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Sample records for hydrolysis oftriglyceride-rich lipoproteins

  1. Give me A5 for lipoprotein hydrolysis!

    PubMed

    Merkel, Martin; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-10-01

    APOA5 is a newly identified apolipoprotein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of plasma triglyceride levels. In several human studies, common APOA5 single nucleotide polymorphisms have been strongly associated with elevated plasma triglyceride levels. In this issue of the JCI, Marçais et al. report that the rare Q139X mutation in APOA5 leads to severe hypertriglyceridemia by exerting a dominant-negative effect on the plasma lipolytic system for triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. The presented data support the idea that the molecular mechanism of APOA5 function may include the enhancement of binding between lipoproteins and proteoglycans at the vascular wall and activation of proteoglycan-bound lipoprotein lipase.

  2. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  3. Apolipoprotein AV accelerates plasma hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by interaction with proteoglycan-bound lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Martin; Loeffler, Britta; Kluger, Malte; Fabig, Nathalie; Geppert, Gesa; Pennacchio, Len A; Laatsch, Alexander; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-06-03

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is associated with differences in triglyceride levels and familial combined hyperlipidemia. In genetically engineered mice, apoAV plasma levels are inversely correlated with plasma triglycerides. To elucidate the mechanism by which apoAV influences plasma triglycerides, metabolic studies and in vitro assays resembling physiological conditions were performed. In human APOA5 transgenic mice (hAPOA5tr), catabolism of chylomicrons and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) was accelerated due to a faster plasma hydrolysis of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hepatic VLDL and intestinal chylomicron production were not affected. The functional interplay between apoAV and LPL was further investigated by cross-breeding a human LPL transgene with the apoa5 knock-out and the hAPOA5tr to an lpl-deficient background. Increased LPL activity completely normalized hypertriglyceridemia of apoa5-deficient mice; however, overexpression of human apoAV modulated triglyceride levels only slightly when LPL was reduced. To reflect the physiological situation in which LPL is bound to cell surface proteoglycans, we examined hydrolysis in the presence or absence of proteoglycans. Without proteoglycans, apoAV derived either from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, hAPOA5tr high density lipoprotein, or a recombinant source did not alter the LPL hydrolysis rate. In the presence of proteoglycans, however, apoAV led to a significant and dose-dependent increase in LPL-mediated hydrolysis of VLDL triglycerides. These results were confirmed in cell culture using a proteoglycan-deficient cell line. A direct interaction between LPL and apoAV was found by ligand blotting. It is proposed, that apoAV reduces triglyceride levels by guiding VLDL and chylomicrons to proteoglycan-bound LPL for lipolysis.

  4. Apolipoprotein AV Accelerates Plasma Hydrolysis OfTriglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins By Interaction With Proteoglycan BoundLipoprotein Lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Martin; Loeffler, Britta; Kluger, Malte; Fabig, Nathalie; Geppert, Gesa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Laatsch, Alexander; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-02-22

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is associated with differences intriglyceride levels and familial combined hyperlipidemia. In genetically engineered mice, apoAV plasma levels are inversely correlated with plasmatriglycerides. To elucidate the mechanism by which apoAV influences plasma triglycerides, metabolic studies and in vitro assays resembling physiological conditions were performed. In hAPOA5 transgenic mice(hAPOA5tr), catabolism of chylomicrons and VLDL was accelerated due to a faster plasma hydrolysis of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase (LPL).Hepatic VLDL and intestinal chylomicron production were not affected. The functional interplay between apoAV and LPL was further investigated by crossbreeding a human LPL transgene with the apoa5 knockout, and the hAPOA5tr to an LPL deficient background. Increased LPL activity completely normalized hypertriglyceridemia of apoa5 deficient mice,however, over expression of human apoAV modulated triglyceride levels only slightly when LPL was reduced. To reflect the physiological situation in which LPL is bound to cell surface proteoglycans, we examined hydrolysis in the presence or absence of proteoglycans. Without proteoglycans, apoAV derived either from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, hAPOA5tr HDL, or a recombinant source did not alter the LPL hydrolysis rate. In the presence of proteoglycans, however, apoAV led to a significant and dose-dependent increase in LPL mediated hydrolysis of VLDL triglycerides. These results were confirmed in cell culture using a proteoglycan-deficient cell line.A direct interaction between LPL and apoAV was found by ligand blotting.It is proposed, that apoAV reduces triglyceride levels by guiding VLDL and chylomicrons to proteoglycans bound LPL for lipolysis.

  5. Changes with starvation in the rat of the lipoprotein lipase activity and hydrolysis of triacylglycerols from triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins in adipose tissue preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Lasunción, M A; Herrera, E

    1983-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity was higher in fat-pad pieces than in isolated adipocytes from the same fed rats, whereas hydrolysis of triacylglycerols from triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins was similar in the two preparations when incubated either in basal conditions or in the presence of heparin. In both preparations there was a similar release of lipoprotein lipase activity into the medium during basal incubation, enhanced by the presence of heparin. In fat-pad pieces, but not in isolated adipocytes, incubation with heparin produced a decrease in the lipoprotein lipase activity measured in the tissue preparation. In fat-pad pieces from 24 h-starved rats, lipoprotein lipase activity was the same as in isolated adipocytes from the same animals and incubation with heparin did not affect the appearance of lipoprotein lipase in the medium or the utilization of triacylglycerols from triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. These results support the following conclusions. (1) The effectiveness of lipoprotein lipase in adipose tissue preparations in vitro depends more on its availability to the substrate than on its total activity. (2) Heparin acts on adipose tissue preparations from fed animals both by enhancing the release of pre-existing extracellular enzyme (which is absent in isolated adipocytes) and by enhancing the transfer outside the cells of the intracellular (and mainly undetectable) enzyme that is activated in the secretion process. (3) In adipose tissue from starved animals there is not only a decrease in the active extracellular form of lipoprotein lipase activity but also a reduction in the intracellular (and mainly undetectable) pool of the enzyme. PMID:6870799

  6. Minimal oxidation and storage of low density lipoproteins result in an increased susceptibility to phospholipid hydrolysis by phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Eckey, R; Menschikowski, M; Lattke, P; Jaross, W

    1997-07-25

    In vitro-studies have shown that phospholipid hydrolysis of low density lipoproteins (LDL) by bee venom or porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) leads to an increased uptake of these lipoproteins by macrophages transforming them into foam cells. Recently, a secretory phospholipase A2, group II, was detected in human atherosclerotic plaques. In order to investigate the role of this enzyme in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, a structurally identical human secretory PLA2 was purified from the medium of HepG2 cells stimulated with interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. The activity of the purified enzyme towards the phospholipids of native and modified low density lipoproteins was compared with the activity towards Escherichia coli-membranes and other phospholipid substrates. Compared to E. coli-membranes, native LDL proved to be a poor substrate for group II PLA2. After mild oxidation induced by copper ions or by 2,2-azobis(2-amidinopropane) (AAPH), the susceptibility of LDL to phospholipid hydrolysis was found to be increased by 25 and 23%, respectively, whereas extensive copper-mediated oxidation caused a decreased hydrolysis. Aging of LDL at 6 degrees C for weeks or at 37 degrees C for hours resulted in an increase in PLA2-catalyzed phospholipid hydrolysis of up to 26-fold. LDL protected from oxidation by probucol during aging showed a lesser increase in susceptibility to phospholipid hydrolysis. Our results suggest that PLA2, group II, can increase the atherogenicity of LDL by its ability to hydrolyze the phospholipids of these lipoproteins, especially after modifications that are likely to occur in vivo.

  7. Biosynthesis of oxidized lipid mediators via lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 hydrolysis of extracellular cardiolipin induces endothelial toxicity.

    PubMed

    Buland, Justin R; Wasserloos, Karla J; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Amoscato, Andrew A; Mallampalli, Rama K; Chen, Bill B; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon; Kagan, Valerian E; Pitt, Bruce R

    2016-08-01

    We (66) have previously described an NSAID-insensitive intramitochondrial biosynthetic pathway involving oxidation of the polyunsaturated mitochondrial phospholipid, cardiolipin (CL), followed by hydrolysis [by calcium-independent mitochondrial calcium-independent phospholipase A2-γ (iPLA2γ)] of oxidized CL (CLox), leading to the formation of lysoCL and oxygenated octadecadienoic metabolites. We now describe a model system utilizing oxidative lipidomics/mass spectrometry and bioassays on cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAECs) to assess the impact of CLox that we show, in vivo, can be released to the extracellular space and may be hydrolyzed by lipoprotein-associated PLA2 (Lp-PLA2). Chemically oxidized liposomes containing bovine heart CL produced multiple oxygenated species. Addition of Lp-PLA2 hydrolyzed CLox and produced (oxygenated) monolysoCL and dilysoCL and oxidized octadecadienoic metabolites including 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic (HODE) acids. CLox caused BPAEC necrosis that was exacerbated by Lp-PLA2 Lower doses of nonlethal CLox increased permeability of BPAEC monolayers. This effect was exacerbated by Lp-PLA2 and partially mimicked by authentic monolysoCL or 9- or 13-HODE. Control mice plasma contained virtually no detectable CLox; in contrast, 4 h after Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection, 34 ± 8 mol% (n = 6; P < 0.02) of circulating CL was oxidized. In addition, molar percentage of monolysoCL increased twofold after P. aeruginosa in a subgroup analyzed for these changes. Collectively, these studies suggest an important role for 1) oxidation of CL in proinflammatory environments and 2) possible hydrolysis of CLox in extracellular spaces producing lysoCL and oxidized octadecadienoic acid metabolites that may lead to impairment of pulmonary endothelial barrier function and necrosis.

  8. Inactive lipoprotein lipase (LPL) alone increases selective cholesterol ester uptake in vivo, whereas in the presence of active LPL it also increases triglyceride hydrolysis and whole particle lipoprotein uptake.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Martin; Heeren, Jörg; Dudeck, Wiebke; Rinninger, Franz; Radner, Herbert; Breslow, Jan L; Goldberg, Ira J; Zechner, Rudolf; Greten, Heiner

    2002-03-01

    We have previously shown that transgenic expression of catalytically inactive lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in muscle (Mck-N-LPL) enhances triglyceride hydrolysis as well as whole particle lipoprotein and selective cholesterol ester uptake. In the current study, we have examined whether these functions can be performed by inactive LPL alone or require the presence of active LPL expressed in the same tissue. To study inactive LPL in the presence of active LPL in the same tissue, the Mck-N-LPL transgene was bred onto the heterozygous LPL-deficient (LPL1) background. At 18 h of age, Mck-N-LPL reduced triglycerides by 35% and markedly increased muscle lipid droplets. In adult mice, it reduced triglycerides by 40% and increased lipoprotein particle uptake into muscle by 60% and cholesterol ester uptake by 110%. To study inactive LPL alone, the Mck-N-LPL transgene was bred onto the LPL-deficient (LPL0) background. These mice die at approximately 24 h of age. At 18 h of age, in the absence of active LPL, inactive LPL expression did not diminish triglycerides nor did it result in the accumulation of muscle lipid droplets. To study inactive LPL in the absence of active LPL in the same tissue in adult animals, the Mck-N-LPL transgene was bred onto mice that only expressed active LPL in the heart (LPL0/He-LPL). In this case, Mck-N-LPL did not reduce triglycerides or increase the uptake of lipoprotein particles but did increase muscle uptake of chylomicron and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol ester by 40%. Thus, in the presence of active LPL in the same tissue, inactive LPL augments triglyceride hydrolysis and increases whole particle triglyceride-rich lipoprotein and selective cholesterol ester uptake. In the absence of active LPL in the same tissue, inactive LPL only mediates selective cholesterol ester uptake.

  9. Medium-chain versus long-chain triacylglycerol emulsion hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase: Implications for the mechanisms of lipase action

    SciTech Connect

    Deckelbaum, R.J. ); Hamilton, J.A.; Butbul, E.; Gutman, A. ); Moser, A. ); Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.; Olivecrona, T. ); Carpentier, Y.A. )

    1990-02-06

    To explore how enzyme affinities and enzyme activities regulate hydrolysis of water-insoluble substrates, the authors compared hydrolysis of phospholipid-stabilized emulsions of medium-chain (MCT) versus long-chain triacylglycerols (LCT). Because substrate solubility at the emulsion surface might modulate rates of hydrolysis, the ability of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine to solubilize MCT was examined by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shift measurements showed that 11 mol % of ({sup 13}C)carbonyl enriched trioctanoin was incorporated into phospholipid vesicles as a surface component. Line widths of trioctanoin surface peaks were half that of LCT, and relaxation times, T{sub 1}, were also shorter for trioctanoin, showing greater mobility for MCT in phospholipid. In assessing the effects of these differences in solubility on lipolysis, they found that both purified bovine milk lipoprotein lipase and human hepatic lipase hydrolyzed MCT at rates at least 2-fold higher than for LCT. Differences in affinity were also demonstrated in mixed incubations where increasing amounts of LCT emulsion resulted in decreased hydrolysis of MCT emulsions. These results suggest that despite lower enzyme affinity for MCT emulsions, shorter chain triacylglycerols are more readily hydrolyzed by lipoprotein and hepatic lipases than long-chain triacylglycerols because of greater MCT solubility and mobility at the emulsion-water interface.

  10. Apolipoprotein E enhances hepatic lipase-mediated hydrolysis of reconstituted high-density lipoprotein phospholipid and triacylglycerol in an isoform-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hime, Neil J; Drew, Kate J; Hahn, Chris; Barter, Philip J; Rye, Kerry-Anne

    2004-09-28

    This study compares the kinetics of hepatic lipase (HL)-mediated phospholipid and triacylglycerol hydrolysis in spherical, reconstituted high-density lipoproteins (rHDL) that contain either apolipoprotein E2 (apoE2), apoE3, apoE4, or apoA-I as the sole apolipoprotein. HL-mediated phospholipid hydrolysis was assessed by incubating various concentrations of rHDL that contained only cholesteryl esters (CE) in their core, (E2/CE)rHDL, (E3/CE)rHDL, (E4/CE)rHDL, and (A-I/CE)rHDL, with a constant amount of HL. The rate of phospholipid hydrolysis was determined as the formation of nonesterified fatty acid mass. HL-mediated triacylglycerol hydrolysis was assessed in rHDL containing CE, unlabeled triacylglycerol, and [(3)H]triacylglycerol in their core, (E2/TG)rHDL, (E3/TG)rHDL, (E4/TG)rHDL, and (A-I/TG)rHDL. Triacylglycerol hydrolysis was determined as the ratio of (3)H-labeled hydrolysis products to (3)H-labeled unhydrolyzed triacylglycerol. The rates of phospholipid hydrolysis in the (E2/CE)rHDL, (E3/CE)rHDL, and (E4/CE)rHDL were significantly greater than that in the (A-I/CE)rHDL. The rates of triacylglycerol hydrolysis were also greater in the (E2/TG)rHDL, (E3/TG)rHDL, and (E4/TG)rHDL compared to the (A-I/TG)rHDL, although to a lesser degree than observed with phospholipid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the rates of both phospholipid and triacylglycerol hydrolyses were greater in the (E2)rHDL than in either the (E3)rHDL or the (E4)rHDL. These results show that apoE increases the rate of HL-mediated phospholipid and triacylglycerol hydrolysis in rHDL and that this influence is isoform dependent.

  11. ApoAV reduces plasma triglycerides by inhibiting very low density lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) production and stimulating lipoprotein lipase-mediated VLDL-TG hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Schaap, Frank G; Rensen, Patrick C N; Voshol, Peter J; Vrins, Carlos; van der Vliet, Hendrik N; Chamuleau, Robert A F M; Havekes, Louis M; Groen, Albert K; van Dijk, Ko Willems

    2004-07-02

    ApoAV has been discovered recently as a novel modifier of triglyceride (TG) metabolism, but the pathways involved are currently unknown. To gain insight into the function of apoAV, adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of murine apoa5 to C57Bl/6 mice was employed. The injection of low doses of Ad-apoa5 (1-5 x 10(8) plaqueforming units/mouse) dose-dependently reduced plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG levels. First, we evaluated whether a reduced hepatic VLDL production contributed to the TG-lowering effect. Ad-apoa5 treatment dose-dependently diminished (29-37%) the VLDL-TG production rate without affecting VLDL particle production, suggesting that apoAV impairs the lipidation of apoB. Second, Ad-apoa5 treatment dose-dependently reduced (68-88%) the postprandial hypertriglyceridemia following an intragastric fat load, suggesting that apoAV also stimulates the lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-dependent clearance of TG-rich lipoproteins. Indeed, recombinant apoAV was found to dose-dependently stimulate LPL activity up to 2.3-fold in vitro. Accordingly, intravenously injected VLDL-like TG-rich emulsions were cleared at an accelerated rate concomitant with the increased uptake of emulsion TG-derived fatty acids by skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue in Ad-apoa5-treated mice. From these data, we conclude that apoAV is a potent stimulator of LPL activity. Thus, apoAV lowers plasma TG by both reducing the hepatic VLDL-TG production rate and by enhancing the lipolytic conversion of TG-rich lipoproteins.

  12. Unique cellular events occurring during the initial interaction of macrophages with matrix-retained or methylated aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL). Prolonged cell-surface contact during which ldl-cholesteryl ester hydrolysis exceeds ldl protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Buton, X; Mamdouh, Z; Ghosh, R; Du, H; Kuriakose, G; Beatini, N; Grabowski, G A; Maxfield, F R; Tabas, I

    1999-11-05

    A critical event in atherogenesis is the interaction of arterial wall macrophages with subendothelial lipoproteins. Although most studies have investigated this interaction by incubating cultured macrophages with monomeric lipoproteins dissolved in media, arterial wall macrophages encounter lipoproteins that are mostly bound to subendothelial extracellular matrix, and these lipoproteins are often aggregated or fused. Herein, we utilize a specialized cell-culture system to study the initial interaction of macrophages with aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL) bound to extracellular matrix. The aggregated LDL remains extracellular for a relatively prolonged period of time and becomes lodged in invaginations in the surface of the macrophages. As expected, the degradation of the protein moiety of the LDL was very slow. Remarkably, however, hydrolysis of the cholesteryl ester (CE) moiety of the LDL was 3-7-fold higher than that of the protein moiety, in stark contrast to the situation with receptor-mediated endocytosis of acetyl-LDL. Similar results were obtained using another experimental system in which the degradation of aggregated LDL protein was delayed by LDL methylation rather than by retention on matrix. Additional experiments indicated the following properties of this interaction: (a) LDL-CE hydrolysis is catalyzed by lysosomal acid lipase; (b) neither scavenger receptors nor the LDL receptor appear necessary for the excess LDL-CE hydrolysis; and (c) LDL-CE hydrolysis in this system is resistant to cellular potassium depletion, which further distinguishes this process from receptor-mediated endocytosis. In summary, experimental systems specifically designed to mimic the in vivo interaction of arterial wall macrophages with subendothelial lipoproteins have demonstrated an initial period of prolonged cell-surface contact in which CE hydrolysis exceeds protein degradation.

  13. Hydrolysis of bovine and caprine milk fat globules by lipoprotein lipase. Effects of heparin and skim milk on lipase distribution and on lipolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sundheim, G.; Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.

    1987-12-01

    Heparin can dissociate lipoprotein lipase from casein micelles, and addition of heparin enhances lipolysis in bovine but not in caprine milk. Heparin shortened the lag-time for binding of lipoprotein lipase to milk fat globules and for lipolysis. Heparin counteracted the inhibitory effects of skim milk on binding of lipase and on lipolysis. Heparin stimulated lipolysis in all bovine milk samples when added before cooling and in spontaneously lipolytic milk samples also when added after cooling. Heparin enhanced lipolysis of isolated milk fat globules. Hence, its effect is not solely due to dissociation of lipoprotein lipase from the casein micelles. Cooling of goat milk caused more marked changes in the distribution of lipase than cooling of bovine milk; the fraction of added /sup 125/I-labeled lipase that bound to cream increased from about 8 to 60%. In addition, caprine skim milk caused less inhibition of lipolysis than bovine skim milk. These observations provide an explanation for the high degree of cold storage lipolysis in goat milk. Heparin had only small effects on the distribution of lipoprotein lipase in caprine milk, which explains why heparin has so little effect on lipolysis in caprine milk. The distribution of /sup 35/S-labeled heparin in bovine milk was studied. In warm milk less than 10% bound to the cream fraction, but when milk was cooled, binding of heparin to cream increased to 45%. These results suggest that there exists in the skim fraction a relatively small amount of a heparin-binding protein, which on cooling of milk adsorbs to the milk fat, or suggests that cooling induces a conformational change in a membrane protein such that its affinity for heparin increases.

  14. Lipoprotein electrostatic properties regulate hepatic lipase association and activity.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Jonathan G; Nguyen, Trang; Sparks, Daniel L

    2007-12-01

    The effect of lipoprotein electrostatic properties on the catalytic regulation of hepatic lipase (HL) was investigated. Enrichment of serum or very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) with oleic acid increased lipoprotein negative charge and stimulated lipid hydrolysis by HL. Similarly, enrichment of serum or isolated lipoproteins with the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidic acid, or phosphatidylserine also increased lipoprotein negative charge and stimulated hydrolysis by HL. Anionic lipids had a small effect on phospholipid hydrolysis, but significantly stimulated triacylglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. High density lipoprotein (HDL) charge appears to have a specific effect on lipolysis. Enrichment of HDL with PI significantly stimulated VLDL-TG hydrolysis by HL. To determine whether HDL charge affects the association of HL with HDL and VLDL, HL-lipoprotein interactions were probed immunochemically. Under normal circumstances, HL associates with HDL particles, and only small amounts bind to VLDL. PI enrichment of HDL blocked the binding of HL with HDL. These data indicate that increasing the negative charge of HDL stimulates VLDL-TG hydrolysis by reducing the association of HL with HDL. Therefore, HDL controls the hydrolysis of VLDL by affecting the interlipoprotein association of HL. Lipoprotein electrostatic properties regulate lipase association and are an important regulator of the binding and activity of lipolytic enzymes.

  15. The pathophysiology of intestinal lipoprotein production

    PubMed Central

    Giammanco, Antonina; Cefalù, Angelo B.; Noto, Davide; Averna, Maurizio R.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal lipoprotein production is a multistep process, essential for the absorption of dietary fats and fat-soluble vitamins. Chylomicron assembly begins in the endoplasmic reticulum with the formation of primordial, phospholipids-rich particles that are then transported to the Golgi for secretion. Several classes of transporters play a role in the selective uptake and/or export of lipids through the villus enterocytes. Once secreted in the lymph stream, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are metabolized by Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of triacylglycerols of very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs) and chylomicrons, thereby delivering free fatty acids to various tissues. Genetic mutations in the genes codifying for these proteins are responsible of different inherited disorders affecting chylomicron metabolism. This review focuses on the molecular pathways that modulate the uptake and the transport of lipoproteins of intestinal origin and it will highlight recent findings on TRLs assembly. PMID:25852563

  16. Release of endothelial cell lipoprotein lipase by plasma lipoproteins and free fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, U.; Witte, L.D.; Goldberg, I.J.

    1989-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) bound to the lumenal surface of vascular endothelial cells is responsible for the hydrolysis of triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins. Studies were performed to investigate whether human plasma lipoproteins and/or free fatty acids would release LPL which was bound to endothelial cells. Purified bovine milk LPL was incubated with cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells resulting in the association of enzyme activity with the cells. When the cells were then incubated with media containing chylomicrons or very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), a concentration-dependent decrease in the cell-associated LPL enzymatic activity was observed. In contrast, incubation with media containing low density lipoproteins or high density lipoproteins produced a much smaller decrease in the cell-associated enzymatic activity. The addition of increasing molar ratios of oleic acid:bovine serum albumin to the media also reduced enzyme activity associated with the endothelial cells. To determine whether the decrease in LPL activity was due to release of the enzyme from the cells or inactivation of the enzyme, studies were performed utilizing radioiodinated bovine LPL. Radiolabeled LPL protein was released from endothelial cells by chylomicrons, VLDL, and by free fatty acids (i.e. oleic acid bound to bovine serum albumin). The release of radiolabeled LPL by VLDL correlated with the generation of free fatty acids from the hydrolysis of VLDL triglyceride by LPL bound to the cells. Inhibition of LPL enzymatic activity by use of a specific monoclonal antibody, reduced the extent of release of /sup 125/I-LPL from the endothelial cells by the added VLDL. These results demonstrated that LPL enzymatic activity and protein were removed from endothelial cells by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons and VLDL) and oleic acid.

  17. Lipolytic degradation of human very low density lipoproteins by human milk lipoprotein lipase: the identification of lipoprotein B as the main lipoprotein degradation product.

    PubMed

    Alaupovic, P; Wang, C S; McConathy, W J; Weiser, D; Downs, D

    1986-01-01

    Although the direct conversion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) into low density (LDL) and high density (HDL) lipoproteins only requires lipoprotein lipase (LPL) as a catalyst and albumin as the fatty acid acceptor, the in vitro-formed LDL and HDL differ chemically from their native counterparts. To investigate the reason(s) for these differences, VLDL were treated with human milk LPL in the presence of albumin, and the LPL-generated LDL1-, LDL2-, and HDL-like particles were characterized by lipid and apolipoprotein composition. Results showed that the removal of apolipoproteins B, C, and E from VLDL was proportional to the degree of triglyceride hydrolysis with LDL2 particles as the major and LDL1 and HDL + VHDL particles as the minor products of a complete in vitro lipolysis of VLDL. In comparison with native counterparts, the in vitro-formed LDL2 and HDL + VHDL were characterized by lower levels of triglyceride and cholesterol ester and higher levels of free cholesterol and lipid phosphorus. The characterization of lipoprotein particles present in the in vitro-produced LDL2 showed that, as in plasma LDL2, lipoprotein B (LP-B) was the major apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein accounting for over 90% of the total apolipoprotein B. Other, minor species of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins included LP-B:C-I:E and LP-B:C-I:C-II:C-III. The lipid composition of in vitro-formed LP-B closely resembled that of plasma LP-B. The major parts of apolipoproteins C and E present in VLDL were released to HDL + VHDL as simple, cholesterol/phospholipid-rich lipoproteins including LP-C-I, LP-C-II, LP-C-III, and LP-E. However, some of these same simple lipoprotein particles were present after ultracentrifugation in the LDL2 density segment because of their hydrated density and/or because they formed, in the absence of naturally occurring acceptors (LP-A-I:A-II), weak associations with LP-B. Thus, the presence of varying amounts of these cholesterol

  18. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content.

  19. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content. PMID:26193433

  20. Arachnid lipoproteins: comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mónica; Garcia, Fernando; Pollero, Ricardo J

    2007-01-01

    Findings on hemolymph lipoproteins in the class Arachnida are reviewed in relation to their lipid and protein compositions, hydrated densities, the capacity of apoproteins to bind lipids, and the influence of xenobiotics on their structures and functionality. The occurrence of hemolymphatic lipoproteins in arachnids has been reported in species belonging to the orders Araneida, Scorpionida, Solpugida and Acarina. However, lipoproteins were properly characterized in only three species, Eurypelma californicum, Polybetes pythagoricus and Latrodectus mirabilis. Like insect and crustaceans the arachnids examined contain high density lipoproteins (HDLs) as predominant circulating lipoproteins. Although in most arachnids these particles resemble those of insect HDLs called "lipophorins", in two arachnid species they differ from lipophorins in their apoproteins, total mass and lipid composition. The hemolymph of P. pythagoricus and L. mirabilis contains another HDL of higher density, while P. pythagoricus and E. californicum hemolymph contain a third lipoprotein of very high density (VHDL). Composition of arachnid lipoproteins regarding apoprotein classes as well as lipid classes differ among species. Hemocyanin, in addition to the classical role of this protein as respiratory pigment, is presented here performing the function of apolipoprotein in some arachnid species. Reports on experiments demonstrating the capacity of hemocyanin to bind neutral and polar lipid classes, including ecdysteroids, are commented. Recent works about the changes evoked by a phosphorous pesticide on the structures and functionality of spider lipoproteins are also reviewed.

  1. Glycosaminoglycan-lipoprotein interaction.

    PubMed

    Olsson, U; Ostergren-Lundén, G; Moses, J

    2001-10-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) bound to various proteoglycans (PGs) present in the cardiovascular system have been proposed to perform a wide range of functions. These include conferring viscoelastic properties; interacting with and modulating growth factors and enzymes; and as receptors and co-receptors in lipoprotein metabolism. Binding of apoB-100 lipoproteins, particularly low density lipoproteins (LDL), to GAGs of extracellular matrix PGs in arteries has been proposed to be an initiating event in development of atherosclerosis. This study was initiated with the aim of getting an overview of the binding patterns of different lipoprotein subclasses with individual GAG categories. We thus evaluated the interaction of lipoproteins with GAGs commonly found in the cardiovascular system using a gel mobility-shift assay developed for this purpose. The same procedure was used to measure lipoproteins binding to metabolically [(35)S]-labeled whole PGs prepared from three cell types, arterial smooth muscle cells, THP-1 macrophages and from HepG2 cells. The effect of GAG composition on PGs on lipoprotein binding was evaluated by enzymatic degradation of the carbohydrate chains. Heparan sulfate was found to bind beta very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL) and a chylomicron remnant model (beta-VLDL+apoE), but not LDL. Dermatan sulfate was found to bind LDL, but not beta-VLDL or the chylomicron remnant model. Chondroitin sulfate and heparin were found to bind all lipoproteins tested (LDL, beta-VLDL and beta-VLDL+apoE) although with different affinities. We can conclude that each lipoprotein subclass tested binds a specific assortment of the GAGs tested. The observations made contribute to the understanding of new and complex mechanisms by which carbohydrate and lipid metabolism may be linked.

  2. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 decreases oxidized lipoprotein cellular association by human macrophages and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Chu, Eugene M; Caslake, Muriel J; Edelstein, Celina; Scanu, Angelo M; Hill, John S

    2010-02-01

    We investigated whether the presence of endogenous or exogenous lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) can modify the cellular association of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxidized lipoprotein(a) (oxLp(a)) by human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and hepatocytes (HepG2). Purified recombinant Lp-PLA2 was used as a source of exogenous enzyme whereas Pefabloc (serine esterase inhibitor) was used to inhibit the endogenous Lp-PLA2 activity associated with isolated lipoproteins. Cellular association studies were performed with DiI-labeled oxLDL or oxLp(a) and human monocyte-derived macrophages and HepG2 cells. Active Lp-PLA2 decreased the cellular association of oxLDL and oxLp(a) in macrophages and HepG2 cells by approximately 30-40%, whereas the inactive enzyme did not significantly change oxidized lipoprotein cellular association by either cell type. OxLDL pretreated by Pefabloc increased oxLDL cellular association by MDM and HepG2 cells compared to untreated oxLDL. Therefore, unlike some lipases, Lp-PLA2 did not appear to have any catalytic independent function in oxLDL cellular association. To assess whether the reduced cellular association mediated by Lp-PLA2 was due to the hydrolysis of oxidized phosphatidylcholine (oxPC), we measured the concentration of lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) in lipoprotein fractions after Lp-PLA2 treatment. LysoPC was increased by 20% (0.4 microM) and 87% (0.7 microM) by active Lp-PLA2 compared to inactive Lp-PLA2 for oxLDL and Lp(a), respectively. LysoPC at higher concentration dose-dependently increased the cellular association of oxLDL and oxLp(a) in MDM and HepG2 cells. We conclude that Lp-PLA2 mediates a decrease in oxidized lipoprotein cellular association in human macrophages and HepG2 cells by reducing the concentration of oxPC within these lipoproteins.

  3. Role of lipoprotein lipase activity on lipoprotein metabolism and the fate of circulating triglycerides in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Herrera, E; Lasunción, M A; Gomez-Coronado, D; Aranda, P; López-Luna, P; Maier, I

    1988-06-01

    The mechanism that induces maternal hypertriglyceridemia in late normal pregnancy, and its physiologic significance are reviewed as a model of the effects of sex steroids on lipoprotein metabolism. In the pregnant rat, maternal carcass fat content progressively increases up to day 19 of gestation, then declines at day 21. The decline may be explained by the augmented lipolytic activity in adipose tissue that is seen in late pregnancy in the rat. This change causes maternal circulating free fatty acids and glycerol levels to rise. Although the liver is the main receptor organ for these metabolites, liver triglyceride content is reduced. Circulating triglycerides and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-triglyceride levels are highly augmented in the pregnant rat, indicating that liver-synthesized triglycerides are rapidly released into the circulation. Similar increments in circulating VLDL-triglycerides are seen in pregnant women during the third trimester of gestation. This increase is coincident with a decrease in plasma postheparin lipoprotein lipase activity, indicating a reduced removal of circulating triglycerides by maternal tissues or a redistribution in their use among the different tissues. During late gestation in the rat, tissue lipoprotein lipase activity varies in different directions; it decreases in adipose tissue, the liver, and to a smaller extent the heart, but increases in placental and mammary gland tissue. These changes play an important role in the fate of circulating triglycerides, which are diverted from uptake by adipose tissue to uptake by the mammary gland for milk synthesis, and probably by the placenta for hydrolysis and transfer of released nonesterified fatty acids to the fetus. After 24 hours of starvation, lipoprotein lipase activity in the liver greatly increases in the rat in late pregnancy; this change is not seen in virgin animals. This alteration is similar to that seen in liver triglyceride content and plasma ketone body

  4. The hydrolysis of polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoagland, P. D.; Fox, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal polymerization of aspartic acid produces a polysuccinimide (I), a chain of aspartoyl residues. An investigation was made of the alkaline hydrolysis of the imide rings of (I) which converts the polyimide to a polypeptide. The alkaline hydrolysis of polyimides can be expected to be kinetically complex due to increasing negative charge generated by carboxylate groups. For this reason, a diimide, phthaloyl-DL-aspartoyl-beta-alanine (IIA) was synthesized for a progressive study of the hydrolysis of polyimides. In addition, this diimide (IIA) can be related to thalidomide and might be expected to exhibit similar reactivity during hydrolysis of the phthalimide ring.

  5. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    DOEpatents

    Cubicciotti, Roger S.; Karu, Alexander E.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  6. Lipoprotein lipase variants interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to modulate obesity traits in Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a candidate gene for obesity based on its role in triglyceride hydrolysis and the partitioning of fatty acids towards storage or oxidation. Whether dietary fatty acids modify LPL associated obesity risk is unknown. We examined five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (...

  7. Surface properties of native human plasma lipoproteins and lipoprotein models.

    PubMed Central

    Massey, J B; Pownall, H J

    1998-01-01

    Plasma lipoprotein surface properties are important but poorly understood determinants of lipoprotein catabolism. To elucidate the relation between surface properties and surface reactivity, the physical properties of surface monolayers of native lipoproteins and lipoprotein models were investigated by fluorescent probes of surface lipid fluidity, surface lateral diffusion, and interfacial polarity, and by their reactivity to Naja melanoleuca phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Native lipoproteins were human very low, low-, and subclass 3 high-density lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL, and HDL3); models were 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) or its ether analog in single-bilayer vesicles, large and small microemulsions of POPC and triolein, and reassembled HDL (apolipoprotein A-I plus phospholipid). Among lipoproteins, surface lipid fluidity increased in the order HDL3 < LDL < VLDL, varying inversely with their (protein + cholesterol)/phospholipid ratios. Models resembled VLDL in fluidity. Both lateral mobility in the surface monolayer and polarity of the interfacial region were lower in native lipoproteins than in models. Among native lipoproteins and models, increased fluidity in the surface monolayer was associated with increased reactivity to PLA2. Addition of cholesterol (up to 20 mol%) to models had little effect on PLA2 activity, whereas the addition of apolipoprotein C-III stimulated it. Single-bilayer vesicles, phospholipid-triolein microemulsions, and VLDL have surface monolayers that are quantitatively similar, and distinct from those of LDL and HDL3. Surface property and enzymatic reactivity differences between lipoproteins and models were associated with differences in surface monolayer protein and cholesterol contents. Thus differences in the surface properties that regulate lipolytic reactivity are a predictable function of surface composition. PMID:9533698

  8. Lipoprotein metabolism indicators improve cardiovascular risk prediction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease risk increases when lipoprotein metabolism is dysfunctional. We have developed a computational model able to derive indicators of lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes from a single lipoprotein profile measurement. This is the first study to inves...

  9. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  10. Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-01

    Activities in this project are aimed at overcoming barriers associated with high capital and operating costs and sub-optimal sugar yields resulting from pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass.

  11. Phytosterols, Phytostanols, and Lipoprotein Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gylling, Helena; Simonen, Piia

    2015-09-17

    The efficacy of phytosterols and phytostanols added to foods and food supplements to obtain significant non-pharmacologic serum and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol reduction is well documented. Irrespective of age, gender, ethnic background, body weight, background diet, or the cause of hypercholesterolemia and, even added to statin treatment, phytosterols and phytostanols at 2 g/day significantly lower LDL cholesterol concentration by 8%-10%. They do not affect the concentrations of high density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipoprotein (a) or serum proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. In some studies, phytosterols and phytostanols have modestly reduced serum triglyceride levels especially in subjects with slightly increased baseline concentrations. Phytosterols and phytostanols lower LDL cholesterol by displacing cholesterol from mixed micelles in the small intestine so that cholesterol absorption is partially inhibited. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis have been carefully evaluated during phytosterol and phytostanol supplementation. However, only a few lipoprotein kinetic studies have been performed, and they revealed that LDL apoprotein B-100 transport rate was reduced. LDL particle size was unchanged, but small dense LDL cholesterol concentration was reduced. In subjects with metabolic syndrome and moderate hypertriglyceridemia, phytostanols reduced not only non- high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration but also serum triglycerides by 27%, and reduced the large and medium size very low density lipoprotein particle concentrations. In the few postprandial studies, the postprandial lipoproteins were reduced, but detailed studies with apoprotein B-48 are lacking. In conclusion, more kinetic studies are required to obtain a more complete understanding of the fasting and postprandial lipoprotein metabolism caused by phytosterols and phytostanols. It seems obvious, however, that the most atherogenic lipoprotein particles will be

  12. Effect of proteolysis of low-density serum lipoproteins on their interaction with macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Karmanskii, I.M.; Kovaleva, G.G.; Viktorova, L.N.; Shpikiter, V.O.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previously postulated, on the basis of changes observed in the structural stability of low-density lipoproteins during treatment with pepsin or aortic cathepsin, that enzymatic modifications may lead to potentiation of the atherogenic properties of the lipoproteins. They also reported that treatment of lipoproteins with trypsin causes an increase in their binding with aortic glycosaminoglycans and to increased degradation by fibroblasts of patients with hereditary hypercholesterolemia. Limited proteolysis of lipoproteins with pepsin facilitated their binding with fibronectin. In this paper the authors investigate the uptake and degradation of low-density lipoproteins by macrophages after their limited hydrolysis by pepsin, an analog of tissue cathepsin D. The lipoproteins were isolated from the serum of healthy blood donors by ultracentrifugation. Iodination of the proteins with I 125 was carried out by the iodine monochloride method. Uptake and retention of the labelled lipoprotein were measured with a gamma counter. The increased uptake of the proteins, partially hydrolized by pepsin, was accompanied by their more intense degradation by macrophages.

  13. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, John D.

    1986-01-01

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock, comprising passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feedstock to glucose; cooling said dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, then feeding said dilute acid stream serially through a plurality of prehydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose; and cooling the dilute acid stream containing glucose after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  14. Intestinal Lipid Absorption and Lipoprotein Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to summarize evidence for the presence of two pathways of lipid absorption and their regulation. Recent findings Lipid absorption involves hydrolysis of dietary fat in the lumen of the intestine followed by the uptake of hydrolyzed products by enterocytes. Lipids are re-synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and are either secreted with chylomicrons and high density lipoproteins or stored as cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Lipids in the droplets are hydrolyzed and are secreted at a later time. Secretion of lipids by the chylomicron and HDL pathways are critically dependent on MTP and ABCA1, respectively, and are regulated independently. Gene ablation studies showed that MTP function and chylomicron assembly is essential for the absorption of triglyceride and retinyl esters. Ablation of MTP abolishes triglyceride absorption and results in massive triglyceride accumulation in enterocytes. Although majority of phospholipid, cholesterol and vitamin E are absorbed through the chylomicron pathway, a significant amount of these lipids are also absorbed via the HDL pathway. Chylomicron assembly and secretion is increased by the enhanced availability of fatty acids, whereas HDL pathway is upregulated by LXR agonists. Intestinal insulin resistance increases chylomicron and might reduce HDL production. Summary Triglycerides are exclusively transported via the chylomicron pathway and this process is critically dependent on MTP. Besides chylomicrons, absorption of phospholipids, free cholesterol, retinol, and vitamin E also involves high density lipoproteins. These two pathways are complementary and are regulated independently. They may be targeted to lower lipid absorption in order to control hyperlipidemia, obesity, metabolic syndrome, steatosis, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis and other disorders. PMID:24751933

  15. [Atherogenic lipoprotein remnants in humans].

    PubMed

    Wikinski, Regina; Schreier, Laura E; Berg, Gabriela A; Brites, Fernando D; López, Graciela; González, Ana I; Zago, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    Remnant lipoproteins (RLPs) are the lipolytic product of triglycerides transported by very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) of hepatic and intestinal origin and intestinal chylomicrons. Lipoprotein lipase activity hydrolyse triglycerides in several steps, producing heterogeneous particles. Fasting plasma concentration in normolipidemic subjects is low, but it increases in post-prandial states. Genetic alterations in Apo-E subtypes increases RLPs plasma concentration and produce dyslipoproteinemia phenotype. RLPs atherogenicity depends on their role as endothelial injuring factors, their impaired recognition by lipoprotein receptors, and their susceptibility to oxidative stress. They also promote the circulation of molecular adhesion molecules, the internalization in subendothelial macrophages via scavenger receptors and the accumulation in foam cells, all of them early mechanisms of atheromatosis. RLPs metabolism has been a subject of controversial studies. Their origin from different lipoproteins may explain their structural heterogeneity, therefore increasing the methodological difficulties to include RLPs in the atherogenic lipoprotein profile in the epidemiological studies of the field. Last advances on metabolism of RLPs and their emergent clinical role justifies an up dated revision of RLPs.

  16. Chylomicron remnant cholesteryl esters as the major constituent of very low density lipoproteins in plasma of cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ross, A C; Zilversmit, D B

    1977-03-01

    Feeding rabbits 500 mg of cholesterol daily for 4 to 15 days greatly increased the concentration of esterified cholesterol in lipoproteins of d less than 1.006 g/ml. The origin of hypercholesterolemic very low density lipoproteins was investigated by monitoring the degradation of labeled lymph chyomicrons administered to normal and cholesterol-fed rabbits. Chylomicrons were labeled in vivo by feeding either 1) [3H]cholesterol and [14C]oleic acid or 2) [14C]cholesterol and [3H]retinyl acetate. After intravenous injection of labeled chylomicrons to recipient rabbits, [14C]triglyceride hydrolysis was equally rapid in normal and cholesterol-fed animals. Normal rabbits rapidly removed from plasma both labeled cholesteryl and retinyl esters, whereas cholesterol-fed rabbits retained nearly 50% of doubly labeled remnants in plasma 25 min after chylomicron injection. Ultracentrifugal separation of plasma into subfractions of very low density lipoproteins showed that chylomicron remnants in cholesterol-fed animals are found among all subclasses of very low density lipoproteins. Analysis of cholesteryl ester specific activity-time curves for the very low density lipoproteins subfraction from hypercholesterolemic plasma showed that nearly all esterified cholesterol in large very low density lipoproteins and approximately 30% of esterified cholesterol in small very low density lipoproteins was derived from chylomicron degradation. Apparently, nearly two-thirds of the esterified cholesterol in total very low density lipoproteins from moderately hypercholesterolemic rabbits is of dietary origin.

  17. Classifying lipoproteins based on their polar profiles.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas; Uversky, Vladimir N; Amkie, Rafael Zonana

    2016-01-01

    The lipoproteins are an important group of cargo proteins known for their unique capability to transport lipids. By applying the Polarity index algorithm, which has a metric that only considers the polar profile of the linear sequences of the lipoprotein group, we obtained an analytical and structural differentiation of all the lipoproteins found in UniProt Database. Also, the functional groups of lipoproteins, and particularly of the set of lipoproteins relevant to atherosclerosis, were analyzed with the same method to reveal their structural preference, and the results of Polarity index analysis were verified by an alternate test, the Cumulative Distribution Function algorithm, applied to the same groups of lipoproteins.

  18. Aerosol preparation of intact lipoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W Henry [Danville, CA; Krauss, Ronald M [Berkeley, CA; Blanche, Patricia J [Berkeley, CA

    2012-01-17

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  19. Ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2007-08-21

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  20. Lipid composition of human serum lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Skipski, V. P.; Barclay, Marion; Barclay, R. K.; Fetzer, Valentina A.; Good, J. J.; Archibald, F. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The lipid compositions of the low-density lipoproteins, the high-density lipoproteins and the ultracentrifugal residue of human serum are presented, with emphasis on certain lipoprotein classes and lipid components not previously described. 2. Except for the lipoproteins with the lowest and highest densities, there is a trend for stepwise successive increase or, respectively, decrease in the relative amounts of the main constituents of lipoproteins. 3. High-density lipoprotein-2 and high-density lipoprotein-3 have different amounts of certain lipids; high-density lipoprotein-2 has relatively more free cholesterol and sphingomyelin; high-density lipoprotein-3 has more free fatty acids, diglycerides and ceramide monohexosides. 4. All the lipoproteins contain hydrocarbons of the alkane series. The greatest amount, which averages 4·4% of total lipid extracted, is in the ultracentrifugal residue; n-alkanes comprise 18–50% of the hydrocarbons. 5. All the lipoproteins contain ceramide monohexosides. The highest relative contents of these glycolipids are in high-density lipoprotein-3 and in the ultracentrifugal residue. 6. The ultracentrifugal residue contains 55% of the total quantity of free fatty acids present in serum. The remaining free fatty acids are distributed among the other lipoprotein classes. 7. The choline-containing phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin) comprise about 90% of the phospholipids in all the lipoprotein classes except the low-density lipoprotein-2, which contains about 80% of these phospholipids. 8. The presence of a large amount of lysophosphatidylcholine in the ultracentrifugal residue and the successive decrease of sphingomyelin from the low-density lipoprotein-1 to the ultracentrifugal residue was confirmed. 9. The low-density lipoprotein-2 and the ultracentrifugal residue are characterized by relatively high contents of the lower glycerides. PMID:6048776

  1. What are Lipoproteins doing in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Eckel, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Lipoproteins in plasma transport lipids between tissues, however, only high density lipoproteins (HDL) appear to traverse the blood brain barrier; thus, lipoproteins found in the brain must be produced within the central nervous system. Apolipoproteins E (ApoE) and ApoJ are the most abundant apolipoproteins in the brain, are mostly synthesized by astrocytes and are found on HDL. In the hippocampus and other brain regions lipoproteins help regulate neurobehavioral functions by processes that are lipoprotein receptor-mediated. Moreover, lipoproteins and their receptors also have roles in the regulation of body weight and energy balance, i.e. through lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and the LDL receptor-related protein (LRP). Thus, understanding lipoproteins and their metabolism in the brain provides a new opportunity with potential therapeutic relevance. PMID:24189266

  2. Lipoprotein metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenghui Gordon; Robson, Simon C.; Yao, Zemin

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an escalating health problem worldwide, covers a spectrum of pathologies characterized by fatty accumulation in hepatocytes in early stages, with potential progression to liver inflammation, fibrosis, and failure. A close, yet poorly understood link exists between NAFLD and dyslipidemia, a constellation of abnormalities in plasma lipoproteins including triglyceride-rich very low density lipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are a group of primarily liver-derived proteins found in serum lipoproteins; they not only play an extracellular role in lipid transport between vital organs through circulation, but also play an important intracellular role in hepatic lipoprotein assembly and secretion. The liver functions as the central hub for lipoprotein metabolism, as it dictates lipoprotein production and to a significant extent modulates lipoprotein clearance. Lipoprotein metabolism is an integral component of hepatocellular lipid homeostasis and is implicated in the pathogenesis, potential diagnosis, and treatment of NAFLD. PMID:23554788

  3. Revisiting the gram-negative lipoprotein paradigm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The processing of lipoproteins (lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered to be an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein n-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted...

  4. Hydrolysis of biomass material

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Orth, Rick J.; Franz, James A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail

    2004-02-17

    A method for selective hydrolysis of the hemicellulose component of a biomass material. The selective hydrolysis produces water-soluble small molecules, particularly monosaccharides. One embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A second embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently enzymatically hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A third embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose by heating the biomass material to greater than 110.degree. C. resulting in an aqueous portion that includes the solubilized hemicellulose and a water insoluble solids portion and subsequently separating the aqueous portion from the water insoluble solids portion. A fourth embodiment is a method for making a composition that includes cellulose, at least one protein and less than about 30 weight % hemicellulose, the method including solubilizing at least a portion of hemicellulose present in a biomass material that also includes cellulose and at least one protein and subsequently separating the solubilized hemicellulose from the cellulose and at least one protein.

  5. [Lipoprotein receptors. Old acquaintances and newcomers].

    PubMed

    Ducobu, J

    1997-02-01

    Lipoprotein receptors are plasma membrane proteins of high affinity which interact with circulating lipoprotein particles. The well characterized LDL receptor continues to be analysed and some new findings on its intracellular mechanisms of action have emerged. New lipoprotein receptors have recently been described: the chylomicron remnant receptor or LDL-related protein (LRP), the lipolysis stimulated receptor (LSR), the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), the HDL receptor (HDLR) and the scavenger receptor (SR). The molecular details of the receptors will facilitate the development of new therapeutic means to improve receptor-mediated clearance of lipoproteins.

  6. Lipoprotein metabolism and lipoprotein lipase in severe cystic acne.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, P; Altomare, G F; Negri, M; Finzi, A F; Vigotti, G; Vergani, C

    1985-01-01

    In severe cystic acne we found low levels of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A (Apo-A) in the presence of normal total lipids. In a larger number of patients, we always observed significantly lower levels of HDL-C and Apo-A than in either age-matched controls or subjects with acne vulgaris. Since lipoprotein lipase is one major determinant of HDL concentration, we assayed the lipase activity in liver and extra-hepatic tissues by the method of Krauss et al. There was highly significant less total and hepatic lipase activity than in age-matched controls. HDL distribution was examined by zonal ultracentrifugation and a decrease in the HDL2 subclass was discovered. Since HDL are inversely correlated to atherosclerosis, cystic acne is one risk factor for atherosclerosis. The linkage between low HDL levels and severe cystic acne should be further investigated.

  7. Effects of hormones on lipids and lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.

    1991-12-01

    Levels of plasma lipids and lipoproteins are strong predictors for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. In women, as in men, numerous factors contribute to variations in plasma lipoproteins that may affect cardiovascular disease risk. These include age, dietary components, adiposity, genetic traits, and hormonal changes. Each of these factors may operate to varying degrees in determining changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles accompanying menopause- Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested increases in levels of cholesterol, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins associated with menopause. High density lipoproteins (HDL), which are higher in women than men and are thought to contribute to relative protection of premenopausal women from cardiovascular disease, remain relatively constant in the years following menopause, although small, and perhaps transient reductions in the HDL{sub 2} subfraction have been reported in relation to reduced estradiol level following menopause. Despite these associations, it has been difficult to determine the role of endogenous hormones in influencing the plasma lipoproteins of postmenopausal women. In principle, the effects of hormone replacement should act to reverse any alterations in lipoprotein metabolism that are due to postmenopausal hormone changes. While there may be beneficial effects on lipoproteins, hormone treatment does not restore a premenopausal lipoprotein profile. Furthermore, it is not dear to what extent exogenous hormone-induced lipoprotein changes contribute to the reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy.

  8. Biogenesis and Membrane Targeting of Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins, which are anchored to membranes through triacyl chains attached to the amino-terminal cysteine. They are involved in various functions localized in cell envelope. Escherichia coli possesses more than 90 species of lipoproteins, most of which are localized in the outer membrane, with others being in the inner membrane. All lipoproteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm with an N-terminal signal peptide, translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, and converted to mature lipoproteins through sequential reactions catalyzed by three lipoprotein-processing enzymes: Lgt, LspA, and Lnt. The sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane requires a system comprising five Lol proteins. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, LolCDE, initiates the sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane. Formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is coupled to this LolCDE-dependent release reaction. LolA accommodates the amino-terminal acyl chain of lipoproteins in its hydrophobic cavity, thereby generating a hydrophilic complex that can traverse the periplasmic space by diffusion. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB on the outer membrane and anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane by the action of LolB. In contrast, since LolCDE does not recognize lipoproteins possessing Asp at position +2, these lipoproteins remain anchored to the inner membrane. Genes for Lol proteins are widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, and Lol-mediated outer membrane targeting of lipoproteins is considered to be the general lipoprotein localization mechanism.

  9. Postprandial Hyperlipidemia and Remnant Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Shizuya

    2017-01-01

    Fasting hypertriglyceridemia is positively associated with the morbidity of coronary heart disease (CHD), and postprandial (non-fasting) hypertriglyceridemia is also correlated with the risk status for CHD, which is related to the increase in chylomicron (CM) remnant lipoproteins produced from the intestine. CM remnant particles, as well as oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) or very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) remnants, are highly atherogenic and act by enhancing systemic inflammation, platelet activation, coagulation, thrombus formation, and macrophage foam cell formation. The cholesterol levels of remnant lipoproteins significantly correlate with small, dense LDL; impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and CHD prevalence. We have developed an assay of apolipoprotein (apo)B-48 levels to evaluate the accumulation of CM remnants. Fasting apoB-48 levels correlate with the morbidity of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, obesity, type III hyperlipoproteinemia, the metabolic syndrome, hypothyroidism, chronic kidney disease, and IGT. Fasting apoB-48 levels also correlate with carotid intima-media thickening and CHD prevalence, and a high apoB-48 level is a significant predictor of CHD risk, independent of the fasting TG level. Diet interventions, such as dietary fibers, polyphenols, medium-chain fatty acids, diacylglycerol, and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), ameliorate postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, moreover, drugs for dyslipidemia (n-3 PUFA, statins, fibrates or ezetimibe) and diabetes concerning incretins (dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitor or glucagon like peptide-1 analogue) may improve postprandial hypertriglyceridemia. Since the accumulation of CM remnants correlates to impaired lipid and glucose metabolism and atherosclerotic cardiovascular events, further studies are required to investigate the characteristics, physiological activities, and functions of CM remnants for the development of new interventions to reduce atherogenicity. PMID

  10. DNA-Catalyzed Amide Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cong; Avins, Joshua L.; Klauser, Paul C.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.; Lee, Yujeong; Silverman, Scott K.

    2016-01-01

    DNA catalysts (deoxyribozymes) for a variety of reactions have been identified by in vitro selection. However, for certain reactions this identification has not been achieved. One important example is DNA-catalyzed amide hydrolysis, for which a previous selection experiment instead led to DNA-catalyzed DNA phosphodiester hydrolysis. Subsequent efforts in which the selection strategy deliberately avoided phosphodiester hydrolysis led to DNA-catalyzed ester and aromatic amide hydrolysis, but aliphatic amide hydrolysis has been elusive. In the present study, we show that including modified nucleotides that bear protein-like functional groups (any one of primary amino, carboxyl, or primary hydroxyl) enables identification of amide-hydrolyzing deoxyribozymes. In one case, the same deoxyribozyme sequence without the modifications still retains substantial catalytic activity. Overall, these findings establish the utility of introducing protein-like functional groups into deoxyribozymes for identifying new catalytic function. The results also suggest the longer-term feasibility of deoxyribozymes as artificial proteases. PMID:26854515

  11. Metabolic Characterization of a Rare Genetic Variation Within APOC3 and Its Lipoprotein Lipase–Independent Effects

    PubMed Central

    Davey Smith, George; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; Würtz, Peter; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J.; Dale, Caroline; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Casas, Juan-Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background— Plasma triglyceride levels have been implicated in atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Apolipoprotein C-III (APOC3) plays a key role in the hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins to remnant particles by lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and their uptake by the liver. A rare variant in APOC3(rs138326449) has been associated with triglyceride, very low–density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein levels, as well as risk of coronary heart disease. We aimed to characterize the impact of this locus across a broad set of mainly lipids-focused metabolic measures. Methods and Results— A high-throughput serum nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics platform was used to quantify 225 metabolic measures in 13 285 participants from 2 European population cohorts. We analyzed the effect of the APOC3 variant on the metabolic measures and used the common LPL(rs12678919) polymorphism to test for LPL-independent effects. Eighty-one metabolic measures showed evidence of association with APOC3(rs138326449). In addition to previously reported triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein associations, the variant was also associated with very low–density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein composition measures, other cholesterol measures, and fatty acids. Comparison of the APOC3 and LPL associations revealed that APOC3 association results for medium and very large very low–density lipoprotein composition are unlikely to be solely predictable by the action of APOC3 through LPL. Conclusions— We characterized the effects of the rare APOC3(rs138326449) loss of function mutation in lipoprotein metabolism, as well as the effects of LPL(rs12678919). Our results improve our understanding of the role of APOC3 in triglyceride metabolism, its LPL independent action, and the complex and correlated nature of human metabolites. PMID:27114411

  12. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS - ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  13. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. I. ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  14. A More Flexible Lipoprotein Sorting Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chahales, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Lipoprotein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria occurs by a conserved pathway, each step of which is considered essential. In contrast to this model, LoVullo and colleagues demonstrate that the N-acyl transferase Lnt is not required in Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This suggests the existence of a more flexible lipoprotein pathway, likely due to a modified Lol transporter complex, and raises the possibility that pathogens may regulate lipoprotein processing to modulate interactions with the host. PMID:25755190

  15. LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE RELEASES ESTERIFIED OXYLIPINS FROM VERY LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Defects in lipoprotein metabolism alter the lipoprotein distribution of oxidized PUFAs, and we speculate that lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is a determinant in the release of VLDL-associated oxylipins. Here, using 12 wk old normolipidemic (lean) and hyperlipidemic (obese) Zucker-rats, we measured PUFA al...

  16. Hydrolysis reactor for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas A.; Matthews, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for hydrolysis of a chemical hydride is provided. The method includes adding a chemical hydride to a reaction chamber and exposing the chemical hydride in the reaction chamber to a temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. in the presence of water and in the absence of an acid or a heterogeneous catalyst, wherein the chemical hydride undergoes hydrolysis to form hydrogen gas and a byproduct material.

  17. Lipoprotein-inspired nanoparticles for cancer theranostics.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth K; Lovell, Jonathan F; Zheng, Gang

    2011-10-18

    Over hundreds of millions of years, animals have evolved endogenous lipoprotein nanoparticles for shuttling hydrophobic molecules to different parts of the body. In the last 70 years, scientists have developed an understanding of lipoprotein function, often in relationship to lipid transport and heart disease. Such biocompatible, lipid-protein complexes are also ideal for loading and delivering cancer therapeutic and diagnostic agents, which means that lipoprotein and lipoprotein-inspired nanoparticles also offer opportunities for cancer theranostics. By mimicking the endogenous shape and structure of lipoproteins, the nanocarrier can remain in circulation for an extended period of time, while largely evading the reticuloendothelial cells in the body's defenses. The small size (less than 30 nm) of the low-density (LDL) and high-density (HDL) classes of lipoproteins allows them to maneuver deeply into tumors. Furthermore, lipoproteins can be targeted to their endogenous receptors, when those are implicated in cancer, or to other cancer receptors. In this Account, we review the field of lipoprotein-inspired nanoparticles related to the delivery of cancer imaging and therapy agents. LDL has innate cancer targeting potential and has been used to incorporate diverse hydrophobic molecules and deliver them to tumors. Nature's method of rerouting LDL in atherosclerosis provides a strategy to extend the cancer targeting potential of lipoproteins beyond its narrow purview. Although LDL has shown promise as a drug nanocarrier for cancer imaging and therapy, increasing evidence indicates that HDL, the smallest lipoprotein, may also be of use for drug targeting and uptake into cancer cells. We also discuss how synthetic HDL-like nanoparticles, which do not include human or recombinant proteins, can deliver molecules directly to the cytoplasm of certain cancer cells, effectively bypassing the endosomal compartment. This strategy could allow HDL-like nanoparticles to be used to

  18. Lipoprotein binding to cultured human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krempler, F; Kostner, G M; Friedl, W; Paulweber, B; Bauer, H; Sandhofer, F

    1987-01-01

    Binding of various 125I-lipoproteins to hepatic receptors was studied on cultured human hepatoma cells (Hep G2). Chylomicrons, isolated from a chylothorax, chylomicron remnants, hypertriglyceridemic very low-density lipoproteins, normotriglyceridemic very low-density lipoproteins (NTG-VLDL), their remnants, low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and HDL-E (an Apo E-rich high-density lipoprotein isolated from the plasma of a patient with primary biliary cirrhosis) were bound by high-affinity receptors. Chylomicron remnants and HDL-E were bound with the highest affinity. The results, obtained from competitive binding experiments, are consistent with the existence of two distinct receptors on Hep G2 cells: (a) a remnant receptor capable of high-affinity binding of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL-E, but not of Apo E free LDL, and (b) a LDL receptor capable of high-affinity binding of LDL, NTG-VLDL, and HDL-E. Specific binding of Apo E-free LDL was completely abolished in the presence of 3 mM EDTA, indicating that binding to the LDL receptor is calcium dependent. Specific binding of chylomicron remnants was not inhibited by the presence of even 10 mM EDTA. Preincubation of the Hep G2 cells in lipoprotein-containing medium resulted in complete suppression of LDL receptors but did not affect the remnant receptors. Hep G2 cells seem to be a suitable model for the study of hepatic receptors for lipoprotein in man. Images PMID:3038957

  19. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Sander

    2008-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that mediates the effect of dietary fatty acids and certain drugs on plasma lipoproteins are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs). Three PPAR isotypes can be distinguished, all of which have a major role in regulating lipoprotein metabolism. PPARα is the molecular target for the fibrate class of drugs. Activation of PPARα in mice and humans markedly reduces hepatic triglyceride production and promotes plasma triglyceride clearance, leading to a clinically significant reduction in plasma triglyceride levels. In addition, plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels are increased upon PPARα activation in humans. PPARγ is the molecular target for the thiazolidinedione class of drugs. Activation of PPARγ in mice and human is generally associated with a modest increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol and a decrease in plasma triglycerides. The latter effect is caused by an increase in lipoprotein lipase-dependent plasma triglyceride clearance. Analogous to PPARα, activation of PPARβ/δ leads to increased plasma HDL-cholesterol and decreased plasma triglyceride levels. In this paper, a fresh perspective on the relation between PPARs and lipoprotein metabolism is presented. The emphasis is on the physiological role of PPARs and the mechanisms underlying the effect of synthetic PPAR agonists on plasma lipoprotein levels. PMID:18288277

  20. Lipoprotein lipase, LDL receptors and apo-lipoproteins in human fetal membranes at term.

    PubMed

    Huter, O; Wolf, H J; Schnetzer, A; Pfaller, K

    1997-11-01

    Ultrastructurally, all cells of human fetal membranes strongly exhibit a large amount of lipid deposits throughout pregnancy. Their origin and function is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization of key components of lipid metabolism in this tissue. Using immunohistochemical techniques, the distribution of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), low density lipoprotein receptors (LDL receptors), and apo-lipoprotein B and E was investigated in 20 human fetal membranes at term. In addition, electron microscopy was used to study the intracellular localization of lipoprotein-sized particles. Amnionic epithelium and trophoblast cells reacted strongly for LPL. LDL receptors and apo-lipoproteins were present in amnionic epithelium and fibroblasts of the amnion. In none of the investigated cells were lipoprotein-sized particles identified. Similar results were obtained in all 20 cases. The findings indicate that lipoprotein from the amniotic fluid or from the maternal circulation may serve as substrate for lipids in human fetal membranes.

  1. Molecular Model of Plasma PAF Acetylhydrolase-Lipoprotein Association: Insights from the Structure.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Prabhavathi; Bahnson, Brian J

    2010-03-08

    Plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), also called lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A₂ (Lp-PLA₂), is a group VIIA PLA₂ enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of PAF and certain oxidized phospholipids. Although the role of PAF-AH as a pro- or anti-atherosclerotic enzyme is highly debated, several studies have shown it to be an independent marker of cardiovascular diseases. In humans the majority of plasma PAF-AH is bound to LDL and a smaller portion to HDL; the majority of the enzyme being associated with small dense LDL and VHDL-1 subclasses. Several studies suggest that the anti- or pro-atherosclerotic tendency of PAF-AH might be dependent on the type of lipoprotein it is associated with. Amino acid residues in PAF-AH necessary for binding to LDL and HDL have been identified. However our understanding of the interaction of PAF-AH with LDL and HDL is still incomplete. In this review we present an overview of what is already known about the interaction of PAF-AH with lipoprotein particles, and we pose questions that are yet to be answered. The recently solved crystal structure of PAF-AH, along with functional work done by others is used as a guide to develop a model of interaction of PAF-AH with lipoprotein particles.

  2. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... measure lipoprotein in serum and plasma. Lipoprotein measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... measure lipoprotein in serum and plasma. Lipoprotein measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... measure lipoprotein in serum and plasma. Lipoprotein measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... measure lipoprotein in serum and plasma. Lipoprotein measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... measure lipoprotein in serum and plasma. Lipoprotein measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal...

  7. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-08-22

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  8. [Lipid and lipoprotein profile in psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Deiana, L; Pes, G M; Carru, C; Tidore, M; Cherchi, G M

    1992-12-01

    Psoriasis is a common relapsing dermatosis characterized by an increased epidermal cell proliferation. In this work we studied the lipid and lipoprotein pattern in 17 patients affected by long-standing psoriasis and in 20 normal controls. Total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol and Apolipoprotein AI and B levels were measured; VLDL, LDL and HDL chemical composition was assessed by preparative ultracentrifugation. Plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels were significantly lower in the patient group; chemical analysis of the main lipoprotein classes showed compositional abnormalities consistent with an accelerated turnover of these particles. We believe that epidermal cell proliferation can play a role in determining these changes.

  9. Nanocrystal Core Lipoprotein Biomimetics for Imaging of Lipoproteins and Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Cormode, David P.; Skajaa, Torjus; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoproteins are natural nanoparticles composed of phospholipids and apolipoproteins that transport lipids throughout the body. As key effectors of lipid homeostasis, the functions of lipoproteins have been demonstrated to be crucial during the development of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore various strategies have been used to study their biology and detect them in vivo. A recent approach has been the production of lipoprotein biomimetic particles loaded with diagnostically active nanocrystals in their core. These include, but are not limited to: quantum dots, iron oxide or gold nanocrystals. Inclusion of these nanocrystals enables the utilization of lipoproteins as probes for a variety of imaging modalities (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, fluorescence) while preserving their biological activity. Furthermore as some lipoproteins naturally accumulate in atherosclerotic plaque or specific tumor tissues, nanocrystal core lipoprotein biomimetics have been developed as contrast agents for early diagnosis of these diseases. PMID:23687557

  10. Understanding Lipoproteins as Transporters of Cholesterol and Other Lipids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggerstaff, Kyle D.; Wooten, Joshua S.

    2004-01-01

    A clear picture of lipoprotein metabolism is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Many students are taught that low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "bad" and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "good." This misconception leads to students thinking that lipoproteins are types of cholesterol rather than…

  11. Enzymatic hydrolysis of organic phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orthophosphate-releasing enzymatic hydrolysis is an alternative means for characterizing organic phosphorus (Po) in animal manure. The approach is not only simple and fast, but can also provide information difficult to obtain by other methods. Currently, commercially available phosphatases are mainl...

  12. Lignocellulose hydrolysis by multienzyme complexes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant renewable resource on the planet. Converting this material into a usable fuel is a multi-step process, the rate-limiting step being enzymatic hydrolysis of organic polymers into monomeric sugars. While the substrate can be complex and require a multitud...

  13. Microbial hydrolysis of steviol glycosides.

    PubMed

    Renwick, A G; Tarka, S M

    2008-07-01

    A review of the role of gut microbiota in the metabolism of the steviol glycosides, stevioside and rebaudioside A, indicates that they are not absorbed intact but undergo hydrolysis by the intestinal microflora to steviol. Steviol is not metabolized by the intestinal flora and is absorbed from the intestine. The rate of hydrolysis for stevioside is greater than for rebaudioside A. Recent studies using mass spectrometry have shown that steviol-16,17-epoxide is not a microbial metabolite of steviol glycosides. Bacteroides species are primarily responsible for hydrolysis via their beta-glucosidase activity. Fecal incubation studies with both human and animal mixed flora provide similar results, and this indicates that the rat is an appropriate model for studies on steviol glycosides. Given the similarity in the microbial metabolism of stevioside and rebaudioside A with the formation of steviol as the single hydrolysis product that is absorbed from the intestinal tract, the toxicological data on stevioside are relevant to the risk assessment of rebaudioside A.

  14. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles*

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. PMID:26018414

  15. Contribution of lipoproteins and lipoprotein processing to endocarditis virulence in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Das, Sankar; Kanamoto, Taisei; Ge, Xiuchun; Xu, Ping; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L; Kitten, Todd

    2009-07-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is an important cause of infective endocarditis. Previous studies have identified lipoproteins as virulence determinants in other streptococcal species. Using a bioinformatic approach, we identified 52 putative lipoprotein genes in S. sanguinis strain SK36 as well as genes encoding the lipoprotein-processing enzymes prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (lgt) and signal peptidase II (lspA). We employed a directed signature-tagged mutagenesis approach to systematically disrupt these genes and screen each mutant for the loss of virulence in an animal model of endocarditis. All mutants were viable. In competitive index assays, mutation of a putative phosphate transporter reduced in vivo competitiveness by 14-fold but also reduced in vitro viability by more than 20-fold. Mutations in lgt, lspA, or an uncharacterized lipoprotein gene reduced competitiveness by two- to threefold in the animal model and in broth culture. Mutation of ssaB, encoding a putative metal transporter, produced a similar effect in culture but reduced in vivo competiveness by >1,000-fold. [(3)H]palmitate labeling and Western blot analysis confirmed that the lgt mutant failed to acylate lipoproteins, that the lspA mutant had a general defect in lipoprotein cleavage, and that SsaB was processed differently in both mutants. These results indicate that the loss of a single lipoprotein, SsaB, dramatically reduces endocarditis virulence, whereas the loss of most other lipoproteins or of normal lipoprotein processing has no more than a minor effect on virulence.

  16. Cholesterol in serum lipoprotein fractions after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Philip C., Jr.; Krauhs, Jane M.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are reported from blood-lipid measurements obtained from 125 Space Shuttle crew members before and after space flight. The data are presented in tables and discussed in detail. The main differences noted between preflight and postflight values are a 12.8-percent decrease in high-density lipoproteins on postflight day 1 and significant decreases in total cholesterol and both high- and low-density lipoproteins later in the 23-day postflight period.

  17. Pathophysiological role and clinical significance of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A₂ (Lp-PLA₂) bound to LDL and HDL.

    PubMed

    Tellis, Constantinos C; Tselepis, Alexandros D

    2014-01-01

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), also named as platelet-activating factor (PAF)-acetylhydrolase, exhibits a Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 activity and catalyzes the hydrolysis of the ester bond at the sn-2 position of PAF and oxidized phospholipids (oxPL). These phospholipids are formed under oxidative and inflammatory conditions, and may play important roles in atherogenesis. The vast majority of plasma Lp-PLA2 mass binds to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) while a smaller amount is associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Lp-PLA2 is also bound to lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and remnant lipoproteins. Several lines of evidence suggest that the role of plasma Lp-PLA2 in atherosclerosis may depend on the type of lipoprotein particle with which this enzyme is associated. Data from large Caucasian population studies have supported plasma Lp-PLA2 (primarily LDL-associated Lp-PLA2) as a cardiovascular risk marker independent of, and additive to, traditional risk factors. On the contrary, the HDL-associated Lp-PLA2 may express antiatherogenic activities and is also independently associated with lower risk for cardiac death. The present review presents data on the biochemical and enzymatic properties of Lp-PLA2 as well as its structural characteristics that determine the association with LDL and HDL. We also critically discuss the possible pathophysiological and clinical significance of the Lp- PLA2 distribution between LDL and HDL in human plasma, in view of the results of prospective epidemiologic studies on the association of Lp-PLA2 with future cardiovascular events as well the recent studies that evaluate the possible effectiveness of specific Lp-PLA2 inhibitors in reducing residual cardiovascular risk.

  18. Ultrafiltration of lipoproteins through a synthetic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Colton, Clark K.; Friedman, Sigmund; Wilson, Dana E.; Lees, Robert S.

    1972-01-01

    To investigate the interaction of lipoproteins with semipermeable membranes, solutions of low density lipoproteins (LDL), very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), mixtures of the two, and diluted, normal, and hyperlipidemic serum were ultrafiltered through a synthetic membrane (500 A nominal pore diameter) using a stirred laboratory ultrafiltration cell. The pressure dependence of ultrafiltrate flux showed that a concentrated layer of lipoproteins was built up at the membrane surface (concentration polarization) and that VLDL was more subject to polarization than LDL. This phenomenon controlled the observed lipoprotein transport behavior. Whereas true membrane rejection (the fraction of the solute on the membrane surface which does not pass through the membrane) was greater than 0.95 for both LDL and VLDL, observed solute rejection varied from nearly 0 to 1.0, depending upon experimental conditions. If concentration polarization occurs in the arterial system, these results suggest that lipoprotein transport into arterial wall may be influenced not only by arterial blood pressure and the properties of the arterial wall, but also by local hemodynamic conditions and by the relative as well as absolute magnitudes of LDL and VLDL concentration. PMID:4344733

  19. A database of bacterial lipoproteins (DOLOP) with functional assignments to predicted lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Babu, M Madan; Priya, M Leena; Selvan, A Tamil; Madera, Martin; Gough, Julian; Aravind, L; Sankaran, K

    2006-04-01

    Lipid modification of the N-terminal Cys residue (N-acyl-S-diacylglyceryl-Cys) has been found to be an essential, ubiquitous, and unique bacterial posttranslational modification. Such a modification allows anchoring of even highly hydrophilic proteins to the membrane which carry out a variety of functions important for bacteria, including pathogenesis. Hence, being able to identify such proteins is of great value. To this end, we have created a comprehensive database of bacterial lipoproteins, called DOLOP, which contains information and links to molecular details for about 278 distinct lipoproteins and predicted lipoproteins from 234 completely sequenced bacterial genomes. The website also features a tool that applies a predictive algorithm to identify the presence or absence of the lipoprotein signal sequence in a user-given sequence. The experimentally verified lipoproteins have been classified into different functional classes and more importantly functional domain assignments using hidden Markov models from the SUPERFAMILY database that have been provided for the predicted lipoproteins. Other features include the following: primary sequence analysis, signal sequence analysis, and search facility and information exchange facility to allow researchers to exchange results on newly characterized lipoproteins. The website, along with additional information on the biosynthetic pathway, statistics on predicted lipoproteins, and related figures, is available at http://www.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/genomes/dolop/.

  20. Revisiting the Gram-Negative Lipoprotein Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    LoVullo, Eric D.; Wright, Lori F.; Isabella, Vincent; Huntley, Jason F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The processing of lipoproteins (Lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted by the Lol system, with most Lpps inserted into the outer membrane (OM). We demonstrate here that the lnt gene is not essential to the Gram-negative pathogen Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis strain Schu or to the live vaccine strain LVS. An LVS Δlnt mutant has a small-colony phenotype on sucrose medium and increased susceptibility to globomycin and rifampin. We provide data indicating that the OM lipoprotein Tul4A (LpnA) is diacylated but that it, and its paralog Tul4B (LpnB), still sort to the OM in the Δlnt mutant. We present a model in which the Lol sorting pathway of Francisella has a modified ABC transporter system that is capable of recognizing and sorting both triacylated and diacylated lipoproteins, and we show that this modified system is present in many other Gram-negative bacteria. We examined this model using Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which has the same Lol architecture as that of Francisella, and found that the lnt gene is not essential in this organism. This work suggests that Gram-negative bacteria fall into two groups, one in which full lipoprotein processing is essential and one in which the final acylation step is not essential, potentially due to the ability of the Lol sorting pathway in these bacteria to sort immature apolipoproteins to the OM. IMPORTANCE This paper describes the novel finding that the final stage in lipoprotein processing (normally considered an essential process) is not required by Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The paper provides a potential reason for this and shows that it may be widespread in other Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25755189

  1. A Phospholipidomic Analysis of All Defined Human Plasma Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Dashti, Monireh; Kulik, Willem; Hoek, Frans; Veerman, Enno C.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2011-01-01

    Since plasma lipoproteins contain both protein and phospholipid components, either may be involved in processes such as atherosclerosis. In this study the identification of plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipids, which is essential for understanding these processes at the molecular level, are performed. LC-ESI/MS, LC-ESI-MS/MS and High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC) analysis of different lipoprotein fractions collected from pooled plasma revealed the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and sphingomyeline (SM) only on lipoproteins and phosphatidylcholine (PC), Lyso-PC on both lipoproteins and plasma lipoprotein free fraction (PLFF). Cardiolipin, phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and Phosphatidylserine (PS) were observed neither in the lipoprotein fractions nor in PLFF. All three approaches led to the same results regarding phospholipids occurrence in plasma lipoproteins and PLFF. A high abundancy of PE and SM was observed in VLDL and LDL fractions respectively. This study provides for the first time the knowledge about the phospholipid composition of all defined plasma lipoproteins. PMID:22355656

  2. Limiting factors of starch hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Colonna, P; Leloup, V; Buléon, A

    1992-10-01

    Foods appear as complex structures, in which starch may be present in different forms. These, including the molecular characteristics and the crystalline organization, depend on processing conditions and compositions of ingredients. The main changes in starch macro- and microstructures are the increase of surface area to volume ratio in the solid phase, the modification of the crystallinity as affected by gelatinization and gelation, and the depolymerization of amylose and amylopectin. Starch modification may be estimated by different methodologies, which should be selected according to the level of structure considered. When amylose and amylopectin are in solution, rapid and total hydrolysis leads to the formation of a mixture of linear oligosaccharides and branched alpha-limit dextrins. However, starch usually occurs in foods as solid structures. Structural factors of starchy materials influence their enzymic hydrolysis. A better understanding of the enzymatic process enables the identification of the structural factors limiting hydrolysis: diffusion of enzyme molecules, porosity of solid substrates, adsorption of enzymes onto solid substrates, and the catalytic event. A mechanistic modelling should be possible in the future.

  3. Hydrolysis of fluorosilanes: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Cypryk, Marek

    2005-12-29

    Hydrolysis and condensation of simple trifluorosilanes, HSiF3 and MeSiF3, was studied by quantum mechanical methods. Hydrolysis of fluorosilanes is highly endothermic. The Gibbs free energy of the first reaction step in the gas phase is 31.4 kJ/mol, which corresponds to an equilibrium constant of 10(-6). Hydrolysis of the subsequent fluorine atoms in trifluorosilanes is thermodynamically more unfavorable than the first step of substitution. No significant difference in thermodynamics of hydrolysis was found between HSiF3 and MeSiF3. The activation energy for hydrolysis by a water dimer is significantly lower than that for hydrolysis by a water monomer. The former reaction is also less unfavorable thermodynamically, due to a high binding energy of the HF-H2O complex formed as a product of hydrolysis. Self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) calculations show that hydrolysis of trifluorosilanes in aqueous medium has lower activation energy than in the gas phase. It is also thermodynamically less unfavorable, due to better solvation of the products. Homofunctional condensation of HSiF2OH is thermodynamically favored. The equilibrium mixture for hydrolysis/condensation of RSiF3 in water is predicted to contain ca. 2.3% disiloxane (HF2Si)2O, if 100-fold excess of water relative to silane is assumed. Further hydrolysis of (HF2Si)2O is negligible. The thermodynamics of fluorosilane hydrolysis contrasts with that of chlorosilanes, where both hydrolysis and condensation are strongly favorable. Moreover, in the case of trichlorosilanes each subsequent hydrolysis step is more facile, leading to the product of full hydrolysis, RSi(OH)3.

  4. Immune response to lipoproteins in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Samson, Sonia; Mundkur, Lakshmi; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  5. Lipids and lipoproteins in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J L; Chamberlain, S; Robinson, N

    1980-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessively inherited disease affecting the nervous system with a high incidence of heart involvement. Abnormalities of lipid metabolism are known to be associated with several progressive ataxic conditions. In this study of 46 Friedreich's ataxia patients, serum lipids, fatty acids and lipoproteins were assayed and compared with some earlier findings on Friedreich's ataxia and related disorders. Abnormalities of low and high density lipoproteins suggestive of a major defect have been reported; in the present study the level and chemical composition of high density lipoprotein has been assessed in 20 Friedreich's ataxia patients but previous abnormalities could not be substantiated. Lipid compositional analysis of Friedreich's ataxia central nervous tissue and heart, which has not been previously reported, did not markedly differ from control tissue. PMID:7359148

  6. HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrolytic processes provide the baseline loss rate for any chemical in an aqueous envi- ronment. Although various hydrolytic pathways account for significant degradation of certain classes of organic chemicals, other organic structures are completely inert. Strictly speaking, hy...

  7. Lipoprotein apheresis for the treatment of elevated circulating levels of lipoprotein(a): a critical literature review

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Capuzzo, Enrico; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a), which consists of a low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle linked to an apolipoprotein(a) moiety, is currently considered an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease due to its atherogenic (LDL-like) and prothrombotic (plasminogen-like) properties. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current and newer therapies for lowering increased lipoprotein(a) levels, focusing on lipoprotein apheresis. After a systematic literature search, we identified ten studies which, overall, documented that lipoprotein apheresis is effective in reducing increased lipoprotein(a) levels and cardiovascular events. PMID:26710351

  8. Analysis of individual lipoproteins and liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, D.L.; Keller, R.A.; Nolan, J.P.

    1997-08-01

    We describe the application of single molecule detection (SMD) technologies for the analysis of natural (serum lipoproteins) and synthetic (liposomes) transport systems. The need for advanced analytical procedures of these complex and important systems is presented with the specific enhancements afforded by SMD with flowing sample streams. In contrast to bulk measurements which yield only average values, measurement of individual species allows creation of population histograms from heterogeneous samples. The data are acquired in minutes and the analysis requires relatively small sample quantities. Preliminary data are presented from the analysis of low density lipoprotein, and multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of and Immune Responses to Ehrlichia chaffeensis Lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Lin, Mingqun ..; Wang, Xueqi; Kikuchi, Takane; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2008-08-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligatory intracellular Gram-negative bacterium and is the etiologic agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME). Although E. chaffeensis induces generation of several cytokines and chemokines by leukocytes, E. chaffeensis lacks LPS and peptidoglycan. Bioinfomatic analysis of the E. chaffeensis genome, however, predicted genes encoding fifteen lipoproteins and three posttranslational lipoprotein processing enzymes. The present study showed that using multidimensional liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry, all predicted lipoproteins as well as lipoprotein-processing enzymes were expressed by E. chaffeensis cultured in human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60. Consistent with this observation, a signal peptidase II inhibitor, globomycin was found to inhibit E. chaffeensis infection and lipoprotein processing in HL-60 cell culture. To study in vivo E.chaffeensis lipoprotein expression and host immune responses to E. chaffeensis lipoproteins, thirteen E. chaffeensis lipoprotein genes were cloned into a mammalian expression vector.

  10. Allotypy of High Density Lipoprotein of Rabbit Serum

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Kåre; Boman, Helge; Torsvik, Harald; Walker, Suzanne M.

    1971-01-01

    A common antigenic polymorphism of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in rabbit serum is described. The presence or absence of an antigen termed Hl 1 appears to be controlled by autosomal dominant inheritance. The polymorphism should be a useful tool in the study of serum lipoproteins, particularly since genetic polymorphisms within the low density lipoprotein are already known in several species. The Hl polymorphism may make the rabbit more useful for model studies of serum lipoproteins in health and disease. Images PMID:4995822

  11. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose to yield glucose

    DOEpatents

    Tsao, George T.; Ladisch, Michael R.; Bose, Arindam

    1979-01-01

    A process to yield glucose from cellulose through acid hydrolysis. Cellulose is recovered from cellulosic materials, preferably by pretreating the cellulosic materials by dissolving the cellulosic materials in Cadoxen or a chelating metal caustic swelling solvent and then precipitating the cellulose therefrom. Hydrolysis is accomplished using an acid, preferably dilute sulfuric acid, and the glucose is yielded substantially without side products. Lignin may be removed either before or after hydrolysis.

  12. Low temperature hydrolysis for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Fischer, J.R.; Iannotti, E.L.

    1982-12-01

    Hydrolysis of corn was compared at two temperatures of 100/sup 0/C and 75/sup 0/C. Starch conversion to dextrose and then ethanol were determined. Yields were 10.69% ethanol in the fermented beer for 100/sup 0/C and 9.89% for 75/sup 0/C. The 75/sup 0/C hydrolysis required about 100 MJ less thermal energy than the 100/sup 0/C hydrolysis. The effects of contamination and respiration were also assessed.

  13. Acid Hydrolysis of Trioxalatocobaltate (III) Ion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggans, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an investigation involving acid hydrolysis and using both volumetric and kinetic techniques. Presents examples of the determination of the rate constant and its variation with temperature. (GS)

  14. Limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol assay for diagnostic use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    I wish to comment on the limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RemL-C) assay reported in Clinical Chemistry. Remnants are lipoprotein particles produced after newly formed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) of either hepatic or intestinal origin enter the plasma space and unde...

  15. Human intestinal lipoproteins. Studies in chyluric subjects.

    PubMed

    Green, P H; Glickman, R M; Saudek, C D; Blum, C B; Tall, A R

    1979-07-01

    To explore the role of the human intestine as a source of apolipoproteins, we have studied intestinal lipoproteins and apoprotein secretion in two subjects with chyluria (mesenteric lymphatic-urinary fistulae). After oral corn oil, apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) output in urine increased in parallel to urinary triglyceride. One subject, on two occasions, after 40 g of corn oil, excreted 8.4 and 8.6 g of triglyceride together with 196 and 199 mg apoA-I and on one occasion, 56 mg apoA-II. The other subject, after 40 g corn oil, excreted 0.3 g triglyceride and 17.5 mg apoA-I, and, after 100 g of corn oil, excreted 44.8 mg apoA-I and 5.8 mg apoA-II. 14.5+/-2.1% of apoA-I and 17.7+/-4.3% of apoA-II in chylous urine was in the d < 1.006 fraction (chylomicrons and very low density lipoprotein). Calculations based on the amount of apoA-I and apoA-II excreted on triglyceride-rich lipoproteins revealed that for these lipid loads, intestinal secretion could account for 50 and 33% of the calculated daily synthetic rate of apoA-I and apoA-II, respectively. Similarly, subject 2 excreted 48-70% and 14% of the calculated daily synthetic rate of apoA-I and apoA-II, respectively. Chylous urine contained chylomicrons, very low density lipoproteins and high density lipoproteins, all of which contained apoA-I. Chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins contained a previously unreported human apoprotein of 46,000 mol wt. We have called this apoprotein apoA-IV because of the similarity of its molecular weight and amino acid composition to rat apoA-IV. In sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, chylomicron apoproteins consisted of apoB 3.4+/-0.7%, apoA-IV 10.0+/-3.3%, apoE 4.4+/-0.3%, apoA-I 15.0+/-1.8%, and apoC and apoA-II 43.3+/-11.3%. Very low density lipoprotein contained more apoB and apoA-IV and less apoC than chylomicrons. Ouchterlony immunodiffusion of chylomicron apoproteins revealed the presence of apoC-I, apoC-II, and apoC-III. In contrast, plasma

  16. Six new loci associated with blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and blood triglycerides reflect key metabolic processes including sensitivity to insulin. Blood lipoprotein and lipid concentrations are heritable. To date, the identification o...

  17. Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David B

    2011-06-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by microorganisms is a key step in the global carbon cycle. Despite its abundance only a small percentage of microorganisms can degrade cellulose, probably because it is present in recalcitrant cell walls. There are at least five distinct mechanisms used by different microorganisms to degrade cellulose all of which involve cellulases. Cellulolytic organisms and cellulases are extremely diverse possibly because their natural substrates, plant cell walls, are very diverse. At this time the microbial ecology of cellulose degradation in any environment is still not clearly understood even though there is a great deal of information available about the bovine rumen. Two major problems that limit our understanding of this area are the vast diversity of organisms present in most cellulose degrading environments and the inability to culture most of them.

  18. Rate of Hydrolysis of Tertiary Halogeno Alkanes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment to measure the relative rate of hydrolysis of the 2-x-2 methylpropanes, where x is bromo, chloro or iodo. The results are plotted on a graph from which the relative rate of hydrolysis can be deduced. (Author/GA)

  19. Microwave Pretreatment For Hydrolysis Of Cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; George, Clifford E.; Lightsey, George R.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave pretreatment enhances enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes into soluble saccharides used as feedstocks for foods, fuels, and other products. Low consumption of energy, high yield, and low risk of proposed hydrolysis process incorporating microwave pretreatment makes process viable alternative to composting.

  20. Binding of anthracycline derivatives to human serum lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chassany, O; Urien, S; Claudepierre, P; Bastian, G; Tillement, J P

    1994-01-01

    The binding of eight anthracycline analogues (including mitoxantrone) to isolated serum lipoproteins (high, low and very low density lipoproteins) was studied in order to elucidate some determinants of their interaction with lipidic structures. Serum lipoproteins were isolated by ultracentrifugation. Drug binding experiments were run by ultrafiltration at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4. Anthracycline concentrations (total and free) were determined by HPLC with fluorometric detection. All the ligands were significantly bound to the three lipoprotein classes, and for each ligand the binding increased as the lipidic fraction of lipoprotein increased. From doxorubicin to iododoxorubicin, there was a tenfold increase in lipoprotein binding (doxorubicin < mitoxantrone < epirubicin < daunorubicin < pirarubicin < aclarubicin < zorubicin < iododoxorubicin). For all the ligands studied, the extent of lipoprotein binding appears to be related to chemical determinants of lipophilicity.

  1. Hitch-hiking between cells on lipoprotein particles.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Sylvia; Harterink, Martin; Sprong, Hein

    2007-04-01

    Cell surface proteins containing covalently linked lipids associate with specialized membrane domains. Morphogens like Hedgehog and Wnt use their lipid anchors to bind to lipoprotein particles and employ lipoproteins to travel through tissues. Removal of their lipid anchors or decreasing lipoprotein levels give rise to adverse Hedgehog and Wnt signaling. Some parasites can also transfer their glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored surface proteins to host lipoprotein particles. These antigen-loaded lipoproteins spread throughout the circulation, and probably hamper an adequate immune response by killing neutrophils. Together, these findings imply a widespread role for lipoproteins in intercellular transfer of lipid-anchored surface proteins, and may have various physiological consequences. Here, we discuss how lipid-modified proteins may be transferred to and from lipoproteins at the cellular level.

  2. Analyzing the molecular mechanism of lipoprotein localization in Brucella

    PubMed Central

    Goolab, Shivani; Roth, Robyn L.; van Heerden, Henriette; Crampton, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins possess diverse structure and functionality, ranging from bacterial physiology to pathogenic processes. As such many lipoproteins, originating from Brucella are exploited as potential vaccines to countermeasure brucellosis infection in the host. These membrane proteins are translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane where they are anchored peripherally by a multifaceted targeting mechanism. Although much research has focused on the identification and classification of Brucella lipoproteins and their potential use as vaccine candidates for the treatment of Brucellosis, the underlying route for the translocation of these lipoproteins to the outer surface of the Brucella (and other pathogens) outer membrane (OM) remains mostly unknown. This is partly due to the complexity of the organism and evasive tactics used to escape the host immune system, the variation in biological structure and activity of lipoproteins, combined with the complex nature of the translocation machinery. The biosynthetic pathway of Brucella lipoproteins involves a distinct secretion system aiding translocation from the cytoplasm, where they are modified by lipidation, sorted by the lipoprotein localization machinery pathway and thereafter equipped for export to the OM. Surface localized lipoproteins in Brucella may employ a lipoprotein flippase or the β-barrel assembly complex for translocation. This review provides an overview of the characterized Brucella OM proteins that form part of the OM, including a handful of other characterized bacterial lipoproteins and their mechanisms of translocation. Lipoprotein localization pathways in gram negative bacteria will be used as a model to identify gaps in Brucella lipoprotein localization and infer a potential pathway. Of particular interest are the dual topology lipoproteins identified in Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenza. The localization and topology of these lipoproteins from other gram negative bacteria

  3. Lipoprotein secretion: It takes two to TANGO.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2016-05-09

    An unsolved mystery in cell biology is how unusually large secretory cargoes are exported from the endoplasmic reticulum. In this issue, Santos et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201603072) report the function of a Mia2/cTAGE5 transcript fusion, named TALI, in the endoplasmic reticulum export of chylomicrons and very low-density lipoproteins, but not collagen XII.

  4. Identification of a small molecule that stabilizes lipoprotein lipase in vitro and lowers triglycerides in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mikael; Caraballo, Rémi; Ericsson, Madelene; Lookene, Aivar; Enquist, Per-Anders; Elofsson, Mikael; Nilsson, Stefan K; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2014-07-25

    Patients at increased cardiovascular risk commonly display high levels of plasma triglycerides (TGs), elevated LDL cholesterol, small dense LDL particles and low levels of HDL-cholesterol. Many remain at high risk even after successful statin therapy, presumably because TG levels remain high. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) maintains TG homeostasis in blood by hydrolysis of TG-rich lipoproteins. Efficient clearance of TGs is accompanied by increased levels of HDL-cholesterol and decreased levels of small dense LDL. Given the central role of LPL in lipid metabolism we sought to find small molecules that could increase LPL activity and serve as starting points for drug development efforts against cardiovascular disease. Using a small molecule screening approach we have identified small molecules that can protect LPL from inactivation by the controller protein angiopoietin-like protein 4 during incubations in vitro. One of the selected compounds, 50F10, was directly shown to preserve the active homodimer structure of LPL, as demonstrated by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. On injection to hypertriglyceridemic apolipoprotein A-V deficient mice the compound ameliorated the postprandial response after an olive oil gavage. This is a potential lead compound for the development of drugs that could reduce the residual risk associated with elevated plasma TGs in dyslipidemia.

  5. Linkage of low-density lipoprotein size to the lipoprotein lipase gene in heterozygous lipoprotein lipase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Hokanson, J E; Brunzell, J D; Jarvik, G P; Wijsman, E M; Austin, M A

    1999-01-01

    Small low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles are a genetically influenced coronary disease risk factor. Lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the formation of LDL particles. The current study examined genetic linkage of LDL particle size to the LpL gene in five families with structural mutations in the LpL gene. LDL particle size was smaller among the heterozygous subjects, compared with controls. Among heterozygous subjects, 44% were classified as affected by LDL subclass phenotype B, compared with 8% of normal family members. Plasma triglyceride levels were significantly higher, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were lower, in heterozygous subjects, compared with normal subjects, after age and sex adjustment. A highly significant LOD score of 6.24 at straight theta=0 was obtained for linkage of LDL particle size to the LpL gene, after adjustment of LDL particle size for within-genotype variance resulting from triglyceride and HDL-C. Failure to adjust for this variance led to only a modest positive LOD score of 1.54 at straight theta=0. Classifying small LDL particles as a qualitative trait (LDL subclass phenotype B) provided only suggestive evidence for linkage to the LpL gene (LOD=1. 65 at straight theta=0). Thus, use of the quantitative trait adjusted for within-genotype variance, resulting from physiologic covariates, was crucial for detection of significant evidence of linkage in this study. These results indicate that heterozygous LpL deficiency may be one cause of small LDL particles and may provide a potential mechanism for the increase in coronary disease seen in heterozygous LpL deficiency. This study also demonstrates a successful strategy of genotypic specific adjustment of complex traits in mapping a quantitative trait locus. PMID:9973300

  6. Retinal pigment epithelial acid lipase activity and lipoprotein receptors: effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Victor M

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show that fish oil-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, delivered to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by circulating low-density lipoproteins (LDL), enhance already considerable RPE lysosomal acid lipase activity, providing for more efficient hydrolysis of intralysosomal RPE lipids, an effect that may help prevent development of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). METHODS: Colorimetric biochemical and histochemical techniques were used to demonstrate RPE acid lipase in situ, in vitro, and after challenge with phagocytic stimuli. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of fluorescently labeled native, aceto-acetylated, and oxidized LDL was studied in vitro and in vivo. LDL effects on RPE lysosomal enzymes were assessed. Lysosomal enzyme activity was compared in RPE cells from monkeys fed diets rich in fish oil to those from control animals and in cultured RPE cells exposed to sera from these monkeys. RESULTS: RPE acid lipase activity was substantial and comparable to that of mononuclear phagocytes. Acid lipase activity increased significantly following phagocytic challenge with photoreceptor outer segment (POS) membranes. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of labeled lipoproteins was determined in vitro. Distinctive uptake of labeled lipoproteins occurred in RPE cells and mononuclear phagocytes in vivo. Native LDL enhanced RPE lysosomal enzyme activity. RPE lysosomal enzymes increased significantly in RPE cells from monkeys fed fish oil-rich diets and in cultured RPE cells exposed to their sera. CONCLUSIONS: RPE cells contain substantial acid lipase for efficient metabolism of lipids imbibed by POS phagocytosis and LDL uptake. Diets rich in fish oil-derived omega-3 fatty acids, by enhancing acid lipase, may reduce RPE lipofuscin accumulation, RPE oxidative damage, and the development of ARMD. PMID:12545699

  7. [Reducing low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels by apheresis].

    PubMed

    Reiber, I; Gógl, A

    1994-03-13

    The predominate number of homozygote familial hypercholesterolemic and approximately 20% of heterozygotes are resistant to low cholesterol diet and lipid lowering pharmacological treatment even in combination of 2 or more drugs. In such cases, the selective lipoprotein apheresis has become a promising alternative and indicated absolute (homozygotes) or relative (heterozygotes). The combination of low density lipoprotein apheresis, together with diet and drugs, should allow a maximal lowering of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (-60-70%). Besides low density lipoprotein, various apheresis procedures may also eliminate other potentially atherogenic factors, such as lipoprotein(a) and fibrinogen and acutely improve the haemo-rheological status of the patient. The authors review several lipoprotein apheresis procedures with varying degrees of selectivity, those have and furthermore analysis the advantages and disadvantages and cost of each procedure.

  8. Cotton cellulose: enzyme adsorption and enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beltrame, P.L.; Carniti, P.; Focher, B.; Marzetti, A.; Cattaneo, M.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of a crude cellulase complex from Trichoderma viride on variously pretreated cotton cellulose samples was studied in the framework of the Langmuir approach at 2-8 degrees. The saturation amount of adsorbed enzyme was related to the susceptibility of the substrates to hydrolysis. In every case the adsorption process was faster by 2-3 orders of magnitude than the hydrolysis step to give end products. For ZnCl/sub 2/-treated cotton cellulose the Langmuir parameters correlated fairly well with the value of the Michaelis constant, measured for its enzymic hydrolysis, and the adsorptive complex was indistinguishable from the complex of the Michaelis-Menten model for the hydrolysis.

  9. Continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Fieber, C.A.; Roberts, R.S.; Faass, G.S.; Muzzy, J.D.; Colcord, A.R.; Bery, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    The continuous hydrolysis of poplar chips by steam at 300-350 psi resulted in the separation of hemicellulose (I) cellulose and lignin components. The I fraction was readily depolymerised by steam to acetic acid, furfural, methanol, and xylose.

  10. Calcineurin hydrolysis of para-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate.

    PubMed

    Spannaus-Martin, Donna J; Martin, Bruce L

    2004-04-01

    para-Nitrophenyl phosphorothioate (pNPT) was hydrolyzed by calcineurin at initial rates slightly, but comparable to rates for para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP). Kinetic characterization yielded higher estimates for both Km and Vmax compared to pNPP. Metal ion activation of phosphorothioate hydrolysis was more promiscuous. Unlike the hydrolysis of with pNPP, Ca2+, Mg2+, and Ba2+ activated calcineurin as well as Mn2+.

  11. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  13. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Michael D.; Fazio, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol-rich, apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins are now widely accepted as the most important causal agents of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Multiple unequivocal and orthogonal lines of evidence all converge on low-density lipoprotein and related particles as being the principal actors in the genesis of atherosclerosis. Here, we review the fundamental role of atherogenic apoB-containing lipoproteins in cardiovascular disease and several other humoral and parietal factors that are required to initiate and maintain arterial degeneration. The biology of foam cells and their interactions with high-density lipoproteins, including cholesterol efflux, are also briefly reviewed. PMID:28299190

  14. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-05

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology.

  15. Regulation of high density lipoprotein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.

    1982-03-01

    An increasing awareness of the physiologic and pathologic importance of serum high density lipoproteins (HDL) has led to a large number of observations regarding factors which influence their concentrations. HDL consists of a heterogeneous collection of macromolecules with diverse physical properties and chemical constituents. While laboratory techniques have made it possible to measure HDL and their individual components, there are as yet large gaps in our knowledge of the biochemical mechanisms and clinical significance of changes in these laboratory parameters. In this review, current concepts of the structure and metabolism of HDL will be briefly summarized, and the factors influencing their levels in humans will be surveyed. 313 references.

  16. Lipolysis Produces Changes in the Immunoreactivity and Cell Reactivity of Very Low Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Schonfeld, G.; Patsch, W.; Pfleger, B.; Witztum, J. L.; Weidman, S. W.

    1979-01-01

    Smaller very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) remnants interact more readily with tissues than do larger “intact” VLDL. This may be related to changes in the availability of VLDL apoproteins on the surface of the lipoproteins. To test this hypothesis VLDL were incubated at 37°C with bovine milk lipase (LPL), and the abilities of LPL-treated VLDL preparations to compete with 125I-low density lipoproteins (LDL) for interaction with cultured normal human fibroblasts were measured. At the same time, the immunologic activities of these preparations were also tested by double antibody radioimmunoassay. Triglyceride (TG) contents of VLDL fell by 30-90% during incubation with LPL and, on zonal ultracentrifugation, VLDL of faster Svedberg unit of flotation (Sf1.063) rates (>150) were gradually converted to smaller VLDL with lower Sf rates (21-60). LPL-treated VLDL competed two to five times more effectively with 125I-LDL for binding to cellular receptors than did control VLDL. Control VLDL incubated with heat-inactivated LPL at 37°C, or with active LPL at 4°C had unaltered cell reactivities and TG contents compared with VLDL incubated without any enzyme. The direct uptake and degradation of LPL-treated VLDL was also assessed by using VLDL 125I-labeled in apoprotein (Apo)B. LPL-treated VLDL-125I-ApoB were taken up and degraded by fibroblast at greater rates than were control VLDL-125I-ApoB. Thus, hydrolysis of VLDL lipids was accompanied by an increased ability of VLDL to interact with fibroblasts. The immunoreactivity of ApoB in the same VLDL preparations, expressed as the “apparent ApoB contents” of LPL-treated VLDL, increased by 10-50% (P < 0.02) in those assays that contained anti-LDL antisera, but the ApoB of control VLDL remained constant. However, assays that contained antisera directed against ApoB isolated from VLDL did not distinguish between LPL-treated and control VLDL. Thus, VLDL lipid hydrolysis was accompanied by changes in the immunoreactivity of

  17. Synergy between cellulases and pectinases in the hydrolysis of hemp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junhua; Pakarinen, Annukka; Viikari, Liisa

    2013-02-01

    The impact of pectinases in the hydrolysis of fresh, steam-exploded and ensiled hemp was investigated and the synergy between cellulases, pectinases and xylanase in the hydrolysis was evaluated. About half; 59.3% and 46.1% of pectin in the steam-exploded and ensiled hemp, respectively, could be removed by a low dosage of pectinases used. Pectinases were more efficient than xylanase in the hydrolysis of fresh and ensiled hemp whereas xylanase showed higher hydrolytic efficiency than the pectinase preparation used in the hydrolysis of steam-exploded hemp. Clear synergistic action between cellulases and xylanase could be observed in the hydrolysis of steam-exploded hemp. Supplementation of pectinase resulted in clear synergism with cellulases in the hydrolysis of all hemp substrates. Highest hydrolysis yield of steam-exploded hemp was obtained in the hydrolysis with cellulases and xylanase. In the hydrolysis of ensiled hemp, the synergistic action between cellulases and pectinases was more obvious for efficient hydrolysis.

  18. Lipoprotein Receptors Redundantly Participate in Entry of Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satomi; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Ono, Chikako; Uemura, Kentaro; Kawachi, Yukako; Shiokawa, Mai; Mori, Hiroyuki; Wada, Masami; Shima, Ryoichi; Okamoto, Toru; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Chayama, Kazuaki; Wakita, Takaji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-05-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) are known to be involved in entry of hepatitis C virus (HCV), but their precise roles and their interplay are not fully understood. In this study, deficiency of both SR-B1 and LDLR in Huh7 cells was shown to impair the entry of HCV more strongly than deficiency of either SR-B1 or LDLR alone. In addition, exogenous expression of not only SR-B1 and LDLR but also very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) rescued HCV entry in the SR-B1 and LDLR double-knockout cells, suggesting that VLDLR has similar roles in HCV entry. VLDLR is a lipoprotein receptor, but the level of its hepatic expression was lower than those of SR-B1 and LDLR. Moreover, expression of mutant lipoprotein receptors incapable of binding to or uptake of lipid resulted in no or slight enhancement of HCV entry in the double-knockout cells, suggesting that binding and/or uptake activities of lipid by lipoprotein receptors are essential for HCV entry. In addition, rescue of infectivity in the double-knockout cells by the expression of the lipoprotein receptors was not observed following infection with pseudotype particles bearing HCV envelope proteins produced in non-hepatic cells, suggesting that lipoproteins associated with HCV particles participate in the entry through their interaction with lipoprotein receptors. Buoyant density gradient analysis revealed that HCV utilizes these lipoprotein receptors in a manner dependent on the lipoproteins associated with HCV particles. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoprotein receptors redundantly participate in the entry of HCV.

  19. Lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, and retinal arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Javadzadeh, Alireza; Argani, Hassan; Nezami, Nariman; Rashtchizadeh, Nadereh; Rafeey, Mandana; Rohbaninoubar, Mohammad; Rahimi-Ardabili, Babak

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Elevated levels of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and homocysteine (Hcy) have been implicated as risk factors for vascular diseases. The study was performed to explore the possible relationship between retinal arteriosclerosis and serum Lp(a) and Hcy levels. Methods Study subjects consisted of 80 nonsmoking male patients with retinal arteriosclerosis and 54 healthy nonsmoker males as controls. Retinal arteriosclerosis was graded according to the Scheie classification. Serum levels of lipids, lipoproteins, Lp(a), and Hcy were measured by standard methods. Results The serum level of Hcy was higher in patients (24.2±8.1 μmol/l) than controls (10.5±4.1 μmol/l); p<0.01. Serum levels of Lp(a) in patients (47.9±33.1 mg/dl) was also higher than controls (11.7±7.6 mg/dl); p<0.01. There was a significant direct linear correlation between the degree of retinal arteriosclerosis and Lp(a) level (r=0.61, p<0.01), the degree of retinal arteriosclerosis and Hcy level (r=0.72, p<0.01), and also between Lp(a) and Hcy levels (r=0.67, p<0.01). Conclusions The association between retinal arteriosclerosis and serum Lp(a) and Hcy levels suggests that Lp(a) as well as Hcy could play a role in the development of retinal arteriosclerosis. PMID:18806883

  20. Lipoprotein nature of Bacillus licheniformis membrane penicillinase.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, J B; Caulfield, M P; Lampen, J O

    1981-06-01

    Membrane penicillinase (penicillin amido-beta-lactamhydrolase, EC 3.5.2.6) from Bacillus licheniformis bears a striking resemblance to the major outer membrane lipoprotein of Escherichia coli. It can be specifically labeled in vivo with [3H]glycerol, [35S]cysteine, or [3H]palmitate but not by [32P]orthophosphate. The labeled residues are located at or near the NH2 terminus of the membrane penicillinase because they can be completely removed by trypsin which cleaves a hydrophobic peptide(s) from the NH2 terminus, thereby rendering the enzyme hydrophilic. The membrane penicillinase produced by the 749/C gene carried in E. coli on phage lambda is similar to the enzyme formed in strain 749/C itself. The peptide antibiotic globomycin, which prevents processing of the E. coli prolipoprotein, severely inhibited the attachment of [3H]palmitate or [3H]glycerol to the 749/C enzyme (either in B. licheniformis 749/C or in E. coli), blocked the accumulation of penicillinase in the plasma membrane, and enhanced the formation of exoenzyme. Under the same conditions, globomycin does not prevent the attachment of palmitate or glycerol to the E. coli prolipoprotein but inhibits processing of the modified precursor to the mature lipoprotein. These results are in contrast with the lack of effect of globomycin on the RTEM-beta-lactamase of E. coli which has no detectable hydrophobic membrane form and was not labeled with palmitate or glycerol.

  1. Methylation at CPT1A locus is associated with lipoprotein subfraction profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoprotein subfractions help discriminate cardiometabolic disease risk. Genetic loci validated as associating with lipoprotein measures do not account for a large proportion of the individual variation in lipoprotein measures. We hypothesized that DNA methylation levels across the genome contribute...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of alpha-1-lipoprotein may aid in the diagnosis of Tangier disease (a hereditary disorder of fat metabolism)....

  3. [Lipids, lipoproteins, arterial accidents and oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Bakir, R; Hilliquin, P

    1986-01-01

    This work reviews lipoprotein metabolism and relationships to atherosclerosis, examines the nature of arterial accidents and lipid modifications that occur with oral contraceptive (OC) use, and assesses the practical consequences for OC prescription. Cholesterol, triglycerides, and phospholipids are not soluble in aqueous milieus, and their transport in plasma is provided by macromolecules comprising a protein part and a lipid part. 5 types of these lipoproteins are distinguished by their relative richness in lipids and protein and by the nature of their proteins. The chylomicrons carry exogenous triglycerides to the peripheral tissues and cholesterol of dietary origin to the liver. Very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol is secreted by the liver and transports triglycerides and cholesterol of endogenous origin. Low denisty lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol originates in the degradation of VLDL cholesterol and transports cholesterol to the cells. High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is secreted by the liver and intestines or formed in the course of degradation of chylomicrons and VLDL cholesterol. Its role is to carry excess cholesterol in the peripheral tissues to the liver for elimination in the bile. Cholesterol thus follows 2 different pathways in the body: a path from the liver to the peripheral cells, whose markers are LDL and VLDL cholesterol and the plasma apoprotein B, and a path of return of excess cholesterol from the tissues and especially the arteries to the liver, marked by HDL cholesterol and the plasma apoprotein A. Only a proper balance between the 2 flows can prevent an excess of cholesterol in the arteries and the consequent constitution of atherosclerotic lesions. LDL and to a lesser extent VLDL cholesterol are strongly and positively correlated to atherogenic risk, while HDL cholesterol is negatively correlated to risk, independently of other risk factors. Arterial accidents occurring with OC use do not seem to be atheromatous in

  4. A clustering analysis of lipoprotein diameters in the metabolic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of smaller low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been associated with atherosclerosis risk, and the insulin resistance (IR) underlying the metabolic syndrome (MetS). In addition, some research has supported the association of very low-, low- and high-density lipoprotein (VLDL HDL) particle...

  5. Enzymatic saccharification of pretreated wheat straw: comparison of solids-recycling, sequential hydrolysis and batch hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Pihlajaniemi, Ville; Sipponen, Satu; Sipponen, Mika H; Pastinen, Ossi; Laakso, Simo

    2014-02-01

    In the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose materials, the recycling of the solid residue has previously been considered within the context of enzyme recycling. In this study, a steady state investigation of a solids-recycling process was made with pretreated wheat straw and compared to sequential and batch hydrolysis at constant reaction times, substrate feed and liquid and enzyme consumption. Compared to batch hydrolysis, the recycling and sequential processes showed roughly equal hydrolysis yields, while the volumetric productivity was significantly increased. In the 72h process the improvement was 90% due to an increased reaction consistency, while the solids feed was 16% of the total process constituents. The improvement resulted primarily from product removal, which was equally efficient in solids-recycling and sequential hydrolysis processes. No evidence of accumulation of enzymes beyond the accumulation of the substrate was found in recycling. A mathematical model of solids-recycling was constructed, based on a geometrical series.

  6. Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-07-16

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  7. Impact of Lipoprotein Lipase Gene Polymorphism, S447X, on Postprandial Triacylglycerol and Glucose Response to Sequential Meal Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Shatwan, Israa M.; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Williams, Christine M.; Lovegrove, Julie A.; Jackson, Kim G.; Vimaleswaran, Karani S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein. Given that postprandial assessment of lipoprotein metabolism may provide a more physiological perspective of disturbances in lipoprotein homeostasis compared to assessment in the fasting state, we have investigated the influence of two commonly studied LPL polymorphisms (rs320, HindIII; rs328, S447X) on postprandial lipaemia, in 261 participants using a standard sequential meal challenge. S447 homozygotes had lower fasting HDL-C (p = 0.015) and a trend for higher fasting TAG (p = 0.057) concentrations relative to the 447X allele carriers. In the postprandial state, there was an association of the S447X polymorphism with postprandial TAG and glucose, where S447 homozygotes had 12% higher TAG area under the curve (AUC) (p = 0.037), 8.4% higher glucose-AUC (p = 0.006) and 22% higher glucose-incremental area under the curve (IAUC) (p = 0.042). A significant gene–gender interaction was observed for fasting TAG (p = 0.004), TAG-AUC (Pinteraction = 0.004) and TAG-IAUC (Pinteraction = 0.016), where associations were only evident in men. In conclusion, our study provides novel findings of an effect of LPL S447X polymorphism on the postprandial glucose and gender-specific impact of the polymorphism on fasting and postprandial TAG concentrations in response to sequential meal challenge in healthy participants. PMID:26999119

  8. [Very low density lipoproteins and subclasses of intermediate density lipoproteins in postmenopausal women].

    PubMed

    Berg, G; Halperín, H; Siseles, N; Wikinski, R

    1996-01-01

    Post menopausal women present an increase of cardiovascular risk associated with the atherogenic plasma lipoproteins IDL and LDL. Our purpose was to study the composition of VLDL, IDL and the subfractions IDL-1 and IDL-2, and the Lipoprotein Lipase and Hepatic Lipase activities in a group of twelve healthy post menopausal women as compared with eleven fertile controls. The mean values of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol were significantly increased in the post menopausal group compared to the controls (p < 0.005 and p < 0.001 respectively). The contribution of the HDL-cholesterol plasma concentration to total cholesterol was lower in the postmenopausal women (p < 0.02) although no one had HDL-cholesterol lower than 35 mg/dl and the mean value was 50 mg/dl. Postmenopausal women had increased concentrations of VLDL, total IDL and IDL-2 compared to controls (p < 0.05, p < 0.005 and p < 0.001 respectively). Plasma concentrations of total IDL was increased in postmenopausal women (33.6 +/- 3.4 vs 22.6 +/- 0.8 mg/dl, p < 0.005). The increase in total IDL was due to IDL-2 (19.9 +/- 1.7 vs 11.5 +/- 0.8 mg/dl, p < 0.001, in postmenopausal women vs controls). The IDL-2 subfraction was 60 +/- 2.6% of total IDL in postmenopausal women and 51 +/- 2.0% in controls (p < 0.02). In postmenopausal women and in controls the ratio triglyceride/protein (which indicates particles size) was significantly higher in IDL-1 than in IDL-2 (p < 0.005 and p < 0.01 respectively), but this ratio did not show differences when VLDL, total IDL and IDL-2 were compared between postmenopausal and control women. Then, the increased plasma concentration of these lipoproteins would show an increased number of particles in the postmenopausal women vs controls. There were no differences in the Lipoprotein Lipase and Hepatic Lipase activities between both groups. Lipoprotein Lipase vs total IDL-triglycerides and IDL-2-triglycerides showed a significant inverse correlation in controls (p < 0.05) but not

  9. Reversible and irreversible interactions between elastin and plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Winlove, C P; Parker, K H; Ewins, A R

    1985-03-08

    The interactions between radiolabeled, human plasma lipoproteins and elastin derived from bovine ligamentum nuchae were investigated using a washout technique. The interaction was characterised by Ki, a coefficient of irreversible binding, and Kr, the reversible partition coefficient. For both low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) the Ki values decreased as total lipoprotein concentration increased, suggesting that the binding is saturable, and were similar in magnitude to those measured by other workers using elastin derived from the human aorta. For both LDL and HDL the Kr values were independent of lipoprotein concentration in the range 0.1 microgram/ml-1.5 micrograms/ml. At a total protein concentration of 1.5 mg/ml in the incubation medium, the reversible interactions were comparable in magnitude to the irreversible.

  10. Lipoprotein ratios: Physiological significance and clinical usefulness in cardiovascular prevention

    PubMed Central

    Millán, Jesús; Pintó, Xavier; Muñoz, Anna; Zúñiga, Manuel; Rubiés-Prat, Joan; Pallardo, Luis Felipe; Masana, Luis; Mangas, Alipio; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; González-Santos, Pedro; Ascaso, Juan F; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentration has been the prime index of cardiovascular disease risk and the main target for therapy. However, several lipoprotein ratios or “atherogenic indices” have been defined in an attempt to optimize the predictive capacity of the lipid profile. In this review, we summarize their pathophysiological aspects, and highlight the rationale for using these lipoprotein ratios as cardiovascular risk factors in clinical practice, specifying their cut-off risk levels and a target for lipid-lowering therapy. Total/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and LDL/HDL cholesterol ratios are risk indicators with greater predictive value than isolated parameters used independently, particularly LDL. Future recommendations regarding the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia, including instruments for calculating cardiovascular risk or action guidelines, should include the lipoprotein ratios with greater predictive power which, in view of the evidence-based results, are none other than those which include HDL cholesterol. PMID:19774217

  11. The fibrate drug gemfibrozil disrupts lipoprotein metabolism in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Prindiville, John S. Mennigen, Jan A.; Zamora, Jake M.; Moon, Thomas W.; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2011-03-15

    Gemfibrozil (GEM) is a fibrate drug consistently found in effluents from sewage treatment plants. This study characterizes the pharmacological effects of GEM on the plasma lipoproteins of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Our goals were to quantify the impact of the drug on: 1) lipid constituents of lipoproteins (phospholipids (PL), triacylglycerol (TAG), and cholesterol), 2) lipoprotein classes (high, low and very low density lipoproteins), and 3) fatty acid composition of lipoproteins. Potential mechanisms of GEM action were investigated by measuring lipoprotein lipase activity (LPL) and the hepatic gene expression of LPL and of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} isoforms. GEM treatment resulted in decreased plasma lipoprotein levels (- 29%) and a reduced size of all lipoprotein classes (lower PL:TAG ratios). However, the increase in HDL-cholesterol elicited by GEM in humans failed to be observed in trout. Therefore, HDL-cholesterol cannot be used to assess the impact of the drug on fish. GEM also modified lipoprotein composition by reducing the abundance of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, thereby potentially reducing the nutritional quality of exposed fish. The relative gene expression of LPL was increased, but the activity of the enzyme was not, and we found no evidence for the activation of PPAR pathways. The depressing effects of GEM on fish lipoproteins demonstrated here may be a concern in view of the widespread presence of fibrates in aquatic environments. Work is needed to test whether exposure to environmental concentrations of these drugs jeopardizes the capacity of fish for reproduction, temperature acclimation or migratory behaviors.

  12. Role for circulating lipoproteins in protection from endotoxin toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, K R; Funk, J L; Moser, A H; Shigenaga, J K; Rapp, J H; Grunfeld, C

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS])-induced death can be prevented by preincubating LPS with lipoproteins in vitro or by infusing large quantities of lipids into animals prior to LPS administration. In the present study we determined whether physiological levels of lipids also provide protection. Serum lipid levels were decreased by two different mechanisms: administration of 4-aminopyrolo-(3,4-D)pyrimide, which prevents the hepatic secretion of lipoproteins, and administration of pharmacological doses of estradiol, which increases the number of hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptors, leading to increased lipoprotein clearance. In both hypolipidemic models, LPS-induced mortality is markedly increased compared with that of controls with normal serum lipid levels. In both hypolipidemic models, administration of exogenous lipoproteins, which increase levels of serum lipids into the physiological range, reduces the increased mortality to levels similar to that seen in normal animals. In normal lipidemic animals, 63% of 125I-LPS in plasma is associated with lipoproteins, where it would not be capable of stimulating cytokine production. In contrast, in hypolipidemic animals, very little LPS (12 to 17%) is associated with lipoproteins. Rather, more LPS is in the lipoprotein-free plasma compartment, where it could exert biological effects. In both hypolipidemic models, LPS produces a greater increase in serum tumor necrosis factor levels than it does in controls (three- to fivefold increase), and administration of exogenous lipoproteins prevents this increase. Cytokines, in particular tumor necrosis factor, are responsible for most of the toxic effects of LPS. These data provide evidence that physiological levels of serum lipids protect animals from LPS toxicity. Thus, lipoproteins, in addition to playing a role in lipid transport, may have protective functions. Moreover, as part of the immune response, cytokine-induced increases in

  13. Acylglucuronide in alkaline conditions: migration vs. hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Di Meo, Florent; Steel, Michele; Nicolas, Picard; Marquet, Pierre; Duroux, Jean-Luc; Trouillas, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    This work rationalizes the glucuronidation process (one of the reactions of the phase II metabolism) for drugs having a carboxylic acid moiety. At this stage, acylglucuronides (AG) metabolites are produced, that have largely been reported in the literature for various drugs (e.g., mycophenolic acid (MPA), diclofenac, ibuprofen, phenylacetic acids). The competition between migration and hydrolysis is rationalized by adequate quantum calculations, combing MP2 and density functional theory (DFT) methods. At the molecular scale, the former process is a real rotation of the drug around the glucuconic acid. This chemical-engine provides four different metabolites with various toxicities. Migration definitely appears feasible under alkaline conditions, making proton release from the OH groups. The latter reaction (hydrolysis) releases the free drug, so the competition is of crucial importance to tackle drug action and elimination. From the theoretical data, both migration and hydrolysis appear kinetically and thermodynamically favored, respectively.

  14. Hydrolysis of iodine: equilibria at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A.; Ramette, R.W.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrolysis (or disproportionation) of molecular iodine to form iodate and iodide ions has been studied by emf measurements over the temperature range, 3.8/sup 0/ to 209.0/sup 0/C. The interpretation of these results required a knowledge of the formation constant for triiodide ion and the acid dissociation constant of iodic acid, both of which were measured as a function of temperature. The resulting thermodynamic data have been incorporated into a general computer model describing the hydrolysis equilibria of iodine as a function of initial concentration, pH and temperature.

  15. Changes in the structural properties and rate of hydrolysis of cotton fibers during extended enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lushan; Zhang, Yuzhong; Gao, Peiji; Shi, Dongxia; Liu, Hongwen; Gao, Hongjun

    2006-02-20

    An extended enzymatic hydrolysis of cotton fibers by crude cellulase from Trichoderma pseudokoningii S-38 is described with characterization of both the enzyme changes of activities and cellulose structure. The hydrolysis rates declined drastically during the early stage and then slowly and steadily throughout the whole hydrolysis process the same trend could be seen during the following re-hydrolysis process. Morphological and structural changes to the fibers, such as swelling, frequent surface erosion, and variation in the packing and orientation of microfibrils, were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Observation of X-ray diffraction and IR spectra suggests that the hydrolysis process results in a gradual increase in the relative intensity of the hydrogen bond network, and a gradual decrease in the apparent crystal size of cellulose. The I(alpha) crystal phase was hydrolyzed more easily than was the I(beta) crystal phase. Apart from the inactivation of CBHs activity, changes in the packing and arrangement of microfibrils and the structural heterogeneity of cellulose during hydrolysis could be responsible for the reduction in the rate of reaction, especially in its later stages. The results indicate that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose occurs on the outer layer of the fiber surface and that, following this, the process continues in a sub-layer manner.

  16. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol: current perspective for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2009-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins are regarded as ''good guys'' but not always. Situations involving high-density lipoproteins are discussed and medication results are considered. Clinicians usually consider high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Nicotinic acid is the best available medication to elevate high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and this appears beneficial for cardiovascular risk. The major problem with nicotinic acid is that many patients do not tolerate the associated flushing. Laropiprant decreases this flushing and has an approval in Europe but not in the United States. The most potent medications for increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors. The initial drug in this class, torcetrapib, was eliminated by excess cardiovascular problems. Two newer cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors, R1658 and anacetrapib, initially appear promising. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol may play an important role in improving cardiovascular risk in the 60% of patients who do not receive cardiovascular mortality/morbidity benefit from low-density lipoproteins reduction by statins.

  17. An efficient depyrogenation method for recombinant bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Basto, Afonso P; Morais, Joana; Marcelino, Eduardo; Leitão, Alexandre; Santos, Dulce M

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins are anchored in the outer membrane lipid layer in close association with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and with other hydrophobic membrane proteins, making their purification technically challenging. We have previously shown that a thorough delipidation of outer membrane preparations from the Escherichia coli expression host is an important step to eliminate contaminant proteins when purifying recombinant antigens expressed in fusion with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprI lipoprotein. Here we report the cloning and expression of three antigens in fusion with OprI (ovalbumin, eGFP and BbPDI) and our efforts to deal with the variable LPS contamination levels observed in different batches of purified lipoproteins. The use of polymyxin B columns or endotoxin removal polycationic magnetic beads for depyrogenation of purified lipoproteins resulted in high protein losses and the use of Triton X-114 or sodium deoxycholate during the course of affinity chromatography showed to be ineffective to reduce LPS contamination. Instead, performing a hot phenol/water LPS extraction from outer membrane preparations prior to metal affinity chromatography allowed the purification of the recombinant fusion lipoproteins with LPS contents below 0.02EU/μg of protein. The purified recombinant lipoproteins retain their capacity to stimulate bone marrow-derived dendritic cells allowing for the study of their immunomodulatory properties through TLR2/1. This is a simple and easy to scale up method that can also be considered for the purification of other outer membrane lipoproteins.

  18. Lipoprotein mediated lipid uptake in oocytes of polychaetes (Annelida).

    PubMed

    Schenk, Sven; Hoeger, Ulrich

    2009-08-01

    The uptake of the 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled sex-unspecific Nereis lipoprotein was investigated in oocytes of the nereidid polychaetes Nereis virens and Platynereis dumerilii. The fluorescence label was first observed in endocytic vesicles (<1 microm diameter), which later fused to larger vesicles (2-3 microm); these were finally incorporated into existing unlabeled yolk granules (5-6 microm). In Platynereis oocytes, the fusion of endocytic vesicles was delayed in oocytes at their final stage of development compared with those at an early stage of development. Lipoprotein double-labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and DiI revealed that both the protein and the lipid moiety remained co-localized during incorporation into the yolk granules of the oocyte. No labeling of the cytoplasmic lipid droplets was observed. In N. virens, unlabeled Nereis lipoprotein was effective as a competitive inhibitor of DiI-labeled Nereis lipoprotein. Ligand blot experiments demonstrated the presence of a lipoprotein receptor with an apparent molecular mass of 120 kDa, which is different from that of the known yolk protein receptor. This indicates the presence, in the polychaete oocyte, of two distinct receptors mediating yolk protein and lipoprotein uptake, respectively. Thus, the sex-unspecific lipoprotein contributes to the lipid supply of the growing oocyte in addition to the known uptake of the yolk-protein-associated lipids. The absence of label in the cytoplasmic lipid droplets, even after prolonged incubation with labeled lipoprotein, suggests that these lipids arise either by the breakdown and resynthesis of lipoprotein-derived lipids and/or by de novo synthesis within the oocyte.

  19. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-07-14

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  20. Thioglycoside hydrolysis catalyzed by {beta}-glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Hong; Byers, Larry D.

    2007-10-26

    Sweet almond {beta}-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) has been shown to have significant thioglycohydrolase activity. While the K{sub m} values for the S- and O-glycosides are similar, the k{sub cat} values are about 1000-times lower for the S-glycosides. Remarkably, the pH-profile for k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl thioglucoside (pNPSG) shows the identical dependence on a deprotonated carboxylate (pK{sub a} 4.5) and a protonated group (pK{sub a} 6.7) as does the pH-profile for hydrolysis of the corresponding O-glycoside. Not surprisingly, in spite of the requirement for the presence of this protonated group in catalytically active {beta}-glucosidase, thioglucoside hydrolysis does not involve general acid catalysis. There is no solvent kinetic isotope effect on the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of pNPSG.

  1. Phosphatase hydrolysis of organic phosphorus compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphatases are diverse groups of enzymes that deserve special attention because of the significant roles they play in mineralizing organic phosphorus (P) into inorganic available form. For getting more insight on the enzymatically hydrolysis of organic P, in this work, we compared the catalytic pa...

  2. Optimization of dilute acid hydrolysis of Enteromorpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Dawei; Liu, Haiyan; Li, Fuchao; Jiang, Peng; Qin, Song

    2011-11-01

    Acid hydrolysis is a simple and direct way to hydrolyze polysaccharides in biomass into fermentable sugars. To produce fermentable sugars effectively and economically for fuel ethanol, we have investigated the hydrolysis of Enteromorpha using acids that are typically used to hydrolyze biomass: H2SO4, HCl, H3PO4 and C4H4O4 (maleic acid). 5%(w/w) Enteromorpha biomass was treated for different times (30, 60, and 90 min) and with different acid concentrations (0.6, 1.0, 1.4, 1.8, and 2.2%, w/w) at 121°C. H2SO4 was the most effective acid in this experiment. We then analyzed the hydrolysis process in H2SO4 in detail using high performance liquid chromatography. At a sulfuric acid concentration of 1.8% and treatment time of 60 min, the yield of ethanol fermentable sugars (glucose and xylose) was high, (230.5 mg/g dry biomass, comprising 175.2 mg/g glucose and 55.3 mg/g xylose), with 48.6% of total reducing sugars being ethanol fermentable. Therefore, Enteromorpha could be a good candidate for production of fuel ethanol. In future work, the effects of temperature and biomass concentration on hydrolysis, and also the fermentation of the hydrolysates to ethanol fuel should be focused on.

  3. Enzymatic hydrolysis of spent coffee ground.

    PubMed

    Jooste, T; García-Aparicio, M P; Brienzo, M; van Zyl, W H; Görgens, J F

    2013-04-01

    Spent coffee ground (SCG) is the main residue generated during the production of instant coffee by thermal water extraction from roasted coffee beans. This waste is composed mainly of polysaccharides such as cellulose and galactomannans that are not solubilised during the extraction process, thus remaining as unextractable, insoluble solids. In this context, the application of an enzyme cocktail (mannanase, endoglucanase, exoglucanase, xylanase and pectinase) with more than one component that acts synergistically with each other is regarded as a promising strategy to solubilise/hydrolyse remaining solids, either to increase the soluble solids yield of instant coffee or for use as raw material in the production of bioethanol and food additives (mannitol). Wild fungi were isolated from both SCG and coffee beans and screened for enzyme production. The enzymes produced from the selected wild fungi and recombinant fungi were then evaluated for enzymatic hydrolysis of SCG, in comparison to commercial enzyme preparations. Out of the enzymes evaluated on SCG, the application of mannanase enzymes gave better yields than when only cellulase or xylanase was utilised for hydrolysis. The recombinant mannanase (Man1) provided the highest increments in soluble solids yield (17 %), even when compared with commercial preparations at the same protein concentration (0.5 mg/g SCG). The combination of Man1 with other enzyme activities revealed an additive effect on the hydrolysis yield, but not synergistic interaction, suggesting that the highest soluble solid yields was mainly due to the hydrolysis action of mannanase.

  4. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems.

  5. Hydrolysis of ionic cellulose to glucose.

    PubMed

    Vo, Huyen Thanh; Widyaya, Vania Tanda; Jae, Jungho; Kim, Hoon Sik; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2014-09-01

    Hydrolysis of ionic cellulose (IC), 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cellulose phosphite, which could be synthesized from cellulose and dimethylimidazolium methylphosphite ([Dmim][(OCH3)(H)PO2]) ionic liquid, was conducted for the synthesis of glucose. The reaction without catalysts at 150°C for 12h produced glucose with 14.6% yield. To increase the hydrolysis yield, various acid catalysts were used, in which the sulfonated active carbon (AC-SO3H) performed the best catalytic activity in the IC hydrolysis. In the presence of AC-SO3H, the yields of glucose reached 42.4% and 53.9% at the reaction condition of 150°C for 12h and 180°C for 1.5h, respectively; however the yield decreased with longer reaction time due to the degradation of glucose. Consecutive catalyst reuse experiments on the IC hydrolysis demonstrated the catalytic activity of AC-SO3H persisted at least through four successive uses.

  6. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in microgels.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aiping; Wu, Qingshi; Xu, Wenting; Xie, Jianda; Wu, Weitai

    2015-07-04

    A cellulose-based microgel, where an individual microgel contains approximately one cellulose chain on average, is synthesized via free radical polymerization of a difunctional small-molecule N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide in cellulose solution. This microgelation leads to a low-ordered cellulose, favoring enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to generate glucose.

  7. Hepatitis C virus relies on lipoproteins for its life cycle

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Germana; Di Caprio, Giorgia; Fimia, Gian Maria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Marco; Alonzi, Tonino

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 150 million people worldwide. In most cases, HCV infection becomes chronic causing liver disease ranging from fibrosis to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Viral persistence and pathogenesis are due to the ability of HCV to deregulate specific host processes, mainly lipid metabolism and innate immunity. In particular, HCV exploits the lipoprotein machineries for almost all steps of its life cycle. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge concerning the interplay between HCV and lipoprotein metabolism. We discuss the role played by members of lipoproteins in HCV entry, replication and virion production. PMID:26877603

  8. Nondenaturing electrophoresis of lipoproteins in agarose and polyacrylamide gradient gels

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, V.G.

    1989-12-19

    The plasma lipoproteins frequently are classified according to density and/or electrophoretic mobility. The lipoprotein classes differ characteristically also in particle size and apolipoprotein composition. Each class is heterogeneous in size and composition as well. Nondenaturing electrophoresis in agarose gels and polyacrylamide gradient gels are complementary analytical methods for classification of lipoproteins and determining distribution profiles of the major classes. In addition, gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE) has a high resolving capability for subfractionating each class according to particle size. Combination of gel electrophoresis with immunoblotting yields information on heterogeneity in apolipoprotein distribution. 14 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Cooperation between hepatic cholesteryl ester hydrolase and scavenger receptor BI for hydrolysis of HDL-CE.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Quan; Bie, Jinghua; Wang, Jing; Ghosh, Siddhartha S; Ghosh, Shobha

    2013-11-01

    Liver is the sole organ responsible for the final elimination of cholesterol from the body either as biliary cholesterol or bile acids. High density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived cholesterol is the major source of biliary sterols and represents a mechanism for the removal of cholesterol from peripheral tissues including artery wall-associated macrophage foam cells. Via selective uptake through scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), HDL-cholesterol is thought to be directly secreted into bile, and HDL cholesteryl esters (HDL-CEs) enter the hepatic metabolic pool and need to be hydrolyzed prior to conversion to bile acids. However, the identity of hepatic CE hydrolase (CEH) as well as the role of SR-BI in bile acid synthesis remains elusive. In this study we examined the role of human hepatic CEH (CES1) in facilitating hydrolysis of SR-BI-delivered HDL-CEs. Over-expression of CEH led to increased hydrolysis of HDL-[³H]CE in primary hepatocytes and SR-BI expression was required for this process. Intracellular CEH associated with BODIPY-CE delivered by selective uptake via SR-BI. CEH and SR-BI expression enhanced the movement of [³H]label from HDL-[³H]CE to bile acids in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that SR-BI-delivered HDL-CEs are hydrolyzed by hepatic CEH and utilized for bile acid synthesis.

  10. Molecular-scale investigations of cellulose microstructure during enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Santa-Maria, Monica; Jeoh, Tina

    2010-08-09

    Changes in cellulose microstructure have been proposed to occur throughout hydrolysis that impact enzyme access and hydrolysis rates. However, there are very few direct observations of such changes in ongoing reactions. In this study, changes in the microstructure of cellulose are measured by simultaneous confocal and atomic force microscopy and are correlated to hydrolysis extents and quantities of bound enzyme in the reaction. Minimally processed and never-dried cellulose I was hydrolyzed by a purified cellobiohydrolase, Trichoderma reesei Cel7A. Early in the reaction ( approximately 30% hydrolysis), at high hydrolysis rates and high bound cellulase quantities, untwisting of cellulose microfibrils was observed. As the hydrolysis reaction neared completion (>80% hydrolysis), extensively thinned microfibrils (diameters of 3-5 nm) and channels (0.3-0.6 nm deep) along the lengths of the microfibrils were observed. The prominent microstructural changes in cellulose due to cellobiohydrolase action are discussed in the context of the overall hydrolysis reaction.

  11. Kinetics of Hydrolysis and Products of Hydrolysis and Photolysis of Tetryl.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-22

    NSWC TR 84-88 Lfl KINETICS OF HYDROLYSIS AND PRODUCTS OF HYDROLYSIS AND PHOTOLYSIS OF TETRYL BY ELEONORE G. KAYSER NICHOLAS E. BURLINSON DAVID H...PHOTOLYSIS OF TETRYL Feb 1980 to Dec 1981 S.PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AU THOR(s) SCONTRACT OR GRANT NUMUER11110 Eleonore G. Kayser, NLchcolas E...Library 1 Monitoring Techniques Division Dr. Ron Spanggord I Attn: RD680 (Robert B. Medz) 1 333 Rcvenswood Avenue Washington, DC 20460 Menlo Park

  12. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590... Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. (a) Identification. A lipoprotein X immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques lipoprotein X (a...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590... Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. (a) Identification. A lipoprotein X immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques lipoprotein X (a...

  14. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-10-05

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF).

  15. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein promotes neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Neufert, C; Pai, R K; Noss, E H; Berger, M; Boom, W H; Harding, C V

    2001-08-01

    Certain microbial substances, e.g., LPS, can activate neutrophils or prime them to enhance their response to other activating agents, e.g., fMLP. We investigated the role of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) 19-kDa lipoprotein in activation of human neutrophils. MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein initiated phenotypic changes characteristic of neutrophil activation, including down-regulation of CD62 ligand (L-selectin) and up-regulation of CD35 (CR1) and CD11b/CD18 (CR3, Mac-1). In addition, exposure of neutrophils to MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein enhanced the subsequent oxidative burst in response to fMLP as assessed by oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (determined by flow cytometry). LPS also produced these effects with similar kinetics, but an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a CpG motif failed to induce any priming or activation response. Although the effects of LPS required the presence of serum, neutrophil activation by MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein occurred independently of serum factors, suggesting the involvement of different receptors and signaling mechanisms for LPS and MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein. Thus, MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein serves as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that promotes neutrophil priming and activation.

  17. Isolation and characterization of the haemolymph lipoproteins of Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Fichera, L E; Brenner, R R

    1982-01-01

    1. Three lipoproteins differing in hydrated densities were isolated by ultracentrifugal procedures from the haemolymph of adult and fasted Triatoma infestans. 2. They are the high density lipoprotein HDL (d = 1.115-1.152) and the two very high density lipoproteins VHDL-I (d = 1.190-1.231) and VHDL-II (d = 1.245-1.260). HDL was the predominant lipoprotein. 3. The total lipid content expressed as % of lipoprotein weight in HDL, VHDL-I an VHDL-II was 30.1, 7.8 ad 2.9% respectively. Diacylglycerols are the predominant lipids of HDL (38.7%) and VHDL-I (27.0%) but only amount of 6.2% in VHDL-II. 4. Triacylglycerols are minor components (about 6.0%) of all fractions. 5. The phospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine), sterols, sterol esters and hydrocarbons were present in all lipoprotein fractions. 6. Phospholipids and hydrocarbons were the most abundant lipids of VHDL-II.

  18. The use of transgenic animals to study lipoprotein metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.M.; Plump, A.S.

    1993-12-01

    The application of transgenic technology to lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis was first reported in 1988. Today, a large percentage of the genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism have been overexpressed in mice, and a substantial number of these same genes have been disrupted by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. The utility of animal models of lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis is far-reaching given the complex nature of these systems. There are at least 17 known genes directly involved in lipoprotein metabolism and likely dozens more may be involved. This massive network of interacting factors has necessitated the development of in vivo systems which can be subject to genetic manipulation. The power of overexpression is obvious: elucidating function in a relatively controlled genetic environment in which the whole system is present and operational. The not-so-obvious problem with transgenics is ``background,`` or for purposes of the current discussion, the mouse`s own lipoprotein system. With the advent of gene knockout, we have been given the ability to overcome ``background.`` By recreating the genetic complement of the mouse we can alter a system in essentially any manner desired. As unique tools, and in combination with one another, the overexpression of foreign genes and the targeted disruption or alteration of endogenous genes has already and will continue to offer a wealth of information on the biology of lipoprotein metabolism and its effect on atherosclerosis susceptibility.

  19. Modulation of lipoprotein receptor functions by intracellular adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Stolt, Peggy C; Bock, Hans H

    2006-10-01

    Members of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family are critically involved in a wide range of physiological processes including lipid and vitamin homeostasis, cellular migration, neurodevelopment, and synaptic plasticity, to name a few. Lipoprotein receptors exert these diverse biological functions by acting as cellular uptake receptors or by inducing intracellular signaling cascades. It was discovered that a short sequence in the intracellular region of all lipoprotein receptors, Asn-Pro-X-Tyr (NPXY) is important for mediating either endocytosis or signal transduction events, and that this motif serves as a binding site for phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain containing scaffold proteins. These molecular adaptors connect the transmembrane receptors with the endocytosis machinery and regulate cellular trafficking, or function as assembly sites for dynamic multi-protein signaling complexes. Whereas the LDL receptor represents the archetype of an endocytic lipoprotein receptor, the structurally closely related apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor activate a kinase-dependent intracellular signaling cascade after binding to the neuronal signaling molecule Reelin. This review focuses on two related PTB domain containing adaptor proteins that mediate these divergent lipoprotein receptor responses, ARH (autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) and Dab1 (disabled-1), and discusses the structural and molecular basis of this different behaviour.

  20. Utilization of ascites plasma very low density lipoprotein triglycerides by Ehrlich cells.

    PubMed

    Brenneman, D E; Spector, A A

    1974-07-01

    Much of the lipid present in the ascites plasma in which Ehrlich cells grow is contained in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). Chemical measurements indicated that triglycerides were taken up by the cells during in vitro incubation with ascites VLDL. When tracer amounts of radioactive triolein were incorporated into the ascites VLDL, the percentage uptakes of glyceryl tri[1-(14)C]oleate and triglycerides measured chemically were similar. The cells also took up [2-(3)H]glyceryl trioleate that was added to VLDL, but the percentage of available (3)H recovered in the cell lipids was 30-40% less than that of (1 4)C from glyceryl tri[1-(1 4)C]oleate. This difference was accounted for by water-soluble (3)H that accumulated in the incubation medium, suggesting that extensive hydrolysis accompanied the uptake of VLDL triglycerides. Radioactive fatty acids derived from the VLDL triglycerides were incorporated into cell phospholipids, glycerides, and free fatty acids, and they also were oxidized to CO(2). Triglyceride utilization increased as the VLDL concentration was raised. These results suggest that one function of the ascites plasma VLDL may be to supply fatty acid to the Ehrlich cells and that the availability of fatty acid to this tumor is determined in part by the ascites plasma VLDL concentration. Although Ehrlich cells incorporate almost no free glycerol into triglycerides, considerable amounts of [2-(3)H]glyceryl trioleate radioactivity were recovered in cell triglycerides. This indicates that at least some VLDL triglycerides were taken up intact. The net uptake of VLDL protein and cholesterol was very small relative to the triglyceride uptake, suggesting that intact triglycerides are transferred from the ascites VLDL to the Ehrlich cells and that hydrolysis occurs after the triglyceride is associated with the cells.

  1. Continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Fieber, C.; Colcord, A.R.; Faass, S.; Muzzy, J.D.; Roberts, R.S.

    1982-08-01

    To produce ethanol from hardwood it is desirable to fractionate the hardwood in order to produce a relatively pure cellulosic pulp for dilute acid hydrolysis. An experimental investigation of continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar wood chips indicates that over 90% of the lignin present can be extracted by 0.1N sodium hydroxide, resulting in a cellulose pulp containing over 90% hexosan. The study was performed using a Stake Technology, Ltd., continuous digester rated at one oven dry ton per hour of wood chips. The yields of hexosans, hexoses, xylan, xylose, lignin, furfural, acetic acid and methanol were determined as a function of residence time and steam pressure in the digester. The information provides a basis for establishing a material and energy balance for a hardwood to ethanol plant.

  2. Enzymatic hydrolysis of poly(ethylene furanoate).

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Haernvall, Karolina; Pichler, Christian M; Ghazaryan, Gagik; Breinbauer, Rolf; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-10-10

    The urgency of producing new environmentally-friendly polyesters strongly enhanced the development of bio-based poly(ethylene furanoate) (PEF) as an alternative to plastics like poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) for applications that include food packaging, personal and home care containers and thermoforming equipment. In this study, PEF powders of various molecular weights (6, 10 and 40kDa) were synthetized and their susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated for the first time. According to LC/TOF-MS analysis, cutinase 1 from Thermobifida cellulosilytica liberated both 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid and oligomers of up to DP4. The enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed PEF with higher molecular weights but was active on all tested substrates. Mild enzymatic hydrolysis of PEF has a potential both for surface functionalization and monomers recycling.

  3. [THE SPIRIT CHOLESTEROL, BIOLOGICA L ROLE AT STAGES OF PHYLOGENESIS, MECHANISMS OF INHIBITION OF SYNTHESIS OF STEROL BY STATINS, FACTORS OF PHARMACOGENOMICS AND DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF CHOLESTEROL OF LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Kotlovskii, M Yu; Pokrovskii, A A; Kotlovskaia, O S; Osedko, A V; Titova, N M; Kotlovskii, Yu V; Digaii, A M

    2015-04-01

    The hypolipidemic effect of statins is realized by inhibition of synthesis of local pool of cholesterol spirit in endoplasmic net of hepatocytes. The cholesterol spirit covers all hydrophobic medium of triglycerides with polar mono layer of phosphatidylcholines and cholesterol spirit prior to secretion of lipoproteins of very low density into hydrophilic medium. The lesser mono layer between lipase enzyme and triglycerides substrate contains of cholesterol spirit the higher are the parameters of hydrolysis of palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density. The sequence of effect of statins is as follows: blocking of synthesis in hepatocytes and decreasing of content of unesterified cholesterol spirit in blood plasma; activation of hydrolysis of triglycerides in palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density; formation of ligand lipoproteins of very low density and their absorption by cells by force of apoB-100 endocytosis; decreasing in blood of content of polyenoic fatty acids, equimolar esterified by cholesterol spirit, polyethers of cholesterol spirit and decreasing of level of cholesterol spirit-lipoproteins of very low density. There is no way to eliminate aphysiological effect of disordered biological function of trophology (nutrition) on metabolism of fatty acids in population by means of pharmaceuticals intake. It is necessary to eliminate aphysiological effect of environment. To decrease rate of diseases of cardiovascular system one has to decrease in food content of saturated fatty acids and in the first instance palmitic saturated fatty acid, trans-form fatty acid, palmitoleic fatty acids up to physiological values and increase to the same degree the content of polyenoic fatty acids. The saturated fatty acids block absorption of polyenoic fatty acids by cells. The atherosclerosis is a deficiency of polyenoic fatty acids under surplus of palmitic saturated fatty acid.

  4. Xylan hydrolysis in zinc chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N.J.; Xu, Q.; Chen, L.F

    1995-12-31

    Xylan is the major component of hemicellulose, which consists of up to one-third of the lignocellulosic biomass. When the zinc chloride solution was used as a pretreatment agent to facilitate cellulose hydrolysis, hemicellulose was hydrolyzed during the pretreatment stage. In this study, xylan was used as a model to study the hydrolysis of hemicellulose in zinc chloride solution. The degradation of xylose that is released from xylan was reduced by the formation of zinc-xylose complex. The xylose yield was > 90% (w/w) at 70{degrees}C. The yield and rate of hydrolysis were a function of temperature and the concentration of zinc chloride. The ratio of zinc chloride can be decreased from 9 to 1.3 (w/w). At this ratio, 76% of xylose yield was obtained. When wheat straw was pretreated with a concentrated zinc chloride solution, the hemicellulose hydrolysate contained only xylose and trace amounts of arabinose and oligosaccharides. With this approach, the hemicellulose hydrolysate can be separated from cellulose residue, which would be hydrolyzed subsequently to glucose by acid or enzymes to produce glucose. This production scheme provided a method to produce glucose and xylose in different streams, which can be fermented in separated fermenters.

  5. Fungal secretomes enhance sugar beet pulp hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kracher, Daniel; Oros, Damir; Yao, Wanying; Preims, Marita; Rezic, Iva; Haltrich, Dietmar; Rezic, Tonci; Ludwig, Roland

    2014-04-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulose makes enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass for the production of second generation biofuels a major challenge. This work investigates an efficient and economic approach for the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp (SBP), which is a difficult to degrade, hemicellulose-rich by-product of the table sugar industry. Three fungal strains were grown on different substrates and the production of various extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes involved in pectin, hemicellulose, and cellulose breakdown were monitored. In a second step, the ability of the culture supernatants to hydrolyze thermally pretreated SBP was tested in batch experiments. The supernatant of Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne facultative plant pathogen, was found to have the highest hydrolytic activity on SBP and was selected for further hydrolyzation experiments. A low enzyme load of 0.2 mg g(-1) protein from the culture supernatant was sufficient to hydrolyze a large fraction of the pectin and hemicelluloses present in SBP. The addition of Trichoderma reesei cellulase (1-17.5 mg g(-1) SBP) resulted in almost complete hydrolyzation of cellulose. It was found that the combination of pectinolytic, hemicellulolytic, and cellulolytic activities works synergistically on the complex SBP composite, and a combination of these hydrolytic enzymes is required to achieve a high degree of enzymatic SBP hydrolysis with a low enzyme load.

  6. Structural basis unifying diverse GTP hydrolysis mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Anand, Baskaran; Majumdar, Soneya; Prakash, Balaji

    2013-02-12

    Central to biological processes is the regulation rendered by GTPases. Until recently, the GTP hydrolysis mechanism, exemplified by Ras-family (and G-α) GTPases, was thought to be universal. This mechanism utilizes a conserved catalytic Gln supplied "in cis" from the GTPase and an arginine finger "in trans" from a GAP (GTPase activating protein) to stabilize the transition state. However, intriguingly different mechanisms are operative in structurally similar GTPases. MnmE and dynamin like cation-dependent GTPases lack the catalytic Gln and instead employ a Glu/Asp/Ser situated elsewhere and in place of the arginine finger use a K(+) or Na(+) ion. In contrast, Rab33 possesses the Gln but does not utilize it for catalysis; instead, the GAP supplies both a catalytic Gln and an arginine finger in trans. Deciphering the underlying principles that unify seemingly unrelated mechanisms is central to understanding how diverse mechanisms evolve. Here, we recognize that steric hindrance between active site residues is a criterion governing the mechanism employed by a given GTPase. The Arf-ArfGAP structure is testimony to this concept of spatial (in)compatibility of active site residues. This understanding allows us to predict an as yet unreported hydrolysis mechanism and clarifies unexplained observations about catalysis by Rab11 and the need for HAS-GTPases to employ a different mechanism. This understanding would be valuable for experiments in which abolishing GTP hydrolysis or generating constitutively active forms of a GTPase is important.

  7. Fungal secretomes enhance sugar beet pulp hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kracher, Daniel; Oros, Damir; Yao, Wanying; Preims, Marita; Rezic, Iva; Haltrich, Dietmar; Rezic, Tonci; Ludwig, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulose makes enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass for the production of second generation biofuels a major challenge. This work investigates an efficient and economic approach for the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp (SBP), which is a difficult to degrade, hemicellulose-rich by-product of the table sugar industry. Three fungal strains were grown on different substrates and the production of various extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes involved in pectin, hemicellulose, and cellulose breakdown were monitored. In a second step, the ability of the culture supernatants to hydrolyze thermally pretreated SBP was tested in batch experiments. The supernatant of Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne facultative plant pathogen, was found to have the highest hydrolytic activity on SBP and was selected for further hydrolyzation experiments. A low enzyme load of 0.2 mg g–1 protein from the culture supernatant was sufficient to hydrolyze a large fraction of the pectin and hemicelluloses present in SBP. The addition of Trichoderma reesei cellulase (1–17.5 mg g–1 SBP) resulted in almost complete hydrolyzation of cellulose. It was found that the combination of pectinolytic, hemicellulolytic, and cellulolytic activities works synergistically on the complex SBP composite, and a combination of these hydrolytic enzymes is required to achieve a high degree of enzymatic SBP hydrolysis with a low enzyme load. PMID:24677771

  8. Phagocytosis of aggregated lipoprotein by macrophages: Low density lipoprotein receptor-dependent foam-cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; Chait, A.; Aviram, M.; Heinecke, J.W. )

    1989-04-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by incubation with phospholipase C (PLC-LDL) aggregates in solution and is rapidly taken up and degraded by human and mouse macrophages, producing foam cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rabbit macrophages degraded {sup 125}I-labeled PLC-LDL ({sup 125}I-PLC-LDL) more rapidly than native {sup 125}I-labeled LDL ({sup 125}I-LDL), while nonphagocytic cells such as human fibroblasts and bovine aortic endothelial cells degraded {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL more slowly than {sup 125}I-LDL. This suggested the mechanism for internalization of PLC-LDL was phagocytosis. When examined by electron microscopy, mouse peritoneal macrophages appeared to be phagocytosing PLC-LDL. The uptake and degradation of {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL by human macrophages was inhibited >80% by the monoclonal antibody C7 (IgG2b) produced by hybridoma C7, which blocks the ligand binding domain of the LDL receptor. Similarly, methylation of {sup 125}I-LDL ({sup 125}I-MeLDL) prior to treatment with phospholipase C decreased its subsequent uptake and degradation by human macrophages by >90%. The uptake and degradation of phospholipase C-modified {sup 125}I-MeLDL by macrophages could be restored by incubation of the methylated lipoprotein with apoprotein E, a ligand recognized by the LDL receptor. These results indicate that macrophages internalize PLC-LDL by LDL receptor-dependent phagocytosis.

  9. Lipoprotein alterations in hemodialysis: differences between diabetic and nondiabetic patients.

    PubMed

    González, Ana Inés; Schreier, Laura; Elbert, Alicia; Berg, Gabriela; Beresan, Hugo; López, Graciela; Wikinski, Regina

    2003-01-01

    Both renal failure and type 2 diabetes may contribute synergistically to the dyslipemia of diabetic renal failure with the development of atherosclerosis as the possible consequence. It has not yet been conclusively evaluated whether diabetic patients with end-stage renal failure under maintenance hemodialysis (HD) show accentuated alterations in plasma lipids and lipoproteins in comparison to nondiabetics under HD. These abnormalities would involve hepatic lipase activity and the regulation of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether type 2 diabetic patients undergoing HD exhibited a lipid-lipoprotein profile different from that of nondiabetic hemodialyzed patients. We compared plasma lipids, apoprotein (apo) A-I and B, and lipoprotein parameters among 3 groups: 25 type 2 diabetics, 25 nondiabetics, both undergoing HD, and 20 healthy control subjects. Intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were isolated by sequential ultracentrifugation. Hepatic lipase activity was measured in postheparin plasma. Both groups of HD patients showed higher triglyceride and IDL cholesterol (P <.001), and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (P <.01) and apo A-I (P <.001) levels compared to the control group, even after adjustment for age and body mass index (BMI). However, no differences were found in lipid, lipoprotein, and apoprotein concentrations between diabetic and nondiabetic HD patients, except for high LDL triglyceride content of diabetic HD patients (P <.01). Nondiabetics undergoing HD also presented higher LDL triglyceride levels than controls (P <.05). LDL triglyceride correlated with plasma triglycerides (r = 0.51, P <.001). A lower LDL cholesterol/apo B ratio was found in each group of HD patients in comparison to controls (P <.02). Comparing the diabetic and nondiabetic patients, hepatic lipase activity remained unchanged, but significantly lower than control subjects

  10. Aminoacylation of the N-terminal cysteine is essential for Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes but does not depend on lipoprotein sorting signals.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ayumu; Matsuyama, Shin-Ichi; Hara, Takashi; Nakayama, Jiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-11-08

    Lipoproteins are present in a wide variety of bacteria and are anchored to membranes through lipids attached to the N-terminal cysteine. The Lol system of Escherichia coli mediates the membrane-specific localization of lipoproteins. Aspartate at position 2 functions as a Lol avoidance signal and causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane, whereas lipoproteins having residues other than aspartate at position 2 are released from the inner membrane and localized to the outer membrane by the Lol system. Phospholipid:apolipoprotein transacylase, Lnt, catalyzes the last step of lipoprotein modification, converting apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein. To reveal the importance of this aminoacylation for the Lol-dependent membrane localization, apolipoproteins were prepared by inhibiting lipoprotein maturation. Lnt was also purified and used to convert apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein in vitro. The release of these lipoproteins was examined in proteoliposomes. We show here that the aminoacylation is essential for the Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes. Furthermore, lipoproteins with aspartate at position 2 were found to be aminoacylated both in vivo and in vitro, indicating that the lipoprotein-sorting signal does not affect lipid modification.

  11. Degradation of Opioids and Opiates During Acid Hydrolysis Leads to Reduced Recovery Compared to Enzymatic Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sitasuwan, Pongkwan; Melendez, Cathleen; Marinova, Margarita; Mastrianni, Kaylee R; Darragh, Alicia; Ryan, Emily; Lee, L Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Drug monitoring laboratories utilize a hydrolysis process to liberate the opiates from their glucuronide conjugates to facilitate their detection by tandem mass spectrometry (MS). Both acid and enzyme hydrolysis have been reported as viable methods, with the former as a more effective process for recovering codeine-6-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide. Here, we report concerns with acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of opioids, including a significant loss of analytes and conversions of oxycodone to oxymorphone, hydrocodone to hydromorphone and codeine to morphine. The acid-catalyzed reaction was monitored in neat water and patient urine samples by liquid chromatography-time-of-flight and tandem MS. These side reactions with acid hydrolysis may limit accurate quantitation due to loss of analytes, possibly lead to false positives, and poorly correlate with pharmacogenetic profiles, as cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP2D6) is often involved with oxycodone to oxymorphone, hydrocodone to hydromorphone and codeine to morphine conversions. Enzymatic hydrolysis process using the purified, genetically engineered β-glucuronidase (IMCSzyme(®)) addresses many of these concerns and demonstrates accurate quantitation and high recoveries for oxycodone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone and hydromorphone.

  12. Laser enhanced hydrolysis of selected polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzts, Mary Paige

    This project serves as a preliminary examination of selectively enhancing bond cleavage during chemical reactions in biological molecules by using continuous wave infrared lasers. To analyze protein content, polypeptides are broken into their constituent amino acids through hydrolysis. The cleaving of the peptide bond has traditionally been accomplished under harsh conditions, 110°C in 6 N hydrochloric acid for 24 hours. In this project hydrolysis was strongly enhanced by irradiating the dipeptides, threonyl-aspartate and alanyl-alanine, for 30 minutes with coherent infrared radiation from a tunable carbon dioxide laser. The dipeptide tyrosyl-tyrosine, the chemical N- methylacetimide, and the protein BSA were successfully hydrolyzed with the laser. The effect of reaction parameters such as laser power and HCl concentration were studied, as well as the effect of the primary parameter, the beam wavelength. The samples were analyzed using standard biological methods for determining the amino acid concentration, thin layer chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. These methods gave consistent results for the irradiated samples as well as for standard amino acids and polypeptide samples. The results from these methods were used to create the hydrolysis spectra. The catalytic action of the laser was strongly wavelength dependent. The hydrolysis spectra of the molecules were compared to the absorption spectra of the samples. Laser enhanced hydrolysis occurred when the laser wavelength coincided with a line in the dipeptide spectra. This weak line in each of the dipeptide spectra is consistent both in position and strength with a line in NMA, which has been identified as a fundamental mode associated with the peptide bond. From the experimental results, the enhanced process appears to occur in the vapor phase. The initially liquid sample was progressively evaporated, and fully hydrolyzed material was carried to a collection trap by the vapor. It can, in principle

  13. Development and application of proton NMR methodology to lipoprotein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Ari Juhani

    1998-11-01

    The present thesis describes the development of 1H NMR spectroscopy and its applications to lipoprotein analysis in vitro, utilizing biochemical prior knowledge and advanced lineshape fitting analysis in the frequency domain. A method for absolute quantification of lipoprotein lipids and proteins directly from the terminal methyl-CH3 resonance region of 1H NMR spectra of human blood plasma is described. Then the use of NMR methodology in time course studies of the oxidation process of LDL particles is presented. The function of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in lipoprotein mixtures was also assessed by 1H NMR, which allows for dynamic follow-up of the lipid transfer reactions between VLDL, LDL, and HDL particles. The results corroborated the suggestion that neutral lipid mass transfer among lipoproteins is not an equimolar heteroexchange. A novel method for studying lipoprotein particle fusion is also demonstrated. It is shown that the progression of proteolytically (α- chymotrypsin) induced fusion of LDL particles can be followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy and, moreover, that fusion can be distinguished from aggregation. In addition, NMR methodology was used to study the changes in HDL3 particles induced by phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in HDL3 + PLTP mixtures. The 1H NMR study revealed a gradual production of enlarged HDL particles, which demonstrated that PLTP-mediated remodeling of HDL involves fusion of the HDL particles. These applications demonstrated that the 1H NMR approach offers several advantages both in quantification and in time course studies of lipoprotein-lipoprotein interactions and of enzyme/lipid transfer protein function.

  14. [Intermediate-density lipoproteins and liver lipase in postmenopausal women].

    PubMed

    Halperin, H; Berg, G; Aisemberg, L; Brites, F; Siseles, N; Wikinski, R

    1992-01-01

    In order to evaluate atherogenic lipoproteins in post-menopause, we studied 73 healthy women, 49 to 65 years old (Post-menopausal Group), with 1 to 10 years of amenorrhea and body mass index below 27 Kg/m2, and 20 young women (Control Group). We have determined plasma cholesterol concentration in the lipoproteins of intermediate density in addition to the classical lipoprotein parameters: total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and fractionation of lipoproteins by electrophoresis. In 63 women from the Post-menopausal Group and 16 from the Control Group we studied the activity of hepatic lipase. Among these patients we selected at random 25 post-menopausal women and 13 controls to add measurements of triglycerides in the lipoproteins of intermediate density. Table 1 shows that the average plasma concentration of total cholesterol in the Post-menopausal Group was higher than that of the Controls (p < 0.001). The same was found for LDL-cholesterol (p < 0.001) and for triglycerides (p < 0.001) whereas the average concentration of HDL-cholesterol did not show significant differences. The Post-menopausal Group had high values of plasma lipoproteins of intermediate density, even with normal phenotypes (Table 2). Cholesterol but also triglycerides (Fig. 1) were responsible for this increase. A triglyceride rich lipoprotein subspecies of intermediate density was predominant in 73% of Post-menopausal women vs 23% of the Controls (p < 0.01, Table 3). No differences in hepatic lipase activity were seen between the two groups (Table 4), and non statistic correlation between the enzyme activity and IDL-triglycerides or HDL-cholesterol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particle assembly: Lipid capacity of the nascent lipoprotein particle

    SciTech Connect

    Manchekar, Medha; Forte, Trudy M.; Datta, Geeta; Richardson, Paul E.; Segrest, Jere P.; Dashti, Nassrin

    2003-12-01

    We previously proposed that the N-terminal 1000 residue {beta}{alpha}{sub 1} domain of apolipoprotein B (apoB) forms a bulk lipid pocket homologous to that of lamprey lipovitellin (LV). In support of this ''lipid pocket'' hypothesis, apoB:1000 (residues 1-1000) was shown to be secreted by a stable transformant of McA-RH7777 cells as a monodisperse particle with HDL{sub 3} density and Stokes diameter of 112 {angstrom}. In contrast, apoB:931 (residues 1-931), missing only 69 residues of the sequence homologous to LV, was secreted as a particle considerably more dense than HDL with Stokes diameter of 110 {angstrom}. The purpose of the present study was to determine the stoichiometry of the lipid component of the apoB:931 and apoB:1000 particles. This was accomplished by metabolic labeling of cells with either [{sup 14}C]oleic acid or [{sup 3}H]glycerol followed by immunoprecipitation (IP) or nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (NDGGE) of secreted lipoproteins and by immunoaffinity chromatography of secreted unlabeled lipoproteins. The [{sup 3}H]-labeled apoB:1000-containing particles, isolated by NDGGE, contained 50 phospholipids (PL) and 11 triacylglycerols (TAG) molecules per particle. In contrast, apoB:931-containing particles contained only a few molecules of PL and were devoid of TAG. The unlabeled apoB:1000-containing particles isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography and analyzed for lipid mass, contained 56 PL, 8 TAG, and 7 cholesteryl ester molecules per particle. The surface:core lipid ratio of apoB:1000-containing particles was approximately 4:1 and was not affected by incubation of cells with oleate. Although small amounts of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) were associated with apoB:1000-containing particles, it never approached a 1:1 molar ratio of MTP to apoB. These results support a model in which: (1) the first 1000 amino acid residues of apoB are competent to complete the ''lipid pocket'' without a structural requirement for MTP

  16. Unmodified low density lipoprotein causes cholesteryl ester accumulation in J774 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tabas, I; Weiland, D A; Tall, A R

    1985-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE)-loaded macrophages (foam cells) are a prominent feature of atherosclerotic plaques. Previous studies have shown that human monocytes or resident mouse peritoneal macrophages accumulate CE in response to low density lipoprotein (LDL) only when the LDL has been appropriately chemically modified. By contrast, we report here that J774 macrophages accumulate large amounts of CE when incubated with unmodified LDL. The CE is stored in oil red O-positive droplets, which have the typical appearance of foam cell inclusions by electron microscopy. The fatty acid moieties of the cellular CE are enriched in oleate unlike those of LDL-CE, which are enriched in linoleate, indicating that the LDL-CE undergoes hydrolysis and reesterification by acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase. Studies with 125I-labeled LDL at both 4 degrees C and 37 degrees C indicate that the LDL is internalized by a specific receptor that has several characteristics in common with the apolipoprotein B/E (apo B/E) receptor. However, in comparison with fibroblasts, the LDL receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity in J774 cells are relatively resistant to down-regulation by LDL or 25-hydroxycholesterol, leading to receptor-mediated CE storage. In addition, J774 cells appear to accumulate CE from LDL internalized by nonspecific means. Thus, macrophage-like cells can accumulate CE in response to unmodified LDL by both nonspecific and receptor-mediated processes.

  17. New and emerging regulators of intestinal lipoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Morgantini, Cecilia; Lewis, Gary F

    2014-04-01

    Overproduction of hepatic apoB100-containing VLDL particles has been well documented in animal models and in humans with insulin resistance such as the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and contributes to the typical dyslipidemia of these conditions. In addition, postprandial hyperlipidemia and elevated plasma concentrations of intestinal apoB48-containing chylomicron and chylomicron remnant particles have been demonstrated in insulin resistant states. Intestinal lipoprotein production is primarily determined by the amount of fat ingested and absorbed. Until approximately 10 years ago, however, relatively little attention was paid to the role of the intestine itself in regulating the production of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) and its dysregulation in pathological states such as insulin resistance. We and others have shown that insulin resistant animal models and humans are characterized by overproduction of intestinal apoB48-containing lipoproteins. Whereas various factors are known to regulate hepatic lipoprotein particle production, less is known about factors that regulate the production of intestinal lipoprotein particles. Monosacharides, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), resveratrol, intestinal peptides (e.g. GLP-1 and GLP-2), and pancreatic hormones (e.g. insulin) have recently been shown to be important regulators of intestinal lipoprotein secretion. Available evidence in humans and animal models strongly supports the concept that the small intestine is not merely an absorptive organ but rather plays an active role in regulating the rate of production of chylomicrons in fed and fasting states. Metabolic signals in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and in some cases an aberrant intestinal response to these factors contribute to the enhanced formation and secretion of TRL. Understanding the regulation of intestinal lipoprotein production is imperative for the development of new therapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of

  18. A lipoprotein characterizing obstructive jaundice. I. Method for quantitative separation and identification of lipoproteins in jaundiced subjects

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, D.; Alaupovic, P.; Furman, R. H.

    1969-01-01

    Three immunochemically and electrophoretically distinct lipoproteins, LP-A, LP-B, and LP-X,1 were isolated from the low density lipoprotein fraction (1.006-1.063 g/ml) in plasma from patients with biliary obstruction by a separation procedure which combines ultracentrifugation, heparin precipitation, and ethanol fractionation. This method, here described, permits the quantitative determination of individual plasma lipoprotein families on the basis of their protein moieties, rather than on the basis of their lipid moieties or density. The chemical composition of the unique lipoprotein, LP-X, was similar to that of an abnormal lipoprotein, OLP, isolated by Russ et al. (29) and by Switzer (30). In obstructive jaundice plasma, the combined LP-X and LP-B accounted for 98% and the LP-A for only 2% of the total protein content of the LDL fraction. This study indicates that the plasma lipoprotein pattern in obstructive jaundice is characterized by (a) a decreased concentration of HDL, (b) an increased concentration of LDL, and (c) the presence in the LDL fraction of varying amounts of a specific lipoprotein, LP-X, immunochemically and chemically distinct from LP-A and LP-B. LP-X, with its characteristically high content of unesterified cholesterol and phospholipids, is primarily responsible for the unusual protein and lipid content of the LDL fraction. Screening tests in 61 patients with various forms of jaundice indicated that a characteristic immunoelectrophoretic precipitin are between plasma samples and purified antibodies to LP-X was observed only in patients with obstructive jaundice. This simple immunochemical test may represent a valuable new tool in the differential diagnosis of obstructive and nonobstructive jaundice. Images PMID:4978447

  19. Structural Stability and Functional Remodeling of High-Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Gursky, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Lipoproteins are protein-lipid nanoparticles that transport lipids in circulation and are central in atherosclerosis and other disorders of lipid metabolism. Apolipoproteins form flexible structural scaffolds and important functional ligands on the particle surface and direct lipoprotein metabolism. Lipoproteins undergo multiple rounds of metabolic remodeling that is crucial to lipid transport. Important aspects of this remodeling, including apolipoprotein dissociation and particle fusion, are mimicked in thermal or chemical denaturation and are modulated by free energy barriers. Here we review our biophysical studies that revealed kinetic mechanism of lipoprotein stabilization and unraveled its structural basis. The main focus is on high-density lipoprotein (HDL). An inverse correlation between stability and functions of various HDLs in cholesterol transport suggests functional role of structural disorder. A mechanism for conformational adaptation of the major HDL proteins, apoA-I and apoA-II, to the increasing lipid load is proposed. Together, these studies help understand why HDL form discrete subclasses separated by kinetic barriers, which have distinct composition, conformation and functional properties. Understanding these properties may help improve HDL quality and develop novel therapies for cardiovascular disease. PMID:25749369

  20. Heterogeneity of lipoprotein particles in hepatic Golgi fractions

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Newly synthesized phospholipids, labeled with either [14C]choline, [3H]myo-inositol, or [33P]phosphate, partioned preferentially (greater than 80% of total incorporated radioactivity) in a Golgi membrane subfraction, although the cognate content subfraction contained a relatively large amount of secretory lipoproteins. The labeling pattern was the same for all phospholipids tested in the two subfractions. An active exchange process of polar lipids between Golgi membranes and Golgi secretory lipoproteins is postulated as a plausible explanation for these findings. Less than half of all Golgi lipoprotein particles have the density of serum VLDLs and a similar, but not identical, biochemical composition. The remaining lipoprotein particles are characterized by a continuous spectrum of sizes, and (to the extent tested) by a lipid and protein composition different from that of serum VLDLs and HDLs. Results obtained in control experiments rule out the possibility that the heterogeneous population of Golgi lipoprotein particles is an artefact caused by our preparation procedures. It is assumed that these heterogeneous particles are immature precursors of both VLDLs and HDLs. PMID:7085757

  1. Low density lipoproteins mediated nanoplatforms for cancer targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Kesharwani, Prashant; Jain, Narendra K.

    2013-09-01

    Chemotherapy is a foremost remedial approach for the treatment of localized and metastasized tumors. In order to explore new treatment modalities for cancer, it is important to identify qualitative or quantitative differences in metabolic processes between normal and malignant cells. One such difference may be that of increased receptor-mediated cellular uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDLs) by cancer cells. Lipoproteins in general and specifically LDL are ideal candidates for loading and delivering cancer therapeutic and diagnostic agents due to their biocompatibility. By mimicking the endogenous shape and structure of lipoproteins, the reconstituted lipoproteins can remain in circulation for an extended period of time, while largely evading the reticuloendothelial cells in the body's defenses. In this account, we review the field of low density inspired nanoparticles in relation to the delivery of cancer imaging and therapeutic agents. LDL has instinctive cancer targeting potential and has been used to incorporate various lipophillic molecules to transport them to tumors. Nature's method of rerouting LDL provides a strategy to extend the cancer targeting potential of lipoproteins far off its constricted purview. In this review, we have discussed the various aspects of LDL including its role in cancer imaging and chemotherapy in retrospect and prospect and current efforts aimed to further improve the delivery efficacy of LDL-drug complexes with reduced chances of drug resistance leading to optimal drug delivery. This review provides a strong support for the concept of using LDL as a drug carrier.

  2. Characterization of chick serum lipoproteins isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Vico, F; Lopez, J M; Castillo, M; Zafra, M F; Garcia-Peregrin, E

    1992-01-01

    Serum lipoproteins from 12h fasted male chicks (15-day-old) were separated into 20 fractions by isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation. A new procedure was described by collecting the different fractions from the bottom of tube instead of by aspiration from the meniscus of each tube. Analyses of chemical composition of serum lipoproteins have permitted to reevaluate the density limits of major classes: VHDL, d greater than 1.132 g/ml; HDL, d 1.132-1.084 g/ml; LDL, d 1.084-1.038; IDL, d 1.038-1.022; and VLDL d less than 1.022. HDL fractions clearly predominated (approx. 77% of total lipoproteins) while IDL and VLDL were present at low percentage. LDL was the fraction richest in cholesterol; triacylglycerol content clearly increased from HDL to VLDL, while protein content decreased. All the chemical components of chick serum lipoproteins were accumulated in HDL, although triacylglycerol was relatively distributed in all the lipoprotein classes.

  3. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  4. RP105 facilitates macrophage activation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Antje; Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Pierini, Lynda M; Banaei, Niaz; Ernst, Joel D; Miyake, Kensuke; Ehrt, Sabine

    2009-01-22

    RP105, phylogenetically related to Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, is reported to facilitate B cell activation by the TLR4-agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS)--but to limit LPS-induced cytokine production by antigen-presenting cells. Here, we show that the role of RP105 extends beyond LPS recognition and that RP105 positively regulates macrophage responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) lipoproteins. Mtb-infected RP105(-/-) mice exhibited impaired proinflammatory cytokine responses associated with enhanced bacterial burden and increased lung pathology. The Mtb 19 kDa lipoprotein induced release of tumor necrosis factor in a manner dependent on both TLR2 and RP105, and macrophage activation by Mtb lacking mature lipoproteins was not RP105 dependent. Thus, mycobacterial lipoproteins are RP105 agonists. RP105 physically interacted with TLR2, and both RP105 and TLR2 were required for optimal macrophage activation by Mtb. Our data identify RP105 as an accessory molecule for TLR2, forming part of the receptor complex for innate immune recognition of mycobacterial lipoproteins.

  5. Learning from Biology: Synthetic Lipoproteins for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huang; Cruz, William; Chen, Juan; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic lipoproteins represent a relevant tool for targeted delivery of biological/chemical agents (chemotherapeutics, siRNAs, photosensitizers and imaging contrast agents) into various cell types. These nanoparticles offer a number of advantages on drugs delivery over their native counterparts while retaining their natural characteristics and biological functions. Their ultra-small size (<30nm), high biocompatibility, favorable circulation half-life and natural ability to bind specific lipoprotein receptors i.e. low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and Scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SRB1) that are found in a number of pathological conditions (e.g. cancer, atherosclerosis), make them superior delivery strategies when compared to other nanoparticle systems. We review the various approaches that have been developed for the generation of synthetic lipoproteins and their respective applications in vitro and in vivo. More specifically, we summarize the way to address the limitation on use of reconstituted lipoproteins by means of natural or recombinant apolipoproteins, as well as apolipoprotein mimetic molecules. Finally, we provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches and discuss future perspectives for clinical translation of these nanoparticles. PMID:25346461

  6. MicroRNAs regulating apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liye; Irani, Sara; Sirwi, Alaa; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2016-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have been implicated in many pathological conditions. Significant progress has been made to unveil their role in lipid metabolism. This review aims at summarizing the role of different miRs that regulate hepatic assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins. Overproduction and/or impaired clearance of these lipoproteins from circulation increase plasma concentrations of lipids enhancing risk for cardiovascular disease. So far, three miRs, miR-122, miR-34a, and miR-30c have been shown to modulate hepatic production of apoB-containing low density lipoproteins. In this review, we will first provide a brief overview of lipid metabolism and apoB-containing lipoprotein assembly to orient readers to different steps that have been shown to be regulated by miRs. Then, we will discuss the role of each miR on plasma lipids and atherosclerotic burden. Furthermore, we will summarize mechanistic studies explaining how these miRs regulate hepatic lipid synthesis, fatty acid oxidation, and lipoprotein secretion. Finally, we will briefly highlight the potential use of each miR as a therapeutic drug for treating cardiovascular diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MicroRNAs and lipid/energy metabolism and related diseases edited by Carlos Fernández-Hernando and Yajaira Suárez.

  7. Hydrolysis of ferric chloride in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lussiez, G.; Beckstead, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Detox{trademark} process uses concentrated ferric chloride and small amounts of catalysts to oxidize organic compounds. It is under consideration for oxidizing transuranic organic wastes. Although the solution is reused extensively, at some point it will reach the acceptable limit of radioactivity or maximum solubility of the radioisotopes. This solution could be cemented, but the volume would be increased substantially because of the poor compatibility of chlorides and cement. A process has been developed that recovers the chloride ions as HCl and either minimizes the volume of radioactive waste or permits recycling of the radioactive chlorides. The process involves a two-step hydrolysis at atmospheric pressure, or preferably under a slight vacuum, and relatively low temperature, about 200{degrees}C. During the first step of the process, hydrolysis occurs according to the reaction below: FeCl{sub 3 liquid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} FeOCl{sub solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas} During the second step, the hot, solid, iron oxychloride is sprayed with water or placed in contact with steam, and hydrolysis proceeds to the iron oxide according to the following reaction: 2 FeOCl{sub solid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3 solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas}. The iron oxide, which contains radioisotopes, can then be disposed of by cementation or encapsulation. Alternately, these chlorides can be washed off of the solids and can then either be recycled or disposed of in some other way.

  8. Urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate reaction fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, D. T.; Redden, G. D.; Henriksen, J.; Fujita, Y.; Guo, L.; Huang, H.

    2010-12-01

    The mobility of toxic or radioactive metal contaminants in subsurface environments can be reduced by the formation of mineral precipitates that form co-precipitates with the contaminants or that isolate them from the mobile fluid phase. An engineering challenge is to control the spatial distribution of precipitation reactions with respect to: 1) the location of a contaminant, and 2) where reactants are introduced into the subsurface. One strategy being explored for immobilizing contaminants, such as Sr-90, involves stimulating mineral precipitation by forming carbonate ions and hydroxide via the in situ, microbially mediated hydrolysis of urea. A series of column experiments have been conducted to explore how the construction or design of such an in situ reactant production strategy can affect the temporal and spatial distribution of calcium carbonate precipitation, and how the distribution is coupled to changes in permeability. The columns were constructed with silica gel as the porous media. An interval midway through the column contained an adsorbed urease enzyme in order to simulate a biologically active zone. A series of influent solutions were injected to characterize hydraulic properties of the column (e.g., bromide tracer), profiles of chemical conditions and reaction products as the enzyme catalyzes urea hydrolysis (e.g., pH, ammonia, urea), and changes that occur due to CaCO3 precipitation with the introduction of a calcium+urea solutions. In one experiment, hydraulic conductivity was reduced as precipitate accumulated in a layer within the column that had a higher fraction of fine grained silica gel. Subsequent reduction of permeability and flow (for a constant head condition) resulted in displacement of the hydrolysis and precipitation reaction profiles upstream. In another experiment, which lacked the physical heterogeneity (fine grained layer), the precipitation reaction did not result in loss of permeability or flow velocity and the reaction profile

  9. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, Deisy Y.

    The performance of soybean hulls and forage sorghum as feedstocks for ethanol production was studied. The main goal of this research was to increase fermentable sugars' yield through high-efficiency pretreatment technology. Soybean hulls are a potential feedstock for production of bio-ethanol due to their high carbohydrate content (≈50%) of nearly 37% cellulose. Soybean hulls could be the ideal feedstock for fuel ethanol production, because they are abundant and require no special harvesting and additional transportation costs as they are already in the plant. Dilute acid and modified steam-explosion were used as pretreatment technologies to increase fermentable sugars yields. Effects of reaction time, temperature, acid concentration and type of acid on hydrolysis of hemicellulose in soybean hulls and total sugar yields were studied. Optimum pretreatment parameters and enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for converting soybean hulls into fermentable sugars were identified. The combination of acid (H2SO4, 2% w/v) and steam (140°C, 30 min) efficiently solubilized the hemicellulose, giving a pentose yield of 96%. Sorghum is a tropical grass grown primarily in semiarid and dry parts of the world, especially in areas too dry for corn. The production of sorghum results in about 30 million tons of byproducts mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Forage sorghum such as brown midrib (BMR) sorghum for ethanol production has generated much interest since this trait is characterized genetically by lower lignin concentrations in the plant compared with conventional types. Three varieties of forage sorghum and one variety of regular sorghum were characterized and evaluated as feedstock for fermentable sugar production. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction were used to determine changes in structure and chemical composition of forage sorghum before and after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

  10. Improved method for detection of starch hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohawale, M.R.; Wilson, J.J.; Khachatourians, G.G.; Ingledew, W.M.

    1982-09-01

    A new starch hydrolysis detection method which does not rely on iodine staining or the use of color-complexed starch is described. A linear relationship was obtained with agar-starch plates when net clearing zones around colonies of yeasts were plotted against enzyme levels (semilogarithm scale) produced by the same yeast strains in liquid medium. A similar relationship between starch clearing zones and alpha-amylase levels from three different sources was observed. These observations suggest that the method is useful in mutant isolations, strain improvement programs, and the prediction of alpha-amylase activities in culture filtrates or column effluents. (Refs. 18).

  11. Effects of bioactive lipids and lipoproteins on bone

    PubMed Central

    Tintut, Yin; Demer, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies from the past two decades show a link between atherosclerotic vascular disease and bone loss, that is independent of age, the mechanism is still unclear. This review focuses on evidence that suggests a role for atherogenic lipids and lipoproteins in the pathogenesis of bone loss, including direct effects of these bioactive lipids/lipoproteins on bone cells, inhibiting osteoblastic differentiation and promoting osteoclastic differentiation. It also addresses recent evidence that suggests that bioactive lipids blunt the effects of bone anabolic agents, such as teriparatide and bone morphogenetic proteins. The role of systemic and intracellular oxidant stress and inflammation in mediating the effects of bioactive lipids/lipoproteins are implicated. PMID:24183940

  12. Emerging strategies for increasing high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Forrester, James S; Shah, Prediman K

    2006-12-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol is a potent and independent epidemiologic risk factor and is a proved antiatherosclerotic agent in animal models of atherosclerosis, acting through the principal mechanisms of accelerating cholesterol efflux and inhibiting oxidation and inflammation. Lifestyle modification increases serum levels by 5% to 15%, whereas niacin, the drug most widely used to increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, increases it by 25% to 35% at the highest doses. This review examines the potent methods of increasing high-density lipoprotein and/or enhancing reverse cholesterol transport, including cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors, apolipoprotein A-I Milano, D4F, the dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists, and rimonabant, that are now in clinical trials. In conclusion, these new agents, used alone or in combination with existing therapies, carry the potential to markedly reduce the incidence of new coronary disease and cardiac events in this decade.

  13. Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Katayoon B.; Handa, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly. While excellent treatment has emerged for neovascular disease, treatment for early AMD is lacking due to an incomplete understanding of the early molecular events. A prominent age-related change is the accumulation of neutral lipid in normal Bruch's membrane (BrM) throughout adulthood and also disease-related BrM accumulations called basal deposits and drusen. AMD lesion formation has thus been conceptualized as sharing mechanisms with atherosclerotic plaque formation, where low-density lipoprotein (LDL) retention within the arterial wall initiates a cascade of pathologic events. However, we do not yet understand how lipoproteins contribute to AMD. This paper explores how systemic and local production of lipoproteins might contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:21822496

  14. Ultrasound enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of Parthenium hysterophorus: A mechanistic investigation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shuchi; Agarwal, Mayank; Bhatt, Aditya; Goyal, Arun; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2015-09-01

    This study has attempted to establish the mechanism of the ultrasound-induced enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated and delignified biomass of Parthenium hysterophorus. A dual approach of statistical optimization of hydrolysis followed by application of sonication at optimum conditions has been adopted. The kinetics of hydrolysis shows a marked 6× increase with sonication, while net sugar yield shows marginal rise of ∼ 20%. The statistical experimental design reveals the hydrolysis process to be enzyme limited. Profile of sugar yield in ultrasound-assisted enzymatic hydrolysis has been analyzed using HCH-1 model coupled with Genetic Algorithm optimization. The trends in the kinetic and physiological parameters of HCH-1 model reveal that sonication enhances enzyme/substrate affinity and reaction velocity of hydrolysis. The product inhibition of enzyme in all forms (free, adsorbed, complexed) also reduces with ultrasound. These effects are attributed to intense micro-convection induced by ultrasound and cavitation in the liquid medium.

  15. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  16. Extended-release niacin for modifying the lipoprotein profile.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R

    2004-06-01

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) favourably modifies all aspects of the lipoprotein profile; it raises high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, lowers triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and lipoprotein(a) levels and reduces atherogenic small, dense LDL particles. One large monotherapy trial and multiple trials of niacin in combination with other lipid-modifying drugs show remarkable consistency in the ability of niacin to improve angiographic and clinical outcomes. In practice, however, the use of regular, immediate-release niacin (niacin IR) has been limited by the side effect of flushing. Sustained-release (SR) formulations, developed in order to reduce flushing, were found to cause serious hepatotoxicity at varying frequencies. Extended-release niacin (niacin ER; Niaspan), Kos Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) is a prescription formulation of niacin, administered once-daily at bedtime. Niacin ER is as effective in modifying lipoprotein levels as an equal daily dose of niacin IR and it causes less flushing. In addition, niacin ER administered once-daily is not associated with the increased hepatotoxicity reported with SR formulations. Niacin ER has been studied extensively in combination therapy with statins, including lovastatin in a recently introduced combination tablet. Myopathy has not been a substantial problem in statin/niacin ER combination therapy. Finally, a study of niacin ER given to diabetic patients showed only mild trends towards increased glycosylated haemoglobin concentrations and a need for additional antidiabetic medication. Thus, niacin ER represents an effective and safe option in the management of low levels of HDL-C and other lipoprotein abnormalities in a variety of settings.

  17. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. II. ACID AND GENERAL BASE CATALYZED HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate acid and neutral hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition states of a ...

  18. Simulation of continuous and batch hydrolysis of willow

    SciTech Connect

    Zacchi, G.; Dahlbom, J.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of product and enzyme concentrations on the kinetics of the enzymic hydrolysis of alkali-pretreated willow is studied. The hydrolysis was performed in a UF-membrane reactor in which the product concentration was kept constant. An empirical 4-parameter rate equation that gives a good correlation to both continuous and batch hydrolysis data is presented. The model comprises the effects of enzyme concentration and product inhibition. (Refs. 11).

  19. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Lambert, D.P.

    1992-11-09

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for tetraphenylborate precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92-737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The program was in conjunction with reducing the nitrite ion level in DWPF feed.

  20. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Lambert, D.P.

    1992-11-09

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for tetraphenylborate precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92-737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The program was in conjunction with reducing the nitrite ion level in DWPF feed.

  1. Structural changes of lipoprotein lipids by 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-Korpela, M.; Oja, J.; Lounila, J.; Jokisaari, J.; Savolainen, M. J.; Kesäniemi, Y. A.

    1995-08-01

    A new procedure for detecting structural changes of lipoprotein lipids is introduced and applied to study native low (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. The method involves lineshape fitting analyses of specific resonances in proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra together with numerical derivation of the obtained intensity curves with respect to temperature. In addition to the well-known phase transition of the LDL core cholesterol esters, a novel structural change was revealed in the phospholipid monolayer of both native LDL and HDL particles. The attributes of this phenomenon are discussed.

  2. JCL Roundtable: Hypertriglyceridemia due to defects in lipoprotein lipase function.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Virgil; Goldberg, Ira J; Young, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    In this Roundtable, our intent is to discuss those rare genetic disorders that impair the function of lipoprotein lipase. These cause severe hypertriglyceridemia that appears in early childhood with Mendelian inheritance and usually with full penetrance in a recessive pattern. Dr Ira Goldberg from New York University School of Medicine and Dr Stephen Young from the University of California, Los Angeles have agreed to answer my questions about this topic. Both have done fundamental work in recent years that has markedly altered our views on lipoprotein lipase function. I am going to start by asking them to give us a brief history of this enzyme system as a clinical entity.

  3. Effects of oxidation on the hydrolysis by cholesterol esterase of sitosteryl esters as compared to a cholesteryl ester.

    PubMed

    Julien-David, Diane; Ennahar, Saïd; Miesch, Michel; Geoffroy, Philippe; Raul, Francis; Aoude-Werner, Dalal; Lessinger, Jean-Marc; Marchioni, Eric

    2009-10-01

    Phytosteryl esters (PE) are used as ingredients in functional food to decrease plasma concentration of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). Effective impairment of cholesterol absorption by PE suggests that these esters are hydrolyzed by the pancreatic cholesterol esterase (CEase, EC 3.1.1.13) and the liberated sterol may interfere with cholesterol reducing its intestinal absorption. PE-enriched foods are marketed for cooking purposes, and temperature is one of the most important factors leading to the formation of oxidation products. Very little is known about the outcome of PE oxides during the digestive process. A new analytical method based on mass spectrometric detection directly after enzymatic reaction was developed to determine in vitro the activity of CEase on PE and their oxides present in functional food. Using this method, we identified a new inhibitor of CEase: sitosteryl 9,10-dihydroxystearate, which behaves as a non-competitive inhibitor of the hydrolysis of cholesteryl oleate and sitosteryl oleate.

  4. Hydrolysis of lignocelluloses by penicillium funiculosum cellulase

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, C.; Rao, M.; Seeta, R.; Srinivasan, M.C.; Deshpande, V.

    1984-04-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is a promising method for the conversion of waste cellulose to glucose. During the past few years, the development of this technology has proceeded rapidly, with significant advances made in enzyme production, pretreatment, and hydrolysis. A variety of fungi are reported to produce cellulases but among these Trichoderma reesei and its mutants are powerful producers of cellulases. However, the search for new and possibly better sources of cellulase is continued due to the low levels of beta-glucosidase of T. reesei. Penicillium funiculosum produces a complete cellulase having endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (15-20 U/mL), exo-beta-1,4-glucanase (1.5-2.0 U/mL), and high beta-glucosidase (8-10 U/mL). The saccharification of alkali-treated cotton and bagasse by P. funiculosum enzyme was 70 and 63%, respectively. It was possible to obtain glucose concentration as high as 30% using 50% bagasse. It is of interest that the percent saccharification of cellulosic substrates with the Penicillium enzyme is comparable to that of T. reesei cellulase when the same amount of filter paper activity is used, although the endo-glucanase activity of the latter is two to three times higher. This communication reports the studies on saccharification of lignocelluloses by P. funiculosum cellulase and certain studies on the kinetic aspects. (Refs. 15).

  5. Muscarinic receptor activation of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis. Relationship to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and diacylglycerol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, E.A.; Goldstein, D.; Brown, J.H. )

    1989-09-05

    We examined the relationship between phosphatidylcholine (PC) hydrolysis, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, and diacylglycerol (DAG) formation in response to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) stimulation in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. Carbachol increases the release of (3H)choline and (3H)phosphorylcholine ((3H)Pchol) from cells containing (3H)choline-labeled PC. The production of Pchol is rapid and transient, while choline production continues for at least 30 min. mAChR-stimulated release of Pchol is reduced in cells that have been depleted of intracellular Ca2+ stores by ionomycin pretreatment, whereas choline release is unaffected by this pretreatment. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increases the release of choline, but not Pchol, from 1321N1 cells, and down-regulation of protein kinase C blocks the ability of carbachol to stimulate choline production. Taken together, these results suggest that Ca2+ mobilization is involved in mAChR-mediated hydrolysis of PC by a phospholipase C, whereas protein kinase C activation is required for mAChR-stimulated hydrolysis of PC by a phospholipase D. Both carbachol and PMA rapidly increase the formation of (3H)phosphatidic acid ((3H)PA) in cells containing (3H)myristate-labeled PC. (3H)Diacylglycerol ((3H)DAG) levels increase more slowly, suggesting that the predominant pathway for PC hydrolysis is via phospholipase D. When cells are labeled with (3H)myristate and (14C)arachidonate such that there is a much greater 3H/14C ratio in PC compared with the phosphoinositides, the 3H/14C ratio in DAG and PA increases with PMA treatment but decreases in response to carbachol.

  6. Studies on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Organophosphate Poisons in Pigs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    Idantlty by Woe« numb«-; Hydrolysis Of the OrganO- phosphate paraoxon was studied in Yorkshire pig, rat and human sera. Enzymatic hydrolysis ...D-A123 269 UNCLASSIFIED STUDIES ON THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF ORGflNOPHOSPHATE 1/i POISONS IN PIGS(U) LETTERNAN ARMY INST OF RESEARCH...ON THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE POISONS IN PIGS Part 1. pH and Ion Effects in Sera from Pigs, Rats, and Humans PETER SCHMID, PhD

  7. Effect of gelatinization and hydrolysis conditions on the selectivity of starch hydrolysis with alpha-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Baks, Tim; Bruins, Marieke E; Matser, Ariette M; Janssen, Anja E M; Boom, Remko M

    2008-01-23

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of starch can be used to obtain various valuable hydrolyzates with different compositions. The effects of starch pretreatment, enzyme addition point, and hydrolysis conditions on the hydrolyzate composition and reaction rate during wheat starch hydrolysis with alpha-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis were compared. Suspensions of native starch or starch gelatinized at different conditions either with or without enzyme were hydrolyzed. During hydrolysis, the oligosaccharide concentration, the dextrose equivalent, and the enzyme activity were determined. We found that the hydrolyzate composition was affected by the type of starch pretreatment and the enzyme addition point but that it was just minimally affected by the pressure applied during hydrolysis, as long as gelatinization was complete. The differences between hydrolysis of thermally gelatinized, high-pressure gelatinized, and native starch were explained by considering the granule structure and the specific surface area of the granules. These results show that the hydrolyzate composition can be influenced by choosing different process sequences and conditions.

  8. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-density lipoprotein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of lipoprotein X aids in the diagnosis of obstructive liver disease. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  9. One precursor, three apolipoproteins: the relationship between two crustacean lipoproteins, the large discoidal lipoprotein and the high density lipoprotein/β-glucan binding protein.

    PubMed

    Stieb, Stefanie; Roth, Ziv; Dal Magro, Christina; Fischer, Sabine; Butz, Eric; Sagi, Amir; Khalaila, Isam; Lieb, Bernhard; Schenk, Sven; Hoeger, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    The novel discoidal lipoprotein (dLp) recently detected in the crayfish, differs from other crustacean lipoproteins in its large size, apoprotein composition and high lipid binding capacity, We identified the dLp sequence by transcriptome analyses of the hepatopancreas and mass spectrometry. Further de novo assembly of the NGS data followed by BLAST searches using the sequence of the high density lipoprotein/1-glucan binding protein (HDL-BGBP) of Astacus leptodactylus as query revealed a putative precursor molecule with an open reading frame of 14.7 kb and a deduced primary structure of 4889 amino acids. The presence of an N-terminal lipid bind- ing domain and a DUF 1943 domain suggests the relationship with the large lipid transfer proteins. Two-putative dibasic furin cleavage sites were identified bordering the sequence of the HDL-BGBP. When subjected to mass spectroscopic analyses, tryptic peptides of the large apoprotein of dLp matched the N-terminal part of the precursor, while the peptides obtained for its small apoprotein matched the C-terminal part. Repeating the analysis in the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii revealed a similar protein with identical domain architecture suggesting that our findings do not represent an isolated instance. Our results indicate that the above three apolipoproteins (i.e HDL-BGBP and both the large and the small subunit of dLp) are translated as a large precursor. Cleavage at the furin type sites releases two subunits forming a heterodimeric dLP particle, while the remaining part forms an HDL-BGBP whose relationship with other lipoproteins as well as specific functions are yet to be elucidated.

  10. Relation Between Cigarette Smoking, Body Fat Distribution and Density of Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Women.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Cholesterol in Women Linda R. Beson, Major AFIT Student Attending: University of Florida AFIT/CI/CIA-92-085 DTIC Wright-Patterson AFB OH 45433-6583 ELECTE 1...CIGARETTE SMOKING, BODY FAT DISTRIBUTION AND DENSITY OF LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL IN WOMEN By W: , LINDA R. BESON " Di t A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE...12 Cholesterol and Serum Lipoproteins ......... .. 14 Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol . . . 18 High Density Lipoprotein (HDL

  11. Acid-functionalized nanoparticles for biomass hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena Duque, Leidy Eugenia

    Cellulosic ethanol is a renewable source of energy. Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex material composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Biomass pretreatment is a required step to make sugar polymers liable to hydrolysis. Mineral acids are commonly used for biomass pretreatment. Using acid catalysts that can be recovered and reused could make the process economically more attractive. The overall goal of this dissertation is the development of a recyclable nanocatalyst for the hydrolysis of biomass sugars. Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles (CoFe2O4) were synthesized to provide a magnetic core that could be separated from reaction using a magnetic field and modified to carry acid functional groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the crystal structure was that of cobalt spinel ferrite. CoFe2O4 were covered with silica which served as linker for the acid functions. Silica-coated nanoparticles were functionalized with three different acid functions: perfluoropropyl-sulfonic acid, carboxylic acid, and propyl-sulfonic acid. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were analyzed to obtain particle size distributions of the nanoparticles. Total carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur were quantified using an elemental analyzer. Fourier transform infra-red spectra confirmed the presence of sulfonic and carboxylic acid functions and ion-exchange titrations accounted for the total amount of catalytic acid sites per nanoparticle mass. These nanoparticles were evaluated for their performance to hydrolyze the beta-1,4 glycosidic bond of the cellobiose molecule. Propyl-sulfonic (PS) and perfluoropropyl-sulfonic (PFS) acid functionalized nanoparticles catalyzed the hydrolysis of cellobiose significantly better than the control. PS and PFS were also evaluated for their capacity to solubilize wheat straw hemicelluloses and performed better than the control. Although PFS nanoparticles were stronger acid catalysts, the acid functions leached out of the nanoparticle during

  12. Lipoprotein metabolism differs between Marek's disease susceptible and resistant chickens.

    PubMed

    Yuan, P; Yu, Y; Luo, J; Tian, F; Zhang, H; Chang, S; Ramachandran, R; Zhang, L; Song, J

    2012-10-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens caused by MD virus and has an important impact on the poultry industry worldwide. There have been reports showing different physiological characteristics between MD susceptible and resistant chickens. However, little is known about whether there are differences in lipid metabolism between MD susceptible and resistant lines of chickens. In this study, we examined the BW and the weight of tissues (abdominal fat, breast muscle with bone, leg muscle with bone, liver, and heart), the lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations and distributions, and the plasma and tissue levels of adiponectin and its receptors in the highly resistant and susceptible lines during chicken growth. Our data showed that the increase in total cholesterol during growth was mainly due to the elevation of cholesterol in the low-density/very low-density lipoprotein fraction in MD susceptible chickens, whereas the increase of total cholesterol was mainly attributable to the increase in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in MD resistant chickens. Meanwhile, the MD resistant line appeared to have increased plasma adiponectin levels compared with MD susceptible chickens during growth. Taken together, our data suggested that lipoprotein-cholesterol and adiponectin metabolism are different between MD susceptible and resistant chickens.

  13. Lifecycle of a Lipoprotein from a Biophysical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, John C.; Huser, Thomas; Voss, John; Chan, James; Parikh, Atul

    The goal of our project was to understand how lipids and lipoproteins interact with cell membranes. This chapter will present the five major areas in which we have focused our attention on understanding how lipids and lipoproteins interact with cell membranes (Fig. 11.1): (1) triglycerides and vascular injury, (2) single lipoprotein analysis, (3) apolipoprotein E (apoE) conformation changes in the postprandial state, (4) triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRLs) and endothelial cell inflammation, and (5) TGRL lipolysis products and monocyte activation. For over a hundred years, Western civilization has questioned how the food we eat translates into disease, and specifically atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Although most information indicates that this basic pathophysiological process is mediated through consumption of excess saturated fats, much remains unknown. After humans eat a meal, there is an elevation of triglycerides in the blood in the postprandial state. In normal individuals, triglycerides can rise after a meal by 50 to 100%. This has been documented many times in the past, including a paper by Hyson et al, (1998) [1]. In that study, normal healthy individuals were given a 40%-fat meal. Plasma triglycerides, which were modestly elevated initially, rose about 60% higher three to four hours after ingestion of the meal. Subsequently plasma triglycerides fell to baseline levels six hours after the meal. Even in these healthy individuals, a significant elevation of triglycerides was noted after ingestion of a moder ately high-fat meal.

  14. Serum lipid and lipoprotein patterns of Iranian horses.

    PubMed

    Asadi, F; Asadian, P; Shahriari, A; Pourkabir, M; Kazemi, A

    2011-12-01

    Patterns of serum biochemical parameters vary among horse breeds. The objective of the present study was to compare serum lipoproteins of Iranian Caspian ponies with those of other horses (Arabs and Thoroughbreds) in the Iranian region. Serum lipoprotein values were determined by agar-agarose gel electrophoresis and measured by scan densitometry. Moreover, serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were determined and the results were analysed by one-way analysis of variance. Serum triglyceride and cholesterol values were 1.13 +/- 0.23 and 2.38 +/- 0.18 mmol/l in Caspian ponies, 1.96 +/- 0.49 and 1.92 +/- 0.25 mmol/l in Arab horses and 1.38 +/- 0.26 and 2.17 +/- 0.53 mmol/l in Thoroughbred horses. The relative percentages of alpha- (72.63 +/- 17.76%) and beta-lipoproteins (29.10 +/- 5.49%) in serum electrophoretic tracings from Caspian ponies were not significantly different from those of other horses (p > 0.05). The lipoprotein phenotype in Caspian ponies may be useful for evaluating metabolic diseases.

  15. PCSK9 and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Druce, Irena; Abujrad, Hussein; Ooi, Teik Chye

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pro-protein convertase subtilisin-kexin 9 (PCSK9) is known to affect low-density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolism, but there are indications from several lines of research that it may also influence the metabolism of other lipoproteins, especially triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL). This review summarizes the current data on this possible role of PCSK9. A link between PCSK9 and TRL has been suggested through the demonstration of (1) a correlation between plasma PCSK9 and triglyceride (TG) levels in health and disease, (2) a correlation between plasma PCSK9 and markers of carbohydrate metabolism, which is closely related to TG metabolism, (3) an effect of TG-lowering fibrate therapy on plasma PCSK9 levels, (4) an effect of PCSK9 on postprandial lipemia, (5) an effect of PCSK9 on adipose tissue biology, (6) an effect of PCSK9 on apolipoprotein B production from the liver and intestines, (7) an effect of PCSK9 on receptors other than low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) that are involved in TRL metabolism, and (8) an effect of anti-PCSK9 therapy on serum TG levels. The underlying mechanisms are unclear but starting to emerge. PMID:26320603

  16. [Residual risk: The roles of triglycerides and high density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Grammer, Tanja; Kleber, Marcus; Silbernagel, Günther; Scharnagl, Hubert; März, Winfried

    2016-06-01

    In clinical trials, the reduction of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) with statins reduces the incidence rate of cardiovascular events by approximately one third. This means, that a sizeable "residual risk" remains. Besides high lipoprotein (a), disorders in the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and high density liproteins have been implicated as effectors of the residual risk. Both lipoprotein parameters correlate inversely with each other. Therefore, the etiological contributions of triglycerides and / or of HDL for developing cardiovascular disease can hardly be estimated from either observational studies or from intervention studies. The largely disappointing results of intervention studies with inhibitors of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein and in particular the available set of genetically-epidemiological studies suggest that in the last decade, the importance of HDL cholesterol has been overvalued, while the importance of triglycerides has been underestimated. High triglycerides not always atherogenic, but only if they are associated with the accumulation relatively cholesterol-enriched, incompletely catabolized remnants of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins (familial type III hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus). The normalization of the concentration of triglycerides and remnants by inhibiting the expression of apolipoprotein C3 is hence a new, promising therapeutic target.

  17. Relative atherogenicity and predictive value of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well-established atherogenic factor for coronary heart disease, it does not completely represent the risk associated with atherogenic lipoproteins in the presence of high triglyceride (TG) levels. Constituent lipoproteins constituting non–hig...

  18. Fermentable sugars by chemical hydrolysis of biomass.

    PubMed

    Binder, Joseph B; Raines, Ronald T

    2010-03-09

    Abundant plant biomass has the potential to become a sustainable source of fuels and chemicals. Realizing this potential requires the economical conversion of recalcitrant lignocellulose into useful intermediates, such as sugars. We report a high-yielding chemical process for the hydrolysis of biomass into monosaccharides. Adding water gradually to a chloride ionic liquid-containing catalytic acid leads to a nearly 90% yield of glucose from cellulose and 70-80% yield of sugars from untreated corn stover. Ion-exclusion chromatography allows recovery of the ionic liquid and delivers sugar feedstocks that support the vigorous growth of ethanologenic microbes. This simple chemical process, which requires neither an edible plant nor a cellulase, could enable crude biomass to be the sole source of carbon for a scalable biorefinery.

  19. Storage oil hydrolysis during early seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Quettier, Anne-Laure; Eastmond, Peter J

    2009-06-01

    Storage oil breakdown plays an important role in the life cycle of many plants by providing the carbon skeletons that support seedling growth immediately following germination. This metabolic process is initiated by lipases (EC: 3.1.1.3), which catalyze the hydrolysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs) to release free fatty acids and glycerol. A number of lipases have been purified to near homogeneity from seed tissues and analysed for their in vitro activities. Furthermore, several genes encoding lipases have been cloned and characterised from plants. However, only recently has data been presented to establish the molecular identity of a lipase that has been shown to be required for TAG breakdown in seeds. In this review we briefly outline the processes of TAG synthesis and breakdown. We then discuss some of the biochemical literature on seed lipases and describe the cloning and characterisation of a lipase called SUGAR-DEPENDENT1, which is required for TAG breakdown in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

  20. Fermentable sugars by chemical hydrolysis of biomass

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Joseph B.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Abundant plant biomass has the potential to become a sustainable source of fuels and chemicals. Realizing this potential requires the economical conversion of recalcitrant lignocellulose into useful intermediates, such as sugars. We report a high-yielding chemical process for the hydrolysis of biomass into monosaccharides. Adding water gradually to a chloride ionic liquid-containing catalytic acid leads to a nearly 90% yield of glucose from cellulose and 70–80% yield of sugars from untreated corn stover. Ion-exclusion chromatography allows recovery of the ionic liquid and delivers sugar feedstocks that support the vigorous growth of ethanologenic microbes. This simple chemical process, which requires neither an edible plant nor a cellulase, could enable crude biomass to be the sole source of carbon for a scalable biorefinery. PMID:20194793

  1. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Grohmann, K.; Bothast, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Corn fiber is a co-product of the corn wet milling industry which is usually marketed as a low value animal feed ingredient. Approximately 1.2 x 10{sup 6} dry tons of this material are produced annually in the United States. The fiber is composed of kernel cell wall fractions and a residual starch which can all be potentially hydrolyzed to a mixture of glucose, xylose, arabinose and galactose. We have investigated a sequential saccharification of polysaccharides in corn fiber by a treatment with dilute sulfuric acid at 100 to 160{degrees}C followed by partial neutralization and enzymatic hydrolysis with mixed cellulose and amyloglucosidase enzymes at 45{degrees}C. The sequential treatment achieved a high (approximately 85%) conversion of all polysaccharides in the corn fiber to monomeric sugars, which were in most cases fermentable to ethanol by the recombinant bacterium Escherichia coli KOll.

  2. Lipoprotein products of lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase and cholesteryl ester transfer.

    PubMed

    Rose, H G; Ellerbe, P

    1982-09-14

    High-density lipoprotein substrates and products of human plasma lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase have been labelled with radioisotopic cholesteryl esters in order to facilitate identification. [3H]Cholesteryl esters were formed by endogenous HDL3/VHDL enzyme (d greater than 1.125 g/ml) following incubation with mixed vesicles of phosphatidylcholine, unesterified cholesterol and 3H-labelled unesterified cholesterol. Transfer of labelled esters to acceptor lipoproteins (VLDL+LDL, d less than 1.063 g/ml) was employed to distinguish a hypothetical transfer complex. Separation of labelled HDL3/VHDL was by gel-permeation chromatography. The results indicate that a subpopulation of labelled HDL3/VHDL cholesteryl esters (43-61% of total) were removed by VLDL/LDL during a 3 h transfer period and these derive from the smaller lipoproteins of the spectrum. HDL carrying non-transferable [3H]cholesteryl esters localize to the larger HDL3. Transfer rates were proportional to ratios of acceptor to donor lipoproteins. Net transfer of cholesteryl esters from the smaller HDL3 also occurred, but was smaller in magnitude (about 10.5% of total). Acyltransferase assays indicated that enzyme distribution is skewed to larger-sized HDL3, suggesting that the non-transferable components might be lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase-containing parent complexes, while the smaller transfer products contain little acyltransferase. The results fit the hypothesis that a parent HDL3-lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase complex generates a smaller-sized lipoprotein product which is active in cholesteryl ester transport.

  3. [The microanalysis of serum lipoprotein lipids (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Leiss, O; Murawski, U; Egge, H

    1979-10-01

    A method is described which allows the determination of phospholipids, free and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids in lipoprotein fractions starting from 50 microliter of serum. Lipoproteins were separated by successive precipitation: VLDL with Heparin/Mg++, LDL with Dextran sulfate/Mg++ and finally HDL with Dextran sulfate/Mn++. Lipids extracted from the precipitated lipoproteins were determined gravimetrically and by densitometry after thin layer chromatography and charring (van Gent, C.M. (1968), Z. Anal. Chem. 236, 344--350; Egge, H. et al. (1970) Z. Klin. Chem. Klin. Biochem. 8, 488--491). The results obtained from the serum of 12 adult healthy persons were compared with those from lipoprotein fractions separated by preparative ultracentrifugation (Havel, R. J. et al. (1955) J. Clin. Invest. 34, 1345--1353). The distribution of lipids in beta-lipoproteins (d less than 1.063 g/ml) and HDL (1.063 less than d less than 1.21 g/ml) prepared by both methods showed good agreement. Some differences were observed between VLDL (d less than 1.006 g/ml) and VHDL (d greater than 1.21 g/ml) prepared either by precipitation or ultracentrifugation. Compared to the total lipid of the sera, recovery rates were 95--105%. Variation coefficients were in the range of 15--20% for VLDL lipids, 5--10% for LDL and HDL lipids and 10--15% for VHDL lipids. Gravimetrically determined total lipids had a variation coefficient of 4 and 6% for LDL and HDL respectively.

  4. Structures of dimeric hydrolysis products of thorium.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Richard E; Skanthakumar, S; Sigmon, Ginger; Burns, Peter C; Soderholm, L

    2007-04-02

    Three unique thorium dimeric compounds have been crystallized from either direct hydrolysis of Th4+(aq)/HCl or titration of Th(OH)4(am) with Th(NO3)4(aq) and their structures determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compound [Th2(micro2-OH)2(NO3)6(H2O)6]H2O (1) is identical to that identified previously by Johansson. Two additional unreported compounds have been identified, [Th2(micro2-OH)2(NO3)4(H2O)8](NO3)2 (2) and [Th2(micro2-OH)2Cl2(H2O)12]Cl4.2H2O (3). 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c, with a = 6.792(2) A, b = 11.710(4) A, c = 13.778(5) A, and beta = 102.714(5) degrees and 2 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/n, with a = 6.926(5) A, b = 7.207(1) A, c = 21.502(1) A, and beta = 96.380(1) degrees . The chloride-containing dimer, 3, crystallizes in triclinic P, with a = 8.080(2) A, b = 8.880(2) A, c = 9.013(2) A, alpha = 97.41(3) degrees , beta = 91.00(3), and gamma = 116.54(3) degrees . We also present high-energy X-ray scattering data demonstrating the presence of the hydroxo-bridged moiety in solution and discuss our findings in the context of known solid-state structures. The three structures demonstrate 11-, 10-, and 9-coordinate thorium, respectively, and coupled with the scattering experiments provide additional structural and chemical insight into tetravalent actinide hydrolysis.

  5. [Heroin. II. Preparation, hydrolysis, stability, pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, S

    2001-10-01

    Heroin is prepared by treating morphine with acetyl chloride or acetic anhydride. It is a simple reaction and the yields are generally quantitative. Nowadays the whole process is illegal. Morphine is the major alkaloid present in the opium poppy. Opium is manufactured illicitly then morphine is extracted from it in clandestine laboratories. Numerous studies were carried out on heroin to investigate its rate of hydrolysis. It has been shown that heroin is rapidly deacylated in aqueous solution at alkaline or acidic pH to form 6-acethylmorphine and finally, to morphine. Heroin also rapidly decomposes in biological medium yielding first 6-acetylmorphine and then morphine. Hydrolysis can be performed in blood and in tissue homogenates. Heroin can be administered by several routes. Smoking and intravenous administration are preferred, but intranasal, intramuscular and subcutaneous administration are also common. Recently, there has been a shift in heroin use patterns from injection to sniffing and smoking. Sharing of the injection equipment can result in several severe infectious diseases, such as AIDS, hepatitis B and C. Soon after administration, heroin metabolizes to 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. Most of the pharmacological activities of heroin are due to these active metabolites. Therefore, knowledge of distribution of 6-acetylmorphine and morphine is essential to understand pharmacological properties of heroin. Heroin, which is relatively nonpolar compound compared with morphine, has high lipid solubility facilitating rapid absorption from the bloodstream and passage through the blood-brain barrier. When heroin is administered by intravenously the drug takes 10 s to reach the brain i.e. pharmacological effects appear quickly.

  6. Enzymatic hydrolysis of steryl ferulates and steryl glycosides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steryl ferulates and steryl glycosides are phytosterol conjugates found characteristically in cereals. Their properties in enzymatic hydrolysis are, however, not yet well known. Steryl ferulates and steryl glycosides were extracted and purified from rye and wheat bran. Their rates of hydrolysis with...

  7. Bioabatement with hemicellulase supplementation to reduce enzymatic hydrolysis inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Removal of inhibitory compounds by bioabatement, combined with xylan hydrolysis, enables effective cellulose hydrolysis of pretreated corn stover, for fermentation of the sugars to fuel ethanol or other products. The fungus Coniochaeta ligniaria NRRL30616 eliminates most enzyme and fermentation inhi...

  8. Class Projects in Physical Organic Chemistry: The Hydrolysis of Aspirin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrs, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    An exercise that provides a hands-on demonstration of the hydrolysis of aspirin is presented. The key to understanding the hydrolysis is recognizing that all six process may occur simultaneously and that the observed rate constant is the sum of the rate constants that one rate constant dominates the overall process.

  9. Ultrasound Enhancement of Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Plant Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The work reported here is based on acceleration of enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass substrate by introduction of low intensity, uniform ultrasound field into a reaction chamber (bio-reactor). This method may serve as improvement of rates in the hydrolysis of cellulosic materials to sugars, whi...

  10. Enhanced functional properties of tannic acid after thermal hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal hydrolysis processing of fresh tannic acid was carried out in a closed reactor at four different temperatures (65, 100, 150 and 200°C). Pressures reached in the system were 1.3 and 4.8 MPa at 150 and 200°C, respectively. Hydrolysis products (gallic acid and pyrogallol) were separated and qua...

  11. Lipoprotein lipase regulates Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis by macrophages maintained in glucose-deficient medium.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, B; Loike, J D; Kako, Y; Weinstock, P H; Breslow, J L; Silverstein, S C; Goldberg, I J

    1997-01-01

    During periods of intense activity such as phagocytosis, macrophages are thought to derive most of their energy from glucose metabolism under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To determine whether fatty acids released from lipoproteins by macrophage lipoprotein lipase (LPL) could substitute for glucose as a source of energy for phagocytosis, we cultured peritoneal macrophages from normal and LPL knockout (LPL-KO) mice that had been rescued from neonatal demise by expression of human LPL via the muscle creatine kinase promoter. Normal and LPL-KO macrophages were cultured in medium containing normal (5 mM) or low (1 mM) glucose, and were tested for their capacity to phagocytose IgG-opsonized sheep erythrocytes. LPL-KO macrophages maintained in 1 and 5 mM glucose phagocytosed 67 and 79% fewer IgG-opsonized erythrocytes, respectively, than macrophages from normal mice. Addition of VLDL to LPL-expressing macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose enhanced the macrophages' phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes, but did not stimulate phagocytosis by LPL-KO macrophages. Inhibition of secreted LPL with a monoclonal anti-LPL antibody or with tetrahydrolipstatin blocked the ability of VLDL to enhance phagocytosis by LPL-expressing macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose. Addition of oleic acid significantly enhanced phagocytosis by both LPL-expressing and LPL-KO macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose. Moreover, oleic acid stimulated phagocytosis in cells cultured in non-glucose-containing medium, and increased the intracellular stores of creatine phosphate. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, but not of glycolysis, blocked the capacity of oleic acid to stimulate phagocytosis. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of acetyl LDL by macrophages from LPL-expressing and LPL-KO mice was similar whether the cells were maintained in 5 or 1 mM glucose, and was not augmented by VLDL. We postulate that fatty acids derived from macrophage LPL-catalyzed hydrolysis of triglycerides and

  12. Giardia lamblia low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein is involved in selective lipoprotein endocytosis and parasite replication.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Maria R; Miras, Silvana L; Quiroga, Rodrigo; Rópolo, Andrea S; Touz, Maria C

    2011-03-01

    As Giardia lamblia is unable to synthesize cholesterol de novo, this steroid might be obtained from the host's intestinal milieu by endocytosis of lipoproteins. In this work, we identified a putative Giardia lamblia low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (GlLRP), a type I membrane protein, which shares the substrate N-terminal binding domain and a FXNPXY-type endocytic motif with human LRPs. Expression of tagged GlLRP showed that it was localized predominantly in the endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomal-like peripheral vacuoles and plasma membrane. However, the FXNPXY-deleted GlLRP was retained at the plasma membrane suggesting that it is abnormally transported and processed. The low-density lipoprotein and chylomicrons interacted with GlLRP, with this interaction being necessary for lipoprotein internalization and cell proliferation. Finally, we show that GlLRP binds directly to the medium subunit of Giardia adaptor protein 2, indicating that receptor-mediated internalization occurs through an adaptin mechanism.

  13. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Hydrotropic Pulps at Different Substrate Loadings.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Marina N; Makarova, Ekaterina I; Pavlov, Igor N; Budaeva, Vera V; Sakovich, Gennady V

    2016-03-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic raw materials to produce nutrient broths for microbiological synthesis of ethanol and other valuable products is an important field of modern biotechnology. Biotechnological processing implies the selection of an effective pretreatment technique for raw materials. In this study, the hydrotropic treatment increased the reactivity of the obtained substrates toward enzymatic hydrolysis by 7.1 times for Miscanthus and by 7.3 times for oat hulls. The hydrotropic pulp from oat hulls was more reactive toward enzymatic hydrolysis compared to that from Miscanthus, despite that the substrates had similar compositions. As the initial substrate loadings were raised during enzymatic hydrolysis of the hydrotropic Miscanthus and oat hull pulps, the concentration of reducing sugars increased by 34 g/dm(3) and the yield of reducing sugars decreased by 31 %. The findings allow us to predict the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of hydrotropic pulps from Miscanthus and oat hulls when scaling up the process by volume.

  14. Epidemic based modeling of enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; Arellano, Maria G; Keshwani, Deepak R

    2014-01-01

    An epidemic based model was developed to describe the enzymatic hydrolysis of a lignocellulosic biomass, dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover. The process of substrate getting adsorbed and digested by enzyme was simulated as susceptibles getting infected by viruses and becoming removed and recovered. This model simplified the dynamic enzyme "infection" process and the catalysis of cellulose into a two-parameter controlled, enzyme behavior guided mechanism. Furthermore, the model incorporates the adsorption block by lignin and inhibition effects on cellulose catalysis. The model satisfactorily predicted the enzyme adsorption and hydrolysis, negative role of lignin, and inhibition effects over hydrolysis for a broad range of substrate and enzyme loadings. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the incorporation of lignin and other inhibition effects. Our model will be a useful tool for evaluating the effects of parameters during hydrolysis and guide a design strategy for continuous hydrolysis and the associated process control.

  15. Factors affecting cellulose hydrolysis based on inactivation of adsorbed enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhuoliang; Berson, R Eric

    2014-09-01

    The rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose reaction is known to decrease significantly as the reaction proceeds. Factors such as reaction temperature, time, and surface area of substrate that affect cellulose conversion were analyzed relative to their role in a mechanistic model based on first order inactivation of adsorbed cellulases. The activation energies for the hydrolytic step and inactivation step were very close in magnitude: 16.3 kcal mol(-1) for hydrolysis and 18.0 kcal mol(-1) for inactivation, respectively. Therefore, increasing reaction temperature would cause a significant increase in the inactivation rate in addition to the catalytic reaction rate. Vmax,app was only 20% or less of the value at 72 h compared to at 2h as a result of inactivation of adsorbed cellulases, suggesting prolonged hydrolysis is not an efficient way to improve cellulose hydrolysis. Hydrolysis rate increased with corresponding increases in available substrate surface binding area.

  16. Modeling of autocatalytic hydrolysis of adefovir dipivoxil in solid formulations.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Zhang, Yan; Xiang, Bingren; Deng, Haishan; Wu, Jingfang

    2011-04-01

    The stability and hydrolysis kinetics of a phosphate prodrug, adefovir dipivoxil, in solid formulations were studied. The stability relationship between five solid formulations was explored. An autocatalytic mechanism for hydrolysis could be proposed according to the kinetic behavior which fits the Prout-Tompkins model well. For the classical kinetic models could hardly describe and predict the hydrolysis kinetics of adefovir dipivoxil in solid formulations accurately when the temperature is high, a feedforward multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network was constructed to model the hydrolysis kinetics. The build-in approaches in Weka, such as lazy classifiers and rule-based learners (IBk, KStar, DecisionTable and M5Rules), were used to verify the performance of MLP. The predictability of the models was evaluated by 10-fold cross-validation and an external test set. It reveals that MLP should be of general applicability proposing an alternative efficient way to model and predict autocatalytic hydrolysis kinetics for phosphate prodrugs.

  17. Trihalomethane hydrolysis in drinking water at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lu; Yang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Karanfil, Tanju; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2015-07-01

    Hydrolysis could contribute to the loss of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the drinking water at elevated temperatures. This study was aimed at investigating THM hydrolysis pertaining to the storage of hot boiled water in enclosed containers. The water pH value was in the range of 6.1-8.2 and the water temperature was varied from 65 to 95 °C. The effects of halide ions, natural organic matter, and drinking water matrix were investigated. Results showed that the hydrolysis rates declined in the order following CHBrCl2 > CHBr2Cl > CHBr3 > CHCl3. THM hydrolysis was primarily through the alkaline pathway, except for CHCl3 in water at relatively low pH value. The activation energies for the alkaline hydrolysis of CHCl3, CHBrCl2, CHBr2Cl and CHBr3 were 109, 113, 115 and 116 kJ/mol, respectively. No hydrolysis intermediates could accumulate in the water. The natural organic matter, and probably other constituents, in drinking water could substantially decrease THM hydrolysis rates by more than 50%. When a drinking water was at 90 °C or above, the first order rate constants for THM hydrolysis were in the magnitude of 10(-2)‒10(-1) 1/h. When the boiled real tap water was stored in an enclosed container, THMs continued increasing during the first few hours and then kept decreasing later on due to the competition between hydrolysis and further formation. The removal of THMs, especially brominated THMs, by hydrolysis would greatly reduce one's exposure to disinfection by-products by consuming the boiled water stored in enclosed containers.

  18. Bolstering cholesteryl ester hydrolysis in liver: A hepatocyte-targeting gene delivery strategy for potential alleviation of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    He, Hongliang; Lancina, Michael G; Wang, Jing; Korzun, William J; Yang, Hu; Ghosh, Shobha

    2017-06-01

    Current atherosclerosis treatment strategies primarily focus on limiting further cholesteryl esters (CE) accumulation by reducing endogenous synthesis of cholesterol in the liver. No therapy is currently available to enhance the removal of CE, a crucial step to reduce the burden of the existing disease. Given the central role of hepatic cholesteryl ester hydrolase (CEH) in the intrahepatic hydrolysis of CE and subsequent removal of the resulting free cholesterol (FC), in this work, we applied galactose-functionalized polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer generation 5 (Gal-G5) for hepatocyte-specific delivery of CEH expression vector. The data presented herein show the increased specific uptake of Gal-G5/CEH expression vector complexes (simply Gal-G5/CEH) by hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the upregulated CEH expression in the hepatocytes significantly enhanced the intracellular hydrolysis of high density lipoprotein-associated CE (HDL-CE) and subsequent conversion/secretion of hydrolyzed FC as bile acids (BA). The increased CEH expression in the liver significantly increased the flux of HDL-CE to biliary as well as fecal FC and BA. Meanwhile, Gal-G5 did not induce hepatic or renal toxicity. It was also not immunotoxic. Because of these encouraging pre-clinical testing results, using this safe and highly efficient hepatocyte-specific gene delivery platform to enhance the hepatic processes involved in cholesterol elimination is a promising strategy for the alleviation of atherosclerosis.

  19. TAT-pathway-dependent lipoproteins as a niche-based adaptation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Shruthi, Hamsanathan; Babu, Mohan Madan; Sankaran, Krishnan

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins, characterized by the N-terminal N-acyl S-diacylglyceryl Cysteine, are key membrane proteins in bacterial homeostasis. It is generally thought that during the modification lipoprotein precursors are translocated via the Sec-machinery in an unfolded state. The recent discovery of twin-arginine translocation (TAT) machinery, meant for exporting folded-proteins, and the presence of TAT-type signal sequences in co-factor-containing (hence already folded) lipoproteins, prompted us to investigate its role and significance in lipoprotein biosynthesis. We systematically analyzed 696 prokaryotic genomes using an algorithm based on DOLOP and TatP rules to predict TAT-pathway-dependent lipoprotein substrates. Occurrence of the deduced TAT-pathway-dependent lipoprotein substrates in relation to genome size, presence or absence of TAT machinery, and extent of its usage for lipoprotein export and habitat types revealed that unlike the host-obligates, the free-living prokaryotes in complex hostile environments (e.g., soil) depend more on TAT-exported lipoproteins. Functional classification of the predicted TAT-dependent lipoproteins revealed enrichment in hydrolases and oxido-reductases, which are fast-folding and co-factor-containing proteins. The role of the TAT pathway in the export of folded-lipoproteins and in niche-specific adaptation for survival has important implications not only in lipoprotein biosynthesis, but also for protein and metabolic engineering applications.

  20. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane.

  1. Distinct Hepatic Receptors for Low Density Lipoprotein and Apolipoprotein E in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, Jeffrey M.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Gregg, Richard E.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1985-02-01

    Since the liver is a central organ for lipid and lipoprotein synthesis and catabolism, hepatic receptors for specific apolipoproteins on plasma lipoproteins would be expected to modulate lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The role of hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins was evaluated in patients with complementary disorders in lipoprotein metabolism: abetalipoproteinemia and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. In addition, hepatic membranes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia were studied and compared before and after portacaval shunt surgery. The results establish that the human liver has receptors for apolipoproteins B and E. Furthermore, in the human, hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E are genetically distinct and can undergo independent control.

  2. Bidirectional flux of cholesterol between cells and lipoproteins. Effects of phospholipid depletion of high density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.J.; Bamberger, M.J.; Latta, R.A.; Rapp, P.E.; Phillips, M.C.; Rothblat, G.H.

    1986-05-05

    The bidirectional surface transfer of free cholesterol (FC) between Fu5AH rat hepatoma cells and human high density lipoprotein (HDL) was studied. Cells and HDL were prelabeled with (4-/sup 14/C)FC and (7-/sup 3/H)FC, respectively. Influx and efflux of FC were measured simultaneously from the appearance of /sup 3/H counts in cells and /sup 14/C counts in medium. Results were analyzed by a computerized procedure which fitted sets of kinetic data to a model assuming that cell and HDL FC populations each formed a single homogeneous pool and that together the pools formed a closed system. This analysis yielded values for the first-order rate constants of FC influx and efflux (ki and ke), from which influx and efflux of FC mass (Fi and Fe) could be calculated. With normal HDL, the uptake and release of FC tracers conformed well to the above-described model; Fi and Fe were approximately equal, suggesting an exchange of FC between cells and HDL. HDL was depleted of phospholipid (PL) by treatment with either phospholipase A2 or heparin-releasable rat hepatic lipase, followed by incubation with bovine serum albumin. PL depletion of HDL had little or no effect on ki, but reduced ke, indicating that PL-deficient HDL is a relatively poor acceptor of cell cholesterol. The reduction in ke resulted in initial Fi greater than Fe and, thus, in net uptake of FC by the cells. This result explained previous results demonstrating net uptake of FC from PL-depleted HDL. In the presence of an inhibitor of acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase, the steady state distribution of FC mass between cells and HDL was accurately predicted by the ratio of rate constants for FC flux. This result provided additional validation for describing FC flux in terms of first-order rate constants and homogeneous cell and HDL FC pools.

  3. Alkaline phosphatase revisited: hydrolysis of alkyl phosphates.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Patrick J; Herschlag, Daniel

    2002-03-05

    Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) is the prototypical two metal ion catalyst with two divalent zinc ions bound approximately 4 A apart in the active site. Studies spanning half a century have elucidated many structural and mechanistic features of this enzyme, rendering it an attractive model for investigating the potent catalytic power of bimetallic centers. Unfortunately, fundamental mechanistic features have been obscured by limitations with the standard assays. These assays generate concentrations of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) in excess of its inhibition constant (K(i) approximately 1 muM). This tight binding by P(i) has affected the majority of published kinetic constants. Furthermore, binding limits k(cat)/K(m) for reaction of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the most commonly employed substrate. We describe a sensitive (32)P-based assay for hydrolysis of alkyl phosphates that avoids the complication of product inhibition. We have revisited basic mechanistic features of AP with these alkyl phosphate substrates. The results suggest that the chemical step for phosphorylation of the enzyme limits k(cat)/K(m). The pH-rate profile and additional results suggest that the serine nucleophile is active in its anionic form and has a pK(a) of < or = 5.5 in the free enzyme. An inactivating pK(a) of 8.0 is observed for binding of both substrates and inhibitors, and we suggest that this corresponds to ionization of a zinc-coordinated water molecule. Counter to previous suggestions, inorganic phosphate dianion appears to bind to the highly charged AP active site at least as strongly as the trianion. The dependence of k(cat)/K(m) on the pK(a) of the leaving group follows a Brønsted correlation with a slope of beta(lg) = -0.85 +/- 0.1, differing substantially from the previously reported value of -0.2 obtained from data with a less sensitive assay. This steep leaving group dependence is consistent with a largely dissociative transition state for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis of

  4. Factors impeding enzymatic wheat gluten hydrolysis at high solid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hardt, N A; Janssen, A E M; Boom, R M; van der Goot, A J

    2014-07-01

    Enzymatic wheat gluten hydrolysis at high solid concentrations is advantageous from an environmental and economic point of view. However, increased wheat gluten concentrations result in a concentration effect with a decreased hydrolysis rate at constant enzyme-to-substrate ratios and a decreased maximum attainable degree of hydrolysis (DH%). We here identified the underlying factors causing the concentration effect. Wheat gluten was hydrolyzed at solid concentrations from 4.4% to 70%. The decreased hydrolysis rate was present at all solid concentrations and at any time of the reaction. Mass transfer limitations, enzyme inhibition and water activity were shown to not cause this hydrolysis rate limitation up to 50% solids. However, the hydrolysis rate limitation can be, at least partly, explained by a second-order enzyme inactivation process. Furthermore, mass transfer impeded the hydrolysis above 60% solids. Addition of enzyme after 24 h at high solid concentrations scarcely increased the DH%, suggesting that the maximum attainable DH% decreases at high solid concentrations. Reduced enzyme activities caused by low water activities can explain this DH% limitation. Finally, a possible influence of the plastein reaction on the DH% limitation is discussed.

  5. Disposition and metabolism of darapladib, a lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitor, in humans.

    PubMed

    Dave, Mehul; Nash, Mike; Young, Graeme C; Ellens, Harma; Magee, Mindy H; Roberts, Andrew D; Taylor, Maxine A; Greenhill, Robert W; Boyle, Gary W

    2014-03-01

    The absorption, metabolism, and excretion of darapladib, a novel inhibitor of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, was investigated in healthy male subjects using [(14)C]-radiolabeled material in a bespoke study design. Disposition of darapladib was compared following single i.v. and both single and repeated oral administrations. The anticipated presence of low circulating concentrations of drug-related material required the use of accelerator mass spectrometry as a sensitive radiodetector. Blood, urine, and feces were collected up to 21 days post radioactive dose, and analyzed for drug-related material. The principal circulating drug-related component was unchanged darapladib. No notable metabolites were observed in plasma post-i.v. dosing; however, metabolites resulting from hydroxylation (M3) and N-deethylation (M4) were observed (at 4%-6% of plasma radioactivity) following oral dosing, indicative of some first-pass metabolism. In addition, an acid-catalyzed degradant (M10) resulting from presystemic hydrolysis was also detected in plasma at similar levels of ∼5% of radioactivity post oral dosing. Systemic exposure to radioactive material was reduced within the repeat dose regimen, consistent with the notion of time-dependent pharmacokinetics resulting from enhanced clearance or reduced absorption. Elimination of drug-related material occurred predominantly via the feces, with unchanged darapladib representing 43%-53% of the radioactive dose, and metabolites M3 and M4 also notably accounting for ∼9% and 19% of the dose, respectively. The enhanced study design has provided an increased understanding of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties of darapladib in humans, and substantially influenced future work on the compound.

  6. The role of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 in a murine model of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Crawford, G L; Boldison, J; Copland, D A; Adamson, P; Gale, D; Brandt, M; Nicholson, L B; Dick, A D

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage activation is, in part, regulated via hydrolysis of oxidised low density lipoproteins by Lipoprotein-Associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), resulting in increased macrophage migration, pro-inflammatory cytokine release and chemokine expression. In uveitis, tissue damage is mediated as a result of macrophage activation; hence inhibition of Lp-PLA2 may limit macrophage activation and protect the tissue. Utilising Lp-PLA2 gene-deficient (KO) mice and a pharmacological inhibitor of Lp-PLA2 (SB-435495) we aimed to determine the effect of Lp-PLA2 suppression in mediating retinal protection in a model of autoimmune retinal inflammation, experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Following immunisation with RBP-3 (IRBP) 1-20 or 161-180 peptides, clinical disease was monitored and severity assessed, infiltrating leukocytes were enumerated by flow cytometry and tissue destruction quantified by histology. Despite ablation of Lp-PLA2 enzyme activity in Lp-PLA2 KO mice or wild-type mice treated with SB-435495, the number of infiltrating CD45+ cells in the retina was equivalent to control EAU animals, and there was no reduction in disease severity. Thus, despite the reported beneficial effects of therapeutic Lp-PLA2 depletion in a variety of vascular inflammatory conditions, we were unable to attenuate disease, show delayed disease onset or prevent progression of EAU in Lp-PLA2 KO mice. Although EAU exhibits inflammatory vasculopathy there is no overt defect in lipid metabolism and given the lack of effect following Lp-PLA2 suppression, these data support the hypothesis that sub-acute autoimmune inflammatory disease progresses independently of Lp-PLA2 activity.

  7. Interaction of lipoprotein lipase with p-nitrophenyl N-alkylcarbamates: kinetics, mechanism, and analogy to the acylenzyme mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shin, H C; Quinn, D M

    1992-01-28

    The interaction of lipoprotein lipase with p-nitrophenyl N-alkylcarbamates [PNPOC(=O)-NHCnH2n+1; n = 4, 8, and 12] proceeds by the three-stage mechanism shown below. After reversible [formula: see text] formation of the enzyme-carbamate complex (EC), rapid carbamylation (kc) precedes slow decarbamylation. Therefore, in short-term assays (less than or equal to 30 min) of lipoprotein lipase catalyzed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate, activity is rapidly lost. The inhibition by p-nitrophenyl N-butylcarbamate follows saturation kinetics, which allows determination of Kc = 5.4 +/- 0.9 microM and kc = (4.9 +/- 0.7) x 10(-2)s-1. Saturation kinetics are not observed for the longer inhibitors p-nitrophenyl N-octylcarbamate and p-nitrophenyl N-dodecylcarbamate. Rather, plots of the pseudo-first-order rate constant for activity loss versus inhibitor concentration are concave upward, consistent with inhibitor binding to two sites on the enzyme. The inhibition phase is sufficiently rapid that p-nitrophenyl N-octylcarbamate can be used to titrate enzyme active sites. On the other hand, long-term assays (greater than 5 h) show sequential inhibition and activity return phases, and from the activity return phase kd is calculated. The long-term activity time course is accurately simulated by Runge-Kutta integration of the differential equations for the three-stage mechanism. These approaches have been used to characterize the kinetics of interaction of the enzyme with the carbamate inhibitors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Lipoprotein alterations, abdominal fat distribution and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schreier, L E; Berg, G A; Basilio, F M; Lopez, G I; Etkin, A E; Wikinski, R L

    1999-04-01

    Plasma lipid profile and abdominal obesity have been associated with breast cancer risk, however published results have been inconsistent. To clarify these associations we studied lipid and lipoprotein alterations, obesity degree and body fat distribution, in 30 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients without treatment and 30 controls matched by age and menopausal status. Both pre and postmenopausal breast cancer patients presented higher body mass index, waist/hip ratio and insulin levels than their matched controls. An increase in triglycerides and a decrease in HDL-cholesterol, especially in the HDL2 subfraction, were observed in patients with breast cancer. Besides, HDL particle from these patients showed increased apo A1/HDL-cholesterol ratio. These alterations were correlated with waist/hip ratio. The association between lipoprotein alterations and abdominal obesity independent of menopausal status, in untreated newly diagnosed breast cancer patients is reported for the first time in this study.

  9. Cholesterol, lipoproteins and subclinical interstitial lung disease: the MESA study.

    PubMed

    Podolanczuk, Anna J; Raghu, Ganesh; Tsai, Michael Y; Kawut, Steven M; Peterson, Eric; Sonti, Rajiv; Rabinowitz, Daniel; Johnson, Craig; Barr, R Graham; Hinckley Stukovsky, Karen; Hoffman, Eric A; Carr, J Jeffrey; Ahmed, Firas S; Jacobs, David R; Watson, Karol; Shea, Steven J; Lederer, David J

    2017-01-27

    We investigated associations of plasma lipoproteins with subclinical interstitial lung disease (ILD) by measuring high attenuation areas (HAA: lung voxels between -600 and -250 Hounsfield units) in 6700 adults and serum MMP-7 and SP-A in 1216 adults age 45-84 without clinical cardiovascular disease in Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. In cross-sectional analyses, each SD decrement in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was associated with a 2.12% HAA increment (95% CI 1.44% to 2.79%), a 3.53% MMP-7 increment (95% CI 0.93% to 6.07%) and a 6.37% SP-A increment (95% CI 1.35% to 11.13%), independent of demographics, smoking and inflammatory biomarkers. These findings support a novel hypothesis that HDL-C might influence subclinical lung injury and extracellular matrix remodelling.

  10. [Lipoprotein metabolism in menopause. Effect of hormonal substitution therapy].

    PubMed

    Heckers, H; Platt, D

    1991-06-20

    Oral administration of conjugated estrogens, estradiol valerate and micronized estradiol--but not the percutaneous application--in the postmenopause modifies the plasmic lipoprotein profile by lowering, dose-dependently, LDL and elevating HDL (HDL2). In parallel, the cardiovascular mortality is decreased by 50-66%, with smokers also benefiting to the same extent. On account of the increased risk for endometrial carcinoma associated with postmenopausal estrogen monotherapy, combination with a lowest-dose gestagen is imperative. However, the very numerous synthetic gestagens can antagonize the favorable effects of the estrogen on lipoprotein metabolism. This applies in particular to the gestagens of the 19-nortestosterone type, such as norethisterone acetate and, in particular, levonorgestrel, but less so the 17-hydroxyprogesterone derivatives medroxyprogesterone acetate and medrogestone with their very low androgenic effect.

  11. [Hydrolysis of peptides by immobilized bacterial peptide hydrolases].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Deniakina, E K

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of hydrolysis of a mixture of peptides with an enzyme from the bacterium Xanthomonas rubrilineans, displaying a peptidase activity and immobilized on aluminum oxide, was studied. Kinetic schemes and equations allowing for approaching quantitative description of peptide hydrolysis in complex mixtures containing free amino acids and peptides were obtained. It was demonstrated that as a result of hydrolysis, the content of free amino acids in hydrolysates decreased 2.5- to 3-fold and the molecular weight of the constituent peptides, 2-fold.

  12. Low-density lipoprotein density determination by electric conductivity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Higuero, José A; Salvador, Ana M; Arrondo, José L R; Milicua, José Carlos G

    2011-10-15

    The predominance of small dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. A simple but precise method has been developed, based on electrical conductivity of an isopycnic gradient of KBr, to obtain density values of human LDL fraction. The results obtained can distinguish LDL density populations and their subfractions from different patients. These data were corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) (structure) and light-scattering analyses (size).

  13. Transgenic rabbit that expresses a functional human lipoprotein (a)

    DOEpatents

    Rouy, Didier; Duverger, Nicolas; Emmanuel, Florence; Denefle, Patrice; Houdebine, Louis-Marie; Viglietta, Celine; Rubin, Edward M.; Hughes, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    A transgenic rabbit which has in its genomic DNA sequences that encode apolipoprotein (a) and apolipoprotein B polypeptides which are capable of combining to produce lipoprotein (a), a process for creating such a rabbit, and the use of the rabbit to identify compounds which are effective in the treatment of human diseases which are associated with, induced and/or exacerbated by Lp(a) expression.

  14. Preliminary model for human lipoprotein metabolism in hyperlipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Phair, R D; Hammond, M G; Bowden, J A; Fried, M; Fisher, W R; Berman, M

    1975-12-01

    A model is proposed for the metabolism of plasma lipoprotein apoproteins based on studies of a hyperlipoproteinemic subject who received 2.5 mCi[3H]leucine intravenously. Measurements included apoprotein specific activities (apo-B and apo-C) of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and of three low density lipoprotein (LDL) subspecies, Sf 17 LDL, Sf 10 LDL, and Sf 4 LDL. Activities of plasma albumin were also determined. The data were analyzed using a compartmental model and the SAAM computer program. A chain-like series of compartments were necessary to simulate plasma VLDL kinetics, suggesting a multistep delipidation process. The data are consistent with the notion that VLDL is the dominant LDL precursor. Two modes of conversion from VLDL to LDL are required. After partial delipidation some VLDL is converted to the Sf 17 LDL, while the remainder undergoes further delipidation before being converted to Sf 4 LDL, the major plasma LDL component. Some direct release of LDL into plasma had to be introduced to fit the data, about 24% of total LDL production. The three LDL subspecies follow a precursor-product relationship (Sf 17 leads to Sf 10 leads to Sf 4). The analysis also indicates that in using labeled leucine as a tracer, the slow exchange of leucine with the total body protein pool must be considered in trying to resolve the LDL subsystem and in the estimation of steady-state apoprotein levels. In view of the fact that the proposed model is based predominantly on the data from a single patient, no generalizations can be made about parameter values. The study is most valuable, however, in pointing out metabolic pathways not considered before and in calling attention to variables that must be considered in the design of experiments to study lipoprotein kinetics.

  15. Enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass from wood.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Consolación; Reyes-Sosa, Francisco Manuel; Díez, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Current research and development in cellulosic ethanol production has been focused mainly on agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops such as corn stover and switchgrass; however, woody biomass remains a very important feedstock for ethanol production. The precise composition of hemicellulose in the wood is strongly dependent on the plant species, therefore different types of enzymes are needed based on hemicellulose complexity and type of pretreatment. In general, hardwood species have much lower recalcitrance to enzymes than softwood. For hardwood, xylanases, beta-xylosidases and xyloglucanases are the main hemicellulases involved in degradation of the hemicellulose backbone, while for softwood the effect of mannanases and beta-mannosidases is more relevant. Furthermore, there are different key accessory enzymes involved in removing the hemicellulosic fraction and increasing accessibility of cellulases to the cellulose fibres improving the hydrolysis process. A diversity of enzymatic cocktails has been tested using from low to high densities of biomass (2-20% total solids) and a broad range of results has been obtained. The performance of recently developed commercial cocktails on hardwoods and softwoods will enable a further step for the commercialization of fuel ethanol from wood.

  16. Catalytic hydrolysis of cellulose into furans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chengmei; Tao, Furong; Cui, Yuezhi

    2016-12-01

    Chromium chloride in 4-(3-methylimidazolium-1-yl)butane-1-sulfonic acid hydrogen sulfate (IL-1) was found to effectively catalyze the hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) at 150°C for 300 min to achieve 87.8% conversion to a slate of products. With a catalytic amount of CrCl3, the yields of 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) and furfural were up to 32.4 and 15.2%, respectively, small molecules levulinic acid (LA, 10.8%) and the total reducing sugars (TRS, 10.7%) were also generated. Through LC-MSD analysis and mass spectra, dimer of furan compounds as the main by-products were speculated, and the components of gas products were methane, ethane, CO, CO2, and H2. We suggested that IL-1 and CrCl3 exhibited a coordination interaction; the formation of the intermediate via the hydride shift played a key role in the formation of HMF. The catalyst was recycled and exhibited constant activity for five successive trials.

  17. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  18. Autophagy-mediated longevity is modulated by lipoprotein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Seah, Nicole E; de Magalhaes Filho, C Daniel; Petrashen, Anna P; Henderson, Hope R; Laguer, Jade; Gonzalez, Julissa; Dillin, Andrew; Hansen, Malene; Lapierre, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy-dependent longevity models in C. elegans display altered lipid storage profiles, but the contribution of lipid distribution to life-span extension is not fully understood. Here we report that lipoprotein production, autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis are linked to modulate life span in a conserved fashion. We find that overexpression of the yolk lipoprotein VIT/vitellogenin reduces the life span of long-lived animals by impairing the induction of autophagy-related and lysosomal genes necessary for longevity. Accordingly, reducing vitellogenesis increases life span via induction of autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis. Life-span extension due to reduced vitellogenesis or enhanced lysosomal lipolysis requires nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) NHR-49 and NHR-80, highlighting novel roles for these NHRs in lysosomal lipid signaling. In dietary-restricted worms and mice, expression of VIT and hepatic APOB (apolipoprotein B), respectively, are significantly reduced, suggesting a conserved longevity mechanism. Altogether, our study demonstrates that lipoprotein biogenesis is an important mechanism that modulates aging by impairing autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis.

  19. Functional Roles of the Interaction of APP and Lipoprotein Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkamp, Theresa; Wasser, Catherine R.; Herz, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The biological fates of the key initiator of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and a family of lipoprotein receptors, the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related proteins (LRPs) and their molecular roles in the neurodegenerative disease process are inseparably interwoven. Not only does APP bind tightly to the extracellular domains (ECDs) of several members of the LRP group, their intracellular portions are also connected through scaffolds like the one established by FE65 proteins and through interactions with adaptor proteins such as X11/Mint and Dab1. Moreover, the ECDs of APP and LRPs share common ligands, most notably Reelin, a regulator of neuronal migration during embryonic development and modulator of synaptic transmission in the adult brain, and Agrin, another signaling protein which is essential for the formation and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and which likely also has critical, though at this time less well defined, roles for the regulation of central synapses. Furthermore, the major independent risk factors for AD, Apolipoprotein (Apo) E and ApoJ/Clusterin, are lipoprotein ligands for LRPs. Receptors and ligands mutually influence their intracellular trafficking and thereby the functions and abilities of neurons and the blood-brain-barrier to turn over and remove the pathological product of APP, the amyloid-β peptide. This article will review and summarize the molecular mechanisms that are shared by APP and LRPs and discuss their relative contributions to AD. PMID:28298885

  20. Autophagy-mediated longevity is modulated by lipoprotein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seah, Nicole E.; de Magalhaes Filho, C. Daniel; Petrashen, Anna P.; Henderson, Hope R.; Laguer, Jade; Gonzalez, Julissa; Dillin, Andrew; Hansen, Malene; Lapierre, Louis R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy-dependent longevity models in C. elegans display altered lipid storage profiles, but the contribution of lipid distribution to life-span extension is not fully understood. Here we report that lipoprotein production, autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis are linked to modulate life span in a conserved fashion. We find that overexpression of the yolk lipoprotein VIT/vitellogenin reduces the life span of long-lived animals by impairing the induction of autophagy-related and lysosomal genes necessary for longevity. Accordingly, reducing vitellogenesis increases life span via induction of autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis. Life-span extension due to reduced vitellogenesis or enhanced lysosomal lipolysis requires nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) NHR-49 and NHR-80, highlighting novel roles for these NHRs in lysosomal lipid signaling. In dietary-restricted worms and mice, expression of VIT and hepatic APOB (apolipoprotein B), respectively, are significantly reduced, suggesting a conserved longevity mechanism. Altogether, our study demonstrates that lipoprotein biogenesis is an important mechanism that modulates aging by impairing autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis. PMID:26671266

  1. Acrolein consumption induces systemic dyslipidemia and lipoprotein modification

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg A.; Lesgards, Jean-Francois; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Prough, Russell A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Liu, SiQi; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2010-02-15

    Aldehydes such as acrolein are ubiquitous pollutants present in automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. Such aldehydes are also constituents of several food substances and are present in drinking water, irrigation canals, and effluents from manufacturing plants. Oral intake represents the most significant source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. To study the effects of short-term oral exposure to acrolein on lipoprotein levels and metabolism, adult mice were gavage-fed 0.1 to 5 mg acrolein/kg bwt and changes in plasma lipoproteins were assessed. Changes in hepatic gene expression related to lipid metabolism and cytokines were examined by qRT-PCR analysis. Acrolein feeding did not affect body weight, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, electrolytes, cytokines or liver enzymes, but increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Similar results were obtained with apoE-null mice. Plasma lipoproteins from acrolein-fed mice showed altered electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Chromatographic analysis revealed elevated VLDL cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides levels with little change in LDL or HDL. NMR analysis indicated shifts from small to large VLDL and from large to medium-small LDL with no change in the size of HDL particles. Increased plasma VLDL was associated with a significant decrease in post-heparin plasma hepatic lipase activity and a decrease in hepatic expression of hepatic lipase. These observations suggest that oral exposure to acrolein could induce or exacerbate systemic dyslipidemia and thereby contribute to cardiovascular disease risk.

  2. Lipoprotein subclass metabolism in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis[S

    PubMed Central

    Männistö, Ville T.; Simonen, Marko; Soininen, Pasi; Tiainen, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Kaminska, Dorota; Venesmaa, Sari; Käkelä, Pirjo; Kärjä, Vesa; Gylling, Helena; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with increased synthesis of triglycerides and cholesterol coupled with increased VLDL synthesis in the liver. In addition, increased cholesterol content in the liver associates with NASH. Here we study the association of lipoprotein subclass metabolism with NASH. To this aim, liver biopsies from 116 morbidly obese individuals [age 47.3 ± 8.7 (mean ± SD) years, BMI 45.1 ± 6.1 kg/m2, 39 men and 77 women] were used for histological assessment. Proton NMR spectroscopy was used to measure lipid concentrations of 14 lipoprotein subclasses in native serum samples at baseline and after obesity surgery. We observed that total lipid concentration of VLDL and LDL subclasses, but not HDL subclasses, associated with NASH [false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.1]. More specifically, total lipid and cholesterol concentration of VLDL and LDL subclasses associated with inflammation, fibrosis, and cell injury (FDR < 0.1), independent of steatosis. Cholesterol concentration of all VLDL subclasses also correlated with total and free cholesterol content in the liver. All NASH-related changes in lipoprotein subclasses were reversed by obesity surgery. High total lipid and cholesterol concentration of serum VLDL and LDL subclasses are linked to cholesterol accumulation in the liver and to liver cell injury in NASH. PMID:25344588

  3. Acrolein Consumption Induces Systemic Dyslipidemia and Lipoprotein Modification

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg A.; Lesgards, Jean-Francois; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Prough, Russell A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Liu, SiQi; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2010-01-01

    Aldehydes such as acrolein are ubiquitous pollutants present in automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. Such aldehydes are also constituents of several food substances and are present in drinking water, irrigation canals, and effluents from manufacturing plants. Oral intake represents the most significant source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. To study the effects of short-term oral exposure to acrolein on lipoprotein levels and metabolism, adult mice were gavage fed 0.1 to 5 mg acrolein/kg bwt and changes in plasma lipoproteins were assessed. Changes in hepatic gene expression related to lipid metabolism and cytokines were examined by qRT-PCR analysis. Acrolein feeding did not affect body weight, BUN, plasma creatinine, electrolytes, cytokines or liver enzymes, but increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Similar results were obtained with apoE-null mice. Plasma lipoproteins from acrolein-fed mice showed altered electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Chromatographic analysis revealed elevated VLDL cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides levels with little change in LDL or HDL. NMR analysis indicated shifts from small to large VLDL and from large to medium-small LDL with no change in the size of HDL particles. Increased plasma VLDL was associated with a significant decrease in post-heparin plasma hepatic lipase activity and a decrease in hepatic expression of hepatic lipase. These observations suggest that oral exposure to acrolein could induce or exacerbate systemic dyslipidemia and thereby contribute to cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:20034506

  4. New insights into the role of lipoprotein(a)-associated lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Tsimikas, Sotirios; Tsironis, Loukas D; Tselepis, Alexandros D

    2007-10-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] plays an important role in atherosclerosis. The biological effects of Lp(a) have been attributed either to apolipoprotein(a) or to its low-density lipoprotein-like particle. Lp(a) contains platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, an enzyme that exhibits a Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 activity and is complexed to lipoproteins in plasma; thus, it is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. Substrates for lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 include phospholipids containing oxidatively fragmented residues at the sn-2 position (oxidized phospholipids; OxPLs). OxPLs may play important roles in vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Plasma levels of OxPLs present on apolipoprotein B-100 particles (OxPL/apolipoprotein B) are correlated with coronary artery, carotid, and peripheral arterial disease. Furthermore, OxPL/apolipoprotein B levels in plasma are strongly correlated with Lp(a) levels, are preferentially sequestered on Lp(a), and thus are potentially subjected to degradation by the Lp(a)-associated lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. The present review article focuses specifically on the characteristics of the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 associated with Lp(a) and discusses the possible role of this enzyme in view of emerging data showing that OxPLs in plasma are preferentially sequestered on Lp(a) and may significantly contribute to the increased atherogenicity of this lipoprotein.

  5. Androgen and FSH synergistically stimulate lipoprotein degradation and utilization by ovary granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.R.; Nakamura, K.; Schmit, V.; Weinstein, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Androgen can directly modulate the induction of steroidogenic enzymes by FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) in ovary granulosa cells. In studies of its mechanism of action, the authors examined the androgen effect on granulosa cell interaction with lipoproteins, the physiologic source of cholesterol. After granulosa cells were cultured for 48 hours with and without androgen and/or FSH, the cells were incubated for 24 hours with /sup 125/I-lipoproteins (human high density lipoprotein (HDL), rat HDL, or human low density lipoprotein (LDL)). The media were then analyzed for lipoprotein protein coat degradation products (mainly /sup 125/I-monoiodotyrosine) and progestin (mainly 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone (20 alpha-DHP)). In the absence of FSH and androgen, 2 X 10(5) granulosa cells degraded basal levels of all three lipoproteins, but produced no measurable 20 alpha-DHP. The addition of 10(-7) M androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) had no effect on lipoprotein protein degradation or 20 alpha-DHP production. FSH alone stimulated lipoprotein protein degradation by 50 to 300% while the addition of androgen synergistically augmented the FSH-stimulated 20 alpha-DHP production as well as protein coat degradation of all three lipoproteins. DHT and T were both effective, indicating that androgens themselves, and not estrogen products, were responsible for the effect on lipoprotein protein degradation and 20 alpha-DHP production.

  6. Optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis of cassava to obtain fermentable sugars.

    PubMed

    Collares, Renata M; Miklasevicius, Luiza V S; Bassaco, Mariana M; Salau, Nina P G; Mazutti, Marcio A; Bisognin, Dilson A; Terra, Lisiane M

    2012-07-01

    This work evaluates the enzymatic hydrolysis of starch from cassava using pectinase, α-amylase, and amyloglucosidase. A central composite rotational design (CCRD) was carried out to evaluate the effects of amyloglucosidase, pectinase, reaction time, and solid to liquid ratio. All the experiments were carried out in a bioreactor with working volume of 2 L. Approximately 98% efficiency hydrolysis was obtained, resulting in a concentration of total reducing sugar released of 160 g/L. It was concluded that pectinase improved the hydrolysis of starch from cassava. Reaction time was found to be significant until 7 h of reaction. A solid to liquid ratio of 1.0 was considered suitable for hydrolysis of starch from cassava. Amyloglucosidase was a significant variable in the process: after its addition to the reaction media, a 30%-50% increase in the amount of total reducing sugar released was observed. At optimal conditions the maximum productivity obtained was 22.9 g/(L·h).

  7. Energetic approach of biomass hydrolysis in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Cantero, Danilo A; Vaquerizo, Luis; Mato, Fidel; Bermejo, M Dolores; Cocero, M José

    2015-03-01

    Cellulose hydrolysis can be performed in supercritical water with a high selectivity of soluble sugars. The process produces high-pressure steam that can be integrated, from an energy point of view, with the whole biomass treating process. This work investigates the integration of biomass hydrolysis reactors with commercial combined heat and power (CHP) schemes, with special attention to reactor outlet streams. The innovation developed in this work allows adequate energy integration possibilities for heating and compression by using high temperature of the flue gases and direct shaft work from the turbine. The integration of biomass hydrolysis with a CHP process allows the selective conversion of biomass into sugars with low heat requirements. Integrating these two processes, the CHP scheme yield is enhanced around 10% by injecting water in the gas turbine. Furthermore, the hydrolysis reactor can be held at 400°C and 23 MPa using only the gas turbine outlet streams.

  8. Kinetics of the hydrolysis of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1986-01-01

    The hydrolysis kinetics of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) in aqueous buffered solutions of various pH's was studied at 75 and 37 C, using spectrophotometric and HPLC techniques. The hydrolysis was found to be very slow even at low pH. At 75 C and pH at or below l.0, two kinetic processes were observed: the more rapid one was attributed to the hydrolysis of the phosphoimidazolide P-N bond; the second, much slower one, was attributed to the cleavage of the glycosidic bond. It is noted that the P-N hydrolysis in phosphoimidazolides is very slow compared to other phosphoramidates, and that this might be one of the reasons why the phosphoimidazolides showed an extraordinary ability to form long oligomers under template-directed conditions.

  9. Evaluation of hydrolysis-esterification biodiesel production from wet microalgae.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunfeng; Liu, Qingling; Ji, Na; Deng, Shuai; Zhao, Jun; Li, Shuhong; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Wet microalgae hydrolysis-esterification route has the advantage to avoid the energy-intensive units (e.g. drying and lipid extraction) in the biodiesel production process. In this study, techno-economic evaluation of hydrolysis-esterification biodiesel production process was carried out and compared with conventional (usually including drying, lipid extraction, esterification and transesterification) biodiesel production process. Energy and material balance of the conventional and hydrolysis-esterification processes was evaluated by Aspen Plus. The simulation results indicated that drying (2.36MJ/L biodiesel) and triolein transesterification (1.89MJ/L biodiesel) are the dominant energy-intensive stages in the conventional route (5.42MJ/L biodiesel). By contrast, the total energy consumption of hydrolysis-esterification route can be reduced to 1.81MJ/L biodiesel, and approximately 3.61MJ can be saved to produce per liter biodiesel.

  10. A General Approach for Teaching Hydrolysis of Salts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre-Ode, Fernando

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a general approach and equation for teaching the hydrolysis of salts. This general equation covers many more sets of conditions than those currently in textbooks. The simplifying assumptions leading to the known limiting equations are straightforward. (RH)

  11. Hydrolysis of whey lactose using CTAB-permeabilized yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Panesar, Parmjit S; Bera, Manav B; Kumar, Harish

    2009-01-01

    Disposal of lactose in whey and whey permeates is one of the most significant problems with regard to economics and environmental impact faced by the dairy industries. The enzymatic hydrolysis of whey lactose to glucose and galactose by beta-galactosidase constitutes the basis of the most biotechnological processes currently developed to exploit the sugar content of whey. Keeping this in view, lactose hydrolysis in whey was performed using CTAB permeabilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells. Permeabilization of K. marxianus cells in relation to beta-galactosidase activity was carried out using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) to avoid the problem of enzyme extraction. Different process parameters (biomass load, pH, temperature, and incubation time) were optimized to enhance the lactose hydrolysis in whey. Maximum hydrolysis (90.5%) of whey lactose was observed with 200 mg DW yeast biomass after 90 min of incubation period at optimum pH of 6.5 and temperature of 40 degrees C.

  12. ESTIMATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid esters from molecular structure. The energy differences between the initial state and the transition state for a molecule of interest are factored into internal and external...

  13. Responsive behavior of regenerated cellulose in hydrolysis under microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jinping; Na, Haining; She, Zhen; Wang, Jinggang; Xue, Wenwen; Zhu, Jin

    2014-09-01

    This work studied the responsive behavior of regenerated cellulose (RC) in hydrolysis under microwave radiation. Four types of RC with different crystallinity (Cr) and degree of polymerization (DP) are produced to evaluate the reactivity of RC by step-by-step hydrolysis. Results show Cr is the key factor to affect the reactivity of RCs. With hydrolysis of amorphous region and the formation of recrystallization, the Cr of RC reaches a high value and thus weakens the reactivity. As a result, the increment of cellulose conversion and sugar yield gradually reduces. Decrease of the DP of RC is helpful to increase the speed at the onset of hydrolysis and produce high sugar yield. But, there is no direct influence with the reactivity of RC to prolong the time of pretreatment. This research provides an accurate understanding to guide the RC preparation for sugar formation with relative high efficiency under mild reaction conditions.

  14. Hydrolysis of cellulose by purified cellulase components: Synergistic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Lee, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    The hydrolysis of cellulose by purified cellulase components is reported. The adsorption of purified cellobiohydrolases (CBH I and II) and endoglucanases (EG I and II) from Trichoderma reesei strain L27 to microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) has been studied. Scatchard analysis of the adsorption data gave the maximum amount of each component that bound to Avicel at saturation. Hydrolysis of Avicel was thus carried out by saturating and non-saturating (50% saturation) concentrations of cellulase components alone and in combination with each other, and it was found that the greatest amount of synergism between them was observed when Avicel was incubated with non-saturating concentrations of enzyme. Synergism was observed between CBH I and CBH II, as well as between EG I and CBH I; however, inhibition of hydrolysis occurred using a combination of EG I and EG II. Synergism between cellulase components may be significant during cellulose hydrolysis only when non-saturating enzyme concentrations are used. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Sorting of an integral outer membrane protein via the lipoprotein-specific Lol pathway and a dedicated lipoprotein pilotin.

    PubMed

    Collin, Séverine; Guilvout, Ingrid; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Pugsley, Anthony P

    2011-05-01

    The lipoprotein PulS is a dedicated chaperone that is required to target the secretin PulD to the outer membrane in Klebsiella or Escherichia coli, and to protect it from proteolysis. Here, we present indirect evidence that PulD protomers do not assemble into the secretin dodecamer before they reach the outer membrane, and that PulS reaches the outer membrane in a soluble heterodimer with the general lipoprotein chaperone LolA. However, we could not find any direct evidence for PulD protomer association with the PulS-LolA heterodimer. Instead, in cells producing PulD and a permanently locked PulS-LolA dimer (in which LolA carries an R43L substitution that prevents lipoprotein transfer to LolB in the outer membrane), LolAR43L was found in the inner membrane, probably still associated with PulS bound to PulD that had been incorrectly targeted because of the LolAR43L substitution. It is speculated that PulD protomers normally cross the periplasm together with PulS bound to LolA but when the latter cannot be separated (due to the mutation in lolA), the PulD protomers form dodecamers that insert into the inner membrane.

  16. Low density lipoprotein and very low density lipoprotein are selectively bound by aggregated C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    de Beer, F C; Soutar, A K; Baltz, M L; Trayner, I M; Feinstein, A; Pepys, M B

    1982-07-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), the classical acute-phase protein, can bind phospholipids by virtue of its specific, calcium-dependent reactivity with phosphorylcholine residues. However, analysis of acute-phase serum by gel filtration and by density gradient ultracentrifugation showed that the CRP was in a free, uncomplexed form, despite the coexistent presence of the various classes of serum lipoproteins, all of which contain phospholipids. In contrast, when isolated CRP was aggregated by immobilization at a sufficient density on a solid phase and then exposed to normal human serum, it selectively bound low density lipoprotein (LDL) and traces of very low density lipoprotein. The reaction was calcium dependent and reversible by free phosphorylcholine but not by heparin. LDL isolated from normal plasma was also bound by aggregated CRP. CRP reacts in vitro with a wide variety of different ligands both of extrinsic and of autogenous origin, e.g., microbial products and damaged cell membranes, respectively. If CRP aggregated in vivo by complexing with these ligands than acquires the capacity to selectively bind LDL, the phenomenon may have significant implications for the function of CRP and for the metabolism, clearance, and deposition of LDL.

  17. Kinetic studies of cellulose enzymatic hydrolysis from pretreated corn cob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevanie, Jeannie; Kartawiria, Irvan; Abimanyu, Haznan

    2017-01-01

    Successful utilization of corn cob biomass as raw material in bioethanol production is depending on the hydrolysis process where high level of β-cellulose is converted into glucose. Enzymatic hydrolysis is the common process for this purpose. This study is focusing on the evaluation of hydrolysis of pre-treated corn cob using Novozymes Cellic ® C-Tec2 and H-Tec2 enzymes to obtain the optimum reaction condition and its general reaction kinetics. The corn cob used was pretreated using 10% of NaOH solution. Hydrolysis reactions were conducted in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flask for 72 hour using mixture of C-Tec2 and H-Tec2 enzymes at the fixed ratio of 5:1 and glucose concentration were measured using HPLC. Reaction temperature of 40°C and quantity of 0.5 ml enzyme solution per gram substrate gives the highest reaction rate (0.0123 gram of glucose/gram sample.h) with the glucose yield being 0.089 g glucose/ g substrate. Total conversion of cellulose observed was 11.91 %. Corn cob hydrolysis using C-Tec2 and H-Tec2 enzymes also result in xylose (0.0202 g/g substrate), which can also contribute to bioethanol productivity in further fermentation process. The reaction is following zero order kinetics for the first 8 hours and reaches maximum yield within 10 hours; significantly shorter compared to previous studies of cellulosic material hydrolysis that may take up to 72 hour to complete. Prolonging the hydrolysis of pre-treated corn cob more than 24 hour gives no significant increase in glucose conversion and yield. Hydrolysis temperature range of 40°C to 60°C is in accordance with the manufacturer recommendation for the purpose; however the decrease of reaction rate is observable at temperature 50°C or higher.

  18. Sub-Equimolar Hydrolysis and Condensation of Organophosphates

    DOE PAGES

    Alam, Todd M.; Kinnan, Mark K.; Wilson, Brendan W.; ...

    2016-07-16

    We characterized the in-situ hydrolysis and subsequent condensation reaction of the chemical agent simulant diethyl chlorophosphate (DECP) by high-resolution 31P NMR spectroscopy following the addition of water in sub-equimolar concentrations. Moreover, the identification and quantification of the multiple pyrophosphate and larger polyphosphate chemical species formed through a series of self-condensation reactions are reported. Finally, the DECP hydrolysis kinetics and distribution of breakdown species was strongly influenced by the water concentration and reaction temperature.

  19. Hydrolysis of phosphodiesters through transformation of the bacterial phosphotriesterase.

    PubMed

    Shim, H; Hong, S B; Raushel, F M

    1998-07-10

    The phosphotriesterase from Pseudomonas diminuta catalyzes the hydrolysis of a wide array of phosphotriesters and related phosphonates, including organophosphate pesticides and military nerve agents. It has now been shown that this enzyme can also catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphodiesters, albeit at a greatly reduced rate. However, the enzymatic hydrolysis of ethyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (compound I) by the wild-type enzyme was >10(8) times faster than the uncatalyzed reaction (kcat = 0.06 s-1 and Km = 38 mM). Upon the addition of various alkylamines to the reaction mixture, the kcat/Km for the phosphodiester (compound I) increased up to 200-fold. Four mutant enzymes of the phosphotriesterase were constructed in a preliminary attempt to improve phosphodiester hydrolysis activity of the native enzyme. Met-317, which is thought to reside in close proximity to the pro-S-ethoxy arm of the paraoxon substrate, was mutated to arginine, alanine, histidine, and lysine. These mutant enzymes showed slight improvements in the catalytic hydrolysis of organophosphate diesters. The M317K mutant enzyme displayed the most improvement in catalytic activity (kcat = 0.34 s-1 and Km = 30 mM). The M317A mutant enzyme catalyzed the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester (compound I) in the presence of alkylamines up to 200 times faster than the wild-type enzyme in the absence of added amines. The neutralization of the negative charge on the oxygen atom of the phosphodiester by the ammonium cation within the active site is thought to be responsible for the rate enhancement by these amines in the hydrolytic reaction. These results demonstrate that an active site optimized for the hydrolysis of organophosphate triesters can be made to catalyze the hydrolysis of organophosphate diesters.

  20. Design, Synthesis and Study of Catalysts for Organophosphate Ester Hydrolysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    catalysts for phosphate ester hydrolyses which are modelled after carbonic anhydrase (CA) and alkaline phosphatase (APase). Section II describes the...Catalysts for Hydrolysis of Phosphate Esters. Alkaline phosphatases (APases) are Zn(II)- and Mg(II)- containing metalloenzymes found in virtually every...E TA "APR 14 07 k-1 le -p /m mm Alkaline phosphatase , models, catalysis, organophosphate ester, hydrolysis, metal ion 2"n.VUAC? - ",N-060 p MV ad& N

  1. Ultrasound mediated enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Ahmad Ziad; Ajit, Azilah; Chisti, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant Trichoderma reesei cellulase was used for the ultrasound-mediated hydrolysis of soluble carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and insoluble cellulose of various particle sizes. The hydrolysis was carried out at low intensity sonication (2.4-11.8 W cm(-2) sonication power at the tip of the sonotrode) using 10, 20, and 40% duty cycles. [A duty cycle of 10%, for example, was obtained by sonicating for 1 s followed by a rest period (no sonication) of 9 s.] The reaction pH and temperature were always 4.8 and 50°C, respectively. In all cases, sonication enhanced the rate of hydrolysis relative to nonsonicated controls. The hydrolysis of CMC was characterized by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The Michaelis-Menten parameter of the maximum reaction rate Vmax was enhanced by sonication relative to controls, but the value of the saturation constant Km was reduced. The optimal sonication conditions were found to be a 10% duty cycle and a power intensity of 11.8 W cm(-2) . Under these conditions, the maximum rate of hydrolysis of soluble CMC was nearly double relative to control. In the hydrolysis of cellulose, an increasing particle size reduced the rate of hydrolysis. At any fixed particle size, sonication at a 10% duty cycle and 11.8 W cm(-2) power intensity improved the rate of hydrolysis relative to control. Under the above mentioned optimal sonication conditions, the enzyme lost about 20% of its initial activity in 20 min. Sonication was useful in accelerating the enzyme catalyzed saccharification of cellulose.

  2. Reaction Pathway for Cocaine Hydrolase-Catalyzed Hydrolysis of (+)-Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuan; Liu, Junjun; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2017-01-01

    A recently designed and discovered cocaine hydrolase (CocH), engineered from human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), has been proven promising as a novel enzyme therapy for treatment of cocaine overdose and addiction because it is highly efficient in catalyzing hydrolysis of naturally occurring (−)-cocaine. It has been known that the CocH also has a high catalytic efficiency against (+)-cocaine, a synthetic enantiomer of cocaine. Reaction pathway and the corresponding free energy profile for the CocH-catalyzed hydrolysis of (+)-cocaine have been determined, in the present study, by performing first-principles pseudobond quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM)-free energy (FE) calculations. Acordingt to the QM/MM-FE results, the catalytic hydrolysis process is initiated by the nucleophilic attack on carbonyl carbon of (−)-cocaine benzoyl ester via hydroxyl oxygen of S198 side chain, and the second reaction step (i.e. dissociation of benzoyl ester) is rate-determining. This finding for CocH-catalyzed hydrolysis of (+)-cocaine is remarkably different from that for the (+)-cocaine hydrolysis catalyzed by bacterial cocaine esterase in which the first reaction step of the deacylation is associated with the highest free energy barrier (~17.9 kcal/mol). The overall free energy barrier (~16.0 kcal/mol) calculated for the acylation stage of CocH-catalyzed hydrolysis of (+)-cocaine is in good agreement with the experimental free energy barrier of ~14.5 kcal/mol derivated from the experimental kinetic data.

  3. Study of microwave effects on the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chen; Reddy, P Muralidhar; Devi, C Shobha; Chang, Po-Chi; Ho, Yen-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The effect of microwave heating on lipase-catalyzed reaction remains controversial. It is not clear whether the reaction rate enhancements are purely due to thermal/heating effects or to non-thermal effects. Therefore, quantitative mass spectrometry was used to conduct accurate kinetic analysis of lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of triolein by microwave and conventional heating. Commercial lipases from Candida rugosa (CRL), Porcine Pancreas (PPL), and Burkholderia cepacia (BCL) were used. Hydrolysis reactions were performed at various temperatures and pH levels, along with various amounts of buffer and enzymes. Hydrolysis product yields at each time point using an internal-standard method showed no significant difference between microwave and conventional heating conditions when the reaction was carried out at the same temperature. CRL showed optimum catalytic activity at 37 °C, while PPL and BCL had better activities at 50 °C. The phosphate buffer was found to give a better hydrolysis yield than the Tris-HCl buffer. Overall results prove that a non-thermal effect does not exist in microwave-assisted lipase hydrolysis of triolein. Therefore, conventional heating at high temperatures (e.g., 50 °C) can be also used to accelerate hydrolysis reactions.

  4. Development of complete hydrolysis of pectins from apple pomace.

    PubMed

    Wikiera, Agnieszka; Mika, Magdalena; Starzyńska-Janiszewska, Anna; Stodolak, Bożena

    2015-04-01

    Enzymatically extracted pectins have a more complex structure than those obtained by conventional methods. As a result, they are less susceptible to hydrolysis, which makes the precise determination of their composition difficult. The aim of the study was to develop a method of complete hydrolysis of enzymatically extracted apple pectins. Substrates were pectins isolated from apple pomace by the use of xylanase and multicatalytic preparation Celluclast and apple pomace. Hydrolysis was performed by a chemical method with 2M TFA at 100 °C and 120 °C and a combined acidic/enzymatic method. After hydrolysis, the contents of galacturonic acid and neutral sugars were measured by HPLC. Complete hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid occurred after 2.5h incubation with 2M TFA at 120 °C. The efficient hydrolysis of neutral sugars in pectins was performed with 2M TFA at 100 °C for 2.5h. Monomers most susceptible to concentrated acid were rhamnose, mannose and arabinose.

  5. Site- and species-specific hydrolysis rates of heroin.

    PubMed

    Szöcs, Levente; Orgován, Gábor; Tóth, Gergő; Kraszni, Márta; Gergó, Lajos; Hosztafi, Sándor; Noszál, Béla

    2016-06-30

    The hydroxide-catalyzed non-enzymatic, simultaneous and consecutive hydrolyses of diacetylmorphine (DAM, heroin) are quantified in terms of 10 site- and species-specific rate constants in connection with also 10 site- and species-specific acid-base equilibrium constants, comprising all the 12 coexisting species in solution. This characterization involves the major and minor decomposition pathways via 6-acetylmorphine and 3-acetylmorphine, respectively, and morphine, the final product. Hydrolysis has been found to be 18-120 times faster at site 3 than at site 6, depending on the status of the amino group and the rest of the molecule. Nitrogen protonation accelerates the hydrolysis 5-6 times at site 3 and slightly less at site 6. Hydrolysis rate constants are interpreted in terms of intramolecular inductive effects and the concomitant local electron densities. Hydrolysis fraction, a new physico-chemical parameter is introduced and determined to quantify the contribution of the individual microspecies to the overall hydrolysis. Hydrolysis fractions are depicted as a function of pH.

  6. Enzymatic hydrolysis of waste sugarcane bagasse in water media.

    PubMed

    Zheng, C; Lei, Y; Yu, Q; Lui, X; Huan, K

    2002-09-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of natural cellulose such as sugarcane bagasse is usually carried out in a buffer medium. In this paper, the enzymatic hydrolysis of a waste sugarcane bagasse in water media was carried out.The bagasse was pre-treated with heating explosion and pure (ion exchange), reverse-osmosis and tap water media were used in place of a buffer solution in the hydrolysis process. The yields for reducing sugars and the changes in solution pH and electric conductivity during the hydrolysis under various conditions were studied. The results were also compared with those obtained in buffer solutions. Similar levels of sugar yields were obtained in water and buffer solution media. The pH of the hydrolyzate was in the range of 4.5 - 5.0, which coincided with the optimum pH for the enzyme reaction. It was considered that the enzyme and the substrate formed a transitional complex in the hydrolysis process. The transitional complex provided the buffering capacity pH 5. The results indicate of the hydrolyzate solution at around that industrialization of the enzymatic hydrolysis in a water medium is feasible.

  7. Echium Oil Reduces Plasma Triglycerides by Increasing Intravascular Lipolysis in apoB100-Only Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Lolita M.; Lough, Christopher M.; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y.; Gebre, Abraham K.; Smith, Thomas L.; Colvin, Perry L.; Parks, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model. PMID:23857172

  8. Echium oil reduces plasma triglycerides by increasing intravascular lipolysis in apoB100-only low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lolita M; Lough, Christopher M; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y; Gebre, Abraham K; Smith, Thomas L; Colvin, Perry L; Parks, John S

    2013-07-12

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model.

  9. An increase in lipoprotein oxidation and endogenous lipid peroxides in serum of obese women.

    PubMed

    Mutlu-Türkoğlu, U; Oztezcan, S; Telci, A; Orhan, Y; Aykaç-Toker, G; Sivas, A; Uysal, M

    2003-02-01

    Endogenous malondialdehyde and diene conjugate levels, the susceptibility of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins to copper-induced lipid peroxidation, and antibody titer against oxidized low-density lipoproteins were increased, but serum antioxidant activity was unchanged in obese women. Serum cholesterol, low-density lipoproteincholesterol, and trigliceride levels were also elevated, but high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels remained unchanged in obese women. In vitro, oxidation of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and levels of antibody against oxidized low-density lipoprotein correlated with body mass index, serum total cholesterol, and low-density lipoproteincholesterol levels in obese women. These results indicate that obesity is associated with increases in endogenous lipid peroxides, oxidation of low-density lipoproteins, and lipids in serum.

  10. Effects of high-density lipoproteins on storage at 4 degrees C of fowl spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Blesbois, E; Hermier, D

    1990-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative characterization of lipoproteins found in seminal plasma from domestic cocks was performed after isolation by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Trigyceride-rich lipoproteins (very low, intermediate- and low density lipoproteins) were not detectable in seminal plasma. High-density lipoproteins (HDL), identified on the basis of size, chemical composition and protein moiety, were present at a concentration of 66 micrograms/ml. A fraction possibly corresponding to VHDL (very high density lipoproteins, 77% protein, 23% lipid) was also detected but appeared contaminated by a protein-rich opalescent material. Since HDL contains mostly phospholipid and cholesterol, the physiological role of these lipoproteins on the storage of fowl spermatozoa was studied. Replacing seminal plasma with a solution containing chicken HDL at physiological concentration (66 micrograms/ml) had no effect on fertilizing ability of spermatozoa stored at 4 degrees C for 24 h. However, higher concentrations of HDL (560 micrograms/ml) had deleterious effects on spermatozoa stored in vitro.

  11. Serum Lipoprotein Abnormalities in Patients with Ischaemic Heart Disease: Comparisons with a Control Population

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, B.; Chait, A.; Oakley, C. M. O.; Wootton, I. D. P.; Krikler, D. M.; Onitiri, A.; Sigurdsson, G.; February, A.

    1974-01-01

    The frequency and nature of abnormalities of serum lipoproteins have been studied, using quantitative techniques, in 143 patients with ischaemic heart disease (I.H.D.). Rigorous selection criteria were used. The findings were related to the distribution of lipoprotein concentrations in a carefully screened control population. Hyperlipoproteinaemia occurred in 55% of patients and in 11 out of 15 patients aged less than 40 years. Raised triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations in very low density lipoprotein were the most frequent abnormalities followed by raised cholesterol content of low density lipoprotein. In young patients high density lipoprotein levels were subnormal. Hyperlipoproteinaemia of W.H.O. types IIa, IIb, III, IV, and V all seemed to be over-represented in I.H.D. I.H.D. patients with type IIa, IIb, and IV abnormalities were all significantly younger than I.H.D. patients with normal lipoprotein levels. PMID:4370367

  12. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency: a case of compound heterozygosity of a novel duplication (R44Kfs*4) and a common mutation (N291S) in the lipoprotein lipase gene.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Martin; Brasen, Claus Lohman; Svaneby, Dea; Feddersen, Søren; Nybo, Mads

    2013-07-01

    Familial lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency (FLLD) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the LPL gene. FLLD individuals usually express an impaired or non-functional LPL enzyme with low or absent triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis activity causing severe hypertriglyceridaemia. Here we report a case of FLLD in a 29-year-old man, who initially presented with eruptive cutaneous xanthomata, elevated plasma TG concentration but no other co-morbidities. Subsequent genetic testing of the patient revealed compound heterozygosity of a novel duplication (p.R44Kfs*4) leading to a premature stop codon in exon 2 and a known mutation (N291S) in exon 5 of the LPL gene. Further biochemical analysis of the patient's postheparin plasma confirmed a reduction of total lipase activity compared with his heterozygous father carrying the common N291S mutation and to a healthy control. Also the patient showed increased (1.85-fold) activity of hepatic lipase (HL), indicating a functional link between HL and LPL. In summary, we report a case of FLLD caused by compound heterozygosity of a new duplication and a common mutation in the LPL gene, resulting in residual LPL activity. With such mutations, individuals may not receive a diagnosis before classical FLLD symptoms appear later in adulthood. Nevertheless, early diagnosis and lipid-lowering treatment may favour a reduced risk of premature cardiovascular disease or acute pancreatitis in such individuals.

  13. Recurrent Embolic Strokes of Undetermined Source in a Patient with Extreme Lipoprotein(a) Levels.

    PubMed

    Bulwa, Zachary; Kim, Audrey; Singh, Karandeep; Kantorovich, Alexander; Suhail, Faten

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is a plasma lipoprotein and known cardiovascular risk factor, most recently implicated in the development of high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques without significant carotid stenosis. We present a case of a young African-American female with recurrent embolic strokes of undetermined source. After our thorough investigation, we identified the link between a small, irregular plaque in the right internal carotid artery, and an extremely elevated plasma level of lipoprotein(a) as the source of her embolic strokes.

  14. Serum lipoproteins during bone marrow hyperplasia after phenylhydrazine administration in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dessì, S.; Batetta, B.; Spano, O.; Pulisci, D.; Anchisi, C.; Pani, P.; Broccia, G.

    1990-01-01

    In the present study, lipoprotein metabolism was investigated during compensatory hyperplasia of bone marrow after haemolysis induced by phenylhydrazine (20 mg/kg b.w.) administration in rats. The rats were sacrificed at different time intervals (0, 1, 2 and 5 days) after phenylhydrazine treatment. Analysis of the different fractions of lipoproteins has shown that during bone marrow hyperplasia there is an alteration of lipoprotein profiles, mainly due to a decrease of HDL2 and HDL3 subfractions. PMID:2206988

  15. Characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lol system as a lipoprotein sorting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shin-Ya; Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2007-05-04

    Escherichia coli lipoproteins are localized to either the inner or the outer membrane depending on the residue that is present next to the N-terminal acylated Cys. Asp at position 2 causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane. In contrast, the accompanying study (9) revealed that the residues at positions 3 and 4 determine the membrane specificity of lipoproteins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Since the five Lol proteins involved in the sorting of E. coli lipoproteins are conserved in P. aeruginosa, we examined whether or not the Lol proteins of P. aeruginosa are also involved in lipoprotein sorting but utilize different signals. The genes encoding LolCDE, LolA, and LolB homologues were cloned and expressed. The LolCDE homologue thus purified was reconstituted into proteoliposomes with lipoproteins. When incubated in the presence of ATP and a LolA homologue, the reconstituted LolCDE homologue released lipoproteins, leading to the formation of a LolA-lipoprotein complex. Lipoproteins were then incorporated into the outer membrane depending on a LolB homologue. As revealed in vivo, lipoproteins with Lys and Ser at positions 3 and 4, respectively, remained in proteoliposomes. On the other hand, E. coli LolCDE released lipoproteins with this signal and transferred them to LolA of not only E. coli but also P. aeruginosa. These results indicate that Lol proteins are responsible for the sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, as in the case of E. coli, but respond differently to inner membrane retention signals.

  16. Impacts of microalgae pre-treatments for improved anaerobic digestion: thermal treatment, thermal hydrolysis, ultrasound and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ometto, Francesco; Quiroga, Gerardo; Pšenička, Pavel; Whitton, Rachel; Jefferson, Bruce; Villa, Raffaella

    2014-11-15

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of microalgae is primarily inhibited by the chemical composition of their cell walls containing biopolymers able to resist bacterial degradation. Adoption of pre-treatments such as thermal, thermal hydrolysis, ultrasound and enzymatic hydrolysis have the potential to remove these inhibitory compounds and enhance biogas yields by degrading the cell wall, and releasing the intracellular algogenic organic matter (AOM). This work investigated the effect of four pre-treatments on three microalgae species, and their impact on the quantity of soluble biomass released in the media and thus on the digestion process yields. The analysis of the composition of the soluble COD released and of the TEM images of the cells showed two main degradation actions associated with the processes: (1) cell wall damage with the release of intracellular AOM (thermal, thermal hydrolysis and ultrasound) and (2) degradation of the cell wall constituents with the release of intracellular AOM and the solubilisation of the cell wall biopolymers (enzymatic hydrolysis). As a result of this, enzymatic hydrolysis showed the greatest biogas yield increments (>270%) followed by thermal hydrolysis (60-100%) and ultrasounds (30-60%).

  17. Analysis of lipoprotein profiles of healthy cats by gel-permeation high-performance liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    MIZUTANI, Hisashi; SAKO, Toshinori; OKUDA, Hiroko; ARAI, Nobuaki; KURIYAMA, Koji; MORI, Akihiro; YOSHIMURA, Itaru; KOYAMA, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    Density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGUC) and gel electrophoresis are conventionally used to obtain lipoprotein profiles of animals. We recently applied high-performance liquid chromatography with a gel permeation column (GP-HPLC) and an on-line dual enzymatic system to dogs for lipoprotein profile analysis. We compared the GP-HPLC with DGUC as a method to obtain a feline lipoprotein profile. The lipoprotein profiles showed large and small peaks, which corresponded to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), respectively, whereas very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and chylomicron (CM) were only marginally detected. This profile was very similar to that of dogs reported previously. Healthy cats also had a small amount of cholesterol-rich particles distinct from the normal LDL or HDL profile. There was no difference in lipoprotein profiles between the sexes, but males had a significantly larger LDL particle size (P=0.015). This study shows the feasibility of GP-HPLC for obtaining accurate lipoprotein profiles with small sample volumes and provides valuable reference data for healthy cats that should facilitate diagnoses. PMID:27170431

  18. Cardiovascular risk in parents of children with extreme lipoprotein cholesterol levels: the Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Croft, J B; Cresanta, J L; Webber, L S; Srinivasan, S R; Freedman, D S; Burke, G L; Berenson, G S

    1988-03-01

    Fasting serum lipids, lipoprotein cholesterol, and other cardiovascular disease risk factors were examined in 321 natural parents of children with low and/or high levels of beta- and pre-beta-lipoprotein cholesterol. Parents of children from low pre-beta-lipoprotein groups had elevated alpha- and lower pre-beta-lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Parents whose children had high beta-lipoprotein cholesterol levels also had high serum total and beta-lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Parents of children with high levels of both beta- and pre-beta-lipoprotein cholesterol had a high prevalence of both abnormal risk factor levels, as well as clinical evidence of early coronary artery disease (before age 50 years). These observations show that parents of children with high beta- and/or pre-beta-lipoprotein cholesterol levels have greatly enhanced risk for cardiovascular disease, and children mirror their parents' lipoprotein cholesterol levels. These observations emphasize the need for cardiovascular risk evaluation early in life, especially in high-risk families.

  19. Cholesterol transfer from normal and atherogenic low density lipoproteins to Mycoplasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mitschelen, J.J.; St. Clair, R.W.; Hester, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the free cholesterol of hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein from cholesterol-fed nonhuman primates has a greater potential for surface transfer to cell membranes than does the free cholesterol of normal low density lipoprotein. The low density lipoproteins were isolated from normal and hypercholesterolemic rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys, incubated with membranes from Acholeplasma laidlawii, a mycoplasma species devoid of cholesterol in its membranes, and the mass transfer of free cholesterol determined by measuring membrane cholesterol content. Since these membranes neither synthesize nor esterify cholesterol, nor degrade the protein or cholesterol ester moieties of low density lipoprotein, they are an ideal model with which to study differences in the cholesterol transfer potential of low density lipoprotein independent of the uptake of the intact low density lipoprotein particle. These studies indicate that, even though there are marked differences in the cholesterol composition of normal and hypercholesterolemic low density lipoproteins, this does not result in a greater chemical potential for surface transfer of free cholesterol. Consequently, if a difference in the surface transfer of free cholesterol is responsible for the enhanced ability of hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein to promote cellular cholesterol accumulation and, perhaps, also atherosclerosis, it must be the result of differences in the interaction to the hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein with the more complicated mammalian cell membranes, rather than differences in the chemical potential for cholesterol transfer.

  20. Identification of the major lipoproteins in crayfish hemolymph as proteins involved in immune recognition and clotting.

    PubMed

    Hall, M; van Heusden, M C; Söderhäll, K

    1995-11-22

    Lipid-containing hemolymph proteins from males of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Two major lipoproteins, one high density lipoprotein (HDL) and one very high density lipoprotein (VHDL), were characterized. The HDL and the VHDL were found to be identical to two proteins previously studied for their roles in immune recognition and hemolymph clotting, namely the beta-1,3-glucan binding protein and the clotting protein. These results imply that crayfish lipoproteins have dual functions, and that they are involved in immunity, hemolymph clotting, and lipid transport in these animals. Also, the oxygen-transporting protein hemocyanin was found to have a small lipid content.

  1. In vitro lipid transfer between lipoproteins and midgut-diverticula in the spider Polybetes pythagoricus.

    PubMed

    Laino, Aldana; Cunningham, Mónica L; Heras, Horacio; Garcia, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    It has been already reported that most hemolymphatic lipids in the spider Polybetes pythagoricus are transported by HDL1 and VHDL lipoproteins. We studied in vitro the lipid transfer among midgut-diverticula (M-diverticula), and either hemolymph or purified lipoproteins as well as between hemolymphatic lipoproteins. M-diverticula and hemolymph were labeled by in vivo (14)C-palmitic acid injection. In vitro incubations were performed between M-diverticula and either hemolymph or isolated lipoproteins. Hemolymph lipid uptake was associated to HDL1 (67%) and VHDL (32%). Release from hemolymph towards M-diverticula showed the opposite trend, VHDL 75% and HDL1 45%. Isolated lipoproteins showed a similar behavior to that observed with whole hemolymph. Lipid transfer between lipoproteins showed that HDL1 transfer more (14)C-lipids to VHDL than vice versa. Only 38% FFA and 18% TAG were transferred from M-diverticula to lipoproteins, while on the contrary 75% and 73% of these lipids, respectively, were taken up from hemolymph. A similar trend was observed regarding lipoprotein phospholipids. This study supports the hypothesis that HDL1 and hemocyanin-containing VHDL are involved in the uptake and release of FFA, phospholipids and triacylglycerols in the spider P. pythagoricus. The data support a directional flow of lipids from HDL1 and VHDL suggesting a mode of lipid transport between lipoproteins and M-diverticula.

  2. A large discoidal lipoprotein present in only one of two closely related crayfish.

    PubMed

    Stieb, Stefanie; Hoeger, Ulrich; Schenk, Sven

    2008-08-01

    The hemolymph lipoproteins of two European freshwater crayfish, Astacus astacus and Astacus leptodactylus, were isolated and characterized. The former species possesses two sex-independent lipoproteins, which can be related to the formerly described high-density lipoprotein (HDL)/beta-glucan binding protein and very high-density lipoprotein/clotting protein from other crustaceans. The latter species, however, contains an additional third lipoprotein with a unique structure. It is a large discoidal HDL with a diameter of 42 nm, a thickness of 7 nm and a density of 1.1 g/ml. SDS-PAGE revealed two different apolipoproteins with molecular masses of 240 and 85 kDa, respectively, arranged in a 1:1 stoichiometry as judged from cross linking experiments. The lipid content of this lipoprotein was 67%, far higher than in every other crustacean lipoprotein described so far. The native molecular mass of this HDL-type lipoprotein was estimated to be about 930 kDa. The lipid content of the other lipoproteins ranged between 25 and 30% for the HDL/beta-glucan binding protein and 6-8% for the VHDL/clotting protein.

  3. Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOEpatents

    Torget, Robert W.; Padukone, Nandan; Hatzis, Christos; Wyman, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4

  4. Selective association of lipoprotein cholesteryl esters with liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Rinninger, F; Jaeckle, S; Greten, H; Windler, E

    1993-02-24

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesteryl esters are taken up by hepatocytes without parallel uptake of HDL apolipoproteins. This selective uptake of HDL cholesteryl esters is mediated by a non-endocytotic mechanism. Recently, selective uptake of cholesteryl esters also from low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was demonstrated. In this study, the role of the plasma membrane in selective uptake by the liver was investigated. Plasma membranes were prepared from rat liver or from human Hep G2 hepatoma cells. Human HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21 g/ml) was either radioiodinated or labeled with [3H]cholesteryl oleate. Human low-density lipoprotein (d = 1.019-1.05 g/ml) was labeled in its protein and in its lipid moiety as well. Labeled lipoproteins, unlabeled lipoproteins and membranes were incubated. After separation by ultracentrifugation, apparent lipoprotein particle association with membranes was determined. Plasma membranes from rat liver and Hep G2 cells bound 125I-HDL3, indicating specific HDL3 particle binding. With both types of membrane, apparent HDL3 particle association according to [3H]cholesteryl oleate-labeled HDL3 was in significant excess on that due to 125I-HDL3. This indicates selective, i.e., particle binding independent, association of cholesteryl esters with the membrane. Excess unlabeled HDL3 competed for selective association, indicating a specific process. Selective association of HDL3 cholesteryl esters was concentration-, time-, temperature-dependent; however, parameters differed from HDL3 particle binding. HDL3 was modified by nitration; this modification inhibited HDL3 particle binding in contrast to unchanged selective association. These results suggested distinct membrane sites for HDL3 particle binding and selective cholesteryl ester association. Regulation of selective association was investigated. Hep G2 cells were cholesterol-loaded or cholesterol-depleted. Cellular cholesterol-loading down-regulated selective association of HDL3 cholesteryl esters

  5. Severe hypertriglyceridemia, reduced high density lipoprotein, and neonatal death in lipoprotein lipase knockout mice. Mild hypertriglyceridemia with impaired very low density lipoprotein clearance in heterozygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, P H; Bisgaier, C L; Aalto-Setälä, K; Radner, H; Ramakrishnan, R; Levak-Frank, S; Essenburg, A D; Zechner, R; Breslow, J L

    1995-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-deficient mice have been created by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. At birth, homozygous knockout pups have threefold higher triglycerides and sevenfold higher VLDL cholesterol levels than controls. When permitted to suckle, LPL-deficient mice become pale, then cyanotic, and finally die at approximately 18 h of age. Before death, triglyceride levels are severely elevated (15,087 +/- 3,805 vs 188 +/- 71 mg/dl in controls). Capillaries in tissues of homozygous knockout mice are engorged with chylomicrons. This is especially significant in the lung where marginated chylomicrons prevent red cell contact with the endothelium, a phenomenon which is presumably the cause of cyanosis and death in these mice. Homozygous knockout mice also have diminished adipose tissue stores as well as decreased intracellular fat droplets. By crossbreeding with transgenic mice expressing human LPL driven by a muscle-specific promoter, mouse lines were generated that express LPL exclusively in muscle but not in any other tissue. This tissue-specific LPL expression rescued the LPL knockout mice and normalized their lipoprotein pattern. This supports the contention that hypertriglyceridemia caused the death of these mice and that LPL expression in a single tissue was sufficient for rescue. Heterozygous LPL knockout mice survive to adulthood and have mild hypertriglyceridemia, with 1.5-2-fold elevated triglyceride levels compared with controls in both the fed and fasted states on chow, Western-type, or 10% sucrose diets. In vivo turnover studies revealed that heterozygous knockout mice had impaired VLDL clearance (fractional catabolic rate) but no increase in transport rate. In summary, total LPL deficiency in the mouse prevents triglyceride removal from plasma, causing death in the neonatal period, and expression of LPL in a single tissue alleviates this problem. Furthermore, half-normal levels of LPL cause a decrease in VLDL fractional catabolic rate and mild

  6. Kinetics of catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl caprylate (MUCAP) salmonella reagent.

    PubMed

    Al-Kady, Ahmed S; Ahmed, El-Sadat I; Gaber, M; Hussein, Mohamed M; Ebeid, El-Zeiny M

    2011-09-01

    The kinetics of chemical hydrolysis including neutral, acid- and base-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl caprylate (MUCAP) salmonella reagent were studied at different temperatures. The rate constants and activation parameters were determined by following the build-up of fluorescence peak of the hydrolysis product 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU). The time scale of esterase enzyme hydrolysis caused by salmonella was compared with chemical hydrolysis as a background process.

  7. Kinetics of catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl caprylate (MUCAP) salmonella reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kady, Ahmed S.; Ahmed, El-Sadat I.; Gaber, M.; Hussein, Mohamed M.; Ebeid, El-Zeiny M.

    2011-09-01

    The kinetics of chemical hydrolysis including neutral, acid- and base-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl caprylate (MUCAP) salmonella reagent were studied at different temperatures. The rate constants and activation parameters were determined by following the build-up of fluorescence peak of the hydrolysis product 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU). The time scale of esterase enzyme hydrolysis caused by salmonella was compared with chemical hydrolysis as a background process.

  8. ENIGMATIC ROLE OF LIPOPROTEIN(a) IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Anuurad, Erdembileg; Enkhmaa, Byambaa; Berglund, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a), Lp(a), has many properties in common with low density lipoprotein, LDL, but contains a unique protein apolipoprotein(a), linked to apolipoprotein B-100 by a single disulfide bond. There is a substantial size heterogeneity of apo(a), and generally smaller apo(a) sizes tend to correspond to higher plasma Lp(a) levels, but this relation is far from linear, underscoring the importance to assess allele-specific apo(a) levels. The presence of apo(a), a highly charged, carbohydrate-rich, hydrophilic protein may obscure key features of the LDL moiety and offer opportunities for binding to vessel wall elements. Recently, interest in Lp(a) has increased because studies over the past decade have confirmed and more robustly demonstrated a risk factor role of Lp(a) for cardiovascular disease. In particular, levels of Lp(a) carried in particles with smaller size apo(a) isoforms are associated with CAD. Other studies suggest that pro-inflammatory conditions may modulate risk factor properties of Lp(a). Further, Lp(a) may act as a preferential acceptor for pro-inflammatory oxidized phospholipids transferred from tissues or from other lipoproteins. However, at present only a limited number of agents (e.g. nicotinic acid and estrogen) has proven efficacy in lowering Lp(a) levels. Although Lp(a) has not been definitely established as a cardiovascular risk factor and no guidelines presently recommend intervention, Lp(a)-lowering therapy might offer benefits in subgroups of patients with high Lp(a) levels. PMID:21167011

  9. Identification of carboxylesterase-dependent dabigatran etexilate hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Laizure, S Casey; Parker, Robert B; Herring, Vanessa L; Hu, Zhe-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Dabigatran etexilate (DABE) is an oral prodrug that is rapidly converted to the active thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran (DAB), by serine esterases. The aims of the present study were to investigate the in vitro kinetics and pathway of DABE hydrolysis by human carboxylesterase enzymes, and the effect of alcohol on these transformations. The kinetics of DABE hydrolysis in two human recombinant carboxylesterase enzymes (CES1 and CES2) and in human intestinal microsomes and human liver S9 fractions were determined. The effects of alcohol (a known CES1 inhibitor) on the formation of DABE metabolites in carboxylesterase enzymes and human liver S9 fractions were also examined. The inhibitory effect of bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate on the carboxylesterase-mediated metabolism of DABE and the effect of alcohol on the hydrolysis of a classic carboxylesterase substrate (cocaine) were studied to validate the in vitro model. The ethyl ester of DABE was hydrolyzed exclusively by CES1 to M1 (Km 24.9 ± 2.9 μM, Vmax 676 ± 26 pmol/min per milligram protein) and the carbamate ester of DABE was exclusively hydrolyzed by CES2 to M2 (Km 5.5 ± 0.8 μM; Vmax 71.1 ± 2.4 pmol/min per milligram protein). Sequential hydrolysis of DABE in human intestinal microsomes followed by hydrolysis in human liver S9 fractions resulted in complete conversion to DAB. These results suggest that after oral administration of DABE to humans, DABE is hydrolyzed by intestinal CES2 to the intermediate M2 metabolite followed by hydrolysis of M2 to DAB in the liver by CES1. Carboxylesterase-mediated hydrolysis of DABE was not inhibited by alcohol.

  10. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces hematopoietic stem cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Gui-Hai; Wang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Jun; Wei, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced senescence in hematopoietic stem cells (HCs). Mouse Sca-1+ HCs were separated and purified using the magnetic activated cell sorting technique. Ox-LDL induced significant senescence in HCs measured by SA-β-Gal staining, and reduced CFU-Mix colony-forming capacity, arresting cells at G0/G1 phase. In agreement with the cell cycle arrest, ox-LDL markedly reduced the expression of CDK4, cyclin D, and cyclin E. As possible contributing factors for cell senescence, ox-LDL also induced cellular oxidative stress and reduced telomerase activity.

  11. Biomimetic high density lipoprotein nanoparticles for nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kaylin M; Mutharasan, R Kannan; Tripathy, Sushant; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bobeica, Mariana; Shumaker, Dale K; Luthi, Andrea J; Helfand, Brian T; Ardehali, Hossein; Mirkin, Chad A; Volpert, Olga; Thaxton, C Shad

    2011-03-09

    We report a gold nanoparticle-templated high density lipoprotein (HDL AuNP) platform for gene therapy that combines lipid-based nucleic acid transfection strategies with HDL biomimicry. For proof-of-concept, HDL AuNPs are shown to adsorb antisense cholesterylated DNA. The conjugates are internalized by human cells, can be tracked within cells using transmission electron microscopy, and regulate target gene expression. Overall, the ability to directly image the AuNP core within cells, the chemical tailorability of the HDL AuNP platform, and the potential for cell-specific targeting afforded by HDL biomimicry make this platform appealing for nucleic acid delivery.

  12. Compounds Released from Biomass Deconstruction: Understanding Their Effect on Cellulose Enzyme Hydrolysis and Their Biological Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djioleu, Angele Mezindjou

    aureus growth and copper-induced peroxidation of human low-density lipoprotein, confirming antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the extract. On the other hand, bark extract inhibited cellulase cocktail activity by reducing cellulose hydrolysis by 82.32% after 48 h of incubation. Overall, phenolic compounds generated from biomass fractionation are important players in cellulolytic enzyme inhibition; removal of biomass extractives prior to pretreatment could reduce inhibitory compounds in prehydrolyzate while generating phytochemicals with societal benefits.

  13. Hydrolysis of phosphate diesters with copper(II) catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, J.R.; Trogler, W.C.

    1988-09-21

    Hydrolysis of phosphate diesters (4-NO/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 4/O)/sub 2/PO/sub 2/Na (1) and (4-NO/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 4/O)(CH/sub 3/CH/sub 2/O)PO/sub 2/Li (2) is catalyzed by Cu(bpy)/sup 2 +/ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) in aqueous solution at 75/degrees/C in the pH range 5.8-8.3. Greater than 1000 turnovers and 200 turnovers per Cu(bpy)/sup 2 +/ are observed in the hydrolysis of 1 and 2, respectively. Catalytic rate enhancements of the hydrolysis of 1 and 2 by 1 x 10/sup -3/ M Cu(bpy)/sup 2 +/ at pH 6.5 over spontaneous hydrolysis under the same conditions without catalyst are 2000 and 150, respectively. The hydrolysis of copper-bound 2 proceeds 6300-fold more rapidly (pH 7.85) than hydrolysis of 2 in the absence of catalyst. Kinetics for the Cu(bpy)/sup 2 +/-catalyzed hydrolysis of 2 are examined in detail. Reaction pathways are proposed. Labeling studies in /sup 18/OH/sub 2/ show no incorporation of /sup 18/O into p-nitrophenol. A single /sup 18/O label incorporates into the (C/sub 2/H/sub 5/O)PO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ product. Several simple transition-metal complexes promote the catalytic hydrolysis of phosphate diesters 1 and 2, although none are as effective as Cu(bpy)/sup 2 +/. Second-order rate constants for Cu(bpy)/sup 2 +/-promoted hydrolysis in the series of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate esters (triester, diester (anion), monoester (dianion)) vary by only a factor of 60 in contrast to those for the reaction of these phosphate esters with anionic nucleophiles in the absence of metal catalysts, which show large differences in second-order rate constants (> 10/sup 3/) between each ester in the series. 54 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  14. Enzymatic hydrolysis of fractionated products from oil thermally oxidated

    SciTech Connect

    Yashida, H.; Alexander, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of the acylglycerol products obtained from thermally oxidized vegetable oils was studied. Corn, sunflower and soybean oils were heated in the laboratory at 180/sup 0/C for 50, 70 and 100 hr with aeration and directly fractionated by silicic acid column chromatography. By successive elution with 20%, then 60% isopropyl ether in n-hexane, and diethyl ether, the thermally oxidized oils were separated into three fractions: the nonpolar fraction (monomeric compounds), slightly polar fraction (dimeric compounds), and polar fraction comprising oligomeric compounds. Enzymatic hydrolysis with pancreatic lipase showed that the monomers were hydrolyzed as rapidly as the corresponding unheated oils, the dimers much more slowly, and the oligomeric compounds barely at all. Overall, the hydrolysis of the dimers was less than 23% of that for the monomers, with small differences among the oils. Longer heating periods resulted in greater reductions in hydrolysis of the dimeric compounds. These results suggest that the degree of enzymatic hydrolysis of the fractionated acylglycerol compounds is related to differences in the thermal oxidative deterioration, and amounts of polar compounds in the products. (33 Refs.)

  15. Benefits from Tween during enzymic hydrolysis of corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Kaar, W.E.; Holtzapple, M.T.

    1998-08-20

    Corn stover is a potential substrate for fermentation processes. Previous work with corn stover demonstrated that lime pretreatment rendered it digestible by cellulase; however, high sugar yields required very high enzyme loadings. Because cellulase is a significant cost in biomass conversion processes, the present study focused on improving the enzyme efficiency using Tween 20 and Tween 80; Tween 20 is slightly more effective than Tween 80. The recommended pretreatment conditions for the biomass remained unchanged regardless of whether Tween was added during the hydrolysis. The recommended Tween loading was 0.15 g Tween/g dry biomass. The critical relationship was the Tween loading on the biomass, not the Tween concentration in solution. The 72-h enzymic conversion of pretreated corn stover using 5 FPU cellulase/g dry biomass at 50 C with Tween 20 as part of the medium was 0.85 g/g for cellulose, 0.66 g/g for xylan, and 0.75 for total polysaccharide; addition of Tween improved the cellulose, xylan, and total polysaccharide conversions by 42, 40, and 42%, respectively. Kinetic analyses showed that Tween improved the enzymic absorption constants, which increased the effective hydrolysis rate compared to hydrolysis without Tween. Furthermore, Tween prevented thermal deactivation of the enzymes, which allows for the kinetic advantage of higher temperature hydrolysis. Ultimate digestion studies showed higher conversions for samples containing Tween, indicating a substrate effect. It appears that Tween improves corn stover hydrolysis through three effects: enzyme stabilizer, lignocellulose disrupter, and enzyme effector.

  16. Hydrolysis and acidification of grass silage in leaching bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Xie, S; Lawlor, P G; Frost, J P; Wu, G; Zhan, X

    2012-06-01

    Hydrolysis and acidification of grass silage (GS) was examined in leaching bed reactors (LBRs) under organic loading rates (OLRs) of 0.5, 0.8 and 1.0 kg volatile solids (VS)/m(3)/day. The LBRs were run in duplicate over five consecutive batch tests (Batch tests 1-5) to examine the effects of pH, leachate dilution and addition of inoculum on the process of hydrolysis and acidification. The highest GS hydrolysis yields of 52-58%, acidification yields of 57-60% and VS removals of 62-66% were obtained in Batch test 4. Increasing OLRs affected the hydrolysis yield negatively. In Batch test 4, the reduction of lignocellulosic materials was up to 74.4% of hemicellulose, 30.1% of cellulose and 9.3% of lignin within 32 days. Cellulase activity can be used as an indicator for the hydrolysis process. Methane production from the LBRs only accounted for 10.0-13.8% of the biological methane potential of GS.

  17. Fluoride incorporation into apatite crystals delays amelogenin hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    DenBesten, Pamela; Zhu, Li; Li, Wu; Tanimoto, Kotaro; Liu, Haichuan; Witkowska, Halina Ewa

    2012-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis has been related to an increase in the amount of amelogenin in fluorosed enamel as compared to normal enamel in the maturation stage. In this study we tested the hypothesis that fluoride incorporated into carbonated apatite alters amelogenin hydrolysis. Recombinant human amelogenin (rh174) was allowed to bind to 0.15 mg of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CAP) or fluoride-containing carbonated hydroxyapatite (F-CAP) synthesized to contain 100, 1000 or 4000 ppm F-. After 3 h digestion with recombinant human MMP20 or KLK4, bound protein was characterized by reverse-phase HPLC. Proteolytic fragments formed after 24 h digestion of amelogenin, were identified by LC tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/MS). The hydrolysis of amelogenin bound to F100-CAP by both MMP20 and KLK4 was significantly reduced in a dose dependent manner as compared to CAP. After 24 h hydrolysis, the number of cleavage sites in bound amelogenin by MMP20 were similar in CAP and F100-CAP, whereas there were 24 fewer cleavage sites identified for the KLK4 hydrolysis on F100-CAP as compared to CAP. These results suggest that the reduced hydrolysis of amelogenins in fluorosed enamel may be partially due to the increased fluoride content in fluoride containing apatite, contributing to the hypomineralized enamel matrix phenotype observed in fluorosed enamel. PMID:22243219

  18. Enzymatic hydrolysis of fructans in the tequila production process.

    PubMed

    Avila-Fernández, Angela; Rendón-Poujol, Xóchitl; Olvera, Clarita; González, Fernando; Capella, Santiago; Peña-Alvarez, Araceli; López-Munguía, Agustín

    2009-06-24

    In contrast to the hydrolysis of reserve carbohydrates in most plant-derived alcoholic beverage processes carried out with enzymes, agave fructans in tequila production have traditionally been transformed to fermentable sugars through acid thermal hydrolysis. Experiments at the bench scale demonstrated that the extraction and hydrolysis of agave fructans can be carried out continuously using commercial inulinases in a countercurrent extraction process with shredded agave fibers. Difficulties in the temperature control of large extraction diffusers did not allow the scaling up of this procedure. Nevertheless, batch enzymatic hydrolysis of agave extracts obtained in diffusers operating at 60 and 90 degrees C was studied at the laboratory and industrial levels. The effects of the enzymatic process on some tequila congeners were studied, demonstrating that although a short thermal treatment is essential for the development of tequila's organoleptic characteristics, the fructan hydrolysis can be performed with enzymes without major modifications in the flavor or aroma, as determined by a plant sensory panel and corroborated by the analysis of tequila congeners.

  19. Linking hydrolysis performance to Trichoderma reesei cellulolytic enzyme profile.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Linda; Rønnest, Nanna P; Jørgensen, Christian I; Olsson, Lisbeth; Stocks, Stuart M; Jørgensen, Henrik S; Hobley, Timothy

    2016-05-01

    Trichoderma reesei expresses a large number of enzymes involved in lignocellulose hydrolysis and the mechanism of how these enzymes work together is too complex to study by traditional methods, for example, by spiking with single enzymes and monitoring hydrolysis performance. In this study, a multivariate approach, partial least squares regression, was used to see whether it could help explain the correlation between enzyme profile and hydrolysis performance. Diverse enzyme mixtures were produced by T. reesei Rut-C30 by exploiting various fermentation conditions and used for hydrolysis of washed pretreated corn stover as a measure of enzyme performance. In addition, the enzyme mixtures were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify and quantify the different proteins. A multivariate model was applied for the prediction of enzyme performance based on the combination of different proteins present in an enzyme mixture. The multivariate model was used for identification of candidate proteins that are correlated to enzyme performance on pretreated corn stover. A very large variation in hydrolysis performance was observed and this was clearly caused by the difference in fermentation conditions. Besides β-glucosidase, the multivariate model identified several xylanases, Cip1 and Cip2, as relevant proteins to study further.

  20. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and various pretreated wood fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Saddler, J.N.; Brownell, H.H.; Clermont, L.P.; Levitin, N.

    1982-06-01

    Three strains of Trichoderma-Trichoderma reesei C30, Trichoderma reesei QM9414, and Trichoderma species E58-were used to study the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated wood substrates. Each of the culture filtrates was incubated with a variety of commercially prepared cellulose substrates and pretreated wood substrates. Solka floc was the most easily degraded commercial cellulose. The enzyme accessibility of steam-exploded samples which has been alkali extracted and then stored wet decreased with the duration of the steam treatment. Air drying reduced the extent of hydrolysis of all the samples but had a greater effect on the samples which had previously shown the greatest hydrolysis. Mild pulping using 2% chlorite increased the enzymatic hydrolysis of all the samples. Steam explosion was shown to be an excellent pretreatment method for aspen wood and was much superior to dilute nitric acid pretreatment. The results indicate that the distribution of the lignin as well as the surface area of the cellulosic substrate are important features in enzymatic hydrolysis. (Refs 17).

  1. Starch hydrolysis modeling: application to fuel ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Ganti S; Johnston, David B; Rausch, Kent D; Tumbleson, M E; Singh, Vijay

    2011-09-01

    Efficiency of the starch hydrolysis in the dry grind corn process is a determining factor for overall conversion of starch to ethanol. A model, based on a molecular approach, was developed to simulate structure and hydrolysis of starch. Starch structure was modeled based on a cluster model of amylopectin. Enzymatic hydrolysis of amylose and amylopectin was modeled using a Monte Carlo simulation method. The model included the effects of process variables such as temperature, pH, enzyme activity and enzyme dose. Pure starches from wet milled waxy and high-amylose corn hybrids and ground yellow dent corn were hydrolyzed to validate the model. Standard deviations in the model predictions for glucose concentration and DE values after saccharification were less than ± 0.15% (w/v) and ± 0.35%, respectively. Correlation coefficients for model predictions and experimental values were 0.60 and 0.91 for liquefaction and 0.84 and 0.71 for saccharification of amylose and amylopectin, respectively. Model predictions for glucose (R2 = 0.69-0.79) and DP4+ (R2 = 0.8-0.68) were more accurate than the maltotriose and maltose for hydrolysis of high-amylose and waxy corn starch. For yellow dent corn, simulation predictions for glucose were accurate (R2 > 0.73) indicating that the model can be used to predict the glucose concentrations during starch hydrolysis.

  2. Structural modification of lignocellulosics by pretreatments to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gharpuray, M M; Lee, Y H; Fan, L T

    1983-01-01

    In this work an evaluation was made of a wide variety of single and multiple pretreatment methods for enhancing the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw. A multiple pretreatment consisted of a physical pretreatment followed by a chemical pretreatment. The structural features of wheat straw, including the specific surface area, crystallinity index, and lignin content, were measured to understand the mechanism of the enhancement in the hydrolysis rate upon pretrement. It has been found that, in general, multiple pretreatments were not promising, since the hydrolysis rates rarely exceeded those achieved by single pretreatments. Ballmilling pretreatment was found to be effective in increasing the specific surface area and decreasing the crystallinity index. Treatment with ethylene glycol was highly effective in increasing the specific surface area, in addition to a high degree of delignification. Peracetic acid pretreatment was highly effective in delignifying substrate. Among multiple pretreatments, those involving peracetic acid treatment generally had lower crystallinity indices and lignin content values. The relationship between the hydrolysis rate and the set of structural features indicated that an increase in surface area and a decrease in the crystallinity and lignin content enhance the hydrolysis; the specific surface area is the most influential of the structural features, followed by the lignin content.

  3. Lipoprotein apheresis in the management of severe hypercholesterolemia and of elevation of lipoprotein(a): current perspectives and patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Julius, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    This review reports the current situation with respect to therapeutic options (lifestyle and drugs) reducing the concentrations of atherogenic low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]). Three lipoprotein apheresis (LA) principles have been realized: precipitation, filtration, and adsorption. Available LA methods are herein described in detail – major components, pumps, extracorporeal volume, treated volume, and anticoagulation. General features of all LA methods as well as pleotropic effects are elaborated. Indications for LA therapy are quoted: homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HCH), severe HCH, and isolated elevation of Lp(a) and progress of atherosclerotic disease. A major focus is on the evidence of the effect of LA on cardiovascular outcome data, and the most important publications are cited in this context. The best studies have been performed in patients with elevated Lp(a) in whom cardiovascular events were reduced by more than 80%. Major adverse effects and contraindications are listed. The impact of an LA therapy on patient quality of life and the requirements they have to fulfill are also highlighted. Finally, the future role of LA in treating high-risk patients with high LDL-C and/or high Lp(a) is discussed. It is probable that the significance of LA for treating patients with elevated LDL-C will decrease (with the exception of homozygous familial HCH) due to the application of PCSK9 inhibitors. The antisense oligonucleotide against apolipoprotein(a) could replace LA in patients with high Lp(a), provided positive outcome data are generated. PMID:27785114

  4. Identification of a New Lipoprotein Export Signal in Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lauber, Frédéric; Cornelis, Guy Richard; Renzi, Francesco

    2016-10-25

    Bacteria of the phylum Bacteroidetes, including commensal organisms and opportunistic pathogens, harbor abundant surface-exposed multiprotein membrane complexes (Sus-like systems) involved in carbohydrate acquisition. These complexes have been mostly linked to commensalism, and in some instances, they have also been shown to play a role in pathogenesis. Sus-like systems are mainly composed of lipoproteins anchored to the outer membrane and facing the external milieu. This lipoprotein localization is uncommon in most studied Gram-negative bacteria, while it is widespread in Bacteroidetes Little is known about how these complexes assemble and particularly about how lipoproteins reach the bacterial surface. Here, by bioinformatic analyses, we identify a lipoprotein export signal (LES) at the N termini of surface-exposed lipoproteins of the human pathogen Capnocytophaga canimorsus corresponding to K-(D/E)2 or Q-A-(D/E)2 We show that, when introduced in sialidase SiaC, an intracellular lipoprotein, this signal is sufficient to target the protein to the cell surface. Mutational analysis of the LES in this reporter system showed that the amino acid composition, position of the signal sequence, and global charge are critical for lipoprotein surface transport. These findings were further confirmed by the analysis of the LES of mucinase MucG, a naturally surface-exposed C. canimorsus lipoprotein. Furthermore, we identify a LES in Bacteroides fragilis and Flavobacterium johnsoniae surface lipoproteins that allow C. canimorsus surface protein exposure, thus suggesting that Bacteroidetes share a new bacterial lipoprotein export pathway that flips lipoproteins across the outer membrane.

  5. Identification of a New Lipoprotein Export Signal in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lauber, Frédéric; Cornelis, Guy Richard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria of the phylum Bacteroidetes, including commensal organisms and opportunistic pathogens, harbor abundant surface-exposed multiprotein membrane complexes (Sus-like systems) involved in carbohydrate acquisition. These complexes have been mostly linked to commensalism, and in some instances, they have also been shown to play a role in pathogenesis. Sus-like systems are mainly composed of lipoproteins anchored to the outer membrane and facing the external milieu. This lipoprotein localization is uncommon in most studied Gram-negative bacteria, while it is widespread in Bacteroidetes. Little is known about how these complexes assemble and particularly about how lipoproteins reach the bacterial surface. Here, by bioinformatic analyses, we identify a lipoprotein export signal (LES) at the N termini of surface-exposed lipoproteins of the human pathogen Capnocytophaga canimorsus corresponding to K-(D/E)2 or Q-A-(D/E)2. We show that, when introduced in sialidase SiaC, an intracellular lipoprotein, this signal is sufficient to target the protein to the cell surface. Mutational analysis of the LES in this reporter system showed that the amino acid composition, position of the signal sequence, and global charge are critical for lipoprotein surface transport. These findings were further confirmed by the analysis of the LES of mucinase MucG, a naturally surface-exposed C. canimorsus lipoprotein. Furthermore, we identify a LES in Bacteroides fragilis and Flavobacterium johnsoniae surface lipoproteins that allow C. canimorsus surface protein exposure, thus suggesting that Bacteroidetes share a new bacterial lipoprotein export pathway that flips lipoproteins across the outer membrane. PMID:27795390

  6. Lipoprotein(a) plasma levels and the risk of cancer: the PRIME study.

    PubMed

    Marrer, Émilie; Wagner, Aline; Montaye, Michèle; Luc, Gérald; Amouyel, Philippe; Dallongeville, Jean; Ducimetiere, Pierre; Bingham, Annie; Arveiler, Dominique; Velten, Michel

    2013-05-01

    Although experimental studies have shown lipoprotein(a) antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects, the association of lipoprotein(a) levels with cancer in population studies remains elusive and poorly documented. The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between lipoprotein(a) plasma levels and the incidence of cancer over 10 years of follow-up. Data from two French centres of the PRIME cohort were used, representing 5237 men aged 50-59 years and free from a history of cancer at baseline. Data on medical history, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors were obtained by questionnaire. Lipoprotein(a) plasma levels were analysed from fasting blood samples collected at baseline. The relationship between lipoprotein(a) levels and first incident cancer was studied using the multivariate Cox proportional hazards models for all-site and the main-site-specific cancers, adjusted for various potential confounders including age, centre, smoking status and alcohol consumption. During follow-up, 456 new cancers were identified. No significant association was found between lipoprotein(a) and the all-site or main-site-specific cancers (hazard ratios for quartiles 2-4 vs. 1, respectively: 1.24, 1.11, 1.29, P=0.23). However, a higher risk seemed to be observed for highest lipoprotein(a) levels in all sites, lung, colorectal or tobacco/alcohol-related cancers. For prostate cancer, the lowest risk was observed for the highest levels of lipoprotein(a) (P=0.12). In conclusion, no evident association was found between the lipoprotein(a) levels and the incidence of cancer. Nevertheless, a higher cancer risk seemed to be observed for the highest lipoprotein(a) levels. Further research focusing on the lipoprotein(a) qualitative structure, that is, apolipoprotein(a) polymorphism could help clarify this highly complex relation.

  7. Action of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase on model lipoproteins. Preparation and characterization of model nascent high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Pownall, H J; Van Winkle, W B; Pao, Q; Rohde, M; Gotto, A M

    1982-12-13

    Apolipoprotein A-I, the major protein of human plasma high density lipoprotein, is the primary activator of plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase. In vitro, the association of apolipoprotein A-I with physiological phosphatidylcholines can be catalyzed by mixing the protein and lipid with sodium cholate, which is removed by chromatography. The apolipoprotein A-I/phospholipid complex has the physical properties of an HDL, and when cholesterol is present the complex is a highly reactive substrate in the lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase-catalyzed reaction. The relative reactivity of this complex compared with a number of other lipid-protein complexes is presented and discussed.

  8. Granular starch hydrolysis for fuel ethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping

    addition were evaluated in the dry grind process using GSHE (GSH process). Addition of proteases resulted in higher ethanol concentrations (15.2 to 18.0% v/v) and lower (DDGS) yields (32.9 to 45.8% db) compared to the control (no protease addition). As level of proteases and GSHE increased, ethanol concentrations increased and DDGS yields decreased. Proteases addition reduced required GSHE dose. Ethanol concentrations with protease addition alone were higher than with urea or with addition of both protease and urea. Corn endosperm consists of soft and hard endosperm. More exposed starch granules and rough surfaces produced from soft endosperm compared to hard endosperm will create more surface area which will benefit the solid phase hydrolysis as used in GSH process. In this study, the effects of protease, urea, endosperm hardness and GSHE levels on the GSH process were evaluated. Soft and hard endosperm materials were obtained by grinding and sifting flaking grits from dry milling pilot plant. Soft endosperm resulted in higher ethanol concentrations (at 72 hr) compared to ground corn or hard endosperm. Addition of urea increased ethanol concentrations (at 72 hr) for soft and hard endosperm. The effect of protease addition on increasing ethanol concentrations and fermentation rates was more predominant for soft endosperm, less for hard endosperm and least for ground corn. The GSH process with protease resulted in higher ethanol concentration than that with urea. For fermentation of soft endosperm, GSHE dose can be reduced. Ground corn fermented faster at the beginning than hard and soft endosperm due to the presence of inherent nutrients which enhanced yeast growth.

  9. High-density lipoprotein-raising strategies: update 2010.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Frank; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Tschöpe, Carsten; Van Linthout, Sophie

    2010-05-01

    Population studies have consistently shown that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels are a strong, independent inverse predictor of cardiovascular disease. Every 1 mg/dl increase in HDL cholesterol is associated with a 2% to 3% decrease in coronary artery disease risk, independent of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The primary mechanism for this protective effect is believed to be reverse cholesterol transport, but several other anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidative functions for HDL have also been identified. Low HDL cholesterol is predictive of cardiovascular events in statin-treated patients with low LDL cholesterol, indicating that intensive lipid lowering strategies with statins alone are not sufficient to prevent cardiovascular events, and merging for additional effective HDL-raising therapy. This review focuses at giving an overview of current established HDL-raising pharmaca, including statins, fibrates, thiazolidinediones, and nicotinic acids, and of novel therapies including cholesterol ester transfer protein-inhibitors, liver X receptor agonists, reconstituted HDL, and apolipoprotein A-I mimetics. Working mechanisms are described and results from clinical trials of monotherapy and combination therapy are discussed.

  10. Hypothesis: lipoprotein(a) is a surrogate for ascorbate.

    PubMed Central

    Rath, M; Pauling, L

    1990-01-01

    The concept that lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a surrogate for ascorbate is suggested by the fact that this lipoprotein is found generally in the blood of primates and the guinea pig, which have lost the ability to synthesize ascorbate, but only rarely in the blood of other animals. Properties of Lp(a) that are shared with ascorbate, in accordance with this hypothesis, are the acceleration of wound healing and other cell-repair mechanisms, the strengthening of the extracellular matrix (e.g., in blood vessels), and the prevention of lipid peroxidation. High plasma Lp(a) is associated with coronary heart disease and other forms of atherosclerosis in humans, and the incidence of cardiovascular disease is decreased by elevated ascorbate. Similar observations have been made in cancer and diabetes. We have formulated the hypothesis that Lp(a) is a surrogate for ascorbate in humans and other species and have marshaled the evidence bearing on this hypothesis. PMID:2143582

  11. Hypertriglyceridemia and unusual lipoprotein subclass distributions associated with late pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, T.M.; Kretchmer, N.; Silliman, K. )

    1991-03-15

    In the human adult population elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) levels are associated with decreased high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and decreased HDL and LDL particle sizes. Late pregnancy is a hypertriglyceridemic state where little is known about LDL and HDL subpopulation distribution. Plasma lipids, apolipoproteins (apo) and lipoprotein subpopulations were examined in 36 pregnant women at 36 wk pregnancy and 6 wk postpartum and correlated with HDL and LDL size. There was a significant decrease in LDL diameter at 36 wk pre, 25 {plus minus} 0.7 nm compared, with 6 wk post, 26.4 {plus minus} 0.8 nm. A total of 97% of the 36 wk pre subjects had small dense LDL which paralleled increases in apoB concentration. Unlike LDL HDL at 36 wks pre showed a significant increase in larger sized particles where HDL{sub 2b} predominated. There was a positive correlation between HDL{sub 2b} mass and apoAl and HDL-C concentrations. Late pregnancy is a metabolic state where the predominance of large, HDL{sub 2b} particles is discordant with the predominance of small LDL and elevated TG. This annual metabolic pattern may in part be due to hormonal changes occurring in late pregnancy.

  12. An evaluation of serum high density lipoproteins-phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Ide, H; Tsuji, M; Shimada, M; Kondo, T; Fujiya, S; Asanuma, Y; Agishi, Y

    1988-07-01

    Phospholipids in high density lipoproteins (HDL) is being used as a negative risk indicator of atherosclerosis. Phospholipids in HDL may not demonstrate the actual level of HDL-phospholipids when determined by the precipitation or ultracentrifugal methods, because HDL fractions contain very high density lipoproteins (VHDL) and albumin. In the present study, the true level of phospholipids in HDL was estimated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and it was compared with the level of phospholipids in HDL determined by the precipitation method. Sera from 18 healthy subjects were used as materials. In the HPLC method, the HDL fraction was extracted making sure that it contained no free albumin, which is albumin not bound to phospholipids. The HDL fraction was separated into subfractions. It was found that phospholipids in the VHDL fraction make a 20.2 +/- 7.3% (mean +/- S.D.) part of the total HDL-phospholipids. A large part of the VHDL fraction was constituted of albumin-bound phospholipids. A significant correlation was observed between HDL-phospholipids determined by the precipitation method, which contain albumin, and the actual HDL fraction phospholipids determined by HPLC, which do not contain VHDL (r = 0.903, p less than 0.01). These results suggest that HDL-phospholipids values determined by the precipitation method give useful clinical data.

  13. Lipid profiling of lipoprotein X: Implications for dyslipidemia in cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Heimerl, Susanne; Boettcher, Alfred; Kaul, Harald; Liebisch, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Lipoprotein X (Lp-X) is an abnormal lipoprotein that may typically be formed in intra- and extrahepatic cholestasis and potentially interfere with lipid analysis in the routine lab. To gain insight into lipid class and species composition, Lp-X, LDL and HDL from cholestatic and control serum samples were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis including phospholipids (PL), sphingolipids, free cholesterol (FC), cholesteryl esters (CE) and bile acids. Our analysis of Lp-X revealed a content of 46% FC, 49% PL with 34% phosphatidylcholine (PC) as main PL component. The lipid species pattern of Lp-X showed remarkable high fractions of mono-unsaturated species including PC 32:1 and PC 34:1 and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) 32:1 and 34:1. LDL and HDL lipid composition in the same specimens strongly reflected the lipid composition of Lp-X with increased PC 32:1, PC 34:1, PE 32:1, PE 34:1 and FC accompanied by decreased CE compared to controls. Comparison of Lp-X and biliary lipid composition clearly indicates that Lp-X does not originate from a sole release of bile lipids. Moreover, these data present evidence for increased hepatic fatty acid and PL synthesis which may represent a reaction to high hepatic FC level observed during cholestasis.

  14. MicroRNAs and lipoproteins: a connection beyond atherosclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Norata, Giuseppe Danilo; Sala, Federica; Catapano, Alberico Luigi; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of cardiovascular diseases. In this review article, we have summarized the role of miRNAs in regulating lipid metabolism and how their therapeutical inhibition may lead to new approaches to treat cardiometabolic diseases, including atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. Specific miRNAs, such as miR-33a and -33b, represent one of the most interesting and attractive targets for metabolic-related disorders and anti-miR33 approaches are under intensive investigation. In addition to miR-33, other miRNAs, including miR-122, are also emerging as key players in lipid metabolism. More recently miRNAs were shown to exert their activities in a paracrine manner and also systemically. The latter is possible due to lipid-carriers, including lipoproteins, that transport and protect miRNAs from degradation. The emerging strong connection between miRNAs, lipoproteins and lipid metabolism indicates the existence of a reciprocal modulation that might go beyond atherosclerosis. PMID:23260873

  15. Age-related changes of serum lipoprotein oxidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukiko Kawashima; Omaye, Stanley Teruo

    2004-01-23

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) may be a prelude to atherogenesis and directly age related. To assess whether there may be relationship between age and plasma lipoprotein (LP) oxidation, we studied copper-mediated LP oxidation isolated from the blood of 2 months, 7 months, and 15 months old rats. We determined whether the susceptibility of LP to oxidation might be related to vitamin C levels in serum, vitamin E levels in LP, or the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of serum or LP. Serum vitamin C content was inversely related to age, malondialdehyde (MDA) propagation rate, and maximum change of MDA concentrations. However, there were no significant relationships between age and serum TAC, LP TAC, serum vitamin E, or the ratio of LP vitamin E to serum vitamin C content. The lag phase of MDA formation was significantly decreased with age and the ratio of LP vitamin E content to serum vitamin C content, increased with age. Maximum change of MDA concentration was positively correlated with the ratio of LP vitamin E contents to serum vitamin C concentration. Thus, as the rat ages, vitamin C status decreases with an increased LP susceptibility to oxidation. It is tempting to speculate that enhanced LP oxidation in older rats may reflect a reduced amount of recycling of LDL vitamin E by serum vitamin C.

  16. Cigarette smoking, exercise and high density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Stamford, B A; Matter, S; Fell, R D; Sady, S; Papanek, P; Cresanta, M

    1984-07-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with depressed levels of HDL-C, whereas exercise is associated with elevated levels of HDL-C. The purpose was to determine effects of smoking and exercise on blood lipids and lipoproteins in middle-aged males. It was hypothesized that smoking may attenuate the effects of exercise to elevate HDL-C. A total of 269 males (70 smokers) met all criteria for inclusion in the study population. Age, height, weight, body fatness via hydrostatic weighing, daily caloric consumption and alcohol intake, and smoking habits and history were determined. Interviews concerning physical activity patterns were conducted and cardiovascular responses to treadmill exercise were determined. Subjects were grouped as sedentary (low activity), participants in vigorous recreational activities (moderate activity) and joggers/runners (high activity). Analysis of covariance with adjustments for factors which may affect blood lipids and lipoproteins was employed. Smokers demonstrated lower HDL-C and higher total cholesterol levels than nonsmokers. High activity subjects demonstrated significantly higher HDL-C levels than the low and moderate groups which did not differ. High activity smokers did not differ from low activity nonsmokers with respect to HDL-C. This supports the proposed hypothesis. Nonsmokers were higher in weight and body fatness than smokers even though smokers consumed 288 more calories per day on the average. This suggests that smoking may account for a significant number of calories through altered metabolism or some other means.

  17. Triacylglycerol kinetics in endotoxic rats with suppressed lipoprotein lipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Corll, C.B.; Martinez, R.R.

    1987-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia observed in animals after bacterial endotoxin administration and some forms of sepsis can result from increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) output or decreased TG clearance by extrahepatic tissues. To differentiate between these two possibilities, TG and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics were determined in control and endotoxin-injected rats 18 h after treatment. Plasma TG and FFA kinetics were assessed by a constant intravenous infusion with (9,10-/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled very low-density lipoprotein and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin, respectively. In addition, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue as well as in postheparin plasma of functionally hepatectomized, adrenalectomized, and gonadectomized rats. Plasma FFA acid concentrations were slightly increased in endotoxin-treated rats but their turnover did not differ from control. Endotoxin-treated rats had a threefold increase in plasma TG concentrations and decreased heart, skeletal muscle, and post-heparin plasma LPL activity. Plasma TG turnover was decreased, indicating that hypertriglyceridemia was not due to an increased TG output by the liver. Instead, the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TG concentration was consequence of the 80% reduction in TG metabolic clearance rate. Thus, suppression of LPL activity in endotoxic animals impairs TG clearance resulting in hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, endotoxin administration reduced the delivery of TG-FFA to extrahepatic tissues because hepatic synthesis and secretion of TG from plasma FFA was decreased and LPL activity was suppressed.

  18. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  19. Lipoprotein (a) and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Palmeira, Ástrid Camêlo; Leal, Adriana Amorim de F.; Ramos, Nathaly de Medeiros N.; de Alencar F., José; Simões, Mônica Oliveira da S.; Medeiros, Carla Campos M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCES: This systematic review included studies from 2001 to 2011, a ten-year time period. Epidemiological studies with children and/or adolescents published in English, Portuguese or Spanish and fully available online were included. The searches were performed in Science Direct, PubMed/Medline, BVS (Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde) and Cochrane Library databases, using the following combination of key-words: "lipoprotein a" and "cardiovascular diseases" and "obesity". DATA SYNTHESIS: Overall, 672 studies were obtained but only seven were included. Some studies assessed the family history for CVD. In all of them, Lp(a) levels were increased in patients with family history for CVD. There was also a positive correlation between Lp(a) and LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B levels, suggesting an association between Lp(a) levels and the lipid profile. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence that CVD may originate in childhood and adolescence leads to the need for investigating the risk factors during this period in order to propose earlier and possibly more effective interventions to reduce morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:24473960

  20. Monoolein production by triglycerides hydrolysis using immobilized Rhizopus oryzae lipase.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Nesrine; Abidi, Ferid; Galai, Said; Marzouki, M Nejib; Salah, Abderraouf Ben

    2014-07-01

    Lipase extracted from Rhizopus oryzae was immobilized in alginate gel beads. The effects of the immobilization conditions, such as, alginate concentration, CaCl2 concentration and amount of initial enzyme on retained activity (specific activity ratio of entrapped active lipase to free lipase) were investigated. The optimal conditions for lipase entrapment were determined: 2% (w/v) alginate concentration, 100mM CaCl2 and enzyme ratio of 2000IU/mL.In such conditions, immobilized lipase by inclusion in alginate showed a highest stability and activity, on olive oil hydrolysis reaction where it could be reused for 10 cycles. After 15min of hydrolysis reaction, the mass composition of monoolein, diolein and triolein were about 78%, 10% and 12%. Hydrolysis' products purification by column chromatography lead to a successful separation of reaction compounds and provide a pure fraction of monoolein which is considered as the widest used emulsifier in food and pharmaceutical industries.

  1. Complex enzyme hydrolysis releases antioxidative phenolics from rice bran.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Ruifen; Wei, Zhencheng; Deng, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Juan; Zhang, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, phenolic profiles and antioxidant activity of rice bran were analyzed following successive treatment by gelatinization, liquefaction and complex enzyme hydrolysis. Compared with gelatinization alone, liquefaction slightly increased the total amount of phenolics and antioxidant activity as measured by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays. Complex enzyme hydrolysis significantly increased the total phenolics, flavonoids, FRAP and ORAC by 46.24%, 79.13%, 159.14% and 41.98%, respectively, compared to gelatinization alone. Furthermore, ten individual phenolics present in free or soluble conjugate forms were also analyzed following enzymatic processing. Ferulic acid experienced the largest release, followed by protocatechuic acid and then quercetin. Interestingly, a major proportion of phenolics existed as soluble conjugates, rather than free form. Overall, complex enzyme hydrolysis releases phenolics, thus increasing the antioxidant activity of rice bran extract. This study provides useful information for processing rice bran into functional beverage rich in phenolics.

  2. Base hydrolysis and hydrothermal processing of PBX-9404 explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.A.; Flesner, R.L.; Spontarelli, T.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Kramer, J.F.

    1995-04-01

    Base hydrolysis in combination with hydrothermal processing has been proposed as an environmentally acceptable alternative to open burning/open detonation for degradation and destruction of high explosives. In this report, the authors examine gaseous and aqueous products of base hydrolysis of the HMX-based plastic bonded explosive, PBX-9404. The authors also examine products from the subsequent hydrothermal treatment of the base hydrolysate. The gases produced from hydrolysis of PBX-9404 are ammonia, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen. Major aqueous products are sodium formate, acetate, nitrate, and nitrite, but not all carbon products have been identified. Hydrothermal processing of base hydrolysate destroyed up to 98% of the organic carbon in solution, and higher destruction efficiencies are possible. Major gas products detected from hydrothermal processing were nitrogen and nitrous oxide.

  3. Base hydrolysis and supercritical water oxidation of PBX-9404

    SciTech Connect

    Flesner, R.L.; Spontarelli, T.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Kramer, J.F.; Sanchez, J.A.

    1994-11-09

    Base hydrolysis in combination with hydrothermal processing has been proposed as an environmentally acceptable alternative to open burning/open detonation for degradation and destruction of high explosives. In this report, the authors examine gaseous and aqueous products of base hydrolysis of the HMX-based plastic bonded explosive, PBX-9404. The authors also examine products from the subsequent hydrothermal treatment of the base hydrolysate. The gases produced from hydrolysis of PBX-9404 are ammonia, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen. Major aqueous products are sodium formate, acetate, nitrate, and nitrite, but not all carbon products have been identified. Hydrothermal processing of base hydrolysate destroyed up to 98% of the organic carbon in solution, and higher destruction efficiencies are possible. Major gas products detected from hydrothermal processing were nitrogen and nitrous oxide.

  4. Kinetic study of hydrolysis of coconut fiber into glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhaimin, Sudiono, Sri

    2017-03-01

    Kinetic study of hydrolysis of coconut fiber into glucose has been done. The aim of this research was to study of the effect of time and temperature to the glucose as the result of the conversion of coconut fiber. The various temperature of the hydrolysis process were 30 °C, 48 °C, 72 °C and 95 °C and the various time of the hydrolysis process were 0, 15, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300 minutes. A quantitative analysis was done by measured the concentration of the glucose as the result of the conversion of coconut fiber. The result showed that the rate constant from the various temperature were 3.10-4 minute-1; 8.10-4 minutees-1; 84.10-4 minute-1, and 205.10-4 minute-1, and the energy activation was 7,69. 103 kJ/mol.

  5. Characteristics of enzyme hydrolysis of cellulose under static condition.

    PubMed

    Taneda, Daisuke; Ueno, Yoshiki; Ikeo, Makoto; Okino, Shohei

    2012-10-01

    The effect of enzyme loading under static and agitated conditions was investigated. Enzymatic hydrolysis of 10 w/v% de-lignified cellulose slurry such as filter paper, avicel and pulp was conducted under agitated (120 rpm) and static condition, and the enzyme loading ranging from 1.2 to 120 mg-protein/g-dry substrate. Under the agitated condition, the final sugar concentration decreased with the decreasing enzyme loading. Under the static condition, the final sugar concentration was maintained even if the enzyme loading was decreased. The above phenomenon was caused by a rapid precipitation of cellobiohydrolase 2 (CBH2) under the agitated condition, which was not observed under the static condition. The hydrolysis experiments using enzymes containing different ratios of cellobiohydrolase 1 (CBH1) and CBH2 under the static condition suggested that preservation of CBH2 and its synergism with CBH1 is essential for static condition's characteristics, and for efficient hydrolysis of cellulose.

  6. Kinetic expression for hydrolysis of soluble starch by glucoamylase

    SciTech Connect

    Koichiro, K.; Koel, K.; Fumihide, S.; Keiichi, K.; Mayumi, K.

    1982-01-01

    As the hydrolysis of starch by glucoamylase proceeds with stepwise removal of glucose units from the nonreducing ends of the starch chain, the number of available substrate molecules is essentially unchanged in the course of the degradation. In view of this aspect, a simple practical kinetic expression, which consists of a modified Michaelis-Menten form with product inhibition, is presented for the hydrolysis of soluble starch. It is assumed that the values of kinetic parameters Vm and Km vary linearly from the values for starch toward those for maltose. The applicability of this kinetic expression is verified through the simulation with the experimental results for the hydrolysis of two soluble starches with different average molecular weights of 3 X 10 to the power of 4 and 3 X 10 to the power of 6. (Refs. 12)>

  7. Comparative hydrolysis and fermentation of sugarcane and agave bagasse.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Salas, J M; Villa-Ramírez, M S; Veloz-Rendón, J S; Rivera-Hernández, K N; González-César, R A; Plascencia-Espinosa, M A; Trejo-Estrada, S R

    2009-02-01

    Sugarcane and agave bagasse samples were hydrolyzed with either mineral acids (HCl), commercial glucanases or a combined treatment consisting of alkaline delignification followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. Acid hydrolysis of sugar cane bagasse yielded a higher level of reducing sugars (37.21% for depithed bagasse and 35.37% for pith bagasse), when compared to metzal or metzontete (agave pinecone and leaves, 5.02% and 9.91%, respectively). An optimized enzyme formulation was used to process sugar cane bagasse, which contained Celluclast, Novozyme and Viscozyme L. From alkaline-enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse samples, a reduced level of reducing sugar yield was obtained (11-20%) compared to agave bagasse (12-58%). Selected hydrolyzates were fermented with a non-recombinant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Maximum alcohol yield by fermentation (32.6%) was obtained from the hydrolyzate of sugarcane depithed bagasse. Hydrolyzed agave waste residues provide an increased glucose decreased xylose product useful for biotechnological conversion.

  8. Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Show Altered Lipoprotein Profiles with Dysfunctional High-Density Lipoproteins that Can Exacerbate Inflammatory and Atherogenic Process

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Eun-Young; Park, Jin Kyun; Song, Yeong Wook; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective In order to identify putative biomarkers in lipoprotein, we compared lipid and lipoprotein properties between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and control with similar age. Methods We analyzed four classes of lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL, HDL2, HDL3) from both male (n = 8, 69±4 year-old) and female (n = 25, 53±7 year-old) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as well as controls with similar age (n = 13). Results Although RA group showed normal levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and glucose, however, the RA group showed significantly reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-C level and ratio of HDL-C/TC. The RA group showed significantly elevated levels of blood triglyceride (TG), uric acid, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity. The RA group also showed elevated levels of advanced glycated end (AGE) products in all lipoproteins and severe aggregation of apoA-I in HDL. As CETP activity and TG contents were 2-fold increased in HDL from RA group, paraoxonase activity was reduced upto 20%. Electron microscopy revealed that RA group showed much less HDL2 particle number than control. LDL from the RA group was severely oxidized and glycated with greater fragmentation of apo-B, especially in female group, it was more atherogenic via phagocytosis. Conclusion Lipoproteins from the RA patients showed severely altered structure with impaired functionality, which is very similar to that observed in coronary heart patients. These dysfunctional properties in lipoproteins from the RA patients might be associated with high incidence of cardiovascular events in RA patients. PMID:27736980

  9. Lipoprotein Changes in HIV-Infected Antiretroviral-Naïve Individuals after Starting Antiretroviral Therapy: ACTG Study A5152s Stein: Lipoprotein Changes on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Stein, James H; Komarow, Lauren; Cotter, Bruno R; Currier, Judith S; Dubé, Michael P; Fichtenbaum, Carl J; Gerschenson, Mariana; Mitchell, Carol K C; Murphy, Robert L; Squires, Kathleen; Parker, Robert A; Torriani, Francesca J

    2008-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Dyslipidemia is a frequent complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV). The effects of ART on lipoproteins are less well-understood, and have not been investigated in a prospective study where assignment to ART is randomized. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of three class-sparing ART regimens on lipids and lipoproteins. METHODS: This was a substudy of a prospective, multicenter study treatment-naïve HIV-infected individuals randomly assigned to receive a regimen of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) + the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor efavirenz, NRTIs + the protease inhibitor lopinavir/ritonavir, or a NRTI-sparing regimen of efavirenz + lopinavir/ritonavir. Lipoproteins were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. RESULTS: Among the 82 participants, total and small low-density lipoprotein concentrations increased (median, interquartile range) by 152 (-49 - +407, p<0.01) and 130 (-98 - +417, p<0.01) nmol/L, respectively, especially in the arms containing lopinavir/ritonavir (p(KW)<0.04). Very low-density lipoproteins also increased (p<0.01), with a larger increase in the arms that contained lopinavir/ritonavir (p=0.022). High-density lipoproteins increased by 6.0 nmol/L (2.8 - 10.4, p<0.01), but differences between arms were not significant (p(KW)=0.069). Changes were not related to changes in markers of insulin/glucose metabolism. CONCLUSIONS: Total and small low-density lipoprotein concentrations increased, especially in the arms containing lopinavir/ritonavir, as did increases in total very low-density lipoproteins. Adverse changes were especially prominent in the arm with efavirenz + lopinavir/ritonavir.

  10. Mechanistic kinetic models of enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis-a review.

    PubMed

    Jeoh, Tina; Cardona, Maria J; Karuna, Nardrapee; Mudinoor, Akshata R; Nill, Jennifer

    2017-02-28

    Bioconversion of lignocellulose forms the basis for renewable, advanced biofuels, and bioproducts. Mechanisms of hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulases have been actively studied for nearly 70 years with significant gains in understanding of the cellulolytic enzymes. Yet, a full mechanistic understanding of the hydrolysis reaction has been elusive. We present a review to highlight new insights gained since the most recent comprehensive review of cellulose hydrolysis kinetic models by Bansal et al. () Biotechnol Adv 27:833-848. Recent models have taken a two-pronged approach to tackle the challenge of modeling the complex heterogeneous reaction-an enzyme-centric modeling approach centered on the molecularity of the cellulase-cellulose interactions to examine rate limiting elementary steps and a substrate-centric modeling approach aimed at capturing the limiting property of the insoluble cellulose substrate. Collectively, modeling results suggest that at the molecular-scale, how rapidly cellulases can bind productively (complexation) and release from cellulose (decomplexation) is limiting, while the overall hydrolysis rate is largely insensitive to the catalytic rate constant. The surface area of the insoluble substrate and the degrees of polymerization of the cellulose molecules in the reaction both limit initial hydrolysis rates only. Neither enzyme-centric models nor substrate-centric models can consistently capture hydrolysis time course at extended reaction times. Thus, questions of the true reaction limiting factors at extended reaction times and the role of complexation and decomplexation in rate limitation remain unresolved. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;9999: 1-16. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Transition-state structures for enzymatic and alkaline phosphotriester hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, S.R.; Raushel, F.M. ); Weiss, P.M.; Cleland, W.W. )

    1991-07-30

    The primary and secondary {sup 18}O isotope effects for the alkaline (KOH) and enzymatic (phosphotriesterase) hydrolysis of two phosphotriesters, O,O-diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (I) and O,O-diethyl O-(4-carbamoylphenyl) phosphate (II), are consistent with an associative mechanism with significant changes in bond order to both the phosphoryl and phenolic leaving group oxygens in the transition state. The synthesis of ({sup 15}N, phosphoryl-{sup 18}O)-,({sup 15}N, phenolic-{sup 18}O)-, and ({sup 15}N)-O,O-diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate and O,O-diethyl O-(4-carbamoylphenyl)phosphate is described. The primary and secondary {sup 18}O isotope effects for the alkaline hydrolysis of compound I are 1.0060 and 1.0063 {plus minus} 0.0001, whereas for compound II they are 1.027{plus minus}0.002 and 1.025 {plus minus} 0.002, respectively. These isotope effects are consistent with the rate-limiting addition of hydroxide and provide evidence for a S{sub N}2-like transition state with the absence of a stable phosphorane intermediate. For the enzymatic hydrolysis of compound I, the primary and secondary {sup 18}O isotope effects are very small, 1.0020 and 1.0021{plus minus}0.0004, respectively, and indicate that the chemical step in the enzymatic mechanism is not rate-limiting. The {sup 18}O isotope effects for the enzymatic hydrolysis of compound II are 1.036{plus minus}0.001 and 1.0181{plus minus}0.0007, respectively, and are comparable in magnitude to the isotope effects for alkaline hydrolysis, suggesting that the chemical step is rate-limiting. The relative magnitude of the primary {sup 18}O isotope effects for the alkaline and enzymatic hydrolysis of compound II reflect a transition state that is more progressed for the enzymatic reaction.

  12. Transition-state structures for enzymatic and alkaline phosphotriester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, S R; Raushel, F M; Weiss, P M; Cleland, W W

    1991-07-30

    The primary and secondary 18O isotope effects for the alkaline (KOH) and enzymatic (phosphotriesterase) hydrolysis of two phosphotriesters, O,O-diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (I) and O,O-diethyl O-(4-carbamoylphenyl) phosphate (II), are consistent with an associative mechanism with significant changes in bond order to both the phosphoryl and phenolic leaving group oxygens in the transition state. The synthesis of [15N, phosphoryl-18O]-, [15N, phenolic-18O]-, and [15N]-O,O-diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate and O,O-diethyl O-(4-carbamoylphenyl)phosphate is described. The primary and secondary 18O isotope effects for the alkaline hydrolysis of compound I are 1.0060 and 1.0063 +/- 0.0001, whereas for compound II they are 1.027 +/- 0.002 and 1.025 +/- 0.002, respectively. These isotope effects are consistent with the rate-limiting addition of hydroxide and provide evidence for a SN2-like transition state with the absence of a stable phosphorane intermediate. For the enzymatic hydrolysis of compound I, the primary and secondary 18O isotope effects are very small, 1.0020 and 1.0021 +/- 0.0004, respectively, and indicate that the chemical step in the enzymatic mechanism is not rate-limiting. The 18O isotope effects for the enzymatic hydrolysis of compound II are 1.036 +/- 0.001 and 1.0181 +/- 0.0007, respectively, and are comparable in magnitude to the isotope effects for alkaline hydrolysis, suggesting that the chemical step is rate-limiting. The relative magnitude of the primary 18O isotope effects for the alkaline and enzymatic hydrolysis of compound II reflect a transition state that is more progressed for the enzymatic reaction.

  13. Formation of tissue factor activity following incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein with plasma lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, T.; Kisiel, W. )

    1990-11-01

    Incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein (Apo-TF) with human plasma decreased the recalcified clotting time of this plasma in a time-and dose-dependent manner suggesting relipidation of the Apo-TF by plasma lipoproteins. Incubation of Apo-TF with purified preparations of human very low density, low density and high density lipoproteins resulted in tissue factor activity in a clotting assay. The order of effectiveness was VLDL greater than LDL much greater than HDL. Tissue factor activity generated by incubation of a fixed amount of Apo-TF with plasma lipoproteins was lipoprotein concentration-dependent and saturable. The association of Apo-TF with lipoprotein particles was supported by gel filtration studies in which {sup 125}I-Apo-TF coeluted with the plasma lipoprotein in the void volume of a Superose 6 column in the presence and absence of calcium ions. In addition, void-volume Apo-TF-lipoprotein fractions exhibited tissue factor activity. These results suggest that the factor VIII-bypassing activity of bovine Apo-TF observed in a canine hemophilic model may be due, in part, to its association with plasma lipoproteins and expression of functional tissue factor activity.

  14. Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins are secreted to the outer surface by default.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Ryan J; Zückert, Wolfram R

    2006-03-01

    Borrelia spirochaetes are unique among diderm bacteria in their abundance of surface-displayed lipoproteins, some of which play important roles in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease and relapsing fever. To identify the lipoprotein-sorting signals in Borrelia burgdorferi, we generated chimeras between the outer surface lipoprotein OspA, the periplasmic oligopeptide-binding lipoprotein OppAIV and mRFP1, a monomeric red fluorescent reporter protein. Localization of OspA and OppAIV point mutants showed that Borrelia lipoproteins do not follow the '+2' sorting rule which targets lipoproteins to the cytoplasmic or outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria via the Lol pathway. Fusions of mRFP1 to short N-terminal lipopeptides of OspA, and surprisingly OppAIV, were targeted to the spirochaetal surface. Mutagenesis of the OspA N-terminus defined less than five N-terminal amino acids as the minimal secretion-facilitating signal. With the exception of negative charges, which can act as partial subsurface retention signals in certain peptide contexts, lipoprotein secretion occurs independent of N-terminal sequence. Together, these data indicate that Borrelia lipoproteins are targeted to the bacterial surface by default, but can be retained in the periplasm by sequence-specific signals.

  15. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein in serum may aid in the diagnosis of disorders of lipid (fat) metabolism and help to identify young persons at risk from cardiovascular diseases. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  16. Fitness, Heart Disease, and High-Density Lipoproteins: A Look at the Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCunney, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    The role of fitness in preventing coronary heart disease is explored. Research on high-density lipoprotein, which has been found to be one of the most critical determinants of risk, is reviewed. The relationship between fitness, high-density lipoprotein, and coronary heart disease is assessed, and clinical implications are spelled out. (MT)

  17. Effects of Anabolic Steroids on Lipoprotein Profiles of Female Weight Lifters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffatt, Robert J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the effects of resistance exercise and anabolic steroids on lipoprotein profiles of female weightlifters. The study found that women who participate in resistance training have better lipoprotein profiles than their sedentary counterparts, but these changes do not offset the deleterious effects of steroid use. (SM)

  18. Nanoporous carbon sorbent for molecular-sieve chromatography of lipoprotein complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerimkulova, A. R.; Mansurova, B. B.; Gil'manov, M. K.; Mansurov, Z. A.

    2012-06-01

    The physicochemical characteristics of carbon sorbents are investigated. Electron microscopy data for the sorbent and separated lipoprotein complex are presented. It is found that the obtained carbon sorbent possess high porosity. Nanoporous carbon sorbents for the chromatography of molecular-sieve markers are obtained and tested. The applicability of nanoporous carbon sorbents for separation of lipoprotein complexes (LPC) is investigated.

  19. ApoE and the role of very low density lipoproteins in adipose tissue inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal was too identify the role of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and apoE, a major apolipoprotein in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, in adipose tissue inflammation with high-fat diet induced obesity. Male apoE-/- and C57BL/6J wild-type mice fed high fat diets for 12 weeks were assessed for metab...

  20. Hydrolysis of an organophosphate ester by manganese dioxide.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, D S; Beattie, J K; Coleman, L M; Jones, D R

    2001-02-15

    Amorphous manganese dioxide facilitates the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate to p-nitrophenol and orthophosphate despite insignificant adsorption of p-nitrophenyl phosphate or p-nitrophenol to the manganese dioxide. At pH 8, the orthophosphate product is released into solution; at pH 4 and pH 6, some remains adsorbed. The rate of hydrolysis is an order of magnitude more rapid than the same reaction facilitated by iron oxides. Because manganese dioxides are ubiquitous components of soils and sediments, this suggests the possibility of significant abiotic pathways for the formation of bioavailable orthophosphate from phosphate ester precursors.

  1. The mechanisms of plant cell wall deconstruction during enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Thygesen, Lisbeth G; Thybring, Emil E; Johansen, Katja S; Felby, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble plant biomass at high dry matter contents is indispensable for the initial liquefaction step in biorefining. It is known that particle size reduction is an important part of liquefaction, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we put forward a simple model based on mechanical principles capable of capturing the result of the interaction between mechanical forces and cell wall weakening via hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds. This study illustrates that basic material science insights are relevant also within biochemistry, particularly when it comes to up-scaling of processes based on insoluble feed stocks.

  2. Hydrolysis for direct esterification of lipids from wet microalgae.

    PubMed

    Takisawa, Kenji; Kanemoto, Kazuyo; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2013-09-01

    Hydrolysis of lipids from microalgae under high water content was investigated as a pretreatment of direct esterification. Results indicated that the hydrolysis process reduced the inhibition by water in FAME production; in addition, FAME obtained by esterification of hydrolysates was increased by 181.7% compared to FAME obtained by direct transesterification under the same amount of water content (80%). This method has great potential in terms of biodiesel production from microalgae since it uses no organic solvent, reduces the drying cost and lowers the operating cost compared to any other traditional method.

  3. Hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse by mycelial biomass of Penicillium funiculosum

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.; Deshpande, V.; Seeta, R.; Srinivasan, M.C.; Mishra, C.

    1985-07-01

    Cellulose bioconversion has great promise for producing unlimited quantities of fermentable feedstocks and liquid fuels. Extensive studies on the production of extracellular cellulase and on the saccharification of various cellulosic substrates using cellulases have been reported. Use of mycelial biomass having cell bound cellulase for saccharification of cellulose was studied in Aspergillus terreus by Miller and Srinivasan. Extracellular cellulase production by P. funiculosum and its application for cellulose hydrolysis have been reported earlier by the authors. The present communication reports the hydrolysis of lignocellulose using mycelial biomass of P. funiculosum cultivated on cellulose and its reuse potential. 10 references.

  4. Recovery by ultrafiltration of a commercial enzyme for cellulose hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzichini, M.; Fabiani, C.; Sperandei, M. )

    1991-02-01

    An enzymatic process of cellulose hydrolysis based mainly on the use of membrane techniques is under study. The proposed flow sheet assumes that during cellulose hydrolysis the enzyme is continuously separated from glucose and cellobiose and is recycled in the cellulose reaction vessel by membrane ultrafiltration. The ultrafiltration of Celluclast enzyme by Novo is performed in a DDS column module assembled with flat polysulfone membranes. Membrane polarization effects are studies in the 0.1-5% w/v enzyme concentration range under varying pressures up to 600 kPa. A partial loss of enzymatic activity is observed as a consequence of the ultrafiltration and membrane washing operations.

  5. Outer membrane protein A, peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein, and murein lipoprotein are released by Escherichia coli bacteria into serum.

    PubMed

    Hellman, J; Loiselle, P M; Tehan, M M; Allaire, J E; Boyle, L A; Kurnick, J T; Andrews, D M; Sik Kim, K; Warren, H S

    2000-05-01

    Complexes containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and three outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are released by gram-negative bacteria incubated in human serum and into the circulation in an experimental model of sepsis. The same OMPs are bound by immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the cross-protective antiserum raised to Escherichia coli J5 (anti-J5 IgG). This study was performed to identify the three OMPs. The 35-kDa OMP was identified as outer membrane protein A (OmpA) by immunoblotting studies using OmpA-deficient bacteria and recombinant OmpA protein. The 18-kDa OMP was identified as peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) based on peptide sequences from the purified protein and immunoblotting studies using PAL-deficient bacteria. The 5- to 9-kDa OMP was identified as murein lipoprotein (MLP) based on immunoblotting studies using MLP-deficient bacteria. The studies identify the OMPs released into human serum and into the circulation in an experimental model of sepsis as OmpA, PAL, and MLP.

  6. Simultaneous labeling of lipoprotein intracellular trafficking in pigeon monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, N. L.

    1997-01-01

    Macrophage foam cell formation resulting from the accumulation of cholesterol and cholesterol esters derived from plasma lipoproteins is important for progression of atherosclerosis. Hypothetically, intracellular processing of lipoproteins that stimulate foam cell formation differs from processing of lipoproteins that do not. To test this, we examined simultaneous subcellular trafficking of lipoproteins in pigeon monocyte-derived macrophages. Pigeon beta-very-low-density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and acetylated low-density lipoprotein (Ac-LDL), differentially labeled with colloidal gold, were added in pairs to cells at 4 degrees C for 2 hours before uptake at 18 degrees C, 22 degrees C, or 37 degrees C for either 30 minutes or 2 hours. The colloidal gold distribution and percent co-labeling as observed by transmission electron microscopy were determined for organelles of the endocytic pathway. Incubations at 18 degrees C and 22 degrees C blocked lipoprotein trafficking to lysosomes. Incubation at 18 degrees C increased the percent distribution of lipoproteins in the endocytic pathway up to the early cisternal endosomes. Incubations at 22 degrees C resulted in a greater distribution of lipoproteins in the spherical late endosomes and late endosomal-prelysosomal tubular reticular compartment. The distribution in the endocytic pathway was a factor of time and temperature rather than lipoprotein type. The percentage of co-labeling of organelles for the three pairs of lipoproteins examined, Ac-LDL plus beta-VLDL, LDL plus beta-VLDL, and LDL plus Ac-LDL, was similar. Fewer noncoated and clathrin-coated pits and vesicles were co-labeled (average of 6%, maximum of 17%) than the rest of the endocytic pathway, early cisternal endosomes, spherical late endosomes, late endosomal-prelysosomal tubuloreticular compartment, and spherical lysosomes (average of 36%, maximum of 47%). The 36% of co-labeled later endocytic organelles contained an average

  7. The expanding role of lipoprotein apheresis in the treatment of raised lipoprotein(a) in ischaemic heart disease and refractory angina

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tina Z; Pottle, Alison; Pennell, Dudley J; Barbir, Mahmoud S

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly recognised that lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], an inherited, genetically-determined form of LDL-cholesterol, is an independent cardiovascular risk factor and predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Lp(a) is felt to increase cardiovascular risk via its pro-thrombotic effect and by enhancing intimal lipoprotein deposition. Lipoprotein apheresis is currently the most effective treatment for raised Lp(a). There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that aggressively lowering raised Lp(a) may improve cardiovascular and clinical outcomes, although much more research is required in this field. Angina which is refractory to conventional medical therapy and revascularisation, is extremely challenging to manage. Treatment options for such patients remain very limited. We describe the case of a patient with refractory angina and raised lipoprotein(a) in whom aggressive reduction of Lp(a) with lipoprotein apheresis successfully ameliorated the progression of coronary stenosis and provided effective and durable relief of angina symptoms. In our centre, we are currently conducting a prospective, randomised controlled cross-over study of patients with refractory angina and raised Lp(a), randomised to undergoing lipoprotein apheresis or ‘sham’ apheresis with assessment of myocardial perfusion, carotid atherosclerosis, endothelial vascular function, thrombogenesis, oxidised phospholipids and their antibodies, exercise capacity, angina symptoms and quality of life at the beginning and end of treatment. PMID:25054114

  8. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on the oxylipin composition of lipoproteins in hypertriglyceridemic, statin-treated subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Oxylipins mediate many physiological processes, including inflammation and vascular function. Generally considered local and transient, we suggest their presence in lipoproteins indicates they also mediate the effects lipoproteins have on inflammation and vascular biology. To support th...

  9. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging and quantification of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Oliver T; Ittrich, Harald; Peldschus, Kersten; Kaul, Michael G; Tromsdorf, Ulrich I; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Nikolic, Marija S; Mollwitz, Birgit; Merkel, Martin; Bigall, Nadja C; Sapra, Sameer; Reimer, Rudolph; Hohenberg, Heinz; Weller, Horst; Eychmüller, Alexander; Adam, Gerhard; Beisiegel, Ulrike; Heeren, Joerg

    2009-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals have physical properties that are well suited for biomedical imaging. Previously, we have shown that iron oxide nanocrystals embedded within the lipid core of micelles show optimized characteristics for quantitative imaging. Here, we embed quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of lipoproteins--micelles that transport lipids and other hydrophobic substances in the blood--and show that it is possible to image and quantify the kinetics of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using fluorescence and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. The lipoproteins were taken up by liver cells in wild-type mice and displayed defective clearance in knock-out mice lacking a lipoprotein receptor or its ligand, indicating that the nanocrystals did not influence the specificity of the metabolic process. Using this strategy it is possible to study the clearance of lipoproteins in metabolic disorders and to improve the contrast in clinical imaging.

  10. Biosynthesis of murein lipoprotein in Escherichia coli: effects of 3,4-dihydroxybutyl-1-phosphonate.

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, P K; Engel, R; Tropp, B E; Wu, H C

    1979-01-01

    The effects of 3,4-dihydroxybutyl-1-phosphonate, a four-carbon analog of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate, on the biosynthesis of the glyceryl moiety in murein lipoprotein of Escherichia coli were studied. The compound at a concentration of 55 microM strong inhibits in the incorporation of [2-3H]glycerol radioactivity into lipoprotein by virtue of its inhibition of the synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol. On the other hand, the incorporation of prelabeled [2-3H]glycerol radioactivity into lipoprotein was only partially inhbited by 3,4-dihydroxybutyl-1-phosphonate even at a much higher concentration (1 mM). These data were consistent with the postulated pathway for the biosynthesis of the lipid moiety in lipoportein: cysteine-lipoprotein + phosphatidylglycerol leads to glycerylcystein-lipoprotein + phosphatidic acid. PMID:378946

  11. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging and quantification of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Oliver T.; Ittrich, Harald; Peldschus, Kersten; Kaul, Michael G.; Tromsdorf, Ulrich I.; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Nikolic, Marija S.; Mollwitz, Birgit; Merkel, Martin; Bigall, Nadja C.; Sapra, Sameer; Reimer, Rudolph; Hohenberg, Heinz; Weller, Horst; Eychmüller, Alexander; Adam, Gerhard; Beisiegel, Ulrike; Heeren, Joerg

    2009-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals have physical properties that are well suited for biomedical imaging. Previously, we have shown that iron oxide nanocrystals embedded within the lipid core of micelles show optimized characteristics for quantitative imaging. Here, we embed quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of lipoproteins-micelles that transport lipids and other hydrophobic substances in the blood-and show that it is possible to image and quantify the kinetics of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using fluorescence and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. The lipoproteins were taken up by liver cells in wild-type mice and displayed defective clearance in knock-out mice lacking a lipoprotein receptor or its ligand, indicating that the nanocrystals did not influence the specificity of the metabolic process. Using this strategy it is possible to study the clearance of lipoproteins in metabolic disorders and to improve the contrast in clinical imaging.

  12. Amphotericin B toxicity as related to the formation of oxidatively modified low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Barwicz, J; Dumont, I; Ouellet, C; Gruda, I

    1998-01-01

    The effect of amphotericin B on the oxidation and degradation of low- and high-density lipoproteins was investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy, electrophoresis, and size-exclusion chromatography. Two formulations of the drug were used: the commercial Fungizone and a new, less toxic, liposomal formulation, AmBisome. It was shown that Fungizone strongly enhanced the oxidative deformation of low-density lipoprotein structure while AmBisome did not bind to this lipoprotein fraction and did not affect its oxidation. It was shown that amphotericin B contained in Fungizone extracted cholesterol from low-density lipoproteins which sensitized them to oxidation. Both formulations of amphotericin B studied here did not bind to high-density lipoprotein and did not affect the process of its oxidation.

  13. Stability of serum high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs for preanalytical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Yamada, Hiroya; Taromaru, Nao; Kondo, Kanako; Nagura, Ayuri; Yamazaki, Mirai; Ando, Yoshitaka; Munetsuna, Eiji; Suzuki, Koji; Ohashi, Koji; Teradaira, Ryoji

    2017-01-01

    Background Recently, several studies have shown that microRNAs are present in high-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein-microRNA may be a promising disease biomarker. We investigated the stability of high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs in different storage conditions as this is an important issue for its application to the field of clinical research. Methods microRNAs were extracted from the high-density lipoprotein fraction that was purified from the serum. miR-135 a and miR-223, which are known to be present in high-density lipoprotein, were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. The influence of preanalytical parameters on the analysis of high-density lipoprotein-miRNAs was examined by the effect of RNase, storage conditions, and freezing and thawing. Results The concentrations of microRNA in high-density lipoprotein were not altered by RNase A treatment (0-100 U/mL). No significant change in these microRNAs was observed after storing serum at room temperature or 4℃ for 0-24 h, and there was a similar result in the cryopreservation for up to two weeks. Also, high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs were stable for, at least, up to five freeze-thaw cycles. Conclusions These results demonstrated that high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs are relatively resistant to various storage conditions. This study provides new and important information on the stability of high-density lipoprotein-microRNAs.

  14. Role of Plasma Lipoproteins in Cortisone-Induced Fat Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Mahley, Robert W.; Gray, Mary E.; LeQuire, Virgil S.

    1972-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of fat embolism can be a complication in patients who have suffered long-bone fracture, and has been associated with a number of conditions in which bone fracture is not a factor. The origin of embolic fat (bone marrow or depot fat versus plasma lipoproteins) has been debated. To test the hypothesis that alterations in the composition of plasma very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) could lead to their coalescence and subsequent impaction in pulmonary vasculature, New Zealand white rabbits were injected intramuscularly with 25 mg of cortisone twice a day for 2, 4, 6, 11 and 12 days. Blood samples were obtained from unanesthetized animals prior to the cortisone treatment and at sacrifice. Pulmonary fat embolism that was similar histologically to that found in the human patient with the clinical syndrome was produced in all rabbits treated for 4-12 days. After the fourth day, all animals were hyperlipidemic. There was a tenfold increase in plasma VLDL concentration and the mean particle diameter of the VLDL was increased from 620 Å to 1016 Å. The proportion of triglyceride (TG) was increased, protein (PR) and phospholipid (PL) were decreased and total cholesterol (TC) was unaltered (untreated controls: PR, 16.4%; TG, 58.5%; PL, 19.2%; TC, 6.7% and cortisone-treated: PR, 8.4%; TG, 75.1%; PL, 11%; TC, 6.4%). The lipid composition of pulmonary embolic fat from rabbits treated with cortisone for 6 or 11 days was TG, 81%; PL, 13% and TC, 6%. VLDL from similarly treated rabbits had a lipid composition of TG, 79%; PL, 14.5% and TC, 6.6%. The TC concentration of bone marrow and depot fat from animals treated with cortisone for 11 days was <1%, and the PL concentration was <2%. These data support the hypothesis that plasma lipoproteins, primarily the VLDL, when altered in size and composition can coalesce into globules of sufficient size to occlude peripheral capillaries. ImagesFig 1Fig 2 PMID:5009252

  15. Genetic risk scores associated with baseline lipoprotein subfraction concentrations do not associate with their responses to fenofibrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoprotein subclass concentrations are modifiable markers of cardiovascular disease risk. Fenofibrate is known to show beneficial effects on lipoprotein subclasses, but little is known about the role of genetics in mediating the responses of lipoprotein subclasses to fenofibrate. A recent genomewid...

  16. Genome-wide association study indicates variants associated with insulin signaling and inflammation mediate lipoprotein responses to fenofibrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A shift towards overall larger very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and smaller low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) diameters occurs in insulin resistance (IR), which reflects shifts in the distribution of the subfraction concentrations. Fenofibrate, indicated for hypertriglyc...

  17. Effects of APOA5 S19W polymorphism on growth, insulin sensitivity and lipoproteins in normoweight neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apolipoprotein (Apo) A5 is a protein involved in the activation of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and the metabolism of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins. LPL plays a major role in the metabolism of TG-rich lipoproteins, and placental LPL activity is known to correlate positively with foetal fat deposit...

  18. Effect of improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on low-density lipoprotein size, electronegative low-density lipoprotein and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 distribution.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quesada, José L; Vinagre, Irene; de Juan-Franco, Elena; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Pérez, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intensified hypoglycemic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on the distribution of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity between high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its relation with the lipid profile and other qualitative properties of LDL. Forty-two patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of poor glycemic control and normal or near normal LDL cholesterol were recruited. Lifestyle counseling and pharmacologic hypoglycemic therapy were intensified to improve glycemic control, but lipid-lowering therapy was unchanged. At 4 ± 2 months, glycosylated hemoglobin had decreased by a mean of 2.1%, but the only effect on the lipid profile were statistically significant decreases in nonesterified fatty acids and apolipoprotein B concentration. LDL size increased and the proportion of electronegative LDL decreased significantly. In parallel, total Lp-PLA2 activity decreased significantly, promoting a redistribution of Lp-PLA2 activity toward a higher proportion in high-density lipoprotein. Improvements in glycemic control led to more marked changes in Lp-PLA2 activity and distribution in patients with diabetes who had not received previous lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, optimizing glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes promotes atheroprotective changes, including larger LDL size, decreased electronegative LDL, and a higher proportion of Lp-PLA2 activity in high-density lipoprotein.

  19. Diet, lipoproteins and cholesteryl ester transfer activity in hyperlipidaemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Groener, J E; Jacobs, D M; van Rozen, A J; Erkelens, D W

    1985-02-01

    In order to study the response of cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) to alteration in diet in humans we carried out a longitudinal study in hyperlipidaemic patients. Five subjects, all hyperlipidaemic, were first given a low fat diet for 7 to 15 days and then a diet high in fat for 7 to 21 days. In four out of five patients both diets were low in energy. The plasma lipoprotein levels and CETA were measured daily. All patients responded on the low fat diet by a decrease in total cholesterol and total triglycerides. No response on the high fat diet was noticed except in the patient for whom the high fat diet was also high in energy. In all patients the changes in CETA ran parallel to changes in (VLDL + LDL) cholesterol. It is concluded that diet induced changes in (VLDL + LDL) cholesterol are accompanied by similar changes in CETA in hyperlipidaemic subjects.

  20. Pharmacogenomics of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol-raising therapies

    PubMed Central

    Aslibekyan, Stella; Straka, Robert J.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Claas, Steven A.; Arnett, Donna K.

    2017-01-01

    High levels of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) have traditionally been linked to lower incidence of cardiovascular disease, prompting the search for effective and safe HDL-C raising pharmaceutical agents. Although drugs such as niacin and fibrates represent established therapeutic approaches, HDL-C response to such therapies is variable and heritable, suggesting a role for pharmacogenomic determinants. Multiple genetic polymorphisms, located primarily in genes encoding lipoproteins, cholesteryl ester transfer protein, transporters and CYP450 genes have been shown to associate with HDL-C drug response in vitro and in epidemiologic studies. However, few of the pharmacogenomic findings have been independently validated, precluding the development of clinical tools that can be used to predict HDL-C response and leaving the goal of personalized medicine to future efforts. PMID:23469915

  1. LIPOPROTEIN GRANULES IN THE CORTICAL COLLECTING TUBULES OF MOUSE KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Fritz

    1961-01-01

    The light and, to a lesser extent, the dark cells of the cortical collecting tubules in mouse kidney contain a great number of granules which according to histochemical tests are composed of phospholipids and proteins. These granules are bounded by a triple-layered membrane measuring approximately 75 A across, and contain one or several crystals with a hexagonal or square lattice. These crystals are built up of rod-shaped units, which appear dense after osmium fixation, measure about 48 A in diameter, and are separated by a light interspace of similar dimensions. The mean center-to-center distance of the rods is about 96 A. The structure is explained as a lipoprotein crystallized within a membrane-bounded vacuole. No relationship between these granules and mitochondria was found. The physiological significance of the granules remains unknown. PMID:13770761

  2. Lipoproteins of Treponema denticola: their effect on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sela, M N; Bolotin, A; Naor, R; Weinberg, A; Rosen, G

    1997-07-01

    The presence of lipoproteins and lipooligosaccharides in Treponema denticola, an oral spirochaete associated with periodontal diseases, was investigated. T. denticola ATCC 35404 and the clinical isolate GM-1 were metabolically labeled with [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid and extracted with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-114. The extract was phase separated, precipitated with acetone and delipidated to remove non-covalently bound lipid (dLPP). In T. denticola ATCC 35404, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide electrophoretic separation followed by autoradiography showed [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid incorporation in bands with apparent molecular masses of 14, 20, 26, 31, 38, 72 and 85 kDa and a broad band running from 113 kDa to the top of the gel. This last band resolved into a 53 kDa [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid band upon heating for 10 min, at 100 degrees C. The structural relationship of the outer sheath major oligomeric polypeptide of strain ATCC 35404 and the 53 kDa protein was demonstrated immunologically. Antibodies against the 113 kDa component of the oligomer cross-reacted with the 53 kDa protein. Proteinase K degraded the [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid bands with the exception of the 14 kDa. The 14 kDa was also the major [3H]-fatty acid labeled compound found in the water phase following phenol-water extraction of whole T. denticola ATCC 35404 cells. This compound was purified from the water phase by gel filtration followed by hydrophobic chromatography. Chemical analysis showed that hexadecanoic acid was the predominant fatty acid bound to T. denticola lipoproteins. In the GM-1 strain [3H]-cis-9-octadecenoic acid incorporation was observed in the 116 kDa and 14 kDa bands. dLPP from strain ATCC 35404 caused an enhanced (0.8-8 micrograms/ml) luminol dependent chemiluminiscence (LDCL) effect in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) which could be related to protein concentration. The addition of dLPP to PMN together with FMLP at submaximal concentration (1

  3. Heritability of Biomarkers of Oxidized Lipoproteins: A Twin Pair Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Fangwen; Schork, Andrew J.; Maihofer, Adam X.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Marcovina, Santica; Miller, Elizabeth R.; Witztum, Joseph L.; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if biomarkers of oxidized lipoproteins are genetically determined. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a heritable risk factor and carrier of oxidized phospholipids (OxPL). Approach and Results We measured OxPL-apoB, Lp(a), IgG and IgM autoantibodies to malondialdehyde-modified low density lipoprotein (MDA-LDL), copper oxidized LDL (CuOxLDL) and apoB-immune complexes (ApoB-IC) in 386 monozygotic and dizygotic twins to estimate trait heritability (h2) and determine specific genetic effects among traits. A genome wide linkage study followed by genetic association was performed. The h2 (scale:0-1) for Lp(a) was 0.91±0.01 and for OxPL-apoB 0.87±0.02, which were higher than physiologic, inflammatory, or lipid traits. h2 of IgM MDA-LDL, CuOxLDL and ApoB-IC were 0.69±0.04, 0.67±0.05, and 0.80±0.03, respectively, and for IgG MDA-LDL, CuOxLDL and apoB-IC 0.62±0.05, 0.52±0.06, and 0.53±0.06, respectively. There was an inverse correlation between the major apo(a) isoform and OxPL-apoB (R=-0.49, p<0.001), and Lp(a) (R=-0.48, p<0.001) and OxPL-apoB was modestly correlated with Lp(a) (ρ=0.57, p<0.0001). The correlation in major apo(a) isoform size was concordant (R=1.0, p<0.001) among monozygotic twins but not dizygotic twins (R=0.40, p=0.055). Lp(a) and OxPL-apoB shared genetic co-determination (genetic covariance: ρG = 0.774±0.032, p=1.09×10-38), though not environmental determination (environmental covariance: ρE= 0.081±0.15, p=0.15). In contrast, Lp(a) shared environmental but not genetic co-determination with autoantibodies to MDA-LDL and CuOxLDL and ApoB-IC. Sib-pair genetic linkage of the Lp(a) trait revealed that SNP rs10455872 was significantly associated with OxPL-apoB after adjusting for Lp(a). Conclusions OxPL-apoB and other biomarkers of oxidized lipoproteins are highly heritable cardiovascular risk factors that suggest novel genetic origins of atherothrombosis. PMID:25953646

  4. Can phosphatidylserine enhance atheroprotective activities of high-density lipoprotein?

    PubMed

    Darabi, Maryam; Kontush, Anatol

    2016-01-01

    Although high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is well known to be protective against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, therapeutic interventions to raise HDL-cholesterol levels do not translate into reduction in cardiovascular risk. Due to the compositional complexity of HDL particles, molecular determinants of their atheroprotective function still remain to be clarified. Recent structural and functional data identify phospholipid as a major bioactive component of HDL. Such a role has recently been specifically evidenced for phosphatidylserine (PS); indeed, HDL content of PS displayed positive correlations with all metrics of HDL functionality assessed. This review summarizes current knowledge about HDL-associated PS; possible mechanisms for its atheroprotective role are discussed and potential applications of PS to HDL-based therapies are highlighted.

  5. Lipoprotein CD0873 is a novel adhesin of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Kovacs-Simon, Andrea; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Kasendra, Magdalena; Minton, Nigel; Titball, Richard W; Michell, Stephen L

    2014-07-15

    Clostridium difficile is a cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis, a healthcare-associated intestinal disease. Colonization of the gut is a critical step in the course of infection. The C. difficile lipoprotein CD0873 was identified as a putative adhesin through a bioinformatics approach. Surface exposure of CD0873 was confirmed and a CD0873 mutant was generated. The CD0873 mutant showed a significant reduction in adherence to Caco-2 cells and wild-type bacteria preincubated with anti-CD0873 antibodies showed significantly decreased adherence to Caco-2 cells. In addition, we demonstrated that purified recombinant CD0873 protein alone associates with Caco-2 cells. This is the first definitive identification of a C. difficile adhesin, which now allows work to devise improved measures for preventing and treating disease.

  6. High-Density Lipoprotein and Prostate Cancer: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Kazuhiko; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo; Ikpot, Imoh Z.; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Remaley, Alan T.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common disease in modern, developed societies and has a high incidence and mortality. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) has recently received much attention as a possible risk marker of prostate cancer development and prognosis. In the present article, we summarized findings from epidemiologic studies of the association between HDL-C and prostate cancer. Low HDL-C level was found to be a risk and prognostic factor of prostate cancer in several epidemiologic studies, although the overall linkage between HDL and prostate cancer has not been definitively established. The mechanisms for this association remain uncertain; however, limited data from experimental studies imply a possible role of HDL in the pathophysiology of prostate cancer. More epidemiologic research, in combination with experimental studies, is needed in this field. PMID:23985823

  7. Coronary heart disease in women: triglycerides and lipoprotein biology.

    PubMed

    Dayspring, Thomas D

    2002-01-01

    An examination of coronary heart disease in women over the past two decades in the United States reveals a disturbing gender difference that points to more treatment success in men than in women, which raises the question as to whether women have been as aggressively evaluated and treated. It is only over the last several years that evidence from randomized clinical trials on coronary heart disease etiology and treatment in women has become available. In addition, the previous widely held viewpoint that estrogen is cardioprotective and should be an integral part of pharmacologic therapy has been abandoned. Triglycerides and their very important influence on lipoproteins have emerged as a critical part of the pathobiological forces related to atherothrombosis in women.

  8. Thermal-pressure-mediated hydrolysis of Reactive Blue 19 dye.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Maria; Farooq, Robina; Khalid, Abda; Farooq, Ather; Mahmood, Qaisar; Farooq, Umar; Raja, Iftikhar Ahmad; Shaukat, Saleem Farooq

    2009-12-30

    The thermal-pressure-mediated hydrolysis rates and the degradation kinetics of environmentally persistent Reactive Blue (RB) 19 dye were studied. The dye decomposition was studied at 40-120 degrees C, pH 2-10, and atmospheric pressure range of 1-2 atm. The intermediates and end products formed during the degradation were identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and a possible degradation pathway of RB 19 was proposed. The stability of the dye in aqueous solution was influenced by changes in pH. At pH 4, half-life was 2247.5 min at 40 degrees C and it reduced to 339.4 min when the temperature was increased to 120 degrees C. Acidic conditions were more conducive to enhance hydrolysis rate than basic ones as the decomposition was optimum at pH 4. The kinetic studies indicated that the rate of hydrolysis apparently followed first order reaction. A linear relationship was observed between hydrolysis rate of RB 19 dye and increasing temperatures and pressures. Overall, 23% dye decomposition occurred in 120 minutes at pH 4, 120 degrees C and pressure of 2 atm. Along with thermal-pressure, a combination of techniques like physico-chemical, biological, enzymatic etc. may be more suitable choice for the effective treatment of RB19 dye.

  9. DFT STUDY OF THE HYDROLYSIS OF SOME S-TRIAZINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of atrazine and related 2-chloro-s-triazines to the corresponding 2-hydroxy-s-triazines was investigated using the B3LYP hybrid density functional theory method. Gas-phase calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G* level of ...

  10. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose in zinc chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N.J.; Xu, Q.; Chen, L.F.

    1995-12-31

    The efficient conversion of cellulosic materials to ethanol has been hindered by the low yield of sugars, the high energy consumption in pretreatment processes, and the difficulty of recycling the pre-treatment agents. Zinc chloride may provide an alternative for pre-treating biomass prior to the hydrolysis of cellulose. The formation of a zinc-cellulose complex during the pretreatment of cellulose improves the yield of glucose in both the enzymatic and acid hydrolysis of cellulose. Low-temperature acid hydrolysis of cellulose in zinc chloride solution is carried out in two stages, a liquefaction stage and a saccharification stage. Because of the formation of zinc-cellulose complex in the first stage, the required amount of acid in the second stage has been decreased significantly. In 67% zinc chloride solution, a 99.5% yield of soluble sugars has been obtained at 70{degrees}C and 0.5M acid concentration. The ratio of zinc chloride to cellulose has been reduced from 4.5 to 1.5, and the yield of soluble sugars is kept above 80%. The rate of hydrolysis is affected by the ratio of zinc chloride to cellulose, acid concentration, and temperature.

  11. [A rate-limiting stage of enteropeptidase hydrolysis].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlova, A G; Likhareva, V V; Rumsh, L D

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown for the first time that deacylation is the rate-limiting stage in the enteropeptidase-catalyzed hydrolysis of highly efficient oligopeptide substrates containing four Asp residues in positions P2-P5. On the other hand, the rate-limiting stage in the hydrolysis of low-efficiency peptide substrates containing less than four Asp or Glu residues in positions P2-P5 is acylation, as has previously been suggested for all amide and peptide substrates of serine proteases on the basis of the classic studies by Bender et al. The method of introduction of an additional nucleophile or another effector that selectively affects the deacylation stage was used to determine the rate-limiting stage in the enteropeptidase hydrolysis of Nalpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-lysine thiobenzyl ester, the highly efficient amide substrate GlyAsp4-Lys beta-naphthyl amide, and the low-efficiency peptide substrate VLSAADK-GNVKAAWG (where a hyphen denotes the hydrolysis site). The English version of the paper: Russian Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry, 2008, vol. 34, no. 2; see also http://www.maik.ru.

  12. Effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particle size reduction is a crucial factor in transportation logistics as well as cellulosic conversion. The effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus x giganteus was determined. Miscanthus was ground using a hammer mill equipped with screens having 0.08, 2.0 or 6.0...

  13. Thermal hydrolysis for sewage treatment: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Barber, W P F

    2016-11-01

    A review concerning the development and applicability of sewage sludge thermal hydrolysis especially prior to anaerobic digestion is presented. Thermal hydrolysis has proven to be a successful approach to making sewage sludge more amenable to anaerobic digestion. Currently there are 75 facilities either in operation or planning, spanning several continents with the first installation in 1995. The reported benefits of thermal hydrolysis relate to: increased digestion loading rate due to altered rheological properties, improved biodegradation of (especially activated) sludge and enhanced dewaterability. In spite of its relative maturity, there has been no attempt to perform a critical review of the pertinent literature relating to the technology. Closer look at the literature reveals complications with comparing both experimental- and full-scale results due to differences in experimental set-up and capability, and also site-specific conditions at full-scale. Furthermore, it appears that understanding of thermodynamic and rheological properties of sludge is key to optimizing the process, however these parameters are largely overlooked by the literature. This paper aims to bridge these complexities in order to elucidate the benefits of thermal hydrolysis for sewage treatment, and makes recommendations for further development and research.

  14. Penicillin Hydrolysis: A Kinetic Study of a Multistep, Multiproduct Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarrick, Thomas A.; McLafferty, Fred W.

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures used, and typical results are provided for an experiment in which students carry out the necessary measurements on the acid-catalysis of penicillin in two hours. By applying kinetic theory to the data obtained, the reaction pathways for the hydrolysis of potassium benzyl penicillin are elucidated. (JN)

  15. Acid hydrolysis of sweet potato for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were conducted to establish optimal conditions for the acid hydrolysis of sweet potato for maximal ethanol yield. The starch contents of two sweet potato cultivars (Georgia Red and TG-4), based on fresh weight, were 21.1 +/- 0.6% and 27.5 +/- 1.6%, respectively. The results of acid hydrolysis experiments showed the following: (1) both hydrolysis rate and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) concentration were a function of HCL concentration, temperature, and time; (2) the reducing sugars were rapidly formed with elevated concentrations of HCl and temperature, but also destroyed quickly; and (3) HMF concentration increased significantly with the concentration of HCl, temperature, and hydrolysis time. Maximum reducing sugar value of 84.2 DE and 0.056% HMF (based on wet weight) was achieved after heating 8% SPS for 15 min in 1N HCl at 110/sup 0/C. Degraded 8% SPS (1N HCl, 97/sup 0/C for 20 min or 110/sup 0/C for 10 min) was utilized as substrate for ethanol fermentation and 3.8% ethanol (v/v) was produced from 1400 mL fermented wort. This is equal to 41.6 g ethanol (200 proof) from 400 g of fresh sweet potato tuber (Georgia Red) or an ethanol yield potential of 431 gal of 200-proof ethanol/acre (from 500 bushel tubers/acre).

  16. Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

  17. Bioabatement with xylanase supplementation to reduce enzymatic hydrolysis inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioabatement, using the fungus Coniochaeta ligniaria NRRL30616 can effectively eliminate enzyme inhibitors from pretreated biomass hydrolysis. However, our recent research suggested that bioabatement had no beneficial effect on removing xylo-oligomers which were identified as strong inhibitors to ce...

  18. Evaluation of Cation Hydrolysis Schemes with a Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clare, Brian W.

    1979-01-01

    Described is the use of two models of pocket calculators. The Hewlett-Packard HP67 and the Texas Instruments TI59, to solve problems arising in connection with ionic equilibria in solution. A three-parameter regression program is described and listed as a specific example, the hydrolysis of hexavalent uranium, is provided. (BT)

  19. Effects of hydrolysis and carbonization reactions on hydrochar production.

    PubMed

    Fakkaew, K; Koottatep, T; Polprasert, C

    2015-09-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a thermal conversion process which converts wet biomass into hydrochar. In this study, a low-energy HTC process named "Two-stage HTC" comprising of hydrolysis and carbonization stages using faecal sludge as feedstock was developed and optimized. The experimental results indicated the optimum conditions of the two-stage HTC to be; hydrolysis temperature of 170 °C, hydrolysis reaction time of 155 min, carbonization temperature of 215 °C, and carbonization reaction time of 100 min. The hydrolysis reaction time and carbonization temperature had a statistically significant effect on energy content of the produced hydrochar. Energy input of the two-stage HTC was about 25% less than conventional HTC. Energy efficiency of the two-stage HTC for treating faecal sludge was higher than that of conventional HTC and other thermal conversion processes such as pyrolysis and gasification. The two-stage HTC could be considered as a potential technology for treating FS and producing hydrochar.

  20. Concerning two-metal cooperativity in model phosphate hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Leivers, M; Breslow, R

    2001-12-01

    Three series of bimetallic ligands were tested for cooperativity in the hydrolysis of phosphate esters. It was shown that rate enhancements were in part contributed by binding to the hydrophobic linkers when the substrates were also hydrophobic, and two metal cooperativity was not found to be present. Kinetic order tests were performed and shown to be superior to previous methods for analyzing cooperativity.

  1. Solvent effects and alkali metal ion catalysis in phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Tagle, Paola; Vargas-Zúñiga, Idania; Taran, Olga; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2006-12-22

    The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) have been studied in aqueous DMSO, dioxane, and MeCN. In all solvent mixtures the reaction rate steadily decreases to half of its value in pure water in the range of 0-70 vol % of organic cosolvent and sharply increases in mixtures with lower water content. Correlations based on different scales of solvent empirical parameters failed to describe the solvent effect in this system, but it can be satisfactorily treated in terms of a simplified stepwise solvent-exchange model. Alkali metal ions catalyze the BNPP hydrolysis but do not affect the rate of hydrolysis of neutral phosphotriester p-nitrophenyl diphenyl phosphate in DMSO-rich mixtures. The catalytic activity decreases in the order Li+ > Na+ > K+ > Rb+ > Cs+. For all cations except Na+, the reaction rate is first-order in metal ion. With Na+, both first- and second-order kinetics in metal ions are observed. Binding constants of cations to the dianionic transition state of BNPP alkaline hydrolysis are of the same order of magnitude and show a similar trend as their binding constants to p-nitrophenyl phosphate dianion employed as a transition-state model. The appearance of alkali metal ion catalysis in a medium, which solvates metal ions stronger than water, is attributed to the increased affinity of cations to dianions, which undergo a strong destabilization in the presence of an aprotic dipolar cosolvent.

  2. Validation of lignocellulosic biomass carbohydrates determination via acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengfei; Runge, Troy M

    2014-11-04

    This work studied the two-step acid hydrolysis for determining carbohydrates in lignocellulosic biomass. Estimation of sugar loss based on acid hydrolyzed sugar standards or analysis of sugar derivatives was investigated. Four model substrates (starch, holocellulose, filter paper and cotton) and three levels of acid/material ratios (7.8, 10.3 and 15.4, v/w) were studied to demonstrate the range of test artifacts. The method for carbohydrates estimation based on acid hydrolyzed sugar standards having the most satisfactory carbohydrate recovery and relative standard deviation. Raw material and the acid/material ratio both had significant effect on carbohydrate hydrolysis, suggesting the acid to have impacts beyond a catalyst in the hydrolysis. Following optimal procedures, we were able to reach a carbohydrate recovery of 96% with a relative standard deviation less than 3%. The carbohydrates recovery lower than 100% was likely due to the incomplete hydrolysis of substrates, which was supported by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images.

  3. Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Keller, Fred A.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2003-12-09

    A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

  4. Designer xylanosomes: protein nanostructures for enhanced xylan hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work is the first report of the successful design, construction, and application of multi-functional, self-assembling biocatalysts for targeted xylan hydrolysis, termed xylanosomes. Using the architecture of cellulosomes found in some anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, four different xylanosomes...

  5. Results of the hydrolysis of fusinitic brown coals

    SciTech Connect

    Perednikova, Z.M.; Garstman, B.B.; Rakitina, E.V.; Rumyantseva, Z.A.

    1984-01-01

    The products of the alkaline hydrolysis of debituminized fusinitic brown coals have been separated into relatively homogeneous groups of substances with the aid of extraction, chromatography, and alkaline saponification. The group compositions of the substances isolated have been studied by IR spectroscopy.

  6. The Preparation and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Library of Esters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Elizabeth M.; Smith, Traci L.

    2008-01-01

    An investigative case study involving the preparation of a library of esters using Fischer esterification and alcoholysis of acid chlorides and their subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis by pig liver esterase and orange peel esterase is described. Students work collaboratively to prepare and characterize the library of esters and complete and evaluate…

  7. Radiolysis and Hydrolysis of TRUEX-NPH solvent.

    SciTech Connect

    Simonzadeh, N.; Crabtree, A. M.; Trevorrow, L. E.; Vandegrift, G. F.

    1992-07-01

    The TRUEX solvent extraction process separates transuranic (TRU) elements from aqueous nitrate and chloride solutions. During contact with high-level wastes, which may be highly radioactive and highly acidic, the radiolysis and hydrolysis ofTRUEX-NPH solvent can affect the process not only by destroying the extractant CMPO in the solvent, but also by generating products of CMPO destruction, some of which are powerful extractants at low acidities and can prevent the stripping of Am and Pu from solvent that is to be recycled. To provide an experimental basis from which mathematical expressions of these effects could be derived, samples of solvent were degraded by radiolysis and hydrolysis while in contact with acidic aqueous solutions. Following this treatment, the distribution of americium between degraded solvent and aqueous HNO3 was used as a measure of the extent of degradation. Mathematical expressions were derived to represent the distribution coefficient, DAm, as a function of hydrolysis time and/or radiation dose. Assumptions about the dependence of DAm on CMPO concentration were used to derive expressions for the hydrolysis rate for CMPO and also to calculate values of radiation chemical yield for CMPO radiolysis. Also experimentally investigated were changes in acidity of both the aqueous and organic phases as functions of contact time, the effects of a carbonate wash in removing acidic degradation products that function as extractants at low acidities, and changes in compositions of some of the aqueous and organic phases during contact.

  8. Atmospheric Plasma-Enhanced Soft Hydrolysis of Southern Pine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of fermentable sugars from southern pine using atmospheric plasma (AP) was studied. AP processing in the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) configuration was coupled with acid hydrolysis in an effort to determine how AP can impact a standard conversion technique. The effects of plas...

  9. Structural modifications of lignocellulosics by pretreatments to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gharpuray, M.M.; Lee, Y.F.; Fan, L.T.

    1983-01-01

    In this work an evaluation was made of a wide variety of single and multiple pretreatment methods for enhancing the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw. A multiple pretreatment consisted of a physical pretreatment followed by a chemical pretreatment. The structural features of wheat straw, including the specific surface area, crystallinity index, and lignin content, were measured to understand the mechanism of the enhancement in the hyrolysis rate upon pretreatment. It has been found that, in general, multiple pretreatments were not promising, since the hydrolysis rates rarely exceeded those achieved by single pretreatments. Ball-milling pretreatment was found to be effective in increasing the specific surface area and decreasing the crystallinity index. Treatment with ethylene glycol was highly effective in increasing the specific surface area, in addition to a high degree of delignification. Peracetic acid pretreatment was highly effective in delignifying substrate. Among multiple pretreatments, those involving peracetic acid treatment generally had lower crystallinity indices and lignin content values. The relationship between the hydrolysis rate and the set of structural features indicated that an increase in surface area and a decrease in the crystallinity and lignin content enhance the hydrolysis; the specific surface area is the most influential of the structural features, followed by the lignin content. (Refs. 23).

  10. Effect of obesity on high-density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Shirya; Genest, Jacques

    2007-12-01

    Reduced levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in non-obese and obese states are associated with increased risk for the development of coronary artery disease. Therefore, it is imperative to determine the mechanisms responsible for reduced HDL in obese states and, conversely, to examine therapies aimed at increasing HDL levels in these individuals. This paper examines the multiple causes for reduced HDL in obese states and the effect of exercise and diet--two non-pharmacologic therapies--on HDL metabolism in humans. In general, the concentration of HDL-cholesterol is adversely altered in obesity, with HDL-cholesterol levels associated with both the degree and distribution of obesity. More specifically, intra-abdominal visceral fat deposition is an important negative correlate of HDL-cholesterol. The specific subfractions of HDL that are altered in obese states include the HDL2, apolipoprotein A-I, and pre-beta1 subfractions. Decreased HDL levels in obesity have been attributed to both an enhancement in the uptake of HDL2 by adipocytes and an increase in the catabolism of apolipoprotein A-I on HDL particles. In addition, there is a decrease in the conversion of the pre-beta1 subfraction, the initial acceptor of cholesterol from peripheral cells, to pre-beta2 particles. Conversely, as a means of reversing the decrease in HDL levels in obesity, sustained weight loss is an effective method. More specifically, weight loss achieved through exercise is more effective at raising HDL levels than dieting. Exercise mediates positive effects on HDL levels at least partly through changes in enzymes of HDL metabolism. Increased lipid transfer to HDL by lipoprotein lipase and reduced HDL clearance by hepatic triglyceride lipase as a result of endurance training are two important mechanisms for increases in HDL observed from exercise.

  11. Lipoprotein(a) accelerates atherosclerosis in uremic mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Tanja X.; McCormick, Sally P.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Bro, Susanne; Nielsen, Lars B.

    2010-01-01

    Uremic patients have increased plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels and elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. Lp(a) is a subfraction of LDL, where apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] is disulfide bound to apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB). Lp(a) binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPL), and uremia increases lipoprotein-associated OxPL. Thus, Lp(a) may be particularly atherogenic in a uremic setting. We therefore investigated whether transgenic (Tg) expression of human Lp(a) increases atherosclerosis in uremic mice. Moderate uremia was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (NX) in Tg mice with expression of human apo(a) (n = 19), human apoB-100 (n = 20), or human apo(a) + human apoB [Lp(a)] (n = 15), and in wild-type (WT) controls (n = 21). The uremic mice received a high-fat diet, and aortic atherosclerosis was examined 35 weeks later. LDL-cholesterol was increased in apoB-Tg and Lp(a)-Tg mice, but it was normal in apo(a)-Tg and WT mice. Uremia did not result in increased plasma apo(a) or Lp(a). Mean atherosclerotic plaque area in the aortic root was increased 1.8-fold in apo(a)-Tg (P = 0.025) and 3.3-fold (P = 0.0001) in Lp(a)-Tg mice compared with WT mice. Plasma OxPL, as detected with the E06 antibody, was associated with both apo(a) and Lp(a). In conclusion, expression of apo(a) or Lp(a) increased uremia-induced atherosclerosis. Binding of OxPL on apo(a) and Lp(a) may contribute to the atherogenicity of Lp(a) in uremia. PMID:20584868

  12. Proprotein convertases in high-density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seungbum; Korstanje, Ron

    2013-09-18

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexins (PCSKs) are a serine endopeptidase family. PCSK members cleave amino acid residues and modulate the activity of precursor proteins. Evidence from patients and animal models carrying genetic alterations in PCSK members show that PCSK members are involved in various metabolic processes. These studies further revealed the molecular mechanism by which genetic alteration of some PCSK members impairs normal molecular and physiological functions, which in turn lead to cardiovascular disease. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is anti-atherogenic as it removes excessive amount of cholesterol from blood and peripheral tissues. Several PCSK members are involved in HDL metabolism. PCSK3, PCSK5, and PCSK6 process two triglyceride lipase family members, endothelial lipase and lipoprotein lipase, which are important for HDL remodeling. Recent studies in our lab found evidence that PCSK1 and PCSK9 are also involved in HDL metabolism. A mouse model carrying an amino acid substitution in PCSK1 showed an increase in serum apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) level. Another mouse model lacking PCSK9 showed a decrease in APOE-containing HDL. In this review, we summarize the role of the five PCSK members in lipid, glucose, and bile acid (BA) metabolism, each of which can influence HDL metabolism. We propose an integrative model in which PCSK members regulate HDL metabolism through various molecular mechanisms and metabolic processes and genetic variation in some PCSK members may affect the efficiency of reverse cholesterol transport. PCSK members are considered as attractive therapeutic targets. A greater understanding of the molecular and physiological functions of PCSK members will improve therapeutic strategies and drug efficacy for cardiovascular disease where PCSK members play critical role, with fewer adverse effects.

  13. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  14. Fatty acid alcohol ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, T; Sumiyoshi, M; Okuda, H

    1999-12-01

    The fatty acid alcohol ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) was characterized using bovine milk LPL. Synthesizing activities were determined in an aqueous medium using oleic acid or trioleylglycerol as the acyl donor and equimolar amounts of long-chain alcohols as the acyl acceptor. When oleic acid and hexadecanol emulsified with gum arabic were incubated with LPL, palmityl oleate was synthesized, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Apo-very low density lipoprotein (apoVLDL) stimulated LPL-catalyzed palmityl oleate synthesis. The apparent equilibrium ratio of fatty acid alcohol ester/oleic acid was estimated using a high concentration of LPL and a long (20 h) incubation period. The equilibrium ratio was affected by the incubation pH and the alcohol chain length. When the incubation pH was below pH 7.0 and long chain fatty acyl alcohols were used as substrates, the fatty acid alcohol ester/free fatty acid equilibrium ratio favored ester formation, with an apparent equilibrium ratio of fatty acid alcohol ester/fatty acid of about 0.9/0.1. The equilibrium ratio decreased sharply at alkaline pH (above pH 8.0). The ratio also decreased when fatty alcohols with acyl chains shorter than dodecanol were used. When a trioleoylglycerol/fatty acyl alcohol emulsion was incubated with LPL, fatty acid alcohol esters were synthesized in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Fatty acid alcohol esters were easily synthesized from trioleoylglycerol when fatty alcohols with acyl chains longer than dodecanol were used, but synthesis was decreased with fatty alcohols with acyl chain lengths shorter than decanol, and little synthesizing activity was detected with shorter-chain fatty alcohols such as butanol or ethanol.

  15. Distribution of High-Density Lipoprotein Subfractions and Hypertensive Status

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha; Xu, Rui-Xia; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Gao, Ying; Dong, Qian; Liu, Geng; Sun, Jing; Li, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The exact mechanisms of hypertension contributing to atherosclerosis have not been fully elucidated. Although multiple studies have clarified the association with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions, uncertainty remains about its relationship with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subfractions. Therefore, we aimed to comprehensively determine the relationship between distribution of HDL subfractions and hypertensive status. A total of 953 consecutive subjects without previous lipid-lowering drug treatment were enrolled and were categorized based on hypertension history (with hypertension [n = 550] or without hypertension [n = 403]). Baseline clinical and laboratory data were collected. HDL separation was performed using the Lipoprint System. Plasma large HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and large HDL percentage were dramatically lower whereas the small HDL-C and small HDL percentage were higher in patients with hypertension (all P < 0.05). The antihypertensive drug therapy was not associated with large or small HDL subfractions (on treatment vs not on treatment, P > 0.05; combination vs single drug therapy, P > 0.05). However, the blood pressure well-controlled patients have significantly lower small HDL subfraction (P < 0.05). Moreover, large HDL-C and percentage were inversely whereas small HDL percentage was positively associated with incident hypertension after adjusting potential confounders (all P < 0.05). In the multivariate model conducted in patients with and without hypertension separately, the cardio-protective value of large HDL-C was disappeared in patients with hypertension (OR 95%CI: 1.011 [0.974–1.049]). The distribution of HDL subfractions is closely associated with hypertensive status and hypertension may potentially impact the cardio-protective value of large HDL subfraction. PMID:26512616

  16. Isolation of high density lipoproteins from rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Magun, A M; Brasitus, T A; Glickman, R M

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have defined forms of high density lipoproteins (HDL) in rat mesenteric lymph, suggesting that they have a secretory origin. This study describes the isolation and characterization of intestinal intracellular HDL. Two preparations were made as follows: (a) Rat enterocytes were isolated and a Golgi organelle fraction was prepared. (b) Cell homogenates were subjected to nitrogen cavitation and a cytoplasmic fraction was prepared. Lipoproteins were isolated from both preparations by sequential ultracentrifugation. When the HDL fraction (1.07-1.21 g/ml) was subjected to isopyknic density gradient ultracentrifugation, a peak of apoproteins A-I and B (apoA-I and apoB, respectively) was found at a density of 1.11-1.14 g/ml. Electron microscopy of the fraction showed spherical particles ranging in size from 6 to 13 nm. Immunoelectrophoresis revealed a precipitin arc in the alpha region against apoA-I which extended into the pre-beta region where a precipitin arc against apoB was also seen. ApoB antisera depleted the pre-beta particles whereas the alpha migrating particles remained. Lipid analysis of the whole HDL fraction revealed phospholipid, cholesteryl ester, and triglyceride as the major lipids. [3H]leucine was then administered into the duodenum and a radiolabeled intracellular HDL fraction was isolated. The newly synthesized apoproteins of the HDL fraction, as determined by gel electrophoresis, were apoB, apoA-I, and apolipoprotein A-IV (ApoA-IV). Immunoprecipitation of the apoB particles revealed apoA-I and apoA-IV in the supernatant. These data demonstrate that there are at least two intracellular intestinal forms of HDL particles, one of which contains apoB. The other particle contains apoA-I and apoA-IV, has alpha mobility, is spherical, and resembles a particle found in the lymph. Images PMID:3965504

  17. Fundamental Reaction Mechanism for Cocaine Hydrolysis in Human Butyrylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zheng, Fang; Landry, Donald W.

    2010-01-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE)-cocaine binding and the fundamental pathway for BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of cocaine have been studied by molecular modelling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and ab initio calculations. Modelling and simulations indicate that the structures of the prereactive BChE-substrate complexes for (−)-cocaine and (+)-cocaine are all similar to that of the corresponding prereactive BChE-butyrylcholine (BCh) complex. The overall binding of BChE with (−)-cocaine and (+)-cocaine is also similar to that proposed with butyrylthiocholine and succinyldithiocholine, i.e. (−)-cocaine/(+)-cocaine first slides down the substrate-binding gorge to bind to Trp-82 and stands vertically in the gorge between Asp-70 and Trp-82 (non-prereactive complex) and then rotates to a position in the catalytic site within a favorable distance for nucleophilic attack and hydrolysis by Ser-198 (prereactive complex). In the prereactive complex, cocaine lies horizontally at the bottom of the gorge. The fundamental catalytic hydrolysis pathway, consisting of acylation and deacylation stages similar to those for ester hydrolysis by other serine hydrolases, was proposed based on the simulated prereactive complex and confirmed theoretically by ab initio reaction coordinate calculations. Both the acylation and deacylation follow a double-proton-transfer mechanism. The calculated energetic results show that within the chemical reaction process the highest energy barrier and Gibbs free energy barrier are all associated with the first step of deacylation. The calculated ratio of the rate constant (kcat) for the catalytic hydrolysis to that (k0) for the spontaneous hydrolysis is ~ 9.0 × 107. The estimated kcat/k0 value of ~ 9.0 × 107 is in excellent agreement with the experimentally-derived kcat/k0 value of ~ 7.2 × 107 for (+)-cocaine, whereas it is ~ 2000 times larger than the experimentally-derived kcat/k0 value of ~ 4.4 × 104 for (−)-cocaine. All of the results

  18. Antioxidant activities of the synthesized thiol-contained peptides derived from computer-aided pepsin hydrolysis of yam tuber storage protein, dioscorin.

    PubMed

    Han, Chuan-Hsiao; Liu, Ju-Chi; Fang, Sheng-Uei; Hou, Wen-Chi

    2013-06-01

    Our previous report showed that yam dioscorin and its peptic hydrolysates exhibit radical scavenging activities; however, the functions of these peptic hydrolases are still under investigation. In this study, the thiol-containing peptides derived from computer-aided simulation of pepsin hydrolysis of dioscorin, namely, KTCGNGME (diotide1), PPCSE (diotide2), CDDRVIRTPLT (diotide3), KTCGY (diotide4), and PPCTE (diotide5) were synthesized to compare their antioxidant activities with GSH and/or carnosine by examining hydroxyl radical scavenging activity by electron spin resonance spectrometry, anti-low-density lipoprotein peroxidation, anti-AAPH-induced hemolysis, and oxygen radical absorbance capacity activity. We found that while all the synthesized diotides showed antioxidant activity, diotide4 exhibited the highest levels. Moreover, all diotides (100 μM) showed protective effects against methylglyoxal-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell death. These results suggest that thiol-containing diotides derived from dioscorin hydrolysis exhibit antioxidant activities and reveal the benefits of yam tuber as an antioxidant-rich food.

  19. Fluoride incorporation into apatite crystals delays amelogenin hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    DenBesten, Pamela K; Zhu, Li; Li, Wu; Tanimoto, Kotaro; Liu, Haichuan; Witkowska, Halina E

    2011-12-01

    Enamel fluorosis has been related to an increase in the amount of amelogenin in fluorosed enamel compared with normal enamel in the maturation stage. In this study we tested the hypothesis that fluoride incorporated into carbonated apatite alters amelogenin hydrolysis. Recombinant human amelogenin (rh174) was allowed to bind to 0.15 mg of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CAP) or to fluoride-containing carbonated hydroxyapatite (F-CAP) synthesized to contain 100, 1,000, or 4,000 ppm F(-). After 3 h of digestion with recombinant human matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20) or kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4), bound protein was characterized by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Proteolytic fragments of amelogenin formed after 24h of digestion with MMP20 of KLK 4 were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The hydrolysis, by both MMP20 and KLK4, of amelogenin bound to F100-CAP was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner compared with the hydrolysis of amelogenin bound to CAP. After 24 h of hydrolysis, a similar number of MMP20 cleavage sites was found for amelogenin bound to CAP and amelogenin bound to F100-CAP; however, 24 fewer KLK4 cleavage sites were identified for amelogenin bound to F100-CAP than for amelogenin bound to CAP. These results suggest that the reduced hydrolysis of amelogenins in fluorosed enamel may be partially caused by the increased fluoride content in fluoride-containing apatite, contributing to the hypomineralized enamel matrix phenotype observed in fluorosed enamel.

  20. Lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of TG containing acetylenic FA.

    PubMed

    Jie, Marcel S F Lie Ken; Fua, Xun; Lau, Maureen M L; Chye, M L

    2002-10-01

    Hydrolysis of symmetrical acetylenic TG of type AAA [viz., glycerol tri-(4-decynoate), glycerol tri-(6-octadecynoate), glycerol tri-(9-octadecynoate), glycerol tri-(10-undecynoate), and glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate)] in the presence of eight microbial lipases was studied. Novozyme 435 (Candida antarctica), an efficient enzyme for esterification, showed a significant resistance in the hydrolysis of glycerol tri-(9-octadecynoate) and glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate). Hydrolysis of acetylenic TG with Lipolase 100T (Humicola lanuginosa) was rapidly accomplished. Lipase PS-D (Pseudomonas cepacia) showed a fair resistance toward the hydrolysis of glycerol tri-(6-octadecynoate) only, which reflected its ability to recognize the delta6 positional isomer of 18:1. Lipase CCL (Candida cylindracea, syn. C. rugosa) and AY-30 (C. rugosa) were able to catalyze the release of 10-undecynoic acid and 9-octadecynoic acid from the corresponding TG, but less readily the 13-docosynoic acid in the case of glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate). The two lipases CCL and AY-30 were able to distinguish the small difference in structure of fatty acyl moieties in the TG substrate. To confirm this trend, three regioisomers of mixed acetylenic TG of type ABC (containing one each of delta6, delta9, and delta13 acetylenic FA in various positions) were prepared and hydrolyzed with CCL and AY-40. The results reconfirmed the observation that AY-30 and CCL were able to distinguish the slight differences in the molecular structure (position of the acetylenic bond and chain length) of the acyl groups in the TG during the hydrolysis of such TG substrates.

  1. Accelerated hydrolysis of substituted cellulose for potential biofuel production: kinetic study and modeling.

    PubMed

    Mu, Bingnan; Xu, Helan; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-01

    In this work, kinetics of substitution accelerated cellulose hydrolysis with multiple reaction stages was investigated to lay foundation for mechanism study and molecular design of substituting compounds. High-efficiency hydrolysis of cellulose is critical for cellulose-based bioethanol production. It is known that, substitution could substantially decrease activation energy and increase reaction rate of acidic hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds in cellulose. However, reaction kinetics and mechanism of the accelerated hydrolysis were not fully revealed. In this research, it was proved that substitution therefore accelerated hydrolysis only occurred in amorphous regions of cellulose fibers, and was a process with multiple reaction stages. With molar ratio of substitution less than 1%, the overall hydrolysis rate could be increased for around 10 times. We also quantified the relationship between the hydrolysis rate of individual reaction stage and its major influences, including molar ratio of substitution, activation energy of acidic hydrolysis, pH and temperature.

  2. A kinetic study of hydrolysis of polyester elastomer in magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Watanabe, H.

    1994-01-01

    A useful method for kinetic study of the hydrolysis of polyester elastomer is established which uses the number-average molecular weight. The reasonableness of this method is confirmed and the effect of magnetic particles on hydrolysis is considered.

  3. Non-ionic surfactants do not consistently improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of pure cellulose.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Chen, Hongmei; Qi, Feng; Zhao, Xuebing; Liu, Dehua

    2015-04-01

    Non-ionic surfactants have been frequently reported to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass and pure cellulose. However, how the hydrolysis condition, substrate structure and cellulase formulation affect the beneficial action of surfactants has not been well elucidated. In this work, it was found that the enzymatic hydrolysis of pure cellulose was not consistently improved by surfactants. Contrarily, high surfactant concentration, e.g. 5 g/L, which greatly improved the hydrolysis of dilute acid pretreated substrates, actually showed notable inhibition to pure cellulose conversion in the late phase of hydrolysis. Under an optimal hydrolysis condition, the improvement by surfactant was limited, but under harsh conditions surfactant indeed could enhance cellulose conversion. It was proposed that non-ionic surfactants could interact with substrates and cellulases to impact the adsorption behaviors of cellulases. Therefore, the beneficial action of surfactants on pure cellulose hydrolysis is influenced by hydrolysis condition, cellulose structural features and cellulase formulation.

  4. Three-stage enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-exploded corn stover at high substrate concentration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoping; Yong, Qiang; Yu, Shiyuan

    2011-04-01

    The feasibility of three-stage hydrolysis of steam-exploded corn stover at high-substrate concentration was investigated. When substrate concentration was 30% and enzyme loading was 15-30 FPU/g cellulose, three-stage (9+9+12 h) hydrolysis could reach a hydrolysis yield of 59.9-81.4% in 30 h. Compared with one-stage hydrolysis for 72 h, an increase of 34-37% in hydrolysis yield could be achieved. When steam-exploded corn stover was used as the substrate for enzyme synthesis and hydrolysis was conducted at a substrate concentration of 25% with an enzyme loading of 20 FPU/g cellulose, a hydrolysis yield of 85.1% was obtained, 19% higher than that the commercial cellulase could reach under the same conditions. The removal of end products was suggested to improve the adsorption of cellulase on the substrate and enhance the productivity of enzymatic hydrolysis.

  5. Effect of Antiepileptic drugs on plasma lipoprotein (a) and other lipid levels in childhood.

    PubMed

    Aynaci, F M; Orhan, F; Orem, A; Yildirmis, S; Gedik, Y

    2001-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs may alter plasma lipid status in epileptic patients. We conducted a study to assess the effect of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproate on plasma levels of lipoprotein (a), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A, and apolipoprotein B in 22 epileptic children. The children were separated as group 1, seven children, mean age 1.6+/-0.2 years, treated with phenobarbital, 5 mg/kg/day, twice daily; group 2, seven children, mean age 9.8+/-1.2 years, treated with carbamazepine, 20 mg/kg/day, twice daily; and group 3, eight children, mean age 6.8+/-0.6 years, treated with valproate, 20 mg/kg/day, twice daily. Plasma lipoprotein (a) and other lipid levels were studied before (pretreatment) and at 3 and 6 months of treatment. Friedman two-way analysis of variance and Wilcoxon's signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis, and the results were expressed as the mean and standard error of the mean. The mean age of children in group 1 was significantly low, compared with groups 2 and, 3 (P < .001). The mean pretreatment lipid levels between the groups were not significant. The increase in lipoprotein (a) at 3 and 6 months and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at 6 months was statistically significant in group 1 (P < .025). We suggest a careful monitoring of plasma levels of lipoprotein (a) and other lipids in epileptic children treated with antiepileptic drugs.

  6. Defective lipoprotein sorting induces lolA expression through the Rcs stress response phosphorelay system.

    PubMed

    Tao, Kazuyuki; Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2012-07-01

    The Escherichia coli LolA protein is a lipoprotein-specific chaperone that carries lipoproteins from the inner to the outer membrane. A dominant negative LolA mutant, LolA(I93C/F140C), in which both (93)Ile and (140)Phe are replaced by Cys, binds tightly to the lipoprotein-dedicated ABC transporter LolCDE complex on the inner membrane and therefore inhibits the detachment of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane. We found that the expression of this mutant strongly induced lolA gene transcription. The depletion of the LolA or LolB protein also triggered lolA gene transcription, indicating that the inhibition of outer membrane lipoprotein transport triggers lolA transcription. To elucidate the mechanism, we isolated mutants that are unable to induce lolA transcription using the lacZ gene fused to the lolA promoter as a reporter and found that the Rcs phosphorelay system directly regulates lolA transcription. An outer membrane lipoprotein, RcsF, was essential for this activation, while the coactivator RcsA was dispensable. Taking the observation that an RcsF mutant localized in the inner membrane constitutively activated the Rcs phosphorelay system into consideration, the results shown here strongly suggest that correct lipoprotein sorting to the outer membrane is monitored by RcsF, which plays a key role in the Rcs stress response system.

  7. Adaptive immune response to lipoproteins of Staphylococcus aureus in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Chi Hai; Kolata, Julia; Stentzel, Sebastian; Beyer, Anica; Gesell Salazar, Manuela; Steil, Leif; Pané‐Farré, Jan; Rühmling, Vanessa; Engelmann, Susanne; Götz, Friedrich; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Hecker, Michael; Mäder, Ulrike; Schmidt, Frank; Völker, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent commensal but also a dangerous pathogen, causing many forms of infection ranging from mild to life‐threatening conditions. Among its virulence factors are lipoproteins, which are anchored in the bacterial cell membrane. Lipoproteins perform various functions in colonization, immune evasion, and immunomodulation. These proteins are potent activators of innate immune receptors termed Toll‐like receptors 2 and 6. This study addressed the specific B‐cell and T‐cell responses directed to lipoproteins in human S. aureus carriers and non‐carriers. 2D immune proteomics and ELISA approaches revealed that titers of antibodies (IgG) binding to S. aureus lipoproteins were very low. Proliferation assays and cytokine profiling data showed only subtle responses of T cells; some lipoproteins did not elicit proliferation. Hence, the robust activation of the innate immune system by S. aureus lipoproteins does not translate into a strong adaptive immune response. Reasons for this may include inaccessibility of lipoproteins for B cells as well as ineffective processing and presentation of the antigens to T cells. PMID:27324828

  8. Characterization of biophysical properties of baboon lipoproteins: modulation by dietary fat and cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Babiak, J.

    1984-04-01

    The serum lipoproteins of baboons fed diets containing differing types and amounts of fat and varying amounts of cholesterol were examined by analytic ultracentrifugation, gradient gel electrophoresis, density gradient ultracentrifugation, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis, electron microscopy, and standard protein and lipid composition assays. These studies characterized the lipoproteins of the baboon, observed how concentrations and physical-chemical properties of the lipoproteins are modulated by dietary fat and cholesterol and described the suitability of the baboon as an animal model of human lipoprotein metabolism. Results indicate that baboon high density lipoproteins (HDL), though higher in total serum concentration than human HDL, are remarkably similar to human HDL. The concentration of baboon HDL is increased by dietary saturated fat but decreased by the addition of cholesterol. While serum concentrations of low density lipoproteins (LDL) tend to be lower in baboons, the physical-chemical properties of the LDL of baboons and humans are comparable. The LDL of both species contains apolipoprotein B as their major apolipoprotein and exhibit considerable polydispersity in particle size. LDL of both species consists of seven discrete subpopulations. The analytical and statistical data presented in this dissertation indicate that the baboon is a good model for studying the role of lipoproteins in the development of atherosclerosis. 125 references, 31 figures, 28 tables.

  9. Thermal transitions in the low-density lipoprotein and lipids of the egg yolk of hens.

    PubMed

    Smith, M B; Back, J F

    1975-05-22

    1. Differential sanning calorimetry and light-scattering have been used to investigate temperature-dependent transitions in low-density lipoprotein and in lipids from hens' egg yolk. Yolks of different fatty acid composition were obtained by varying the dietary lipid and by adding methyl sterculate to the hen's diet. 2. Lipoprotein solutions in 50 percent glycerol/water gave characteristic melting curves between -25 degrees C and 50 degrees C, and on cooling showed increases in light-scattering between 10 degrees C and -20 degrees C. The temperatures at which major changes occurred depended on the proportions of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. 3. The thermal transitions in the intact lipoprotein in glycerol solution were reversible, but with marked hysteresis. Lipid extracted from the lipoprotein did not show temperature hystersis but the transition heats and melting curves similar to those of the intact lipoprotein. The results support the hypothesis of a "lipid-core" structure for low-density lipoproteins. 4. Scanning calorimetry of egg-yolk lecithins indicated a strong dependence of transition temperature on water content in the rane 3 percent-20 percent water. A rise in the mid-temperature of the liquid-crystalline to gel transition as the water content is lowered on freezing may be the primary event in the irreversible gelation of egg yolk and aggregation of lipoprotein.

  10. The effects of glibenclamide and insulin on plasma high density lipoprotein in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Tamai, T; Nakai, T; Yamada, S; Kobayashi, T; Hayashi, T; Kutsumi, Y; Oida, K; Takeda, R

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of various types of treatment such as glibenclamide and insulin on plasma lipids and lipoprotein concentration in diabetics. Treatment of diabetes mellitus was reevaluated from the standpoint of high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Twenty-one diabetic patients (6 men and 15 women) who have been admitted in the hospital and kept on Japanese standard diet for diabetes mellitus, have been studied. Changes of plasma lipoprotein in diabetic patients were followed up before and after treatment with glibenclamide or insulin. Very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) were decreased and HDL was increased with insulin treatment. However, glibenclamide induced a significant decrease in HDL- cholesterol (Ch). Relationship between triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins and HDL metabolism was studied. A significant negative correlation was found between pretreatment VLDL-TG and changes of VLDL-TG with insulin treatment, indicating an accelerated catabolism of VLDL-TG with possible increase of triglyceride lipases. There was a significant negative correlation between VLDL-TG and HDL-Ch before insulin treatment, but not after treatment. There was no negative correlation between changes of VLDL-TG and changes of HDL-Ch with insulin therapy. These results indicate that an increment of HDL with insulin treatment can not be explained solely by increased HDL formation from TG-rich lipoprotein and that insulin might increase synthesis and secretion of HDL in liver and/or intestine.

  11. High density lipoprotein level is negatively associated with the increase of oxidized low density lipoprotein lipids after a fatty meal.

    PubMed

    Tiainen, Sanna; Ahotupa, Markku; Ylinen, Petteri; Vasankari, Tommi

    2014-12-01

    Recent reports show that a fatty meal can substantially increase the concentration of oxidized lipids in low density lipoprotein (LDL). Knowing the LDL-specific antioxidant effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL), we aimed to investigate whether HDL can modify the postprandial oxidative stress after a fatty meal. Subjects of the study (n = 71) consumed a test meal (a standard hamburger meal) rich in lipid peroxides, and blood samples were taken before, 120, 240, and 360 min after the meal. The study subjects were divided into four subgroups according to the pre-meal HDL cholesterol value (HDL subgroup 1, 0.66-0.91; subgroup 2, 0.93-1.13; subgroup 3, 1.16-1.35; subgroup 4, 1.40-2.65 mmol/L). The test meal induced a marked postprandial increase in the concentration of oxidized LDL lipids in all four subgroups. The pre-meal HDL level was associated with the extent of the postprandial rise in oxidized LDL lipids. From baseline to 6 h after the meal, the concentration of ox-LDL increased by 48, 31, 24, and 16% in the HDL subgroup 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, and the increase was higher in subgroup 1 compared to subgroup 3 (p = 0.028) and subgroup 4 (p = 0.0081), respectively. The pre-meal HDL correlated with both the amount and the rate of increase of oxidized LDL lipids. Results of the present study show that HDL is associated with the postprandial appearance of lipid peroxides in LDL. It is therefore likely that the sequestration and transport of atherogenic lipid peroxides is another significant mechanism contributing to cardioprotection by HDL.

  12. Lipoprotein(a)-hyperlipoproteinemia as cause of chronic spinal cord ischemia resulting in progressive myelopathy - successful treatment with lipoprotein apheresis.

    PubMed

    Heigl, Franz; Hettich, Reinhard; Mauch, Erich; Klingel, Reinhard; Fassbender, Cordula

    2017-03-01

    High concentrations of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) represent an important independent and causal risk factor associated with adverse outcome in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Effective Lp(a) lowering drug treatment is not available. Lipoprotein apheresis (LA) has been proven to prevent cardiovascular events in patients with Lp(a)-hyperlipoproteinemia (Lp(a)-HLP) and progressive CVD. Here we present the course of a male patient with established peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) at the early age of 41 and coronary artery disease (CAD), who during follow-up developed over 2 years a progressive syndrome of cerebellar and spinal cord deficits against the background of multifactorial cardiovascular risk including positive family history of CVD. Spastic tetraplegia and dependency on wheel chair and nursing care represented the nadir of neurological deficits. All conventional risk factors including LDL-cholesterol had already been treated and after exclusion of other causes, genetically determined Lp(a)-HLP was considered as the major underlying etiologic factor of ischemic vascular disease in this patient including spinal cord ischemia with vascular myelopathy. Treatment with an intensive regimen of chronic LA over 4.5 years now was successful to stabilize PAOD and CAD and led to very impressive neurologic and overall physical rehabilitation and improvement of quality of life.Measurement of Lp(a) concentration must be recommended to assess individual cardiovascular risk. Extracorporeal clearance of Lp(a) by LA should be considered as treatment option for select patients with progressive Lp(a)-associated ischemic syndromes.

  13. Measurement of cholesterol and other lipoprotein constituents in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Warnick, G R

    2000-04-01

    Measurements of lipids and lipoproteins in the clinical laboratory have become increasingly important because of their predictive association with cardiovascular diseases, especially coronary artery disease. The US National Institutes of Health-sponsored National Cholesterol Education Program and counterparts in other countries have developed national consensus guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease which provide risk cut-points and define use of the lipid/lipoprotein analytes in case finding and therapy. Total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are measured as positive risk factors and high density lipoprotein cholesterol as an inverse risk factor for coronary artery disease. A National Cholesterol Education Program-sponsored expert laboratory panel has developed guidelines for measurements with requisite analytical performance targets for total error and corresponding precision and bias. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have established reference methods for total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and for triglycerides, with a method for low density lipoprotein cholesterol in development. Standardization programs for research laboratories and a Cholesterol Reference Method Laboratory Network for diagnostic manufacturers and clinical laboratories provide reliable access and documentation of traceability to accepted reference methods. Methods for the lipid/lipoprotein analytes have improved dramatically in recent years and, coupled with improved chemistry analyzer systems and more attention to standardization by manufacturers, offer considerable improvement in analytical performance. Fully automated homogeneous assays for high density lipoprotein cholesterol and newer similar assays for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol have potential for better precision as well as more convenient and cost-effective measurements. Attention to pre-analytical sources of variation is also important in making

  14. Cellular uptake of lipoproteins and persistent organic compounds-An update and new data

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelmborg, Philip Sebastian; Andreassen, Thomas Kjaergaard; Bonefeld-Jorgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2008-10-15

    There are a number of interactions related to the transport of lipophilic xenobiotic compounds in the blood stream of mammals. This paper will focus on the interactions between lipoproteins and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and how these particles are taken up by cells. A number of POPs including the pesticide p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and especially its metabolite p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE), interacts with nuclear hormone receptors causing these to malfunction, which in turn results in a range of deleterious health effects in humans. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of lipoprotein receptors in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells in conjunction with uptake of DDT-lipoprotein complexes from supplemented media in vitro. Uptake of DDT by MEF cells was investigated using MEF1 cells carrying the receptors low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) present and MEF4 cells with no LRP and LDLR expression. Cells were incubated together with the complex of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and [{sup 14}C]DDT. The receptor function was further evaluated by adding the 40 kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) which blocks receptor activity. The results showed that [{sup 14}C]DDT uptake was decreasing when the LDL concentration was increasing. There was no strong evidence for a receptor-mediated uptake of the [{sup 14}C]DDT-lipoprotein complex. To conclude, DDT travels in the blood stream and can cross cell membranes while being transported as a DDT-lipoprotein complex. The lipoproteins do not need receptors to cross cell membranes since passive diffusion constitutes a major passageway.

  15. Lipoprotein composition and oxidative modification during therapy with gemfibrozil and lovastatin in patients with combined hyperlipidaemia

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, M; Zambón, D; Hernández, Y; Adzet, T; Merlos, M; Ros, E; Laguna, J C

    1998-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the resistance to oxidation of human lipoproteins after hypolipidaemic therapy. Methods VLDL and LDL samples were obtained from patients with Familial Combined Hyperlipidaemia included in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study, with 8 weeks of active treatment (gemfibrozil, 600 mg twice daily, or lovastatin, 40 mg daily) and a 4-week wash-out period. Oxidation related analytes after Cu-induced oxidation of VLDL and LDL have been investigated. Further, in order to relate possible changes in oxidative behaviour to lipoprotein composition, the proportion of the lipid species transported by lipoproteins (triglycerides, phospholipids, and cholesteryl esters), the molar composition of fatty acids for each lipoprotein lipid, and the content of antioxidant vitamins in plasma (vitamin C) and lipoproteins (vitamin E) have been studied. Results Both drugs reduced the plasma concentration of apo-B lipoproteins (−23% gemfibrozil, −26% lovastatin), but whereas lovastatin affected mainly LDL-cholesterol (−30%), gemfibrozil reduced triglycerides (−49%) and VLDL-cholesterol (−48%). Lovastatin treatment had no effect on the lipid and protein composition, the fatty acid profile, or the vitamin E content of either VLDL or LDL; likewise, lipoprotein oxidation markers (Cu-induced conjugated dienes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation, and lysine residues) were similar before and after lovastatin treatment. Gemfibrozil therapy also had no effect on lipoprotein oxidation; nevertheless, it consistently: a) decreased the proportion of LDL-triglycerides (−32%), and b) increased the proportion (molar%) of 18:3 n-6 in VLDL triglycerides (+140%), phospholipids (+363%) and cholesteryl esters (+53%). Conclusions Based on these results, lovastatin and gemfibrozil do not adversely affect lipoprotein oxidation in patients with mixed dyslipidaemia. In the case of gemfibrozil, this occurs in spite of an increased proportion of some polyunsaturated fatty

  16. Identification of Lipoprotein MslA as a Neoteric Virulence Factor of Mycoplasma gallisepticum▿

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanek, S. M.; Frasca, S.; Schumacher, V. L.; Liao, X.; Padula, M.; Djordjevic, S. P.; Geary, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Many lipoproteins are expressed on the surfaces of mycoplasmas, and some have been implicated as playing roles in pathogenesis. Family 2 lipoproteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae have a conserved “mycoplasma lipoprotein X” central domain and a “mycoplasma lipoprotein 10” C-terminal domain and are differentially expressed in response to environmental conditions. Homologues of family 2 lipoproteins are Mycoplasma specific and include the lipoprotein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum, encoded by the MGA0674 gene. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of the M. gallisepticum live attenuated vaccine strain F and the virulent strain Rlow, reported in this study, indicated that MGA0674 is one of several differentially expressed genes. The MGA0674-encoded lipoprotein is a proteolytically processed, immunogenic, TX-114 detergent-phase protein which appears to have antigenic divergence between field strains Rlow and S6. We examined the virulence of an Rlow ΔMGA0674 mutant (P1H9) in vivo and observed reduced recovery and attenuated virulence in the tracheas of experimentally infected chickens. The virulence of two additional Rlow ΔMGA0674 mutants, 2162 and 2204, was assessed in a second in vivo virulence experiment. These mutants exhibited partial to complete attenuation in vivo, but recovery was observed more frequently. Since only Mycoplasma species harbor homologues of MGA0674, the gene product has been renamed “Mycoplasma-specific lipoprotein A” (MslA). Collectively, these data indicate that MslA is an immunogenic lipoprotein exhibiting reduced expression in an attenuated strain and plays a role in M. gallisepticum virulence. PMID:20515935

  17. Comparison of Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Acid Hydrolysis of Sterol Glycosides from Foods Rich in Δ(7)-Sterols.

    PubMed

    Münger, Linda H; Jutzi, Sabrina; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Nyström, Laura

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present the difference in sterol composition of extracted steryl glycosides (SG) hydrolyzed by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis. SG were analyzed from foods belonging to the plant families Cucurbitaceae (melon and pumpkin seeds) and Amaranthaceae (amaranth and beetroot), both of which are dominated by Δ(7)-sterols. Released sterols were quantified by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All Δ(7)-sterols identified (Δ(7)-stigmastenyl, spinasteryl, Δ(7)-campesteryl, Δ(7)-avenasteryl, poriferasta-7,25-dienyl and poriferasta-7,22,25-trienyl glucoside) underwent isomerization under acidic conditions and high temperature. Sterols with an ethylidene or methylidene side chain were found to form multiple artifacts. The artifact sterols coeluted with residues of incompletely isomerized Δ(7)-sterols, or Δ(5)-sterols if present, and could be identified as Δ(8(14))-sterols on the basis of relative retention time, and their MS spectra as trimethylsilyl (TMS) and acetate derivatives. For instance, SG from melon were composed of 66% Δ(7)-stigmastenol when enzymatic hydrolysis was performed, whereas with acid hydrolysis only 8% of Δ(7)-stigmastenol was determined. The artifact of Δ(7)-stigmastenol coeluted with residual non-isomerized spinasterol, demonstrating the high risk of misinterpretation of compositional data obtained after acid hydrolysis. Therefore, the accurate composition of SG from foods containing sterols with a double bond at C-7 can only be obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis or by direct analysis of the intact SG.

  18. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol on a roller coaster: where will the ride end?

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Bowe et al. report an association between low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and various incident chronic kidney disease end points in a cohort of almost 2 million US veterans followed for 9 years. These impressive data should be a starting point for further investigations including genetic epidemiologic investigations as well as post hoc analyses of interventional trials that target high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and, finally, studies that focus on the functionality of high-density lipoprotein particles.

  19. [Lipoproteins as serum inhibitors in rubella hemagglutination inhibition test and their elimination (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Steinmann, J

    1977-09-01

    Lipoproteins of 20 human sera were isolated by flotation centrifugation and tested for inhibitory activity in rubella HI-test. Low density lipoproteins (LDL) showed the highest titers with an average of 1:238,0, whereas the others (VLDL, HDL) had lower titers (see tab. 2). The greatest reduction of all classes of lipoproteins was achieved with kaolin treatment. Heparin-manganous chloride and dextran sulfate-calcium chloride method mainly reduced the LDL (84.4 resp. 78.7%). In a comparative test sera treated with the heparin procedure showed higher antibody titers than those treated with dextran sulfate.

  20. Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Scharnagl, Hubert; Kist, Manfred; Grawitz, Andrea Busse; Koenig, Wolfgang; Wieland, Heinrich; März, Winfried

    2004-01-15

    We examined the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication on lipids and apolipoproteins in 87 patients with duodenal ulcers. A significant increase was observed in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (+24.7%, p <0.001), apolipoprotein AI (+9.0%, p <0.001), and apolipoprotein AII (+11.7%, p <0.001) after eradication. Minor increases occurred in total cholesterol, triglycerides, and apolipoprotein B, whereas low-density lipoprotein cholesterol remained unchanged. Our results suggest that chronic H. pylori infection reduces plasma levels of HDL cholesterol and that eradication improves the lipoprotein pattern.

  1. Serum beta-lipoprotein and other specific protein concentrations in patients with immunocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, G; Lynch, S R; Bezwoda, W R; Gilich, G C

    1976-01-01

    Serum beta-lipoprotein and other specific protein concentrations were measured in 56 patients suffering from multiple myelomatosis, "benign" paraproteinaemia or Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia and in 56 control subjects. The mean level of B-lipoprotein in untreated patients with multiple myelomatosis and macroglobulinaemia was significantly lower than that of the controls. Patients who responded to chemotherapy showed a rapid return to normal of the beta-lipoprotein concentration, while the level remained unchanged in most of those who did not. PMID:180062

  2. [Lipoproteins HDL and coronary artery disease: a molecular mechanism of fibrate].

    PubMed

    Kaletha, Krystian; Chodorowski, Zygmunt; Anand, Izabela Sein; Rybakowska, Iwona; Nagel-Starczynowska, Gabriela

    2003-01-01

    The importance of dyslipidemia in the development of cardiovascular disease is now recognized as a central factor of equal, if not greater significance than any other risk factor. Although correction of high level of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been regarded now as the main goal of therapy, it has now been reaffirmed that the contribution of low level of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to the risk of ischaemic heart disease should also be considered. In the therapy of dislipidemias with hipertriglyceridemia and decreased level of HDL lipoprotein fibrates play an especially important role. In the article the molecular mechanism of fibrates action is presented.

  3. Obstructive jaundice leads to accumulation of oxidized low density lipoprotein in human liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Comert, Mustafa; Ustundag, Yucel; Tekin, Ishak Ozel; Gun, Banu Dogan; Barut, Figen

    2006-08-21

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) molecule is one of the most important modified lipoproteins produced during the oxidative stress. Modified lipoproteins have been defined as being part of the immune inflammatory mechanisms in association with oxidant stress. We have reported the accumulation of ox-LDL in Balb/c mice liver after bile duct ligation previously. Here, we investigated this finding in human beings with obstructive jaundice. Our study demonstrates that obstructive jaundice results in tremendous accumulation of ox-LDL in the liver tissue of patients.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10498 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10498 Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products... chemical substances identified generically as substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10498 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10498 Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products... chemical substances identified generically as substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10499 - Substituted silane, hydrolysis products with silica (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted silane, hydrolysis... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10499 Substituted silane, hydrolysis products with... substances identified generically as substituted silane, hydrolysis products with silica (PMNs P-06-278 and...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10497 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis... ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (PMNs P-06-276 and P-06-279)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10497 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis... ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (PMNs P-06-276 and P-06-279)...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10499 - Substituted silane, hydrolysis products with silica (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted silane, hydrolysis... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10499 Substituted silane, hydrolysis products with... substances identified generically as substituted silane, hydrolysis products with silica (PMNs P-06-278 and...

  10. Influence of temperature on nonenzymatic hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.L.; Linkins, A.E.; Wallace, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    Nonenzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate, p-nitrophenylphosphate used for detection of phosphomonesterase activity in soil, was found to occur. The nonenzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate was temperature dependent; the higher the assay temperature, the greater the amount of hydrolysis. Modifications of the method for determining soil phosphomonesterase are suggested in order to alleviate potential overestimation of phosphomonesterase activity in soil.

  11. Chitosan oligosaccharide decreases very-low-density lipoprotein triglyceride and increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in high-fat-diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daxin; Han, Jiju; Yu, Yang; Li, Xueping; Wang, Yun; Tian, Hua; Guo, Shoudong; Jin, Shiguang; Luo, Tian; Qin, Shucun

    2011-09-01

    It is well known that chitosan has beneficial lipid-regulating effects, but it remains unknown whether chitosan oligosaccharide (COS), the chitosan degradation product, has the same lipid benefits. High-fat-diet-fed Wistar rats were administrated with COS by gastric gavage for three weeks. The effects of COS on lipids, lipoprotein components and lipid metabolism related protein activities were investigated. Plasma lipids level assays by an enzyme method showed that COS decreased triglyceride (TG) by 29-31%, and increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol by 8-11%, but did not affect low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Lipid distribution analysis through fast protein liquid chromatography indicated that COS significantly decreased TG content distributed in very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)/LDL fractions but increased cholesterol content in HDL fractions. Apolipoprotein analysis through plasma ultracentrifugation and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis displayed that COS decreased apolipoprotein B-100 of LDL and increased apolipoprotein E of LDL and apolipoprotein B-100 of VLDL, but did not change apoA-I content of HDL particles. Lipoprotein formation associated protein determination showed that COS also increased plasma activity of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase but not phospholipid transfer protein. The present study suggests that COS may play a beneficial role in plasma lipid regulation of rats with dyslipidemia induced by high-fat diet. The COS-decreased VLDL/LDL TG and -enhanced HDL cholesterol may be related to the upregulated activity of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase.

  12. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  13. Switching Catalysis from Hydrolysis to Perhydrolysis in Pseudomonas fluorescens Esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, D.; Bernhardt, P; Morley, K; Jiang, Y; Cheeseman, J; Purpero, V; Schrag, J; Kazlauskas, R

    2010-01-01

    Many serine hydrolases catalyze perhydrolysis, the reversible formation of peracids from carboxylic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we showed that a single amino acid substitution in the alcohol binding pocket, L29P, in Pseudomonas fluorescens (SIK WI) aryl esterase (PFE) increased the specificity constant of PFE for peracetic acid formation >100-fold [Bernhardt et al. (2005) Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 44, 2742]. In this paper, we extend this work to address the three following questions. First, what is the molecular basis of the increase in perhydrolysis activity? We previously proposed that the L29P substitution creates a hydrogen bond between the enzyme and hydrogen peroxide in the transition state. Here we report two X-ray structures of L29P PFE that support this proposal. Both structures show a main chain carbonyl oxygen closer to the active site serine as expected. One structure further shows acetate in the active site in an orientation consistent with reaction by an acyl-enzyme mechanism. We also detected an acyl-enzyme intermediate in the hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone by mass spectrometry. Second, can we further increase perhydrolysis activity? We discovered that the reverse reaction, hydrolysis of peracetic acid to acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, occurs at nearly the diffusion limited rate. Since the reverse reaction cannot increase further, neither can the forward reaction. Consistent with this prediction, two variants with additional amino acid substitutions showed 2-fold higher k{sub cat}, but K{sub m} also increased so the specificity constant, k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, remained similar. Third, how does the L29P substitution change the esterase activity? Ester hydrolysis decreased for most esters (75-fold for ethyl acetate) but not for methyl esters. In contrast, L29P PFE catalyzed hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone five times more efficiently than wild-type PFE. Molecular modeling suggests that moving the carbonyl group closer to the

  14. [Lipoprotein (a)--a mysterious factor in atherogenesis].

    PubMed

    Jelaković, Bojan; Laganović, Mario; Kuzmanić, Dusko

    2002-01-01

    Etiopathogenesis of arterial hypertension and coronary disease involves interaction of numerous exogenous factors which determine the clinical course and therapeutic response in genetically predisposed individuals. The role of numerous cardiovascular risk factors has been reevaluated during the past few years, yet some unresolved issues and gaps still remain. One of the still insufficiently studied factors is lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)] which belongs to a subclass of LDL lipoproteins. Its important component is apolipoprotein (a) which is structurally similar to plasminogen. This characteristic can be followed through evolution and is probably crucial for its physiologic but also pathophysiologic role. Actually, through its competition with plasminogen, Lp (a) interferes with the process of fibrinolysis and may contribute to tissue healing and restoration but also support and accelerate atherothrombotic process. Lp (a) concentration is stable and genetically determined in an individual and the indication that persons with elevated levels are permanently exposed to increased risk is supported by the data on twofold incidence of myocardial infarction in mothers of children with highest Lp (a) concentrations. Apart from competing with plasminogen via apolipoprotein (a), Lp (a) increases the activity of inhibitors of plasminogen-I activator and reduces the activity of transforming growth factor-beta. This results both in the absence of fibrinolysis and promotion of migration and proliferation of media smooth muscle cells, which are important in the onset of atherosclerotic process. Lp (a) binds to elastin via apolipoprotein B, resulting in oxidation and facilitated entry into macrophages and their transition into the so-called foam cells, also an important sign of early atherosclerosis. Although many pathophysiologic processes by which Lp (a) contributes to atherosclerosis have also been confirmed by animal experiments as well as by the presence of histologic evidence

  15. Effect of drugs on high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    McKenney, James M

    2007-03-01

    The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III found evidence for raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) to reduce coronary artery disease (CAD) events supports use of HDL-C to help modify low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering goals, but not to establish new HDL-C-focused treatment recommendations. However, the HDL-C-raising clinical trials provide important lessons to help guide clinical management of dyslipidemic patients. The fibrate outcome trials demonstrate that these drugs reduce CAD events, but not death. Their greatest benefit is in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia characterized by high triglycerides, small LDL particles, and low HDL-C. Unfortunately, there is no information on whether these drugs extend risk reduction when added to a statin. The niacin outcome trials also demonstrate a reduction in CAD events, both with niacin monotherapy and in combination with a statin. Unfortunately, most of the trials are too small to address the impact of niacin on mortality. In the clinic, statins are most useful for their LDL-C-lowering efficacy, although their modest HDL-C-raising effects can be important in CAD risk reduction. In most cases, other therapies will need to be added to a statin to augment HDL-C-raising, and the most effective drug for achieving this is niacin. The greatest challenge with the use of niacin is managing the vasodilatory side effects, but this can be effectively done in the majority of patients. Fibrates can also be added to a statin for management of atherogenic dyslipidemia. These drugs are among the most effective triglyceride-lowering drugs, and they also increase HDL-C levels, but not as much as niacin. The biggest concern with combining a fibrate with a statin is the enhanced risk of severe muscle toxicity, but this appears to be a problem unique to gemfibrozil, and not fenofibrate. In the research center, new approaches are under development for enhancing the availability of

  16. Effects of exercise accumulation on plasma lipids and lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Wagganer, Jason D; Robison, Charles E; Ackerman, Terry A; Davis, Paul G

    2015-05-01

    Debate exists as to whether improvements in some cardiometabolic risk factors following exercise training result more from the last session of, or from an accumulation of, exercise sessions. This study was designed to compare the effect of a single exercise session with 3 consecutive days of exercise on triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). Twelve young adult (aged 22.5±2.5 years), overweight (body mass index=29.7±4 kg·m(-2)), sedentary, black (n=5) and white (n=7) men (n=6) and women (n=6) completed, in random order, a single treadmill exercise session at 60% maximal oxygen uptake for 90 min (1EX), accumulated exercise sessions (same as for 1EX) for 3 consecutive days (3EX), and a control protocol (no exercise for 6 days). Plasma samples were collected from baseline through 24, 48, and 72 h postexercise. Significant treatment-by-time interactions (p<0.05) existed in HDL-C and LDL-C. Postexercise responses of HDL-C differed at 48 h (1EX: -3.6, 3EX: +3.7 mg·dL(-1)) and 72 h (1EX: -1.7, 3EX: +3.2 mg·dL(-1)). LDL-C responses differed at 48 h (1EX: -16, 3EX: +6 mg·dL(-1)). Although not statistically significant, TG concentrations decreased by 29% at 24 h after 3EX, compared with -7% after 1EX. An inverse relationship between baseline and postexercise reduction in TG was present with 3EX (r=-0.655; p<0.05). In conclusion, 3EX increased HDL-C and decreased TG more than 1EX, while the decrease in LDL-C after 1EX was suppressed. Blood lipid panel changes may be due to more accumulated effects over time rather than just a result of the most recent exercise session.

  17. Effect of platelet activating factor-acetylhydrolase on the formation and action of minimally oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A D; Navab, M; Hama, S Y; Sevanian, A; Prescott, S M; Stafforini, D M; McIntyre, T M; Du, B N; Fogelman, A M; Berliner, J A

    1995-01-01

    Mildly oxidized low density lipoprotein (MM-LDL) produced by oxidative enzymes or cocultures of human artery wall cells induces endothelial cells to produce monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and to bind monocytes. HDL prevents the formation of MM-LDL by cocultures of artery wall cells. Using albumin treatment and HPLC we have isolated and partially characterized bioactive oxidized phospholipids in MM-LDL. Platelet activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), a serine esterase, hydrolyzes short chain acyl groups esterified to the sn-2 position of phospholipids such as PAF and particular oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. Treatment of MM-LDL with PAF-AH (2-4 x 10(-2) U/ml) eliminated the ability of MM-LDL to induce endothelial cells to bind monocytes. When HDL protected against the formation of MM-LDL by cocultures, lysophosphatidylcholine was detected in HDL; whereas when HDL was pretreated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate, HDL was no longer protective and lysophosphatidylcholine was undetectable. HPLC analysis also revealed that the active oxidized phospholipid species in MM-LDL had been destroyed after PAF-AH treatment. In addition, treatment of MM-LDL with albumin removed polar phospholipids that, when reisolated, induced monocyte binding to endothelial cells. These polar phospholipids, when treated with PAF-AH, lost biological activity and were no longer detected by HPLC. These results suggest that PAF-AH in HDL protects against the production and activity of MM-LDL by facilitating hydrolysis of active oxidized phospholipids to lysolipids, thereby destroying the biologically active lipids in MM-LDL. PMID:7860760

  18. Simultaneous pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of forage biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Henk, L.; Linden, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Sweet sorghum is an attractive fermentation feedstock because as much as 40% of the dry weight consists of readily femented sugars such as sucrose, glucose and frutose. Cellulose and hemicellulose comprise another 50%. However, if this material is to be used a year-round feedstock for ethanol production, a stable method of storage must be developed to maintain the sugar content. A modified version of the traditional ensiling process is made effective by the addition of cellulolytic/hemicellulolytic enzymes and lactic acid bacteria to freshly chopped sweet sorghum prior to the production of silage. In situ hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose occurs concurrently with the acidic ensiling fementation. By hydolyzing the acetyl groups using acetyl xylan esterase and 3-0-methyl glucuronyl side chains using pectinase from hemicellulose, cellulose becomes accessible to hydrolysis by cellulase, both during in situ ensiling with enzymes and in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol.

  19. Accelerated Hydrolysis of Aspirin Using Alternating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinscheid, Uwe M.

    2009-08-01

    The major problem of current drug-based therapy is selectivity. As in other areas of science, a combined approach might improve the situation decisively. The idea is to use the pro-drug principle together with an alternating magnetic field as physical stimulus, which can be applied in a spatially and temporarily controlled manner. As a proof of principle, the neutral hydrolysis of aspirin in physiological phosphate buffer of pH 7.5 at 40 °C was chosen. The sensor and actuator system is a commercially available gold nanoparticle (NP) suspension which is approved for animal usage, stable in high concentrations and reproducibly available. Applying the alternating magnetic field of a conventional NMR magnet system accelerated the hydrolysis of aspirin in solution.

  20. Reconsidering the energetics of ribonuclease catalysed RNA hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Loverix, S; Laus, G; Martins, J C; Wyns, L; Steyaert, J

    1998-10-01

    In principle, all biochemical reactions are reversible, though some are more reversible than others. The classical ribonuclease mechanism involves a reversible transphosphorylation step, followed by quasi irreversible hydrolysis of the cyclic intermediate. We performed isotope-exchange and intermediate-trapping experiments showing that the second hydrolysis step is readily reversible in the presence of RNase A or RNase T1. As a consequence, the equilibrium between a phosphodiester and a 2',3'-cyclophosphate accounts for all catalysed reactions, even if the leaving/attacking group is a water molecule. Therefore, ribonucleases are transferases rather than hydrolases. The equilibrium constant for the catalysed interconversion is close to 1 M. From this result, we estimate the effective concentration of the 2'-hydroxyl nucleophile in the cyclization step to be 10(7) M. The high effective concentration of the vicinal hydroxyl group balances the strain-associated and solvation-associated instability of the pentacyclic phosphodiester.

  1. Role of bifidobacteria in the hydrolysis of chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Stefano; Anighoro, Andrew; Quartieri, Andrea; Amaretti, Alberto; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Rastelli, Giulio; Rossi, Maddalena

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to explore the capability of potentially probiotic bifidobacteria to hydrolyze chlorogenic acid into caffeic acid (CA), and to recognize the enzymes involved in this reaction. Bifidobacterium strains belonging to eight species occurring in the human gut were screened. The hydrolysis seemed peculiar of Bifidobacterium animalis, whereas the other species failed to release CA. Intracellular feruloyl esterase activity capable of hydrolyzing chlorogenic acid was detected only in B. animalis. In silico research among bifidobacteria esterases identified Balat_0669 as the cytosolic enzyme likely responsible of CA release in B. animalis. Comparative modeling of Balat_0669 and molecular docking studies support its role in chlorogenic acid hydrolysis. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of Balat_0669 in Escherichia coli were obtained as further validation. A possible role of B. animalis in the activation of hydroxycinnamic acids was demonstrated and new perspectives were opened in the development of new probiotics, specifically selected for the enhanced bioconversion of phytochemicals into bioactive compounds.

  2. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of agricultural residues to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Mes-Hartree, M.; Hogan, C.M.; Saddler, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    A combined enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation process was used to convert steam-treated wheat and barley straw to ethanol. Maximum conversion efficiencies were obtained when the substrates were steamed for 90 s. These substrates could yield over 0.4 g ethanol/g cellulose following a combined enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation process procedure using culture filtrates derived from Trichoderma harzianum E58. When culture filtrates from Trichoderma reesei C30 and T. reesei QM9414 were used, the ethanol yields obtained were 0.32 and 0.12 g ethanol/g cellulose utilized, respectively. The lower ethanol yields obtained with these strains were attributed to the lower amounts of ..beta..-glucosidase detected in the T. reesei culture filtrates.

  3. Hydrolysis kinetics of tulip tree xylan in hot compressed water.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junho; Lee, Hun Wook; Sim, Seungjae; Myint, Aye Aye; Park, Hee Jeong; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, a promising renewable resource, can be converted into numerous valuable chemicals post enzymatic saccharification. However, the efficacy of enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass is low; therefore, pretreatment is necessary to improve the efficiency. Here, a kinetic analysis was carried out on xylan hydrolysis, after hot compressed water pretreatment of the lignocellulosic biomass conducted at 180-220°C for 5-30min, and on subsequent xylooligosaccharide hydrolysis. The weight ratio of fast-reacting xylan to slow-reacting xylan was 5.25 in tulip tree. Our kinetic results were applied to three different reaction systems to improve the pretreatment efficiency. We found that semi-continuous reactor is promising. Lower reaction temperatures and shorter space times in semi-continuous reactor are recommended for improving xylan conversion and xylooligosaccharide yield. In the theoretical calculation, 95% of xylooligosaccharide yield and xylan conversion were achieved simultaneously with high selectivity (desired product/undesired product) of 100 or more.

  4. Thermal hydrolysis of secondary scum for control of biological foam.

    PubMed

    Jolis, Domènec; Marneri, Matina

    2006-08-01

    Thermal hydrolysis of secondary scum at 9 bars and 170 degrees C was shown to completely destroy Gordonia sp. cells and reduce its foaming potential, so that it can be recycled to headworks or sent to the solids-handling side of the plant without the risk of causing foaming problems in the activated sludge system and anaerobic digesters. This process shows promise for biological foam control in wastewater treatment plants where solids retention time control and selective wasting cannot be applied and/or selector installation is not possible. An initial cost comparison of thermal hydrolysis and several widely accepted foam-management strategies shows it to be competitive; however, optimization of operating pressure and temperature is necessary.

  5. Simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification of wet microalgal lipid using acid.

    PubMed

    Takisawa, Kenji; Kanemoto, Kazuyo; Kartikawati, Muliasari; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2013-12-01

    This research demonstrated hydrolysis of wet microalgal lipid and esterification of free fatty acid (FFA) using acid in one-step process. The investigation of simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification (SHE) of wet microalgal lipid was conducted by using L27 orthogonal design and the effects of water content, volume of sulphuric acid, volume of methanol, temperature and time on SHE were examined. As a result, water content was found to be the most effective factor. The effects of various parameters on fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) content and equilibrium relation between FAME and FFA were also examined under water content 80%. Equimolar amounts of sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid showed similar results. This method has great potential in terms of biodiesel production from microalgae since no organic solvents are used.

  6. Novel agents for enzymatic and fungal hydrolysis of stevioside

    PubMed Central

    Milagre, H.M.S.; Martins, L.R.; Takahashi, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study on the potential of some biological agents to perform the hydrolysis of stevioside was carried out, aiming at establishing an alternative methodology to achieve the aglycon steviol or its rearranged derivative isosteviol, in high yields to be used in the preparation of novel bioactive compounds. Hydrolysis reactions were performed by using filamentous fungi (Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus stolonifer and Rhizopus arrhizus), a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and enzymes (pancreatin and lipases PL250 and VFL 8000). Pancreatin showed the best hydrolytic activity, furnishing isosteviol at 93.9% of yield, at pH 4.0, using toluene as a co-solvent. Steviol was produced using both pancreatin at pH 7.0 (20.2% yield) and A. niger at pH 7 (20.8% yield). PMID:24031374

  7. Modeling and analysis of CaBr{sub 2} hydrolysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Lottes, S. A.; Lyczkowski, R. W.; Energy Systems

    2006-01-01

    The main focus of this paper is the modeling, simulation, and analysis of the CaBr{sub 2} hydrolysis reactor stage in the Calcium-Bromine thermochemical water splitting cycle for nuclear hydrogen production. One concept is to use a spray reactor of CaBr{sub 2} into steam. Droplet models were built up in a series of steps that consider various physical phenomena separately, including droplet flow, heat transfer, phase change, and reaction. Given the large heat reservoir contained in a pool of liquid CaBr{sub 2} that allows bubbles to rise easily, using a bubble column for the hydrolysis reaction appears to be a feasible and promising alternative to the spray reactor concept. The two limiting cases of bubble geometry, spherical and spherical-cap, are considered in the modeling. Results for both droplet and bubble modeling with COMSOL are presented together with recommendations for the path forward.

  8. Preparation of 1-C-glycosyl aldehydes by reductive hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Szabolcs; Jablonkai, István

    2011-09-06

    Reductive hydrolysis of various protected glycosyl cyanides was carried out using DIBAL-H to form aldimine alane intermediates which were then hydrolyzed under mildly acidic condition to provide the corresponding aldehyde derivatives. While 1-C-formyl glycal and 2-deoxy glycosyl derivatives were stable during isolation and storage 1-C-glycosyl formaldehydes in the gluco, galacto and manno series were sensitive and decomposition occurred by 2-alkyloxy elimination. A one-pot method using N,N'-diphenylethylenediamine to trap these aldehydes in stable form was developed. Reductive hydrolysis of glycosyl cyanides offers valuable aldehyde building blocks in a convenient way which can be applied in the synthesis of complex C-glycosides.

  9. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato. Membrane reactor in enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-06-01

    Use of ultrafiltration membrane systems in stirred cell and in thin-channel systems for immobilizing enzyme (sweet potato intrinsic and crystalline /beta/-amylase) in hydrolysis of sweet potato through a continuous operation mode were studied. Both the filtration rate and reducing sugars, produced as the result of enzymatic hydrolysis, decreased with the filtration time. THe immobilized enzymes in the thin-channel system showed a much better performance compared to that in the stirred cell system. Addition of crystalline sweet potato /beta/-amylase to the sweet potato increased both the filtration rate and reducing-sugars content. Alcoholic fermentation of the filtrate resulted in an alcohol content of 4.2%. This represented fermentation of 95% of the sugars with an efficiency of 88%. 17 refs.

  10. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato. Membrane reactor in enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    Use of ultrafiltration membrane systems in stirred cell and in thin-channel systems for immobilizing enzyme (sweet potato intrinsic and crystalline beta-amylase) in hydrolysis of sweet potato through a continuous operation mode were studied. Both the filtration rate and reducing sugars, produced as the result of enzymic hydrolysis, decreased with the filtration time. The immobilized enzymes in the thin-channel system showed a much better performance compared to that in the stirred cell system. Addition of crystalline sweet potato beta-amylase to the sweet potato increased both the filtration rate and reducing-sugars content. Alcohol fermentation of the filtrate resulted in an alcohol content of 4.2%. This represented fermentation of 95% of the sugars with an efficiency of 88%.

  11. Snapshots of the maltose transporter during ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Chen, Jue

    2011-12-05

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are powered by ATP, but the mechanism by which these transporters hydrolyze ATP is unclear. In this study, four crystal structures of the full-length wild-type maltose transporter, stabilized by adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate or ADP in conjunction with phosphate analogs BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, VO{sub 4}{sup 3-}, or AlF{sub 4}{sup -}, were determined to 2.2- to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. These structures led to the assignment of two enzymatic states during ATP hydrolysis and demonstrate specific functional roles of highly conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domain, suggesting that ATP-binding cassette transporters catalyze ATP hydrolysis via a general base mechanism.

  12. A mechanism of catalyzed GTP hydrolysis by Ras protein through magnesium ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiang; Nassar, Nicolas; Wang, Jin

    2011-11-01

    The hydrolysis by Ras plays pivotal roles in the activation of signaling pathways that lead to cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Despite their significant role in human cancer, the hydrolysis mechanism remains unclear. In the present Letter, we propose a GTP hydrolysis mechanism in which the γ phosphate is cut off primarily by magnesium ion. We studied both normal and mutated Ras and the cause of the malfunction of these mutants, compared the effect of Mg2+ and Mn2+. The simulation results are consistent with the experiments and support the new hydrolysis mechanism. This work will benefit both GTPases and ATPases hydrolysis studies.

  13. Effects of fibrillation on the wood fibers' enzymatic hydrolysis enhanced by mechanical refining.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Hou, Qingxi; Chen, Wei; Wu, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The hardwood bleached kraft pulp (HBKP) fibers were pretreated by PFI mill to obtain the substrates, the effects of fibrillation on HBKP fibers' enzymatic hydrolysis was studied. The results showed that the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency was enhanced obviously by mechanical refining. The mechanical refining alterated the fibers' characteristics such as fibrillation degree, specific surface area, swelling ability, crystallinity, fiber length and fines content. All these factors correlating to the enzymatic hydrolysis were evaluated through mathematical analysis. Among these factors, the fibrillation degree has the profoundest impact on the enzymatic hydrolysis of wood fibers. Consequently, the mechanical refining aiming for a high fibrillation degree was feasible to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

  14. Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay of Binding Properties of Antisense Oligonucleotides to Serum Albumins and Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Reina; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Sekiguchi, Mitsuaki; Kugimiya, Akira; Kinouchi, Hiroki; Nihashi, Yoichiro; Kamimori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we developed an assay to evaluate the kinetic binding properties of the unconjugated antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) and lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands conjugated ASOs to mouse and human serum albumin, and lipoproteins using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The lipophilic ligands conjugated ASOs showed clear affinity to the albumins and lipoproteins, while the unconjugated and hydrophilic ligand conjugated ASOs showed no interaction. The SPR method showed reproducible immobilization of albumins and lipoproteins as ligands on the sensor chip, and reproducible affinity kinetic parameters of interaction of ASOs conjugated with the ligands could be obtained. The kinetic binding data of these ASOs to albumin and lipoproteins by SPR were related with the distributions in the whole liver in mice after administration of these conjugated ASOs. The results demonstrated that our SPR method could be a valuable tool for predicting the mechanism of the properties of delivery of conjugated ASOs to the organs.

  15. Polyacrylate adsorbents for the selective adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins from plasma or blood

    PubMed Central

    Heuck, Claus-Chr.

    2011-01-01

    Polyacrylate (PAA) adsorbents selectively bind low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human plasma and blood, whereas very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) are only minimally adsorbed. The adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins to PAA adsorbents is related to the molecular weight (mw) of the polyanion ligand. Ca++ and Mg++ inhibit the binding of LDL to PAA adsorbents. The chemical composition of the organic hardgels of the adsorbents does not have an influence on adsorption. The selective adsorption of LDL to PAA adsorbents can be explained to result from their low negative surface charge density and the specific colloid-chemical properties of the surface-bound PAA, which do not prevent LDL from binding to charge-like domains of the ligand. By contrast, VLDL and high density lipoproteins (HDL) are repelled from the adsorbents due to their higher negative surface charge density. PMID:21289994

  16. Altered Serum Lipoprotein Profiles in Male and Female Power Lifters Ingesting Anabolic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jonathan C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Serum lipoprotein profiles were measured in nine male and three female weightlifters who were taking anabolic steroids. The profiles suggest that steriod users may face an increased risk of coronary artery disease. (Author/MT)

  17. Increased Very Low Density Lipoprotein Secretion, Hepatic Steatosis, and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Hee; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2011-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) not only affects regulation of carbohydrate metabolism, but all aspects of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. IR is associated with increased secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and increased plasma triglycerides, as well as hepatic steatosis, despite the increased VLDL secretion. Here, we link IR with increased VLDL secretion and hepatic steatosis at both the physiologic and molecular levels. Increased VLDL secretion, together with the downstream effects on high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein size is pro-atherogenic. Hepatic steatosis is a risk for steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Understanding the complex inter-relationship between IR and these abnormalities of liver lipid homeostasis may provide insights relevant to new therapies for these increasing clinical problems. PMID:21616678

  18. Behavioral versus genetic determination of lipoproteins andidentical twins discordant for exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul T.; Blanche, Patricia J.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2004-06-01

    Lipoprotein and weight differences between vigorously active and sedentary MZ twins are used to: (1) estimate the effects of training while controlling for genotype; (2) estimate genetic concordance in the presence of divergent lifestyles.

  19. Polyacrylate adsorbents for the selective adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins from plasma or blood.

    PubMed

    Heuck, Claus-Chr

    2011-01-24

    Polyacrylate (PAA) adsorbents selectively bind low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human plasma and blood, whereas very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) are only minimally adsorbed. The adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins to PAA adsorbents is related to the molecular weight (mw) of the polyanion ligand. Ca(++) and Mg(++) inhibit the binding of LDL to PAA adsorbents. The chemical composition of the organic hardgels of the adsorbents does not have an influence on adsorption. The selective adsorption of LDL to PAA adsorbents can be explained to result from their low negative surface charge density and the specific colloid-chemical properties of the surface-bound PAA, which do not prevent LDL from binding to charge-like domains of the ligand. By contrast, VLDL and high density lipoproteins (HDL) are repelled from the adsorbents due to their higher negative surface charge density.

  20. Diet and the role of lipoproteins, lipases, and thyroid hormones in coronary lesion growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Jacques D.; Jansen, Hans; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Birkenhager, Jan C.; Kromhout, Daan

    1987-01-01

    The relationships between the coronary lesion growth and the blood contents of lipoprotein fractions, thyroic hormones, and the lipoprotein lipase activity were investigated in male patients with severe coronary atherosclerosis, who participated in a lipid-lowering dietary intervention program. A quantitative computer-assisted image-processing technique was used to assess the severity of coronary obstructions at the beginning of the program and at its termination two years later. Based on absolute coronary scores, patients were divided into a no-lesion growth group (14 patients) and a progression group (21 paients). At the end of the trial, the very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were found to be significantly higher, while the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and hepatic lipase (HL) were lower in the progression group. Multivariate regression analysis showed HL to be the most important determinant of changes in coronary atherosclerotic lesions.

  1. Optical Properties of Europium Tetracycline Complexes in the Presence of High-Density Lipoproteins (HDL) Subfractions.

    PubMed

    Sicchieri, Letícia Bonfante; Monteiro, Andrea Moreira; Figueiredo Neto, Antônio Martins; Gomes, Laércio; Courrol, Lilia Coronato

    2016-12-12

    Standard lipoprotein measurements of triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) fail to identify many lipoprotein abnormalities that contribute to cardiovascular heart diseases (CHD). Studies suggested that the presence of CHD is more strongly associated with the HDL subspecies than with total HDL cholesterol levels. The HDL particles can be collected in at least three subfractions, the HDL2b, HDL2a, and HDL3. More specifically, atherosclerosis is associated with low levels of HDL2. In this work, the optical spectroscopic properties of europium tetracycline (EuTc) complex in the presence of different HDL subspecies was studied. The results show that the europium spectroscopic properties in the EuTc complex are influenced by sizes and concentrations of subclasses. Eu(3+) emission intensity and lifetime can discriminate the subfractions HDL3 and HDL2b.

  2. Breast milk jaundice; the role of lipoprotein lipase and the free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Constantopoulos, A; Messaritakis, J; Matsaniotis, N

    1980-06-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity and free fatty acid concentrations were measured in samples of milk collected from mothers of infants without and with prolonged neonatal jaundice. The lipoprotein lipase and free fatty acid values in the milk from mothers of infants without jaundice were found to increase with the duration of breast-feeding until the 12th post-partum day, and then to fall to the original levels. In the group of mothers with jaundiced infants both lipoprotein lipase and free fatty acid values were found within normal limits when measured between 15th and 37th days post-partum. These findings indicate that increased values of lipoprotein lipase and free fatty acids in the milk are not responsible for the development of breast-milk jaundice.

  3. Liver-specific inactivation of the abetalipoproteinemia gene completely abrogates very low density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein production in a viable conditional knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Chang, B H; Liao, W; Li, L; Nakamuta, M; Mack, D; Chan, L

    1999-03-05

    Conventional knockout of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein large subunit (lMTP) gene is embryonic lethal in the homozygous state in mice. We have produced a conditional lMTP knockout mouse by inserting loxP sequences flanking exons 5 and 6 by gene targeting. Homozygous floxed mice were born live with normal plasma lipids. Intravenous injection of an adenovirus harboring Cre recombinase (AdCre1) produced deletion of exons 5 and 6 and disappearance of lMTP mRNA and immunoreactive protein in a liver-specific manner. There was also disappearance of plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B-100 and marked reduction in apoB-48 levels. Wild-type mice showed no response, and heterozygous mice, an intermediate response, to AdCre1. Wild-type mice doubled their plasma cholesterol level following a high cholesterol diet. This hypercholesterolemia was abolished in AdCre1-treated lMTP-/- mice, the result of a complete absence of very low/intermediate/low density lipoproteins and a slight reduction in high density lipoprotein. Heterozygous mice showed an intermediate lipoprotein phenotype. The rate of accumulation of plasma triglyceride following Triton WR1339 treatment in lMTP-/- mice was <10% that in wild-type animals, indicating a failure of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein production. Pulse-chase experiments using hepatocytes isolated from wild-type and lMTP-/- mice revealed a failure of apoB secretion in lMTP-/- animals. Therefore, the liver-specific inactivation of the lMTP gene completely abrogates apoB-100 and very low/intermediate/low density lipoprotein production. These conditional knockout mice are a useful in vivo model for studying the role of MTP in apoB biosynthesis and the biogenesis of apoB-containing lipoproteins.

  4. Comparing the catalytic strategy of ATP hydrolysis in biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    ATP-driven biomolecular motors utilize the chemical energy obtained from the ATP hydrolysis to perform vital tasks in living cells. Understanding the mechanism of enzyme-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis reaction has substantially progressed lately thanks to combined quantum/classical molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. Here, we present a comparative summary of the most recent QM/MM results for myosin, kinesin and F1-ATPase motors. These completely different motors achieve the acceleration of ATP hydrolysis through a very similar catalytic mechanism. ATP hydrolysis has high activation energy because it involves the breaking of two strong bonds, namely the Pγ-Oβγ bond of ATP and the H-O bond of lytic water. The key to the four-fold decrease in the activation barrier by the three enzymes is that the breaking of the Pγ-Oβγ bond precedes the deprotonation of the lytic water molecule, generating a metaphosphate hydrate complex. The resulting singly charged trigonal planar PγO3(-) metaphosphate is a better electrophilic target for attack by an OaH(-) hydroxyl group. The formation of this OaH(-) is promoted by a strong polarization of the lytic water: in all three proteins, this water is forming a hydrogen-bond with a backbone carbonyl group and interacts with the carboxylate group of glutamate (either directly or via an intercalated water molecule). This favors the shedding of one proton by the attacking water. The abstracted proton is transferred to the γ-phosphate via various proton wires, resulting in a H2PγO4(-)/ADP(3-) product state. This catalytic strategy is so effective that most other nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes adopt a similar approach, as suggested by their very similar triphosphate binding sites.

  5. The enzymatic hydrolysis of leather waste with chromium recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.S.; Clesceri, L.S.

    1996-11-01

    The work of Taylor et al. (1990) has shown the potential for alkaline hydrolase enzymes for the solubilization of waste from the tanning industry. The authors have carried this work further to examine the mechanism whereby enzymes release chromium from leather waste. An alkaline digest of waste leather was used in this work. Treatment with strong alkali produced a thick slurry that contained 7,000 ppm chromium. The objective of this work is to optimize a closed cycle system for the recycling of chromium salts for tanning as well as a chrome-free product for use as a fertilizer. The authors are able to track the progress of the leather protein hydrolysis with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). By means of PAGE, it is possible to determine the relationship between chromium release and the extent of protein hydrolysis. Rate constant for hydrolysis and chromium release have been developed for various hydrolysis conditions. Chemical precipitation of chromium from the hydrolysate results in a purified product for reuse in tanning. The chrome-free hydrolysate can be applied as a fertilizer either directly or as a dried product. There are more than 56,000 metric tons of tannery waste produced annually in the US. The majority of the organic solids can be converted into high quality fertilizers. Since the nitrogen is organic rather than inorganic, release is at a controlled rate since the microbody in the soil must make the nitrogen available for plant growth. Leather manufacturing is a world-wide industry. Conversion of leather waste to fertilizers can improve global productivity as well as solve a waste problem.

  6. Allergenicity of Peanut Proteins is Retained Following Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rationale: Hydrolysis of peanut proteins by food-grade enzymes may reduce allergenicity and could lead to safer forms of immunotherapy. Methods: Light roasted peanut flour extracts were digested with pepsin (37°C, pH 2), Alcalase (60°C pH 8), or Flavourzyme (50°C, pH 7) up to 1 hr, or sequentially w...

  7. Novel Penicillium cellulases for total hydrolysis of lignocellulosics.

    PubMed

    Marjamaa, Kaisa; Toth, Karolina; Bromann, Paul Andrew; Szakacs, George; Kruus, Kristiina

    2013-05-10

    The (hemi)cellulolytic systems of two novel lignocellulolytic Penicillium strains (Penicillium pulvillorum TUB F-2220 and P. cf. simplicissimum TUB F-2378) have been studied. The cultures of the Penicillium strains were characterized by high cellulase and β-glucosidase as well moderate xylanase activities compared to the Trichoderma reesei reference strains QM 6a and RUTC30 (volumetric or per secreted protein, respectively). Comparison of the novel Penicillium and T. reesei secreted enzyme mixtures in the hydrolysis of (ligno)cellulose substrates showed that the F-2220 enzyme mixture gave higher yields in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose (Avicel) and similar yields in hydrolysis of pre-treated spruce and wheat straw than enzyme mixture secreted by the T. reesei reference strain. The sensitivity of the Penicillium cellulase complexes to softwood (spruce) and grass (wheat straw) lignins was lignin and temperature dependent: inhibition of cellulose hydrolysis in the presence of wheat straw lignin was minor at 35°C while at 45°C by spruce lignin a clear inhibition was observed. The two main proteins in the F-2220 (hemi)cellulase complex were partially purified and identified by peptide sequence similarity as glycosyl hydrolases (cellobiohydrolases) of families 7 and 6. Adsorption of the GH7 enzyme PpCBH1 on cellulose and lignins was studied showing that the lignin adsorption of the enzyme is temperature and pH dependent. The ppcbh1 coding sequence was obtained using PCR cloning and the translated amino acid sequence of PpCBH1 showed up to 82% amino acid sequence identity to known Penicillium cellobiohydrolases.

  8. Effect of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Mochidzuki, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Hiraide, Hatsue; Wang, Xiaofen; Cui, Zongjun

    2013-06-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was added to filter paper during the hydrolysis of cellulase. Adding BSA before the addition of the cellulase enhances enzyme activity in the solution, thereby increasing the conversion rate of cellulose. After 48 h of BSA treatment, the BSA adsorption quantities are 3.3, 4.6, 7.8, 17.2, and 28.3 mg/g substrate, each with different initial BSA concentration treatments at 50 °C; in addition, more cellulase was adsorbed onto the filter paper at 50 °C compared with 35 °C. After 48 h of hydrolysis, the free-enzyme activity could not be measured without the BSA treatment, whereas the remaining activity of the filter paper activity was approximately 41 % when treated with 1.0 mg/mL BSA. Even after 96 h of hydrolysis, 25 % still remained. Meanwhile, after 48 h of incubation without substrate, the remaining enzyme activities were increased 20.7 % (from 43.7 to 52.7 %) and 94.8 % (from 23.3 to 45.5 %) at 35 and 50 °C, respectively. Moreover, the effect of the BSA was more obvious at 35 °C compared with 50 °C. When using 15 filter paper cellulase units per gram substrate cellulase loading at 50 °C, the cellulose conversion was increased from 75 % (without BSA treatment) to ≥90 % when using BSA dosages between 0.1 and 1.5 mg/mL. Overall, these results suggest that there are promising strategies for BSA treatment in the reduction of enzyme requirements during the hydrolysis of cellulose.

  9. Effect of antiepileptic drugs on plasma lipids, lipoprotein (a), and liver enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Demir, Ercan; Orem, Asim; Yildirmis, Sermet; Orhan, Fazil; Aslan, Adnan; Topbas, Murat

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a study to assess the effect of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproate on serum lipid profiles and lipoprotein (a) in 64 children with epilepsy (aged between 1 and 15 years) admitted to the child neurology outpatient clinic between July 2000 and July 2002. The children were separated as group 1 (18 children), treated with phenobarbital, 5 mg/kg/day; group 2 (22 children), treated with carbamazepine, 10 to 15 mg/kg/day; and group 3 (24 children), treated with sodium valproate, 20 mg/kg/day. Plasma lipoprotein (a), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A and apolipoprotein B levels, and liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase were determined before the initiation of the treatment and at 3, 6, and 12 months of the treatment period. The mean age of children in group 1 was significantly low compared with those in groups 2 and 3 (P <.05). The mean pretreatment lipid levels among the groups were not significantly increased. The mean lipoprotein (a) levels were significantly increased in all groups at 3, 6, and 12 months of the treatment period (P <.05). The increase in alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3, 6, and 12 months was statistically significant in group 1 (P <.05). The higher levels in lipoprotein (a) (mean > 30 mg/dL) were observed only in carbamazepine-treated patients at 6 and 12 months. The percentage of children with lipoprotein (a) levels over 30 mg/dL was 44%, 63%, and 33% in the phenobarbital-, carbamazepine-, and valproate-treated children, respectively. Antiepileptic drugs significantly increase the level of lipoprotein (a), which is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, and also have variable effects on other lipid parameters

  10. Low-density lipoprotein, its susceptibility to oxidation and the role of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and carboxyl ester lipase lipases in atherosclerotic plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Burchardt, Paweł; Zurawski, Jakub; Zuchowski, Bartosz; Kubacki, Tomasz; Murawa, Dawid; Wiktorowicz, Krzysztof; Wysocki, Henryk

    2013-02-21

    An increased level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a very well established risk factor of coronary artery disease (CAD). Unoxidized LDL is an inert transport vehicle of cholesterol and other lipids in the body and is thought to be atherogenic. Recently it has been appreciated that oxidized products of LDL are responsible for plaque formation properties previously attributed to the intact particle. The goal of this article is to review the recent understanding of the LDL oxidation pathway. The role of oxidized products and key enzymes (lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and carboxyl ester lipase) are also extensively discussed in the context of clinical conditions.

  11. Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of starch in legumes.

    PubMed

    Wong, S; Traianedes, K; O'Dea, K

    1985-07-01

    In an attempt to understand the mechanism for the extremely slow rate of digestion and absorption of carbohydrate from legumes, we have examined a number of factors which could potentially affect the process in vitro. The rate of hydrolysis of legume starch in vitro was not affected by the presence of fat (as either butter or an emulsion). However, it was significantly increased in commercially available canned bean preparations, suggesting that the high temperatures used in the canning process may alter the availability of starch in legumes. In vitro starch hydrolysis rate was also significantly increased by grinding legumes finely prior to cooking. Finally, the slow rate of digestion and absorption of legume carbohydrate does not appear to be due to viscosity since a) increasing the shaking rate of viscous mixture of either red kidney beans or lentils from 0 to 120 oscillations per minute did not affect the hydrolysis rate, and b) a thick viscous mixture of either of these legumes did not retard the diffusion of free glucose from a dialysis sac into the dialysate.

  12. Pretreatment for cellulose hydrolysis by carbon dioxide explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y.; Lin, H.M.; Tsao, G.T.

    1998-11-01

    Cellulosic materials were treated with supercritical carbon dioxide to increase the reactivity of cellulose, thereby to enhance the rate and the extent of cellulose hydrolysis. In this pretreatment process, the cellulosic materials such as Avicel, recycled paper mix, sugarcane bagasse and the repulping waste of recycled paper are placed in a reactor under pressurized carbon dioxide at 35 C for a controlled time period. Upon an explosive release of the carbon dioxide pressure, the disruption of the cellulosic structure increases the accessible surface area of the cellulosic substrate to enzymatic hydrolysis. Results indicate that supercritical carbon dioxide is effective for pretreatment of cellulose. An increase in pressure facilitates the faster penetration of carbon dioxide molecules into the crystalline structures, thus more glucose is produced from cellulosic materials after the explosion as compared to those without the pretreatment. This explosion pretreatment enhances the rate of cellulosic material hydrolysis as well as increases glucose yield by as much as 50%. Results from the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation tests also show the increase in the available carbon source from the cellulosic materials for fermentation to produce ethanol. As an alternative method, this supercritical carbon dioxide explosion has a possibility to reduce expense compared with ammonia explosion, and since it is operated at the low temperature, it will not cause degradation of sugars such as those treated with steam explosion due to the high-temperature involved.

  13. Hydrolysis of whey protein isolate using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Ashley D; Morawicki, Rubén O; Hager, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    Hydrolyzed whey protein isolate (WPI) is used in the food industry for protein enrichment and modification of functional properties. The purpose of the study was to determine the feasibility of subcritical water hydrolysis (SWH) on WPI and to determine the temperature and reaction time effects on the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and the production of peptides and free amino acids (AAs). Effects of temperature (150 to 320 °C) and time (0 to 20 min) were initially studied with a central composite rotatable design followed by a completely randomized factorial design with temperature (250 and 300 °C) and time (0 to 50 min) as factors. SWH was conducted in an electrically heated, 100-mL batch, high pressure vessel. The DH was determined by a spectrophotometric method after derivatization. The peptide molecular weights (MWs) were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and AAs were quantified by high-performance liquid chromotography. An interaction of temperature and time significantly affected the DH and AA concentration. As the DH increased, the accumulation of lower MW peptides also increased following SWH (and above 10% DH, the majority of peptides were <1000 Da). Hydrolysis at 300 °C for 40 min generated the highest total AA concentration, especially of lysine (8.894 mg/g WPI). Therefore, WPI was successfully hydrolyzed by subcritical water, and with adjustment of treatment parameters there is reasonable control of the end-products.

  14. Hydrolysis of organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shang; Shilling, John E.; Song, Chen; Hiranuma, Naruki; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Russell, Lynn M.

    2012-10-19

    Organonitrate (ON) groups are important substituents in secondary organic aerosols. Model simulations and laboratory studies indicate a large fraction of ON groups in aerosol particles, but much lower quantities are observed in the atmosphere. Hydrolysis of ON groups in aerosol particles has been proposed recently. To test this hypothesis, we simulated formation of ON molecules in a reaction chamber under a wide range of relative humidity (0% to 90%). The mass fraction of ON groups (5% to 20% for high-NOx experiments) consistently decreased with increasing relative humidity, which was best explained by hydrolysis of ON groups at a rate of 4 day-1 (lifetime of 6 hours) for reactions under relative humidity greater than 20%. In addition, we found that secondary nitrogen-containing molecules absorb light, with greater absorption under dry and high-NOx conditions. This work provides the first evidence for particle-phase hydrolysis of ON groups, a process that could substantially reduce ON group concentration in the atmosphere.

  15. A single molecule study of cellulase hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-San; Luo, Yonghua; Baker, John O.; Zeng, Yining; Himmel, Michael E.; Smith, Steve; Ding, Shi-You

    2010-02-01

    Cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I), a processive exoglucanase secreted by Trichoderma reesei, is one of the key enzyme components in a commercial cellulase mixture currently used for processing biomass to biofuels. CBH I contains a family 7 glycoside hydrolase catalytic module, a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), and a highlyglycosylated linker peptide. It has been proposed that the CBH I cellulase initiates the hydrolysis from the reducing end of one cellulose chain and successively cleaves alternate β-1,4-glycosidic bonds to release cellobiose as its principal end product. The role each module of CBH I plays in the processive hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose has yet to be convincingly elucidated. In this report, we use a single-molecule approach that combines optical (Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence microscopy, or TIRF-M) and non-optical (Atomic Force Microscopy, or AFM) imaging techniques to analyze the molecular motion of CBM tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP), and to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBM and CBH I. The preliminary results have revealed a confined nanometer-scale movement of the TrCBM1-GFP bound to cellulose, and decreases in cellulose crystal size as well as increases in surface roughness during CBH I hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose.

  16. Toward antibody-catalyzed hydrolysis of organophosphorus poisons

    PubMed Central

    Vayron, Philippe; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Taran, Frédéric; Créminon, Christophe; Frobert, Yveline; Grassi, Jacques; Mioskowski, Charles

    2000-01-01

    We report here our preliminary results on the use of catalytic antibodies as an approach to neutralizing organophosphorus chemical weapons. A first-generation hapten, methyl-α-hydroxyphosphinate Ha, was designed to mimic the approach of an incoming water molecule for the hydrolysis of exceedingly toxic methylphosphonothioate VX (1a). A moderate protective activity was first observed on polyclonal antibodies raised against Ha. The results were further confirmed by using a mAb PAR 15 raised against phenyl-α-hydroxyphosphinate Hb, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of PhX (1b), a less toxic phenylphosphonothioate analog of VX with a rate constant of 0.36 M−1⋅min−1 at pH 7.4 and 25°C, which corresponds to a catalytic proficiency of 14,400 M−1 toward the rate constant for the uncatalyzed hydrolysis of 1b. This is a demonstration on the organophosphorus poisons themselves that mAbs can catalytically hydrolyze nerve agents, and a significant step toward the production of therapeutically active abzymes to treat poisoning by warfare agents. PMID:10860971

  17. Enzymatic hydrolysis of defatted mackerel protein with low bitter taste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Hu; Li, Bafang; Zhao, Xue

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction was confirmed as a novel, effective method for separating lipid from mackerel protein, resulting in a degreasing rate (DR) of 95% and a nitrogen recovery (NR) of 88.6%. To obtain protein hydrolysates with high nitrogen recovery and low bitter taste, enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using eight commercially available proteases. It turned out that the optimum enzyme was the `Mixed enzymes for animal proteolysis'. An enzyme dosage of 4%, a temperature of 50°, and a hydrolysis time of 300 min were found to be the optimum conditions to obtain high NR (84.28%) and degree of hydrolysis (DH, 16.18%) by orthogonal experiments. Glutamic acid was the most abundant amino acid of MDP (defatted mackerel protein) and MDPH (defatted mackerel protein hydrolysates). Compared with the FAO/WHO reference protein, the essential amino acid chemical scores (CS) were greater than 1.0 (1.0-1.7) in MDPH, which is reflective of high nutritional value. This, coupled with the light color and slight fishy odor, indicates that MDPH would potentially have a wide range of applications such as nutritional additives, functional ingredients, and so on.

  18. Artefact formation during acid hydrolysis of saponins from Medicago spp.

    PubMed

    Tava, Aldo; Biazzi, Elisa; Mella, Mariella; Quadrelli, Paolo; Avato, Pinarosa

    2017-02-28

    Artefact compounds obtained during acid hydrolysis of saponins from Medicago spp. (Fabaceae), have been monitored and evaluated by GC-FID. Their identification has been performed by GC-MS and (1)H and (13)C NMR. Saponins with different substituents on the triterpenic pentacyclic aglycones were considered, and their hydrolysis products were detected and quantified during 10 h of time course reaction. From soyasapogenol B glycoside the well known soyasapogenols B, C, D and F were obtained together with a previously undescribed sapogenol artefact identified as 3β,22β,24-trihydroxyolean-18(19)-en and named soyasapogenol H. From a zanhic acid saponin two major artefact compounds identified as 2β,3β,16α-trihydroxyolean-13(18)-en-23,28-dioic acid and 2β,3β,16α-trihydroxyolean-28,13β-olide-23-oic acid were obtained, together with some zanhic acid. Other compounds, detected in very small amount in the reaction mixture, were also tentatively identified based on their GC-MS and UV spectra. The other most characteristic saponins in Medicago spp., hederagenin, bayogenin and medicagenic acid glycosides, under acidic condition of hydrolysis, released instead the correspondent aglycones and generated a negligible amount of artefacts. Nature of artefacts and mechanism of their formation, involving a stable tertiary carbocation, is here proposed and discussed for the first time.

  19. A new route to improved glucose yields in cellulose hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haibo; Holladay, John E.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2007-08-01

    An unusual inverse temperature-dependent pathway was discovered for cellulose decrystallization in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Cellulose was completely decrystallized by TFA at 0 °C in less than 2 hours, a result not achieved in 48 hours at 25°C in the same medium. The majority of TFA used in cellulose decrystallization was recycled via a vacuum process. The small remaining amount of TFA was diluted with water to make a 0.5% TFA solution and used as a catalyst in dilute acid hydrolysis. After one minute, under batch conditions at 185 °C, the glucose yield reached 63.5% without production of levulinic acid. In comparison, only 15.0% glucose yield was achieved in the hydrolysis of untreated cellulose by 0.5% H2SO4 under the same condition. Further improvement of glucose yield is possible by optimizing reaction conditions. Alternatively, the remaining TFA can be completely removed by water while keeping the regenerated cellulose in a highly amorphous state. This regenerated cellulose is much more reactive than untreated cellulose in hydrolysis reactions, but still less reactive than corn starch. The lower temperatures and shorter reaction times with this activated cellulose makes it possible to reduce operating costs and decrease byproduct yields such as HMF and levulinic acid.

  20. The Competing Mechanisms of Phosphate Monoester Dianion Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical studies on phosphate monoester hydrolysis, significant questions remain concerning the mechanistic details of these biologically critical reactions. In the present work we construct a linear free energy relationship for phosphate monoester hydrolysis to explore the effect of modulating leaving group pKa on the competition between solvent- and substrate-assisted pathways for the hydrolysis of these compounds. Through detailed comparative electronic-structure studies of methyl phosphate and a series of substituted aryl phosphate monoesters, we demonstrate that the preferred mechanism is dependent on the nature of the leaving group. For good leaving groups, a strong preference is observed for a more dissociative solvent-assisted pathway. However, the energy difference between the two pathways gradually reduces as the leaving group pKa increases and creates mechanistic ambiguity for reactions involving relatively poor alkoxy leaving groups. Our calculations show that the transition-state structures vary smoothly across the range of pKas studied and that the pathways remain discrete mechanistic alternatives. Therefore, while not impossible, a biological catalyst would have to surmount a significantly higher activation barrier to facilitate a substrate-assisted pathway than for the solvent-assisted pathway when phosphate is bonded to good leaving groups. For poor leaving groups, this intrinsic preference disappears. PMID:27471914