE from acLDL normally is hydrolyzed rapidly. Three days of incubation with oxLDL or DISP produced an excess of CE in lipid-engorged lysosomes, indicative of inhibition. After prolonged oxLDL or DISP pretreatment, subsequent hydrolysis of acLDL CE was inhibited. Coincident with the inhibition, the lipid-engorged lysosomes failed to maintain an acidic pH during both the initial pretreatment and subsequent acLDL incubation. This indicates that the alterations in lysosomes were general, long-lived and affected subsequent lipoprotein metabolism. This same phenomenon, occurring within atherosclerotic foam cells, could significantly affect lesion progression. PMID:18312718

  3. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  4. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M; Brown, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  5. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M; Brown, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL. PMID:25130461

  6. Apolipoprotein AV accelerates plasma hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by interaction with proteoglycan-bound lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Martin; Loeffler, Britta; Kluger, Malte; Fabig, Nathalie; Geppert, Gesa; Pennacchio, Len A; Laatsch, Alexander; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-06-01

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is associated with differences in triglyceride levels and familial combined hyperlipidemia. In genetically engineered mice, apoAV plasma levels are inversely correlated with plasma triglycerides. To elucidate the mechanism by which apoAV influences plasma triglycerides, metabolic studies and in vitro assays resembling physiological conditions were performed. In human APOA5 transgenic mice (hAPOA5tr), catabolism of chylomicrons and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) was accelerated due to a faster plasma hydrolysis of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hepatic VLDL and intestinal chylomicron production were not affected. The functional interplay between apoAV and LPL was further investigated by cross-breeding a human LPL transgene with the apoa5 knock-out and the hAPOA5tr to an lpl-deficient background. Increased LPL activity completely normalized hypertriglyceridemia of apoa5-deficient mice; however, overexpression of human apoAV modulated triglyceride levels only slightly when LPL was reduced. To reflect the physiological situation in which LPL is bound to cell surface proteoglycans, we examined hydrolysis in the presence or absence of proteoglycans. Without proteoglycans, apoAV derived either from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, hAPOA5tr high density lipoprotein, or a recombinant source did not alter the LPL hydrolysis rate. In the presence of proteoglycans, however, apoAV led to a significant and dose-dependent increase in LPL-mediated hydrolysis of VLDL triglycerides. These results were confirmed in cell culture using a proteoglycan-deficient cell line. A direct interaction between LPL and apoAV was found by ligand blotting. It is proposed, that apoAV reduces triglyceride levels by guiding VLDL and chylomicrons to proteoglycan-bound LPL for lipolysis.

  7. Apolipoprotein AV Accelerates Plasma Hydrolysis OfTriglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins By Interaction With Proteoglycan BoundLipoprotein Lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Martin; Loeffler, Britta; Kluger, Malte; Fabig, Nathalie; Geppert, Gesa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Laatsch, Alexander; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-02-22

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is associated with differences intriglyceride levels and familial combined hyperlipidemia. In genetically engineered mice, apoAV plasma levels are inversely correlated with plasmatriglycerides. To elucidate the mechanism by which apoAV influences plasma triglycerides, metabolic studies and in vitro assays resembling physiological conditions were performed. In hAPOA5 transgenic mice(hAPOA5tr), catabolism of chylomicrons and VLDL was accelerated due to a faster plasma hydrolysis of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase (LPL).Hepatic VLDL and intestinal chylomicron production were not affected. The functional interplay between apoAV and LPL was further investigated by crossbreeding a human LPL transgene with the apoa5 knockout, and the hAPOA5tr to an LPL deficient background. Increased LPL activity completely normalized hypertriglyceridemia of apoa5 deficient mice,however, over expression of human apoAV modulated triglyceride levels only slightly when LPL was reduced. To reflect the physiological situation in which LPL is bound to cell surface proteoglycans, we examined hydrolysis in the presence or absence of proteoglycans. Without proteoglycans, apoAV derived either from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, hAPOA5tr HDL, or a recombinant source did not alter the LPL hydrolysis rate. In the presence of proteoglycans, however, apoAV led to a significant and dose-dependent increase in LPL mediated hydrolysis of VLDL triglycerides. These results were confirmed in cell culture using a proteoglycan-deficient cell line.A direct interaction between LPL and apoAV was found by ligand blotting.It is proposed, that apoAV reduces triglyceride levels by guiding VLDL and chylomicrons to proteoglycans bound LPL for lipolysis.

  8. Hydrolysis products generated by lipoprotein lipase and endothelial lipase differentially impact THP-1 macrophage cell signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Essaji, Yasmin; Yang, Yanbo; Albert, Carolyn J; Ford, David A; Brown, Robert J

    2013-08-01

    Macrophages express lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and endothelial lipase (EL) within atherosclerotic plaques; however, little is known about how lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by these lipases might affect macrophage cell signalling pathways. We hypothesized that hydrolysis products affect macrophage cell signalling pathways associated with atherosclerosis. To test our hypothesis, we incubated differentiated THP-1 macrophages with products from total lipoprotein hydrolysis by recombinant LPL or EL. Using antibody arrays, we found that the phosphorylation of six receptor tyrosine kinases and three signalling nodes--most associated with atherosclerotic processes--was increased by LPL derived hydrolysis products. EL derived hydrolysis products only increased the phosphorylation of tropomyosin-related kinase A, which is also implicated in playing a role in atherosclerosis. Using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, we identified the species of triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines that were hydrolyzed by LPL and EL, and we identified the fatty acids liberated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To determine if the total liberated fatty acids influenced signalling pathways, we incubated differentiated THP-1 macrophages with a mixture of the fatty acids that matched the concentrations of liberated fatty acids from total lipoproteins by LPL, and we subjected cell lysates to antibody array analyses. The analyses showed that only the phosphorylation of Akt was significantly increased in response to fatty acid treatment. Overall, our study shows that macrophages display potentially pro-atherogenic signalling responses following acute treatments with LPL and EL lipoprotein hydrolysis products. PMID:23794138

  9. Changes with starvation in the rat of the lipoprotein lipase activity and hydrolysis of triacylglycerols from triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins in adipose tissue preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Lasunción, M A; Herrera, E

    1983-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity was higher in fat-pad pieces than in isolated adipocytes from the same fed rats, whereas hydrolysis of triacylglycerols from triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins was similar in the two preparations when incubated either in basal conditions or in the presence of heparin. In both preparations there was a similar release of lipoprotein lipase activity into the medium during basal incubation, enhanced by the presence of heparin. In fat-pad pieces, but not in isolated adipocytes, incubation with heparin produced a decrease in the lipoprotein lipase activity measured in the tissue preparation. In fat-pad pieces from 24 h-starved rats, lipoprotein lipase activity was the same as in isolated adipocytes from the same animals and incubation with heparin did not affect the appearance of lipoprotein lipase in the medium or the utilization of triacylglycerols from triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. These results support the following conclusions. (1) The effectiveness of lipoprotein lipase in adipose tissue preparations in vitro depends more on its availability to the substrate than on its total activity. (2) Heparin acts on adipose tissue preparations from fed animals both by enhancing the release of pre-existing extracellular enzyme (which is absent in isolated adipocytes) and by enhancing the transfer outside the cells of the intracellular (and mainly undetectable) enzyme that is activated in the secretion process. (3) In adipose tissue from starved animals there is not only a decrease in the active extracellular form of lipoprotein lipase activity but also a reduction in the intracellular (and mainly undetectable) pool of the enzyme. PMID:6870799

  10. Inactive lipoprotein lipase (LPL) alone increases selective cholesterol ester uptake in vivo, whereas in the presence of active LPL it also increases triglyceride hydrolysis and whole particle lipoprotein uptake.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Martin; Heeren, Jörg; Dudeck, Wiebke; Rinninger, Franz; Radner, Herbert; Breslow, Jan L; Goldberg, Ira J; Zechner, Rudolf; Greten, Heiner

    2002-03-01

    We have previously shown that transgenic expression of catalytically inactive lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in muscle (Mck-N-LPL) enhances triglyceride hydrolysis as well as whole particle lipoprotein and selective cholesterol ester uptake. In the current study, we have examined whether these functions can be performed by inactive LPL alone or require the presence of active LPL expressed in the same tissue. To study inactive LPL in the presence of active LPL in the same tissue, the Mck-N-LPL transgene was bred onto the heterozygous LPL-deficient (LPL1) background. At 18 h of age, Mck-N-LPL reduced triglycerides by 35% and markedly increased muscle lipid droplets. In adult mice, it reduced triglycerides by 40% and increased lipoprotein particle uptake into muscle by 60% and cholesterol ester uptake by 110%. To study inactive LPL alone, the Mck-N-LPL transgene was bred onto the LPL-deficient (LPL0) background. These mice die at approximately 24 h of age. At 18 h of age, in the absence of active LPL, inactive LPL expression did not diminish triglycerides nor did it result in the accumulation of muscle lipid droplets. To study inactive LPL in the absence of active LPL in the same tissue in adult animals, the Mck-N-LPL transgene was bred onto mice that only expressed active LPL in the heart (LPL0/He-LPL). In this case, Mck-N-LPL did not reduce triglycerides or increase the uptake of lipoprotein particles but did increase muscle uptake of chylomicron and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol ester by 40%. Thus, in the presence of active LPL in the same tissue, inactive LPL augments triglyceride hydrolysis and increases whole particle triglyceride-rich lipoprotein and selective cholesterol ester uptake. In the absence of active LPL in the same tissue, inactive LPL only mediates selective cholesterol ester uptake.

  11. Medium-chain versus long-chain triacylglycerol emulsion hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase: Implications for the mechanisms of lipase action

    SciTech Connect

    Deckelbaum, R.J. ); Hamilton, J.A.; Butbul, E.; Gutman, A. ); Moser, A. ); Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.; Olivecrona, T. ); Carpentier, Y.A. )

    1990-02-06

    To explore how enzyme affinities and enzyme activities regulate hydrolysis of water-insoluble substrates, the authors compared hydrolysis of phospholipid-stabilized emulsions of medium-chain (MCT) versus long-chain triacylglycerols (LCT). Because substrate solubility at the emulsion surface might modulate rates of hydrolysis, the ability of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine to solubilize MCT was examined by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shift measurements showed that 11 mol % of ({sup 13}C)carbonyl enriched trioctanoin was incorporated into phospholipid vesicles as a surface component. Line widths of trioctanoin surface peaks were half that of LCT, and relaxation times, T{sub 1}, were also shorter for trioctanoin, showing greater mobility for MCT in phospholipid. In assessing the effects of these differences in solubility on lipolysis, they found that both purified bovine milk lipoprotein lipase and human hepatic lipase hydrolyzed MCT at rates at least 2-fold higher than for LCT. Differences in affinity were also demonstrated in mixed incubations where increasing amounts of LCT emulsion resulted in decreased hydrolysis of MCT emulsions. These results suggest that despite lower enzyme affinity for MCT emulsions, shorter chain triacylglycerols are more readily hydrolyzed by lipoprotein and hepatic lipases than long-chain triacylglycerols because of greater MCT solubility and mobility at the emulsion-water interface.

  12. Apolipoprotein E enhances hepatic lipase-mediated hydrolysis of reconstituted high-density lipoprotein phospholipid and triacylglycerol in an isoform-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hime, Neil J; Drew, Kate J; Hahn, Chris; Barter, Philip J; Rye, Kerry-Anne

    2004-09-28

    This study compares the kinetics of hepatic lipase (HL)-mediated phospholipid and triacylglycerol hydrolysis in spherical, reconstituted high-density lipoproteins (rHDL) that contain either apolipoprotein E2 (apoE2), apoE3, apoE4, or apoA-I as the sole apolipoprotein. HL-mediated phospholipid hydrolysis was assessed by incubating various concentrations of rHDL that contained only cholesteryl esters (CE) in their core, (E2/CE)rHDL, (E3/CE)rHDL, (E4/CE)rHDL, and (A-I/CE)rHDL, with a constant amount of HL. The rate of phospholipid hydrolysis was determined as the formation of nonesterified fatty acid mass. HL-mediated triacylglycerol hydrolysis was assessed in rHDL containing CE, unlabeled triacylglycerol, and [(3)H]triacylglycerol in their core, (E2/TG)rHDL, (E3/TG)rHDL, (E4/TG)rHDL, and (A-I/TG)rHDL. Triacylglycerol hydrolysis was determined as the ratio of (3)H-labeled hydrolysis products to (3)H-labeled unhydrolyzed triacylglycerol. The rates of phospholipid hydrolysis in the (E2/CE)rHDL, (E3/CE)rHDL, and (E4/CE)rHDL were significantly greater than that in the (A-I/CE)rHDL. The rates of triacylglycerol hydrolysis were also greater in the (E2/TG)rHDL, (E3/TG)rHDL, and (E4/TG)rHDL compared to the (A-I/TG)rHDL, although to a lesser degree than observed with phospholipid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the rates of both phospholipid and triacylglycerol hydrolyses were greater in the (E2)rHDL than in either the (E3)rHDL or the (E4)rHDL. These results show that apoE increases the rate of HL-mediated phospholipid and triacylglycerol hydrolysis in rHDL and that this influence is isoform dependent.

  13. ApoAV reduces plasma triglycerides by inhibiting very low density lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) production and stimulating lipoprotein lipase-mediated VLDL-TG hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Schaap, Frank G; Rensen, Patrick C N; Voshol, Peter J; Vrins, Carlos; van der Vliet, Hendrik N; Chamuleau, Robert A F M; Havekes, Louis M; Groen, Albert K; van Dijk, Ko Willems

    2004-07-01

    ApoAV has been discovered recently as a novel modifier of triglyceride (TG) metabolism, but the pathways involved are currently unknown. To gain insight into the function of apoAV, adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of murine apoa5 to C57Bl/6 mice was employed. The injection of low doses of Ad-apoa5 (1-5 x 10(8) plaqueforming units/mouse) dose-dependently reduced plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG levels. First, we evaluated whether a reduced hepatic VLDL production contributed to the TG-lowering effect. Ad-apoa5 treatment dose-dependently diminished (29-37%) the VLDL-TG production rate without affecting VLDL particle production, suggesting that apoAV impairs the lipidation of apoB. Second, Ad-apoa5 treatment dose-dependently reduced (68-88%) the postprandial hypertriglyceridemia following an intragastric fat load, suggesting that apoAV also stimulates the lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-dependent clearance of TG-rich lipoproteins. Indeed, recombinant apoAV was found to dose-dependently stimulate LPL activity up to 2.3-fold in vitro. Accordingly, intravenously injected VLDL-like TG-rich emulsions were cleared at an accelerated rate concomitant with the increased uptake of emulsion TG-derived fatty acids by skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue in Ad-apoa5-treated mice. From these data, we conclude that apoAV is a potent stimulator of LPL activity. Thus, apoAV lowers plasma TG by both reducing the hepatic VLDL-TG production rate and by enhancing the lipolytic conversion of TG-rich lipoproteins.

  14. Hydrolysis of bovine and caprine milk fat globules by lipoprotein lipase. Effects of heparin and skim milk on lipase distribution and on lipolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sundheim, G.; Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.

    1987-12-01

    Heparin can dissociate lipoprotein lipase from casein micelles, and addition of heparin enhances lipolysis in bovine but not in caprine milk. Heparin shortened the lag-time for binding of lipoprotein lipase to milk fat globules and for lipolysis. Heparin counteracted the inhibitory effects of skim milk on binding of lipase and on lipolysis. Heparin stimulated lipolysis in all bovine milk samples when added before cooling and in spontaneously lipolytic milk samples also when added after cooling. Heparin enhanced lipolysis of isolated milk fat globules. Hence, its effect is not solely due to dissociation of lipoprotein lipase from the casein micelles. Cooling of goat milk caused more marked changes in the distribution of lipase than cooling of bovine milk; the fraction of added /sup 125/I-labeled lipase that bound to cream increased from about 8 to 60%. In addition, caprine skim milk caused less inhibition of lipolysis than bovine skim milk. These observations provide an explanation for the high degree of cold storage lipolysis in goat milk. Heparin had only small effects on the distribution of lipoprotein lipase in caprine milk, which explains why heparin has so little effect on lipolysis in caprine milk. The distribution of /sup 35/S-labeled heparin in bovine milk was studied. In warm milk less than 10% bound to the cream fraction, but when milk was cooled, binding of heparin to cream increased to 45%. These results suggest that there exists in the skim fraction a relatively small amount of a heparin-binding protein, which on cooling of milk adsorbs to the milk fat, or suggests that cooling induces a conformational change in a membrane protein such that its affinity for heparin increases.

  15. Lipoprotein electrostatic properties regulate hepatic lipase association and activity.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Jonathan G; Nguyen, Trang; Sparks, Daniel L

    2007-12-01

    The effect of lipoprotein electrostatic properties on the catalytic regulation of hepatic lipase (HL) was investigated. Enrichment of serum or very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) with oleic acid increased lipoprotein negative charge and stimulated lipid hydrolysis by HL. Similarly, enrichment of serum or isolated lipoproteins with the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidic acid, or phosphatidylserine also increased lipoprotein negative charge and stimulated hydrolysis by HL. Anionic lipids had a small effect on phospholipid hydrolysis, but significantly stimulated triacylglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. High density lipoprotein (HDL) charge appears to have a specific effect on lipolysis. Enrichment of HDL with PI significantly stimulated VLDL-TG hydrolysis by HL. To determine whether HDL charge affects the association of HL with HDL and VLDL, HL-lipoprotein interactions were probed immunochemically. Under normal circumstances, HL associates with HDL particles, and only small amounts bind to VLDL. PI enrichment of HDL blocked the binding of HL with HDL. These data indicate that increasing the negative charge of HDL stimulates VLDL-TG hydrolysis by reducing the association of HL with HDL. Therefore, HDL controls the hydrolysis of VLDL by affecting the interlipoprotein association of HL. Lipoprotein electrostatic properties regulate lipase association and are an important regulator of the binding and activity of lipolytic enzymes.

  16. [Lipoprotein lipase and diabetic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Yu; Yin, Wei-Dong; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-02-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins into free fatty acids (FFA) to provide energy for cardiac tissue. During diabetes, cardiac energy supply is insufficient due to defected utilization of glucose. As a compensation of cardiac energy supply, FFAs are released through the hydrolysis of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and chylomicrons (CM) due to activation of LPL activity. In diabetic patients, activated LPL activity and elevated FFAs result in the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species and lipids in myocardium and potentially induce the diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). The present review summarizes the regulatory mechanisms of myocardial LPL and the pathogenesis of DCM induced by LPL and provides novel therapeutic targets and pathways for DCM. PMID:24873138

  17. The pathophysiology of intestinal lipoprotein production

    PubMed Central

    Giammanco, Antonina; Cefalù, Angelo B.; Noto, Davide; Averna, Maurizio R.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal lipoprotein production is a multistep process, essential for the absorption of dietary fats and fat-soluble vitamins. Chylomicron assembly begins in the endoplasmic reticulum with the formation of primordial, phospholipids-rich particles that are then transported to the Golgi for secretion. Several classes of transporters play a role in the selective uptake and/or export of lipids through the villus enterocytes. Once secreted in the lymph stream, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are metabolized by Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of triacylglycerols of very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs) and chylomicrons, thereby delivering free fatty acids to various tissues. Genetic mutations in the genes codifying for these proteins are responsible of different inherited disorders affecting chylomicron metabolism. This review focuses on the molecular pathways that modulate the uptake and the transport of lipoproteins of intestinal origin and it will highlight recent findings on TRLs assembly. PMID:25852563

  18. Release of endothelial cell lipoprotein lipase by plasma lipoproteins and free fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, U.; Witte, L.D.; Goldberg, I.J.

    1989-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) bound to the lumenal surface of vascular endothelial cells is responsible for the hydrolysis of triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins. Studies were performed to investigate whether human plasma lipoproteins and/or free fatty acids would release LPL which was bound to endothelial cells. Purified bovine milk LPL was incubated with cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells resulting in the association of enzyme activity with the cells. When the cells were then incubated with media containing chylomicrons or very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), a concentration-dependent decrease in the cell-associated LPL enzymatic activity was observed. In contrast, incubation with media containing low density lipoproteins or high density lipoproteins produced a much smaller decrease in the cell-associated enzymatic activity. The addition of increasing molar ratios of oleic acid:bovine serum albumin to the media also reduced enzyme activity associated with the endothelial cells. To determine whether the decrease in LPL activity was due to release of the enzyme from the cells or inactivation of the enzyme, studies were performed utilizing radioiodinated bovine LPL. Radiolabeled LPL protein was released from endothelial cells by chylomicrons, VLDL, and by free fatty acids (i.e. oleic acid bound to bovine serum albumin). The release of radiolabeled LPL by VLDL correlated with the generation of free fatty acids from the hydrolysis of VLDL triglyceride by LPL bound to the cells. Inhibition of LPL enzymatic activity by use of a specific monoclonal antibody, reduced the extent of release of /sup 125/I-LPL from the endothelial cells by the added VLDL. These results demonstrated that LPL enzymatic activity and protein were removed from endothelial cells by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons and VLDL) and oleic acid.

  19. Lipoprotein sorting in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytoplasm and processed into mature forms on the cytoplasmic membrane. A lipid moiety attached to the N terminus anchors these proteins to the membrane surface. Many bacteria are predicted to express more than 100 lipoproteins, which play diverse functions on the cell surface. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes the localization of Escherichia coli lipoproteins to the outer membrane. Some lipoproteins play vital roles in the sorting of other lipoproteins, lipopolysaccharides, and β-barrel proteins to the outer membrane. On the basis of results from biochemical, genetic, and structural studies, we discuss the biogenesis of lipoproteins in bacteria, their importance in cellular functions, and the molecular mechanisms underlying efficient sorting of hydrophobic lipoproteins to the outer membrane through the hydrophilic periplasm. PMID:21663440

  20. Lipoproteins and lipoprotein metabolism in periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Rachel; Barbour, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that the incidence of atherosclerosis is increased in subjects with periodontitis – a chronic infection of the oral cavity. This article summarizes the evidence that suggests periodontitis shifts the lipoprotein profile to be more proatherogenic. LDL-C is elevated in periodontitis and most studies indicate that triglyceride levels are also increased. By contrast, antiatherogenic HDL tends to be low in periodontitis. Periodontal therapy tends to shift lipoprotein levels to a healthier profile and also reduces subclinical indices of atherosclerosis. In summary, periodontal disease alters lipoprotein metabolism in ways that could promote atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:20835400

  1. Lipolytic degradation of human very low density lipoproteins by human milk lipoprotein lipase: the identification of lipoprotein B as the main lipoprotein degradation product.

    PubMed

    Alaupovic, P; Wang, C S; McConathy, W J; Weiser, D; Downs, D

    1986-01-01

    Although the direct conversion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) into low density (LDL) and high density (HDL) lipoproteins only requires lipoprotein lipase (LPL) as a catalyst and albumin as the fatty acid acceptor, the in vitro-formed LDL and HDL differ chemically from their native counterparts. To investigate the reason(s) for these differences, VLDL were treated with human milk LPL in the presence of albumin, and the LPL-generated LDL1-, LDL2-, and HDL-like particles were characterized by lipid and apolipoprotein composition. Results showed that the removal of apolipoproteins B, C, and E from VLDL was proportional to the degree of triglyceride hydrolysis with LDL2 particles as the major and LDL1 and HDL + VHDL particles as the minor products of a complete in vitro lipolysis of VLDL. In comparison with native counterparts, the in vitro-formed LDL2 and HDL + VHDL were characterized by lower levels of triglyceride and cholesterol ester and higher levels of free cholesterol and lipid phosphorus. The characterization of lipoprotein particles present in the in vitro-produced LDL2 showed that, as in plasma LDL2, lipoprotein B (LP-B) was the major apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein accounting for over 90% of the total apolipoprotein B. Other, minor species of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins included LP-B:C-I:E and LP-B:C-I:C-II:C-III. The lipid composition of in vitro-formed LP-B closely resembled that of plasma LP-B. The major parts of apolipoproteins C and E present in VLDL were released to HDL + VHDL as simple, cholesterol/phospholipid-rich lipoproteins including LP-C-I, LP-C-II, LP-C-III, and LP-E. However, some of these same simple lipoprotein particles were present after ultracentrifugation in the LDL2 density segment because of their hydrated density and/or because they formed, in the absence of naturally occurring acceptors (LP-A-I:A-II), weak associations with LP-B. Thus, the presence of varying amounts of these cholesterol

  2. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content. PMID:26193433

  3. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content.

  4. Enzymes involved in triglyceride hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Taskinen, M R; Kuusi, T

    1987-08-01

    The lipolytic enzymes LPL and HL play important roles in the metabolism of lipoproteins and participate in lipoprotein interconversions. LPL was originally recognized to be the key enzyme in the hydrolysis of chylomicrons and triglyceride, but it also turned out to be one determinant of HDL concentration in plasma. When LPL activity is high, chylomicrons and VLDL are rapidly removed from circulation and a concomitant rise of the HDL2 occurs. In contrast, low LPL activity impedes the removal of triglyceride-rich particles, resulting in the elevation of serum triglycerides and a decrease of HDL (HDL2). Concordant changes of this kind in LPL and HDL2 are induced by many physiological and pathological perturbations. Finally, the operation of LPL is also essential for the conversion of VLDL to LDL. This apparently clear-cut role of LPL in lipoprotein interconversions is contrasted with the enigmatic actions of HL. The enzyme was originally thought to participate in the catalyses of chylomicron and VLDL remnants generated in the LPL reaction. However, substantial in vitro and in vivo data indicate that HL is a key enzyme in the degradation of plasma HDL (HDL2) in a manner which opposes LPL. A scheme is presented for the complementary actions of the two enzymes in plasma HDL metabolism. In addition, recent studies have attributed a role to HL in the catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, particularly those containing apo E. However, this function becomes clinically important only under conditions where the capacity of the LPL-mediated removal system is exceeded. Such a situation may arise when the input of triglyceride-rich particles (chylomicrons and/or VLDL) is excessive or LPL activity is decreased or absent.

  5. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and white-colored blood vessels in the retinas Pancreatitis that keeps returning Yellowing of the eyes and ... discuss your diet needs with a registered dietitian. Pancreatitis that is related to lipoprotein lipase deficiency responds ...

  6. The role of ANGPTL3 in controlling lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tikka, Anna; Jauhiainen, Matti

    2016-05-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) is a secretory protein regulating plasma lipid levels via affecting lipoprotein lipase- and endothelial lipase-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides and phospholipids. ANGPTL3-deficiency due to loss-of-function mutations in the ANGPTL3 gene causes familial combined hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL2, OMIM # 605019), a phenotype characterized by low concentration of all major lipoprotein classes in circulation. ANGPTL3 is therefore a potential therapeutic target to treat combined hyperlipidemia, a major risk factor for atherosclerotic coronary heart disease. This review focuses on the mechanisms behind ANGPTL3-deficiency induced FHBL2. PMID:26754661

  7. Inhibition of endothelial lipase activity by sphingomyelin in the lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Belikova, Natalia A; Billheimer, Jeff; Rader, Daniel J; Hill, John S; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a major determinant of plasma HDL concentration, its activity being inversely proportional to HDL levels. Although it is known that it preferentially acts on HDL compared to LDL and VLDL, the basis for this specificity is not known. Here we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin, a major phospholipid in lipoproteins is a physiological inhibitor of EL, and that the preference of the enzyme for HDL may be due to low sphingomyelin/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) ratio in HDL, compared to other lipoproteins. Using recombinant human EL, we showed that sphingomyelin inhibits the hydrolysis of PtdCho in the liposomes in a concentration-dependent manner. While the enzyme showed lower hydrolysis of LDL PtdCho, compared to HDL PtdCho, this difference disappeared after the degradation of lipoprotein sphingomyelin by bacterial sphingomyelinase. Analysis of molecular species of PtdCho hydrolyzed by EL in the lipoproteins showed that the enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed PtdCho containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as 22:6, 20:5, 20:4 at the sn-2 position, generating the corresponding PUFA-lyso PtdCho. This specificity for PUFA-PtdCho species was not observed after depletion of sphingomyelin by sphingomyelinase. These results show that sphingomyelin not only plays a role in regulating EL activity, but also influences its specificity towards PtdCho species. PMID:25167836

  8. Hepatic Lipase: a Comprehensive View of its Role on Plasma Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Junji; Miyashita, Kazuya; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Mabuchi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is a key enzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) and phospholipids (PLs) in several lipoproteins. It is generally recognized that HL is involved in the remodeling of remnant, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and the production of small, dense low-density lipoproteins (sd-LDLs).On the other hand, it is unclear whether HL accelerates or retards atherosclerosis. From the clinical point of view, HL deficiency may provide useful information on answering this question, but the rarity of this disease makes it impossible to conduct epidemiological study.In this review, we describe a comprehensive and updated view of the clinical significance of HL on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:26194979

  9. The hydrolysis of polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoagland, P. D.; Fox, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal polymerization of aspartic acid produces a polysuccinimide (I), a chain of aspartoyl residues. An investigation was made of the alkaline hydrolysis of the imide rings of (I) which converts the polyimide to a polypeptide. The alkaline hydrolysis of polyimides can be expected to be kinetically complex due to increasing negative charge generated by carboxylate groups. For this reason, a diimide, phthaloyl-DL-aspartoyl-beta-alanine (IIA) was synthesized for a progressive study of the hydrolysis of polyimides. In addition, this diimide (IIA) can be related to thalidomide and might be expected to exhibit similar reactivity during hydrolysis of the phthalimide ring.

  10. Role of Brown Fat in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hoeke, Geerte; Kooijman, Sander; Boon, Mariëtte R; Rensen, Patrick C N; Berbée, Jimmy F P

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, for which hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society, and new therapeutic strategies are highly warranted. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is metabolically active in human adults. Although positron emission tomography-computed tomography using a glucose tracer is the golden standard to visualize and quantify the volume and activity of BAT, it has become clear that activated BAT combusts fatty acids rather than glucose. Here, we review the role of brown and beige adipocytes in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis, with evidence derived from both animal and human studies. On the basis of mainly data from animal models, we propose a model in which activated brown adipocytes use their intracellular triglyceride stores to generate fatty acids for combustion. BAT rapidly replenishes these stores by internalizing primarily lipoprotein triglyceride-derived fatty acids, generated by lipoprotein lipase-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides, rather than by holoparticle uptake. As a consequence, BAT activation leads to the generation of lipoprotein remnants that are subsequently cleared via the liver provided that an intact apoE-low-density lipoprotein receptor pathway is present. Through these mechanisms, BAT activation reduces plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels and attenuates diet-induced atherosclerosis development. Initial studies suggest that BAT activation in humans may also reduce triglyceride and cholesterol levels, but potential antiatherogenic effects should be assessed in future studies.

  11. Role of Brown Fat in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hoeke, Geerte; Kooijman, Sander; Boon, Mariëtte R; Rensen, Patrick C N; Berbée, Jimmy F P

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, for which hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society, and new therapeutic strategies are highly warranted. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is metabolically active in human adults. Although positron emission tomography-computed tomography using a glucose tracer is the golden standard to visualize and quantify the volume and activity of BAT, it has become clear that activated BAT combusts fatty acids rather than glucose. Here, we review the role of brown and beige adipocytes in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis, with evidence derived from both animal and human studies. On the basis of mainly data from animal models, we propose a model in which activated brown adipocytes use their intracellular triglyceride stores to generate fatty acids for combustion. BAT rapidly replenishes these stores by internalizing primarily lipoprotein triglyceride-derived fatty acids, generated by lipoprotein lipase-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides, rather than by holoparticle uptake. As a consequence, BAT activation leads to the generation of lipoprotein remnants that are subsequently cleared via the liver provided that an intact apoE-low-density lipoprotein receptor pathway is present. Through these mechanisms, BAT activation reduces plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels and attenuates diet-induced atherosclerosis development. Initial studies suggest that BAT activation in humans may also reduce triglyceride and cholesterol levels, but potential antiatherogenic effects should be assessed in future studies. PMID:26837747

  12. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    DOEpatents

    Cubicciotti, Roger S.; Karu, Alexander E.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  13. Lipoprotein lipase variants interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to modulate obesity traits in Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a candidate gene for obesity based on its role in triglyceride hydrolysis and the partitioning of fatty acids towards storage or oxidation. Whether dietary fatty acids modify LPL associated obesity risk is unknown. We examined five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (...

  14. Specificity and localisation of lipoprotein lipase in the flight muscles of Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, C H; Goldsworthy, G J

    1985-12-01

    Using natural lipoproteins as substrates, lipase activity has been measured in leg muscle, fat body, midgut and flight muscles of Locusta migratoria. The enzymic activity in the flight muscles is higher than in those other tissues tested, confirming the potential of the flight muscles to utilise lipids at high rates. In addition, a membrane-bound lipoprotein lipase can be extracted from flight muscle. The flight muscle enzyme activity shows a marked substrate specificity; at lipoprotein concentrations equivalent to those found normally in flown or resting locusts respectively, the enzyme hydrolyses diacylglycerols associated with lipoprotein A+ (present in the haemolymph of flown or adipokinetic hormone-injected locusts) at about 4 times the rate of those associated with lipoprotein Ayellow (which is the major lipoprotein in resting locusts). In addition, the hydrolysis of lipids carried by lipoprotein Ayellow is dramatically reduced in the presence of lipoprotein A+. These observations indicate that the enzyme plays a specific role in the uptake of lipids at the flight muscles to ensure a smooth transition from carbohydrate to lipid based metabolism during flight. PMID:4091966

  15. Lipoprotein metabolism indicators improve cardiovascular risk prediction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease risk increases when lipoprotein metabolism is dysfunctional. We have developed a computational model able to derive indicators of lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes from a single lipoprotein profile measurement. This is the first study to inves...

  16. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  17. Lipoprotein (a) and stroke

    PubMed Central

    Milionis, H.; Winder, A.; Mikhailidis, D.

    2000-01-01

    Strokes are one of the most common causes of mortality and long term severe disability. There is evidence that lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) is a predictor of many forms of vascular disease, including premature coronary artery disease. Several studies have also evaluated the association between Lp(a) and ischaemic (thrombotic) stroke. Several cross sectional (and a few prospective) studies provide contradictory findings regarding Lp(a) as a predictor of ischaemic stroke. Several factors might contribute to the existing confusion—for example, small sample sizes, different ethnic groups, the influence of oestrogens in women participating in the studies, plasma storage before Lp(a) determination, statistical errors, and selection bias. This review focuses on the Lp(a) related mechanisms that might contribute to the pathogenesis of ischaemic stroke. The association between Lp(a) and other cardiovascular risk factors is discussed. Therapeutic interventions that can lower the circulating concentrations of Lp(a) and thus possibly reduce the risk of stroke are also considered. Key Words: atherothrombosis • fibrinogen • homocysteine • lipids • lipoprotein a • stroke PMID:10961170

  18. Central Nervous System Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahley, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ApoE on high-density lipoproteins is primarily responsible for lipid transport and cholesterol homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS). Normally produced mostly by astrocytes, apoE is also produced under neuropathologic conditions by neurons. ApoE on high-density lipoproteins is critical in redistributing cholesterol and phospholipids for membrane repair and remodeling. The 3 main structural isoforms differ in their effectiveness. Unlike apoE2 and apoE3, apoE4 has markedly altered CNS metabolism, is associated with Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, and is expressed at lower levels in brain and cerebrospinal fluid. ApoE4-expressing cultured astrocytes and neurons have reduced cholesterol and phospholipid secretion, decreased lipid-binding capacity, and increased intracellular degradation. Two structural features are responsible for apoE4 dysfunction: domain interaction, in which arginine-61 interacts ionically with glutamic acid-255, and a less stable conformation than apoE3 and apoE2. Blocking domain interaction by gene targeting (replacing arginine-61 with threonine) or by small-molecule structure correctors increases CNS apoE4 levels and lipid-binding capacity and decreases intracellular degradation. Small molecules (drugs) that disrupt domain interaction, so-called structure correctors, could prevent the apoE4-associated neuropathology by blocking the formation of neurotoxic fragments. Understanding how to modulate CNS cholesterol transport and metabolism is providing important insights into CNS health and disease. PMID:27174096

  19. Atherosclerosis, diabetes and lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2010-07-01

    The enormous burden of vascular disease is likely to expand rapidly as sedentary obesity and diabetes increase. Although cholesterol plays a major role in atherosclerosis and LDL is the major carrier of cholesterol in the blood, the importance of the postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the development of atherosclerosis is gaining recognition. The role of HDL-cholesterol is also receiving more attention. These changes have been forced upon us by the realization that statins, which primarily lower LDL-cholesterol, only reduce the risk of atherosclerosis by 30%, suggesting that 70% of the risk still has to be explained and treated. In diabetes, abnormality in the metabolism of the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and the inter-relationship with HDL-cholesterol appears to be of primary importance in atherosclerotic risk. Postprandial studies are difficult to carry out, which is one reason why large studies have not so far been performed. The important new findings in chylomicron metabolism suggest new treatments for the future.

  20. A framework for lipoprotein ontology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meifania; Hadzic, Maja

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have established a significant correlation between abnormal plasma lipoprotein levels and cardiovascular disease, which remains the leading cause of mortality in the world today. In addition, lipoprotein dysregulation, known as dyslipidemia, is a central feature in disease states, such as diabetes and hypertension, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. While a corpus of literature exists on different areas of lipoprotein research, one of the major challenges that researchers face is the difficulties in accessing and integrating relevant information amidst massive quantities of heterogeneous data. Semantic web technologies, specifically ontologies, target these problems by providing an organizational framework of the concepts involved in a system of related instances to support systematic querying of information. In this paper, we identify issues within the lipoprotein research domain and present a preliminary framework for Lipoprotein Ontology, which consists of five specific areas of lipoprotein research: Classification, Metabolism, Pathophysiology, Etiology, and Treatment. By integrating specific aspects of lipoprotein research, Lipoprotein Ontology will provide the basis for the design of various applications to enable interoperability between research groups or software agents, as well as the development of tools for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia.

  1. Lipoprotein lipase activity is required for cardiac lipid droplet production.

    PubMed

    Trent, Chad M; Yu, Shuiqing; Hu, Yunying; Skoller, Nathan; Huggins, Lesley A; Homma, Shunichi; Goldberg, Ira J

    2014-04-01

    The rodent heart accumulates TGs and lipid droplets during fasting. The sources of heart lipids could be either FFAs liberated from adipose tissue or FAs from lipoprotein-associated TGs via the action of lipoprotein lipase (LpL). Because circulating levels of FFAs increase during fasting, it has been assumed that albumin transported FFAs are the source of lipids within heart lipid droplets. We studied mice with three genetic mutations: peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor α deficiency, cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) deficiency, and heart-specific LpL deletion. All three genetically altered groups of mice had defective accumulation of lipid droplet TGs. Moreover, hearts from mice treated with poloxamer 407, an inhibitor of lipoprotein TG lipolysis, also failed to accumulate TGs, despite increased uptake of FFAs. TG storage did not impair maximal cardiac function as measured by stress echocardiography. Thus, LpL hydrolysis of circulating lipoproteins is required for the accumulation of lipids in the heart of fasting mice.

  2. Lipoprotein lipase activity is required for cardiac lipid droplet production.

    PubMed

    Trent, Chad M; Yu, Shuiqing; Hu, Yunying; Skoller, Nathan; Huggins, Lesley A; Homma, Shunichi; Goldberg, Ira J

    2014-04-01

    The rodent heart accumulates TGs and lipid droplets during fasting. The sources of heart lipids could be either FFAs liberated from adipose tissue or FAs from lipoprotein-associated TGs via the action of lipoprotein lipase (LpL). Because circulating levels of FFAs increase during fasting, it has been assumed that albumin transported FFAs are the source of lipids within heart lipid droplets. We studied mice with three genetic mutations: peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor α deficiency, cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) deficiency, and heart-specific LpL deletion. All three genetically altered groups of mice had defective accumulation of lipid droplet TGs. Moreover, hearts from mice treated with poloxamer 407, an inhibitor of lipoprotein TG lipolysis, also failed to accumulate TGs, despite increased uptake of FFAs. TG storage did not impair maximal cardiac function as measured by stress echocardiography. Thus, LpL hydrolysis of circulating lipoproteins is required for the accumulation of lipids in the heart of fasting mice. PMID:24493834

  3. Lipoprotein (a), lipids, and lipoproteins in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S; Wållberg-Jonsson, S; Dahlén, G

    1991-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a), (Lp(a)), an independent atherogenic factor, was significantly increased in 93 patients with classical, seropositive rheumatoid arthritis of median disease activity. In the patients with Lp(a) concentrations above the upper reference value of 480 mg/l there was a significant correlation between Lp(a) and the concentration of orosomucoid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the platelet count. The plasma concentrations of cholesterol and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol in both male and female patients were significantly lower than in controls. Apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein AI in the patients correlated significantly with total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol respectively. PMID:1829348

  4. Phytosterols, Phytostanols, and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gylling, Helena; Simonen, Piia

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of phytosterols and phytostanols added to foods and food supplements to obtain significant non-pharmacologic serum and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol reduction is well documented. Irrespective of age, gender, ethnic background, body weight, background diet, or the cause of hypercholesterolemia and, even added to statin treatment, phytosterols and phytostanols at 2 g/day significantly lower LDL cholesterol concentration by 8%–10%. They do not affect the concentrations of high density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipoprotein (a) or serum proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. In some studies, phytosterols and phytostanols have modestly reduced serum triglyceride levels especially in subjects with slightly increased baseline concentrations. Phytosterols and phytostanols lower LDL cholesterol by displacing cholesterol from mixed micelles in the small intestine so that cholesterol absorption is partially inhibited. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis have been carefully evaluated during phytosterol and phytostanol supplementation. However, only a few lipoprotein kinetic studies have been performed, and they revealed that LDL apoprotein B-100 transport rate was reduced. LDL particle size was unchanged, but small dense LDL cholesterol concentration was reduced. In subjects with metabolic syndrome and moderate hypertriglyceridemia, phytostanols reduced not only non- high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration but also serum triglycerides by 27%, and reduced the large and medium size very low density lipoprotein particle concentrations. In the few postprandial studies, the postprandial lipoproteins were reduced, but detailed studies with apoprotein B-48 are lacking. In conclusion, more kinetic studies are required to obtain a more complete understanding of the fasting and postprandial lipoprotein metabolism caused by phytosterols and phytostanols. It seems obvious, however, that the most atherogenic lipoprotein particles will be

  5. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, John D.

    1986-01-01

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock, comprising passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feedstock to glucose; cooling said dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, then feeding said dilute acid stream serially through a plurality of prehydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose; and cooling the dilute acid stream containing glucose after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  6. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  7. Lipoprotein lipase release from BFC-1 beta adipocytes. Effects of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and lipolysis products.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, A; Goldberg, I J

    1992-07-25

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), synthesized by adipocytes and myocytes, must be transported to the luminal endothelial cell surface where it then interacts with circulating lipoproteins. The first step in this extracellular LPL transport pathway is LPL release from the surface of LPL-synthesizing cells. Because hydrolysis of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins releases LPL from the apical surface of endothelial cells, we hypothesized that the same substances dissociate LPL from adipocytes. 125I-LPL was bound to the surface of brown adipocytes (BFC-1 beta). LPL binding to the adipocyte surface was greater than to endothelial cell surfaces. Using low concentrations of heparin, more LPL was released from endothelial cells than BFC-1 beta, suggesting that the affinity of LPL binding to the adipocytes was greater than LPL affinity for endothelial cells. Greater than 3-fold more LPL was released from the cell surface when very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) were added to culture medium containing 3% bovine serum albumin. LPL remaining on the cell surface decreased with VLDL addition. Endogenously produced LPL activity was also released from the cells by VLDL. Low and high density lipoproteins did not release 125I-LPL or LPL activity from the adipocytes. To assess whether lipolysis was necessary for LPL release, BFC-1 beta were incubated with TG-rich lipoproteins from a patient with apoCII deficiency. The apoCII-deficient lipoproteins did not release LPL unless an exogenous source of apoCII was added. Apolipoproteins E and Cs and high molar ratios of oleic acid:bovine serum albumin did not release surface-associated LPL. Lysolecithin (25 and 100 microM), but not lecithin, monoglycerides, or diglycerides, released adipocyte surface LPL. Because lysolecithin also released LPL during a 4 degrees C incubation, cellular metabolic functions are not required for LPL dissociation from the cells. Lysolecithin also inhibited LPL binding to endothelial cells; however, this effect was

  8. Phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis and lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cole, Laura K; Vance, Jean E; Vance, Dennis E

    2012-05-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major phospholipid component of all plasma lipoprotein classes. PC is the only phospholipid which is currently known to be required for lipoprotein assembly and secretion. Impaired hepatic PC biosynthesis significantly reduces the levels of circulating very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs) and high density lipoproteins (HDLs). The reduction in plasma VLDLs is due in part to impaired hepatic secretion of VLDLs. Less PC within the hepatic secretory pathway results in nascent VLDL particles with reduced levels of PC. These particles are recognized as being defective and are degraded within the secretory system by an incompletely defined process that occurs in a post-endoplasmic reticulum compartment, consistent with degradation directed by the low-density lipoprotein receptor and/or autophagy. Moreover, VLDL particles are taken up more readily from the circulation when the PC content of the VLDLs is reduced, likely due to a preference of cell surface receptors and/or enzymes for lipoproteins that contain less PC. Impaired PC biosynthesis also reduces plasma HDLs by inhibiting hepatic HDL formation and by increasing HDL uptake from the circulation. These effects are mediated by elevated expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 and hepatic scavenger receptor class B type 1, respectively. Hepatic PC availability has recently been linked to the progression of liver and heart disease. These findings demonstrate that hepatic PC biosynthesis can regulate the amount of circulating lipoproteins and suggest that hepatic PC biosynthesis may represent an important pharmaceutical target. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Triglyceride Metabolism and Disease.

  9. Lipoproteins: When size really matters

    PubMed Central

    German, J. Bruce; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Zivkovic, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    The field of nanoscience is extending the applications of physics, chemistry and biology into previously unapproached infinitesimal length scales. Understanding the behavior and manipulating the positions and properties of single atoms and molecules hold great potential to improve areas of science as disparate as medicine and computation, and communication and orbiting satellites. Yet, in the race to develop novel, previously unavailable nanoparticles, there is an opportunity for scientists in this field to digress and to apply their growing understanding of nanoscience and the tools of nanotechnology to one of the most pressing problems in all of human biology—diseases related to lipoproteins. Although not appreciated outside the field of lipoprotein biology, variations in the compositions, structures and properties of these nanoscale-sized, blood-borne particles are responsible for most of the variations in health, morbidity and mortality in the Western world. If the lipoproteins could be understood at the nanometer length scale with precise details of their structures and functions, scientists could understand a wide range of perplexing physiological processes and also address the dysfunctions in normal lipoprotein biology that lead to such diseases as hypercholesterolemia, heart disease, stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, if the capabilities of nanoscience to assemble and manipulate nanometer-sized particles could be recruited to studies of lipoproteins, these biological particles would provide a new dimension to therapeutic agents, and these natural particles could be designed to carry out many specialized beneficial tasks. PMID:20592953

  10. Ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2007-08-21

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  11. Aerosol preparation of intact lipoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M; Blanche, Patricia J

    2012-01-17

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  12. Lipoprotein metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenghui Gordon; Robson, Simon C.; Yao, Zemin

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an escalating health problem worldwide, covers a spectrum of pathologies characterized by fatty accumulation in hepatocytes in early stages, with potential progression to liver inflammation, fibrosis, and failure. A close, yet poorly understood link exists between NAFLD and dyslipidemia, a constellation of abnormalities in plasma lipoproteins including triglyceride-rich very low density lipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are a group of primarily liver-derived proteins found in serum lipoproteins; they not only play an extracellular role in lipid transport between vital organs through circulation, but also play an important intracellular role in hepatic lipoprotein assembly and secretion. The liver functions as the central hub for lipoprotein metabolism, as it dictates lipoprotein production and to a significant extent modulates lipoprotein clearance. Lipoprotein metabolism is an integral component of hepatocellular lipid homeostasis and is implicated in the pathogenesis, potential diagnosis, and treatment of NAFLD. PMID:23554788

  13. Genetics Home Reference: familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue. This enzyme helps break down fats called triglycerides, which are carried by molecules called lipoproteins . Mutations ... which prevents the enzyme from effectively breaking down triglycerides. As a result, triglycerides attached to lipoproteins build ...

  14. Low levels of high density lipoproteins in Turks, a population with elevated hepatic lipase. High density lipoprotein characterization and gender-specific effects of apolipoprotein e genotype.

    PubMed

    Mahley, R W; Pépin, J; Palaoğlu, K E; Malloy, M J; Kane, J P; Bersot, T P

    2000-08-01

    Turks have strikingly low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (10-15 mg/dL lower than those of Americans or Western Europeans) associated with elevated hepatic lipase mass and activity. Here we report that Turks have low levels of high density lipoprotein subclass 2 (HDL(2)), apoA-I-containing lipoproteins (LpA-I), and pre-beta-1 HDL and increased levels of HDL(3) and LpA-I/A-II particles (potentially an atherogenic lipid profile). The frequency distributions of HDL-C and LpA-I levels were skewed toward bimodality in Turkish women but were unimodal in Turkish men. The apoE genotype affected HDL-C and LpA-I levels in women only. In women, but not men, the varepsilon2 allele was strikingly more prevalent in those with the highest levels of HDL-C and LpA-I than in those with the lowest levels. The higher prevalence of the epsilon2 allele in these subgroups of women was not explained by plasma triglyceride levels, total cholesterol levels, age, or body mass index. The modulating effects of apoE isoforms on lipolytic hydrolysis of HDL by hepatic lipase (apoE2 preventing efficient hydrolysis) or on lipoprotein receptor binding (apoE2 interacting poorly with the low density lipoprotein receptors) may account for differences in HDL-C levels in Turkish women (the epsilon2 allele being associated with higher HDL levels). In Turkish men, who have substantially higher levels of hepatic lipase activity than women, the modulating effect of apoE may be overwhelmed. The gender-specific impact of the apoE genotype on HDL-C and LpA-I levels in association with elevated levels of hepatic lipase provides new insights into the metabolism of HDL.

  15. Thermal stability of human plasma electronegative low-density lipoprotein: A paradoxical behavior of low-density lipoprotein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rull, Anna; Jayaraman, Shobini; Gantz, Donald L; Rivas-Urbina, Andrea; Pérez-Cuellar, Montserrat; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Sánchez-Quesada, Jose Luis; Gursky, Olga

    2016-09-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) aggregation is central in triggering atherogenesis. A minor fraction of electronegative plasma LDL, termed LDL(-), plays a special role in atherogenesis. To better understand this role, we analyzed the kinetics of aggregation, fusion and disintegration of human LDL and its fractions, LDL(+) and LDL(-). Thermal denaturation of LDL was monitored by spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Initially, LDL(-) aggregated and fused faster than LDL(+), but later the order reversed. Most LDL(+) disintegrated and precipitated upon prolonged heating. In contrast, LDL(-) partially retained lipoprotein morphology and formed soluble aggregates. Biochemical analysis of all fractions showed no significant degradation of major lipids, mild phospholipid oxidation, and an increase in non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) upon thermal denaturation. The main baseline difference between LDL subfractions was higher content of NEFA in LDL(-). Since NEFA promote lipoprotein fusion, increased NEFA content can explain rapid initial aggregation and fusion of LDL(-) but not its resistance to extensive disintegration. Partial hydrolysis of apoB upon heating was similar in LDL subfractions, suggesting that minor proteins importantly modulate LDL disintegration. Unlike LDL(+), LDL(-) contains small amounts of apoA-I and apoJ. Addition of exogenous apoA-I to LDL(+) hampered lipoprotein aggregation, fusion and precipitation, while depletion of endogenous apoJ had an opposite effect. Therefore, the initial rapid aggregation of LDL(-) is apparently counterbalanced by the stabilizing effects of minor proteins such as apoA-I and apoJ. These results help identify key determinants for LDL aggregation, fusion and coalescence into lipid droplets in vivo. PMID:27233433

  16. Revisiting the gram-negative lipoprotein paradigm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The processing of lipoproteins (lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered to be an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein n-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted...

  17. Role of low-density lipoprotein apheresis.

    PubMed

    Ziajka, Paul

    2005-08-22

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis has been shown to reduce plasma levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and lipoprotein(a). In addition to these lipoprotein changes, LDL apheresis induces atherosclerosis regression, improves myocardial perfusion and endothelial function, and may reduce cardiovascular event rates. PMID:16098847

  18. Hydrolysis of biomass material

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Orth, Rick J.; Franz, James A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail

    2004-02-17

    A method for selective hydrolysis of the hemicellulose component of a biomass material. The selective hydrolysis produces water-soluble small molecules, particularly monosaccharides. One embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A second embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently enzymatically hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A third embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose by heating the biomass material to greater than 110.degree. C. resulting in an aqueous portion that includes the solubilized hemicellulose and a water insoluble solids portion and subsequently separating the aqueous portion from the water insoluble solids portion. A fourth embodiment is a method for making a composition that includes cellulose, at least one protein and less than about 30 weight % hemicellulose, the method including solubilizing at least a portion of hemicellulose present in a biomass material that also includes cellulose and at least one protein and subsequently separating the solubilized hemicellulose from the cellulose and at least one protein.

  19. [Lipoprotein receptors. Old acquaintances and newcomers].

    PubMed

    Ducobu, J

    1997-02-01

    Lipoprotein receptors are plasma membrane proteins of high affinity which interact with circulating lipoprotein particles. The well characterized LDL receptor continues to be analysed and some new findings on its intracellular mechanisms of action have emerged. New lipoprotein receptors have recently been described: the chylomicron remnant receptor or LDL-related protein (LRP), the lipolysis stimulated receptor (LSR), the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), the HDL receptor (HDLR) and the scavenger receptor (SR). The molecular details of the receptors will facilitate the development of new therapeutic means to improve receptor-mediated clearance of lipoproteins.

  20. Effects of hormones on lipids and lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.

    1991-12-01

    Levels of plasma lipids and lipoproteins are strong predictors for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. In women, as in men, numerous factors contribute to variations in plasma lipoproteins that may affect cardiovascular disease risk. These include age, dietary components, adiposity, genetic traits, and hormonal changes. Each of these factors may operate to varying degrees in determining changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles accompanying menopause- Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested increases in levels of cholesterol, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins associated with menopause. High density lipoproteins (HDL), which are higher in women than men and are thought to contribute to relative protection of premenopausal women from cardiovascular disease, remain relatively constant in the years following menopause, although small, and perhaps transient reductions in the HDL{sub 2} subfraction have been reported in relation to reduced estradiol level following menopause. Despite these associations, it has been difficult to determine the role of endogenous hormones in influencing the plasma lipoproteins of postmenopausal women. In principle, the effects of hormone replacement should act to reverse any alterations in lipoprotein metabolism that are due to postmenopausal hormone changes. While there may be beneficial effects on lipoproteins, hormone treatment does not restore a premenopausal lipoprotein profile. Furthermore, it is not dear to what extent exogenous hormone-induced lipoprotein changes contribute to the reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy.

  1. Biogenesis and Membrane Targeting of Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins, which are anchored to membranes through triacyl chains attached to the amino-terminal cysteine. They are involved in various functions localized in cell envelope. Escherichia coli possesses more than 90 species of lipoproteins, most of which are localized in the outer membrane, with others being in the inner membrane. All lipoproteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm with an N-terminal signal peptide, translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, and converted to mature lipoproteins through sequential reactions catalyzed by three lipoprotein-processing enzymes: Lgt, LspA, and Lnt. The sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane requires a system comprising five Lol proteins. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, LolCDE, initiates the sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane. Formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is coupled to this LolCDE-dependent release reaction. LolA accommodates the amino-terminal acyl chain of lipoproteins in its hydrophobic cavity, thereby generating a hydrophilic complex that can traverse the periplasmic space by diffusion. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB on the outer membrane and anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane by the action of LolB. In contrast, since LolCDE does not recognize lipoproteins possessing Asp at position +2, these lipoproteins remain anchored to the inner membrane. Genes for Lol proteins are widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, and Lol-mediated outer membrane targeting of lipoproteins is considered to be the general lipoprotein localization mechanism. PMID:26443779

  2. Metabolism of lipoproteins by human fetal hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, B.R.

    1987-12-01

    The rate of clearance of lipoproteins from plasma appears to play a role in the development of atherogenesis. The liver may account for as much as two thirds of the removal of low-density lipoprotein and one third of the clearance of high-density lipoprotein in certain animal species and humans, mainly by receptor-mediated pathways. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if human fetal hepatocytes maintained in vitro take up and degrade lipoproteins. We first determined that the maximal binding capacity of iodine 125-iodo-LDL was approximately 300 ng of low-density lipoprotein protein/mg of membrane protein and an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 60 micrograms low-density lipoprotein protein/ml in membranes prepared from human fetal liver. We found that the maximal uptake of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL by fetal hepatocytes occurred after 12 hours of incubation. Low-density lipoprotein uptake preceded the appearance of degradation products by 4 hours, and thereafter the degradation of low-density lipoprotein increased linearly for at least 24 hours. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein was not degraded to any extent by fetal hepatocytes. (/sup 125/I)Iodo-LDL uptake and degradation were inhibited more than 75% by preincubation with low-density lipoprotein but not significantly by high-density lipoprotein, whereas (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL uptake was inhibited 70% by preincubation with high-density lipoprotein but not by low-density lipoprotein. In summary, human fetal hepatocytes take up and degrade low-density lipoprotein by a receptor-mediated process similar to that described for human extrahepatic tissues.

  3. Biogenesis and Membrane Targeting of Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins, which are anchored to membranes through triacyl chains attached to the amino-terminal cysteine. They are involved in various functions localized in cell envelope. Escherichia coli possesses more than 90 species of lipoproteins, most of which are localized in the outer membrane, with others being in the inner membrane. All lipoproteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm with an N-terminal signal peptide, translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, and converted to mature lipoproteins through sequential reactions catalyzed by three lipoprotein-processing enzymes: Lgt, LspA, and Lnt. The sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane requires a system comprising five Lol proteins. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, LolCDE, initiates the sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane. Formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is coupled to this LolCDE-dependent release reaction. LolA accommodates the amino-terminal acyl chain of lipoproteins in its hydrophobic cavity, thereby generating a hydrophilic complex that can traverse the periplasmic space by diffusion. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB on the outer membrane and anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane by the action of LolB. In contrast, since LolCDE does not recognize lipoproteins possessing Asp at position +2, these lipoproteins remain anchored to the inner membrane. Genes for Lol proteins are widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, and Lol-mediated outer membrane targeting of lipoproteins is considered to be the general lipoprotein localization mechanism.

  4. Alkali hydrolysis of trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Karasch, Christian; Popovic, Milan; Qasim, Mohamed; Bajpai, Rakesh K

    2002-01-01

    Data for alkali hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in aqueous solution at pH 12.0 under static (pH-controlled) as well as dynamic (pH-uncontrolled) conditions are reported. The experiments were conducted at two different molar ratios of TNT to hydroxyl ions at room temperature. The TNT disappeared rapidly from the solution as a first-order reaction. The complete disappearance of aromatic structure from the aqueous solution within 24 h was confirmed by the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectra of the samples. Cuvet experiments in a UV-VIS spectrophotometer demonstrated the formation of Meisenheimer complex, which slowly disappeared via formation of aromatic compounds with fewer nitro groups. The known metabolites of TNT were found to accumulate only in very small quantities in the liquid phase.

  5. Prothrombotic lipoprotein patterns in stroke.

    PubMed

    Podrez, Eugene A; Byzova, Tatiana V

    2016-03-10

    The importance of research focused on the final events of atherothrombosis cannot be overestimated. Platelet hyperreactivity leading to thrombosis is the main reason for mortality and morbidity in patients with cardiovascular disease and stroke, which together remain a leading cause of death in developed countries. In this issue of Blood, Shen et al1 establish another functional link between proatherogenic lipoproteins and platelet-mediated thrombus formation with a specific focus on stroke. In their model, the initiating component is L5, the electronegative subfraction of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), which was shown to be substantially elevated in patients with ischemic stroke. L5 was shown to activate platelets via its receptor, lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), and αβ amyloid peptide, which together contribute to platelet hyperreactivity and stroke complications. PMID:26965920

  6. Metabolic Characterization of a Rare Genetic Variation Within APOC3 and Its Lipoprotein Lipase–Independent Effects

    PubMed Central

    Davey Smith, George; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; Würtz, Peter; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J.; Dale, Caroline; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Casas, Juan-Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background— Plasma triglyceride levels have been implicated in atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Apolipoprotein C-III (APOC3) plays a key role in the hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins to remnant particles by lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and their uptake by the liver. A rare variant in APOC3(rs138326449) has been associated with triglyceride, very low–density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein levels, as well as risk of coronary heart disease. We aimed to characterize the impact of this locus across a broad set of mainly lipids-focused metabolic measures. Methods and Results— A high-throughput serum nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics platform was used to quantify 225 metabolic measures in 13 285 participants from 2 European population cohorts. We analyzed the effect of the APOC3 variant on the metabolic measures and used the common LPL(rs12678919) polymorphism to test for LPL-independent effects. Eighty-one metabolic measures showed evidence of association with APOC3(rs138326449). In addition to previously reported triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein associations, the variant was also associated with very low–density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein composition measures, other cholesterol measures, and fatty acids. Comparison of the APOC3 and LPL associations revealed that APOC3 association results for medium and very large very low–density lipoprotein composition are unlikely to be solely predictable by the action of APOC3 through LPL. Conclusions— We characterized the effects of the rare APOC3(rs138326449) loss of function mutation in lipoprotein metabolism, as well as the effects of LPL(rs12678919). Our results improve our understanding of the role of APOC3 in triglyceride metabolism, its LPL independent action, and the complex and correlated nature of human metabolites. PMID:27114411

  7. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS - ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  8. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. I. ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  9. A more flexible lipoprotein sorting pathway.

    PubMed

    Chahales, Peter; Thanassi, David G

    2015-05-01

    Lipoprotein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria occurs by a conserved pathway, each step of which is considered essential. In contrast to this model, LoVullo and colleagues demonstrate that the N-acyl transferase Lnt is not required in Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This suggests the existence of a more flexible lipoprotein pathway, likely due to a modified Lol transporter complex, and raises the possibility that pathogens may regulate lipoprotein processing to modulate interactions with the host. PMID:25755190

  10. Hydrolysis reactor for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas A.; Matthews, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for hydrolysis of a chemical hydride is provided. The method includes adding a chemical hydride to a reaction chamber and exposing the chemical hydride in the reaction chamber to a temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. in the presence of water and in the absence of an acid or a heterogeneous catalyst, wherein the chemical hydride undergoes hydrolysis to form hydrogen gas and a byproduct material.

  11. Lipoprotein-inspired nanoparticles for cancer theranostics.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth K; Lovell, Jonathan F; Zheng, Gang

    2011-10-18

    Over hundreds of millions of years, animals have evolved endogenous lipoprotein nanoparticles for shuttling hydrophobic molecules to different parts of the body. In the last 70 years, scientists have developed an understanding of lipoprotein function, often in relationship to lipid transport and heart disease. Such biocompatible, lipid-protein complexes are also ideal for loading and delivering cancer therapeutic and diagnostic agents, which means that lipoprotein and lipoprotein-inspired nanoparticles also offer opportunities for cancer theranostics. By mimicking the endogenous shape and structure of lipoproteins, the nanocarrier can remain in circulation for an extended period of time, while largely evading the reticuloendothelial cells in the body's defenses. The small size (less than 30 nm) of the low-density (LDL) and high-density (HDL) classes of lipoproteins allows them to maneuver deeply into tumors. Furthermore, lipoproteins can be targeted to their endogenous receptors, when those are implicated in cancer, or to other cancer receptors. In this Account, we review the field of lipoprotein-inspired nanoparticles related to the delivery of cancer imaging and therapy agents. LDL has innate cancer targeting potential and has been used to incorporate diverse hydrophobic molecules and deliver them to tumors. Nature's method of rerouting LDL in atherosclerosis provides a strategy to extend the cancer targeting potential of lipoproteins beyond its narrow purview. Although LDL has shown promise as a drug nanocarrier for cancer imaging and therapy, increasing evidence indicates that HDL, the smallest lipoprotein, may also be of use for drug targeting and uptake into cancer cells. We also discuss how synthetic HDL-like nanoparticles, which do not include human or recombinant proteins, can deliver molecules directly to the cytoplasm of certain cancer cells, effectively bypassing the endosomal compartment. This strategy could allow HDL-like nanoparticles to be used to

  12. New horizons in lipoprotein research.

    PubMed

    Scott, J

    1987-08-01

    The present decade was heralded by the identification of cDNA clones for apo-AI, HMG CoA reductase and the LDL receptor. Today we have descriptions of many other proteins involved in lipid metabolism and of the genes that code for them. Structure and function have been probed by techniques for protein blotting and by in vitro mutagenesis of proteins. The details of gene regulation are now beginning to be unravelled and we can expect exciting new developments in the understanding of how gene expression affects plasma lipoprotein levels. New and powerful techniques have been established for identifying known mutations and for detecting new mutations. Discovery of restriction fragment length polymorphisms have allowed the association between these DNA markers and particular genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism to be probed. The extent to which particular gene loci contribute to the variation in plasma cholesterol levels is being analysed using the methods of genetic epidemiology. With the advent of methods for establishing linkage and physical maps of the human genome, it is now possible to identify the genes responsible for any disorder in which clinical material can be assembled. From this rapidly advancing knowledge it must be anticipated that many new exciting diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities will emerge.

  13. Lipoprotein Metabolism Indicators Improve Cardiovascular Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    van Schalkwijk, Daniël B.; de Graaf, Albert A.; Tsivtsivadze, Evgeni; Parnell, Laurence D.; van der Werff-van der Vat, Bianca J. C.; van Ommen, Ben; van der Greef, Jan; Ordovás, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease risk increases when lipoprotein metabolism is dysfunctional. We have developed a computational model able to derive indicators of lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes from a single lipoprotein profile measurement. This is the first study to investigate whether lipoprotein metabolism indicators can improve cardiovascular risk prediction and therapy management. Methods and Results We calculated lipoprotein metabolism indicators for 1981 subjects (145 cases, 1836 controls) from the Framingham Heart Study offspring cohort in which NMR lipoprotein profiles were measured. We applied a statistical learning algorithm using a support vector machine to select conventional risk factors and lipoprotein metabolism indicators that contributed to predicting risk for general cardiovascular disease. Risk prediction was quantified by the change in the Area-Under-the-ROC-Curve (ΔAUC) and by risk reclassification (Net Reclassification Improvement (NRI) and Integrated Discrimination Improvement (IDI)). Two VLDL lipoprotein metabolism indicators (VLDLE and VLDLH) improved cardiovascular risk prediction. We added these indicators to a multivariate model with the best performing conventional risk markers. Our method significantly improved both CVD prediction and risk reclassification. Conclusions Two calculated VLDL metabolism indicators significantly improved cardiovascular risk prediction. These indicators may help to reduce prescription of unnecessary cholesterol-lowering medication, reducing costs and possible side-effects. For clinical application, further validation is required. PMID:24667559

  14. Familial lipoprotein lipase-activity deficiency: study of total body fatness and subcutaneous fat tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Brun, L D; Gagné, C; Julien, P; Tremblay, A; Moorjani, S; Bouchard, C; Lupien, P J

    1989-10-01

    Total body fatness and subcutaneous fat tissue distribution were evaluated in 19 hyperchylomicronemic patients. Eleven were males, aged 10 to 57 years, and eight were females, aged 13 to 46 years. Familial lipoprotein-lipase-activity deficiency was diagnosed by the absence of lipoprotein-lipase activity in the plasma withdrawn ten and 20 minutes after intravenous injection of ten units of heparin per kilogram of body weight. The 19 patients had skin-fold measurements for evaluation of subcutaneous fat distribution. Fifteen also underwent body density measurements by underwater weighing. Percent body fat was calculated from body density. These anthropometric data were plotted against the regression curves of 1638 normal controls of both sexes (aged 10 to 54 years) for fat tissue weight, percent body fat, subcutaneous fat/total fat mass ratio and trunk/extremity skin-fold ratio. Impairments in the process of building fat tissue reserves could not be shown in the 19 hyperchylomicronemic patients, in spite of the absence of lipoprotein-lipase activity in their postheparin plasma. It is hypothesized that normal fat tissue mass in these patients could be due partly to de novo synthesis of fatty acids by adipocytes, hydrolysis of plasma triglycerides by hepatic lipase, and/or contribution of a specific fat-tissue lipase to the catabolism of plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.

  15. Computational studies of plasma lipoprotein lipids.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lurong; Segrest, Jere P

    2016-10-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are macromolecular assemblies of proteins and lipids found in the blood. The lipid components of lipoproteins are amphipathic lipids such as phospholipids (PLs), and unesterified cholesterols (UCs) and hydrophobic lipids such as cholesteryl esters (CEs) and triglycerides (TGs). Since lipoproteins are soft matter supramolecular assemblies easily deformable by thermal fluctuations and they also exist in varying densities and protein/lipid components, a detailed understanding of their structure/function is experimentally difficult. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has emerged as a particularly promising way to explore the structure and dynamics of lipoproteins. The purpose of this review is to survey the current status of computational studies of the lipid components of the lipoproteins. Computational studies aim to explore three levels of complexity for the 3-dimensional structural dynamics of lipoproteins at various metabolic stages: (i) lipoprotein particles consist of protein with minimal lipid; (ii) lipoprotein particles consist of PL-rich discoidal bilayer-like lipid particles; (iii) mature circulating lipoprotein particles consist of CE-rich or TG-rich spheroidal lipid-droplet-like particles. Due to energy barriers involved in conversion between these species, other biomolecules also participate in lipoprotein biological assembly. For example: (i) lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) interacts with ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) to produce nascent discoidal high density lipoprotein (dHDL) particles; (ii) lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) mediates the conversion of UC to CE in dHDL, driving spheroidal HDL (sHDL) formation; (iii) transfer proteins, cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), transfer both CE and TG and PL, respectively, between lipoprotein particles. Computational studies have the potential to explore different lipoprotein particles at each metabolic stage in

  16. Topics in lipoprotein glomerulopathy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takao; Matsunaga, Akira; Ito, Kenji; Nakashima, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    Here, we introduce four topics in lipoprotein glomerulopathy (LPG). To date, approximately 150 cases of LPG have been reported worldwide. Recently two groups studied hot spots of APOE-Sendai and APOE-Kyoto, the representative variants of LPG, in narrow areas of Japan and China, respectively. They suggest that both variants have descended through a founder effect. APOE-Sendai and APOE-Kyoto cause different transformations of apolipoproteins aggregating lipoproteins and resulting in lipoprotein thrombi within the glomerulus. Moreover, the macrophage impairment in LPG may provide another mechanism for lipoprotein thrombi in which massive lipoproteins accumulate in the glomerulus without foam cells. On the other hand, the administration of fibrate with the intensive control of triglyceride and apolipoprotein E particularly from the early phase will ameliorate LPG and prevent renal dysfunction. PMID:24149835

  17. Topics in lipoprotein glomerulopathy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takao; Matsunaga, Akira; Ito, Kenji; Nakashima, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    Here, we introduce four topics in lipoprotein glomerulopathy (LPG). To date, approximately 150 cases of LPG have been reported worldwide. Recently two groups studied hot spots of APOE-Sendai and APOE-Kyoto, the representative variants of LPG, in narrow areas of Japan and China, respectively. They suggest that both variants have descended through a founder effect. APOE-Sendai and APOE-Kyoto cause different transformations of apolipoproteins aggregating lipoproteins and resulting in lipoprotein thrombi within the glomerulus. Moreover, the macrophage impairment in LPG may provide another mechanism for lipoprotein thrombi in which massive lipoproteins accumulate in the glomerulus without foam cells. On the other hand, the administration of fibrate with the intensive control of triglyceride and apolipoprotein E particularly from the early phase will ameliorate LPG and prevent renal dysfunction.

  18. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-08-22

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  19. [THE LIPOLYSIS IN PHYLOGENETICALLY EARLY LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY AND MORE LATER LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY: FUNCTION AND DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF APOE AND APOC-III].

    PubMed

    Rozhkova, T A; Titov, V N; Amelyushkina, V A; Kaba, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-12-01

    According to phylogenetic theory of general pathology, the function of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) in them under the effect of hepatic glycerol hydrolase apoC-III (HGH) developed at much earlier stages of phylogenesis than functioning of insulin-dependent phylogenetically late very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). For millions ofyears, lipolysis and HGH+apoC-III have activated transfer of polyenic fatty acids (FA) in the form of cholesteryl polyesters (CLE) from high density lipoproteins (HDL) to linoleic and linolenic LDL under the effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein. It is reasonable to suggest that hepatocytes physiologically secrete oleic and palmitic VLDL and linoleic and linolenic LDL. Cells uptake ligand oleic and palmitic VLVL by apoE/B-100 receptor-mediated endocytosis. Physiologically, VLDL are not converted to LDL. If hepatocytes secrete palmitic VLDL in greater amounts than oleic VLDL upon slow hydrolysis ofpalmitic TG and under the effect of postheparinic lipoprotein lipase+apoC-II, only some proportion of palmitic TG is uptaken by cells as VLDL, and the rest is converted in ligand-free palmitic LDL These LDL increase plasma contents of TG and LDL-cholesterol and form small dense palmitic LDL. Expression of HGH+apoC-III synthesis compensates TG hydrolysis in nonphysiological palmitic LDL. In vivo, apoC-III is neither physiological no pathological inhibitor of lipolysis. Increase in plasma apoC-III content is an indicator of accumulation of non-physiological palmitic LDL and atherosclerosis-atheromatosis risk factor ApoE content ofpalmitic LDL increases together with apoC-III, i.e., apoE in ligand VLDL is not internalized via apoE/B-100 endocytosis. An increase in apoC-III and apoE contents are reliable in vivo tests for the rise inpalmitic FA, palmitic TG and excessive secretion of palmitic VLDL by hepatocytes. ApoC-III and apoE contents in LDL are additional tests to evaluate the efficiency of

  20. [THE LIPOLYSIS IN PHYLOGENETICALLY EARLY LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY AND MORE LATER LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY: FUNCTION AND DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF APOE AND APOC-III].

    PubMed

    Rozhkova, T A; Titov, V N; Amelyushkina, V A; Kaba, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-12-01

    According to phylogenetic theory of general pathology, the function of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) in them under the effect of hepatic glycerol hydrolase apoC-III (HGH) developed at much earlier stages of phylogenesis than functioning of insulin-dependent phylogenetically late very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). For millions ofyears, lipolysis and HGH+apoC-III have activated transfer of polyenic fatty acids (FA) in the form of cholesteryl polyesters (CLE) from high density lipoproteins (HDL) to linoleic and linolenic LDL under the effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein. It is reasonable to suggest that hepatocytes physiologically secrete oleic and palmitic VLDL and linoleic and linolenic LDL. Cells uptake ligand oleic and palmitic VLVL by apoE/B-100 receptor-mediated endocytosis. Physiologically, VLDL are not converted to LDL. If hepatocytes secrete palmitic VLDL in greater amounts than oleic VLDL upon slow hydrolysis ofpalmitic TG and under the effect of postheparinic lipoprotein lipase+apoC-II, only some proportion of palmitic TG is uptaken by cells as VLDL, and the rest is converted in ligand-free palmitic LDL These LDL increase plasma contents of TG and LDL-cholesterol and form small dense palmitic LDL. Expression of HGH+apoC-III synthesis compensates TG hydrolysis in nonphysiological palmitic LDL. In vivo, apoC-III is neither physiological no pathological inhibitor of lipolysis. Increase in plasma apoC-III content is an indicator of accumulation of non-physiological palmitic LDL and atherosclerosis-atheromatosis risk factor ApoE content ofpalmitic LDL increases together with apoC-III, i.e., apoE in ligand VLDL is not internalized via apoE/B-100 endocytosis. An increase in apoC-III and apoE contents are reliable in vivo tests for the rise inpalmitic FA, palmitic TG and excessive secretion of palmitic VLDL by hepatocytes. ApoC-III and apoE contents in LDL are additional tests to evaluate the efficiency of

  1. Understanding Lipoproteins as Transporters of Cholesterol and Other Lipids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggerstaff, Kyle D.; Wooten, Joshua S.

    2004-01-01

    A clear picture of lipoprotein metabolism is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Many students are taught that low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "bad" and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "good." This misconception leads to students thinking that lipoproteins are types of cholesterol rather than…

  2. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles*

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. PMID:26018414

  3. The antigenic similarity of human low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    LEVINE, L; KAUFFMAN, D L; BROWN, R K

    1955-08-01

    THE FOLLOWING HUMAN LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS WERE PREPARED: beta-lipoproteins of densities greater than 1.040 (A, B,C) a beta-lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 5 (D), a lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 19 (E), and a lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 70 (F). Data are presented which show the immunochemical homogeneity of the D lipoprotein rabbit-anti-D lipoprotein system. Cross-reactions between antibody to A and D lipoproteins and the above lipoproteins have been demonstrated by quantitative precipitation, quanitative complement fixation, and single and double diffusion in agar. The antigenic similarities appear to be associated with the protein portions of the molecule. The antisera produced did not differentiate the low density lipoprotein classes. PMID:13242737

  4. Atherogenicity of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    1998-02-26

    There is increasing evidence that alterations in metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are of importance in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and its clinical consequences. Particles with the characteristics of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnants have been related to the extent and severity of atherosclerosis in humans and in animal models. These particles can be identified using ultracentrifugal procedures as small, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) with Svedberg flotation rates (Sf) of 12-60. Postprandial triglyceride levels also have been related to risk of coronary artery disease, consistent with a pathologic role for remnant lipoproteins. In studies in which measurements of lipoprotein subfractions have been carried out, levels of IDL have been more predictive than low-density lipoprotein (LDL) of atherosclerosis progression as assessed by coronary artery angiography or carotid artery ultrasonography. These findings suggest that a considerable portion of the coronary disease risk attributed to LDL may be accounted for by the IDL particles included in standard LDL measurements. Other metabolic changes associated with increased levels of plasma triglyceride may also adversely affect cardiovascular disease risk. These include reductions in HDL-cholesterol and apoprotein A1, increased levels of small dense LDL particles, redistribution of apoC-III from HDL to apoB-containing lipoproteins, diminished insulin sensitivity, and procoagulant changes, including increased levels of the fibrinolysis inhibitor, plasminogen-activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). A predominance of small dense LDL (subclass pattern B) is a discrete marker for this cluster of interrelated abnormalities and is found in 40-50% of patients with coronary artery disease. Therapeutic interventions with favorable effects on components of this dysmetabolic profile appear to be of value in decreasing atherosclerosis risk in a substantial proportion of

  5. Cholesterol in serum lipoprotein fractions after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Philip C., Jr.; Krauhs, Jane M.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are reported from blood-lipid measurements obtained from 125 Space Shuttle crew members before and after space flight. The data are presented in tables and discussed in detail. The main differences noted between preflight and postflight values are a 12.8-percent decrease in high-density lipoproteins on postflight day 1 and significant decreases in total cholesterol and both high- and low-density lipoproteins later in the 23-day postflight period.

  6. [Possibility of New Circulating Atherosclerosis-Related Lipid Markers Measurement in Medical and Complete Medical Checkups: Small Dense Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Lipase].

    PubMed

    Sumino, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Murakami, Masami

    2016-03-01

    Small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (sdLDL-C) concentrations correlate more strongly with cardiovascular disease (CVD) than other LDL-C and large LDL particle concentrations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays a central role in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism by catalyzing the hydrolysis of triglycerides in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein particles and is a useful biomarker in diagnosing Type I, Type IV, and Type V hyperlipidemia. Therefore, the measurement of circulating sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations contributes to the assessment of circulating atherosclerosis-related lipid markers. However, the measurement of these lipids has not been fully adopted in medical and complete medical checkups. Recently, novel automated homogenous assay for measuring sdLDL-C and latex particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (LTIA) for measuring LPL have been developed, respectively. Using these new assays, sdLDL-C values showed excellent agreement with those obtained by isolation of the d = 1.044 - 1.063 g/mL plasma fraction by sequential ultracentrifugation, and LPL values measured with and without heparin injection were highly correlated with the values measured by the LPL-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). These assays may be superior to the previous assays for the measurement of sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations due their simplicity and reproducibility. The measurements of sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations may be useful as lipid markers in the assessment of the development and progression of atherosclerosis and the detection of pathological conditions and diseases if these markers are measured in medical and complete medical checkups. We have introduced the possibility of the novel measurement of circulating atherosclerosis-related lipid markers such as sdLDL-C and LPL in medical and complete medical checkups. Further studies are needed to clarify whether sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations are related to the development and progression of

  7. Hippurate hydrolysis by Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, G A

    1981-01-01

    Strains of Legionella pneumophila were shown to hydrolyze sodium hippurate in an overnight test system, but strains of L. bozemanii, L. micdadei, L. dumoffii, and some other organisms similar to the legionellae did not. Although only a small number of strains of legionellae other than L. pneumophila have been classified and tested, the results indicate that the hippurate hydrolysis test may prove useful for differentiating among Legionella species. PMID:7462418

  8. [Position of lipoprotein apheresis in present].

    PubMed

    Bláha, Vladimír; Bláha, Milan; Lánská, Miriam; Havel, Eduard; Vyroubal, Pavel; Zadák, Zdeněk; Vrablík, Michal; Piťha, Jan; Žák, Pavel; Sobotka, Luboš

    2015-11-01

    Lipoprotein apheresis (LA) is an effective treatment method the patients with severe hypercholesterolemia, resistant to the standard therapy. LA is an extracorporeal elimination technique, which specifically removes low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol from the circulation. At present, lipoprotein apheresis, combined with high-dose statin and ezetimibe therapy, is the best available means of treating patients with homozygous and statin refractory heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). However, the extent of cholesterol-lowering achieved is often insufficient to meet the targets set by current guidelines. The recent advent of new classes of lipid-lowering agents provides new hope that the latter objective may now be achievable. These compounds act either by reducing low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol production by inhibiting apolipoprotein B synthesis with an antisense oligonucleotide (mipomersen), or by inhibiting microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (lomitapid), or by enhancing LDL catabolism via monoclonal antibody-mediated inhibition of the activity of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9-alirocumab, evolocumab etc). The promising is the combination of LDL-apheresis with new drugs, namely for its potential to further decrease of LDL-cholesterol between apheresis. Depending on the outcome of current trials, it seems likely that these compounds, used alone or combined with lipoprotein apheresis, will markedly improve the management of refractory FH. PMID:26652784

  9. HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrolytic processes provide the baseline loss rate for any chemical in an aqueous envi- ronment. Although various hydrolytic pathways account for significant degradation of certain classes of organic chemicals, other organic structures are completely inert. Strictly speaking, hy...

  10. Lipoprotein(a): nonhuman primate models.

    PubMed

    Makino, K; Scanu, A M

    1991-09-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a low density lipoprotein which has apo(a) disulfide-linked to apoB100. Apo(a) has recently been shown to have a striking homology with plasminogen, a knowledge that has stimulated a lot of interest in the mechanism of atherogenicity and thrombogenicity of this lipoprotein particle. Several studies have documented the presence of Lp(a) in nonhuman primates with particular reference to the rhesus monkeys and baboons. The Lp(a) of rhesus monkey is structurally very similar to that of humans, except for the absence of kringle V and the amino acid composition of the catalytic region. The Lp(a) of nonhuman primates, like their human counterparts, exhibit a wide range of interindividual plasma levels and also a wide size polymorphism of apo(a). Nonhuman primates appear to represent a good model for the study of the structure and biology of Lp(a).

  11. Lipoprotein apheresis for the treatment of elevated circulating levels of lipoprotein(a): a critical literature review

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Capuzzo, Enrico; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a), which consists of a low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle linked to an apolipoprotein(a) moiety, is currently considered an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease due to its atherogenic (LDL-like) and prothrombotic (plasminogen-like) properties. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current and newer therapies for lowering increased lipoprotein(a) levels, focusing on lipoprotein apheresis. After a systematic literature search, we identified ten studies which, overall, documented that lipoprotein apheresis is effective in reducing increased lipoprotein(a) levels and cardiovascular events. PMID:26710351

  12. Analysis of individual lipoproteins and liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, D.L.; Keller, R.A.; Nolan, J.P.

    1997-08-01

    We describe the application of single molecule detection (SMD) technologies for the analysis of natural (serum lipoproteins) and synthetic (liposomes) transport systems. The need for advanced analytical procedures of these complex and important systems is presented with the specific enhancements afforded by SMD with flowing sample streams. In contrast to bulk measurements which yield only average values, measurement of individual species allows creation of population histograms from heterogeneous samples. The data are acquired in minutes and the analysis requires relatively small sample quantities. Preliminary data are presented from the analysis of low density lipoprotein, and multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles.

  13. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose to yield glucose

    DOEpatents

    Tsao, George T.; Ladisch, Michael R.; Bose, Arindam

    1979-01-01

    A process to yield glucose from cellulose through acid hydrolysis. Cellulose is recovered from cellulosic materials, preferably by pretreating the cellulosic materials by dissolving the cellulosic materials in Cadoxen or a chelating metal caustic swelling solvent and then precipitating the cellulose therefrom. Hydrolysis is accomplished using an acid, preferably dilute sulfuric acid, and the glucose is yielded substantially without side products. Lignin may be removed either before or after hydrolysis.

  14. Acid Hydrolysis of Trioxalatocobaltate (III) Ion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggans, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an investigation involving acid hydrolysis and using both volumetric and kinetic techniques. Presents examples of the determination of the rate constant and its variation with temperature. (GS)

  15. Limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol assay for diagnostic use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    I wish to comment on the limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RemL-C) assay reported in Clinical Chemistry. Remnants are lipoprotein particles produced after newly formed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) of either hepatic or intestinal origin enter the plasma space and unde...

  16. Lipoprotein subspecies and risk of coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Musliner, T A; Krauss, R M

    1988-01-01

    This review summarizes physical and chemical properties of major subspecies of very-low-, low-, intermediate, and high-density lipoproteins. Hypotheses regarding the metabolic origins of these subspecies and evidence for their associations with risk of coronary artery disease are presented.

  17. Six new loci associated with blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and blood triglycerides reflect key metabolic processes including sensitivity to insulin. Blood lipoprotein and lipid concentrations are heritable. To date, the identification o...

  18. The serum lipoprotein pattern of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Mondola, P; Santangelo, F; Santillo, M; Belfiore, A; Avallone, L; Cifaldi, S; d'Angelo, A; Pizzuti, G P

    1987-01-01

    1. The serum lipoprotein pattern of water buffalo was studied by means of electrophoresis and the lipoproteins were isolated by ultracentrifugation on the basis of their hydrated density. 2. High density lipoproteins (HDL) showed a higher level of cholesterol than did the other lipoproteins. Moreover, the level of phospholipids was higher in HDL than in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). 3. The buffalo B100 apoprotein was similar to that of man and rat. Three apoproteins similar to human apo E, apo AI and AII were found in buffalo HDL, buffalo VLDL contained essentially apo B protein.

  19. Microwave Pretreatment For Hydrolysis Of Cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; George, Clifford E.; Lightsey, George R.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave pretreatment enhances enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes into soluble saccharides used as feedstocks for foods, fuels, and other products. Low consumption of energy, high yield, and low risk of proposed hydrolysis process incorporating microwave pretreatment makes process viable alternative to composting.

  20. Rate of Hydrolysis of Tertiary Halogeno Alkanes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment to measure the relative rate of hydrolysis of the 2-x-2 methylpropanes, where x is bromo, chloro or iodo. The results are plotted on a graph from which the relative rate of hydrolysis can be deduced. (Author/GA)

  1. Analyzing the molecular mechanism of lipoprotein localization in Brucella.

    PubMed

    Goolab, Shivani; Roth, Robyn L; van Heerden, Henriette; Crampton, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins possess diverse structure and functionality, ranging from bacterial physiology to pathogenic processes. As such many lipoproteins, originating from Brucella are exploited as potential vaccines to countermeasure brucellosis infection in the host. These membrane proteins are translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane where they are anchored peripherally by a multifaceted targeting mechanism. Although much research has focused on the identification and classification of Brucella lipoproteins and their potential use as vaccine candidates for the treatment of Brucellosis, the underlying route for the translocation of these lipoproteins to the outer surface of the Brucella (and other pathogens) outer membrane (OM) remains mostly unknown. This is partly due to the complexity of the organism and evasive tactics used to escape the host immune system, the variation in biological structure and activity of lipoproteins, combined with the complex nature of the translocation machinery. The biosynthetic pathway of Brucella lipoproteins involves a distinct secretion system aiding translocation from the cytoplasm, where they are modified by lipidation, sorted by the lipoprotein localization machinery pathway and thereafter equipped for export to the OM. Surface localized lipoproteins in Brucella may employ a lipoprotein flippase or the β-barrel assembly complex for translocation. This review provides an overview of the characterized Brucella OM proteins that form part of the OM, including a handful of other characterized bacterial lipoproteins and their mechanisms of translocation. Lipoprotein localization pathways in gram negative bacteria will be used as a model to identify gaps in Brucella lipoprotein localization and infer a potential pathway. Of particular interest are the dual topology lipoproteins identified in Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenza. The localization and topology of these lipoproteins from other gram negative bacteria

  2. Analyzing the molecular mechanism of lipoprotein localization in Brucella

    PubMed Central

    Goolab, Shivani; Roth, Robyn L.; van Heerden, Henriette; Crampton, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins possess diverse structure and functionality, ranging from bacterial physiology to pathogenic processes. As such many lipoproteins, originating from Brucella are exploited as potential vaccines to countermeasure brucellosis infection in the host. These membrane proteins are translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane where they are anchored peripherally by a multifaceted targeting mechanism. Although much research has focused on the identification and classification of Brucella lipoproteins and their potential use as vaccine candidates for the treatment of Brucellosis, the underlying route for the translocation of these lipoproteins to the outer surface of the Brucella (and other pathogens) outer membrane (OM) remains mostly unknown. This is partly due to the complexity of the organism and evasive tactics used to escape the host immune system, the variation in biological structure and activity of lipoproteins, combined with the complex nature of the translocation machinery. The biosynthetic pathway of Brucella lipoproteins involves a distinct secretion system aiding translocation from the cytoplasm, where they are modified by lipidation, sorted by the lipoprotein localization machinery pathway and thereafter equipped for export to the OM. Surface localized lipoproteins in Brucella may employ a lipoprotein flippase or the β-barrel assembly complex for translocation. This review provides an overview of the characterized Brucella OM proteins that form part of the OM, including a handful of other characterized bacterial lipoproteins and their mechanisms of translocation. Lipoprotein localization pathways in gram negative bacteria will be used as a model to identify gaps in Brucella lipoprotein localization and infer a potential pathway. Of particular interest are the dual topology lipoproteins identified in Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenza. The localization and topology of these lipoproteins from other gram negative bacteria

  3. Serum and urinary lipoproteins in the human nephrotic syndrome: evidence for renal catabolism of lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, V.G.; Forte, T.; Licht, H.; Lewis, S.B.

    1982-03-01

    The urinary excretion of lipoproteins and the possibility of catabolic alterations on glomerular filtration were investigated in four nephrotic subjects difering in etiology, serum lipoprotein profile, and 24 hr urinary output of protein and lipids. The apolipoproteins and lipoproteins of urine were compared with those of serum with respect to distribution profile, physical properties, and composition. As expected from molecular sieving effects during glomerular filtration, the urinary HDL were more abundant than the lower density lipoproteins even when the plasma LDL was elevated markedly. Intact apolipoproteins were not found in the concentrated urinary fraction isolated by ultrafiltration between the limits of 10/sup 4/ and 5 x 10/sup 4/ daltons. On the basis of immunoreactivity, gel electrophoresis, and amino acid composition, apolipoproteins B and AI are the major and minor proteins, respectively, of urinary LDL, and apo B is the major protein of the urinary IDL and VLDL. Apolipoproteins AI, AII, CI, CIII, and possibly AIV were isolated from the urinary HDL. As much as 20% of the protein moiety of the urinary HDL appeared to be large apolipoprotien fragments with molecular weights and isoelectric points similar to those of apo CII and apo CIII. The lower density classes of urinary lipoproteins also appeared to have lost apo E and apo C's and to have undergone partial proteolysis.

  4. Abnormal high density lipoproteins in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, V.; Salen, G.; Cheng, F.W.; Forte, T.; Shefer, S.; Tint, G.S.

    1981-11-01

    The plasma lipoprotein profiles and high density lipoproteins (HDL) were characterized in patients with the genetic disease cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX). The mean HDL-cholesterol concentration in the CTX plasmas was 14.5 +/- 3.2 mg/dl, about one-third the normal value. The low HDL-cholesterol reflects a low concentration and an abnormal lipid composition of the plasma HDL. Relative to normal HDL, the cholesteryl esters are low, free cholesterol and phospholipids essentially normal, and triglycerides increased. The ratio of apoprotein (apo) to total cholesterol in the HDL of CTX was two to three times greater than normal. In the CTX HDL, the ratio of apoAI to apoAII was high, the proportion of apoC low, and a normally minor form of apoAI increased relative to other forms. The HDL in electron micrographs appeared normal morphologically and in particle size. The adnormalities in lipoprotein distribution profiles and composition of the plasma HDL result from metabolic defects that are not understood but may be linked to the genetic defect in bile acid synthesis in CTX. As a consequence, it is probable that the normal functions of the HDL, possibly including modulation of LDL-cholesterol uptake and the removal of excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues, are perturbed significantly in this disease.

  5. Double Superhelix Model of High Density Lipoprotein*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiping; Gogonea, Valentin; Lee, Xavier; Wagner, Matthew A.; Li, Xin-Min; Huang, Ying; Undurti, Arundhati; May, Roland P.; Haertlein, Michael; Moulin, Martine; Gutsche, Irina; Zaccai, Giuseppe; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2009-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL), the carrier of so-called “good” cholesterol, serves as the major athero-protective lipoprotein and has emerged as a key therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease. We applied small angle neutron scattering (SANS) with contrast variation and selective isotopic deuteration to the study of nascent HDL to obtain the low resolution structure in solution of the overall time-averaged conformation of apolipoprotein AI (apoA-I) versus the lipid (acyl chain) core of the particle. Remarkably, apoA-I is observed to possess an open helical shape that wraps around a central ellipsoidal lipid phase. Using the low resolution SANS shapes of the protein and lipid core as scaffolding, an all-atom computational model for the protein and lipid components of nascent HDL was developed by integrating complementary structural data from hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and previously published constraints from multiple biophysical techniques. Both SANS data and the new computational model, the double superhelix model, suggest an unexpected structural arrangement of protein and lipids of nascent HDL, an anti-parallel double superhelix wrapped around an ellipsoidal lipid phase. The protein and lipid organization in nascent HDL envisages a potential generalized mechanism for lipoprotein biogenesis and remodeling, biological processes critical to sterol and lipid transport, organismal energy metabolism, and innate immunity. PMID:19812036

  6. Intrinsic enzymes of high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Le, Ngoc-Anh; Walter, Mary F

    2007-03-01

    Several lines of evidence are available to support the protective effects of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) on atherosclerosis. The exact mechanisms by which HDL protects against atherosclerotic disease development are not understood. In addition to its role in the reverse transport of cholesterol from the peripheral sites to the liver for excretion, HDL also carries a number of enzymes that contribute to the remodeling of plasma lipoproteins and to the protection of other lipoproteins against oxidative modification. Many of these enzymes can play a role in determining the composition of circulating HDL, while others appear to affect specific biologic activities associated with HDL. It is not clear whether the concentrations of HDL particles or the activities associated with this class of particles are more important. One of the problems is that HDL constitutes a heterogeneous population of particles, and analytical tools to characterize the various subpopulations are not widely available. In this article, we will review the enzymes that are associated with plasma HDL and possible mechanisms as to how these may contribute to the protective properties of HDL in humans. PMID:21291665

  7. Lipoprotein-induced phenoloxidase-activity in tarantula hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Sven; Schmidt, Juliane; Hoeger, Ulrich; Decker, Heinz

    2015-08-01

    Phenoloxidases play vital roles in invertebrate innate immune reactions, wound closure and sclerotization processes in arthropods. In chelicerates, where phenoloxidases are lacking, phenoloxidase-activity can be induced in the oxygen carrier hemocyanin in vitro by proteolytic cleavage, incubation with the artificial inducer SDS, or lipids. The role of protein-protein interaction has up to now received little attention. This is remarkable, as lipoproteins - complexes of proteins and lipids - are present at high concentrations in arthropod hemolymph. We characterized the three lipoproteins present in tarantula hemolymph, two high-density lipoproteins and one very high-density lipoprotein, and show that the two high-density lipoproteins have distinct structures: the more abundant high-density lipoprotein is an ellipsoid particle with axes of ~22.5 nm and ~16.8 nm, respectively. The second high-density lipoprotein, present only in trace amount, is a large discoidal lipoprotein with a diameter of ~38.4 nm and an on-edge thickness of ~7.1 nm. We further demonstrate that the interaction between lipoproteins and hemocyanin induces phenoloxidase activity in hemocyanin, and propose that this activation is due to protein-protein interaction rather than protein-lipid interaction, as neither lipid micelles nor lipid monomers were found to be activating. Activation was strongest in the presence of high-density lipoproteins; very high-density lipoproteins were found to be non-activating. This is the first time that the ability of lipoproteins to induce phenoloxidase activity of hemocyanin has been demonstrated, thus adding novel aspects to the function of lipoproteins apart from their known role in nutrient supply. PMID:25817204

  8. Identification of a small molecule that stabilizes lipoprotein lipase in vitro and lowers triglycerides in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mikael; Caraballo, Rémi; Ericsson, Madelene; Lookene, Aivar; Enquist, Per-Anders; Elofsson, Mikael; Nilsson, Stefan K; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2014-07-25

    Patients at increased cardiovascular risk commonly display high levels of plasma triglycerides (TGs), elevated LDL cholesterol, small dense LDL particles and low levels of HDL-cholesterol. Many remain at high risk even after successful statin therapy, presumably because TG levels remain high. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) maintains TG homeostasis in blood by hydrolysis of TG-rich lipoproteins. Efficient clearance of TGs is accompanied by increased levels of HDL-cholesterol and decreased levels of small dense LDL. Given the central role of LPL in lipid metabolism we sought to find small molecules that could increase LPL activity and serve as starting points for drug development efforts against cardiovascular disease. Using a small molecule screening approach we have identified small molecules that can protect LPL from inactivation by the controller protein angiopoietin-like protein 4 during incubations in vitro. One of the selected compounds, 50F10, was directly shown to preserve the active homodimer structure of LPL, as demonstrated by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. On injection to hypertriglyceridemic apolipoprotein A-V deficient mice the compound ameliorated the postprandial response after an olive oil gavage. This is a potential lead compound for the development of drugs that could reduce the residual risk associated with elevated plasma TGs in dyslipidemia. PMID:24984153

  9. Identification of a small molecule that stabilizes lipoprotein lipase in vitro and lowers triglycerides in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mikael; Caraballo, Rémi; Ericsson, Madelene; Lookene, Aivar; Enquist, Per-Anders; Elofsson, Mikael; Nilsson, Stefan K; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2014-07-25

    Patients at increased cardiovascular risk commonly display high levels of plasma triglycerides (TGs), elevated LDL cholesterol, small dense LDL particles and low levels of HDL-cholesterol. Many remain at high risk even after successful statin therapy, presumably because TG levels remain high. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) maintains TG homeostasis in blood by hydrolysis of TG-rich lipoproteins. Efficient clearance of TGs is accompanied by increased levels of HDL-cholesterol and decreased levels of small dense LDL. Given the central role of LPL in lipid metabolism we sought to find small molecules that could increase LPL activity and serve as starting points for drug development efforts against cardiovascular disease. Using a small molecule screening approach we have identified small molecules that can protect LPL from inactivation by the controller protein angiopoietin-like protein 4 during incubations in vitro. One of the selected compounds, 50F10, was directly shown to preserve the active homodimer structure of LPL, as demonstrated by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. On injection to hypertriglyceridemic apolipoprotein A-V deficient mice the compound ameliorated the postprandial response after an olive oil gavage. This is a potential lead compound for the development of drugs that could reduce the residual risk associated with elevated plasma TGs in dyslipidemia.

  10. An insect lipoprotein hybrid helps to define the role of apolipophorin III.

    PubMed

    Van der Horst, D J; Ryan, R O; Van Heusden, M C; Schulz, T K; Van Doorn, J M; Law, J H; Beenakkers, A M

    1988-02-01

    Insects transport lipid for flight in the form of diacylglycerol-rich low density lipoproteins (low density lipophorin (LDLp)). A hybrid LDLp has been produced in vitro by using Locusta migratoria fat body, locust high density lipophorin, locust adipokinetic hormone, and Manduca sexta apolipophorin III (apoLp-III). The hybrid is similar in size and density to locust LDLp, contains several molecules of M. sexta apoLp-III, and lacks locust apoLp-III, as shown by immunochemical methods. Under the same conditions an apoLp-III from Thasus acutangulus is poorly incorporated into the locust lipoprotein. The role of apoLp-III as a recognition signal/activator of flight muscle lipoprotein lipase was assayed with labeled hybrid LDLp produced in vitro using M. sexta apoLp-III radiolabeled with 35S. In addition, hydrolysis of diacylglycerol was determined with lipid-labeled hybrid LDLp produced in vitro using [U-14C]glycerol incorporated into the diacylglycerol moiety. In vitro incubations of the labeled hybrid LDLp with L. migratoria flight muscles show that the lipase efficiently utilizes hybrid LDLp as a substrate and demonstrate that the carbohydrate moiety of locust apoLp-III (which is lacking in the M. sexta protein) is not required for interaction with the lipase. It also suggests that specific antigenic determinants of L. migratoria apoLp-III are not required for lipase activation since M. sexta apoLp-III lacks immunological cross-reactivity with L. migratoria apoLp-III. PMID:2448303

  11. Retinal pigment epithelial acid lipase activity and lipoprotein receptors: effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Victor M

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show that fish oil-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, delivered to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by circulating low-density lipoproteins (LDL), enhance already considerable RPE lysosomal acid lipase activity, providing for more efficient hydrolysis of intralysosomal RPE lipids, an effect that may help prevent development of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). METHODS: Colorimetric biochemical and histochemical techniques were used to demonstrate RPE acid lipase in situ, in vitro, and after challenge with phagocytic stimuli. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of fluorescently labeled native, aceto-acetylated, and oxidized LDL was studied in vitro and in vivo. LDL effects on RPE lysosomal enzymes were assessed. Lysosomal enzyme activity was compared in RPE cells from monkeys fed diets rich in fish oil to those from control animals and in cultured RPE cells exposed to sera from these monkeys. RESULTS: RPE acid lipase activity was substantial and comparable to that of mononuclear phagocytes. Acid lipase activity increased significantly following phagocytic challenge with photoreceptor outer segment (POS) membranes. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of labeled lipoproteins was determined in vitro. Distinctive uptake of labeled lipoproteins occurred in RPE cells and mononuclear phagocytes in vivo. Native LDL enhanced RPE lysosomal enzyme activity. RPE lysosomal enzymes increased significantly in RPE cells from monkeys fed fish oil-rich diets and in cultured RPE cells exposed to their sera. CONCLUSIONS: RPE cells contain substantial acid lipase for efficient metabolism of lipids imbibed by POS phagocytosis and LDL uptake. Diets rich in fish oil-derived omega-3 fatty acids, by enhancing acid lipase, may reduce RPE lipofuscin accumulation, RPE oxidative damage, and the development of ARMD. PMID:12545699

  12. Metabolic abnormalities: triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ronald M; Siri, Patty W

    2004-06-01

    Increased plasma triglyceride and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are key features of the metabolic syndrome. Although elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is not an integral characteristic of this syndrome, there is commonly an increase in the proportion of small, dense low-density lipoprotein particles. Together, these abnormalities constitute the atherogenic dyslipidemia of the metabolic syndrome. This article reviews the pathophysiology of altered triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein metabolism in the metabolic syndrome, outlines the relationship of these lipoprotein abnormalities to increased risk of coronary heart disease,and highlights the application of this information to clinical practice. The role of reduced high-density lipoprotein in the metabolic syndrome is discussed elsewhere in this issue.

  13. Modeling the mechanisms of biological GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Alexandra T P; Szeler, Klaudia; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Åqvist, Johan; Kamerlin, Shina C L

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes that hydrolyze GTP are currently in the spotlight, due to their molecular switch mechanism that controls many cellular processes. One of the best-known classes of these enzymes are small GTPases such as members of the Ras superfamily, which catalyze the hydrolysis of the γ-phosphate bond in GTP. In addition, the availability of an increasing number of crystal structures of translational GTPases such as EF-Tu and EF-G have made it possible to probe the molecular details of GTP hydrolysis on the ribosome. However, despite a wealth of biochemical, structural and computational data, the way in which GTP hydrolysis is activated and regulated is still a controversial topic and well-designed simulations can play an important role in resolving and rationalizing the experimental data. In this review, we discuss the contributions of computational biology to our understanding of GTP hydrolysis on the ribosome and in small GTPases.

  14. Cotton cellulose: enzyme adsorption and enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beltrame, P.L.; Carniti, P.; Focher, B.; Marzetti, A.; Cattaneo, M.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of a crude cellulase complex from Trichoderma viride on variously pretreated cotton cellulose samples was studied in the framework of the Langmuir approach at 2-8 degrees. The saturation amount of adsorbed enzyme was related to the susceptibility of the substrates to hydrolysis. In every case the adsorption process was faster by 2-3 orders of magnitude than the hydrolysis step to give end products. For ZnCl/sub 2/-treated cotton cellulose the Langmuir parameters correlated fairly well with the value of the Michaelis constant, measured for its enzymic hydrolysis, and the adsorptive complex was indistinguishable from the complex of the Michaelis-Menten model for the hydrolysis.

  15. Continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Fieber, C.A.; Roberts, R.S.; Faass, G.S.; Muzzy, J.D.; Colcord, A.R.; Bery, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    The continuous hydrolysis of poplar chips by steam at 300-350 psi resulted in the separation of hemicellulose (I) cellulose and lignin components. The I fraction was readily depolymerised by steam to acetic acid, furfural, methanol, and xylose.

  16. Hydrolysis of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate to hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, M T; Brown, P W

    1998-04-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was hydrolysed in water and in 1 M Na2HPO4 solution at temperatures from 25-60 degrees C. Hydrolysis was incomplete in water. At 25 degrees C, DCPD partially hydrolysed to hydroxyapatite (HAp). Formation of HAp is indicative of incongruent DCPD dissolution. At the higher temperatures, hydrolysis to HAp was more extensive and was accompanied by the formation of anhydrous dicalcium phosphate (DCP). Both of these processes are endothermic. When hydrolysis was carried out in 1 M Na2HPO4 solution, heat absorption was greater at any given temperature than for hydrolysis in water. Complete hydrolysis to HAp occurred in this solution. The hydrolysis of DCPD to HAp in sodium phosphate solution was also endothermic. The complete conversion of DCPD to HAp in sodium phosphate solution would not be expected if the only effect of this solution was to cause DCPD dissolution to become congruent. Because of the buffering capacity of a dibasic sodium phosphate solution, DCPD hydrolysed completely to HAp. Complete conversion to HAp was accompanied by the conversion of dibasic sodium phosphate to monobasic sodium phosphate. The formation of DCP was not observed indicating that the sodium phosphate solution precluded the DCPD-to-DCP dehydration reaction. In addition to affecting the extent of hydrolysis, reaction in the sodium phosphate solution also caused a morphological change in the HAp which formed. HAp formed by hydrolysis in water was needle-like to globular while that formed in the sodium phosphate solution exhibited a florette-like morphology.

  17. Distribution and Kinetics of Lipoprotein-Bound Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Levels, J. H. M.; Abraham, P. R.; van den Ende, A.; van Deventer, S. J. H.

    2001-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major glycolipid component of gram-negative bacterial outer membranes, is a potent endotoxin responsible for pathophysiological symptoms characteristic of infection. The observation that the majority of LPS is found in association with plasma lipoproteins has prompted the suggestion that sequestering of LPS by lipid particles may form an integral part of a humoral detoxification mechanism. Previous studies on the biological properties of isolated lipoproteins used differential ultracentrifugation to separate the major subclasses. To preserve the integrity of the lipoproteins, we have analyzed the LPS distribution, specificity, binding capacity, and kinetics of binding to lipoproteins in human whole blood or plasma by using high-performance gel permeation chromatography and fluorescent LPS of three different chemotypes. The average distribution of O111:B4, J5, or Re595 LPS in whole blood from 10 human volunteers was 60% (±8%) high-density lipoprotein (HDL), 25% (±7%) low-density lipoprotein, and 12% (±5%) very low density lipoprotein. The saturation capacity of lipoproteins for all three LPS chemotypes was in excess of 200 μg/ml. Kinetic analysis however, revealed a strict chemotype dependence. The binding of Re595 or J5 LPS was essentially complete within 10 min, and subsequent redistribution among the lipoprotein subclasses occurred to attain similar distributions as O111:B4 LPS at 40 min. We conclude that under simulated physiological conditions, the binding of LPS to lipoproteins is highly specific, HDL has the highest binding capacity for LPS, the saturation capacity of lipoproteins for endotoxin far exceeds the LPS concentrations measured in clinical situations, and the kinetics of LPS association with lipoproteins display chemotype-dependent differences. PMID:11292694

  18. Fish plasma lipoproteins--comparative observations in serranides and sparides.

    PubMed

    Santulli, A; Cusenza, L; Modica, A; Curatolo, A; D'Amelio, V

    1991-01-01

    1. Diet, time from last feeding, temperature, season and sexual stage are some of the factors influencing the lipoprotein pattern. 2. Keeping these factors constant species-specific differences observed among lipoprotein patterns of Sparus aurata, Puntazzo puntazzo, Diplodus sargus, Diplodus vulgaris and Dicentrarchus labrax are discussed. 3. Feeding habits and therefore lipid absorption and the rate of lipoprotein maturation process are the factors determining the observed differences. PMID:1764905

  19. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  20. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology. PMID:26370942

  1. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end

    PubMed Central

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology. PMID:26370942

  2. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology.

  3. Arterial Stiffness, Lipoprotein Particle Size, and Lipoprotein Particle Concentration in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Lisa M; Silverstein, Janet H.; Shuster, Jonathan J; Haller, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine if lipoprotein particle abnormalities correlate with arterial stiffness in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D). STUDY DESIGN In this case-control study, we evaluated 70 children, 35 with T1D and 35 controls, ages 10–18 years, matched for age, sex, race, and BMI. Arterial stiffness was assessed by radial tonometry (AI75) and blood was collected for lipoprotein subclass analysis. RESULTS T1D subjects had increased AI75, decreased small LDL particle concentration (P=0.0067), increased large LDL particle concentration (P=0.007), increased large HDL particle concentration (P=0.0012), increased mean LDL particle size (P=0.0028), and increased mean HDL particle size (P<0.0001) compared to controls. No significant correlations were found between lipoprotein subclasses and arterial stiffness in T1D subjects. CONCLUSIONS T1D subjects have increased arterial stiffness when compared to controls, despite a less pro-atherogenic lipoprotein profile, indicating the need to identify other risk factors that correlate with arterial stiffness in T1D youth. PMID:20857838

  4. Exome sequencing: new insights into lipoprotein disorders.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Sali M K; Hegele, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Several next generation sequencing platforms allow for a DNA-to-diagnosis protocol to identify the molecular basis of monogenic dyslipidemias. However, recent reports of the application of whole genome or whole exome sequencing in families with severe dyslipidemias have largely identified genetic variants in known lipid genes. To date, high-throughput DNA sequencing in families with previously uncharacterized monogenic dyslipidemias, have failed to reveal new genes for regulation of plasma lipids. This suggests that rather than sequencing whole genomes or exomes, most patients with monogenic dyslipidemias could be diagnosed using a more dedicated approach that focuses primarily on genes already known to act within lipoprotein metabolic pathways.

  5. Why are low-density lipoproteins atherogenic?

    PubMed Central

    Young, S G; Parthasarathy, S

    1994-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) carry most of the cholesterol in human plasma, and high levels of LDL cholesterol clearly cause heart disease. In recent years, many scientists have focused on elucidating the pathophysiologic steps that lie between elevated levels of LDL in the plasma and atherosclerotic plaques in the arterial wall. A large number of scientific studies indicate that oxidation of LDL within the arterial wall may be an important early step in atherogenesis. The uptake of oxidized LDL by macrophages is a likely explanation for the formation of macrophage foam cells in early atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, oxidized LDL has many other potentially proatherogenic properties. Images PMID:8160466

  6. Synergy between cellulases and pectinases in the hydrolysis of hemp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junhua; Pakarinen, Annukka; Viikari, Liisa

    2013-02-01

    The impact of pectinases in the hydrolysis of fresh, steam-exploded and ensiled hemp was investigated and the synergy between cellulases, pectinases and xylanase in the hydrolysis was evaluated. About half; 59.3% and 46.1% of pectin in the steam-exploded and ensiled hemp, respectively, could be removed by a low dosage of pectinases used. Pectinases were more efficient than xylanase in the hydrolysis of fresh and ensiled hemp whereas xylanase showed higher hydrolytic efficiency than the pectinase preparation used in the hydrolysis of steam-exploded hemp. Clear synergistic action between cellulases and xylanase could be observed in the hydrolysis of steam-exploded hemp. Supplementation of pectinase resulted in clear synergism with cellulases in the hydrolysis of all hemp substrates. Highest hydrolysis yield of steam-exploded hemp was obtained in the hydrolysis with cellulases and xylanase. In the hydrolysis of ensiled hemp, the synergistic action between cellulases and pectinases was more obvious for efficient hydrolysis.

  7. Lipoprotein Receptors Redundantly Participate in Entry of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Chikako; Uemura, Kentaro; Kawachi, Yukako; Shiokawa, Mai; Mori, Hiroyuki; Wada, Masami; Shima, Ryoichi; Okamoto, Toru; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Chayama, Kazuaki; Wakita, Takaji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) are known to be involved in entry of hepatitis C virus (HCV), but their precise roles and their interplay are not fully understood. In this study, deficiency of both SR-B1 and LDLR in Huh7 cells was shown to impair the entry of HCV more strongly than deficiency of either SR-B1 or LDLR alone. In addition, exogenous expression of not only SR-B1 and LDLR but also very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) rescued HCV entry in the SR-B1 and LDLR double-knockout cells, suggesting that VLDLR has similar roles in HCV entry. VLDLR is a lipoprotein receptor, but the level of its hepatic expression was lower than those of SR-B1 and LDLR. Moreover, expression of mutant lipoprotein receptors incapable of binding to or uptake of lipid resulted in no or slight enhancement of HCV entry in the double-knockout cells, suggesting that binding and/or uptake activities of lipid by lipoprotein receptors are essential for HCV entry. In addition, rescue of infectivity in the double-knockout cells by the expression of the lipoprotein receptors was not observed following infection with pseudotype particles bearing HCV envelope proteins produced in non-hepatic cells, suggesting that lipoproteins associated with HCV particles participate in the entry through their interaction with lipoprotein receptors. Buoyant density gradient analysis revealed that HCV utilizes these lipoprotein receptors in a manner dependent on the lipoproteins associated with HCV particles. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoprotein receptors redundantly participate in the entry of HCV. PMID:27152966

  8. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of alpha-1-lipoprotein may aid in the diagnosis of Tangier disease (a hereditary disorder of fat metabolism)....

  9. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of alpha-1-lipoprotein may aid in the diagnosis of Tangier disease (a hereditary disorder of fat metabolism)....

  10. Methylation at CPT1A locus is associated with lipoprotein subfraction profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoprotein subfractions help discriminate cardiometabolic disease risk. Genetic loci validated as associating with lipoprotein measures do not account for a large proportion of the individual variation in lipoprotein measures. We hypothesized that DNA methylation levels across the genome contribute...

  11. [Atherogenic modification of low-density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Sukhorukov, V N; Karagodin, V P; Orekhov, A N

    2016-05-01

    One of the first manifestations of atherosclerosis is accumulation of extra- and intracellular cholesterol esters in the arterial intima. Formation of foam cells is considered as a trigger in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) circulating in human blood is the source of lipids accumulated in the arterial walls. This review considered features and role in atherogenesis different modified forms of LDL: oxidized, small dense, electronegative and especially desialylated LDL. Desialylated LDL of human blood plasma is capable to induce lipid accumulation in cultured cells and it is atherogenic. LDL possesses numerous alterations of protein, carbohydrate and lipid moieties and therefore can be termed multiple-modified LDL. Multiple modification of LDL occurs in human blood plasma and represents a cascade of successive changes in the lipoprotein particle: desialylation, loss of lipids, reduction in the particle size, increase of surface electronegative charge, etc. In addition to intracellular lipid accumulation, stimulatory effects of naturally occurring multiple-modified LDL on other processes involved in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, namely cell proliferation and fibrosis, were shown. PMID:27562992

  12. Resistance Exercise and Lipoproteins in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Joshua S.; Phillips, Melody D.; Mitchell, Joel B.; Patrizi, Robert; Pleasant, Ronique N.; Hein, Robert M.; Menzies, Robert D.; Barbee, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The specific aims of this study were to quantify the effects of 12 weeks of resistance training, as well as a single session of resistance exercise on lipids and lipoproteins in obese, postmenopausal women. Twenty-one obese, postmenopausal women, not on hormone replacement therapy (age = 65.9 ± 0.5 yr; BMI = 32.7 ± 0.8 kg/m2), were randomly assigned to control (n=12) and exercise (n=9) groups matched for age and BMI. For 12 weeks, 3 days/week, the exercise group performed 10 whole body resistance exercises (3 sets at 8-RM). Fasting (10 hr) blood samples were collected immediately prior to and 24 hr after the first and last exercise and control session. Serum was assayed for concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-C, HDL-C, HDL2-C, HDL3-C, non-HDL-C and TC:HDL and LDL:HDL ratios. The exercise group exhibited a significant (P < 0.01) improvement in muscular strength, but no change in BMI, body mass or body composition post-training. Total cholesterol, LDL-C and non-HDL-C were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the exercise compared to the control group following the 12 weeks of resistance training. Whole body resistance training provides obese, postmenopausal women a non-pharmacological approach for the reduction of lipid and lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations. PMID:21086242

  13. Turkish Heart Study: lipids, lipoproteins, and apolipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Mahley, R W; Palaoğlu, K E; Atak, Z; Dawson-Pepin, J; Langlois, A M; Cheung, V; Onat, H; Fulks, P; Mahley, L L; Vakar, F

    1995-04-01

    We examined the plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and selected apolipoproteins in approximately 9,000 men and women from six different regions of Turkey with markedly different diets, ranging from an Aegean coast diet high in olive oil (plasma cholesteryl ester fatty acids enriched in monounsaturated fatty acids) to an inland Anatolian diet high in meat and dairy products (plasma cholesteryl esters enriched in saturated fatty acids). The rural population consuming an olive oil-rich diet had the lowest plasma cholesterol levels (men, 149 mg/dl; women, 150 mg/dl). The urban populations of Istanbul and Adana had higher plasma cholesterol levels (men, 202 and 184 mg/dl, respectively; women, 181 and 190 mg/dl, respectively). Affluent men had the highest cholesterol levels (207 mg/dl). The low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels tended to parallel the total cholesterol levels (highest for Istanbul men at 136 mg/dl and lowest for Aegean coast men and women at approximately 100 mg/dl). Strikingly, the Turkish people were found to have very low levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) (mean values for all six regions: men, 34-38 mg/dl; women, 37-45 mg/dl) and total cholesterol/HDL-C ratios that were high (mean values for all six regions: men, 4.5-5.5; women, 3.9-5.0). The low HDL-C levels appear to be caused, at least in part, by a genetic factor. Triglyceride levels also tended to be high in Turkish men (approximately 120-150 mg/dl) and women (approximately 90-110 mg/dl). Thus, even though the total plasma cholesterol levels are not excessively elevated in comparison to those in other populations, the presence of low HDL-C or low HDL-C coupled with mildly elevated triglyceride levels may represent a significant risk factor for heart disease in the Turkish population. Affluence and higher education were associated with higher cholesterol levels. Lack of physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption also tended to be associated with a

  14. Enzymatic saccharification of pretreated wheat straw: comparison of solids-recycling, sequential hydrolysis and batch hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Pihlajaniemi, Ville; Sipponen, Satu; Sipponen, Mika H; Pastinen, Ossi; Laakso, Simo

    2014-02-01

    In the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose materials, the recycling of the solid residue has previously been considered within the context of enzyme recycling. In this study, a steady state investigation of a solids-recycling process was made with pretreated wheat straw and compared to sequential and batch hydrolysis at constant reaction times, substrate feed and liquid and enzyme consumption. Compared to batch hydrolysis, the recycling and sequential processes showed roughly equal hydrolysis yields, while the volumetric productivity was significantly increased. In the 72h process the improvement was 90% due to an increased reaction consistency, while the solids feed was 16% of the total process constituents. The improvement resulted primarily from product removal, which was equally efficient in solids-recycling and sequential hydrolysis processes. No evidence of accumulation of enzymes beyond the accumulation of the substrate was found in recycling. A mathematical model of solids-recycling was constructed, based on a geometrical series.

  15. A clustering analysis of lipoprotein diameters in the metabolic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of smaller low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been associated with atherosclerosis risk, and the insulin resistance (IR) underlying the metabolic syndrome (MetS). In addition, some research has supported the association of very low-, low- and high-density lipoprotein (VLDL HDL) particle...

  16. Microchip-based human serum atherogenic lipoprotein profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Zhang, Wei; Wan, Jun; Liu, Weiwei; Yu, Bo; Jin, Qinghui; Guan, Ming

    2014-12-15

    Owing to the mounting evidence of serum lipid changes in atherosclerosis, there has been increasing interest in developing new methods for analyzing atherogenic lipoprotein profiles. The separation of lipoprotein and lipoprotein subclasses has been demonstrated using a microchip capillary electrophoresis (CE) system [Chromatographia 74 (2011) 799-805]. In contrast to this previous study, the current report demonstrates that sdLDL peak efficiencies can be improved dramatically by adding gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to the sample. Moreover, NBD C6-ceramide was identified as a satisfactory dye for specific labeling and quantitation of individual serum lipoproteins. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by comparison with ultracentrifuge separated small, dense, low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL). A high correlation was observed between these two methods for sdLDL cholesterol. Lipid levels were investigated between atherosclerotic patients and healthy controls. The variation of serum atherogenic lipoprotein profiles for atherosclerotic patients pre- and post-treatment was assessed by microchip CE. This method has potential for the rapid and sensitive detection of different lipoprotein classes as well as their subclasses and, therefore, is suitable for routine clinical applications. Microchip-based atherogenic lipoprotein profile assays will greatly improve the analysis of risk factors in atherosclerosis and will provide useful information for monitoring the effect of therapies on atherosclerotic disease.

  17. Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-07-16

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  18. Impact of Lipoprotein Lipase Gene Polymorphism, S447X, on Postprandial Triacylglycerol and Glucose Response to Sequential Meal Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Shatwan, Israa M.; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Williams, Christine M.; Lovegrove, Julie A.; Jackson, Kim G.; Vimaleswaran, Karani S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein. Given that postprandial assessment of lipoprotein metabolism may provide a more physiological perspective of disturbances in lipoprotein homeostasis compared to assessment in the fasting state, we have investigated the influence of two commonly studied LPL polymorphisms (rs320, HindIII; rs328, S447X) on postprandial lipaemia, in 261 participants using a standard sequential meal challenge. S447 homozygotes had lower fasting HDL-C (p = 0.015) and a trend for higher fasting TAG (p = 0.057) concentrations relative to the 447X allele carriers. In the postprandial state, there was an association of the S447X polymorphism with postprandial TAG and glucose, where S447 homozygotes had 12% higher TAG area under the curve (AUC) (p = 0.037), 8.4% higher glucose-AUC (p = 0.006) and 22% higher glucose-incremental area under the curve (IAUC) (p = 0.042). A significant gene–gender interaction was observed for fasting TAG (p = 0.004), TAG-AUC (Pinteraction = 0.004) and TAG-IAUC (Pinteraction = 0.016), where associations were only evident in men. In conclusion, our study provides novel findings of an effect of LPL S447X polymorphism on the postprandial glucose and gender-specific impact of the polymorphism on fasting and postprandial TAG concentrations in response to sequential meal challenge in healthy participants. PMID:26999119

  19. Impact of Lipoprotein Lipase Gene Polymorphism, S447X, on Postprandial Triacylglycerol and Glucose Response to Sequential Meal Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Shatwan, Israa M; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Williams, Christine M; Lovegrove, Julie A; Jackson, Kim G; Vimaleswaran, Karani S

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein. Given that postprandial assessment of lipoprotein metabolism may provide a more physiological perspective of disturbances in lipoprotein homeostasis compared to assessment in the fasting state, we have investigated the influence of two commonly studied LPL polymorphisms (rs320, HindIII; rs328, S447X) on postprandial lipaemia, in 261 participants using a standard sequential meal challenge. S447 homozygotes had lower fasting HDL-C (p = 0.015) and a trend for higher fasting TAG (p = 0.057) concentrations relative to the 447X allele carriers. In the postprandial state, there was an association of the S447X polymorphism with postprandial TAG and glucose, where S447 homozygotes had 12% higher TAG area under the curve (AUC) (p = 0.037), 8.4% higher glucose-AUC (p = 0.006) and 22% higher glucose-incremental area under the curve (IAUC) (p = 0.042). A significant gene-gender interaction was observed for fasting TAG (p = 0.004), TAG-AUC (Pinteraction = 0.004) and TAG-IAUC (Pinteraction = 0.016), where associations were only evident in men. In conclusion, our study provides novel findings of an effect of LPL S447X polymorphism on the postprandial glucose and gender-specific impact of the polymorphism on fasting and postprandial TAG concentrations in response to sequential meal challenge in healthy participants. PMID:26999119

  20. Differential activation of the Toll-like receptor 2/6 complex by lipoproteins of Streptococcus suis serotypes 2 and 9.

    PubMed

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J; Rebel, Johanna M J; Smits, Mari A; van Putten, Jos P M; Smith, Hilde E

    2010-07-14

    Streptococcus suis causes invasive infections in pigs and occasionally in humans. Worldwide, S. suis serotype 2 is most frequently isolated from diseased piglets, but the less virulent serotype 9 is emerging, at least in Europe. We compared the activation of human Toll-like receptors (hTLRs) by S. suis serotype 2 and 9 strains to better understand the role of the innate immune response in fighting S. suis infections. Neither live nor heat-killed log phase grown S. suis activated the hTLR1/2, hTLR2/6 and hTLR4/MD-2 complexes. However, the hTLR2/6 complex was specifically activated by both serotypes after disruption of the cell wall synthesis using penicillin. Activation levels of the hTLR2/6 complex were higher for serotype 9 strains compared to serotype 2 strains suggesting intrinsic differences in cell wall composition between both serotypes. The hTLR2/6 activating fractions decreased in molecular size after digestion with proteinase K and were sensitive for lipoprotein lipase digestion and NaOH hydrolysis, indicating lipoprotein(s) as active component(s). Overall, our results indicate that S. suis lipoproteins activate TLR2/6 but not TLR1/2 and that the clinically different serotypes 2 and 9 display differential release of TLR ligand when cell wall integrity is compromised.

  1. Lipoprotein ratios: Physiological significance and clinical usefulness in cardiovascular prevention

    PubMed Central

    Millán, Jesús; Pintó, Xavier; Muñoz, Anna; Zúñiga, Manuel; Rubiés-Prat, Joan; Pallardo, Luis Felipe; Masana, Luis; Mangas, Alipio; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; González-Santos, Pedro; Ascaso, Juan F; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentration has been the prime index of cardiovascular disease risk and the main target for therapy. However, several lipoprotein ratios or “atherogenic indices” have been defined in an attempt to optimize the predictive capacity of the lipid profile. In this review, we summarize their pathophysiological aspects, and highlight the rationale for using these lipoprotein ratios as cardiovascular risk factors in clinical practice, specifying their cut-off risk levels and a target for lipid-lowering therapy. Total/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and LDL/HDL cholesterol ratios are risk indicators with greater predictive value than isolated parameters used independently, particularly LDL. Future recommendations regarding the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia, including instruments for calculating cardiovascular risk or action guidelines, should include the lipoprotein ratios with greater predictive power which, in view of the evidence-based results, are none other than those which include HDL cholesterol. PMID:19774217

  2. The fibrate drug gemfibrozil disrupts lipoprotein metabolism in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Prindiville, John S; Mennigen, Jan A; Zamora, Jake M; Moon, Thomas W; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2011-03-15

    Gemfibrozil (GEM) is a fibrate drug consistently found in effluents from sewage treatment plants. This study characterizes the pharmacological effects of GEM on the plasma lipoproteins of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Our goals were to quantify the impact of the drug on: 1) lipid constituents of lipoproteins (phospholipids (PL), triacylglycerol (TAG), and cholesterol), 2) lipoprotein classes (high, low and very low density lipoproteins), and 3) fatty acid composition of lipoproteins. Potential mechanisms of GEM action were investigated by measuring lipoprotein lipase activity (LPL) and the hepatic gene expression of LPL and of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α, β, and γ isoforms. GEM treatment resulted in decreased plasma lipoprotein levels (-29%) and a reduced size of all lipoprotein classes (lower PL:TAG ratios). However, the increase in HDL-cholesterol elicited by GEM in humans failed to be observed in trout. Therefore, HDL-cholesterol cannot be used to assess the impact of the drug on fish. GEM also modified lipoprotein composition by reducing the abundance of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, thereby potentially reducing the nutritional quality of exposed fish. The relative gene expression of LPL was increased, but the activity of the enzyme was not, and we found no evidence for the activation of PPAR pathways. The depressing effects of GEM on fish lipoproteins demonstrated here may be a concern in view of the widespread presence of fibrates in aquatic environments. Work is needed to test whether exposure to environmental concentrations of these drugs jeopardizes the capacity of fish for reproduction, temperature acclimation or migratory behaviors. PMID:21195106

  3. Lipoproteins modulate expression of the macrophage scavenger receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Han, J.; Nicholson, A. C.

    1998-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors (MSR) bind and internalize oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL), a modified lipoprotein that is thought to be the proximal source of lipids that accumulate within cells of atherosclerotic lesions. The role of lipoproteins in modulating MSR expression are undetermined. We studied the effect of lipoproteins, native and modified LDL (acetylated LDL (AcLDL) and OxLDL) on the expression of the MSR in RAW cells, a murine macrophage cell line. Exposure to lipoproteins resulted in a marked induction of MSR mRNA expression (12- to 17-fold) with OxLDL and AcLDL having the greatest effects. Maximum induction occurred 1 hour after treatment with OxLDL and LDL. AcLDL induced a fourfold increase at 1 hour followed by a return to baseline and peak expression (sixfold) at 14 hours. Scavenger receptor function, as measured by 125I-AcLDL binding, was only modestly increased in response to lipoproteins. Incubation of macrophages with a cholesterol acceptor particle resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in MSR mRNA expression, which paralleled cholesterol loss from the cells. OxLDL did not affect MSR mRNA stability, implying that MSR mRNA was transcriptionally regulated by lipoproteins. Finally, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from mice following intraperitoneal injection of lipoproteins. Macrophage expression of MSR mRNA was significantly (16-fold) increased by LDL, AcLDL, or OxLDL relative to mice infused with phosphate-buffered saline. This demonstration that exposure to lipoproteins increases expression of the macrophage scavenger receptor implies that lipoproteins can further contribute to foam cell development in atherosclerosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9626069

  4. The fibrate drug gemfibrozil disrupts lipoprotein metabolism in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Prindiville, John S. Mennigen, Jan A.; Zamora, Jake M.; Moon, Thomas W.; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2011-03-15

    Gemfibrozil (GEM) is a fibrate drug consistently found in effluents from sewage treatment plants. This study characterizes the pharmacological effects of GEM on the plasma lipoproteins of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Our goals were to quantify the impact of the drug on: 1) lipid constituents of lipoproteins (phospholipids (PL), triacylglycerol (TAG), and cholesterol), 2) lipoprotein classes (high, low and very low density lipoproteins), and 3) fatty acid composition of lipoproteins. Potential mechanisms of GEM action were investigated by measuring lipoprotein lipase activity (LPL) and the hepatic gene expression of LPL and of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} isoforms. GEM treatment resulted in decreased plasma lipoprotein levels (- 29%) and a reduced size of all lipoprotein classes (lower PL:TAG ratios). However, the increase in HDL-cholesterol elicited by GEM in humans failed to be observed in trout. Therefore, HDL-cholesterol cannot be used to assess the impact of the drug on fish. GEM also modified lipoprotein composition by reducing the abundance of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, thereby potentially reducing the nutritional quality of exposed fish. The relative gene expression of LPL was increased, but the activity of the enzyme was not, and we found no evidence for the activation of PPAR pathways. The depressing effects of GEM on fish lipoproteins demonstrated here may be a concern in view of the widespread presence of fibrates in aquatic environments. Work is needed to test whether exposure to environmental concentrations of these drugs jeopardizes the capacity of fish for reproduction, temperature acclimation or migratory behaviors.

  5. Analytical capillary isotachophoresis: a routine technique for the analysis of lipoproteins and lipoprotein subfractions in whole serum.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, G; Borgmann, U; Assmann, G

    1985-02-22

    A capillary isotachophoretic separation technique was developed for lipoproteins in native serum which, compared with previous electrophoretic techniques, has negligible molecular sieve effects, does not need gel casting, is suitable for whole serum and has a high discriminative power for lipoprotein subfractions. The technique is based on pre-staining whole serum lipoproteins for 30 min at 4 degrees C before separation of 0.5 microliter of the sample in a free-flow capillary system (0.5 mm I.D.) with discontinuous buffer system. In normolipidaemic sera, high-density (HDL) and low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) are separated into two major subpopulations according to their net electric mobility. The identification of these fractions was confirmed by substitution with ultracentrifugally isolated lipoproteins and by their complete absence from Tangier and abetalipoproteinaemic serum. Triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) revealed a defined zone between the HDL and LDL subpopulations. Our preliminary results indicate that the separation of human whole serum lipoproteins by capillary isotachophoresis is a promising method for the determination of lipoprotein subfractions.

  6. Hydrolysis of iodine: equilibria at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A.; Ramette, R.W.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrolysis (or disproportionation) of molecular iodine to form iodate and iodide ions has been studied by emf measurements over the temperature range, 3.8/sup 0/ to 209.0/sup 0/C. The interpretation of these results required a knowledge of the formation constant for triiodide ion and the acid dissociation constant of iodic acid, both of which were measured as a function of temperature. The resulting thermodynamic data have been incorporated into a general computer model describing the hydrolysis equilibria of iodine as a function of initial concentration, pH and temperature.

  7. Apolipoprotein B-100 containing lipoprotein metabolism in subjects with lipoprotein lipase gene mutations (106/120)

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Esther M M; Russell, Betsy S; Olson, Eric; Sun, Sam Z; Diffenderfer, Margaret R; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Keilson, Leonard; Barrett, P Hugh R; Schaefer, Ernst J; Sprecher, Dennis L

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigated the impact of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene mutations on apolipoprotein (apo) B-100 metabolism. Methods and Results We studied 3 subjects with familial LPL deficiency (FLD), 14 subjects heterozygous for the LPL gene mutations, Gly188Glu, Trp64Stop and Ile194Thr, and 10 control subjects. Very-low density lipoprotein (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-apoB-100 kinetics were determined in the fed state using stable isotope methods and compartmental modeling. Compared with controls, FLD had markedly elevated plasma triglycerides and lower VLDL-apoB-100 fractional catabolic rate (FCR), IDL-apoB-100 FCR, VLDL-to-IDL conversion and VLDL-apoB-100 production rate (PR) (p<0.01). Compared with controls, Gly188Glu had higher plasma triglyceride, VLDL- and IDL-apoB-100 concentrations, and lower VLDL- and IDL-apoB-100 FCR (p<0.05). Plasma triglycerides were not different but IDL-apoB-100 concentration and PR, and VLDL-to-IDL conversion were lower in Trp64Stop compared with controls (p<0.05). No differences between controls and Ile194Thr were observed. Conclusions Our results confirm that hypertriglyceridemia is a key feature of familial LPL deficiency. This is due to impaired VLDL- and IDL-apoB-100 catabolism and VLDL-to-IDL conversion. Single allele mutations of the LPL gene result in modest to elevated plasma triglycerides. The changes in plasma triglycerides and apoB-100 kinetics are attributable to the effects of the LPL genotype. PMID:22095987

  8. Subendothelial retention of lipoprotein (a). Evidence that reduced heparan sulfate promotes lipoprotein binding to subendothelial matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Pillarisetti, S; Paka, L; Obunike, J C; Berglund, L; Goldberg, I J

    1997-01-01

    Vessel wall subendothelial extracellular matrix, a dense mesh formed of collagens, fibronectin, laminin, and proteoglycans, has important roles in lipid and lipoprotein retention and cell adhesion. In atherosclerosis, vessel wall heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) are decreased and we therefore tested whether selective loss of HSPG affects lipoprotein retention. A matrix synthesized by aortic endothelial cells and a commercially available matrix (Matrigel; , Rutherford, NJ) were used. Treatment of matrix with heparinase/heparitinase (1 U/ml each) increased LDL binding by approximately 1.5-fold. Binding of lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] to both subendothelial matrix and Matrigel(R) increased 2-10-fold when the HSPG were removed by heparinase treatment. Incubation of endothelial cells with oxidized LDL (OxLDL) or lysolecithin resulted in decreased matrix proteoglycans and increased Lp(a) retention by matrix. The effect of OxLDL or lysolecithin on endothelial PG was abolished in the presence of HDL. The decrease in matrix HSPG was associated with production of a heparanase-like activity by OxLDL-stimulated endothelial cells. To test whether removal of HSPG exposes fibronectin, a candidate Lp(a) binding protein in the matrix, antifibronectin antibodies were used. The increased Lp(a) binding after HSPG removal was inhibited 60% by antifibronectin antibodies. Similarly, the increased Lp(a) binding to matrix from OxLDL-treated endothelial cells was inhibited by antifibronectin antibodies. We hypothesize that atherogenic lipoproteins stimulate endothelial cell production of heparanase. This enzyme reduces HSPG which in turn promotes Lp(a) retention. PMID:9259586

  9. Recombinant bacterial lipoproteins as vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Chong, Pele

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant bacterial lipoproteins (RLP) with built-in immuno-stimulating properties for novel subunit vaccine development are reviewed. This platform technology offers the following advantages: easily converts antigens into highly immunogenic RLP using a fusion sequence containing lipobox; the lipid moiety of RLP is recognized as the danger signals in the immune system through the Toll-like receptor 2, so both innate and adaptive immune responses can be induced by RLP; serves as an efficient and cost-effective bioprocess for producing RLP in Escherichia coli and the feasibility and safety of this core platform technology has been successfully demonstrated in animal model studies including meningococcal group B subunit vaccine, dengue subunit vaccine, novel subunit vaccine against Clostridium difficile-associated diseases and HPV-based immunotherapeutic vaccines. PMID:26420467

  10. Triglycerides, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in rats exposed to premium motor spirit fumes

    PubMed Central

    Aberare, Ogbevire L.; Okuonghae, Patrick; Mukoro, Nathaniel; Dirisu, John O.; Osazuwa, Favour; Odigie, Elvis; Omoregie, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background: Deliberate and regular exposure to premium motor spirit fumes is common and could be a risk factor for liver disease in those who are occupationally exposed. A possible association between premium motor spirit fumes and plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol using a rodent model could provide new insights in the pathology of diseases where cellular dysfunction is an established risk factor. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effect of premium motor spirit fumes on lipids and lipoproteins in workers occupationally exposed to premium motor spirit fumes using rodent model. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five Wister albino rats (of both sexes) were used for this study between the 4th of August and 7th of September, 2010. The rats were divided into five groups of five rats each. Group 1 rats were not exposed to premium motor spirit fumes (control group), group 2 rats were exposed for 1 hour daily, group 3 for 3 hours daily, group 4 for 5 hours daily and group 5 for 7 hours daily. The experiment lasted for a period of 4 weeks. Blood samples obtained from all the groups after 4 weeks of exposure were used for the estimation of plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein- cholesterol and low density lipoprotein- cholesterol. Result: Results showed significant increase in means of plasma total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels (P<0.05). The mean triglyceride and total body weight were significantly lower (P<0.05) in the exposed group when compared with the unexposed. The plasma level of high density lipoprotein, the ratio of low density lipoprotein to high density lipoprotein and the ratio of total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein did not differ significantly in exposed subjects when compared with the control group. Conclusion: These results showed that frequent exposure to petrol fumes may be highly

  11. The effects of oral contraceptives on plasma lipids and lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    1988-01-01

    It has been well documented that low-density lipoproteins and intermediate-density lipoproteins play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Data also indicate that high-density lipoproteins (HDLs), have potentially antiatherogenic effects. The individual estrogen and progestogen components of oral contraceptives (OCs) have been shown to affect plasma lipoproteins in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. This effect depends on both the type of steroid used and the dose of each of the OC components. Estrogen and progestogen have opposing effects on lipoprotein physiology. Estrogens raise the level of HDL cholesterol, while progestogens tend to lower HDL levels. Thus, in OC formulations, as the ratio of estrogen to progestogen increases in favor of estrogen, there is a greater increase in HDL cholesterol--a potentially beneficial effect. Although there is no direct evidence that favorable lipoprotein changes produced by OCs are cardioprotective, the physician prescribing an OC should minimize adverse lipoprotein effects by prescribing a balanced low-dose, low-impact formulation.

  12. Triglycerides and atherogenic lipoproteins: rationale for lipid management.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    1998-07-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical studies have demonstrated a relation between plasma triglyceride levels and risk of coronary artery disease and an amplification of risk with combined elevations of triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. In patients with coronary disease, angiographic progression and clinical events have been correlated with concentrations of smaller very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) and intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), consistent with evidence for enhanced atherogenicity of lipolytic products of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism, including postprandial lipoproteins. IDL levels also have been shown to be strongly and independently predictive of progression of carotid artery intimal-medial thickness, a measure of early atherogenesis that is related to coronary disease risk. Although there is evidence that these triglyceride-rich lipoprotein species may have direct atherogenic effects, other lipoprotein changes associated with altered triglyceride metabolism may be of particular importance in the development of coronary artery disease. These include reductions in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and increases in small, dense LDL particles (LDL subclass pattern B). Because of the strong interrelations among elevated triglyceride, reduced HDL, and small dense LDL, it is difficult to use statistical techniques to determine the independent contributions of these traits to coronary disease risk. Based on their biologic properties, it is likely that each are involved in multiple steps of the disease process. Moreover, this cluster of lipoprotein changes is associated with other conditions that can promote vascular disease, including increases in coagulation factors and reduced insulin sensitivity. Analyses from intervention trials in patients with coronary disease have indicated that measurement of plasma triglyceride and LDL particle distributions can be of value in predicting the benefits of specific lipid-altering therapies

  13. Lipoprotein mediated lipid uptake in oocytes of polychaetes (Annelida).

    PubMed

    Schenk, Sven; Hoeger, Ulrich

    2009-08-01

    The uptake of the 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled sex-unspecific Nereis lipoprotein was investigated in oocytes of the nereidid polychaetes Nereis virens and Platynereis dumerilii. The fluorescence label was first observed in endocytic vesicles (<1 microm diameter), which later fused to larger vesicles (2-3 microm); these were finally incorporated into existing unlabeled yolk granules (5-6 microm). In Platynereis oocytes, the fusion of endocytic vesicles was delayed in oocytes at their final stage of development compared with those at an early stage of development. Lipoprotein double-labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and DiI revealed that both the protein and the lipid moiety remained co-localized during incorporation into the yolk granules of the oocyte. No labeling of the cytoplasmic lipid droplets was observed. In N. virens, unlabeled Nereis lipoprotein was effective as a competitive inhibitor of DiI-labeled Nereis lipoprotein. Ligand blot experiments demonstrated the presence of a lipoprotein receptor with an apparent molecular mass of 120 kDa, which is different from that of the known yolk protein receptor. This indicates the presence, in the polychaete oocyte, of two distinct receptors mediating yolk protein and lipoprotein uptake, respectively. Thus, the sex-unspecific lipoprotein contributes to the lipid supply of the growing oocyte in addition to the known uptake of the yolk-protein-associated lipids. The absence of label in the cytoplasmic lipid droplets, even after prolonged incubation with labeled lipoprotein, suggests that these lipids arise either by the breakdown and resynthesis of lipoprotein-derived lipids and/or by de novo synthesis within the oocyte.

  14. Phosphatase hydrolysis of organic phosphorus compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphatases are diverse groups of enzymes that deserve special attention because of the significant roles they play in mineralizing organic phosphorus (P) into inorganic available form. For getting more insight on the enzymatically hydrolysis of organic P, in this work, we compared the catalytic pa...

  15. Optimization of dilute acid hydrolysis of Enteromorpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Dawei; Liu, Haiyan; Li, Fuchao; Jiang, Peng; Qin, Song

    2011-11-01

    Acid hydrolysis is a simple and direct way to hydrolyze polysaccharides in biomass into fermentable sugars. To produce fermentable sugars effectively and economically for fuel ethanol, we have investigated the hydrolysis of Enteromorpha using acids that are typically used to hydrolyze biomass: H2SO4, HCl, H3PO4 and C4H4O4 (maleic acid). 5%(w/w) Enteromorpha biomass was treated for different times (30, 60, and 90 min) and with different acid concentrations (0.6, 1.0, 1.4, 1.8, and 2.2%, w/w) at 121°C. H2SO4 was the most effective acid in this experiment. We then analyzed the hydrolysis process in H2SO4 in detail using high performance liquid chromatography. At a sulfuric acid concentration of 1.8% and treatment time of 60 min, the yield of ethanol fermentable sugars (glucose and xylose) was high, (230.5 mg/g dry biomass, comprising 175.2 mg/g glucose and 55.3 mg/g xylose), with 48.6% of total reducing sugars being ethanol fermentable. Therefore, Enteromorpha could be a good candidate for production of fuel ethanol. In future work, the effects of temperature and biomass concentration on hydrolysis, and also the fermentation of the hydrolysates to ethanol fuel should be focused on.

  16. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-07-14

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  17. Hydrolysis of DNA by 17 snake venoms.

    PubMed

    de Roodt, Adolfo Rafael; Litwin, Silvana; Angel, Sergio O

    2003-08-01

    DNA hydrolysis caused by venoms of 17 species of snakes was studied by different methodologies. Endonucleolytic activity was tested by incubation of the venoms with the plasmid pBluescript and subsequent visualization of the electrophoretic patterns in 1% agarose gels stained with ethidium bromide. DNA was sequentially degraded, from supercoiled to opened circle, to linear form, in a concentration dependent manner. The highest hydrolytic activity was observed in Bothrops (B.) neuwiedii and Naja (N.) siamensis venoms. Exonucleolytic activity was analyzed on pBluescript digested with SmaI or EcoRI. All venoms caused complete hydrolysis after 2 h of incubation. SDS-PAGE analysis in gels containing calf thymus DNA showed that the hydrolytic bands were located at approximately 30 kDa. DNA degradation was studied by radial hydrolysis in 1% agarose gels containing calf thymus DNA plus ethidium bromide and visualized by UV light. Venom of B. neuwiedii showed the highest activity whereas those of B. ammodytoides and Ovophis okinavensis (P<0.05) showed the lowest activity. Antibodies against venom of B. neuwiedii or N. siamensis neutralized the DNAse activity of both venoms. In conclusion, venom from different snakes showed endo- and exonucleolytic activity on DNA. The inhibition of DNA hydrolysis by EDTA and heterologous antibodies suggests similarities in the structure of the venom components involved.

  18. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems.

  19. Thioglycoside hydrolysis catalyzed by {beta}-glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Hong; Byers, Larry D.

    2007-10-26

    Sweet almond {beta}-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) has been shown to have significant thioglycohydrolase activity. While the K{sub m} values for the S- and O-glycosides are similar, the k{sub cat} values are about 1000-times lower for the S-glycosides. Remarkably, the pH-profile for k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl thioglucoside (pNPSG) shows the identical dependence on a deprotonated carboxylate (pK{sub a} 4.5) and a protonated group (pK{sub a} 6.7) as does the pH-profile for hydrolysis of the corresponding O-glycoside. Not surprisingly, in spite of the requirement for the presence of this protonated group in catalytically active {beta}-glucosidase, thioglucoside hydrolysis does not involve general acid catalysis. There is no solvent kinetic isotope effect on the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of pNPSG.

  20. Cooperation between hepatic cholesteryl ester hydrolase and scavenger receptor BI for hydrolysis of HDL-CE.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Quan; Bie, Jinghua; Wang, Jing; Ghosh, Siddhartha S; Ghosh, Shobha

    2013-11-01

    Liver is the sole organ responsible for the final elimination of cholesterol from the body either as biliary cholesterol or bile acids. High density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived cholesterol is the major source of biliary sterols and represents a mechanism for the removal of cholesterol from peripheral tissues including artery wall-associated macrophage foam cells. Via selective uptake through scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), HDL-cholesterol is thought to be directly secreted into bile, and HDL cholesteryl esters (HDL-CEs) enter the hepatic metabolic pool and need to be hydrolyzed prior to conversion to bile acids. However, the identity of hepatic CE hydrolase (CEH) as well as the role of SR-BI in bile acid synthesis remains elusive. In this study we examined the role of human hepatic CEH (CES1) in facilitating hydrolysis of SR-BI-delivered HDL-CEs. Over-expression of CEH led to increased hydrolysis of HDL-[³H]CE in primary hepatocytes and SR-BI expression was required for this process. Intracellular CEH associated with BODIPY-CE delivered by selective uptake via SR-BI. CEH and SR-BI expression enhanced the movement of [³H]label from HDL-[³H]CE to bile acids in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that SR-BI-delivered HDL-CEs are hydrolyzed by hepatic CEH and utilized for bile acid synthesis. PMID:23990661

  1. The Role of Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A₂ in a Murine Model of Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, G. L.; Boldison, J.; Copland, D. A.; Adamson, P.; Gale, D.; Brandt, M.; Nicholson, L. B.; Dick, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage activation is, in part, regulated via hydrolysis of oxidised low density lipoproteins by Lipoprotein-Associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), resulting in increased macrophage migration, pro-inflammatory cytokine release and chemokine expression. In uveitis, tissue damage is mediated as a result of macrophage activation; hence inhibition of Lp-PLA2 may limit macrophage activation and protect the tissue. Utilising Lp-PLA2 gene-deficient (KO) mice and a pharmacological inhibitor of Lp-PLA2 (SB-435495) we aimed to determine the effect of Lp-PLA2 suppression in mediating retinal protection in a model of autoimmune retinal inflammation, experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Following immunisation with RBP-3 (IRBP) 1–20 or 161–180 peptides, clinical disease was monitored and severity assessed, infiltrating leukocytes were enumerated by flow cytometry and tissue destruction quantified by histology. Despite ablation of Lp-PLA2 enzyme activity in Lp-PLA2 KO mice or wild-type mice treated with SB-435495, the number of infiltrating CD45+ cells in the retina was equivalent to control EAU animals, and there was no reduction in disease severity. Thus, despite the reported beneficial effects of therapeutic Lp-PLA2 depletion in a variety of vascular inflammatory conditions, we were unable to attenuate disease, show delayed disease onset or prevent progression of EAU in Lp-PLA2 KO mice. Although EAU exhibits inflammatory vasculopathy there is no overt defect in lipid metabolism and given the lack of effect following Lp-PLA2 suppression, these data support the hypothesis that sub-acute autoimmune inflammatory disease progresses independently of Lp-PLA2 activity. PMID:25874928

  2. Associations of hepatic and lipoprotein lipase activities with changes in dietary composition and low density lipoprotein subclasses.

    PubMed

    Campos, H; Dreon, D M; Krauss, R M

    1995-03-01

    To test whether lipoprotein lipase or hepatic lipase activities are associated with lipoprotein subclasses, and to assess the effects of dietary manipulations on these associations, enzyme activities were measured in postheparin plasma (75 U heparin/kg) from 43 healthy men who were randomly allocated to a low-fat (24% fat, 60% carbohydrate) and a high-fat (46% fat, 38% carbohydrate) diet for 6 weeks each in a cross-over design. The high-fat diet significantly increased both lipoprotein lipase (+20%, P = 0.02) and hepatic lipase (+8%, P = 0.007) activities. On both diets, hepatic lipase activity was significantly positively correlated (P < 0.01) with plasma apolipoprotein (apo)B concentrations, and with levels of small dense low density lipoprotein (LDL) III, measured by analytic ultracentrifugation as mass of lipoproteins of flotation rate (Sof) 3-5, while lipoprotein lipase activity was inversely associated with levels of LDL III (P < 0.05). Despite the cross-sectional correlations, increased hepatic lipase activity was not significantly correlated with the reduction in LDL III mass observed on the high-fat diet. Rather, changes in hepatic lipase were correlated inversely with changes in small very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) of Sof 20-40, and small intermediate density lipoproteins (VLDL) of Sof 10-16. Moreover, changes in lipoprotein lipase activity were not significantly correlated with changes in small LDL, but were positively associated with changes in small IDL of Sof 10-14, and large LDL I of Sof 7-10. Thus, while increased levels of small dense LDL are associated with a metabolic state characterized by relatively increased hepatic lipase and decreased lipoprotein lipase activity, changes in these enzymes do not appear to be primary determinants of diet-induced changes in levels of this LDL subfraction. On the other hand, increased lipoprotein lipase activity induced by high-fat feeding may contribute to the accumulation in plasma of both large LDL I

  3. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-10-05

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF).

  4. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism. PMID:23769508

  5. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism.

  6. Mycoplasmal lipoprotein p37 binds human protein HER2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Wu, Lijuan; Fang, Cheng; Nie, Rong; Wang, Jiamou; Wang, Xuan; Liu, Wenbin

    2016-11-01

    Mycoplasmas are a group of microbes that can cause human diseases. The mycoplasmal lipoprotein p37 promotes cancer metastasis, at least in part, by interacting with EGFR. In this study, we show that the p37 lipoprotein binds another member of the EGFR family, HER2, through the HER2 extracellular domain. The binding of p37-HER2 promotes phosphorylation of HER2 and activates the downstream signaling molecule Erk1/2. Because the HER2 signaling pathway contributes to breast tumor metastasis, our results imply that the mycoplasmal lipoprotein p37 may also be involved in breast cancer metastasis. This study contributes to our understanding of mycoplasmal lipoprotein p37 function and its potential involvement in tumorigenesis. PMID:27664744

  7. A quantitative method for blood lipoproteins using cellulose acetate electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, H. N.; Howard, A. N.

    1971-01-01

    A rapid, inexpensive, and quantitative method is described for obtaining the levels of plasma very low, low, and high density lipoproteins using cellulose acetate electrophoresis and lipid assays without prior separation by ultracentrifuge or other techniques. It involves separation of the lipoproteins by cellulose acetate electrophoresis, followed by their identification with the ozone-Schiff reaction. The total lipoprotein concentration is estimated from the total plasma phospholipid, and the percentage of each component obtained by densitometric analysis of the stained electrophoretograms, using reflected light. For samples with a raised level of very low density lipoprotein, plasma triglyceride analysis is also required. The results obtained by the cellulose acetate electrophoresis method are in good agreement with those by the analytical ultracentrifuge and the preparative ultracentrifuge with refractometry. The theoretical assumptions on which the method is based have been shown to be valid. Images PMID:4110791

  8. Brain lipoprotein metabolism and its relation to neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Danik, M; Champagne, D; Petit-Turcotte, C; Beffert, U; Poirier, J

    1999-01-01

    Lipoproteins are macromolecular complexes composed of lipids and proteins. The role of these complexes is to provide cells of the organism with lipids to be used as a source of energy, building blocks for biomembrane synthesis, and lipophilic molecules (e.g., steroid hormones and vitamin E) for other physiological purposes, such as cell signaling and antioxidative mechanisms. Lipoproteins also promote the cellular efflux of cholesterol for its disposal into bile. Thus, lipoproteins play an important role in the maintenance of lipid homeostasis throughout the organism. Accordingly, lipoprotein particles have been found circulating in blood, lymph, and interstitial fluid. Despite the existence of the blood-brain barrier, lipoprotein particles have been shown to be also present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Although a portion of their protein components may filter through the barrier from the vascular compartment, experimental evidence indicates that these particles originate from the nervous tissue. The other protein components include apolipoproteins E, J, and D, and these have been shown to be synthesized by cells within the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, it was shown that lipoprotein particles can be isolated from the conditioned medium of astrocytic cultures. The differences in size, structure, and composition of in vitro assembled particles compared with those isolated from the CSF suggest that the particles are modified following their secretion in vivo. This is supported by observations that lipoprotein-modifying enzymes and transfer proteins are also present within CNS tissue and CSF. The fate of CSF lipoproteins is unclear but is probably related to the turnover and clearance of lipids from the CNS or, alternatively, the particles may be recaptured and recycled back into the CNS tissue. The presence of several cell surface receptors for apoE-containing lipoproteins on ependymal cells, as well as on neurons and glial cells, supports this

  9. Lipoprotein subclasses in genetic studies: the Berkeley data set.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M; Williams, P T; Blanche, P J; Cavanaugh, A; Holl, L G; Austin, M A

    1993-01-01

    In conjunction with a study examining the inheritance of LDL subclass patterns in a healthy population, measurements of lipids, lipoproteins, and lipoprotein subclasses were performed in 301 individuals in 27 kindreds. Questionnaires were used to obtain information on use of medications, hormones, cigarettes, and alcohol. Laboratory data from this study (the Berkeley data set) include measurements of LDL and HDL size subclasses by nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and measurement of apolipoprotein A-I by radial immunodiffusion.

  10. Lipoprotein metabolism and fattening in poultry.

    PubMed

    Hermier, D

    1997-05-01

    Because de novo fatty acid synthesis in birds takes place mainly in the liver, adipose tissue growth and subsequent fattening depend on the availability of plasma triglycerides, which are transported as components of lipoproteins. In growing birds, VLDL is the major transporter of triglycerides, and attempts to reduce excessive fatness in poultry have involved the control of VLDL metabolism. Lean and fat lines of chickens have been selected on the basis of either their abdominal fat content or plasma VLDL concentration. In both cases, hepatic lipogenesis or LPL activity in adipose tissue did not differ between lean and fat lines, and therefore they did not appear to be limiting factors of susceptibility to fattening. In contrast, hepatic secretion and plasma concentration of VLDL were always higher in fat chickens than in lean chickens. Thus, current methods of selection of broilers against excessive fatness are based on this direct relationship between plasma VLDL and adiposity. When hepatic lipogenesis exceeds the capacity of VLDL secretion, triglycerides accumulate in the liver, causing steatosis. Although fatty liver is associated with reduced egg production and increased mortality in laying hens, hepatic steatosis in overfed ducks and geese is of positive economic value, serving as the basis for "foie-gras" production. The balance between synthesis and secretion of VLDL is therefore the key point that regulates hepatic and extrahepatic fattening in poultry.

  11. Lipoprotein (a) measurements for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Marcovina, Santica M; Albers, John J

    2016-04-01

    The high degree of size heterogeneity of apo(a), the distinct protein component of lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], renders the development and selection of specific antibodies directed to apo(a) more difficult and poses significant challenges to the development of immunoassays to measure its concentration in plasma or serum samples. Apo(a) is extremely variable in size not only between but also within individuals because of the presence of two different, genetically determined apo(a) isoform sizes. Therefore, the antigenic determinants per particle available to interact with the antibodies will vary in the samples and the calibrators, thus contributing to apo(a) size-dependent inaccuracy of different methods. The lack of rigorous validation of the immunoassays and common means of expressing Lp(a) concentrations hinder the harmonization of results obtained by different studies and contribute to the lack of common cut points for identification of individuals at risk for coronary artery disease or for interventions aimed at reducing Lp(a) levels. The aim of our review is to present and critically evaluate the issues surrounding the measurements of Lp(a), their impact on the clinical interpretation of the data, and the obstacles we need to overcome to achieve the standardization of Lp(a) measurements. PMID:26637278

  12. Nanobiotechnology applications of reconstituted high density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays a fundamental role in the Reverse Cholesterol Transport pathway. Prior to maturation, nascent HDL exist as disk-shaped phospholipid bilayers whose perimeter is stabilized by amphipathic apolipoproteins. Methods have been developed to generate reconstituted (rHDL) in vitro and these particles have been used in a variety of novel ways. To differentiate between physiological HDL particles and non-natural rHDL that have been engineered to possess additional components/functions, the term nanodisk (ND) is used. In this review, various applications of ND technology are described, such as their use as miniature membranes for solubilization and characterization of integral membrane proteins in a native like conformation. In other work, ND harboring hydrophobic biomolecules/drugs have been generated and used as transport/delivery vehicles. In vitro and in vivo studies show that drug loaded ND are stable and possess potent biological activity. A third application of ND is their use as a platform for incorporation of amphiphilic chelators of contrast agents, such as gadolinium, used in magnetic resonance imaging. Thus, it is demonstrated that the basic building block of plasma HDL can be repurposed for alternate functions. PMID:21122135

  13. High-Density Lipoproteins: Nature's Multifunctional Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kuai, Rui; Li, Dan; Chen, Y Eugene; Moon, James J; Schwendeman, Anna

    2016-03-22

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are endogenous nanoparticles involved in the transport and metabolism of cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides. HDL is well-known as the "good" cholesterol because it not only removes excess cholesterol from atherosclerotic plaques but also has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties, which protect the cardiovascular system. Circulating HDL also transports endogenous proteins, vitamins, hormones, and microRNA to various organs. Compared with other synthetic nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles, and inorganic and polymeric nanoparticles, HDL has unique features that allow them to deliver cargo to specific targets more efficiently. These attributes include their ultrasmall size (8-12 nm in diameter), high tolerability in humans (up to 8 g of protein per infusion), long circulating half-life (12-24 h), and intrinsic targeting properties to different recipient cells. Various recombinant ApoA proteins and ApoA mimetic peptides have been recently developed for the preparation of reconstituted HDL that exhibits properties similar to those of endogenous HDL and has a potential for industrial scale-up. In this review, we will summarize (a) clinical pharmacokinetics and safety of reconstituted HDL products, (b) comparison of HDL with inorganic and other organic nanoparticles, PMID:26889958

  14. Nanobiotechnology applications of reconstituted high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Robert O

    2010-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays a fundamental role in the Reverse Cholesterol Transport pathway. Prior to maturation, nascent HDL exist as disk-shaped phospholipid bilayers whose perimeter is stabilized by amphipathic apolipoproteins. Methods have been developed to generate reconstituted (rHDL) in vitro and these particles have been used in a variety of novel ways. To differentiate between physiological HDL particles and non-natural rHDL that have been engineered to possess additional components/functions, the term nanodisk (ND) is used. In this review, various applications of ND technology are described, such as their use as miniature membranes for solubilization and characterization of integral membrane proteins in a native like conformation. In other work, ND harboring hydrophobic biomolecules/drugs have been generated and used as transport/delivery vehicles. In vitro and in vivo studies show that drug loaded ND are stable and possess potent biological activity. A third application of ND is their use as a platform for incorporation of amphiphilic chelators of contrast agents, such as gadolinium, used in magnetic resonance imaging. Thus, it is demonstrated that the basic building block of plasma HDL can be repurposed for alternate functions.

  15. The use of transgenic animals to study lipoprotein metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.M.; Plump, A.S.

    1993-12-01

    The application of transgenic technology to lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis was first reported in 1988. Today, a large percentage of the genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism have been overexpressed in mice, and a substantial number of these same genes have been disrupted by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. The utility of animal models of lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis is far-reaching given the complex nature of these systems. There are at least 17 known genes directly involved in lipoprotein metabolism and likely dozens more may be involved. This massive network of interacting factors has necessitated the development of in vivo systems which can be subject to genetic manipulation. The power of overexpression is obvious: elucidating function in a relatively controlled genetic environment in which the whole system is present and operational. The not-so-obvious problem with transgenics is ``background,`` or for purposes of the current discussion, the mouse`s own lipoprotein system. With the advent of gene knockout, we have been given the ability to overcome ``background.`` By recreating the genetic complement of the mouse we can alter a system in essentially any manner desired. As unique tools, and in combination with one another, the overexpression of foreign genes and the targeted disruption or alteration of endogenous genes has already and will continue to offer a wealth of information on the biology of lipoprotein metabolism and its effect on atherosclerosis susceptibility.

  16. Hemodynamics alter arterial low-density lipoprotein metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Warty, V.S.; Calvo, W.J.; Berceli, S.A.; Pham, S.M.; Durham, S.J.; Tanksale, S.K.; Klein, E.C.; Herman, I.M.; Borovetz, H.S. )

    1989-10-01

    We have investigated the role of hemodynamic factors on low-density lipoprotein transport and metabolism in the intact arterial wall. Freshly excised canine carotid blood vessels were exposed to well-defined pulsatile flow in vitro for continuous periods up to 20 hours. We chose to impose the following hemodynamic conditions on our test carotid arteries: normotension, hypertension (at physiologic flow conditions), and hypertension coupled with elevated flow of canine serum perfusate. In several experiments the effect of endothelial denudation was examined in carotid arteries exposed to normotensive pulsatile flow. A trapped ligand method was used for quantitating low-density lipoprotein uptake and metabolism in the arterial wall. The distribution of both intact and degraded low-density lipoprotein fractions was determined from measurements of radiolabelled low-density lipoprotein activity within thin radial sections of perfused arteries. Our results suggest that both hypertensive hemodynamic simulations exacerbate the uptake of low-density lipoprotein within the arterial wall (by a factor of three to nine). The percentage of low-density lipoprotein that undergoes irreversible degradation falls from 41% under normotensive conditions to below 30% when hypertensive conditions are imposed, indicating that degradative processes are not proportionally elevated with the accelerated influx. A similar pattern is observed for deendothelialized vessels.

  17. Pathway of processive ATP hydrolysis by kinesin

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Susan P.; Webb, Martin R.; Brune, Martin; Johnson, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    Direct measurement of the kinetics of kinesin dissociation from microtubules, the release of phosphate and ADP from kinesin, and rebinding of kinesin to the microtubule have defined the mechanism for the kinesin ATPase cycle. The processivity of ATP hydrolysis is ten molecules per site at low salt concentration but is reduced to one ATP per site at higher salt concentration. Kinesin dissociates from the microtubule after ATP hydrolysis. This step is rate-limiting. The subsequent rebinding of kinesin · ADP to the microtubule is fast, so kinesin spends only a small fraction of its duty cycle in the dissociated state. These results provide an explanation for the motility differences between skeletal myosin and kinesin. PMID:7854446

  18. Enzymatic hydrolysis of poly(ethylene furanoate).

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Haernvall, Karolina; Pichler, Christian M; Ghazaryan, Gagik; Breinbauer, Rolf; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-10-10

    The urgency of producing new environmentally-friendly polyesters strongly enhanced the development of bio-based poly(ethylene furanoate) (PEF) as an alternative to plastics like poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) for applications that include food packaging, personal and home care containers and thermoforming equipment. In this study, PEF powders of various molecular weights (6, 10 and 40kDa) were synthetized and their susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated for the first time. According to LC/TOF-MS analysis, cutinase 1 from Thermobifida cellulosilytica liberated both 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid and oligomers of up to DP4. The enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed PEF with higher molecular weights but was active on all tested substrates. Mild enzymatic hydrolysis of PEF has a potential both for surface functionalization and monomers recycling. PMID:26854948

  19. Continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Fieber, C.; Colcord, A.R.; Faass, S.; Muzzy, J.D.; Roberts, R.S.

    1982-08-01

    To produce ethanol from hardwood it is desirable to fractionate the hardwood in order to produce a relatively pure cellulosic pulp for dilute acid hydrolysis. An experimental investigation of continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar wood chips indicates that over 90% of the lignin present can be extracted by 0.1N sodium hydroxide, resulting in a cellulose pulp containing over 90% hexosan. The study was performed using a Stake Technology, Ltd., continuous digester rated at one oven dry ton per hour of wood chips. The yields of hexosans, hexoses, xylan, xylose, lignin, furfural, acetic acid and methanol were determined as a function of residence time and steam pressure in the digester. The information provides a basis for establishing a material and energy balance for a hardwood to ethanol plant.

  20. PLA recycling by hydrolysis at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristina, Annesini Maria; Rosaria, Augelletti; Sara, Frattari; Fausto, Gironi

    2016-05-01

    In this work the process of PLA hydrolysis at high temperature was studied, in order to evaluate the possibility of chemical recycling of this polymer bio-based. In particular, the possibility to obtain the monomer of lactic acid from PLA degradation was investigated. The results of some preliminary tests, performed in a laboratory batch reactor at high temperature, are presented: the experimental results show that the complete degradation of PLA can be obtained in relatively low reaction times.

  1. Angiotensin II Reduces Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Visceral Adipose Tissue via Phospholipase C β4 Depending on Feeding but Increases Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue via c-Src.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tomono, Shoichi; Sato, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, high triglyceride (TG)- and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-levels, hypertension, and diabetes-all of which often cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It remains unclear, however, why visceral adiposity but not subcutaneous adiposity causes insulin resistance and other pathological situations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) catalyzes hydrolysis of TG in plasma lipoproteins. In the present study, we investigated whether the effects of angiotensin II (AngII) on TG metabolism are mediated through an effect on LPL expression. Adipose tissues were divided into visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) for comparison. AngII accelerated LPL expression in SAT but, on the contrary, suppressed its expression in VAT. In both SAT and VAT, AngII signaled through the same type 1 receptor. In SAT, AngII increased LPL expression via c-Src and p38 MAPK signaling. In VAT, however, AngII reduced LPL expression via the Gq class of G proteins and the subsequent phospholipase C β4 (PLCβ4), protein kinase C β1, nuclear factor κB, and inducible nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways. PLCβ4 small interfering RNA experiments showed that PLCβ4 expression is important for the AngII-induced LPL reduction in VAT, in which PLCβ4 expression increases in the evening and falls at night. Interestingly, PLCβ4 expression in VAT decreased with fasting, while AngII did not decrease LPL expression in VAT in a fasting state. In conclusion, AngII reduces LPL expression through PLCβ4, the expression of which is regulated by feeding in VAT, whereas AngII increases LPL expression in SAT. The different effects of AngII on LPL expression and, hence, TG metabolism in VAT and SAT may partly explain their different contributions to the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26447765

  2. Angiotensin II Reduces Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Visceral Adipose Tissue via Phospholipase C β4 Depending on Feeding but Increases Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue via c-Src

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tomono, Shoichi; Sato, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, high triglyceride (TG)- and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-levels, hypertension, and diabetes—all of which often cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It remains unclear, however, why visceral adiposity but not subcutaneous adiposity causes insulin resistance and other pathological situations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) catalyzes hydrolysis of TG in plasma lipoproteins. In the present study, we investigated whether the effects of angiotensin II (AngII) on TG metabolism are mediated through an effect on LPL expression. Adipose tissues were divided into visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) for comparison. AngII accelerated LPL expression in SAT but, on the contrary, suppressed its expression in VAT. In both SAT and VAT, AngII signaled through the same type 1 receptor. In SAT, AngII increased LPL expression via c-Src and p38 MAPK signaling. In VAT, however, AngII reduced LPL expression via the Gq class of G proteins and the subsequent phospholipase C β4 (PLCβ4), protein kinase C β1, nuclear factor κB, and inducible nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways. PLCβ4 small interfering RNA experiments showed that PLCβ4 expression is important for the AngII-induced LPL reduction in VAT, in which PLCβ4 expression increases in the evening and falls at night. Interestingly, PLCβ4 expression in VAT decreased with fasting, while AngII did not decrease LPL expression in VAT in a fasting state. In conclusion, AngII reduces LPL expression through PLCβ4, the expression of which is regulated by feeding in VAT, whereas AngII increases LPL expression in SAT. The different effects of AngII on LPL expression and, hence, TG metabolism in VAT and SAT may partly explain their different contributions to the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26447765

  3. [THE SPIRIT CHOLESTEROL, BIOLOGICA L ROLE AT STAGES OF PHYLOGENESIS, MECHANISMS OF INHIBITION OF SYNTHESIS OF STEROL BY STATINS, FACTORS OF PHARMACOGENOMICS AND DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF CHOLESTEROL OF LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Kotlovskii, M Yu; Pokrovskii, A A; Kotlovskaia, O S; Osedko, A V; Titova, N M; Kotlovskii, Yu V; Digaii, A M

    2015-04-01

    The hypolipidemic effect of statins is realized by inhibition of synthesis of local pool of cholesterol spirit in endoplasmic net of hepatocytes. The cholesterol spirit covers all hydrophobic medium of triglycerides with polar mono layer of phosphatidylcholines and cholesterol spirit prior to secretion of lipoproteins of very low density into hydrophilic medium. The lesser mono layer between lipase enzyme and triglycerides substrate contains of cholesterol spirit the higher are the parameters of hydrolysis of palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density. The sequence of effect of statins is as follows: blocking of synthesis in hepatocytes and decreasing of content of unesterified cholesterol spirit in blood plasma; activation of hydrolysis of triglycerides in palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density; formation of ligand lipoproteins of very low density and their absorption by cells by force of apoB-100 endocytosis; decreasing in blood of content of polyenoic fatty acids, equimolar esterified by cholesterol spirit, polyethers of cholesterol spirit and decreasing of level of cholesterol spirit-lipoproteins of very low density. There is no way to eliminate aphysiological effect of disordered biological function of trophology (nutrition) on metabolism of fatty acids in population by means of pharmaceuticals intake. It is necessary to eliminate aphysiological effect of environment. To decrease rate of diseases of cardiovascular system one has to decrease in food content of saturated fatty acids and in the first instance palmitic saturated fatty acid, trans-form fatty acid, palmitoleic fatty acids up to physiological values and increase to the same degree the content of polyenoic fatty acids. The saturated fatty acids block absorption of polyenoic fatty acids by cells. The atherosclerosis is a deficiency of polyenoic fatty acids under surplus of palmitic saturated fatty acid. PMID:26189285

  4. Fungal secretomes enhance sugar beet pulp hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kracher, Daniel; Oros, Damir; Yao, Wanying; Preims, Marita; Rezic, Iva; Haltrich, Dietmar; Rezic, Tonci; Ludwig, Roland

    2014-04-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulose makes enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass for the production of second generation biofuels a major challenge. This work investigates an efficient and economic approach for the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp (SBP), which is a difficult to degrade, hemicellulose-rich by-product of the table sugar industry. Three fungal strains were grown on different substrates and the production of various extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes involved in pectin, hemicellulose, and cellulose breakdown were monitored. In a second step, the ability of the culture supernatants to hydrolyze thermally pretreated SBP was tested in batch experiments. The supernatant of Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne facultative plant pathogen, was found to have the highest hydrolytic activity on SBP and was selected for further hydrolyzation experiments. A low enzyme load of 0.2 mg g(-1) protein from the culture supernatant was sufficient to hydrolyze a large fraction of the pectin and hemicelluloses present in SBP. The addition of Trichoderma reesei cellulase (1-17.5 mg g(-1) SBP) resulted in almost complete hydrolyzation of cellulose. It was found that the combination of pectinolytic, hemicellulolytic, and cellulolytic activities works synergistically on the complex SBP composite, and a combination of these hydrolytic enzymes is required to achieve a high degree of enzymatic SBP hydrolysis with a low enzyme load. PMID:24677771

  5. Fungal secretomes enhance sugar beet pulp hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kracher, Daniel; Oros, Damir; Yao, Wanying; Preims, Marita; Rezic, Iva; Haltrich, Dietmar; Rezic, Tonci; Ludwig, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulose makes enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass for the production of second generation biofuels a major challenge. This work investigates an efficient and economic approach for the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp (SBP), which is a difficult to degrade, hemicellulose-rich by-product of the table sugar industry. Three fungal strains were grown on different substrates and the production of various extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes involved in pectin, hemicellulose, and cellulose breakdown were monitored. In a second step, the ability of the culture supernatants to hydrolyze thermally pretreated SBP was tested in batch experiments. The supernatant of Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne facultative plant pathogen, was found to have the highest hydrolytic activity on SBP and was selected for further hydrolyzation experiments. A low enzyme load of 0.2 mg g–1 protein from the culture supernatant was sufficient to hydrolyze a large fraction of the pectin and hemicelluloses present in SBP. The addition of Trichoderma reesei cellulase (1–17.5 mg g–1 SBP) resulted in almost complete hydrolyzation of cellulose. It was found that the combination of pectinolytic, hemicellulolytic, and cellulolytic activities works synergistically on the complex SBP composite, and a combination of these hydrolytic enzymes is required to achieve a high degree of enzymatic SBP hydrolysis with a low enzyme load. PMID:24677771

  6. Fungal secretomes enhance sugar beet pulp hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kracher, Daniel; Oros, Damir; Yao, Wanying; Preims, Marita; Rezic, Iva; Haltrich, Dietmar; Rezic, Tonci; Ludwig, Roland

    2014-04-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulose makes enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass for the production of second generation biofuels a major challenge. This work investigates an efficient and economic approach for the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp (SBP), which is a difficult to degrade, hemicellulose-rich by-product of the table sugar industry. Three fungal strains were grown on different substrates and the production of various extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes involved in pectin, hemicellulose, and cellulose breakdown were monitored. In a second step, the ability of the culture supernatants to hydrolyze thermally pretreated SBP was tested in batch experiments. The supernatant of Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne facultative plant pathogen, was found to have the highest hydrolytic activity on SBP and was selected for further hydrolyzation experiments. A low enzyme load of 0.2 mg g(-1) protein from the culture supernatant was sufficient to hydrolyze a large fraction of the pectin and hemicelluloses present in SBP. The addition of Trichoderma reesei cellulase (1-17.5 mg g(-1) SBP) resulted in almost complete hydrolyzation of cellulose. It was found that the combination of pectinolytic, hemicellulolytic, and cellulolytic activities works synergistically on the complex SBP composite, and a combination of these hydrolytic enzymes is required to achieve a high degree of enzymatic SBP hydrolysis with a low enzyme load.

  7. Sugarcane bagasse hydrolysis using yeast cellulolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Souza, Angelica Cristina de; Carvalho, Fernanda Paula; Silva e Batista, Cristina Ferreira; Schwan, Rosane Freitas; Dias, Disney Ribeiro

    2013-10-28

    Ethanol fuel production from lignocellulosic biomass is emerging as one of the most important technologies for sustainable development. To use this biomass, it is necessary to circumvent the physical and chemical barriers presented by the cohesive combination of the main biomass components, which hinders the hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose into fermentable sugars. This study evaluated the hydrolytic capacity of enzymes produced by yeasts, isolated from the soils of the Brazilian Cerrado biome (savannah) and the Amazon region, on sugarcane bagasse pre-treated with H2SO4. Among the 103 and 214 yeast isolates from the Minas Gerais Cerrado and the Amazon regions, 18 (17.47%) and 11 (5.14%) isolates, respectively, were cellulase-producing. Cryptococcus laurentii was prevalent and produced significant β- glucosidase levels, which were higher than the endo- and exoglucanase activities. In natura sugarcane bagasse was pre-treated with 2% H2SO4 for 30 min at 150oC. Subsequently, the obtained fibrous residue was subjected to hydrolysis using the Cryptococcus laurentii yeast enzyme extract for 72 h. This enzyme extract promoted the conversion of approximately 32% of the cellulose, of which 2.4% was glucose, after the enzymatic hydrolysis reaction, suggesting that C. laurentii is a good β-glucosidase producer. The results presented in this study highlight the importance of isolating microbial strains that produce enzymes of biotechnological interest, given their extensive application in biofuel production.

  8. Low-density lipoprotein subclass patterns and lipoprotein response to a reduced-fat diet in men.

    PubMed

    Dreon, D M; Fernstrom, H A; Miller, B; Krauss, R M

    1994-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclass pattern B is a common genetically influenced lipoprotein profile characterized by a predominance of small, dense LDL particles, and associated with increased levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, reductions in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and increased risk of coronary artery disease compared to individuals with a predominance of larger LDL (pattern A). We sought to determine whether LDL subclass patterns are associated with response of plasma lipoprotein levels to changes in dietary fat and carbohydrate content. In a randomized cross-over study, 105 men consumed, for six weeks each, high-fat (46%) and low-fat (24%) solid food diets, with replacement of fat by carbohydrate. Diet-induced changes in subjects who exhibited pattern B (n = 18) following the high-fat diet differed significantly from those in subjects with pattern A (n = 87): in pattern B subjects LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) reductions were two-fold greater and plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B levels decreased significantly. These differences remained significant after adjustment for levels of plasma LDL-C, apo B, HDL-C, and body mass index. Thus, LDL subclass pattern is a factor that contributes significantly to interindividual variation of plasma lipoprotein response to a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet.

  9. Pistachio intake increases high density lipoprotein levels and inhibits low-density lipoprotein oxidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Nur; Aksoy, Mehmet; Bagci, Cahit; Gergerlioglu, H Serdar; Celik, Hakim; Herken, Emine; Yaman, Abdullah; Tarakcioglu, Mehmet; Soydinc, Serdar; Sari, Ibrahim; Davutoglu, Vedat

    2007-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that nuts have protective effects against coronary artery disease by improving lipid profile and inhibiting lipid oxidation. However, data about pistachio nuts are limited, and to our knowledge, there is no study investigating the effects of pistachio intake on lipid oxidation and serum antioxidant levels. This study, therefore, sought to determine the effects of pistachio intake on serum lipids and determine whether consumption of pistachio would alter serum antioxidant levels. Rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=12 for each): control group fed basic diet for 10 weeks and treated groups fed basic diet plus pistachio which constituted 20% and 40% of daily caloric intake, respectively. Consumption of pistachio as 20% of daily caloric intake increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and decreased total cholesterol (TC)/HDL ratio, compared with those not taking pistachio. However, TC, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels were unaffected by pistachio consumption. Consumption of pistachio as 20% of daily caloric intake increased serum paraoxonase activity by 35% and arylesterase activity by 60%, which are known to inhibit LDL cholesterol oxidation, compared with the control group. However, increased antioxidant activity was blunted when pistachio intake was increased to 40% of daily caloric intake. In conclusion, the present results show that consumption of pistachio as 20% of daily caloric intake leads to significant improvement in HDL and TC/HDL ratio and inhibits LDL cholesterol oxidation. These results suggest that pistachio may be beneficial for both prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease.

  10. Phagocytosis of aggregated lipoprotein by macrophages: Low density lipoprotein receptor-dependent foam-cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; Chait, A.; Aviram, M.; Heinecke, J.W. )

    1989-04-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by incubation with phospholipase C (PLC-LDL) aggregates in solution and is rapidly taken up and degraded by human and mouse macrophages, producing foam cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rabbit macrophages degraded {sup 125}I-labeled PLC-LDL ({sup 125}I-PLC-LDL) more rapidly than native {sup 125}I-labeled LDL ({sup 125}I-LDL), while nonphagocytic cells such as human fibroblasts and bovine aortic endothelial cells degraded {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL more slowly than {sup 125}I-LDL. This suggested the mechanism for internalization of PLC-LDL was phagocytosis. When examined by electron microscopy, mouse peritoneal macrophages appeared to be phagocytosing PLC-LDL. The uptake and degradation of {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL by human macrophages was inhibited >80% by the monoclonal antibody C7 (IgG2b) produced by hybridoma C7, which blocks the ligand binding domain of the LDL receptor. Similarly, methylation of {sup 125}I-LDL ({sup 125}I-MeLDL) prior to treatment with phospholipase C decreased its subsequent uptake and degradation by human macrophages by >90%. The uptake and degradation of phospholipase C-modified {sup 125}I-MeLDL by macrophages could be restored by incubation of the methylated lipoprotein with apoprotein E, a ligand recognized by the LDL receptor. These results indicate that macrophages internalize PLC-LDL by LDL receptor-dependent phagocytosis.

  11. Initial hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants is unaffected but endocytosis is delayed in mice lacking the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Herz, J; Qiu, S Q; Oesterle, A; DeSilva, H V; Shafi, S; Havel, R J

    1995-01-01

    Two endocytic receptors, the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) and the LDLR-related protein (LRP), are thought to act in concert in the hepatic uptake of partially metabolized dietary lipoproteins, the chylomicron remnants. We have evaluated the role of these two receptors in the hepatic metabolism of chylomicron remnants in normal mice and in LDLR-deficient [LDLR (-/-)] mice. The rate of chylomicron remnant removal by the liver was normal up to 30 min after intravenous injection of chylomicrons into LDLR (-/-) mice and was unaffected by receptor-associated protein (RAP), a potent inhibitor of ligand binding to LRP. In contrast, endocytosis of the remnants by the hepatocytes, measured by their accumulation in the endosomal fraction and by the rate of hydrolysis of component cholesteryl esters, was dramatically reduced in the absence of the LDLR. Coadministration of RAP prevented the continuing hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants in LDL (-/-) mice after 30 min, consistent with blockade of the slow endocytosis by a RAP-sensitive process. Taken together with previous studies, our results are consistent with a model in which the initial hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants is primarily mediated by mechanisms that do not include LDLR or LRP, possibly involving glycosaminoglycan-bound hepatic lipase and apolipoprotein E. After the remnants bind to these alternative sites on the hepatocyte surface, endocytosis is predominantly mediated by the LDLR and also by a slower and less efficient backup process that is RAP sensitive and therefore most likely involves LRP. PMID:7753850

  12. Aminoacylation of the N-terminal cysteine is essential for Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes but does not depend on lipoprotein sorting signals.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ayumu; Matsuyama, Shin-Ichi; Hara, Takashi; Nakayama, Jiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-11-01

    Lipoproteins are present in a wide variety of bacteria and are anchored to membranes through lipids attached to the N-terminal cysteine. The Lol system of Escherichia coli mediates the membrane-specific localization of lipoproteins. Aspartate at position 2 functions as a Lol avoidance signal and causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane, whereas lipoproteins having residues other than aspartate at position 2 are released from the inner membrane and localized to the outer membrane by the Lol system. Phospholipid:apolipoprotein transacylase, Lnt, catalyzes the last step of lipoprotein modification, converting apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein. To reveal the importance of this aminoacylation for the Lol-dependent membrane localization, apolipoproteins were prepared by inhibiting lipoprotein maturation. Lnt was also purified and used to convert apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein in vitro. The release of these lipoproteins was examined in proteoliposomes. We show here that the aminoacylation is essential for the Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes. Furthermore, lipoproteins with aspartate at position 2 were found to be aminoacylated both in vivo and in vitro, indicating that the lipoprotein-sorting signal does not affect lipid modification.

  13. HIV Infection and High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Honor; Hoy, Jennifer; Woolley, Ian; Tchoua, Urbain; Bukrinsky, Michael; Dart, Anthony; Sviridov, Dmitri

    2008-01-01

    HIV infection and its treatment are associated with dyslipidemia, including hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Parameters of HDL metabolism in HIV-positive patients were investigated in a cross-sectional study. The following groups of subjects were selected: i) 25 treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients or HIV-infected patients on long therapy break, ii) 28 HIV-infected patients currently treated with protease inhibitors, and iii) 33 HIV-negative subjects. Compared to the HIV-negative group, all groups of HIV-infected patients were characterized by significantly elevated triglyceride and apolipoprotein B levels, mass and activity of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (p<0.01). Total and LDL cholesterol was lower in treatment-naïve HIV-infected group only. HDL cholesterol and preβ1-HDL were significantly lower in all HIV-infected groups (p<0.05), while mean levels of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and ability of plasma to promote cholesterol efflux were similar in all groups. We found a positive correlation between apoA-I and levels of CD4+ cells (r2 = 0.3, p<0.001). Plasma level of phospholipid transfer protein was reduced in the group on antiretroviral therapy. Taken together these results suggest that HIV infection is associated with modified HDL metabolism re-directing cholesterol to the apoB-containing lipoproteins and likely reducing the functionality of reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:18054941

  14. Charge properties of low density lipoprotein subclasses.

    PubMed

    La Belle, M; Blanche, P J; Krauss, R M

    1997-04-01

    Measurements of electrophoretic mobility and particle size of low density lipoproteins (LDL) allowed use of standard electrokinetic theory to quantitate LDL charge characteristics from subjects with predominance of large LDL (pattern A, n = 9) or small LDL (pattern B, n = 8). Pattern A LDL was found to have significantly lower (P < or = 0.001) mobility (-0.22 +/- 0.01 micron s-1 cm V-1), surface potential (-4.2 +/- 0.3 mV) and charge density (-500 +/- 34 esu/cm2) than pattern B LDL (-0.25 +/- 0.01 micron s-1 cm V-1, -4.9 +/- 0.3 mV, and -580 +/- 30 esu/cm2), but no significant difference in particle valence (-22.0 +/- 1.4 for pattern A vs. -21.8 +/- 1.9 for pattern B). Thus, the greater mobility of pattern B LDL is due to similar net charge residing on a smaller particle. Comparison of subfractions in pattern B relative to pattern A LDL revealed greater surface potential in all pattern B subfractions and greater charge density in fractions of d > or = 1.032 g/ml. In a subset of subjects incubation with neuraminidase produced significant reductions in all LDL charge parameters for all subfractions, but did not abolish the differences between pattern A and B. Thus increased surface potential and charge density of unfractionated pattern B LDL is due both to charge properties of particles across the size and density spectrum as well as enrichment of pattern B LDL with smaller, denser particles that have higher surface charge density.

  15. Transport of lipoprotein lipase across endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, U.; Klein, M.G.; Goldberg, I.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), synthesized in muscle and fat, hydrolyzes plasma triglycerides primarily while bound to luminal endothelial cell surfaces. To obtain information about the movement of LPL from the basal to the luminal endothelial cell surface, the authors studied the transport of purified bovine milk LPL across bovine aortic endothelial cell monolayers. {sup 125}I-labeled LPL ({sup 125}I-LPL) added to the basal surface of the monolayers was detected on the apical side of the cells in two compartments: (1) in the medium of the upper chamber, and (2) bound to the apical cell surface. The amount of {sup 125}I-LPL on the cell surface, but not in the medium, reached saturation with time and LPL dose. Catalytically active LPL was transported to the apical surface but very little LPL activity appeared in the medium. Heparinase treatment of the basal cell surface and addition of dextran sulfate to the lower chamber decreased the amount of {sup 125}I-LPL appearing on the apical surface. Similarly, the presence of increasing molar ratios of oleic acid/bovine serum albumin at the basal surface decreased the transport of active LPL across the monolayer. Thus, a saturable transport system, which requires haparan sulfate proteoglycans and is inhibited by high concentrations of free fatty acids on the basal side of the cells, appears to exist for passage of enzymatically active LPL across endothelial cells. They postulate that regulation of LPL transport to the endothelial luminal surface modulates the physiologically active pool of LPL in vivo.

  16. Development and application of proton NMR methodology to lipoprotein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Ari Juhani

    1998-11-01

    The present thesis describes the development of 1H NMR spectroscopy and its applications to lipoprotein analysis in vitro, utilizing biochemical prior knowledge and advanced lineshape fitting analysis in the frequency domain. A method for absolute quantification of lipoprotein lipids and proteins directly from the terminal methyl-CH3 resonance region of 1H NMR spectra of human blood plasma is described. Then the use of NMR methodology in time course studies of the oxidation process of LDL particles is presented. The function of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in lipoprotein mixtures was also assessed by 1H NMR, which allows for dynamic follow-up of the lipid transfer reactions between VLDL, LDL, and HDL particles. The results corroborated the suggestion that neutral lipid mass transfer among lipoproteins is not an equimolar heteroexchange. A novel method for studying lipoprotein particle fusion is also demonstrated. It is shown that the progression of proteolytically (α- chymotrypsin) induced fusion of LDL particles can be followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy and, moreover, that fusion can be distinguished from aggregation. In addition, NMR methodology was used to study the changes in HDL3 particles induced by phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in HDL3 + PLTP mixtures. The 1H NMR study revealed a gradual production of enlarged HDL particles, which demonstrated that PLTP-mediated remodeling of HDL involves fusion of the HDL particles. These applications demonstrated that the 1H NMR approach offers several advantages both in quantification and in time course studies of lipoprotein-lipoprotein interactions and of enzyme/lipid transfer protein function.

  17. Characterization of lipoproteins in human and canine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Pitas, R.E.; Weisgraber, K.H.; Boyles, J.K.; Lee, S.; Mahley, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    Previously the authors demonstrated that rat brain astrocytes in vitro synthesize and secrete apo-E and possess apo-B,E(LDL) receptors. The apo-E secreted by astrocytes and apo-E in rat brain extracts differed from serum apo-E in two respects. Brain apo-E had a higher apparent molecular weight and a higher percentage of more acidic isoforms. To characterize further the apo-E within the central nervous system, apo-E in human and canine CSF was investigated. Compared to plasma apo-E, CSF apo-E had a higher apparent M/sub r/ and a higher percentage of acidic isoforms which were sialylated, as shown by neuraminidase digestion. The apo-E in human CSF was approx.5-10% of the plasma level. In CSF 60-80% of the apo-E was in lipoproteins with d = 1.09-1.15. The remainder of the apo-E was in the d > 1.21 fraction. Human CSF lipoproteins were primarily spherical (110-190 A) while canine CSF lipoproteins were a mixture of discs (205 x 65 A) while canine CSF lipoproteins were a mixture of discs (205 x 65 A) and spheres (100-150 A). The CSF also contained apo-AI in the d = 1.09-1.15 g/ml fraction. Human CSF lipoproteins containing both apo-E and apo-AI were isolated on an anti-apo-E affinity column, suggesting that apo-E and AI occurred in the same particles. The CSF apo-E-containing lipoproteins competed for binding of /sup 125/I-LDL to the apo-B,E(LDL) receptor. There was no detectable apo-B in CSF. These data suggest that CSF lipoproteins might transport lipid and regulate lipid homeostasis within the brain.

  18. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, A D; Logan, R L; Thomson, M; Elton, R A; Oliver, M F; Riemersma, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate long term changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and in measures of other risk factors for coronary heart disease and to assess their importance for the development of coronary heart disease in Scottish men. DESIGN--Longitudinal study entailing follow up in 1988-9 of men investigated during a study in 1976. SETTING--Edinburgh, Scotland. SUBJECTS--107 men from Edinburgh who had taken part in a comparative study of risk factors for heart disease with Swedish men in 1976 when aged 40. INTERVENTION--The men were invited to attend a follow up clinic in 1988-9 for measurement of cholesterol concentrations and other risk factor measurements. Eighty three attended and 24 refused to or could not attend. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, body weight, weight to height index, prevalence of smoking, and alcohol intake; number of coronary artery disease events. RESULTS--Mean serum total cholesterol concentration increased over the 12 years mainly due to an increase in the low density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction (from 3.53 (SD 0.09) to 4.56 (0.11) mmol/l) despite a reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Body weight and weight to height index increased. Fewer men smoked more than 15 cigarettes/day in 1988-9 than in 1976. Blood pressure remained stable and fasting triglyceride concentrations did not change. The frequency of corneal arcus doubled. Alcohol consumption decreased significantly. Eleven men developed clinical coronary heart disease. High low density lipoprotein and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in 1976, but not total cholesterol concentration, significantly predicted coronary heart disease (p = 0.05). Almost all of the men who developed coronary heart disease were smokers (91% v 53%, p less than

  19. Partial acid hydrolysis of poplar wood as a pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Knappert, D.; Grethlein, H.; Converse, A.

    1981-01-01

    Partial acid hydrolysis was studied as a pretreatment to enhance glucose yields from enzymatic hydrolysis of poplar. The pretreatments were carried out in a continuous flow reactor at temperatures ranging from 162 to 222/sup 0/C, acid concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.5%, and treatment times from 3.6 to 12.7 s. The pretreated slurries were hydrolyzed with Trichoderma reesei C30 cellulase at 50/sup 0/C and a pH of 4.8 for 48 h. Increased yields of glucose were achieved when poplar was pretreated at temperatures higher than 180/sup 0/C. By increasing the cellobiase activity of the cellulase with the addition of NOVO cellobiase, in some cases 100% of the potential glucose content of the substrate was converted to glucose after only 24 h of enzymatic hydrolysis.

  20. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particle assembly: Lipid capacity of the nascent lipoprotein particle

    SciTech Connect

    Manchekar, Medha; Forte, Trudy M.; Datta, Geeta; Richardson, Paul E.; Segrest, Jere P.; Dashti, Nassrin

    2003-12-01

    We previously proposed that the N-terminal 1000 residue {beta}{alpha}{sub 1} domain of apolipoprotein B (apoB) forms a bulk lipid pocket homologous to that of lamprey lipovitellin (LV). In support of this ''lipid pocket'' hypothesis, apoB:1000 (residues 1-1000) was shown to be secreted by a stable transformant of McA-RH7777 cells as a monodisperse particle with HDL{sub 3} density and Stokes diameter of 112 {angstrom}. In contrast, apoB:931 (residues 1-931), missing only 69 residues of the sequence homologous to LV, was secreted as a particle considerably more dense than HDL with Stokes diameter of 110 {angstrom}. The purpose of the present study was to determine the stoichiometry of the lipid component of the apoB:931 and apoB:1000 particles. This was accomplished by metabolic labeling of cells with either [{sup 14}C]oleic acid or [{sup 3}H]glycerol followed by immunoprecipitation (IP) or nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (NDGGE) of secreted lipoproteins and by immunoaffinity chromatography of secreted unlabeled lipoproteins. The [{sup 3}H]-labeled apoB:1000-containing particles, isolated by NDGGE, contained 50 phospholipids (PL) and 11 triacylglycerols (TAG) molecules per particle. In contrast, apoB:931-containing particles contained only a few molecules of PL and were devoid of TAG. The unlabeled apoB:1000-containing particles isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography and analyzed for lipid mass, contained 56 PL, 8 TAG, and 7 cholesteryl ester molecules per particle. The surface:core lipid ratio of apoB:1000-containing particles was approximately 4:1 and was not affected by incubation of cells with oleate. Although small amounts of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) were associated with apoB:1000-containing particles, it never approached a 1:1 molar ratio of MTP to apoB. These results support a model in which: (1) the first 1000 amino acid residues of apoB are competent to complete the ''lipid pocket'' without a structural requirement for MTP

  1. New and emerging regulators of intestinal lipoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Morgantini, Cecilia; Lewis, Gary F

    2014-04-01

    Overproduction of hepatic apoB100-containing VLDL particles has been well documented in animal models and in humans with insulin resistance such as the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and contributes to the typical dyslipidemia of these conditions. In addition, postprandial hyperlipidemia and elevated plasma concentrations of intestinal apoB48-containing chylomicron and chylomicron remnant particles have been demonstrated in insulin resistant states. Intestinal lipoprotein production is primarily determined by the amount of fat ingested and absorbed. Until approximately 10 years ago, however, relatively little attention was paid to the role of the intestine itself in regulating the production of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) and its dysregulation in pathological states such as insulin resistance. We and others have shown that insulin resistant animal models and humans are characterized by overproduction of intestinal apoB48-containing lipoproteins. Whereas various factors are known to regulate hepatic lipoprotein particle production, less is known about factors that regulate the production of intestinal lipoprotein particles. Monosacharides, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), resveratrol, intestinal peptides (e.g. GLP-1 and GLP-2), and pancreatic hormones (e.g. insulin) have recently been shown to be important regulators of intestinal lipoprotein secretion. Available evidence in humans and animal models strongly supports the concept that the small intestine is not merely an absorptive organ but rather plays an active role in regulating the rate of production of chylomicrons in fed and fasting states. Metabolic signals in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and in some cases an aberrant intestinal response to these factors contribute to the enhanced formation and secretion of TRL. Understanding the regulation of intestinal lipoprotein production is imperative for the development of new therapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of

  2. Associations of lipoproteins and apolipoproteins with gradient gel electrophoresis estimates of high density lipoprotein subfractions in men and women.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Krauss, R M; Vranizan, K M; Stefanick, M L; Wood, P D; Lindgren, F T

    1992-03-01

    We examined the relations of gender and lipoproteins to subclasses of high density lipoproteins (HDLs) in a cross-sectional sample of moderately overweight men (n = 116) and women (n = 78). The absorbance of protein-stained polyacrylamide gradient gels was used as an index of mass concentrations of HDL at intervals of 0.01 nm across the entire HDL particle size range (7.2-12 nm). At least five HDL subclasses have been identified by their particle sizes: HDL3c (7.2-7.8 nm), HDL3b (7.8-8.2 nm), HDL3a (8.2-8.8 nm), HDL2a (8.8-9.7 nm), and HDL2b (9.7-12 nm). Men had significantly higher HDL3b and significantly lower HDL2a and HDL2b than did women. Correlations of HDL subclasses with concentrations of other lipoprotein variables were generally as strong for gradient gel electrophoresis as for analytical ultracentrifugation measurements of HDL particle distributions. In both sexes, high levels of HDL3b were associated with coronary heart disease risk factors, including high concentrations of triglycerides, apolipoprotein B, small low density lipoproteins, intermediate density lipoproteins, and very low density lipoproteins and low concentrations of HDL2 cholesterol and HDL2 mass. Plasma concentrations of HDL3 cholesterol were unrelated to protein-stained HDL3b levels. HDL3 cholesterol concentrations also did not exhibit the sex difference or the relations with lipoprotein concentrations that characterized HDL3b. Thus, low HDL3b levels may contribute in part to the low heart disease risk in men and women who have high HDL cholesterol. Measurements of HDL3 cholesterol may not identify clinically important relations involving HDL3b.

  3. Auxotrophy to lipoproteins of Entamoeba histolytica cultivated under axenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mata-Cárdenas, B D; Vargas-Villarreal, J; Martínez-Rodríguez, H G; Castro-Garza, J; González-Garza, M T; Said-Fernández, S

    2000-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica grows in media without serum but with a mixture of aminoacids, vitamins, lipoproteins, free cholesterol, phospholipids and fatty acids called PACSR. The ability of lipoproteins and free lipids to support growth of three E. histolytica strains (HK9, HMI:IMSS and HM3:IMSS) was analysed. Tubes containing 5 ml culture medium, amino acids, vitamins and either 120-1,200 microg lipoproteins/ml or 0.017-0.10 mg free lipids/ml (predissolved in absolute ethanol) were inoculated with 1x10(4) trophozoites/ml and incubated at 37 degrees C for 72 h. Amoebae died within 12 h in the presence of any free lipid combination, while those having 240-480 mg lipoproteins/ml reached densities similar to or higher than those of controls (depending on strain). The addition of ethanol (0.1%) to the media produced stable lipid solutions and did not show significant adverse effects. Accordingly, E. histolytica is auxotrophic to lipoproteins and unable to use free cholesterol, phospholipids or fatty acids. PMID:11133106

  4. Learning from Biology: Synthetic Lipoproteins for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huang; Cruz, William; Chen, Juan; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic lipoproteins represent a relevant tool for targeted delivery of biological/chemical agents (chemotherapeutics, siRNAs, photosensitizers and imaging contrast agents) into various cell types. These nanoparticles offer a number of advantages on drugs delivery over their native counterparts while retaining their natural characteristics and biological functions. Their ultra-small size (<30nm), high biocompatibility, favorable circulation half-life and natural ability to bind specific lipoprotein receptors i.e. low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and Scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SRB1) that are found in a number of pathological conditions (e.g. cancer, atherosclerosis), make them superior delivery strategies when compared to other nanoparticle systems. We review the various approaches that have been developed for the generation of synthetic lipoproteins and their respective applications in vitro and in vivo. More specifically, we summarize the way to address the limitation on use of reconstituted lipoproteins by means of natural or recombinant apolipoproteins, as well as apolipoprotein mimetic molecules. Finally, we provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches and discuss future perspectives for clinical translation of these nanoparticles. PMID:25346461

  5. The Vascular Implications of Post-prandial Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David R; Celermajer, David S; Le Couteur, David G; Lam, Christopher W K

    2004-01-01

    Impaired lipoprotein metabolism is one of the major aetiological factors for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Assessment is usually made in the fasting state, and particular attention is directed towards the measurement of the cholesterol content of both the low and high-density lipoprotein fractions. By comparison, a massive amount of lipid fluxes through the intra-vascular compartment during the post-prandial period. This has led to the hypothesis that atherosclerosis could be partially, or even predominantly, due to the pathological effects of this flux of post-prandial lipoproteins on the vessel wall. This justifies efforts to systematically study the relationship between the lipoprotein responses to food (particularly fat) ingestion and cardiovascular disease or its surrogate markers. This review will consider the mechanisms by which post-prandial metabolism might affect the risk of CVD. It will examine the evidence for and against such an association. It will also consider the practical and methodological issues that are likely to determine the future utility of post-prandial lipoprotein assessment. PMID:18516208

  6. Drug binding in sera deficient in lipoproteins, albumin or orosomucoid.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, E; Kierulf, P; Skuterud, B; Bredesen, J E; Lunde, P K

    1983-01-01

    The relative role of lipoproteins, albumin and orosomucoid in the serum binding variation of various drugs was examined by separate removal of these proteins. Lipoproteins were removed from serum by ultracentrifugation, albumin by affinity chromatography and orosomucoid by immunoprecipitation. Removal of the lipoproteins did not affect the serum binding of the acidic (phenytoin) and neutral (digitoxin) drugs tested, nor the basic drugs disopyramide, quinidine or propranolol. A reduction in binding of amitryptyline, nortriptyline, doxepin and desmethyldoxepin was observed. Removal of albumin did, with some exception for nortriptyline, not affect the serum binding of the basic drugs tested. A pronounced reduction in the binding of phenytoin and digitoxin was observed. Removal of orosomucoid did not affect the binding of the acidic and neutral drugs tested. A reduction in the binding of all the basic drugs tested was observed, especially for disopyramide whose binding almost disappeared. Quinidine, propranolol, phenytoin and digitoxin all bound to isolated lipoproteins, but the removal of lipoproteins had no effect on the total serum binding for these drugs. Hence, the use of deficient sera provides valuable information as to the quantitative role of the various proteins in drug binding, whereas studies using purified proteins are often necessary to examine the mechanisms of the drug protein interactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6626414

  7. New micromethod for measuring cholesterol in plasma lipoprotein fractions.

    PubMed

    Bronzert, T J; Brewer, H B

    1977-11-01

    A method is described for the reliable, fast, and relatively inexpensive fractionation of plasma lipoproteins and quantitation of their cholesterol content. This procedure requires 350 microliter of plasma and can be completed within 3 h. Plasma lipoproteins (175 microliter of plasma) were prestained with Fat Red 7B and centrifuged (Beckman Airfuge) at plasma density (d = 1.006 kg/liter) and at a solvent density of 1.060 kg/liter, adjusted by adding solid KBr. Prestained centrifuged samples demonstrated the characteristic elevation of chylomicrons in phenotypes I and V, low-density lipoproteins of phenotype II, very-low-density lipoproteins in phenotype IV and V, and continuum of pink color throughout the centrifuge tube, diagnostic of the floating beta lipoprotein of type III. Centrifuged samples were separated into top and bottom fractions by aspiration. Cholesterol was quantitated with an enzymic oxygen-electrode analyzer (Beckman Cholesterol Analyzer). Correlation coefficients between cholesterol values for plasma from normal hyperlipidemic individuals obtained with the Beckman Analyzer vs. the Technicon AutoAnalyzer II and SMAC systems were 0.977 and 0.973, respectively.

  8. Hydrolysis of ferric chloride in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lussiez, G.; Beckstead, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Detox{trademark} process uses concentrated ferric chloride and small amounts of catalysts to oxidize organic compounds. It is under consideration for oxidizing transuranic organic wastes. Although the solution is reused extensively, at some point it will reach the acceptable limit of radioactivity or maximum solubility of the radioisotopes. This solution could be cemented, but the volume would be increased substantially because of the poor compatibility of chlorides and cement. A process has been developed that recovers the chloride ions as HCl and either minimizes the volume of radioactive waste or permits recycling of the radioactive chlorides. The process involves a two-step hydrolysis at atmospheric pressure, or preferably under a slight vacuum, and relatively low temperature, about 200{degrees}C. During the first step of the process, hydrolysis occurs according to the reaction below: FeCl{sub 3 liquid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} FeOCl{sub solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas} During the second step, the hot, solid, iron oxychloride is sprayed with water or placed in contact with steam, and hydrolysis proceeds to the iron oxide according to the following reaction: 2 FeOCl{sub solid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3 solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas}. The iron oxide, which contains radioisotopes, can then be disposed of by cementation or encapsulation. Alternately, these chlorides can be washed off of the solids and can then either be recycled or disposed of in some other way.

  9. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, Deisy Y.

    The performance of soybean hulls and forage sorghum as feedstocks for ethanol production was studied. The main goal of this research was to increase fermentable sugars' yield through high-efficiency pretreatment technology. Soybean hulls are a potential feedstock for production of bio-ethanol due to their high carbohydrate content (≈50%) of nearly 37% cellulose. Soybean hulls could be the ideal feedstock for fuel ethanol production, because they are abundant and require no special harvesting and additional transportation costs as they are already in the plant. Dilute acid and modified steam-explosion were used as pretreatment technologies to increase fermentable sugars yields. Effects of reaction time, temperature, acid concentration and type of acid on hydrolysis of hemicellulose in soybean hulls and total sugar yields were studied. Optimum pretreatment parameters and enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for converting soybean hulls into fermentable sugars were identified. The combination of acid (H2SO4, 2% w/v) and steam (140°C, 30 min) efficiently solubilized the hemicellulose, giving a pentose yield of 96%. Sorghum is a tropical grass grown primarily in semiarid and dry parts of the world, especially in areas too dry for corn. The production of sorghum results in about 30 million tons of byproducts mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Forage sorghum such as brown midrib (BMR) sorghum for ethanol production has generated much interest since this trait is characterized genetically by lower lignin concentrations in the plant compared with conventional types. Three varieties of forage sorghum and one variety of regular sorghum were characterized and evaluated as feedstock for fermentable sugar production. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction were used to determine changes in structure and chemical composition of forage sorghum before and after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

  10. Improved method for detection of starch hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohawale, M.R.; Wilson, J.J.; Khachatourians, G.G.; Ingledew, W.M.

    1982-09-01

    A new starch hydrolysis detection method which does not rely on iodine staining or the use of color-complexed starch is described. A linear relationship was obtained with agar-starch plates when net clearing zones around colonies of yeasts were plotted against enzyme levels (semilogarithm scale) produced by the same yeast strains in liquid medium. A similar relationship between starch clearing zones and alpha-amylase levels from three different sources was observed. These observations suggest that the method is useful in mutant isolations, strain improvement programs, and the prediction of alpha-amylase activities in culture filtrates or column effluents. (Refs. 18).

  11. Urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate reaction fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, D. T.; Redden, G. D.; Henriksen, J.; Fujita, Y.; Guo, L.; Huang, H.

    2010-12-01

    The mobility of toxic or radioactive metal contaminants in subsurface environments can be reduced by the formation of mineral precipitates that form co-precipitates with the contaminants or that isolate them from the mobile fluid phase. An engineering challenge is to control the spatial distribution of precipitation reactions with respect to: 1) the location of a contaminant, and 2) where reactants are introduced into the subsurface. One strategy being explored for immobilizing contaminants, such as Sr-90, involves stimulating mineral precipitation by forming carbonate ions and hydroxide via the in situ, microbially mediated hydrolysis of urea. A series of column experiments have been conducted to explore how the construction or design of such an in situ reactant production strategy can affect the temporal and spatial distribution of calcium carbonate precipitation, and how the distribution is coupled to changes in permeability. The columns were constructed with silica gel as the porous media. An interval midway through the column contained an adsorbed urease enzyme in order to simulate a biologically active zone. A series of influent solutions were injected to characterize hydraulic properties of the column (e.g., bromide tracer), profiles of chemical conditions and reaction products as the enzyme catalyzes urea hydrolysis (e.g., pH, ammonia, urea), and changes that occur due to CaCO3 precipitation with the introduction of a calcium+urea solutions. In one experiment, hydraulic conductivity was reduced as precipitate accumulated in a layer within the column that had a higher fraction of fine grained silica gel. Subsequent reduction of permeability and flow (for a constant head condition) resulted in displacement of the hydrolysis and precipitation reaction profiles upstream. In another experiment, which lacked the physical heterogeneity (fine grained layer), the precipitation reaction did not result in loss of permeability or flow velocity and the reaction profile

  12. Ultrasound enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of Parthenium hysterophorus: A mechanistic investigation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shuchi; Agarwal, Mayank; Bhatt, Aditya; Goyal, Arun; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2015-09-01

    This study has attempted to establish the mechanism of the ultrasound-induced enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated and delignified biomass of Parthenium hysterophorus. A dual approach of statistical optimization of hydrolysis followed by application of sonication at optimum conditions has been adopted. The kinetics of hydrolysis shows a marked 6× increase with sonication, while net sugar yield shows marginal rise of ∼ 20%. The statistical experimental design reveals the hydrolysis process to be enzyme limited. Profile of sugar yield in ultrasound-assisted enzymatic hydrolysis has been analyzed using HCH-1 model coupled with Genetic Algorithm optimization. The trends in the kinetic and physiological parameters of HCH-1 model reveal that sonication enhances enzyme/substrate affinity and reaction velocity of hydrolysis. The product inhibition of enzyme in all forms (free, adsorbed, complexed) also reduces with ultrasound. These effects are attributed to intense micro-convection induced by ultrasound and cavitation in the liquid medium.

  13. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  14. Serum lipid & lipoprotein profiles of obese Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Ho, T F; Paramsothy, S; Aw, T C; Yip, W C

    1996-03-01

    The serum lipid and lipoprotein levels of 59 obese Chinese children with a mean age of 13.0 years and mean relative weight of 164.2% were analysed. Between 40% to 54% of these children had elevated lipid and lipoprotein levels and about 78% had reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL) level when compared to healthy American and Japanese children. The obese children also had higher mean levels of total cholesterol (TC) and lower HDL compared to male adults in the local population. Those with elevated TC had higher mean relative weight (170% vs 159%, p < 0.05). In view of the close association between hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis, obese children should be carefully screened and managed to prevent long term morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease. PMID:10967982

  15. Lipids, lipoproteins, and coronary heart disease: implications for antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Feher, M D; Betteridge, D J

    1989-06-01

    There is now considerable evidence that treatment of abnormalities of lipids and lipoproteins reduces the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD). Treatment of hypertension, another major cardiovascular risk factor, has not been shown to have the same impact on CHD. Possible explanations for this are that cardiovascular risk factors may occur in combination in an individual or that therapy for hypertension has adversely affected one or several of the other risk factors for CHD, thereby offsetting the benefit gained by lowering blood pressure. This article reviews the relationship between lipids, lipoproteins, and coronary heart disease, and the impact of cholesterol lowering on CHD. The evidence that antihypertensive drugs are associated with lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities is introduced by a critical appraisal of the several studies for such evidence. Implications for the treatment of the hypertensive patient are discussed. PMID:2487804

  16. Brucella outer membrane lipoprotein shares antigenic determinants with Escherichia coli Braun lipoprotein and is exposed on the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Miguel, M J; Moriyón, I; López, J

    1987-01-01

    In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), purified Brucella abortus and Escherichia coli peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins gave a strong cross-reaction with sera from rabbits hyperimmunized with the heterologous lipoprotein. When smooth E. coli cells were used as ELISA antigens, the immunological cross-reaction was not observed unless the cells were treated to remove lipopolysaccharide and other outer membrane components. In contrast, intact cells from smooth strains of B. abortus and Brucella melitensis bound anti-lipoprotein immunoglobulin G, and the controls performed by ELISA showed that this reaction was not due to antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide, group 3 outer membrane proteins, or porins. Electron microscopy of cells labeled with antilipoprotein serum and protein A-colloidal gold showed specific labeling of smooth cells from both B. abortus and B. melitensis, even though unspecific labeling by nonimmune serum was observed with rough B. abortus. These results confirm the close similarity between E. coli and Brucella peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins and show that, in contrast to E. coli, the lipoprotein of B. abortus and B. melitensis is partially exposed on the surface of smooth cells. Images PMID:2432014

  17. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. II. ACID AND GENERAL BASE CATALYZED HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate acid and neutral hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition states of a ...

  18. The effects of chemically modifying serum apolipoproteins on their ability to activate lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, P F; Lopez-Johnston, A; Welch, V A; Gurr, M I

    1987-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity was measured in an acetone-dried-powder preparation from rat epididymal adipose tissue using pig serum or pig serum lipoprotein, which had been chemically modified, as activator. Modification of acidic amino acids of lipoproteins with NN-dimethyl-1,3-diamine resulted in a complete loss of ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. Modification of 34% of lipoprotein arginine groups with cyclohexanedione resulted in the loss of 75% of the activation of lipoprotein lipase; approx. 42% of the original activity was recovered after reversal of the modification. This effect was dependent on the cyclohexanedione concentration. Modification of 48% of lipoprotein lysine groups with malonaldehyde decreased the maximum activation by 20%, but three times as much lipoprotein was required to achieve this. Non-enzymic glycosylation of lipoprotein with glucose, under a variety of conditions resulting in up to 28 nmol of glucose/mg of protein, had no effect upon the ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. In contrast non-enzymic sialylation resulted in a time-dependent loss of up to 60% of ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. Reductive methylation and acetoacetylation of serum did not affect the ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. The results are compared to the effects of similar modifications to low density lipoproteins on receptor-mediated endocytosis. PMID:3593262

  19. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Lambert, D.P.

    1992-11-09

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for tetraphenylborate precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92-737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The program was in conjunction with reducing the nitrite ion level in DWPF feed.

  20. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Lambert, D.P.

    1992-11-09

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for tetraphenylborate precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92-737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The program was in conjunction with reducing the nitrite ion level in DWPF feed.

  1. Extended-release niacin for modifying the lipoprotein profile.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R

    2004-06-01

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) favourably modifies all aspects of the lipoprotein profile; it raises high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, lowers triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and lipoprotein(a) levels and reduces atherogenic small, dense LDL particles. One large monotherapy trial and multiple trials of niacin in combination with other lipid-modifying drugs show remarkable consistency in the ability of niacin to improve angiographic and clinical outcomes. In practice, however, the use of regular, immediate-release niacin (niacin IR) has been limited by the side effect of flushing. Sustained-release (SR) formulations, developed in order to reduce flushing, were found to cause serious hepatotoxicity at varying frequencies. Extended-release niacin (niacin ER; Niaspan), Kos Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) is a prescription formulation of niacin, administered once-daily at bedtime. Niacin ER is as effective in modifying lipoprotein levels as an equal daily dose of niacin IR and it causes less flushing. In addition, niacin ER administered once-daily is not associated with the increased hepatotoxicity reported with SR formulations. Niacin ER has been studied extensively in combination therapy with statins, including lovastatin in a recently introduced combination tablet. Myopathy has not been a substantial problem in statin/niacin ER combination therapy. Finally, a study of niacin ER given to diabetic patients showed only mild trends towards increased glycosylated haemoglobin concentrations and a need for additional antidiabetic medication. Thus, niacin ER represents an effective and safe option in the management of low levels of HDL-C and other lipoprotein abnormalities in a variety of settings.

  2. Apolipoprotein E isoform-specific effects on lipoprotein receptor processing

    PubMed Central

    Bachmeier, Corbin; Shackleton, Ben; Ojo, Joseph; Paris, Daniel; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings indicate an isoform-specific role for apolipoprotein E (apoE) in the elimination of beta-amyloid (Aβ) from the brain. ApoE is closely associated with various lipoprotein receptors, which contribute to Aβ brain removal via metabolic clearance or transit across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). These receptors are subject to ectodomain shedding at the cell surface, which alters endocytic transport and mitigates Aβ elimination. To further understand the manner in which apoE influences Aβ brain clearance, these studies investigated the effect of apoE on lipoprotein receptor shedding. Consistent with prior reports, we observed an increased shedding of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and the LDLR-related protein 1 (LRP1) following Aβ exposure in human brain endothelial cells. When Aβ was co-treated with each apoE isoform, there was a reduction in Aβ-induced shedding with apoE2 and apoE3, while lipoprotein receptor shedding in the presence of apoE4 remained elevated. Likewise, intracranial administration of Aβ to apoE targeted replacement mice (expressing the human apoE isoforms) resulted in an isoform-dependent effect on lipoprotein receptor shedding in the brain (apoE4>apoE3>apoE2). Moreover, these results show a strong inverse correlation with our prior work in apoE transgenic mice in which apoE4 animals showed reduced Aβ clearance across the BBB compared to apoE3 animals. Based on these results, apoE4 appears less efficient than other apoE isoforms in regulating lipoprotein receptor shedding, which may explain the differential effects of these isoforms in removing Aβ from the brain. PMID:25015123

  3. Structural changes of lipoprotein lipids by 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-Korpela, M.; Oja, J.; Lounila, J.; Jokisaari, J.; Savolainen, M. J.; Kesäniemi, Y. A.

    1995-08-01

    A new procedure for detecting structural changes of lipoprotein lipids is introduced and applied to study native low (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. The method involves lineshape fitting analyses of specific resonances in proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra together with numerical derivation of the obtained intensity curves with respect to temperature. In addition to the well-known phase transition of the LDL core cholesterol esters, a novel structural change was revealed in the phospholipid monolayer of both native LDL and HDL particles. The attributes of this phenomenon are discussed.

  4. JCL Roundtable: Hypertriglyceridemia due to defects in lipoprotein lipase function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, W. Virgil; Goldberg, Ira J.; Young, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In this Roundtable, our intent is to discuss those rare genetic disorders that impair the function of lipoprotein lipase. These cause severe hypertriglyceridemia that appears in early childhood with Mendelian inheritance and usually with full penetrance in a recessive pattern. Dr Ira Goldberg from New York University School of Medicine and Dr Stephen Young from the University of California, Los Angeles have agreed to answer my questions about this topic. Both have done fundamental work in recent years that has markedly altered our views on lipoprotein lipase function. I am going to start by asking them to give us a brief history of this enzyme system as a clinical entity. PMID:26073384

  5. Hydrolysis of peptide esters by different enzymes.

    PubMed

    Reissmann, S; Greiner, G

    1992-08-01

    The combined use in peptide synthesis of the Fmoc-group with methyl, benzyl or p-nitro benzyl esters is not practical because of the elimination of the Fmoc-group under basic conditions and by catalytic hydrogenation. Nevertheless the solution synthesis of peptides requires those combinations in some cases. For this purpose we have investigated enzymatic hydrolysis of some tri and tetrapeptide esters. The hydrolysis were carried out under pH-control. We measured deprotection of the carboxyl group by thermitase, porcine liver esterase, carboxypeptidase A and alpha-chymotrypsin. The main problems are to suppress proteolytic degradation of the peptide bond and to bring the protected peptides into solution. To solve both problems we used dimethylformamide and dimethylsulfoxide as cosolvents. The ratios between esterolytic and proteolytic activity were estimated under various cosolvent concentrations. Advantages of this method are to avoid side reactions of alkaline instable side chains (e.g. asparagine, glutamine), cleavage of base labile protecting groups and racemization by alkaline saponification. The enzymatic deprotection was followed by HPLC, HPTLC and titration. On a preparative scale this method gives good yields and sufficiently pure products.

  6. Muscarinic receptor activation of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis. Relationship to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and diacylglycerol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, E.A.; Goldstein, D.; Brown, J.H. )

    1989-09-05

    We examined the relationship between phosphatidylcholine (PC) hydrolysis, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, and diacylglycerol (DAG) formation in response to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) stimulation in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. Carbachol increases the release of (3H)choline and (3H)phosphorylcholine ((3H)Pchol) from cells containing (3H)choline-labeled PC. The production of Pchol is rapid and transient, while choline production continues for at least 30 min. mAChR-stimulated release of Pchol is reduced in cells that have been depleted of intracellular Ca2+ stores by ionomycin pretreatment, whereas choline release is unaffected by this pretreatment. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increases the release of choline, but not Pchol, from 1321N1 cells, and down-regulation of protein kinase C blocks the ability of carbachol to stimulate choline production. Taken together, these results suggest that Ca2+ mobilization is involved in mAChR-mediated hydrolysis of PC by a phospholipase C, whereas protein kinase C activation is required for mAChR-stimulated hydrolysis of PC by a phospholipase D. Both carbachol and PMA rapidly increase the formation of (3H)phosphatidic acid ((3H)PA) in cells containing (3H)myristate-labeled PC. (3H)Diacylglycerol ((3H)DAG) levels increase more slowly, suggesting that the predominant pathway for PC hydrolysis is via phospholipase D. When cells are labeled with (3H)myristate and (14C)arachidonate such that there is a much greater 3H/14C ratio in PC compared with the phosphoinositides, the 3H/14C ratio in DAG and PA increases with PMA treatment but decreases in response to carbachol.

  7. Intercellular transport of lysosomal acid lipase mediates lipoprotein cholesteryl ester metabolism in a human vascular endothelial cell-fibroblast coculture system.

    PubMed Central

    Sando, G N; Ma, G P; Lindsley, K A; Wei, Y P

    1990-01-01

    We present results from studies of human cell culture models to support the premise that the extracellular transport of lysosomal acid lipase has a function in lipoprotein cholesteryl ester metabolism in vascular tissue. Vascular endothelial cells secreted a higher fraction of cellular acid lipase than did smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Acid lipase and lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase were secreted at approximately the same rate from the apical and basolateral surface of an endothelial cell monolayer. Stimulation of secretion with NH4Cl did not affect the polarity. We tested for the ability of secreted endothelial lipase to interact with connective tissue cells and influence lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism in a coculture system in which endothelial cells on a micropore filter were suspended above a monolayer of acid lipase-deficient (Wolman disease) fibroblasts. After 5-7 d, acid lipase activity in the fibroblasts reached 10%-20% of the level in normal cells; cholesteryl esters that had accumulated from growth in serum were cleared. Addition of mannose 6-phosphate to the coculture medium blocked acid lipase uptake and cholesterol clearance, indicating that lipase released from endothelial cells was packaged into fibroblast lysosomes by a phosphomannosyl receptor-mediated pathway. Supplementation of the coculture medium with serum was not required for lipase uptake and cholesteryl ester hydrolysis by the fibroblasts, but was necessary for cholesterol clearance. Results from our coculture model suggest that acid lipase may be transported from intact endothelium to cells in the lumen or the wall of a blood vessel. We postulate that delivery of acid hydrolases and lipoproteins to a common endocytic compartment may occur and have an impact on cellular lipoprotein processing. PMID:2150334

  8. Lipoproteins binding malachite green to slow the decolorization of malachite green in Pseudomonas sp. JT-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Li, Liguan; Du, Hongwei; Jiang, Lijuan; Zhang, Qiong; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Lin; Yang, Liuyan

    2011-01-01

    Lipoproteins of a malachite green (MG)-decolorizing bacterium Pseudomonas sp. JT-1 could bind MG to form green MG-Lipoproteins complexes, which prevented the decolorization of MG by triphenylmethane reductase.

  9. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-density lipoprotein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of lipoprotein X aids in the diagnosis of obstructive liver disease. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  10. Effects of human low and high density lipoproteins on the binding of rat intermediate density lipoproteins to rat liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Brissette, L.; Nol, S.P.

    1986-05-25

    Upon incubation with rat liver membranes, radioiodinated rat intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) interacted with at least two binding sites having a low and a high affinity as demonstrated by the curvilinear Scatchard plots obtained from the specific binding data. The purpose of our work was to identify the nature of these binding sites. Human low density lipoproteins (LDL), contain apolipoprotein B only, and human high density lipoproteins (HDL3), containing neither apolipoprotein B nor E, were both capable of decreasing the specific binding of rat /sup 125/I-IDL. The Scatchard analysis clearly revealed that only the low affinity component was affected by the addition of these human lipoproteins. In fact, the low affinity binding component gradually decreased as the amount of human LDL or HDL3 increased in the binding assay. At a 200-fold excess of human LDL or HDL3, the low affinity binding was totally masked, and the Scatchard plot of the specific /sup 125/I-IDL binding became linear. Only the high affinity binding component was left, enabling a precise measurement of its binding parameters. In a series of competitive displacement experiments in which the binding assay contained a 200-fold excess of human LDL or HDL3, only unlabeled rat IDL effectively displaced the binding of rat /sup 125/I-IDL. We conclude that the low affinity binding of rat IDL to rat liver membranes is due to weak interactions with unspecified lipoprotein binding sites. The camouflage of these sites by human lipoproteins makes possible the study of IDL binding to the high affinity component which likely represents the combined effect of IDL binding to both the remnant and the LDL receptors.

  11. One precursor, three apolipoproteins: the relationship between two crustacean lipoproteins, the large discoidal lipoprotein and the high density lipoprotein/β-glucan binding protein.

    PubMed

    Stieb, Stefanie; Roth, Ziv; Dal Magro, Christina; Fischer, Sabine; Butz, Eric; Sagi, Amir; Khalaila, Isam; Lieb, Bernhard; Schenk, Sven; Hoeger, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    The novel discoidal lipoprotein (dLp) recently detected in the crayfish, differs from other crustacean lipoproteins in its large size, apoprotein composition and high lipid binding capacity, We identified the dLp sequence by transcriptome analyses of the hepatopancreas and mass spectrometry. Further de novo assembly of the NGS data followed by BLAST searches using the sequence of the high density lipoprotein/1-glucan binding protein (HDL-BGBP) of Astacus leptodactylus as query revealed a putative precursor molecule with an open reading frame of 14.7 kb and a deduced primary structure of 4889 amino acids. The presence of an N-terminal lipid bind- ing domain and a DUF 1943 domain suggests the relationship with the large lipid transfer proteins. Two-putative dibasic furin cleavage sites were identified bordering the sequence of the HDL-BGBP. When subjected to mass spectroscopic analyses, tryptic peptides of the large apoprotein of dLp matched the N-terminal part of the precursor, while the peptides obtained for its small apoprotein matched the C-terminal part. Repeating the analysis in the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii revealed a similar protein with identical domain architecture suggesting that our findings do not represent an isolated instance. Our results indicate that the above three apolipoproteins (i.e HDL-BGBP and both the large and the small subunit of dLp) are translated as a large precursor. Cleavage at the furin type sites releases two subunits forming a heterodimeric dLP particle, while the remaining part forms an HDL-BGBP whose relationship with other lipoproteins as well as specific functions are yet to be elucidated.

  12. Acid-functionalized nanoparticles for biomass hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena Duque, Leidy Eugenia

    Cellulosic ethanol is a renewable source of energy. Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex material composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Biomass pretreatment is a required step to make sugar polymers liable to hydrolysis. Mineral acids are commonly used for biomass pretreatment. Using acid catalysts that can be recovered and reused could make the process economically more attractive. The overall goal of this dissertation is the development of a recyclable nanocatalyst for the hydrolysis of biomass sugars. Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles (CoFe2O4) were synthesized to provide a magnetic core that could be separated from reaction using a magnetic field and modified to carry acid functional groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the crystal structure was that of cobalt spinel ferrite. CoFe2O4 were covered with silica which served as linker for the acid functions. Silica-coated nanoparticles were functionalized with three different acid functions: perfluoropropyl-sulfonic acid, carboxylic acid, and propyl-sulfonic acid. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were analyzed to obtain particle size distributions of the nanoparticles. Total carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur were quantified using an elemental analyzer. Fourier transform infra-red spectra confirmed the presence of sulfonic and carboxylic acid functions and ion-exchange titrations accounted for the total amount of catalytic acid sites per nanoparticle mass. These nanoparticles were evaluated for their performance to hydrolyze the beta-1,4 glycosidic bond of the cellobiose molecule. Propyl-sulfonic (PS) and perfluoropropyl-sulfonic (PFS) acid functionalized nanoparticles catalyzed the hydrolysis of cellobiose significantly better than the control. PS and PFS were also evaluated for their capacity to solubilize wheat straw hemicelluloses and performed better than the control. Although PFS nanoparticles were stronger acid catalysts, the acid functions leached out of the nanoparticle during

  13. Esterification of Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Human Fibroblasts and Its Absence in Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Joseph L.; Dana, Suzanna E.; Brown, Michael S.

    1974-01-01

    A new mechanism is described for the cellular esterification of cholesterol derived from extra-cellular lipoproteins. Incubation of monolayers of cultured fibroblasts from normal human subjects with low density lipoproteins led to a 30- to 40-fold increase in the rate of incorporation of either [14C]acetate or [14C]oleate into the fatty acid fraction of cholesteryl [14C]esters. This stimulation of cholesteryl ester formation by low density lipoproteins occurred despite the fact that endogenous synthesis of free cholesterol was completely suppressed by the lipoprotein. Thus, exogenous cholesterol contained in low density lipoproteins, rather than endogenously synthesized sterol, appeared to provide the cholesterol substrate for this cellular esterfication process. High density lipoproteins and the lipoprotein-deficient fraction of serum neither stimulated cholesteryl ester formation nor inhibited cholesterol synthesis. Both the low density lipoprotein-dependent increase in cholesterol esterification and decrease in free cholesterol synthesis required the interaction of the lipoprotein with its recently described cell surface receptor. Cells from homozygotes with familial hypercholesterolemia, which lack specific low density lipoprotein receptors, showed neither lipoprotein-dependent cholesterol esterification nor suppression of cholesterol synthesis. The reciprocal changes in free cholesterol synthesis and cholesteryl ester formation produced by low density lipoprotein-receptor interactions may play an important role in the regulation of the cholesterol content of mammalian cells. PMID:4373706

  14. Esterification of low density lipoprotein cholesterol in human fibroblasts and its absence in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, J L; Dana, S E; Brown, M S

    1974-11-01

    A new mechanism is described for the cellular esterification of cholesterol derived from extra-cellular lipoproteins. Incubation of monolayers of cultured fibroblasts from normal human subjects with low density lipoproteins led to a 30- to 40-fold increase in the rate of incorporation of either [(14)C]acetate or [(14)C]oleate into the fatty acid fraction of cholesteryl [(14)C]esters. This stimulation of cholesteryl ester formation by low density lipoproteins occurred despite the fact that endogenous synthesis of free cholesterol was completely suppressed by the lipoprotein. Thus, exogenous cholesterol contained in low density lipoproteins, rather than endogenously synthesized sterol, appeared to provide the cholesterol substrate for this cellular esterfication process. High density lipoproteins and the lipoprotein-deficient fraction of serum neither stimulated cholesteryl ester formation nor inhibited cholesterol synthesis. Both the low density lipoprotein-dependent increase in cholesterol esterification and decrease in free cholesterol synthesis required the interaction of the lipoprotein with its recently described cell surface receptor. Cells from homozygotes with familial hypercholesterolemia, which lack specific low density lipoprotein receptors, showed neither lipoprotein-dependent cholesterol esterification nor suppression of cholesterol synthesis. The reciprocal changes in free cholesterol synthesis and cholesteryl ester formation produced by low density lipoprotein-receptor interactions may play an important role in the regulation of the cholesterol content of mammalian cells.

  15. Pitavastatin versus Pravastatin in Reduction of Remnant Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Patients with Dyslipidemias.

    PubMed

    Roever, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Remnant lipoproteins cholesterol are products of partially catabolized chylomicrons and very-low-density lipoprotein, from which some triglycerides have been removed. These particles are smaller and are believed to be strongly atherogenic. Elevated Remnant lipoproteins cholesterol levels were reported to be associated with endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerotic disease.

  16. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590 Section 866.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-density lipoprotein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of lipoprotein X aids in the diagnosis...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5580 Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-lipoprotein... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5580 Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-lipoprotein... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test...

  19. Improved Estimation of Human Lipoprotein Kinetics with Mixed Effects Models

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Martin; Adiels, Martin; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Borén, Jan; Wennberg, Bernt

    2015-01-01

    Context Mathematical models may help the analysis of biological systems by providing estimates of otherwise un-measurable quantities such as concentrations and fluxes. The variability in such systems makes it difficult to translate individual characteristics to group behavior. Mixed effects models offer a tool to simultaneously assess individual and population behavior from experimental data. Lipoproteins and plasma lipids are key mediators for cardiovascular disease in metabolic disorders such as diabetes mellitus type 2. By the use of mathematical models and tracer experiments fluxes and production rates of lipoproteins may be estimated. Results We developed a mixed effects model to study lipoprotein kinetics in a data set of 15 healthy individuals and 15 patients with type 2 diabetes. We compare the traditional and the mixed effects approach in terms of group estimates at various sample and data set sizes. Conclusion We conclude that the mixed effects approach provided better estimates using the full data set as well as with both sparse and truncated data sets. Sample size estimates showed that to compare lipoprotein secretion the mixed effects approach needed almost half the sample size as the traditional method. PMID:26422201

  20. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lipoprotein test system. 862.1475 Section 862.1475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lipoprotein test system. 862.1475 Section 862.1475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lipoprotein test system. 862.1475 Section 862.1475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lipoprotein test system. 862.1475 Section 862.1475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  4. Dietary fats, fatty acids, and their effects on lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Denke, Margo A

    2006-11-01

    All saturated fatty acids, with the notable exception of stearic acid (C18:0), raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. A few less ubiquitous fatty acids also have LDL cholesterol effects. Trans-monounsaturated fatty acids, at equivalent doses of saturated fatty acids, raise LDL cholesterol. Polyunsaturated fatty acids, at three times the dose of saturated fatty acids, lower LDL cholesterol. Higher intakes of most fatty acids raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, with the notable exception of trans-monounsaturated fatty acids, which lower HDL cholesterol to the same extent as carbohydrate when either is substituted for other dietary fatty acids. Conjugated linoleic acids containing both cis and trans bonds and cis-monounsaturated fatty acids neither raise nor lower cholesterol concentrations of lipoproteins. The omega-3 fatty acids from fish lower triglyceride levels. Although dietary composition remains an important, modifiable predictor of dyslipidemia, overconsumption of any form of dietary energy may replace overconsumption of saturated fat as the primary factor that increases lipid and lipoprotein levels. PMID:17045072

  5. Dense low density lipoproteins and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    1995-02-23

    A common, genetically influenced lipoprotein subclass profile characterized by a predominance of small, dense low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is associated with relative increases in plasma triglyceride and apolipoprotein (apo) B-100, and reduced levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and apoAI. Recently, this phenotype has also been associated with the insulin resistance syndrome and familial combined hyperlipidemia. Case-control studies of patients with myocardial infarction and angiographically documented coronary artery disease (CAD) have demonstrated that 40-50% of patients have the small, dense LDL phenotype and that this is associated with a 2- to 3-fold increase in disease risk. However, because of strong statistical correlations among the multiple features of the phenotype, it has been difficult to determine whether > or = 1 of its metabolic alterations are primarily responsible for increased CAD susceptibility. More direct evidence for enhanced atherogenicity of lipoproteins in this trait derives from a recent report that LDL-cholesterol lowering by diet and drug treatment resulted in reduced coronary angiographic progression in CAD subjects with predominantly dense LDL, but that an equivalent lowering of LDL cholesterol in subjects with more buoyant LDL was not associated with angiographic benefit. Further, in vitro findings have indicated increased susceptibility of small, dense LDL to oxidative modification and relatively greater binding of these particles to arterial wall proteoglycans. Thus, the small, dense LDL trait may underlie familial predisposition to CAD in a large proportion of the population, and its presence may indicate the potential for benefit from specific therapeutic interventions.

  6. PCSK9 and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Druce, Irena; Abujrad, Hussein; Ooi, Teik Chye

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pro-protein convertase subtilisin-kexin 9 (PCSK9) is known to affect low-density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolism, but there are indications from several lines of research that it may also influence the metabolism of other lipoproteins, especially triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL). This review summarizes the current data on this possible role of PCSK9. A link between PCSK9 and TRL has been suggested through the demonstration of (1) a correlation between plasma PCSK9 and triglyceride (TG) levels in health and disease, (2) a correlation between plasma PCSK9 and markers of carbohydrate metabolism, which is closely related to TG metabolism, (3) an effect of TG-lowering fibrate therapy on plasma PCSK9 levels, (4) an effect of PCSK9 on postprandial lipemia, (5) an effect of PCSK9 on adipose tissue biology, (6) an effect of PCSK9 on apolipoprotein B production from the liver and intestines, (7) an effect of PCSK9 on receptors other than low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) that are involved in TRL metabolism, and (8) an effect of anti-PCSK9 therapy on serum TG levels. The underlying mechanisms are unclear but starting to emerge. PMID:26320603

  7. A Novel Anti-Inflammatory Effect for High Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Scott J.; Morrell, Craig N.; Bao, Clare; Swaim, AnneMarie F.; Rodriguez, Annabelle; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoprotein has anti-inflammatory effects in addition to mediating reverse cholesterol transport. While many of the chronic anti-inflammatory effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL) are attributed to changes in cell adhesion molecules, little is known about acute signal transduction events elicited by HDL in endothelial cells. We now show that high density lipoprotein decreases endothelial cell exocytosis, the first step in leukocyte trafficking. ApoA-I, a major apolipoprotein of HDL, mediates inhibition of endothelial cell exocytosis by interacting with endothelial scavenger receptor-BI which triggers an intracellular protective signaling cascade involving protein kinase C (PKC). Other apolipoproteins within the HDL particle have only modest effects upon endothelial exocytosis. Using a human primary culture of endothelial cells and murine apo-AI knockout mice, we show that apo-AI prevents endothelial cell exocytosis which limits leukocyte recruitment. These data suggest that high density lipoprotein may inhibit diseases associated with vascular inflammation in part by blocking endothelial exocytosis. PMID:26680360

  8. Lifecycle of a Lipoprotein from a Biophysical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, John C.; Huser, Thomas; Voss, John; Chan, James; Parikh, Atul

    The goal of our project was to understand how lipids and lipoproteins interact with cell membranes. This chapter will present the five major areas in which we have focused our attention on understanding how lipids and lipoproteins interact with cell membranes (Fig. 11.1): (1) triglycerides and vascular injury, (2) single lipoprotein analysis, (3) apolipoprotein E (apoE) conformation changes in the postprandial state, (4) triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRLs) and endothelial cell inflammation, and (5) TGRL lipolysis products and monocyte activation. For over a hundred years, Western civilization has questioned how the food we eat translates into disease, and specifically atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Although most information indicates that this basic pathophysiological process is mediated through consumption of excess saturated fats, much remains unknown. After humans eat a meal, there is an elevation of triglycerides in the blood in the postprandial state. In normal individuals, triglycerides can rise after a meal by 50 to 100%. This has been documented many times in the past, including a paper by Hyson et al, (1998) [1]. In that study, normal healthy individuals were given a 40%-fat meal. Plasma triglycerides, which were modestly elevated initially, rose about 60% higher three to four hours after ingestion of the meal. Subsequently plasma triglycerides fell to baseline levels six hours after the meal. Even in these healthy individuals, a significant elevation of triglycerides was noted after ingestion of a moder ately high-fat meal.

  9. Macrophage Infiltration into the Glomeruli in Lipoprotein Glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Takasaki, Satoshi; Maeda, Kunihiko; Joh, Kensuke; Yamakage, Shu; Fukase, Sachiko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsunaga, Akira; Saito, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Lipoprotein glomerulopathy (LPG) is characterized by histopathological features showing intra-glomerular lipoprotein thrombi and type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP), with heterozygote mutation of apolipoprotein (apo) E gene. On the other hand, as another renal lipidosis with type III HLP, apoE2 homozygote-related glomerulopathy (apoE2-GN) showing foamy macrophages has been reported. The case of a 25-year-old man who had LPG by clinical behavior and gene analysis, but demonstrated atypical histopathological features with a substantial amount of foamy macrophage infiltration in the glomeruli, is presented. The combination of alleles for apoE Tokyo/Maebashi and classical apoE2 (Arg158Cys) was inferred to be the leading cause of the unique renal pathology with lipoprotein thrombi and foamy macrophages. In addition, foamy macrophages infiltrated some part of the apoE-positive region within the glomerulus, but did not exist in lipoprotein thrombi despite apoE positivity, suggesting that properties of apoE are crucial in the development of LPG rather than macrophage function. This case provides important information related to the pathogenesis of LPG and apoE2-GN. PMID:26955632

  10. Reactor optimization for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.H.; Gharpuray, M.M.; Fan, L.T.

    1982-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose furnishes sugar which can be subsequently fermented to ethanol. The production of such sugar at relatively low cost is essential for commercially viable production of ethanol. Many processes have been developed for converting cellulosic materials to sugar, and their economic feasibility has been analyzed; however, relatively little has been done to optimize such processes. A comprehensive mechanistic kinetic model for enzymatic degradation was established previously; it takes into account the structure of cellulose, mode of action of celluloytic enzyme, and mode of interaction between the enzyme and the cellulosic substrate. In the present work this model has been applied to the optimal design of cellulose hydrloysis reactors. Both batch and continously stirred reactors have been considered for this purpose. The fractional contributions of various cost parameters to the production cost have been estimated. The sensitivity of sugar cost to the important cost parameters, such as raw material and enzyme costs, have been examined. 8 figures, 7 tables.

  11. Fermentable sugars by chemical hydrolysis of biomass

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Joseph B.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Abundant plant biomass has the potential to become a sustainable source of fuels and chemicals. Realizing this potential requires the economical conversion of recalcitrant lignocellulose into useful intermediates, such as sugars. We report a high-yielding chemical process for the hydrolysis of biomass into monosaccharides. Adding water gradually to a chloride ionic liquid-containing catalytic acid leads to a nearly 90% yield of glucose from cellulose and 70–80% yield of sugars from untreated corn stover. Ion-exclusion chromatography allows recovery of the ionic liquid and delivers sugar feedstocks that support the vigorous growth of ethanologenic microbes. This simple chemical process, which requires neither an edible plant nor a cellulase, could enable crude biomass to be the sole source of carbon for a scalable biorefinery. PMID:20194793

  12. Storage oil hydrolysis during early seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Quettier, Anne-Laure; Eastmond, Peter J

    2009-06-01

    Storage oil breakdown plays an important role in the life cycle of many plants by providing the carbon skeletons that support seedling growth immediately following germination. This metabolic process is initiated by lipases (EC: 3.1.1.3), which catalyze the hydrolysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs) to release free fatty acids and glycerol. A number of lipases have been purified to near homogeneity from seed tissues and analysed for their in vitro activities. Furthermore, several genes encoding lipases have been cloned and characterised from plants. However, only recently has data been presented to establish the molecular identity of a lipase that has been shown to be required for TAG breakdown in seeds. In this review we briefly outline the processes of TAG synthesis and breakdown. We then discuss some of the biochemical literature on seed lipases and describe the cloning and characterisation of a lipase called SUGAR-DEPENDENT1, which is required for TAG breakdown in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

  13. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Grohmann, K.; Bothast, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Corn fiber is a co-product of the corn wet milling industry which is usually marketed as a low value animal feed ingredient. Approximately 1.2 x 10{sup 6} dry tons of this material are produced annually in the United States. The fiber is composed of kernel cell wall fractions and a residual starch which can all be potentially hydrolyzed to a mixture of glucose, xylose, arabinose and galactose. We have investigated a sequential saccharification of polysaccharides in corn fiber by a treatment with dilute sulfuric acid at 100 to 160{degrees}C followed by partial neutralization and enzymatic hydrolysis with mixed cellulose and amyloglucosidase enzymes at 45{degrees}C. The sequential treatment achieved a high (approximately 85%) conversion of all polysaccharides in the corn fiber to monomeric sugars, which were in most cases fermentable to ethanol by the recombinant bacterium Escherichia coli KOll.

  14. Enhanced functional properties of tannic acid after thermal hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal hydrolysis processing of fresh tannic acid was carried out in a closed reactor at four different temperatures (65, 100, 150 and 200°C). Pressures reached in the system were 1.3 and 4.8 MPa at 150 and 200°C, respectively. Hydrolysis products (gallic acid and pyrogallol) were separated and qua...

  15. Ultrasound Enhancement of Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Plant Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The work reported here is based on acceleration of enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass substrate by introduction of low intensity, uniform ultrasound field into a reaction chamber (bio-reactor). This method may serve as improvement of rates in the hydrolysis of cellulosic materials to sugars, whi...

  16. Class Projects in Physical Organic Chemistry: The Hydrolysis of Aspirin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrs, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    An exercise that provides a hands-on demonstration of the hydrolysis of aspirin is presented. The key to understanding the hydrolysis is recognizing that all six process may occur simultaneously and that the observed rate constant is the sum of the rate constants that one rate constant dominates the overall process.

  17. Bioabatement with hemicellulase supplementation to reduce enzymatic hydrolysis inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Removal of inhibitory compounds by bioabatement, combined with xylan hydrolysis, enables effective cellulose hydrolysis of pretreated corn stover, for fermentation of the sugars to fuel ethanol or other products. The fungus Coniochaeta ligniaria NRRL30616 eliminates most enzyme and fermentation inhi...

  18. Lipoprotein receptors in copper-deficient rats: high density lipoprotein binding to liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hassel, C.A.; Lei, K.Y.; Marchello, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    In copper-deficient rats, the observed hyperlipoproteinemia was mainly due to the elevation in high density lipoproteins (HDL). This study was designed to determine whether an impairment in the binding of HDL to liver membrane is responsible for the hyperlipoproteinemia. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 treatments, namely copper (Cu) deficient and adequate (less than 1 and 8 mg Cu/kg of diet). After 8 weeks, plasma, heart and liver tissues were obtained. Reduction in liver Cu content and elevation in heart to body weight ratio and plasma cholesterol confirmed that rats fed the test diet were Cu-deficient. Plasma HDL isolated from both Cu-deficient and control rats were iodinated and bound to liver membranes prepared from rats of each treatment. Binding of /sup 125/I-HDL was competitively inhibited by unlabelled rat HDL from both treatments, but not by human LDL. Scatchard analysis of specific binding data showed that maximal /sup 125/I-HDL binding (per mg membrane protein) to membranes prepared from Cu-deficient rats was not lower than controls. Furthermore, the amount of /sup 125/I-HDL from deficient rats specifically bound to liver membranes prepared from either treatment was not less than the amount of /sup 125/I-HDL from control rats bound to the same membranes. The data suggest that the hyperlipoproteinemia in Cu-deficient rats may not have resulted from a decrease in the number of hepatic HDL binding sites.

  19. Epidemic based modeling of enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; Arellano, Maria G; Keshwani, Deepak R

    2014-01-01

    An epidemic based model was developed to describe the enzymatic hydrolysis of a lignocellulosic biomass, dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover. The process of substrate getting adsorbed and digested by enzyme was simulated as susceptibles getting infected by viruses and becoming removed and recovered. This model simplified the dynamic enzyme "infection" process and the catalysis of cellulose into a two-parameter controlled, enzyme behavior guided mechanism. Furthermore, the model incorporates the adsorption block by lignin and inhibition effects on cellulose catalysis. The model satisfactorily predicted the enzyme adsorption and hydrolysis, negative role of lignin, and inhibition effects over hydrolysis for a broad range of substrate and enzyme loadings. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the incorporation of lignin and other inhibition effects. Our model will be a useful tool for evaluating the effects of parameters during hydrolysis and guide a design strategy for continuous hydrolysis and the associated process control.

  20. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Hydrotropic Pulps at Different Substrate Loadings.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Marina N; Makarova, Ekaterina I; Pavlov, Igor N; Budaeva, Vera V; Sakovich, Gennady V

    2016-03-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic raw materials to produce nutrient broths for microbiological synthesis of ethanol and other valuable products is an important field of modern biotechnology. Biotechnological processing implies the selection of an effective pretreatment technique for raw materials. In this study, the hydrotropic treatment increased the reactivity of the obtained substrates toward enzymatic hydrolysis by 7.1 times for Miscanthus and by 7.3 times for oat hulls. The hydrotropic pulp from oat hulls was more reactive toward enzymatic hydrolysis compared to that from Miscanthus, despite that the substrates had similar compositions. As the initial substrate loadings were raised during enzymatic hydrolysis of the hydrotropic Miscanthus and oat hull pulps, the concentration of reducing sugars increased by 34 g/dm(3) and the yield of reducing sugars decreased by 31 %. The findings allow us to predict the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of hydrotropic pulps from Miscanthus and oat hulls when scaling up the process by volume. PMID:26634840

  1. Lipoprotein binding and endosomal itinerary of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, H; Takahashi, K; Hamilton, R L; Havel, R J

    1989-01-01

    The high affinity of 45Ca binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) and the LDL-R-related protein (LRP) was utilized to study the subcellular distribution of these two proteins in rat liver. Like the LDL-R, LRP was manyfold enriched in rat liver endosomal membranes with a relative distribution in early and late endosomal compartments consistent with recycling between endosomes and the cell surface. The high concentration of LRP in hepatic endosomal membranes greatly facilitated demonstration of Ca-dependent binding of apolipoprotein E- and B-containing lipoproteins in ligand blots. LRP was severalfold more abundant than the LDL-R in hepatic parenchymal cells, showed extensive degradation in hepatic endosomes, and was found in high concentrations in the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest a high rate of synthesis of LRP that appeared to be unaffected by treatment of rats with estradiol. The repeating cysteine-rich A-motif found in the ligand-binding domain of LRP appeared to be responsible for Ca binding by LRP, LDL-R, and complement factor C9 and accounted for immunological cross-reactivity among these proteins. Weaker ligand-blotting properties and an extraordinary susceptibility to proteolysis most likely contribute to the difficulty of detecting LRP in conventional assays for lipoprotein receptors. Our data suggest an extensive proteolytic processing of this protein and are consistent with a functional role of LRP in lipoprotein metabolism. Images PMID:2594771

  2. Trihalomethane hydrolysis in drinking water at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lu; Yang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Karanfil, Tanju; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2015-07-01

    Hydrolysis could contribute to the loss of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the drinking water at elevated temperatures. This study was aimed at investigating THM hydrolysis pertaining to the storage of hot boiled water in enclosed containers. The water pH value was in the range of 6.1-8.2 and the water temperature was varied from 65 to 95 °C. The effects of halide ions, natural organic matter, and drinking water matrix were investigated. Results showed that the hydrolysis rates declined in the order following CHBrCl2 > CHBr2Cl > CHBr3 > CHCl3. THM hydrolysis was primarily through the alkaline pathway, except for CHCl3 in water at relatively low pH value. The activation energies for the alkaline hydrolysis of CHCl3, CHBrCl2, CHBr2Cl and CHBr3 were 109, 113, 115 and 116 kJ/mol, respectively. No hydrolysis intermediates could accumulate in the water. The natural organic matter, and probably other constituents, in drinking water could substantially decrease THM hydrolysis rates by more than 50%. When a drinking water was at 90 °C or above, the first order rate constants for THM hydrolysis were in the magnitude of 10(-2)‒10(-1) 1/h. When the boiled real tap water was stored in an enclosed container, THMs continued increasing during the first few hours and then kept decreasing later on due to the competition between hydrolysis and further formation. The removal of THMs, especially brominated THMs, by hydrolysis would greatly reduce one's exposure to disinfection by-products by consuming the boiled water stored in enclosed containers.

  3. Kinetic Studies to Elucidate Impaired Metabolism of Triglyceride-rich Lipoproteins in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Adiels, Martin; Mardinoglu, Adil; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Borén, Jan

    2015-01-01

    To develop novel strategies for prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia, it is essential to understand the pathophysiology of dyslipoproteinemia in humans. Lipoprotein metabolism is a complex system in which abnormal concentrations of various lipoprotein particles can result from alterations in their rates of production, conversion, and/or catabolism. Traditional methods that measure plasma lipoprotein concentrations only provide static estimates of lipoprotein metabolism and hence limited mechanistic information. By contrast, the use of tracers labeled with stable isotopes and mathematical modeling, provides us with a powerful tool for probing lipid and lipoprotein kinetics in vivo and furthering our understanding of the pathogenesis of dyslipoproteinemia. PMID:26635628

  4. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane. PMID:20419407

  5. TAT-pathway-dependent lipoproteins as a niche-based adaptation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Shruthi, Hamsanathan; Babu, Mohan Madan; Sankaran, Krishnan

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins, characterized by the N-terminal N-acyl S-diacylglyceryl Cysteine, are key membrane proteins in bacterial homeostasis. It is generally thought that during the modification lipoprotein precursors are translocated via the Sec-machinery in an unfolded state. The recent discovery of twin-arginine translocation (TAT) machinery, meant for exporting folded-proteins, and the presence of TAT-type signal sequences in co-factor-containing (hence already folded) lipoproteins, prompted us to investigate its role and significance in lipoprotein biosynthesis. We systematically analyzed 696 prokaryotic genomes using an algorithm based on DOLOP and TatP rules to predict TAT-pathway-dependent lipoprotein substrates. Occurrence of the deduced TAT-pathway-dependent lipoprotein substrates in relation to genome size, presence or absence of TAT machinery, and extent of its usage for lipoprotein export and habitat types revealed that unlike the host-obligates, the free-living prokaryotes in complex hostile environments (e.g., soil) depend more on TAT-exported lipoproteins. Functional classification of the predicted TAT-dependent lipoproteins revealed enrichment in hydrolases and oxido-reductases, which are fast-folding and co-factor-containing proteins. The role of the TAT pathway in the export of folded-lipoproteins and in niche-specific adaptation for survival has important implications not only in lipoprotein biosynthesis, but also for protein and metabolic engineering applications. PMID:20333370

  6. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane.

  7. Distinct Hepatic Receptors for Low Density Lipoprotein and Apolipoprotein E in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, Jeffrey M.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Gregg, Richard E.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1985-02-01

    Since the liver is a central organ for lipid and lipoprotein synthesis and catabolism, hepatic receptors for specific apolipoproteins on plasma lipoproteins would be expected to modulate lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The role of hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins was evaluated in patients with complementary disorders in lipoprotein metabolism: abetalipoproteinemia and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. In addition, hepatic membranes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia were studied and compared before and after portacaval shunt surgery. The results establish that the human liver has receptors for apolipoproteins B and E. Furthermore, in the human, hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E are genetically distinct and can undergo independent control.

  8. Structural basis of transfer between lipoproteins by cholesteryl ester transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yan, Feng; Zhang, Shengli; Lei, Dongsheng; Charles, M Arthur; Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Oda, Michael; Krauss, Ronald M; Weisgraber, Karl H; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Pownall, Henry J; Qiu, Xiayang; Ren, Gang

    2012-02-19

    Human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the net transfer of cholesteryl ester mass from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins by an unknown mechanism. Delineating this mechanism would be an important step toward the rational design of new CETP inhibitors for treating cardiovascular diseases. Using EM, single-particle image processing and molecular dynamics simulation, we discovered that CETP bridges a ternary complex with its N-terminal β-barrel domain penetrating into high-density lipoproteins and its C-terminal domain interacting with low-density lipoprotein or very-low-density lipoprotein. In our mechanistic model, the CETP lipoprotein-interacting regions, which are highly mobile, form pores that connect to a hydrophobic central cavity, thereby forming a tunnel for transfer of neutral lipids from donor to acceptor lipoproteins. These new insights into CETP transfer provide a molecular basis for analyzing mechanisms for CETP inhibition.

  9. Structural basis of transfer between lipoproteins by cholesteryl ester transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Yan, Feng; Zhang, Shengli; Lei, Dongsheng; Charles, M. Arthur; Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Oda, Michael; Krauss, Ronald M.; Weisgraber, Karl H.; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Pownall, Henry J.; Qiu, Xiayang; Ren, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the net transfer of cholesteryl ester mass from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins by an unknown mechanism. Delineating this mechanism would be an important step toward the rational design of new CETP inhibitors for treating cardiovascular diseases. Using EM, single-particle image processing and molecular dynamics simulation, we discovered that CETP bridges a ternary complex with its N-terminal β-barrel domain penetrating into high-density lipoproteins and its C-terminal domain interacting with low-density lipoprotein or very-low-density lipoprotein. In our mechanistic model, the CETP lipoprotein-interacting regions, which are highly mobile, form pores that connect to a hydrophobic central cavity, thereby forming a tunnel for transfer of neutral lipids from donor to acceptor lipoproteins. These new insights into CETP transfer provide a molecular basis for analyzing mechanisms for CETP inhibition. PMID:22344176

  10. Lipoprotein(a), essential fatty acid status and lipoprotein lipids in female Australian vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Li, D; Ball, M; Bartlett, M; Sinclair, A

    1999-08-01

    In the present study we investigated serum lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels, plasma lipids, the serum phospholipid polyunsaturated fatty acid profile and correlates of serum Lp(a) in healthy free-living female vegetarians (n=50) and omnivores (n=24) to assess differences which may have implications for cardiovascular risk. Dietary saturated fat and total plasma cholesterol were significantly lower in the vegetarians compared with omnivores. The mean serum Lp(a) concentration was lower in the vegetarians (171 mg/l) than in the omnivores (247 mg/l). The serum Lp(a) concentration was significantly negatively correlated with carbohydrate intake (as % of energy), and positively correlated with plasma total cholesterol. Compared with the omnivores, the vegetarians had significantly lower concentrations of 20:3,n-6, 20:4,n-6, 22:5,n-6, 20:5,n-3, 22:6,n-3 and total n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a lower n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio, in serum phospholipids. Lower concentrations of plasma total cholesterol, serum phospholipid total fatty acids, total saturated fatty acids and arachidonic acid, and a tendency towards a lower serum Lp(a) concentration, in vegetarians may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease risk. However, the decreased concentration of serum phospholipid n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may potentially promote thrombotic risk. Based on the present data, it would seem appropriate for omnivores to reduce their dietary intake of total fat and saturated fat in order to decrease their plasma cholesterol, and vegetarians should perhaps increase their dietary intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and thus improve the balance of n-3/n-6, in order to reduce any thrombotic tendency that might increase their generally low risk of cardiovascular disease.

  11. Angiopoietin-like 4 Modifies the Interactions between Lipoprotein Lipase and Its Endothelial Cell Transporter GPIHBP1.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xun; Shetty, Shwetha K; Shows, Hannah W; Hjelmaas, Alexander J; Malcolm, Emily K; Davies, Brandon S J

    2015-05-01

    The release of fatty acids from plasma triglycerides for tissue uptake is critically dependent on the enzyme lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hydrolysis of plasma triglycerides by LPL can be disrupted by the protein angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4), and ANGPTL4 has been shown to inactivate LPL in vitro. However, in vivo LPL is often complexed to glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) on the surface of capillary endothelial cells. GPIHBP1 is responsible for trafficking LPL across capillary endothelial cells and anchors LPL to the capillary wall during lipolysis. How ANGPTL4 interacts with LPL in this context is not known. In this study, we investigated the interactions of ANGPTL4 with LPL-GPIHBP1 complexes on the surface of endothelial cells. We show that ANGPTL4 was capable of binding and inactivating LPL complexed to GPIHBP1 on the surface of endothelial cells. Once inactivated, LPL dissociated from GPIHBP1. We also show that ANGPTL4-inactivated LPL was incapable of binding GPIHBP1. ANGPTL4 was capable of binding, but not inactivating, LPL at 4 °C, suggesting that binding alone was not sufficient for ANGPTL4's inhibitory activity. We observed that although the N-terminal coiled-coil domain of ANGPTL4 by itself and full-length ANGPTL4 both bound with similar affinities to LPL, the N-terminal fragment was more potent in inactivating both free and GPIHBP1-bound LPL. These results led us to conclude that ANGPTL4 can both bind and inactivate LPL complexed to GPIHBP1 and that inactivation of LPL by ANGPTL4 greatly reduces the affinity of LPL for GPIHBP1. PMID:25809481

  12. Angiopoietin-like 4 Modifies the Interactions between Lipoprotein Lipase and Its Endothelial Cell Transporter GPIHBP1.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xun; Shetty, Shwetha K; Shows, Hannah W; Hjelmaas, Alexander J; Malcolm, Emily K; Davies, Brandon S J

    2015-05-01

    The release of fatty acids from plasma triglycerides for tissue uptake is critically dependent on the enzyme lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hydrolysis of plasma triglycerides by LPL can be disrupted by the protein angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4), and ANGPTL4 has been shown to inactivate LPL in vitro. However, in vivo LPL is often complexed to glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) on the surface of capillary endothelial cells. GPIHBP1 is responsible for trafficking LPL across capillary endothelial cells and anchors LPL to the capillary wall during lipolysis. How ANGPTL4 interacts with LPL in this context is not known. In this study, we investigated the interactions of ANGPTL4 with LPL-GPIHBP1 complexes on the surface of endothelial cells. We show that ANGPTL4 was capable of binding and inactivating LPL complexed to GPIHBP1 on the surface of endothelial cells. Once inactivated, LPL dissociated from GPIHBP1. We also show that ANGPTL4-inactivated LPL was incapable of binding GPIHBP1. ANGPTL4 was capable of binding, but not inactivating, LPL at 4 °C, suggesting that binding alone was not sufficient for ANGPTL4's inhibitory activity. We observed that although the N-terminal coiled-coil domain of ANGPTL4 by itself and full-length ANGPTL4 both bound with similar affinities to LPL, the N-terminal fragment was more potent in inactivating both free and GPIHBP1-bound LPL. These results led us to conclude that ANGPTL4 can both bind and inactivate LPL complexed to GPIHBP1 and that inactivation of LPL by ANGPTL4 greatly reduces the affinity of LPL for GPIHBP1.

  13. Hydrolysis of milk triglycerides by human gastric lipase.

    PubMed

    Jaśkiewicz, J; Szafran, Z; Popiela, T; Szafran, H

    1980-01-01

    The concentrations of myristic, palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic and oleic acids were determined in the products of hydrolysis of lipids of cow milk incubated with human gastric juice using thin-layer chromatography for the separation of lipid fractions, and gas liquid chromatography for the determination of fatty acids. It was found that the percentage ratio of the above fatty acids in hydrolysis products was similar to that in milk triglycerides. It was concluded that triglycerides containing higher fatty acids present in milk are hydrolysed by the lipase appearing in human gastric juice, the rate of hydrolysis of the individual acids being roughly proportional to the concentration of these acids in triglyceride substrate.

  14. Effect of Ultrasonic Frequency on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Keiji; Kato, Daiki; Xu, Zheng; Sakka, Makiko; Sakka, Kazuo

    2010-07-01

    The effect of ultrasonic frequency on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was examined. As the cellulose and enzyme, needle unbleached kraft pulp and cellulase were used. In the cases of the horn-type transducer at 20 kHz and the plate-type transducer at 28 kHz, the enzymatic hydrolysis was accelerated by ultrasonic irradiation. Total sugar concentration linearly increased with ultrasonic intensity. On the other hand, in the case of the plate-type transducer at 500 kHz, the enzymatic hydrolysis was inhibited. Total sugar concentration decreased with increasing ultrasonic intensity.

  15. Adsorption and recovery of cellulases during hydrolysis of newspaper

    SciTech Connect

    Castanon, M.; Wilke, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    The adsorption of cellulases from Trichoderma viride was studied during the hydrolysis of newspaper. By measuring individual enzyme activities it was found that in the early stage of hydrolysis enzyme components showing C/sub x/A were adsorbed preferentially to those showing C/sub 1/A; afterwards this situation was inverted. Electrophoretic resolution of proteins in hydrolysates showed a continuous decrease of enzyme proteins in solution, and furthermore suggested that the enzymes once adsorbed remained immobilized on the substrate (even after extensive digestion). Experiments to recover the enzymes that had remained in solution after typical hydrolysis showed a potential saving of enzyme of up to 40%.

  16. Dot-blot assay for the low density lipoprotein receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, F.M.; Catapano, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a new method for detecting the interaction of low density lipoprotein with its receptor using unmodified nitrocellulose as support for membrane protein. The method is specific and sensitive down to 3 micrograms of membrane protein. Unlabeled LDL, but not HDL, competes with /sup 125/I-labeled LDL for binding, and binding is abolished by pretreatment of the membranes with pronase and is dependent upon the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, modification of arginine or lysine residues on LDL abolishes the lipoprotein interaction with the receptor protein supported on the nitrocellulose. When the membranes are solubilized with octyl glucoside, purification steps of the receptor can be directly followed with no interference of the detergent, therefore eliminating the need for its removal. The increased expression of LDL receptors on liver membranes from estradiol-treated rats was also demonstrated. We suggest, therefore, that this method can be used to detect the presence of LDL receptors on minute amounts of membrane protein.

  17. Clinical applications of advanced lipoprotein testing in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Moin, Danyaal S; Rohatgi, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Traditional lipid profiles often fail to fully explain the elevated cardiovascular risk of individuals with diabetes mellitus. Advanced lipoprotein testing offers a novel means to evaluate dyslipidemia and refine risk estimation. Numerous observational studies have demonstrated a characteristic pattern of elevated levels of small, dense LDL particles, out of proportion to traditional lipid levels, in patients with both diabetes mellitus and the metabolic syndrome. Commonly used glucose and lipid-lowering agents have varied effects in patients with diabetes on both LDL and HDL subfractions. The exact role of advanced lipoprotein testing in patients with diabetes mellitus and the metabolic syndrome remains unclear but may offer improved assessment of cardiovascular risk compared with traditional lipid measurements. PMID:22162979

  18. Recombinant human LCAT normalizes plasma lipoprotein profile in LCAT deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, Sara; Tinti, Cristina; Salvini, Laura; Tinti, Laura; Ossoli, Alice; Vitali, Cecilia; Sousa, Vitor; Orsini, Gaetano; Nolli, Maria Luisa; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura

    2013-11-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is the enzyme responsible for cholesterol esterification in plasma. Mutations in the LCAT gene leads to two rare disorders, familial LCAT deficiency and fish-eye disease, both characterized by severe hypoalphalipoproteinemia associated with several lipoprotein abnormalities. No specific treatment is presently available for genetic LCAT deficiency. In the present study, recombinant human LCAT was expressed and tested for its ability to correct the lipoprotein profile in LCAT deficient plasma. The results show that rhLCAT efficiently reduces the amount of unesterified cholesterol (-30%) and promotes the production of plasma cholesteryl esters (+210%) in LCAT deficient plasma. rhLCAT induces a marked increase in HDL-C levels (+89%) and induces the maturation of small preβ-HDL into alpha-migrating particles. Moreover, the abnormal phospholipid-rich particles migrating in the LDL region were converted in normally sized LDL.

  19. Cell wall sorting of lipoproteins in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Navarre, W W; Daefler, S; Schneewind, O

    1996-01-01

    Many surface proteins are thought to be anchored to the cell wall of gram-positive organisms via their C termini, while the N-terminal domains of these molecules are displayed on the bacterial surface. Cell wall anchoring of surface proteins in Staphylococcus aureus requires both an N-terminal leader peptide and a C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. By fusing the cell wall sorting of protein A to the C terminus of staphylococcal beta-lactamase, we demonstrate here that lipoproteins can also be anchored to the cell wall of S. aureus. The topology of cell wall-anchored beta-lactamase is reminiscent of that described for Braun's murein lipoprotein in that the N terminus of the polypeptide chain is membrane anchored whereas the C-terminal end is tethered to the bacterial cell wall. PMID:8550464

  20. Recombinant human LCAT normalizes plasma lipoprotein profile in LCAT deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, Sara; Tinti, Cristina; Salvini, Laura; Tinti, Laura; Ossoli, Alice; Vitali, Cecilia; Sousa, Vitor; Orsini, Gaetano; Nolli, Maria Luisa; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura

    2013-11-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is the enzyme responsible for cholesterol esterification in plasma. Mutations in the LCAT gene leads to two rare disorders, familial LCAT deficiency and fish-eye disease, both characterized by severe hypoalphalipoproteinemia associated with several lipoprotein abnormalities. No specific treatment is presently available for genetic LCAT deficiency. In the present study, recombinant human LCAT was expressed and tested for its ability to correct the lipoprotein profile in LCAT deficient plasma. The results show that rhLCAT efficiently reduces the amount of unesterified cholesterol (-30%) and promotes the production of plasma cholesteryl esters (+210%) in LCAT deficient plasma. rhLCAT induces a marked increase in HDL-C levels (+89%) and induces the maturation of small preβ-HDL into alpha-migrating particles. Moreover, the abnormal phospholipid-rich particles migrating in the LDL region were converted in normally sized LDL. PMID:24140107

  1. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency presenting with neonatal perianal abscesses.

    PubMed

    Akesson, Lauren S; Burnett, John R; Mehta, Divyesh K; Martin, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), a member of the triglyceride lipase gene family, is synthesised by parenchymal cells of the heart, skeletal muscle and adipose tissues before being transported to luminal surfaces of vascular endothelial cells to exert its main physiological function to hydrolyse plasma lipoproteins. LPL deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, resulting in severe hypertriglyceridaemia from birth. The effect of marked hypertriglyceridaemia on the immune function in children has not been described. We present a case of a neonate with LPL deficiency and grossly elevated plasma triglyceride levels, presenting with recurrent and recalcitrant perianal abscesses suggestive of underlying immunodeficiency. With reduced levels of plasma triglycerides, the recurrent perianal infections resolved. This case report reviews evidence for potential deleterious effects of hypertriglyceridaemia on immune function, however, underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Whether hypertriglyceridaemia contributes to immune dysfunction in this context is unknown. If there is a pathophysiological link, this may have implications for hypertriglyceridaemia management. PMID:26825936

  2. [Various lipoprotein fractions and their relation to ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, V; Mondillo, S; Kristodhullu, A; De Stefano, R; Amatucci, G

    1983-01-01

    In a study carried out on over 700 patients with three different manifestations of aterosclerosis (cerebrovascular, coronary and peripheral), we could not find any statistically significant difference between the total cholesterol and triglyceride concentration in these three groups. Also, there was o difference in cholesterol and triglyceride levels between these three groups and 200 normal subjects. The same held true when we compared a selected group of 76 patients with ischaemic heart disease who had no other risk factor, with a group of 80 control subjects. On the contrary, when we compared several fractions of serum lipoproteins and the ratios of apolipoprotein A to Apolipoprotein B, LDL Cholesterol to HDL Cholesterol, and total Cholesterol to HDL Cholesterol of the two groups, the differences were statistically significant. We conclude that when other risk factors are excluded, the protein component, rather than the lipid component of the plasma lipoproteins correlates the presence of coronary artery disease.

  3. Enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass from wood.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Consolación; Reyes-Sosa, Francisco Manuel; Díez, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Current research and development in cellulosic ethanol production has been focused mainly on agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops such as corn stover and switchgrass; however, woody biomass remains a very important feedstock for ethanol production. The precise composition of hemicellulose in the wood is strongly dependent on the plant species, therefore different types of enzymes are needed based on hemicellulose complexity and type of pretreatment. In general, hardwood species have much lower recalcitrance to enzymes than softwood. For hardwood, xylanases, beta-xylosidases and xyloglucanases are the main hemicellulases involved in degradation of the hemicellulose backbone, while for softwood the effect of mannanases and beta-mannosidases is more relevant. Furthermore, there are different key accessory enzymes involved in removing the hemicellulosic fraction and increasing accessibility of cellulases to the cellulose fibres improving the hydrolysis process. A diversity of enzymatic cocktails has been tested using from low to high densities of biomass (2-20% total solids) and a broad range of results has been obtained. The performance of recently developed commercial cocktails on hardwoods and softwoods will enable a further step for the commercialization of fuel ethanol from wood. PMID:26833542

  4. Synthesis, hydrolysis and stability of psilocin glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rafaela; Schürenkamp, Jennifer; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Lehr, Matthias; Köhler, Helga

    2014-04-01

    A two-step synthesis of psilocin glucuronide (PCG), the main metabolite of psilocin, with methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-isobutyryl-1-O-trichloroacetimidoyl-α-d-glucopyranuronate is reported. With the synthesized PCG, hydrolysis conditions in serum and urine were optimized. Escherichia coli proved to be a better enzyme source for β-glucuronidase than Helix pomatia. It was essential to add ascorbic acid to serum samples to protect psilocin during incubation. Furthermore the stability of PCG and psilocin was compared as stability data are the basis for forensic interpretation of measurements. PCG showed a greater long-term stability after six months in deep frozen serum and urine samples than psilocin. The short-term stability of PCG for one week in whole blood at room temperature and in deep frozen samples was also better than that of psilocin. Therefore, PCG can be considered to be more stable than the labile psilocin and should always be included if psilocin is analyzed in samples. PMID:24513688

  5. Synthesis, hydrolysis and stability of psilocin glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rafaela; Schürenkamp, Jennifer; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Lehr, Matthias; Köhler, Helga

    2014-04-01

    A two-step synthesis of psilocin glucuronide (PCG), the main metabolite of psilocin, with methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-isobutyryl-1-O-trichloroacetimidoyl-α-d-glucopyranuronate is reported. With the synthesized PCG, hydrolysis conditions in serum and urine were optimized. Escherichia coli proved to be a better enzyme source for β-glucuronidase than Helix pomatia. It was essential to add ascorbic acid to serum samples to protect psilocin during incubation. Furthermore the stability of PCG and psilocin was compared as stability data are the basis for forensic interpretation of measurements. PCG showed a greater long-term stability after six months in deep frozen serum and urine samples than psilocin. The short-term stability of PCG for one week in whole blood at room temperature and in deep frozen samples was also better than that of psilocin. Therefore, PCG can be considered to be more stable than the labile psilocin and should always be included if psilocin is analyzed in samples.

  6. Membrane reactor for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellobiose

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.; Tsao, G.T.; Wankat, P.C.

    1981-07-01

    A pressurized, stirred vessel attached with an ultrafiltration membrane was used as a membrane reactor. Cellobiose hydrolysis by cellobiase was carried out and theoretically analyzed in terms of steady-state conversion and flow rate through the membrane. When the flow rate exceeds a critical value, a significant fraction of the enzyme inside the reactor is localized in the concentration polarization layer where shear from stirring is high. Consequently, enzyme deactivation inside the concentration polarization layer is accelerated and the conversion decreased due to an exchange of active enzyme in bulk with deactivated enzyme in the polarization layer via convection and back diffusion. Successful operation can be obtained at flow rates lower than the critical point to avoid the polarization and thus the deactivation. It is shown that 6.5 L of 2mg/mL of cellobiose solution is hydrolyzed to glucose with a conversion of 91% in 20 hours with 1.617 mg of cellobiase enzyme in a reactor attached with a PM 10 membrane of an effective surface area of 39.2 sq.cm. (Refs. 17).

  7. Characterization of sheep lung lymph lipoproteins: chemical and physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, T.M.; Cross, C.E.; Gunther, R.A.; Kramer, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have determined the composition and distribution of plasma and lung lymph lipoproteins from unanesthetized ewes. Cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid levels in lung lymph were 45%, 50%, and 50%, respectively, of those in plasma. Lipoproteins from both lymph and plasma were separated into two major fractions: d < 1.063 g/ml or LDL, and d 1.063-1.21 g/ml or HDL. HDL was the major lipoprotein species in the plasma and lymph. Gradients gel electrophoresis of HDL on 4-30% gels showed that, in lymph, HDL particles were shifted to larger sizes; in addition to a peak at 8.5 nm, which was similar to plasma HDL, there were two additional components of larger size, one at 9.2 nm and the other at 12 nm. Electron microscopy revealed that lymph HDL contained two new particles not seen in plasma: large, round particles, 13.6 nm diameter, and discoidal particles, 18.7 by 4.9 nm, long and short axis, respectively. Compositional analysis of lymph HDL revealed a relative enrichment in free cholesterol as well as an enrichment in apolipoprotein E. Lymph LDL on gradient gel electrophoresis was extremely heterogeneous. Several peaks were evident in the 23-30 nm size range (similar to plasma LDL), but a supplementary component at approximately 15-16 nm was also present. Whereas plasma LDL on electron microscopy contained only round particles 26 nm in diameter, lymph contained an additional, unusual particle which was close-packed, with square geometry, and was 15 nm in diameter. Changes in the physical and chemical properties of lung lymph lipoproteins suggest that these particles are metabolically modified.

  8. Transgenic rabbit that expresses a functional human lipoprotein (a)

    DOEpatents

    Rouy, Didier; Duverger, Nicolas; Emmanuel, Florence; Denefle, Patrice; Houdebine, Louis-Marie; Viglietta, Celine; Rubin, Edward M.; Hughes, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    A transgenic rabbit which has in its genomic DNA sequences that encode apolipoprotein (a) and apolipoprotein B polypeptides which are capable of combining to produce lipoprotein (a), a process for creating such a rabbit, and the use of the rabbit to identify compounds which are effective in the treatment of human diseases which are associated with, induced and/or exacerbated by Lp(a) expression.

  9. Mechanism of action of gemfibrozil on lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Saku, K; Gartside, P S; Hynd, B A; Kashyap, M L

    1985-01-01

    Gemfibrozil is a potent lipid regulating drug whose major effects are to increase plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) and to decrease plasma triglycerides (TG) in a wide variety of primary and secondary dyslipoproteinemias. Its mechanism of action is not clear. Six patients with primary familial endogenous hypertriglyceridemia with fasting chylomicronemia (type V lipoprotein phenotype) with concurrent subnormal HDL cholesterol levels (HDL deficiency) were treated initially by diet and once stabilized, were given gemfibrozil (1,200 mg/d). Each patient was admitted to the Clinical Research Center with metabolic kitchen facilities, for investigation of HDL and TG metabolism immediately before and after 8 wk of gemfibrozil treatment. Gemfibrozil significantly increased plasma HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein (apo) AI, and apo AII by 36%, 29%, and 38% from base line, respectively. Plasma TG decreased by 54%. Kinetics of apo AI and apo AII metabolism were assessed by analysis of the specific radioactivity decay curves after injection of autologous HDL labeled with 125I. Gemfibrozil increased synthetic rates of apo AI and apo AII by 27% and 34%, respectively, without changing the fractional catabolic rates. Stimulation of apo AI and apo AII synthesis by gemfibrozil was associated with the appearance in plasma of smaller (and heavier) HDL particles as assessed by gradient gel electrophoresis and HDL composition. Postheparin extra-hepatic lipoprotein lipase activity increased significantly by 25% after gemfibrozil, and was associated with the appearance in plasma of smaller very low density lipoprotein particles whose apo CIII:CII ratio was decreased. These data suggest that gemfibrozil increases plasma HDL levels by stimulating their synthesis. Increased transport (turnover) of HDL induced by gemfibrozil may be significant in increasing tissue cholesterol removal in these patients. PMID:3923042

  10. Management of non-high-density lipoprotein abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Rosenson, Robert S

    2009-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports the use of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB), and low-density lipoprotein particles as markers of atherogenic risk. Treatment guidelines also identify these as additional targets of lipid-modifying intervention in patients with elevated triglycerides (TG). Even when TG are only moderately elevated, many patients on statin monotherapy who have achieved targets for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) fail to reach non-HDL-C treatment goals, and even fewer reach apoB goals. Combination lipid-modifying therapy is therefore indicated for comprehensive lipid management, particularly in patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome in whom LDL-C levels are often considered 'optimal'. Of the available options, adding either a niacin, fibrate or omega-3 fatty acids provides greater opportunity to achieve non-HDL-C and apoB targets, given complementary profiles of lipid-modifying activity and supported by evidence from clinical studies. Improvement in lipid control and reduction in atherogenic risk could be anticipated to translate to benefits in clinical outcomes. PMID:19545870

  11. Modification of lipoproteins by very low-carbohydrate diets.

    PubMed

    Volek, Jeff S; Sharman, Matthew J; Forsythe, Cassandra E

    2005-06-01

    Very low-carbohydrate diets (VLCDs) are popular, but remain controversial. This review summarizes the latest studies that have examined the effects of VLCDs on lipoproteins and related risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Prospective studies indicate that VLCDs improve the lipoprotein profile independently of weight loss. Although not as effective at lowering LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), VLCDs consistently improve postabsorptive and postprandial triacylglycerols (TAGs), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), and the distribution of LDL-C subfractions to a greater extent than low-fat diets. VLCDs also improve proinflammatory markers when associated with weight loss. Studies usually report mean lipid responses, but individual data indicate a large degree of variability in the magnitude and in some cases the direction (e.g., LDL-C) of lipoprotein responses to both low-fat and VLCDs. Such variability makes it hard to defend a single diet recommendation, especially considering the potential for low-fat/high-carbohydrate diets to exacerbate TAG, HDL-C, and other characteristics of the metabolic syndrome. Considering the effectiveness of VLCDs in promoting fat loss and improving the metabolic syndrome, discounting or condemning their use is unjustified. We encourage a more unbiased, balanced appraisal of VLCDs.

  12. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  13. Autophagy-mediated longevity is modulated by lipoprotein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seah, Nicole E.; de Magalhaes Filho, C. Daniel; Petrashen, Anna P.; Henderson, Hope R.; Laguer, Jade; Gonzalez, Julissa; Dillin, Andrew; Hansen, Malene; Lapierre, Louis R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy-dependent longevity models in C. elegans display altered lipid storage profiles, but the contribution of lipid distribution to life-span extension is not fully understood. Here we report that lipoprotein production, autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis are linked to modulate life span in a conserved fashion. We find that overexpression of the yolk lipoprotein VIT/vitellogenin reduces the life span of long-lived animals by impairing the induction of autophagy-related and lysosomal genes necessary for longevity. Accordingly, reducing vitellogenesis increases life span via induction of autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis. Life-span extension due to reduced vitellogenesis or enhanced lysosomal lipolysis requires nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) NHR-49 and NHR-80, highlighting novel roles for these NHRs in lysosomal lipid signaling. In dietary-restricted worms and mice, expression of VIT and hepatic APOB (apolipoprotein B), respectively, are significantly reduced, suggesting a conserved longevity mechanism. Altogether, our study demonstrates that lipoprotein biogenesis is an important mechanism that modulates aging by impairing autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis. PMID:26671266

  14. Iron-ascorbate-phospholipid mediated modification of low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, P; Yu, H; Gutman, R L; Mao, F; Ryu, B H; Lou, P

    1996-06-11

    LDL can be oxidized by a variety of agents to form a modified lipoprotein which is capable of being avidly metabolized by macrophages. While previous in vitro studies have focused exclusively on the oxidation of LDL, other lipids found in the atheroma are also subject to oxidation and its lipoperoxide byproducts may contribute to the process of LDL modification. To examine the relationship between the oxidation of phospholipids and the subsequent modification of LDL, we incubated 250 microM phosphatidylcholine with 10 microM ferrous sulfate and 50 microM ascorbic acid in 10 mM Tris (pH 7.0). After 18 h at 37 degrees C, significant amounts of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were formed. The inclusion of LDL (100 micrograms protein/ml) elevated the TBARS and increased the electrophoretic mobility of the lipoprotein. LDL treated with iron and ascorbate in the absence of phosphatidylcholine did not result in the modification of this lipoprotein. LDL that was incubated with phosphatidylcholine, iron and ascorbate was found to be metabolized by macrophages to a far greater extent than native LDL or LDL treated with phosphatidylcholine alone. Probucol (10 microM) inhibited the LDL modification process. These results demonstrate that while iron and ascorbate cannot oxidize LDL directly, the addition of phosphatidylcholine to these initiators of lipid peroxidation can mediate and lead to the modification of LDL. PMID:8664335

  15. Acrolein Consumption Induces Systemic Dyslipidemia and Lipoprotein Modification

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg A.; Lesgards, Jean-Francois; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Prough, Russell A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Liu, SiQi; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2010-01-01

    Aldehydes such as acrolein are ubiquitous pollutants present in automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. Such aldehydes are also constituents of several food substances and are present in drinking water, irrigation canals, and effluents from manufacturing plants. Oral intake represents the most significant source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. To study the effects of short-term oral exposure to acrolein on lipoprotein levels and metabolism, adult mice were gavage fed 0.1 to 5 mg acrolein/kg bwt and changes in plasma lipoproteins were assessed. Changes in hepatic gene expression related to lipid metabolism and cytokines were examined by qRT-PCR analysis. Acrolein feeding did not affect body weight, BUN, plasma creatinine, electrolytes, cytokines or liver enzymes, but increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Similar results were obtained with apoE-null mice. Plasma lipoproteins from acrolein-fed mice showed altered electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Chromatographic analysis revealed elevated VLDL cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides levels with little change in LDL or HDL. NMR analysis indicated shifts from small to large VLDL and from large to medium-small LDL with no change in the size of HDL particles. Increased plasma VLDL was associated with a significant decrease in post-heparin plasma hepatic lipase activity and a decrease in hepatic expression of hepatic lipase. These observations suggest that oral exposure to acrolein could induce or exacerbate systemic dyslipidemia and thereby contribute to cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:20034506

  16. Acrolein consumption induces systemic dyslipidemia and lipoprotein modification

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg A.; Lesgards, Jean-Francois; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Prough, Russell A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Liu, SiQi; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2010-02-15

    Aldehydes such as acrolein are ubiquitous pollutants present in automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. Such aldehydes are also constituents of several food substances and are present in drinking water, irrigation canals, and effluents from manufacturing plants. Oral intake represents the most significant source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. To study the effects of short-term oral exposure to acrolein on lipoprotein levels and metabolism, adult mice were gavage-fed 0.1 to 5 mg acrolein/kg bwt and changes in plasma lipoproteins were assessed. Changes in hepatic gene expression related to lipid metabolism and cytokines were examined by qRT-PCR analysis. Acrolein feeding did not affect body weight, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, electrolytes, cytokines or liver enzymes, but increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Similar results were obtained with apoE-null mice. Plasma lipoproteins from acrolein-fed mice showed altered electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Chromatographic analysis revealed elevated VLDL cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides levels with little change in LDL or HDL. NMR analysis indicated shifts from small to large VLDL and from large to medium-small LDL with no change in the size of HDL particles. Increased plasma VLDL was associated with a significant decrease in post-heparin plasma hepatic lipase activity and a decrease in hepatic expression of hepatic lipase. These observations suggest that oral exposure to acrolein could induce or exacerbate systemic dyslipidemia and thereby contribute to cardiovascular disease risk.

  17. Androgen and FSH synergistically stimulate lipoprotein degradation and utilization by ovary granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.R.; Nakamura, K.; Schmit, V.; Weinstein, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Androgen can directly modulate the induction of steroidogenic enzymes by FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) in ovary granulosa cells. In studies of its mechanism of action, the authors examined the androgen effect on granulosa cell interaction with lipoproteins, the physiologic source of cholesterol. After granulosa cells were cultured for 48 hours with and without androgen and/or FSH, the cells were incubated for 24 hours with /sup 125/I-lipoproteins (human high density lipoprotein (HDL), rat HDL, or human low density lipoprotein (LDL)). The media were then analyzed for lipoprotein protein coat degradation products (mainly /sup 125/I-monoiodotyrosine) and progestin (mainly 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone (20 alpha-DHP)). In the absence of FSH and androgen, 2 X 10(5) granulosa cells degraded basal levels of all three lipoproteins, but produced no measurable 20 alpha-DHP. The addition of 10(-7) M androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) had no effect on lipoprotein protein degradation or 20 alpha-DHP production. FSH alone stimulated lipoprotein protein degradation by 50 to 300% while the addition of androgen synergistically augmented the FSH-stimulated 20 alpha-DHP production as well as protein coat degradation of all three lipoproteins. DHT and T were both effective, indicating that androgens themselves, and not estrogen products, were responsible for the effect on lipoprotein protein degradation and 20 alpha-DHP production.

  18. Hydrophobic surface patches on LolA of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are essential for lipoprotein binding.

    PubMed

    Remans, Kim; Pauwels, Kris; van Ulsen, Peter; Buts, Lieven; Cornelis, Pierre; Tommassen, Jan; Savvides, Savvas N; Decanniere, Klaas; Van Gelder, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Many lipoproteins reside in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, and their biogenesis is dependent on the Lol (localization of lipoproteins) system. The periplasmic chaperone LolA accepts OM-destined lipoproteins that are released from the inner membrane by the LolCDE complex and transfers them to the OM receptor LolB. The exact nature of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is still unknown. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli LolA features an open beta-barrel covered by alpha helices that together constitute a hydrophobic cavity, which would allow the binding of one acyl chain. However, OM lipoproteins contain three acyl chains, and the stoichiometry of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is 1:1. Here we present the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa LolA that projects clear hydrophobic surface patches. Since these patches are large enough to accommodate acyl chains, their role in lipoprotein binding was investigated. Several LolA mutant proteins were created, and their functionality was assessed by studying their capacity to release lipoproteins produced in sphaeroplasts. Interruption of the largest hydrophobic patch completely destroyed the lipoprotein-releasing capacity of LolA, while interruption of smaller patches apparently reduced efficiency. Thus, the results show a new lipoprotein transport model that places (some of) the acyl chains on the hydrophobic surface patches. PMID:20620146

  19. Modifying plasma low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: what combinations are available in the future?

    PubMed

    Kastelein, John J P

    2005-11-01

    Despite a growing body of research on the benefit of combination drug therapy for dyslipidemia in the metabolic syndrome or diabetes mellitus, there are insufficient outcome data on the use of combination therapy as well as inadequate data to compare certain combination regimens. The focus of the therapeutic approach in treating the metabolic syndrome has been almost exclusively on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol for approximately the past 10 years, and specifically on statin therapy. Although results of epidemiologic studies as well as clinical trials using angiographic and clinical end points confirm the association of LDL cholesterol and risk of coronary artery disease, data are lacking regarding the effects of combination therapy in the management of coronary artery disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome focusing on the modification of plasma LDL as well as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is reviewed. Future management strategies with the use of novel combination therapy is also discussed. PMID:16291010

  20. Evaluation of hydrolysis-esterification biodiesel production from wet microalgae.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunfeng; Liu, Qingling; Ji, Na; Deng, Shuai; Zhao, Jun; Li, Shuhong; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Wet microalgae hydrolysis-esterification route has the advantage to avoid the energy-intensive units (e.g. drying and lipid extraction) in the biodiesel production process. In this study, techno-economic evaluation of hydrolysis-esterification biodiesel production process was carried out and compared with conventional (usually including drying, lipid extraction, esterification and transesterification) biodiesel production process. Energy and material balance of the conventional and hydrolysis-esterification processes was evaluated by Aspen Plus. The simulation results indicated that drying (2.36MJ/L biodiesel) and triolein transesterification (1.89MJ/L biodiesel) are the dominant energy-intensive stages in the conventional route (5.42MJ/L biodiesel). By contrast, the total energy consumption of hydrolysis-esterification route can be reduced to 1.81MJ/L biodiesel, and approximately 3.61MJ can be saved to produce per liter biodiesel.

  1. A General Approach for Teaching Hydrolysis of Salts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre-Ode, Fernando

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a general approach and equation for teaching the hydrolysis of salts. This general equation covers many more sets of conditions than those currently in textbooks. The simplifying assumptions leading to the known limiting equations are straightforward. (RH)

  2. Kinetics of the hydrolysis of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1986-01-01

    The hydrolysis kinetics of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) in aqueous buffered solutions of various pH's was studied at 75 and 37 C, using spectrophotometric and HPLC techniques. The hydrolysis was found to be very slow even at low pH. At 75 C and pH at or below l.0, two kinetic processes were observed: the more rapid one was attributed to the hydrolysis of the phosphoimidazolide P-N bond; the second, much slower one, was attributed to the cleavage of the glycosidic bond. It is noted that the P-N hydrolysis in phosphoimidazolides is very slow compared to other phosphoramidates, and that this might be one of the reasons why the phosphoimidazolides showed an extraordinary ability to form long oligomers under template-directed conditions.

  3. Hydrolysis of Al3+ from constrained molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Takashi; Hirata, Masaru; Kimura, Takaumi

    2006-02-01

    We investigated the hydrolysis reactions of Al3+ in AlCl3 aqueous solution using the constrained molecular dynamics based on the Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics method. By employing the proton-aluminum coordination number as a reaction coordinate in the constrained molecular dynamics the deprotonation as well as dehydration processes are successfully realized. From our free-energy difference of ΔG0≃8.0kcalmol-1 the hydrolysis constant pKa1 is roughly estimated as 5.8, comparable to the literature value of 5.07. We show that the free-energy difference for the hydrolysis of Al3+ in acidic conditions is at least 4kcalmol-1 higher than that in neutral condition, indicating that the hydrolysis reaction is inhibited by the presence of excess protons located around the hydrated ion, in agreement with the change of the predominant species by pH.

  4. Hydrolysis of whey lactose using CTAB-permeabilized yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Panesar, Parmjit S; Bera, Manav B; Kumar, Harish

    2009-01-01

    Disposal of lactose in whey and whey permeates is one of the most significant problems with regard to economics and environmental impact faced by the dairy industries. The enzymatic hydrolysis of whey lactose to glucose and galactose by beta-galactosidase constitutes the basis of the most biotechnological processes currently developed to exploit the sugar content of whey. Keeping this in view, lactose hydrolysis in whey was performed using CTAB permeabilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells. Permeabilization of K. marxianus cells in relation to beta-galactosidase activity was carried out using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) to avoid the problem of enzyme extraction. Different process parameters (biomass load, pH, temperature, and incubation time) were optimized to enhance the lactose hydrolysis in whey. Maximum hydrolysis (90.5%) of whey lactose was observed with 200 mg DW yeast biomass after 90 min of incubation period at optimum pH of 6.5 and temperature of 40 degrees C.

  5. Energetic approach of biomass hydrolysis in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Cantero, Danilo A; Vaquerizo, Luis; Mato, Fidel; Bermejo, M Dolores; Cocero, M José

    2015-03-01

    Cellulose hydrolysis can be performed in supercritical water with a high selectivity of soluble sugars. The process produces high-pressure steam that can be integrated, from an energy point of view, with the whole biomass treating process. This work investigates the integration of biomass hydrolysis reactors with commercial combined heat and power (CHP) schemes, with special attention to reactor outlet streams. The innovation developed in this work allows adequate energy integration possibilities for heating and compression by using high temperature of the flue gases and direct shaft work from the turbine. The integration of biomass hydrolysis with a CHP process allows the selective conversion of biomass into sugars with low heat requirements. Integrating these two processes, the CHP scheme yield is enhanced around 10% by injecting water in the gas turbine. Furthermore, the hydrolysis reactor can be held at 400°C and 23 MPa using only the gas turbine outlet streams.

  6. Energetic approach of biomass hydrolysis in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Cantero, Danilo A; Vaquerizo, Luis; Mato, Fidel; Bermejo, M Dolores; Cocero, M José

    2015-03-01

    Cellulose hydrolysis can be performed in supercritical water with a high selectivity of soluble sugars. The process produces high-pressure steam that can be integrated, from an energy point of view, with the whole biomass treating process. This work investigates the integration of biomass hydrolysis reactors with commercial combined heat and power (CHP) schemes, with special attention to reactor outlet streams. The innovation developed in this work allows adequate energy integration possibilities for heating and compression by using high temperature of the flue gases and direct shaft work from the turbine. The integration of biomass hydrolysis with a CHP process allows the selective conversion of biomass into sugars with low heat requirements. Integrating these two processes, the CHP scheme yield is enhanced around 10% by injecting water in the gas turbine. Furthermore, the hydrolysis reactor can be held at 400°C and 23 MPa using only the gas turbine outlet streams. PMID:25536511

  7. Evaluation of hydrolysis-esterification biodiesel production from wet microalgae.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunfeng; Liu, Qingling; Ji, Na; Deng, Shuai; Zhao, Jun; Li, Shuhong; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Wet microalgae hydrolysis-esterification route has the advantage to avoid the energy-intensive units (e.g. drying and lipid extraction) in the biodiesel production process. In this study, techno-economic evaluation of hydrolysis-esterification biodiesel production process was carried out and compared with conventional (usually including drying, lipid extraction, esterification and transesterification) biodiesel production process. Energy and material balance of the conventional and hydrolysis-esterification processes was evaluated by Aspen Plus. The simulation results indicated that drying (2.36MJ/L biodiesel) and triolein transesterification (1.89MJ/L biodiesel) are the dominant energy-intensive stages in the conventional route (5.42MJ/L biodiesel). By contrast, the total energy consumption of hydrolysis-esterification route can be reduced to 1.81MJ/L biodiesel, and approximately 3.61MJ can be saved to produce per liter biodiesel. PMID:27209457

  8. ESTIMATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid esters from molecular structure. The energy differences between the initial state and the transition state for a molecule of interest are factored into internal and external...

  9. Mathematical modeling of maltose hydrolysis in different types of reactor.

    PubMed

    Findrik, Zvjezdana; Presecki, Ana Vrsalović; Vasić-Racki, Durda

    2010-03-01

    A commercial enzyme Dextrozyme was tested as catalyst for maltose hydrolysis at two different temperatures: 40 and 65 degrees C at pH 5.5. Its operational stability was studied in different reactor types: batch, repetitive batch, fed-batch and continuously operated enzyme membrane reactor. Dextrozyme was more active at 65 degrees C, but operational stability decay was observed during the prolonged use in the reactor at this temperature. The reactor efficiencies were compared according to the volumetric productivity, biocatalyst productivity and enzyme consumption. The best reactor type according to the volumetric productivity for maltose hydrolysis is batch and the best reactor type according to the biocatalyst productivity and enzyme consumption is continuously operated enzyme membrane reactor. The mathematical model developed for the maltose hydrolysis in the different reactors was validated by the experiments at both temperatures. The Michaelis-Menten kinetics describing maltose hydrolysis was used.

  10. Sub-Equimolar Hydrolysis and Condensation of Organophosphates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alam, Todd M.; Kinnan, Mark K.; Wilson, Brendan W.; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-07-16

    We characterized the in-situ hydrolysis and subsequent condensation reaction of the chemical agent simulant diethyl chlorophosphate (DECP) by high-resolution 31P NMR spectroscopy following the addition of water in sub-equimolar concentrations. Moreover, the identification and quantification of the multiple pyrophosphate and larger polyphosphate chemical species formed through a series of self-condensation reactions are reported. Finally, the DECP hydrolysis kinetics and distribution of breakdown species was strongly influenced by the water concentration and reaction temperature.

  11. Sorting of an integral outer membrane protein via the lipoprotein-specific Lol pathway and a dedicated lipoprotein pilotin.

    PubMed

    Collin, Séverine; Guilvout, Ingrid; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Pugsley, Anthony P

    2011-05-01

    The lipoprotein PulS is a dedicated chaperone that is required to target the secretin PulD to the outer membrane in Klebsiella or Escherichia coli, and to protect it from proteolysis. Here, we present indirect evidence that PulD protomers do not assemble into the secretin dodecamer before they reach the outer membrane, and that PulS reaches the outer membrane in a soluble heterodimer with the general lipoprotein chaperone LolA. However, we could not find any direct evidence for PulD protomer association with the PulS-LolA heterodimer. Instead, in cells producing PulD and a permanently locked PulS-LolA dimer (in which LolA carries an R43L substitution that prevents lipoprotein transfer to LolB in the outer membrane), LolAR43L was found in the inner membrane, probably still associated with PulS bound to PulD that had been incorrectly targeted because of the LolAR43L substitution. It is speculated that PulD protomers normally cross the periplasm together with PulS bound to LolA but when the latter cannot be separated (due to the mutation in lolA), the PulD protomers form dodecamers that insert into the inner membrane. PMID:21338419

  12. Focus on lipids: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and its associated lipoproteins in cardiac and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun Joon; McCullough, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) contains dozens of apoproteins that participate in normal cholesterol metabolism with a reliance on renal catabolism for clearance from the body. The plasma pool of HDL-C has been an excellent inverse predictor of cardiovascular events. However, when HDL-C concentrations have been manipulated with the use of niacin, fibric acid derivatives, and cholesteryl ester transferase protein inhibitors, there has been no improvement in outcomes in patients where the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol has been well treated with statins. Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) is one of the minor apoproteins of HDL-C, newly discovered in 1997. Circulating APOL1 is a 43-kDa protein mainly found in the HDL3 subfraction. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), mutant forms of APOL1 have been associated with rapidly progressive CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Because mutant forms of APOL1 are more prevalent in African Americans compared to Caucasians, it may explain some of the racial disparities seen in the pool of patients with ESRD in the United States. Thus, HDL-C is an important lipoprotein carrying apoproteins that play roles in vascular and kidney disease. PMID:25343842

  13. Sorting of an integral outer membrane protein via the lipoprotein-specific Lol pathway and a dedicated lipoprotein pilotin.

    PubMed

    Collin, Séverine; Guilvout, Ingrid; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Pugsley, Anthony P

    2011-05-01

    The lipoprotein PulS is a dedicated chaperone that is required to target the secretin PulD to the outer membrane in Klebsiella or Escherichia coli, and to protect it from proteolysis. Here, we present indirect evidence that PulD protomers do not assemble into the secretin dodecamer before they reach the outer membrane, and that PulS reaches the outer membrane in a soluble heterodimer with the general lipoprotein chaperone LolA. However, we could not find any direct evidence for PulD protomer association with the PulS-LolA heterodimer. Instead, in cells producing PulD and a permanently locked PulS-LolA dimer (in which LolA carries an R43L substitution that prevents lipoprotein transfer to LolB in the outer membrane), LolAR43L was found in the inner membrane, probably still associated with PulS bound to PulD that had been incorrectly targeted because of the LolAR43L substitution. It is speculated that PulD protomers normally cross the periplasm together with PulS bound to LolA but when the latter cannot be separated (due to the mutation in lolA), the PulD protomers form dodecamers that insert into the inner membrane.

  14. Protein hydrolysis by immobilized and stabilized trypsin.

    PubMed

    Marques, Daniela; Pessela, Benavides C; Betancor, Lorena; Monti, Rubens; Carrascosa, Alfonso V; Rocha-Martin, Javier; Guisán, Jose M; Fernandez-Lorente, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    The preparation of novel immobilized and stabilized derivatives of trypsin is reported here. The new derivatives preserved 80% of the initial catalytic activity toward synthetic substrates [benzoyl-arginine p-nitroanilide (BAPNA)] and were 50,000-fold more thermally stable than the diluted soluble enzyme in the absence of autolysis. Trypsin was immobilized on highly activated glyoxyl-Sepharose following a two-step immobilization strategy: (a) first, a multipoint covalent immobilization at pH 8.5 that only involves low pK(a) amino groups (e.g., those derived from the activation of trypsin from trypsinogen) is performed and (b) next, an additional alkaline incubation at pH 10 is performed to favor an intense, additional multipoint immobilization between the high concentration of proximate aldehyde groups on the support surface and the high pK(a) amino groups at the enzyme surface region that participated in the first immobilization step. Interestingly, the new, highly stable trypsin derivatives were also much more active in the proteolysis of high molecular weight proteins when compared with a nonstabilized derivative prepared on CNBr-activated Sepharose. In fact, all the proteins contained a cheese whey extract had been completely proteolyzed after 6 h at pH 9 and 50°C, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Under these experimental conditions, the immobilized biocatalysts preserve more than 90% of their initial activity after 20 days. Analysis of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the best immobilized trypsin derivative showed a surface region containing two amino terminal groups and five lysine (Lys) residues that may be responsible for this novel and interesting immobilization and stabilization. Moreover, this region is relatively far from the active site of the enzyme, which could explain the good results obtained for the hydrolysis of high-molecular weight proteins.

  15. Development of complete hydrolysis of pectins from apple pomace.

    PubMed

    Wikiera, Agnieszka; Mika, Magdalena; Starzyńska-Janiszewska, Anna; Stodolak, Bożena

    2015-04-01

    Enzymatically extracted pectins have a more complex structure than those obtained by conventional methods. As a result, they are less susceptible to hydrolysis, which makes the precise determination of their composition difficult. The aim of the study was to develop a method of complete hydrolysis of enzymatically extracted apple pectins. Substrates were pectins isolated from apple pomace by the use of xylanase and multicatalytic preparation Celluclast and apple pomace. Hydrolysis was performed by a chemical method with 2M TFA at 100 °C and 120 °C and a combined acidic/enzymatic method. After hydrolysis, the contents of galacturonic acid and neutral sugars were measured by HPLC. Complete hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid occurred after 2.5h incubation with 2M TFA at 120 °C. The efficient hydrolysis of neutral sugars in pectins was performed with 2M TFA at 100 °C for 2.5h. Monomers most susceptible to concentrated acid were rhamnose, mannose and arabinose.

  16. Development of complete hydrolysis of pectins from apple pomace.

    PubMed

    Wikiera, Agnieszka; Mika, Magdalena; Starzyńska-Janiszewska, Anna; Stodolak, Bożena

    2015-04-01

    Enzymatically extracted pectins have a more complex structure than those obtained by conventional methods. As a result, they are less susceptible to hydrolysis, which makes the precise determination of their composition difficult. The aim of the study was to develop a method of complete hydrolysis of enzymatically extracted apple pectins. Substrates were pectins isolated from apple pomace by the use of xylanase and multicatalytic preparation Celluclast and apple pomace. Hydrolysis was performed by a chemical method with 2M TFA at 100 °C and 120 °C and a combined acidic/enzymatic method. After hydrolysis, the contents of galacturonic acid and neutral sugars were measured by HPLC. Complete hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid occurred after 2.5h incubation with 2M TFA at 120 °C. The efficient hydrolysis of neutral sugars in pectins was performed with 2M TFA at 100 °C for 2.5h. Monomers most susceptible to concentrated acid were rhamnose, mannose and arabinose. PMID:25442606

  17. Study of enzyme adsorption and reaction kinetics for cellulose hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, I.G.

    1982-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose occurs due to the combined catalytic action of two types of cellulase components commonly referred to as C/sub 1/ and C/sub x/. However, before the hydrolysis reaction can begin, it is necessary for these enzymes to first adsorb onto the accessible surfaces of the insoluble cellulose substrate. The objective of the study was to gain a better understanding of the relationships between the adsorption of these enzyme components, the hydrolysis kinetics, the cellulosic surface area accessible to the enzymes, and the cellulose crystallinity. These relationships were investigated by passing a Trichoderma viride cellulase solution through columns of cellulose powder having different accessibility and crystallinity, and then analyzing the quantities of the different enzyme components and the hydrolysis product in the effluent. The amounts of the different cellulase components were analyzed using high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Additional adsorption and hydrolysis experiments were done using columns of cellulose beads specially developed to provide amodel substrate for this analysis. A mathematical model has been formulated to describe the kinetics of enzyme adsorption and the resultant, initial hydrolysis rate in cellulose column. The analytical solutions obtained have been linearized into a convenient form so that the kinetic parameters of the model can be readily determined from experimental breakthrough curves.

  18. Study of microwave effects on the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chen; Reddy, P Muralidhar; Devi, C Shobha; Chang, Po-Chi; Ho, Yen-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The effect of microwave heating on lipase-catalyzed reaction remains controversial. It is not clear whether the reaction rate enhancements are purely due to thermal/heating effects or to non-thermal effects. Therefore, quantitative mass spectrometry was used to conduct accurate kinetic analysis of lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of triolein by microwave and conventional heating. Commercial lipases from Candida rugosa (CRL), Porcine Pancreas (PPL), and Burkholderia cepacia (BCL) were used. Hydrolysis reactions were performed at various temperatures and pH levels, along with various amounts of buffer and enzymes. Hydrolysis product yields at each time point using an internal-standard method showed no significant difference between microwave and conventional heating conditions when the reaction was carried out at the same temperature. CRL showed optimum catalytic activity at 37 °C, while PPL and BCL had better activities at 50 °C. The phosphate buffer was found to give a better hydrolysis yield than the Tris-HCl buffer. Overall results prove that a non-thermal effect does not exist in microwave-assisted lipase hydrolysis of triolein. Therefore, conventional heating at high temperatures (e.g., 50 °C) can be also used to accelerate hydrolysis reactions.

  19. Study of microwave effects on the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chen; Reddy, P Muralidhar; Devi, C Shobha; Chang, Po-Chi; Ho, Yen-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The effect of microwave heating on lipase-catalyzed reaction remains controversial. It is not clear whether the reaction rate enhancements are purely due to thermal/heating effects or to non-thermal effects. Therefore, quantitative mass spectrometry was used to conduct accurate kinetic analysis of lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of triolein by microwave and conventional heating. Commercial lipases from Candida rugosa (CRL), Porcine Pancreas (PPL), and Burkholderia cepacia (BCL) were used. Hydrolysis reactions were performed at various temperatures and pH levels, along with various amounts of buffer and enzymes. Hydrolysis product yields at each time point using an internal-standard method showed no significant difference between microwave and conventional heating conditions when the reaction was carried out at the same temperature. CRL showed optimum catalytic activity at 37 °C, while PPL and BCL had better activities at 50 °C. The phosphate buffer was found to give a better hydrolysis yield than the Tris-HCl buffer. Overall results prove that a non-thermal effect does not exist in microwave-assisted lipase hydrolysis of triolein. Therefore, conventional heating at high temperatures (e.g., 50 °C) can be also used to accelerate hydrolysis reactions. PMID:26672464

  20. Site- and species-specific hydrolysis rates of heroin.

    PubMed

    Szöcs, Levente; Orgován, Gábor; Tóth, Gergő; Kraszni, Márta; Gergó, Lajos; Hosztafi, Sándor; Noszál, Béla

    2016-06-30

    The hydroxide-catalyzed non-enzymatic, simultaneous and consecutive hydrolyses of diacetylmorphine (DAM, heroin) are quantified in terms of 10 site- and species-specific rate constants in connection with also 10 site- and species-specific acid-base equilibrium constants, comprising all the 12 coexisting species in solution. This characterization involves the major and minor decomposition pathways via 6-acetylmorphine and 3-acetylmorphine, respectively, and morphine, the final product. Hydrolysis has been found to be 18-120 times faster at site 3 than at site 6, depending on the status of the amino group and the rest of the molecule. Nitrogen protonation accelerates the hydrolysis 5-6 times at site 3 and slightly less at site 6. Hydrolysis rate constants are interpreted in terms of intramolecular inductive effects and the concomitant local electron densities. Hydrolysis fraction, a new physico-chemical parameter is introduced and determined to quantify the contribution of the individual microspecies to the overall hydrolysis. Hydrolysis fractions are depicted as a function of pH. PMID:27130543

  1. Echium Oil Reduces Plasma Triglycerides by Increasing Intravascular Lipolysis in apoB100-Only Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Lolita M.; Lough, Christopher M.; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y.; Gebre, Abraham K.; Smith, Thomas L.; Colvin, Perry L.; Parks, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model. PMID:23857172

  2. Echium oil reduces plasma triglycerides by increasing intravascular lipolysis in apoB100-only low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lolita M; Lough, Christopher M; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y; Gebre, Abraham K; Smith, Thomas L; Colvin, Perry L; Parks, John S

    2013-07-12

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model.

  3. Echium oil reduces plasma triglycerides by increasing intravascular lipolysis in apoB100-only low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lolita M; Lough, Christopher M; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y; Gebre, Abraham K; Smith, Thomas L; Colvin, Perry L; Parks, John S

    2013-07-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model. PMID:23857172

  4. Low-density lipoprotein subclass patterns and risk of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Austin, M A; Breslow, J L; Hennekens, C H; Buring, J E; Willett, W C; Krauss, R M

    1988-10-01

    The association of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclass patterns with coronary heart disease was investigated in a case-control study of nonfatal myocardial infarction. Subclasses of LDL were analyzed by gradient gel electrophoresis of plasma samples from 109 cases and 121 controls. The LDL subclass pattern characterized by a preponderance of small, dense LDL particles was significantly associated with a threefold increased risk of myocardial infarction, independent of age, sex, and relative weight. Plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were decreased, and levels of triglyceride, very low-density lipoproteins, and intermediate-density lipoproteins were increased in subjects with this LDL subclass pattern. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that both high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels contributed to the risk associated with the small, dense LDL subclass pattern. Thus, the metabolic trait responsible for this LDL subclass pattern results in a set of interrelated lipoprotein changes that lead to increased risk of coronary heart disease.

  5. Impacts of microalgae pre-treatments for improved anaerobic digestion: thermal treatment, thermal hydrolysis, ultrasound and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ometto, Francesco; Quiroga, Gerardo; Pšenička, Pavel; Whitton, Rachel; Jefferson, Bruce; Villa, Raffaella

    2014-11-15

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of microalgae is primarily inhibited by the chemical composition of their cell walls containing biopolymers able to resist bacterial degradation. Adoption of pre-treatments such as thermal, thermal hydrolysis, ultrasound and enzymatic hydrolysis have the potential to remove these inhibitory compounds and enhance biogas yields by degrading the cell wall, and releasing the intracellular algogenic organic matter (AOM). This work investigated the effect of four pre-treatments on three microalgae species, and their impact on the quantity of soluble biomass released in the media and thus on the digestion process yields. The analysis of the composition of the soluble COD released and of the TEM images of the cells showed two main degradation actions associated with the processes: (1) cell wall damage with the release of intracellular AOM (thermal, thermal hydrolysis and ultrasound) and (2) degradation of the cell wall constituents with the release of intracellular AOM and the solubilisation of the cell wall biopolymers (enzymatic hydrolysis). As a result of this, enzymatic hydrolysis showed the greatest biogas yield increments (>270%) followed by thermal hydrolysis (60-100%) and ultrasounds (30-60%).

  6. Recurrent Embolic Strokes of Undetermined Source in a Patient with Extreme Lipoprotein(a) Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bulwa, Zachary; Kim, Audrey; Singh, Karandeep; Kantorovich, Alexander; Suhail, Faten

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is a plasma lipoprotein and known cardiovascular risk factor, most recently implicated in the development of high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques without significant carotid stenosis. We present a case of a young African-American female with recurrent embolic strokes of undetermined source. After our thorough investigation, we identified the link between a small, irregular plaque in the right internal carotid artery, and an extremely elevated plasma level of lipoprotein(a) as the source of her embolic strokes.

  7. Characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lol system as a lipoprotein sorting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shin-Ya; Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2007-05-01

    Escherichia coli lipoproteins are localized to either the inner or the outer membrane depending on the residue that is present next to the N-terminal acylated Cys. Asp at position 2 causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane. In contrast, the accompanying study (9) revealed that the residues at positions 3 and 4 determine the membrane specificity of lipoproteins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Since the five Lol proteins involved in the sorting of E. coli lipoproteins are conserved in P. aeruginosa, we examined whether or not the Lol proteins of P. aeruginosa are also involved in lipoprotein sorting but utilize different signals. The genes encoding LolCDE, LolA, and LolB homologues were cloned and expressed. The LolCDE homologue thus purified was reconstituted into proteoliposomes with lipoproteins. When incubated in the presence of ATP and a LolA homologue, the reconstituted LolCDE homologue released lipoproteins, leading to the formation of a LolA-lipoprotein complex. Lipoproteins were then incorporated into the outer membrane depending on a LolB homologue. As revealed in vivo, lipoproteins with Lys and Ser at positions 3 and 4, respectively, remained in proteoliposomes. On the other hand, E. coli LolCDE released lipoproteins with this signal and transferred them to LolA of not only E. coli but also P. aeruginosa. These results indicate that Lol proteins are responsible for the sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, as in the case of E. coli, but respond differently to inner membrane retention signals.

  8. Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOEpatents

    Torget, Robert W.; Padukone, Nandan; Hatzis, Christos; Wyman, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4

  9. Lipoprotein lipase variants interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids for obesity traits in women: Replication in two populations

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Y.; Tucker, K.L.; Smith, C.E.; Lee, Y.C.; Huang, T.; Richardson, K.; Parnell, L.D.; Lai, C.Q.; Young, K.L.; Justice, A.E.; Shao, Y.; North, K.E.; Ordovás, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a candidate gene for obesity based on its role in triglyceride hydrolysis and the partitioning of fatty acids towards storage or oxidation. Whether dietary fatty acids modify LPL associated obesity risk is unknown. Methods and results We examined five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs320, rs2083637, rs17411031, rs13702, rs2197089) for potential interaction with dietary fatty acids for obesity traits in 1171 participants (333 men and 838 women, aged 45–75 y) of the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study (BPRHS). In women, SNP rs320 interacted with dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) for body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.002) and waist circumference (WC) (P = 0.001) respectively. Higher intake of PUFA was associated with lower BMI and WC in homozygotes of the major allele (TT) (P = 0.01 and 0.005) but not in minor allele carriers (TG and GG). These interactions were replicated in an independent population, African American women of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study (n = 1334). Conclusion Dietary PUFA modulated the association of LPL rs320 with obesity traits in two independent populations. These interactions may be relevant to the dietary management of obesity, particularly in women. PMID:25156894

  10. Identification of Carboxylesterase-Dependent Dabigatran Etexilate Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Robert B.; Herring, Vanessa L.; Hu, Zhe-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate (DABE) is an oral prodrug that is rapidly converted to the active thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran (DAB), by serine esterases. The aims of the present study were to investigate the in vitro kinetics and pathway of DABE hydrolysis by human carboxylesterase enzymes, and the effect of alcohol on these transformations. The kinetics of DABE hydrolysis in two human recombinant carboxylesterase enzymes (CES1 and CES2) and in human intestinal microsomes and human liver S9 fractions were determined. The effects of alcohol (a known CES1 inhibitor) on the formation of DABE metabolites in carboxylesterase enzymes and human liver S9 fractions were also examined. The inhibitory effect of bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate on the carboxylesterase-mediated metabolism of DABE and the effect of alcohol on the hydrolysis of a classic carboxylesterase substrate (cocaine) were studied to validate the in vitro model. The ethyl ester of DABE was hydrolyzed exclusively by CES1 to M1 (Km 24.9 ± 2.9 μM, Vmax 676 ± 26 pmol/min per milligram protein) and the carbamate ester of DABE was exclusively hydrolyzed by CES2 to M2 (Km 5.5 ± 0.8 μM; Vmax 71.1 ± 2.4 pmol/min per milligram protein). Sequential hydrolysis of DABE in human intestinal microsomes followed by hydrolysis in human liver S9 fractions resulted in complete conversion to DAB. These results suggest that after oral administration of DABE to humans, DABE is hydrolyzed by intestinal CES2 to the intermediate M2 metabolite followed by hydrolysis of M2 to DAB in the liver by CES1. Carboxylesterase-mediated hydrolysis of DABE was not inhibited by alcohol. PMID:24212379

  11. Characteristics of 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl distribution among lipoproteins in vitro. [Rats and human whole blood, plasma, and lipoprotein fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Vomachka, M.S.; Vodicnik, M.J.; Lech, J.J.

    1983-09-01

    The uptake, distribution, and transfer of 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (6-CB) were examined in vitro with human and rat whole blood, plasma, and lipoprotein fractions. 6-CB distribution between plasma and erythrocytes as well as among lipoproteins was determined following sedimentation of erythrocytes and ultracentrifugal fractionation of plasma. In both rat and human whole blood, 70 to 75% of 6-CB partitioned into plasma and 25 to 30% into erythrocytes. The uptake of 6-CB into plasma was extremely rapid and the rate of uptake was found to be dependent upon temperature. The distribution of 6-CB among lipoproteins was relatively homogeneous with 20 to 30% being distributed in very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL, d . 0.95-1.006 g/ml), 15 to 20% in low-density lipoproteins (LDL, d . 1.006-1.063 g/ml), and 15 to 25% in high-density lipoproteins (HDL, d . 1.063-1.21 g/ml). Over 25% of 6-CB was found in the remaining bottom fraction. In addition, each isolated fraction when incubated alone with 6-CB was shown capable of uptake. The relative proportion of 6-CB among the lipoproteins was independent of the level taken up by plasma. 6-CB was also found to transfer among lipoproteins. This exchange of 6-CB proved to be dependent upon the concentrations of both protein and triacylglycerol in the incubations. Two proteins in the bottom fraction (Bf), albumin and a steroid binding globulin, were capable of competing with the lipoproteins for 6-CB uptake.

  12. Effect of dietary triacylglycerol structure on lipoprotein metabolism: a comparison of the effects of dioleoylpalmitoylglycerol in which palmitate is esterified to the 2- or 1(3)-position of the glycerol.

    PubMed

    Pufal, D A; Quinlan, P T; Salter, A M

    1995-08-24

    The effect on lipoprotein metabolism of diets enriched in different isomers of dioleoylpalmitoylglycerol was studied. One diet contained fat in which palmitate was esterified to the two outer positions of the glycerol (OOP) and the other in which it was esterified to the middle carbon (OPO). The lipid composition of chylomicrons was similar in rats fed either fat blend. However, triacylglycerol (TAG) in chylomicrons from OPO fed animals was relatively enriched in palmitic acid, at the expense of stearic, oleic and linoleic acids. Silver phase HPLC and 2-positional analysis clearly demonstrated that the identity of the fatty acid in the 2-position was similar in both dietary and chylomicron TAG. No significant differences could be seen in the in vitro hydrolysis of chylomicron TAG from animals fed the two fats labelled with [14C]palmitate. As expected, following hydrolysis, palmitate was released as free fatty acid from chylomicrons isolated from OOP-fed animals but within 2-monoacylglycerol from those fed OPO. The enrichment of chylomicrons with palmitate in animals fed O[14C]PO resulted in increased delivery of [14C]palmitate to the liver. In a further series of experiments Golden Syrian hamsters were fed diets containing the fat blends and either 0.005% or 0.12% (w/w) cholesterol, for 28 days. No differences in fasting plasma lipoprotein concentrations were seen in response to the dietary fats. We conclude that, while these isometric triacylglycerols had transient effects on chylomicron metabolism, no significant longer term effect on plasma concentrations of endogenous lipoproteins could be found. PMID:7654779

  13. High density lipoprotein metabolism in a rabbit model of hyperalphalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Quig, D W; Zilversmit, D B

    1989-03-01

    The potential utility of an animal model of hyperalphalipoproteinemia for examining the role of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in atherogenesis prompted the current studies. Preliminary data indicated that in rabbits high-coconut oil feeding for 30 days doubled plasma HDL-cholesterol levels, but did not affect lower density lipoproteins (LDL) (d less than 1.063 g/ml). Experiments were performed to examine the composition of these HDL and to determine the mechanism for the diet-induced increase in plasma HDL. Rabbits were fed commercial chow or chow plus 14% (w/w) coconut oil and blood samples were collected 18 h after feeding. Compared to chow-fed rabbits, peak levels of HDL-cholesterol were attained within 2 weeks, and coconut oil feeding doubled the plasma levels of HDL-cholesterol, phospholipids and protein for up to 4 months without affecting HDL lipid and apoprotein composition. After 3 months the diet also increased VLDL- (107%) and LDL-cholesterol (40%) levels, but the absolute increases in each of these lipoprotein fractions was less than half of that of HDL. Isotope kinetic studies of 125I-HDL protein indicated a doubled rate of production of HDL and no change in the efficiency of removal of HDL from plasma. These studies demonstrate that in the rabbit high-coconut oil feeding doubles the rate of production and turnover of apparently normal HDL particles. It is proposed that such an animal model could be utilized to examine directly the role of HDL in atherogenesis. PMID:2920068

  14. Lipoprotein Particle Profiles Mark Familial and Sporadic Human Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Beekman, Marian; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Cobain, Mark R; Powell, Jonathan; Blauw, Gerard Jan; van der Ouderaa, Frans; Westendorp, Rudi G. J; Slagboom, P. Eline

    2006-01-01

    Background Genetic and biochemical studies have indicated an important role for lipid metabolism in human longevity. Ashkenazi Jewish centenarians and their offspring have large low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles as compared with control individuals. This profile also coincided with a lower prevalence of disease. Here, we investigate whether this observation can be confirmed for familial longevity in an outbred European population and whether it can be extended to sporadic longevity in the general population. Methods and Findings NMR-measured lipoprotein profiles were analyzed in 165 families from the Leiden Longevity Study, consisting of 340 long-lived siblings (females >91 y, males >89 y), 511 of their offspring, and 243 partners of the offspring. Offspring had larger (21.3 versus 21.1 nm; p = 0.020) and fewer (1,470 versus 1,561 nmol/l; p = 0.011) LDL particles than their same-aged partners. This effect was even more prominent in the long-lived siblings (p < 10−3) and could be pinpointed to a reduction specifically in the concentration of small LDL particles. No differences were observed for HDL particle phenotypes. The mean LDL particle sizes in 259 90-y-old singletons from a population-based study were similar to those in the long-lived siblings and thus significantly larger than in partners of the offspring, suggesting that the relevance of this phenotype extends beyond familial longevity. A low concentration of small LDL particles was associated with better overall health among both long-lived siblings (p = 0.003) and 90-y-old singletons (p = 0.007). Conclusions Our study indicates that LDL particle profiles mark both familial and sporadic human longevity already in middle age. PMID:17194192

  15. Transport of phytanic acid on lipoproteins in Refsum disease.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, A S; Sankaralingam, A; Lumb, P J; Hardman, T C; Sidey, M C; Gibberd, F B

    1999-02-01

    Patients with Refsum disease accumulate significant quantities of phytanic acid in adipose and neural tissue. The accumulation can be reversed by following a diet low in phytanic acid, yet the mechanism of transport of this fatty acid is obscure. We investigated the distribution of phytanic acid in different lipoprotein subfractions in 11 patients with Refsum disease and 9 unaffected siblings. Plasma phytanic acid was distributed on VLDL (16.2% +/- 12.2%), IDL (1.77% +/- 1.64%), LDL (34.8% +/- 12.6%) and HDL (14.3% +/- 7.87%). No correlations with any parameter were seen with total phytanic acid content. Weak nonsignificant correlations were found with the fractional distribution of phytanic acid and VLDL triglyceride (r = 0.35; p = 0.12) and plasma HDL-cholesterol (r = 0.32; p = 0.16) and with LDL:HDL cholesterol ratio (r = 0.33; p = 0.14). Significant correlation of the fractional distribution of phytanic acid on lipoprotein particles was noted with the ratio of apolipoprotein B: apolipoprotein A1-containing particles (r = 0.46; p = 0.03) and apolipoprotein B: apolipoprotein A1 in HDL2 (r = 0.53; p = 0.01). This suggests that the import-export balance for phytanic acid in plasma is related to forward and reverse cholesterol transport on lipoprotein particles, and only weakly to plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. These ratios of apolipoprotein particles may play a significant role in determining the rate of phytanic acid elimination in patients with Refsum disease.

  16. ENIGMATIC ROLE OF LIPOPROTEIN(a) IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Anuurad, Erdembileg; Enkhmaa, Byambaa; Berglund, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a), Lp(a), has many properties in common with low density lipoprotein, LDL, but contains a unique protein apolipoprotein(a), linked to apolipoprotein B-100 by a single disulfide bond. There is a substantial size heterogeneity of apo(a), and generally smaller apo(a) sizes tend to correspond to higher plasma Lp(a) levels, but this relation is far from linear, underscoring the importance to assess allele-specific apo(a) levels. The presence of apo(a), a highly charged, carbohydrate-rich, hydrophilic protein may obscure key features of the LDL moiety and offer opportunities for binding to vessel wall elements. Recently, interest in Lp(a) has increased because studies over the past decade have confirmed and more robustly demonstrated a risk factor role of Lp(a) for cardiovascular disease. In particular, levels of Lp(a) carried in particles with smaller size apo(a) isoforms are associated with CAD. Other studies suggest that pro-inflammatory conditions may modulate risk factor properties of Lp(a). Further, Lp(a) may act as a preferential acceptor for pro-inflammatory oxidized phospholipids transferred from tissues or from other lipoproteins. However, at present only a limited number of agents (e.g. nicotinic acid and estrogen) has proven efficacy in lowering Lp(a) levels. Although Lp(a) has not been definitely established as a cardiovascular risk factor and no guidelines presently recommend intervention, Lp(a)-lowering therapy might offer benefits in subgroups of patients with high Lp(a) levels. PMID:21167011

  17. Compounds Released from Biomass Deconstruction: Understanding Their Effect on Cellulose Enzyme Hydrolysis and Their Biological Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djioleu, Angele Mezindjou

    aureus growth and copper-induced peroxidation of human low-density lipoprotein, confirming antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the extract. On the other hand, bark extract inhibited cellulase cocktail activity by reducing cellulose hydrolysis by 82.32% after 48 h of incubation. Overall, phenolic compounds generated from biomass fractionation are important players in cellulolytic enzyme inhibition; removal of biomass extractives prior to pretreatment could reduce inhibitory compounds in prehydrolyzate while generating phytochemicals with societal benefits.

  18. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces hematopoietic stem cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Gui-Hai; Wang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Jun; Wei, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced senescence in hematopoietic stem cells (HCs). Mouse Sca-1+ HCs were separated and purified using the magnetic activated cell sorting technique. Ox-LDL induced significant senescence in HCs measured by SA-β-Gal staining, and reduced CFU-Mix colony-forming capacity, arresting cells at G0/G1 phase. In agreement with the cell cycle arrest, ox-LDL markedly reduced the expression of CDK4, cyclin D, and cyclin E. As possible contributing factors for cell senescence, ox-LDL also induced cellular oxidative stress and reduced telomerase activity.

  19. Biomimetic high density lipoprotein nanoparticles for nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kaylin M; Mutharasan, R Kannan; Tripathy, Sushant; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bobeica, Mariana; Shumaker, Dale K; Luthi, Andrea J; Helfand, Brian T; Ardehali, Hossein; Mirkin, Chad A; Volpert, Olga; Thaxton, C Shad

    2011-03-01

    We report a gold nanoparticle-templated high density lipoprotein (HDL AuNP) platform for gene therapy that combines lipid-based nucleic acid transfection strategies with HDL biomimicry. For proof-of-concept, HDL AuNPs are shown to adsorb antisense cholesterylated DNA. The conjugates are internalized by human cells, can be tracked within cells using transmission electron microscopy, and regulate target gene expression. Overall, the ability to directly image the AuNP core within cells, the chemical tailorability of the HDL AuNP platform, and the potential for cell-specific targeting afforded by HDL biomimicry make this platform appealing for nucleic acid delivery.

  20. Clearance of amyloid-β by circulating lipoprotein receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sagare, Abhay; Deane, Rashid; Bell, Robert D.; Johnson, Bradley; Hamm, Katie; Pendu, Ronan; Marky, Andrew; Lenting, Peter J.; Wu, Zhenhua; Zarcone, Troy; Goate, Alison; Mayo, Kevin; Perlmutter, David; Coma, Mireia; Zhong, Zhihui; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2010-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP) on brain capillaries clears amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) from brain. Here, we show that soluble circulating LRP (sLRP) provides key endogenous peripheral ‘sink’ activity for Aβ in humans. Recombinant LRP cluster IV (LRP-IV) bound Aβ in plasma in mice and in Alzheimer’s disease-affected humans with compromised sLRP-mediated Aβ binding, and reduced Aβ-related pathology and dysfunction in a mouse model of Alzheimer mice, suggesting LRP-IV can effectively replace native sLRP and clear Aβ. PMID:17694066

  1. Enzymatic hydrolysis of fructans in the tequila production process.

    PubMed

    Avila-Fernández, Angela; Rendón-Poujol, Xóchitl; Olvera, Clarita; González, Fernando; Capella, Santiago; Peña-Alvarez, Araceli; López-Munguía, Agustín

    2009-06-24

    In contrast to the hydrolysis of reserve carbohydrates in most plant-derived alcoholic beverage processes carried out with enzymes, agave fructans in tequila production have traditionally been transformed to fermentable sugars through acid thermal hydrolysis. Experiments at the bench scale demonstrated that the extraction and hydrolysis of agave fructans can be carried out continuously using commercial inulinases in a countercurrent extraction process with shredded agave fibers. Difficulties in the temperature control of large extraction diffusers did not allow the scaling up of this procedure. Nevertheless, batch enzymatic hydrolysis of agave extracts obtained in diffusers operating at 60 and 90 degrees C was studied at the laboratory and industrial levels. The effects of the enzymatic process on some tequila congeners were studied, demonstrating that although a short thermal treatment is essential for the development of tequila's organoleptic characteristics, the fructan hydrolysis can be performed with enzymes without major modifications in the flavor or aroma, as determined by a plant sensory panel and corroborated by the analysis of tequila congeners.

  2. Hydrolysis of aluminum dross material to achieve zero hazardous waste.

    PubMed

    David, E; Kopac, J

    2012-03-30

    A simple method with high efficiency for generating high pure hydrogen by hydrolysis in tap water of highly activated aluminum dross is established. Aluminum dross is activated by mechanically milling to particles of about 45 μm. This leads to removal of surface layer of the aluminum particles and creation of a fresh chemically active metal surface. In contact with water the hydrolysis reaction takes place and hydrogen is released. In this process a Zero Waste concept is achieved because the other product of reaction is aluminum oxide hydroxide (AlOOH), which is nature-friendly and can be used to make high quality refractory or calcium aluminate cement. For comparison we also used pure aluminum powder and alkaline tap water solution (NaOH, KOH) at a ratio similar to that of aluminum dross content. The rates of hydrogen generated in hydrolysis reaction of pure aluminum and aluminum dross have been found to be similar. As a result of the experimental setup, a hydrogen generator was designed and assembled. Hydrogen volume generated by hydrolysis reaction was measured. The experimental results obtained reveal that aluminum dross could be economically recycled by hydrolysis process with achieving zero hazardous aluminum dross waste and hydrogen generation. PMID:22326245

  3. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and various pretreated wood fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Saddler, J.N.; Brownell, H.H.; Clermont, L.P.; Levitin, N.

    1982-06-01

    Three strains of Trichoderma-Trichoderma reesei C30, Trichoderma reesei QM9414, and Trichoderma species E58-were used to study the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated wood substrates. Each of the culture filtrates was incubated with a variety of commercially prepared cellulose substrates and pretreated wood substrates. Solka floc was the most easily degraded commercial cellulose. The enzyme accessibility of steam-exploded samples which has been alkali extracted and then stored wet decreased with the duration of the steam treatment. Air drying reduced the extent of hydrolysis of all the samples but had a greater effect on the samples which had previously shown the greatest hydrolysis. Mild pulping using 2% chlorite increased the enzymatic hydrolysis of all the samples. Steam explosion was shown to be an excellent pretreatment method for aspen wood and was much superior to dilute nitric acid pretreatment. The results indicate that the distribution of the lignin as well as the surface area of the cellulosic substrate are important features in enzymatic hydrolysis. (Refs 17).

  4. Enzymatic hydrolysis of fractionated products from oil thermally oxidated

    SciTech Connect

    Yashida, H.; Alexander, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of the acylglycerol products obtained from thermally oxidized vegetable oils was studied. Corn, sunflower and soybean oils were heated in the laboratory at 180/sup 0/C for 50, 70 and 100 hr with aeration and directly fractionated by silicic acid column chromatography. By successive elution with 20%, then 60% isopropyl ether in n-hexane, and diethyl ether, the thermally oxidized oils were separated into three fractions: the nonpolar fraction (monomeric compounds), slightly polar fraction (dimeric compounds), and polar fraction comprising oligomeric compounds. Enzymatic hydrolysis with pancreatic lipase showed that the monomers were hydrolyzed as rapidly as the corresponding unheated oils, the dimers much more slowly, and the oligomeric compounds barely at all. Overall, the hydrolysis of the dimers was less than 23% of that for the monomers, with small differences among the oils. Longer heating periods resulted in greater reductions in hydrolysis of the dimeric compounds. These results suggest that the degree of enzymatic hydrolysis of the fractionated acylglycerol compounds is related to differences in the thermal oxidative deterioration, and amounts of polar compounds in the products. (33 Refs.)

  5. Fluoride incorporation into apatite crystals delays amelogenin hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    DenBesten, Pamela; Zhu, Li; Li, Wu; Tanimoto, Kotaro; Liu, Haichuan; Witkowska, Halina Ewa

    2012-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis has been related to an increase in the amount of amelogenin in fluorosed enamel as compared to normal enamel in the maturation stage. In this study we tested the hypothesis that fluoride incorporated into carbonated apatite alters amelogenin hydrolysis. Recombinant human amelogenin (rh174) was allowed to bind to 0.15 mg of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CAP) or fluoride-containing carbonated hydroxyapatite (F-CAP) synthesized to contain 100, 1000 or 4000 ppm F-. After 3 h digestion with recombinant human MMP20 or KLK4, bound protein was characterized by reverse-phase HPLC. Proteolytic fragments formed after 24 h digestion of amelogenin, were identified by LC tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/MS). The hydrolysis of amelogenin bound to F100-CAP by both MMP20 and KLK4 was significantly reduced in a dose dependent manner as compared to CAP. After 24 h hydrolysis, the number of cleavage sites in bound amelogenin by MMP20 were similar in CAP and F100-CAP, whereas there were 24 fewer cleavage sites identified for the KLK4 hydrolysis on F100-CAP as compared to CAP. These results suggest that the reduced hydrolysis of amelogenins in fluorosed enamel may be partially due to the increased fluoride content in fluoride containing apatite, contributing to the hypomineralized enamel matrix phenotype observed in fluorosed enamel. PMID:22243219

  6. Identification of a New Lipoprotein Export Signal in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lauber, Frédéric; Cornelis, Guy Richard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria of the phylum Bacteroidetes, including commensal organisms and opportunistic pathogens, harbor abundant surface-exposed multiprotein membrane complexes (Sus-like systems) involved in carbohydrate acquisition. These complexes have been mostly linked to commensalism, and in some instances, they have also been shown to play a role in pathogenesis. Sus-like systems are mainly composed of lipoproteins anchored to the outer membrane and facing the external milieu. This lipoprotein localization is uncommon in most studied Gram-negative bacteria, while it is widespread in Bacteroidetes. Little is known about how these complexes assemble and particularly about how lipoproteins reach the bacterial surface. Here, by bioinformatic analyses, we identify a lipoprotein export signal (LES) at the N termini of surface-exposed lipoproteins of the human pathogen Capnocytophaga canimorsus corresponding to K-(D/E)2 or Q-A-(D/E)2. We show that, when introduced in sialidase SiaC, an intracellular lipoprotein, this signal is sufficient to target the protein to the cell surface. Mutational analysis of the LES in this reporter system showed that the amino acid composition, position of the signal sequence, and global charge are critical for lipoprotein surface transport. These findings were further confirmed by the analysis of the LES of mucinase MucG, a naturally surface-exposed C. canimorsus lipoprotein. Furthermore, we identify a LES in Bacteroides fragilis and Flavobacterium johnsoniae surface lipoproteins that allow C. canimorsus surface protein exposure, thus suggesting that Bacteroidetes share a new bacterial lipoprotein export pathway that flips lipoproteins across the outer membrane. PMID:27795390

  7. Effects of estrogen dose and smoking on lipid and lipoprotein levels in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M; Perlman, J A; Ray, R; Petitti, D

    1988-06-01

    The joint effects of conjugated estrogen use, age, body mass index, and smoking on plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels were assessed in 585 women who used oral estrogen and 1093 women who did not who participated in the Walnut Creek Contraceptive Drug Study. Whether administered daily or cyclically, conjugated estrogen was associated with reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The adjusted mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration was 132 mg/dl for women who used conjugated estrogen in a dose greater than or equal to 1.25 mg/day; the adjusted corresponding mean concentration was 147 mg/dl for postmenopausal women who did not use estrogen. A dose-response pattern was demonstrated between conjugated estrogen and low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. A maximum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level reduction was reached at a dose of 1.25 mg, suggesting a saturation phenomenon. Stepwise dose-response increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were also found with estrogen therapy, with a maximum increase of 8 to 10 mg/dl observed with the 1.25 mg dose. Estrogen-related rises in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and decreases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were offset by 2 to 3 mg/dl in women who smoked. It may be concluded, therefore, that among postmenopausal women, low-risk lipoprotein profiles as assessed by low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels are found in nonsmokers whose postmenopausal hormone therapy includes the equivalent of a conjugated estrogen dose of 1.25 mg.

  8. Lipoprotein apheresis in the management of severe hypercholesterolemia and of elevation of lipoprotein(a): current perspectives and patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Julius, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    This review reports the current situation with respect to therapeutic options (lifestyle and drugs) reducing the concentrations of atherogenic low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]). Three lipoprotein apheresis (LA) principles have been realized: precipitation, filtration, and adsorption. Available LA methods are herein described in detail – major components, pumps, extracorporeal volume, treated volume, and anticoagulation. General features of all LA methods as well as pleotropic effects are elaborated. Indications for LA therapy are quoted: homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HCH), severe HCH, and isolated elevation of Lp(a) and progress of atherosclerotic disease. A major focus is on the evidence of the effect of LA on cardiovascular outcome data, and the most important publications are cited in this context. The best studies have been performed in patients with elevated Lp(a) in whom cardiovascular events were reduced by more than 80%. Major adverse effects and contraindications are listed. The impact of an LA therapy on patient quality of life and the requirements they have to fulfill are also highlighted. Finally, the future role of LA in treating high-risk patients with high LDL-C and/or high Lp(a) is discussed. It is probable that the significance of LA for treating patients with elevated LDL-C will decrease (with the exception of homozygous familial HCH) due to the application of PCSK9 inhibitors. The antisense oligonucleotide against apolipoprotein(a) could replace LA in patients with high Lp(a), provided positive outcome data are generated. PMID:27785114

  9. Granular starch hydrolysis for fuel ethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping

    addition were evaluated in the dry grind process using GSHE (GSH process). Addition of proteases resulted in higher ethanol concentrations (15.2 to 18.0% v/v) and lower (DDGS) yields (32.9 to 45.8% db) compared to the control (no protease addition). As level of proteases and GSHE increased, ethanol concentrations increased and DDGS yields decreased. Proteases addition reduced required GSHE dose. Ethanol concentrations with protease addition alone were higher than with urea or with addition of both protease and urea. Corn endosperm consists of soft and hard endosperm. More exposed starch granules and rough surfaces produced from soft endosperm compared to hard endosperm will create more surface area which will benefit the solid phase hydrolysis as used in GSH process. In this study, the effects of protease, urea, endosperm hardness and GSHE levels on the GSH process were evaluated. Soft and hard endosperm materials were obtained by grinding and sifting flaking grits from dry milling pilot plant. Soft endosperm resulted in higher ethanol concentrations (at 72 hr) compared to ground corn or hard endosperm. Addition of urea increased ethanol concentrations (at 72 hr) for soft and hard endosperm. The effect of protease addition on increasing ethanol concentrations and fermentation rates was more predominant for soft endosperm, less for hard endosperm and least for ground corn. The GSH process with protease resulted in higher ethanol concentration than that with urea. For fermentation of soft endosperm, GSHE dose can be reduced. Ground corn fermented faster at the beginning than hard and soft endosperm due to the presence of inherent nutrients which enhanced yeast growth.

  10. High-density lipoprotein functionality in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kosmas, Constantine E; Christodoulidis, Georgios; Cheng, Jeh-wei; Vittorio, Timothy J; Lerakis, Stamatios

    2014-06-01

    The role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in cardiovascular atheroprotection is well established. Epidemiological data have clearly demonstrated an inverse relationship between HDL levels and the risk for coronary artery disease, which is independent of the low-density lipoprotein levels. However, more recent data provide evidence that high HDL levels are not always protective and that under certain conditions may even confer an increased risk. Thus, a new concept has arisen, which stresses the importance of HDL functionality, rather than HDL concentration per se, in the assessment of cardiovascular risk. HDL functionality is genetically defined but can also be modified by several environmental and lifestyle factors, such as diet, smoking or certain pharmacologic interventions. Furthermore, HDL is consisted of a heterogeneous group of particles with major differences in their structural, biological and functional properties. Recently, the cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages was proven to be an excellent metric of HDL functionality, because it was shown to have a strong inverse relationship with the risk of angiographically documented coronary artery disease, independent of the HDL and apolipoprotein A-1 levels, although it may not actually predict the prospective risk for cardiovascular events. Thus, improving the quality of HDL may represent a better therapeutic target than simply raising the HDL level, and assessment of HDL function may prove informative in refining our understanding of HDL-mediated atheroprotection.

  11. The lipoprotein abnormality in Tangier disease: quantitation of A apoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Assmann, G; Smootz, E; Adler, K; Capurso, A; Oette, K

    1977-01-01

    In this study we have determined by radioimmunoassay and double immunoelectrophoresis the total quantities and distributions of A apoproteins in three adult patients affected with Tangier disease (hereditary alpha-lipoprotein deficiency). Compared with normal plasma, the total quantities of apoproteins A-I and A-II in Tangier plasma were determined to be less than 1% and 5-7%, respectively. In Tangier patients, approximately 90% of the apoprotein A-I sedimented when ultracentrifugations of plasma were carried out at density 1.21 g/ml KBr. By contrast, more than 95% of the apoprotein A-II floated under those conditions. In normal plasma, approximately 90% of both apoproteins A-I and A-II is found in the 1.063-1.21-g/ml KBr density fraction. These findings suggest that complete dissociation of A apoproteins occurs in Tangier plasma. This dissociation of apoproteins was confirmed by double immunoelectrophoresis with monospecific antisera. Immunochemical and electrophoretic experiments did not provide evidence for a structural abnormality of apoprotein A-I in these patients, The results taken together strongly suggest that normal high-density lipoproteins are absent from Tangier plasma. Images PMID:190272

  12. Biologically active low density lipoprotein in human peripheral lymph.

    PubMed Central

    Reichl, D; Myant, N B; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1978-01-01

    We have compared the ability of human serum and peripheral lymph to suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), to activate cholesteryl ester synthesis, and to compete with 125I-labeled low density lipoprotein (LDL) for binding to LDL receptors in cultured human fibroblasts. Whole lymph was active in all three tests and the activity per unit volume in lymph was approximately equal to 1/10th that in serum. All three biologic activities in lymph were confined to the d less than 1.063 g/ml fraction. Whole lymph had no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity in fibroblasts from a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, whose cells lack LDL receptors. The LDL-like biologic activity per unit mass of immunologically active apoprotein B was approximately the same in lymph as in serum. The current data indicate that functionally active LDL is present in lymph and that the concentration of this lipoprotein is approximately equal to 1/10th that in serum. PMID:201669

  13. Lipid profiling of lipoprotein X: Implications for dyslipidemia in cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Heimerl, Susanne; Boettcher, Alfred; Kaul, Harald; Liebisch, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Lipoprotein X (Lp-X) is an abnormal lipoprotein that may typically be formed in intra- and extrahepatic cholestasis and potentially interfere with lipid analysis in the routine lab. To gain insight into lipid class and species composition, Lp-X, LDL and HDL from cholestatic and control serum samples were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis including phospholipids (PL), sphingolipids, free cholesterol (FC), cholesteryl esters (CE) and bile acids. Our analysis of Lp-X revealed a content of 46% FC, 49% PL with 34% phosphatidylcholine (PC) as main PL component. The lipid species pattern of Lp-X showed remarkable high fractions of mono-unsaturated species including PC 32:1 and PC 34:1 and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) 32:1 and 34:1. LDL and HDL lipid composition in the same specimens strongly reflected the lipid composition of Lp-X with increased PC 32:1, PC 34:1, PE 32:1, PE 34:1 and FC accompanied by decreased CE compared to controls. Comparison of Lp-X and biliary lipid composition clearly indicates that Lp-X does not originate from a sole release of bile lipids. Moreover, these data present evidence for increased hepatic fatty acid and PL synthesis which may represent a reaction to high hepatic FC level observed during cholestasis.

  14. Lipoprotein (a) and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Palmeira, Ástrid Camêlo; Leal, Adriana Amorim de F.; Ramos, Nathaly de Medeiros N.; de Alencar F., José; Simões, Mônica Oliveira da S.; Medeiros, Carla Campos M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCES: This systematic review included studies from 2001 to 2011, a ten-year time period. Epidemiological studies with children and/or adolescents published in English, Portuguese or Spanish and fully available online were included. The searches were performed in Science Direct, PubMed/Medline, BVS (Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde) and Cochrane Library databases, using the following combination of key-words: "lipoprotein a" and "cardiovascular diseases" and "obesity". DATA SYNTHESIS: Overall, 672 studies were obtained but only seven were included. Some studies assessed the family history for CVD. In all of them, Lp(a) levels were increased in patients with family history for CVD. There was also a positive correlation between Lp(a) and LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B levels, suggesting an association between Lp(a) levels and the lipid profile. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence that CVD may originate in childhood and adolescence leads to the need for investigating the risk factors during this period in order to propose earlier and possibly more effective interventions to reduce morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:24473960

  15. Triacylglycerol kinetics in endotoxic rats with suppressed lipoprotein lipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Corll, C.B.; Martinez, R.R.

    1987-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia observed in animals after bacterial endotoxin administration and some forms of sepsis can result from increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) output or decreased TG clearance by extrahepatic tissues. To differentiate between these two possibilities, TG and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics were determined in control and endotoxin-injected rats 18 h after treatment. Plasma TG and FFA kinetics were assessed by a constant intravenous infusion with (9,10-/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled very low-density lipoprotein and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin, respectively. In addition, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue as well as in postheparin plasma of functionally hepatectomized, adrenalectomized, and gonadectomized rats. Plasma FFA acid concentrations were slightly increased in endotoxin-treated rats but their turnover did not differ from control. Endotoxin-treated rats had a threefold increase in plasma TG concentrations and decreased heart, skeletal muscle, and post-heparin plasma LPL activity. Plasma TG turnover was decreased, indicating that hypertriglyceridemia was not due to an increased TG output by the liver. Instead, the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TG concentration was consequence of the 80% reduction in TG metabolic clearance rate. Thus, suppression of LPL activity in endotoxic animals impairs TG clearance resulting in hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, endotoxin administration reduced the delivery of TG-FFA to extrahepatic tissues because hepatic synthesis and secretion of TG from plasma FFA was decreased and LPL activity was suppressed.

  16. Protein carbamylation renders high-density lipoprotein dysfunctional

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim Carbamylation of proteins through reactive cyanate has been demonstrated to predict an increased cardiovascular risk. Cyanate is formed in vivo by break-down of urea and at sites of inflammation by the phagocyte protein myeloperoxidase. Since myeloperoxidase (MPO) associates with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in human atherosclerotic intima, we examined in the present study whether cyanate specifically targets HDL. Results Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that protein carbamylation is a major post-translational modification of HDL. The carbamyllysine content of lesion derived HDL was more than 20-fold higher in comparison to 3-chlorotyrosine levels, a specific oxidation product of MPO. Notable, the carbamyllysine content of lesion-derived HDL was 5 to 8-fold higher when compared to lesion derived low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or total lesion protein and increased with lesion severity. Importantly, the carbamyllysine content of HDL, but not of LDL, correlated with levels of 3-chlorotyrosine, suggesting MPO mediated carbamylation in the vessel wall. Remarkably, one carbamyllysine residue per HDL associated apolipoprotein A-I was sufficient to induce cholesterol accumulation and lipid droplet formation in macrophages through a pathway requiring the HDL receptor scavenger receptor class B, type I. Conclusion The present results raise the possibility that HDL carbamylation contributes to foam cell formation in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:21235354

  17. Hypertriglyceridemia and unusual lipoprotein subclass distributions associated with late pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, T.M.; Kretchmer, N.; Silliman, K. )

    1991-03-15

    In the human adult population elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) levels are associated with decreased high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and decreased HDL and LDL particle sizes. Late pregnancy is a hypertriglyceridemic state where little is known about LDL and HDL subpopulation distribution. Plasma lipids, apolipoproteins (apo) and lipoprotein subpopulations were examined in 36 pregnant women at 36 wk pregnancy and 6 wk postpartum and correlated with HDL and LDL size. There was a significant decrease in LDL diameter at 36 wk pre, 25 {plus minus} 0.7 nm compared, with 6 wk post, 26.4 {plus minus} 0.8 nm. A total of 97% of the 36 wk pre subjects had small dense LDL which paralleled increases in apoB concentration. Unlike LDL HDL at 36 wks pre showed a significant increase in larger sized particles where HDL{sub 2b} predominated. There was a positive correlation between HDL{sub 2b} mass and apoAl and HDL-C concentrations. Late pregnancy is a metabolic state where the predominance of large, HDL{sub 2b} particles is discordant with the predominance of small LDL and elevated TG. This annual metabolic pattern may in part be due to hormonal changes occurring in late pregnancy.

  18. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara; Calabresi, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  19. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  20. The tissue distribution of lipoprotein lipase determines where chylomicrons bind.

    PubMed

    Savonen, Roger; Hiden, Michaela; Hultin, Magnus; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Olivecrona, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    To determine the role of LPL for binding of lipoproteins to the vascular endothelium, and for the distribution of lipids from lipoproteins, four lines of induced mutant mice were used. Rat chylomicrons labeled in vivo with [(14)C]oleic acid (primarily in TGs, providing a tracer for lipolysis) and [(3)H]retinol (primarily in ester form, providing a tracer for the core lipids) were injected. TG label was cleared more rapidly than core label. There were no differences between the mouse lines in the rate at which core label was cleared. Two minutes after injection, about 5% of the core label, and hence chylomicron particles, were in the heart of WT mice. In mice that expressed LPL only in skeletal muscle, and had much reduced levels of LPL in the heart, binding of chylomicrons was reduced to 1%, whereas in mice that expressed LPL only in the heart, the binding was increased to over 10%. The same patterns of distribution were evident at 20 min when most of the label had been cleared. Thus, the amount of LPL expressed in muscle and heart governed both the binding of chylomicron particles and the assimilation of chylomicron lipids in the tissue. PMID:25589507

  1. Intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of cardiac lipoprotein lipase following diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Rodrigues, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Cardiac lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a pivotal enzyme controlling heart metabolism by providing the majority of fatty acids required by this organ. From activation in cardiomyocytes to secretion to the vascular lumen, cardiac LPL is regulated by multiple pathways, which are altered during diabetes. Hence, dimerization/activation of LPL is modified following diabetes, a process controlled by lipase maturation factor 1. The role of AMP-activated protein kinase, protein kinase D, and heparan sulfate proteoglycans, intrinsic factors that regulate the intracellular transport of LPL is also shifted, and is discussed. More recent studies have identified several exogenous factors released from endothelial cells (EC) and adipose tissue that are required for proper functioning of LPL. In response to hyperglycemia, both active and latent heparanase are released from EC to facilitate LPL secretion. Diabetes also increased the expression of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) in EC, which mediates the transport of LPL across EC. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 secreted from the adipose tissue has the potential to reduce coronary LPL activity. Knowledge of these intrinsic and extrinsic factors could be used develop therapeutic targets to normalize LPL function, and maintain cardiac energy homeostasis after diabetes. PMID:25463481

  2. Lipids and lipoproteins in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ronald M

    2004-06-01

    Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a clustering of interrelated plasma lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities, which include reduced HDL cholesterol, a predominance of small dense LDL particles, and elevated triglyceride levels. Each of these dyslipidemic features is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased hepatic secretion of large triglyceride-rich VLDL and impaired clearance of VLDL appears to be of central importance in the pathophysiology of this dyslipidemia. Small dense LDL particles arise from the intravascular processing of specific larger VLDL precursors. Typically, reduced plasma HDL levels in type 2 diabetes are manifest as reductions in the HDL(2b) subspecies and relative or absolute increases in smaller denser HDL(3b) and HDL(3c). Although behavioral interventions such as diet and exercise can improve diabetic dyslipidemia, for most patients, pharmacological therapy is needed to reach treatment goals. There are several classes of medications that can be used to treat lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, including statins, fibrates, niacin, and thiazolidinediones. Clinical trials have shown significant improvement in coronary artery disease after diabetic dyslipidemia treatment.

  3. Enzymatic hydrolysis of plant polysaccharides: substrates for fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dekker, R F

    1989-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of plant carbohydrate polymers is discussed with particular emphasis on lignocellulose. The polysaccharides include starch, inulin, cellulose and the hemicelluloses, i.e., the heteroxylans and glucomannans. Commercial operations exist for the enzymatic hydrolysis of starch and its fermentation into chemicals such as ethanol. Enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose is more complex and the enzymes are rather expensive to produce, which currently precludes the commercial processing of lignocellulosic materials. The bioconversion of lignocellulose consists of 4 process steps: pretreatment, enzyme production, enzymatic saccharification and fermentation. Except for the last step, each of these process steps is discussed. The discussion is highlighted with examples of lignocellulosic waste materials (e.g., sugar cane and a hardwood and softwood sawdust) which are of potential use in a bioconversion process for providing sugar hydrolysates that can serve as fermentation substrates.

  4. Monoolein production by triglycerides hydrolysis using immobilized Rhizopus oryzae lipase.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Nesrine; Abidi, Ferid; Galai, Said; Marzouki, M Nejib; Salah, Abderraouf Ben

    2014-07-01

    Lipase extracted from Rhizopus oryzae was immobilized in alginate gel beads. The effects of the immobilization conditions, such as, alginate concentration, CaCl2 concentration and amount of initial enzyme on retained activity (specific activity ratio of entrapped active lipase to free lipase) were investigated. The optimal conditions for lipase entrapment were determined: 2% (w/v) alginate concentration, 100mM CaCl2 and enzyme ratio of 2000IU/mL.In such conditions, immobilized lipase by inclusion in alginate showed a highest stability and activity, on olive oil hydrolysis reaction where it could be reused for 10 cycles. After 15min of hydrolysis reaction, the mass composition of monoolein, diolein and triolein were about 78%, 10% and 12%. Hydrolysis' products purification by column chromatography lead to a successful separation of reaction compounds and provide a pure fraction of monoolein which is considered as the widest used emulsifier in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:24755261

  5. Complex enzyme hydrolysis releases antioxidative phenolics from rice bran.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Ruifen; Wei, Zhencheng; Deng, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Juan; Zhang, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, phenolic profiles and antioxidant activity of rice bran were analyzed following successive treatment by gelatinization, liquefaction and complex enzyme hydrolysis. Compared with gelatinization alone, liquefaction slightly increased the total amount of phenolics and antioxidant activity as measured by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays. Complex enzyme hydrolysis significantly increased the total phenolics, flavonoids, FRAP and ORAC by 46.24%, 79.13%, 159.14% and 41.98%, respectively, compared to gelatinization alone. Furthermore, ten individual phenolics present in free or soluble conjugate forms were also analyzed following enzymatic processing. Ferulic acid experienced the largest release, followed by protocatechuic acid and then quercetin. Interestingly, a major proportion of phenolics existed as soluble conjugates, rather than free form. Overall, complex enzyme hydrolysis releases phenolics, thus increasing the antioxidant activity of rice bran extract. This study provides useful information for processing rice bran into functional beverage rich in phenolics. PMID:27507440

  6. Monoolein production by triglycerides hydrolysis using immobilized Rhizopus oryzae lipase.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Nesrine; Abidi, Ferid; Galai, Said; Marzouki, M Nejib; Salah, Abderraouf Ben

    2014-07-01

    Lipase extracted from Rhizopus oryzae was immobilized in alginate gel beads. The effects of the immobilization conditions, such as, alginate concentration, CaCl2 concentration and amount of initial enzyme on retained activity (specific activity ratio of entrapped active lipase to free lipase) were investigated. The optimal conditions for lipase entrapment were determined: 2% (w/v) alginate concentration, 100mM CaCl2 and enzyme ratio of 2000IU/mL.In such conditions, immobilized lipase by inclusion in alginate showed a highest stability and activity, on olive oil hydrolysis reaction where it could be reused for 10 cycles. After 15min of hydrolysis reaction, the mass composition of monoolein, diolein and triolein were about 78%, 10% and 12%. Hydrolysis' products purification by column chromatography lead to a successful separation of reaction compounds and provide a pure fraction of monoolein which is considered as the widest used emulsifier in food and pharmaceutical industries.

  7. Homogeneous catalysis of valeronitrile hydrolysis under supercritical conditions.

    PubMed

    Sarlea, Michael; Kohl, Sabine; Blickhan, Nina; Vogel, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical nitrile hydrolysis can be used for both, amide and acid production as well as waste water treatment, as the hydrolysis products show good biodegradability. The conventional process at ambient conditions requires large amounts of mineral acid or base. Approaches that use supercritical water as a green solvent without a catalyst have been investigated over recent years. Findings for valeronitrile hydrolysis presented recently showed promising reaction rates and valeric acid yields. In an attempt to further maximize product yield and to better understand the impact of the pH, reactions in dilute sulfuric acid (0.01 mol L(-1)) were performed in a continuous high-pressure laboratory-scale apparatus at 400-500 °C, 30 MPa, and a maximum residence time of 100 s. Results from both reaction media were compared with regard to productivity and sustainability.

  8. Determining yields in high solids enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Jan B; Felby, Claus; Jørgensen, Henning

    2009-05-01

    As technologies for utilizing biomass for fuel and chemical production continue to improve, enzymatic hydrolysis can be run at still higher solids concentrations. For hydrolyses that initially contain little or no free water (10-40% total solids, w/w), the saccharification of insoluble polymers into soluble sugars involves changes of volume, density, and proportion of insoluble solids. This poses a new challenge when determining the degree of hydrolysis (conversion yield). Experiments have shown that calculating the yield from the resulting sugar concentration in the supernatant of the slurry and using the assumed initial volume leads to significant overestimations of the yield. By measuring the proportion of insoluble solids in the slurry as well as the sugar concentration and specific gravity of the aqueous phase, it is possible to precisely calculate the degree of conversion. The discrepancies between the different ways of calculating yields are demonstrated along with a nonlaborious method for approximating yields in high solids hydrolysis. PMID:18836690

  9. Comparative hydrolysis and fermentation of sugarcane and agave bagasse.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Salas, J M; Villa-Ramírez, M S; Veloz-Rendón, J S; Rivera-Hernández, K N; González-César, R A; Plascencia-Espinosa, M A; Trejo-Estrada, S R

    2009-02-01

    Sugarcane and agave bagasse samples were hydrolyzed with either mineral acids (HCl), commercial glucanases or a combined treatment consisting of alkaline delignification followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. Acid hydrolysis of sugar cane bagasse yielded a higher level of reducing sugars (37.21% for depithed bagasse and 35.37% for pith bagasse), when compared to metzal or metzontete (agave pinecone and leaves, 5.02% and 9.91%, respectively). An optimized enzyme formulation was used to process sugar cane bagasse, which contained Celluclast, Novozyme and Viscozyme L. From alkaline-enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse samples, a reduced level of reducing sugar yield was obtained (11-20%) compared to agave bagasse (12-58%). Selected hydrolyzates were fermented with a non-recombinant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Maximum alcohol yield by fermentation (32.6%) was obtained from the hydrolyzate of sugarcane depithed bagasse. Hydrolyzed agave waste residues provide an increased glucose decreased xylose product useful for biotechnological conversion.

  10. A kinetic study on sesame cake protein hydrolysis by Alcalase.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Elçin; Apar, Dilek Kılıç; Özbek, Belma

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, the hydrolysis of sesame cake protein was performed by Alcalase, a bacterial protease produced by Bacillus licheniformis, to investigate the reaction kinetics of sesame cake hydrolysis and to determine decay and product inhibition effects for Alcalase. The reactions were carried out for 10 min in 0.1 L of aqueous solutions containing 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 g protein/L at various temperature and pH values. To determine decay and product inhibition effects for Alcalase, a series of inhibition experiments were conducted with the addition of various amounts of hydrolysate. The reaction kinetics was investigated by initial rate approach. The initial reaction rates were determined from the slopes of the linear models that fitted to the experimental data. The kinetic parameters, K(m) and V(max), were estimated as 41.17 g/L and 9.24 meqv/L x min. The Lineweaver-Burk plots showed that the type of inhibition for Alcalase determined as uncompetitive, and the inhibition constant, K(i), was estimated as 38.24% (hydrolysate/substrate mixture). Practical Application: Plant proteins are increasingly being used as an alternative to proteins from animal sources to perform functional roles in food formulation. Knowledge of the kinetics of the hydrolysis reaction is essential for the optimization of enzymatic protein hydrolysis and for increasing the utilization of plant proteins in food products. Therefore, in the present study, the hydrolysis of sesame cake protein was performed by Alcalase, a bacterial protease produced by B. licheniformis, to investigate the reaction kinetics of sesame cake hydrolysis and to determine decay and product inhibition effects for Alcalase.

  11. An investigation into the mechanisms mediating plasma lipoprotein-potentiated beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stanyer, Lee; Betteridge, D John; Smith, Christopher C T

    2002-05-01

    The toxicity of the beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide of Alzheimer's disease may relate to its polymerisation state (i.e. fibril content). We have shown previously that plasma lipoproteins, particularly when oxidised, greatly enhance Abeta polymerisation. In the present study the nature of the interactions between both native and oxidised lipoproteins and Abeta1-40 was investigated employing various chemical treatments. The addition of ascorbic acid or the vitamin E analogue, trolox, to lipoprotein/Abeta coincubations failed to inhibit Abeta fibrillogenesis, as did the treatment of lipoproteins with the aldehyde reductant, sodium borohydride. The putative lipid peroxide-derived aldehyde scavenger, aminoguanidine, however, inhibited Abeta-oxidised lipoprotein-potentiated polymerisation, but in a manner consistent with an antioxidant action for the drug. Lipoprotein treatment with the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal enhanced Abeta polymerisation in a concentration-dependent fashion. Incubation of Abeta with lipoprotein fractions from which the apoprotein components had been removed resulted in extents of polymerisation comparable to those observed with Abeta alone. These data indicate that the apoprotein components of plasma lipoproteins play a key role in promoting Abeta polymerisation, possibly via interactions with aldehydes.

  12. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. 866.5580 Section 866.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5580 Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. An...

  13. Effect of dietary Fatty acids on human lipoprotein metabolism: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Esther M M; Watts, Gerald F; Ng, Theodore W K; Barrett, P Hugh R

    2015-06-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Dietary fatty-acid composition regulates lipids and lipoprotein metabolism and may confer CVD benefit. This review updates understanding of the effect of dietary fatty-acids on human lipoprotein metabolism. In elderly participants with hyperlipidemia, high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty-acids (PUFA) consumption diminished hepatic triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) secretion and enhanced TRL to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) conversion. n-3 PUFA also decreased TRL-apoB-48 concentration by decreasing TRL-apoB-48 secretion. High n-6 PUFA intake decreased very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations by up-regulating VLDL lipolysis and uptake. In a study of healthy subjects, the intake of saturated fatty-acids with increased palmitic acid at the sn-2 position was associated with decreased postprandial lipemia. Low medium-chain triglyceride may not appreciably alter TRL metabolism. Replacing carbohydrate with monounsaturated fatty-acids increased TRL catabolism. Trans-fatty-acid decreased LDL and enhanced high-density lipoprotein catabolism. Interactions between APOE genotype and n-3 PUFA in regulating lipid responses were also described. The major advances in understanding the effect of dietary fatty-acids on lipoprotein metabolism has centered on n-3 PUFA. This knowledge emphasizes the importance of regulating lipoprotein metabolism as a mode to improve plasma lipids and potentially CVD risk. Additional studies are required to better characterize the cardiometabolic effects of other dietary fatty-acids. PMID:26043038

  14. Relative atherogenicity and predictive value of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael; Ginsberg, Henry N; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2008-04-01

    Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well-established atherogenic factor for coronary heart disease, it does not completely represent the risk associated with atherogenic lipoproteins in the presence of high triglyceride (TG) levels. Constituent lipoproteins constituting non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) include atherogenic TG-rich lipoproteins, cholesteryl ester-enriched remnants of TG-rich lipoproteins, and lipoprotein(a). Recent observational and intervention studies suggest that the predictive value of non-HDL-C for cardiovascular risk and mortality is better than low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and that non-HDL-C correlates highly with plasma apolipoprotein B levels. Currently, the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines identify non-HDL-C as a secondary target of therapy in patients with TG elevation (> or =200 mg/dl) after the attainment of LDL-C target goals. In patients with coronary heart disease or coronary heart disease risk equivalents, an optional non-HDL-C goal is <100 mg/dl. To achieve the non-HDL-C goal, statin therapy may be intensified or combined with ezetimibe, niacin, a fibrate, or omega-3 fatty acids. In conclusion, non-HDL-C remains an important target of therapy for patients with elevated TGs, although its widespread adoption has yet to gain a foothold among health care professionals treating patients with dyslipidemia. PMID:18359322

  15. ION MOBILITY ANALYSIS OF LIPOPROTEIN SUBFRACTIONS IDENTIFIES THREE INDEPENDENT AXES OF CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

    PubMed Central

    Musunuru, Kiran; Orho-Melander, Marju; Caulfield, Michael P.; Li, Shuguang; Salameh, Wael A.; Reitz, Richard E.; Berglund, Göran; Hedblad, Bo; Engström, Gunnar; Williams, Paul T.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Whereas epidemiologic studies show that levels of low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) predict incident cardiovascular disease (CVD), there is limited evidence relating lipoprotein subfractions and composite measures of subfractions to risk for CVD in prospective cohort studies. Methods and Results We tested whether combinations of lipoprotein subfractions independently predict CVD in a prospective cohort of 4,594 initially healthy men and women (the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study, mean follow-up 12.2 years, 377 incident cardiovascular events). Plasma lipoproteins and lipoprotein subfractions were measured at baseline with a novel, high-resolution ion mobility technique. Principal component analysis (PCA) of subfraction concentrations identified three major independent (i.e., zero correlation) components of CVD risk, one representing LDL-associated risk, a second representing HDL-associated protection, and the third representing a pattern of decreased large HDL, increased small/medium LDL, and increased triglycerides. The last corresponds to the previously described “atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype.” Several genes that may underlie this phenotype—CETP, LIPC, GALNT2, MLXIPL, APOA1/A5, LPL—are suggested by SNPs associated with the combination of small/medium LDL and large HDL. Conclusion PCA on lipoprotein subfractions yielded three independent components of CVD risk. Genetic analyses suggest these components represent independent mechanistic pathways for development of CVD. PMID:19729614

  16. Formation of tissue factor activity following incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein with plasma lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, T.; Kisiel, W. )

    1990-11-01

    Incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein (Apo-TF) with human plasma decreased the recalcified clotting time of this plasma in a time-and dose-dependent manner suggesting relipidation of the Apo-TF by plasma lipoproteins. Incubation of Apo-TF with purified preparations of human very low density, low density and high density lipoproteins resulted in tissue factor activity in a clotting assay. The order of effectiveness was VLDL greater than LDL much greater than HDL. Tissue factor activity generated by incubation of a fixed amount of Apo-TF with plasma lipoproteins was lipoprotein concentration-dependent and saturable. The association of Apo-TF with lipoprotein particles was supported by gel filtration studies in which {sup 125}I-Apo-TF coeluted with the plasma lipoprotein in the void volume of a Superose 6 column in the presence and absence of calcium ions. In addition, void-volume Apo-TF-lipoprotein fractions exhibited tissue factor activity. These results suggest that the factor VIII-bypassing activity of bovine Apo-TF observed in a canine hemophilic model may be due, in part, to its association with plasma lipoproteins and expression of functional tissue factor activity.

  17. Induction kinetics and cell surface distribution of Escherichia coli lipoprotein under lac promoter control.

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, H; de Hoop, M J; Inouye, M; Witholt, B

    1986-01-01

    The induction kinetics and surface accessibility of the outer membrane lipoprotein were studied in an Escherichia coli strain with the lpp gene under control of the lac promoter. Free lipoprotein appeared rapidly after induction with isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside and reached a steady-state level after 30 min. The newly induced lipoprotein was slowly bound to the peptidoglycan layer. Immunological methods were developed to detect lipoprotein accessible at the cell surface after various pretreatments as well as peptidoglycan-bound lipoprotein at the surface of isolated peptidoglycan sacculi with specific antibodies in combination with 125I-protein A. With these methods an increase in lipoprotein molecules at the cell surface and bound to the peptidoglycan sacculus could be detected following induction. The topology of newly synthesized lipoprotein was examined in thin sections as well as at the cell surface and the surface of the peptidoglycan sacculus with immunoelectron microscopy. Ultrathin cell sections, whole cells, and isolated peptidoglycan sacculi showed lipoprotein distributed homogeneously over the entire surface. Images PMID:3531164

  18. Human very low density lipoproteins and chylomicrons can protect against endotoxin-induced death in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, H W; Grunfeld, C; Feingold, K R; Rapp, J H

    1990-01-01

    Endotoxemia stimulates many physiologic responses including disturbances in lipid metabolism. We hypothesized that this lipemia may be part of a defensive mechanism by which the body combats the toxic effects of circulating endotoxin. We tested the effects of mixtures of endotoxin, lipoproteins, and lipoprotein-free plasma and determined the ability of varying concentrations of human very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and chylomicrons, as well as low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL), and of the synthetic lipid emulsion SOYACAL to prevent endotoxin-induced death in mice. This study demonstrates that the triglyceride-rich VLDL and chylomicrons, as well as cholesterol-rich LDL and HDL, and cholesterol-free SOYACAL can protect against endotoxin-induced death. Protection required small amounts of lipoprotein-free plasma, and depended on the incubation time and the concentration of lipoprotein lipid. Despite stringent techniques to prevent exogenous endotoxin contamination eight of ten duplicate VLDL preparations contained endotoxin (5,755 +/- 3,514 ng endotoxin/mg triglyceride, mean +/- SEM) making the isolation of endotoxin-free VLDL difficult. In contrast, simultaneous preparations of LDL and HDL were relatively free of endotoxin contamination (3 +/- 3 and 320 +/- 319 ng/mg total cholesterol, respectively), suggesting that the contamination of VLDL occurs in vivo and not during the isolation procedure. These observations suggest a possible role for increased triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the host's defense against endotoxemia and infection. Images PMID:2394827

  19. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density...

  1. Serum Lipoproteins Are Critical for Pulmonary Innate Defense against Staphylococcus aureus Quorum Sensing.

    PubMed

    Manifold-Wheeler, Brett C; Elmore, Bradley O; Triplett, Kathleen D; Castleman, Moriah J; Otto, Michael; Hall, Pamela R

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia has been extensively studied in the context of atherosclerosis, whereas the potential health consequences of the opposite extreme, hypolipidemia, remain largely uninvestigated. Circulating lipoproteins are essential carriers of insoluble lipid molecules and are increasingly recognized as innate immune effectors. Importantly, severe hypolipidemia, which may occur with trauma or critical illness, is clinically associated with bacterial pneumonia. To test the hypothesis that circulating lipoproteins are essential for optimal host innate defense in the lung, we used lipoprotein-deficient mice and a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia in which invasive infection requires virulence factor expression controlled by the accessory gene regulator (agr) operon. Activation of agr and subsequent virulence factor expression is inhibited by apolipoprotein B, the structural protein of low-density lipoprotein, which binds and sequesters the secreted agr-signaling peptide (AIP). In this article, we report that lipoprotein deficiency impairs early pulmonary innate defense against S. aureus quorum-sensing-dependent pathogenesis. Specifically, apolipoprotein B levels in the lung early postinfection are significantly reduced with lipoprotein deficiency, coinciding with impaired host control of S. aureus agr-signaling and increased agr-dependent morbidity (weight loss) and inflammation. Given that lipoproteins also inhibit LTA- and LPS-mediated inflammation, these results suggest that hypolipidemia may broadly impact posttrauma pneumonia susceptibility to both Gram-positive and -negative pathogens. Together with previous reports demonstrating that hyperlipidemia also impairs lung innate defense, these results suggest that maintenance of normal serum lipoprotein levels is necessary for optimal host innate defense in the lung.

  2. Drug delivery via lipoprotein-based carriers: answering the challenges in systemic therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sabnis, Nirupama; Lacko, Andras G

    2012-05-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are transporters of lipids and other hydrophobic molecules in the mammalian circulation. Lipoproteins also have a strong potential to serve as drug-delivery vehicles due to their small size, long residence time in the circulation and high-drug payload. Consequently, lipoproteins and synthetic/reconstituted lipoprotein preparations have been evaluated with increasing interest towards clinical applications, particularly for cancer diagnostics/imaging and chemotherapy. In this review, past and current studies on lipoproteins and similar alternative drug carriers are discussed regarding their suitability as agents to deliver drugs, primarily to cancer cells and tumors. A lipoprotein-based delivery strategy may also provide a novel platform for improving the therapeutic efficacy of drugs that have previously been judged unsuitable or had only limited application due to poor solubility. An additional, and perhaps the most important aspect of the drug-delivery process via lipoprotein-type carriers, is the receptor-mediated uptake of the payload from the lipoprotein complex. Monitoring the expression of specific receptors prior to treatment could, thus, give rise to efficient selection of optimally responsive patients, resulting in a successful personalized therapy regimen.

  3. Effects of Anabolic Steroids on Lipoprotein Profiles of Female Weight Lifters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffatt, Robert J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the effects of resistance exercise and anabolic steroids on lipoprotein profiles of female weightlifters. The study found that women who participate in resistance training have better lipoprotein profiles than their sedentary counterparts, but these changes do not offset the deleterious effects of steroid use. (SM)

  4. Isolation of lipoprotein (a) using the regenerate of a dextran sulfate cellulose LDL apheresis system.

    PubMed

    Gross, E; März, W; Siekmeier, R; Scharrer, I; Gross, W

    1994-04-01

    A simple method for the preparation of lipoprotein (a) is presented. The procedure uses the eluate of an LDL apheresis system operating on the basis of LDL adsorbing dextran sulfate cellulose. The eluate is concentrated by tangential flow membrane filtration and subjected to ultracentrifugation, first at a density of 1.125 kg/liter and then at 1.050 kg/liter. The crude lipoprotein (a)-containing fraction is chromatographed on agarose (Bio-Gel A-15m) to remove contaminating low-density and high-density lipoproteins. As demonstrated by immunoelectrophoresis with intermediate gel, the method provides lipoprotein (a) completely free of LDL. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that apolipoprotein E was associated with purified lipoprotein (a). On agarose gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis, lipoprotein (a) prepared by the proposed method cannot be distinguished from native lipoprotein (a). The major advantage of the procedure is that it allows the isolation of large amounts of lipoprotein (a) from a single donor.

  5. Fitness, Heart Disease, and High-Density Lipoproteins: A Look at the Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCunney, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    The role of fitness in preventing coronary heart disease is explored. Research on high-density lipoprotein, which has been found to be one of the most critical determinants of risk, is reviewed. The relationship between fitness, high-density lipoprotein, and coronary heart disease is assessed, and clinical implications are spelled out. (MT)

  6. Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Show Altered Lipoprotein Profiles with Dysfunctional High-Density Lipoproteins that Can Exacerbate Inflammatory and Atherogenic Process

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Eun-Young; Park, Jin Kyun; Song, Yeong Wook; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective In order to identify putative biomarkers in lipoprotein, we compared lipid and lipoprotein properties between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and control with similar age. Methods We analyzed four classes of lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL, HDL2, HDL3) from both male (n = 8, 69±4 year-old) and female (n = 25, 53±7 year-old) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as well as controls with similar age (n = 13). Results Although RA group showed normal levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and glucose, however, the RA group showed significantly reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-C level and ratio of HDL-C/TC. The RA group showed significantly elevated levels of blood triglyceride (TG), uric acid, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity. The RA group also showed elevated levels of advanced glycated end (AGE) products in all lipoproteins and severe aggregation of apoA-I in HDL. As CETP activity and TG contents were 2-fold increased in HDL from RA group, paraoxonase activity was reduced upto 20%. Electron microscopy revealed that RA group showed much less HDL2 particle number than control. LDL from the RA group was severely oxidized and glycated with greater fragmentation of apo-B, especially in female group, it was more atherogenic via phagocytosis. Conclusion Lipoproteins from the RA patients showed severely altered structure with impaired functionality, which is very similar to that observed in coronary heart patients. These dysfunctional properties in lipoproteins from the RA patients might be associated with high incidence of cardiovascular events in RA patients. PMID:27736980

  7. [Magnetic Magnesium Isotope Accelerates ATP Hydrolysis Catalyzed by Myosin].

    PubMed

    Koltover, V K; Labyntseva, R D; Karandashev, V K; Kosterin, S O

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of experimental studies on the influence of different magnesium isotopes, the magnetic 25Mg and nonmagnetic 24Mg and 26Mg on ATP activity of the isolated myosin subfragment-1. The reaction rate in the presence of magetic 25Mg isotope turned out to be 2.0-2.5 times higher than that using nonmagnetic 24Mg and 2 Mg isotopes. No magnetic isotope effect was observed in the absence of the enzyme as in spontaneous ATP hydrolysis in aqueous solution. Hence, a significant catalytic effect of the magnetic 25Mg isotope (nuclear spin catalysis) was observed in the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP.

  8. Enzymatic hydrolysis of ammonia-treated sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Foster, B L; Dale, B E; Doran-Peterson, J B

    2001-01-01

    Sugar beet pulp is a carbohydrate-rich coproduct generated by the table sugar industry. Beet pulp has shown promise as a feedstock for ethanol production using enzymes to hydrolyze polymeric carbohydrates and engineered bacteria to ferment sugars to ethanol. In this study, sugar beet pulp underwent an ammonia pressurization depressurization (APD) pretreatment in which the pulp was exploded by the sudden evaporation of ammonia in a reactor vessel. APD was found to substantially increase hydrolysis efficiency of the cellulose component, but when hemicellulose- and pectin-degrading enzymes were added, treated pulp hydrolysis was no better than the untreated control.

  9. Benzene/nitrous oxide flammability in the precipitate hydrolysis process

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R A

    1989-09-18

    The HAN (hydroxylamine nitrate) process for destruction of nitrite in precipitate hydrolysis produces nitrous oxide (N2O) gas as one of the products. N2O can form flammable mixtures with benzene which is also present due to radiolysis and hydrolysis of tetraphenylborate. Extensive flame modeling and explosion testing was undertaken to define the minimum oxidant for combustion of N2O/benzene using both nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents. The attached memorandum interprets and documents the results of the studies.

  10. Hydrolysis of xylan by an immobilized xylanase from Aureobasidium pullulans

    SciTech Connect

    Allenza, P.; Scherl, D.S.; Detroy, R.W.; Leathers, T.D.; Scott, C.D. .

    1986-01-01

    The beta-(1,4)-linked xylose residues that comprise the backbone of the abundant plant polymer xylan can be released by enzymic hydrolysis. Xylanase, which is produced in exceptionally high levels by the color-variant strain Y-2311-1 of A. pullulans, was immobilized onto a macroporous ceramic carrier. Despite a low coupling efficiency, it was possible to run the reactor under a wide range of conditions with flow rates of 3-10 bed volumes/minute of 1% soluble xylan with no detectable leaching of enzyme. The size distribution of products and rate of xylan hydrolysis were very similar for the immobilized and soluble enzymes. (Refs. 13).

  11. Hydrolysis of xylan by an immobilized xylanase from Aureobasidium pullanans

    SciTech Connect

    Allenza, P.; Scherl, D.S.; Detroy, R.W.; Leathers, T.D.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The beta-(1,4)-linked xylose residues that comprise the backbone of the abundant plant polymer xylan can be released by enzymic hydrolysis. Xylanase, which is produced in exceptionally high levels by the color-variant strain of A. pullulans, was immobilized onto a macroporous ceramic carrier. Despite a low coupling efficiency, it was possible to run the reactor under a wide range of conditions with flow rates of 3-10 bed volumes/minute of 1% soluble xylan with no detectable leaching of enzyme. The size distribution of products and rate of xylan hydrolysis were very similar for the immobilized and soluble enzymes. (Refs. 13).

  12. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on the oxylipin composition of lipoproteins in hypertriglyceridemic, statin-treated subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Oxylipins mediate many physiological processes, including inflammation and vascular function. Generally considered local and transient, we suggest their presence in lipoproteins indicates they also mediate the effects lipoproteins have on inflammation and vascular biology. To support th...

  13. A case of type 2 diabetes and metastatic liver cancer exhibiting hypercholesterolemia with abnormal lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Motoko; Wada, Jun; Nakatsuka, Atsuko; Teshigawara, Sanae; Murakami, Kazutoshi; Inoue, Kentaro; Terami, Takahiro; Katayama, Akihiro; Nasu, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Makino, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    Although the appearance of abnormal lipoproteins in liver diseases is well known, the precise analyses of abnormal lipoproteins remain elusive. Here, we report a 71-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes whose serum cholesterol levels were elevated to 560 mg/dL over a 4-month period. High-performance liquid chromatography demonstrated the presence of lipoprotein-X and lipoprotein-Y and sigmoid colon cancer and multiple liver metastases were found by colonoscopy and computed tomography. Remission of the primary colon cancer and liver lesions was achieved by chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and fluorouracil and her serum cholesterol went back to basal levels associated with the disappearance of abnormal lipoproteins.

  14. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging and quantification of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Oliver T.; Ittrich, Harald; Peldschus, Kersten; Kaul, Michael G.; Tromsdorf, Ulrich I.; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Nikolic, Marija S.; Mollwitz, Birgit; Merkel, Martin; Bigall, Nadja C.; Sapra, Sameer; Reimer, Rudolph; Hohenberg, Heinz; Weller, Horst; Eychmüller, Alexander; Adam, Gerhard; Beisiegel, Ulrike; Heeren, Joerg

    2009-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals have physical properties that are well suited for biomedical imaging. Previously, we have shown that iron oxide nanocrystals embedded within the lipid core of micelles show optimized characteristics for quantitative imaging. Here, we embed quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of lipoproteins-micelles that transport lipids and other hydrophobic substances in the blood-and show that it is possible to image and quantify the kinetics of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using fluorescence and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. The lipoproteins were taken up by liver cells in wild-type mice and displayed defective clearance in knock-out mice lacking a lipoprotein receptor or its ligand, indicating that the nanocrystals did not influence the specificity of the metabolic process. Using this strategy it is possible to study the clearance of lipoproteins in metabolic disorders and to improve the contrast in clinical imaging.

  15. Effect of a new herbo-mineral hypolipidemic agent on plasma lipoprotein pattern in rat atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tarvady, S; Dhar, S C

    1990-07-01

    Hyperlipidemia was induced in rats by feeding an atherogenic diet for 5 months. The effect of administration of an indigenous hypolipidemic agent, Anna Kaara Raaja Sindhooram (AKRS) on the plasma lipoprotein profile was studied in the presence and absence of dietary lipid stimuli. Hyperlipidemia produced an enormous increase in the cholesterol and triglyceride contents of the low density (LDL) and very low density (VLDL) lipoprotein fractions and reduced the level of the putative non-atherogenic high density cholesterol (HDL-C). The agarose gel electrophoretic pattern showed a decrease in alpha-lipoproteins and an increase in beta-lipoproteins in the hyperlipidemic rats. AKRS treatment for 5 months altered the lipoprotein pattern favourably by raising HDL-C and lowering LDL-C in the treated rats. PMID:2272653

  16. Reliability of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B measurement.

    PubMed

    Contois, John H; Warnick, G Russell; Sniderman, Allan D

    2011-01-01

    There is little understanding of the reliability of laboratory measurements among clinicians. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) measurement is the cornerstone of cardiovascular risk assessment and prevention, but it is fraught with error. Therefore, we have reviewed issues related to accuracy and precision for the measurement of LDL-C and the related markers non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and apolipoprotein B. Despite the widespread belief that LDL-C is standardized and reproducible, available data suggest that results can vary significantly as the result of methods from different manufacturers. Similar problems with direct HDL-C assays raise concerns about the reliability of non-HDL-C measurement. The root cause of method-specific bias relates to the ambiguity in the definition of both LDL and HDL, and the heterogeneity of LDL and HDL particle size and composition. Apolipoprotein B appears to provide a more reliable alternative, but assays for it have not been as rigorously tested as direct LDL-C and HDL-C assays.

  17. 99mTc-low density lipoprotein: intracellularly trapped radiotracer for noninvasive imaging of low density lipoprotein metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, S; Goldsmith, S J

    1990-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is the major transport protein for endogenous cholesterol in human plasma. LDL can be radiolabeled with 99mTc using sodium dithionite as a reducing agent. Biodistribution studies of 99mTc-LDL in normal rabbits confirm that 99mTc-LDL acts as an intracellularly "trapped ligand" similar to radioiodinated tyramine cellobiose-LDL (the previously validated trapped radioligand). In addition, studies performed in hypercholesterolemic rabbit models demonstrated the feasibility of imaging hepatic LDL-receptor concentration noninvasively. 99mTc-LDL imaging studies in a number of hypercholesterolemic and hypocholesterolemic patients have proven useful in understanding the abnormal uptake and metabolism of LDL. In patients with hypercholesterolemia (HC), 99mTc-LDL appears to be taken up well by the actively evolving atherosclerotic lesions and xanthomata that contained foam cells and macrophages. In patients with myeloproliferative disease and chronic hypocholesterolemia, 99mTc-LDL images showed intense accumulation of radioactivity in the spleen and bone marrow; this demonstrated extensive proliferation of the macrophage population suggesting that hypocholesterolemia in these patients may be due to increased uptake of LDL uptake by the macrophages. 99mTc-LDL is a powerful tool for the noninvasive exploration of a variety of disorders of lipoprotein metabolism in patients.

  18. Effect of protamine on lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hultin, M; Olivecrona, G; Olivecrona, T

    1994-01-01

    The polycation protamine impedes the catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and this has been suggested to be due to intravascular inactivation of lipoprotein lipase. We have made intravenous injections of protamine to rats and found that both lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase activities were released to plasma. The effect of protamine was more short-lived than that obtained by injection of heparin. The release of hepatic lipase by protamine was as effective as the release by heparin, while the amount of lipoprotein lipase released by protamine was only about one-tenth of that released by heparin. This was not due to inactivation of lipoprotein lipase, since injection of an excess of heparin 10 min after injection of protamine released as much lipoprotein lipase activity to plasma as in controls. The results in vivo differed from those obtained in model experiments in vitro. Protamine was able to almost quantitatively release both lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase from columns of heparin-agarose. The displacement was dependent on the total amount of protamine that had passed over the column, indicating that it was due to occupation by protamine of all available binding sites. Our results in vivo showed that the binding sites for lipoprotein lipase were not blocked as efficiently as those for hepatic lipase, indicating that the binding structures were not identical. It was concluded that the impaired turnover of lipoproteins by protamine probably was due to prevention of binding of the lipoproteins to endothelial cell surfaces rather than to impaired lipase function. PMID:7818503

  19. Size of lipoproteins in intestinal lympho of sheep and suckling lambs.

    PubMed

    Gooden, J M; Fraser, R; Bosanquet, A G; Bickerstaffe, R

    1979-12-01

    The relative importance of chylomicrons (Sf greater than 400) and very low density lipoproteins (Sf 20--400) in transporting lipids in lymph was investigated in surgically prepared adult sheep and pre-ruminant lambs fed low fat diets or infused intraduodenally with corn oil. The concentration of triacylglycerol in the intestinal lymph of sheep and lambs was increased from 520 and 925 mg/100 ml to 2326 and 2367 mg/100 ml respectively when corn oil was infused into the duodenum and the ratio of triacylglycerol to phospholipid changed from 3.7 and 5.5 to 9.5 and 9.7 respectively. The flow of lymph also increased. Electron microscopy and analytical and preparative ultracentrifugation showed that lymph lipoproteins from sheep and lambs fed low fat diets consisted mainly of lipoproteins 50 nm in diameter and that very low density lipoproteins (Sf 20--400) contirbuted up to 75% of the Sf greater than 20 lipoproteins. There were no lipoproteins with diameters above 150 nm. Infusion of corn oil into the duodenum of sheep and lambs increased the diameters of lymph lipoproteins. Most were 80--100 nm in diameter but substantial numbers above 150 and up to 400 mn were observed. The maximum contribution of very low density lipoproteins (Sf 20--400) to lipoproteins of Sf greater than 20 was 27--30%. The above findings demonstrate that the size of intestinal lymph lipoprotein particles increases with the amount of lipid absorbed from the small intestines and that the transport of lymph lipids, in ruminants, is similar to that previously found in rats, rabbits and man.

  20. Genome-wide association study indicates variants associated with insulin signaling and inflammation mediate lipoprotein responses to fenofibrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A shift towards overall larger very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and smaller low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) diameters occurs in insulin resistance (IR), which reflects shifts in the distribution of the subfraction concentrations. Fenofibrate, indicated for hypertriglyc...

  1. Genetic risk scores associated with baseline lipoprotein subfraction concentrations do not associate with their responses to fenofibrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoprotein subclass concentrations are modifiable markers of cardiovascular disease risk. Fenofibrate is known to show beneficial effects on lipoprotein subclasses, but little is known about the role of genetics in mediating the responses of lipoprotein subclasses to fenofibrate. A recent genomewid...

  2. Effect of improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on low-density lipoprotein size, electronegative low-density lipoprotein and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 distribution.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quesada, José L; Vinagre, Irene; de Juan-Franco, Elena; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Pérez, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intensified hypoglycemic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on the distribution of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity between high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its relation with the lipid profile and other qualitative properties of LDL. Forty-two patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of poor glycemic control and normal or near normal LDL cholesterol were recruited. Lifestyle counseling and pharmacologic hypoglycemic therapy were intensified to improve glycemic control, but lipid-lowering therapy was unchanged. At 4 ± 2 months, glycosylated hemoglobin had decreased by a mean of 2.1%, but the only effect on the lipid profile were statistically significant decreases in nonesterified fatty acids and apolipoprotein B concentration. LDL size increased and the proportion of electronegative LDL decreased significantly. In parallel, total Lp-PLA2 activity decreased significantly, promoting a redistribution of Lp-PLA2 activity toward a higher proportion in high-density lipoprotein. Improvements in glycemic control led to more marked changes in Lp-PLA2 activity and distribution in patients with diabetes who had not received previous lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, optimizing glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes promotes atheroprotective changes, including larger LDL size, decreased electronegative LDL, and a higher proportion of Lp-PLA2 activity in high-density lipoprotein. PMID:22481012

  3. Results of the hydrolysis of fusinitic brown coals

    SciTech Connect

    Perednikova, Z.M.; Garstman, B.B.; Rakitina, E.V.; Rumyantseva, Z.A.

    1984-01-01

    The products of the alkaline hydrolysis of debituminized fusinitic brown coals have been separated into relatively homogeneous groups of substances with the aid of extraction, chromatography, and alkaline saponification. The group compositions of the substances isolated have been studied by IR spectroscopy.

  4. Small peptides hydrolysis in dry-cured meats.

    PubMed

    Mora, Leticia; Gallego, Marta; Escudero, Elizabeth; Reig, Milagro; Aristoy, M-Concepción; Toldrá, Fidel

    2015-11-01

    Large amounts of different peptides are naturally generated in dry-cured meats as a consequence of the intense proteolysis mechanisms which take place during their processing. In fact, meat proteins are extensively hydrolysed by muscle endo-peptidases (mainly calpains and cathepsins) followed by exo-peptidases (mainly, tri- and di-peptidyl peptidases, dipeptidases, aminopeptidases and carboxypeptidases). The result is a large amount of released free amino acids and a pool of numerous peptides with different sequences and lengths, some of them with interesting sequences for bioactivity. This manuscript is presenting the proteomic identification of small peptides resulting from the hydrolysis of four target proteins (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, beta-enolase, myozenin-1 and troponin T) and discusses the enzymatic routes for their generation during the dry-curing process. The results indicate that the hydrolysis of peptides follows similar exo-peptidase mechanisms. In the case of dry-fermented sausages, most of the observed hydrolysis is the result of the combined action of muscle and microbial exo-peptidases except for the hydrolysis of di- and tri-peptides, mostly due to microbial di- and tri-peptidases, and the release of amino acids at the C-terminal that appears to be mostly due to muscle carboxypeptidases.

  5. Effects of hydrolysis and carbonization reactions on hydrochar production.

    PubMed

    Fakkaew, K; Koottatep, T; Polprasert, C

    2015-09-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a thermal conversion process which converts wet biomass into hydrochar. In this study, a low-energy HTC process named "Two-stage HTC" comprising of hydrolysis and carbonization stages using faecal sludge as feedstock was developed and optimized. The experimental results indicated the optimum conditions of the two-stage HTC to be; hydrolysis temperature of 170 °C, hydrolysis reaction time of 155 min, carbonization temperature of 215 °C, and carbonization reaction time of 100 min. The hydrolysis reaction time and carbonization temperature had a statistically significant effect on energy content of the produced hydrochar. Energy input of the two-stage HTC was about 25% less than conventional HTC. Energy efficiency of the two-stage HTC for treating faecal sludge was higher than that of conventional HTC and other thermal conversion processes such as pyrolysis and gasification. The two-stage HTC could be considered as a potential technology for treating FS and producing hydrochar.

  6. Bioabatement with xylanase supplementation to reduce enzymatic hydrolysis inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioabatement, using the fungus Coniochaeta ligniaria NRRL30616 can effectively eliminate enzyme inhibitors from pretreated biomass hydrolysis. However, our recent research suggested that bioabatement had no beneficial effect on removing xylo-oligomers which were identified as strong inhibitors to ce...

  7. Designer xylanosomes: protein nanostructures for enhanced xylan hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work is the first report of the successful design, construction, and application of multi-functional, self-assembling biocatalysts for targeted xylan hydrolysis, termed xylanosomes. Using the architecture of cellulosomes found in some anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, four different xylanosomes...

  8. Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Keller, Fred A.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2003-12-09

    A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

  9. Validation of lignocellulosic biomass carbohydrates determination via acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengfei; Runge, Troy M

    2014-11-01

    This work studied the two-step acid hydrolysis for determining carbohydrates in lignocellulosic biomass. Estimation of sugar loss based on acid hydrolyzed sugar standards or analysis of sugar derivatives was investigated. Four model substrates (starch, holocellulose, filter paper and cotton) and three levels of acid/material ratios (7.8, 10.3 and 15.4, v/w) were studied to demonstrate the range of test artifacts. The method for carbohydrates estimation based on acid hydrolyzed sugar standards having the most satisfactory carbohydrate recovery and relative standard deviation. Raw material and the acid/material ratio both had significant effect on carbohydrate hydrolysis, suggesting the acid to have impacts beyond a catalyst in the hydrolysis. Following optimal procedures, we were able to reach a carbohydrate recovery of 96% with a relative standard deviation less than 3%. The carbohydrates recovery lower than 100% was likely due to the incomplete hydrolysis of substrates, which was supported by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images.

  10. The Preparation and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Library of Esters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Elizabeth M.; Smith, Traci L.

    2008-01-01

    An investigative case study involving the preparation of a library of esters using Fischer esterification and alcoholysis of acid chlorides and their subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis by pig liver esterase and orange peel esterase is described. Students work collaboratively to prepare and characterize the library of esters and complete and evaluate…

  11. Radioactive demonstration of the ``late wash`` Precipitate Hydrolysis Process

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.; Ferrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.

    1992-06-30

    This report presents results of the radioactive demonstration of the DWPF Precipitate Hydrolysis Process as it would occur in the ``late wash`` flowsheet in the absence of hydroxylamine nitrate. Radioactive precipitate containing Cs-137 from the April, 1983, in-tank precipitation demonstration in Tank 48 was used for these tests.

  12. Radioactive demonstration of the late wash'' Precipitate Hydrolysis Process

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.; Ferrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.

    1992-06-30

    This report presents results of the radioactive demonstration of the DWPF Precipitate Hydrolysis Process as it would occur in the late wash'' flowsheet in the absence of hydroxylamine nitrate. Radioactive precipitate containing Cs-137 from the April, 1983, in-tank precipitation demonstration in Tank 48 was used for these tests.

  13. Acid hydrolysis of Jerusalem artichoke for ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    An excellent substrate for ethanol production is the Jerusalem artichoke (JA) tuber (Helianthus tuberosus). This crop contains a high level of inulin that can be hydrolyzed mainly to D-fructose and has several distinct advantages as an energy source compared to others. The potential ethanol yield of ca. 4678 L/ha on good agricultural land is equivalent to that obtained from sugar beets and twice that of corn. When JA is to be used for ethanol fermentation by conventional yeast, it is first converted to fermentable sugars by enzymes or acids although various strains of yeast were used for the direct fermentation of JA extracts. Fleming and GrootWassink compared various acids (hydrochloric, sulfuric, citric, and phosphoric) and strong cation exchange resin for their effectiveness on inulin hydrolysis and reported that no differences were noted among the acids or resin in their influence on inulin hydrolysis. Undesirable side reactions were noted during acid hydrolysis leading to the formation of HMF and 2-(2-hydroxy acetyl) furan. The HMF at a level of 0.1% is known to inhibit growth and ethanol fermentation by yeast. In this study the authors established optimal conditions for complete acid-hydrolysis of JA with minimum side reactions and maximum sugar-ethanol production. A material balance for the ethanol production was also determined.

  14. DFT STUDY OF THE HYDROLYSIS OF SOME S-TRIAZINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of atrazine and related 2-chloro-s-triazines to the corresponding 2-hydroxy-s-triazines was investigated using the B3LYP hybrid density functional theory method. Gas-phase calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G* level of ...

  15. Penicillin Hydrolysis: A Kinetic Study of a Multistep, Multiproduct Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarrick, Thomas A.; McLafferty, Fred W.

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures used, and typical results are provided for an experiment in which students carry out the necessary measurements on the acid-catalysis of penicillin in two hours. By applying kinetic theory to the data obtained, the reaction pathways for the hydrolysis of potassium benzyl penicillin are elucidated. (JN)

  16. Exploring potassium-dependent GTP hydrolysis in TEES family GTPases.

    PubMed

    Rafay, Abu; Majumdar, Soneya; Prakash, Balaji

    2012-01-01

    GTPases are important regulatory proteins that hydrolyze GTP to GDP. A novel GTP-hydrolysis mechanism is employed by MnmE, YqeH and FeoB, where a potassium ion plays a role analogous to the Arginine finger of the Ras-RasGAP system, to accelerate otherwise slow GTP hydrolysis rates. In these proteins, two conserved asparagines and a 'K-loop' present in switch-I, were suggested as attributes of GTPases employing a K(+)-mediated mechanism. Based on their conservation, a similar mechanism was suggested for TEES family GTPases. Recently, in Dynamin, Fzo1 and RbgA, which also conserve these attributes, a similar mechanism was shown to be operative. Here, we probe K(+)-activated GTP hydrolysis in TEES (TrmE-Era-EngA-YihA-Septin) GTPases - Era, EngB and the two contiguous G-domains, GD1 and GD2 of YphC (EngA homologue) - and also in HflX, another GTPase that also conserves the same attributes. While GD1-YphC and Era exhibit a K(+)-mediated activation of GTP hydrolysis, surprisingly GD2-YphC, EngB and HflX do not. Therefore, the attributes identified thus far, do not necessarily predict a K(+)-mechanism in GTPases and hence warrant extensive structural investigations. PMID:23650596

  17. Destruction of waste energetic materials using base hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Benziger, T.M.; Buntain, G.A.; Sanchez, J.A.; Spontarelli, T.

    1993-01-01

    In dismantling weapons from stockpile reduction, environmentally acceptable degradation of the associated high explosive (HE) waste to non-energetic forms is a critical objective. Base hydrolysis appears to be a simple, inexpensive method for converting propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics (PEPS) into non-energetic materials that can be released directly or, if necessary, treated further. We have demonstrated that many PEPs can be hydrolyzed with aqueous sodium hydroxide or ammonia at temperatures ranging from 60 to 150[degree]C. Hydrolysis experiments have been performed on pure compounds as well as DOE and DoD formulations, such as plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) 9404, tritonal, and rocket motor propellant. Small particle size of the energetic material is desirable, but not necessary. We have decomposed molding powder, pressed charges up to two pounds in weight, and partially exposed, metal-encased pieces. The products formed are dependent on the starting material composition, but usually consist of organic and inorganic salts, e.g., sodium formate, acetate, nitrite and nitrate. The major gaseous product from the base hydrolysis of PEPs is nitrous oxide. The time required for complete destruction varies with the material being hydrolyzed, and is dependent on solubility and mass transfer. Hydrolysis rates can be increased by particle size reduction, efficient stirring, and addition of organic solvent to the alkaline solution. Rate enhancement by ultrasonic agitation is a possibility that we have just begun to study.

  18. Release of bound procyanidins from cranberry pomace by alkaline hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Procyanidins in plant products are present as extractable or unextractable/bound forms. We optimized alkaline hydrolysis conditions to liberate bound procyanidins from dried cranberry pomace. Five mL of sodium hydroxide (2, 4, or 6N) was added to 0.5 g of cranberry pomace in screw top glass tubes,...

  19. Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

  20. Solvent effects and alkali metal ion catalysis in phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Tagle, Paola; Vargas-Zúñiga, Idania; Taran, Olga; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2006-12-22

    The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) have been studied in aqueous DMSO, dioxane, and MeCN. In all solvent mixtures the reaction rate steadily decreases to half of its value in pure water in the range of 0-70 vol % of organic cosolvent and sharply increases in mixtures with lower water content. Correlations based on different scales of solvent empirical parameters failed to describe the solvent effect in this system, but it can be satisfactorily treated in terms of a simplified stepwise solvent-exchange model. Alkali metal ions catalyze the BNPP hydrolysis but do not affect the rate of hydrolysis of neutral phosphotriester p-nitrophenyl diphenyl phosphate in DMSO-rich mixtures. The catalytic activity decreases in the order Li+ > Na+ > K+ > Rb+ > Cs+. For all cations except Na+, the reaction rate is first-order in metal ion. With Na+, both first- and second-order kinetics in metal ions are observed. Binding constants of cations to the dianionic transition state of BNPP alkaline hydrolysis are of the same order of magnitude and show a similar trend as their binding constants to p-nitrophenyl phosphate dianion employed as a transition-state model. The appearance of alkali metal ion catalysis in a medium, which solvates metal ions stronger than water, is attributed to the increased affinity of cations to dianions, which undergo a strong destabilization in the presence of an aprotic dipolar cosolvent.

  1. Acid hydrolysis of sweet potato for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were conducted to establish optimal conditions for the acid hydrolysis of sweet potato for maximal ethanol yield. The starch contents of two sweet potato cultivars (Georgia Red and TG-4), based on fresh weight, were 21.1 +/- 0.6% and 27.5 +/- 1.6%, respectively. The results of acid hydrolysis experiments showed the following: (1) both hydrolysis rate and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) concentration were a function of HCL concentration, temperature, and time; (2) the reducing sugars were rapidly formed with elevated concentrations of HCl and temperature, but also destroyed quickly; and (3) HMF concentration increased significantly with the concentration of HCl, temperature, and hydrolysis time. Maximum reducing sugar value of 84.2 DE and 0.056% HMF (based on wet weight) was achieved after heating 8% SPS for 15 min in 1N HCl at 110/sup 0/C. Degraded 8% SPS (1N HCl, 97/sup 0/C for 20 min or 110/sup 0/C for 10 min) was utilized as substrate for ethanol fermentation and 3.8% ethanol (v/v) was produced from 1400 mL fermented wort. This is equal to 41.6 g ethanol (200 proof) from 400 g of fresh sweet potato tuber (Georgia Red) or an ethanol yield potential of 431 gal of 200-proof ethanol/acre (from 500 bushel tubers/acre).

  2. Evaluation of Cation Hydrolysis Schemes with a Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clare, Brian W.

    1979-01-01

    Described is the use of two models of pocket calculators. The Hewlett-Packard HP67 and the Texas Instruments TI59, to solve problems arising in connection with ionic equilibria in solution. A three-parameter regression program is described and listed as a specific example, the hydrolysis of hexavalent uranium, is provided. (BT)

  3. Structural modifications of lignocellulosics by pretreatments to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gharpuray, M.M.; Lee, Y.F.; Fan, L.T.

    1983-01-01

    In this work an evaluation was made of a wide variety of single and multiple pretreatment methods for enhancing the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw. A multiple pretreatment consisted of a physical pretreatment followed by a chemical pretreatment. The structural features of wheat straw, including the specific surface area, crystallinity index, and lignin content, were measured to understand the mechanism of the enhancement in the hyrolysis rate upon pretreatment. It has been found that, in general, multiple pretreatments were not promising, since the hydrolysis rates rarely exceeded those achieved by single pretreatments. Ball-milling pretreatment was found to be effective in increasing the specific surface area and decreasing the crystallinity index. Treatment with ethylene glycol was highly effective in increasing the specific surface area, in addition to a high degree of delignification. Peracetic acid pretreatment was highly effective in delignifying substrate. Among multiple pretreatments, those involving peracetic acid treatment generally had lower crystallinity indices and lignin content values. The relationship between the hydrolysis rate and the set of structural features indicated that an increase in surface area and a decrease in the crystallinity and lignin content enhance the hydrolysis; the specific surface area is the most influential of the structural features, followed by the lignin content. (Refs. 23).

  4. Effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particle size reduction is a crucial factor in transportation logistics as well as cellulosic conversion. The effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus x giganteus was determined. Miscanthus was ground using a hammer mill equipped with screens having 0.08, 2.0 or 6.0...

  5. Effects of hydrolysis and carbonization reactions on hydrochar production.

    PubMed

    Fakkaew, K; Koottatep, T; Polprasert, C

    2015-09-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a thermal conversion process which converts wet biomass into hydrochar. In this study, a low-energy HTC process named "Two-stage HTC" comprising of hydrolysis and carbonization stages using faecal sludge as feedstock was developed and optimized. The experimental results indicated the optimum conditions of the two-stage HTC to be; hydrolysis temperature of 170 °C, hydrolysis reaction time of 155 min, carbonization temperature of 215 °C, and carbonization reaction time of 100 min. The hydrolysis reaction time and carbonization temperature had a statistically significant effect on energy content of the produced hydrochar. Energy input of the two-stage HTC was about 25% less than conventional HTC. Energy efficiency of the two-stage HTC for treating faecal sludge was higher than that of conventional HTC and other thermal conversion processes such as pyrolysis and gasification. The two-stage HTC could be considered as a potential technology for treating FS and producing hydrochar. PMID:26051497

  6. A saposin-lipoprotein nanoparticle system for membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Frauenfeld, Jens; Löving, Robin; Armache, Jean-Paul; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Guettou, Fatma; Moberg, Per; Zhu, Lin; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Flayhan, Ali; Briggs, John A G; Garoff, Henrik; Löw, Christian; Cheng, Yifan; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-04-01

    A limiting factor in membrane protein research is the ability to solubilize and stabilize such proteins. Detergents are used most often for solubilizing membrane proteins, but they are associated with protein instability and poor compatibility with structural and biophysical studies. Here we present a saposin-lipoprotein nanoparticle system, Salipro, which allows for the reconstitution of membrane proteins in a lipid environment that is stabilized by a scaffold of saposin proteins. We demonstrate the applicability of the method on two purified membrane protein complexes as well as by the direct solubilization and nanoparticle incorporation of a viral membrane protein complex from the virus membrane. Our approach facilitated high-resolution structural studies of the bacterial peptide transporter PeptTSo2 by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and allowed us to stabilize the HIV envelope glycoprotein in a functional state.

  7. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  8. Distribution of High-Density Lipoprotein Subfractions and Hypertensive Status

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha; Xu, Rui-Xia; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Gao, Ying; Dong, Qian; Liu, Geng; Sun, Jing; Li, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The exact mechanisms of hypertension contributing to atherosclerosis have not been fully elucidated. Although multiple studies have clarified the association with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions, uncertainty remains about its relationship with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subfractions. Therefore, we aimed to comprehensively determine the relationship between distribution of HDL subfractions and hypertensive status. A total of 953 consecutive subjects without previous lipid-lowering drug treatment were enrolled and were categorized based on hypertension history (with hypertension [n = 550] or without hypertension [n = 403]). Baseline clinical and laboratory data were collected. HDL separation was performed using the Lipoprint System. Plasma large HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and large HDL percentage were dramatically lower whereas the small HDL-C and small HDL percentage were higher in patients with hypertension (all P < 0.05). The antihypertensive drug therapy was not associated with large or small HDL subfractions (on treatment vs not on treatment, P > 0.05; combination vs single drug therapy, P > 0.05). However, the blood pressure well-controlled patients have significantly lower small HDL subfraction (P < 0.05). Moreover, large HDL-C and percentage were inversely whereas small HDL percentage was positively associated with incident hypertension after adjusting potential confounders (all P < 0.05). In the multivariate model conducted in patients with and without hypertension separately, the cardio-protective value of large HDL-C was disappeared in patients with hypertension (OR 95%CI: 1.011 [0.974–1.049]). The distribution of HDL subfractions is closely associated with hypertensive status and hypertension may potentially impact the cardio-protective value of large HDL subfraction. PMID:26512616

  9. Lipoprotein(a), cardiovascular disease, and contemporary management.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Terry A

    2013-11-01

    Elevated lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) is a causal genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To determine if current evidence supports both screening and treatment for elevated Lp(a) in high-risk patients, an English-language search of PubMed and MEDLINE was conducted. In population studies, there is a continuous association between Lp(a) concentrations and cardiovascular risk, with synergistic effects when low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is also elevated. Candidates for Lp(a) screening include patients with a personal or family history of premature cardiovascular disease, familial hypercholesterolemia, recurrent cardiovascular events, or inadequate LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) responses to statins. Given the comparative strength of clinical evidence, reducing LDL-C to the lowest attainable value with a high-potency statin should be the primary focus of lipid-modifying therapies. If the Lp(a) level is 30 mg/dL or higher in a patient who has the aforementioned characteristics plus residual LDL-C elevations (≥70-100 mg/dL) despite maximum-potency statins or combination statin therapy, the clinician may consider adding niacin (up to 2 g/d). If, after these interventions, the patient has progressive coronary heart disease (CHD) or LDL-C levels of 160-200 mg/dL or higher, LDL apheresis should be contemplated. Although Lp(a) is a major causal risk factor for CHD, no currently available controlled studies have suggested that lowering it through either pharmacotherapy or LDL apheresis specifically and significantly reduces coronary risk. Further research is needed to (1) optimize management in order to reduce CHD risk associated with elevated Lp(a) and (2) determine what other intermediate- or high-risk groups might benefit from Lp(a) screening.

  10. Proprotein convertases in high-density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seungbum; Korstanje, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexins (PCSKs) are a serine endopeptidase family. PCSK members cleave amino acid residues and modulate the activity of precursor proteins. Evidence from patients and animal models carrying genetic alterations in PCSK members show that PCSK members are involved in various metabolic processes. These studies further revealed the molecular mechanism by which genetic alteration of some PCSK members impairs normal molecular and physiological functions, which in turn lead to cardiovascular disease. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is anti-atherogenic as it removes excessive amount of cholesterol from blood and peripheral tissues. Several PCSK members are involved in HDL metabolism. PCSK3, PCSK5, and PCSK6 process two triglyceride lipase family members, endothelial lipase and lipoprotein lipase, which are important for HDL remodeling. Recent studies in our lab found evidence that PCSK1 and PCSK9 are also involved in HDL metabolism. A mouse model carrying an amino acid substitution in PCSK1 showed an increase in serum apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) level. Another mouse model lacking PCSK9 showed a decrease in APOE-containing HDL. In this review, we summarize the role of the five PCSK members in lipid, glucose, and bile acid (BA) metabolism, each of which can influence HDL metabolism. We propose an integrative model in which PCSK members regulate HDL metabolism through various molecular mechanisms and metabolic processes and genetic variation in some PCSK members may affect the efficiency of reverse cholesterol transport. PCSK members are considered as attractive therapeutic targets. A greater understanding of the molecular and physiological functions of PCSK members will improve therapeutic strategies and drug efficacy for cardiovascular disease where PCSK members play critical role, with fewer adverse effects. PMID:24252756

  11. Paraoxonase inhibits high-density lipoprotein oxidation and preserves its functions. A possible peroxidative role for paraoxonase.

    PubMed Central

    Aviram, M; Rosenblat, M; Bisgaier, C L; Newton, R S; Primo-Parmo, S L; La Du, B N

    1998-01-01

    HDL levels are inversely related to the risk of developing atherosclerosis. In serum, paraoxonase (PON) is associated with HDL, and was shown to inhibit LDL oxidation. Whether PON also protects HDL from oxidation is unknown, and was determined in the present study. In humans, we found serum HDL PON activity and HDL susceptibility to oxidation to be inversely correlated (r2 = 0.77, n = 15). Supplementing human HDL with purified PON inhibited copper-induced HDL oxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. Adding PON to HDL prolonged the oxidation lag phase and reduced HDL peroxide and aldehyde formation by up to 95%. This inhibitory effect was most pronounced when PON was added before oxidation initiation. When purified PON was added to whole serum, essentially all of it became HDL-associated. The PON-enriched HDL was more resistant to copper ion-induced oxidation than was control HDL. Compared with control HDL, HDL from PON-treated serum showed a 66% prolongation in the lag phase of its oxidation, and up to a 40% reduction in peroxide and aldehyde content. In contrast, in the presence of various PON inhibitors, HDL oxidation induced by either copper ions or by a free radical generating system was markedly enhanced. As PON inhibited HDL oxidation, two major functions of HDL were assessed: macrophage cholesterol efflux, and LDL protection from oxidation. Compared with oxidized untreated HDL, oxidized PON-treated HDL caused a 45% increase in cellular cholesterol efflux from J-774 A.1 macrophages. Both HDL-associated PON and purified PON were potent inhibitors of LDL oxidation. Searching for a possible mechanism for PON-induced inhibition of HDL oxidation revealed PON (2 paraoxonase U/ml)-mediated hydrolysis of lipid peroxides (by 19%) and of cholesteryl linoleate hydroperoxides (by 90%) in oxidized HDL. HDL-associated PON, as well as purified PON, were also able to substantially hydrolyze (up to 25%) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a major reactive oxygen species produced

  12. Generation of group B soyasaponins I and III by hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Teng, Su Ping; Popovich, David G

    2009-05-13

    Soyasaponins are a group of oleanane triterpenoids found in soy and other legumes that have been associated with some of the benefits achieved by consuming plant-based diets. However, these groups of compounds are diverse and structurally complicated to chemically characterize, separate from the isoflavones, and isolate in sufficient quantities for bioactive testing. Therefore, the aim of this study was to maximize the extraction of soyasaponins from soy flour, remove isoflavones, separate group B soyasaponins from group A, and produce an extract that contained a majority of non-DDMP (2,3-dihydro-2,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one)-conjugated group B soyasaponins I and III. Room temperature extraction in methanol for 24 or 48 h resulted in the maximum recovery of soyasaponins, and Soxhlet extraction resulted in the least. A solid-phase extraction using methanol (45%) was found to virtually eliminate the interfering isoflavones as compared to butanol-water liquid-liquid extraction and ammonium sulfate precipitation, while maximizing saponin recovery. Alkaline hydrolysis in anhydrous methanol produced the maximum amount of soyasaponins I and III as compared to aqueous methanol and acid hydrolysis in both aqueous and anhydrous methanol. The soyasaponin I amount was increased by 175%, and soyasaponin III was increased by 211% after alkaline hydrolysis. Furthermore, after alkaline hydrolysis, a majority of DDMP-conjugated group B soyasaponins such as betag, betaa, gammag, and gammaa transformed into the non-DDMP-conjugated soyasaponins I and III without affecting the glycosidic bond at position C-3 of the ring structure. Therefore, we have developed a method that maximizes the recovery of DDMP-conjugated saponins and uses alkaline hydrolysis to produce an extract containing mainly soyasaponins I and III. PMID:19338335

  13. Hydrolysis of thorium(iv) at variable temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, P L; Di Bernardo, P; Zhang, Z; Gong, Y; Tian, G; Gibson, J K; Rao, L

    2016-08-01

    Hydrolysis of Th(iv) was studied in tetraethylammonium perchlorate (0.10 mol kg(-1)) at variable temperatures (283-358 K) by potentiometry and microcalorimetry. Three hydrolysis reactions, mTh(4+) + nH2O = Thm(OH)n((4m-n)+) + nH(+), in which (n,m) = (2,2), (8,4), and (15,6), were invoked to describe the potentiometric and calorimetric data for solutions with the [hydroxide]/[Th(iv)] ratio ≤ 2. At higher ratios, the formation of (16,5) cannot be excluded. The hydrolysis constants, *β2,2, *β8,4, and *β15,6, increased by 3, 7, and 11 orders of magnitude, respectively, as the temperature was increased from 283 to 358 K. The enhancement is mainly due to the significant increase of the degree of ionization of water as the temperature rises. All three hydrolysis reactions are endothermic at 298 K, with enthalpies of (118 ± 4) kJ mol(-1), (236 ± 7) kJ mol(-1), and (554 ± 4) kJ mol(-1) for ΔH2,2, ΔH8,4, and ΔH15,6 respectively. The hydrolysis constants at infinite dilution have been obtained with the specific ion interaction approach. The applicability of three approaches for estimating the equilibrium constants at different temperatures, including the constant enthalpy approach, the constant heat capacity approach and the DQUANT equation was evaluated with the data from this work. PMID:27460458

  14. Lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of TG containing acetylenic FA.

    PubMed

    Jie, Marcel S F Lie Ken; Fua, Xun; Lau, Maureen M L; Chye, M L

    2002-10-01

    Hydrolysis of symmetrical acetylenic TG of type AAA [viz., glycerol tri-(4-decynoate), glycerol tri-(6-octadecynoate), glycerol tri-(9-octadecynoate), glycerol tri-(10-undecynoate), and glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate)] in the presence of eight microbial lipases was studied. Novozyme 435 (Candida antarctica), an efficient enzyme for esterification, showed a significant resistance in the hydrolysis of glycerol tri-(9-octadecynoate) and glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate). Hydrolysis of acetylenic TG with Lipolase 100T (Humicola lanuginosa) was rapidly accomplished. Lipase PS-D (Pseudomonas cepacia) showed a fair resistance toward the hydrolysis of glycerol tri-(6-octadecynoate) only, which reflected its ability to recognize the delta6 positional isomer of 18:1. Lipase CCL (Candida cylindracea, syn. C. rugosa) and AY-30 (C. rugosa) were able to catalyze the release of 10-undecynoic acid and 9-octadecynoic acid from the corresponding TG, but less readily the 13-docosynoic acid in the case of glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate). The two lipases CCL and AY-30 were able to distinguish the small difference in structure of fatty acyl moieties in the TG substrate. To confirm this trend, three regioisomers of mixed acetylenic TG of type ABC (containing one each of delta6, delta9, and delta13 acetylenic FA in various positions) were prepared and hydrolyzed with CCL and AY-40. The results reconfirmed the observation that AY-30 and CCL were able to distinguish the slight differences in the molecular structure (position of the acetylenic bond and chain length) of the acyl groups in the TG during the hydrolysis of such TG substrates.

  15. Non-ionic surfactants do not consistently improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of pure cellulose.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Chen, Hongmei; Qi, Feng; Zhao, Xuebing; Liu, Dehua

    2015-04-01

    Non-ionic surfactants have been frequently reported to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass and pure cellulose. However, how the hydrolysis condition, substrate structure and cellulase formulation affect the beneficial action of surfactants has not been well elucidated. In this work, it was found that the enzymatic hydrolysis of pure cellulose was not consistently improved by surfactants. Contrarily, high surfactant concentration, e.g. 5 g/L, which greatly improved the hydrolysis of dilute acid pretreated substrates, actually showed notable inhibition to pure cellulose conversion in the late phase of hydrolysis. Under an optimal hydrolysis condition, the improvement by surfactant was limited, but under harsh conditions surfactant indeed could enhance cellulose conversion. It was proposed that non-ionic surfactants could interact with substrates and cellulases to impact the adsorption behaviors of cellulases. Therefore, the beneficial action of surfactants on pure cellulose hydrolysis is influenced by hydrolysis condition, cellulose structural features and cellulase formulation.

  16. A kinetic study of hydrolysis of polyester elastomer in magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Watanabe, H.

    1994-01-01

    A useful method for kinetic study of the hydrolysis of polyester elastomer is established which uses the number-average molecular weight. The reasonableness of this method is confirmed and the effect of magnetic particles on hydrolysis is considered.

  17. Association between lipids, lipoproteins composition of HDL particles and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and LCAT and CETP activity in post-renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Kimak, Elżbieta; Bylina, Jerzy; Solski, Janusz; Hałabiś, Magdalena; Baranowicz-Gąszczyk, Iwona; Książek, Andrzej

    2013-11-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) remodeling within the plasma compartment and the association between lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) activity, and lipid, lipoprotein concentrations and composition were investigated. The aim was to examine the high sensitivity of C-reactive protein (hsCRP), lipid, apolipoprotein B (apoB), apoAI, total apoAII, apoAIInonB, apoB-containing apoAII (apoB:AII), total apoCIII, apoCIIInonB, apoB-containing apoCIII (apoB:CIII) concentration and LCAT and CETP activity to gain an insight into the association between them and LCAT and CETP, 57 post-renal transplant (Tx) patients with and without statin therapy and in 15 healthy subjects. Tx patients had moderate hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and dyslipoproteinemia, disturbed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) and HDL composition, decreased LCAT, and slightly increased hsCRP but no CETP activity. Spearman's correlation test showed the association between lipids and lipoproteins and LCAT or CETP, and multiple ridge stepwise forward regression showed that immunosuppressive therapy in Tx patients can disturb HDL and TRLs composition. The results suggest that inhibition or activation of LCAT is due, in part, to HDL-associated lipoprotein. Lipoprotein composition of apoAI, apoAIInonB, and apoCIIInonB in HDL particle and apoB:AII TRLs can contribute to decrease LCAT mass in Tx patients. Tx patients without statin and with lower triglycerides but higher HDL cholesterol concentration and disturbed lipoprotein composition of ApoAI and apoAII in HDL particle can decrease LCAT, increase LDL cholesterol, aggravate renal graft, and accelerate atherosclerosis and chronic heart diseases. PMID:23479335

  18. Methylation at CPT1A locus is associated with lipoprotein subfraction profiles[S

    PubMed Central

    Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Aslibekyan, Stella; Absher, Devin M.; Hopkins, Paul N.; Sha, Jin; Tsai, Michael Y.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhi, Degui; Arnett, Donna K.

    2014-01-01

    Lipoprotein subfractions help discriminate cardiometabolic disease risk. Genetic loci validated as associating with lipoprotein measures do not account for a large proportion of the individual variation in lipoprotein measures. We hypothesized that DNA methylation levels across the genome contribute to interindividual variation in lipoprotein measures. Using data from participants of the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (n = 663 for discovery and n = 331 for replication stages, respectively), we conducted the first systematic screen of the genome to determine associations between methylation status at ∼470,000 cytosine-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) sites in CD4+ T cells and 14 lipoprotein subfraction measures. We modeled associations between methylation at each CpG site and each lipoprotein measure separately using linear mixed models, adjusted for age, sex, study site, cell purity, and family structure. We identified two CpGs, both in the carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT1A) gene, which reached significant levels of association with VLDL and LDL subfraction parameters in both discovery and replication phases (P < 1.1 × 10−7 in the discovery phase, P < .004 in the replication phase, and P < 1.1 × 10−12 in the full sample). CPT1A is regulated by PPARα, a ligand for drugs used to reduce CVD. Our associations between methylation in CPT1A and lipoprotein measures highlight the epigenetic role of this gene in metabolic dysfunction. PMID:24711635

  19. Analytic ultracentrifuge calibration and determination of lipoprotein-specific refractive increments

    SciTech Connect

    Talwinder, S.K.; Adamson, G.L.; Glines, L.A.; Lindgren, F.T.; Laskaris, M.A.; Shore, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate quantification of the major classes and subfractions of human serum lipoproteins is an important analytical need in the characterization and evaluation of therapy of lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities. For calibrating the analytic ultracentrifuge (AnUC), the authors routinely use a Beckman calibration wedge cell with parallel scribed lines 1 cm apart. Such a cell give a rectangular pattern in the schlieren diagram, which determines magnification and also provides an area corresponding to an invariant refractive increment. Complete calibration for AnUC analysis of lipoproteins also requires accurate determination of the specific refractive increments (SRI) of the major lipoprotein classes, namely low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL). These are measured in the density in which they are analyzed, i.e., 1.061 g/ml for LDL and 1.200 g/ml for HDL. Five fresh serum samples were fractionated for total LDL and total HDL and their SRI determined. Total lipoprotein mass was determined using precise CHN elemental analysis and compositional analyses. The results yielded corrected SRI of 0.00142 and 0.00135 ..delta..n/g/100 ml for LDL and HDL. Thus, their current values using 0.00154 and 0.00149 ..delta..n/g/100 ml underestimate LDL and HDL by 9% and 11%. Corrections of all previous LDL and HDL AnUC data can be made using appropriate factors of 1.087 and 1.106.

  20. Membrane receptors for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) inhibitor of lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, P.I.; Beck, G.; Zucker, S.

    1981-06-01

    Physiologic concentrations of human plasma very low density lipoproteins inhibit the DNA synthesis of lymphocytes stimulated by allogeneic cells or lectins. In this report reachers have compared the effects of isolated lipoproteins (very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), low density lipoproteins (LDL), and high density lipoproteins (HDL)) and lipoprotein-depleted plasma (LDP) on DNA synthesis by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes. The relative potency for the inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation was VLDL greater than LDL greater than HDL greater than LDP. Fifty percent inhibition of DNA synthesis was observed at a VLDL protein concentration of 1.5--2.0 microgram/ml. Researchers have further demonstrated the presence of specific receptors for VLDL on human lymphocytes. Native VLDL was more effective than LDL in competing for 125I-VLDL binding sites. Subsequent to binding to lymphocytes, 125I-VLDL was internalized and degraded to acid-soluble products. Based on a Scatchard analysis of VLDL binding at 4 degrees C, the number of VLDL receptors per lymphocyte was estimated at 28,000 +/- 1300. Based on an estimated mean binding affinity for the VLDL receptor complex at half saturation of approximately 8.8 X 10(7) liter/mole, it is estimated that 91% of lymphocyte VLDL receptors are occupied at physiologic VLDL concentrations in blood. Although the immune regulatory role of plasma lipoproteins is uncertain, researchers suggest tha VLDL and LDL-In may maintain circulating blood lymphocytes in a nonproliferative state via their respective cell receptor mechanisms.

  1. Analysis and quantitation of biotinylated apoB-containing lipoproteins with streptavidin-Cy3.

    PubMed

    Berneis, Kaspar; La Belle, Michael; Blanche, Patricia J; Krauss, Ronald M

    2002-07-01

    Non denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE) is commonly used to analyze the size distribution of lipoprotein particles. Its relatively low sensitivity and linear dynamic range limit use of GGE to quantify protein content of lipoproteins. We demonstrate a new high sensitivity method for analysis and quantitation of biotinylated apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins using a fluorescent streptavidin-Cy3 conjugate and non covalent preelectrophoretic binding. Forty-four lipoprotein subfractions spanning the VLDL and LDL particle spectrum subfractions (11 each from four human subjects) were prepared by density gradient ultracentrifugation. An aliquot of each sample was biotinylated and GGE was performed. Gels also were stained for lipid with Oil Red O (32 samples) and for protein with Coomassie Brilliant Blue (30 samples). There was a significant relationship between the Cy3 fluorescent label area under the curve and the mass of apoB (P < 0.02-0.004) and total cholesterol (P < 0.03-0.004). Particle diameters of each absorbence/fluorescent peak were comparable between Oil-Red O and streptavidin-Cy3 treated biotinylated lipoproteins (+/-3.54 A, P = 0.3). Biotinylation and prestaining of lipoprotein particle with streptavidin-Cy3 provides a new fluorescence-based method for detection and quantitative analysis of lipoprotein subspecies by gradient gel electrophoresis.

  2. Triolein and trilinolein ameliorate oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Deng, Ze-yuan; Li, Xiao-ping; Rao, Huan; Fan, Ya-wei

    2014-05-01

    Uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein by endothelial cells is a critical step for the initiation of atherosclerosis. Triacylglycerol uptake in these cells is understood to be a part of the process. The present investigation, comparison among the effects of simple acylglycerol, including tristearin, triolein, and trilinolein, upon oxidized low-density lipoprotein -induced oxidative stress was undertaken. Results indicated that trilinolein (78 % ± 0.02) and triolein (90 % ± 0.01) increased cell viability of endothelial cells exposed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein, whereas tristearin decreased the cell viability (55 % ± 0.03) (P < 0.05). Oxidized low-density lipoprotein treatment significantly increased apoptosis (23 %), compared to cells simultaneously exposed to trilinolein (19 %) or triolein (16 %), where apoptosis was reduced (P < 0.05). On the other hand, exposure to tristearin further increased oxidized low-density lipoprotein -induced cell apoptosis (34 %). Treatment with trilinolein or triolein on oxidized low-density lipoprotein -stimulated endothelial cells inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 and E-selectin mRNA. Moreover, both trilinolein and triolein demonstrated a strong antioxidant response to oxidative stress caused by oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Taken together, the results indicate trilinolein and triolein possess anti-inflammatory properties, which are mediated via the antioxidant defense system.

  3. Effects of niacin combination therapy with statin or bile acid resin on lipoproteins and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zambon, Alberto; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Brown, B Greg; Brunzell, John D

    2014-05-01

    Two large studies in populations selected for cardiovascular disease (CVD) demonstrated that raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol with niacin added to statin therapy did not decrease CVD. We examine the association of lipoprotein subfractions with niacin and changes in coronary stenosis and CVD event risk. One hundred and seven patients from 2 previous studies using niacin in combination with either statin or bile acid-binding resin were selected to evaluate changes in lipoproteins separated by density-gradient ultracentrifugation to progression of coronary artery disease as assessed by quantitative coronary angiography. Improvement in coronary stenosis was significantly associated with the decrease of cholesterol in the dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and across most of the intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) and very low density lipoprotein particle density range, but, not with any of the HDL fraction or of the more buoyant LDL fractions. Event-free survival was significantly associated with the decrease of cholesterol in the dense LDL and IDL; there was no association with changes in cholesterol in the HDL and buoyant LDL fractions. Niacin combination therapy raises HDL cholesterol and decreases dense LDL and IDL cholesterol levels. Changes in LDL and IDL are related to improvement in CVD. Lipoprotein subfraction analysis should be performed in larger studies utilizing niacin in combination with statins.

  4. Hepatic apo B-100 lipoproteins and plasma LDL heterogeneity in African green monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, V.N.; Marzetta, C.A.; Rudel, L.L.; Zech, L.A.; Foster, D.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The contribution of hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) B-100 lipoproteins to plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolic heterogeneity was examined in African green monkeys. Hepatic 3H-labeled very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) (d less than 1.006, where d is density in g/ml) or hepatic 131I-labeled LDL (1.030 less than d less than 1.063) were isolated from perfused livers and injected simultaneously with autologous plasma 125I-LDL into African green monkeys. Serial blood samples were taken, and the distribution of radioactivity among various subfractions of apo B-100 lipoproteins was determined using density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Compartmental models were developed to describe simultaneously the kinetics of hepatic lipoproteins and plasma LDL. In five of seven studies, the metabolic behavior of LDL derived from radiolabeled hepatic lipoprotein precursors differed from the metabolic behavior of radiolabeled autologous plasma LDL. These differences could be described by different models supporting two hypotheses with different physiological interpretations: (1) lipoproteins of donor and recipient animals are kinetically distinct, and/or (2) plasma LDL derived from various potential sources are kinetically distinct. Compartmental modeling was used to test these hypotheses, which were not accessible to testing by conventional experimental methodologies. The kinetic analyses of these studies suggest that plasma LDL may be derived from a variety of precursors, including hepatic VLDL and hepatic LDL, with each source giving rise to metabolically distinct plasma LDL.

  5. Characterization of biophysical properties of baboon lipoproteins: modulation by dietary fat and cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Babiak, J.

    1984-04-01

    The serum lipoproteins of baboons fed diets containing differing types and amounts of fat and varying amounts of cholesterol were examined by analytic ultracentrifugation, gradient gel electrophoresis, density gradient ultracentrifugation, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis, electron microscopy, and standard protein and lipid composition assays. These studies characterized the lipoproteins of the baboon, observed how concentrations and physical-chemical properties of the lipoproteins are modulated by dietary fat and cholesterol and described the suitability of the baboon as an animal model of human lipoprotein metabolism. Results indicate that baboon high density lipoproteins (HDL), though higher in total serum concentration than human HDL, are remarkably similar to human HDL. The concentration of baboon HDL is increased by dietary saturated fat but decreased by the addition of cholesterol. While serum concentrations of low density lipoproteins (LDL) tend to be lower in baboons, the physical-chemical properties of the LDL of baboons and humans are comparable. The LDL of both species contains apolipoprotein B as their major apolipoprotein and exhibit considerable polydispersity in particle size. LDL of both species consists of seven discrete subpopulations. The analytical and statistical data presented in this dissertation indicate that the baboon is a good model for studying the role of lipoproteins in the development of atherosclerosis. 125 references, 31 figures, 28 tables.

  6. Automated measurement method for the determination of vitamin E in plasma lipoprotein classes

    PubMed Central

    Hirowatari, Yuji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Hideo; Manita, Daisuke; Tada, Norio

    2014-01-01

    In a subendothelial space of atherosclerotic arteries, apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins are accumulated and oxidized, and the oxidized lipoproteins promote macrophage foam cell formation. Therefore, the analysis of vitamin E, a major antioxidant in lipoproteins, is important for understanding atherosclerotic pathogenesis. A new method for the automated measurement of vitamin-E (γ- and α-tocopherols) in plasma HDL, LDL, and VLDL was established by using anion-exchange-chromatography for separation of lipoproteins, reverse-phase-chromatography for separation of γ- and α-tocopherols in each of lipoproteins, and fluorescent detection. The within-day assay and between-day assay coefficients of variation for lipoprotein tocopherol levels were 4.73–12.84% and 7.00–14.73%, respectively. The γ- and α-tocopherol/cholesterol ratios of VLDL were higher in healthy plasma than in plasma of untreated patients with dyslipidemia, but the ratios of LDL and HDL were not different. This new estimated method can provide the reliable data of lipoprotein vitamin-E and would be useful for the clinical settings. PMID:24522390

  7. Effect of the extent of the hydrolysis of tetrabutoxytitanium on catalysis efficiency in the esterification reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chervina, S.I.; Maksimenko, E.G.; Barshtein, R.S.; Shabanova, N.V.; Bulai, A.K.; Kotov, Yu.I.; Slonim, I.Ya.

    1988-03-01

    A study was carried out on the products of the hydrolysis of tetrabutoxytitanium and their catalytic activity in the esterification reaction. A maximum is observed in the dependence of the reaction rate constant on the extent of the hydrolysis of tetrabutoxytitanium. The maximum effective esterification rate constant corresponds to 60% hydrolysis of tetrabutoxytitanium. The hydrolysis products in this case have largely linear structure. The relationship between the catalytic activity of linear polytitanates and their stability in the reaction medium is discussed.

  8. Identification of lipoprotein MslA as a neoteric virulence factor of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Szczepanek, S M; Frasca, S; Schumacher, V L; Liao, X; Padula, M; Djordjevic, S P; Geary, S J

    2010-08-01

    Many lipoproteins are expressed on the surfaces of mycoplasmas, and some have been implicated as playing roles in pathogenesis. Family 2 lipoproteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae have a conserved "mycoplasma lipoprotein X" central domain and a "mycoplasma lipoprotein 10" C-terminal domain and are differentially expressed in response to environmental conditions. Homologues of family 2 lipoproteins are Mycoplasma specific and include the lipoprotein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum, encoded by the MGA0674 gene. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of the M. gallisepticum live attenuated vaccine strain F and the virulent strain R(low), reported in this study, indicated that MGA0674 is one of several differentially expressed genes. The MGA0674-encoded lipoprotein is a proteolytically processed, immunogenic, TX-114 detergent-phase protein which appears to have antigenic divergence between field strains R(low) and S6. We examined the virulence of an R(low) Delta MGA0674 mutant (P1H9) in vivo and observed reduced recovery and attenuated virulence in the tracheas of experimentally infected chickens. The virulence of two additional R(low) Delta MGA0674 mutants, 2162 and 2204, was assessed in a second in vivo virulence experiment. These mutants exhibited partial to complete attenuation in vivo, but recovery was observed more frequently. Since only Mycoplasma species harbor homologues of MGA0674, the gene product has been renamed "Mycoplasma-specific lipoprotein A" (MslA). Collectively, these data indicate that MslA is an immunogenic lipoprotein exhibiting reduced expression in an attenuated strain and plays a role in M. gallisepticum virulence. PMID:20515935

  9. Lipidomic analysis of plasma lipoprotein fractions in myocardial infarction-prone rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroaki; Koike, Tomonari; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Takayuki; Yoshida, Masaru; Shiomi, Masashi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    Lipids play important roles in the body and are transported to various tissues via lipoproteins. It is commonly assumed that alteration of lipid levels in lipoproteins leads to dyslipidemia and serious diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD). However, lipid compositions in each lipoprotein fraction induced by lipoprotein metabolism are poorly understood. Lipidomics, which involves the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of lipids, is expected to provide valuable information regarding the pathogenic mechanism of CAD. Here, we performed a lipidomic analysis of plasma and its lipoprotein fractions in myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHLMI) rabbits. In total, 172 lipids in plasma obtained from normal and WHHLMI rabbits were quantified with high throughput and accuracy using supercritical fluid chromatography hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (SFC/Q-Orbitrap-MS). Plasma levels of each lipid class (i.e., phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, lysophosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, ceramide, triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and cholesterol ester, except for free fatty acids) in 21-month-old WHHLMI rabbits were significantly higher than those in normal rabbits. High levels of functional lipids, such as alkyl-phosphatidylcholines, phospholipids including ω-6 fatty acids, and plasmalogens, were also observed in WHHLMI rabbit plasma. In addition, high-resolution lipidomic analysis using very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) provided information on the specific molecular species of lipids in each lipoprotein fraction. In particular, higher levels of phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogens were detected in LDL than in VLDL. Our lipidomics approach for plasma lipoprotein fractions will be useful for in-depth studies on the pathogenesis of CAD. PMID:26162515

  10. Cellular uptake of lipoproteins and persistent organic compounds-An update and new data

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelmborg, Philip Sebastian; Andreassen, Thomas Kjaergaard; Bonefeld-Jorgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2008-10-15

    There are a number of interactions related to the transport of lipophilic xenobiotic compounds in the blood stream of mammals. This paper will focus on the interactions between lipoproteins and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and how these particles are taken up by cells. A number of POPs including the pesticide p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and especially its metabolite p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE), interacts with nuclear hormone receptors causing these to malfunction, which in turn results in a range of deleterious health effects in humans. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of lipoprotein receptors in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells in conjunction with uptake of DDT-lipoprotein complexes from supplemented media in vitro. Uptake of DDT by MEF cells was investigated using MEF1 cells carrying the receptors low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) present and MEF4 cells with no LRP and LDLR expression. Cells were incubated together with the complex of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and [{sup 14}C]DDT. The receptor function was further evaluated by adding the 40 kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) which blocks receptor activity. The results showed that [{sup 14}C]DDT uptake was decreasing when the LDL concentration was increasing. There was no strong evidence for a receptor-mediated uptake of the [{sup 14}C]DDT-lipoprotein complex. To conclude, DDT travels in the blood stream and can cross cell membranes while being transported as a DDT-lipoprotein complex. The lipoproteins do not need receptors to cross cell membranes since passive diffusion constitutes a major passageway.

  11. Effects of cardiovascular lifestyle change on lipoprotein subclass profiles defined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Decewicz, David J; Neatrour, David M; Burke, Amy; Haberkorn, Mary Jane; Patney, Heather L; Vernalis, Marina N; Ellsworth, Darrell L

    2009-01-01

    Background Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering is a primary goal in clinical management of patients with cardiovascular disease, but traditional cholesterol levels may not accurately reflect the true atherogenicity of plasma lipid profiles. The size and concentration of lipoprotein particles, which transport cholesterol and triglycerides, may provide additional information for accurately assessing cardiovascular risk. This study evaluated changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in patients participating in a prospective, nonrandomized lifestyle modification program designed to reverse or stabilize progression of coronary artery disease (CAD) to improve our understanding of lipoprotein management in cardiac patients. Results The lifestyle intervention was effective in producing significant changes in lipoprotein subclasses that contribute to CAD risk. There was a clear beneficial effect on the total number of LDL particles (-8.3%, p < 0.05 compared to matched controls), small dense LDL particles (-9.5%, p < 0.05), and LDL particle size (+0.8%; p < 0.05). Likewise, participants showed significant improvement in traditional CAD risk factors such as body mass index (-9.9%, p < 0.01 compared to controls), total cholesterol (-5.5%, p < 0.05), physical fitness (+37.2%, p < 0.01), and future risk for CAD (-7.9%, p < 0.01). Men and women responded differently to the program for all clinically-relevant variables, with men deriving greater benefit in terms of lipoprotein atherogenicity. Plasma lipid and lipoprotein responses to the lifestyle change program were not confounded by lipid-lowering medications. Conclusion In at risk patients motivated to participate, an intensive lifestyle change program can effectively alter traditional CAD risk factors and plasma lipoprotein subclasses and may reduce risk for cardiovascular events. Improvements in lipoprotein subclasses are more evident in men compared to

  12. Measurement of cholesterol and other lipoprotein constituents in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Warnick, G R

    2000-04-01

    Measurements of lipids and lipoproteins in the clinical laboratory have become increasingly important because of their predictive association with cardiovascular diseases, especially coronary artery disease. The US National Institutes of Health-sponsored National Cholesterol Education Program and counterparts in other countries have developed national consensus guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease which provide risk cut-points and define use of the lipid/lipoprotein analytes in case finding and therapy. Total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are measured as positive risk factors and high density lipoprotein cholesterol as an inverse risk factor for coronary artery disease. A National Cholesterol Education Program-sponsored expert laboratory panel has developed guidelines for measurements with requisite analytical performance targets for total error and corresponding precision and bias. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have established reference methods for total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and for triglycerides, with a method for low density lipoprotein cholesterol in development. Standardization programs for research laboratories and a Cholesterol Reference Method Laboratory Network for diagnostic manufacturers and clinical laboratories provide reliable access and documentation of traceability to accepted reference methods. Methods for the lipid/lipoprotein analytes have improved dramatically in recent years and, coupled with improved chemistry analyzer systems and more attention to standardization by manufacturers, offer considerable improvement in analytical performance. Fully automated homogeneous assays for high density lipoprotein cholesterol and newer similar assays for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol have potential for better precision as well as more convenient and cost-effective measurements. Attention to pre-analytical sources of variation is also important in making

  13. Lipoprotein(a) Catabolism Is Regulated by Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 through the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Romagnuolo, Rocco; Scipione, Corey A.; Boffa, Michael B.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Seidah, Nabil G.; Koschinsky, Marlys L.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) have been identified as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. Plasma Lp(a) levels are reduced by monoclonal antibodies targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). However, the mechanism of Lp(a) catabolism in vivo and the role of PCSK9 in this process are unknown. We report that Lp(a) internalization by hepatic HepG2 cells and primary human fibroblasts was effectively reduced by PCSK9. Overexpression of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) in HepG2 cells dramatically increased the internalization of Lp(a). Internalization of Lp(a) was markedly reduced following treatment of HepG2 cells with a function-blocking monoclonal antibody against the LDLR or the use of primary human fibroblasts from an individual with familial hypercholesterolemia; in both cases, Lp(a) internalization was not affected by PCSK9. Optimal Lp(a) internalization in both hepatic and primary human fibroblasts was dependent on the LDL rather than the apolipoprotein(a) component of Lp(a). Lp(a) internalization was also dependent on clathrin-coated pits, and Lp(a) was targeted for lysosomal and not proteasomal degradation. Our data provide strong evidence that the LDLR plays a role in Lp(a) catabolism and that this process can be modulated by PCSK9. These results provide a direct mechanism underlying the therapeutic potential of PCSK9 in effectively lowering Lp(a) levels. PMID:25778403

  14. Radiotracers for low density lipoprotein biodistribution studies in vivo: technetium-99m low density lipoprotein versus radioiodinated low density lipoprotein preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhajosula, S.; Paidi, M.; Badimon, J.J.; Le, N.A.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Fuster, V.; Ginsberg, H.N.

    1988-07-01

    In an attempt to characterize the in vivo behavior of (99mTc) low density lipoprotein (LDL), biodistribution studies were performed in normal and hypercholesterolemic (HC) rabbits. In normal rabbits, 24 hr after the injection of (99mTc)LDL, 99mTc activity accumulated mainly in adrenal glands, spleen, liver, and kidney. In HC rabbits, however, there was a marked reduction of 99mTc activity in these organs. In both normal and HC rabbits, less than 17% of 99mTc activity appeared in the 24-hr urine following injection of (99mTc)LDL, suggesting that in vivo, (99mTc)LDL is trapped and accumulated within the tissues. Direct comparison of (99mTc)LDL, 125I-native-LDL and (131I)tyramine cellobiose-LDL (the previously validated trapped radioligand) in normal rabbits, demonstrated that the biodistribution of (99mTc)LDL was similar to that of (131I)tyramine cellobiose-LDL. The adrenal glands, liver, and spleen accumulated significantly greater quantities of 99mTc and 131I activity per gram of tissue than 125I (from native-LDL). In addition, imaging studies in monkeys, showed that the hepatic uptake and retention of (99mTc) LDL was similar to that of (131I)tyramine cellobiose LDL. In contrast, radioiodine from native-LDL was deiodinated in liver with subsequent excretion into the intestine. These results suggest that (99mTc)LDL acts as a trapped ligand in vivo and should therefore, be a good tracer for noninvasive quantitative biodistribution studies of LDL.

  15. Radiotracers for low density lipoprotein biodistribution studies in vivo: technetium-99m low density lipoprotein versus radioiodinated low density lipoprotein preparations.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, S; Paidi, M; Badimon, J J; Le, N A; Goldsmith, S J; Fuster, V; Ginsberg, H N

    1988-07-01

    In an attempt to characterize the in vivo behavior of [99mTc] low density lipoprotein (LDL), biodistribution studies were performed in normal and hypercholesterolemic (HC) rabbits. In normal rabbits, 24 hr after the injection of [99mTc]LDL, 99mTc activity accumulated mainly in adrenal glands, spleen, liver, and kidney. In HC rabbits, however, there was a marked reduction of 99mTc activity in these organs. In both normal and HC rabbits, less than 17% of 99mTc activity appeared in the 24-hr urine following injection of [99mTc]LDL, suggesting that in vivo, [99mTc]LDL is trapped and accumulated within the tissues. Direct comparison of [99mTc]LDL, 125I-native-LDL and [131I]tyramine cellobiose-LDL (the previously validated trapped radioligand) in normal rabbits, demonstrated that the biodistribution of [99mTc]LDL was similar to that of [131I]tyramine cellobiose-LDL. The adrenal glands, liver, and spleen accumulated significantly greater quantities of 99mTc and 131I activity per gram of tissue than 125I (from native-LDL). In addition, imaging studies in monkeys, showed that the hepatic uptake and retention of [99mTc] LDL was similar to that of [131I]tyramine cellobiose LDL. In contrast, radioiodine from native-LDL was deiodinated in liver with subsequent excretion into the intestine. These results suggest that [99mTc]LDL acts as a trapped ligand in vivo and should therefore, be a good tracer for noninvasive quantitative biodistribution studies of LDL.

  16. 40 CFR 721.10498 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10498 Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products... chemical substances identified generically as substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10498 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10498 Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products... chemical substances identified generically as substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with...

  18. Comparison of Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Acid Hydrolysis of Sterol Glycosides from Foods Rich in Δ(7)-Sterols.

    PubMed

    Münger, Linda H; Jutzi, Sabrina; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Nyström, Laura

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present the difference in sterol composition of extracted steryl glycosides (SG) hydrolyzed by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis. SG were analyzed from foods belonging to the plant families Cucurbitaceae (melon and pumpkin seeds) and Amaranthaceae (amaranth and beetroot), both of which are dominated by Δ(7)-sterols. Released sterols were quantified by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All Δ(7)-sterols identified (Δ(7)-stigmastenyl, spinasteryl, Δ(7)-campesteryl, Δ(7)-avenasteryl, poriferasta-7,25-dienyl and poriferasta-7,22,25-trienyl glucoside) underwent isomerization under acidic conditions and high temperature. Sterols with an ethylidene or methylidene side chain were found to form multiple artifacts. The artifact sterols coeluted with residues of incompletely isomerized Δ(7)-sterols, or Δ(5)-sterols if present, and could be identified as Δ(8(14))-sterols on the basis of relative retention time, and their MS spectra as trimethylsilyl (TMS) and acetate derivatives. For instance, SG from melon were composed of 66% Δ(7)-stigmastenol when enzymatic hydrolysis was performed, whereas with acid hydrolysis only 8% of Δ(7)-stigmastenol was determined. The artifact of Δ(7)-stigmastenol coeluted with residual non-isomerized spinasterol, demonstrating the high risk of misinterpretation of compositional data obtained after acid hydrolysis. Therefore, the accurate composition of SG from foods containing sterols with a double bond at C-7 can only be obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis or by direct analysis of the intact SG.

  19. Recurrent Embolic Strokes of Undetermined Source in a Patient with Extreme Lipoprotein(a) Levels.

    PubMed

    Bulwa, Zachary; Kim, Audrey; Singh, Karandeep; Kantorovich, Alexander; Suhail, Faten

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is a plasma lipoprotein and known cardiovascular risk factor, most recently implicated in the development of high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques without significant carotid stenosis. We present a case of a young African-American female with recurrent embolic strokes of undetermined source. After our thorough investigation, we identified the link between a small, irregular plaque in the right internal carotid artery, and an extremely elevated plasma level of lipoprotein(a) as the source of her embolic strokes. PMID:27630613

  20. Secretion of bacterial lipoproteins: through the cytoplasmic membrane, the periplasm and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zückert, Wolfram R

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins that play a variety of roles in bacterial physiology and virulence in monoderm (single membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-positive) and diderm (double membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-negative) bacteria. After export of prolipoproteins through the cytoplasmic membrane, which occurs predominantly but not exclusively via the general secretory or Sec pathway, the proteins are lipid-modified at the cytoplasmic membrane in a multistep process that involves sequential modification of a cysteine residue and cleavage of the signal peptide by the signal II peptidase Lsp. In both monoderms and diderms, signal peptide processing is preceded by acylation with a diacylglycerol through preprolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (Lgt). In diderms but also some monoderms, lipoproteins are further modified with a third acyl chain through lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). Fully modified lipoproteins that are destined to be anchored in the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) are selected, transported and inserted by the Lol (lipoprotein outer membrane localization) pathway machinery, which consists of the inner-membrane (IM) ABC transporter-like LolCDE complex, the periplasmic LolA chaperone and the OM LolB lipoprotein receptor. Retention of lipoproteins in the cytoplasmic membrane results from Lol avoidance signals that were originally described as the "+2 rule". Surface localization of lipoproteins in diderms is rare in most bacteria, with the exception of several spirochetal species. Type 2 (T2SS) and type 5 (T5SS) secretion systems are involved in secretion of specific surface lipoproteins of γ-proteobacteria. In the model spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, surface lipoprotein secretion does not follow established sorting rules, but remains dependent on N-terminal peptide sequences. Secretion through the outer membrane requires maintenance of lipoproteins in a translocation-competent unfolded conformation

  1. Recurrent Embolic Strokes of Undetermined Source in a Patient with Extreme Lipoprotein(a) Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bulwa, Zachary; Kim, Audrey; Singh, Karandeep; Kantorovich, Alexander; Suhail, Faten

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is a plasma lipoprotein and known cardiovascular risk factor, most recently implicated in the development of high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques without significant carotid stenosis. We present a case of a young African-American female with recurrent embolic strokes of undetermined source. After our thorough investigation, we identified the link between a small, irregular plaque in the right internal carotid artery, and an extremely elevated plasma level of lipoprotein(a) as the source of her embolic strokes. PMID:27630613

  2. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol on a roller coaster: where will the ride end?

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Bowe et al. report an association between low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and various incident chronic kidney disease end points in a cohort of almost 2 million US veterans followed for 9 years. These impressive data should be a starting point for further investigations including genetic epidemiologic investigations as well as post hoc analyses of interventional trials that target high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and, finally, studies that focus on the functionality of high-density lipoprotein particles. PMID:26994572

  3. [Lipoproteins HDL and coronary artery disease: a molecular mechanism of fibrate].

    PubMed

    Kaletha, Krystian; Chodorowski, Zygmunt; Anand, Izabela Sein; Rybakowska, Iwona; Nagel-Starczynowska, Gabriela

    2003-01-01

    The importance of dyslipidemia in the development of cardiovascular disease is now recognized as a central factor of equal, if not greater significance than any other risk factor. Although correction of high level of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been regarded now as the main goal of therapy, it has now been reaffirmed that the contribution of low level of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to the risk of ischaemic heart disease should also be considered. In the therapy of dislipidemias with hipertriglyceridemia and decreased level of HDL lipoprotein fibrates play an especially important role. In the article the molecular mechanism of fibrates action is presented.

  4. Properties of salt-resistant lipase and lipoprotein lipase purified from human post-heparin plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Ostlund-Lindqvist, A M

    1979-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase and salt-resistant lipase were isolated from human post-heparin plasma. The proteins of human post-plasma lipoprotein lipase and salt-resistant lipase were identified and demonstrated to be immunologically different. Significant differences between the two enzymes in their relative amino acid composition were demonstrated, which indicates that the two enzymes are different proteins. When analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, the enzymes seemed to have monomer molecular weights similar to that of lipoprotein lipase purified from bovine milk. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:113002

  5. More Than Cholesterol Transporters: Lipoprotein Receptors in CNS Function and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney E.; Philips, Gary T.; Herz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Members of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family have a diverse set of biological functions that transcend lipid metabolism. Lipoprotein receptors have broad effects in both the developing and adult brain and participate in synapse development, cargo trafficking, and signal transduction. In addition, several family members play key roles in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role lipoprotein receptors play in CNS function and AD pathology, with a special emphasis on amyloid-independent roles in endocytosis and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:25144875

  6. Rapid and simple profiling of lipoproteins by polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis to determine the heterogeneity of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) including small, dense LDL.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Seo, Makoto; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Awata, Takuya; Komoda, Tsugikazu; Katayama, Shigehiro

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential of polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis (PAGE) for lipoprotein profiling in clinical practice. Blood samples were collected from 146 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lipid parameters were assayed by PAGE, including small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (n = 41), and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnant cholesterol (n = 37). We also used a commercial kit to measure small, dense LDL (n = 41). By PAGE, we obtained the percentage of the area under the curve (AUC %) of each peaks and calculated respective AUC% x total cholesterol (AUC%xTC) values. The calculated values of LDL-AUC%xTC, small LDL-AUC%xTC, and HDL-AUC%xTC values were correlated well with values from homogeneous assay for LDL-cholesterol, small, dense LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol assays (r = 0.94, 0.81, and 0.89, respectively). PAGE combined with measurement of total cholesterol and triglycerides provides a rapid evaluation of anti- or pro-atherogenic lipoproteins and a simple profiling system for both the "quantity" and "quality" of lipoproteins, allowing a better assessment of the risk of coronary artery diseases. This article discusses several methods for simple and rapid lipid profiling and outlines some recent patents relevant to the methods.

  7. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  8. Endotoxemia alters nucleotide hydrolysis in platelets of rats.

    PubMed

    Vuaden, Fernanda Cenci; Furstenau, Cristina Ribas; Savio, Luiz Eduardo Baggio; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2009-03-01

    Platelets play a critical role in homeostasis and blood clotting at sites of vascular injury, and also in various ways in innate immunity and inflammation. Platelets are one of the first cells to accumulate at an injured site, and local release of their secretome at some point initiate an inflammatory cascade that attracts leukocytes, activates target cells, stimulates vessel growth and repair. The level of exogenous ATP in the body may be increased in various inflammatory and shock conditions, primarily as a consequence of nucleotide release from platelets, endothelium and blood vessel cells. An increase of ATP release has been described during inflammation and this compound presents proinflammatory properties. ADP is a nucleotide known to induce changes in platelets shape and aggregation, to promote the exposure of fibrinogen-binding sites and to inhibit the stimulation of adenylate cyclase. Adenosine, the final product of the nucleotide hydrolysis, is a vasodilator and an inhibitor of platelet aggregation. There is a group of ecto-enzymes responsible for extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis named ectonucleotidases, which includes the NTPDase (nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase) family, the NPP (nucleoside pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase) family and an ecto-5'-nucleotidase. Therefore, we have aimed to investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin from Escherichia coli on ectonucleotidases in platelets from adult rats in order to better understand the role of extracellular adenine nucleotides and nucleosides in the maintenance of blood homeostasis in inflammatory processes. LPS administered in vitro was not able to alter the ATP, ADP, AMP and rho-Nph-5'-TMP hydrolysis of platelets from untreated rats in all concentrations tested (25-100 microg/ml). There was a significant decrease in ATP, ADP, AMP and rho-Nph-5'-TMP hydrolysis in rat platelets after 48 hours of LPS exposure (2 mg/Kg, i.p.). ATP and ADP hydrolysis has been reduced about 28

  9. Switching Catalysis from Hydrolysis to Perhydrolysis in Pseudomonas fluorescens Esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, D.; Bernhardt, P; Morley, K; Jiang, Y; Cheeseman, J; Purpero, V; Schrag, J; Kazlauskas, R

    2010-01-01

    Many serine hydrolases catalyze perhydrolysis, the reversible formation of peracids from carboxylic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we showed that a single amino acid substitution in the alcohol binding pocket, L29P, in Pseudomonas fluorescens (SIK WI) aryl esterase (PFE) increased the specificity constant of PFE for peracetic acid formation >100-fold [Bernhardt et al. (2005) Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 44, 2742]. In this paper, we extend this work to address the three following questions. First, what is the molecular basis of the increase in perhydrolysis activity? We previously proposed that the L29P substitution creates a hydrogen bond between the enzyme and hydrogen peroxide in the transition state. Here we report two X-ray structures of L29P PFE that support this proposal. Both structures show a main chain carbonyl oxygen closer to the active site serine as expected. One structure further shows acetate in the active site in an orientation consistent with reaction by an acyl-enzyme mechanism. We also detected an acyl-enzyme intermediate in the hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone by mass spectrometry. Second, can we further increase perhydrolysis activity? We discovered that the reverse reaction, hydrolysis of peracetic acid to acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, occurs at nearly the diffusion limited rate. Since the reverse reaction cannot increase further, neither can the forward reaction. Consistent with this prediction, two variants with additional amino acid substitutions showed 2-fold higher k{sub cat}, but K{sub m} also increased so the specificity constant, k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, remained similar. Third, how does the L29P substitution change the esterase activity? Ester hydrolysis decreased for most esters (75-fold for ethyl acetate) but not for methyl esters. In contrast, L29P PFE catalyzed hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone five times more efficiently than wild-type PFE. Molecular modeling suggests that moving the carbonyl group closer to the

  10. [Lipoprotein (a)--a mysterious factor in atherogenesis].

    PubMed

    Jelaković, Bojan; Laganović, Mario; Kuzmanić, Dusko

    2002-01-01

    Etiopathogenesis of arterial hypertension and coronary disease involves interaction of numerous exogenous factors which determine the clinical course and therapeutic response in genetically predisposed individuals. The role of numerous cardiovascular risk factors has been reevaluated during the past few years, yet some unresolved issues and gaps still remain. One of the still insufficiently studied factors is lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)] which belongs to a subclass of LDL lipoproteins. Its important component is apolipoprotein (a) which is structurally similar to plasminogen. This characteristic can be followed through evolution and is probably crucial for its physiologic but also pathophysiologic role. Actually, through its competition with plasminogen, Lp (a) interferes with the process of fibrinolysis and may contribute to tissue healing and restoration but also support and accelerate atherothrombotic process. Lp (a) concentration is stable and genetically determined in an individual and the indication that persons with elevated levels are permanently exposed to increased risk is supported by the data on twofold incidence of myocardial infarction in mothers of children with highest Lp (a) concentrations. Apart from competing with plasminogen via apolipoprotein (a), Lp (a) increases the activity of inhibitors of plasminogen-I activator and reduces the activity of transforming growth factor-beta. This results both in the absence of fibrinolysis and promotion of migration and proliferation of media smooth muscle cells, which are important in the onset of atherosclerotic process. Lp (a) binds to elastin via apolipoprotein B, resulting in oxidation and facilitated entry into macrophages and their transition into the so-called foam cells, also an important sign of early atherosclerosis. Although many pathophysiologic processes by which Lp (a) contributes to atherosclerosis have also been confirmed by animal experiments as well as by the presence of histologic evidence

  11. Lipoprotein Lipase, Tissue Expression and Effects on Genes Related to Fatty Acid Synthesis in Goat Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wang-Sheng; Hu, Shi-Liang; Yu, Kang; Wang, Hui; Wang, Wei; Loor, Juan; Luo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) serves as a central factor in hydrolysis of triacylglycerol and uptake of free fatty acids from the plasma. However, there are limited data concerning the action of LPL on the regulation of milk fat synthesis in goat mammary gland. In this investigation, we describe the cloning and sequencing of the LPL gene from Xinong Saanen dairy goat mammary gland, along with a study of its phylogenetic relationships. Sequence analysis showed that goat LPL shares similarities with other species including sheep, bovine, human and mouse. LPL mRNA expression in various tissues determined by RT-qPCR revealed the highest expression in white adipose tissue, with lower expression in heart, lung, spleen, rumen, small intestine, mammary gland, and kidney. Expression was almost undetectable in liver and muscle. The expression profiles of LPL gene in mammary gland at early, peak, mid, late lactation, and the dry period were also measured. Compared with the dry period, LPL mRNA expression was markedly greater at early lactation. However, compared with early lactation, the expression was lower at peak lactation and mid lactation. Despite those differences, LPL mRNA expression was still greater at peak, mid, and late lactation compared with the dry period. Using goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC), the in vitro knockdown of LPL via shRNA or with Orlistat resulted in a similar degree of down-regulation of LPL (respectively). Furthermore, knockdown of LPL was associated with reduced mRNA expression of SREBF1, FASN, LIPE and PPARG but greater expression of FFAR3. There was no effect on ACACA expression. Orlistat decreased expression of LIPE, FASN, ACACA, and PPARG, and increased FFAR3 and SREBF1 expression. The pattern of LPL expression was similar to the changes in milk fat percentage in lactating goats. Taken together, results suggest that LPL may play a crucial role in fatty acid synthesis. PMID:25501331

  12. Lipoprotein lipase expression exclusively in liver. A mouse model for metabolism in the neonatal period and during cachexia.

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, M; Weinstock, P H; Chajek-Shaul, T; Radner, H; Yin, B; Breslow, J L; Goldberg, I J

    1998-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), the rate-limiting enzyme in triglyceride hydrolysis, is normally not expressed in the liver of adult humans and animals. However, liver LPL is found in the perinatal period, and in adults it can be induced by cytokines. To study the metabolic consequences of liver LPL expression, transgenic mice producing human LPL specifically in the liver were generated and crossed onto the LPL knockout (LPL0) background. LPL expression exclusively in liver rescued LPL0 mice from neonatal death. The mice developed a severe cachexia during high fat suckling, but caught up in weight after switching to a chow diet. At 18 h of age, compared with LPL0 mice, liver-only LPL-expressing mice had equally elevated triglycerides (10,700 vs. 14,800 mg/dl, P = NS), increased plasma ketones (4.3 vs. 1.7 mg/dl, P < 0.05) and glucose (28 vs. 15 mg/dl, P < 0.05), and excessive amounts of intracellular liver lipid droplets. Adult mice expressing LPL exclusively in liver had slower VLDL turnover than wild-type mice, but greater VLDL mass clearance, increased VLDL triglyceride production, and three- to fourfold more plasma ketones. In summary, it appears that liver LPL shunts circulating triglycerides to the liver, which results in a futile cycle of enhanced VLDL production and increased ketone production, and subsequently spares glucose. This may be important to sustain brain and muscle function at times of metabolic stress with limited glucose availability. PMID:9727057

  13. Effect of medium- and long-chain triglyceride infusion on lipoprotein and hepatic lipase in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Nordenström, J; Neeser, G; Olivecrona, T; Wahren, J

    1991-12-01

    Plasma lipolytic activity and hydrolysis of intravenous fat were studied in six healthy subjects during infusion of a long-chain triglyceride (LCT) fat emulsion (Intralipid 20%) or of a medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)/LCT emulsion (Lipofundin MCT 20%). The fat emulsions were infused continuously at a rate of 0.17 g triglyceride kg-1 body weight (BW)h-1 for 6 h in random order at 7-day intervals. A continuous infusion of glucose (0.18 g kg-1 BW h-1) was administered for a period of 7 h and was started 1 h before the lipid infusion. Infusions of both types of fat increased plasma triglyceride (TG), free fatty acid (FFA) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) levels and steady-state values were present during the 3rd to 5th h of infusion. MCT/LCT infusion resulted in higher plasma levels at steady-state of TG (3.63 +/- 0.45 [SEM] vs 2.73 +/- 0.45 mmol l-1; P less than 0.05), FFA (1.05 +/- 0.08 vs 0.54 +/- 0.04 mmol l-1; P less than 0.01) and LPL (4.6 +/- 0.6 vs 2.6 +/- 0.5 mU ml-1; P less than 0.05) in comparison with LCT administration. There was a positive correlation between plasma LPL activity and TG concentration (r = 0.77; P less than 0.001) when data for the two infusions were combined. Although the same amount of fat was infused on a weight basis, the molar infusion rate was 40% higher with MCT/LCT than with LCT infusion, due to differences in molecular weights (634 vs 885 Da).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1778219

  14. Influence of protein hydrolysis on the growth kinetics of β-lg fibrils.

    PubMed

    Kroes-Nijboer, Ardy; Venema, Paul; Bouman, Jacob; van der Linden, Erik

    2011-05-17

    Recently it was found that protein hydrolysis is an important step in the formation of β-lactoglobulin fibrils at pH 2 and elevated temperatures. The objective of the present study was to further investigate the influence of hydrolysis on the kinetics of fibril formation. Both the hydrolysis of β-lactoglobulin and the growth of the fibrils were followed as a function of time and temperature, using SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a Thioflavin T fluorescence assay. As an essential extension to existing models, the quantification of the effect of the hydrolysis on the fibrillar growth was established by a simple polymerization model including a hydrolysis step.

  15. Investigation of the Polymorphs and Hydrolysis of Uranium Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Lucas E.; Blake, Thomas A.; Henager, Charles H.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Meier, David E.; Peper, Shane M.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-04-01

    This work focuses on progress in gaining a better understanding of the polymorphic nature of the UO3-water system, one of several important materials associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. The UO3-water system is complex and has not been fully characterized, even though these species are common throughout the fuel cycle. Powder x-ray diffraction, Raman and fluorescence characterization was performed on polymorphic forms of UO3 and UO3 hydrolysis products for the purpose of developing some predictive capability of estimating process history and utility, e.g. for polymorphic phases of unknown origin. Specifically, we have investigated three industrially relevant production pathways of UO3 and discovered a previously unknown low temperature route to β-UO3. Pure phases of UO3, hydrolysis products and starting materials were used to establish optical spectroscopic signatures for these compounds.

  16. Catalysis of a Flavoenzyme-Mediated Amide Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh; Ealick, Steven E.; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2010-09-13

    A new pyrimidine catabolic pathway (the Rut pathway) was recently discovered in Escherichia coli K12. In this pathway, uracil is converted to 3-hydroxypropionate, ammonia, and carbon dioxide. The seven-gene Rut operon is required for this conversion. Here we demonstrate that the flavoenzyme RutA catalyzes the initial uracil ring-opening reaction to give 3-ureidoacrylate. This reaction, while formally a hydrolysis reaction, proceeds by an oxidative mechanism initiated by the addition of a flavin hydroperoxide to the C4 carbonyl. While peroxide-catalyzed amide hydrolysis has chemical precedent, we are not aware of a prior example of analogous chemistry catalyzed by flavin hydroperoxides. This study further illustrates the extraordinary catalytic versatility of the flavin cofactor.

  17. Hydrolysis kinetics of tulip tree xylan in hot compressed water.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junho; Lee, Hun Wook; Sim, Seungjae; Myint, Aye Aye; Park, Hee Jeong; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, a promising renewable resource, can be converted into numerous valuable chemicals post enzymatic saccharification. However, the efficacy of enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass is low; therefore, pretreatment is necessary to improve the efficiency. Here, a kinetic analysis was carried out on xylan hydrolysis, after hot compressed water pretreatment of the lignocellulosic biomass conducted at 180-220°C for 5-30min, and on subsequent xylooligosaccharide hydrolysis. The weight ratio of fast-reacting xylan to slow-reacting xylan was 5.25 in tulip tree. Our kinetic results were applied to three different reaction systems to improve the pretreatment efficiency. We found that semi-continuous reactor is promising. Lower reaction temperatures and shorter space times in semi-continuous reactor are recommended for improving xylan conversion and xylooligosaccharide yield. In the theoretical calculation, 95% of xylooligosaccharide yield and xylan conversion were achieved simultaneously with high selectivity (desired product/undesired product) of 100 or more.

  18. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic materials: a kinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Beltrame, P.L.; Carniti, P.; Focher, B.; Marzetti, A.; Sarto, V.

    1984-01-01

    A kinetic study of the enzymatic hydrolysis of two celluloses with different structural features was performed at various temperatures (26-50/sup 0/C). The enzymatic system consisted of three types of enzymes: E/sub 1/-..beta..-1,4-glucan glucanohydrolase; E/sub 2/-..beta..-1,4-glucan cellobiohydrolase; and E/sub 3/-..beta..-glucosidase. A mathematical model for the mechanism of the hydrolysis of cellulosic materials catalyzed by a multienzymatic system was checked and a good rationalization of the experimental results was achieved. Uncompetitive and competitive glucose inhibition on E/sub 1/ and E/sub 2/, respectively, appeared to occur for both substrates. Inhibition by cellobiose was checked at 34/sup 0/C on one substrate. The V/sub max/, K/sub m/, and glucose inhibition constants were optimized and their dependence on temperature determined.

  19. Role of bifidobacteria in the hydrolysis of chlorogenic acid

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Stefano; Anighoro, Andrew; Quartieri, Andrea; Amaretti, Alberto; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Rastelli, Giulio; Rossi, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the capability of potentially probiotic bifidobacteria to hydrolyze chlorogenic acid into caffeic acid (CA), and to recognize the enzymes involved in this reaction. Bifidobacterium strains belonging to eight species occurring in the human gut were screened. The hydrolysis seemed peculiar of Bifidobacterium animalis, whereas the other species failed to release CA. Intracellular feruloyl esterase activity capable of hydrolyzing chlorogenic acid was detected only in B. animalis. In silico research among bifidobacteria esterases identified Balat_0669 as the cytosolic enzyme likely responsible of CA release in B. animalis. Comparative modeling of Balat_0669 and molecular docking studies support its role in chlorogenic acid hydrolysis. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of Balat_0669 in Escherichia coli were obtained as further validation. A possible role of B. animalis in the activation of hydroxycinnamic acids was demonstrated and new perspectives were opened in the development of new probiotics, specifically selected for the enhanced bioconversion of phytochemicals into bioactive compounds. PMID:25515139

  20. Novel agents for enzymatic and fungal hydrolysis of stevioside

    PubMed Central

    Milagre, H.M.S.; Martins, L.R.; Takahashi, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study on the potential of some biological agents to perform the hydrolysis of stevioside was carried out, aiming at establishing an alternative methodology to achieve the aglycon steviol or its rearranged derivative isosteviol, in high yields to be used in the preparation of novel bioactive compounds. Hydrolysis reactions were performed by using filamentous fungi (Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus stolonifer and Rhizopus arrhizus), a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and enzymes (pancreatin and lipases PL250 and VFL 8000). Pancreatin showed the best hydrolytic activity, furnishing isosteviol at 93.9% of yield, at pH 4.0, using toluene as a co-solvent. Steviol was produced using both pancreatin at pH 7.0 (20.2% yield) and A. niger at pH 7 (20.8% yield). PMID:24031374

  1. Simultaneous pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of forage biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Henk, L.; Linden, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Sweet sorghum is an attractive fermentation feedstock because as much as 40% of the dry weight consists of readily femented sugars such as sucrose, glucose and frutose. Cellulose and hemicellulose comprise another 50%. However, if this material is to be used a year-round feedstock for ethanol production, a stable method of storage must be developed to maintain the sugar content. A modified version of the traditional ensiling process is made effective by the addition of cellulolytic/hemicellulolytic enzymes and lactic acid bacteria to freshly chopped sweet sorghum prior to the production of silage. In situ hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose occurs concurrently with the acidic ensiling fementation. By hydolyzing the acetyl groups using acetyl xylan esterase and 3-0-methyl glucuronyl side chains using pectinase from hemicellulose, cellulose becomes accessible to hydrolysis by cellulase, both during in situ ensiling with enzymes and in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol.

  2. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of agricultural residues to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Mes-Hartree, M.; Hogan, C.M.; Saddler, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    A combined enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation process was used to convert steam-treated wheat and barley straw to ethanol. Maximum conversion efficiencies were obtained when the substrates were steamed for 90 s. These substrates could yield over 0.4 g ethanol/g cellulose following a combined enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation process procedure using culture filtrates derived from Trichoderma harzianum E58. When culture filtrates from Trichoderma reesei C30 and T. reesei QM9414 were used, the ethanol yields obtained were 0.32 and 0.12 g ethanol/g cellulose utilized, respectively. The lower ethanol yields obtained with these strains were attributed to the lower amounts of ..beta..-glucosidase detected in the T. reesei culture filtrates.

  3. Enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover process development and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J.; Wilke, C.R.; Blanch, H.W.

    1981-12-01

    The hydrolysis of acid treated corn stover with cellulase from T. reesei Rut-C-30 was evaluated. Experiments were conducted with substrate concentrations of 5 to 25% by weight, enzyme activities of 0.5 to 7 IU/ml and residence times of 24 to 48 hours. Maximum conversion was 55% for specific cellulase activity of 25 to 30 IU/g. Optimum cellobiase activity for minimum cellobiose production was found to be approximately 1.8 cellobiase units to 1 FPA unit. Hydrolysis experiments with steam exploded corn stover led to a maximum conversion of 80%, significantly higher than the results obtained for acid treated substrate. Steam exploded corn stover was demonstrated as a suitable carbon source for growth of T. reesei in submerged cultures.

  4. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato. Membrane reactor in enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-06-01

    Use of ultrafiltration membrane systems in stirred cell and in thin-channel systems for immobilizing enzyme (sweet potato intrinsic and crystalline /beta/-amylase) in hydrolysis of sweet potato through a continuous operation mode were studied. Both the filtration rate and reducing sugars, produced as the result of enzymatic hydrolysis, decreased with the filtration time. THe immobilized enzymes in the thin-channel system showed a much better performance compared to that in the stirred cell system. Addition of crystalline sweet potato /beta/-amylase to the sweet potato increased both the filtration rate and reducing-sugars content. Alcoholic fermentation of the filtrate resulted in an alcohol content of 4.2%. This represented fermentation of 95% of the sugars with an efficiency of 88%. 17 refs.

  5. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato. Membrane reactor in enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    Use of ultrafiltration membrane systems in stirred cell and in thin-channel systems for immobilizing enzyme (sweet potato intrinsic and crystalline beta-amylase) in hydrolysis of sweet potato through a continuous operation mode were studied. Both the filtration rate and reducing sugars, produced as the result of enzymic hydrolysis, decreased with the filtration time. The immobilized enzymes in the thin-channel system showed a much better performance compared to that in the stirred cell system. Addition of crystalline sweet potato beta-amylase to the sweet potato increased both the filtration rate and reducing-sugars content. Alcohol fermentation of the filtrate resulted in an alcohol content of 4.2%. This represented fermentation of 95% of the sugars with an efficiency of 88%.

  6. Accelerated Hydrolysis of Aspirin Using Alternating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinscheid, Uwe M.

    2009-08-01

    The major problem of current drug-based therapy is selectivity. As in other areas of science, a combined approach might improve the situation decisively. The idea is to use the pro-drug principle together with an alternating magnetic field as physical stimulus, which can be applied in a spatially and temporarily controlled manner. As a proof of principle, the neutral hydrolysis of aspirin in physiological phosphate buffer of pH 7.5 at 40 °C was chosen. The sensor and actuator system is a commercially available gold nanoparticle (NP) suspension which is approved for animal usage, stable in high concentrations and reproducibly available. Applying the alternating magnetic field of a conventional NMR magnet system accelerated the hydrolysis of aspirin in solution.

  7. Snapshots of the maltose transporter during ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Chen, Jue

    2011-12-05

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are powered by ATP, but the mechanism by which these transporters hydrolyze ATP is unclear. In this study, four crystal structures of the full-length wild-type maltose transporter, stabilized by adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate or ADP in conjunction with phosphate analogs BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, VO{sub 4}{sup 3-}, or AlF{sub 4}{sup -}, were determined to 2.2- to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. These structures led to the assignment of two enzymatic states during ATP hydrolysis and demonstrate specific functional roles of highly conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domain, suggesting that ATP-binding cassette transporters catalyze ATP hydrolysis via a general base mechanism.

  8. Fructan Hydrolysis Drives Petal Expansion in the Ephemeral Daylily Flower.

    PubMed

    Bieleski, R. L.

    1993-09-01

    Dry weight, water content, soluble carbohydrate content, and carbohydrate composition of daylily (Hemerocallis hybrid cv Cradle Song) flower petals were monitored in the 3 d leading up to full opening and in the first day of senescence. Timing of events was related to the time (hour 0) when flower expansion was 60% complete. Petal dry weight increased linearly from hour -62 (tight bud) to hour 10 (fully developed flower), then fell rapidly to hour 34 as senescence advanced. Increase in water content was proportional to dry weight increase from hour -62 to hour -14, but was more rapid as the bud cracked and the flower opened, giving an increase in fresh weight/dry weight ratio. Soluble carbohydrate was 50% of petal dry weight up to hour 10, then decreased during senescence to reach 4% by hour 34. Up until hour -14, fructan accounted for 80% of the soluble carbohydrate in the petals, whereas hexose accounted for only 2%. Fructan hydrolysis started just prior to bud crack at hour -14, reaching completion by hour 10 when no detectable fructan remained, and fructose plus glucose accounted for more than 80% of the total soluble carbohydrate. The proportion of sucrose remained constant throughout development. Osmolality of petal cell sap increased significantly during fructan hydrolysis, from 0.300 to 0.340 osmolal. Cycloheximide applied to excised buds between hour -38 and hour -14 halted both fructan hydrolysis and flower expansion. The findings suggest that onset of fructan hydrolysis, with the concomitant large increase in osmoticum, is an important event driving flower expansion in daylily. PMID:12231928

  9. Ultrasound-enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Gamerith, Caroline; Ghazaryan, Gagik; Ortner, Andreas; Herrero Acero, Enrique; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-10-01

    The application of ultrasound was found to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). After a short activation phase up to 6.6times increase in the amount of released products was found. PET powder with lower crystallinity of 8% was hydrolyzed faster when compared to PET with 28% crystallinity. Ultrasound activation was found to be around three times more effective on powders vs. films most likely due to a larger surface area accessible to the enzyme. PMID:27481467

  10. Effect of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Mochidzuki, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Hiraide, Hatsue; Wang, Xiaofen; Cui, Zongjun

    2013-06-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was added to filter paper during the hydrolysis of cellulase. Adding BSA before the addition of the cellulase enhances enzyme activity in the solution, thereby increasing the conversion rate of cellulose. After 48 h of BSA treatment, the BSA adsorption quantities are 3.3, 4.6, 7.8, 17.2, and 28.3 mg/g substrate, each with different initial BSA concentration treatments at 50 °C; in addition, more cellulase was adsorbed onto the filter paper at 50 °C compared with 35 °C. After 48 h of hydrolysis, the free-enzyme activity could not be measured without the BSA treatment, whereas the remaining activity of the filter paper activity was approximately 41 % when treated with 1.0 mg/mL BSA. Even after 96 h of hydrolysis, 25 % still remained. Meanwhile, after 48 h of incubation without substrate, the remaining enzyme activities were increased 20.7 % (from 43.7 to 52.7 %) and 94.8 % (from 23.3 to 45.5 %) at 35 and 50 °C, respectively. Moreover, the effect of the BSA was more obvious at 35 °C compared with 50 °C. When using 15 filter paper cellulase units per gram substrate cellulase loading at 50 °C, the cellulose conversion was increased from 75 % (without BSA treatment) to ≥90 % when using BSA dosages between 0.1 and 1.5 mg/mL. Overall, these results suggest that there are promising strategies for BSA treatment in the reduction of enzyme requirements during the hydrolysis of cellulose.

  11. Novel Penicillium cellulases for total hydrolysis of lignocellulosics.

    PubMed

    Marjamaa, Kaisa; Toth, Karolina; Bromann, Paul Andrew; Szakacs, George; Kruus, Kristiina

    2013-05-10

    The (hemi)cellulolytic systems of two novel lignocellulolytic Penicillium strains (Penicillium pulvillorum TUB F-2220 and P. cf. simplicissimum TUB F-2378) have been studied. The cultures of the Penicillium strains were characterized by high cellulase and β-glucosidase as well moderate xylanase activities compared to the Trichoderma reesei reference strains QM 6a and RUTC30 (volumetric or per secreted protein, respectively). Comparison of the novel Penicillium and T. reesei secreted enzyme mixtures in the hydrolysis of (ligno)cellulose substrates showed that the F-2220 enzyme mixture gave higher yields in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose (Avicel) and similar yields in hydrolysis of pre-treated spruce and wheat straw than enzyme mixture secreted by the T. reesei reference strain. The sensitivity of the Penicillium cellulase complexes to softwood (spruce) and grass (wheat straw) lignins was lignin and temperature dependent: inhibition of cellulose hydrolysis in the presence of wheat straw lignin was minor at 35°C while at 45°C by spruce lignin a clear inhibition was observed. The two main proteins in the F-2220 (hemi)cellulase complex were partially purified and identified by peptide sequence similarity as glycosyl hydrolases (cellobiohydrolases) of families 7 and 6. Adsorption of the GH7 enzyme PpCBH1 on cellulose and lignins was studied showing that the lignin adsorption of the enzyme is temperature and pH dependent. The ppcbh1 coding sequence was obtained using PCR cloning and the translated amino acid sequence of PpCBH1 showed up to 82% amino acid sequence identity to known Penicillium cellobiohydrolases.

  12. Endo-exo Synergism in Cellulose Hydrolysis Revisited*

    PubMed Central

    Jalak, Jürgen; Kurašin, Mihhail; Teugjas, Hele; Väljamäe, Priit

    2012-01-01

    Synergistic cooperation of different enzymes is a prerequisite for efficient degradation of cellulose. The conventional mechanistic interpretation of the synergism between randomly acting endoglucanases (EGs) and chain end-specific processive cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) is that EG-generated new chain ends on cellulose surface serve as starting points for CBHs. Here we studied the hydrolysis of bacterial cellulose (BC) by CBH TrCel7A and EG TrCel5A from Trichoderma reesei under both single-turnover and “steady state” conditions. Unaccountable by conventional interpretation, the presence of EG increased the rate constant of TrCel7A-catalyzed hydrolysis of BC in steady state. At optimal enzyme/substrate ratios, the “steady state” rate of synergistic hydrolysis became limited by the velocity of processive movement of TrCel7A on BC. A processivity value of 66 ± 7 cellobiose units measured for TrCel7A on 14C-labeled BC was close to the leveling off degree of polymerization of BC, suggesting that TrCel7A cannot pass through the amorphous regions on BC and stalls. We propose a mechanism of endo-exo synergism whereby the degradation of amorphous regions by EG avoids the stalling of TrCel7A and leads to its accelerated recruitment. Hydrolysis of pretreated wheat straw suggested that this mechanism of synergism is operative also in the degradation of lignocellulose. Although both mechanisms of synergism are used in parallel, the contribution of conventional mechanism is significant only at high enzyme/substrate ratios. PMID:22733813

  13. DWPF integrated cold runs revised technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, L.F.

    1992-06-01

    The report defines new precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters for DWPF Chemical runs assuming the precipitate feed simulants to be processed reflect the decision to implement a final wash of the tetraphenylborate slurry before transfer to DWPF (i.e. the Late Wash Facility). Control of the nitrite content of the tetraphenylborate slurry to 0.01M or less has eliminated the need for hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) during hydrolysis. Consequently, the oxidant nitrous oxide will not be generated. However, nitric oxide (NO) is expected to be generated (reaction of formic acid with nitrite) and some fraction of the NO can be expected to be oxidized to nitrogen dioxide. The rate of NO generation with low nitrite feed has not been quantified at this time nor is the extent to which the NO is oxidized to NO{sub 2} known. A mass spectrometer is being installed in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF) which will enable the NO generation rate to be defined as well as the extent to which the NO is oxidized to NO{sub 2}. There is some undocumented data available for C{sub 6}H{sub 6}/NO and C{sub 6}H{sub 6}/NO{sub 2} with N{sub 2} as the diluent but no similar data for CO{sub 2}. Development of test data in the required time frame is not possible. However, MOC`s will be estimated for benzene/NO/NO{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} gas mixtures (the MOC is expected to be approximately 60% less than for the HAN process). Once these data are obtained, and NO/NO{sub 2} concentration profiles are obtained from PHEF hydrolysis process demonstrations, a flammability control strategy for the DWPF Salt Processing Cell will be developed. Implementation of the HAN process purge strategy upon startup of the SPC with the late wash process would be conservative.

  14. Comparing the catalytic strategy of ATP hydrolysis in biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    ATP-driven biomolecular motors utilize the chemical energy obtained from the ATP hydrolysis to perform vital tasks in living cells. Understanding the mechanism of enzyme-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis reaction has substantially progressed lately thanks to combined quantum/classical molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. Here, we present a comparative summary of the most recent QM/MM results for myosin, kinesin and F1-ATPase motors. These completely different motors achieve the acceleration of ATP hydrolysis through a very similar catalytic mechanism. ATP hydrolysis has high activation energy because it involves the breaking of two strong bonds, namely the Pγ-Oβγ bond of ATP and the H-O bond of lytic water. The key to the four-fold decrease in the activation barrier by the three enzymes is that the breaking of the Pγ-Oβγ bond precedes the deprotonation of the lytic water molecule, generating a metaphosphate hydrate complex. The resulting singly charged trigonal planar PγO3(-) metaphosphate is a better electrophilic target for attack by an OaH(-) hydroxyl group. The formation of this OaH(-) is promoted by a strong polarization of the lytic water: in all three proteins, this water is forming a hydrogen-bond with a backbone carbonyl group and interacts with the carboxylate group of glutamate (either directly or via an intercalated water molecule). This favors the shedding of one proton by the attacking water. The abstracted proton is transferred to the γ-phosphate via various proton wires, resulting in a H2PγO4(-)/ADP(3-) product state. This catalytic strategy is so effective that most other nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes adopt a similar approach, as suggested by their very similar triphosphate binding sites. PMID:27296627

  15. Allergenicity of Peanut Proteins is Retained Following Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rationale: Hydrolysis of peanut proteins by food-grade enzymes may reduce allergenicity and could lead to safer forms of immunotherapy. Methods: Light roasted peanut flour extracts were digested with pepsin (37°C, pH 2), Alcalase (60°C pH 8), or Flavourzyme (50°C, pH 7) up to 1 hr, or sequentially w...

  16. Severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with lipoprotein lipase deficiency in childhood.

    PubMed

    van Walraven, L A; de Klerk, J B C; Postema, R R

    2003-09-01

    An 11-year-old girl with lipoprotein lipase deficiency experienced recurring episodes of abdominal pain. She initially underwent appendectomy for suspected appendicitis; however, the appendix was normal. Pancreatitis was subsequently identified as the cause of her pain.

  17. Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay of Binding Properties of Antisense Oligonucleotides to Serum Albumins and Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Reina; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Sekiguchi, Mitsuaki; Kugimiya, Akira; Kinouchi, Hiroki; Nihashi, Yoichiro; Kamimori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we developed an assay to evaluate the kinetic binding properties of the unconjugated antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) and lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands conjugated ASOs to mouse and human serum albumin, and lipoproteins using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The lipophilic ligands conjugated ASOs showed clear affinity to the albumins and lipoproteins, while the unconjugated and hydrophilic ligand conjugated ASOs showed no interaction. The SPR method showed reproducible immobilization of albumins and lipoproteins as ligands on the sensor chip, and reproducible affinity kinetic parameters of interaction of ASOs conjugated with the ligands could be obtained. The kinetic binding data of these ASOs to albumin and lipoproteins by SPR were related with the distributions in the whole liver in mice after administration of these conjugated ASOs. The results demonstrated that our SPR method could be a valuable tool for predicting the mechanism of the properties of delivery of conjugated ASOs to the organs.

  18. Quantitative Lipoproteomics in Clostridium difficile Reveals a Role for Lipoproteins in Sporulation.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Thomas M; Kovacs-Simon, Andrea; Michell, Stephen L; Fairweather, Neil F; Tate, Edward W

    2015-11-19

    Bacterial lipoproteins are surface exposed, anchored to the membrane by S-diacylglyceryl modification of the N-terminal cysteine thiol. They play important roles in many essential cellular processes and in bacterial pathogenesis. For example, Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive anaerobe that causes severe gastrointestinal disease; however, its lipoproteome remains poorly characterized. Here we describe the application of metabolic tagging with alkyne-tagged lipid analogs, in combination with quantitative proteomics, to profile protein lipidation across diverse C. difficile strains and on inactivation of specific components of the lipoprotein biogenesis pathway. These studies provide the first comprehensive map of the C. difficile lipoproteome, demonstrate the existence of two active lipoprotein signal peptidases, and provide insights into lipoprotein function, implicating the lipoproteome in transmission of this pathogen.

  19. Diet and the role of lipoproteins, lipases, and thyroid hormones in coronary lesion growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Jacques D.; Jansen, Hans; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Birkenhager, Jan C.; Kromhout, Daan

    1987-01-01

    The relationships between the coronary lesion growth and the blood contents of lipoprotein fractions, thyroic hormones, and the lipoprotein lipase activity were investigated in male patients with severe coronary atherosclerosis, who participated in a lipid-lowering dietary intervention program. A quantitative computer-assisted image-processing technique was used to assess the severity of coronary obstructions at the beginning of the program and at its termination two years later. Based on absolute coronary scores, patients were divided into a no-lesion growth group (14 patients) and a progression group (21 paients). At the end of the trial, the very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were found to be significantly higher, while the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and hepatic lipase (HL) were lower in the progression group. Multivariate regression analysis showed HL to be the most important determinant of changes in coronary atherosclerotic lesions.

  20. Behavioral versus genetic determination of lipoproteins andidentical twins discordant for exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul T.; Blanche, Patricia J.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2004-06-01

    Lipoprotein and weight differences between vigorously active and sedentary MZ twins are used to: (1) estimate the effects of training while controlling for genotype; (2) estimate genetic concordance in the presence of divergent lifestyles.