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Sample records for hydrophobic grid membrane

  1. Improved Aerobic Colony Count Technique for Hydrophobic Grid Membrane Filters

    PubMed Central

    Parrington, Lorna J.; Sharpe, Anthony N.; Peterkin, Pearl I.

    1993-01-01

    The AOAC International official action procedure for performing aerobic colony counts on hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) uses Trypticase soy-fast green FCF agar (FGA) incubated for 48 h. Microbial growths are various shades of green on a pale green background, which can cause problems for automated as well as manual counting. HGMFs which had been incubated 24 or 48 h at 35°C on Trypticase soy agar were flooded underneath with 1 to 2 ml of 0.1% triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) solution by simply lifting one corner of the filter while it was still on the agar and adding the reagent. Microbial growths on HGMFs were counted after color had been allowed to develop for 15 min at room temperature. With representative foods, virtually all colonies stained pink to red. Automated electronic counts made by using the MI-100 HGMF Interpreter were easier and more reliable than control HGMF counts made by the AOAC International official action procedure. Manual counting was easier as well because of increased visibility of the microbial growths. Except in the case of dairy products, 24-h TTC counts did not differ significantly from 48-h FGA counts, whereas the FGA counts at 24 h were always significantly lower, indicating that for many food products the HGMF TTC flooding method permits aerobic colony counts to be made after 24 h. PMID:16349033

  2. Enumeration of total coliforms, fecal coliforms, and Escherichia coli in foods by hydrophobic grid membrane filter: supplementary report.

    PubMed

    Entis, P

    1984-01-01

    Raw, comminuted poultry meat was used to determine the specificity of the media and incubation conditions used in the hydrophobic grid membrane filter method. Confirmation rates for target colonies were 100% for total coliforms, 98% for fecal coliforms, and 97-99% for Escherichia coli. The results of total coliform enumeration in 30 pasteurized milk samples by both the hydrophobic grid membrane filter method and AOAC method 46.013-46.016 are also reported. PMID:6381469

  3. Enumeration of total coliforms, fecal coliforms, and Escherichia coli in foods by hydrophobic grid membrane filter: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Entis, P; Bennett, B; Brodsky, M H; Burgener, D M; Carlson, V L; Carson, M; Catherwood, K; Ciebin, B S; Cox, N A; Dahiya, R S

    1984-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted in 18 laboratories to assess the performance of the hydrophobic grid membrane filter method against that of the AOAC official first action method 46.013-46.016 for enumerating total and fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli. The study was carried out on frozen breaded fish, raw comminuted poultry, unroasted walnut pieces, ground black pepper, and cheddar cheese. The hydrophobic grid membrane filter method recovered significantly larger numbers of target bacteria in 7 of the food/analysis combinations: fecal coliforms in fish; E. coli in poultry; fecal coliforms and E. coli in walnuts; and total coliforms, fecal coliforms and E. coli in black pepper. Random error (Sr2) associated with the hydrophobic grid membrane filter method was significantly lower than that of the reference method in over 30% of the paired sample series. The hydrophobic grid membrane filter method for total coliform, fecal coliform, and E. coli enumeration in foods has been adopted official first action. PMID:6381470

  4. Novel Campylobacter isolation method using hydrophobic grid membrane filter and semisolid medium.

    PubMed

    Valdivieso-Garcia, Alfonso; Harris, Kathleen; Riche, Edward; Campbell, Stephanie; Jarvie, Anne; Popa, Maria; Deckert, Anne; Reid-Smith, Richard; Rahn, Kris

    2007-02-01

    Culture procedures for isolation of thermophilic campylobacters from food matrices are complex, labor intensive, and time-consuming. Most available methods include the use of antibiotics as selective agents to prevent the growth of competing microflora. A simple procedure for isolation of thermophilic campylobacters after enrichment in Rosef's enrichment broth was developed using a hydrophobic grid membrane filter (HGMF) on semisolid medium (SSM). SSM contains no antibiotics, and the HGMF physically separates Campylobacter from the enrichment broth, allowing isolation based on differential motility. The HGMF-SSM method was compared to the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Food Safety Procedures Manual (FSPM-10) method (Isolation of Thermophilic Campylobacters from Fresh Pork, Beef Veal, Poultry and Ready-to-Eat Meat Products), which includes the use of selective antibiotics. During the initial study, after enrichment the HGMF-SSM method yielded pure cultures of campylobacters after 16 to 18 h (overnight) compared with 48 h for the FSPM-10 method. Ninety-four turkey samples collected at local retail stores and 38 frozen pig fecal samples were processed by both methods. Thirty-five samples (26.5%) were positive by the HGMF-SSM method; 24 (18.2%) of these positive samples contained Campylobacter jejuni and 11 (8.3%) contained Campylobacter coli. With the FSPM-10 method, 25 samples (18.9%) were positive: 21 (15.9%) with C. jejuni and 4 (3%) with C. coli. For a subsequent field study, only the HGMF-SSM method was used to isolate Campylobacter from 1,200 chicken samples and 454 turkey samples sold at retail. Analysis of five subisolates from various samples indicated that only one type of Campylobacter was recovered by the HGMF-SSM method, as ascertained by MICs for 10 antimicrobials, sequencing of the short variable region of the flaA gene, and fingerprinting based on amplified fragment length polymorphism. The absence of antibiotics in the SSM may explain the higher

  5. Hydrophobic grid membrane filter/MUG method for total coliform and Escherichia coli enumeration in foods: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Entis, P

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-four laboratories participated in a collaborative study to validate a hydrophobic grid membrane filter (HGMF) method incorporating the use of 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide (MUG) for enumeration of total coliform and Escherichia coli bacteria in foods by comparing its performance against the AOAC 3-tube MPN method (46.013-46.016). Raw milk, raw ground poultry, whole egg powder, cheese powder, and ground black pepper were included in the study. The total coliform methods did not differ significantly, except that the 3-tube method detected a significantly higher level of total coliforms than did the HGMF method in the ground black pepper. Conversely, the HGMF/MUG E. coli method detected significantly higher numbers of E. coli present in the egg powder, cheese powder, and ground black pepper samples, while not differing significantly from the 3-tube method for the raw milk and raw ground poultry samples. The overall confirmation rate of MUG-positive colonies isolated using the HGMF method was 99.5%. The hydrophobic grid membrane filter/MUG method has been adopted official first action as an additional method to AOAC official final action method 46.030-46.034. PMID:2687225

  6. Application of a DNA Hybridization–Hydrophobic-Grid Membrane Filter Method for Detection and Isolation of Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Todd, E. C. D.; Szabo, R. A.; MacKenzie, J. M.; Martin, A.; Rahn, K.; Gyles, C.; Gao, A.; Alves, D.; Yee, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains were isolated from food and animal fecal samples by using PCR to screen for the presence of VTEC after broth enrichment and then filtering VTEC-positive cultures through hydrophobic-grid membrane filters (HGMFs) which were incubated on MacConkey agar. The filters were probed with a digoxigenin-labeled PCR product generated by amplification of a conserved verotoxin gene sequence. Replication of the growth on filters allowed probe-positive colonies to be picked. When ground beef samples were inoculated with VTEC strains, 100% of the strains were recovered, and the detection limit was 0.1 CFU per g. Similar results were obtained with seven types of artificially contaminated vegetables. A survey of 32 packages of vegetables and 23 samples of apple cider obtained at the retail level did not reveal the presence of VTEC. However, the intestinal fecal contents of a moose, 1 of 35 wild mammals and birds examined, contained E. coli O157:H7. The DNA hybridization-HGMF method was also used in a prevalence survey of 327 raw and 744 ready-to-eat products; VTEC strains were recovered from 4.9% of the raw products and 0.7% of the ready-to-eat products. No serotype O157:H7 strains were detected. This method is particularly suited for surveys in which low numbers of VTEC-positive samples are expected and isolates are required. PMID:10543785

  7. Hydrophobic Compounds Reshape Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Jonathan; Rossi, Giulia; Marrink, Siewert J.; Monticelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes have a complex lateral organization featuring domains with distinct composition, also known as rafts, which play an essential role in cellular processes such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. In vivo, perturbations of membrane domains (e.g., by drugs or lipophilic compounds) have major effects on the activity of raft-associated proteins and on signaling pathways, but they are difficult to characterize because of the small size of the domains, typically below optical resolution. Model membranes, instead, can show macroscopic phase separation between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains, and they are often used to investigate the driving forces of membrane lateral organization. Studies in model membranes have shown that some lipophilic compounds perturb membrane domains, but it is not clear which chemical and physical properties determine domain perturbation. The mechanisms of domain stabilization and destabilization are also unknown. Here we describe the effect of six simple hydrophobic compounds on the lateral organization of phase-separated model membranes consisting of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and cholesterol. Using molecular simulations, we identify two groups of molecules with distinct behavior: aliphatic compounds promote lipid mixing by distributing at the interface between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains; aromatic compounds, instead, stabilize phase separation by partitioning into liquid-disordered domains and excluding cholesterol from the disordered domains. We predict that relatively small concentrations of hydrophobic species can have a broad impact on domain stability in model systems, which suggests possible mechanisms of action for hydrophobic compounds in vivo. PMID:25299598

  8. Inverse colloidal crystal membranes for hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vu, Anh T; Wang, Xinying; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Cong, Hailin; Luo, Yongli; Tang, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has gained interest due to its excellent performance in the purification of humanized monoclonal antibodies. The membrane material used in hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has typically been commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride. In this contribution, newly developed inverse colloidal crystal membranes that have uniform pores, high porosity and, therefore, high surface area for protein binding are used as hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography membranes for humanized monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G purification. The capacity of the inverse colloidal crystal membranes developed here is up to ten times greater than commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride membranes with a similar pore size. This work highlights the importance of developing uniform pore size high porosity membranes in order to maximize the capacity of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

  9. Sweeping Gas Membrane Desalination Using Commercial Hydrophobic Hollow Fiber Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    EVANS, LINDSEY; MILLER, JAMES E.

    2002-01-01

    Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods of purifying freshwater, and desalting seawater are required to contend with this destabilizing trend. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology for separations that are traditionally accomplished via conventional distillation or reverse osmosis. As applied to desalination, MD involves the transport of water vapor from a saline solution through the pores of a hydrophobic membrane. In sweeping gas MD, a flowing gas stream is used to flush the water vapor from the permeate side of the membrane, thereby maintaining the vapor pressure gradient necessary for mass transfer. Since liquid does not penetrate the hydrophobic membrane, dissolved ions are completely rejected by the membrane. MD has a number of potential advantages over conventional desalination including low temperature and pressure operation, reduced membrane strength requirements, compact size, and 100% rejection of non-volatiles. The present work evaluated the suitability of commercially available technology for sweeping gas membrane desalination. Evaluations were conducted with Celgard Liqui-Cel{reg_sign} Extra-Flow 2.5X8 membrane contactors with X-30 and X-40 hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes. Our results show that sweeping gas membrane desalination systems are capable of producing low total dissolved solids (TDS) water, typically 10 ppm or less, from seawater, using low grade heat. However, there are several barriers that currently prevent sweeping gas MD from being a viable desalination technology. The primary problem is that large air flows are required to achieve significant water yields, and the costs associated with transporting this air are prohibitive. To

  10. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  11. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  12. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding

    PubMed Central

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices—implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. PMID:25970811

  13. Dehydration processes using membranes with hydrophobic coating

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Yu; Baker, Richard W; Aldajani, Tiem; Ly, Jennifer

    2013-07-30

    Processes for removing water from organic compounds, especially polar compounds such as alcohols. The processes include a membrane-based dehydration step, using a membrane that has a dioxole-based polymer selective layer or the like and a hydrophilic selective layer, and can operate even when the stream to be treated has a high water content, such as 10 wt % or more. The processes are particularly useful for dehydrating ethanol.

  14. Highly efficient hydrophobic titania ceramic membranes for water desalination.

    PubMed

    Kujawa, Joanna; Cerneaux, Sophie; Koter, Stanisław; Kujawski, Wojciech

    2014-08-27

    Hydrophobic titania ceramic membranes (300 kD) were prepared by grafting of C6F13C2H4Si(OC2H5)3 and C12F25C2H4Si(OC2H5)3 molecules and thus applied in membrane distillation (MD) process of NaCl solutions. Grafting efficiency and hydrophobicity were evaluated by contact angle measurement, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, and liquid entry pressure measurement of water. Desalination of NaCl solutions was performed using the modified hydrophobic membranes in air gap MD (AGMD) and direct contact MD (DCMD) processes in various operating conditions. High values of NaCl retention coefficient (>99%) were reached. The permeate fluxes were in the range 231-3692 g·h(-1)·m(-2), depending on applied experimental conditions. AGMD mode appeared to be more efficient showing higher fluxes and selectivity in desalination. Overall mass transfer coefficients (K) for membranes tested in AGMD were constant over the investigated temperature range. However, K values in DCMD increased at elevated temperature. The hydrophobic layer was also stable after 4 years of exposure to open air. PMID:25084346

  15. [Hydrophobic membrane chromatography for fast purification of biological macromolecules].

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Chen, X; Jia, L; Zou, H; Zhang, Y

    1999-07-01

    Cellulose membrane bonded with four commonly used hydrophobic groups, octyl, butyl, phenyl and polyethylene glycol was first investigated for their binding and purification characteristics of protein and enzyme with octyl- and phenyl-Sepharose CL-4 B as controls. Hydrophobic membranes bound BSA effectively by hydrophobic interaction in high salt solution. Their binding capacities were not notably affected by significantly increasing the flow mass rate or decreasing the mass concentration of protein solution, but were much lower than those of octyl- and phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B. 11.8 fold of purification with an approximately 100% recovery of bovine liver catalase was achieved by step gradient elution on the phenyl cellulose membrane cartridge in a single step in only ten mins or a little more. Increase of the flow mass rate had no effect on the purification of catalase, however, the processing time was shortened greatly. Hydrophobic membrane chromatography here reported exibits a potential of fast processing of the protein solution in large volume with low mass concentration of the target protein, such as genetic engineering culture solution. PMID:12552843

  16. Highly efficient hydrophobic titania ceramic membranes for water desalination.

    PubMed

    Kujawa, Joanna; Cerneaux, Sophie; Koter, Stanisław; Kujawski, Wojciech

    2014-08-27

    Hydrophobic titania ceramic membranes (300 kD) were prepared by grafting of C6F13C2H4Si(OC2H5)3 and C12F25C2H4Si(OC2H5)3 molecules and thus applied in membrane distillation (MD) process of NaCl solutions. Grafting efficiency and hydrophobicity were evaluated by contact angle measurement, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, and liquid entry pressure measurement of water. Desalination of NaCl solutions was performed using the modified hydrophobic membranes in air gap MD (AGMD) and direct contact MD (DCMD) processes in various operating conditions. High values of NaCl retention coefficient (>99%) were reached. The permeate fluxes were in the range 231-3692 g·h(-1)·m(-2), depending on applied experimental conditions. AGMD mode appeared to be more efficient showing higher fluxes and selectivity in desalination. Overall mass transfer coefficients (K) for membranes tested in AGMD were constant over the investigated temperature range. However, K values in DCMD increased at elevated temperature. The hydrophobic layer was also stable after 4 years of exposure to open air.

  17. Why Hydrophilic Water can Permeate Hydrophobic Interior of Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Baofu; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2014-03-01

    Water molecules as well as some small molecules have long been found to be able to diffuse across lipid membranes. Such permeation is of significant biological and biotechnological importance. For instance, the permeation of water across lipid membrane plays a important role in regulating ionic concentrations inside of cells. Such water permeation without the assistance of proteins embedded in membranes has been found to be a energetically unfavorable process. We, for the first time, explicitly depict the driving force for such an energetically unfavorable process. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate water diffusion in both liquid-crystalline and ordered gel phases of membranes containing zwitterionic DPPC or anionic DLPS lipid. The membrane conformation is calculated to have a critical role in water permeation, regardless of the type of lipid. The fluctuations in the potential energy are found to have a significant, if not the exclusive, role in the transportation of water across lipid membranes. Our results are also informative for the diffusion of small molecules of CO2, O2 and drug molecules, the absence of diffusion of ions, and the diffusion of water into the hydrophobic pores of carbon nanotubes. The authors acknowledge the support from the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR & E) under Award No. FA9550-10-1-0167.

  18. Converting a marginally hydrophobic soluble protein into a membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Nørholm, Morten H H; Cunningham, Fiona; Deber, Charles M; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2011-03-18

    δ-Helices are marginally hydrophobic α-helical segments in soluble proteins that exhibit certain sequence characteristics of transmembrane (TM) helices [Cunningham, F., Rath, A., Johnson, R. M. & Deber, C. M. (2009). Distinctions between hydrophobic helices in globular proteins and TM segments as factors in protein sorting. J. Biol. Chem., 284, 5395-402]. In order to better understand the difference between δ-helices and TM helices, we have studied the insertion of five TM-like δ-helices into dog pancreas microsomal membranes. Using model constructs in which an isolated δ-helix is engineered into a bona fide membrane protein, we find that, for two δ-helices originating from secreted proteins, at least three single-nucleotide mutations are necessary to obtain efficient membrane insertion, whereas one mutation is sufficient in a δ-helix from the cytosolic protein P450BM-3. We further find that only when the entire upstream region of the mutated δ-helix in the intact cytochrome P450BM-3 is deleted does a small fraction of the truncated protein insert into microsomes. Our results suggest that upstream portions of the polypeptide, as well as embedded charged residues, protect δ-helices in globular proteins from being recognized by the signal recognition particle-Sec61 endoplasmic-reticulum-targeting machinery and that δ-helices in secreted proteins are mutationally more distant from TM helices than δ-helices in cytosolic proteins.

  19. A new method for permeability measurement of hydrophobic membranes in Vacuum Membrane Distillation process.

    PubMed

    Dao, T D; Mericq, J-P; Laborie, S; Cabassud, C

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, a new method for permeability measurement of hydrophobic membranes used in Vacuum Membrane Distillation, instead of common measurement methods, was proposed. As VMD is a pressure and temperature driven process, the idea of this work is to propose a new water vapour permeability measurement method based on variation of feed temperature at a fixed vacuum pressure. This new method showed a greater stability and simplicity than the existing pressure variation method by not only allowing a wide range of feed temperature (25 °C ÷ 60 °C) to be scanned continuously, but also avoiding fluctuations of the system as observed in the pressure variation test. Permeabilities of two different kinds of hydrophobic membranes were measured by this new method and also by the existing pressure variation test. A comparison between these two methods was also presented to assess the feasibility and applicability of this new method. PMID:23415955

  20. Preparation of hydrophobic PVDF hollow fiber membranes for desalination through membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Deyin; Wang, Jun; Qu, Dan; Luan, Zhaokun; Zhao, Changwei; Ren, Xiaojing

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hydrophobic asymmetric hollow fiber membranes was studied by introducing inorganic salt LiCl and water soluble polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) 1500, using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) as solvent and tap water as the coagulation medium. The membranes properties also were tested and characterized. It is found that the non-solvent additive can increase membranes porosity, ether LiCl or PEG 1500. Because of the addition of PEG 1500, the PVDF membranes obtained a rough topography on the membrane surface and the contact angle of the PVDF membranes increased to 113.50 degrees compared to 89.82 degrees of the PVDF membranes spun without an additive. During direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) of 0.6 M sodium chloride solution, the PVDF membranes spun with PEG 1500 as a non-solvent additive achieved higher water permeation flux compared to the membranes spun from PVDF/DMAc and PVDF/DMAC/LiCl dopes, but the latter two membranes exhibited higher salt rejection rate.

  1. Proteomic analysis of mouse liver plasma membrane: use of differential extraction to enrich hydrophobic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijun; Xie, Jinyun; Wang, Xi'e; Liu, Xiaohui; Tang, Xinke; Cao, Rui; Hu, Weijun; Nie, Song; Fan, Chunming; Liang, Songping

    2005-11-01

    To comprehensively identify proteins of liver plasma membrane (PM), we isolated PMs from mouse liver by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. An optimized extraction method for whole PM proteins and several methods of differential extraction expected to enrich hydrophobic membrane proteins were tested. The extracted PM proteins were separated by 2-DE, and were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS, and ESI-quadrupole-TOF MS. As the complementary method, 1-DE-MS/MS was also used to identify PM proteins. The optimized lysis buffer containing urea, thiourea, CHAPS and NP-40 was able to extract more PM proteins, and treatment of PM samples with chloroform/methanol and sodium carbonate led to enrichment of more hydrophobic PM proteins. From the mouse liver PM fraction, 175 non-redundant gene products were identified, of which 88 (about 50%) were integral membrane proteins with one to seven transmembrane domains. The remaining products were probably membrane-associated and cytosolic proteins. The function distribution of all the identified liver PM proteins was analyzed; 40% represented enzymes, 12% receptors and 9% proteins with unknown function.

  2. Oxygen-Permeable, Hydrophobic Membranes of Silanized alpha-Al2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Membranes made of silanized alumina have been prepared and tested as prototypes of derivatized ceramic membranes that are both highly permeable to oxygen and hydrophobic. Improved oxygen-permeable, hydrophobic membranes would be attractive for use in several technological disciplines, including supporting high-temperature aqueousphase oxidation in industrial production of chemicals, oxygenation of aqueous streams for bioreactors, and oxygenation of blood during open-heart surgery and in cases of extreme pulmonary dysfunction. In comparison with organic polymeric oxygen-permeable membranes now commercially available, the derivatized ceramic membranes are more chemically robust, are capable of withstanding higher temperatures, and exhibit higher oxygen-diffusion coefficients.

  3. Hydrophobic Light-to-Heat Conversion Membranes with Self-Healing Ability for Interfacial Solar Heating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianbin; Tang, Bo; Wu, Jinbo; Li, Renyuan; Wang, Peng

    2015-09-01

    Self-healing hydrophobic light-to-heat conversion membranes for interfacial solar heating are fabricated by deposition of light-to-heat conversion material of polypyrrole onto a porous stainless-steel mesh, followed by hydrophobic fluoroalkylsilane modification. The mesh-based membranes spontaneously stay at the water-air interface, collect and convert solar light into heat, and locally heat only the water surface for enhanced evaporation.

  4. Stop-and-move of a marginally hydrophobic segment translocating across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Yukiko; Yamagishi, Marifu; Imai, Kenta; Fujita, Hidenobu; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-09-01

    Many membrane proteins are cotranslationally integrated into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via the protein-conducting channel, the so-called translocon. The hydrophobic transmembrane segment of the translocating nascent polypeptide chain stops at the translocon and then moves laterally into the membrane. Partitioning of the hydrophobic segment into the membrane is the primary determinant for membrane insertion. Here, we examined the behavior of a marginally hydrophobic segment at the translocon and found that its stop-translocation was greatly affected by the C-terminally attached ribosomes. The marginally hydrophobic segment first stops at the membrane and then moves into the lumen as long as the nascent chain is attached to translating ribosomes. When it is released from the ribosome by the termination codon, the marginally hydrophobic segment does not move. Puromycin or RNase treatment also suppressed movement. The movement was reversibly inhibited by high-salt conditions and irreversibly inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. There is an unstable state prior to the stable membrane insertion of the transmembrane segment. This characteristic state is maintained by the synthesizing ribosome. PMID:23747484

  5. Sticking polydisperse hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Michael; Degen, Patrick; Brenner, Thorsten; Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Struth, Bernd; Tolan, Metin; Rehage, Heinz

    2010-10-19

    The formation of a layer of hydrophobic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles stabilized by lauric acid is analyzed by in situ X-ray reflectivity measurements. The data analysis shows that the nanoparticles partially disperse their hydrophobic coating. Consequently, a Langmuir layer was formed by lauric acid molecules that can be compressed into an untilted condensed phase. A majority of the nanoparticles are attached to the Langmuir film integrating lauric acid residue on their surface into the Langmuir film. Hence, the particles at the liquid-gas interface can be identified as so-called Janus beads, which are amphiphilic solids having two sides with different functionality.

  6. Sticking polydisperse hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Michael; Degen, Patrick; Brenner, Thorsten; Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Struth, Bernd; Tolan, Metin; Rehage, Heinz

    2010-10-19

    The formation of a layer of hydrophobic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles stabilized by lauric acid is analyzed by in situ X-ray reflectivity measurements. The data analysis shows that the nanoparticles partially disperse their hydrophobic coating. Consequently, a Langmuir layer was formed by lauric acid molecules that can be compressed into an untilted condensed phase. A majority of the nanoparticles are attached to the Langmuir film integrating lauric acid residue on their surface into the Langmuir film. Hence, the particles at the liquid-gas interface can be identified as so-called Janus beads, which are amphiphilic solids having two sides with different functionality. PMID:20873726

  7. Potentiometric responses of polymeric liquid membranes based on hydrophobic chelating agents to metal ions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Y; Ueda, Y; Hirano, A; Sugawara, M; Tohda, K; Akaiwa, H; Umezawa, Y

    2001-05-01

    The effect of hydrophobicity of acidic chelating agents as sensing materials on the potentiometric responses of polymeric liquid membranes was investigated. The chelating agents tested were 8-quinolinol (HOx), dithizone (HDz), 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) and their alkylated analogues, 5-octyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO8Q), di(phexylphenyl)thiocarbazone (C6HDz), 7-pentadecyloxy-1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (C15PAN) and a series of N-alkylcarbonyl-N-phenylhydroxylamines (CnPHA, n = 3, 6, 9, 12). The distribution coefficients between membrane solvent and water were determined to evaluate the hydrophobicity of the agents. The potential-pH profiles of the membranes containing hydrophobic chelating agents demonstrated the generation of potentiometric responses, while less hydrophobic agents gave no response. A possible model for the generation of membrane potential is proposed. The charge separation is attained by the permselective uptake of metal cations by the chelating agent anion at membrane/solution interface, where the high hydrophobicity of the agent enables the anionic or deprotonated form of the agents to remain at the membrane/solution interface.

  8. How hydrophobic nanoparticles aggregate in the interior of membranes: A computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Falin; Zhang, Xianren; Dong, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Lipid-based dispersion of hydrophobic nanoparticles (NPs) not only gives fundamental insight into how nanomaterials distribute in live cells and organisms, but also provides a quite general route to designing nanocarrier agents in triggered drug delivery and medical imaging. It is not clearly understood how hydrophobic NPs arrange in the interior of a membrane. In this paper, with computer simulation techniques, we demonstrate that hydrophobic NPs having a diameter compared to the hydrophobic thickness of the membrane are capable of clustering in the hydrophobic interior of a cell membrane. Except from the isotropic aggregation, an unexpected linear arrangement of spherical NPs, which is still not found from experiments, is identified here. The free-energy costs associated with linear and isotropic aggregations are computed explicitly to interpret aggregation behavior and the obtained phase diagrams give us a comprehensive understanding of where linear aggregation is expected. In this work we also shows that NP size and membrane tension play key roles in determining the NP aggregate, while the effects of NP concentration and membrane curvature seem to be relatively weak.

  9. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Steffen; Gerwert, Klaus; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang

    2014-12-14

    Proton conduction along protein-bound “water wires” is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded (“dangling”) O–H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments.

  10. Polydimethysiloxane Modified Silica Nanochannel Membrane for Hydrophobicity-Based Molecular Filtration and Detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xingyu; Zhang, Bowen; Yang, Qian; Yan, Fei; Hua, Xin; Su, Bin

    2016-08-01

    We report in this work the fabrication of ultrathin silica nanochannel membranes inhomogeneously modified by polydimethysiloxane (PDMS), designated as PDMS-SNM, for hydrophobicity-based molecular filtration and detection. The modification was accomplished by spatially selective evaporation of hydrophobic PDMS oligomers onto the top surface of the membrane and orifice of silica nanochannels. Thanks to this hydrophobic ultrathin layer and beneath ultrasmall channels (2-3 nm in diameter), only small hydrophobic molecules are able to transport through the PDMS-SNM, whereas hydrophilic and large ones are remarkably inhibited. We first employed this PDMS-SNM as the molecular sieving matrix for selective electrochemical detection of hydrophobic organophosphates (OPs) in milk samples without pretreatment. The PDMS-SNM modified electrode displayed an excellent analytical performance and antifouling/anti-interference ability. We also prepared the free-standing PDMS-SNM consisting of perforated channels, which could filtrate molecules based on their hydrophobicity with an excellent selectivity. As demonstrated, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and dopamine could be separated with a selectivity coefficient as high as 335. Moreover, because of the inhomogeneous nanochannel structure and ultrasmall thickness, a remarkably high flux of hydrophobic molecules across the PDMS-SNM was obtained, which was 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that reported previously. PMID:27414252

  11. Paper-PEG-based membranes for hydrophobic interaction chromatography: purification of monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Yu, Deqiang; Chen, Xiaonong; Pelton, Robert; Ghosh, Raja

    2008-04-15

    This article discusses the preparation of novel Paper-PEG interpenetrating polymer network-based membranes as inexpensive alternative to currently available adsorptive membranes. The Paper-PEG membranes were developed for carrying out hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography (HIMC). PEG is normally very hydrophilic but can undergo phase separation and become hydrophobic in the presence of high antichaotropic salt concentrations. Two variants of the Paper-PEG membranes, Paper-PEG 1 and Paper-PEG 2 were prepared by grafting different amounts of the polymer on filter paper and these were tested for their hydraulic properties and antibody binding capacity. The better of the two membranes (Paper-PEG 1) was then used for purifying the monoclonal antibody hIgG1-CD4 from simulated mammalian cell culture supernatant. The processing conditions required for purification were systematically optimized. The dynamic antibody binding capacity of the Paper-PEG 1 membrane was about 9 mg/mL of bed volume. A single step membrane chromatographic process using Paper-PEG 1 membrane gave high monoclonal antibody purity and recovery. The hydraulic permeability of the paper-based membrane was high and was maintained even after many runs, indicating that membrane fouling was negligible and the membrane was largely incompressible.

  12. Super-hydrophobic surfaces of layer-by-layer structured film-coated electrospun nanofibrous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Tasuku; Ding, Bin; Sone, Yuji; Shiratori, Seimei

    2007-04-01

    We have recently fabricated super-hydrophobic membrane surfaces based on the inspiration of self-cleaning silver ragwort leaves. This biomimetic super-hydrophobic surface was composed of fluoroalkylsilane (FAS)-modified layer-by-layer (LBL) structured film-coated electrospun nanofibrous membranes. The rough fibre surface caused by the electrostatic LBL coating of TiO2 nanoparticles and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was used to imitate the rough surface of nanosized grooves along the silver ragwort leaf fibre axis. The results showed that the FAS modification was the key process for increasing the surface hydrophobicity of the fibrous membranes. Additionally, the dependence of the hydrophobicity of the membrane surfaces upon the number of LBL coating bilayers was affected by the membrane surface roughness. Moreover, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results further indicated that the surface of LBL film-coated fibres absorbed more fluoro groups than the fibre surface without the LBL coating. A (TiO2/PAA)10 film-coated cellulose acetate nanofibrous membrane with FAS surface modification showed the highest water contact angle of 162° and lowest water-roll angle of 2°.

  13. Temporal changes in extracellular polymeric substances on hydrophobic and hydrophilic membrane surfaces in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Matar, Gerald; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Maab, Husnul; Nunes, Suzana; Le-Clech, Pierre; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-05-15

    Membrane surface hydrophilic modification has always been considered to mitigating biofouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). Four hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membranes (pore sizes ∼0.1 μm) differing only in hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface characteristics were operated at a permeate flux of 10 L/m(2) h in the same lab-scale MBR fed with synthetic wastewater. In addition, identical membrane modules without permeate production (0 L/m(2) h) were operated in the same lab-scale MBR. Membrane modules were autopsied after 1, 10, 20 and 30 days of MBR operation, and total extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) accumulated on the membranes were extracted and characterized in detail using several analytical tools, including conventional colorimetric tests (Lowry and Dubois), liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD), fluorescence excitation - emission matrices (FEEM), fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The transmembrane pressure (TMP) quickly stabilized with higher values for the hydrophobic membranes than hydrophilic ones. The sulfonated polysulfone (SPSU) membrane had the highest negatively charged membrane surface, accumulated the least amount of foulants and displayed the lowest TMP. The same type of organic foulants developed with time on the four membranes and the composition of biopolymers shifted from protein dominance at early stages of filtration (day 1) towards polysaccharides dominance during later stages of MBR filtration. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling of LC-OCD data showed that biofilm samples clustered according to the sampling event (time) regardless of the membrane surface chemistry (hydrophobic or hydrophilic) or operating mode (with or without permeate flux). These results suggest that EPS composition may not be the dominant parameter for evaluating membrane performance and possibly other parameters such as biofilm thickness, porosity, compactness and structure should be

  14. Temporal changes in extracellular polymeric substances on hydrophobic and hydrophilic membrane surfaces in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Matar, Gerald; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Maab, Husnul; Nunes, Suzana; Le-Clech, Pierre; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-05-15

    Membrane surface hydrophilic modification has always been considered to mitigating biofouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). Four hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membranes (pore sizes ∼0.1 μm) differing only in hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface characteristics were operated at a permeate flux of 10 L/m(2) h in the same lab-scale MBR fed with synthetic wastewater. In addition, identical membrane modules without permeate production (0 L/m(2) h) were operated in the same lab-scale MBR. Membrane modules were autopsied after 1, 10, 20 and 30 days of MBR operation, and total extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) accumulated on the membranes were extracted and characterized in detail using several analytical tools, including conventional colorimetric tests (Lowry and Dubois), liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD), fluorescence excitation - emission matrices (FEEM), fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The transmembrane pressure (TMP) quickly stabilized with higher values for the hydrophobic membranes than hydrophilic ones. The sulfonated polysulfone (SPSU) membrane had the highest negatively charged membrane surface, accumulated the least amount of foulants and displayed the lowest TMP. The same type of organic foulants developed with time on the four membranes and the composition of biopolymers shifted from protein dominance at early stages of filtration (day 1) towards polysaccharides dominance during later stages of MBR filtration. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling of LC-OCD data showed that biofilm samples clustered according to the sampling event (time) regardless of the membrane surface chemistry (hydrophobic or hydrophilic) or operating mode (with or without permeate flux). These results suggest that EPS composition may not be the dominant parameter for evaluating membrane performance and possibly other parameters such as biofilm thickness, porosity, compactness and structure should be

  15. Liposome-based engineering of cells to package hydrophobic compounds in membrane vesicles for tumor penetration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junsung; Kim, Jiyoung; Jeong, Moonkyoung; Lee, Hyoungjin; Goh, Unbyeol; Kim, Hyaeyeong; Kim, Byungji; Park, Ji-Ho

    2015-05-13

    Natural membrane vesicles (MVs) derived from various types of cells play an essential role in transporting biological materials between cells. Here, we show that exogenous compounds are packaged in the MVs by engineering the parental cells via liposomes, and the MVs mediate autonomous intercellular migration of the compounds through multiple cancer cell layers. Hydrophobic compounds delivered selectively to the plasma membrane of cancer cells using synthetic membrane fusogenic liposomes were efficiently incorporated into the membrane of MVs secreted from the cells and then transferred to neighboring cells via the MVs. This liposome-mediated MV engineering strategy allowed hydrophobic photosensitizers to significantly penetrate both spheroids and in vivo tumors, thereby enhancing the therapeutic efficacy. These results suggest that innate biological transport systems can be in situ engineered via synthetic liposomes to guide the penetration of chemotherapeutics across challenging tissue barriers in solid tumors.

  16. Interplay between hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule in determining membrane-protein topology.

    PubMed

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan Jacob; Prilusky, Jaime; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-09-13

    The energetics of membrane-protein interactions determine protein topology and structure: hydrophobicity drives the insertion of helical segments into the membrane, and positive charges orient the protein with respect to the membrane plane according to the positive-inside rule. Until recently, however, quantifying these contributions met with difficulty, precluding systematic analysis of the energetic basis for membrane-protein topology. We recently developed the dsTβL method, which uses deep sequencing and in vitro selection of segments inserted into the bacterial plasma membrane to infer insertion-energy profiles for each amino acid residue across the membrane, and quantified the insertion contribution from hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule. Here, we present a topology-prediction algorithm called TopGraph, which is based on a sequence search for minimum dsTβL insertion energy. Whereas the average insertion energy assigned by previous experimental scales was positive (unfavorable), the average assigned by TopGraph in a nonredundant set is -6.9 kcal/mol. By quantifying contributions from both hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule we further find that in about half of large membrane proteins polar segments are inserted into the membrane to position more positive charges in the cytoplasm, suggesting an interplay between these two energy contributions. Because membrane-embedded polar residues are crucial for substrate binding and conformational change, the results implicate the positive-inside rule in determining the architectures of membrane-protein functional sites. This insight may aid structure prediction, engineering, and design of membrane proteins. TopGraph is available online (topgraph.weizmann.ac.il). PMID:27562165

  17. Interplay between hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule in determining membrane-protein topology.

    PubMed

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan Jacob; Prilusky, Jaime; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-09-13

    The energetics of membrane-protein interactions determine protein topology and structure: hydrophobicity drives the insertion of helical segments into the membrane, and positive charges orient the protein with respect to the membrane plane according to the positive-inside rule. Until recently, however, quantifying these contributions met with difficulty, precluding systematic analysis of the energetic basis for membrane-protein topology. We recently developed the dsTβL method, which uses deep sequencing and in vitro selection of segments inserted into the bacterial plasma membrane to infer insertion-energy profiles for each amino acid residue across the membrane, and quantified the insertion contribution from hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule. Here, we present a topology-prediction algorithm called TopGraph, which is based on a sequence search for minimum dsTβL insertion energy. Whereas the average insertion energy assigned by previous experimental scales was positive (unfavorable), the average assigned by TopGraph in a nonredundant set is -6.9 kcal/mol. By quantifying contributions from both hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule we further find that in about half of large membrane proteins polar segments are inserted into the membrane to position more positive charges in the cytoplasm, suggesting an interplay between these two energy contributions. Because membrane-embedded polar residues are crucial for substrate binding and conformational change, the results implicate the positive-inside rule in determining the architectures of membrane-protein functional sites. This insight may aid structure prediction, engineering, and design of membrane proteins. TopGraph is available online (topgraph.weizmann.ac.il).

  18. Polar interactions trump hydrophobicity in stabilizing the self-inserting membrane protein Mistic.

    PubMed

    Broecker, Jana; Fiedler, Sebastian; Gimpl, Katharina; Keller, Sandro

    2014-10-01

    Canonical integral membrane proteins are attached to lipid bilayers through hydrophobic transmembrane helices, whose topogenesis requires sophisticated insertion machineries. By contrast, membrane proteins that, for evolutionary or functional reasons, cannot rely on these machineries need to resort to driving forces other than hydrophobicity. A striking example is the self-inserting Bacillus subtilis protein Mistic, which is involved in biofilm formation and has found application as a fusion tag supporting the recombinant production and bilayer insertion of other membrane proteins. Although this unusual protein contains numerous polar and charged residues and lacks characteristic membrane-interaction motifs, it is tightly bound to membranes in vivo and membrane-mimetic systems in vitro. Therefore, we set out to quantify the contributions from polar and nonpolar interactions to the coupled folding and insertion of Mistic. To this end, we defined conditions under which the protein can be unfolded completely and reversibly from various detergent micelles by urea in a two-state equilibrium and where the unfolded state is independent of the detergent used for solubilizing the folded state. This enabled equilibrium unfolding experiments previously used for soluble and β-barrel membrane proteins, revealing that polar interactions with ionic and zwitterionic headgroups and, presumably, the interfacial dipole potential stabilize the protein much more efficiently than nonpolar interactions with the micelle core. These findings unveil the forces that allow a protein to tightly interact with a membrane-mimetic environment without major hydrophobic contributions and rationalize the differential suitability of detergents for the extraction and solubilization of Mistic-tagged membrane proteins.

  19. Water Diffusion Dependence on Amphiphilic Block Design in (Amphiphilic-Hydrophobic) Diblock Copolymer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Dorenbos, Gert

    2016-06-30

    Polyelectrolyte membranes (PEMs) are applied in polyelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). The proton conductive pathways within PEMs are provided by nanometer-sized water containing pores. Large-scale application of PEFC requires the production of low-cost membranes with high proton conductivity and therefore good connected pore networks. Pore network formation within four alternative model diblock (hydrophobic_amphiphilic) copolymers in the presence of water is studied by dissipative particle dynamics. Each hydrophobic block contains 50 consecutively connected hydrophobic (A) fragments, and amphiphilic blocks contain 40 hydrophobic A beads and 10 hydrophilic C beads. For one amphiphilic block the C beads are distributed uniformly along the backbone. For the other architectures C beads are located at the end of the side chains attached at regular intervals along the backbone. Water diffusion through the pores is modeled by Monte Carlo tracer diffusion through mapped morphologies. Diffusion is highest for the grafted architectures and increases with increase of length of the side chains. A consistent picture emerges in which diffusion strongly increases with the value of ⟨Nbond⟩ within the amphiphilic block, where ⟨Nbond⟩ is the average number of bonds between hydrophobic A beads and the nearest C bead. PMID:27266679

  20. Water Diffusion Dependence on Amphiphilic Block Design in (Amphiphilic-Hydrophobic) Diblock Copolymer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Dorenbos, Gert

    2016-06-30

    Polyelectrolyte membranes (PEMs) are applied in polyelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). The proton conductive pathways within PEMs are provided by nanometer-sized water containing pores. Large-scale application of PEFC requires the production of low-cost membranes with high proton conductivity and therefore good connected pore networks. Pore network formation within four alternative model diblock (hydrophobic_amphiphilic) copolymers in the presence of water is studied by dissipative particle dynamics. Each hydrophobic block contains 50 consecutively connected hydrophobic (A) fragments, and amphiphilic blocks contain 40 hydrophobic A beads and 10 hydrophilic C beads. For one amphiphilic block the C beads are distributed uniformly along the backbone. For the other architectures C beads are located at the end of the side chains attached at regular intervals along the backbone. Water diffusion through the pores is modeled by Monte Carlo tracer diffusion through mapped morphologies. Diffusion is highest for the grafted architectures and increases with increase of length of the side chains. A consistent picture emerges in which diffusion strongly increases with the value of ⟨Nbond⟩ within the amphiphilic block, where ⟨Nbond⟩ is the average number of bonds between hydrophobic A beads and the nearest C bead.

  1. Hydrophobic asymmetric ultrafiltration PVDF membranes: an alternative separator for VFB with excellent stability.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenping; Zhang, Huamin; Li, Xianfeng; Zhang, Hongzhang; Li, Yun; Vankelecom, Ivo

    2013-02-14

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) ultrafiltration membranes were investigated for the first time in vanadium redox flow battery (VFB) applications. Surprisingly, PVDF ultrafiltration membranes with hydrophobic pore walls and relatively large pore sizes of several tens of nanometers proved able to separate vanadium ions and protons efficiently, thus being suitable as a VFB separator. The ion selectivity of this new type of VFB membrane could be tuned readily by controlling the membrane morphology via changes in the composition of the membrane casting solution, and the casting thickness. The results showed that the PVDF membranes offered good performances and excellent stability in VFB applications, where it could, performance-wise, truly substitute Nafion in VFB applications, but at a much lower cost. PMID:23223708

  2. Hydrophobic asymmetric ultrafiltration PVDF membranes: an alternative separator for VFB with excellent stability.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenping; Zhang, Huamin; Li, Xianfeng; Zhang, Hongzhang; Li, Yun; Vankelecom, Ivo

    2013-02-14

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) ultrafiltration membranes were investigated for the first time in vanadium redox flow battery (VFB) applications. Surprisingly, PVDF ultrafiltration membranes with hydrophobic pore walls and relatively large pore sizes of several tens of nanometers proved able to separate vanadium ions and protons efficiently, thus being suitable as a VFB separator. The ion selectivity of this new type of VFB membrane could be tuned readily by controlling the membrane morphology via changes in the composition of the membrane casting solution, and the casting thickness. The results showed that the PVDF membranes offered good performances and excellent stability in VFB applications, where it could, performance-wise, truly substitute Nafion in VFB applications, but at a much lower cost.

  3. Hydrophobic allergens from the bottom fraction membrane of Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Mengumpun, Kesajee; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Hamilton, Robert G; Sangsupawanich, Pasuree; Wititsuwannakul, Rapepun

    2008-01-01

    Several proteins of rubber latex have been recognized as allergens causing immediate hypersensitivity in humans. In this study, a bottom fraction membrane (BFM) protein preparation from Hevea brasiliensis trees grown in southern Thailand was used to detect specific IgE in four groups of serum samples. The first group included 170 samples of latex glove factory workers (LGWs); group 2 consisted of the sera of 35 health care workers (HCWs) who were repeatedly exposed to powdered latex gloves; groups 3 and 4 were 31 positive and 22 negative sera, respectively, obtained from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA, tested for IgE to latex allergen. It was found that 56/170 (33%), 5/35 (14%), 11/31 (35.5%) and 1/22 (4.5%) samples of the LGWs, HCWs, CAP+ and CAP- groups had significant IgE to the BFM proteins, respectively. However, of all subjects only one subject of group 1 had experienced allergic morbidity consisting of eczema, conjunctivitis and asthma. The IgE of this subject bound to a 55 kDa component in the rubber latex BFM preparation. Thus, this protein may be regarded as a novel, although minor, latex allergen. Further investigation is needed to characterize the component and to pinpoint its allergenic role. PMID:19054931

  4. How To Functionalize Ceramics by Perfluoroalkylsilanes for Membrane Separation Process? Properties and Application of Hydrophobized Ceramic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kujawa, Joanna; Cerneaux, Sophie; Kujawski, Wojciech; Bryjak, Marek; Kujawski, Jan

    2016-03-23

    The combination of microscopic (atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy) and goniometric (static and dynamic measurements) techniques, and surface characterization (surface free energy determination, critical surface tension, liquid entry pressure, hydraulic permeability) was implemented to discuss the influence of perfluoroalkylsilanes structure and grafting time on the physicochemistry of the created hydrophobic surfaces on the titania ceramic membranes of 5 kD and 300 kD. The impact of molecular structure of perfluoroalkylsilanes modifiers (possessing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms in the fluorinated part of the alkyl chain) and the time of the functionalization process in the range of 5 to 35 h was studied. Based on the scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, it was found that the localization of grafting molecules depends on the membrane pore size (5 kD or 300 kD). In the case of 5 kD titania membranes, modifiers are attached mainly on the surface and only partially inside the membrane pores, whereas, for 300 kD membranes, the perfluoroalkylsilanes molecules are present within the whole porous structure of the membranes. The application of 4 various types of PFAS molecules enabled for interesting observations and remarks. It was explained how to obtain ceramic membrane surfaces with controlled material (contact angle, roughness, contact angle hysteresis) and separation properties. Highly hydrophobic surfaces with low values of contact angle hysteresis and low roughness were obtained. These surfaces possessed also low values of critical surface tension, which means that surfaces are highly resistant to wetting. This finding is crucial in membrane applicability in separation processes. The obtained and characterized hydrophobic membranes were subsequently applied in air-gap membrane distillation processes. All membranes were very efficient in MD processes, showing good transport and selective properties (∼99% of Na

  5. How To Functionalize Ceramics by Perfluoroalkylsilanes for Membrane Separation Process? Properties and Application of Hydrophobized Ceramic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kujawa, Joanna; Cerneaux, Sophie; Kujawski, Wojciech; Bryjak, Marek; Kujawski, Jan

    2016-03-23

    The combination of microscopic (atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy) and goniometric (static and dynamic measurements) techniques, and surface characterization (surface free energy determination, critical surface tension, liquid entry pressure, hydraulic permeability) was implemented to discuss the influence of perfluoroalkylsilanes structure and grafting time on the physicochemistry of the created hydrophobic surfaces on the titania ceramic membranes of 5 kD and 300 kD. The impact of molecular structure of perfluoroalkylsilanes modifiers (possessing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms in the fluorinated part of the alkyl chain) and the time of the functionalization process in the range of 5 to 35 h was studied. Based on the scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, it was found that the localization of grafting molecules depends on the membrane pore size (5 kD or 300 kD). In the case of 5 kD titania membranes, modifiers are attached mainly on the surface and only partially inside the membrane pores, whereas, for 300 kD membranes, the perfluoroalkylsilanes molecules are present within the whole porous structure of the membranes. The application of 4 various types of PFAS molecules enabled for interesting observations and remarks. It was explained how to obtain ceramic membrane surfaces with controlled material (contact angle, roughness, contact angle hysteresis) and separation properties. Highly hydrophobic surfaces with low values of contact angle hysteresis and low roughness were obtained. These surfaces possessed also low values of critical surface tension, which means that surfaces are highly resistant to wetting. This finding is crucial in membrane applicability in separation processes. The obtained and characterized hydrophobic membranes were subsequently applied in air-gap membrane distillation processes. All membranes were very efficient in MD processes, showing good transport and selective properties (∼99% of Na

  6. Fouling and cleaning characteristics of ultrafiltration of hydrophobic dissolved organic matter by a polyvinyl chloride hollow fiber membrane.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyan; Gao, Wei; Li, Jihui; Hu, Wanli

    2009-06-01

    Ultrafiltration membrane fouling is a significant problem in drinking water treatment. Many researchers believe that hydrophobic natural organic matter is the main foulant. In this research, fulvic acid, tannin, and aniline were used to represent hydrophobic acid, neutral, and base, respectively, to investigate modified polyvinyl chloride ultrafiltration membrane fouling characteristics. Four kinds of cleaning methods were used in this study: flushing, backwashing, flushing and backwashing, and chemical cleaning with 0.5% sodium hydroxide. Each was performed on the three hydrophobic dissolved organic matters (acid, neutral, and base) to identify the fouling mechanisms of polyvinyl chloride ultrafiltration membrane. Results showed that hydrophobic base fouled membranes the most and hydrophobic acid the least based on cleaning difficulty.

  7. Toward a Molecular Understanding of the Mechanism of Cryopreservation by Polyampholytes: Cell Membrane Interactions and Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Robin; Hayashi, Fumiaki; Nagashima, Toshio; Matsumura, Kazuaki

    2016-05-01

    Cryopreservation enables long-term preservation of cells at ultralow temperatures. Current cryoprotective agents (CPAs) have several limitations, making it imperative to develop CPAs with advanced properties. Previously, we developed a novel synthetic polyampholyte-based CPA, copolymer of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and methacrylic acid(MAA) (poly(MAA-DMAEMA)), which showed excellent efficiency and biocompatibility. Introduction of hydrophobicity increased its efficiency significantly. Herein, we investigated the activity of other polyampholytes. We prepared two zwitterionic polymers, poly(sulfobetaine) (SPB) and poly(carboxymethyl betaine) (CMB), and compared their efficiency with poly(MAA-DMAEMA). Poly-SPB showed only intermediate property and poly-CMB showed no cryoprotective property. These data suggested that the polymer structure strongly influences cryoprotection, providing an impetus to elucidate the molecular mechanism of cryopreservation. We investigated the mechanism by studying the interaction of polymers with cell membrane, which allowed us to identify the interactions responsible for imparting different properties. Results unambiguously demonstrated that polyampholytes cryopreserve cells by strongly interacting with cell membrane, with hydrophobicity increasing the affinity for membrane interaction, which enables it to protect the membrane from various freezing-induced damages. Additionally, cryoprotective polymers, especially their hydrophobic derivatives, inhibit the recrystallization of ice, thus averting cell death. Hence, our results provide an important insight into the complex mechanism of cryopreservation, which might facilitate the rational design of polymeric CPAs with improved efficiency. PMID:27077533

  8. The role of hydrophobic interactions in positioning of peripheral proteins in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lomize, Andrei L; Pogozheva, Irina D; Lomize, Mikhail A; Mosberg, Henry I

    2007-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) structures of numerous peripheral membrane proteins have been determined. Biological activity, stability, and conformations of these proteins depend on their spatial positions with respect to the lipid bilayer. However, these positions are usually undetermined. Results We report the first large-scale computational study of monotopic/peripheral proteins with known 3D structures. The optimal translational and rotational positions of 476 proteins are determined by minimizing energy of protein transfer from water to the lipid bilayer, which is approximated by a hydrocarbon slab with a decadiene-like polarity and interfacial regions characterized by water-permeation profiles. Predicted membrane-binding sites, protein tilt angles and membrane penetration depths are consistent with spin-labeling, chemical modification, fluorescence, NMR, mutagenesis, and other experimental studies of 53 peripheral proteins and peptides. Experimental membrane binding affinities of peripheral proteins were reproduced in cases that did not involve a helix-coil transition, specific binding of lipids, or a predominantly electrostatic association. Coordinates of all examined peripheral proteins and peptides with the calculated hydrophobic membrane boundaries, subcellular localization, topology, structural classification, and experimental references are available through the Orientations of Proteins in Membranes (OPM) database. Conclusion Positions of diverse peripheral proteins and peptides in the lipid bilayer can be accurately predicted using their 3D structures that represent a proper membrane-bound conformation and oligomeric state, and have membrane binding elements present. The success of the implicit solvation model suggests that hydrophobic interactions are usually sufficient to determine the spatial position of a protein in the membrane, even when electrostatic interactions or specific binding of lipids are substantial. Our results demonstrate that

  9. Affinity Labeling of Highly Hydrophobic Integral Membrane Proteins for Proteome-Wide Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goshe, Michael B.; Blonder, Josip; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-03-01

    The ability to identify and quantify integral membrane proteins is an analytical challenge for mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The use of surfactants to solubilize and derivatize these proteins can suppress peptide ionization and interfere with chromatographic separations during microcapillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry. To circumvent the use of surfactants and increase proteome coverage, an affinity labeling method has been developed to target highly hydrophobic integral membrane proteins using organic-assisted extraction and solubilization followed by cysteinyl-specific labeling using biotinylation reagents. As demonstrated on the membrane subproteome of Deinococcus radiodurans, specific and quantitative labeling of integral membrane proteins was achieved using a 60% methanol-aqueous buffer system and (+)-biotinyl-iodoacetamidyl-3,6-dioxaoctanediamine as the cysteinyl-alkylating reagent. From a total of 220 unique Cys-labeled peptides, 89 proteins were identified of which 40 were integral membrane proteins containing from 1 to 9 mapped transmembrane domains with a maximum positive GRAVY of 1.08. The protocol described can be used with other stable isotope labeling reagents (e.g. ICAT) to enable comparative measurements to be made on differentially expressed hydrophobic membrane proteins from various organisms (e.g. pathogenic bacteria) and cell types and provide a viable method for comparative proteome-wide analyses.

  10. Hydrophobic ion interactions with membranes. Thermodynamic analysis of tetraphenylphosphonium binding to vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Flewelling, R F; Hubbell, W L

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties for the interaction of the hydrophobic ion tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) with egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles were studied in detail by equilibrium dialysis and spin label techniques. A partition coefficient of beta = 4.2 + 0.4 x 10(-6) cm (K congruent to 100) was determined. Electrostatic saturation sets in at approximately 600 microM (about one absorbed TPP+ molecule per 100 lipids), and is not screened by salt. The temperature dependence of binding was determined, which reveals that the binding is entropy-driven with a positive (repulsive) enthalpy of binding, a result to be compared with hydrophobic anions in which the binding enthalpy is negative. The membrane dipole potential may be responsible for this binding difference. Activity coefficients are determined and shown to be significantly different from those of most common salts, an important result that should be considered in all hydrophobic ion studies. Comparison of the TPP+ results with those of its anionic structural analogue, tetraphenylboron (TPB-), permits a general analysis of hydrophobic ion interactions with membranes. A theoretical model consistent with the entire set of data is developed in an accompanying article. PMID:3006814

  11. Effects of Streptococcus sanguinis Bacteriocin on Cell Surface Hydrophobicity, Membrane Permeability, and Ultrastructure of Candida Thallus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengli; Zhao, Yingnan; Xia, Xue; Dong, Xue; Ge, Wenyu; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans (C.a) and Candida tropicalis (C.t) were treated with Streptococcus sanguinis bacteriocin (S.s bacteriocin), respectively; the bacteriostatic dynamics of S.s bacteriocin, their effects on cell surface hydrophobicity, leakage of inorganic phosphorus and macromolecular substance, cytosolic calcium concentration, and ultrastructure changes of Candida thallus were detected and analyzed. The results showed that inhibitory effect of S.s bacteriocin on C.a and C.t reached peak level at 24 h, the cell-surface hydrophobicity decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after S.s bacteriocin treatment, and there was leakage of cytoplasmic inorganic phosphorus and macromolecular substance from C.a and C.t; cytosolic calcium concentration decreased greatly. After 24 h treatment by S.s bacteriocin, depressive deformity and defect could be found in the cell surface of C.a and C.t; the thallus displayed irregular forms: C.a was shrunken, there was unclear margins abutting upon cell wall and cell membrane, nucleus disappeared, and cytoplasm was inhomogeneous; likewise, C.t was first plasmolysis, and then the cytoplasm was shrunk, the ultrastructure of cell wall and cell membrane was continuously damaged, and the nucleus was karyolysis. It was illustrated that S.s bacteriocin had similar antifungal effect on C.a and C.t; their cell surface hydrophobicity, membrane permeability, and ultrastructure were changed significantly on exposure to S.s bacteriocin. PMID:26064919

  12. Effects of Streptococcus sanguinis Bacteriocin on Cell Surface Hydrophobicity, Membrane Permeability, and Ultrastructure of Candida Thallus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shengli; Zhao, Yingnan; Xia, Xue; Dong, Xue; Ge, Wenyu; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans (C.a) and Candida tropicalis (C.t) were treated with Streptococcus sanguinis bacteriocin (S.s bacteriocin), respectively; the bacteriostatic dynamics of S.s bacteriocin, their effects on cell surface hydrophobicity, leakage of inorganic phosphorus and macromolecular substance, cytosolic calcium concentration, and ultrastructure changes of Candida thallus were detected and analyzed. The results showed that inhibitory effect of S.s bacteriocin on C.a and C.t reached peak level at 24 h, the cell-surface hydrophobicity decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after S.s bacteriocin treatment, and there was leakage of cytoplasmic inorganic phosphorus and macromolecular substance from C.a and C.t; cytosolic calcium concentration decreased greatly. After 24 h treatment by S.s bacteriocin, depressive deformity and defect could be found in the cell surface of C.a and C.t; the thallus displayed irregular forms: C.a was shrunken, there was unclear margins abutting upon cell wall and cell membrane, nucleus disappeared, and cytoplasm was inhomogeneous; likewise, C.t was first plasmolysis, and then the cytoplasm was shrunk, the ultrastructure of cell wall and cell membrane was continuously damaged, and the nucleus was karyolysis. It was illustrated that S.s bacteriocin had similar antifungal effect on C.a and C.t; their cell surface hydrophobicity, membrane permeability, and ultrastructure were changed significantly on exposure to S.s bacteriocin. PMID:26064919

  13. Roles of Interleaflet Coupling and Hydrophobic Mismatch in Lipid Membrane Phase-Separation Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Philip W; Williamson, John J; Sansom, Mark S P; Olmsted, Peter D

    2016-09-14

    Characterizing the nanoscale dynamic organization within lipid bilayer membranes is central to our understanding of cell membranes at a molecular level. We investigate phase separation and communication across leaflets in ternary lipid bilayers, including saturated lipids with between 12 and 20 carbons per tail. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations reveal a novel two-step kinetics due to hydrophobic mismatch, in which the initial response of the apposed leaflets upon quenching is to increase local asymmetry (antiregistration), followed by dominance of symmetry (registration) as the bilayer equilibrates. Antiregistration can become thermodynamically preferred if domain size is restricted below ∼20 nm, with implications for the symmetry of rafts and nanoclusters in cell membranes, which have similar reported sizes. We relate our findings to theory derived from a semimicroscopic model in which the leaflets experience a "direct" area-dependent coupling, and an "indirect" coupling that arises from hydrophobic mismatch and is most important at domain boundaries. Registered phases differ in composition from antiregistered phases, consistent with a direct coupling between the leaflets. Increased hydrophobic mismatch purifies the phases, suggesting that it contributes to the molecule-level lipid immiscibility. Our results demonstrate an interplay of competing interleaflet couplings that affect phase compositions and kinetics, and lead to a length scale that can influence lateral and transverse bilayer organization within cells. PMID:27574865

  14. Roles of Interleaflet Coupling and Hydrophobic Mismatch in Lipid Membrane Phase-Separation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the nanoscale dynamic organization within lipid bilayer membranes is central to our understanding of cell membranes at a molecular level. We investigate phase separation and communication across leaflets in ternary lipid bilayers, including saturated lipids with between 12 and 20 carbons per tail. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations reveal a novel two-step kinetics due to hydrophobic mismatch, in which the initial response of the apposed leaflets upon quenching is to increase local asymmetry (antiregistration), followed by dominance of symmetry (registration) as the bilayer equilibrates. Antiregistration can become thermodynamically preferred if domain size is restricted below ∼20 nm, with implications for the symmetry of rafts and nanoclusters in cell membranes, which have similar reported sizes. We relate our findings to theory derived from a semimicroscopic model in which the leaflets experience a “direct” area-dependent coupling, and an “indirect” coupling that arises from hydrophobic mismatch and is most important at domain boundaries. Registered phases differ in composition from antiregistered phases, consistent with a direct coupling between the leaflets. Increased hydrophobic mismatch purifies the phases, suggesting that it contributes to the molecule-level lipid immiscibility. Our results demonstrate an interplay of competing interleaflet couplings that affect phase compositions and kinetics, and lead to a length scale that can influence lateral and transverse bilayer organization within cells. PMID:27574865

  15. Hydrophobic Variations of N-Oxide Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Manipulation: Importance of Non-hydrocarbon Groups in the Hydrophobic Portion

    PubMed Central

    Aiman, Sadaf; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces several N-oxide amphiphiles evaluated for a large membrane protein assembly. Among these N-oxide amphiphiles, cholate-based agents (CAO and CAO-1) displayed the most favorable behaviors for membrane protein stabilization. This result raises the possibility that the identity and number of non-hydrocarbon groups present in the hydrophobic region plays a critical role in determining detergent properties. PMID:24347070

  16. Cholesterol expels ibuprofen from the hydrophobic membrane core and stabilizes lamellar phases in lipid membranes containing ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Richard J; Armstrong, Clare L; Maqbool, Amna; Toppozini, Laura; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-06-28

    There is increasing evidence that common drugs, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, interact with lipid membranes. Ibuprofen is one of the most common over the counter drugs in the world, and is used for relief of pain and fever. It interacts with the cyclooxygenase pathway leading to inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. From X-ray diffraction of highly oriented model membranes containing between 0 and 20 mol% ibuprofen, 20 mol% cholesterol, and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), we present evidence for a non-specific interaction between ibuprofen and cholesterol in lipid bilayers. At a low ibuprofen concentrations of 2 mol%, three different populations of ibuprofen molecules were found: two in the lipid head group region and one in the hydrophobic membrane core. At higher ibuprofen concentrations of 10 and 20 mol%, the lamellar bilayer structure is disrupted and a lamellar to cubic phase transition was observed. In the presence of 20 mol% cholesterol, ibuprofen (at 5 mol%) was found to be expelled from the membrane core and reside solely in the head group region of the bilayers. 20 mol% cholesterol was found to stabilize lamellar membrane structure and the formation of a cubic phase at 10 and 20 mol% ibuprofen was suppressed. The results demonstrate that ibuprofen interacts with lipid membranes and that the interaction is strongly dependent on the presence of cholesterol.

  17. MtsB, a hydrophobic membrane protein of Streptococcus iniae, is an effective subunit vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lili; Wang, Jun; Huang, Baofeng; Xie, Mingquan; Li, Anxing

    2011-01-10

    Streptococcus iniae is a major bacterium that causes invasive disease in cultured fish worldwide. The protection relies mainly on anti-microbial compounds and vaccines, and there is much interest in developing S. iniae vaccine based on conserved protein immunogens. Subcellular localization of protein has important influence on its immunogenicity. The surface and extracellular proteins of pathogenic bacteria can be easily recognized by the infected host compare to intracellular proteins, which are the feasible vaccine development targets. However, a putative hydrophobic membrane protein (designated MtsB) of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter system was found to be protective against S. iniae HD-1 infection when used as an injection vaccine administered intraperitoneally into tilapia. The MtsB protein is present on the cytoplasmic membrane and is expressed in vivo during Kunming mice infection by S. iniae HD-1. This is believed to be the first report on the use of a hydrophobic membrane protein of the ABC system as an S. iniae subunit vaccine.

  18. Modulation by small hydrophobic molecules of valinomycin-mediated potassium transport across phospholipid vesicle membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, N.R.; Gould, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of small hydrophobic molecules on valinonycin-mediated K/sup +/ transport in small unilamellar soybean phospholipid vesicles have been studied by using a vesicle-entrapped pH-sensitive hydropholic fluorescence probe to monitor counterion-limited, passive H/sup +/ diffusion into vesicles after an abrupt decrease in external pH. Under conditions where, even in the absence of valinomycin, transmembrane K/sup +/ movement represented the primary and limiting counterion flux, <1 valinomycin molecule/vesicle was sufficient to accelerate the rate of H/sup +/ entry into all of the vesicles. Incorporation of the bulkily substituted molecules butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), and p-di-tert-butylbenzene into soybean lipid bilayers had no effect upon K/sup +/ diffusion in the absence of valinomycin. However, the presence of these hydrophobic molecules increased the apparent efficacy for K/sup +/ transport of a given valinomycin concentration by as much as 4-6 fold. The less bulky membrane perturbants tert-butyl alcohol, phenol, and heptane showed very much less dramatic effects. While the rate of valinomycin-mediated K/sup +/ transport (in the presence or absence of BHT) was very sensitive to temperature-induced changes in membrane fluidity, the degree of synergistic interaction between valinomycin and BHT was independent of temperature. Furthermore, BHT, BHA, and p-di-tert-butylbenzene, at levels which alter valinomycin-mediated K/sup +/ transport, did not by themselves induce changes in membrane fluidity. It is postulated that changes in phospholipid head-group packing and/or surface charge density brought about by the presence of bulky perturber molecules leads to changes in partitioning of valinomycin or the valinomycin-K/sup +/ complex between the aqueous and membrane phases.

  19. Hydrophobicity, topography in membranes and photosensitization of silicon phthalocyanines with axial ligands of varying lengths.

    PubMed

    Sholto, Alan; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2008-03-01

    Six amphiphilic silicon phthalocyanines (SiPc's) axially linked to a dimethylated amino alkyl group of varying length have been examined for their potential suitability as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). This group of molecules was chosen because the length of the axial ligand might place the chromophoric part of the molecule at different vertical depths in the membrane and possibly affect the extent of membrane localized damage caused by singlet oxygen. We tested the relative penetration depth of the SiPc groups in the membrane by the extent to which their fluorescence was quenched by external iodide ions. We also measured singlet oxygen quantum yields of the SiPc's in a liposome membrane, using the fluorescent target for singlet oxygen, 9,10-dimethylanthracene. The hydrophobicity parameters, LogP, were calculated and were also measured. Some correlation was found between them and Kb's, the binding constants for liposomes. The effect of the axial ligand's length is less striking than in similar cases with hematoporphyrins and protoporphyrins. We link this smaller effect with a bending of the linker chain that enables, sterically, a better positioning of the sensitizer molecules within the ordered lipid layer structure.

  20. Inhibition of Sendai virus fusion with phospholipid vesicles and human erythrocyte membranes by hydrophobic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, D.R.; Flanagan, T.D.; Young, J.E.; Yeagle, P.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Hydrophobic di- and tripeptides which are capable of inhibiting enveloped virus infection of cells are also capable of inhibiting at least three different types of membrane fusion events. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of N-methyl dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (N-methyl DOPE), containing encapsulated 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid (ANTS) and/or p-xylene bis(pyridinium bromide) (DPX), were formed by extrusion. Vesicle fusion and leakage were then monitored with the ANTS/DPX fluorescence assay. Sendai virus fusion with lipid vesicles and Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes were measured by following the relief of fluorescence quenching of virus labeled with octadecylrhodamine B chloride (R18). This study found that the effectiveness of the peptides carbobenzoxy-L-Phe-L-Phe (Z-L-Phe-L-Phe), Z-L-Phe, Z-D-Phe, and Z-Gly-L-Phe-L-Phe in inhibiting N-methyl DOPE LUV fusion or fusion of virus with N-methyl DOPE LUV also paralleled their reported ability to block viral infectivity. Furthermore, Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly and Z-Gly-L-Phe inhibited Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes with the same relative potency with which they inhibited vesicle-vesicle and virus-vesicle fusion. The evidence suggests a mechanism by which these peptides exert their inhibition of plaque formation by enveloped viruses. This class of inhibitors apparently acts by inhibiting fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane, thereby preventing viral infection. The physical pathway by which these peptides inhibit membrane fusion was investigated. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of proposed intermediates in the pathway for membrane fusion in LUV revealed that the potent fusion inhibitor Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly selectively altered the structure (or dynamics) of the hypothesized fusion intermediates and that the poor inhibitor Z-Gly-L-Phe did not.

  1. A molecular model for lipid-protein interaction in membranes: the role of hydrophobic mismatch.

    PubMed Central

    Fattal, D R; Ben-Shaul, A

    1993-01-01

    The interaction free energy between a hydrophobic, transmembrane, protein and the surrounding lipid environment is calculated based on a microscopic model for lipid organization. The protein is treated as a rigid hydrophobic solute of thickness dP, embedded in a lipid bilayer of unperturbed thickness doL. The lipid chains in the immediate vicinity of the protein are assumed to adjust their length to that of the protein (e.g., they are stretched when dP > doL) in order to bridge over the lipid-protein hydrophobic mismatch (dP-doL). The bilayer's hydrophobic thickness is assumed to decay exponentially to its asymptotic, unperturbed, value. The lipid deformation free energy is represented as a sum of chain (hydrophobic core) and interfacial (head-group region) contributions. The chain contribution is calculated using a detailed molecular theory of chain packing statistics, which allows the calculation of conformational properties and thermodynamic functions (in a mean-field approximation) of the lipid tails. The tails are treated as single chain amphiphiles, modeled using the rotational isometric state scheme. The interfacial free energy is represented by a phenomenological expression, accounting for the opposing effects of head-group repulsions and hydrocarbon-water surface tension. The lipid deformation free energy delta F is calculated as a function of dP-doL. Most calculations are for C14 amphiphiles which, in the absence of a protein, pack at an average area per head-group ao approximately equal to 32 A2 (doL approximately 24.5 A), corresponding to the fluid state of the membrane. When dP = doL, delta F > 0 and is due entirely to the loss of conformational entropy experienced by the chains around the protein. When dP > doL, the interaction free energy is further increased due to the enhanced stretching of the tails. When dP < doL, chain flexibility (entropy) increases, but this contribution to delta F is overcounted by the increase in the interfacial free energy

  2. Plasma membrane association of three classes of bacterial toxins is mediated by a basic-hydrophobic motif.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Brett; Ahrens, Sebastian; Satchell, Karla J F

    2012-02-01

    Plasma membrane targeting is essential for the proper function of many bacterial toxins. A conserved fourhelical bundle membrane localization domain (4HBM) was recently identified within three diverse families of toxins: clostridial glucosylating toxins, MARTX toxins and Pasteurella multocida-like toxins. When expressed in tissue culture cells or in yeast, GFP fusions to at least one 4HBM from each toxin family show significant peripheral membrane localization but with differing profiles. Both in vivo expression and in vitro binding studies reveal that the ability of these domains to localize to the plasma membrane and bind negatively charged phospholipids requires a basic-hydrophobic motif formed by the L1 and L3 loops. The different binding capacity of each 4HBM is defined by the hydrophobicity of an exposed residue within the motif. This study establishes that bacterial effectors utilize a normal host cell mechanism to locate the plasma membrane where they can then access their intracellular targets.

  3. Influence of hydrophobic/hydrophilic fractions of extracellular organic matters of Microcystis aeruginosa on ultrafiltration membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqing; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Li, Lei; Deng, Jing; Tan, Chaoqun; Zhu, Mingqiu

    2014-02-01

    Fouling is a major obstacle to maintain the efficiency of ultrafiltration-based drinking water treatment process. Algal extracellular organic matters (EOMs) are currently considered as one of the major sources of membrane fouling. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of different hydrophobic/hydrophilic fractions of EOM extracted from Microcystis aeruginosa on ultrafiltration membrane fouling at lab scale. The experimental data indicated that EOM exhibited similar flux decline trends on polyethersulfone (PES) and regenerated cellulose (RC) membranes but caused greater irreversible fouling on PES membrane than RC membrane due to its hydrophobic property. It was also observed that charged hydrophilic (CHPI) and neutral hydrophilic (NHPI) fractions caused greater flux decline over hydrophobic (HPO) and transphilic (TPI) fractions. For PES membrane, the order of the irreversible fouling potentials for the four fractions was HPO>TPI>CHPI>NHPI, while the irreversible fouling potentials of RC membrane were tiny and could be ignored. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra suggested that protein-like, polysaccharide-like and humic-like substances were the major components responsible for membrane fouling. The results also indicated that the irreversible fouling increased as the pH decreased. The addition of calcium to feed solutions led to more severe flux decline and irreversible fouling.

  4. Evaluation of persistent hydrophobic organic compounds in the Columbia River Basin using semipermeable-membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, K.A.; Gale, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    Persistent hydrophobic organic compounds are of concern in the Columbia River because they have been correlated with adverse effects on wildlife. We analysed samples from nine main-stem and six tributary sites throughout the Columbia River Basin (Washington and Oregon) for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, and priority-pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Because these compounds may have important biological consequences at aqueous concentrations well below the detection limits associated with conventional sampling methods, we used semipermeable-membrane devices to sample water and achieved parts-per-quintillion detection limits. All of these compound classes were prevalent within the basin, but concentrations of many analytes were highest in the vicinity of Portland-Vancouver, indicating that the Willamette subbasin-and perhaps the urban area in particular-is an important source of these compounds. Data collected during basin low-flow conditions in 1997 and again during basin high-flow conditions in 1998 indicate that in-stream processes such as dilution by relatively clean inflow, and flow through island hyporheic zones may be important mechanisms for attenuating dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic compounds.

  5. Effect of non-solvent additives on the morphology, pore structure, and direct contact membrane distillation performance of PVDF-CTFE hydrophobic membranes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Libing; Wu, Zhenjun; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Yuansong; Wang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Four common types of additives for polymer membrane preparation including organic macromolecule and micromolecule additives, inorganic salts and acids, and the strong non-solvent H2O were used to prepare poly (vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) (PVDF-CTFE) hydrophobic flat-sheet membranes. Membrane properties including morphology, porosity, hydrophobicity, pore size and pore distribution were investigated, and the permeability was evaluated via direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) of 3.5g/L NaCl solution in a DCMD configuration. Both inorganic and organic micromolecule additives were found to slightly influence membrane hydrophobicity. Polyethylene glycol (PEG), organic acids, LiCl, MgCl2, and LiCl/H2O mixtures were proved to be effective additives to PVDF-CTFE membranes due to their pore-controlling effects and the capacity to improve the properties and performance of the resultant membranes. The occurrence of a pre-gelation process showed that when organic and inorganic micromolecules were added to PVDF-CTFE solution, the resultant membranes presented a high interconnectivity structure. The membrane prepared with dibutyl phthalate (DBP) showed a nonporous surface and symmetrical cross-section. When H2O and LiCl/H2O mixtures were also used as additives, they were beneficial for solid-liquid demixing, especially when LiCl/H2O mixed additives were used. The membrane prepared with 5% LiCl+2% H2O achieved a flux of 24.53kg/(m(2)·hr) with 99.98% salt rejection. This study is expected to offer a reference not only for PVDF-CTFE membrane preparation but also for other polymer membranes. PMID:27372116

  6. Effect of non-solvent additives on the morphology, pore structure, and direct contact membrane distillation performance of PVDF-CTFE hydrophobic membranes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Libing; Wu, Zhenjun; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Yuansong; Wang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Four common types of additives for polymer membrane preparation including organic macromolecule and micromolecule additives, inorganic salts and acids, and the strong non-solvent H2O were used to prepare poly (vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) (PVDF-CTFE) hydrophobic flat-sheet membranes. Membrane properties including morphology, porosity, hydrophobicity, pore size and pore distribution were investigated, and the permeability was evaluated via direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) of 3.5g/L NaCl solution in a DCMD configuration. Both inorganic and organic micromolecule additives were found to slightly influence membrane hydrophobicity. Polyethylene glycol (PEG), organic acids, LiCl, MgCl2, and LiCl/H2O mixtures were proved to be effective additives to PVDF-CTFE membranes due to their pore-controlling effects and the capacity to improve the properties and performance of the resultant membranes. The occurrence of a pre-gelation process showed that when organic and inorganic micromolecules were added to PVDF-CTFE solution, the resultant membranes presented a high interconnectivity structure. The membrane prepared with dibutyl phthalate (DBP) showed a nonporous surface and symmetrical cross-section. When H2O and LiCl/H2O mixtures were also used as additives, they were beneficial for solid-liquid demixing, especially when LiCl/H2O mixed additives were used. The membrane prepared with 5% LiCl+2% H2O achieved a flux of 24.53kg/(m(2)·hr) with 99.98% salt rejection. This study is expected to offer a reference not only for PVDF-CTFE membrane preparation but also for other polymer membranes.

  7. Deconvoluting the Effect of the Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Domains of an Amphiphilic Integral Membrane Protein in Lipid Bicontinuous Cubic Mesophases.

    PubMed

    van 't Hag, Leonie; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lu, Jingxiong; Hawley, Adrian M; Gras, Sally L; Drummond, Calum J; Conn, Charlotte E

    2015-11-10

    Lipidic bicontinuous cubic mesophases with encapsulated amphiphilic proteins are widely used in a range of biological and biomedical applications, including in meso crystallization, as drug delivery vehicles for therapeutic proteins, and as biosensors and biofuel cells. However, the effect of amphiphilic protein encapsulation on the cubic phase nanostructure is not well-understood. In this study, we illustrate the effect of incorporating the bacterial amphiphilic membrane protein Ag43, and its individual hydrophobic β(43) and hydrophilic α(43) domains, in bicontinuous cubic mesophases. For the monoolein, monoalmitolein, and phytantriol cubic phases with and without 8% w/w cholesterol, the effect of the full length amphiphilic protein Ag43 on the cubic phase nanostructure was more significant than the sum of the individual hydrophobic β(43) and hydrophilic α(43) domains. Several factors were found to potentially influence the impact of the hydrophobic β(43) domain on the cubic phase internal nanostructure. These include the size of the hydrophobic β(43) domain relative to the thickness of the lipid bilayer, as well as its charge and diameter. The size of the hydrophilic α(43) domain relative to the water channel radius of the cubic mesophase was also found to be important. The secondary structure of the Ag43 proteins was affected by the hydrophobic thickness and physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer and the water channel diameter of the cubic phase. Such structural changes may be small but could potentially affect membrane protein function.

  8. Hydrophobic pillared square grids for selective removal of CO 2 from simulated flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Elsaidi, Sameh K.; Mohamed, Mona H.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Kumar, Amrit; Lusi, Matteo; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A.; Space, Brian; Xu, Wenqian; Halder, Gregory J.; Liu, Jun; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2015-01-01

    Capture of CO2 from flue gas or air is considered as feasible way to reduce the anthropogenic emission of CO2. Herein we reported the impact of metal substitution on tuning the physicochemical properties in isostructural family of metal organic materials (MOMs) based on pyrazine as organic linker, hexaflouro silicate as anionic pillar and Zn, Cu, Ni and Co as metal centres. Two new isostructural square grid networks namely SIFSIX-3-Ni and SIFSIX-Co are fully characterized and compared with the parent Zn(II) and Cu(II). Interestingly the new Ni(II) and Co (II) analogues higher loading capacity for CO2 at 0.15 bar and higher CO2/N2 selectivity at condition relevant to flue gas separation. Our data show that a small change in the structure could lead to dramatic enhancement in the physicochemical properties of MOMs.

  9. Switchable hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface of electrospun poly (l-lactide) membranes obtained by CF₄microwave plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Mengyao; Zhou, Baoming; Jiao, Kunyan; Qian, Xiaoming; Xu, Zhiwei; Teng, Kunyue; Zhao, Lihuan; Wang, Jiajun; Jiao, Yanan

    2014-11-29

    A switchable surface that promotes either hydrophobic or hydrophilic wettability of poly (L-lactide) (PLLA) microfibrous membranes is obtained by CF₄ microwave plasma treatment in this paper. The results indicated that both etching and grafting process occurred during the CF₄ plasma treatment and these two factors synergistically affected the final surface wettability of PLLA membranes. When plasma treatment was taken under a relatively low power, the surface wettability of PLLA membranes turned from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Especially when CF₄ plasma treatment was taken under 100 W for 10 min and 150 W for 5 min, the water contact angle sharply decreased from 116 ± 3.0° to ~0°. According to Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) results, the PLLA fibers were notably etched by CF₄ plasma treatment. Combined with the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements, only a few fluorine-containing groups were grafted onto the surface, so the etching effect directly affected the surface wettability of PLLA membranes in low plasma power condition. However, with the plasma power increasing to 200 W, the PLLA membrane surface turned to hydrophobic again. In contrast, the morphology changes of PLLA fiber surfaces were not obvious while a large number of fluorine-containing groups grafted onto the surface. So the grafting effect gradually became the major factor for the final surface wettability.

  10. Switchable hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface of electrospun poly (l-lactide) membranes obtained by CF₄microwave plasma treatment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Mengyao; Zhou, Baoming; Jiao, Kunyan; Qian, Xiaoming; Xu, Zhiwei; Teng, Kunyue; Zhao, Lihuan; Wang, Jiajun; Jiao, Yanan

    2014-11-29

    A switchable surface that promotes either hydrophobic or hydrophilic wettability of poly (L-lactide) (PLLA) microfibrous membranes is obtained by CF₄ microwave plasma treatment in this paper. The results indicated that both etching and grafting process occurred during the CF₄ plasma treatment and these two factors synergistically affected the final surface wettability of PLLA membranes. When plasma treatment was taken under a relatively low power, the surface wettability of PLLA membranes turned from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Especially when CF₄ plasma treatment was taken under 100 W for 10 min and 150 W for 5 min, the water contact angle sharply decreasedmore » from 116 ± 3.0° to ~0°. According to Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) results, the PLLA fibers were notably etched by CF₄ plasma treatment. Combined with the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements, only a few fluorine-containing groups were grafted onto the surface, so the etching effect directly affected the surface wettability of PLLA membranes in low plasma power condition. However, with the plasma power increasing to 200 W, the PLLA membrane surface turned to hydrophobic again. In contrast, the morphology changes of PLLA fiber surfaces were not obvious while a large number of fluorine-containing groups grafted onto the surface. So the grafting effect gradually became the major factor for the final surface wettability.« less

  11. Interaction of Phenylalanine with DPPC Model Membranes: More Than a Hydrophobic Interaction.

    PubMed

    Rosa, A S; Cutro, A C; Frías, M A; Disalvo, E A

    2015-12-31

    The negative free energy previously reported is explained by the stabilization of a PC-Phe (phosphocholine-phenylalanine) complex in the presence of water shown by the decrease in the symmetric stretching frequency of the phosphate group of the lipid (PO2(-)). An entropic contribution due to the disruption of the water network around the phenyl and in the membrane defect may be invoked. The dipole potential decrease is explained by the orientation of the carboxylate opposing to the CO of the lipids with oxygen moiety toward the low hydrated hydrocarbon core. The symmetric bending frequency of NH3(+) group of Phe, decreases in 5.2 cm(-1) in relation to water congruent with zeta potential shift to positive values. The Phe to DPPC dissociation constant is Kd = 2.23 ± 0.09 mM, from which the free energy change is about -4.54 kcal/mol at 25 °C. This may be due to hydrophobic contributions and two hydrogen bonds.

  12. Effects of hydrophobicity of diffusion layer on the electroreduction of biomass derivatives in polymer electrolyte membrane reactors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; He, Gaohong; Ge, Feilong; Xiao, Wu; Benziger, Jay; Wu, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, the hydrophobicity design of a diffusion layer based on the volatility of hydrogenation reactants in aqueous solutions is reported. The hydrophobicity of the diffusion layer greatly influences the hydrogenation performance of two model biomass derivatives, namely, butanone and maleic acid, in polymer electrolyte membrane reactors operated at atmospheric pressure. Hydrophobic carbon paper repels aqueous solutions, but highly volatile butanone can permeate in vapor form and achieve a high hydrogenation rate, whereas, for nonvolatile maleic acid, great mass transfer resistance prevents hydrogenation. With a hydrophilic stainless-steel welded mesh diffusion layer, aqueous solutions of both butanone and maleic acid permeate in liquid form. Hydrogenation of maleic acid reaches a similar level as that of butanone. The maximum reaction rate is 340 nmol cm(-2)  s(-1) for both hydrogenation systems and the current efficiency reaches 70 %. These results are better than those reported in the literature. PMID:25319718

  13. Effects of hydrophobicity of diffusion layer on the electroreduction of biomass derivatives in polymer electrolyte membrane reactors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; He, Gaohong; Ge, Feilong; Xiao, Wu; Benziger, Jay; Wu, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, the hydrophobicity design of a diffusion layer based on the volatility of hydrogenation reactants in aqueous solutions is reported. The hydrophobicity of the diffusion layer greatly influences the hydrogenation performance of two model biomass derivatives, namely, butanone and maleic acid, in polymer electrolyte membrane reactors operated at atmospheric pressure. Hydrophobic carbon paper repels aqueous solutions, but highly volatile butanone can permeate in vapor form and achieve a high hydrogenation rate, whereas, for nonvolatile maleic acid, great mass transfer resistance prevents hydrogenation. With a hydrophilic stainless-steel welded mesh diffusion layer, aqueous solutions of both butanone and maleic acid permeate in liquid form. Hydrogenation of maleic acid reaches a similar level as that of butanone. The maximum reaction rate is 340 nmol cm(-2)  s(-1) for both hydrogenation systems and the current efficiency reaches 70 %. These results are better than those reported in the literature.

  14. Peripheral myelin of Xenopus laevis: Role of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions in membrane compaction

    PubMed Central

    Luo, XiaoYang; Cerullo, Jana; Dawli, Tamara; Priest, Christina; Haddadin, Zaid; Kim, Angela; Inouye, Hideyo; Suffoletto, Brian P.; Avila, Robin L.; Lees, Jonathan P.B.; Sharma, Deepak; Xie, Bo; Costello, Catherine E.; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    P0 glycoprotein is the major structural protein of peripheral nerve myelin where it is thought to modulate inter-membrane adhesion at both the extracellular apposition, which is labile upon changes in pH and ionic strength, and the cytoplasmic apposition, which is resistant to such changes. Most studies on P0 have focused on structure-function correlates in higher vertebrates. Here, we focused on its role in the structure and interactions of frog (Xenopus laevis) myelin, where it exists primarily in a dimeric form. As part of our study, we deduced the full sequence of Xenopus laevis P0 (xP0) from its cDNA. The xP0 sequence was found to be similar to P0 sequences of higher vertebrates, suggesting that a common mechanism of PNS myelin compaction via P0 interaction might have emerged through evolution. As previously reported for mouse PNS myelin, a similar change of extracellular apposition in frog PNS myelin as a function of pH and ionic strength was observed, which can be explained by a conformational change of P0 due to protonation-deprotonation of His52 at P0’s putative adhesive interface. On the other hand, the cytoplasmic apposition in frog PNS myelin, like that in the mouse, remained unchanged at different pH and ionic strength. The contribution of hydrophobic interactions to stabilizing the cytoplasmic apposition was tested by incubating sciatic nerves with detergents. Dramatic expansion at the cytoplasmic apposition was observed for both frog and mouse, indicating a common hydrophobic nature at this apposition. Urea also expanded the cytoplasmic apposition of frog myelin likely owing to denaturation of P0. Removal of the fatty acids that attached to the single Cys residue in the cytoplasmic domain of P0 did not change PNS myelin structure of either frog or mouse, suggesting that the P0-attached fatty acyl chain does not play a significant role in PNS myelin compaction and stability. These results help clarify the present understanding of P0’s adhesion

  15. Membrane Partitioning of the Pore-Forming Domain of Colicin A. Role of the Hydrophobic Helical Hairpin

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Ivan L.; Arnulphi, Cristina; Ibáñez de Opakua, Alain; Alonso-Mariño, Marián; Goñi, Félix M.; Viguera, Ana R.

    2013-01-01

    The colicins are bacteriocins that target Escherichia coli and kill bacterial cells through different mechanisms. Colicin A forms ion channels in the inner membranes of nonimmune bacteria. This activity resides exclusively in its C-terminal fragment (residues 387–592). The soluble free form of this domain is a 10 α-helix bundle. The hydrophobic helical hairpin, H8–H9, is buried inside the structure and shielded by eight amphipathic surface helices. The interaction of the C-terminal colicin A domain and several chimeric variants with lipidic vesicles was examined here by isothermal titration calorimetry. In the mutant constructions, natural sequences of the hydrophobic helices H8 and H9 were either removed or substituted by polyalanine or polyleucine. All the constructions fully associated with DOPG liposomes including the mutant that lacked helices H8 and H9, indicating that amphipathic rather than hydrophobic helices were the major determinants of the exothermic binding reactions. Alanine is not specially favored in the lipid-bound form; the chimeric construct with polyalanine produced lower enthalpy gain. On the other hand, the large negative heat capacities associated with partitioning, a characteristic feature of the hydrophobic effect, were found to be dependent on the sequence hydrophobicity of helices H8 and H9. PMID:24047995

  16. Membrane Docking of the Synaptotagmin 7 C2A Domain: Computation Reveals Interplay between Electrostatic and Hydrophobic Contributions.

    PubMed

    Chon, Nara Lee; Osterberg, J Ryan; Henderson, Jack; Khan, Hanif M; Reuter, Nathalie; Knight, Jefferson D; Lin, Hai

    2015-09-22

    The C2A domain of synaptotagmin 7 (Syt7) is a Ca(2+) and membrane binding module that docks and inserts into cellular membranes in response to elevated intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. Like other C2 domains, Syt7 C2A binds Ca(2+) and membranes primarily through three loop regions; however, it docks at Ca(2+) concentrations much lower than those required for other Syt C2A domains. To probe structural components of its unusually strong membrane docking, we conducted atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of Syt7 C2A under three conditions: in aqueous solution, in the proximity of a lipid bilayer membrane, and embedded in the membrane. The simulations of membrane-free protein indicate that Syt7 C2A likely binds three Ca(2+) ions in aqueous solution, consistent with prior experimental reports. Upon membrane docking, the outermost Ca(2+) ion interacts directly with lipid headgroups, while the other two Ca(2+) ions remain chelated by the protein. The membrane-bound domain was observed to exhibit large-amplitude swinging motions relative to the membrane surface, varying by up to 70° between a more parallel and a more perpendicular orientation, both during and after insertion of the Ca(2+) binding loops into the membrane. The computed orientation of the membrane-bound protein correlates well with experimental electron paramagnetic resonance measurements presented in the preceding paper ( DOI: 10.1021/acs.biochem.5b00421 ). In particular, the strictly conserved residue Phe229 inserted stably ∼4 Å below the average depth of lipid phosphate groups, providing critical hydrophobic interactions anchoring the domain in the membrane. Overall, the position and orientation of Syt7 C2A with respect to the membrane are consistent with experiments.

  17. [Effect of relative molecular mass distribution and hydrophilicity/ hydrophobicity of NOM on membrane fouling in MF-combined process].

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng-Liu; Lin, Jie; Xu, Guang-Hong; Dong, Bing-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the reversible and irreversible foulants in a submerged microfiltration (MF) with pretreatments (coagulation/powdered activated carbon (PAC)/potassium permanganate) in a pilot scale treatment of water from Taihu Lake. The study focused on the effect of relative molecular mass (M(r)) distribution and hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity on membrane fouling using high performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) with UV and TOC detectors and three dimension fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (3DEEM). HPSEC analyses showed that pretreatments could almost completely remove the macro molecules (M(r) > 10 x 10(3)), but only eliminate part of medium (10 x 10(3)) > M(r) > 1 x 10(3)) and micro molecules (M(r) < 1 x 10(3)). A majority of medium and micro molecules were found in chemical cleaning solutions, indicating that medium and micro molecules were the main foulants that contributed to irreversible membrane fouling. In addition, it was also found that the content of strong hydrophobic acids (SHA) and neutral hydrophilic (Neut) fractions in chemical solutions were far higher than that of weakly hydrophobic acids (WHA) and charged hydrophilic (Char), which suggested that both organic fractions were responsible for irreversible fouling. 3DEEM fluorescence demonstrated that aromatic proteins and soluble microbial products were the main contributors to irreversible membrane fouling. PMID:23487934

  18. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, includingmore » membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.« less

  19. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, including membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.

  20. Selective Membrane Permeabilization by the Rotavirus VP5* Protein Is Abrogated by Mutations in an Internal Hydrophobic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, William; Denisova, Evgeniya; LaMonica, Rachel; Mackow, Erich R.

    2000-01-01

    Rotavirus infectivity is dependent on the proteolytic cleavage of the VP4 spike protein into VP8* and VP5* proteins. Proteolytically activated virus, as well as expressed VP5*, permeabilizes membranes, suggesting that cleavage exposes a membrane-interactive domain of VP5* which effects rapid viral entry. The VP5* protein contains a single long hydrophobic domain (VP5*-HD, residues 385 to 404) at an internal site. In order to address the role of the VP5*-HD in permeabilizing cellular membranes, we analyzed the entry of o-nitrophenyl-β-d-galactopyranoside (ONPG) into cells induced to express VP5* or mutated VP5* polypeptides. Following IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) induction, VP5* and VP5* truncations containing the VP5*-HD permeabilized cells to the entry and cleavage of ONPG, while VP8* and control proteins had no effect on cellular permeability. Expression of VP5* deletions containing residues 265 to 474 or 265 to 404 permeabilized cells; however, C-terminal truncations which remove the conserved GGA (residues 399 to 401) within the HD abolished membrane permeability. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP5-HD further demonstrated a requirement for residues within the HD for VP5*-induced membrane permeability. Functional analysis of mutant VP5*s indicate that conserved glycines within the HD are required and suggest that a random coiled structure rather than the strictly hydrophobic character of the domain is required for permeability. Expressed VP5* did not alter bacterial growth kinetics or lyse bacteria following induction. Instead, VP5*-mediated size-selective membrane permeability, releasing 376-Da carboxyfluorescein but not 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran from preloaded liposomes. These findings suggest that the fundamental role for VP5* in the rotavirus entry process may be to expose triple-layered particles to low [Ca]i, which uncoats the virus, rather than to effect the detergent-like lysis of early endosomal membranes. PMID:10864647

  1. Role of amphipathicity and hydrophobicity in the balance between hemolysis and peptide-membrane interactions of three related antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Hollmann, Axel; Martínez, Melina; Noguera, Martín E; Augusto, Marcelo T; Disalvo, Anibal; Santos, Nuno C; Semorile, Liliana; Maffía, Paulo C

    2016-05-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) represent important self defense molecules in many organisms, including humans. These peptides have a broad spectrum of activities, killing or neutralizing many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The emergence of multidrug resistant microbes has stimulated research on the development of alternative antibiotics. In the search for new antibiotics, cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) offer a viable alternative to conventional antibiotics, as they physically disrupt the bacterial membranes, leading to lysis of microbial membranes and eventually cell death. In particular, the group of linear α-helical cationic peptides has attracted increasing interest from clinical as well as basic research during the last decade. In this work, we studied the biophysical and microbiological characteristics of three new designed CAMPs. We modified a previously studied CAMP sequence, in order to increase or diminish the hydrophobic face, changing the position of two lysines or replacing three leucines, respectively. These mutations modified the hydrophobic moment of the resulting peptides and allowed us to study the importance of this parameter in the membrane interactions of the peptides. The structural properties of the peptides were also correlated with their membrane-disruptive abilities, antimicrobial activities and hemolysis of human red blood cells. PMID:26896660

  2. Nafion ® nanocomposite membranes: Effect of fluorosurfactants on hydrophobic silica nanoparticle dispersion and direct methanol fuel cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chi Hoon; Kim, Hong Keon; Lee, Chang Hyun; Park, Ho Bum; Lee, Young Moo

    Nafion ®-silica nanocomposite membranes are successfully prepared by adding hydrophobic silica nanoparticles to a Nafion ® solution. To distribute these nanoparticles evenly in the Nafion ® matrix, various fluorosurfactants of different ionic character are employed. Fluorosurfactants with acid groups such as phosphonic acid and sulfonic acid play an important role in simultaneously increasing the homogeneous dispersion of silica nanoparticles, enhancing proton conductivity, and reducing the methanol permeability of the nanocomposite membranes. Therefore, the dispersion properties of inorganic fillers such as silica can significantly affect nanocomposite performance in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications, whereas surfactants, if used properly, can improve the nanocomposite membrane properties. In particular, a commercial fluorosurfactant containing a sulfonic acid group (Zonyl ® TBS) at the end of the surfactant chain exhibits better miscibility with the Nafion ® ionomer. This feature results in a reduction in the dimensional change of the nanocomposite membrane due to relatively lower water swelling and significantly reduced methanol permeability through the membrane. A membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) prepared from a Nafion ®-silica nanocomposite membrane with TBS shows the highest DMFC performance in terms of voltage vs. current density (V- I) and power density vs. current density (P- I). The current densities at 0.4 V and 90 °C are 342, 508, and 538 mA cm -2 with 1, 3 and 5 M methanol being fed at the anode side, respectively.

  3. Morphology-properties relationship of gas plasma treated hydrophobic meso-porous membranes and their improved performance for desalination by membrane distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumée, Ludovic F.; Alglave, Hortense; Chaffraix, Thomas; Lin, Bao; Magniez, Kevin; Schütz, Jürg

    2016-02-01

    The impact on performance of the surface energy and roughness of membrane materials used for direct contact membrane distillation are critical but yet poorly investigated parameters. The capacity to alter the wettability of highly hydrophobic materials such as poly(tetra-fluoro-ethylene) (PTFE) by gas plasma treatments is reported in this paper. An equally important contribution from this investigation arises from illustrating how vaporized material from the treated sample participates after a short while in the composition of the plasma and fundamentally changes the result of surface chemistry processes. The water contact angle across the hydrophobic membranes is generally controlled by varying the plasma gas conditions, such as the plasma power, chamber pressure and irradiation duration. Changes to surface porosity and roughness of the bulk material as well as the surface chemistry, through specific and partial de-fluorination of the surface were detected and systematically studied by Fourier transform infra-red analysis and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the rupture of fibrils, formed during membrane processing by thermal-stretching, led to the formation of a denser surface composed of nodules similar to these naturally acting as bridging points across the membrane material between fibrils. This structural change has a profound and impart a permanent effect on the permeation across the modified membranes, which was found to be enhanced by up to 10% for long plasma exposures while the selectivity of the membranes was found to remain unaffected by the treatment at a level higher than 99.99%. This is the first time that an investigation demonstrates how the permeation characteristics of these membranes is directly related to data from spectral, morphological and surface charge analyses, which provide new insights on the impact of plasma treatments on both, the surface charge and roughness, of PTFE porous materials.

  4. The Outer Membrane Protein OmpW Forms an Eight-Stranded beta-Barrel with a Hydrophobic Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Hong,H.; Patel, D.; Tamm, L.; van den Berg, B.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli OmpW belongs to a family of small outer membrane (OM) proteins that are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. Their functions are unknown, but recent data suggest that they may be involved in the protection of bacteria against various forms of environmental stress. In order to gain insight into the function of these proteins we have determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli OmpW to 2.7 Angstroms resolution. The structure shows that OmpW forms an eight-stranded beta-barrel with a long and narrow hydrophobic channel that contains a bound LDAO detergent molecule. Single channel conductance experiments show that OmpW functions as an ion channel in planar lipid bilayers. The channel activity can be blocked by the addition of LDAO. Taken together, the data suggest that members of the OmpW family could be involved in the transport of small hydrophobic molecules across the bacterial OM.

  5. Effects of exposure time on variations in the structure and hydrophobicity of polyvinylidene fluoride membranes prepared via vapor-induced phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuelian; Fan, Hongwei; Dong, Yajun; Song, Yanna; Han, Hua

    2012-08-01

    The present investigation revealed how the surface morphology and hydrophobicity of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes, which were prepared via a vapor-induced phase separation (VIPS) method, were affected by the exposure time. The mass variation of the cast film was recorded. Membrane morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal behaviors of membranes were examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) was employed to analyze the crystalline structures of the overall membranes and the surface layers. The results showed that different membrane morphologies and hydrophobicities could be obtained by changing the exposure time. A long exposure time facilitated the crystallization process, resulting in the formation of a porous skin and particle morphology, which increased the hydrophobicity of the surface. A short exposure time favored the formation of a digitate macrovoid and dense skin resulting from liquid-liquid phase separation in the immersion process, which reduced surface hydrophobicity. The water permeate flux in vacuum membrane distillation was greatly affected by the membrane porosity and surface hydrophobicity.

  6. Method of making a membrane having hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces for adhering cells or antibodies by using atomic oxygen or hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A portion of an organic polymer article such as a membrane is made hydrophilic by exposing a hydrophobic surface of the article to a depth of about 50 to about 5000 angstroms to atomic oxygen or hydroxyl radicals at a temperature below 100C., preferably below 40 C, to form a hydrophilic uniform surface layer of hydrophilic hydroxyl groups. The atomic oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are generated by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, and the surface is outside of a plasma produced by the discharge. A membrane having both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces can be used in an immunoassay by adhering antibodies to the hydrophobic surface. In another embodiment, the membrane is used in cell culturing where cells adhere to the hydrophilic surface. Prior to adhering cells, the hydrophilic surface may be grafted with a compatibilizing compound. A plurality of hydrophilic regions bounded by adjacent hydrophobic regions can be produced such that a maximum of one cell per each hydrophilic region adheres.

  7. The bacteriocin AS-48 requires dimer dissociation followed by hydrophobic interactions with the membrane for antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Cebrián, Rubén; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Valdivia, Eva; Albert, Armando; Maqueda, Mercedes; Sánchez-Barrena, María José

    2015-05-01

    The molecular mechanism underlining the antibacterial activity of the bacteriocin AS-48 is not known, and two different and opposite alternatives have been proposed. Available data suggested that the interaction of positively charged amino acids of AS-48 with the membrane would produce membrane destabilization and disruption. Alternatively, it has been proposed that AS-48 activity could rely on the effective insertion of the bacteriocin into the membrane. The biological and structural properties of the AS-48G13K/L40K double mutant were investigated to shed light on this subject. Compared with the wild type, the mutant protein suffered an important reduction in the antibacterial activity. Biochemical and structural studies of AS-48G13K/L40K mutant suggest the basis of its decreased antimicrobial activity. Lipid cosedimentation assays showed that the membrane affinity of AS-48G13K/L40K is 12-fold lower than that observed for the wild type. L40K mutation is responsible for this reduced membrane affinity and thus, hydrophobic interactions are involved in membrane association. Furthermore, the high-resolution crystal structure of AS-48G13K/L40K, together with the study of its dimeric character in solution showed that G13K stabilizes the inactive water-soluble dimer, which displays a reduced dipole moment. Our data suggest that the cumulative effect of these three affected properties reduces AS-48 activity, and point out that the bactericidal effect is achieved by the electrostatically driven approach of the inactive water-soluble dimer towards the membrane, followed by the dissociation and insertion of the protein into the lipid bilayer. PMID:25816760

  8. Electrostatic Localization of RNA to Protocell Membranes by Cationic Hydrophobic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Neha P; Tobé, Sylvia; Hill, Ian T; Szostak, Jack W

    2015-09-28

    Cooperative interactions between RNA and vesicle membranes on the prebiotic earth may have led to the emergence of primitive cells. The membrane surface offers a potential platform for the catalysis of reactions involving RNA, but this scenario relies upon the existence of a simple mechanism by which RNA could become associated with protocell membranes. Here, we show that electrostatic interactions provided by short, basic, amphipathic peptides can be harnessed to drive RNA binding to both zwitterionic phospholipid and anionic fatty acid membranes. We show that the association of cationic molecules with phospholipid vesicles can enhance the local positive charge on a membrane and attract RNA polynucleotides. This phenomenon can be reproduced with amphipathic peptides as short as three amino acids. Finally, we show that peptides can cross bilayer membranes to localize encapsulated RNA. This mechanism of polynucleotide confinement could have been important for primitive cellular evolution. PMID:26223820

  9. Electrostatic Localization of RNA to Protocell Membranes by Cationic Hydrophobic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Neha P; Tobé, Sylvia; Hill, Ian T; Szostak, Jack W

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative interactions between RNA and vesicle membranes on the prebiotic earth may have led to the emergence of primitive cells. The membrane surface offers a potential platform for the catalysis of reactions involving RNA, but this scenario relies upon the existence of a simple mechanism by which RNA could become associated with protocell membranes. Here, we show that electrostatic interactions provided by short, basic, amphipathic peptides can be harnessed to drive RNA binding to both zwitterionic phospholipid and anionic fatty acid membranes. We show that the association of cationic molecules with phospholipid vesicles can enhance the local positive charge on a membrane and attract RNA polynucleotides. This phenomenon can be reproduced with amphipathic peptides as short as three amino acids. Finally, we show that peptides can cross bilayer membranes to localize encapsulated RNA. This mechanism of polynucleotide confinement could have been important for primitive cellular evolution. PMID:26223820

  10. Pervaporative removal of organics from water using hydrophobic membranes. Binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, W.

    2000-01-01

    Results of pervaporation experiments are presented for the separation of several polar and nonpolar organic solvents from their aqueous solutions. Three membranes were evaluated: a polydimethylsiloxane (PERVAP-1060) membrane, a PDMS ZSM-5 zeolite filled (PERVAP-1070) membrane, and a poly(ether-block-amide) (PEBAX-4033) membrane. The effect of feed composition on flux and selectivity was also investigated. Performance parameters of a given membrane depended both on the kind of the organic solvent and the feed composition. The PERVAP-1070 membrane exhibited the highest selectivity with a separation factor over 900 in contact with a water-butyl acetate mixture. Polar solvents like methanol were also preferentially separated from aqueous solutions, but the separation factors were close to those obtained from liquid-vapor equilibria data. Permeate fluxes of organics increased with increasing feed concentration. Synergetic effects between water and organics fluxes were also observed.

  11. Lipid Raft-Mediated Membrane Tethering and Delivery of Hydrophobic Cargos from Liquid Crystal-Based Nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Nag, Okhil K; Naciri, Jawad; Oh, Eunkeu; Spillmann, Christopher M; Delehanty, James B

    2016-04-20

    A main goal of bionanotechnology and nanoparticle (NP)-mediated drug delivery (NMDD) continues to be the development of novel biomaterials that can controllably modulate the activity of the NP-associated therapeutic cargo. One of the desired subcellular locations for targeted delivery in NMDD is the plasma membrane. However, the controlled delivery of hydrophobic cargos to the membrane bilayer poses significant challenges including cargo precipitation and lack of specificity. Here, we employ a liquid crystal NP (LCNP)-based delivery system for the controlled partitioning of a model dye cargo from within the NP core into the plasma membrane bilayer. During synthesis of the NPs, the water-insoluble model dye cargo, 3,3'-dioctadecyloxacarbocyanine perchlorate (DiO), was efficiently incorporated into the hydrophobic LCNP core as confirmed by multiple spectroscopic analyses. Conjugation of a PEGylated cholesterol derivative to the NP surface (DiO-LCNP-PEG-Chol) facilitated the localization of the dye-loaded NPs to lipid raft microdomains in the plasma membrane in HEK 293T/17 cell. Analysis of DiO cellular internalization kinetics revealed that when delivered as a LCNP-PEG-Chol NP, the half-life of DiO membrane residence time (30 min) was twice that of free DiO (DiO(free)) (15 min) delivered from bulk solution. Time-resolved laser scanning confocal microscopy was employed to visualize the passive efflux of DiO from the LCNP core and its insertion into the plasma membrane bilayer as confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging. Finally, the delivery of DiO as a LCNP-PEG-Chol complex resulted in the attenuation of its cytotoxicity; the NP form of DiO exhibited ∼30-40% less toxicity compared to DiO(free). Our data demonstrate the utility of the LCNP platform as an efficient vehicle for the combined membrane-targeted delivery and physicochemical modulation of molecular cargos using lipid raft-mediated tethering.

  12. Label-free proteomic analysis of the hydrophobic membrane protein complement in articular chondrocytes: a technique for identification of membrane biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Csaba; Zhang, Xiaofei; Liddell, Susan; Smith, Julia R.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: There is insufficient knowledge about the chondrocyte membranome and its molecular composition. Objective: To develop a Triton X-114 based separation technique using nanoLC-MS/MS combined with shotgun proteomics to identify chondrocyte membrane proteins. Materials and methods: Articular chondrocytes from equine metacarpophalangeal joints were separated into hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions; trypsin-digested proteins were analysed by nanoLC-MS/MS. Results: A total of 315 proteins were identified. The phase extraction method yielded a high proportion of membrane proteins (56%) including CD276, S100-A6 and three VDAC isoforms. Discussion: Defining the chondrocyte membranome is likely to reveal new biomarker targets for conventional and biological drug discovery. PMID:26864288

  13. Adsorption and transport of charged vs. neutral hydrophobic molecules at the membrane of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jia; Eckenrode, Heather M; Dai, Hai-Lung; Wilhelm, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    The adsorption and transport of hydrophobic molecules at the membrane surface of pre- and post-DMSO induced differentiated murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells were examined by time- and wavelength-resolved second harmonic light scattering. Two medium (<600 Da) hydrophobic molecules, cationic malachite green (MG) and neutral bromocresol purple (BCP), were investigated. While it was observed that the MG cation adsorbs onto the surface of the MEL cell, neutral BCP does not. It is suggested that an electrostatic interaction between the opposite charges of the cation and the MEL cell surface is the primary driving force for adsorption. Comparisons of adsorption density and free energy, measured at different pH and cell morphology, indicate that the interaction is predominantly through sialic acid carboxyl groups. MG cation adsorption densities have been determined as (0.6±0.3)×10(6) μm(-2) on the surface of undifferentiated MEL cells, and (1.8±0.5)×10(7) μm(-2) on differentiated MEL cells, while the deduced adsorption free energies are effectively identical (ca. -10.9±0.1 and -10.8±0.1 kcal mol(-1), respectively). The measured MG densities indicate that the total number of surface carboxyl groups is largely conserved following differentiation, and therefore the density of carboxylic groups is much larger on the differentiated cell surface than the undifferentiated one. Finally, in contrast to synthetic liposomes and bacterial membranes, surface adsorbed MG cations are unable to traverse the MEL cell membrane. PMID:25660095

  14. The hydrophobic adsorption of charged molecules to bilayer membranes: a test of the applicability of the stern equation.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, S; Harary, H

    1976-05-01

    To describe the hydrophobic adsorption of charged molecules to bilayer membranes, one must recognize that the adsorption produces a change in the electrostatic potential at the surface of the membrane. The surface potential produced by the adsorption of the charged molecules can be described most simply by the Gouy equation from the theory of the diffuse double layer. This potential will tend to lower the concentration of the adsorbing ions in the aqueous phase immediately adjacent to the membrane, a phenomenon which can be described by the Boltzmann relation. The number of adsorbed ions is, in turn, a function of the aqueous concentration of these ions at the membrane solution interface and can be described, in the simplest case, by a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. If the ions are regarded as point charges, the combination of the Gouy, Boltzmann, and Langmuir relations may be considered a simplified Stern equation. To test experimentally the applicability of this equation, one should measure both the charge density and surface potential as a function of the concentration of adsorbing molecules in the bulk aqueous phases. Direct, accurate measurements of one of these parameters, the number of moles of 2, 6-toluidinylnaphthalenesulfonate ions bound to vesicles formed from phosphatidylcholine, are available in the literature (Huang, C., and Charlton, J.P. (1972), Biochemistry 11, 735). We estimated the change in the surface potential in two independent ways; by means of conductance measurements with "probe" molecules on planar black lipid membranes and by means of electrophoresis measurements on multilaminar unsonicated vesicles. The two estimates agreed with one another and all of the data could be adequately described by the Stern equation, assuming, at 25 degrees C, a dissociation constant of 2 X 10(-4) M and a maximum number of binding sites of 1/70 A2.

  15. Selective permeabilization of lipid membranes by photodynamic action via formation of hydrophobic defects or pre-pores.

    PubMed

    Kotova, Elena A; Kuzevanov, Alexey V; Pashkovskaya, Alina A; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2011-09-01

    To gain insight into mechanisms of photodynamic modification of biological membranes, we studied an impact of visible light in combination with a photosensitizer on translocation of various substances across artificial (vesicular and planar) bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). Along with induction of carboxyfluorescein leakage from liposomes, pronounced stimulation of lipid flip-flop between the two monolayers was found after photosensitization, both processes being prevented by the singlet oxygen quencher sodium azide. On the contrary, no enhancement of potassium chloride efflux from liposomes was detected by conductometry under these conditions. Illumination of planar BLMs in the presence of a photosensitizer led to a marked increase in membrane permeability to amphiphilic 2-n-octylmalonic acid, but practically no change in the permeability to ammonia, which agreed with selective character of the photosensitized leakage of fluorescent dyes from liposomes (Pashkovskaya et al., Langmuir, 2010). Thus, the effect on transbilayer movement of molecules elicited by the photodynamic treatment substantially depended on the kind of translocated species, in particular, on their lipophilicity. Based on similarity with results of previous electroporation studies, we hypothesized about photodynamic induction of "pre-pores" or "hydrophobic defects" permeable to amphiphilic compounds and less permeable to hydrophilic substances and inorganic ions. PMID:21663731

  16. Buckle-driven delamination of hydrophobic micro-, nano-, and heterostructured membranes without a sacrificial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, George K.; Zhao, Yiping

    2013-10-01

    A fabrication method, based on thin film buckling, is demonstrated to form unique membranes that can be used for applications in optics and biosensing. This method should be applicable to a variety of material systems, which, along with its simplicity and compatibility with different film architectures, allows for widespread implementation.A fabrication method, based on thin film buckling, is demonstrated to form unique membranes that can be used for applications in optics and biosensing. This method should be applicable to a variety of material systems, which, along with its simplicity and compatibility with different film architectures, allows for widespread implementation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Monolayer characterization and details; morphological parameters of the membranes; diffraction pattern images; rigorous coupled wave analysis; pattern transfer fidelity; experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03933a

  17. Factors affecting alcohol-water pervaporation performance of hydrophobic zeolite-silicone rubber mixed matrix membranes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) consisting of ZSM-5 zeolite particles dispersed in silicone rubber exhibited ethanol-water pervaporation permselectivities up to 5 times that of silicone rubber alone and 3 times higher than simple vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). A number of conditi...

  18. Buckle-driven delamination of hydrophobic micro-, nano-, and heterostructured membranes without a sacrificial layer.

    PubMed

    Larsen, George K; Zhao, Yiping

    2013-11-21

    A fabrication method, based on thin film buckling, is demonstrated to form unique membranes that can be used for applications in optics and biosensing. This method should be applicable to a variety of material systems, which, along with its simplicity and compatibility with different film architectures, allows for widespread implementation.

  19. MECHANISM AND HYDROPHOBIC FORCES DRIVING MEMBRANE PROTEIN INSERTION OF SUBUNIT II OF CYTOCHROME BO OXIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Nil; Dalbey, Ross E.; Yuan, Jijun

    2009-01-01

    Subunit II (CyoA) of cytochrome bo oxidase, which spans the inner membrane twice in bacteria, has several unusual features in membrane biogenesis. It is synthesized with an amino-terminal signal peptide. In addition, distinct pathways are used to insert the two ends of the protein. The amino-terminal domain is inserted by the YidC pathway whereas the large carboxyl-terminal domain is translocated by the SecYEG pathway. Insertion of the protein is also pmf-independent. In this study we examined the topogenic requirements and mechanism of insertion of CyoA in bacteria. We find that both the signal peptide and the first membrane spanning region are required for insertion of the amino-terminal periplasmic loop. The pmf-independence of insertion of the first periplasmic loop is due to the loop’s neutral net charge. We observe also that the introduction of negatively charged residues into the periplasmic loop makes insertion pmf dependent, whereas the addition of positively charged residues prevents insertion unless the pmf is abolished. Insertion of the carboxyl-terminal domain in the full-length CyoA occurs by a sequential mechanism even when the CyoA amino and carboxyl-terminal domains are swapped with other domains. However, when a long spacer peptide is added to increase the distance between the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal domains, insertion no longer occurs by a sequential mechanism. PMID:18155041

  20. Evidence for hydrophobic region within heavy chains of mouse B lymphocyte membrane-bound IgM

    PubMed Central

    Vassalli, Pierre; Tedghi, Rachel; Lisowska-Bernstein, Barbara; Tartakoff, Alan; Jaton, Jean-Claude

    1979-01-01

    The gel filtration behavior, in the presence of detergents, of membrane-bound IgM from normal mouse spleen B lymphocytes was compared to that of secretory IgM from mouse plasma cells. The proteins were labeled either by surface radioiodination or biosynthetically with radioactive amino acids. Cell lysates were fractionated on calibrated Sepharose 6B columns in the presence of the detergents Nonidet P-40 or deoxycholate. Eluted fractions were immunoprecipitated and the reduced or unreduced precipitates were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis followed by radioautography. Surface 125I-labeled 8S IgM exhibited a gel filtration pattern in Nonidet P-40 corresponding to much higher apparent molecular weight than that of secretory 8S IgM, a difference that almost disappeared when gel filtration was performed in the presence of deoxycholate, which forms much smaller micelles than does Nonidet P-40. Biosynthetically labeled lymphocytes contain two types of IgM molecules differing in their gel filtration behavior and fate: one identical to secretory 8S IgM of plasma cells and secreted in the medium during chase periods, and the other identical to surface 125I-labeled IgM and remaining cell-associated. Because the surface-bound 8S IgM was not found to be associated with other labeled molecules, it is likely that the detergent-binding behavior of surface IgM is due to a hydrophobic segment carried by these Ig molecules. That lymphocytes synthesize two types of μ chains was also shown by the use of tunicamycin, an inhibitor of glycosylation. In its presence, two unglycosylated μ chains were observed: one identical in size to that made by tunicamycin-treated plasma cells, and the second slightly larger. Gel filtration in Nonidet P-40 of the cell lysates of tunicamycin-treated lymphocytes showed that the nonsecretory 8S IgM contains this second type of μ chains, whereas the IgM molecules of the secretory type contain plasma cell-like μ chains. It is

  1. Role of hydrophobic interactions in the adsorption of poly(ethylene glycol) chains on phospholipid membranes investigated with a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangming; Fu, Li; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2009-03-19

    We have investigated the adsorption of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with different end groups onto phospholipid membranes at the liquid/solid interface by use of a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation in real time. On a SiO(2)-coated surface, the adsorption of lipid vesicles results in a solid-supported lipid bilayer. Our experiments demonstrate that PEG chains with enough hydrophobic end groups (PEG-C(18)H(37)) can insert in the bilayer and form aggregates on the membrane surface. On the other hand, the adsorbed vesicles are intact on a gold surface. When the end group of PEG chain is not hydrophobic enough, PEG chains do not interact with the vesicles so that they have slight effect on the vesicle stability. However, PEG-C(18)H(37) chains with enough hydrophobic end groups lead to a vesicle-to-bilayer transition because of the insertion of the chains and their aggregation on the membrane surface. In addition, the studies on effect of polymer concentration show that PEG-C(18)H(37) can readily induce the rupture of vesicles at a concentration above the critical micelle concentration.

  2. Functional substitution of the transient membrane-anchor domain in Escherichia coli FtsY with an N-terminal hydrophobic segment of Streptomyces lividans FtsY.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Isamu; Hirata, Asumi; Shoji, Miki; Ueda, Shunsaku; Yoshida, Kazuyuki

    2008-10-01

    FtsY is a signal recognition particle receptor in Escherichia coli that mediates the targeting of integral membrane proteins to translocons by interacting with both signal recognition particle (SRP)-nascent polypeptide-ribosome complexes and the cytoplasmic membrane. Genes encoding the N-terminal segments of Streptomyces lividans FtsY were fused to a gene encoding the E. coli FtsY NG domain (truncated versions of FtsY lacking the transient membrane-anchor domain at the N-terminus), introduced into a conditional ftsY-deletion mutant of E. coli, and expressed in trans to produce chimeric FtsY proteins. Under FtsY-depleted conditions, strains producing chimeric proteins including 34 N-terminal hydrophobic residues grew whereas strains producing chimeric proteins without these 34 residues did not. A strain producing the chimeric protein comprising the 34 residues and NG domain processed beta-lactamase, suggesting that the SRP-dependent membrane integration of leader peptidase was restored in this strain. These results suggest that the N-terminal hydrophobic segment of FtsY in this Gram-positive bacterium is responsible for its interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane.

  3. A fast method for the quantitative estimation of the distribution of hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments in alpha-helices of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Luzhkov, V B; Surkov, N F

    2000-01-01

    The work presents a fast quantitative approach for estimating the orientations of hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions in the helical wheels of membrane-spanning alpha-helices of transmembrane proteins. The common hydropathy analysis provides an estimate of the integral hydrophobicity in a moving window which scans an amino acid sequence. The new parameter, orientation hydrophobicity, is based on the estimate of hydrophobicity of the angular segment that scans the helical wheel of a given amino acid sequence. The corresponding procedure involves the treatment of transmembrane helices as cylinders with equal surface elements for each amino acid residue. The orientation hydrophobicity, P(phi), phi = 0-360 degrees, of a helical cylinder is given as a sum of hydrophobicities of individual amino acids which are taken as the S-shaped functions of the angle between the centre of amino acid surface element and the centre of the segment. Non-zero contribution to P(phi) comes only from the amino acids belonging to the angular segment for a given angle phi. The size of the angular segment is related to the size of the channel pore. The amplitudes of amino acid S-functions are calibrated in the way that their maximum values (reached when the amino acid is completely exposed into the pore) are equal to the corresponding hydropathy index in the selected scale (here taken as Goldman-Engelman-Steitz hydropathy scale). The given procedure is applied in the studies of three ionic channels with well characterized three-dimensional structures where the channel pore is formed by a bundle of alpha-helices: cholera toxin B, nicotinic acetylcholine homopentameric alpha7 receptor, and phospholamban. The estimated maximum of hydrophilic properties at the helical wheels are in a good agreement with the spatial orientations of alpha-helices in the corresponding channel pores.

  4. The Crystal Structure of OprG from Pseudomonas aeruginosa a Potential Channel for Transport of Hydrophobic Molecules across the Outer Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    D Touw; D Patel; b van den Berg

    2011-12-31

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria provides a barrier to the passage of hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds into the cell. The OM has embedded proteins that serve important functions in signal transduction and in the transport of molecules into the periplasm. The OmpW family of OM proteins, of which P. aeruginosa OprG is a member, is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. The biological functions of OprG and other OmpW family members are still unclear. The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria provides a barrier to the passage of hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds into the cell. The OM has embedded proteins that serve important functions in signal transduction and in the transport of molecules into the periplasm. The OmpW family of OM proteins, of which P. aeruginosa OprG is a member, is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. The biological functions of OprG and other OmpW family members are still unclear. The crystal structure, together with recent biochemical data, suggests that OprG and other OmpW family members form channels that mediate the diffusion of small hydrophobic molecules across the OM by a lateral diffusion mechanism similar to that of E. coli FadL.

  5. Evolution with time of hydrophobicity and microrelief of a cation-exchange membrane surface and its impact on overlimiting mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Pismenskaya, Natalia D; Nikonenko, Victor V; Melnik, Nadezhda A; Shevtsova, Kseniya A; Belova, Elena I; Pourcelly, Gérald; Cot, Didier; Dammak, Lasâad; Larchet, Christian

    2012-02-23

    Surface properties were measured together with electrochemical characteristics of a CMX (Neosepta, Tokuyama Corp.) cation-exchange membrane. Relative hydrophobicity was controlled by the contact angle; XPS and SEM were used for characterizing chemical composition and microrelief of the surface, respectively. Voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and mass transfer rate measurements were made as well. A "fresh" membrane and samples after 10, 25, 100, and 150 h of operation in an electrodialysis cell at an overlimiting current equal to 3 theoretical limiting currents, in a 0.02 M NaCl solution, were characterized. Some electrochemical properties were also measured for a Neosepta cation-exchange membrane, aged 2 years, in an industrial food process. It was found that the hydrophobicity of the CMX membrane has increased after the first 10 h of operation; more and more cavities of the dimension of the order of 1 μm have appeared with time testifying electrochemical erosion of the surface. The limiting current density (i(lim)) and the overlimiting transfer rate through the CMX membrane increased with time of its operation under overlimiting current. In the case of new CMX, i(lim) was very close to the theoretical value i(lim)(theor) calculated by the Lévêque equation. After 10 h of operation, i(lim) increased by 5%, and after 25, 100, and 150 h, the increase was by 30%, 70%, and 100%, respectively. Similarly, the mass transfer rate was found to increase up to 5 times (when desalting 0.005 M NaCl under 3 V) in comparison with the theoretical value. The ensemble of data was explained by the hypothesis that the passage of intensive current produces erosion of the ion-exchange polymer forming a continuous phase in CMX. This erosion results in exposure at the surface of the other constituent of CMX: small (about 100 nm) particles of relatively hydrophobic polyvinylchloride. Increasing surface hydrophobicity facilitates the slip of electroconvective vortexes along the surface

  6. Evolution with time of hydrophobicity and microrelief of a cation-exchange membrane surface and its impact on overlimiting mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Pismenskaya, Natalia D; Nikonenko, Victor V; Melnik, Nadezhda A; Shevtsova, Kseniya A; Belova, Elena I; Pourcelly, Gérald; Cot, Didier; Dammak, Lasâad; Larchet, Christian

    2012-02-23

    Surface properties were measured together with electrochemical characteristics of a CMX (Neosepta, Tokuyama Corp.) cation-exchange membrane. Relative hydrophobicity was controlled by the contact angle; XPS and SEM were used for characterizing chemical composition and microrelief of the surface, respectively. Voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and mass transfer rate measurements were made as well. A "fresh" membrane and samples after 10, 25, 100, and 150 h of operation in an electrodialysis cell at an overlimiting current equal to 3 theoretical limiting currents, in a 0.02 M NaCl solution, were characterized. Some electrochemical properties were also measured for a Neosepta cation-exchange membrane, aged 2 years, in an industrial food process. It was found that the hydrophobicity of the CMX membrane has increased after the first 10 h of operation; more and more cavities of the dimension of the order of 1 μm have appeared with time testifying electrochemical erosion of the surface. The limiting current density (i(lim)) and the overlimiting transfer rate through the CMX membrane increased with time of its operation under overlimiting current. In the case of new CMX, i(lim) was very close to the theoretical value i(lim)(theor) calculated by the Lévêque equation. After 10 h of operation, i(lim) increased by 5%, and after 25, 100, and 150 h, the increase was by 30%, 70%, and 100%, respectively. Similarly, the mass transfer rate was found to increase up to 5 times (when desalting 0.005 M NaCl under 3 V) in comparison with the theoretical value. The ensemble of data was explained by the hypothesis that the passage of intensive current produces erosion of the ion-exchange polymer forming a continuous phase in CMX. This erosion results in exposure at the surface of the other constituent of CMX: small (about 100 nm) particles of relatively hydrophobic polyvinylchloride. Increasing surface hydrophobicity facilitates the slip of electroconvective vortexes along the surface

  7. A bioluminescence ATP assay for estimating surface hydrophobicity and membrane damage of Escherichia coli cells treated with pulsed electric fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulse Electric Field (PEF) treatments, a non-thermal process have been reported to injure and inactivate bacteria in liquid foods. However, the effect of this treatment on bacterial cell surface charge and hydrophobicity has not been investigated. Apple juice (AJ, pH 3.8) purchased from a wholesale ...

  8. Induction of nonbilayer structures in diacylphosphatidylcholine model membranes by transmembrane alpha-helical peptides: importance of hydrophobic mismatch and proposed role of tryptophans.

    PubMed

    Killian, J A; Salemink, I; de Planque, M R; Lindblom, G; Koeppe, R E; Greathouse, D V

    1996-01-23

    We have investigated the effect of several hydrophobic polypeptides on the phase behavior of diacylphosphatidylcholines with different acyl chain length. The polypeptides are uncharged and consist of a sequence with variable length of alternating leucine and alanine, flanked on both sides by two tryptophans, and with the N- and C-termini blocked. First it was demonstrated by circular dichroism measurements that these peptides adopt an alpha-helical conformation with a transmembrane orientation in bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Subsequent 31P NMR measurements showed that the peptides can affect lipid organization depending on the difference in hydrophobic length between the peptide and the lipid bilayer in the liquid-crystalline phase. When a 17 amino acid residue long peptide (WALP17) was incorporated in a 1/10 molar ratio of peptide to lipid, a bilayer was maintained in saturated phospholipids containing acyl chains of 12 and 14 C atoms, an isotropic phase was formed at 16 C atoms, and an inverted hexagonal (HII) phase at 18 and 20 C atoms. For a 19 amino acid residue long peptide (WALP19) similar changes in lipid phase behavior were observed, but at acyl chain lengths of 2 C-atoms longer. Also in several cis-unsaturated phosphatidylcholine model membranes it was found that these peptides and a shorter analog (WALP16) induce the formation of nonbilayer structures as a consequence of hydrophobic mismatch. It is proposed that this unique ability of the peptides to induce nonbilayer structures in phosphatidylcholine model membranes is due to the presence of two tryptophans at both sides of the membrane/water interface, which prevent the peptide from aggregating when the mismatch is increased. Comparison of the hydrophobic length of the bilayers with the length of the different peptides showed that it is the precise extent of mismatch that determines whether the preferred lipid organization is a bilayer, isotropic phase, or HII phase. The peptide

  9. Binding of Sudan II and IV to lecithin liposomes and E. coli membranes: insights into the toxicity of hydrophobic azo dyes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu; Gao, Hong-Wen; Ren, Jiao-Rong; Chen, Ling; Li, Yu-Cheng; Zhao, Jian-Fu; Zhao, He-Ping; Yuan, Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Background Sudan red compounds are hydrophobic azo dyes, still used as food additives in some countries. However, they have been shown to be unsafe, causing tumors in the liver and urinary bladder in rats. They have been classified as category 3 human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. A number of hypotheses that could explain the mechanism of carcinogenesis have been proposed for dyes similar to the Sudan red compounds. Traditionally, investigations of the membrane toxicity of organic substances have focused on hydrocarbons, e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and DDT. In contrast to hydrocarbons, Sudan red compounds contain azo and hydroxy groups, which can form hydrogen bonds with the polar head groups of membrane phospholipids. Thus, entry may be impeded. They could have different toxicities from other lipophilic hydrocarbons. The available data show that because these compounds are lipophilic, interactions with hydrophobic parts of the cell are important for their toxicity. Lipophilic compounds accumulate in the membrane, causing expansion of the membrane surface area, inhibition of primary ion pumps and increased proton permeability. Results This work investigated the interactions of the amphiphilic compounds Sudan II and IV with lecithin liposomes and live Escherichia coli (E. coli). Sudan II and IV binding to lecithin liposomes and live E. coli corresponds to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. In the Sudan red compounds – lecithin liposome solutions, the binding ratio of Sudan II to lecithin is 1/31 and that of Sudan IV to 1/314. The binding constant of the Sudan II-lecithin complex is 1.75 × 104 and that of the Sudan IV-lecithin complex 2.92 × 105. Besides, the influences of pH, electrolyte and temperature were investigated and analyzed quantitatively. In the Sudan red compounds – E.coli mixture, the binding ratios of Sudan II and Sudan IV to E.coli membrane phospholipid are 1/29 and 1/114. The binding constants

  10. Tracking of proton flow during transition from anaerobiosis to steady state. 2. Effect of cation uptake on the response of a hydrophobic membrane bound pH indicator.

    PubMed

    Luvisetto, S; Cola, C; Schmehl, I; Azzone, G F

    1991-11-15

    1. During aerobic cation uptake in liver mitochondria, the hydrophobic pH indicator bromothymol blue undergoes a multiphase response: phase 1 (rapid acidification), phase 2 (slow alkalinization), phase 3 (rapid alkalinization) and phase 4 (reacidification). 2. Titrations with ruthenium red and malonate indicate that the various phases depend on the relative rates of cation uptake and proton translocation: at high rates of cation uptake, phase 1 disappears and phases 2 and 3 are transformed in a monotonic process of alkalinization. 3. The comparison of the bromothymol blue response with the arsenazo III, 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) and safranine responses indicates that: (a) phase 2 (slow alkalinization) corresponds to a slow rise of matrix pH and a parallel decline of membrane potential; (b) phase 3 (rapid alkalinization) corresponds to termination of proton translocation and initiation of the processes of cation efflux and proton reuptake. All the above processes reach completion during phase 4. 4. Although bromothymol blue always behaves as a membrane-bound indicator, the extent to which it reflects the matrix or the cytosolic pH is a function of the membrane-potential-determined asymmetric distribution: in parallel with the lowering of the membrane potential, the dye chromophore is shifted from the cytosolic to the matrix side membrane layer. 5. A model is discussed which describes the behaviour of bromothymol blue as pH indicator recording the changes in membrane layers facing either the matrix or the cytosolic side. The complex response of the dye during cation uptake is due to two independent processes, one of pH change and another of dye intramembrane shift. Computer simulations of the dye response, based on the conversion of a kinetic model into an electrical network and closely reproducing the experimental observations, are reported. PMID:1718751

  11. Distribution of hydrophobic ionizable xenobiotics between water and lipid membranes: pentachlorophenol and pentachlorophenate. A comparison with octanol-water partition.

    PubMed

    Smejtek, P; Wang, S

    1993-09-01

    We have studied distribution of pentachlorophenol (PCP)--a major environmental pollutant--between egg-phosphatidylcholine (egg-PC) membranes and water. The objectives were (1) to compare the membrane-water partition of the un-ionized (HA) and ionized (A) PCP, and (2) to establish similarities and differences between the partition of PCP into lipid membranes and into octanol. The studies were made with egg-PC liposomes. It is shown that the distribution isotherms can be understood in terms of the Langmuir-Stern-Grahame adsorption model. The model is applicable to both the HA and A species; it takes into account the electrostatic interactions at the membrane-water interface charged by the adsorbed pentachlorophenate. Relationships between the membrane surface adsorption and bulk partition characteristics were presented and used to relate the partition of PCP into egg-PC membranes to those for octanol-water systems. Results (egg-PC membranes): bulk distribution coeff. gamma HA = 2.9 x 10(5), gamma A = 1.6 x 10(4), association constant KmHA = 2.9 x 10(5) M-1, KmA = 0.7 x 10(5) M-1, adsorption site area PsHA = 0.6 nm2, PsA = 3.5 nm2, and linear partition coeff. Beta mHA = 550 microns, beta mA = 30 microns. Comparable to gamma HA and gamma A for octanol-water are P(ow)(HA) approximately 1.3 x 10(5) and P(ow)(A) approximately 30. The major difference is in the distribution of ionized PCP which is several hundred times greater for egg-PC membranes compared to octanol. The difference is associated with the properties of the membrane-water interface. PMID:8215590

  12. Photolabeling of membrane-bound Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with the hydrophobic probe 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-(/sup 125/I)iodophenyl)diazirine

    SciTech Connect

    White, B.J.; Cohen, J.B.

    1988-11-29

    The hydrophobic, photoactivatable probe 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-(/sup 125/I)iodophenyl)diazirine ((/sup 125/I)TID) was used to label acetylcholine receptor rich membranes purified from Torpedo californica electric organ. All four subunits of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) were found to incorporate label, with the ..gamma..-subunit incorporating approximately 4 times as much as each of the other subunits. Carbamylcholine, an agonist, and histrionicotoxin, a noncompetitive antagonist, both strongly inhibited labeling of all AChR subunits in a specific and dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the competitive antagonist ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin and the noncompetitive antagonist phencyclidine had only modest effect on (/sup 125/I)TID labeling of the AChR. The regions of the AChR ..cap alpha..-subunit that incorporate (/sup 125/)TID were mapped by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protest digestion. The carbamylcholine-sensitive site of labeling was localized to a 20-kDa V8 cleavage fragment that begins at Ser-173 and is of sufficient length to contain the three hydrophobic regions M1, M2, and M3. A 10-kDa fragment beginning at Asn-339 and containing the hydrophobic region M4 also incorporated (/sup 125/I)TID but in a carbamylcholine-insensitive manner. Two further cleavage fragments, which together span about one-third of the ..cap alpha..-subunit amino terminus, incorporated no detectable (/sup 125/I)TID. The mapping results place constraints on suggested models of AChR subunit topology.

  13. From dioxin to dioxin congeners: understanding the differences in hydrophobic aggregation in water and absorption into lipid membranes by means of atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Casalegno, Mosé; Raos, Guido; Sello, Guido

    2016-06-29

    Translocation of small molecules through a cell membrane barrier is a fundamental step to explain the response of cells to foreign molecules. Investigating the mechanisms through which this complex process takes place is especially important in the study of the adverse effects of toxicants. In this work, we start from the results of a previous simulation study of the mechanism of dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) absorption into a model membrane, and extend it to four structural congeners of dioxin. The new molecules have been chosen taking into consideration the structural features that characterize dioxin: aromaticity, planarity, the presence of chlorine and oxygen atoms, and hydrophobicity. Our results for the absorption mechanism confirm our expectations based on the chemical structures, but also reveal some interesting differences in single-molecules and especially in cooperative actions underlying cluster absorption. The analysis of key parameters, such as free energies of transfer and translocation times, supports the idea that dioxin, more than its congeners investigated here, likely accumulates in cell membranes. PMID:27314876

  14. Multilevel Precision-Based Rational Design of Chemical Inhibitors Targeting the Hydrophobic Cleft of Toxoplasma gondii Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1)

    PubMed Central

    Muralikumar, Shalini; Mahalakshmi, B; Lily Therese, K; Madhavan, HN; Alameen, Mohamed; Thirumudi, Indhuja

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular Apicomplexan parasite and a causative agent of toxoplasmosis in human. It causes encephalitis, uveitis, chorioretinitis, and congenital infection. T. gondii invades the host cell by forming a moving junction (MJ) complex. This complex formation is initiated by intermolecular interactions between the two secretory parasitic proteins—namely, apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and rhoptry neck protein 2 (RON2) and is critically essential for the host invasion process. By this study, we propose two potential leads, NSC95522 and NSC179676 that can efficiently target the AMA1 hydrophobic cleft, which is a hotspot for targeting MJ complex formation. The proposed leads are the result of an exhaustive conformational search-based virtual screen with multilevel precision scoring of the docking affinities. These two compounds surpassed all the precision levels of docking and also the stringent post docking and cumulative molecular dynamics evaluations. Moreover, the backbone flexibility of hotspot residues in the hydrophobic cleft, which has been previously reported to be essential for accommodative binding of RON2 to AMA1, was also highly perturbed by these compounds. Furthermore, binding free energy calculations of these two compounds also revealed a significant affinity to AMA1. Machine learning approaches also predicted these two compounds to possess more relevant activities. Hence, these two leads, NSC95522 and NSC179676, may prove to be potential inhibitors targeting AMA1-RON2 complex formation towards combating toxoplasmosis. PMID:27445648

  15. Multilevel Precision-Based Rational Design of Chemical Inhibitors Targeting the Hydrophobic Cleft of Toxoplasma gondii Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1).

    PubMed

    Vetrivel, Umashankar; Muralikumar, Shalini; Mahalakshmi, B; Lily Therese, K; Madhavan, H N; Alameen, Mohamed; Thirumudi, Indhuja

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular Apicomplexan parasite and a causative agent of toxoplasmosis in human. It causes encephalitis, uveitis, chorioretinitis, and congenital infection. T. gondii invades the host cell by forming a moving junction (MJ) complex. This complex formation is initiated by intermolecular interactions between the two secretory parasitic proteins-namely, apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and rhoptry neck protein 2 (RON2) and is critically essential for the host invasion process. By this study, we propose two potential leads, NSC95522 and NSC179676 that can efficiently target the AMA1 hydrophobic cleft, which is a hotspot for targeting MJ complex formation. The proposed leads are the result of an exhaustive conformational search-based virtual screen with multilevel precision scoring of the docking affinities. These two compounds surpassed all the precision levels of docking and also the stringent post docking and cumulative molecular dynamics evaluations. Moreover, the backbone flexibility of hotspot residues in the hydrophobic cleft, which has been previously reported to be essential for accommodative binding of RON2 to AMA1, was also highly perturbed by these compounds. Furthermore, binding free energy calculations of these two compounds also revealed a significant affinity to AMA1. Machine learning approaches also predicted these two compounds to possess more relevant activities. Hence, these two leads, NSC95522 and NSC179676, may prove to be potential inhibitors targeting AMA1-RON2 complex formation towards combating toxoplasmosis.

  16. Multilevel Precision-Based Rational Design of Chemical Inhibitors Targeting the Hydrophobic Cleft of Toxoplasma gondii Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1).

    PubMed

    Vetrivel, Umashankar; Muralikumar, Shalini; Mahalakshmi, B; Lily Therese, K; Madhavan, H N; Alameen, Mohamed; Thirumudi, Indhuja

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular Apicomplexan parasite and a causative agent of toxoplasmosis in human. It causes encephalitis, uveitis, chorioretinitis, and congenital infection. T. gondii invades the host cell by forming a moving junction (MJ) complex. This complex formation is initiated by intermolecular interactions between the two secretory parasitic proteins-namely, apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and rhoptry neck protein 2 (RON2) and is critically essential for the host invasion process. By this study, we propose two potential leads, NSC95522 and NSC179676 that can efficiently target the AMA1 hydrophobic cleft, which is a hotspot for targeting MJ complex formation. The proposed leads are the result of an exhaustive conformational search-based virtual screen with multilevel precision scoring of the docking affinities. These two compounds surpassed all the precision levels of docking and also the stringent post docking and cumulative molecular dynamics evaluations. Moreover, the backbone flexibility of hotspot residues in the hydrophobic cleft, which has been previously reported to be essential for accommodative binding of RON2 to AMA1, was also highly perturbed by these compounds. Furthermore, binding free energy calculations of these two compounds also revealed a significant affinity to AMA1. Machine learning approaches also predicted these two compounds to possess more relevant activities. Hence, these two leads, NSC95522 and NSC179676, may prove to be potential inhibitors targeting AMA1-RON2 complex formation towards combating toxoplasmosis. PMID:27445648

  17. Effect of bioavailability on the fate of hydrophobic organic compounds and metal in treatment of young landfill leachate by membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zolfaghari, M; Droguia, P; Brar, S K; Buelna, G; Dubé, R

    2016-10-01

    Complex dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in landfill leachate provides reliable media for adsorption of highly hydrophobic contaminants, such as Di 2-ethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP). In this research, the feasibility of submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) for treatment of landfill leachate (LFL) was determined. Later, the operating conditions were optimized for removal of DEHP, COD, NH4(+) and PO4(3-), and finally the effect of bioavailability was examined by introduction of different concentrations of humic acid into the influent. The result revealed that presence of complex agglomerated organic compounds increased the removal efficiency of DEHP and COD, even though DEHP biodegradation rate in sludge dramatically decreased (from 58.8% to 12.8%). MBR retention of different metals in the absence and in the presence of recalcitrant DOM was also studied. Like DEHP, ternary interaction between metals, DOM, and sludge play a pivotal role in their removal efficiency and their concentration in sludge. PMID:27448320

  18. Effect of bioavailability on the fate of hydrophobic organic compounds and metal in treatment of young landfill leachate by membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zolfaghari, M; Droguia, P; Brar, S K; Buelna, G; Dubé, R

    2016-10-01

    Complex dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in landfill leachate provides reliable media for adsorption of highly hydrophobic contaminants, such as Di 2-ethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP). In this research, the feasibility of submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) for treatment of landfill leachate (LFL) was determined. Later, the operating conditions were optimized for removal of DEHP, COD, NH4(+) and PO4(3-), and finally the effect of bioavailability was examined by introduction of different concentrations of humic acid into the influent. The result revealed that presence of complex agglomerated organic compounds increased the removal efficiency of DEHP and COD, even though DEHP biodegradation rate in sludge dramatically decreased (from 58.8% to 12.8%). MBR retention of different metals in the absence and in the presence of recalcitrant DOM was also studied. Like DEHP, ternary interaction between metals, DOM, and sludge play a pivotal role in their removal efficiency and their concentration in sludge.

  19. Membrane Vesicle Formation as a Multiple-Stress Response Mechanism Enhances Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E Cell Surface Hydrophobicity and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Sperling, Stefanie; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Steiniger, Frank; Wick, Lukas Y.

    2012-01-01

    Among the adaptive responses of bacteria to rapid changes in environmental conditions, those of the cell envelope are known to be the most crucial. Therefore, several mechanisms with which bacteria change their cell surface and membranes in the presence of different environmental stresses have been elucidated. Among these mechanisms, the release of outer membrane vesicles (MV) in Gram-negative bacteria has attracted particular research interest because of its involvement in pathogenic processes, such as that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation in cystic fibrosis lungs. In this study, we investigated the role of MV formation as an adaptive response of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E to several environmental stress factors and correlated it to the formation of biofilms. In the presence of toxic concentrations of long-chain alcohols, under osmotic stress caused by NaCl, in the presence of EDTA, and after heat shock, cells of this strain released MV within 10 min in the presence of a stressor. The MV formed showed similar size and charge properties, as well as comparable compositions of proteins and fatty acids. MV release caused a significant increase in cell surface hydrophobicity, and an enhanced tendency to form biofilms was demonstrated in this study. Therefore, the release of MV as a stress response could be put in a physiological context. PMID:22752175

  20. In Vivo Identification of the Outer Membrane Protein OmcA-MtrC Interaction Network in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells Using Novel Hydrophobic Chemical Cross-Linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Zakharova, Natalia L.; Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Wolff, Meagan A.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-04-01

    Outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA (SO1779) and MtrC (SO1778) are the integral components of electron transfer used by Shewanella oneidensis for anaerobic respiration of metal (hydr)oxides. Here the OmcA-MtrC interaction was identified in vivo using a novel hydrophobic chemical cross-linker (MRN) combined with immunoprecipitation techniques. In addition, identification of other OM proteins from the cross-linked complexes allows first visualization of the OmcA-MtrC interaction network. Further experiments on omcA and mtrC mutant cells showed OmcA plays a central role in the network interaction. For comparison, two commercial cross-linkers were also used in parallel and both resulted in fewer OM protein identifications, indicating the superior properties of MRN for identification of membrane protein interactions. Finally, comparison experiments of in vivo cross-linking and cell lysate cross-linking resulted in significantly different protein interaction data, demonstrating the importance of in vivo cross-linking for study of protein-protein interactions in cells.

  1. Closed and Semiclosed Interhelical Structures in Membrane vs Closed and Open Structures in Detergent for the Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Fusion Peptide and Correlation of Hydrophobic Surface Area with Fusion Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ujjayini; Xie, Li; Jia, Lihui; Liang, Shuang; Weliky, David P

    2015-06-24

    The ∼25 N-terminal "HAfp" residues of the HA2 subunit of the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein are critical for fusion between the viral and endosomal membranes at low pH. Earlier studies of HAfp in detergent support (1) N-helix/turn/C-helix structure at pH 5 with open interhelical geometry and N-helix/turn/C-coil structure at pH 7; or (2) N-helix/turn/C-helix at both pHs with closed interhelical geometry. These different structures led to very different models of HAfp membrane location and different models of catalysis of membrane fusion by HAfp. In this study, the interhelical geometry of membrane-associated HAfp is probed by solid-state NMR. The data are well-fitted to a population mixture of closed and semiclosed structures. The two structures have similar interhelical geometries and are planar with hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The different structures of HAfp in detergent vs membrane could be due to the differences in interaction with the curved micelle vs flat membrane with better geometric matching between the closed and semiclosed structures and the membrane. The higher fusogenicity of longer sequences and low pH is correlated with hydrophobic surface area and consequent increased membrane perturbation.

  2. Enhancing water retention and low-humidity proton conductivity of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) composite membrane enabled by the polymer-microcapsules with controllable hydrophilicity-hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guangwei; Li, Yifan; Li, Zongyu; Nie, Lingli; Wu, Hong; Yang, Xinlin; Zhao, Yuning; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2014-02-01

    Four kinds of polymer microcapsules (PMCs) with different hydrophilicity-hydrophobicity are synthesized via distillation-precipitation polymerization (polymer microcapsules form by self-crosslinking of monomers/crosslinkers in this process) and incorporated into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) matrix to prepare composite membranes. To improve the water retention of the PMCs, the hydrophilicity-hydrophobicity of the PMCs is manipulated by regulating the proportion of hydrophilic ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) and hydrophobic divinylbenzene (DVB) crosslinkers in the synthesis formula. The hydrophilicity of the PMCs decreases with increasing the content of polyDVB in the PMCs. The four kinds of PMCs exhibit different water retention properties. The PMCs with appropriate hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance (EGDMA: DVB = 1:1) possess the best water retention properties. Incorporation of PMCs into SPEEK matrix enhances the water-retention properties, and consequently increases proton conductivity to 0.0132 S cm-1 under 20% relative humidity, about thirteen times higher than that of the SPEEK control membrane. Moreover, the incorporation of PMCs reduces the activation energy for proton conduction and the methanol permeability of the membranes. This study may be helpful to rational design of excellent water-retention materials.

  3. Polycaprolactone multicore-matrix particle for the simultaneous encapsulation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds produced by membrane emulsification and solvent diffusion processes.

    PubMed

    Imbrogno, A; Dragosavac, M M; Piacentini, E; Vladisavljević, G T; Holdich, R G; Giorno, L

    2015-11-01

    Co-encapsulation of drugs in the same carrier, as well as the development of microencapsulation processes for biomolecules using mild operating conditions, and the production of particles with tailored size and uniformity are major challenges for encapsulation technologies. In the present work, a suitable method consisting of the combination of membrane emulsification with solvent diffusion is reported for the production of multi-core matrix particles with tailored size and potential application in multi-therapies. In the emulsification step, the production of a W/O/W emulsion was carried out using a batch Dispersion Cell for formulation testing and subsequently a continuous azimuthally oscillating membrane emulsification system for the scaling-up of the process to higher capacities. In both cases precise and gentle control of droplet size and uniformity of the W/O/W emulsion was achieved, preserving the encapsulation of the drug model within the droplet. Multi-core matrix particles were produced in a post emulsification step using solvent diffusion. The compartmentalized structure of the multicore-matrix particle combined with the different chemical properties of polycaprolactone (matrix material) and fish gelatin (core material) was tested for the simultaneous encapsulation of hydrophilic (copper ions) and hydrophobic (α-tocopherol) test components. The best operating conditions for the solidification of the particles to achieve the highest encapsulation efficiency of copper ions and α-tocopherol of 99 (± 4)% and 93(± 6)% respectively were found. The multi-core matrix particle produced in this work demonstrates good potential as a co-loaded delivery system.

  4. Characterisation of organic matter in IX and PACl treated wastewater in relation to the fouling of a hydrophobic polypropylene membrane.

    PubMed

    Myat, Darli T; Mergen, Max; Zhao, Oliver; Stewart, Matthew B; Orbell, John D; Gray, Stephen

    2012-10-15

    Extensive organic characterisation of a wastewater using liquid chromatography with a photodiode array and fluorescence spectroscopy (Method A), and UV(254) and organic carbon detector (Method B) was undertaken, as well as with fluorescence excitation emission spectroscopy (EEM). Characterisation was performed on the wastewater before and after ion exchange (IX) treatment and polyaluminium chlorohydrate (PACl) coagulation, and following microfiltration of the wastewater and pre-treated wastewaters. Characterisation by EEM was unable to detect biopolymers within the humic rich wastewaters and was not subsequently used to characterise the MF permeates. IX treatment preferentially removed low molecular weight (MW) organic acids and neutrals, and moderate amounts of biopolymers in contrast to a previous report of no biopolymer removal with IX. PACl preferentially removed moderate MW humic and fulvic acids, and large amounts of biopolymers. PACl showed a great preference for removal of proteins from the biopolymer component in comparison to IX. An increase in the fluorescence response of tryptophan-like compounds in the biopolymer fraction following IX treatment suggests that low MW neutrals may influence the structure and/or inhibit aggregation of organic compounds. Fouling rates for IX and PACl treated wastewaters had high initial fouling rates that reduced to lower fouling rates with time, while the untreated Eastern Treatment Plant (ETP) wastewater displayed a consistent, high rate of fouling. The results for the IX and PACl treated wastewaters were consistent with the long-term fouling rate being determined by cake filtration while both pore constriction and cake filtration contributed to the higher initial fouling rates. Higher rejection of biopolymers was observed for PACl and IX waters compared to the untreated ETP water, suggesting increased adhesion of biopolymers to the membrane or cake layer may lead to the higher rejection.

  5. Voltage-Gated Hydrophobic Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobicity is a fundamental property that is responsible for numerous physical and biophysical aspects of molecular interactions in water. Peculiar behavior is expected for water in the vicinity of hydrophobic structures, such as nanopores. Indeed, hydrophobic nanopores can be found in two distinct states, dry and wet, even though the latter is thermodynamically unstable. Transitions between these two states are kinetically hindered in long pores but can be much faster in shorter pores. As it is demonstrated for the first time in this paper, these transitions can be induced by applying a voltage across a membrane with a single hydrophobic nanopore. Such voltage-induced gating in single nanopores can be realized in a reversible manner through electrowetting of inner walls of the nanopores. The resulting I-V curves of such artificial hydrophobic nanopores mimic biological voltage-gated channels.

  6. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis show increased outer membrane permeability to hydrophobic agents which correlates with lipopolysaccharide acyl-chain fluidity.

    PubMed

    Bengoechea, J A; Brandenburg, K; Seydel, U; Díaz, R; Moriyón, I

    1998-06-01

    The hydrophobic probe N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine accumulated less in non-pathogenic Yersinia spp. and non-pathogenic and pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica than in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis or Yersinia pestis. This was largely due to differences in the activity of efflux systems, but also to differences in outer membrane permeability because uptake of the probe in KCN/arsenate-poisoned cells was slower in the former group than in Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis. The probe accumulation rate was higher in Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis grown at 37 degrees C than at 26 degrees C and was always highest in Y. pestis. These yersiniae had LPSs with shorter polysaccharides than Y. enterocolitica, particularly when grown at 37 degrees C. Gel<-->liquid-crystalline phase transitions (Tc 28-31 degrees C) were observed in LPS aggregates of Y. enterocolitica grown at 26 and 37 degrees C, with no differences between non-pathogenic and pathogenic strains. Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis LPSs showed no phase transitions and, although the fluidity of LPSs of Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica grown at 26 degrees C were close below the Tc of the latter, they were always in a more fluid state than Y. enterocolitica LPS. Comparison with previous studies of Salmonella choleraesuis subsp. choleraesuis serotype minnesota rough LPS showed that the increased fluidity and absence of transition of Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis LPSs cannot be explained by their shorter polysaccharides and suggested differences at the lipid A/core level. It is proposed that differences in LPS-LPS interactions and efflux activity explain the above observations and reflect the adaptation of Yersinia spp. to different habitats.

  7. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  8. Enthalpic and Entropic Contributions to Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Schauperl, Michael; Podewitz, Maren; Waldner, Birgit J; Liedl, Klaus R

    2016-09-13

    Hydrophobic hydration plays a key role in a vast variety of biological processes, ranging from the formation of cells to protein folding and ligand binding. Hydrophobicity scales simplify the complex process of hydration by assigning a value describing the averaged hydrophobic character to each amino acid. Previously published scales were not able to calculate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the hydrophobicity directly. We present a new method, based on Molecular Dynamics simulations and Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory, that calculates hydrophobicity from enthalpic and entropic contributions. Instead of deriving these quantities from the temperature dependence of the free energy of hydration or as residual of the free energy and the enthalpy, we directly obtain these values from the phase space occupied by water molecules. Additionally, our method is able to identify regions with specific enthalpic and entropic properties, allowing to identify so-called "unhappy water" molecules, which are characterized by weak enthalpic interactions and unfavorable entropic constraints. PMID:27442443

  9. Enthalpic and Entropic Contributions to Hydrophobicity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic hydration plays a key role in a vast variety of biological processes, ranging from the formation of cells to protein folding and ligand binding. Hydrophobicity scales simplify the complex process of hydration by assigning a value describing the averaged hydrophobic character to each amino acid. Previously published scales were not able to calculate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the hydrophobicity directly. We present a new method, based on Molecular Dynamics simulations and Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory, that calculates hydrophobicity from enthalpic and entropic contributions. Instead of deriving these quantities from the temperature dependence of the free energy of hydration or as residual of the free energy and the enthalpy, we directly obtain these values from the phase space occupied by water molecules. Additionally, our method is able to identify regions with specific enthalpic and entropic properties, allowing to identify so-called “unhappy water” molecules, which are characterized by weak enthalpic interactions and unfavorable entropic constraints. PMID:27442443

  10. HYDROPHOBIC ZEOLITE-SILICONE RUBBER MIXED MATRIX MEMBRANES FOR ETHANOL-WATER SEPARATION: EFFECT OF ZEOLITE AND SILICONE COMPONENT SELECTION ON PERVAPORATION PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-silica ZSM 5 zeolites were incorporated into poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) polymers to form mixed matrix membranes for ethanol removal from water via pervaporation. Membrane formulation and preparation parameters were varied to determine the effect on pervaporation perform...

  11. The N-terminal domain tethers the voltage-gated calcium channel β2e-subunit to the plasma membrane via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Laferte, Erick; Ewers, David; Guzman, Raul E; Jordan, Nadine; Schmidt, Silke; Hidalgo, Patricia

    2014-04-11

    The β-subunit associates with the α1 pore-forming subunit of high voltage-activated calcium channels and modulates several aspects of ion conduction. Four β-subunits are encoded by four different genes with multiple splice variants. Only two members of this family, β2a and β2e, associate with the plasma membrane in the absence of the α1-subunit. Palmitoylation on a di-cysteine motif located at the N terminus of β2a promotes membrane targeting and correlates with the unique ability of this protein to slow down inactivation. In contrast, the mechanism by which β2e anchors to the plasma membrane remains elusive. Here, we identified an N-terminal segment in β2e encompassing a cluster of positively charged residues, which is strictly required for membrane anchoring, and when transferred to the cytoplasmic β1b isoform it confers membrane localization to the latter. In the presence of negatively charged phospholipid vesicles, this segment binds to acidic liposomes dependently on the ionic strength, and the intrinsic fluorescence emission maxima of its single tryptophan blue shifts considerably. Simultaneous substitution of more than two basic residues impairs membrane targeting. Coexpression of the fast inactivating R-type calcium channels with wild-type β2e, but not with a β2e membrane association-deficient mutant, slows down inactivation. We propose that a predicted α-helix within this domain orienting parallel to the membrane tethers the β2e-subunit to the lipid bilayer via electrostatic interactions. Penetration of the tryptophan side chain into the lipidic core stabilizes the membrane-bound conformation. This constitutes a new mechanism for membrane anchoring among the β-subunit family that also sustains slowed inactivation.

  12. A simple method to prepare modified polyethersulfone membrane with improved hydrophilic surface by one-pot: The effect of hydrophobic segment length and molecular weight of copolymers.

    PubMed

    Ran, Fen; Li, Jie; Lu, Yi; Wang, Lingren; Nie, Shengqiang; Song, Haiming; Zhao, Lei; Sun, Shudong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2014-04-01

    A simple method to prepare modified polyethersulfone (PES) membrane by one-pot is provided, and the method includes three steps: polymerization of vinyl pyrrolidone (VP), copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and blending with PES. The effect of the PMMA segment length and molecular weight of the copolymer (PVP-b-PMMA-b-PVP, as an additive) on the structures and properties of the modified membranes was investigated. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) tests indicated that with the increase of the poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) segment length in the chains of the copolymers and with the increase of the molecular weight of the copolymers, the APTTs of the modified membranes increased to some extent, since less of the additives were lost during liquid-liquid phase separation process. Therefore, the copolymer was designed and prepared with appropriate ratio of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) to MMA and with appropriate molecular weight for better membrane performance. When the copolymer was blended in the membrane, the water permeance, protein anti-fouling property and sieving coefficients for PEG-12000 increased obviously. The simple, credible and feasible method had the potential to be used for the modification of membranes with improved blood compatibility, ultrafiltration and antifouling properties of biomaterials and for practical production.

  13. Structural Elucidation of the Cell-Penetrating Penetratin Peptide in Model Membranes at the Atomic Level: Probing Hydrophobic Interactions in the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Bera, Swapna; Kar, Rajiv K; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have shown promise in nonpermeable therapeutic drug delivery, because of their ability to transport a variety of cargo molecules across the cell membranes and their noncytotoxicity. Drosophila antennapedia homeodomain-derived CPP penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), being rich in positively charged residues, has been increasingly used as a potential drug carrier for various purposes. Penetratin can breach the tight endothelial network known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), permitting treatment of several neurodegenerative maladies, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. However, a detailed structural understanding of penetratin and its mechanism of action is lacking. This study defines structural features of the penetratin-derived peptide, DK17 (DRQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), in several model membranes and describes a membrane-induced conformational transition of the DK17 peptide in these environments. A series of biophysical experiments, including high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, provides the three-dimensional structure of DK17 in different membranes mimicking the BBB or total brain lipid extract. Molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental results showing preferential binding of DK17 to particular lipids at atomic resolution. The peptide conserves the structure of the subdomain spanning residues Ile6-Arg11, despite considerable conformational variation in different membrane models. In vivo data suggest that the wild type, not a mutated sequence, enters the central nervous system. Together, these data highlight important structural and functional attributes of DK17 that could be utilized in drug delivery for neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. Membrane filtration of food suspensions.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, A N; Peterkin, P I; Dudas, I

    1979-01-01

    Factors affecting the membrane filtration of food suspensions were studied for 58 foods and 13 membrane filters. Lot number within a brand, pore size (0.45 or 0.8 micrometer), and time elapsed before filtration had little effect on filterability. Brand of membrane filter, flow direction, pressure differential, age (microbiological quality) of the food, duration of the blending process, temperature, and concentration of food in the suspension had significant and often predictable effects. Preparation of suspensions by Stomacher (relative to rotary blender) addition of surfactant (particularly at elevated temperature) and prior incubation with proteases sometimes had dramatic effects of filterability. In contrast to popular opinion, foods can be membrane filtered in quantities pertinent to the maximums used in conventional plating procedures. Removal of growth inhibitors and food debris is possible by using membrane filters. Lowering of the limits of detection of microorganisms by concentration on membrane filters can be considered feasible for many foods. The data are particularly relevant to the use of hydrophobic grid-membrane filters (which are capable of enumerating up to 9 X 10(4) organisms per filter) in instrumented methods of food microbiological analysis. Images PMID:760637

  15. Designing a hydrophobic barrier within biomimetic nanopores.

    PubMed

    Trick, Jemma L; Wallace, E Jayne; Bayley, Hagan; Sansom, Mark S P

    2014-11-25

    Nanopores in membranes have a range of potential applications. Biomimetic design of nanopores aims to mimic key functions of biological pores within a stable template structure. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to test whether a simple β-barrel protein nanopore can be modified to incorporate a hydrophobic barrier to permeation. Simulations have been used to evaluate functional properties of such nanopores, using water flux as a proxy for ionic conductance. The behavior of these model pores has been characterized as a function of pore size and of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chains lining the narrow central constriction of the pore. Potential of mean force calculations have been used to calculate free energy landscapes for water and for ion permeation in selected models. These studies demonstrate that a hydrophobic barrier can indeed be designed into a β-barrel protein nanopore, and that the height of the barrier can be adjusted by modifying the number of consecutive rings of hydrophobic side chains. A hydrophobic barrier prevents both water and ion permeation even though the pore is sterically unoccluded. These results both provide insights into the nature of hydrophobic gating in biological pores and channels, and furthermore demonstrate that simple design features may be computationally transplanted into β-barrel membrane proteins to generate functionally complex nanopores.

  16. Preparation of hydrophobic coatings

    DOEpatents

    Branson, Eric D.; Shah, Pratik B.; Singh, Seema; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2009-02-03

    A method for preparing a hydrophobic coating by preparing a precursor sol comprising a metal alkoxide, a solvent, a basic catalyst, a fluoroalkyl compound and water, depositing the precursor sol as a film onto a surface, such as a substrate or a pipe, heating, the film and exposing the film to a hydrophobic silane compound to form a hydrophobic coating with a contact angle greater than approximately 150.degree.. The contact angle of the film can be controlled by exposure to ultraviolet radiation to reduce the contact angle and subsequent exposure to a hydrophobic silane compound to increase the contact angle.

  17. Krypton Derivatization of an O2 -Tolerant Membrane-Bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reveals a Hydrophobic Tunnel Network for Gas Transport.

    PubMed

    Kalms, Jacqueline; Schmidt, Andrea; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; van der Linden, Peter; von Stetten, David; Lenz, Oliver; Carpentier, Philippe; Scheerer, Patrick

    2016-04-25

    [NiFe] hydrogenases are metalloenzymes catalyzing the reversible heterolytic cleavage of hydrogen into protons and electrons. Gas tunnels make the deeply buried active site accessible to substrates and inhibitors. Understanding the architecture and function of the tunnels is pivotal to modulating the feature of O2 tolerance in a subgroup of these [NiFe] hydrogenases, as they are interesting for developments in renewable energy technologies. Here we describe the crystal structure of the O2 -tolerant membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase of Ralstonia eutropha (ReMBH), using krypton-pressurized crystals. The positions of the krypton atoms allow a comprehensive description of the tunnel network within the enzyme. A detailed overview of tunnel sizes, lengths, and routes is presented from tunnel calculations. A comparison of the ReMBH tunnel characteristics with crystal structures of other O2 -tolerant and O2 -sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenases revealed considerable differences in tunnel size and quantity between the two groups, which might be related to the striking feature of O2 tolerance.

  18. Krypton Derivatization of an O2 -Tolerant Membrane-Bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reveals a Hydrophobic Tunnel Network for Gas Transport.

    PubMed

    Kalms, Jacqueline; Schmidt, Andrea; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; van der Linden, Peter; von Stetten, David; Lenz, Oliver; Carpentier, Philippe; Scheerer, Patrick

    2016-04-25

    [NiFe] hydrogenases are metalloenzymes catalyzing the reversible heterolytic cleavage of hydrogen into protons and electrons. Gas tunnels make the deeply buried active site accessible to substrates and inhibitors. Understanding the architecture and function of the tunnels is pivotal to modulating the feature of O2 tolerance in a subgroup of these [NiFe] hydrogenases, as they are interesting for developments in renewable energy technologies. Here we describe the crystal structure of the O2 -tolerant membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase of Ralstonia eutropha (ReMBH), using krypton-pressurized crystals. The positions of the krypton atoms allow a comprehensive description of the tunnel network within the enzyme. A detailed overview of tunnel sizes, lengths, and routes is presented from tunnel calculations. A comparison of the ReMBH tunnel characteristics with crystal structures of other O2 -tolerant and O2 -sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenases revealed considerable differences in tunnel size and quantity between the two groups, which might be related to the striking feature of O2 tolerance. PMID:26913499

  19. Hydrophobic effect at aqueous interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Conceptual basis for hydrophobic effects in bulk water and at aqueous interfaces have similar conceptual basis but often manifests itself differently. Using a wide range of computer simulations as the basis, I will review different forms of hydrophobic effects at a variety of interfaces starting from simple liquid-vapor and water-oil interfaces and progressing to water-membrane interfaces. I will start with discussing how water is organized at different interfaces, stressing both similarities and differences. The main thread is that, as in the bulk liquid, hydrophobic effects have profound influence on conformational equilibria and organization of both small molecules and macromolecules, but the result of this influence is quite different. Specifically, it will be shown that many small, but not necessarily amphiphilic molecules tend to accumulate at the interface and, and this tendency will be explained. Furthermore, I will show that many short peptides that are disordered in water spontaneously fold into well-defined structures in the interfacial environment. Biological implications of this self-organizing effect will be discussed.

  20. Omniphobic Membrane for Robust Membrane Distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, SH; Nejati, S; Boo, C; Hu, YX; Osuji, CO; Ehmelech, M

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we fabricate an omniphobic microporous membrane for membrane distillation (MD) by modifying a hydrophilic glass fiber membrane with silica nanoparticles followed by surface fluorination and polymer coating. The modified glass fiber membrane exhibits an anti-wetting property not only against water but also against low surface tension organic solvents that easily wet a hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane that is commonly used in MD applications. By comparing the performance of the PTFE and omniphobic membranes in direct contact MD experiments in the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), we show that SDS wets the hydrophobic PTFE membrane but not the omniphobic membrane. Our results suggest that omniphobic membranes are critical for MD applications with feed waters containing surface active species, such as oil and gas produced water, to prevent membrane pore wetting.

  1. Electrokinetic instability near charge-selective hydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelistov, V. S.; Demekhin, E. A.; Ganchenko, G. S.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of the texture of a hydrophobic surface on the electro-osmotic slip of the second kind and the electrokinetic instability near charge selective surfaces (permselective membranes, electrodes, or systems of microchannels and nanochannels) is investigated theoretically using a simple model based on the Rubinstein-Zaltzman approach. A simple formula is derived to evaluate the decrease in the instability threshold due to hydrophobicity. The study is complemented by numerical investigations both of linear and nonlinear instabilities near a hydrophobic membrane surface. Theory predicts a significant enhancement of the ion flux to the surface and shows a good qualitative agreement with the available experimental data.

  2. Electrohydrodynamics Near Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduar, S. R.; Belyaev, A. V.; Lobaskin, V.; Vinogradova, O. I.

    2015-03-01

    We show that an electro-osmotic flow near the slippery hydrophobic surface depends strongly on the mobility of surface charges, which are balanced by counterions of the electrostatic diffuse layer. For a hydrophobic surface with immobile charges, the fluid transport is considerably amplified by the existence of a hydrodynamic slippage. In contrast, near the hydrophobic surface with mobile adsorbed charges, it is also controlled by an additional electric force, which increases the shear stress at the slipping interface. To account for this, we formulate electrohydrodynamic boundary conditions at the slipping interface, which should be applied to quantify electro-osmotic flows instead of hydrodynamic boundary conditions. Our theoretical predictions are fully supported by dissipative particle dynamics simulations with explicit charges. These results lead to a new interpretation of zeta potential of hydrophobic surfaces.

  3. Electrohydrodynamics near hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maduar, S R; Belyaev, A V; Lobaskin, V; Vinogradova, O I

    2015-03-20

    We show that an electro-osmotic flow near the slippery hydrophobic surface depends strongly on the mobility of surface charges, which are balanced by counterions of the electrostatic diffuse layer. For a hydrophobic surface with immobile charges, the fluid transport is considerably amplified by the existence of a hydrodynamic slippage. In contrast, near the hydrophobic surface with mobile adsorbed charges, it is also controlled by an additional electric force, which increases the shear stress at the slipping interface. To account for this, we formulate electrohydrodynamic boundary conditions at the slipping interface, which should be applied to quantify electro-osmotic flows instead of hydrodynamic boundary conditions. Our theoretical predictions are fully supported by dissipative particle dynamics simulations with explicit charges. These results lead to a new interpretation of zeta potential of hydrophobic surfaces.

  4. Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

  5. Hydrophobic, Porous Battery Boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Casey, John E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Boxes made of porous, hydrophobic polymers developed to contain aqueous potassium hydroxide electrolyte solutions of zinc/air batteries while allowing air to diffuse in as needed for operation. Used on other types of batteries for in-cabin use in which electrolytes aqueous and from which gases generated during operation must be vented without allowing electrolytes to leak out.

  6. Wet chemistry route to hydrophobic blue fluorescent nanodiamond.

    PubMed

    Mochalin, Vadym N; Gogotsi, Yury

    2009-04-01

    Hydrophobic blue fluorescent nanodiamond was synthesized by covalent linking of octadecylamine to the surface of nanodiamond particles. The material is easily dispersible in hydrophobic solvents, forming a transparent colloidal solution, and can be used in those applications where stable dispersions of nanodiamond in fuels, polymers or oils are required. Bright blue fluorescence of the octadecylamine-modified nanodiamond opens up new avenues for its use as a non-toxic quantum dot analogue for biomedical imaging of cellular membranes and other hydrophobic components of biological systems. Similar surface modification can be used for other carbon nanoparticles.

  7. Transmembrane passage of hydrophobic compounds through a protein channel wall.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Elizabeth M; Patel, Dimki R; Lepore, Bryan W; Indic, Mridhu; van den Berg, Bert

    2009-03-19

    Membrane proteins that transport hydrophobic compounds have important roles in multi-drug resistance and can cause a number of diseases, underscoring the importance of protein-mediated transport of hydrophobic compounds. Hydrophobic compounds readily partition into regular membrane lipid bilayers, and their transport through an aqueous protein channel is energetically unfavourable. Alternative transport models involving acquisition from the lipid bilayer by lateral diffusion have been proposed for hydrophobic substrates. So far, all transport proteins for which a lateral diffusion mechanism has been proposed function as efflux pumps. Here we present the first example of a lateral diffusion mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by the Escherichia coli outer membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL. A FadL mutant in which a lateral opening in the barrel wall is constricted, but which is otherwise structurally identical to wild-type FadL, does not transport substrates. A crystal structure of FadL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa shows that the opening in the wall of the beta-barrel is conserved and delineates a long, hydrophobic tunnel that could mediate substrate passage from the extracellular environment, through the polar lipopolysaccharide layer and, by means of the lateral opening in the barrel wall, into the lipid bilayer from where the substrate can diffuse into the periplasm. Because FadL homologues are found in pathogenic and biodegrading bacteria, our results have implications for combating bacterial infections and bioremediating xenobiotics in the environment.

  8. Hydrophobic sugar holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejias-Brizuela, N. Y.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Páez-Trujillo, G.; Hernández-Garay, M. P.; Fontanilla-Urdaneta, R.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2008-02-01

    The sugar matrix is used to record of phase holograms; it was modified with the purpose of obtaining a hydrophobic material to improve the stability of the registered image and to stimulate the photosensitivity of the sugar. The new material is formed by a sugar, pectin and vanillin dissolution. The diffraction efficiency parameter increases in comparison with only the sugar matrix, obtaining already of 10%.

  9. MAGNETIC GRID

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1960-08-01

    An electronic grid is designed employing magnetic forces for controlling the passage of charged particles. The grid is particularly applicable to use in gas-filled tubes such as ignitrons. thyratrons, etc., since the magnetic grid action is impartial to the polarity of the charged particles and, accordingly. the sheath effects encountered with electrostatic grids are not present. The grid comprises a conductor having sections spaced apart and extending in substantially opposite directions in the same plane, the ends of the conductor being adapted for connection to a current source.

  10. Positive charges of translocating polypeptide chain retrieve an upstream marginal hydrophobic segment from the endoplasmic reticulum lumen to the translocon.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hidenobu; Kida, Yuichiro; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Morimoto, Fumiko; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2010-06-15

    Positively charged amino acid residues are well recognized topology determinants of membrane proteins. They contribute to the stop-translocation of a polypeptide translocating through the translocon and to determine the orientation of signal sequences penetrating the membrane. Here we analyzed the function of these positively charged residues during stop-translocation in vitro. Surprisingly, the positive charges facilitated membrane spanning of a marginally hydrophobic segment, even when separated from the hydrophobic segment by 70 residues. In this case, the hydrophobic segment was exposed to the lumen, and then the downstream positive charges triggered the segment to slide back into the membrane. The marginally hydrophobic segment spanned the membrane, but maintained access to the water environment. The positive charges not only fix the hydrophobic segment in the membrane at its flanking position, but also have a much more dynamic action than previously realized. PMID:20427573

  11. Effect of amino acid substitution in the hydrophobic face of amphiphilic peptides on membrane curvature and perturbation: N-terminal helix derived from adenovirus internal protein VI as a model.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Tomo; Pujals, Sílvia; Hirose, Hisaaki; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Futaki, Shiroh

    2016-11-01

    The N-terminal amphipathic helical segment of adenovirus internal protein VI (AdVpVI) plays a critical role in viral infection. Here, we report that the peptide segment corresponding to AdVpVI (positions 33-55) can induce positive membrane curvature together with membrane perturbation. The enhanced perturbation ability of the peptide was observed for membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids. Based on the liposome leakage assay, substitution of leucine at position 40 to other aliphatic (isoleucine) and aromatic (phenylalanine and tryptophan) residues yielded a similar degree of membrane perturbation by the peptides, which was considerably diminished by the substitution to glutamine. Further studies using the wild-type AdVpVI (33-55) (WT) and phenylalanine-substituted peptides (L40F) demonstrated that both peptides have positive membrane-curvature-inducing ability. These peptides showed higher binding affinity to 50-nm large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) than to 200-nm LUVs. However, no enhanced perturbation by these peptides was observed for 50-nm LUVs compared to 200-nm LUVs, suggesting that both the original membrane curvature and the additional strain due to peptide insertion affect the membrane perturbation ability of these peptides. In the case of L40F, this peptide rather had a lower membrane perturbation ability for 50-nm LUVs than for 200-nm LUVs, which can be attributed to possible shallower binding of L40F on membranes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 430-439, 2016.

  12. Effect of amino acid substitution in the hydrophobic face of amphiphilic peptides on membrane curvature and perturbation: N-terminal helix derived from adenovirus internal protein VI as a model.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Tomo; Pujals, Sílvia; Hirose, Hisaaki; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Futaki, Shiroh

    2016-11-01

    The N-terminal amphipathic helical segment of adenovirus internal protein VI (AdVpVI) plays a critical role in viral infection. Here, we report that the peptide segment corresponding to AdVpVI (positions 33-55) can induce positive membrane curvature together with membrane perturbation. The enhanced perturbation ability of the peptide was observed for membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids. Based on the liposome leakage assay, substitution of leucine at position 40 to other aliphatic (isoleucine) and aromatic (phenylalanine and tryptophan) residues yielded a similar degree of membrane perturbation by the peptides, which was considerably diminished by the substitution to glutamine. Further studies using the wild-type AdVpVI (33-55) (WT) and phenylalanine-substituted peptides (L40F) demonstrated that both peptides have positive membrane-curvature-inducing ability. These peptides showed higher binding affinity to 50-nm large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) than to 200-nm LUVs. However, no enhanced perturbation by these peptides was observed for 50-nm LUVs compared to 200-nm LUVs, suggesting that both the original membrane curvature and the additional strain due to peptide insertion affect the membrane perturbation ability of these peptides. In the case of L40F, this peptide rather had a lower membrane perturbation ability for 50-nm LUVs than for 200-nm LUVs, which can be attributed to possible shallower binding of L40F on membranes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 430-439, 2016. PMID:27271816

  13. Investigation on hydrophobic films from a hydrophobic powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liqun; Hao, Guofang; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yizhi

    2012-11-01

    A hydrophobic powder was prepared based mainly on an organosiloxane and a corrosion inhibitor with the addition of a reaction promoter. Structure and thermal stability of the hydrophobic powder were characterized by FTIR and TG/DSC, respectively. Hydrophobic property and corrosion resistance of the hydrophobic film formed on phosphatized steel by immersion in 3 wt% NaCl aqueous solution were evaluated together with the electrochemical behavior. Results showed that the skeleton of the hydrophobic powder was composed mainly of sbnd Sisbnd Osbnd Sisbnd which comprises longer and more hydrophobic groups of sbnd Sisbnd R compared with the conventional BH-102 water-repellent agent. A thin hydrophobic film with a thickness of 15-20 μm was formed on surface of the phosphatized steel after immersion in the solution of 5 g/L of the hydrophobic powder in ethanol for 5 min. The hydrophobic film exhibited excellent stability at a temperature below 135 °C. Water contact angle on the film is about 117-132° and it was until 30 h later when a corrosion spot occurred on the film covered on steel which revealed better water-repellent and corrosion resistant properties compared to that of the BH-102.

  14. Fibonacci Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinbank, Richard; Purser, James

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in a variety of non-standard computational grids for global numerical prediction. The motivation has been to reduce problems associated with the converging meridians and the polar singularities of conventional regular latitude-longitude grids. A further impetus has come from the adoption of massively parallel computers, for which it is necessary to distribute work equitably across the processors; this is more practicable for some non-standard grids. Desirable attributes of a grid for high-order spatial finite differencing are: (i) geometrical regularity; (ii) a homogeneous and approximately isotropic spatial resolution; (iii) a low proportion of the grid points where the numerical procedures require special customization (such as near coordinate singularities or grid edges). One family of grid arrangements which, to our knowledge, has never before been applied to numerical weather prediction, but which appears to offer several technical advantages, are what we shall refer to as "Fibonacci grids". They can be thought of as mathematically ideal generalizations of the patterns occurring naturally in the spiral arrangements of seeds and fruit found in sunflower heads and pineapples (to give two of the many botanical examples). These grids possess virtually uniform and highly isotropic resolution, with an equal area for each grid point. There are only two compact singular regions on a sphere that require customized numerics. We demonstrate the practicality of these grids in shallow water simulations, and discuss the prospects for efficiently using these frameworks in three-dimensional semi-implicit and semi-Lagrangian weather prediction or climate models.

  15. Water on a Hydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scruggs, Ryan; Zhu, Mengjue; Poynor, Adele

    2012-02-01

    Hydrophobicity, meaning literally fear of water, is exhibited on the surfaces of non-stick cooking pans and water resistant clothing, on the leaves of the lotus plan, or even during the protein folding process in our bodies. Hydrophobicity is directly measured by determining a contact angle between water and an objects surface. Associated with a hydrophobic surface is the depletion layer, a low density region approximately 0.2 nm thick. We study this region by comparing data found in lab using surface plasmon resonance techniques to theoretical calculations. Experiments use gold slides coated in ODT and Mercapto solutions to model both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces respectively.

  16. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic control in polyphosphazene materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steely, Lee Brent

    sensitive phosphoranimine monomer storage, micelle formation in water from triblock copolymers, and single ion conductive membranes with increased hydrophobicity respectively. Although the appendixes examine polyphosphazene hydrophobic relationships they are not specific to surface hydrophobicity of solids and were not placed in the main text. Appendix A involves the optimization of storage conditions for a phosphoranimine monomer. Conditions examined include room temperature to -80 ºC and dilution with a variety of organic solvents. The micelle formation of A-B-A triblock copolymer of poly[bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phosphazene]-poly(propylene-glycol)-poly[bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phosphazene] was explored in appendix B. It was determined with light scattering and TEM that hairpin folding of our triblock copolymer allowed micelle formation with the two hydrophobic poly[bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phosphazene] blocks facing the hydrophobic core of the micelle. Appendix C details the lithium ion conductivity of poly[norbornene-pendent-cyclotriphosphazene] with sulfonimide and methoxyethoxyethoxy groups attached. These results are then compared with unbound lithium counter ion systems.

  17. Water Fluxes in Polymeric Membranes for Desalination via Membrane Distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannella, G. A.; Brucato, V.; La Carrubba, V.

    2010-06-01

    Membrane distillation is an emerging technique for seawater desalination. Hydrophobic polymeric membranes are used to separate the solute-free water vapour from the hot solution. Vapour fluxes of commercial polymeric membranes were measured in various conditions, i.e. natural and forced convection and vacuum. Vapour fluxes were also predicted with models and compared with experimentals. Higher fluxes were recorded in vacuum conditions.

  18. Binding of cationic peptides (KX)4K to DPPG bilayers. Increasing the hydrophobicity of the uncharged amino acid X drives formation of membrane bound β-sheets: A DSC and FT-IR study.

    PubMed

    Hädicke, André; Blume, Alfred

    2016-06-01

    The binding of cationic peptides of the sequence (KX)4K to lipid vesicles of negatively charged dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and temperature dependent Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The hydrophobicity of the uncharged amino acid X was changed from G (glycine) over A (alanine), Abu (α-aminobutyric acid), V (valine) to L (leucine). The binding of the peptides caused an increase of the phase transition temperature (Tm) of DPPG by up to 20°C. The shift depended on the charge ratio and on the hydrophobicity of the amino acid X. Unexpectedly, the upward shift of Tm increased with increasing hydrophobicity of X. FT-IR spectroscopy showed a shift of the CH2 stretching vibrations of DPPG to lower frequency, particularly for bilayers in the liquid-crystalline phase, indicating an ordering of the hydrocarbon chains when the peptides were bound. Changes in the lipid C=O vibrational band indicated a dehydration of the lipid headgroup region after peptide binding. (KG)4K was bound in an unordered structure at all temperatures. All other peptides formed intermolecular antiparallel β-sheets, when bound to gel phase DPPG. However, for (KA)4K and (KAbu)4K, the β-sheets converted into an unordered structure above Tm. In contrast, the β-sheet structures of (KV)4K and (KL)4K remained stable even at 80°C when bound to the liquid-crystalline phase of DPPG. Strong aggregation of DPPG vesicles occurred after peptide binding. For the aggregates, we suggest a structure, where aggregated single β-sheets are sandwiched between opposing DPPG bilayers with a dehydrated interfacial region.

  19. Changing water affinity from hydrophobic to hydrophilic in hydrophobic channels.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Shotaro; Kodaira, Tetsuya; Hata, Kenji

    2015-01-27

    The behavior of water at hydrophobic interfaces can play a significant role in determining chemical reaction outcomes and physical properties. Carbon nanotubes and aluminophosphate materials have one-dimensional hydrophobic channels, which are entirely surrounded by hydrophobic interfaces. Unique water behavior was observed in such hydrophobic channels. In this article, changes in the water affinity in one-dimensional hydrophobic channels were assessed using water vapor adsorption isotherms at 303 K and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic behavior of water adsorbed in channels wider than 3 nm was observed for both adsorption and desorption processes, owing to the hydrophobic environment. However, water showed hydrophilic properties in both adsorption and desorption processes in channels narrower than 1 nm. In intermediate-sized channels, the hydrophobic properties of water during the adsorption process were seen to transition to hydrophilic behavior during the desorption process. Hydrophilic properties in the narrow channels for both adsorption and desorption processes are a result of the relatively strong water-channel interactions (10-15 kJ mol(-1)). In the 2-3 nm channels, the water-channel interaction energy of 4-5 kJ mol(-1) was comparable to the thermal translational energy. The cohesive water interaction was approximately 35 kJ mol(-1), which was larger than the others. Thus, the water affinity change in the 2-3 nm channels for the adsorption and desorption processes was attributed to weak water-channel interactions and strong cohesive interactions. These results are inherently important to control the properties of water in hydrophobic environments.

  20. Grid Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Ian

    2001-08-01

    The term "Grid Computing" refers to the use, for computational purposes, of emerging distributed Grid infrastructures: that is, network and middleware services designed to provide on-demand and high-performance access to all important computational resources within an organization or community. Grid computing promises to enable both evolutionary and revolutionary changes in the practice of computational science and engineering based on new application modalities such as high-speed distributed analysis of large datasets, collaborative engineering and visualization, desktop access to computation via "science portals," rapid parameter studies and Monte Carlo simulations that use all available resources within an organization, and online analysis of data from scientific instruments. In this article, I examine the status of Grid computing circa 2000, briefly reviewing some relevant history, outlining major current Grid research and development activities, and pointing out likely directions for future work. I also present a number of case studies, selected to illustrate the potential of Grid computing in various areas of science.

  1. Type II transmembrane domain hydrophobicity dictates the cotranslational dependence for inversion

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Dan; da Silva, Diogo V.; Nordholm, Johan; Wang, Hao; Daniels, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Membrane insertion by the Sec61 translocon in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is highly dependent on hydrophobicity. This places stringent hydrophobicity requirements on transmembrane domains (TMDs) from single-spanning membrane proteins. On examining the single-spanning influenza A membrane proteins, we found that the strict hydrophobicity requirement applies to the Nout-Cin HA and M2 TMDs but not the Nin-Cout TMDs from the type II membrane protein neuraminidase (NA). To investigate this discrepancy, we analyzed NA TMDs of varying hydrophobicity, followed by increasing polypeptide lengths, in mammalian cells and ER microsomes. Our results show that the marginally hydrophobic NA TMDs (ΔGapp > 0 kcal/mol) require the cotranslational insertion process for facilitating their inversion during translocation and a positively charged N-terminal flanking residue and that NA inversion enhances its plasma membrane localization. Overall the cotranslational inversion of marginally hydrophobic NA TMDs initiates once ∼70 amino acids past the TMD are synthesized, and the efficiency reaches 50% by ∼100 amino acids, consistent with the positioning of this TMD class in type II human membrane proteins. Inversion of the M2 TMD, achieved by elongating its C-terminus, underscores the contribution of cotranslational synthesis to TMD inversion. PMID:25165139

  2. Side Chain Degradable Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers with Tunable Hydrophobicity Show in Vivo Activity.

    PubMed

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Samaddar, Sandip; Hoque, Jiaul; Konai, Mohini M; Krishnamoorthy, Paramanandham; Shome, Bibek R; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-09-12

    Cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with optimal amphiphilicity generally target the bacterial membranes instead of mammalian membranes. To date, this balance has been achieved by varying the cationic charge or side chain hydrophobicity in a variety of cationic-amphiphilic polymers. Optimal hydrophobicity of cationic-amphiphilic polymers has been considered as the governing factor for potent antibacterial activity yet minimal mammalian cell toxicity. However, the concomitant role of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity with constant cationic charge in the interactions of antibacterial polymers with bacterial membranes is not understood. Also, degradable polymers that result in nontoxic degradation byproducts offer promise as safe antibacterial agents. Here we show that amide- and ester (degradable)-bearing cationic-amphiphilic polymers with tunable side chain hydrophobicity can modulate antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that an amide polymer can be a potent antibacterial agent with lower hydrophobicity whereas the corresponding ester polymer needs a relatively higher hydrophobicity to be as effective as its amide counterpart. Our studies reveal that at higher hydrophobicities both amide and ester polymers have similar profiles of membrane-active antibacterial activity and mammalian cell toxicity. On the contrary, at lower hydrophobicities, amide and ester polymers are less cytotoxic, but the former have potent antibacterial and membrane activity compared to the latter. Incorporation of amide and ester moieties made these polymers side chain degradable, with amide polymers being more stable than the ester polymers. Further, the polymers are less toxic, and their degradation byproducts are nontoxic to mice. More importantly, the optimized amide polymer reduces the bacterial burden of burn wound infections in mice models. Our design introduces a new strategy of interplay between the hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions

  3. Effect of Substrate and Cell Surface Hydrophobicity on Phosphate Utilization in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, M. J.; Churchill, P. F.; Wetzel, R. G.

    1995-01-01

    We measured the rates of utilization of hydrophobic and hydrophilic phosphate compounds in gram-negative bacteria with different surface hydrophobicities, isolated from wetland habitats. Three hydrophobic and two hydrophilic bacterial species were selected for study by measuring cell adherence to hydrocarbons. The bacteria were grown under phosphorus-limited conditions with P(infi), hydrophilic (beta)-glycerophosphate, or hydrophobic phosphatidic acid as the phosphate source. Hydrophilic bacteria grew most rapidly on P(infi), followed by (beta)-glycerophosphate. Phosphatidic acid did not support growth or did so at a much later time (40 h) than did the other phosphate treatments. Although all hydrophobic species grew well on these substrates, the rate of growth of two Acinetobacter baumannii isolates on phosphatidic acid exceeded the rate of growth on phosphate or (beta)-glycerophosphate. A membrane phospholipid and lipopolysaccharide were used as a source of phosphorus by hydrophobic species, whereas hydrophilic species could not use the membrane phospholipids and used lipopolysaccharide to a lesser extent. Besides hydrophobic interaction between cells and substrate, phosphatase activity, which was cell bound in hydrophilic species but 30 to 50% unbound in hydrophobic species, affected cell growth. Dialyzed culture supernatant containing phosphatase from hydrophobic species increased the phosphate availability to hydrophilic species. Additionally, cellular extracts from a hydrophilic species, when added to hydrophilic cells, permitted growth on hydrophobic phosphate sources. Naturally occurring amphiphilic humic acids affected the utilization of P(infi) and (beta)-glycerophosphate in bacteria with hydrophilic surfaces but did not affect hydrophobic bacteria. Our results indicate that hydrophobic phosphate sources can be used by bacteria isolated from aquatic environments as the sole phosphorus source for growth. This utilization, in part, appears to be related to

  4. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  5. Air agglomeration of hydrophobic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The agglomeration of hydrophobic particles in an aqueous suspension was accomplished by introducing small amounts of air into the suspension while it was agitated vigorously. The extent of aggregation was proportional both to the air to solids ratio and to the hydrophobicity of the solids. For a given air/solids ratio, the extent of aggregation of different materials increased in the following order: graphite, gilsonite, coal coated with heptane, and Teflon. The structure of agglomerates produced from coarse Teflon particles differed noticeably from the structure of bubble-particle aggregates produced from smaller, less hydrophobic particles.

  6. Discrepant membrane fouling of partial nitrification and anammox membrane bioreactor operated at the same nitrogen loading rate.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhao; Zhang, Zuotao; Liu, Sitong; Miyoshi, Taro; Matsuyama, Hideo; Ni, Jinren

    2016-08-01

    In this study, two times more serious membrane fouling was found in anammox membrane bioreactor, compared to partial nitrification membrane bioreactor (PN-MBR) operated at the same nitrogen loading rate. By protein, polysaccharide, amino acids and functional groups analysis, it was found that the discrepancy in membrane fouling was virtually due to the difference in microbial products of nitrifiers and anammox bacteria. Protein and polysaccharide were main foulants on membrane surface; meanwhile theirs content and ratio in the EPS, supernatant and membrane surface were significantly different in PN-MBR and anammox-MBR. The anammox metabolism products contained much more hydrophobic organics, hydrophobic amino acids, and hydrophobic functional groups than nitrifiers. A mass of anammox bacteria as well as hydrophobic metabolism products deposited on the hydrophobic membrane surface and formed serious fouling. In further, hydrophilic modification is more urgently needed to mitigate membrane fouling when running anammox-MBR, than PN-MBR. PMID:27209455

  7. Estimation of atomic hydrophobicities using molecular dynamics simulation of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Marie; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2007-12-01

    The hydrophobic force is one of the main driving forces in protein folding and binding. However, its nature is not yet well understood and consequently there are more than 80 different scales published trying to quantify it. Most of the hydrophobicity scales are amino acid-based, but the interaction between the molecular surface of the proteins (and DNA) and surfaces they are immobilized on, e.g., on biomedical micro/nanodevices, occurs on fractions of, rather than whole amino acids. This fragmented structure of the biomolecular surface requires the derivation of atom-level hydrophobicity. Most attempts for the evaluation of atomic hydrophobicities are derived from amino acid-based values, which ignore dynamic and steric factors. This contribution reports on the Molecular Dynamics simulations that aim to overcome this simplification. The calculations examine various tripeptides in an aqueous solution and the analysis focuses on the distance of the nearest water molecules to the individual atoms in the peptides. Different environments result in a variation of average distances for similar atoms in different tripeptides. Comparison with the atomic hydrophobicities derived from the amino acid-based hydrophobicity obtained from peptide partition in water-octanol (Dgoct) and transport through the membrane interface (Dgwif) shows a similar trend to the calculated distances. The variations are likely due to the steric differences of similar types of atoms in different geometric contexts. Therefore, Molecular Dynamics simulations proved convenient for the evaluation of atomic hydrophobicities and open new research avenues. The atomic hydrophobicities can be used to design surfaces that mimic the biomolecular surfaces and therefore elicit an expected biomolecular activity from the immobilized biomolecules.

  8. Temporal variability and switching dynamics of soil hydrophobicity: fire impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla; Walsh, Rory; Injai, Mariama; Costa, Mirela; Shakesby, Rick; Ferreira, António

    2010-05-01

    Soil hydrophobicity is differently affected by fire depending on the degree and duration of soil heating (e.g. Dekker and Ritsema, 1994; Shakesby and Doerr, 2006; Ferreira, 2008). It is also known that hydrophobicity is seasonally variable, affected by soil moisture content and that it is generally (but not invariably) confined to the organically-enriched uppermost few centimetres of the soil (Doerr and Shakesby, 2009). Hydrophobicity behaviour is viewed as an important factor affecting hydrological and erosional soil processes, reducing infiltration capacities and soil moisture content and enhancing overland flow and slopewash (Shakesby and Doerr, 2006). Despite extensive research on patterns and impacts repellency over the past 15 years, however, there remains a lack of knowledge and understanding on the three-dimensional temporal dynamics and controls of switching of soils between hydrophobic and hydrophilic states. This poor understanding is largely related to the destructive nature of hydrophobicity measurement methods and the problems associated with reliable and three-dimensionally meaningful soil moisture content measurements. This poster presents the research design and results of a field and laboratory investigation to assess these switching patterns in burned and unburned areas. The study has been carried out in central Portugal, on schist bedrock with a thin (<10cm) and stony soil, covered by shrubland, mainly Erica scoparia and Gaccharis articulata. Field data are derived from two grids, one installed in an area subject to an experimental fire, and the other one in the immediately adjacent unburned area. Each grid comprises 54 points (with 6 points located along 9 lines, spaced 1-2m apart). Each point was marked with a nail and the monitoring programme used a different ‘clock' position around each point for each survey, to minimize human disturbance caused by excavation and measurement. The grids were monitored twice before the fire and 6 times after

  9. Method for producing hydrophobic aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Coronado, Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for treating a dried monolithic aerogel containing non-dispersed particles, with an organometallic surface modifying agent to produce hydrophobic aerogels. The dried, porous hydrophobic aerogels contain a protective layer of alkyl groups, such as methyl groups, on the modified surfaces of the pores of the aerogel. The alkyl groups at the aerogel surface typically contain at least one carbon-metal bond per group.

  10. Grid reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, P.; Andreeva, J.; Cirstoiu, C.; Gaidioz, B.; Herrala, J.; Maguire, E. J.; Maier, G.; Rocha, R.

    2008-07-01

    Thanks to the Grid, users have access to computing resources distributed all over the world. The Grid hides the complexity and the differences of its heterogeneous components. In such a distributed system, it is clearly very important that errors are detected as soon as possible, and that the procedure to solve them is well established. We focused on two of its main elements: the workload and the data management systems. We developed an application to investigate the efficiency of the different centres. Furthermore, our system can be used to categorize the most common error messages, and control their time evolution.

  11. The true hydrophobicity of microsomal cytochrome P-450 in the rat: size dependence of the free energy of binding of a series of hydrocarbon substrates from the aqueous phase to the enzyme and to the membrane as derived from spectral binding data

    SciTech Connect

    Backes, W.L.; Hogaboom, M.; Canady, W.J.

    1982-04-25

    The associations of some hydrophobic substrates with cytochrome P-450 and with the microsomal membrane were studied. A series of aromatic hydrocarbons of increasing molecular size were used as a probe of the type I site of cytochrome P-450. The size dependence of the free energy (..delta..G/sup 0/) of binding was compared with the size dependence of transfer of the same compounds between the bulk solvent octanol and water. Similar size dependences were observed for the partition process (-0.68 kcal/mol/methylene group) and the binding of hydrocarbons to the type I binding site of cytochrome P-450 in both phenobarbital treated (-0.77 kcal/mol/methylene group) and untreated (-0.63 kcal/mol/methylene group) male rats. This is in contrast to earlier studies which did not take the dependence of the apparent binding constant upon enzyme concentration into account. Microsomal partitioning of the hydrocarbon substrates was quite different from the partitioning of those substrates between water and octanol. The size dependence of microsomal partitioning was found to be -0.27 kcal/mol/methylene group and -0.29 kcal/mol/methylene group in microsomes from untreated and phenobarbital-treated rats, respectively, indicating that the distribution of a substrate between water and a bulk organic solvent such as octanol is not a suitable model for an hepatic microsomal membrane, but that in certain ways it is an adequate model for enzyme-substrate complex formation. (JMT)

  12. Effect of hydrophobic mismatch on domain formation and peptide sorting in the multicomponent lipid bilayers in the presence of immobilized peptides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qing; Wu, Qing-Yan; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2014-08-21

    In the plasma membranes, many transmembrane (TM) proteins/peptides are anchored to the underlying cytoskeleton and/or the extracellular matrix. The lateral diffusion and the tilt of these proteins/peptides may be greatly restricted by the anchoring. Here, using the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we investigated the domain formation and peptide sorting in the ternary lipid bilayers in the presence of the immobilized peptide-grid and peptide-cluster. We mainly focused on examining the combining effect of the peptide immobilization and hydrophobic mismatch on the domain formation and peptide sorting in the lipid bilayers. Compared to the lipid bilayers inserted with free TM peptides, our results showed that, because of the tilt restriction imposed on the peptides, the hydrophobic mismatch effect more significantly influences the domain size, the dynamics of domain formation, and the peptide sorting in our systems. Our results provide some theoretical insights into understanding the formation of nanosized lipid rafts, the protein sorting in the lipid rafts and the interaction between the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix, and the plasma membranes.

  13. Effect of hydrophobic mismatch on domain formation and peptide sorting in the multicomponent lipid bilayers in the presence of immobilized peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qing; Wu, Qing-Yan; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2014-08-01

    In the plasma membranes, many transmembrane (TM) proteins/peptides are anchored to the underlying cytoskeleton and/or the extracellular matrix. The lateral diffusion and the tilt of these proteins/peptides may be greatly restricted by the anchoring. Here, using the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we investigated the domain formation and peptide sorting in the ternary lipid bilayers in the presence of the immobilized peptide-grid and peptide-cluster. We mainly focused on examining the combining effect of the peptide immobilization and hydrophobic mismatch on the domain formation and peptide sorting in the lipid bilayers. Compared to the lipid bilayers inserted with free TM peptides, our results showed that, because of the tilt restriction imposed on the peptides, the hydrophobic mismatch effect more significantly influences the domain size, the dynamics of domain formation, and the peptide sorting in our systems. Our results provide some theoretical insights into understanding the formation of nanosized lipid rafts, the protein sorting in the lipid rafts and the interaction between the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix, and the plasma membranes.

  14. Chlorine resistant desalination membranes based on directly sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers

    DOEpatents

    McGrath, James E.; Park, Ho Bum; Freeman, Benny D.

    2011-10-04

    The present invention provides a membrane, kit, and method of making a hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer membrane. The hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer membrane includes a hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer. The hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer includes one or more hydrophilic monomers having a sulfonated polyarylsulfone monomer and a second monomer and one or more hydrophobic monomers having a non-sulfonated third monomer and a fourth monomer. The sulfonated polyarylsulfone monomer introduces a sulfonate into the hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer prior to polymerization.

  15. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  16. Protein-induced bilayer perturbations: Lipid ordering and hydrophobic coupling.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Frederic N R; Laursen, Ib; Bohr, Henrik; Nielsen, Claus Hélix

    2009-10-01

    The host lipid bilayer is increasingly being recognized as an important non-specific regulator of membrane protein function. Despite considerable progress the interplay between hydrophobic coupling and lipid ordering is still elusive. We use electron spin resonance (ESR) to study the interaction between the model protein gramicidin and lipid bilayers of varying thickness. The free energy of the interaction is up to -6kJ/mol; thus not strongly favored over lipid-lipid interactions. Incorporation of gramicidin results in increased order parameters with increased protein concentration and hydrophobic mismatch. Our findings also show that at high protein:lipid ratios the lipids are motionally restricted but not completely immobilized. Both exchange on and off rate values for the lipid<-->gramicidin interaction are lowest at optimal hydrophobic matching. Hydrophobic mismatch of few A results in up to 10-fold increased exchange rates as compared to the 'optimal' match situation pointing to the regulatory role of hydrophobic coupling in lipid-protein interactions.

  17. Protein-induced bilayer perturbations: Lipid ordering and hydrophobic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Frederic N.R.; Laursen, Ib; Bohr, Henrik; Nielsen, Claus Helix

    2009-10-02

    The host lipid bilayer is increasingly being recognized as an important non-specific regulator of membrane protein function. Despite considerable progress the interplay between hydrophobic coupling and lipid ordering is still elusive. We use electron spin resonance (ESR) to study the interaction between the model protein gramicidin and lipid bilayers of varying thickness. The free energy of the interaction is up to -6 kJ/mol; thus not strongly favored over lipid-lipid interactions. Incorporation of gramicidin results in increased order parameters with increased protein concentration and hydrophobic mismatch. Our findings also show that at high protein:lipid ratios the lipids are motionally restricted but not completely immobilized. Both exchange on and off rate values for the lipid {r_reversible} gramicidin interaction are lowest at optimal hydrophobic matching. Hydrophobic mismatch of few A results in up to 10-fold increased exchange rates as compared to the 'optimal' match situation pointing to the regulatory role of hydrophobic coupling in lipid-protein interactions.

  18. Water-Mediated Hydrophobic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-05-01

    Hydrophobic interactions are driven by the combined influence of the direct attraction between oily solutes and an additional water-mediated interaction whose magnitude (and sign) depends sensitively on both solute size and attraction. The resulting delicate balance can lead to a slightly repulsive water-mediated interaction that drives oily molecules apart rather than pushing them together and thus opposes their direct (van der Waals) attraction for each other. As a consequence, competing solute size-dependent crossovers weaken hydrophobic interactions sufficiently that they are only expected to significantly exceed random thermal energy fluctuations for processes that bury more than ˜1 nm2 of water-exposed area.

  19. Safe Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward T.; Stewart, Helen; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The biggest users of GRID technologies came from the science and technology communities. These consist of government, industry and academia (national and international). The NASA GRID is moving into a higher technology readiness level (TRL) today; and as a joint effort among these leaders within government, academia, and industry, the NASA GRID plans to extend availability to enable scientists and engineers across these geographical boundaries collaborate to solve important problems facing the world in the 21 st century. In order to enable NASA programs and missions to use IPG resources for program and mission design, the IPG capabilities needs to be accessible from inside the NASA center networks. However, because different NASA centers maintain different security domains, the GRID penetration across different firewalls is a concern for center security people. This is the reason why some IPG resources are been separated from the NASA center network. Also, because of the center network security and ITAR concerns, the NASA IPG resource owner may not have full control over who can access remotely from outside the NASA center. In order to obtain organizational approval for secured remote access, the IPG infrastructure needs to be adapted to work with the NASA business process. Improvements need to be made before the IPG can be used for NASA program and mission development. The Secured Advanced Federated Environment (SAFE) technology is designed to provide federated security across NASA center and NASA partner's security domains. Instead of one giant center firewall which can be difficult to modify for different GRID applications, the SAFE "micro security domain" provide large number of professionally managed "micro firewalls" that can allow NASA centers to accept remote IPG access without the worry of damaging other center resources. The SAFE policy-driven capability-based federated security mechanism can enable joint organizational and resource owner approved remote

  20. Production of single-walled carbon nanotube grids

    DOEpatents

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-12-03

    A method of forming a nanotube grid includes placing a plurality of catalyst nanoparticles on a grid framework, contacting the catalyst nanoparticles with a gas mixture that includes hydrogen and a carbon source in a reaction chamber, forming an activated gas from the gas mixture, heating the grid framework and activated gas, and controlling a growth time to generate a single-wall carbon nanotube array radially about the grid framework. A filter membrane may be produced by this method.

  1. Hydrophobic Solvation: Aqueous Methane Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konrod, Oliver; Lankau, Timm

    2007-01-01

    A basic introduction to concept of a solvation shell around an apolar solute as well as its detection is presented. The hydrophobic solvation of toluene is found to be a good teaching example which connects macroscopic, phenomenological thermodynamic results with an atomistic point of view.

  2. Fabricating Super-hydrophobic Polydimethylsiloxane Surfaces by a Simple Filler-Dissolved Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yung-Tsan; Chou, Jung-Hua

    2010-12-01

    The self-cleaning effect of super-hydrophobic surfaces has attracted the attention of researchers. Typical ways of manufacturing super-hydrophobic surfaces include the use of either dedicated equipment or a complex chemical process. In this study, a simple innovative filler-dissolved method is developed using mainly powder salt and rinsing to form hydrophobic surfaces. This method can produce large super-hydrophobic surfaces with porous and micro rib surface structures. It can also be applied to curved surfaces, including flexible membranes. The contact angle of the manufactured artificial hydrophobic surface is about 160°. Furthermore, water droplets roll off the surface readily at a sliding angle of less than 5°, resembling the nonwetting lotus like effect.

  3. A hybridisation-dependent membrane-insertable amphiphilic DNA.

    PubMed

    Dohno, C; Matsuzaki, K; Yamaguchi, H; Shibata, T; Nakatani, K

    2015-10-28

    We synthesised a novel membrane-insertable amphiphilic DNA. The amphiphilic DNA had a nine-nucleotide hydrophobic region at one end consisting of octyl phosphotriester linkages. The amphiphilic DNA bound to the lipid membrane by inserting the hydrophobic region; this process was facilitated by the presence of the complementary DNA strand.

  4. Pretreatment and Membrane Hydrophilic Modification to Reduce Membrane Fouling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wen; Liu, Junxia; Chu, Huaqiang; Dong, Bingzhi

    2013-01-01

    The application of low pressure membranes (microfiltration/ultrafiltration) has undergone accelerated development for drinking water production. However, the major obstacle encountered in its popularization is membrane fouling caused by natural organic matter (NOM). This paper firstly summarizes the two factors causing the organic membrane fouling, including molecular weight (MW) and hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of NOM, and then presents a brief introduction of the methods which can prevent membrane fouling such as pretreatment of the feed water (e.g., coagulation, adsorption, and pre-oxidation) and membrane hydrophilic modification (e.g., plasma modification, irradiation grafting modification, surface coating modification, blend modification, etc.). Perspectives of further research are also discussed. PMID:24956947

  5. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...: (i) Amorphous fumed hydrophobic silica: Not less than 99.0 percent silicon dioxide after ignition... dichlorodimethylsilane. (ii) Precipated hydrophobic silica: Not less than 94.0 percent silicon dioxide after...

  6. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...: (i) Amorphous fumed hydrophobic silica: Not less than 99.0 percent silicon dioxide after ignition... dichlorodimethylsilane. (ii) Precipated hydrophobic silica: Not less than 94.0 percent silicon dioxide after...

  7. GridMan: A grid manipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Wang, Zhu

    1992-01-01

    GridMan is an interactive grid manipulation system. It operates on grids to produce new grids which conform to user demands. The input grids are not constrained to come from any particular source. They may be generated by algebraic methods, elliptic methods, hyperbolic methods, parabolic methods, or some combination of methods. The methods are included in the various available structured grid generation codes. These codes perform the basic assembly function for the various elements of the initial grid. For block structured grids, the assembly can be quite complex due to a large number of clock corners, edges, and faces for which various connections and orientations must be properly identified. The grid generation codes are distinguished among themselves by their balance between interactive and automatic actions and by their modest variations in control. The basic form of GridMan provides a much more substantial level of grid control and will take its input from any of the structured grid generation codes. The communication link to the outside codes is a data file which contains the grid or section of grid.

  8. Vapor transport through short hydrophobic nanopores for desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongho; O'Hern, Sean; Laoui, Tahar; Rahman, Faizur; Karnik, Rohit

    2011-11-01

    We propose a concept for desalination of water by reverse osmosis (RO) using a vapor-trapping membrane composed of short hydrophobic nanopores and separates the salt water (feed) and the fresh water (permeate) on each side. The feed water is vaporized by applied pressure and the water vapor condenses on the permeate side accompanied by recovery of latent heat. A probabilistic model based on rarified gas conditions predicted 3-5 times larger mass flux by the proposed membrane than conventional RO membranes at temperatures in the range of 30-50C. To realize the short hydrophobic nanopores, gold was deposited at the entrance of alumina pores followed by SAM formation. The fraction of leaking pores was confirmed to be less than 0.2% using a calcium ion indicator (Fluo-4). Finally, a microfluidic flow cell was fabricated for characterizing the transport properties of the membranes. The authors would like to thank the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, for funding the research reported in this paper through the Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy at MIT and KFUPM.

  9. Composite Membrane with Underwater-Oleophobic Surface for Anti-Oil-Fouling Membrane Distillation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhangxin; Hou, Deyin; Lin, Shihong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we fabricated a composite membrane for membrane distillation (MD) by modifying a commercial hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane with a nanocomposite coating comprising silica nanoparticles, chitosan hydrogel and fluoro-polymer. The composite membrane exhibits asymmetric wettability, with the modified surface being in-air hydrophilic and underwater oleophobic, and the unmodified surface remaining hydrophobic. By comparing the performance of the composite membrane and the pristine PVDF membrane in direct contact MD experiments using a saline emulsion with 1000 ppm crude oil (in water), we showed that the fabricated composite membrane was significantly more resistant to oil fouling compared to the pristine hydrophobic PVDF membrane. Force spectroscopy was conducted for the interaction between an oil droplet and the membrane surface using a force tensiometer. The difference between the composite membrane and the pristine PVDF membrane in their interaction with an oil droplet served to explain the difference in the fouling propensities between these two membranes observed in MD experiments. The results from this study suggest that underwater oleophobic coating can effectively mitigate oil fouling in MD operations, and that the fabricated composite membrane with asymmetric wettability can enable MD to desalinate hypersaline wastewater with high concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants. PMID:26958985

  10. Composite Membrane with Underwater-Oleophobic Surface for Anti-Oil-Fouling Membrane Distillation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhangxin; Hou, Deyin; Lin, Shihong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we fabricated a composite membrane for membrane distillation (MD) by modifying a commercial hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane with a nanocomposite coating comprising silica nanoparticles, chitosan hydrogel and fluoro-polymer. The composite membrane exhibits asymmetric wettability, with the modified surface being in-air hydrophilic and underwater oleophobic, and the unmodified surface remaining hydrophobic. By comparing the performance of the composite membrane and the pristine PVDF membrane in direct contact MD experiments using a saline emulsion with 1000 ppm crude oil (in water), we showed that the fabricated composite membrane was significantly more resistant to oil fouling compared to the pristine hydrophobic PVDF membrane. Force spectroscopy was conducted for the interaction between an oil droplet and the membrane surface using a force tensiometer. The difference between the composite membrane and the pristine PVDF membrane in their interaction with an oil droplet served to explain the difference in the fouling propensities between these two membranes observed in MD experiments. The results from this study suggest that underwater oleophobic coating can effectively mitigate oil fouling in MD operations, and that the fabricated composite membrane with asymmetric wettability can enable MD to desalinate hypersaline wastewater with high concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants.

  11. Intrinsic Hydrophobicity of Rammed Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, M.; Stone, C.; Balintova, M.; Grul, R.

    2015-11-01

    Rammed earth is well known for its vapour diffusion properties, its ability to regulate humidity within the built environment. Rammed earth is also an aesthetically iconic material such as marble or granite and therefore is preferably left exposed. However exposed rammed earth is often coated with silane/siloxane water repellents or the structure is modified architecturally (large roof overhangs) to accommodate for the hydrophilic nature of the material. This paper sets out to find out optimal hydrophobicity for rammed earth based on natural composite fibres and surface coating without adversely affecting the vapour diffusivity of the material. The material is not required to be waterproof, but should resist at least driving rain. In order to evaluate different approaches to increase hydrophobicity of rammed earth surface, peat fibres and four types of repellents were used.

  12. Nanodisks: hydrophobic drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Robert O

    2008-03-01

    Members of the class of exchangeable apolipoproteins possess the unique capacity to transform phospholipid vesicle substrates into nanoscale disk-shaped bilayers. This reaction can proceed in the presence of exogenous hydrophobic biomolecules, resulting in the formation of novel transport vehicles termed nanodisks (NDs). The objective of this study is to describe the structural organization of NDs and evaluate the utility of these complexes as hydrophobic biomolecule transport vehicles. The topics presented focus on two distinct water insoluble drugs, amphotericin B (AMB) and all trans retinoic acid (ATRA). In vitro and in vivo studies reveal that AMB-ND display potent anti-fungal and anti-protozoal activity, while ATRA-ND show promise in the treatment of cancer. The versatility conferred by the presence of a polypeptide component provides opportunities for targeted delivery of ND to cells.

  13. Role of Positional Hydrophobicity in the Leishmanicidal Activity of Magainin 2

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Esther; Saugar, José María; Matsuzaki, Katsumi; Rivas, Luis

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of membrane-active antimicrobial peptides as new alternatives against pathogens with multiantibiotic resistance requires the design of better analogues. Among the different physicochemical parameters involved in the optimization of linear antimicrobial peptides, positional hydrophobicity has recently been incorporated. This takes into consideration the concept of the topological distribution of hydrophobic residues throughout the sequence rather than the classical concept of hydrophobicity as a global parameter of the peptide, calculated as the summation of the individual hydrophobicities of the residues. In order to assess the contribution of this parameter to the leishmanicidal mechanisms of magainin 2 analogues, the activities of two of these analogues, MG-H1 (GIKKFLHIIWKFIKAFVGEIMNS) and MG-H2 (IIKKFLHSIWKFGKAFVGEIMNI), which have similar charges, amino acid compositions, and hydrophobicities but different positional hydrophobicities, against Leishmania donovani promastigotes were assayed (T. Tachi, R. F. Epand, R. M. Epand, and K. Matsuzaki, Biochemistry 41:10723-10731, 2002). The activities were compared with that of the parental peptide, F5W-magainin 2 (GIGKWLHSAKKFGKAFVGEIMNS). The three peptides were active at micromolar concentrations, in the order MG-H2 > MG-H1 > F5W-magainin 2. These activities differ from their hemolytic and bactericidal activities. The results demonstrate that positional hydrophobicity, which reflects the presence of short stretches of sequences rich in hydrophobic amino acids, plays an important role in the activities of leishmanicidal peptides. PMID:15273109

  14. Hydrophobic-Core Microcapsules and Their Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M. (Inventor); Li, Wenyan (Inventor); Buhrow, Jerry W. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic-core microcapsules and methods of their formation are provided. A hydrophobic-core microcapsule may include a shell that encapsulates a hydrophobic substance with a core substance, such as dye, corrosion indicator, corrosion inhibitor, and/or healing agent, dissolved or dispersed therein. The hydrophobic-core microcapsules may be formed from an emulsion having hydrophobic-phase droplets, e.g., containing the core substance and shell-forming compound, dispersed in a hydrophilic phase. The shells of the microcapsules may be capable of being broken down in response to being contacted by an alkali, e.g., produced during corrosion, contacting the shell.

  15. Atomistic Hydrodynamics and the Dynamical Hydrophobic Effect in Porous Graphene.

    PubMed

    Strong, Steven E; Eaves, Joel D

    2016-05-19

    Mirroring their role in electrical and optical physics, two-dimensional crystals are emerging as novel platforms for fluid separations and water desalination, which are hydrodynamic processes that occur in nanoscale environments. For numerical simulation to play a predictive and descriptive role, one must have theoretically sound methods that span orders of magnitude in physical scales, from the atomistic motions of particles inside the channels to the large-scale hydrodynamic gradients that drive transport. Here, we use constraint dynamics to derive a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method for simulating steady-state mass flow of a fluid moving through the nanoscopic spaces of a porous solid. After validating our method on a model system, we use it to study the hydrophobic effect of water moving through pores of electrically doped single-layer graphene. The trend in permeability that we calculate does not follow the hydrophobicity of the membrane but is instead governed by a crossover between two competing molecular transport mechanisms.

  16. Data Grid Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.; Jagatheesan, Arun; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael; Schroeder, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The "Grid" is an emerging infrastructure for coordinating access across autonomous organizations to distributed, heterogeneous computation and data resources. Data grids are being built around the world as the next generation data handling systems for sharing, publishing, and preserving data residing on storage systems located in multiple administrative domains. A data grid provides logical namespaces for users, digital entities and storage resources to create persistent identifiers for controlling access, enabling discovery, and managing wide area latencies. This paper introduces data grids and describes data grid use cases. The relevance of data grids to digital libraries and persistent archives is demonstrated, and research issues in data grids and grid dataflow management systems are discussed.

  17. Hydrophobicity of rare-earth oxide ceramics.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Gisele; Dhiman, Rajeev; Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Paxson, Adam T; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2013-04-01

    Hydrophobic materials that are robust to harsh environments are needed in a broad range of applications. Although durable materials such as metals and ceramics, which are generally hydrophilic, can be rendered hydrophobic by polymeric modifiers, these deteriorate in harsh environments. Here we show that a class of ceramics comprising the entire lanthanide oxide series, ranging from ceria to lutecia, is intrinsically hydrophobic. We attribute their hydrophobicity to their unique electronic structure, which inhibits hydrogen bonding with interfacial water molecules. We also show with surface-energy measurements that polar interactions are minimized at these surfaces and with Fourier transform infrared/grazing-angle attenuated total reflection that interfacial water molecules are oriented in the hydrophobic hydration structure. Moreover, we demonstrate that these ceramic materials promote dropwise condensation, repel impinging water droplets, and sustain hydrophobicity even after exposure to harsh environments. Rare-earth oxide ceramics should find widespread applicability as robust hydrophobic surfaces.

  18. Hydrophobicity of rare-earth oxide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, Gisele; Dhiman, Rajeev; Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Paxson, Adam T.; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrophobic materials that are robust to harsh environments are needed in a broad range of applications. Although durable materials such as metals and ceramics, which are generally hydrophilic, can be rendered hydrophobic by polymeric modifiers, these deteriorate in harsh environments. Here we show that a class of ceramics comprising the entire lanthanide oxide series, ranging from ceria to lutecia, is intrinsically hydrophobic. We attribute their hydrophobicity to their unique electronic structure, which inhibits hydrogen bonding with interfacial water molecules. We also show with surface-energy measurements that polar interactions are minimized at these surfaces and with Fourier transform infrared/grazing-angle attenuated total reflection that interfacial water molecules are oriented in the hydrophobic hydration structure. Moreover, we demonstrate that these ceramic materials promote dropwise condensation, repel impinging water droplets, and sustain hydrophobicity even after exposure to harsh environments. Rare-earth oxide ceramics should find widespread applicability as robust hydrophobic surfaces.

  19. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approachesmore » continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.« less

  20. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Whited, A M; Johs, A

    2015-11-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approaches continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.

  1. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approaches continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.

  2. Interactions of membranes with coarse-grain proteins: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neder, Jörg; Nielaba, Peter; West, Beate; Schmid, Friederike

    2012-12-01

    We study the interactions between lipid bilayers and rigid transmembrane proteins by Monte Carlo simulations of generic coarse-grain models. Different popular protein models are considered and compared with each other, and key parameters such as the hydrophobicity and the hydrophobic mismatch are varied systematically. Furthermore, the properties of the membrane are manipulated by applying different tensions. The response of the membrane to the insertion of single proteins is found to be mostly generic and independent of the choice of the protein model. Likewise, the orientational distributions of single proteins depend mainly on the hydrophobic mismatch and the hydrophobicity of the proteins, and are otherwise similar for all protein models. Orientational distributions are generally found to be very broad, i.e. tilt angles fluctuate very much, in agreement with experimental findings. Weakly hydrophobic proteins respond to positive hydrophobic mismatch by tilting. Strongly hydrophobic (strongly bound) proteins distort the surrounding membrane and tend to remain upright. For proteins with intermediate hydrophobicity, the two mechanisms compete, and as a result, the tilt only sets in if the hydrophobic mismatch exceeds a threshold. Clusters of several strongly hydrophobic proteins with negative positive mismatch may nucleate raft-like structures in membranes. This effect is more pronounced for proteins with rough, structured surfaces.

  3. Water on hydrophobic surfaces: Mechanistic modeling of hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Hahn, Tobias; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-09-23

    Mechanistic models are successfully used for protein purification process development as shown for ion-exchange column chromatography (IEX). Modeling and simulation of hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) in the column mode has been seldom reported. As a combination of these two techniques is often encountered in biopharmaceutical purification steps, accurate modeling of protein adsorption in HIC is a core issue for applying holistic model-based process development, especially in the light of the Quality by Design (QbD) approach. In this work, a new mechanistic isotherm model for HIC is derived by consideration of an equilibrium between well-ordered water molecules and bulk-like ordered water molecules on the hydrophobic surfaces of protein and ligand. The model's capability of describing column chromatography experiments is demonstrated with glucose oxidase, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lysozyme on Capto™ Phenyl (high sub) as model system. After model calibration from chromatograms of bind-and-elute experiments, results were validated with batch isotherms and prediction of further gradient elution chromatograms. PMID:27575919

  4. Modulation of gramicidin channel conformation and organization by hydrophobic mismatch in saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Devaki A; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2007-05-01

    The matching of hydrophobic lengths of integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer is an important factor that influences both structure and function of integral membrane proteins. The ion channel gramicidin is known to be uniquely sensitive to membrane properties such as bilayer thickness and membrane mechanical properties. The functionally important carboxy terminal tryptophan residues of gramicidin display conformation-dependent fluorescence which can be used to monitor gramicidin conformations in membranes [S.S. Rawat, D.A. Kelkar, A. Chattopadhyay, Monitoring gramicidin conformations in membranes: a fluorescence approach, Biophys. J. 87 (2004) 831-843]. We have examined the effect of hydrophobic mismatch on the conformation and organization of gramicidin in saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers of varying thickness utilizing the intrinsic conformation-dependent tryptophan fluorescence. Our results utilizing steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic approaches, in combination with circular dichroism spectroscopy, show that gramicidin remains predominantly in the channel conformation and gramicidin tryptophans are at the membrane interfacial region over a range of mismatch conditions. Interestingly, gramicidin conformation shifts toward non-channel conformations in extremely thick gel phase membranes although it is not excluded from the membrane. In addition, experiments utilizing self quenching of tryptophan fluorescence indicate peptide aggregation in thicker gel phase membranes.

  5. The Hydrophobic Effect Contributes to the Closed State of a Simplified Ion Channel through a Conserved Hydrophobic Patch at the Pore-Helix Crossing

    PubMed Central

    Yonkunas, Michael; Kurnikova, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Ion selectivity-filter structures are strikingly similar throughout the large family of K++ channels and other p-loop-like receptors (i.e., glutamate receptors). At the same time, the triggers for opening these channels, or gating, are diverse. Two questions that remain unanswered regarding these channels are: (1) what force(s) stabilize the closed non-conducting channel-pore conformation? And (2) what is the free energy associated with transitioning from a closed (non-conducting) to an open (conducting) channel-pore conformation? The effects of charge and hydrophobicity on the conformational states of a model tetrameric biological ion channel are shown utilizing the amino acid sequence from the K+ channel KcsA as the model “channel”. Its widely conserved hydrophobic bundle crossing located adjacent to the lipid head-groups at the intracellular side of the membrane was calculated to have a 5 kcal/mol free energy difference between modeled open and closed conformations. Simulated mutants of amino acids within the hydrophobic region significantly contribute to the size of this difference. Specifically for KcsA, these residues are part of the pH sensor important for channel gating and our results are in agreement with published electrophysiology data. Our simulations support the idea that the hydrophobic effect contributes significantly to the stability of the closed conformation in tetrameric ion channels with a hydrophobic bundle crossing positioned in proximity to the lipid head groups of the biological membrane. PMID:26640439

  6. Hydrophobicity, overland flow and erosion: influences of local spatial variability, vertical routeways and switching dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P. D.; Ferreira, C. S. S.; Leighton-Boyce, G.; Urbanek, E.; Shakesby, R. A.; Stoof, C.; Ferreira, A. J. D.; Doerr, S. H.

    2009-04-01

    model, change is sudden rather than progressive, occurring throughout the soil volume over a short time period. The models are tested in two ways. The first approach is statistical using field data derived from grids of monitoring points, where the differences in frequency distribution of hydrophobicity classes between monitoring occasions can be inferred to indicate whether change is sudden or progressive. The field datasets used are (1) seasonal datasets derived from four 60-point grids (2 metres spacing) in burnt and different-aged Eucalyptus globulus terrain in northern Portugal and (2) daily datasets during drying phases following rainstorms from two 50-point grids (1 metre spacing) on unburned and newly burned heather moorland in central Portugal. Initial results are also presented and used from a laboratory-based programme assessing three-dimensional change in initially hydrophobic soil with and without different types of vertical routways (including those provided by contiguous stone clasts and vertical holes or cracks). Implications of the results for overland flow and erosion in different types of hydrophobicity-affected environments are considered.

  7. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2004-10-19

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  8. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2007-11-06

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  9. Spatial services grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian; Li, Qi; Cheng, Jicheng

    2005-10-01

    This paper discusses the concept, key technologies and main application of Spatial Services Grid. The technologies of Grid computing and Webservice is playing a revolutionary role in studying the spatial information services. The concept of the SSG (Spatial Services Grid) is put forward based on the SIG (Spatial Information Grid) and OGSA (open grid service architecture). Firstly, the grid computing is reviewed and the key technologies of SIG and their main applications are reviewed. Secondly, the grid computing and three kinds of SIG (in broad sense)--SDG (spatial data grid), SIG (spatial information grid) and SSG (spatial services grid) and their relationships are proposed. Thirdly, the key technologies of the SSG (spatial services grid) is put forward. Finally, three representative applications of SSG (spatial services grid) are discussed. The first application is urban location based services gird, which is a typical spatial services grid and can be constructed on OGSA (Open Grid Services Architecture) and digital city platform. The second application is region sustainable development grid which is the key to the urban development. The third application is Region disaster and emergency management services grid.

  10. Identification of soil bacteria able to degrade phenanthrene bound to a hydrophobic sorbent in situ.

    PubMed

    Regonne, Raïssa Kom; Martin, Florence; Mbawala, Augustin; Ngassoum, Martin Benoît; Jouanneau, Yves

    2013-09-01

    Efficient bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sites is limited by the hydrophobic character and poor bioavailability of pollutants. In this study, stable isotope probing (SIP) was implemented to track bacteria that can degrade PAHs adsorbed on hydrophobic sorbents. Temperate and tropical soils were incubated with (13)C-labeled phenanthrene, supplied by spiking or coated onto membranes. Phenanthrene mineralization was faster in microcosms with PAH-coated membranes than in microcosms containing spiked soil. Upon incubation with temperate soil, phenanthrene degraders found in the biofilms that formed on coated membranes were mainly identified as Sphingomonadaceae and Actinobacteria. In the tropical soil, uncultured Rhodocyclaceae dominated degraders bound to membranes. Accordingly, ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase sequences recovered from this soil matched PAH-specific dioxygenase genes recently found in Rhodocyclaceae. Hence, our SIP approach allowed the detection of novel degraders, mostly uncultured, which differ from those detected after soil spiking, but might play a key role in the bioremediation of PAH-polluted soils.

  11. Molecular simulation studies of hydrophobic gating in nanopores and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Trick, Jemma L; Aryal, Prafulla; Tucker, Stephen J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-04-01

    Gating in channels and nanopores plays a key role in regulating flow of ions across membranes. Molecular simulations provide a 'computational microscope' which enables us to examine the physical nature of gating mechanisms at the level of the single channel molecule. Water enclosed within the confines of a nanoscale pore may exhibit unexpected behaviour. In particular, if the molecular surfaces lining the pore are hydrophobic this promotes de-wetting of the pore. De-wetting is observed as stochastic liquid-vapour transitions within a pore, and may lead to functional closure of a pore to the flow of ions and/or water. Such behaviour was first observed in simulations of simple model nanopores and referred to as 'hydrophobic gating'. Simulations of both the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and of TWIK-1 potassium channels (the latter alongside experimental studies) suggest hydrophobic gating may occur in some biological ion channels. Current studies are focused on designing hydrophobic gates into biomimetic nanopores.

  12. Behavior of aqueous solutions in hydrophobic confinement studied using molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumit

    Biological processes, such as formation of cell membranes, vesicles and folding of protein molecules, entail formation of a predominantly hydrophobic interior devoid of water. These processes occur in crowded aqueous environments comprising of amino acids, carbohydrates, ionic species, protein molecules, etc. Kinetics of these processes involve drying of hydrophobic pockets. Previous studies reveal that the kinetics of evaporation of water in hydrophobic confinement significantly slow down as the confinement gap increases. Presumably, the constituents of aqueous environment in biological systems modulate the kinetics of evaporation of confined water. In this work, we employ forward flux sampling in molecular dynamics simulations to study the role of solutes at different concentrations in modulating the kinetics and mechanism of evaporation of water under hydrophobic confinement. The results of these simulations will be useful for understanding optimum conditions for protein folding and other biological self-assembly processes.

  13. Stability of proteins inside a hydrophobic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that enclosing a protein in an athermal cavity stabilizes the protein against reversible unfolding by virtue of eliminating many open chain conformations. Examples of such confined spaces include pores in chromatographic columns, Anfinsen's cage in Chaperonins, interiors of Ribosomes or regions of steric occlusion inside cells. However, the situation is more complex inside a hydrophobic cavity. The protein has a tendency to adsorb on the surface of the hydrophobic cavity, but at the same time it loses conformational entropy because of confinement. We study this system using a simple Hydrophobic Polar (HP) lattice protein model. Canonical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at different temperatures and surface hydrophobicity show that proteins are stabilized at low and moderate hydrophobicity upon adsorption. The range of surface hydrophobicity over which a protein is stable increases with a decrease in radius of the cavity.

  14. How specific halide adsorption varies hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Müller, Melanie; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-03-11

    Hydrophobic interactions (HI) are driven by the water structure around hydrophobes in aqueous electrolytes. How water structures at hydrophobic interfaces and how this influences the HI was subject to numerous studies. However, the effect of specific ion adsorption on HI and hydrophobic interfaces remains largely unexplored or controversial. Here, the authors utilized atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy at well-defined nanoscopic hydrophobic interfaces to experimentally address how specific ion adsorption of halide ions as well as NH4 (+), Cs(+), and Na(+) cations alters interaction forces across hydrophobic interfaces. Our data demonstrate that iodide adsorption at hydrophobic interfaces profoundly varies the hydrophobic interaction potential. A long-range and strong hydration repulsion at distances D > 3 nm, is followed by an instability which could be explained by a subsequent rapid ejection of adsorbed iodides from approaching hydrophobic interfaces. In addition, the authors find only a weakly pronounced influence of bromide, and as expected no influence of chloride. Also, all tested cations do not have any significant influence on HI. Complementary, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation monitoring showed a clear adsorption of large halide ions (Br(-)/I(-)) onto hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Interestingly, iodide can even lead to a full disintegration of SAMs due to specific and strong interactions of iodide with gold. Our data suggest that hydrophobic surfaces are not intrinsically charged negatively by hydroxide adsorption, as it was generally believed. Hydrophobic surfaces rather interact strongly with negatively charged large halide ions, leading to a surface charging and significant variation of interaction forces.

  15. Importance of hydrophobic traps for proton diffusion in lyotropic liquid crystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McDaniel, Jesse G.; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-03-04

    The diffusion of protons in self-assembled systems is potentially important for the design of efficient proton exchange membranes. In this work, we study proton dynamics in a low-water content, lamellar phase of an sodium-carboxylate gemini surfactant/water system using computer simulations. The hopping of protons via the Grotthuss mechanism is explicity allowed through the multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) method. We find that the hydronium ion is trapped on the hydrophobic side of the surfactant-water interface, and proton diffusion then proceeds by hopping between surface sites. The importance of hydrophobic traps is surprising, because one would expect the hydronium ions tomore » be trapped at the charged head-groups. Finally, the physics illustrated in this system should be relevant to the proton dynamics in other amphiphilic membrane systems, whenever there exists exposed hydrophobic surface regions.« less

  16. Method for making nanoporous hydrophobic coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou; Sun, Zaicheng

    2013-04-23

    A simple coating method is used to form nanoporous hydrophobic films that can be used as optical coatings. The method uses evaporation-induced self-assembly of materials. The coating method starts with a homogeneous solution comprising a hydrophobic polymer and a surfactant polymer in a selective solvent. The solution is coated onto a substrate. The surfactant polymer forms micelles with the hydrophobic polymer residing in the particle core when the coating is dried. The surfactant polymer can be dissolved and selectively removed from the separated phases by washing with a polar solvent to form the nanoporous hydrophobic film.

  17. Hydrophobic coatings for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doms, M.; Feindt, H.; Kuipers, W. J.; Shewtanasoontorn, D.; Matar, A. S.; Brinkhues, S.; Welton, R. H.; Mueller, J.

    2008-05-01

    Different kinds of thin-film coatings were investigated with regard to their applicability as hydrophobic coatings for MEMS. The films were deposited onto silicon and borosilicate glass substrates by spincoating of Dyneon™ PTFE and PFA, plasmapolymerization of HMDS-N and C4F8 as well as liquid-phase and vapor-phase coating of SAMs from DDMS, FDTS, FOTS and Geleste Aquaphobe™ CM. The layer properties were analyzed using profilometry, FTIR, SEM and contact angle measurements. Furthermore, the adhesion of the layers to the substrates was determined in an acetone ultrasonic bath. The influence of various deposition process parameters on the properties of the films was investigated. As these layers can be used in microfluidic systems, as water-repellent layers and as anti-stiction coatings, they are suited for versatile fields of application.

  18. Topology and cellular localization of the small hydrophobic protein of avian metapneumovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The small hydrophobic protein (SH) is a type II integral membrane protein that is packaged into virions and is only present in certain paramyxoviruses including metapneumovirus. In addition to a highly divergent primary sequence, SH proteins vary significantly in size among the different viruses. Hu...

  19. Enhancement of hydrophobic chromophore fluorescence by adsorption to nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Elizabeth; Carr, Aaron; Krishnan, Rajagopal; Nordlund, Thomas M.

    2003-11-01

    Optical properties of hydrophobic molecules are usually studied in solvents of low dielectric constant. However, biologically or medically important molecules often exist in a mixed hydrophobic/ aqueous environment, e.g., in emulsions or membranes. In order to study optical processes occurring in oily sunscreen agents, octyl salicylate and octyl methoxycinnamate, in a model aqueous/hydrophobic environment, we dispersed the agents in suspensions of polystyrene nanospheres, ranging in diameter from 30 to 1500 nm. The spheres had sulfate functional groups and a low negative charge on the surface. Adsorption of salicylate resulted in a fluorescence intensity enhancement of 6 +/- 0.5 compared to a solution in methanol. The enhancement was independent of sphere diameter. Cinnamate had a much lower enhancement, about 1.5. The enhancement correlates with fluorescence yield vs. dielectric constant in organic solvents: the adsorbed chromophore acts as if it were surrounded by a material of dielectric constant less than 2, in spite of the presence of neighboring water molecules.

  20. A new angle on heat capacity changes in hydrophobic solvation.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kelly R; Sharp, Kim A

    2003-08-13

    The differential solubility of polar and apolar groups in water is important for the self-assembly of globular proteins, lipid membranes, nucleic acids, and other specific biological structures through hydrophobic and hydrophilic effects. The increase in water's heat capacity upon hydration of apolar compounds is one signature of the hydrophobic effect and differentiates it from the hydration of polar compounds, which cause a decrease in heat capacity. Water structuring around apolar and polar groups is an important factor in their differential solubility and heat capacity effects. Here, it is shown that joint radial/angular distribution functions of water obtained from simulations reveal quite different hydration structures around polar and apolar groups: polar and apolar groups have a deficit or excess, respectively, of "low angle hydrogen bonds". Low angle hydrogen bonds have a larger energy fluctuation than high angle bonds, and analysis of these differences provides a physical reason for the opposite changes in heat capacity and new insight into water structure around solutes and the hydrophobic effect.

  1. Fuel cell membrane humidification

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1999-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell assembly has an anode side and a cathode side separated by the membrane and generating electrical current by electrochemical reactions between a fuel gas and an oxidant. The anode side comprises a hydrophobic gas diffusion backing contacting one side of the membrane and having hydrophilic areas therein for providing liquid water directly to the one side of the membrane through the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing are formed by sewing a hydrophilic thread through the backing. Liquid water is distributed over the gas diffusion backing in distribution channels that are separate from the fuel distribution channels.

  2. Parallel grid population

    SciTech Connect

    Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago

    2015-07-28

    Parallel population of a grid with a plurality of objects using a plurality of processors. One example embodiment is a method for parallel population of a grid with a plurality of objects using a plurality of processors. The method includes a first act of dividing a grid into n distinct grid portions, where n is the number of processors available for populating the grid. The method also includes acts of dividing a plurality of objects into n distinct sets of objects, assigning a distinct set of objects to each processor such that each processor determines by which distinct grid portion(s) each object in its distinct set of objects is at least partially bounded, and assigning a distinct grid portion to each processor such that each processor populates its distinct grid portion with any objects that were previously determined to be at least partially bounded by its distinct grid portion.

  3. Scientific Grid computing.

    PubMed

    Coveney, Peter V

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a definition of Grid computing which is adhered to throughout this Theme Issue. We compare the evolution of the World Wide Web with current aspirations for Grid computing and indicate areas that need further research and development before a generally usable Grid infrastructure becomes available. We discuss work that has been done in order to make scientific Grid computing a viable proposition, including the building of Grids, middleware developments, computational steering and visualization. We review science that has been enabled by contemporary computational Grids, and associated progress made through the widening availability of high performance computing.

  4. Exploring Hydrophobic Binding Surfaces Using Comfa and Flexible Hydrophobic Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Sanchez, Rosa. I.; Bhuveneswaran, Chidambaram; Compadre, Cesar M.

    2011-06-01

    Cysteine proteinases are a very important group of enzymes involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis and rheumatoid arthritis. In this investigation we used 3D-Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques to model the binding of a variety of substrates to two cysteine proteinases, papain, and cathepsin B. The analysis was performed using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA). The molecules were constructed using standard bond angles and lengths, minimized and aligned. Charges were calculated using the PM3 method in MOPAC. The CoMFA models derived for the binding of the studied substrates to the two proteinases were compared with the expected results from the experimental X-ray crystal structures of the same proteinases. The results showed the value of CoMFA modeling of flexible hydrophobic ligands to analyze ligand binding to protein receptors, and could also serve as the basis to design specific inhibitors of cysteine proteinases with potential therapeutic value.

  5. Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material

    DOEpatents

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2007-08-21

    A hydrophobic disordered composite material having a protrusive surface feature includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a protrusive surface feature, the protrusive feature being hydrophobic.

  6. Sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOC) in rapeseed oil bodies.

    PubMed

    Boucher, J; Cengelli, F; Trumbic, D; Marison, I W

    2008-02-01

    Oil-bodies are minute plant organelles (0.5-2.0microm diameter) consisting of an oil core surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer/proteinaceous membrane. Oil-bodies have been isolated from rapeseed seeds and demonstrated to constitute a novel type of micro-capsule suitable for the extraction of hydrophobic organic compounds from aqueous environments. Three hydrophobic pesticides: atrazine (2-chlor-4-ethyl-amino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine), carbaryl (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) and parathion (O,O-diethyl O-(4-nitrophenyl) phosphorothioate), as well as naphthalene and 2-phenylethanol were successfully extracted from aqueous solutions, with absorption in the inner oily core of OB as sorption mechanism. The OB membrane does not represent a barrier for the mass transfer of the compound towards the inner oily core of OB. Moreover, due to very high surface area to volume ratio, oil-bodies exhibit very good mass transfer properties compared with larger synthetic microcapsules or two-phase liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) techniques, which diminishes the need for strong agitation and avoids the formation of difficult to separate stable emulsions.

  7. Extending the Hydrophobic Mismatch Concept to Amphiphilic Membranolytic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Grau-Campistany, Ariadna; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Rabanal, Francesc; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-04-01

    A series of nine amphiphilic, pore-forming α-helical KIA peptides (KIAGKIA repeats) with lengths between 14 and 28 residues were studied by solid-state (15)N NMR to determine their alignment in oriented lipid bilayers. In a 2:1 mixture of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) with its corresponding 1-myristoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (lyso-MPC), which has a highly positive spontaneous curvature, the helix tilt angle was found to vary steadily with peptide length. The shortest peptide was aligned transmembrane and upright, while the longer ones successively became tilted away from the membrane normal. This behavior is in agreement with the hydrophobic matching concept, conceived so far only for hydrophobic helices. In 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine, with a negative spontaneous curvature, all KIA peptides remained flat on the bilayer surface, while the cylindrical DMPC lipids permitted a slight tilt. Peptide insertion thus depends critically on the intrinsic lipid curvature, and helix orientation is then fine-tuned by membrane thickness. A refined toroidal pore model is proposed. PMID:26963560

  8. Dynamics of Wetting of Ultra Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan; Kavehpour, Pirouz; Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Controlling the surface wettability of hydrophobic and super hydrophobic surfaces has extensive industrial applications ranging from coating, painting and printing technology and waterproof clothing to efficiency increase in power and water plants. This requires enhancing the knowledge about the dynamics of wetting on these hydrophobic surfaces. We have done experimental investigation on the dynamics of wetting on hydrophobic surfaces by looking deeply in to the dependency of the dynamic contact angles both advancing and receding on the velocity of the three-phase boundary (Solid/Liquid/Gas interface) using the Wilhelmy plate method with different ultra-hydrophobic surfaces. Several fluids with different surface tension and viscosity are used to study the effect of physical properties of liquids on the governing laws.

  9. Method of grid generation

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Daniel W.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

  10. Dynamic Power Grid Simulation

    2015-09-14

    GridDyn is a part of power grid simulation toolkit. The code is designed using modern object oriented C++ methods utilizing C++11 and recent Boost libraries to ensure compatibility with multiple operating systems and environments.

  11. IPG Power Grid Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    This presentation will describe what is meant by grids and then cover the current state of the IPG. This will include an overview of the middleware that is key to the operation of the grid. The presentation will then describe some of the future directions that are planned for the IPG. Finally the presentation will conclude with a brief overview of the Global Grid Forum, which is a key activity that will contribute to the successful availability of grid components.

  12. Self-Spreading of Lipid Bilayer on a Hydrophobic Surface Made by Self-Assembled Monolayer with Short Alkyl Chain.

    PubMed

    Omori, Yuya; Sakaue, Hiroyuki; Takahagi, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2016-04-01

    Behaviors of self-spreading of lipid bilayer membrane on a glass surface modified with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with short alkyl chain were observed with fluorescence microscopy. Hydrophobic surface made by SAM was found to hamper the self-spreading phenomenon but the lipid bilayer spread on a hydrophilic one where SAM was decomposed by oxidation. On a binary surface having a hydrophobic region and a hydrophilic one, the lipid bilayer spread on the hydrophilic region but it stopped at the boundary of the hydrophobic region.

  13. Chimera Grid Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Nash, Steven M.; Buning, Pieter G.; Meakin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Chimera Grid Tools (CGT) is a software package for performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis utilizing the Chimera-overset-grid method. For modeling flows with viscosity about geometrically complex bodies in relative motion, the Chimera-overset-grid method is among the most computationally cost-effective methods for obtaining accurate aerodynamic results. CGT contains a large collection of tools for generating overset grids, preparing inputs for computer programs that solve equations of flow on the grids, and post-processing of flow-solution data. The tools in CGT include grid editing tools, surface-grid-generation tools, volume-grid-generation tools, utility scripts, configuration scripts, and tools for post-processing (including generation of animated images of flows and calculating forces and moments exerted on affected bodies). One of the tools, denoted OVERGRID, is a graphical user interface (GUI) that serves to visualize the grids and flow solutions and provides central access to many other tools. The GUI facilitates the generation of grids for a new flow-field configuration. Scripts that follow the grid generation process can then be constructed to mostly automate grid generation for similar configurations. CGT is designed for use in conjunction with a computer-aided-design program that provides the geometry description of the bodies, and a flow-solver program.

  14. Purification of radioactive wastes by low temperature evaporation (membrane distillation)

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Harasimowicz, M.; Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.

    1997-01-01

    A method of radioactive waste concentration by membrane distillation is presented. Water flow through a hydrophobic membrane results from the temperature gradient between membrane surfaces which are in contact with two waste streams, warm and cold. A transport of water from the warm to the cold stream occurs and radionuclides and other impurities are concentrated in the warm stream (retentate).

  15. 3D hydrophobic moment vectors as a tool to characterize the surface polarity of amphiphilic peptides.

    PubMed

    Reißer, Sabine; Strandberg, Erik; Steinbrecher, Thomas; Ulrich, Anne S

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of membranes with peptides and proteins is largely determined by their amphiphilic character. Hydrophobic moments of helical segments are commonly derived from their two-dimensional helical wheel projections, and the same is true for β-sheets. However, to the best of our knowledge, there exists no method to describe structures in three dimensions or molecules with irregular shape. Here, we define the hydrophobic moment of a molecule as a vector in three dimensions by evaluating the surface distribution of all hydrophilic and lipophilic regions over any given shape. The electrostatic potential on the molecular surface is calculated based on the atomic point charges. The resulting hydrophobic moment vector is specific for the instantaneous conformation, and it takes into account all structural characteristics of the molecule, e.g., partial unfolding, bending, and side-chain torsion angles. Extended all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are then used to calculate the equilibrium hydrophobic moments for two antimicrobial peptides, gramicidin S and PGLa, under different conditions. We show that their effective hydrophobic moment vectors reflect the distribution of polar and nonpolar patches on the molecular surface and the calculated electrostatic surface potential. A comparison of simulations in solution and in lipid membranes shows how the peptides undergo internal conformational rearrangement upon binding to the bilayer surface. A good correlation with solid-state NMR data indicates that the hydrophobic moment vector can be used to predict the membrane binding geometry of peptides. This method is available as a web application on http://www.ibg.kit.edu/HM/. PMID:24896117

  16. In vitro evaluation of tissue adhesives composed of hydrophobically modified gelatins and disuccinimidyl tartrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Miyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2012-12-01

    The effect of the hydrophobic group content in gelatin on the bonding strength of novel tissue-penetrating tissue adhesives was evaluated. The hydrophobic groups introduced into gelatin were the saturated hexanoyl, palmitoyl, and stearoyl groups, and the unsaturated oleoyl group. A collagen casing was employed as an adherend to model soft tissue for the in vitro determination of bonding strength of tissue adhesives composed of various hydrophobically modified gelatins and disuccinimidyl tartrate. The adhesive composed of stearoyl-modified gelatin (7.4% stearoyl; 10Ste) and disuccinimidyl tartrate showed the highest bonding strength. The bonding strength of the adhesives decreased as the degree of substitution of the hydrophobic groups increased. Cell culture experiments demonstrated that fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled 10Ste was integrated onto the surface of smooth muscle cells and showed no cytotoxicity. These results suggest that 10Ste interacted with the hydrophobic domains of collagen casings, such as hydrophobic amino acid residues and cell membranes. Therefore, 10Ste-disuccinimidyl tartrate is a promising adhesive for use in aortic dissection.

  17. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  18. Nanofiber based triple layer hydro-philic/-phobic membrane - a solution for pore wetting in membrane distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, J. A.; Rana, D.; Matsuura, T.; Ayyanar, N.; Shanmugasundaram, T. S.; Singh, G.

    2014-11-01

    The innovative design and synthesis of nanofiber based hydro-philic/phobic membranes with a thin hydro-phobic nanofiber layer on the top and a thin hydrophilic nanofiber layer on the bottom of the conventional casted micro-porous layer which opens up a solution for membrane pore wetting and improves the pure water flux in membrane distillation.

  19. Nanofiber based triple layer hydro-philic/-phobic membrane--a solution for pore wetting in membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Prince, J A; Rana, D; Matsuura, T; Ayyanar, N; Shanmugasundaram, T S; Singh, G

    2014-01-01

    The innovative design and synthesis of nanofiber based hydro-philic/phobic membranes with a thin hydro-phobic nanofiber layer on the top and a thin hydrophilic nanofiber layer on the bottom of the conventional casted micro-porous layer which opens up a solution for membrane pore wetting and improves the pure water flux in membrane distillation. PMID:25377488

  20. Nanofiber based triple layer hydro-philic/-phobic membrane - a solution for pore wetting in membrane distillation

    PubMed Central

    Prince, J. A.; Rana, D.; Matsuura, T.; Ayyanar, N.; Shanmugasundaram, T. S.; Singh, G.

    2014-01-01

    The innovative design and synthesis of nanofiber based hydro-philic/phobic membranes with a thin hydro-phobic nanofiber layer on the top and a thin hydrophilic nanofiber layer on the bottom of the conventional casted micro-porous layer which opens up a solution for membrane pore wetting and improves the pure water flux in membrane distillation. PMID:25377488

  1. Peptides bound to proteosomes via hydrophobic feet become highly immunogenic without adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Addition of either a lauroyl or a pentapeptide (FLLAV) hydrophobic foot to the NH2 terminus of a small, synthetic peptide allowed the peptide to hydrophobically complex to meningococcal outer membrane protein proteosomes by simple dialysis. Both conventional and LPS- hyporesponsive mice immunized with these complexes without any adjuvants developed high-titered and persistent anti-peptide IgG. Since proteosomes have been safely given to many people and since important antigenic determinants are generally hydrophilic, this system should be widely applicable to the development of peptide vaccines for human use. PMID:3346624

  2. FermiGrid

    SciTech Connect

    Yocum, D.R.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Chadwick, K.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sharma, N.; Timm, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    As one of the founding members of the Open Science Grid Consortium (OSG), Fermilab enables coherent access to its production resources through the Grid infrastructure system called FermiGrid. This system successfully provides for centrally managed grid services, opportunistic resource access, development of OSG Interfaces for Fermilab, and an interface to the Fermilab dCache system. FermiGrid supports virtual organizations (VOs) including high energy physics experiments (USCMS, MINOS, D0, CDF, ILC), astrophysics experiments (SDSS, Auger, DES), biology experiments (GADU, Nanohub) and educational activities.

  3. Grid Architecture 2

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The report describes work done on Grid Architecture under the auspices of the Department of Electricity Office of Electricity Delivery and Reliability in 2015. As described in the first Grid Architecture report, the primary purpose of this work is to provide stakeholder insight about grid issues so as to enable superior decision making on their part. Doing this requires the creation of various work products, including oft-times complex diagrams, analyses, and explanations. This report provides architectural insights into several important grid topics and also describes work done to advance the science of Grid Architecture as well.

  4. Super-hydrophobic fluorine containing aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2007-05-01

    An aerogel material with surfaces containing fluorine atoms which exhibits exceptional hydrophobicity, or the ability to repel liquid water. Hydrophobic aerogels are efficient absorbers of solvents from water. Solvents miscible with water are separated from it because the solvents are more volatile than water and they enter the porous aerogel as a vapor across the liquid water/solid interface. Solvents that are immisicble with water are separated from it by selectively wetting the aerogel. The hydrophobic property is achieved by formulating the aerogel using fluorine containing molecules either directly by addition in the sol-gel process, or by treating a standard dried aerogel using the vapor of fluorine containing molecules.

  5. Molecular Shape and the Hydrophobic Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillyer, Matthew B.; Gibb, Bruce C.

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on papers published since 2000 on the topic of the properties of solutes in water. More specifically, it evaluates the state of the art of our understanding of the complex relationship between the shape of a hydrophobe and the hydrophobic effect. To highlight this, we present a selection of references covering both empirical and molecular dynamics studies of small (molecular-scale) solutes. These include empirical studies of small molecules, synthetic hosts, crystalline monolayers, and proteins, as well as in silico investigations of entities such as idealized hard and soft spheres, small solutes, hydrophobic plates, artificial concavity, molecular hosts, carbon nanotubes and spheres, and proteins.

  6. Interaction of O-acylated chitosans with biomembrane models: probing the effects from hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Pavinatto, Adriana; Souza, Adriano L; Delezuk, Jorge A M; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Campana-Filho, Sérgio P; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2014-02-01

    One of the major challenges in establishing the mechanisms responsible for the chitosan action in biomedical applications lies in the determination of the molecular-level interactions with the cell membrane. In this study, we probed hydrophobic interactions and H-bonding in experiments with O,O'-diacetylchitosan (DACT) and O,O'-dipropionylchitosan (DPPCT) incorporated into monolayers of distinct phospholipids, the zwitterionic dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC), and the negatively charged dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG) and dimyristoyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA). The importance of hydrophobic interactions was confirmed with the larger effects observed for DACT and DPPCT than for parent chitosan (Chi), particularly for the more hydrophobic DPPCT. Such larger effects were noted in surface pressure isotherms and elasticity of the monolayers. Since H-bonding is hampered for the chitosan derivatives, which have part of their hydroxyl groups shielded by O-acylation, these effects indicate that H-bonding does not play an important role in the chitosan-membrane interactions. Using polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption (PM-IRRAS) spectroscopy, we found that the chitosan derivatives were incorporated into the hydrophobic chain of the phospholipids, even at high surface pressures comparable to those in a real cell membrane. Taken together, these results indicate that the chitosan derivatives containing hydrophobic moieties would probably be more efficient than parent chitosan as antimicrobial agents, where interaction with the cell membrane is crucial.

  7. The Combined Effect of Hydrophobic Mismatch and Bilayer Local Bending on the Regulation of Mechanosensitive Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Bavi, Omid; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Naghdabadi, Reza; Jamali, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophobic mismatch between the lipid bilayer and integral membrane proteins has well-defined effect on mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels. Also, membrane local bending is suggested to modulate MS channel activity. Although a number of studies have already shown the significance of each individual factor, the combined effect of these physical factors on MS channel activity have not been investigated. Here using finite element simulation, we study the combined effect of hydrophobic mismatch and local bending on the archetypal mechanosensitive channel MscL. First we show how the local curvature direction impacts on MS channel modulation. In the case of MscL, we show inward (cytoplasmic) bending can more effectively gate the channel compared to outward bending. Then we indicate that in response to a specific local curvature, MscL inserted in a bilayer with the same hydrophobic length is more expanded in the constriction pore region compared to when there is a protein-lipid hydrophobic mismatch. Interestingly in the presence of a negative mismatch (thicker lipids), MscL constriction pore is more expanded than in the presence of positive mismatch (thinner lipids) in response to an identical membrane curvature. These results were confirmed by a parametric energetic calculation provided for MscL gating. These findings have several biophysical consequences for understanding the function of MS channels in response to two major physical stimuli in mechanobiology, namely hydrophobic mismatch and local membrane curvature. PMID:26958847

  8. The Combined Effect of Hydrophobic Mismatch and Bilayer Local Bending on the Regulation of Mechanosensitive Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Bavi, Omid; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Naghdabadi, Reza; Jamali, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophobic mismatch between the lipid bilayer and integral membrane proteins has well-defined effect on mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels. Also, membrane local bending is suggested to modulate MS channel activity. Although a number of studies have already shown the significance of each individual factor, the combined effect of these physical factors on MS channel activity have not been investigated. Here using finite element simulation, we study the combined effect of hydrophobic mismatch and local bending on the archetypal mechanosensitive channel MscL. First we show how the local curvature direction impacts on MS channel modulation. In the case of MscL, we show inward (cytoplasmic) bending can more effectively gate the channel compared to outward bending. Then we indicate that in response to a specific local curvature, MscL inserted in a bilayer with the same hydrophobic length is more expanded in the constriction pore region compared to when there is a protein-lipid hydrophobic mismatch. Interestingly in the presence of a negative mismatch (thicker lipids), MscL constriction pore is more expanded than in the presence of positive mismatch (thinner lipids) in response to an identical membrane curvature. These results were confirmed by a parametric energetic calculation provided for MscL gating. These findings have several biophysical consequences for understanding the function of MS channels in response to two major physical stimuli in mechanobiology, namely hydrophobic mismatch and local membrane curvature. PMID:26958847

  9. A new model for humic materials and their interactions with hydrophobic organic chemicals in soil-water or sediment-water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A generalized model of humic materials in soils and sediments, which is consistent with their observed properties, is presented. This model provides a means of understanding the interaction of hydrophobic pollutants with humic materials. In this model, it is proposed that the humic materials in soils and sediments consist of a number of different oligomers and simple compounds which result from the partial degradation of plant remains. These degradation products are stabilized by incorporation into humic aggregates bound together by weak bonding mechanisms, such as hydrogen bonding, pi bonding, and hydrophobic interactions. The resulting structures are similar to micelles or membranes, in which the interiors of the structures are hydrophobic and the exteriors are hydrophilic. Hydrophobic compounds will partition into the hydrophobic interiors of the humic micelles or "membrane-like" structures. ?? 1986.

  10. Understanding The Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    2007-11-15

    The report provides an overview of what the Smart Grid is and what is being done to define and implement it. The electric industry is preparing to undergo a transition from a centralized, producer-controlled network to a decentralized, user-interactive one. Not only will the technology involved in the electric grid change, but the entire business model of the industry will change too. A major objective of the report is to identify the changes that the Smart Grid will bring about so that industry participants can be prepared to face them. A concise overview of the development of the Smart Grid is provided. It presents an understanding of what the Smart Grid is, what new business opportunities or risks might come about due to its introduction, and what activities are already taking place regarding defining or implementing the Smart Grid. This report will be of interest to the utility industry, energy service providers, aggregators, and regulators. It will also be of interest to home/building automation vendors, information technology vendors, academics, consultants, and analysts. The scope of the report includes an overview of the Smart Grid which identifies the main components of the Smart Grid, describes its characteristics, and describes how the Smart Grid differs from the current electric grid. The overview also identifies the key concepts involved in the transition to the Smart Grid and explains why a Smart Grid is needed by identifying the deficiencies of the current grid and the need for new investment. The report also looks at the impact of the Smart Grid, identifying other industries which have gone through a similar transition, identifying the overall benefits of the Smart Grid, and discussing the impact of the Smart Grid on industry participants. Furthermore, the report looks at current activities to implement the Smart Grid including utility projects, industry collaborations, and government initiatives. Finally, the report takes a look at key technology

  11. Navigation in Grid Space with the NAS Grid Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Hood, Robert; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a navigational tool for computational grids. The navigational process is based on measuring the grid characteristics with the NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB) and using the measurements to assign tasks of a grid application to the grid machines. The tool allows the user to explore the grid space and to navigate the execution at a grid application to minimize its turnaround time. We introduce the notion of gridscape as a user view of the grid and show how it can be me assured by NGB, Then we demonstrate how the gridscape can be used with two different schedulers to navigate a grid application through a rudimentary grid.

  12. Viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a "fusion loop" or "fusion peptide") engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics.

  13. Tracking Membrane Protein Association in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Reffay, Myriam; Gambin, Yann; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Phan, Gilles; Taulier, Nicolas; Ducruix, Arnaud; Hodges, Robert S.; Urbach, Wladimir

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue. We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well. After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 Å, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the bilayers. We

  14. Erosion and flow of hydrophobic granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brian; Benns, Thomas; Foltz, Benjamin; Mahler, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally investigate submerged granular flows of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains both in a rotating drum geometry and under erosion by a surface water flow. While slurry and suspension flows are common in nature and industry, effects of surface chemistry on flow behavior have received relatively little attention. In the rotating drum, we use varying concentrations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains of sand submerged in water rotated at a constant angular velocity. Sequential images of the resulting avalanches are taken and analyzed. High concentrations of hydrophobic grains result in an effectively cohesive interaction between the grains forming aggregates, with aggregate size and repose angle increasing with hydrophobic concentration. However, the formation and nature of the aggregates depends significantly on the presence of air in the system. We present results from a related experiment on erosion by a surface water flow designed to characterize the effects of heterogeneous granular surfaces on channelization and erosion.

  15. Erosion and flow of hydrophobic granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brian; Benns, Thomas; Mahler, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally investigate submerged granular flows of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains both in a rotating drum geometry and under erosion by a surface water flow. While slurry and suspension flows are common in nature and industry, effects of surface chemistry on flow behavior have received relatively little attention. In the rotating drum , we use varying concentrations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains of sand submerged in water rotated at a constant angular velocity. Sequential images of the resulting avalanches are taken and analyzed. High concentrations of hydrophobic grains result in an effectively cohesive interaction between the grains forming aggregates, with aggregate size and repose angle increasing with hydrophobic concentration. However, the formation and nature of the aggregates depends significantly on the presence of air in the system. We present results from a related experiment on erosion by a surface water flow designed to characterize the effects of heterogeneous granular surfaces on channelization and erosion. Supported by NSF CBET Award 1067598.

  16. Hydrophobic gating in single and multiple nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, Laura Michele

    The ion transport properties of hydrophobic conical nanopores in polymer films in the presence of a salt solution were studied. The purpose of this study was to develop a hydrophobic gating mechanism similar to those seen in biological channels. Current-voltage curves were measured to determine if the gating behavior was present in hydrophobic modified nanopores, which would be seen as a zero ion current for small voltages and a finite ion current for larger voltages. It is shown, that for a single nanopore to gate water, it must be partially modified such that there are hydrophobic and hydrophilic islands on the pore walls. Similar experiments were also done with 105 pores/cm2 mutlipore samples.

  17. Facile Surface Functionalization of Hydrophobic Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nonpolar phase synthesized hydrophobic nanocrystals show attractive properties and have demonstrated prominent potential in biomedical applications. However, the preparation of biocompatible nanocrystals is made difficult by the presence of hydrophobic surfactant stabilizer on their surfaces. To address this limitation, we have developed a facile, high efficiency, single-phase and low-cost method to convert hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to an aqueous phase using tetrahydrofuran, NaOH and 3,4-dihydroxyhydrocinnamic acid without any complicated organic synthesis. The as-transferred hydrophilic MNPs are water-soluble over a wide pH range (pH = 3–12), and the solubility is pH-controllable. Furthermore, the as-transferred MNPs with carboxylate can be readily adapted with further surface functionalization, varying from small molecule dyes to oligonucleotides and enzymes. Finally, the strategy developed here can easily be extended to other types of hydrophobic nanoparticles to facilitate biomedical applications of nanomaterials. PMID:25140614

  18. Surface analysis of selected hydrophobic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewska, Sylwia Katarzyna

    This dissertation contains a series of studies on hydrophobic surfaces by various surface sensitive techniques such as contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Hydrophobic surfaces have been classified as mineral surfaces, organic synthetic surfaces, or natural biological surfaces. As a model hydrophobic mineral surface, elemental sulfur has been selected. The sulfur surface has been characterized for selected allotropic forms of sulfur such as rhombic, monoclinic, plastic, and cyclohexasulfur. Additionally, dextrin adsorption at the sulfur surface was measured. The structure of a dextrin molecule showing hydrophobic sites has been presented to support the proposed hydrophobic bonding nature of dextrin adsorption at the sulfur surface. As a model organic hydrophobic surface, primary fatty amines such as dodecylamine, hexadecylamine, and octadecylamine were chosen. An increase of hydrophobicity, significant changes of infrared bands, and surface topographical changes with time were observed for each amine. Based on the results it was concluded that hydrocarbon chain rearrangement associated with recrystallization took place at the surface during contact with air. A barley straw surface was selected as a model of biological hydrophobic surfaces. The differences in the contact angles for various straw surfaces were explained by the presence of a wax layer. SEM images confirmed the heterogeneity and complexity of the wax crystal structure. AFM measurements provided additional structural details including a measure of surface roughness. Additionally, straw degradation as a result of conditioning in an aqueous environment was studied. Significant contact angle changes were observed as soon as one day after conditioning. FTIR studies showed a gradual wax layer removal due to straw surface decomposition. SEM and AFM images revealed topographical changes and biological

  19. Grid enabled Service Support Environment - SSE Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goor, Erwin; Paepen, Martine

    2010-05-01

    The SSEGrid project is an ESA/ESRIN project which started in 2009 and is executed by two Belgian companies, Spacebel and VITO, and one Dutch company, Dutch Space. The main project objectives are the introduction of a Grid-based processing on demand infrastructure at the Image Processing Centre for earth observation products at VITO and the inclusion of Grid processing services in the Service Support Environment (SSE) at ESRIN. The Grid-based processing on demand infrastructure is meant to support a Grid processing on demand model for Principal Investigators (PI) and allow the design and execution of multi-sensor applications with geographically spread data while minimising the transfer of huge volumes of data. In the first scenario, 'support a Grid processing on demand model for Principal Investigators', we aim to provide processing power close to the EO-data at the processing and archiving centres. We will allow a PI (non-Grid expert user) to upload his own algorithm, as a process, and his own auxiliary data from the SSE Portal and use them in an earth observation workflow on the SSEGrid Infrastructure. The PI can design and submit workflows using his own processes, processes made available by VITO/ESRIN and possibly processes from other users that are available on the Grid. These activities must be user-friendly and not requiring detailed knowledge about the underlying Grid middleware. In the second scenario we aim to design, implement and demonstrate a methodology to set up an earth observation processing facility, which uses large volumes of data from various geographically spread sensors. The aim is to provide solutions for problems that we face today, like wasting bandwidth by copying large volumes of data to one location. We will avoid this by processing the data where they are. The multi-mission Grid-based processing on demand infrastructure will allow developing and executing complex and massive multi-sensor data (re-)processing applications more

  20. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment.

  1. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment. PMID:27486044

  2. Hydrophobicity of silver surfaces with microparticle geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macko, Ján; Oriňaková, Renáta; Oriňak, Andrej; Kovaľ, Karol; Kupková, Miriam; Erdélyi, Branislav; Kostecká, Zuzana; Smith, Roger M.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the duration of the current deposition cycle and the number of current pulses on the geometry of silver microstructured surfaces and on the free surface energy, polarizability, hydrophobicity and thus adhesion force of the silver surfaces has been investigated. The changes in surface hydrophobicity were entirely dependent on the size and density of the microparticles on the surface. The results showed that formation of the silver microparticles was related to number of current pulses, while the duration of one current pulse played only a minor effect on the final surface microparticle geometry and thus on the surface tension and hydrophobicity. The conventional geometry of the silver particles has been transformed to the fractal dimension D. The surface hydrophobicity depended predominantly on the length of the dendrites not on their width. The highest silver surface hydrophobicity was observed on a surface prepared by 30 current pulses with a pulse duration of 1 s, the lowest one when deposition was performed by 10 current pulses with a duration of 0.1 s. The partial surface tension coefficients γDS and polarizability kS of the silver surfaces were calculated. Both parameters can be applied in future applications in living cells adhesion prediction and spectral method selection. Silver films with microparticle geometry showed a lower variability in final surface hydrophobicity when compared to nanostructured surfaces. The comparisons could be used to modify surfaces and to modulate human cells and bacterial adhesion on body implants, surgery instruments and clean surfaces.

  3. Securing smart grid technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Kosaleswara Reddy, T.; Reddy, M. YogaTeja; Reddy G. M., Sreerama; Madhusudhan, E.; AlMuhteb, Sulaiman

    2013-03-01

    In the developing countries electrical energy is very important for its all-round improvement by saving thousands of dollars and investing them in other sector for development. For Growing needs of power existing hierarchical, centrally controlled grid of the 20th Century is not sufficient. To produce and utilize effective power supply for industries or people we should have Smarter Electrical grids that address the challenges of the existing power grid. The Smart grid can be considered as a modern electric power grid infrastructure for enhanced efficiency and reliability through automated control, high-power converters, modern communications infrastructure along with modern IT services, sensing and metering technologies, and modern energy management techniques based on the optimization of demand, energy and network availability and so on. The main objective of this paper is to provide a contemporary look at the current state of the art in smart grid communications as well as critical issues on smart grid technologies primarily in terms of information and communication technology (ICT) issues like security, efficiency to communications layer field. In this paper we propose new model for security in Smart Grid Technology that contains Security Module(SM) along with DEM which will enhance security in Grid. It is expected that this paper will provide a better understanding of the technologies, potential advantages and research challenges of the smart grid and provoke interest among the research community to further explore this promising research area.

  4. Microtechnologies for membrane protein studies

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Despite the rapid and enormous progress in biotechnologies, the biochemical analysis of membrane proteins is still a difficult task. The presence of the large hydrophobic region buried in the lipid bilayer membrane (transmembrane domain) makes it difficult to analyze membrane proteins in standard assays developed for water-soluble proteins. To handle membrane proteins, the lipid bilayer membrane may be used as a platform to sustain their functionalities. Relatively slow progress in developing micro total analysis systems (μTAS) for membrane protein analysis directly reflects the difficulty of handling lipid membranes, which is a common problem in bulk measurement technologies. Nonetheless, researchers are continuing to develop efficient and sensitive analytical microsystems for the study of membrane proteins. Here, we review the latest developments, which enable detection of events caused by membrane proteins, such as ion channel current, membrane transport, and receptor/ligand interaction, by utilizing microfabricated structures. High-throughput and highly sensitive detection systems for membrane proteins are now becoming a realistic goal. Although most of these systems are still in the early stages of development, we believe this field will become one of the most important applications of μTAS for pharmaceutical and clinical screenings as well as for basic biochemical research. PMID:18335213

  5. Contribution of Amphipathicity and Hydrophobicity to the Antimicrobial Activity and Cytotoxicity of β-Hairpin Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have acquired extensive resistance mechanisms to protect themselves against antibiotic action. Today the bacterial membrane has become one of the “final frontiers” in the search for new compounds acting on novel targets to address the threat of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and XDR bacterial pathogens. β-Hairpin antimicrobial peptides are amphipathic, membrane-binding antibiotics that exhibit a broad range of activities against Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal pathogens. However, most members of the class also possess adverse cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity that preclude their development as candidate antimicrobials. We examined peptide hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, and structure to better dissect and understand the correlation between antimicrobial activity and toxicity, membrane binding, and membrane permeability. The hydrophobicity, pI, net charge at physiological pH, and amphipathic moment for the β-hairpin antimicrobial peptides tachyplesin-1, polyphemusin-1, protegrin-1, gomesin, arenicin-3, and thanatin were determined and correlated with key antimicrobial activity and toxicity data. These included antimicrobial activity against five key bacterial pathogens and two fungi, cytotoxicity against human cell lines, and hemolytic activity in human erythrocytes. Observed antimicrobial activity trends correlated with compound amphipathicity and, to a lesser extent, with overall hydrophobicity. Antimicrobial activity increased with amphipathicity, but unfortunately so did toxicity. Of note, tachyplesin-1 was found to be 8-fold more amphipathic than gomesin. These analyses identify tachyplesin-1 as a promising scaffold for rational design and synthetic optimization toward an antibiotic candidate. PMID:27331141

  6. Ionomer-Membrane Water Processing Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacCallum, Taber K. (Inventor); Kelsey, Laura (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    This disclosure provides water processing apparatuses, systems, and methods for recovering water from wastewater such as urine. The water processing apparatuses, systems, and methods can utilize membrane technology for extracting purified water in a single step. A containment unit can include an ionomer membrane, such as Nafion(Registered Trademark), over a hydrophobic microporous membrane, such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The containment unit can be filled with wastewater, and the hydrophobic microporous membrane can be impermeable to liquids and solids of the wastewater but permeable to gases and vapors of the wastewater, and the ionomer membrane can be permeable to water vapor but impermeable to one or more contaminants of the gases and vapors. The containment unit can be exposed to a dry purge gas to maintain a water vapor partial pressure differential to drive permeation of the water vapor, and the water vapor can be collected and processed into potable water.

  7. Solar cell grid patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasui, R. K.; Berman, P. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A grid pattern is described for a solar cell of the type which includes a semiconductive layer doped to a first polarity and a top counter-doped layer. The grid pattern comprises a plurality of concentric conductive grids of selected geometric shapes which are centered about the center of the exposed active surface of the counter-doped layer. Connected to the grids is one or more conductors which extend to the cell's periphery. For the pattern area, the grids and conductors are arranged in the pattern to minimize the maximum distance which any injected majority carriers have to travel to reach any of the grids or conductors. The pattern has a multiaxes symmetry with respect to the cell center to minimize the maximum temperature differentials between points on the cell surface and to provide a more uniform temperature distribution across the cell face.

  8. Flavonoid-membrane Interactions: A Protective Role of Flavonoids at the Membrane Surface?

    PubMed Central

    Oteiza, Patricia I.; Erlejman, Alejandra G.; Verstraeten, Sandra V.; Keen, Carl L.; Fraga, César G.

    2005-01-01

    Flavonoids can exert beneficial health effects through multiple mechanisms. In this paper, we address the important, although not fully understood, capacity of flavonoids to interact with cell membranes. The interactions of polyphenols with bilayers include: (a) the partition of the more non-polar compounds in the hydrophobic interior of the membrane, and (b) the formation of hydrogen bonds between the polar head groups of lipids and the more hydrophilic flavonoids at the membrane interface. The consequences of these interactions are discussed. The induction of changes in membrane physical properties can affect the rates of membrane lipid and protein oxidation. The partition of certain flavonoids in the hydrophobic core can result in a chain breaking antioxidant activity. We suggest that interactions of polyphenols at the surface of bilayers through hydrogen bonding, can act to reduce the access of deleterious molecules (i.e. oxidants), thus protecting the structure and function of membranes. PMID:15712595

  9. Hydrophobic and Basic Domains Target Proteins to Lipid Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Ingelmo-Torres, Mercedes; González-Moreno, Elena; Kassan, Adam; Hanzal-Bayer, Michael; Tebar, Francesc; Herms, Albert; Grewal, Thomas; Hancock, John F.; Enrich, Carlos; Bosch, Marta; Gross, Steven P.; Parton, Robert G.; Pol, Albert

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, progress in the study of the lateral organization of the plasma membrane has led to the proposal that mammalian cells use two different organelles to store lipids: intracellular lipid droplets (LDs) and plasma membrane caveolae. Experimental evidence suggests that caveolin (CAV) may act as a sensitive lipid-organizing molecule that physically connects these two lipid-storing organelles. Here, we determine the sequences necessary for efficient sorting of CAV to LDs. We show that targeting is a process cooperatively mediated by two motifs. CAV's central hydrophobic domain (Hyd) anchors CAV to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Next, positively charged sequences (Pos-Seqs) mediate sorting of CAVs into LDs. Our findings were confirmed by identifying an equivalent, non-conserved but functionally interchangeable Pos-Seq in ALDI, a bona fide LD-resident protein. Using this information, we were able to retarget a cytosolic protein and convert it to an LD-resident protein. Further studies suggest three requirements for targeting via this mechanism: the positive charge of the Pos-Seq, physical proximity between Pos-Seq and Hyd and a precise spatial orientation between both motifs. The study uncovers remarkable similarities with the signals that target proteins to the membrane of mitochondria and peroxisomes PMID:19874557

  10. Hydrophobically modified polyelectrolytes: Characterization, aggregation and adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammad Ferdous

    The focus of our work was to experimentally study the aggregation and adsorption behavior of model HM polyelectrolytes. Hydrophobically modified alkali soluble emulsions (HASE), the model HM polyelectrolytes, were chosen because they had complex architecture yet possessed key variables for systematic study. The HASE polymers have methacrylic acid (MAA) and ethyl acrylate (EA) in the backbone with pendent hydrophobic groups. Characterization of a single molecule is an important first step in understanding the aggregation and adsorption of these polymers. However, characterizations of the HASE polymers using conventional techniques such as gel permeation chromatography or static light scattering were difficult because of the hydrophobic association. In this study, two different approaches have been taken to prevent the hydrophobic association in aqueous solution: (1) hydrolyze the polymer to cleave the hydrophobic constituents, and (2) use methyl beta-cyclodextrin that has a hydrophobic cavity and a hydrophilic outer shell, to shield the hydrophobes from associating. By taking these two approaches and using gel permeation chromatography (GPC), dynamic (DLS) and static (SLS) light scattering techniques, the molecular weight, hydrodynamic radius and radius of gyration of a single molecule were determined. Except for one chemical site, we were able to determine that branching or grafting did not occur in the polymer chain during synthesis. Our aggregation studies showed that, in aqueous solutions, the HASE polymers formed small aggregates (presumably single micelles of single or a few chains) and large aggregates (presumably formed by bridging between micelles). The radii and masses of the larger aggregates, measured using DLS and SLS, were found to increase with an increase in the polymer concentration, indicating an open association process for the HASE polymers. Our SLS results also showed that, at high salt concentration, the aggregates of the HASE polymer with

  11. Challenges facing production grids

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.

  12. A grid amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moonil; Weikle, Robert M., II; Hacker, Jonathan B.; Delisio, Michael P.; Rutledge, David B.; Rosenberg, James J.; Smith, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    A 50-MESFET grid amplifier is reported that has a gain of 11 dB at 3.3 GHz. The grid isolates the input from the output by using vertical polarization for the input beam and horizontal polarization for the transmitted output beam. The grid unit cell is a two-MESFET differential amplifier. A simple calibration procedure allows the gain to be calculated from a relative power measurement. This grid is a hybrid circuit, but the structure is suitable for fabrication as a monolithic wafer-scale integrated circuit, particularly at millimeter wavelengths.

  13. Enhanced Elliptic Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.

    2007-01-01

    An enhanced method of elliptic grid generation has been invented. Whereas prior methods require user input of certain grid parameters, this method provides for these parameters to be determined automatically. "Elliptic grid generation" signifies generation of generalized curvilinear coordinate grids through solution of elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). Usually, such grids are fitted to bounding bodies and used in numerical solution of other PDEs like those of fluid flow, heat flow, and electromagnetics. Such a grid is smooth and has continuous first and second derivatives (and possibly also continuous higher-order derivatives), grid lines are appropriately stretched or clustered, and grid lines are orthogonal or nearly so over most of the grid domain. The source terms in the grid-generating PDEs (hereafter called "defining" PDEs) make it possible for the grid to satisfy requirements for clustering and orthogonality properties in the vicinity of specific surfaces in three dimensions or in the vicinity of specific lines in two dimensions. The grid parameters in question are decay parameters that appear in the source terms of the inhomogeneous defining PDEs. The decay parameters are characteristic lengths in exponential- decay factors that express how the influences of the boundaries decrease with distance from the boundaries. These terms govern the rates at which distance between adjacent grid lines change with distance from nearby boundaries. Heretofore, users have arbitrarily specified decay parameters. However, the characteristic lengths are coupled with the strengths of the source terms, such that arbitrary specification could lead to conflicts among parameter values. Moreover, the manual insertion of decay parameters is cumbersome for static grids and infeasible for dynamically changing grids. In the present method, manual insertion and user specification of decay parameters are neither required nor allowed. Instead, the decay parameters are

  14. Membrane Based Thermal Control Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdoch, Karen

    1997-01-01

    The investigation of the feasibility of using a membrane device as a water boiler for thermal control is reported. The membrane device permits water vapor to escape to the vacuum of space but prevents the loss of liquid water. The vaporization of the water provides cooling to the water loop. This type of cooling device would have application for various types of short duration cooling needs where expenditure of water is allowed and a low pressure source is available such as in space or on a planet's surface. A variety of membrane samples, both hydrophilic and hydrophobic, were purchased to test for this thermal control application. An initial screening test determined if the membrane could pose a sufficient barrier to maintain water against vacuum. Further testing compared the heat transfer performance of those membranes that passed the screening test.

  15. Hydrophobic Moiety of Cationic Lipids Strongly Modulates Their Transfection Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana; Tenchov, Boris; Wang, Li; MacDonald, Robert C.

    2010-01-18

    Synthetic cationic lipids are widely used components of nonviral gene carriers, and the factors regulating their transfection efficiency are the subject of considerable interest. In view of the important role that electrostatic interactions with the polyanionic nucleic acids play in formation of lipoplexes, a common empirical approach to improving transfection has been the synthesis and testing of amphiphiles with new versions of positively charged polar groups, while much less attention has been given to the role of the hydrophobic lipid moieties. On the basis of data for {approx}20 cationic phosphatidylcholine (PC) derivatives, here we demonstrate that hydrocarbon chain variations of these lipids modulate by over 2 orders of magnitude their transfection efficiency. The observed molecular structure-activity relationship manifests in well-expressed dependences of activity on two important molecular characteristics, chain unsaturation and total number of carbon atoms in the lipid chains, which is representative of the lipid hydrophobic volume and hydrophilic-lipophilic ratio. Transfection increases with decrease of chain length and increase of chain unsaturation. Maximum transfection was found for cationic PCs with monounsaturated 14:1 chains. It is of particular importance that the high-transfection lipids strongly promote cubic phase formation in zwitterionic membrane phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). These remarkable correlations point to an alternative, chain-dependent process in transfection, not related to the electrostatic cationic-anionic lipid interactions.

  16. Solvent and temperature effects on crambin, a hydrophobic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Llinas, M.; Lecomte, J.T.J.; De Marco, A.

    1980-10-01

    Crambin, a 5000-mol. wt. water-insoluble protein found in crambe abyssinica seeds is presently being studied by x-ray diffraction to 0.9 A resolution and /sup 1/H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Preliminary /sup 1/H-NMR data at 250 and 600 MHz have suggested that this hydrophobic protein retains a similar globular conformation in both glacial acetic acid (AA), a Bronsted acid, and dimethylformamide (DMF), a Lewis base. These observations suggest that the globular conformation observed in these organic solvents is most likely the native structure present in the crystalline state. As suggested by the high intrinsic resolution of the crystallographic x-ray diffraction pattern, and demonstrated by the NMR data, crambin is a very rigid protein. Work is in progress to assign the /sup 1/H-resonances and to correlate H and /sup 13/C NMR dynamic data with the crystallographic model. It is hoped that unravelling conformational features of this hydrophobic protein will provide clues to help us understand other membrane-bound functional proteins.

  17. Atomistic Hydrodynamics and the Dynamical Hydrophobic Effect in Porous Graphene.

    PubMed

    Strong, Steven E; Eaves, Joel D

    2016-05-19

    Mirroring their role in electrical and optical physics, two-dimensional crystals are emerging as novel platforms for fluid separations and water desalination, which are hydrodynamic processes that occur in nanoscale environments. For numerical simulation to play a predictive and descriptive role, one must have theoretically sound methods that span orders of magnitude in physical scales, from the atomistic motions of particles inside the channels to the large-scale hydrodynamic gradients that drive transport. Here, we use constraint dynamics to derive a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method for simulating steady-state mass flow of a fluid moving through the nanoscopic spaces of a porous solid. After validating our method on a model system, we use it to study the hydrophobic effect of water moving through pores of electrically doped single-layer graphene. The trend in permeability that we calculate does not follow the hydrophobicity of the membrane but is instead governed by a crossover between two competing molecular transport mechanisms. PMID:27139634

  18. Hydrophobic blocks facilitate lipid compatibility and translocon recognition of transmembrane protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Stone, Tracy A; Schiller, Nina; von Heijne, Gunnar; Deber, Charles M

    2015-02-24

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity in

  19. Hydrophobic Blocks Facilitate Lipid Compatibility and Translocon Recognition of Transmembrane Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity

  20. Hydrophobic surface patches on LolA of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are essential for lipoprotein binding.

    PubMed

    Remans, Kim; Pauwels, Kris; van Ulsen, Peter; Buts, Lieven; Cornelis, Pierre; Tommassen, Jan; Savvides, Savvas N; Decanniere, Klaas; Van Gelder, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Many lipoproteins reside in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, and their biogenesis is dependent on the Lol (localization of lipoproteins) system. The periplasmic chaperone LolA accepts OM-destined lipoproteins that are released from the inner membrane by the LolCDE complex and transfers them to the OM receptor LolB. The exact nature of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is still unknown. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli LolA features an open beta-barrel covered by alpha helices that together constitute a hydrophobic cavity, which would allow the binding of one acyl chain. However, OM lipoproteins contain three acyl chains, and the stoichiometry of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is 1:1. Here we present the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa LolA that projects clear hydrophobic surface patches. Since these patches are large enough to accommodate acyl chains, their role in lipoprotein binding was investigated. Several LolA mutant proteins were created, and their functionality was assessed by studying their capacity to release lipoproteins produced in sphaeroplasts. Interruption of the largest hydrophobic patch completely destroyed the lipoprotein-releasing capacity of LolA, while interruption of smaller patches apparently reduced efficiency. Thus, the results show a new lipoprotein transport model that places (some of) the acyl chains on the hydrophobic surface patches. PMID:20620146

  1. Structures of KcsA in Complex with Symmetrical Quaternary Ammonium Compounds Reveal a Hydrophobic Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Potassium channels allow for the passive movement of potassium ions across the cell membrane and are instrumental in controlling the membrane potential in all cell types. Quaternary ammonium (QA) compounds block potassium channels and have long been used to study the functional and structural properties of these channels. Here we describe the interaction between three symmetrical hydrophobic QAs and the prokaryotic potassium channel KcsA. The structures demonstrate the presence of a hydrophobic pocket between the inner helices of KcsA and provide insight into the binding site and blocking mechanism of hydrophobic QAs. The structures also reveal a structurally hidden pathway between the central cavity and the outside membrane environment reminiscent of the lateral fenestration observed in sodium channels that can be accessed through small conformational changes in the pore wall. We propose that the hydrophobic binding pocket stabilizes the alkyl chains of long-chain QA molecules and may play a key role in hydrophobic drug binding in general. PMID:25093676

  2. Amphipathicity Determines Different Cytotoxic Mechanisms of Lysine- or Arginine-Rich Cationic Hydrophobic Peptides in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Cao, Rui; Wang, Sha; Jia, Junli; Fei, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Cationic amphipathic peptides (CAPs) are known to be able to cause membrane destabilization and induce cell death, yet how the hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, and lysine (K)/arginine (R) composition synergistically affect the peptide activity remains incompletely understood. Here, we designed a panel of peptides based on the well-known anticancer peptide KLA. Increasing hydrophobicity enhanced the cytotoxicities of both the K- and R-rich peptides. Peptides with an intact amphipathic helical interface can cause instant cell death through a membrane lysis mechanism. Interestingly, rearranging the residue positions to minimize amphipathicity caused a great decrease of cytotoxicity to the K-rich peptides but not to the R-rich peptides. The amphipathicity-minimized R-rich peptide 6 (RL2) (RLLRLLRLRRLLRL-NH2) penetrated the cell membrane and induced caspase-3-dependent apoptotic cell death. We found that the modulation of hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, and K/R residues leads to distinct mechanisms of action of cationic hydrophobic peptides. Amphipathicity-reduced, arginine-rich cationic hydrophobic peptides (CHPs) may represent a new class of peptide therapeutics. PMID:27195657

  3. Differential association of rat liver heparan sulfate proteoglycans in membranes of the Golgi apparatus and the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Brandan, E.; Hirschberg, C.B.

    1989-06-25

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) of rat liver are associated with the plasma membrane in a hydrophobic intrinsic and a hydrophilic extrinsic form. We were interested in determining whether or not these two forms could be detected in the Golgi apparatus, the subcellular site of addition of oligosaccharides and sulfate to HSPG. In vivo and in vitro radiolabeled HSPG from rat liver Golgi apparatus membranes could only be solubilized with detergents that disrupt the membrane lipid bilayer, suggesting that they are solely associated via hydrophobic interactions. Both forms of HSPG were detected in plasma membranes of rat liver and isolated rat hepatocytes. The detergent-solubilized HSPG bound to octyl-Sepharose columns, whereas the hydrophilic form did not; this latter form, however, was released from the membrane by heparin. The hydrophobic anchor of HSPG in the Golgi and plasma membranes was insensitive to treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C under conditions in which alkaline phosphatase was sensitive; this suggests that the hydrophobic anchor of HSPG is the core protein itself. Preliminary experiments suggest that the subcellular site of processing of the hydrophobic to the hydrophilic form of HSPG is the plasma membrane. A specific processing activity, probably a protease of the plasma membrane not present in serum or the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, converted hydrophobic HSPG of the Golgi membrane to the hydrophilic form. In addition, pulse-chase experiments with (35S)Na2SO4 in rats demonstrated that at short times, the bulk of the radiolabeled cellular HSPG was in the Golgi apparatus; later on, the bulk of the radioactivity was found in the plasma membrane, the only subcellular site where the hydrophilic form of HSPG was detected.

  4. In silico partitioning and transmembrane insertion of hydrophobic peptides under equilibrium conditions.

    PubMed

    Ulmschneider, Jakob P; Smith, Jeremy C; White, Stephen H; Ulmschneider, Martin B

    2011-10-01

    Nascent transmembrane (TM) polypeptide segments are recognized and inserted into the lipid bilayer by the cellular translocon machinery. The recognition rules, described by a biological hydrophobicity scale, correlate strongly with physical hydrophobicity scales that describe the free energy of insertion of TM helices from water. However, the exact relationship between the physical and biological scales is unknown, because solubility problems limit our ability to measure experimentally the direct partitioning of hydrophobic peptides across lipid membranes. Here we use microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in which monomeric polyleucine segments of different lengths are allowed to partition spontaneously into and out of lipid bilayers. This approach directly reveals all states populated at equilibrium. For the hydrophobic peptides studied here, only surface-bound and transmembrane-inserted helices are found. The free energy of insertion is directly obtained from the relative occupancy of these states. A water-soluble state was not observed, consistent with the general insolubility of hydrophobic peptides. The approach further allows determination of the partitioning pathways and kinetics. Surprisingly, the transfer free energy appears to be independent of temperature, which implies that surface-to-bilayer peptide insertion is a zero-entropy process. We find that the partitioning free energy of the polyleucine segments correlates strongly with values from translocon experiments but reveals a systematic shift favoring shorter peptides, suggesting that translocon-to-bilayer partitioning is not equivalent but related to spontaneous surface-to-bilayer partitioning. PMID:21861483

  5. Mode matches in hydrophobic free energy eigenfunctions predict peptide-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Mandell, A J; Owens, M J; Selz, K A; Morgan, W N; Shlesinger, M F; Nemeroff, C B

    1998-08-01

    The dominant statistical hydrophobic free energy inverse frequencies amino acid wavelengths as hydrophobic modes, of neurotensin (NT), cholescystokinin (CCK), the human dopamine D2 receptor [(DA)D2], and the human dopamine transporter (DAT) were determined using orthogonal decomposition of the autocovariance matrices of their amino acid sequences as hydrophobic free energy equivalents in kcal/mol. The leading eigenvalues-associated eigenvectors were convolved with the original series to construct eigenfunctions. Eigenfunctions were further analyzed using discrete trigonometric wavelet and all poles, maximum entropy power spectral transformations. This yielded clean representations of the dominant hydrophobic free energy modes, most of which are otherwise lost in the smoothing of hydropathy plots or contaminated by end effects and multimodality in conventional Fourier transformations. Mode matches were found between NT and (DA)D2 and between CCK and DAT, but not the converse. These mode matches successfully predicted the nonlinear kinetic interactions of NT-(DA)D2 in contrast with CCK-(DA) D2 on 3H-spiperone binding to (DA) D2, and by CCK-DAT but not NT-DAT on [N-methyl-3H]-WIN 35,428 binding to DAT in (DA)D2 and DAT cDNA stably transfected cell lines without known NT or CCK receptors. Computation of the dominant modes of hydrophobic free energy eigenfunctions may help predict functionally relevant peptide-membrane protein interactions, even across neurotransmitter families. PMID:9664843

  6. Temperature, stability, and the hydrophobic interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Schellman, J A

    1997-01-01

    Changes in free energy are normally used to track the effect of temperature on the stability of proteins and hydrophobic interactions. Use of this procedure on the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons, a standard representation of the hydrophobic effect, leads to the conclusion that the hydrophobic effect increases in strength as the temperature is raised to approximately 140 degrees C. Acceptance of this interpretation leads to a number of far-reaching conclusions that are at variance with the original conception of the hydrophobic effect and add considerably to the complexity of interpretation. There are two legitimate thermodynamic functions that can be used to look at stability as a function of temperature: the standard Gibbs free energy change, deltaG degrees, and deltaG degrees/T. The latter is proportional to the log of the equilibrium constant and is sometimes called the Massieu-Planck function. Arguments are presented for using deltaG degrees/T rather than deltaG degrees for variations in stability with temperature. This makes a considerable difference in the interpretation of the hydrophobic interaction, but makes little change in the stability profile of proteins. Protein unfolding and the aqueous solubility of benzene are given as examples. The contrast between protein unfolding and the hydration of nonpolar molecules provides a rough estimate of the contribution of other factors that stabilize and destabilize protein structure. PMID:9414210

  7. Electrically Conductive Porous Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth Alan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an electrically conductive membrane that can be configured to be used in fuel cell systems to act as a hydrophilic water separator internal to the fuel cell, or as a water separator used with water vapor fed electrolysis cells, or as a water separator used with water vapor fed electrolysis cells, or as a capillary structure in a thin head pipe evaporator, or as a hydrophobic gas diffusion layer covering the fuel cell electrode surface in a fuel cell.

  8. Temperature polarization coefficients in membrane distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Diez, L.; Vazquez-Gonzalez, M.I.; Florido-Diaz, F.J.

    1998-04-01

    Membrane distillation is a membrane process in which two liquid phases at different temperatures are separated by a microporous hydrophobic membrane. The membrane plays the role of a physical support for the vapor-liquid interface. The aim of this paper is to study pure water transport by membrane distillation through a PTFE flat membrane. The dependence of the phenomenon on average temperature and recirculation rate at the membrane sides is investigated. The influence of these operating conditions on water transport is discussed by taking into account mass and heat transfer within the membrane and the adjoining liquid phases. The concept of temperature polarization is introduced into the transport equations and shown to be important in the interpretation of the experimental results.

  9. Water desalination using carbon-nanotube-enhanced membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Gethard, Ken; Sae-Khow, Ornthida; Mitra, Somenath

    2011-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) enhanced membrane distillation is presented for water desalination. It is demonstrated that the immobilization of the CNTs in the pores of a hydrophobic membrane favorably alters the water-membrane interactions to promote vapor permeability while preventing liquid penetration into the membrane pores. For a salt concentration of 34 000 mg L(-1) and at 80 °C, the nanotube incorporation led to 1.85 and 15 times increase in flux and salt reduction, respectively. PMID:21188976

  10. Water desalination using carbon-nanotube-enhanced membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Gethard, Ken; Sae-Khow, Ornthida; Mitra, Somenath

    2011-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) enhanced membrane distillation is presented for water desalination. It is demonstrated that the immobilization of the CNTs in the pores of a hydrophobic membrane favorably alters the water-membrane interactions to promote vapor permeability while preventing liquid penetration into the membrane pores. For a salt concentration of 34 000 mg L(-1) and at 80 °C, the nanotube incorporation led to 1.85 and 15 times increase in flux and salt reduction, respectively.

  11. Geometric grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, David

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a highly automated hexahedral grid generator based on extensive geometrical and solid modeling operations developed in response to a vision of a designer-driven one day turnaround CFD process which implies a designer-driven one hour grid generation process.

  12. Internet 2 Access Grid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of the Internet 2 Initiative, which is based on collaboration among universities, businesses, and government, focuses on the Access Grid, a Computational Grid that includes interactive multimedia within high-speed networks to provide resources to enable remote collaboration among the research community. (Author/LRW)

  13. Security for grids

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.; Jackson, Keith R.

    2005-08-14

    Securing a Grid environment presents a distinctive set of challenges. This paper groups the activities that need to be secured into four categories: naming and authentication; secure communication; trust, policy, and authorization; and enforcement of access control. It examines the current state of the art in securing these processes and introduces new technologies that promise to meet the security requirements of Grids more completely.

  14. Characterization of hydrophobic peptides in the presence of detergent by photoionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bagag, Aïcha; Jault, Jean-Michel; Sidahmed-Adrar, Nazha; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Le Naour, François

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of membrane proteins is still challenging. The major issue is the high hydrophobicity of membrane proteins that necessitates the use of detergents for their extraction and solubilization. The very poor compatibility of mass spectrometry with detergents remains a tremendous obstacle in studies of membrane proteins. Here, we investigated the potential of atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) for mass spectrometry study of membrane proteins. This work was focused on the tetraspanin CD9 and the multidrug transporter BmrA. A set of peptides from CD9, exhibiting a broad range of hydropathicity, was investigated using APPI as compared to electrospray ionization (ESI). Mass spectrometry experiments revealed that the most hydrophobic peptides were hardly ionized by ESI whereas all peptides, including the highly hydrophobic one that corresponds to the full sequence of the first transmembrane domain of CD9, were easily ionized by APPI. The native protein BmrA purified in the presence of the non-ionic detergent beta-D-dodecyl maltoside (DDM) was digested in-solution using trypsin. The resulting peptides were investigated by flow injection analysis of the mixture followed by mass spectrometry. Upon ESI, only detergent ions were detected and the ionic signals from the peptides were totally suppressed. In contrast, APPI allowed many peptides distributed along the sequence of the protein to be detected. Furthermore, the parent ion corresponding to the first transmembrane domain of the protein BmrA was detected under APPI conditions. Careful examination of the APPI mass spectrum revealed a-, b-, c- and y- fragment ions generated by in-source fragmentation. Those fragment ions allowed unambiguous structural characterization of the transmembrane domain. In conclusion, APPI-MS appears as a versatile method allowing the ionization and fragmentation of hydrophobic peptides in the presence of detergent.

  15. Data Grid Implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Reagan W.; Studham, Ronald S.; Rajasekar, Arcot; Watson, Chip; Stockinger, Heinz; Kunszt, Peter; Charlie Catlett and Ian Foster

    2002-02-27

    Data grids link distributed, heterogeneous storage resources into a coherent data management system. From a user perspective, the data grid provides a uniform name space across the underlying storage systems, while supporting retrieval and storage of files. In the high energy physics community, at least six data grids have been implemented for the storage and distribution of experimental data. Data grids are also being used to support projects as diverse as digital libraries (National Library of Medicine Visible Embryo project), federation of multiple astronomy sky surveys (NSF National Virtual Observatory project), and integration of distributed data sets (Long Term Ecological Reserve). Data grids also form the core interoperability mechanisms for creating persistent archives, in which data collections are migrated to new technologies over time. The ability to provide a uniform name space across multiple administration domains is becoming a critical component of national-scale, collaborative projects.

  16. Transforming Power Grid Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Guttromson, Ross T.; Nieplocha, Jarek; Pratt, Robert G.

    2007-04-15

    While computation is used to plan, monitor, and control power grids, some of the computational technologies now used are more than a hundred years old, and the complex interactions of power grid components impede real-time operations. Thus it is hard to speed up “state estimation,” the procedure used to estimate the status of the power grid from measured input. State estimation is the core of grid operations, including contingency analysis, automatic generation control, and optimal power flow. How fast state estimation and contingency analysis are conducted (currently about every 5 minutes) needs to be increased radically so the analysis of contingencies is comprehensive and is conducted in real time. Further, traditional state estimation is based on a power flow model and only provides a static snapshot—a tiny piece of the state of a large-scale dynamic machine. Bringing dynamic aspects into real-time grid operations poses an even bigger challenge. Working with the latest, most advanced computing techniques and hardware, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) intend to transform grid operations by increasing computational speed and improving accuracy. Traditional power grid computation is conducted on single PC hardware platforms. This article shows how traditional power grid computation can be reformulated to take advantage of advanced computing techniques and be converted to high-performance computing platforms (e.g., PC clusters, reconfigurable hardware, scalable multicore shared memory computers, or multithreaded architectures). The improved performance is expected to have a huge impact on how power grids are operated and managed and ultimately will lead to more reliability and better asset utilization to the power industry. New computational capabilities will be tested and demonstrated on the comprehensive grid operations platform in the Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center, which is a newly commissioned PNNL facility for

  17. The search for the hydrophobic force law.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Malte U; Anderson, Travers H; Chaimovich, Aviel; Shell, M Scott; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    After nearly 30 years of research on the hydrophobic interaction, the search for the hydrophobic force law is still continuing. Indeed, there are more questions than answers, and the experimental data are often quite different for nominally similar conditions, as well as, apparently, for nano-, micro-, and macroscopic surfaces. This has led to the conclusion that the experimentally observed force-distance relationships are either a combination of different 'fundamental' interactions, or that the hydrophobic force-law, if there is one, is complex--depending on numerous parameters. The only unexpectedly strong attractive force measured in all experiments so far has a range of D approximately 100-200 angstroms, increasing roughly exponentially down to approximately 10-20 angstroms and then more steeply down to adhesive contact at D = 0 or, for power-law potentials, effectively at D approximately 2 angstroms. The measured forces in this regime (100-200 angstroms) and especially the adhesive forces are much stronger, and have a different distance-dependence from the continuum VDW force (Lifshitz theory) for non-conducting dielectric media. We suggest a three-regime force-law for the forces observed between hydrophobic surfaces: In the first, from 100-200 angstroms to thousands of angstroms, the dominating force is created by complementary electrostatic domains or patches on the apposing surfaces and/or bridging vapour cavities; a 'pure' but still not well-understood 'long-range hydrophobic force' dominates the second regime from approximately 150 to approximately 15 angstroms, possibly due to an enhanced Hamaker constant associated with the 'proton-hopping' polarizability of water; while below approximately 10-15 anstroms to contact there is another 'pure short-range hydrophobic force' related to water structuring effects associated with surface-induced changes in the orientation and/or density of water molecules and H-bonds at the water-hydrophobic interface. We

  18. A conserved hydrophobic surface of the LARG pleckstrin homology domain is critical for RhoA activation in cells

    PubMed Central

    Aittaleb, Mohamed; Gao, Guang; Evelyn, Chris R.; Neubig, Richard R.; Tesmer, John J. G.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) activates RhoA in response to signals received by specific classes of cell surface receptors. The catalytic core of LARG is a Dbl homology (DH) domain whose activity is modulated by an adjacent pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. In this study, we used a transcriptional assay and confocal microscopy to examine the roles of several novel structural features of the LARG DH/PH domains, including a conserved and exposed hydrophobic patch on the PH domain that mediates protein-protein interactions in crystal structures of LARG and its close homolog PDZ-RhoGEF. Mutation of the hydrophobic patch has no effect on nucleotide exchange activity in vitro, but abolished the ability of LARG to activate RhoA and to induce stress fiber formation in cultured cells. The activity of these mutants could be rescued by fusion with exogenous membrane targeting domains. However, because membrane recruitment by activated Gα13 subunits was not sufficient to rescue activity of a hydrophobic patch mutant, the LARG PH domain cannot solely contribute to membrane targeting. Instead, it seems likely the domain is involved in regulatory interactions with other proteins near the membrane surface. We also show that the hydrophobic patch of the PH domain is likely important for the activity of all Lbc family RhoGEFs. PMID:19560536

  19. Interaction of ethanol with biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, D B; Chin, J H

    1981-05-15

    Ethanol is among the drugs with anesthetic potency determined by lipid solubility, in accord with the Meyer-Overton hypothesis. Thus, it is likely that ethanol acts in a hydrophobic environment. Using electron paramagnetic resonance with 5-doxylstearic acid as spin label, we find that ethanol disorders mouse cell membranes, making the lipid matrix more fluid. We surmise that consequent disruption of the function of integral membrane proteins may be the cause of ethanol's central actions. When mice are treated for 8 days with ethanol, their membranes become tolerant to the disordering effect of ethanol. This tolerance is accompanied by an increased proportion of cholesterol in the membranes.

  20. Bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity properties in the mediation of in vitro adhesion by the rabbit enteric pathogen Escherichia coli strain RDEC-1.

    PubMed Central

    Drumm, B; Neumann, A W; Policova, Z; Sherman, P M

    1989-01-01

    The role of hydrophobicity in the attachment of enteropathogens to gastrointestinal mucosa is controversial. In vitro binding of Escherichia coli RDEC-1 to rabbit intestine is dependent on the expression of pili. We examined in vitro adherence of piliated RDEC-1 after altering either the hydrophobicity of the organisms, the hydrophobicity of the substrate for attachment, or the surface tension of the suspending liquid. Hydrophobicity of RDEC-1 was determined using four complementary methods. In each assay piliated RDEC-1 demonstrated relatively more hydrophobic properties compared with both organisms grown to suppress pilus expression and a mutant that cannot express mannose-resistant pili. When piliated RDEC-1 were pretreated with tetramethyl urea to disrupt hydrophobic bonds surface hydrophobicity decreased. Concurrently, bacterial adherence to rabbit ileal microvillus membranes, mucus and mucin was reduced. Binding of piliated organisms to hydrophobic surfaces was significantly higher compared to both nonpiliated bacteria and the adherence of piliated RDEC-1 to relatively hydrophilic surfaces. Addition of propanol reduced the surface tension of the suspending liquid, and decreased adhesion of piliated RDEC-1 to polystyrene by 80%. Conversely, adherence of piliated organisms to a hydrophilic surface increased 12-fold after lowering the surface tension of the suspending liquid. We conclude that hydrophobic properties have a role in mediating in vitro adherence of this E. coli enteric pathogen. Images PMID:2572606

  1. Electrostatics of deformable lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Vorobyov, Igor; Bekker, Borislava; Allen, Toby W

    2010-06-16

    It was recently demonstrated that significant local deformations of biological membranes take place due to the fields of charged peptides and ions, challenging the standard model of membrane electrostatics. The ability of ions to retain their immediate hydration environment, combined with the lack of sensitivity of permeability to ion type or even ion pairs, led us to question the extent to which hydration energetics and electrostatics control membrane ion permeation. Using the arginine analog methyl-guanidinium as a test case, we find that although hydrocarbon electronic polarizability causes dramatic changes in ion solvation free energy, as well as a significant change (approximately 0.4 V) in the membrane dipole potential, little change in membrane permeation energetics occurs. We attribute this to compensation of solvation terms from polar and polarizable nonpolar components within the membrane, and explain why the dipole potential is not fully sensed in terms of the locally deformed bilayer interface. Our descriptions provide a deeper understanding of the translocation process and allow predictions for poly-ions, ion pairs, charged lipids, and lipid flip-flop. We also report simulations of large hydrophobic-ion-like membrane defects and the ionophore valinomycin, which exhibit little membrane deformation, as well as hydrophilic defects and the ion channel gramicidin A, to provide parallels to membranes deformed by unassisted ion permeation.

  2. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  3. Decentral Smart Grid Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Benjamin; Matthiae, Moritz; Timme, Marc; Witthaut, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Stable operation of complex flow and transportation networks requires balanced supply and demand. For the operation of electric power grids—due to their increasing fraction of renewable energy sources—a pressing challenge is to fit the fluctuations in decentralized supply to the distributed and temporally varying demands. To achieve this goal, common smart grid concepts suggest to collect consumer demand data, centrally evaluate them given current supply and send price information back to customers for them to decide about usage. Besides restrictions regarding cyber security, privacy protection and large required investments, it remains unclear how such central smart grid options guarantee overall stability. Here we propose a Decentral Smart Grid Control, where the price is directly linked to the local grid frequency at each customer. The grid frequency provides all necessary information about the current power balance such that it is sufficient to match supply and demand without the need for a centralized IT infrastructure. We analyze the performance and the dynamical stability of the power grid with such a control system. Our results suggest that the proposed Decentral Smart Grid Control is feasible independent of effective measurement delays, if frequencies are averaged over sufficiently large time intervals.

  4. Vertical type porous membrane hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, C.E.; Taschek, W.G.

    1981-04-14

    The disclosure concerns an apparatus for generating gas by the reaction of a water reactive gas producing fuel with water vapor. A chamber houses the metal hydride fuel and a water vapor is introduced into the fuel chamber through a pair of spaced porous hydrophobic membranes. Reaction of the water vapor with the fuel produces a gas such as hydrogen (If calcium hydride fuel is used) or oxygen for use in a fuel cell. A ''dead space'' is positioned between the porous hydrophobic membranes which provides a safety feature that is unique in its use. If, during operation, an excessive sudden demand is made for the generated gas, I.E. Hydrogen, and in turn for water vapor, with this invention, unvaporized water which might be pulled through the outer membrane or membranes will then pass through the hydrogen outlet rather than accidently directly contacting the fuel.

  5. The open science grid

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, R.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The U.S. LHC Tier-1 and Tier-2 laboratories and universities are developing production Grids to support LHC applications running across a worldwide Grid computing system. Together with partners in computer science, physics grid projects and active experiments, we will build a common national production grid infrastructure which is open in its architecture, implementation and use. The Open Science Grid (OSG) model builds upon the successful approach of last year's joint Grid2003 project. The Grid3 shared infrastructure has for over eight months provided significant computational resources and throughput to a range of applications, including ATLAS and CMS data challenges, SDSS, LIGO, and biology analyses, and computer science demonstrators and experiments. To move towards LHC-scale data management, access and analysis capabilities, we must increase the scale, services, and sustainability of the current infrastructure by an order of magnitude or more. Thus, we must achieve a significant upgrade in its functionalities and technologies. The initial OSG partners will build upon a fully usable, sustainable and robust grid. Initial partners include the US LHC collaborations, DOE & NSF Laboratories and Universities & Trillium Grid projects. The approach is to federate with other application communities in the U.S. to build a shared infrastructure open to other sciences and capable of being modified and improved to respond to needs of other applications, including CDF, D0, BaBar, and RHIC experiments. We describe the application-driven, engineered services of the OSG, short term plans and status, and the roadmap for a consortium, its partnerships and national focus.

  6. Trends in life science grid: from computing grid to knowledge grid

    PubMed Central

    Konagaya, Akihiko

    2006-01-01

    Background Grid computing has great potential to become a standard cyberinfrastructure for life sciences which often require high-performance computing and large data handling which exceeds the computing capacity of a single institution. Results This survey reviews the latest grid technologies from the viewpoints of computing grid, data grid and knowledge grid. Computing grid technologies have been matured enough to solve high-throughput real-world life scientific problems. Data grid technologies are strong candidates for realizing "resourceome" for bioinformatics. Knowledge grids should be designed not only from sharing explicit knowledge on computers but also from community formulation for sharing tacit knowledge among a community. Conclusion Extending the concept of grid from computing grid to knowledge grid, it is possible to make use of a grid as not only sharable computing resources, but also as time and place in which people work together, create knowledge, and share knowledge and experiences in a community. PMID:17254294

  7. Bioluminescence assay for estimating the hydrophobic properties of bacteria as revealed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Mafu, A A; Roy, D; Savoie, L; Goulet, J

    1991-01-01

    The luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence method was used to estimate the number of bacteria retained in neutral and amphiphilic gels and those in the eluate to determine the hydrophobic surface properties of bacteria by using hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Good correlations were found between viable counts and ATP content for Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fragi, and Listeria monocytogenes. ATP determination was more rapid than viable counts for characterizing the relative hydrophobicity of L. monocytogenes. Quantitative estimations of adsorption of L. monocytogenes on octyl-Sepharose indicate that this microorganism is hydrophilic. PMID:1908207

  8. Energy Conversion over Super-hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Zhai, Shengjie

    2015-11-01

    The streaming potential generated by a pressure-driven flow over a charged slip-stick surface with an arbitrary double layer thickness is both theoretically and experimentally studied. To understand the impact of the slip, the streaming potential is compared against that over a homogenously charged smooth surface. Our results indicate that the streaming potential over a super-hydrophobic surface only can be enhanced under certain conditions. In addition, the Onsager relation which directly relates the magnitude of electro-osmotic effect to that of the streaming current effect has been explicitly proved to be valid for thin and thick double layers and homogeneously charged super-hydrophobic surfaces. Comparisons between the streaming current and electro-osmotic mobility for an arbitrary electric double layer thickness under various conditions indicate that the Onsager relation seems applicable for arbitrary weakly charged super-hydrophobic surfaces though there is no general proof. Knowledge of the streaming potential over a slip-stick surface can provide guidance for designing novel and efficient microfluidic energy-conversion devices using super-hydrophobic surfaces. The work was supported by the NSF Grant No. ECCS-1509866.

  9. COSOLVENCY AND SOPRTION OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) by two soils was measured from mixed solvents containing water plus completely miscible organic solvents (CMOSs) and partially miscible organic solvents (PMOSs). The utility of the log-linear cosolvency model for predicting HOC sor...

  10. Grid Connected Functionality

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baker, Kyri; Jin, Xin; Vaidynathan, Deepthi; Jones, Wesley; Christensen, Dane; Sparn, Bethany; Woods, Jason; Sorensen, Harry; Lunacek, Monte

    2016-08-04

    Dataset demonstrating the potential benefits that residential buildings can provide for frequency regulation services in the electric power grid. In a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) implementation, simulated homes along with a physical laboratory home are coordinated via a grid aggregator, and it is shown that their aggregate response has the potential to follow the regulation signal on a timescale of seconds. Connected (communication-enabled), devices in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) received demand response (DR) requests from a grid aggregator, and the devices responded accordingly to meet the signal while satisfying user comfort bounds and physical hardware limitations.

  11. Membrane protein synthesis in cell-free systems: from bio-mimetic systems to bio-membranes.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Rita; Dondapati, Srujan K; Fenz, Susanne F; Schmidt, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-08-25

    When taking up the gauntlet of studying membrane protein functionality, scientists are provided with a plethora of advantages, which can be exploited for the synthesis of these difficult-to-express proteins by utilizing cell-free protein synthesis systems. Due to their hydrophobicity, membrane proteins have exceptional demands regarding their environment to ensure correct functionality. Thus, the challenge is to find the appropriate hydrophobic support that facilitates proper membrane protein folding. So far, various modes of membrane protein synthesis have been presented. Here, we summarize current state-of-the-art methodologies of membrane protein synthesis in biomimetic-supported systems. The correct folding and functionality of membrane proteins depend in many cases on their integration into a lipid bilayer and subsequent posttranslational modification. We highlight cell-free systems utilizing the advantages of biological membranes.

  12. Pathways to dewetting in hydrophobic confinement

    PubMed Central

    Remsing, Richard C.; Xi, Erte; Vembanur, Srivathsan; Sharma, Sumit; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Garde, Shekhar; Patel, Amish J.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid water can become metastable with respect to its vapor in hydrophobic confinement. The resulting dewetting transitions are often impeded by large kinetic barriers. According to macroscopic theory, such barriers arise from the free energy required to nucleate a critical vapor tube that spans the region between two hydrophobic surfaces—tubes with smaller radii collapse, whereas larger ones grow to dry the entire confined region. Using extensive molecular simulations of water between two nanoscopic hydrophobic surfaces, in conjunction with advanced sampling techniques, here we show that for intersurface separations that thermodynamically favor dewetting, the barrier to dewetting does not correspond to the formation of a (classical) critical vapor tube. Instead, it corresponds to an abrupt transition from an isolated cavity adjacent to one of the confining surfaces to a gap-spanning vapor tube that is already larger than the critical vapor tube anticipated by macroscopic theory. Correspondingly, the barrier to dewetting is also smaller than the classical expectation. We show that the peculiar nature of water density fluctuations adjacent to extended hydrophobic surfaces—namely, the enhanced likelihood of observing low-density fluctuations relative to Gaussian statistics—facilitates this nonclassical behavior. By stabilizing isolated cavities relative to vapor tubes, enhanced water density fluctuations thus stabilize novel pathways, which circumvent the classical barriers and offer diminished resistance to dewetting. Our results thus suggest a key role for fluctuations in speeding up the kinetics of numerous phenomena ranging from Cassie–Wenzel transitions on superhydrophobic surfaces, to hydrophobically driven biomolecular folding and assembly. PMID:26100866

  13. Charges in the hydrophobic interior of proteins.

    PubMed

    Isom, Daniel G; Castañeda, Carlos A; Cannon, Brian R; Velu, Priya D; García-Moreno E, Bertrand

    2010-09-14

    Charges are inherently incompatible with hydrophobic environments. Presumably for this reason, ionizable residues are usually excluded from the hydrophobic interior of proteins and are found instead at the surface, where they can interact with bulk water. Paradoxically, ionizable groups buried in the hydrophobic interior of proteins play essential roles, especially in biological energy transduction. To examine the unusual properties of internal ionizable groups we measured the pK(a) of glutamic acid residues at 25 internal positions in a stable form of staphylococcal nuclease. Two of 25 Glu residues titrated with normal pK(a) near 4.5; the other 23 titrated with elevated pK(a) values ranging from 5.2-9.4, with an average value of 7.7. Trp fluorescence and far-UV circular dichroism were used to monitor the effects of internal charges on conformation. These data demonstrate that although charges buried in proteins are indeed destabilizing, charged side chains can be buried readily in the hydrophobic core of stable proteins without the need for specialized structural adaptations to stabilize them, and without inducing any major conformational reorganization. The apparent dielectric effect experienced by the internal charges is considerably higher than the low dielectric constants of hydrophobic matter used to represent the protein interior in electrostatic continuum models of proteins. The high thermodynamic stability required for proteins to withstand the presence of buried charges suggests a pathway for the evolution of enzymes, and it underscores the need to mind thermodynamic stability in any strategy for engineering novel or altered enzymatic active sites in proteins. PMID:20798341

  14. Influences of acid-base property of membrane on interfacial interactions related with membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor based on thermodynamic assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Qu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Meijia; Lin, Hongjun; Zhou, Xiaoling; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Mei, Rongwu; Hong, Huachang

    2016-08-01

    Failure of membrane hydrophobicity in predicting membrane fouling requires a more reliable indicator. In this study, influences of membrane acid base (AB) property on interfacial interactions in two different interaction scenarios in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) were studied according to thermodynamic approaches. It was found that both the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and foulant samples in the MBR had relatively high electron donor (γ(-)) component and low electron acceptor (γ(+)) component. For both of interaction scenarios, AB interaction was the major component of the total interaction. The results showed that, the total interaction monotonically decreased with membrane γ(-), while was marginally affected by membrane γ(+), suggesting that γ(-) could act as a reliable indicator for membrane fouling prediction. This study suggested that membrane modification for fouling mitigation should orient to improving membrane surface γ(-) component rather than hydrophilicity. PMID:27155263

  15. Hydrophobic Mismatch Drives the Interaction of E5 with the Transmembrane Segment of PDGF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Windisch, Dirk; Ziegler, Colin; Grage, Stephan L.; Bürck, Jochen; Zeitler, Marcel; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic E5 protein from bovine papillomavirus is a short (44 amino acids long) integral membrane protein that forms homodimers. It activates platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) β in a ligand-independent manner by transmembrane helix-helix interactions. The nature of this recognition event remains elusive, as numerous mutations are tolerated in the E5 transmembrane segment, with the exception of one hydrogen-bonding residue. Here, we examined the conformation, stability, and alignment of the E5 protein in fluid lipid membranes of substantially varying bilayer thickness, in both the absence and presence of the PDGFR transmembrane segment. Quantitative synchrotron radiation circular dichroism analysis revealed a very long transmembrane helix for E5 of ∼26 amino acids. Oriented circular dichroism and solid-state 15N-NMR showed that the alignment and stability of this unusually long segment depend critically on the membrane thickness. When reconstituted alone in exceptionally thick DNPC lipid bilayers, the E5 helix was found to be inserted almost upright. In moderately thick bilayers (DErPC and DEiPC), it started to tilt and became slightly deformed, and finally it became aggregated in conventional DOPC, POPC, and DMPC membranes due to hydrophobic mismatch. On the other hand, when E5 was co-reconstituted with the transmembrane segment of PDGFR, it was able to tolerate even the most pronounced mismatch and was stabilized by binding to the receptor, which has the same hydrophobic length. As E5 is known to activate PDGFR within the thin membranes of the Golgi compartment, we suggest that the intrinsic hydrophobic mismatch of these two interaction partners drives them together. They seem to recognize each other by forming a closely packed bundle of mutually aligned transmembrane helices, which is further stabilized by a specific pair of hydrogen-bonding residues. PMID:26287626

  16. Isogrid Membranes for Precise, Singly Curved Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Lou, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A new type of composite material has been proposed for membranes that would constitute the reflective surfaces of planned lightweight, single-curvature (e.g., parabolic cylindrical) reflectors for some radar and radio-communication systems. The proposed composite materials would consist of polyimide membranes containing embedded grids of highstrength (e.g., carbon) fibers. The purpose of the fiber reinforcements, as explained in more detail below, is to prevent wrinkling or rippling of the membrane.

  17. FUNDAMENTALS AND APPLICATIONS OF PERVAPORATION THROUGH ZEOLITE MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolite membranes are well suited for separating liquid-phase mixtures by pervaporation because of their molecular-sized pores and their hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature, and the first commercial application of zeolite membranes has been for dehydrating organics [1]. Because of ...

  18. Grid Computing Education Support

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Crumb

    2008-01-15

    The GGF Student Scholar program enabled GGF the opportunity to bring over sixty qualified graduate and under-graduate students with interests in grid technologies to its three annual events over the three-year program.

  19. Space Development Grid Portal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the development of a portal to provide secure and distributed grid computing for Payload Operations Integrated Center and Mission Control Center ground services.

  20. A hydrophobic proline-rich motif is involved in the intracellular targeting of temperature-induced lipocalin.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Gras, Francesc; Boronat, Albert

    2015-06-01

    Temperature-induced lipocalins (TILs) play an essential role in the response of plants to different abiotic stresses. In agreement with their proposed role in protecting membrane lipids, TILs have been reported to be associated to cell membranes. However, TILs show an overall hydrophilic character and do not contain any signal for membrane targeting nor hydrophobic sequences that could represent transmembrane domains. Arabidopsis TIL (AtTIL) is considered the ortholog of human ApoD, a protein known to associate to membranes through a short hydrophobic loop protruding from strands 5 and 6 of the lipocalin β-barrel. An equivalent loop (referred to as HPR motif) is also present between β-strands 5 and 6 of TILs. The HPR motif, which is highly conserved among TIL proteins, extends over as short stretch of eight amino acids and contains four invariant proline residues. Subcellular localization studies have shown that TILs are targeted to a variety of cell membranes and organelles. We have also found that the HPR motif is necessary and sufficient for the intracellular targeting of TILs. Modeling studies suggest that the HPR motif may directly anchor TILs to cell membranes, favoring in this way further contact with the polar group of membrane lipids. However, some particular features of the HPR motif open the possibility that targeting of TILs to cell membranes could be mediated by interaction with other proteins. The functional analysis of the HPR motif unveils the existence of novel mechanisms involved in the intracellular targeting of proteins in plants.

  1. Rejection of pharmaceuticals by forward osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xue; Shan, Junhong; Wang, Can; Wei, Jing; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2012-08-15

    Rejection of four pharmaceutical compounds, carbamazepine, diclofenac, ibuprofen and naproxen, by forward osmosis (FO) membranes was investigated in this study. For the first time, the rejection efficiency of the pharmaceutical compounds was compared between commercial cellulose triacetate (CTA) based membranes and thin film composite (TFC) polyamide based membranes. The rejection behavior was related to membrane interfacial properties, physicochemical characteristics of the pharmaceutical molecules and feed solution pH. TFC polyamide membranes exhibited excellent overall performance, with high water flux, excellent pH stability and great rejection of all pharmaceuticals investigated (>94%). For commercial CTA based FO membranes, hydrophobic interaction between the compounds and membranes exhibited strong influence on their rejection under acidic conditions. The pharmaceuticals rejection was well correlated to their hydrophobicity (log D). Under alkaline conditions, both electrostatic repulsion and size exclusion contributed to the removal of deprotonated molecules. The pharmaceuticals rejection by CTA-HW membrane at pH 8 followed the order: diclofenac (99%)>carbamazepine (95%)>ibuprofen (93%) ≈ naproxen (93%). These results can be important for FO membrane synthesis, modification and their application in water purification. PMID:22640821

  2. Competition of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between small hydrophobes and model enclosures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingle; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The binding affinity between a probe hydrophobic particle and model hydrophobic plates with different charge (or dipole) densities in water was investigated through molecular dynamics simulations free-energy perturbation calculations. We observed a reduced binding affinity when the plates are charged, in agreement with previous findings. With increased charge density, the plates can change from “hydrophobic like” (pulling the particle into the interplate region) to “hydrophilic like” (ejecting the particle out of the interplate region), demonstrating the competition between hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. The reduction of the binding affinity is quadratically dependent on the magnitude of the charge for symmetric systems, but linear and cubic terms also make a contribution for asymmetric systems. Statistical perturbation theory explains these results and shows when and why implicit solvent models fail. PMID:20443643

  3. Implementing Production Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William E.; Ziobarth, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have presented the essence of experience gained in building two production Grids, and provided some of the global context for this work. As the reader might imagine, there were a lot of false starts, refinements to the approaches and to the software, and several substantial integration projects (SRB and Condor integrated with Globus) to get where we are today. However, the point of this paper is to try and make it substantially easier for others to get to the point where Information Power Grids (IPG) and the DOE Science Grids are today. This is what is needed in order to move us toward the vision of a common cyber infrastructure for science. The author would also like to remind the readers that this paper primarily represents the actual experiences that resulted from specific architectural and software choices during the design and implementation of these two Grids. The choices made were dictated by the criteria laid out in section 1. There is a lot more Grid software available today that there was four years ago, and various of these packages are being integrated into IPG and the DOE Grids. However, the foundation choices of Globus, SRB, and Condor would not be significantly different today than they were four years ago. Nonetheless, if the GGF is successful in its work - and we have every reason to believe that it will be - then in a few years we will see that the 28 functions provided by these packages will be defined in terms of protocols and MIS, and there will be several robust implementations available for each of the basic components, especially the Grid Common Services. The impact of the emerging Web Grid Services work is not yet clear. It will likely have a substantial impact on building higher level services, however it is the opinion of the author that this will in no way obviate the need for the Grid Common Services. These are the foundation of Grids, and the focus of almost all of the operational and persistent infrastructure aspects of Grids.

  4. Effect of surface hydrophobicity on the function of the immobilized biomineralization protein Mms6

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xunpei; Zhang, Honghu; Nayak, Srikanth; Parada, German; Anderegg, James; Feng, Shuren; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Akinc, Mufit; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2015-08-13

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetic nanocrystals with uniform shapes and sizes in nature, which has inspired in vitro synthesis of uniformly sized magnetite nanocrystals under mild conditions. Mms6, a biomineralization protein from magnetotactic bacteria with a hydrophobic N-terminal domain and a hydrophilic C-terminal domain, can promote formation of magnetite nanocrystals in vitro with well-defined shape and size in gels under mild conditions. Here we investigate the role of surface hydrophobicity on the ability of Mms6 to template magnetite nanoparticle formation on surfaces. Our results confirmed that Mms6 can form a protein network structure on a monolayer of hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT)-coated gold surfaces and facilitate magnetite nanocrystal formation with uniform sizes close to those seen in nature, in contrast to its behavior on more hydrophilic surfaces. We propose that this hydrophobicity effect might be due to the amphiphilic nature of the Mms6 protein and its tendency to incorporate the hydrophobic N-terminal domain into the hydrophobic lipid bilayer environment of the magnetosome membrane, exposing the hydrophilic C-terminal domain that promotes biomineralization. Supporting this hypothesis, the larger and well-formed magnetite nanoparticles were found to be preferentially located on ODT surfaces covered with Mms6 as compared to control samples, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies. A C-terminal domain mutant of this protein did not form the same network structure as wild-type Mms6, suggesting that the network structure is important for the magnetite nanocrystal formation. This article provides valuable insights into the role of surface hydrophilicity on the action of the biomineralization protein Mms6 to synthesize magnetic nanocrystals and provides a facile route to controlling bioinspired nanocrystal synthesis in vitro.

  5. Effect of surface hydrophobicity on the function of the immobilized biomineralization protein Mms6

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Xunpei; Zhang, Honghu; Nayak, Srikanth; Parada, German; Anderegg, James; Feng, Shuren; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Akinc, Mufit; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2015-08-13

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetic nanocrystals with uniform shapes and sizes in nature, which has inspired in vitro synthesis of uniformly sized magnetite nanocrystals under mild conditions. Mms6, a biomineralization protein from magnetotactic bacteria with a hydrophobic N-terminal domain and a hydrophilic C-terminal domain, can promote formation of magnetite nanocrystals in vitro with well-defined shape and size in gels under mild conditions. Here we investigate the role of surface hydrophobicity on the ability of Mms6 to template magnetite nanoparticle formation on surfaces. Our results confirmed that Mms6 can form a protein network structure on a monolayer of hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT)-coated goldmore » surfaces and facilitate magnetite nanocrystal formation with uniform sizes close to those seen in nature, in contrast to its behavior on more hydrophilic surfaces. We propose that this hydrophobicity effect might be due to the amphiphilic nature of the Mms6 protein and its tendency to incorporate the hydrophobic N-terminal domain into the hydrophobic lipid bilayer environment of the magnetosome membrane, exposing the hydrophilic C-terminal domain that promotes biomineralization. Supporting this hypothesis, the larger and well-formed magnetite nanoparticles were found to be preferentially located on ODT surfaces covered with Mms6 as compared to control samples, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies. A C-terminal domain mutant of this protein did not form the same network structure as wild-type Mms6, suggesting that the network structure is important for the magnetite nanocrystal formation. This article provides valuable insights into the role of surface hydrophilicity on the action of the biomineralization protein Mms6 to synthesize magnetic nanocrystals and provides a facile route to controlling bioinspired nanocrystal synthesis in vitro.« less

  6. Grid in Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitdidier, Monique; Schwichtenberg, Horst

    2010-05-01

    The worldwide Earth science community covers a mosaic of disciplines and players such as academia, industry, national surveys, international organizations, and so forth. It provides a scientific basis for addressing societal issues, which require that the Earth science community utilize massive amounts of data, both in real and remote time. This data is usually distributed among many different organizations and data centers. These facts, the utilization of massive, distributed data amounts, explain the interest of the Earth science community for Grid technology, also noticeable by the variety of applications ported and tools developed. In parallel to the participation in EGEE, other projects involving ES disciplines were or have been carried out as related projects to EGEE (Enabling Grids for E-sciencE) such as CYCLOPS, SEEGrid, EELA2, EUASIA or outside e.g., in the framework of WGISS/CEOS. Numerous applications in atmospheric chemistry, meteorology, seismology, hydrology, pollution, climate and biodiversity were deployed successfully on Grid. In order to fulfill requirements of risk management, several prototype applications have been deployed using OGC (Open geospatial Consortium) components with Grid middleware. Examples are in hydrology for flood or Black Sea Catchment monitoring, and in fire monitoring. Meteorological, pollution and climate applications are based on meteorological models ported on Grid such as MM5 (Mesoscale Model), WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting), RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) or CAM (Community Atmosphere Model). Seismological applications on Grid are numerous in locations where their occurrence is important and computer resources too small; then interfaces and gateways have been developed to facilitate the access to data and specific software and avoid work duplication. A portal has been deployed for commercial seismological software, Geocluster, for academic users. In this presentation examples of such applications will

  7. Exploring Hypersonic, Unstructured-Grid Issues through Structured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.; Kleb, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Pure-tetrahedral unstructured grids have been shown to produce asymmetric heat transfer rates for symmetric problems. Meanwhile, two-dimensional structured grids produce symmetric solutions and as documented here, introducing a spanwise degree of freedom to these structured grids also yields symmetric solutions. The effects of grid skewness and other perturbations of structured-grids are investigated to uncover possible mechanisms behind the unstructured-grid solution asymmetries. By using controlled experiments around a known, good solution, the effects of particular grid pathologies are uncovered. These structured-grid experiments reveal that similar solution degradation occurs as for unstructured grids, especially for heat transfer rates. Non-smooth grids within the boundary layer is also shown to produce large local errors in heat flux but do not affect surface pressures.

  8. Near-Body Grid Adaption for Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    A solution adaption capability for curvilinear near-body grids has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid computational fluid dynamics code. The approach follows closely that used for the Cartesian off-body grids, but inserts refined grids in the computational space of original near-body grids. Refined curvilinear grids are generated using parametric cubic interpolation, with one-sided biasing based on curvature and stretching ratio of the original grid. Sensor functions, grid marking, and solution interpolation tasks are implemented in the same fashion as for off-body grids. A goal-oriented procedure, based on largest error first, is included for controlling growth rate and maximum size of the adapted grid system. The adaption process is almost entirely parallelized using MPI, resulting in a capability suitable for viscous, moving body simulations. Two- and three-dimensional examples are presented.

  9. Using Grid Benchmarks for Dynamic Scheduling of Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Hood, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Navigation or dynamic scheduling of applications on computational grids can be improved through the use of an application-specific characterization of grid resources. Current grid information systems provide a description of the resources, but do not contain any application-specific information. We define a GridScape as dynamic state of the grid resources. We measure the dynamic performance of these resources using the grid benchmarks. Then we use the GridScape for automatic assignment of the tasks of a grid application to grid resources. The scalability of the system is achieved by limiting the navigation overhead to a few percent of the application resource requirements. Our task submission and assignment protocol guarantees that the navigation system does not cause grid congestion. On a synthetic data mining application we demonstrate that Gridscape-based task assignment reduces the application tunaround time.

  10. Influence of hydrophobic mismatch on the catalytic activity of Escherichia coli GlpG rhomboid protease.

    PubMed

    Foo, Alexander C Y; Harvey, Brandon G R; Metz, Jeff J; Goto, Natalie K

    2015-04-01

    Rhomboids comprise a broad family of intramembrane serine proteases that are found in a wide range of organisms and participate in a diverse array of biological processes. High-resolution structures of the catalytic transmembrane domain of the Escherichia coli GlpG rhomboid have provided numerous insights that help explain how hydrolytic cleavage can be achieved below the membrane surface. Key to this are observations that GlpG hydrophobic domain dimensions may not be sufficient to completely span the native lipid bilayer. This formed the basis for a model where hydrophobic mismatch Induces thinning of the local membrane environment to promote access to transmembrane substrates. However, hydrophobic mismatch also has the potential to alter the functional properties of the rhomboid, a possibility we explore in the current work. For this purpose, we purified the catalytic transmembrane domain of GlpG into phosphocholine or maltoside detergent micelles of varying alkyl chain lengths, and assessed proteolytic function with a model water-soluble substrate. Catalytic turnover numbers were found to depend on detergent alkyl chain length, with saturated chains containing 10-12 carbon atoms supporting maximal activity. Similar results were obtained in phospholipid bicelles, with no proteolytic activity being detected in longer-chain lipids. Although differences in thermal stability and GlpG oligomerization could not explain these activity differences, circular dichroism spectra suggest that mismatch gives rise to a small change in structure. Overall, these results demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch can exert an inhibitory effect on rhomboid activity, with the potential for changes in local membrane environment to regulate activity in vivo.

  11. The Use ofa Hydrophobic Binding Peptide Modified Lipid Nanocarrier Improving Tumor Distribution and Antitumor Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Yang, Xiucong; Lin, Zhiqiang; Gao, Shanyun; He, Bing; Mei, Bong; Wang, Dan; Yuan, Lan; Zhang, Hua; Dai, Wenbing; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In addition to showing the specific interaction between a generalized ligand and its receptor and the electrostatic effect between positive cell-penetrating peptides and negative cell membranes, our last study demonstrated the hydrophobic interactivity between a hydrophobic binding peptide (HBP) and biomembranes to be favorable in drug delivery. To yield more evidence for this new strategy and to find more effective HBPs, here we designed and established a novel nanomedicine associated with cyclosporin A (CsA) because this peptide is electrically neutral, highly hydrophobic, very stable in vivo and safe at the given dose. First, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies showed a strong hydrophobic interaction between the CsA molecules and the lipid membrane. The lactate dehydrogenase release assay proved that CsA exhibited low toxicity to cell membranes. These facts encouraged us to explore the potential application of CsA as an HBP to actualize intracellular delivery of nanomedicines for tumor therapy. When conjugated to lipid nanocarriers, CsA significantly enhanced their binding with cells and,. consequently, increased the internalization of recoded nanomedicines into cells. The in vivo experiments further showed that the CsA-associated nanocarriers could achieve better delivery to tumor tissues and improve the tumor therapy of doxorubicin (DOX) compared to the nonmodified control; these findings were identical to the observations-in cell studies. In conclusion, CsA, a readily obtainable molecule with favorable characteristics, is indeed a good candidate for an HBP, and this study provides solid, novel evidence for the use of HBP-based nanocarriers as effective antitumor drug delivery systems.

  12. The Use ofa Hydrophobic Binding Peptide Modified Lipid Nanocarrier Improving Tumor Distribution and Antitumor Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Yang, Xiucong; Lin, Zhiqiang; Gao, Shanyun; He, Bing; Mei, Bong; Wang, Dan; Yuan, Lan; Zhang, Hua; Dai, Wenbing; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In addition to showing the specific interaction between a generalized ligand and its receptor and the electrostatic effect between positive cell-penetrating peptides and negative cell membranes, our last study demonstrated the hydrophobic interactivity between a hydrophobic binding peptide (HBP) and biomembranes to be favorable in drug delivery. To yield more evidence for this new strategy and to find more effective HBPs, here we designed and established a novel nanomedicine associated with cyclosporin A (CsA) because this peptide is electrically neutral, highly hydrophobic, very stable in vivo and safe at the given dose. First, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies showed a strong hydrophobic interaction between the CsA molecules and the lipid membrane. The lactate dehydrogenase release assay proved that CsA exhibited low toxicity to cell membranes. These facts encouraged us to explore the potential application of CsA as an HBP to actualize intracellular delivery of nanomedicines for tumor therapy. When conjugated to lipid nanocarriers, CsA significantly enhanced their binding with cells and,. consequently, increased the internalization of recoded nanomedicines into cells. The in vivo experiments further showed that the CsA-associated nanocarriers could achieve better delivery to tumor tissues and improve the tumor therapy of doxorubicin (DOX) compared to the nonmodified control; these findings were identical to the observations-in cell studies. In conclusion, CsA, a readily obtainable molecule with favorable characteristics, is indeed a good candidate for an HBP, and this study provides solid, novel evidence for the use of HBP-based nanocarriers as effective antitumor drug delivery systems. PMID:27319213

  13. Beyond grid security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, B.; Epting, U.; Koenig, T.

    2008-07-01

    While many fields relevant to Grid security are already covered by existing working groups, their remit rarely goes beyond the scope of the Grid infrastructure itself. However, security issues pertaining to the internal set-up of compute centres have at least as much impact on Grid security. Thus, this talk will present briefly the EU ISSeG project (Integrated Site Security for Grids). In contrast to groups such as OSCT (Operational Security Coordination Team) and JSPG (Joint Security Policy Group), the purpose of ISSeG is to provide a holistic approach to security for Grid computer centres, from strategic considerations to an implementation plan and its deployment. The generalised methodology of Integrated Site Security (ISS) is based on the knowledge gained during its implementation at several sites as well as through security audits, and this will be briefly discussed. Several examples of ISS implementation tasks at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe will be presented, including segregation of the network for administration and maintenance and the implementation of Application Gateways. Furthermore, the web-based ISSeG training material will be introduced. This aims to offer ISS implementation guidance to other Grid installations in order to help avoid common pitfalls.

  14. GRIDS: Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    GRIDS Project: The 12 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s GRIDS Project, short for “Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage,” are developing storage technologies that can store renewable energy for use at any location on the grid at an investment cost less than $100 per kilowatt hour. Flexible, large-scale storage would create a stronger and more robust electric grid by enabling renewables to contribute to reliable power generation.

  15. The Benefits of Grid Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2005-01-01

    In the article, the author talks about the benefits of grid networks. In speaking of grid networks the author is referring to both networks of computers and networks of humans connected together in a grid topology. Examples are provided of how grid networks are beneficial today and the ways in which they have been used.

  16. Computer Code Generates Homotopic Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moitra, Anutosh

    1992-01-01

    HOMAR is computer code using homotopic procedure to produce two-dimensional grids in cross-sectional planes, which grids then stacked to produce quasi-three-dimensional grid systems for aerospace configurations. Program produces grids for use in both Euler and Navier-Stokes computation of flows. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  17. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Troxell, Wade

    2011-12-22

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSU's overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory's focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3) Simulation of

  18. Formation of controllable hydrophilic/hydrophobic drug delivery systems by electrospinning of vesicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Luo, Tian; Yang, Yanjuan; Tan, Xiuniang; Liu, Lifei

    2015-05-12

    Novel multifunctional poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) nanofibrous membrane, which contains vesicles constructed by mixed surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS), has been designed as dual drug-delivery system and fabricated via the electrospinning process. 5-FU and paeonolum, which are hydrophilic and hydrophobic anticancer model drugs, can be dissolved in vesicle solution's bond water and lipid bilayer membranes, respectively. The physicochemical properties of the electrospun nanofibrous membrane were systematically studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Drug release behaviors of the electrospun nanofibrous membrane fabricated with different molar ratio of CTAB/SDBS vesicle solution were investigated. The result showed that the releasing amount of hydrophilic drug presented an ascending release manner, while the hydrophobic one showed a descending release behavior with increasing of the molar ratio of CTAB/SDBS. Moreover, the release amount of drugs from drug delivery system can be controlled by the molar ratio of CTAB/SDBS in the vesicle solution easily and conveniently. The distinct properties can be utilized to encapsulate environmental demanding and quantificational materials.

  19. Impacts of hydrophilic colanic acid on bacterial attachment to microfiltration membranes and subsequent membrane biofouling.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keitaro; Tashiro, Yosuke; May, Thithiwat; Okabe, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    In order to examine the interactions between physicochemical properties of specific extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and membrane biofouling, we investigated the impacts of hydrophilic colanic acid, as a model extracellular polysaccharide component, on initial bacterial attachment to different microfiltration (MF) membranes and membrane biofouling by using Escherichia coli strains producing different amounts of colanic acid. In a newly designed microtiter plate assay, the bacterial attachment by an E. coli strain RcsF(+), which produces massive amounts of colanic acid, decreased only to a hydrophobic membrane because the colanic acid made cell surfaces more hydrophilic, resulting in low cell attachment to hydrophobic membranes. The bench-scale cross-flow filtration tests followed by filtration resistance measurement revealed that RcsF(+) caused severe irreversible membrane fouling (i.e., pore-clogging), whereas less extracellular polysaccharide-producing strains caused moderate but reversible fouling to all membranes used in this study. Further cross-flow filtration tests indicated that colanic acid liberated in the bulk phase could rapidly penetrate pre-accumulated biomass layers (i.e., biofilms) and then directly clogged membrane pores. These results indicate that colanic acid, a hydrophilic extracellular polysaccharide, and possible polysaccharides with similar characteristics with colanic acid are considered as a major cause of severe irreversible membrane fouling (i.e., pore-clogging) regardless of biofilm formation (dynamic membrane).

  20. GridLAB-D/SG

    SciTech Connect

    2011-08-30

    GridLAB-D is a new power system simulation tool that provides valuable information to users who design and operate electric power transmission and distribution systems, and to utilities that wish to take advantage of the latest smart grid technology. This special release of GridLAB-D was developed to study the proposed Smart Grid technology that is used by Battelle Memorial Institute in the AEP gridSMART demonstration project in Northeast Columbus, Ohio.

  1. Thermal conductance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhenbin; Cahill, David G; Braun, Paul V

    2006-05-12

    Using time-domain thermoreflectance, we have measured the transport of thermally excited vibrational energy across planar interfaces between water and solids that have been chemically functionalized with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The Kapitza length--i.e., the thermal conductivity of water divided by the thermal conductance per unit area of the interface--is analogous to the "slip length" for water flowing tangentially past a solid surface. We find that the Kapitza length at hydrophobic interfaces (10-12 nm) is a factor of 2-3 larger than the Kapitza length at hydrophilic interfaces (3-6 nm). If a vapor layer is present at the hydrophobic interface, and this vapor layer has a thermal conductivity that is comparable to bulk water vapor, then our experimental results constrain the thickness of the vapor layer to be less than 0.25 nm.

  2. Biodegradable, hydrophobic coatings based on crosslinked polycaprolactone

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, M.F.

    1993-12-31

    Crosslinked poly(caprolactone) (PCL) has been explored as a hydrophobic and biodegradable coating for hydrophilic substrates. Crosslinking of PCL is known to retard its degradation rate, but does not affect its biodegradability. The cross-linking efficiencies of several organic peroxides have been determined for PCL. This has been accomplished by calculating the crosslink density (M{sub c} from dynamic mechanical data) for a given molar concentration of organic peroxide. Various thicknesses of crosslinked PCL have been coated on several different hydrophilic substrates, including paper, MaterBi (regsign), and PCL/starch composites. The hydrophobicity of the coating has been measured by following the weight gain of the coated samples upon exposure to water and a high relative humidity for various lengths of time. Results show that a coating as thin as 10 {mu}m reduces water absorption of paper by a factor of five, and thicker coatings (0.25 mm) by more than two orders of magnitude.

  3. Analysis of Toxoplasma gondii proteins after Triton X-114 solubilization and hydrophobic chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Simone, S G; Guedes, H C; Bendet, I

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of the surface proteins of Toxoplasma gondii radiodinated were studied using the phase separation technique and ability of binding in the phenyl-Sepharose column. Eight polypeptides with Mr 22 to 180 distributed exclusively in the detergent rich-phase, while six polypeptides with mol. wt. 15,000 to 76,000 distributed exclusively in the detergent poor-phase. Two polypeptides with 15,000 and 70,000 distributed in both phase. All the polypeptides present in the detergent rich-phase binding in the phenyl-Sepharose column, and can be isolated in two peak according with their relative hydrophobicities. Two polypeptides hydrophobic with Mr 60 and 66 recognized by human serum were isolated by the association of the two technique. Our result showed that the surface proteins of T. gondii present different degrees of hydrophobicity and that the use of hydrophobic interaction chromatography after Triton X-114 extraction may be an important isolation method of membrane proteins.

  4. Presence of electrolyte promotes wetting and hydrophobic gating in nanopores with residual surface charges.

    PubMed

    Innes, Laura; Gutierrez, Diego; Mann, William; Buchsbaum, Steven F; Siwy, Zuzanna S

    2015-07-21

    Hydrophobic nanopores provide a model system to study hydrophobic interactions at the nanoscale. Such nanopores could also function as a valve since they halt the transport of water and all dissolved species. It has recently been found that a hydrophobic pore can become wetted i.e. filled with condensed water or an aqueous solution of salt when a sufficiently high electric field is applied across the membrane. The wetting process is reversible thus when the voltage is lowered or switched off, the pore comes back to a closed state due to water evaporation in the pore. In this manuscript we present experimental studies on how the switching between conducting and non-conducting states can be regulated by the electrolyte concentration. Transport properties of single nanopores modified with alkyl chains of different lengths were recorded in salt concentrations between 10 mM and 1 M KCl. Nanopores modified with propyl chains exhibited gating in 10 mM KCl and were open for ionic transport for all voltages at higher salt concentrations. Nanopores modified with decyl chains did not conduct current in 10 mM and exhibited repeatable hydrophobic gating in 100 mM and 1 M KCl. The results are explained in the context of Maxwell stress in confined geometry with local surface charges, which change the shape of the water-vapor interface and promote wetting. PMID:25669872

  5. Membrane species mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shu-Kai; Huang, Ling-Ting; Chao, Ling

    2016-08-17

    Processing and managing cell membrane proteins for characterization while maintaining their intact structure is challenging. Hydrodynamic flow has been used to transport membrane species in supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) where the hydrophobic cores of the membrane species can be protected during processing. However, the forced convection mechanism of species embedded in lipid bilayers is still unclear. Developing a controlled SLB platform with a practical model to predict the membrane species mobility in the platform under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is imperative to ensure the practical applicability of SLBs in processing and managing membrane species with various geometrical properties. The mobility of membrane species is affected by the driving force from the aqueous environment in addition to the frictions from the lipid bilayer, in which both lipid leaflets may exhibit different speeds relative to that of the moving species. In this study, we developed a model, based on the applied driving force and the possible frictional resistances that the membrane species encounter, to predict how the mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is influenced by the sizes of the species' hydrophilic portion in the aqueous environment and the hydrophobic portion embedded in the membrane. In addition, we used a microfluidic device for controlling the flow to arrange the lipid membrane and the tested membrane species in the desirable locations in order to obtain a SLB platform which can provide clear mobility responses of the species without disturbance from the species dispersion effect. The model predictions were consistent with the experimental observations, with the sliding friction coefficient between the upper leaflet and the hydrophilic portion of the species as the only regressed parameter. The result suggests that not only the lateral drag frictions from the lipid layers but also the sliding frictions between the species and the lipid layer planes

  6. Complex Volume Grid Generation Through the Use of Grid Reusability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a set of surface and volume grid generation techniques which reuse existing surface and volume grids. These methods use combinations of data manipulations to reduce grid generation time, improve grid characteristics, and increase the capabilities of existing domain discretization software. The manipulation techniques utilize physical and computational domains to produce basis function on which to operate and modify grid character and smooth grids using Trans-Finite Interpolation, a vector interpolation method and parametric re-mapping technique. With these new techniques, inviscid grids can be converted to viscous grids, multiple zone grid adaption can be performed to improve CFD solver efficiency, and topological changes to improve modeling of flow fields can be done simply and quickly. Examples of these capabilities are illustrated as applied to various configurations.

  7. Time-resolved molecular transport across living cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jia; Eckenrode, Heather M; Dounce, Susan M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that the nonlinear optical phenomenon known as second-harmonic generation can be used for label-free, time-resolved study of the transport of molecules through living cell membranes. The adsorption and transport of a 300-Da molecular-mass hydrophobic ion at the Escherichia coli membrane is observed. Remarkably, at low ion concentrations, the second-harmonic generation technique clearly exposes a multistep molecular transport process: Transport of the molecular ion across the outer and cytoplasmic membranes of the Gram-negative bacteria is recorded, in sequence, in time. Fitting of the data to a multiprocess kinematic model reveals that the transport of this hydrophobic ion through the outer membrane is much faster than through the cytoplasmic membrane, likely reflecting the effectiveness of ion transport porins. The observations illustrate an experimental means for studying the interactions of small molecules with cell membranes.

  8. Diameter-dependent hydrophobicity in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyakuno, Haruka; Fukasawa, Mamoru; Ichimura, Ryota; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Nakai, Yusuke; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Saito, Takeshi; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a good model system that provides atomically smooth nanocavities. It has been reported that water-SWCNTs exhibit hydrophobicity depending on the temperature T and the SWCNT diameter D. SWCNTs adsorb water molecules spontaneously in their cylindrical pores around room temperature, whereas they exhibit a hydrophilic-hydrophobic transition or wet-dry transition (WDT) at a critical temperature Twd ≈ 220-230 K and above a critical diameter Dc ≈ 1.4-1.6 nm. However, details of the WDT phenomenon and its mechanism remain unknown. Here, we report a systematic experimental study involving X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that water molecules inside thick SWCNTs (D > Dc) evaporate and condense into ice Ih outside the SWCNTs at Twd upon cooling, and the ice Ih evaporates and condenses inside the SWCNTs upon heating. On the other hand, residual water trapped inside the SWCNTs below Twd freezes. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that upon lowering T, the hydrophobicity of thick SWCNTs increases without any structural transition, while the water inside thin SWCNTs (D < Dc) exhibits a structural transition, forming an ordered ice. This ice has a well-developed hydrogen bonding network adapting to the cylindrical pores of the SWCNTs. Thus, the unusual diameter dependence of the WDT is attributed to the adaptability of the structure of water to the pore dimension and shape.

  9. Nonflammable, Hydrophobic Aerogel Composites for Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redouane, Begag

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel composites that are both nonflammable and hydrophobic have been developed for use as lightweight thermal- insulation materials for cryogenic systems. Aerogels are well known in the industry for their effectiveness as thermal insulators under cryogenic conditions, but the treatments used heretofore to render them hydrophobic also make them flammable. Nonflammability would make it safer to use aerogel insulation, especially in oxygen-rich environments and on cryogenic systems that contain liquid oxygen. A composite of this type is a silica aerogel reinforced with fibers. In comparison with unreinforced aerogels, the aerogel composite is about ten times as stiff and strong, better able to withstand handling, and more amenable to machining to required shapes. The composite can be made hydrophobic and nonflammable by appropriate design of a sol-gel process used to synthesize the aerogel component. In addition to very low thermal conductivity needed for insulation, aerogel composites of this type have been found to exhibit high resistance to moisture and nonflammability in oxygen-rich atmospheres: Samples floating on water for months gained no weight and showed no signs of deterioration. Samples were found to be nonflammable, even in pure oxygen at atmospheric pressure [14.7 psia (0.10 MPa)

  10. Cellobiohydrolase Hydrolyzes Crystalline Cellulose on Hydrophobic Faces*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-San; Baker, John O.; Zeng, Yining; Himmel, Michael E.; Haas, Thomas; Ding, Shi-You

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradation of plant biomass is a slow process in nature, and hydrolysis of cellulose is also widely considered to be a rate-limiting step in the proposed industrial process of converting lignocellulosic materials to biofuels. It is generally known that a team of enzymes including endo- and exocellulases as well as cellobiases are required to act synergistically to hydrolyze cellulose to glucose. The detailed molecular mechanisms of these enzymes have yet to be convincingly elucidated. In this report, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to image in real-time the structural changes in Valonia cellulose crystals acted upon by the exocellulase cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) from Trichoderma reesei. Under AFM, single enzyme molecules could be observed binding only to one face of the cellulose crystal, apparently the hydrophobic face. The surface roughness of cellulose began increasing after adding CBH I, and the overall size of cellulose crystals decreased during an 11-h period. Interestingly, this size reduction apparently occurred only in the width of the crystal, whereas the height remained relatively constant. In addition, the measured cross-section shape of cellulose crystal changed from asymmetric to nearly symmetric. These observed changes brought about by CBH I action may constitute the first direct visualization supporting the idea that the exocellulase selectively hydrolyzes the hydrophobic faces of cellulose. The limited accessibility of the hydrophobic faces in native cellulose may contribute significantly to the rate-limiting slowness of cellulose hydrolysis. PMID:21282110

  11. Effect of hydrophobic environments on the hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point of water.

    PubMed

    Strekalova, Elena G; Corradini, Dario; Mazza, Marco G; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Gallo, Paola; Franzese, Giancarlo; Stanley, H Eugene

    2012-01-01

    The complex behavior of liquid water, along with its anomalies and their crucial role in the existence of life, continue to attract the attention of researchers. The anomalous behavior of water is more pronounced at subfreezing temperatures and numerous theoretical and experimental studies are directed towards developing a coherent thermodynamic and dynamic framework for understanding supercooled water. The existence of a liquid-liquid critical point in the deep supercooled region has been related to the anomalous behavior of water. However, the experimental study of supercooled water at very low temperatures is hampered by the homogeneous nucleation of the crystal. Recently, water confined in nanoscopic structures or in solutions has attracted interest because nucleation can be delayed. These systems have a tremendous relevance also for current biological advances; e.g., supercooled water is often confined in cell membranes and acts as a solvent for biological molecules. In particular, considerable attention has been recently devoted to understanding hydrophobic interactions or the behavior of water in the presence of apolar interfaces due to their fundamental role in self-assembly of micelles, membrane formation and protein folding. This article reviews and compares two very recent computational works aimed at elucidating the changes in the thermodynamic behavior in the supercooled region and the liquid-liquid critical point phenomenon for water in contact with hydrophobic environments. The results are also compared to previous reports for water in hydrophobic environments. PMID:23277673

  12. An Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method by Grid Subdivision, Local Remeshing, and Grid Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    1999-01-01

    An unstructured grid adaptation technique has been developed and successfully applied to several three dimensional inviscid flow test cases. The approach is based on a combination of grid subdivision, local remeshing, and grid movement. For solution adaptive grids, the surface triangulation is locally refined by grid subdivision, and the tetrahedral grid in the field is partially remeshed at locations of dominant flow features. A grid redistribution strategy is employed for geometric adaptation of volume grids to moving or deforming surfaces. The method is automatic and fast and is designed for modular coupling with different solvers. Several steady state test cases with different inviscid flow features were tested for grid/solution adaptation. In all cases, the dominant flow features, such as shocks and vortices, were accurately and efficiently predicted with the present approach. A new and robust method of moving tetrahedral "viscous" grids is also presented and demonstrated on a three-dimensional example.

  13. Cobra cardiotoxins: membrane interactions and pharmacological potential.

    PubMed

    Dubovskii, P V; Konshina, A G; Efremov, R G

    2014-01-01

    Natural polycationic membrane-active peptides typically lack disulfide bonds and exhibit fusion, cell-penetrating, antimicrobial activities. They are mostly unordered in solution, but adopt a helical structure, when bound to phospholipid membranes. Structurally different are cardiotoxins (or cytotoxins, CTs) from cobra venom. They are fully β- structured molecules, characterized by the three-finger fold (TFF). Affinity of CTs to lipid bilayer was shown to depend on amino acid sequence in the tips of the three loops. In the present review, CT-membrane interactions are analyzed through the prism of data on binding of the toxins to phospholipid liposomes and detergent micelles, as well as their structural and computational studies in membrane mimicking environments. We assess different hydrophobicity scales to compare membrane partitioning of various CTs and their membrane effects. A comparison of hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties of CTs and linear polycationic peptides provides a key to their biological activity and creates a fundamental basis for rational design of new membrane-interacting compounds, including new promising drugs. For instance, from the viewpoint of the data obtained on model lipid membranes, cytotoxic activity of CTs against cancer cells is discussed.

  14. NREL Smart Grid Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Hambrick, J.

    2012-01-01

    Although implementing Smart Grid projects at the distribution level provides many advantages and opportunities for advanced operation and control, a number of significant challenges must be overcome to maintain the high level of safety and reliability that the modern grid must provide. For example, while distributed generation (DG) promises to provide opportunities to increase reliability and efficiency and may provide grid support services such as volt/var control, the presence of DG can impact distribution operation and protection schemes. Additionally, the intermittent nature of many DG energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) can present a number of challenges to voltage regulation, etc. This presentation provides an overview a number of Smart Grid projects being performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) along with utility, industry, and academic partners. These projects include modeling and analysis of high penetration PV scenarios (with and without energy storage), development and testing of interconnection and microgrid equipment, as well as the development and implementation of advanced instrumentation and data acquisition used to analyze the impacts of intermittent renewable resources. Additionally, standards development associated with DG interconnection and analysis as well as Smart Grid interoperability will be discussed.

  15. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  16. Hydrophobic pillared square grids for selective removal of CO2 from simulated flue gas.

    PubMed

    Elsaidi, Sameh K; Mohamed, Mona H; Schaef, Herbert T; Kumar, Amrit; Lusi, Matteo; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Space, Brian; Xu, Wenqian; Halder, Gregory J; Liu, Jun; Zaworotko, Michael J; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2015-11-01

    Capture of CO2 from flue gas is considered to be a feasible approach to mitigate the effects of anthropogenic emission of CO2. Herein we report that an isostructural family of metal organic materials (MOMs) of general formula [M(linker)2(pillar)], linker = pyrazine, pillar = hexaflourosilicate and M = Zn, Cu, Ni and Co exhibits highly selective removal of CO2 from dry and wet simulated flue gas. Two members of the family, M = Ni and Co, SIFSIX-3-Ni and SIFSIX-3-Co, respectively, are reported for the first time and compared with the previously reported Zn and Cu analogs.

  17. Membrane Protein Insertion at the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Sichen; Hegde, Ramanujan S.

    2014-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins of the cell surface and most intracellular compartments of eukaryotic cells are assembled at the endoplasmic reticulum. Two highly conserved and parallel pathways mediate membrane protein targeting to and insertion into this organelle. The classical cotranslational pathway, utilized by most membrane proteins, involves targeting by the signal recognition particle followed by insertion via the Sec61 translocon. A more specialized posttranslational pathway, employed by many tail-anchored membrane proteins, is composed of entirely different factors centered around a cytosolic ATPase termed TRC40 or Get3. Both of these pathways overcome the same biophysical challenges of ferrying hydrophobic cargo through an aqueous milieu, selectively delivering it to one among several intracellular membranes and asymmetrically integrating its transmembrane domain(s) into the lipid bilayer. Here, we review the conceptual and mechanistic themes underlying these core membrane protein insertion pathways, the complexities that challenge our understanding, and future directions to over-come these obstacles. PMID:21801011

  18. Membrane proteins: always an insoluble problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Andrea E.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins play crucial roles in cellular processes and are often important pharmacological drug targets. The hydrophobic properties of these proteins make full structural and functional characterization challenging because of the need to use detergents or other solubilizing agents when extracting them from their native lipid membranes. To aid membrane protein research, new methodologies are required to allow these proteins to be expressed and purified cheaply, easily, in high yield and to provide water soluble proteins for subsequent study. This mini review focuses on the relatively new area of water soluble membrane proteins and in particular two innovative approaches: the redesign of membrane proteins to yield water soluble variants and how adding solubilizing fusion proteins can help to overcome these challenges. This review also looks at naturally occurring membrane proteins, which are able to exist as stable, functional, water soluble assemblies with no alteration to their native sequence. PMID:27284043

  19. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  20. Fusion Data Grid Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shasharina, Svetlana; Wang, Nanbor

    2004-11-01

    Simulations and experiments in the fusion and plasma physics community generate large datasets at remote sites. Visualization and analysis of these datasets are difficult because of the incompatibility among the various data formats adopted by simulation, experiments, and analysis tools, and the large sizes of analyzed data. Grids and Web Services technologies are capable of providing solutions for such heterogeneous settings, but need to be customized to the field-specific needs and merged with distributed technologies currently used by the community. This paper describes how we are addressing these issues in the Fusion Grid Service under development. We also present performance results of relevant data transfer mechanisms including binary SOAP, DIME, GridFTP and MDSplus and CORBA. We will describe the status of data converters (between HDF5 and MDSplus data types), developed in collaboration with MIT (J. Stillerman). Finally, we will analyze bottlenecks of MDSplus data transfer mechanism (work performed in collaboration with General Atomics (D. Schissel and M. Qian).

  1. Information Power Grid Posters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi

    2003-01-01

    This document is a summary of the accomplishments of the Information Power Grid (IPG). Grids are an emerging technology that provide seamless and uniform access to the geographically dispersed, computational, data storage, networking, instruments, and software resources needed for solving large-scale scientific and engineering problems. The goal of the NASA IPG is to use NASA's remotely located computing and data system resources to build distributed systems that can address problems that are too large or complex for a single site. The accomplishments outlined in this poster presentation are: access to distributed data, IPG heterogeneous computing, integration of large-scale computing node into distributed environment, remote access to high data rate instruments,and exploratory grid environment.

  2. Enhanced oil recovery process using a hydrophobic associative composition containing a hydrophilic/hydrophobic polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Evani, S.

    1989-03-21

    An enhanced oil recovery process is described, which comprises forcing an aqueous flooding medium from an injection well through a subterranean formation toward a producing well wherein the flooding medium contains a mobility control agent which is soluble in an aqueous flooding medium. The agent consists of a hydrophilic/hydrophobic polymer having hydrophobic moieties and a water-dispersible, nonionic surfactant having hydrophobic groups that are capable of associating with the hydrophobic moieties of the polymer wherein the proportion of the polymer and the surfactant is such that, at ambient conditions, water containing 0.5 weight percent of the agent has a viscosity at least twice the viscosity of water. The agent is prepared by carrying out the polymerization to form the polymer in the presence of the nonionic surfactant, the ratio of the surfactant to the polymer in the agent being sufficient to provide a viscosity at least twice that of an aqueous solution containing only the polymer, the hydrophobic polymer being a copolymer of a hydrophilic/water-soluble monomer and a water-insoluble monomer selected from the group consisting of higher alkyl ester of ..cap alpha..,..beta..-ethylenically unsaturated carboxylic acids wherein alkyl has from 8 to 20 carbons, alkylaryl esters of ethylenically unsaturated carboxylic acids, N-alkylethylenically unsaturated amides wherein alkyl has from 8 to 20 carbon atoms; vinyl alkylates wherein alkyl has at least 8 carbons and ar-alkyl styrenes wherein alkyl has at least 4 carbons.

  3. GridPV Toolbox

    2014-07-15

    Matlab Toolbox for simulating the impact of solar energy on the distribution grid. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving GridPV Toolbox information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feedermore » on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions.« less

  4. GridPV Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Robert; Quiroz, Jimmy; Grijalva, Santiago; Reno, Matthew; Coogan, Kyle

    2014-07-15

    Matlab Toolbox for simulating the impact of solar energy on the distribution grid. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving GridPV Toolbox information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feeder on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions.

  5. Comparison of the removal of hydrophobic trace organic contaminants by forward osmosis and reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Nghiem, Long D; Price, William E; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-05-15

    We compared the rejection behaviours of three hydrophobic trace organic contaminants, bisphenol A, triclosan and diclofenac, in forward osmosis (FO) and reverse osmosis (RO). Using erythritol, xylose and glucose as inert reference organic solutes and the membrane pore transport model, the mean effective pore size of a commercial cellulose-based FO membrane was estimated to be 0.74 nm. When NaCl was used as the draw solute, at the same water permeate flux of 5.4 L/m(2) h (or 1.5 μm/s), the adsorption of all three compounds to the membrane in the FO mode was consistently lower than that in the RO mode. Rejection of bisphenol A and diclofenac were higher in the FO mode compared to that in the RO mode. Because the molecular width of triclosan was larger than the estimated mean effective membrane pore size, triclosan was completely rejected by the membrane and negligent difference between the FO and RO modes could be observed. The difference in the separation behaviour of these hydrophobic trace organics in the FO (using NaCl the draw solute) and RO modes could be explained by the phenomenon of retarded forward diffusion of solutes. The reverse salt flux of NaCl hinders the pore diffusion and subsequent adsorption of the trace organic compounds within the membrane. The retarded forward diffusion effect was not observed when MgSO(4) and glucose were used as the draw solutes. The reverse flux of both MgSO(4) and glucose was negligible and thus both adsorption and rejection of BPA in the FO mode were identical to those in the RO mode.

  6. Ambidextrous binding of cell and membrane bilayers by soluble matrix metalloproteinase-12.

    PubMed

    Koppisetti, Rama K; Fulcher, Yan G; Jurkevich, Alexander; Prior, Stephen H; Xu, Jia; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Van Doren, Steven R

    2014-11-21

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) regulate tissue remodelling, inflammation and disease progression. Some soluble MMPs are inexplicably active near cell surfaces. Here we demonstrate the binding of MMP-12 directly to bilayers and cellular membranes using paramagnetic NMR and fluorescence. Opposing sides of the catalytic domain engage spin-labelled membrane mimics. Loops project from the β-sheet interface to contact the phospholipid bilayer with basic and hydrophobic residues. The distal membrane interface comprises loops on the other side of the catalytic cleft. Both interfaces mediate MMP-12 association with vesicles and cell membranes. MMP-12 binds plasma membranes and is internalized to hydrophobic perinuclear features, the nuclear membrane and inside the nucleus within minutes. While binding of TIMP-2 to MMP-12 hinders membrane interactions beside the active site, TIMP-2-inhibited MMP-12 binds vesicles and cells, suggesting compensatory rotation of its membrane approaches. MMP-12 association with diverse cell membranes may target its activities to modulate innate immune responses and inflammation.

  7. Essential Grid Workflow Monitoring Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, Daniel K.; Jackson, Keith R.; Konerding, David E.; Lee,Jason R.; Tierney, Brian L.

    2005-07-01

    Troubleshooting Grid workflows is difficult. A typicalworkflow involves a large number of components networks, middleware,hosts, etc. that can fail. Even when monitoring data from all thesecomponents is accessible, it is hard to tell whether failures andanomalies in these components are related toa given workflow. For theGrid to be truly usable, much of this uncertainty must be elim- inated.We propose two new Grid monitoring elements, Grid workflow identifiersand consistent component lifecycle events, that will make Gridtroubleshooting easier, and thus make Grids more usable, by simplifyingthe correlation of Grid monitoring data with a particular Gridworkflow.

  8. Distributed Accounting on the Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thigpen, William; Hacker, Thomas J.; McGinnis, Laura F.; Athey, Brian D.

    2001-01-01

    By the late 1990s, the Internet was adequately equipped to move vast amounts of data between HPC (High Performance Computing) systems, and efforts were initiated to link together the national infrastructure of high performance computational and data storage resources together into a general computational utility 'grid', analogous to the national electrical power grid infrastructure. The purpose of the Computational grid is to provide dependable, consistent, pervasive, and inexpensive access to computational resources for the computing community in the form of a computing utility. This paper presents a fully distributed view of Grid usage accounting and a methodology for allocating Grid computational resources for use on a Grid computing system.

  9. Oriented single directional insertion of nanochannel of bacteriophage SPP1 DNA packaging motor into lipid bilayer via polar hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Ji, Zhouxiang; Wang, Shaoying; Haque, Farzin; Guo, Peixuan

    2016-10-01

    Insertion of biological nanopore into artificial membrane is of fundamental importance in nanotechnology. Many applications require control and knowledge of channel orientation. In this work, the insertion orientation of the bacteriophage SPP1 and phi29 DNA packaging motors into lipid membranes was investigated. Single molecule electrophysiological assays and Ni-NTA-nanogold binding assays revealed that both SPP1 and phi29 motor channels exhibited a one-way traffic property for TAT peptide translocation from N- to C-termini of the protein channels. SPP1 motor channels preferentially inserts into liposomes with their C-terminal wider region facing inward. Changing the hydrophobicity of the N- or C-termini of phi29 connector alters the insertion orientation, suggesting that the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity of the termini of the protein channel governs the orientation of the insertion into lipid membrane. It is proposed that the specificity in motor channel orientation is a result of the hydrophilic/hydrophobic interaction at the air/water interface when the protein channels are incorporating into liposome membranes. PMID:27529454

  10. Membrane-Protein Interactions in a Generic Coarse-Grained Model for Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    West, Beate; Brown, Frank L.H.; Schmid, Friederike

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We study membrane-protein interactions and membrane-mediated protein-protein interactions by Monte Carlo simulations of a generic coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers with cylindrical hydrophobic inclusions. The strength of the hydrophobic force and the hydrophobic thickness of the proteins are systematically varied. The results are compared with analytical predictions of two popular analytical theories: The Landau-de Gennes theory and the elastic theory. The elastic theory provides an excellent description of the fluctuation spectra of pure membranes and successfully reproduces the deformation profiles of membranes around single proteins. However, its prediction for the potential of mean force between proteins is not compatible with the simulation data for large distances. The simulations show that the lipid-mediated interactions are governed by five competing factors: direct interactions; lipid-induced depletion interactions; lipid bridging; lipid packing; and a smooth long-range contribution. The mechanisms leading to hydrophobic mismatch interactions are critically analyzed. PMID:18835907

  11. ADSORPTION AND MEMBRANE SEPARATION MEASUREMENTS WITH MIXTURES OF ETHANOL, ACETIC ACID, AND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomass fermentation produces ethanol and other renewable biofuels. Pervaporation using hydrophobic membranes is potentially a cost-effective means of removing biofuels from fermentation broths for small- to medium-scale applications. Silicalite-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)...

  12. Enabling Campus Grids with Open Science Grid Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitzel, Derek; Bockelman, Brian; Fraser, Dan; Pordes, Ruth; Swanson, David

    2011-12-01

    The Open Science Grid is a recognized key component of the US national cyber-infrastructure enabling scientific discovery through advanced high throughput computing. The principles and techniques that underlie the Open Science Grid can also be applied to Campus Grids since many of the requirements are the same, even if the implementation technologies differ. We find five requirements for a campus grid: trust relationships, job submission, resource independence, accounting, and data management. The Holland Computing Center's campus grid at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was designed to fulfill the requirements of a campus grid. A bridging daemon was designed to bring non-Condor clusters into a grid managed by Condor. Condor features which make it possible to bridge Condor sites into a multi-campus grid have been exploited at the Holland Computing Center as well.

  13. Lipid-membrane modified electrodes to study quinone oxidoreductases

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Sophie A.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Quinone oxidoreductases are a class of membrane enzymes that catalyse the oxidation or reduction of membrane-bound quinols/quinones. The conversion of quinone/quinol by these enzymes is difficult to study due to the hydrophobic nature of the enzymes and their substrates. We describe some biochemical properties of quinones and quinone oxidoreductases and then look in more detail at two model membranes that can be used to study quinone oxidoreductases in a native-like membrane environment with their native lipophylic quinone substrates. The results obtained with these model membranes are compared to classical enzyme assays that use water-soluble quinone analogues. PMID:19614580

  14. The Art of Grid Fields: Geometry of Neuronal Time

    PubMed Central

    Shilnikov, Andrey L.; Maurer, Andrew Porter

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of grid cells in the entorhinal cortex has both elucidated our understanding of spatial representations in the brain, and germinated a large number of theoretical models regarding the mechanisms of these cells’ striking spatial firing characteristics. These models cross multiple neurobiological levels that include intrinsic membrane resonance, dendritic integration, after hyperpolarization characteristics and attractor dynamics. Despite the breadth of the models, to our knowledge, parallels can be drawn between grid fields and other temporal dynamics observed in nature, much of which was described by Art Winfree and colleagues long before the initial description of grid fields. Using theoretical and mathematical investigations of oscillators, in a wide array of mediums far from the neurobiology of grid cells, Art Winfree has provided a substantial amount of research with significant and profound similarities. These theories provide specific inferences into the biological mechanisms and extraordinary resemblances across phenomenon. Therefore, this manuscript provides a novel interpretation on the phenomenon of grid fields, from the perspective of coupled oscillators, postulating that grid fields are the spatial representation of phase resetting curves in the brain. In contrast to prior models of gird cells, the current manuscript provides a sketch by which a small network of neurons, each with oscillatory components can operate to form grid cells, perhaps providing a unique hybrid between the competing attractor neural network and oscillatory interference models. The intention of this new interpretation of the data is to encourage novel testable hypotheses. PMID:27013981

  15. Unlocking the smart grid

    SciTech Connect

    Rokach, Joshua Z.

    2010-10-15

    The country has progressed in a relatively short time from rotary dial phones to computers, cell phones, and iPads. With proper planning and orderly policy implementation, the same will happen with the Smart Grid. Here are some suggestions on how to proceed. (author)

  16. APEC Smart Grid Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Bloyd, Cary N.

    2012-03-01

    This brief paper describes the activities of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Smart Grid Initiative (ASGI) which is being led by the U.S. and developed by the APEC Energy Working Group. In the paper, I describe the origin of the initiative and briefly mention the four major elements of the initiative along with existing APEC projects which support it.

  17. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    SciTech Connect

    Rabari, Anil; Fadipe, Oloruntomi

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  18. Membrane tension and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Michael M; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2015-08-01

    Diverse cell biological processes that involve shaping and remodeling of cell membranes are regulated by membrane lateral tension. Here we focus on the role of tension in driving membrane fusion. We discuss the physics of membrane tension, forces that can generate the tension in plasma membrane of a cell, and the hypothesis that tension powers expansion of membrane fusion pores in late stages of cell-to-cell and exocytotic fusion. We propose that fusion pore expansion can require unusually large membrane tensions or, alternatively, low line tensions of the pore resulting from accumulation in the pore rim of membrane-bending proteins. Increase of the inter-membrane distance facilitates the reaction. PMID:26282924

  19. The surveillance error grid.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C; Lias, Courtney; Vigersky, Robert; Clarke, William; Parkes, Joan Lee; Sacks, David B; Kirkman, M Sue; Kovatchev, Boris

    2014-07-01

    Currently used error grids for assessing clinical accuracy of blood glucose monitors are based on out-of-date medical practices. Error grids have not been widely embraced by regulatory agencies for clearance of monitors, but this type of tool could be useful for surveillance of the performance of cleared products. Diabetes Technology Society together with representatives from the Food and Drug Administration, the American Diabetes Association, the Endocrine Society, and the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation, and representatives of academia, industry, and government, have developed a new error grid, called the surveillance error grid (SEG) as a tool to assess the degree of clinical risk from inaccurate blood glucose (BG) monitors. A total of 206 diabetes clinicians were surveyed about the clinical risk of errors of measured BG levels by a monitor. The impact of such errors on 4 patient scenarios was surveyed. Each monitor/reference data pair was scored and color-coded on a graph per its average risk rating. Using modeled data representative of the accuracy of contemporary meters, the relationships between clinical risk and monitor error were calculated for the Clarke error grid (CEG), Parkes error grid (PEG), and SEG. SEG action boundaries were consistent across scenarios, regardless of whether the patient was type 1 or type 2 or using insulin or not. No significant differences were noted between responses of adult/pediatric or 4 types of clinicians. Although small specific differences in risk boundaries between US and non-US clinicians were noted, the panel felt they did not justify separate grids for these 2 types of clinicians. The data points of the SEG were classified in 15 zones according to their assigned level of risk, which allowed for comparisons with the classic CEG and PEG. Modeled glucose monitor data with realistic self-monitoring of blood glucose errors derived from meter testing experiments plotted on the SEG when compared to

  20. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  1. Membrane stabilization of biodegradable polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Katz, Joshua S; Levine, Dalia H; Davis, Kevin P; Bates, Frank S; Hammer, Daniel A; Burdick, Jason A

    2009-04-21

    Biodegradable polymersomes are promising vehicles for a range of applications. Their stabilization would improve many properties, including the retention and controlled release of polymersome contents, yet this has not been previously accomplished. Here, we present the first example of stabilizing fully biodegradable polymersomes through acrylation of the hydrophobic terminal end of polymersome-forming poly(caprolactone-b-ethylene glycol). Exposure of the resulting polymersomes loaded with a hydrophobic photoinitiator to ultraviolet light polymerized the acrylates, without affecting polymersome morphology or cell cytotoxicity. These stabilized polymersomes were more resistant to surfactant disruption and degradation. As an example of stabilized polymersome utility, the unintended release of doxorubicin (DOX) due to leakage from polymersomes decreased with membrane stabilization and slower sustained release was observed. Finally, DOX-loaded polymersomes retained their cytotoxicity following stabilization.

  2. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  3. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-11-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  4. Hydrophobic polyoxins are resistant to intracellular degradation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H A; Shenbagamurthi, P; Naider, F; Kundu, B; Becker, J M

    1986-01-01

    Two novel polyoxins, N-epsilon-(octanoyl)-lysyl-uracil polyoxin C (Oct-Lys-UPOC) and N-gamma-(octyl)-glutaminyluracil polyoxin C (Oct-Gln-UPOC), were synthesized by reacting uracil polyoxin C with the appropriate amino acid p-nitrophenyl ester. Oct-Lys-UPOC and Oct-Gln-UPOC were strong inhibitors (Kis = 1.7 X 10(-6)M) of chitin synthetase from Candida albicans membrane preparations. In a permeabilized-cell assay, Oct-Gln-UPOC had a 10-fold-lower inhibitory activity toward chitin synthetase than did the Oct-Lys-UPOC analog. Both compounds were resistant to hydrolysis by a cell extract of C. albicans H317; however, Oct-Gln-UPOC was hydrolyzed with a half-life of 23 min by a permeabilized-cell preparation. Oct-Lys-UPOC was resistant to hydrolysis by permeabilized cells. Oct-Gln-UPOC and Oct-Lys-UPOC did not compete with the transport of peptides or uridine into the cell. At concentrations up to 2 mM these two new polyoxins were ineffective in the inhibition of cell growth or reduction of cell viability, but they induced aberrant morphologies in C. albicans at a concentration of 0.25 mM. These data suggest that polyoxins containing hydrophobic amino acids retain strong chitin synthetase inhibitory activity and are resistant to cellular hydrolysis. They provide the first example of effective synthetic chitin synthetase inhibitors which are stable inside C. albicans. PMID:3524423

  5. Determining drug release rates of hydrophobic compounds from nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    D'Addio, Suzanne M; Bukari, Abdallah A; Dawoud, Mohammed; Bunjes, Heike; Rinaldi, Carlos; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2016-07-28

    Obtaining meaningful drug release profiles for drug formulations is essential prior to in vivo testing and for ensuring consistent quality. The release kinetics of hydrophobic drugs from nanocarriers (NCs) are not well understood because the standard protocols for maintaining sink conditions and sampling are not valid owing to mass transfer and solubility limitations. In this work, a new in vitroassay protocol based on 'lipid sinks' and magnetic separation produces release conditions that mimic the concentrations of lipid membranes and lipoproteins in vivo, facilitates separation, and thus allows determination of intrinsic release rates of drugs from NCs. The assay protocol is validated by (i) determining the magnetic separation efficiency, (ii) demonstrating that sink condition requirements are met, and (iii) accounting for drug by completing a mass balance. NCs of itraconazole and cyclosporine A (CsA) were prepared and the drug release profiles were determined. This release protocol has been used to compare the drug release from a polymer stabilized NC of CsA to a solid drug NP of CsA alone. These data have led to the finding that stabilizing block copolymer layers have a retarding effect on drug release from NCs, reducing the rate of CsA release fourfold compared with the nanoparticle without a polymer coating.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'.

  6. Correlation of charge, hydrophobicity, and structure with antimicrobial activity of S1 and MIRIAM peptides.

    PubMed

    Leptihn, Sebastian; Har, Jia Yi; Wohland, Thorsten; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2010-11-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are key elements of the innate immune system. Many of them interact with membranes of bacteria leading to perturbation of the lipid bilayer and eventually to inactivation of the pathogen. The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has necessitated innovations of new and more powerful classes of antimicrobials. Here we present the in-depth study of an antimicrobial peptide, MIRIAM, derived from Sushi1 (S1), a well-characterized peptide from the horseshoe crab. MIRIAM interacts strongly with negatively charged lipids, forming an α-helical structure. MIRIAM was found to neutralize LPS and kill Gram-negative bacteria with high efficiency, while not releasing LPS. The promising therapeutic potential of MIRIAM is shown by hemolytic assays, which demonstrate that eukaryotic membranes are unaffected at bactericidal concentrations. Nanoparticle-conjugated MIRIAM used in single-molecule fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments showed that MIRIAM targets bacterial membranes to kill bacteria similarly to parental S1. Furthermore, fragments derived from MIRIAM and S1 provided insights on their molecular mechanisms of action, in particular, the relationships of functional motifs comprised by charge, hydrophobicity, and structure within each peptide. We conclude that the combination of charge, hydrophobicity, and length of the peptide is important. A close interaction of amino acids in a single molecule in a carefully balanced ensemble of sequence position and secondary structure is crucial.

  7. Current Grid operation and future role of the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.

    2012-12-01

    Grid-like technologies and approaches became an integral part of HEP experiments. Some other scientific communities also use similar technologies for data-intensive computations. The distinct feature of Grid computing is the ability to federate heterogeneous resources of different ownership into a seamless infrastructure, accessible via a single log-on. Like other infrastructures of similar nature, Grid functioning requires not only technologically sound basis, but also reliable operation procedures, monitoring and accounting. The two aspects, technological and operational, are closely related: weaker is the technology, more burden is on operations, and other way around. As of today, Grid technologies are still evolving: at CERN alone, every LHC experiment uses an own Grid-like system. This inevitably creates a heavy load on operations. Infrastructure maintenance, monitoring and incident response are done on several levels, from local system administrators to large international organisations, involving massive human effort worldwide. The necessity to commit substantial resources is one of the obstacles faced by smaller research communities when moving computing to the Grid. Moreover, most current Grid solutions were developed under significant influence of HEP use cases, and thus need additional effort to adapt them to other applications. Reluctance of many non-HEP researchers to use Grid negatively affects the outlook for national Grid organisations, which strive to provide multi-science services. We started from the situation where Grid organisations were fused with HEP laboratories and national HEP research programmes; we hope to move towards the world where Grid will ultimately reach the status of generic public computing and storage service provider and permanent national and international Grid infrastructures will be established. How far will we be able to advance along this path, depends on us. If no standardisation and convergence efforts will take place

  8. Electrospun superhydrophobic membranes with unique structures for membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yuan; Loh, Chun-Heng; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G

    2014-09-24

    With modest temperature demand, low operating pressure, and high solute rejection, membrane distillation (MD) is an attractive option for desalination, waste treatment, and food and pharmaceutical processing. However, large-scale practical applications of MD are still hindered by the absence of effective membranes with high hydrophobicity, high porosity, and adequate mechanical strength, which are important properties for MD permeation fluxes, stable long-term performance, and effective packing in modules without damage. This study describes novel design strategies for highly robust superhydrophobic dual-layer membranes for MD via electrospinning. One of the newly developed membranes comprises a durable and ultrathin 3-dimensional (3D) superhydrophobic skin and porous nanofibrous support whereas another was fabricated by electrospinning 3D superhydrophobic layers on a nonwoven support. These membranes exhibit superhydrophobicity toward distilled water, salty water, oil-in-water emulsion, and beverages, which enables them to be used not only for desalination but also for other processes. The superhydrophobic dual-layer membrane #3S-N with nanofibrous support has a competitive permeation flux of 24.6 ± 1.2 kg m(-2) h(-1) in MD (feed and permeate temperate were set as 333 and 293 K, respectively) due to the higher porosity of the nanofibrous scaffold. Meanwhile, the membranes with the nonwoven support exhibit greater mechanical strength due to this support combined with better long-term performance because of the thicker 3D superhydrophobic layers. The morphology, pore size, porosity, mechanical properties, and liquid enter pressure of water of these superhydrophobic composite membranes with two different structures are reported and compared with commercial polyvinylidene fluoride membranes. PMID:25147909

  9. Electrospun superhydrophobic membranes with unique structures for membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yuan; Loh, Chun-Heng; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G

    2014-09-24

    With modest temperature demand, low operating pressure, and high solute rejection, membrane distillation (MD) is an attractive option for desalination, waste treatment, and food and pharmaceutical processing. However, large-scale practical applications of MD are still hindered by the absence of effective membranes with high hydrophobicity, high porosity, and adequate mechanical strength, which are important properties for MD permeation fluxes, stable long-term performance, and effective packing in modules without damage. This study describes novel design strategies for highly robust superhydrophobic dual-layer membranes for MD via electrospinning. One of the newly developed membranes comprises a durable and ultrathin 3-dimensional (3D) superhydrophobic skin and porous nanofibrous support whereas another was fabricated by electrospinning 3D superhydrophobic layers on a nonwoven support. These membranes exhibit superhydrophobicity toward distilled water, salty water, oil-in-water emulsion, and beverages, which enables them to be used not only for desalination but also for other processes. The superhydrophobic dual-layer membrane #3S-N with nanofibrous support has a competitive permeation flux of 24.6 ± 1.2 kg m(-2) h(-1) in MD (feed and permeate temperate were set as 333 and 293 K, respectively) due to the higher porosity of the nanofibrous scaffold. Meanwhile, the membranes with the nonwoven support exhibit greater mechanical strength due to this support combined with better long-term performance because of the thicker 3D superhydrophobic layers. The morphology, pore size, porosity, mechanical properties, and liquid enter pressure of water of these superhydrophobic composite membranes with two different structures are reported and compared with commercial polyvinylidene fluoride membranes.

  10. Membrane bending is critical for the stability of voltage sensor segments in the membrane.

    PubMed

    Callenberg, Keith M; Latorraca, Naomi R; Grabe, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The interaction between membrane proteins and the surrounding membrane is becoming increasingly appreciated for its role in regulating protein function, protein localization, and membrane morphology. In particular, recent studies have suggested that membrane deformation is needed to stably accommodate proteins harboring charged amino acids in their transmembrane (TM) region, as it is energetically prohibitive to bury charge in the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. Unfortunately, current computational methods are poorly equipped for describing such deformations, as atomistic simulations are often too short to observe large-scale membrane reorganization and most continuum approaches assume a flat membrane. Previously, we developed a method that overcomes these shortcomings by using elasticity theory to characterize equilibrium membrane distortions in the presence of a TM protein, while using traditional continuum electrostatic and nonpolar energy models to determine the energy of the protein in the membrane. Here, we linked the elastostatics, electrostatics, and nonpolar numeric solvers to permit the calculation of energies for nontrivial membrane deformations. We then coupled this procedure to a robust search algorithm that identifies optimal membrane shapes for a TM protein of arbitrary chemical composition. This advance now permits us to explore a host of biological phenomena that were beyond the scope of our original method. We show that the energy required to embed charged residues in the membrane can be highly nonadditive, and our model provides a simple mechanical explanation for this nonadditivity. Our results also predict that isolated voltage sensor segments do not insert into rigid membranes, but membrane bending dramatically stabilizes these proteins in the bilayer despite their high charge content. Additionally, we use the model to explore hydrophobic mismatch with regard to nonpolar peptides and mechanosensitive channels. Our method is in quantitative

  11. Membrane bending is critical for the stability of voltage sensor segments in the membrane

    PubMed Central

    Callenberg, Keith M.; Latorraca, Naomi R.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between membrane proteins and the surrounding membrane is becoming increasingly appreciated for its role in regulating protein function, protein localization, and membrane morphology. In particular, recent studies have suggested that membrane deformation is needed to stably accommodate proteins harboring charged amino acids in their transmembrane (TM) region, as it is energetically prohibitive to bury charge in the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. Unfortunately, current computational methods are poorly equipped for describing such deformations, as atomistic simulations are often too short to observe large-scale membrane reorganization and most continuum approaches assume a flat membrane. Previously, we developed a method that overcomes these shortcomings by using elasticity theory to characterize equilibrium membrane distortions in the presence of a TM protein, while using traditional continuum electrostatic and nonpolar energy models to determine the energy of the protein in the membrane. Here, we linked the elastostatics, electrostatics, and nonpolar numeric solvers to permit the calculation of energies for nontrivial membrane deformations. We then coupled this procedure to a robust search algorithm that identifies optimal membrane shapes for a TM protein of arbitrary chemical composition. This advance now permits us to explore a host of biological phenomena that were beyond the scope of our original method. We show that the energy required to embed charged residues in the membrane can be highly nonadditive, and our model provides a simple mechanical explanation for this nonadditivity. Our results also predict that isolated voltage sensor segments do not insert into rigid membranes, but membrane bending dramatically stabilizes these proteins in the bilayer despite their high charge content. Additionally, we use the model to explore hydrophobic mismatch with regard to nonpolar peptides and mechanosensitive channels. Our method is in quantitative

  12. Spectral methods on arbitrary grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Gottlieb, David

    1995-01-01

    Stable and spectrally accurate numerical methods are constructed on arbitrary grids for partial differential equations. These new methods are equivalent to conventional spectral methods but do not rely on specific grid distributions. Specifically, we show how to implement Legendre Galerkin, Legendre collocation, and Laguerre Galerkin methodology on arbitrary grids.

  13. Grid Interaction Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Grid Interaction Technical Team (GITT) is to support a transition scenario to large scale grid-connected vehicle charging with transformational technology, proof of concept and information dissemination. The GITT facilitates technical coordination and collaboration between vehicle-grid connectivity and communication activities among U.S. DRIVE government and industry partners.

  14. Ion Engine Grid Gap Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, Gerge C.; Frandina, Michael M.

    2004-01-01

    A simple technique for measuring the grid gap of an ion engine s ion optics during startup and steady-state operation was demonstrated with beam extraction. The grid gap at the center of the ion optics assembly was measured with a long distance microscope that was focused onto an alumina pin that protruded through the center accelerator grid aperture and was mechanically attached to the screen grid. This measurement technique was successfully applied to a 30 cm titanium ion optics assembly mounted onto an NSTAR engineering model ion engine. The grid gap and each grid s movement during startup from room temperature to both full and low power were measured. The grid gaps with and without beam extraction were found to be significantly different. The grid gaps at the ion optics center were both significantly smaller than the cold grid gap and different at the two power levels examined. To avoid issues associated with a small grid gap during thruster startup with titanium ion optics, a simple method was to operate the thruster initially without beam extraction to heat the ion optics. Another possible method is to apply high voltage to the grids prior to igniting the discharge because power deposition to the grids from the plasma is lower with beam extraction than without. Further testing would be required to confirm this approach.

  15. Chemical hydrophobicity and uptake by plant roots.

    PubMed

    Dettenmaier, Erik M; Doucette, William J; Bugbee, Bruce

    2009-01-15

    The transpiration stream concentration factor (TSCF), the ratio between a compound's concentration in the xylem to that in the solution adjacent to the roots, is commonly used to describe the relative ability of an organic compound to be passively transported from root to shoot. Widely cited bell-shaped curves relating TSCFto the octanol/water partition coefficient (log Kow) imply that significant root uptake and transfer into shoot tissues occurs only for compounds falling within an intermediate hydrophobicity range. However, recent laboratory and field data for relatively water soluble compounds such as sulfolane, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and 1,4-dioxane suggest that these relationships are not universally applicable, especiallyfor nonionizable, highly polar, water soluble organics. To re-evaluate the relationship between root uptake and chemical hydrophobicity, TSCFs were measured for 25 organic chemicals ranging in log Kow from -0.8 to 5 using a pressure chamber technique. Using the TSCF values measured in this study, a new empirical relationship between TSCF (0 and 1) and log Kow (-0.8 to 5) is presented that indicates that nonionizable, polar, highly water soluble organic compounds are most likely to be taken up by plant roots and translocated to shoot tissue.

  16. Development of the Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (Contracts AC22-86PC91221 and AC22-90PC90174). The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (1) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (2) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. During the quarter, the Anutech Mark IV surface force apparatus was used to generate surface force-distance data for the mica/dodecylamine hydrochloride system (Task 2.1.1). Work to characterize the hydrophobicity of this system and the mica/DDOA[sup [minus

  17. Development of the selective hydrophobic coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (i) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (ii) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. The technical work program was initiated on July 1, 1992. Force-distance curves were generated for DDOA Br-coated mica surfaces in water and used to calculate hydrophobicity constants and decay lengths for this system; and a new device for the measurement of water contact angles, similar to the Wilhelmy plate balance, has been built 225 kg samples of Pittsburgh No. 8 and Elkhom No. 3 seam coals were obtained; a static mixer test facility for the study of coagula growth was set up and was undergoing shakedown tests at the end of the quarter; a bench-scale lamella thickener was being constructed; and preliminary coagula/ mineral separation tests were being conducted in a bench-scale continuous drum filter.

  18. Gated ion transport through dense carbon nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Funke, Hans H; Falconer, John L; Noble, Richard D

    2010-06-23

    Gated ion diffusion is found widely in hydrophobic biological nanopores, upon changes in ligand binding, temperature, transmembrane voltage, and mechanical stress. Because water is the main media for ion diffusion in these hydrophobic biological pores, ion diffusion behavior through these nanochannels is expected to be influenced significantly when water wettability in hydrophobic biological nanopores is sensitive and changes upon small external changes. Here, we report for the first time that ion diffusion through highly hydrophobic nanopores (approximately 3 nm) showed a gated behavior due to change of water wettability on hydrophobic surface upon small temperature change or ultrasound. Dense carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes with both 3-nm CNTs and 3-nm interstitial pores were prepared by a solvent evaporation process and used as a model system to investigate ion diffusion behavior. Ion diffusion through these membranes exhibited a gated behavior. The ion flux was turned on and off, apparently because the water wettability of CNTs changed. At 298 K, ion diffusion through dense CNT membranes stopped after a few hours, but it dramatically increased when the temperature was increased 20 K or the membrane was subjected to ultrasound. Likewise, water adsorption on dense CNT membranes increased dramatically at a water activity of 0.53 when the temperature increased from 293 to 306 K, indicating capillary condensation. Water adsorption isotherms of dense CNT membranes suggest that the adsorbed water forms a discontinuous phase at 293 K, but it probably forms a continuous layer, probably in the interstitial CNT regions, at higher temperatures. When the ion diffusion channel was opened by a temperature increase or ultrasound, ions diffused through the CNT membranes at a rate similar to bulk diffusion in water. This finding may have implications for using CNT membrane for desalination and water treatment. PMID:20504021

  19. Gated ion transport through dense carbon nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Funke, Hans H; Falconer, John L; Noble, Richard D

    2010-06-23

    Gated ion diffusion is found widely in hydrophobic biological nanopores, upon changes in ligand binding, temperature, transmembrane voltage, and mechanical stress. Because water is the main media for ion diffusion in these hydrophobic biological pores, ion diffusion behavior through these nanochannels is expected to be influenced significantly when water wettability in hydrophobic biological nanopores is sensitive and changes upon small external changes. Here, we report for the first time that ion diffusion through highly hydrophobic nanopores (approximately 3 nm) showed a gated behavior due to change of water wettability on hydrophobic surface upon small temperature change or ultrasound. Dense carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes with both 3-nm CNTs and 3-nm interstitial pores were prepared by a solvent evaporation process and used as a model system to investigate ion diffusion behavior. Ion diffusion through these membranes exhibited a gated behavior. The ion flux was turned on and off, apparently because the water wettability of CNTs changed. At 298 K, ion diffusion through dense CNT membranes stopped after a few hours, but it dramatically increased when the temperature was increased 20 K or the membrane was subjected to ultrasound. Likewise, water adsorption on dense CNT membranes increased dramatically at a water activity of 0.53 when the temperature increased from 293 to 306 K, indicating capillary condensation. Water adsorption isotherms of dense CNT membranes suggest that the adsorbed water forms a discontinuous phase at 293 K, but it probably forms a continuous layer, probably in the interstitial CNT regions, at higher temperatures. When the ion diffusion channel was opened by a temperature increase or ultrasound, ions diffused through the CNT membranes at a rate similar to bulk diffusion in water. This finding may have implications for using CNT membrane for desalination and water treatment.

  20. Membrane association of sucrose synthase: changes during the graviresponse and possible control by protein phosphorylation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) plays an important role in sucrose degradation and occurs both as a soluble and as a membrane-associated enzyme in higher plants. We show that membrane association can vary in vivo in response to gravistimulation, apparently involving SuSy dephosphorylation, and is a reversible process in vitro. Phosphorylation of SuSy has little effect on its activity but decreases its surface hydrophobicity as reported with the fluorescent probe bis-ANS. We postulate that phosphorylation of SuSy (and perhaps other membrane proteins) is involved in the release of the membrane-bound enzyme in part as a result of decreased surface hydrophobicity.

  1. Cloud Computing for the Grid: GridControl: A Software Platform to Support the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-08

    GENI Project: Cornell University is creating a new software platform for grid operators called GridControl that will utilize cloud computing to more efficiently control the grid. In a cloud computing system, there are minimal hardware and software demands on users. The user can tap into a network of computers that is housed elsewhere (the cloud) and the network runs computer applications for the user. The user only needs interface software to access all of the cloud’s data resources, which can be as simple as a web browser. Cloud computing can reduce costs, facilitate innovation through sharing, empower users, and improve the overall reliability of a dispersed system. Cornell’s GridControl will focus on 4 elements: delivering the state of the grid to users quickly and reliably; building networked, scalable grid-control software; tailoring services to emerging smart grid uses; and simulating smart grid behavior under various conditions.

  2. Membrane distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryk, Mikhail T.; Nigmatullin, R. R.

    1994-12-01

    Studies in the field of membrane distillation are analysed. A critical analysis of the theoretical and experimental investigations of membrane distillation is presented. Attention is concentrated on the mechanism of mass transfer and the influence of various external factors on the process characteristics. Questions concerning the creation of modules and apparatus for membrane distillation and aspects of the practical employment of such distillation in order to obtain pure water, for the purification of waste water, and for the concentration of technological solutions in various branches of industry are considered quite fully. The advantages and disadvantages of membrane distillation compared with other membrane methods are analysed. The bibliography includes 97 references.

  3. Fusion protein of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5: nucleotide sequence of mRNA predicts a highly hydrophobic glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R G; Harris, T J; Lamb, R A

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the mRNA coding for the fusion glycoprotein (F) of the paramyxovirus, simian virus 5, has been obtained. There is a single large open reading frame on the mRNA that encodes a protein of 529 amino acids with a molecular weight of 56,531. The proteolytic cleavage/activation site of F, to yield F2 and F1, contains five arginine residues. Six potential glycosylation sites were identified in the protein, two on F2 and four on F1. The deduced amino acid sequence indicates that F is extensively hydrophobic over the length of the polypeptide chain. Three regions are very hydrophobic and could interact directly with membranes: these are the NH2-terminal putative signal peptide, the COOH-terminal putative membrane anchorage domain, and the NH2-terminal region of F1. Images PMID:6093114

  4. Polypeptide vesicles with densely packed multilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Song, Ziyuan; Kim, Hojun; Ba, Xiaochu; Baumgartner, Ryan; Lee, Jung Seok; Tang, Haoyu; Leal, Cecilia; Cheng, Jianjun

    2015-05-28

    Multilamellar membranes are important building blocks for constructing self-assembled structures with improved barrier properties, such as multilamellar lipid vesicles. Polymeric vesicles (polymersomes) have attracted growing interest, but multilamellar polymersomes are much less explored. Here, we report the formation of polypeptide vesicles with unprecedented densely packed multilayer membrane structures with poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(γ-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl)-l-glutamate) (PEG-b-PL), an amphiphilic diblock rod-coil copolymer containing a short PEG block and a short hydrophobic rod-like polypeptide segment. The polypeptide rods undergo smectic ordering with PEG buried between the hydrophobic polypeptide layers. The size of both blocks and the rigidity of the hydrophobic polypeptide block are critical in determining the membrane structures. Increase of the PEG length in PEG-b-PL results in the formation of bilayer sheets, while using random-coil polypeptide block leads to the formation of large compound micelles. UV treatment causes ester bond cleavage of the polypeptide side chain, which induces helix-to-coil transition, change of copolymer amphiphilicity, and eventual disassembly of vesicles. These polypeptide vesicles with unique membrane structures provide a new insight into self-assembly structure control by precisely tuning the composition and conformation of polymeric amphiphiles.

  5. Contacts Between Alcohols in Water Are Random Rather than Hydrophobic.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Blake M; Ben-Amotz, Dor; van der Post, Sietse T; Bakker, Huib J

    2015-02-19

    Given the importance of water-mediated hydrophobic interactions in a wide range of biological and synthetic self-assembly processes, it is remarkable that both the sign and the magnitude of the hydrophobic interactions between simple amphiphiles, such as alcohols, remain unresolved. To address this question, we have performed Raman hydration-shell vibrational spectroscopy and polarization-resolved femtosecond infrared experiments, as well as random mixing and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that there are no more hydrophobic contacts in aqueous solutions of alcohols ranging from methanol to tertiary butyl alcohol than in random mixtures of the same concentration. This implies that the interaction between small hydrophobic groups is weaker than thermal energy fluctuations. Thus, the corresponding water-mediated hydrophobic interaction must be repulsive, with a magnitude sufficient to negate the attractive direct van der Waals interaction between the hydrophobic groups.

  6. Contacts Between Alcohols in Water Are Random Rather than Hydrophobic.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Blake M; Ben-Amotz, Dor; van der Post, Sietse T; Bakker, Huib J

    2015-02-19

    Given the importance of water-mediated hydrophobic interactions in a wide range of biological and synthetic self-assembly processes, it is remarkable that both the sign and the magnitude of the hydrophobic interactions between simple amphiphiles, such as alcohols, remain unresolved. To address this question, we have performed Raman hydration-shell vibrational spectroscopy and polarization-resolved femtosecond infrared experiments, as well as random mixing and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that there are no more hydrophobic contacts in aqueous solutions of alcohols ranging from methanol to tertiary butyl alcohol than in random mixtures of the same concentration. This implies that the interaction between small hydrophobic groups is weaker than thermal energy fluctuations. Thus, the corresponding water-mediated hydrophobic interaction must be repulsive, with a magnitude sufficient to negate the attractive direct van der Waals interaction between the hydrophobic groups. PMID:26262487

  7. Statistical Analyses of Hydrophobic Interactions: A Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Lawrence R; Chaudhari, Mangesh I; Rempe, Susan B

    2016-07-14

    This review focuses on the striking recent progress in solving for hydrophobic interactions between small inert molecules. We discuss several new understandings. First, the inverse temperature phenomenology of hydrophobic interactions, i.e., strengthening of hydrophobic bonds with increasing temperature, is decisively exhibited by hydrophobic interactions between atomic-scale hard sphere solutes in water. Second, inclusion of attractive interactions associated with atomic-size hydrophobic reference cases leads to substantial, nontrivial corrections to reference results for purely repulsive solutes. Hydrophobic bonds are weakened by adding solute dispersion forces to treatment of reference cases. The classic statistical mechanical theory for those corrections is not accurate in this application, but molecular quasi-chemical theory shows promise. Finally, because of the masking roles of excluded volume and attractive interactions, comparisons that do not discriminate the different possibilities face an interpretive danger. PMID:27258151

  8. The structure of melittin in membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, H; Jähnig, F

    1986-01-01

    The conformation of the polypeptide melittin in lipid membranes as determined by Raman spectroscopy is a bent alpha-helix formed by the mainly hydrophobic residues 1-21, and a nonhelical COOH-terminal segment of the hydrophilic residues 22-26. Fluorescence quenching experiments on residue Trp19 reveal that all COOH-termini are located on that side of a vesicular membrane to which melittin was added. By means of fluorescence energy transfer between unmodified and modified Trp19 residues, melittin is shown to aggregate in membranes predominantly in the form of tetramers. These and previous results on the location and orientation of melittin permit the development of a model for the structure of melittin tetramers in membranes. The hydrophilic sides of four bilayer-spanning helices face each other to form a hydrophilic pore through the membrane. Images FIGURE 10 PMID:3779000

  9. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  10. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Craig; Carroll, Paul; Bell, Abigail

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and

  11. How the antimicrobial peptides destroy bacteria cell membrane: Translocations vs. membrane buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovic, Leonardo; Gao, Lianghui; Chen, Licui; Fang, Weihai

    2012-02-01

    In this study, coarse grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation with implementation of electrostatic interactions is developed in constant pressure and surface tension ensemble to elucidate how the antimicrobial peptide molecules affect bilayer cell membrane structure and kill bacteria. We find that peptides with different chemical-physical properties exhibit different membrane obstructing mechanisms. Peptide molecules can destroy vital functions of the affected bacteria by translocating across their membranes via worm-holes, or by associating with membrane lipids to form hydrophilic cores trapped inside the hydrophobic domain of the membranes. In the latter scenario, the affected membranes are strongly corrugated (buckled) in accord with very recent experimental observations [G. E. Fantner et al., Nat. Nanotech., 5 (2010), pp. 280-285].

  12. Wireless Communications in Smart Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojkovic, Zoran; Bakmaz, Bojan

    Communication networks play a crucial role in smart grid, as the intelligence of this complex system is built based on information exchange across the power grid. Wireless communications and networking are among the most economical ways to build the essential part of the scalable communication infrastructure for smart grid. In particular, wireless networks will be deployed widely in the smart grid for automatic meter reading, remote system and customer site monitoring, as well as equipment fault diagnosing. With an increasing interest from both the academic and industrial communities, this chapter systematically investigates recent advances in wireless communication technology for the smart grid.

  13. New Hydrophobic IOL Materials and Understanding the Science of Glistenings.

    PubMed

    Tetz, Manfred; Jorgensen, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    An introduction to the history of intraocular lenses (IOLs) is given, leading up to modern hydrophobic examples. The roles of hydrophobicity, hygroscopy, materials chemistry, and edge design are discussed in the context of IOLs. The four major types of IOL materials are compared in terms of their chemistry and biocompatibility. An example of a modern "hydrophobic" acrylic polymer with higher water content is discussed in detail.

  14. Conductive hydrophobic hybrid textiles modified with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, D.; Brzeziński, S.; Makowski, T.; Fortuniak, W.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of modifying and testing modern hybrid polyester-cotton woven fabrics with deposited multi-wall carbon nanotubes and imparted hydrophobicity. The effect of the carbon nanotubes deposited on these fabrics on their conductive properties and hydrophobicity has been assessed. The electro-conductive and hydrophobic composite fabrics obtained in this way, being light, elastic and resistant to mechanical effects, make it possible to be widely used in various industrial fields.

  15. TRMM Gridded Text Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has many products that contain instantaneous or gridded rain rates often among many other parameters. However, these products because of their completeness can often seem intimidating to users just desiring surface rain rates. For example one of the gridded monthly products contains well over 200 parameters. It is clear that if only rain rates are desired, this many parameters might prove intimidating. In addition, for many good reasons these products are archived and currently distributed in HDF format. This also can be an inhibiting factor in using TRMM rain rates. To provide a simple format and isolate just the rain rates from the many other parameters, the TRMM product created a series of gridded products in ASCII text format. This paper describes the various text rain rate products produced. It provides detailed information about parameters and how they are calculated. It also gives detailed format information. These products are used in a number of applications with the TRMM processing system. The products are produced from the swath instantaneous rain rates and contain information from the three major TRMM instruments: radar, radiometer, and combined. They are simple to use, human readable, and small for downloading.

  16. Constructing the ASCI computational grid

    SciTech Connect

    BEIRIGER,JUDY I.; BIVENS,HUGH P.; HUMPHREYS,STEVEN L.; JOHNSON,WILBUR R.; RHEA,RONALD E.

    2000-06-01

    The Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) computational grid is being constructed to interconnect the high performance computing resources of the nuclear weapons complex. The grid will simplify access to the diverse computing, storage, network, and visualization resources, and will enable the coordinated use of shared resources regardless of location. To match existing hardware platforms, required security services, and current simulation practices, the Globus MetaComputing Toolkit was selected to provide core grid services. The ASCI grid extends Globus functionality by operating as an independent grid, incorporating Kerberos-based security, interfacing to Sandia's Cplant{trademark},and extending job monitoring services. To fully meet ASCI's needs, the architecture layers distributed work management and criteria-driven resource selection services on top of Globus. These services simplify the grid interface by allowing users to simply request ''run code X anywhere''. This paper describes the initial design and prototype of the ASCI grid.

  17. 3D Structured Grid Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, D. W.; Hafez, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    Grid adaptation for structured meshes is the art of using information from an existing, but poorly resolved, solution to automatically redistribute the grid points in such a way as to improve the resolution in regions of high error, and thus the quality of the solution. This involves: (1) generate a grid vis some standard algorithm, (2) calculate a solution on this grid, (3) adapt the grid to this solution, (4) recalculate the solution on this adapted grid, and (5) repeat steps 3 and 4 to satisfaction. Steps 3 and 4 can be repeated until some 'optimal' grid is converged to but typically this is not worth the effort and just two or three repeat calculations are necessary. They also may be repeated every 5-10 time steps for unsteady calculations.

  18. Modulation of hydrophobic interactions by proximally immobilized ions.

    PubMed

    Ma, C Derek; Wang, Chenxuan; Acevedo-Vélez, Claribel; Gellman, Samuel H; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2015-01-15

    The structure of water near non-polar molecular fragments or surfaces mediates the hydrophobic interactions that underlie a broad range of interfacial, colloidal and biophysical phenomena. Substantial progress over the past decade has improved our understanding of hydrophobic interactions in simple model systems, but most biologically and technologically relevant structures contain non-polar domains in close proximity to polar and charged functional groups. Theories and simulations exploring such nanometre-scale chemical heterogeneity find it can have an important effect, but the influence of this heterogeneity on hydrophobic interactions has not been tested experimentally. Here we report chemical force microscopy measurements on alkyl-functionalized surfaces that reveal a dramatic change in the surfaces' hydrophobic interaction strengths on co-immobilization of amine or guanidine groups. Protonation of amine groups doubles the strength of hydrophobic interactions, and guanidinium groups eliminate measurable hydrophobic interactions in all pH ranges investigated. We see these divergent effects of proximally immobilized cations also in single-molecule measurements on conformationally stable β-peptides with non-polar subunits located one nanometre from either amine- or guanidine-bearing subunits. Our results demonstrate the importance of nanometre-scale chemical heterogeneity, with hydrophobicity not an intrinsic property of any given non-polar domain but strongly modulated by functional groups located as far away as one nanometre. The judicious placing of charged groups near hydrophobic domains thus provides a strategy for tuning hydrophobic driving forces to optimize molecular recognition or self-assembly processes.

  19. Combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through surface nanoengineering

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Paul R.; Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen; Furrer, David U.; Burlatsky, Sergei F.; Filburn, Thomas P.

    2015-04-08

    This paper reports combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through the nanoscale engineering of surfaces in the form of nanorod-polymer composites. Specifically, the hydrophobicity derives from nanoscale features of mechanically hard ZnO nanorods and the mechanical durability derives from the composite structure of a hard ZnO nanorod core and soft polymer shell. Experimental characterization correlates the morphology of the nanoengineered surfaces with the combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability, and reveals the responsible mechanisms. Such surfaces may find use in applications, such as boat hulls, that benefit from hydrophobicity and require mechanical durability.

  20. Combined Hydrophobicity and Mechanical Durability through Surface Nanoengineering

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Paul R.; Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen; Furrer, David U.; Burlatsky, Sergei F.; Filburn, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through the nanoscale engineering of surfaces in the form of nanorod-polymer composites. Specifically, the hydrophobicity derives from nanoscale features of mechanically hard ZnO nanorods and the mechanical durability derives from the composite structure of a hard ZnO nanorod core and soft polymer shell. Experimental characterization correlates the morphology of the nanoengineered surfaces with the combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability, and reveals the responsible mechanisms. Such surfaces may find use in applications, such as boat hulls, that benefit from hydrophobicity and require mechanical durability. PMID:25851026

  1. Modulation of hydrophobic interactions by proximally immobilized ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. Derek; Wang, Chenxuan; Acevedo-Vélez, Claribel; Gellman, Samuel H.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of water near non-polar molecular fragments or surfaces mediates the hydrophobic interactions that underlie a broad range of interfacial, colloidal and biophysical phenomena. Substantial progress over the past decade has improved our understanding of hydrophobic interactions in simple model systems, but most biologically and technologically relevant structures contain non-polar domains in close proximity to polar and charged functional groups. Theories and simulations exploring such nanometre-scale chemical heterogeneity find it can have an important effect, but the influence of this heterogeneity on hydrophobic interactions has not been tested experimentally. Here we report chemical force microscopy measurements on alkyl-functionalized surfaces that reveal a dramatic change in the surfaces' hydrophobic interaction strengths on co-immobilization of amine or guanidine groups. Protonation of amine groups doubles the strength of hydrophobic interactions, and guanidinium groups eliminate measurable hydrophobic interactions in all pH ranges investigated. We see these divergent effects of proximally immobilized cations also in single-molecule measurements on conformationally stable β-peptides with non-polar subunits located one nanometre from either amine- or guanidine-bearing subunits. Our results demonstrate the importance of nanometre-scale chemical heterogeneity, with hydrophobicity not an intrinsic property of any given non-polar domain but strongly modulated by functional groups located as far away as one nanometre. The judicious placing of charged groups near hydrophobic domains thus provides a strategy for tuning hydrophobic driving forces to optimize molecular recognition or self-assembly processes.

  2. Nanocrack-regulated self-humidifying membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chi Hoon; Lee, So Young; Hwang, Doo Sung; Shin, Dong Won; Cho, Doo Hee; Lee, Kang Hyuck; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Lee, Mokwon; Kim, Deok-Soo; Doherty, Cara M.; Thornton, Aaron W.; Hill, Anita J.; Guiver, Michael D.; Lee, Young Moo

    2016-04-01

    The regulation of water content in polymeric membranes is important in a number of applications, such as reverse electrodialysis and proton-exchange fuel-cell membranes. External thermal and water management systems add both mass and size to systems, and so intrinsic mechanisms of retaining water and maintaining ionic transport in such membranes are particularly important for applications where small system size is important. For example, in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, where water retention in the membrane is crucial for efficient transport of hydrated ions, by operating the cells at higher temperatures without external humidification, the membrane is self-humidified with water generated by electrochemical reactions. Here we report an alternative solution that does not rely on external regulation of water supply or high temperatures. Water content in hydrocarbon polymer membranes is regulated through nanometre-scale cracks (‘nanocracks’) in a hydrophobic surface coating. These cracks work as nanoscale valves to retard water desorption and to maintain ion conductivity in the membrane on dehumidification. Hydrocarbon fuel-cell membranes with surface nanocrack coatings operated at intermediate temperatures show improved electrochemical performance, and coated reverse-electrodialysis membranes show enhanced ionic selectivity with low bulk resistance.

  3. Nanocrack-regulated self-humidifying membranes.

    PubMed

    Park, Chi Hoon; Lee, So Young; Hwang, Doo Sung; Shin, Dong Won; Cho, Doo Hee; Lee, Kang Hyuck; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Lee, Mokwon; Kim, Deok-Soo; Doherty, Cara M; Thornton, Aaron W; Hill, Anita J; Guiver, Michael D; Lee, Young Moo

    2016-04-28

    The regulation of water content in polymeric membranes is important in a number of applications, such as reverse electrodialysis and proton-exchange fuel-cell membranes. External thermal and water management systems add both mass and size to systems, and so intrinsic mechanisms of retaining water and maintaining ionic transport in such membranes are particularly important for applications where small system size is important. For example, in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, where water retention in the membrane is crucial for efficient transport of hydrated ions, by operating the cells at higher temperatures without external humidification, the membrane is self-humidified with water generated by electrochemical reactions. Here we report an alternative solution that does not rely on external regulation of water supply or high temperatures. Water content in hydrocarbon polymer membranes is regulated through nanometre-scale cracks ('nanocracks') in a hydrophobic surface coating. These cracks work as nanoscale valves to retard water desorption and to maintain ion conductivity in the membrane on dehumidification. Hydrocarbon fuel-cell membranes with surface nanocrack coatings operated at intermediate temperatures show improved electrochemical performance, and coated reverse-electrodialysis membranes show enhanced ionic selectivity with low bulk resistance.

  4. Nanocrack-regulated self-humidifying membranes.

    PubMed

    Park, Chi Hoon; Lee, So Young; Hwang, Doo Sung; Shin, Dong Won; Cho, Doo Hee; Lee, Kang Hyuck; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Lee, Mokwon; Kim, Deok-Soo; Doherty, Cara M; Thornton, Aaron W; Hill, Anita J; Guiver, Michael D; Lee, Young Moo

    2016-04-28

    The regulation of water content in polymeric membranes is important in a number of applications, such as reverse electrodialysis and proton-exchange fuel-cell membranes. External thermal and water management systems add both mass and size to systems, and so intrinsic mechanisms of retaining water and maintaining ionic transport in such membranes are particularly important for applications where small system size is important. For example, in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, where water retention in the membrane is crucial for efficient transport of hydrated ions, by operating the cells at higher temperatures without external humidification, the membrane is self-humidified with water generated by electrochemical reactions. Here we report an alternative solution that does not rely on external regulation of water supply or high temperatures. Water content in hydrocarbon polymer membranes is regulated through nanometre-scale cracks ('nanocracks') in a hydrophobic surface coating. These cracks work as nanoscale valves to retard water desorption and to maintain ion conductivity in the membrane on dehumidification. Hydrocarbon fuel-cell membranes with surface nanocrack coatings operated at intermediate temperatures show improved electrochemical performance, and coated reverse-electrodialysis membranes show enhanced ionic selectivity with low bulk resistance. PMID:27121841

  5. Progress in Grid Generation: From Chimera to DRAGON Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Kao, Kai-Hsiung

    1994-01-01

    Hybrid grids, composed of structured and unstructured grids, combines the best features of both. The chimera method is a major stepstone toward a hybrid grid from which the present approach is evolved. The chimera grid composes a set of overlapped structured grids which are independently generated and body-fitted, yielding a high quality grid readily accessible for efficient solution schemes. The chimera method has been shown to be efficient to generate a grid about complex geometries and has been demonstrated to deliver accurate aerodynamic prediction of complex flows. While its geometrical flexibility is attractive, interpolation of data in the overlapped regions - which in today's practice in 3D is done in a nonconservative fashion, is not. In the present paper we propose a hybrid grid scheme that maximizes the advantages of the chimera scheme and adapts the strengths of the unstructured grid while at the same time keeps its weaknesses minimal. Like the chimera method, we first divide up the physical domain by a set of structured body-fitted grids which are separately generated and overlaid throughout a complex configuration. To eliminate any pure data manipulation which does not necessarily follow governing equations, we use non-structured grids only to directly replace the region of the arbitrarily overlapped grids. This new adaptation to the chimera thinking is coined the DRAGON grid. The nonstructured grid region sandwiched between the structured grids is limited in size, resulting in only a small increase in memory and computational effort. The DRAGON method has three important advantages: (1) preserving strengths of the chimera grid; (2) eliminating difficulties sometimes encountered in the chimera scheme, such as the orphan points and bad quality of interpolation stencils; and (3) making grid communication in a fully conservative and consistent manner insofar as the governing equations are concerned. To demonstrate its use, the governing equations are

  6. Hydrophobic pervaporation: toward a shortcut method for the pervaporation-decanter system.

    PubMed

    Field, Robert W; Lobo, Vanessa

    2003-03-01

    Pervaporation is a relatively new technology. Although hydrophilic pervaporation has become established, hydrophobic pervaporation for recovery of organics from water has not been a commercial success. Technologic reasons for this are suggested. However, as the pressure to include waste minimization and to recycle, as well as pollution prevention, increases, there will be opportunity for the development of new wastewater treatment processes. This may lead to hybrid processes, including a coupling of pervaporation with conventional technology. The hybrid process examined herein is a simple pervaporation-decanter system that is applicable to organics with limited solubility in water. In this system, the PV unit produces permeate that after condensation gives two liquid phases. The organic phase is relative pure and concentrated (and available for reuse), whereas the aqueous phase can be recycled into the PV feed stream. For a given feed concentration and water purity target, there is a minimum membrane selectivity (alpha(min)) that yields a two-phase condensate. If the membrane has a selectivity that is just greater than the minimum, the recycle rate of the aqueous phase relative to the feed rate will be very large and likewise the membrane area. Also, for a membrane with known organic permeability, one can define a theoretical A(min), the minimum membrane area required when the separation factor is so high that the aqueous phase is negligible. For membranes with alpha > alpha(min), values of the required membrane area, A, have been obtained for various representative duties, and a correlation between alpha/alpha(min) and A/A(min) has been obtained (compare with the Gilliland correlation used in distillation). An approximate relationship is (A/A(min) (- 1))(alpha/alpha(min) (- 1)) = 1. Since alpha(min) and A(min) can be calculated readily, this relationship is a shortcut tool that permits estimation of A for any alpha and any duty. Finally, membrane areas for the

  7. Enhancing control of grid distribution in algebraic grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, E.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Roelke, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Three techniques are presented to enhance the control of grid-point distribution for a class of algebraic grid generation methods known as the two-, four- and six-boundary methods. First, multidimensional stretching functions are presented, and a technique is devised to construct them based on the desired distribution of grid points along certain boundaries. Second, a normalization procedure is proposed which allows more effective control over orthogonality of grid lines at boundaries and curvature of grid lines near boundaries. And third, interpolating functions based on tension splines are introduced to control curvature of grid lines in the interior of the spatial domain. In addition to these three techniques, consistency conditions are derived which must be satisfied by all user-specified data employed in the grid generation process to control grid-point distribution. The usefulness of the techniques developed in this study was demonstrated by using them in conjunction with the two- and four-boundary methods to generate several grid systems, including a three-dimensional grid system in the coolant passage of a radial turbine blade with serpentine channels and pin fins.

  8. Mammalian plasma membrane proteins as potential biomarkers and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Rucevic, Marijana; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2011-06-01

    Defining the plasma membrane proteome is crucial to understand the role of plasma membrane in fundamental biological processes. Change in membrane proteins is one of the first events that take place under pathological conditions, making plasma membrane proteins a likely source of potential disease biomarkers with prognostic or diagnostic potential. Membrane proteins are also potential targets for monoclonal antibodies and other drugs that block receptors or inhibit enzymes essential to the disease progress. Despite several advanced methods recently developed for the analysis of hydrophobic proteins and proteins with posttranslational modifications, integral membrane proteins are still under-represented in plasma membrane proteome. Recent advances in proteomic investigation of plasma membrane proteins, defining their roles as diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers and as target molecules in disease treatment, are presented.

  9. Cryomicroscopy provides structural snapshots of influenza virus membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Calder, Lesley J; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    The lipid-enveloped influenza virus enters host cells during infection by binding cell-surface receptors and, after receptor-mediated endocytosis, fusing with the membrane of the endosome and delivering the viral genome and transcription machinery into the host cell. These events are mediated by the hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein. At the low pH of the endosome, an irreversible conformational change in the HA, including the exposure of the hydrophobic fusion peptide, activates membrane fusion. Here we used electron cryomicroscopy and cryotomography to image the fusion of influenza virus with target membranes at low pH. We visualized structural intermediates of HA and their interactions with membranes during the course of membrane fusion as well as ultrastructural changes in the virus that accompany membrane fusion. Our observations are relevant to a wide range of protein-mediated membrane-fusion processes and demonstrate how dynamic membrane events may be studied by cryomicroscopy. PMID:27501535

  10. GridTool: A surface modeling and grid generation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid

    1995-01-01

    GridTool is designed around the concept that the surface grids are generated on a set of bi-linear patches. This type of grid generation is quite easy to implement, and it avoids the problems associated with complex CAD surface representations and associated surface parameterizations. However, the resulting surface grids are close to but not on the original CAD surfaces. This problem can be alleviated by projecting the resulting surface grids onto the original CAD surfaces. GridTool is designed primary for unstructured grid generation systems. Currently, GridTool supports VGRID and FELISA systems, and it can be easily extended to support other unstructured grid generation systems. The data in GridTool is stored parametrically so that once the problem is set up, one can modify the surfaces and the entire set of points, curves and patches will be updated automatically. This is very useful in a multidisciplinary design and optimization process. GridTool is written entirely in ANSI 'C', the interface is based on the FORMS library, and the graphics is based on the GL library. The code has been tested successfully on IRIS workstations running IRIX4.0 and above. The memory is allocated dynamically, therefore, memory size will depend on the complexity of geometry/grid. GridTool data structure is based on a link-list structure which allows the required memory to expand and contract dynamically according to the user's data size and action. Data structure contains several types of objects such as points, curves, patches, sources and surfaces. At any given time, there is always an active object which is drawn in magenta, or in their highlighted colors as defined by the resource file which will be discussed later.

  11. Effects of Antimicrobial Peptide Revealed by Simulations: Translocation, Pore Formation, Membrane Corrugation and Euler Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Licui; Jia, Nana; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effects of the peripheral and transmembrane antimicrobial peptides on the lipid bilayer membrane by using the coarse grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations. We study peptide/lipid membrane complexes by considering peptides with various structure, hydrophobicity and peptide/lipid interaction strength. The role of lipid/water interaction is also discussed. We discuss a rich variety of membrane morphological changes induced by peptides, such as pore formation, membrane corrugation and Euler buckling. PMID:23579956

  12. Effects of antimicrobial peptide revealed by simulations: translocation, pore formation, membrane corrugation and euler buckling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Licui; Jia, Nana; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-04-11

    We explore the effects of the peripheral and transmembrane antimicrobial peptides on the lipid bilayer membrane by using the coarse grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations. We study peptide/lipid membrane complexes by considering peptides with various structure, hydrophobicity and peptide/lipid interaction strength. The role of lipid/water interaction is also discussed. We discuss a rich variety of membrane morphological changes induced by peptides, such as pore formation, membrane corrugation and Euler buckling.

  13. Penetration of surfactant solutions into hydrophobic capillaries.

    PubMed

    Bain, Colin D

    2005-08-21

    The initial rise velocity of surfactant solutions in hydrophobic capillaries is independent of time (F. Tiberg, B. Zhmud, K. Hallstensson and M. von Bahr, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2000, 2, 5189). By analogy with the hydrodynamics of an overflowing cylinder, we present a steady-state solution for capillary penetration in which the velocity is determined by the adsorption kinetics at the air-water interface. Good agreement between the model predictions and experimental data of Tiberg and coworkers is obtained for the non-ionic surfactant C10E6 under the assumption of diffusion-controlled adsorption. The longer chain homologue, C14E6, shows evidence of kinetic barriers to adsorption.

  14. ON-COLUMN ENRICHMENT OF HYDROPHOBIC CYP450 PROTEINS IN HPLC FRACTIONATION OF MOUSE MICROSOMES PRIOR TO PROTEIN DIGESTION AND NANOSPRAY-LC/MSMS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction

    Membrane proteins play crucial role in many cellular processes and are promising candidates for biomarker discovery but are under-represented in the field of proteomics due to their hydrophobic nature. Although standard reversed-phase LC methods often exhibit ...

  15. Membrane Fission Is Promoted by Insertion of Amphipathic Helices and Is Restricted by Crescent BAR Domains

    PubMed Central

    Boucrot, Emmanuel; Pick, Adi; Çamdere, Gamze; Liska, Nicole; Evergren, Emma; McMahon, Harvey T.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Shallow hydrophobic insertions and crescent-shaped BAR scaffolds promote membrane curvature. Here, we investigate membrane fission by shallow hydrophobic insertions quantitatively and mechanistically. We provide evidence that membrane insertion of the ENTH domain of epsin leads to liposome vesiculation, and that epsin is required for clathrin-coated vesicle budding in cells. We also show that BAR-domain scaffolds from endophilin, amphiphysin, GRAF, and β2-centaurin limit membrane fission driven by hydrophobic insertions. A quantitative assay for vesiculation reveals an antagonistic relationship between amphipathic helices and scaffolds of N-BAR domains in fission. The extent of vesiculation by these proteins and vesicle size depend on the number and length of amphipathic helices per BAR domain, in accord with theoretical considerations. This fission mechanism gives a new framework for understanding membrane scission in the absence of mechanoenzymes such as dynamin and suggests how Arf and Sar proteins work in vesicle scission. PMID:22464325

  16. Smart Grid Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad Lopez, Carlos Adrian

    Current electricity infrastructure is being stressed from several directions -- high demand, unreliable supply, extreme weather conditions, accidents, among others. Infrastructure planners have, traditionally, focused on only the cost of the system; today, resilience and sustainability are increasingly becoming more important. In this dissertation, we develop computational tools for efficiently managing electricity resources to help create a more reliable and sustainable electrical grid. The tools we present in this work will help electric utilities coordinate demand to allow the smooth and large scale integration of renewable sources of energy into traditional grids, as well as provide infrastructure planners and operators in developing countries a framework for making informed planning and control decisions in the presence of uncertainty. Demand-side management is considered as the most viable solution for maintaining grid stability as generation from intermittent renewable sources increases. Demand-side management, particularly demand response (DR) programs that attempt to alter the energy consumption of customers either by using price-based incentives or up-front power interruption contracts, is more cost-effective and sustainable in addressing short-term supply-demand imbalances when compared with the alternative that involves increasing fossil fuel-based fast spinning reserves. An essential step in compensating participating customers and benchmarking the effectiveness of DR programs is to be able to independently detect the load reduction from observed meter data. Electric utilities implementing automated DR programs through direct load control switches are also interested in detecting the reduction in demand to efficiently pinpoint non-functioning devices to reduce maintenance costs. We develop sparse optimization methods for detecting a small change in the demand for electricity of a customer in response to a price change or signal from the utility

  17. Hydrophobic matching between melittin and phosphocholine lipid bilayers having different thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, William; Qian, Shuo

    2014-03-01

    The lipid bilayer of the cellular membrane is more than a simple medium that houses proteins with specific function. Instead, it is an elastic medium that plays an active role in the function of the membrane and that both drives the function of membrane proteins and alters its properties in response to their presence. The conceptual simplicity of membrane active peptides makes them attractive model systems for studying membrane-protein interactions. Melittin, a 27 amino acid cationic peptide having a helix-hinge-helix motif, is one of the most extensively studied examples. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements of melittin associated with lipid bilayer vesicles having different hydrocarbon thicknesses showed that the bilayer thickness stretches to match the thickness of the peptide in a manner consistent with a rigid, extended melittin having its helical axis oriented parallel to the bilayer normal. This behavior is surprising considering the helix-hinge-helix motif of the peptide and in contrast to studies indicating that transmembrane helices tilt with respect to the bilayer normal to accommodate differences in hydrophobic thicknesses. Possible sources of the discrepancy will be discussed and explored. This research at SNS and HFIR of ORNL was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (ERKP291).

  18. Facile Phase Transfer and Surface Biofunctionalization of Hydrophobic Nanoparticles Using Janus DNA Tetrahedron Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Hong, Cheng-Yi; Wu, Shu-Xian; Liang, Hong; Wang, Li-Ping; Huang, Guoming; Chen, Xian; Yang, Huang-Hao; Shangguan, Dihua; Tan, Weihong

    2015-09-01

    Hydrophobic nanoparticles have shown substantial potential for bioanalysis and biomedical applications. However, their use is hindered by complex phase transfer and inefficient surface modification. This paper reports a facile and universal strategy for phase transfer and surface biofunctionalization of hydrophobic nanomaterials using aptamer-pendant DNA tetrahedron nanostructures (Apt-tet). The Janus DNA tetrahedron nanostructures are constructed by three carboxyl group modified DNA strands and one aptamer sequence. The pendant linear sequence is an aptamer, in this case AS1411, known to specifically bind nucleolin, typically overexpressed on the plasma membranes of tumor cells. The incorporation of the aptamers adds targeting ability and also enhances intracellular uptake. Phase-transfer efficiency using Apt-tet is much higher than that achieved using single-stranded DNA. In addition, the DNA tetrahedron nanostructures can be programmed to permit the incorporation of other functional nucleic acids, such as DNAzymes, siRNA, or antisense DNA, allowing, in turn, the construction of promising theranostic nanoagents for bioanalysis and biomedical applications. Given these unique features, we believe that our strategy of surface modification and functionalization may become a new paradigm in phase-transfer-agent design and further expand biomedical applications of hydrophobic nanomaterials.

  19. Nanoscale imaging and hydrophobicity mapping of the antimicrobial effect of copper on bacterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congzhou; Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2016-09-01

    Copper has a long historical role in the arena of materials with antimicrobial properties. Various forms of copper ranging from surfaces to impregnation in textiles and particles, have attracted considerable interest owing to their versatility, potency, chemical stability, and low cost. However, the effects and mechanisms of their antimicrobial action is still unclear. In this study, the effect of copper particles on Escherichia coli was studied at the nanoscale using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Time-lapse AFM images at the single cell level show the morphological changes on live E. coli during antimicrobial treatment, in which for the first time, this process was followed in situ on the same cell over time. AFM-based hydrophobicity mapping further showed that incubating cells with Cu decreased the surface hydrophobicity with an increase of incubation time. Specifically, we are able to visualize both morphology and physico-chemical nature of the bacterial cell surface change in response to copper treatment, leading to the membrane damage and cytoplasm leakage. Overall, the time-lapse AFM imaging combined with hydrophobicity mapping approach presented here provides spatio-temporal insight into the antimicrobial mechanisms of copper at the single cell level, and can be applied to design of better metallic antimicrobial materials as well as investigate different microorganisms. PMID:27258941

  20. Membrane Processes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Marie-Laure; Sadler, Mary E; Greiner, Anthony D; Aguinaldo, Jorge; Min, Kyungnan; Zhang, Kai; Arabi, Sara; Burbano, Marie S; Kent, Fraser; Shoaf, Robert

    2015-10-01

    This review, for literature published in 2014, contains information related to membrane processes for municipal and industrial applications. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following topics: pretreatment, membrane bioreactor (MBR) configuration, design, nutrient removal, operation, industrial treatment, fixed film and anaerobic membrane systems, reuse, microconstituents removal, membrane technology advances, membrane fouling, and modeling. Other sub-sections of the Treatment Systems section that might relate to this literature review include: Biological Fixed-Film Systems, Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes, Anaerobic Processes, Water Reclamation and Reuse. The following sections might also have related information on membrane processes: Industrial Wastes, Hazardous Wastes, and Fate and Effects of Pollutants. PMID:26420079

  1. Membrane Processes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Marie-Laure; Burbano, Marie S; Sadler, Mary E; Diamond, Jason; Baker, Simon; Greiner, Anthony D; Arabi, Sara; Wong, Joseph; Doody, Alexandra; Padhye, Lokesh P; Sears, Keith; Kistenmacher, Peter; Kent, Fraser; Tootchi, Leila; Aguinaldo, Jorge; Saddredini, Sara; Schilling, Bill; Min, Kyungnan; McCandless, Robert; Danker, Bryce; Gamage, Neranga P; Wang, Sunny; Aerts, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This review, for literature published in 2015, contains information related to membrane processes for municipal and industrial applications. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following topics: pretreatment, membrane bioreactor (MBR) configuration, design, nutrient removal, operation, industrial treatment, anaerobic membrane systems, reuse, microconstituents removal, membrane technology advances, membrane fouling, and modeling. Other sub-sections of the Treatment Systems section that might relate to this literature review include: Biological Fixed-Film Systems, Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes, Anaerobic Processes, Water Reclamation and Reuse. The following sections might also have related information on membrane processes: Industrial Wastes, Hazardous Wastes, and Fate and Effects of Pollutants. PMID:27620084

  2. Influence of Hydrophobic Mismatch on Structures and Dynamics of Gramicidin A and Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taehoon; Lee, Kyu Il; Morris, Phillip; Pastor, Richard W.; Andersen, Olaf S.; Im, Wonpil

    2012-01-01

    Gramicidin A (gA) is a 15-amino-acid antibiotic peptide with an alternating L-D sequence, which forms (dimeric) bilayer-spanning, monovalent cation channels in biological membranes and synthetic bilayers. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of gA dimers and monomers in all-atom, explicit dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers. The variation in acyl chain length among these different phospholipids provides a way to alter gA-bilayer interactions by varying the bilayer hydrophobic thickness, and to determine the influence of hydrophobic mismatch on the structure and dynamics of both gA channels (and monomeric subunits) and the host bilayers. The simulations show that the channel structure varied little with changes in hydrophobic mismatch, and that the lipid bilayer adapts to the bilayer-spanning channel to minimize the exposure of hydrophobic residues. The bilayer thickness, however, did not vary monotonically as a function of radial distance from the channel. In all simulations, there was an initial decrease in thickness within 4–5 Å from the channel, which was followed by an increase in DOPC and POPC or a further decrease in DLPC and DMPC bilayers. The bilayer thickness varied little in the monomer simulations—except one of three independent simulations for DMPC and all three DLPC simulations, where the bilayer thinned to allow a single subunit to form a bilayer-spanning water-permeable pore. The radial dependence of local lipid area and bilayer compressibility is also nonmonotonic in the first shell around gA dimers due to gA-phospholipid interactions and the hydrophobic mismatch. Order parameters, acyl chain dynamics, and diffusion constants also differ between the lipids in the first shell and the bulk. The lipid behaviors in the first shell around gA dimers are more complex than predicted from a simple mismatch

  3. Influence of hydrophobic mismatch on structures and dynamics of gramicidin a and lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Lee, Kyu Il; Morris, Phillip; Pastor, Richard W; Andersen, Olaf S; Im, Wonpil

    2012-04-01

    Gramicidin A (gA) is a 15-amino-acid antibiotic peptide with an alternating L-D sequence, which forms (dimeric) bilayer-spanning, monovalent cation channels in biological membranes and synthetic bilayers. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of gA dimers and monomers in all-atom, explicit dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers. The variation in acyl chain length among these different phospholipids provides a way to alter gA-bilayer interactions by varying the bilayer hydrophobic thickness, and to determine the influence of hydrophobic mismatch on the structure and dynamics of both gA channels (and monomeric subunits) and the host bilayers. The simulations show that the channel structure varied little with changes in hydrophobic mismatch, and that the lipid bilayer adapts to the bilayer-spanning channel to minimize the exposure of hydrophobic residues. The bilayer thickness, however, did not vary monotonically as a function of radial distance from the channel. In all simulations, there was an initial decrease in thickness within 4-5 Å from the channel, which was followed by an increase in DOPC and POPC or a further decrease in DLPC and DMPC bilayers. The bilayer thickness varied little in the monomer simulations-except one of three independent simulations for DMPC and all three DLPC simulations, where the bilayer thinned to allow a single subunit to form a bilayer-spanning water-permeable pore. The radial dependence of local lipid area and bilayer compressibility is also nonmonotonic in the first shell around gA dimers due to gA-phospholipid interactions and the hydrophobic mismatch. Order parameters, acyl chain dynamics, and diffusion constants also differ between the lipids in the first shell and the bulk. The lipid behaviors in the first shell around gA dimers are more complex than predicted from a simple mismatch model

  4. Phase transitions in hydrophobe/phospholipid mixtures: hints at connections between pheromones and anaesthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Borsacchi, Silvia; Geppi, Marco; Macchi, Sara; Ninham, Barry W; Fratini, Emiliano; Ambrosi, Moira; Baglioni, Piero; Lo Nostro, Pierandrea

    2016-06-01

    The phase behavior of a mixture of a typical insect pheromone (olean) and a phospholipid (DOPC)/water dispersion is extensively explored through SAXS, NMR and DSC experiments. The results mimic those obtained with anaesthetics in phospholipid/water systems. They also mimic the behavior and microstructure of ternary mixtures of a membrane mimetic, bilayer-forming double chained surfactants, oils and water. Taken together with recent models for conduction of the nervous impulse, all hint at lipid involvement and the underlying unity in mechanisms of pheromone, anaesthetic and hydrophobic drugs, where a local phase change in the lipid membrane architecture may be at least partly involved in the transmission of the signal. PMID:27210443

  5. Multicomponent membranes

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    A multicomponent membrane which may be used for separating various components which are present in a fluid feed mixture comprises a mixture of a plasticizer such as a glycol and an organic polymer cast upon a porous organic polymer support. The membrane may be prepared by casting an emulsion or a solution of the plasticizer and polymer on the porous support, evaporating the solvent and recovering the membrane after curing.

  6. Grid crusher apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniels, J.D. Jr.

    1994-01-11

    A grid crusher apparatus and method are provided for a nuclear fuel rod consolidation system. Spacer grids are crushed within a basket which is then placed in a storage canister. The grid crusher apparatus has a ram assembly and a basket driving mechanism. The ram assembly has a sleeve ram and a central ram. The sleeve ram surrounds the central ram which is longitudinally movable within the sleeve ram. The central ram protrudes from the sleeve ram at a ram contact end and is retractable upon application of a preselected force to the central ram so that the central ram is flush with the sleeve ram at the ram contact end. The basket driving mechanism is configured to move the basket containing a spacer grid towards the ram contact end so that the spacer grid is crushed within the basket. The spacer grid is crushed by the combination of successive forces from the central ram and the sleeve ram, respectively. Essentially, the central portion of the spacer grid is crushed first, and then the remaining outer portion of the spacer grid is crushed to complete the crushing action of the spacer grid. The foregoing process is repeated for other spacer grids until the basket reaches a predetermined allowable capacity, and then the basket is stored in a storage canister. 11 figs.

  7. Alpha-helical hydrophobic polypeptides form proton-selective channels in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, A E; Deamer, D W

    1994-01-01

    Proton translocation is important in membrane-mediated processes such as ATP-dependent proton pumps, ATP synthesis, bacteriorhodopsin, and cytochrome oxidase function. The fundamental mechanism, however, is poorly understood. To test the theoretical possibility that bundles of hydrophobic alpha-helices could provide a low energy pathway for ion translocation through the lipid bilayer, polyamino acids were incorporated into extruded liposomes and planar lipid membranes, and proton translocation was measured. Liposomes with incorporated long-chain poly-L-alanine or poly-L-leucine were found to have proton permeability coefficients 5 to 7 times greater than control liposomes, whereas short-chain polyamino acids had relatively little effect. Potassium permeability was not increased markedly by any of the polyamino acids tested. Analytical thin layer chromatography measurements of lipid content and a fluorescamine assay for amino acids showed that there were approximately 135 polyleucine or 65 polyalanine molecules associated with each liposome. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that a major fraction of the long-chain hydrophobic peptides existed in an alpha-helical conformation. Single-channel recording in both 0.1 N HCl and 0.1 M KCl was also used to determine whether proton-conducting channels formed in planar lipid membranes (phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine, 1:1). Poly-L-leucine and poly-L-alanine in HCl caused a 10- to 30-fold increase in frequency of conductive events compared to that seen in KCl or by the other polyamino acids in either solution. This finding correlates well with the liposome observations in which these two polyamino acids caused the largest increase in membrane proton permeability but had little effect on potassium permeability. Poly-L-leucine was considerably more conductive than poly-L-alanine due primarily to larger event amplitudes and, to a lesser extent, a higher event frequency. Poly-L-leucine caused two

  8. Alpha-helical hydrophobic polypeptides form proton-selective channels in lipid bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. E.; Deamer, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Proton translocation is important in membrane-mediated processes such as ATP-dependent proton pumps, ATP synthesis, bacteriorhodopsin, and cytochrome oxidase function. The fundamental mechanism, however, is poorly understood. To test the theoretical possibility that bundles of hydrophobic alpha-helices could provide a low energy pathway for ion translocation through the lipid bilayer, polyamino acids were incorporated into extruded liposomes and planar lipid membranes, and proton translocation was measured. Liposomes with incorporated long-chain poly-L-alanine or poly-L-leucine were found to have proton permeability coefficients 5 to 7 times greater than control liposomes, whereas short-chain polyamino acids had relatively little effect. Potassium permeability was not increased markedly by any of the polyamino acids tested. Analytical thin layer chromatography measurements of lipid content and a fluorescamine assay for amino acids showed that there were approximately 135 polyleucine or 65 polyalanine molecules associated with each liposome. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that a major fraction of the long-chain hydrophobic peptides existed in an alpha-helical conformation. Single-channel recording in both 0.1 N HCl and 0.1 M KCl was also used to determine whether proton-conducting channels formed in planar lipid membranes (phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine, 1:1). Poly-L-leucine and poly-L-alanine in HCl caused a 10- to 30-fold increase in frequency of conductive events compared to that seen in KCl or by the other polyamino acids in either solution. This finding correlates well with the liposome observations in which these two polyamino acids caused the largest increase in membrane proton permeability but had little effect on potassium permeability. Poly-L-leucine was considerably more conductive than poly-L-alanine due primarily to larger event amplitudes and, to a lesser extent, a higher event frequency. Poly-L-leucine caused two

  9. Evaluating the Information Power Grid using the NAS Grid Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaartm Rob F.; Frumkin, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    The NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB) are a collection of synthetic distributed applications designed to rate the performance and functionality of computational grids. We compare several implementations of the NGB to determine programmability and efficiency of NASA's Information Power Grid (IPG), whose services are mostly based on the Globus Toolkit. We report on the overheads involved in porting existing NGB reference implementations to the IPG. No changes were made to the component tasks of the NGB can still be improved.

  10. Charged membranes.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This Teaching Resource provides three animated lessons that describe the storage and utilization of energy across plasma membranes. The "Na,K ATPase" animation explains how these pumps establish the electrochemical gradient that stores energy across plasma membranes. The "ATP synthesizing complexes" animation shows how these complexes transfer energy from the inner mitochondrial membrane to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The "action potential" lesson explains how charged membranes are used to propagate signals along the axons of neurons. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these important factors. Courses that might employ them include introductory biology, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, pharmacology, and physiology.

  11. Fabrication of bioinspired composite nanofiber membranes with robust superhydrophobicity for direct contact membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yuan; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G

    2014-06-01

    The practical application of membrane distillation (MD) for water purification is hindered by the absence of desirable membranes that can fulfill the special requirements of the MD process. Compared to the membranes fabricated by other methods, nanofiber membranes produced by electrospinning are of great interest due to their high porosity, low tortuosity, large surface pore size, and high surface hydrophobicity. However, the stable performance of the nanofiber membranes in the MD process is still unsatisfactory. Inspired by the unique structure of the lotus leaf, this study aimed to develop a strategy to construct superhydrophobic composite nanofiber membranes with robust superhydrophobicity and high porosity suitable for use in MD. The newly developed membrane consists of a superhydrophobic silica-PVDF composite selective skin formed on a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) porous nanofiber scaffold via electrospinning. This fabrication method could be easily scaled up due to its simple preparation procedures. The effects of silica diameter and concentration on membrane contact angle, sliding angle, and MD performance were investigated thoroughly. For the first time, the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) tests demonstrate that the newly developed membranes are able to present stable high performance over 50 h of testing time, and the superhydrophobic selective layer exhibits excellent durability in ultrasonic treatment and a continuous DCMD test. It is believed that this novel design strategy has great potential for MD membrane fabrication. PMID:24797803

  12. Fabrication of bioinspired composite nanofiber membranes with robust superhydrophobicity for direct contact membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yuan; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G

    2014-06-01

    The practical application of membrane distillation (MD) for water purification is hindered by the absence of desirable membranes that can fulfill the special requirements of the MD process. Compared to the membranes fabricated by other methods, nanofiber membranes produced by electrospinning are of great interest due to their high porosity, low tortuosity, large surface pore size, and high surface hydrophobicity. However, the stable performance of the nanofiber membranes in the MD process is still unsatisfactory. Inspired by the unique structure of the lotus leaf, this study aimed to develop a strategy to construct superhydrophobic composite nanofiber membranes with robust superhydrophobicity and high porosity suitable for use in MD. The newly developed membrane consists of a superhydrophobic silica-PVDF composite selective skin formed on a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) porous nanofiber scaffold via electrospinning. This fabrication method could be easily scaled up due to its simple preparation procedures. The effects of silica diameter and concentration on membrane contact angle, sliding angle, and MD performance were investigated thoroughly. For the first time, the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) tests demonstrate that the newly developed membranes are able to present stable high performance over 50 h of testing time, and the superhydrophobic selective layer exhibits excellent durability in ultrasonic treatment and a continuous DCMD test. It is believed that this novel design strategy has great potential for MD membrane fabrication.

  13. Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs): interest and applications for biological membrane investigations.

    PubMed

    Rebaud, Samuel; Maniti, Ofelia; Girard-Egrot, Agnès P

    2014-12-01

    Biological membranes play a central role in the biology of the cell. They are not only the hydrophobic barrier allowing separation between two water soluble compartments but also a supra-molecular entity that has vital structural functions. Notably, they are involved in many exchange processes between the outside and inside cellular spaces. Accounting for the complexity of cell membranes, reliable models are needed to acquire current knowledge of the molecular processes occurring in membranes. To simplify the investigation of lipid/protein interactions, the use of biomimetic membranes is an approach that allows manipulation of the lipid composition of specific domains and/or the protein composition, and the evaluation of the reciprocal effects. Since the middle of the 80's, lipid bilayer membranes have been constantly developed as models of biological membranes with the ultimate goal to reincorporate membrane proteins for their functional investigation. In this review, after a brief description of the planar lipid bilayers as biomimetic membrane models, we will focus on the construction of the tethered Bilayer Lipid Membranes, the most promising model for efficient membrane protein reconstitution and investigation of molecular processes occurring in cell membranes.

  14. The Volume Grid Manipulator (VGM): A Grid Reusability Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    1997-01-01

    This document is a manual describing how to use the Volume Grid Manipulation (VGM) software. The code is specifically designed to alter or manipulate existing surface and volume structured grids to improve grid quality through the reduction of grid line skewness, removal of negative volumes, and adaption of surface and volume grids to flow field gradients. The software uses a command language to perform all manipulations thereby offering the capability of executing multiple manipulations on a single grid during an execution of the code. The command language can be input to the VGM code by a UNIX style redirected file, or interactively while the code is executing. The manual consists of 14 sections. The first is an introduction to grid manipulation; where it is most applicable and where the strengths of such software can be utilized. The next two sections describe the memory management and the manipulation command language. The following 8 sections describe simple and complex manipulations that can be used in conjunction with one another to smooth, adapt, and reuse existing grids for various computations. These are accompanied by a tutorial section that describes how to use the commands and manipulations to solve actual grid generation problems. The last two sections are a command reference guide and trouble shooting sections to aid in the use of the code as well as describe problems associated with generated scripts for manipulation control.

  15. GridPP: the UK grid for particle physics.

    PubMed

    Britton, D; Cass, A J; Clarke, P E L; Coles, J; Colling, D J; Doyle, A T; Geddes, N I; Gordon, J C; Jones, R W L; Kelsey, D P; Lloyd, S L; Middleton, R P; Patrick, G N; Sansum, R A; Pearce, S E

    2009-06-28

    The start-up of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva, presents a huge challenge in processing and analysing the vast amounts of scientific data that will be produced. The architecture of the worldwide grid that will handle 15 PB of particle physics data annually from this machine is based on a hierarchical tiered structure. We describe the development of the UK component (GridPP) of this grid from a prototype system to a full exploitation grid for real data analysis. This includes the physical infrastructure, the deployment of middleware, operational experience and the initial exploitation by the major LHC experiments. PMID:19451101

  16. GridPP: the UK grid for particle physics.

    PubMed

    Britton, D; Cass, A J; Clarke, P E L; Coles, J; Colling, D J; Doyle, A T; Geddes, N I; Gordon, J C; Jones, R W L; Kelsey, D P; Lloyd, S L; Middleton, R P; Patrick, G N; Sansum, R A; Pearce, S E

    2009-06-28

    The start-up of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva, presents a huge challenge in processing and analysing the vast amounts of scientific data that will be produced. The architecture of the worldwide grid that will handle 15 PB of particle physics data annually from this machine is based on a hierarchical tiered structure. We describe the development of the UK component (GridPP) of this grid from a prototype system to a full exploitation grid for real data analysis. This includes the physical infrastructure, the deployment of middleware, operational experience and the initial exploitation by the major LHC experiments.

  17. How Membrane-Active Peptides Get into Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-21

    The structure-function relationship for a family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from the skin of Australian tree frogs is discussed and compared with that of peptide toxins from bee and Australian scorpion venoms. Although these membrane-active peptides induce a similar cellular fate by disrupting the lipid bilayer integrity, their lytic activity is achieved via different modes of action, which are investigated in relation to amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and membrane lipid composition. In order to better understand what structural features govern the interaction between peptides and lipid membranes, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which translocate through the membrane without compromising its integrity, are also discussed. AMPs possess membrane lytic activities that are naturally designed to target the cellular membrane of pathogens or competitors. They are extremely diverse in amino acid composition and often show specificity against a particular strain of microbe. Since our antibiotic arsenal is declining precariously in the face of the rise in multiantibiotic resistance, AMPs increasingly are seen as a promising alternative. In an effort to understand their molecular mechanism, biophysical studies of a myriad of AMPs have been reported, yet no unifying mechanism has emerged, rendering difficult the rational design of drug leads. Similarly, a wide variety of cytotoxic peptides are found in venoms, the best known being melittin, yet again, predicting their activity based on a particular amino acid composition or secondary structure remains elusive. A common feature of these membrane-active peptides is their preference for the lipid environment. Indeed, they are mainly unstructured in solution and, in the presence of lipid membranes, quickly adsorb onto the surface, change their secondary structure, eventually insert into the hydrophobic core of the membrane bilayer, and finally disrupt the bilayer integrity. These steps define the molecular

  18. How Membrane-Active Peptides Get into Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-21

    The structure-function relationship for a family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from the skin of Australian tree frogs is discussed and compared with that of peptide toxins from bee and Australian scorpion venoms. Although these membrane-active peptides induce a similar cellular fate by disrupting the lipid bilayer integrity, their lytic activity is achieved via different modes of action, which are investigated in relation to amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and membrane lipid composition. In order to better understand what structural features govern the interaction between peptides and lipid membranes, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which translocate through the membrane without compromising its integrity, are also discussed. AMPs possess membrane lytic activities that are naturally designed to target the cellular membrane of pathogens or competitors. They are extremely diverse in amino acid composition and often show specificity against a particular strain of microbe. Since our antibiotic arsenal is declining precariously in the face of the rise in multiantibiotic resistance, AMPs increasingly are seen as a promising alternative. In an effort to understand their molecular mechanism, biophysical studies of a myriad of AMPs have been reported, yet no unifying mechanism has emerged, rendering difficult the rational design of drug leads. Similarly, a wide variety of cytotoxic peptides are found in venoms, the best known being melittin, yet again, predicting their activity based on a particular amino acid composition or secondary structure remains elusive. A common feature of these membrane-active peptides is their preference for the lipid environment. Indeed, they are mainly unstructured in solution and, in the presence of lipid membranes, quickly adsorb onto the surface, change their secondary structure, eventually insert into the hydrophobic core of the membrane bilayer, and finally disrupt the bilayer integrity. These steps define the molecular

  19. [Calcium-induced changes in bilayer membranes from oxidized cholesterol].

    PubMed

    Hianik, T; Miklovichova, J; Foltinova, O; Bajchi, A

    1985-01-01

    Elastic properties of oxidized cholesterol bilayers in n-octane and membrane solvent free were studied by measuring Young modulus E perpendicular in the direction perpendicular to the membrane plane as a function of concentration of calcium ions. Interaction between calcium ions and solvent free bilayers resulted in a significant increases of Young modulus E perpendicular in the concentration range 20-40 mmol/l Ca2+. It is suggested that the hardening of the membrane is caused by some structural changes in the hydrophobic region of the membrane.

  20. Adventures in Computational Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sometimes one supercomputer is not enough. Or your local supercomputers are busy, or not configured for your job. Or you don't have any supercomputers. You might be trying to simulate worldwide weather changes in real time, requiring more compute power than you could get from any one machine. Or you might be collecting microbiological samples on an island, and need to examine them with a special microscope located on the other side of the continent. These are the times when you need a computational grid.

  1. TASMANIAN Sparse Grids Module

    SciTech Connect

    and Drayton Munster, Miroslav Stoyanov

    2013-09-20

    Sparse Grids are the family of methods of choice for multidimensional integration and interpolation in low to moderate number of dimensions. The method is to select extend a one dimensional set of abscissas, weights and basis functions by taking a subset of all possible tensor products. The module provides the ability to create global and local approximations based on polynomials and wavelets. The software has three components, a library, a wrapper for the library that provides a command line interface via text files ad a MATLAB interface via the command line tool.

  2. TASMANIAN Sparse Grids Module

    2013-09-20

    Sparse Grids are the family of methods of choice for multidimensional integration and interpolation in low to moderate number of dimensions. The method is to select extend a one dimensional set of abscissas, weights and basis functions by taking a subset of all possible tensor products. The module provides the ability to create global and local approximations based on polynomials and wavelets. The software has three components, a library, a wrapper for the library thatmore » provides a command line interface via text files ad a MATLAB interface via the command line tool.« less

  3. Intermolecular Vibrations of Hydrophobic Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Michael Roy Casselman

    Hydrophobic amino acids interact with their chemical environment through a combination of electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, dipole, induced dipole, and dispersion forces. These interactions all have their own characteristic energy scale and distance dependence. The low-frequency (0.1-5 THz, 5-150 cm-1) vibrational modes of amino acids in the solid state are a direct indicator of the interactions between the molecules, which include interactions between an amino acid functional group and its surroundings. This information is central to understanding the dynamics and morphology of proteins. The alpha-carbon is a chiral center for all of the hydrophobic amino acids, meaning that they exist in two forms, traditionally referred to as L- and D-enantiomers. This nomenclature indicates which direction the molecule rotates plane-polarized visible light (levorotory and dextrorotory). Chiral a-amino acids in proteins are exclusively the L-variety In the solid state, the crystal lattice of the pure L-enantiomer is the mirror image of the D-enantiomer crystal lattice. These solids are energetically identical. Enantiomers also have identical spectroscopic properties except when the measurement is polarization sensitive. A mixture of equal amounts D- and L-amino acid enantiomers can crystallize into a racemic (DL-) structure that is different from that of the pure enantiomers. Whether a solution of both enantiomers will crystallize into a racemic form or spontaneously resolve into a mixture of separate D- and L-crystals largely depends on the interactions between molecules available in the various possible configurations. This is an active area of research. Low-frequency vibrations with intermolecular character are very sensitive to changes in lattice geometry, and consequently the vibrational spectra of racemic crystals are usually quite distinct from the spectra of the crystals of the corresponding pure enantiomers in the far-infrared (far-IR). THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz

  4. Developing a general interaction potential for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Stephen H; Røyne, Anja; Kristiansen, Kai; Rapp, Michael V; Das, Saurabh; Gebbie, Matthew A; Lee, Dong Woog; Stock, Philipp; Valtiner, Markus; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2015-02-24

    We review direct force measurements on a broad class of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. These measurements have enabled the development of a general interaction potential per unit area, W(D) = -2γ(i)Hy exp(-D/D(H)) in terms of a nondimensional Hydra parameter, Hy, that applies to both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between extended surfaces. This potential allows one to quantitatively account for additional attractions and repulsions not included in the well-known combination of electrostatic double layer and van der Waals theories, the so-called Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The interaction energy is exponentially decaying with decay length D(H) ≈ 0.3-2 nm for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, with the exact value of D(H) depending on the precise system and conditions. The pre-exponential factor depends on the interfacial tension, γ(i), of the interacting surfaces and Hy. For Hy > 0, the interaction potential describes interactions between partially hydrophobic surfaces, with the maximum hydrophobic interaction (i.e., two fully hydrophobic surfaces) corresponding to Hy = 1. Hydrophobic interactions between hydrophobic monolayer surfaces measured with the surface forces apparatus (SFA) are shown to be well described by the proposed interaction potential. The potential becomes repulsive for Hy < 0, corresponding to partially hydrophilic (hydrated) interfaces. Hydrated surfaces such as mica, silica, and lipid bilayers are discussed and reviewed in the context of the values of Hy appropriate for each system.

  5. Hydroglyphics: Demonstration of Selective Wetting on Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Philseok; Alvarenga, Jack; Aizenberg, Joanna; Sleeper, Raymond S.

    2013-01-01

    A visual demonstration of the difference between hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces has been developed. It involves placing a shadow mask on an optically clear hydrophobic plastic dish, corona treating the surface with a modified Tesla coil, removing the shadow mask, and visualizing the otherwise invisible message or pattern by applying water,…

  6. Genetic analysis of a hydrophobic domain of coxsackie B3 virus protein 2B: a moderate degree of hydrophobicity is required for a cis-acting function in viral RNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    van Kuppeveld, F J; Galama, J M; Zoll, J; Melchers, W J

    1995-01-01

    Coxsackie B virus protein 2B contains near its C terminus a hydrophobic domain with an amino acid composition that is characteristic for transmembrane regions. A molecular genetic approach was followed to define the role of this domain in virus reproduction and to study the structural and hydrophobic requirements of the domain. Nine substitution mutations were introduced in an infectious cDNA clone of coxsackie B3 virus. The effects of the mutations were studied in vivo by transfection of Buffalo green monkey cells with copy RNA transcripts. The results reported here suggest that a critical degree of hydrophobicity of the domain is essential for virus growth. The mutations S77M, C75M, I64S, and V66S, which caused either a small increase or decrease in mean hydrophobicity, yielded viable viruses. The double mutations S77M/C75M and I64S/V6-6S, which caused a more pronounced increase or decrease in hydrophobicity, were nonviable. Negatively charged residues (mutations A71E, I73E, and A71E/I73E) abolished virus growth. The mutations had no effect on the synthesis and processing of the viral polyprotein. Replication and complementation were studied by using a subgenomic coxsackievirus replicon containing the luciferase gene in place of the capsid coding region. Analysis of luciferase accumulation demonstrated that the mutations cause primary defects in viral RNA synthesis that cannot be complemented by wild-type protein 2B provided in trans. The hydrophobic domain is predicted by computer analysis to form a multimeric transmembrane helix. The proposed interaction with the membrane and the implications of the mutations on this interaction are discussed. PMID:7494289

  7. Highly hydrophilic poly(vinylidene fluoride)/meso-titania hybrid mesoporous membrane for photocatalytic membrane reactor in water

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Yang, Guang; Jin, Peng; Tang, Hao; Wang, Huanhuan; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The high hydrophobicity of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane remains an obstacle to be applied in some purification processes of water or wastewater. Herein, a highly hydrophilic hybrid mesoporous titania membrane composed of mesoporous anatase titania (meso-TiO2) materials inside the three-dimensional (3D) macropores of PVDF membrane was successfully prepared by using the dual-templated synthesis method combined with solvent extraction and applied as the photocatalytic membrane reactor for the photodegredation of organic dye in water. The structure and the properties of as-prepared hybrid membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption and contact angle measurements. It was found that the hydrophilicity of PVDF membrane can be significantly improved by filling mesoporous TiO2 inside the 3D macropores of PVDF membrane. Moreover, such a PVDF/meso-TiO2 hybrid membrane exhibits promising photocatalytic degradation of dye in water due to the existence of mesoporous anatase TiO2 materials inside PVDF membrane. This study provides a new strategy to simultaneously introduce hydrophilicity and some desirable properties into PVDF and other hydrophobic membranes. PMID:26754440

  8. Highly hydrophilic poly(vinylidene fluoride)/meso-titania hybrid mesoporous membrane for photocatalytic membrane reactor in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Yang, Guang; Jin, Peng; Tang, Hao; Wang, Huanhuan; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The high hydrophobicity of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane remains an obstacle to be applied in some purification processes of water or wastewater. Herein, a highly hydrophilic hybrid mesoporous titania membrane composed of mesoporous anatase titania (meso-TiO2) materials inside the three-dimensional (3D) macropores of PVDF membrane was successfully prepared by using the dual-templated synthesis method combined with solvent extraction and applied as the photocatalytic membrane reactor for the photodegredation of organic dye in water. The structure and the properties of as-prepared hybrid membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption and contact angle measurements. It was found that the hydrophilicity of PVDF membrane can be significantly improved by filling mesoporous TiO2 inside the 3D macropores of PVDF membrane. Moreover, such a PVDF/meso-TiO2 hybrid membrane exhibits promising photocatalytic degradation of dye in water due to the existence of mesoporous anatase TiO2 materials inside PVDF membrane. This study provides a new strategy to simultaneously introduce hydrophilicity and some desirable properties into PVDF and other hydrophobic membranes.

  9. The EUAsiaGrid Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganoni, Marco

    The EUAsiaGrid proposal contributes to the aims of the Research Infrastructures part of the EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) by promoting interoperation between the European and the Asian-Pacific Grids. The project, with a total number of 15 partners coordinated by INFN, started on April 1st 2008. It will disseminate the knowledge about the EGEE Grid infrastructure, organize specific training events and support applications both within the scientific communities with an already long experience in the Computing Grids (High Energy Physics, Computational Chemistry, Bioinformatics and Biomedics) and in the most recent ones (Social Sciences, Disaster Mitigation, Cultural Heritage). Ultimately the EUAsiaGrid project will pave the way towards a common e-Infrastructure with the European and the Asian Grids.

  10. Prepares Overset Grids for Processing

    1998-04-22

    Many large and complex computational problems require multiple, structured, generically overlapped (overset) grids to obtain numerical solutions in a timely manner. BREAKUP significantly reduces required compute times by preparing overset grids for processing on massively parallel computers. BREAKUP subdivides the original grids for use on a user-specified number of parallel processors. Grid-to-grid and intragrid communications are maintained in the parallel environment via connectivity tables generated by BREAKUP. The subgrids are formed to be statically loadmore » balanced and to incur a minimum of communication between the subgrids. When the output of BREAKUP is submitted to an appropriately modified flow solver, subgrid solutions will be updated simultaneously. This contrasts to the much less efficient solution method of updating each original grid sequentially as done in the past.« less

  11. Prepares Overset Grids for Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Barnette, Daniel W.

    1998-04-22

    Many large and complex computational problems require multiple, structured, generically overlapped (overset) grids to obtain numerical solutions in a timely manner. BREAKUP significantly reduces required compute times by preparing overset grids for processing on massively parallel computers. BREAKUP subdivides the original grids for use on a user-specified number of parallel processors. Grid-to-grid and intragrid communications are maintained in the parallel environment via connectivity tables generated by BREAKUP. The subgrids are formed to be statically load balanced and to incur a minimum of communication between the subgrids. When the output of BREAKUP is submitted to an appropriately modified flow solver, subgrid solutions will be updated simultaneously. This contrasts to the much less efficient solution method of updating each original grid sequentially as done in the past.

  12. Gene expression of an arthrobacter in surfactant-enhanced biodegradation of a hydrophobic organic compound.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Zhu, Lizhong; Wang, Lingwen; Zhan, Yu

    2015-03-17

    Surfactants can affect the biodegradation process and the fate of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in the environment. Previous studies have shown that surfactants can enhance the biodegradation of HOCs by increasing cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and membrane fluidity. In this study, we took this work one step further by investigating the expression levels of three genes of Arthrobacter sp. SA02 in the biodegradation of phenanthrene as a typical HOC at different concentrations of sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS), which is a widely used surfactant. The Δ9 fatty acid desaturase gene codes for Δ9 fatty acid desaturase, which can convert saturated fatty acid to its unsaturated form. The ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (RHDase) and the 1-hydroxyl-2-naphthoate dioxygenase (1H2Nase) genes code for the RHDase and 1H2Nase enzymes, respectively, which play a key role in decomposing doubly hydroxylated aromatic compounds. The results show that these three genes were upregulated in the presence of SDBS. On the basis of the genetic and physiological changes, we proposed a pathway that links the gene expression with the physiological phenomena, including CSH, membrane fluidity, and intracellular degradation. This study advances our understanding of the surfactant-enhanced biodegradation of HOCs at the gene level, and the proposed pathway should be further validated in the future.

  13. Challenges and solutions for biofiltration of hydrophobic volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yan; He, Huijun; Yang, Chunping; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hong; Yu, Guanlong

    2016-11-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted to the environment highly probably result in ecological and health risks. Many biotechnologies for waste gases containing hydrophobic VOCs have been developed in recent years. However, these biological processes usually exhibit poor removal performances for hydrophobic VOCs due to the low bioavailability. This review presents an overview of enhanced removal of hydrophobic VOCs in biofilters. Mechanisms and problems relevant to the biological removal of hydrophobic VOCs are reviewed, and then solutions including the addition of surfactants, application of fungal biocatalysts, biofiltration with pretreatment, innovative bioreactors and utilization of hydrophilic compounds are discussed in detail. Future research needs are also proposed. This review provides new insights into hydrophobic VOC removal by biofiltration. PMID:27374790

  14. Natural hydrophobic flocculation of fine coal particles in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S.; Lu, S.; Trass, O.; Wang, G.; Wang, Z.

    1994-12-31

    The hydrophobic flocculation of fine coal particles with natural hydrophobicity in aqueous solution, which is called natural hydrophobic flocculation, has been studied in this paper. It features no surfactant addition but only high intensity mechanical agitation. The experimental results showed that this flocculation occurred even in the case of {minus}58 mV jet potential of coal particles, that is contrary to the classical DLVO (Derjaguin-LandauVerwey-Overbeek) theory. Wettability of coal particle surface dominates the stability o fine coal particles in aqueous solution. The bigger the contact angle, the more intensive the flocculation of the coal particle suspension. The quantitative theory of natural hydrophobic flocculation is presented in this paper. Using this theory, the authors have calculated the total potential energy of interaction between coal particles in aqueous solution. The results demonstrate that the hydrophobic interaction plays a dominant role in the interaction between coal particles in aqueous solution.

  15. CARBOXYLIC ACID EFFECTS ON ETHANOL RECOVERY FROM AQUEOUS MIXTURES USING PERVAPORATION THROUGH MFI ZEOLITE-FILLED POLYDIMETHYLSILOXANE MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most bioethanol is produced by fermenting sugars released from biomass and using distillation to recover the ethanol. Recovering ethanol from the fermentation broths using pervaporation through hydrophobic membranes is potentially economically competitive with distillation for s...

  16. Hydrophobicity and subunit interactions of rod outer segment proteins investigated using Triton X-114 phase partitioning.

    PubMed

    Justice, J M; Murtagh, J J; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1995-07-28

    Triton X-114 phase partitioning, a procedure used for purifying integral membrane proteins, was used to study protein components of the mammalian visual transduction cascade. An integral membrane protein, rhodopsin, and two isoprenylated protein complexes, cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase and Gt beta gamma, partitioned into the detergent-rich phase. Arrestin, a soluble protein, accumulated in the aqueous phase. Gt alpha distributed about equally between phases whether GDP (Gt alpha.GDP) or GTP (Gt alpha.GTP) was bound. Gt beta gamma increased recovery of Gt alpha.GDP but not Gt alpha.GTP in the detergent phase. Trypsin-treated Gt alpha, which lacks the fatty acylated amino-terminal 2-kDa region, accumulated to a greater extent in the aqueous phase than did intact Gt alpha. Trypsinized cGMP phosphodiesterase, which lacks the isoprenyl group, partitioned into the aqueous phase. A carboxyl-terminal truncated mutant (Val-331 stop) of Gt alpha accumulated more in the aqueous phase then did recombinant full-length Gt alpha, supporting the role of the carboxyl terminus in increasing its hydrophobicity. N-Myristoylated recombinant Go alpha was more hydrophobic than recombinant Go alpha without myristate. ADP-ribosylation of Gt alpha catalyzed by NAD:arginine ADP-ribosyltransferase, but not by pertussis toxin, increased hydrophilicity. Triton X-114 phase partitioning can thus semiquantify the hydrophobic nature of proteins and protein domains. It may aid in evaluating changes associated with post-translational protein modification and protein-protein interactions in a defined system.

  17. On unstructured grids and solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals and the state-of-the-art technology for unstructured grids and solvers are highlighted. Algorithms and techniques pertinent to mesh generation are discussed. It is shown that grid generation and grid manipulation schemes rely on fast multidimensional searching. Flow solution techniques for the Euler equations, which can be derived from the integral form of the equations are discussed. Sample calculations are also provided.

  18. Prospects for using membrane distallation for reprocessing liquid radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Dytnerskii, Y.I.; Karlin, Y.V.; Kropotov, B.N.

    1994-05-01

    Membrane distillation is a promising method for deep desalinization and for removal of impurities of different nature from water. The crux of the method is as follows. The initial (hot) solution, heated up to 30-70{degrees}C, is fed into one side of a hydrophobic microporous membrane. A less heated (cold) distillate moves along the other. Since the membrane is hydrophobic and the pores are small ({approximately}1 {mu}m and less), the liquid phase does not penetrate into the pores in accordance with Kelvin`s law. The vapor evaporating from the surface of the hot solution (the evaporation surface in this case are solution meniscuses forming at the entrance into a pore) penetrates into the pores of the membrane, diffuses through the air layer in the pore, and condenses on the surface of the menisci of cold liquid. In the process rarefaction is produced in the pores, and this accelerates evaporation and therefore increases its efficiency.

  19. Tuning the resistance of polycarbonate membranes by plasma-induced graft surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Lukas; Hegemann, Dirk; de Courten, Damien; Wolf, Martin; Rossi, René M.; Meier, Wolfgang P.; Scherer, Lukas J.

    2013-03-01

    To tune the permeability resistance of porous polycarbonate (PC) membranes for caffeine, their surfaces were plasma modified with different monomers in a grafting from process. These coatings provided characteristic surface hydrophilicities. It was found that membranes with more hydrophilic surfaces have lower resistances to let caffeine pass through than membranes with hydrophobic surfaces. Additionally, it was possible to post-modify a poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate) (AEMA) coated PC membrane with octanoic acid (Oct) under mild conditions. This post modification allowed transforming a slightly hydrophilic PC-AEMA membrane with a moderate permeability resistance into a hydrophobic PC-AEMA-Oct membrane with a high permeability resistance. Overall, it was possible to tune the PC membrane resistance for caffeine in a range from 5100 up to 15,100 s/cm.

  20. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-10-15

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  1. Grid Task Execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Chaumin

    2007-01-01

    IPG Execution Service is a framework that reliably executes complex jobs on a computational grid, and is part of the IPG service architecture designed to support location-independent computing. The new grid service enables users to describe the platform on which they need a job to run, which allows the service to locate the desired platform, configure it for the required application, and execute the job. After a job is submitted, users can monitor it through periodic notifications, or through queries. Each job consists of a set of tasks that performs actions such as executing applications and managing data. Each task is executed based on a starting condition that is an expression of the states of other tasks. This formulation allows tasks to be executed in parallel, and also allows a user to specify tasks to execute when other tasks succeed, fail, or are canceled. The two core components of the Execution Service are the Task Database, which stores tasks that have been submitted for execution, and the Task Manager, which executes tasks in the proper order, based on the user-specified starting conditions, and avoids overloading local and remote resources while executing tasks.

  2. OGC and Grid Interoperability in enviroGRIDS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgan, Dorian; Rodila, Denisa; Bacu, Victor; Giuliani, Gregory; Ray, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    EnviroGRIDS (Black Sea Catchment Observation and Assessment System supporting Sustainable Development) [1] is a 4-years FP7 Project aiming to address the subjects of ecologically unsustainable development and inadequate resource management. The project develops a Spatial Data Infrastructure of the Black Sea Catchment region. The geospatial technologies offer very specialized functionality for Earth Science oriented applications as well as the Grid oriented technology that is able to support distributed and parallel processing. One challenge of the enviroGRIDS project is the interoperability between geospatial and Grid infrastructures by providing the basic and the extended features of the both technologies. The geospatial interoperability technology has been promoted as a way of dealing with large volumes of geospatial data in distributed environments through the development of interoperable Web service specifications proposed by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), with applications spread across multiple fields but especially in Earth observation research. Due to the huge volumes of data available in the geospatial domain and the additional introduced issues (data management, secure data transfer, data distribution and data computation), the need for an infrastructure capable to manage all those problems becomes an important aspect. The Grid promotes and facilitates the secure interoperations of geospatial heterogeneous distributed data within a distributed environment, the creation and management of large distributed computational jobs and assures a security level for communication and transfer of messages based on certificates. This presentation analysis and discusses the most significant use cases for enabling the OGC Web services interoperability with the Grid environment and focuses on the description and implementation of the most promising one. In these use cases we give a special attention to issues such as: the relations between computational grid and

  3. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  4. Remodeling of Super-hydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Extrand, C W

    2016-08-30

    An experimental study on the underlying mechanisms of structured super-hydrophobic surfaces was recently published [ Butt, H.-J.; et al. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2016, 116, 096101 . DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.096101 ]. After depositing small drops of water, Butt's group inclined their surfaces to initiate movement. They examined the contact between the water and structured surfaces with confocal microscopy. They observed that drops were suspended atop the protruding features and movement of water was different at the advancing and receding edges. At the advancing edge, the water interface descended downward and draped itself across the features. At the receding edge, water jumped from one feature to the next. As Butt and co-workers did not test their data against any existing model, that is done in this paper. Here, a previously proposed model that employs linear averaging at the contact line was adapted to their surfaces in an attempt to estimate their contact and sliding angles. Predictions from the model generally agreed with their experimental measurements. PMID:27541362

  5. Amphipols: Polymers that Keep Membrane Proteins Soluble in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribet, Christophe; Audebert, Roland; Popot, Jean-Luc

    1996-12-01

    Amphipols are a new class of surfactants that make it possible to handle membrane proteins in detergent-free aqueous solution as though they were soluble proteins. The strongly hydrophilic backbone of these polymers is grafted with hydrophobic chains, making them amphiphilic. Amphipols are able to stabilize in aqueous solution under their native state four well-characterized integral membrane proteins: (i) bacteriorhodopsin, (ii) a bacterial photosynthetic reaction center, (iii) cytochrome b6f, and (iv) matrix porin.

  6. Structural adaptations of proteins to different biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pogozheva, Irina D.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Mosberg, Henry I.; Lomize, Andrei L.

    2013-01-01

    To gain insight into adaptations of proteins to their membranes, intrinsic hydrophobic thicknesses, distributions of different chemical groups and profiles of hydrogen-bonding capacities (α and β) and the dipolarity/polarizability parameter (π*) were calculated for lipid-facing surfaces of 460 integral α-helical, β-barrel and peripheral proteins from eight types of biomembranes. For comparison, polarity profiles were also calculated for ten artificial lipid bilayers that have been previously studied by neutron and X-ray scattering. Estimated hydrophobic thicknesses are 30-31 Å for proteins from endoplasmic reticulum, thylakoid, and various bacterial plasma membranes, but differ for proteins from outer bacterial, inner mitochondrial and eukaryotic plasma membranes (23.9, 28.6 and 33.5 Å, respectively). Protein and lipid polarity parameters abruptly change in the lipid carbonyl zone that matches the calculated hydrophobic boundaries. Maxima of positively charged protein groups correspond to the location of lipid phosphates at 20-22 Å distances from the membrane center. Locations of Tyr atoms coincide with hydrophobic boundaries, while distributions maxima of Trp rings are shifted by 3-4 Å toward the membrane center. Distributions of Trp atoms indicate the presence of two 5-8 Å-wide midpolar regions with intermediate π* values within the hydrocarbon core, whose size and symmetry depend on the lipid composition of membrane leaflets. Midpolar regions are especially asymmetric in outer bacterial membranes and cell membranes of mesophilic but not hyperthermophilic archaebacteria, indicating the larger width of the central nonpolar region in the later case. In artificial lipid bilayers, midpolar regions are observed up to the level of acyl chain double bonds. PMID:23811361

  7. Grid Generation Techniques Utilizing the Volume Grid Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents grid generation techniques available in the Volume Grid Manipulation (VGM) code. The VGM code is designed to manipulate existing line, surface and volume grids to improve the quality of the data. It embodies an easy to read rich language of commands that enables such alterations as topology changes, grid adaption and smoothing. Additionally, the VGM code can be used to construct simplified straight lines, splines, and conic sections which are common curves used in the generation and manipulation of points, lines, surfaces and volumes (i.e., grid data). These simple geometric curves are essential in the construction of domain discretizations for computational fluid dynamic simulations. By comparison to previously established methods of generating these curves interactively, the VGM code provides control of slope continuity and grid point-to-point stretchings as well as quick changes in the controlling parameters. The VGM code offers the capability to couple the generation of these geometries with an extensive manipulation methodology in a scripting language. The scripting language allows parametric studies of a vehicle geometry to be efficiently performed to evaluate favorable trends in the design process. As examples of the powerful capabilities of the VGM code, a wake flow field domain will be appended to an existing X33 Venturestar volume grid; negative volumes resulting from grid expansions to enable flow field capture on a simple geometry, will be corrected; and geometrical changes to a vehicle component of the X33 Venturestar will be shown.

  8. From the grid to the smart grid, topologically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, Giuliano Andrea; Aiello, Marco

    2016-05-01

    In its more visionary acceptation, the smart grid is a model of energy management in which the users are engaged in producing energy as well as consuming it, while having information systems fully aware of the energy demand-response of the network and of dynamically varying prices. A natural question is then: to make the smart grid a reality will the distribution grid have to be upgraded? We assume a positive answer to the question and we consider the lower layers of medium and low voltage to be the most affected by the change. In our previous work, we analyzed samples of the Dutch distribution grid (Pagani and Aiello, 2011) and we considered possible evolutions of these using synthetic topologies modeled after studies of complex systems in other technological domains (Pagani and Aiello, 2014). In this paper, we take an extra important step by defining a methodology for evolving any existing physical power grid to a good smart grid model, thus laying the foundations for a decision support system for utilities and governmental organizations. In doing so, we consider several possible evolution strategies and apply them to the Dutch distribution grid. We show how increasing connectivity is beneficial in realizing more efficient and reliable networks. Our proposal is topological in nature, enhanced with economic considerations of the costs of such evolutions in terms of cabling expenses and economic benefits of evolving the grid.

  9. Outer Membrane Permeability and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Delcour, Anne H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary To date most antibiotics are targeted at intracellular processes, and must be able to penetrate the bacterial cell envelope. In particular, the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria provides a formidable barrier that must be overcome. There are essentially two pathways that antibiotics can take through the outer membrane: a lipid-mediated pathway for hydrophobic antibiotics, and general diffusion porins for hydrophilic antibiotics. The lipid and protein compositions of the outer membrane have a strong impact on the sensitivity of bacteria to many types of antibiotics, and drug resistance involving modifications of these macromolecules is common. This review will describe the molecular mechanisms for permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane, and the strategies that bacteria have deployed to resist antibiotics by modifications of these pathways. PMID:19100346

  10. Liquid membrane purification of biogas

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Guha, A.K.; Lee, Y.T.; Papadopoulos, T.; Khare, S. . Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    Conventional gas purification technologies are highly energy intensive. They are not suitable for economic removal of CO{sub 2} from methane obtained in biogas due to the small scale of gas production. Membrane separation techniques on the other hand are ideally suited for low gas production rate applications due to their modular nature. Although liquid membranes possess a high species permeability and selectivity, they have not been used for industrial applications due to the problems of membrane stability, membrane flooding and poor operational flexibility, etc. A new hollow-fiber-contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) technique has been developed recently. This technique overcomes the shortcomings of the traditional immobilized liquid membrane technology. A new technique uses two sets of hydrophobic, microporous hollow fine fibers, packed tightly in a permeator shell. The inter-fiber space is filled with an aqueous liquid acting as the membrane. The feed gas mixture is separated by selective permeation of a species through the liquid from one fiber set to the other. The second fiber set carries a sweep stream, gas or liquid, or simply the permeated gas stream. The objectives (which were met) of the present investigation were as follows. To study the selective removal of CO{sub 2} from a model biogas mixture containing 40% CO{sub 2} (the rest being N{sub 2} or CH{sub 4}) using a HFCLM permeator under various operating modes that include sweep gas, sweep liquid, vacuum and conventional permeation; to develop a mathematical model for each mode of operation; to build a large-scale purification loop and large-scale permeators for model biogas separation and to show stable performance over a period of one month.

  11. NAS Grid Benchmarks: A Tool for Grid Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present an approach for benchmarking services provided by computational Grids. It is based on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) and is called NAS Grid Benchmark (NGB) in this paper. We present NGB as a data flow graph encapsulating an instance of an NPB code in each graph node, which communicates with other nodes by sending/receiving initialization data. These nodes may be mapped to the same or different Grid machines. Like NPB, NGB will specify several different classes (problem sizes). NGB also specifies the generic Grid services sufficient for running the bench-mark. The implementor has the freedom to choose any specific Grid environment. However, we describe a reference implementation in Java, and present some scenarios for using NGB.

  12. Hydrophilic fraction of natural organic matter causing irreversible fouling of microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Hiroshi; Okimoto, Kenji; Kimura, Katsuki; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2014-05-01

    Although membrane filtration is a promising technology in the field of drinking water treatment, persistent membrane fouling remains a major disadvantage. For more efficient operation, causative agents of membrane fouling need to be identified. Membrane fouling can be classified into physically reversible and irreversible fouling on basis of the removability of the foulants by physical cleaning. Four types of natural organic matter (NOM) in river water used as a source of drinking water were fractionated into hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions, and their potential to develop irreversible membrane fouling was evaluated by a bench-scale filtration experiment together with spectroscopic and chromatographic analyses. In this study, only dissolved NOM was investigated without consideration of interactions of NOM fractions with particulate matter. Results demonstrated that despite identical total organic carbon (TOC), fouling development trends were significantly different between hydrophilic and hydrophobic fractions. The hydrophobic fractions did not increase membrane resistance, while the hydrophilic fractions caused severe loss of membrane permeability. These results were identical with the case when the calcium was added to hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions. The largest difference in NOM characteristics between hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions was the presence or absence of macromolecules; the primary constituent causing irreversible fouling was inferred to be "biopolymers", including carbohydrates and proteins. In addition, the results demonstrated that the extent of irreversible fouling was considerably different depending on the combination of membrane materials and NOM characteristics. Despite identical nominal pore size (0.1 μm), a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane was found to be more rapidly fouled than a PE membrane. This is probably explained by the generation of strong hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups of biopolymers and fluorine

  13. Hydrophilic fraction of natural organic matter causing irreversible fouling of microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Hiroshi; Okimoto, Kenji; Kimura, Katsuki; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2014-05-01

    Although membrane filtration is a promising technology in the field of drinking water treatment, persistent membrane fouling remains a major disadvantage. For more efficient operation, causative agents of membrane fouling need to be identified. Membrane fouling can be classified into physically reversible and irreversible fouling on basis of the removability of the foulants by physical cleaning. Four types of natural organic matter (NOM) in river water used as a source of drinking water were fractionated into hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions, and their potential to develop irreversible membrane fouling was evaluated by a bench-scale filtration experiment together with spectroscopic and chromatographic analyses. In this study, only dissolved NOM was investigated without consideration of interactions of NOM fractions with particulate matter. Results demonstrated that despite identical total organic carbon (TOC), fouling development trends were significantly different between hydrophilic and hydrophobic fractions. The hydrophobic fractions did not increase membrane resistance, while the hydrophilic fractions caused severe loss of membrane permeability. These results were identical with the case when the calcium was added to hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions. The largest difference in NOM characteristics between hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions was the presence or absence of macromolecules; the primary constituent causing irreversible fouling was inferred to be "biopolymers", including carbohydrates and proteins. In addition, the results demonstrated that the extent of irreversible fouling was considerably different depending on the combination of membrane materials and NOM characteristics. Despite identical nominal pore size (0.1 μm), a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane was found to be more rapidly fouled than a PE membrane. This is probably explained by the generation of strong hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups of biopolymers and fluorine

  14. Recovery of ammonia from poultry litter using flat gas permeable membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of flat gas-permeable membranes was investigated as components of a new process to capture and recover ammonia (NH3) in poultry houses. This process includes the passage of gaseous NH3 through a microporous hydrophobic membrane, capture with a circulating dilute acid on the other side of the...

  15. Synthesis of antimicrobial cyclodextrins bearing polyarylamino and polyalkylamino groups via click chemistry for bacterial membrane disruption.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Hatsuo; Sugiyama, Yuuki; Murata, Kensuke; Yokoi, Takanori; Kurata, Ryuji; Miyagawa, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Kenji; Komagoe, Keiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Katsu, Takashi

    2014-05-28

    Cyclodextrin derivatives are synthesized as membrane-disrupting agents via a microwave-assisted Huisgen reaction. Their ability to permeabilize bacterial membranes depends on the amino substituents and an appropriate balance of hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity, thus enabling the preparation of derivatives with selective toxicity against bacteria.

  16. Poisoning of mixed matrix membranes by fermentation components in pervaporation of ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pervaporation is an alternative to distillation for recovering ethanol produced by fermentation of grains and biomass. Ethanol-selective mixed matrix membranes of the hydrophobic zeolite ZSM-5 in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) have superior performance compared to pure PDMS membranes in pervaporation o...

  17. Multi-block sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer proton exchange membranes

    DOEpatents

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Hibbs, Michael; Ambrosini, Andrea

    2012-02-07

    Improved multi-block sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer compositions, methods of making the same, and their use as proton exchange membranes (PEM) in hydrogen fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cells, in electrode casting solutions and electrodes. The multi-block architecture has defined, controllable hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. These improved membranes have better ion transport (proton conductivity) and water swelling properties.

  18. Thermodynamics of hydrophobic interaction between silica surfaces coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuoli; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    2013-02-15

    Surface force measurements conducted with thiolated gold surfaces showed previously that hydrophobic interaction entails a decrease in excess film entropy, suggesting that hydrophobic force originates from changes in the structure of the medium (water) confined between hydrophobic surfaces. As a follow-up work, surface force measurements have been conducted in the present work using an atomic force microscope (AFM) with silica surfaces coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) at temperatures in the range of 10-40°C. A thermodynamic analysis of the results show that both the excess film entropy (ΔS(f)) and excess film enthalpy (ΔH(f)) decrease with decreasing thickness of the water films between the hydrophobic surfaces. It has been found also that |ΔH(f)|>|TΔS(f)|, which represents a necessary condition for the excess free energy change (ΔG(f)) to be negative and hence the hydrophobic interaction be attractive. Thus, the results obtained with both the thiolated and silylated surfaces show that hydrophobic forces originate from the structural changes in the medium. It is believed that the water molecules in the thin liquid films (TLFs) of water form clusters as a means to reduce the free energy when they cannot form H-bonds to neighboring hydrophobic surfaces. PMID:23127878

  19. Characterization of water formation mechanisms on hydrophobic radome materials

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.C.; Wienhold, P.D.; Nicholas, A.A.; Garner, P.N.

    1994-03-01

    The degree of hydrophobicity and contact angle of water on different radome coating materials was measured. The ability of these hydrophobic materials to bond to a radome substrate was also observed. The materials tested were; Raydell M-26-OS, Raydell M-15-OS, RA 7947, RA 7943, Teflon/Tedlar and Vellox-140. Each material was bonded to G-10 fiberglass panels and evaluated under conditions simulating dew formation, driving rain, freezing rain. Raydell M-26-OS had a relatively high contact angle, demonstrated excellent boding to a radome material, and had fair hydrophobic properties. RA 7947 and RA 7943 had relatively high contact angles, demonstrated poor and fair bonding, respectively, to a radome material, and exhibited good hydrophobic properties. The Teflon/Tedlar material had a low contact angle, demonstrated good bonding to a radome material, but showed fair to poor hydrophobic properties. The Vellox-140 and Raydell M-15-OS had relatively high to high contact angles, demonstrated excellent and possibly excellent bonding, respectively, to a radome material, and showed good to excellent, respectively, hydrophobic properties. These results were consistent whether the test temperature was 22{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) or -13{degrees}C (8{degrees}F) and whether the water was in the form of a mist or a concentrated stream. Long term tests and the effects of salt spray and dirt and the hydrophobic materials were not examined. 17 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Surface Hydrophobicity Causes SO2 Tolerance in Lichens

    PubMed Central

    Hauck, Markus; Jürgens, Sascha-René; Brinkmann, Martin; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The superhydrophobicity of the thallus surface in one of the most SO2-tolerant lichen species, Lecanora conizaeoides, suggests that surface hydrophobicity could be a general feature of lichen symbioses controlling their tolerance to SO2. The study described here tests this hypothesis. Methods Water droplets of the size of a raindrop were placed on the surface of air-dry thalli in 50 lichen species of known SO2 tolerance and contact angles were measured to quantify hydrophobicity. Key Results The wettability of lichen thalli ranges from strongly hydrophobic to strongly hydrophilic. SO2 tolerance of the studied lichen species increased with increasing hydrophobicity of the thallus surface. Extraction of extracellular lichen secondary metabolites with acetone reduced, but did not abolish the hydrophobicity of lichen thalli. Conclusions Surface hydrophobicity is the main factor controlling SO2 tolerance in lichens. It presumably originally evolved as an adaptation to wet habitats preventing the depression of net photosynthesis due to supersaturation of the thallus with water. Hydrophilicity of lichen thalli is an adaptation to dry or humid, but not directly rain-exposed habitats. The crucial role of surface hydrophobicity in SO2 also explains why many markedly SO2-tolerant species are additionally tolerant to other (chemically unrelated) toxic substances including heavy metals. PMID:18077467