Science.gov

Sample records for hydrophobic iminoxyl radicals

  1. Iminoxyl radical-promoted dichotomous cyclizations: efficient oxyoximation and aminooximation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xie-Xue; Deng, Yun-Jing; Yang, Xiu-Long; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Wei; Han, Bing

    2014-09-05

    A novel iminoxyl radical-involved metal-free approach to vicinal oxyoximation and aminooximation of unactivated alkenes is developed. This method utilizes the dichotomous reactivity of the iminoxyl radical to furnish a general difunctionalization on alkenes using simple tert-butyl nitrite (TBN) as the iminoxyl radical initiator as well the carbon radical trap. By using this protocol, oxime featured 4,5-dihydroisoxazoles and cyclic nitrones were facilely prepared from β,γ- and γ,δ-unsaturated ketoximes, respectively.

  2. Method of making a membrane having hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces for adhering cells or antibodies by using atomic oxygen or hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A portion of an organic polymer article such as a membrane is made hydrophilic by exposing a hydrophobic surface of the article to a depth of about 50 to about 5000 angstroms to atomic oxygen or hydroxyl radicals at a temperature below 100C., preferably below 40 C, to form a hydrophilic uniform surface layer of hydrophilic hydroxyl groups. The atomic oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are generated by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, and the surface is outside of a plasma produced by the discharge. A membrane having both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces can be used in an immunoassay by adhering antibodies to the hydrophobic surface. In another embodiment, the membrane is used in cell culturing where cells adhere to the hydrophilic surface. Prior to adhering cells, the hydrophilic surface may be grafted with a compatibilizing compound. A plurality of hydrophilic regions bounded by adjacent hydrophobic regions can be produced such that a maximum of one cell per each hydrophilic region adheres.

  3. HDF and QCI studies on the heterosubstituted iminoxy radicals: substituent effect on the isotropic hyperfine couplings with 13C and 1H nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszewski, Adrian R.

    2001-07-01

    Isotropic hyperfine parameters of a set of iminoxy radicals are investigated using hybrid density functional and quadratic configuration interaction methods. The systems studied are R1R2CNO radicals, where R1H, BH 2, CH 3, NH 2, OH, F, AlH 2, SiH 3, PH 2, SH, Cl and R2H. Theoretical results indicate that magnitude of the hyperfine coupling with iminoxy 13C nucleus due to the particular isomer of the radical is strongly affected by electronegativity of the substituents R1 and R2. A iso( 13C) varies from 6.7 to 56.2 G for Z (and from 45.6 to 18.7 G for E) isomers of the iminoxyls depending on the substituent (AlH 2 and F, respectively).

  4. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  5. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  6. Preparation of hydrophobic coatings

    DOEpatents

    Branson, Eric D [Albuquerque, NM; Shah, Pratik B [Albuquerque, NM; Singh, Seema [Rio Rancho, NM; Brinker, C Jeffrey [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-02-03

    A method for preparing a hydrophobic coating by preparing a precursor sol comprising a metal alkoxide, a solvent, a basic catalyst, a fluoroalkyl compound and water, depositing the precursor sol as a film onto a surface, such as a substrate or a pipe, heating, the film and exposing the film to a hydrophobic silane compound to form a hydrophobic coating with a contact angle greater than approximately 150.degree.. The contact angle of the film can be controlled by exposure to ultraviolet radiation to reduce the contact angle and subsequent exposure to a hydrophobic silane compound to increase the contact angle.

  7. Wetting: Intrinsically robust hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2013-04-01

    Ceramic surfaces can be rendered hydrophobic by using polymeric modifiers, but these are not robust to harsh environments. A known family of rare-earth oxide ceramics is now found to exhibit intrinsic hydrophobicity, even after exposure to high temperatures and abrasive wear.

  8. Electrohydrodynamics near hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maduar, S R; Belyaev, A V; Lobaskin, V; Vinogradova, O I

    2015-03-20

    We show that an electro-osmotic flow near the slippery hydrophobic surface depends strongly on the mobility of surface charges, which are balanced by counterions of the electrostatic diffuse layer. For a hydrophobic surface with immobile charges, the fluid transport is considerably amplified by the existence of a hydrodynamic slippage. In contrast, near the hydrophobic surface with mobile adsorbed charges, it is also controlled by an additional electric force, which increases the shear stress at the slipping interface. To account for this, we formulate electrohydrodynamic boundary conditions at the slipping interface, which should be applied to quantify electro-osmotic flows instead of hydrodynamic boundary conditions. Our theoretical predictions are fully supported by dissipative particle dynamics simulations with explicit charges. These results lead to a new interpretation of zeta potential of hydrophobic surfaces.

  9. The synthesis and rheological characterization of a hydrophobically-modified acrylamide/acrylamide copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, T.A.; Davis, R.M.; Peiffer, D.G.

    1993-12-31

    The synthesis of a anionic, hydrophobically-modified acrylonitrile derivative is described, as the aqueous free-radical copolymerization of this monomer with acrylamide. The hydrophobic monomer contains a long-chain alkyl group and the pendant chain is terminated by a sulfonate group. Past rheological characterization has yielded viscosity profiles atypical for a conventional polyelectrolyte. Preliminary rheological data suggest that the copolymer in aqueous solution exhibits the polyelectrolyte effect, as well as interchain hydrophobic association.

  10. Hydrophobic, Porous Battery Boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Casey, John E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Boxes made of porous, hydrophobic polymers developed to contain aqueous potassium hydroxide electrolyte solutions of zinc/air batteries while allowing air to diffuse in as needed for operation. Used on other types of batteries for in-cabin use in which electrolytes aqueous and from which gases generated during operation must be vented without allowing electrolytes to leak out.

  11. Osteoclast radicals.

    PubMed

    Silverton, S

    1994-11-01

    In biological research, new ideas arise and quickly spread to encompass the entire field. Thus, the evolution of molecular biology has significantly changed our methods of approaching our research. A similar far-reaching finding has been the advent of radical reactions into biology. Although radical chemistry has been utilized for many technological advances that affect our daily lives, the appreciation of this same process within our cells has opened an unexplored arena for research enquiry. As cellular messengers, radical molecules seem whimsically designed: they are evanescent, rapidly and apparently indiscriminately reactive, and barely detectable by most biological methods. Yet, our initial probing of these reactive agents in cells and organisms has led us to postulate a virtually undescribed system of communication within and among cells which may have significant effects in multiple organs. In bone, radical reactants have been attributed with an important role in the control of bone resorption.

  12. Hydrophobic sugar holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejias-Brizuela, N. Y.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Páez-Trujillo, G.; Hernández-Garay, M. P.; Fontanilla-Urdaneta, R.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2008-02-01

    The sugar matrix is used to record of phase holograms; it was modified with the purpose of obtaining a hydrophobic material to improve the stability of the registered image and to stimulate the photosensitivity of the sugar. The new material is formed by a sugar, pectin and vanillin dissolution. The diffraction efficiency parameter increases in comparison with only the sugar matrix, obtaining already of 10%.

  13. Microstructure of Hydrophobically Modified Alkyl Acrylamide Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jun; Seery, T. A. P.; Weiss, R. A.

    2002-03-01

    Hydrophobically modified water soluble polymers of poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-2-(N-ethylfluorooctanesulfonamido)ethyl acrylate) (polyDMA/FOSA) with different compositions were prepared by solution free radical polymerization. The molecular weights ranged from Mw/Mn=53000/23000 to 95000/40000. The intrinsic viscosity decreased with the increasing FOSA content. The glass transition temperature of the copolymer decreased with FOSA content, and exhibited positive deviation from that predicted by the Fox equation. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) curves exhibited a peak that indicated the copolymer had a microphase separated structure, presumably due to hydrophobic association of FOSA groups. The SAXS peak position shifted to higher q value with the increasing FOSA content in the dry polymers, while for the water swollen gel, it shifted to lower q value with the increasing water uptake in the gels. These results suggested that the origin of the peak was related to the spacing between hydrophobic microdomains. The failure of time-temperature superposition of the dynamic shear moduli supported the conclusion of a microphase separated structure in the copolymer.

  14. Water on a Hydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scruggs, Ryan; Zhu, Mengjue; Poynor, Adele

    2012-02-01

    Hydrophobicity, meaning literally fear of water, is exhibited on the surfaces of non-stick cooking pans and water resistant clothing, on the leaves of the lotus plan, or even during the protein folding process in our bodies. Hydrophobicity is directly measured by determining a contact angle between water and an objects surface. Associated with a hydrophobic surface is the depletion layer, a low density region approximately 0.2 nm thick. We study this region by comparing data found in lab using surface plasmon resonance techniques to theoretical calculations. Experiments use gold slides coated in ODT and Mercapto solutions to model both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces respectively.

  15. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koch, V.R.; Nanjundiah, C.; Carlin, R.T.

    1998-10-27

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas shown in a diagram wherein R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}, R{sub 3}, R{sub 4}, R{sub 5}, and R{sub 6} are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F-, Cl-, CF{sub 3}-, SF{sub 5}-, CF{sub 3}S-, (CF{sub 3}){sub 2}CHS- or (CF{sub 3}){sub 3}CS-; and X{sup {minus}} is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 {angstrom}{sup 3}. 4 figs.

  16. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Victor R.; Nanjundiah, Chenniah; Carlin, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, and R.sub.6 are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F--, Cl--, CF.sub.3 --, SF.sub.5 --, CF.sub.3 S--, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 CHS-- or (CF.sub.3).sub.3 CS--; and X.sup.- is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 .ANG..sup.3.

  17. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, V.R.; Nanjundiah, C.; Carlin, R.T.

    1998-10-27

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas shown in a diagram wherein R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}, R{sub 3}, R{sub 4}, R{sub 5}, and R{sub 6} are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F-, Cl-, CF{sub 3}-, SF{sub 5}-, CF{sub 3}S-, (CF{sub 3}){sub 2}CHS- or (CF{sub 3}){sub 3}CS-; and X{sup {minus}} is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 {angstrom}{sup 3}. 4 figs.

  18. Hydrophobic encapsulation of hydrocarbon gases.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, Alexander V; Saleh, Anas W; Rudkevich, Dmitry M

    2007-04-26

    [reaction: see text] Encapsulation data for hydrophobic hydrocarbon gases within a water-soluble hemicarcerand in aqueous solution are reported. It is concluded that hydrophobic interactions serve as the primary driving force for the encapsulation, which can be used for the design of gas-separating polymers with intrinsic inner cavities.

  19. Voltage-Gated Hydrophobic Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobicity is a fundamental property that is responsible for numerous physical and biophysical aspects of molecular interactions in water. Peculiar behavior is expected for water in the vicinity of hydrophobic structures, such as nanopores. Indeed, hydrophobic nanopores can be found in two distinct states, dry and wet, even though the latter is thermodynamically unstable. Transitions between these two states are kinetically hindered in long pores but can be much faster in shorter pores. As it is demonstrated for the first time in this paper, these transitions can be induced by applying a voltage across a membrane with a single hydrophobic nanopore. Such voltage-induced gating in single nanopores can be realized in a reversible manner through electrowetting of inner walls of the nanopores. The resulting I-V curves of such artificial hydrophobic nanopores mimic biological voltage-gated channels.

  20. Changing water affinity from hydrophobic to hydrophilic in hydrophobic channels.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Shotaro; Kodaira, Tetsuya; Hata, Kenji

    2015-01-27

    The behavior of water at hydrophobic interfaces can play a significant role in determining chemical reaction outcomes and physical properties. Carbon nanotubes and aluminophosphate materials have one-dimensional hydrophobic channels, which are entirely surrounded by hydrophobic interfaces. Unique water behavior was observed in such hydrophobic channels. In this article, changes in the water affinity in one-dimensional hydrophobic channels were assessed using water vapor adsorption isotherms at 303 K and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic behavior of water adsorbed in channels wider than 3 nm was observed for both adsorption and desorption processes, owing to the hydrophobic environment. However, water showed hydrophilic properties in both adsorption and desorption processes in channels narrower than 1 nm. In intermediate-sized channels, the hydrophobic properties of water during the adsorption process were seen to transition to hydrophilic behavior during the desorption process. Hydrophilic properties in the narrow channels for both adsorption and desorption processes are a result of the relatively strong water-channel interactions (10-15 kJ mol(-1)). In the 2-3 nm channels, the water-channel interaction energy of 4-5 kJ mol(-1) was comparable to the thermal translational energy. The cohesive water interaction was approximately 35 kJ mol(-1), which was larger than the others. Thus, the water affinity change in the 2-3 nm channels for the adsorption and desorption processes was attributed to weak water-channel interactions and strong cohesive interactions. These results are inherently important to control the properties of water in hydrophobic environments.

  1. Air agglomeration of hydrophobic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The agglomeration of hydrophobic particles in an aqueous suspension was accomplished by introducing small amounts of air into the suspension while it was agitated vigorously. The extent of aggregation was proportional both to the air to solids ratio and to the hydrophobicity of the solids. For a given air/solids ratio, the extent of aggregation of different materials increased in the following order: graphite, gilsonite, coal coated with heptane, and Teflon. The structure of agglomerates produced from coarse Teflon particles differed noticeably from the structure of bubble-particle aggregates produced from smaller, less hydrophobic particles.

  2. Method for producing hydrophobic aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Coronado, Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for treating a dried monolithic aerogel containing non-dispersed particles, with an organometallic surface modifying agent to produce hydrophobic aerogels. The dried, porous hydrophobic aerogels contain a protective layer of alkyl groups, such as methyl groups, on the modified surfaces of the pores of the aerogel. The alkyl groups at the aerogel surface typically contain at least one carbon-metal bond per group.

  3. Wear resistance of hydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, MA; Abenojar, J.; Pantoja, M.; López de Armentia, S.

    2017-05-01

    Nature has been an inspiration source to develop artificial hydrophobic surfaces. During the latest years the development of hydrophobic surfaces has been widely researched due to their numerous ranges of industrial applications. Industrially the use of hydrophobic surfaces is being highly demanded. This is why many companies develop hydrophobic products to repel water, in order to be used as coatings. Moreover, these coating should have the appropriated mechanical properties and wear resistance. In this work wear study of a hydrophobic coating on glass is carried out. Hydrophobic product used was Sika Crystal Dry by Sika S.A.U. (Alcobendas, Spain). This product is currently used on car windshield. To calculate wear resistance, pin-on-disk tests were carried out in dry and water conditions. The test parameters were rate, load and sliding distance, which were fixed to 60 rpm, 5 N and 1000 m respectively. A chamois was used as pin. It allows to simulate a real use. The friction coefficient and loss weight were compared to determinate coating resistance

  4. Hydrophobic Gating in Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Prafulla; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Tucker, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Biological ion channels are nanoscale transmembrane pores. When water and ions are enclosed within the narrow confines of a sub-nanometer hydrophobic pore, they exhibit behavior not evident from macroscopic descriptions. At this nanoscopic level, the unfavorable interaction between the lining of a hydrophobic pore and water may lead to liquid-vapor oscillations. The resultant transient vapor state is ‘dewetted’ i.e. effectively devoid of water molecules within all, or part of the pore, thus leading to an energetic barrier to ion conduction. This process, termed ‘hydrophobic gating’, was first observed in molecular dynamics simulations of model nanopores, where the principles underlying hydrophobic gating (i.e. changes in diameter, polarity, or transmembrane voltage) have now been extensively validated. Computational, structural and functional studies now indicate that biological ion channels may also exploit hydrophobic gating to regulate ion flow within their pores. Here we review the evidence for this process, and propose that this unusual behavior of water represents an increasingly important element in understanding the relationship between ion channel structure and function. PMID:25106689

  5. Modulation of graft architectures for enhancing hydrophobic interaction of biomolecules with thermoresponsive polymer-grafted surfaces.

    PubMed

    Idota, Naokazu; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Jun; Sakai, Kiyotaka; Okano, Teruo

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the effects of graft architecture of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) brush surfaces on thermoresponsive aqueous wettability changes and the temperature-dependent hydrophobic interaction of steroids in silica capillaries (I.D.: 50 μm). PIPAAm brushes were grafted onto glass substrates by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) that is one of the living radical polymerization techniques. Increases in the graft density and chain length of PIPAAm brushes increased the hydration of polymer brushes, resulting in the increased hydrophilic properties of the surface below the transition temperature of PIPAAm at 32 °C. More hydrophobic surface properties were also observed on surfaces modified with the block copolymers of IPAAm and n-butyl methacrylate (BMA) than that with IPAAm homopolymer-grafted surfaces over the transition temperature. Using PBMA-b-PIPAAm-grafted silica capillaries, the baseline separation of steroids was successfully achieved by only changing temperature. The incorporation of hydrophobic PBMA chains in grafted PIPAAm enhanced the hydrophobic interaction with testosterone above the transition temperature. The surface modification of hydrophobicity-enhanced thermoresponsive polymers is a promising method for the preparation of thermoresponsive biointerfaces that can effectively modulated their biomolecule and cell adsorption with the wide dynamic range of hydrophilic/hydrophobic property change across the transition temperature.

  6. Hydrophobic Solvation: Aqueous Methane Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konrod, Oliver; Lankau, Timm

    2007-01-01

    A basic introduction to concept of a solvation shell around an apolar solute as well as its detection is presented. The hydrophobic solvation of toluene is found to be a good teaching example which connects macroscopic, phenomenological thermodynamic results with an atomistic point of view.

  7. Hydrophobic Solvation: Aqueous Methane Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konrod, Oliver; Lankau, Timm

    2007-01-01

    A basic introduction to concept of a solvation shell around an apolar solute as well as its detection is presented. The hydrophobic solvation of toluene is found to be a good teaching example which connects macroscopic, phenomenological thermodynamic results with an atomistic point of view.

  8. Molecular origins of fluorocarbon hydrophobicity

    PubMed Central

    Dalvi, Vishwanath H.; Rossky, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    We have undertaken atomistic molecular simulations to systematically determine the structural contributions to the hydrophobicity of fluorinated solutes and surfaces compared to the corresponding hydrocarbon, yielding a unified explanation for these phenomena. We have transformed a short chain alkane, n-octane, to n-perfluorooctane in stages. The free-energy changes and the entropic components calculated for each transformation stage yield considerable insight into the relevant physics. To evaluate the effect of a surface, we have also conducted contact-angle simulations of water on self-assembled monolayers of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon thiols. Our results, which are consistent with experimental observations, indicate that the hydrophobicity of the fluorocarbon, whether the interaction with water is as solute or as surface, is due to its “fatness.” In solution, the extra work of cavity formation to accommodate a fluorocarbon, compared to a hydrocarbon, is not offset by enhanced energetic interactions with water. The enhanced hydrophobicity of fluorinated surfaces arises because fluorocarbons pack less densely on surfaces leading to poorer van der Waals interactions with water. We find that interaction of water with a hydrophobic solute/surface is primarily a function of van der Waals interactions and is substantially independent of electrostatic interactions. This independence is primarily due to the strong tendency of water at room temperature to maintain its hydrogen bonding network structure at an interface lacking hydrophilic sites. PMID:20643968

  9. Random hydrophilic-hydrophobic copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, T.; Leibler, L.; Orland, H.

    1994-12-01

    We study a single statistical amphiphilic copolymer chain AB in a selective solvent (e.g. water). Two situations are considered. In the annealed case, hydrophilic (A) and hydrophobic (B) monomers are at local chemical equilibrium and both the fraction of A monomers and their location along the chain can vary, whereas in the quenched case (which is relevant to proteins), the chemical sequence along the chain is fixed by synthesis. In both cases, the physical behaviour depends on the average hydrophobicity of the polymer chain. For a strongly hydrophobic chain (large fraction of B), we find an ordinary continuous θ collapse, with a large conformational entropy in the collapsed phase. For a weakly hydrophobic, or a hydrophilic chain, there is an unusual first-order collapse transition. In particular, for the case of Gaussian disorder, this discontinuous transition is driven by a change of sign of the third virial coefficient. The entropy of this collapsed phase is strongly reduced with respect to the θ collapsed phase. Nous étudions un copolymère aléatoire amphiphile AB dans un solvant sélectif (par exemple, de l'eau). Nous considérons deux cas. Dans le cas du désordre mobile, les monomères hydrophiles (A) et hydrophobes (B) sont à l'équilibre chimique local, et la fraction de monomères A ainsi que leur position dans l'espace peuvent varier, alors que dans le cas du désordre gelé (qui est relié au problème des protéines), la séquence chimique est fixée par synthèse. Dans les deux cas, le comportement de la chaîne depend de son hydrophobicité moyenne. Pour une chaîne fortement hydrophobe (grande fraction de B), on trouve un point d'effondrement θ continu ordinaire, avec une grande entropie conformationnelle. Pour une chaîne faiblement hydrophobe ou hydrophile, on trouve une transition inhabituelle du premier ordre. En particulier, dans le cas du désordre gaussien, cette transition discontinue est pilotée par un changement de signe du troisi

  10. Influence of hydrophobic groups on thickening and emulsification properties of hydrophobically modified polyacrylamides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Bian, He; Zhang, Huiming

    2017-09-01

    Hydrophobically modified polyacrylamides can be used to enhance oil recovery in tertiary oil recovery process because they have good thickening and emulsification properties. Hydrophobically modified polyacrylamides with different hydrophobic groups were synthesized using micellar polymerization. Above CAC, elastic polymer gel is formed by the aggregation of hydrophobic groups. Hydrophobicity of hydrophobic groups plays a substantially important role in properties of HMPAMs solutions. Higher hydrophobicity of hydrophobic groups leads to more intensive intermolecular association and thus helps to enhance the apparent viscosity of HMPAMs solutions and form stronger elastic polymer gel network structures in HMPAMs solutions which can enhance the stability of the O/W crude oil emulsions stabilized by HMPAMs.

  11. ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION OF N-BUTYL METHACRYLATE IN AQUEOUS DISPERSED SYSTEMS: A MINIEMULSION APPROACH. (R826735)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrasonication was applied in combination with a hydrophobe for the copper-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization of n-butyl methacrylate in an aqueous dispersed system. A controlled polymerization was successfully achieved, as demonstrated by a linear correlation between...

  12. ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION OF N-BUTYL METHACRYLATE IN AQUEOUS DISPERSED SYSTEMS: A MINIEMULSION APPROACH. (R826735)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrasonication was applied in combination with a hydrophobe for the copper-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization of n-butyl methacrylate in an aqueous dispersed system. A controlled polymerization was successfully achieved, as demonstrated by a linear correlation between...

  13. Hydrophobic effect at aqueous interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Conceptual basis for hydrophobic effects in bulk water and at aqueous interfaces have similar conceptual basis but often manifests itself differently. Using a wide range of computer simulations as the basis, I will review different forms of hydrophobic effects at a variety of interfaces starting from simple liquid-vapor and water-oil interfaces and progressing to water-membrane interfaces. I will start with discussing how water is organized at different interfaces, stressing both similarities and differences. The main thread is that, as in the bulk liquid, hydrophobic effects have profound influence on conformational equilibria and organization of both small molecules and macromolecules, but the result of this influence is quite different. Specifically, it will be shown that many small, but not necessarily amphiphilic molecules tend to accumulate at the interface and, and this tendency will be explained. Furthermore, I will show that many short peptides that are disordered in water spontaneously fold into well-defined structures in the interfacial environment. Biological implications of this self-organizing effect will be discussed.

  14. Hydrophobic effect at aqueous interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Conceptual basis for hydrophobic effects in bulk water and at aqueous interfaces have similar conceptual basis but often manifests itself differently. Using a wide range of computer simulations as the basis, I will review different forms of hydrophobic effects at a variety of interfaces starting from simple liquid-vapor and water-oil interfaces and progressing to water-membrane interfaces. I will start with discussing how water is organized at different interfaces, stressing both similarities and differences. The main thread is that, as in the bulk liquid, hydrophobic effects have profound influence on conformational equilibria and organization of both small molecules and macromolecules, but the result of this influence is quite different. Specifically, it will be shown that many small, but not necessarily amphiphilic molecules tend to accumulate at the interface and, and this tendency will be explained. Furthermore, I will show that many short peptides that are disordered in water spontaneously fold into well-defined structures in the interfacial environment. Biological implications of this self-organizing effect will be discussed.

  15. Contemporary Radical Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Howard J.

    1984-01-01

    The origins of contemporary radical economics are examined. Applications of radical economics to price and value theory, labor segmentation theory, business cycles, industrial organization, government and business, imperialism and development, and comparative systems are reviewed. (Author/RM)

  16. Contemporary Radical Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Howard J.

    1984-01-01

    The origins of contemporary radical economics are examined. Applications of radical economics to price and value theory, labor segmentation theory, business cycles, industrial organization, government and business, imperialism and development, and comparative systems are reviewed. (Author/RM)

  17. Self-assembling of hydrophobic-hydrophilic copolymers in hydrophobic nanocylindrical tubes: formation of channels.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2008-02-21

    By employing Monte Carlo simulations, the phase behavior of hydrophobic-hydrophilic copolymers confined in hydrophobic nanocylindrical tubes has been investigated by changing the hydrophobic-hydrophilic distribution, the ratio of the hydrophobic to hydrophilic segments, the hydrophobicity of the tube surface, and the tube diameter. The ratio of hydrophobic to hydrophilic segments, the number of blocks in a chain, and the number of segments in a block affected the generation of channels in the central region. Such channels were formed when the hydrophobicity of the tube surface was sufficiently strong for its attraction for the hydrophobic segments to overcome the attraction between the hydrophobic segments. When the numbers of hydrophobic and hydrophilic beads in a chain are constant, the number of blocks has opposite effects in small and large tubes. In the former, the formation of channels is stimulated by a larger number of blocks, while in the latter, it is stimulated by a smaller number of blocks.

  18. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostatectomy - discharge; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - discharge; LRP - discharge; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy - discharge ; RALP - discharge; Pelvic lymphadenectomy - ...

  19. Hydrophobic-Core Microcapsules and Their Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M. (Inventor); Li, Wenyan (Inventor); Buhrow, Jerry W. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic-core microcapsules and methods of their formation are provided. A hydrophobic-core microcapsule may include a shell that encapsulates a hydrophobic substance with a core substance, such as dye, corrosion indicator, corrosion inhibitor, and/or healing agent, dissolved or dispersed therein. The hydrophobic-core microcapsules may be formed from an emulsion having hydrophobic-phase droplets, e.g., containing the core substance and shell-forming compound, dispersed in a hydrophilic phase. The shells of the microcapsules may be capable of being broken down in response to being contacted by an alkali, e.g., produced during corrosion, contacting the shell.

  20. The radical amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastie, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The radical amplifier as a method for measuring radical concentrations in the atmosphere has received renewed attention lately. In principle, it can measure the total concentration of HO(x) and RO(x) radicals by reacting ambient air with high concentrations of CO (3-10 percent) and NO (2-6 ppmv), and measuring the NO2 produced.

  1. Reversible Hydrophobic to Hydrophilic Transition in Graphene via Water Splitting Induced by UV Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhemi; Ao, Zhimin; Chu, Dewei; Younis, Adnan; Li, Chang Ming; Li, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Although the reversible wettability transition between hydrophobic and hydrophilic graphene under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation has been observed, the mechanism for this phenomenon remains unclear. In this work, experimental and theoretical investigations demonstrate that the H2O molecules are split into hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals, which are then captured by the graphene surface through chemical binding in an ambient environment under UV irradiation. The dissociative adsorption of H2O molecules induces the wettability transition in graphene from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Our discovery may hold promise for the potential application of graphene in water splitting. PMID:25245110

  2. Polymeric photoresist nanoparticles: light-induced degradation of hydrophobic polymers in aqueous dispersion.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Daniel; Landfester, Katharina

    2011-12-15

    Nanoparticles consisting of a photoreactive polymer able to radically switch its hydrophobicity are successfully prepared by miniemulsion polymerization. Irradiation with UV light causes degradation of the particles where at complete dissolution is achieved by changing the initial hydrophobic photoresist polymer into hydrophilic poly(methacrylic acid). Incorporation of the fluorescence-sensitive Nile red serves as a solvatochromic probe to study the particle degradation. Diffusion of either Nile red out from or water into the former hard spherical nanoparticles is studied and not only renders the described material an ideal system for applications, where in situ dissolution of nanoparticles may be needed, but also bears the additional advantage of performing controlled burst release.

  3. Hydrophobic Compounds Reshape Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Jonathan; Rossi, Giulia; Marrink, Siewert J.; Monticelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes have a complex lateral organization featuring domains with distinct composition, also known as rafts, which play an essential role in cellular processes such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. In vivo, perturbations of membrane domains (e.g., by drugs or lipophilic compounds) have major effects on the activity of raft-associated proteins and on signaling pathways, but they are difficult to characterize because of the small size of the domains, typically below optical resolution. Model membranes, instead, can show macroscopic phase separation between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains, and they are often used to investigate the driving forces of membrane lateral organization. Studies in model membranes have shown that some lipophilic compounds perturb membrane domains, but it is not clear which chemical and physical properties determine domain perturbation. The mechanisms of domain stabilization and destabilization are also unknown. Here we describe the effect of six simple hydrophobic compounds on the lateral organization of phase-separated model membranes consisting of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and cholesterol. Using molecular simulations, we identify two groups of molecules with distinct behavior: aliphatic compounds promote lipid mixing by distributing at the interface between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains; aromatic compounds, instead, stabilize phase separation by partitioning into liquid-disordered domains and excluding cholesterol from the disordered domains. We predict that relatively small concentrations of hydrophobic species can have a broad impact on domain stability in model systems, which suggests possible mechanisms of action for hydrophobic compounds in vivo. PMID:25299598

  4. [Lavoisier and radicals].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Lavoisier and his co-workers (Guyton de Morveau, Bertholet, Fourcroy) considered that acids were constituted of oxygen and of something else that they called radicals. These radicals were known in some cases, i.e. nitrogen for nitrous acid, carbon for carbonic acid, phosphorus for phosphoric acid. In the case of sulfur, the sulfuric radical could be associated with different quantities of oxigen leading to sulfuric or sulfurous acids. In other cases radicals remained unknown at the time i.e. muriatic radical for muriatic acid, or benzoyl radical for benzoic acid. It is interesting to notice that Lavoisier evoked the case of compound radicals constituted of different substances such as carbon and hydrogen.

  5. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2004-10-19

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  6. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2007-11-06

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  7. Is Br2 hydration hydrophobic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz-Torres, A.; Gamboa-Suárez, A.; Bernal-Uruchurtu, M. I.

    2017-02-01

    The spectroscopic properties of bromine in aqueous systems suggest it can behave as either hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute. In small water clusters, the halogen bond and the hydrogen-halogen interaction are responsible for its specific way of binding. In water hydrates, it is efficiently hosted by two different cages forming the crystal structure and it has been frequently assumed that there is little or no interaction between the guest and the host. Bromine in liquid solution poses a challenging question due to its non-negligible solubility and the large blue shift measured in its absorption spectra. Using a refined semi-empirical force field, PM3-PIF, we performed a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study of bromine in liquid water. Here we present a detailed study in which we retrieved the most representative hydration structures in terms of the most frequent positions around bromine and the most common water orientations. Albeit being an approximate description of the total hydration phenomenon, it captures the contribution of the leading molecular interactions in form of the recurrent structures. Our findings confirm that the spectroscopic signature is mainly caused by the closest neighbors. The dynamics of the whole first hydration shell strongly suggests that the external molecules in that structure effectively isolate the bulk from the presence of bromine. The solvation structure fluctuates from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic-like environment along the studied trajectory.

  8. Characterisation of nanomaterial hydrophobicity using engineered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, Cloé; Valsesia, Andrea; Oddo, Arianna; Ceccone, Giacomo; Spampinato, Valentina; Rossi, François; Colpo, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    Characterisation of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) is of outmost importance for the assessment of the potential risks arising from their extensive use. NMs display indeed a large variety of physico-chemical properties that drastically affect their interaction with biological systems. Among them, hydrophobicity is an important property that is nevertheless only slightly covered by the current physico-chemical characterisation techniques. In this work, we developed a method for the direct characterisation of NM hydrophobicity. The determination of the nanomaterial hydrophobic character is carried out by the direct measurement of the affinity of the NMs for different collectors. Each collector is an engineered surface designed in order to present specific surface charge and hydrophobicity degrees. Being thus characterised by a combination of surface energy components, the collectors enable the NM immobilisation with surface coverage in relation to their hydrophobicity. The experimental results are explained by using the extended DLVO theory, which takes into account the hydrophobic forces acting between NMs and collectors.

  9. Expulsion of ions from hydrophobic hydration shells.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Blake M; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2013-06-19

    Raman spectroscopy is combined with multivariate curve resolution to quantify interactions between ions and molecular hydrophobic groups in water. The molecular solutes in this study all have similar structures, with a trimethyl hydrophobic domain and a polar or charged headgroup. Our results imply that aqueous sodium and fluoride ions are strongly expelled from the first hydration shells of the hydrophobic (methyl) groups, while iodide ions are found to enter the hydrophobic hydration shell, to an extent that depends on the methyl group partial charge. However, our quantitative estimates of the corresponding ion binding equilibrium constants indicate that the iodide concentration in the first hydrophobic hydration shell is generally lower than that in the surrounding bulk water, and so an iodide ion cannot be viewed as having a true affinity for the molecular hydrophobic interface, but rather is less strongly expelled from such an interface than fluoride.

  10. Stability of proteins inside a hydrophobic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that enclosing a protein in an athermal cavity stabilizes the protein against reversible unfolding by virtue of eliminating many open chain conformations. Examples of such confined spaces include pores in chromatographic columns, Anfinsen's cage in Chaperonins, interiors of Ribosomes or regions of steric occlusion inside cells. However, the situation is more complex inside a hydrophobic cavity. The protein has a tendency to adsorb on the surface of the hydrophobic cavity, but at the same time it loses conformational entropy because of confinement. We study this system using a simple Hydrophobic Polar (HP) lattice protein model. Canonical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at different temperatures and surface hydrophobicity show that proteins are stabilized at low and moderate hydrophobicity upon adsorption. The range of surface hydrophobicity over which a protein is stable increases with a decrease in radius of the cavity.

  11. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T.; Degrado, William F.

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol-1). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry.

  12. How specific halide adsorption varies hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Müller, Melanie; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-03-11

    Hydrophobic interactions (HI) are driven by the water structure around hydrophobes in aqueous electrolytes. How water structures at hydrophobic interfaces and how this influences the HI was subject to numerous studies. However, the effect of specific ion adsorption on HI and hydrophobic interfaces remains largely unexplored or controversial. Here, the authors utilized atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy at well-defined nanoscopic hydrophobic interfaces to experimentally address how specific ion adsorption of halide ions as well as NH4 (+), Cs(+), and Na(+) cations alters interaction forces across hydrophobic interfaces. Our data demonstrate that iodide adsorption at hydrophobic interfaces profoundly varies the hydrophobic interaction potential. A long-range and strong hydration repulsion at distances D > 3 nm, is followed by an instability which could be explained by a subsequent rapid ejection of adsorbed iodides from approaching hydrophobic interfaces. In addition, the authors find only a weakly pronounced influence of bromide, and as expected no influence of chloride. Also, all tested cations do not have any significant influence on HI. Complementary, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation monitoring showed a clear adsorption of large halide ions (Br(-)/I(-)) onto hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Interestingly, iodide can even lead to a full disintegration of SAMs due to specific and strong interactions of iodide with gold. Our data suggest that hydrophobic surfaces are not intrinsically charged negatively by hydroxide adsorption, as it was generally believed. Hydrophobic surfaces rather interact strongly with negatively charged large halide ions, leading to a surface charging and significant variation of interaction forces.

  13. Method for making nanoporous hydrophobic coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou; Sun, Zaicheng

    2013-04-23

    A simple coating method is used to form nanoporous hydrophobic films that can be used as optical coatings. The method uses evaporation-induced self-assembly of materials. The coating method starts with a homogeneous solution comprising a hydrophobic polymer and a surfactant polymer in a selective solvent. The solution is coated onto a substrate. The surfactant polymer forms micelles with the hydrophobic polymer residing in the particle core when the coating is dried. The surfactant polymer can be dissolved and selectively removed from the separated phases by washing with a polar solvent to form the nanoporous hydrophobic film.

  14. The physical origin of hydrophobic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    From the structural studies on water and air/water interface, hydration free energy is derived, and used to investigate the origin of hydrophobic effects. As a solute is dissolved into water, hydration free energy increases, and is divided into initial and hydrophobic solvation processes. In the initial process, hydration free energy is dominated by hydrogen bonding in interfacial water (topmost water layer at solute/water interface). For hydrophobic process, hydration free energy is related to the hydrogen bonding in bulk and interfacial water. Therefore, hydrophobic effects originate from the structural competition between hydrogen bonding in bulk water and that in interfacial water.

  15. Local hydrophobicity stabilizes secondary structures in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kanehisa, M.I.; Tsong, T.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The probability of occurrence of helix and ..beta..-sheet residues in 47 globular proteins was determined as a function of local hydrophobicity, which was defined by the sum of the Nozaki-Tanford transfer free energies at two nearest-neighbors on both sides of the amino acid sequence. In general, hydrophilic amino acids favor neither helix nor ..beta..-sheet formations when neighbor residues are also hydrophilic but favor helix formation at higher local hydrophobicity. On the other hand, some hydrophobic amino acids such as Met, Leu, and Ile favor helix formation when neighbor residues are hydrophilic. None of the hydrophobic amino acids favor ..beta..-sheet formation with hydrophilic neighbors, but most of them strongly favor ..beta..-sheet formation at high local hydrophobicity. When the average of 20 amino acids is taken, both helix and ..beta..-sheet residue probabilities are higher at higher local hydrophobicity, although the increase is steeper for ..beta..-sheets. Therefore, ..beta..-sheet formation is more influenced by local hydrophobicity than helix formation. Generally, helices are nearer the surface and tend to have hydrophilic and hydrophobic faces at opposite sides. The tendency of alternating regions of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues in a helical sequence was revealed by calculating the correlation of the Nozaki-Tanford values. Such amphipathic helices may be important in protein-protein-lipid interactions and in forming hydrophilic channels in the membrane. The choice of 30 nonhomologous proteins as the data set did not alter the above results.

  16. Hydrophobic coatings for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doms, M.; Feindt, H.; Kuipers, W. J.; Shewtanasoontorn, D.; Matar, A. S.; Brinkhues, S.; Welton, R. H.; Mueller, J.

    2008-05-01

    Different kinds of thin-film coatings were investigated with regard to their applicability as hydrophobic coatings for MEMS. The films were deposited onto silicon and borosilicate glass substrates by spincoating of Dyneon™ PTFE and PFA, plasmapolymerization of HMDS-N and C4F8 as well as liquid-phase and vapor-phase coating of SAMs from DDMS, FDTS, FOTS and Geleste Aquaphobe™ CM. The layer properties were analyzed using profilometry, FTIR, SEM and contact angle measurements. Furthermore, the adhesion of the layers to the substrates was determined in an acetone ultrasonic bath. The influence of various deposition process parameters on the properties of the films was investigated. As these layers can be used in microfluidic systems, as water-repellent layers and as anti-stiction coatings, they are suited for versatile fields of application.

  17. Forgotten Radicals in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Luc, Rochette; Vergely, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Redox reactions play key roles in intra- and inter-cellular signaling, and in adaptative processes of tissues towards stress. Among the major free radicals with essential functions in cells are reactive oxygen species (ROS) including superoxide anion (O2•-), hydroxyl radical (•OH) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitric oxide (•NO). In this article, we review the forgotten and new radicals with potential relevance to cardiovascular pathophysiology. Approximately 0.3% of O2•- present in cytosol exists in its protonated form: hydroperoxyl radical (HO2•). Water (H2O) can be split into two free radicals: •OH and hydrogen radical (H•). Several free radicals, including thiyl radicals (RS•) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2•) are known to isomerize double bonds. In the omega-6 series of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), cis-trans isomerization of γ-linolenate and arachidonate catalyzed by RS• has been investigated. Evidence is emerging that hydrogen disulphide (H2S) is a signaling molecule in vivo which can be a source of free radicals. The Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme can oxidize the ionized form of H2S to hydro-sulphide radical: HS•. Recent studies suggest that H2S plays an important function in cardiovascular functions. Carbonate radical, which can be formed when •OH reacts with carbonate or bicarbonate ions, is also involved in the activity of Cu-Zn-SOD. Recently, it has been reported that carbonate anion were potentially relevant oxidants of nucleic acids in physiological environments. In conclusion, there is solid evidence supporting the formation of many free radicals by cells leading which may play an important role in their homeostasis. PMID:23675099

  18. Real-time monitoring of hydrophobic aggregation reveals a critical role of cooperativity in hydrophobic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liguo; Cao, Siqin; Cheung, Peter Pak-Hang; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Peng, Qian; Shuai, Zhigang; Tang, Ben Zhong; Yao, Shuhuai; Huang, Xuhui

    2017-05-01

    The hydrophobic interaction drives nonpolar solutes to aggregate in aqueous solution, and hence plays a critical role in many fundamental processes in nature. An important property intrinsic to hydrophobic interaction is its cooperative nature, which is originated from the collective motions of water hydrogen bond networks surrounding hydrophobic solutes. This property is widely believed to enhance the formation of hydrophobic core in proteins. However, cooperativity in hydrophobic interactions has not been successfully characterized by experiments. Here, we quantify cooperativity in hydrophobic interactions by real-time monitoring the aggregation of hydrophobic solute (hexaphenylsilole, HPS) in a microfluidic mixer. We show that association of a HPS molecule to its aggregate in water occurs at sub-microsecond, and the free energy change is -5.8 to -13.6 kcal mol-1. Most strikingly, we discover that cooperativity constitutes up to 40% of this free energy. Our results provide quantitative evidence for the critical role of cooperativity in hydrophobic interactions.

  19. An Information Theory of Hydrophobic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Lawrence R.

    1998-03-01

    The hydrophobic effect is a central concept in rationalizing the structure and stability of proteins in solution. However, a consensus has not been achieved on a molecular scale physical theory explaining the broad array of hydrophobic effects. Here we present an information theory designed to achieve consensus by identifying and limiting the physical information and assumptions sufficient to predict hydrophobic effects. The information theory is based upon the study of the probabilities of occupancy by water molecule centers of molecular scale volumes observed in neat liquid water. Predictions for hydrophobic effects can be extracted from this probability distribution. Simulation results show that this probability distribution is accurately predicted by a maximum entropy model using the two moments that are obtained from the experimental liquid density and the experimental radial distribution of oxygen atoms. We show the role of solvent molecule correlation functions of higher order than pairs. We show that this two moment model predicts known atomic scale hydrophobic effects: hydrophobic solubilities, potentials of mean force, and hydrophobic effects on conformational equilibria. We comment on the kinship between the two moment maximum entropy model and the earlier Pratt-Chandler theory of hydrophobic effects. We show that the model predicts the entropy convergence emphasized by high sensitivity calorimetry on the thermal denaturation of globular proteins and explains why this entropy convergence is insensitive to solute molecular details within the broad category of hydrophobic solutes. Finally, we consider the pressure denaturation of globular proteins and discuss the perspective that emerges from the information theory treatment: increasing pressure squeezes water molecules into the protein globule eventually separating hydrophobic components analogously to the separation of hydrophobic solutes in formation of clathrate hydrates.

  20. The effect of micellization on the EPR spectra and reactivity of 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpiperidinoxyl (TEMPO) radicals.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Carolina; Rezende, Marcos Caroli; Mena, Geraldine

    2016-11-01

    A series of 4-alkanoyloxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinoxyl radicals was prepared, and their reactivity in water vis-à-vis antioxidant Trolox was compared. Spectral (electron paramagnetic resonance) and dynamic-light-scattering measurements suggested the formation of micelles for the more hydrophobic members of the series. The observed increase in reactivity for the micelle-forming radicals reflected the increased local concentration of the radical fragment on the micellar interface. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Exploring Hydrophobic Binding Surfaces Using Comfa and Flexible Hydrophobic Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Sanchez, Rosa. I.; Bhuveneswaran, Chidambaram; Compadre, Cesar M.

    2011-06-01

    Cysteine proteinases are a very important group of enzymes involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis and rheumatoid arthritis. In this investigation we used 3D-Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques to model the binding of a variety of substrates to two cysteine proteinases, papain, and cathepsin B. The analysis was performed using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA). The molecules were constructed using standard bond angles and lengths, minimized and aligned. Charges were calculated using the PM3 method in MOPAC. The CoMFA models derived for the binding of the studied substrates to the two proteinases were compared with the expected results from the experimental X-ray crystal structures of the same proteinases. The results showed the value of CoMFA modeling of flexible hydrophobic ligands to analyze ligand binding to protein receptors, and could also serve as the basis to design specific inhibitors of cysteine proteinases with potential therapeutic value.

  2. Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material

    DOEpatents

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2007-08-21

    A hydrophobic disordered composite material having a protrusive surface feature includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a protrusive surface feature, the protrusive feature being hydrophobic.

  3. Hydrophobic Silsesquioxane Nanoparticles and Nanocomposite Surfaces (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-04

    Fluorinated Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes are hydrophobic nanoparticles. One compound, FD8T8, is ultrahydrophobic, possessing a water contact ... angle of 154 deg. This is believed to be the most hydrophobic and lowest surface tension crystalline substance known. Analysis of the x-ray crystal

  4. Why are water-hydrophobic interfaces charged?

    PubMed

    Kudin, Konstantin N; Car, Roberto

    2008-03-26

    We report ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of hydroxide and hydronium ions near a hydrophobic interface, indicating that both ions behave like amphiphilic surfactants that stick to a hydrophobic hydrocarbon surface with their hydrophobic side. We show that this behavior originates from the asymmetry of the molecular charge distribution which makes one end of the ions strongly hydrophobic while the other end is even more hydrophilic than the regular water (H2O) molecules. The effect is more pronounced for the hydroxide than for the hydronium. Our results are consistent with several experimental observations and explain why hydrophobic surfaces in contact with water acquire a net negative charge, a phenomenon that has important implications for biology and polymer science.

  5. Unusual hydrophobic interactions in acidic aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanning; Xu, Jianqing; Voth, Gregory A

    2009-05-21

    Hydrophobic interaction, which is believed to be a primary driving force for many fundamental chemical and biological processes such as nanostructure self-assembly, micelle formation, and protein folding, is different in acidic aqueous solutions compared to salt solutions. In this study, the aggregation/dispersion behavior of nonpolar hydrophobic molecules in aqueous solutions with varying acid (HCl) concentrations is investigated using novel molecular dynamics simulations and compared to the hydrophobic behavior in corresponding salt (NaCl) solutions. The formation of unusual weakly bound hydrophobe-hydrated proton solvation structures is observed and can be attributed to the unique "amphiphilic" characteristic of hydrated protons. This molecular-level mechanism for the acid-enhanced dissolution of hydrophobic particles also provides a novel interpretation for the apparent anomaly of the hydronium cation in the Hofmeister series.

  6. Enthalpic and Entropic Contributions to Hydrophobicity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic hydration plays a key role in a vast variety of biological processes, ranging from the formation of cells to protein folding and ligand binding. Hydrophobicity scales simplify the complex process of hydration by assigning a value describing the averaged hydrophobic character to each amino acid. Previously published scales were not able to calculate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the hydrophobicity directly. We present a new method, based on Molecular Dynamics simulations and Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory, that calculates hydrophobicity from enthalpic and entropic contributions. Instead of deriving these quantities from the temperature dependence of the free energy of hydration or as residual of the free energy and the enthalpy, we directly obtain these values from the phase space occupied by water molecules. Additionally, our method is able to identify regions with specific enthalpic and entropic properties, allowing to identify so-called “unhappy water” molecules, which are characterized by weak enthalpic interactions and unfavorable entropic constraints. PMID:27442443

  7. Characterisation of nanomaterial hydrophobicity using engineered surfaces.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Cloé; Valsesia, Andrea; Oddo, Arianna; Ceccone, Giacomo; Spampinato, Valentina; Rossi, François; Colpo, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Characterisation of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) is of outmost importance for the assessment of the potential risks arising from their extensive use. NMs display indeed a large variety of physico-chemical properties that drastically affect their interaction with biological systems. Among them, hydrophobicity is an important property that is nevertheless only slightly covered by the current physico-chemical characterisation techniques. In this work, we developed a method for the direct characterisation of NM hydrophobicity. The determination of the nanomaterial hydrophobic character is carried out by the direct measurement of the affinity of the NMs for different collectors. Each collector is an engineered surface designed in order to present specific surface charge and hydrophobicity degrees. Being thus characterised by a combination of surface energy components, the collectors enable the NM immobilisation with surface coverage in relation to their hydrophobicity. The experimental results are explained by using the extended DLVO theory, which takes into account the hydrophobic forces acting between NMs and collectors. Graphical abstractDetermination of hydrophobicity character of nanomaterials by measuring their affinity to engineered surfaces.

  8. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  9. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Evgenii T.; Solodova, S. L.; Denisova, Taisa G.

    2010-12-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  10. Radical aminomethylation of imines.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shintaro; Konishi, Takehito; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Yamaoka, Yousuke; Takasu, Kiyosei; Yamada, Ken-Ichi

    2014-09-05

    Taking advantage of the high level of performance of N-alkoxycarbonyl-imines, we achieved the first example of addition of the aminomethyl radical to imine. The reaction efficiency depended on the structure of the radical precursor, whether it is an iodide or a xanthate, and an electron-withdrawing group on the nitrogen atom of the radical. This reaction allows direct introduction of an N-substituted aminomethyl group onto imine to provide 1,2-diamine as well as the short-step synthesis of ICI-199,441.

  11. Greywater-induced soil hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Maimon, Adi; Gross, Amit; Arye, Gilboa

    2017-10-01

    Greywater (GW) reuse for irrigation is a common method of reducing domestic consumption of fresh water. Most of the scientific research and legislation efforts have focused on GW's health risks, while less attention has been given to its environmental outcomes. One of the environmental risks of GW irrigation is its possible effect on soil hydraulic properties. This research examined the ability of GW to induce soil hydrophobicity, as well as its degree and persistence. Fresh water (control) and three model GW solutions representing raw, treated and highly treated GW were used to wet fine-grained sand. Every treatment was subjected to five cycles of wetting, incubation (at 5 °C or 30 °C) and drying (60 °C). After each cycle, capillary rise was measured and the contact angle (CA) was calculated. Samples were also tested by the Wilhelmy plate method to retrieve advancing and receding CA and reservoir surface tension. Water repellence of the sand, as implied from the CA, increased with increasing GW concentration and was highest in the sand coated with the model raw GW and incubated at 5 °C. However, none of the treatments resulted in what is considered to be "water-repellent soil". Furthermore, when raw GW-coated sand was immersed in water, its surface tension was significantly reduced relative to the other treatments, implying a release of surface-active compounds from the sand into the water. It was postulated that untreated GW may induce sub-critical water repellence in sand. However, this effect is sensitive to biodegradation and washing processes and is therefore temporary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaporation of droplets on strongly hydrophobic substrates.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Jutta M; Wilson, Stephen K; Duffy, Brian R; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-03-31

    The manner in which the extreme modes of droplet evaporation (namely, the constant contact radius and the constant contact angle modes) become indistinguishable on strongly hydrophobic substrates is described. Simple asymptotic expressions are obtained which provide good approximations to the evolutions of the contact radius, the contact angle, and the volume of droplets evaporating in the extreme modes for a wide range of hydrophobic substrates. As a consequence, on strongly hydrophobic substrates it is appropriate to use the so-called "2/3 power law" to extrapolate the lifetimes of droplets evaporating in the constant contact radius mode as well as in the constant contact angle mode.

  13. Molecular Shape and the Hydrophobic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Hillyer, Matthew B.

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses in papers published since 2000 on the topic of the properties of solutes in water. More specifically, it evaluates the state-of-the-art of our understanding of the complex relationship between the shape of a hydrophobe and the Hydrophobic effect. To highlight this a selection of references covering both empirical and molecular dynamics studies of small (molecular-scale) solutes are presented. These include empirical studies of small molecules, synthetic hosts, crystalline monolayers, and proteins, as well as in silico investigations of entities including idealized hard and soft spheres, small solutes, hydrophobic plates, artificial concavity, molecular hosts, carbon nanotubes and spheres, and proteins. PMID:27215816

  14. Molecular Shape and the Hydrophobic Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillyer, Matthew B.; Gibb, Bruce C.

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on papers published since 2000 on the topic of the properties of solutes in water. More specifically, it evaluates the state of the art of our understanding of the complex relationship between the shape of a hydrophobe and the hydrophobic effect. To highlight this, we present a selection of references covering both empirical and molecular dynamics studies of small (molecular-scale) solutes. These include empirical studies of small molecules, synthetic hosts, crystalline monolayers, and proteins, as well as in silico investigations of entities such as idealized hard and soft spheres, small solutes, hydrophobic plates, artificial concavity, molecular hosts, carbon nanotubes and spheres, and proteins.

  15. Ice adhesion on super-hydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulinich, S. A.; Farzaneh, M.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, ice adhesion strength on flat hydrophobic and rough super-hydrophobic coatings with similar surface chemistry (based on same fluoropolymer) is compared. Glaze ice, similar to naturally accreted, was prepared on the surfaces by spraying super-cooled water microdroplets at subzero temperature. Ice adhesion was evaluated by spinning the samples at constantly increasing speed until ice delamination occurred. Super-hydrophobic surfaces with different contact angle hysteresis were tested, clearly showing that the latter, along with the contact angle, also influences the ice-solid adhesion strength.

  16. Super-hydrophobic fluorine containing aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2007-05-01

    An aerogel material with surfaces containing fluorine atoms which exhibits exceptional hydrophobicity, or the ability to repel liquid water. Hydrophobic aerogels are efficient absorbers of solvents from water. Solvents miscible with water are separated from it because the solvents are more volatile than water and they enter the porous aerogel as a vapor across the liquid water/solid interface. Solvents that are immisicble with water are separated from it by selectively wetting the aerogel. The hydrophobic property is achieved by formulating the aerogel using fluorine containing molecules either directly by addition in the sol-gel process, or by treating a standard dried aerogel using the vapor of fluorine containing molecules.

  17. Shear flow on super-hydrophobic surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, Frank B.; Truesdell, Richard; Vorobieff, Peter V.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Mammoli, Andrea A.

    2007-10-01

    Super-hydrophobic surfaces, which exhibit large contact angles, can give rise to slip flow of aqueous fluids. We present our work on shear flow of atomistic fluids over simple super-hydrophobic surfaces. Molecular dynamic simulations are employed to investigate the flow field of fluid between two parallel surfaces, one of which is moving. Exploring a range of fluid thermodynamic state points, we demonstrate the influence of fluid phase and structure near the surfaces on prevalence, and degree, of slip at the super-hydrophobic surface.

  18. Hydrophobic interactions increase attachment of gum Arabic- and PVP-coated Ag nanoparticles to hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, Jee Eun; Phenrat, Tanapon; Marinakos, Stella; Xiao, Yao; Liu, Jie; Wiesner, Mark R; Tilton, Robert D; Lowry, Gregory V

    2011-07-15

    A fundamental understanding of attachment of surface-coated nanoparticles (NPs) is essential to predict the distribution and potential risks of NPs in the environment. Column deposition studies were used to examine the effect of surface-coating hydrophobicity on NP attachment to collector surfaces in mixtures with varying ratios of octadecylichlorosilane (OTS)-coated (hydrophobic) glass beads and clean silica (hydrophilic) glass beads. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) coated with organic coatings of varying hydrophobicity, including citrate, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and gum arabic (GA), were used. The attachment efficiencies of GA and PVP AgNPs increased by 2- and 4-fold, respectively, for OTS-coated glass beads compared to clean glass beads. Citrate AgNPs showed no substantial change in attachment efficiency for hydrophobic compared to hydrophilic surfaces. The attachment efficiency of PVP-, GA-, and citrate-coated AgNPs to hydrophobic collector surfaces correlated with the relative hydrophobicity of the coatings. The differences in the observed attachment efficiencies among AgNPs could not be explained by classical DLVO, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions between AgNPs and OTS-coated glass beads were responsible for the increase in attachment of surface-coated AgNPs with greater hydrophobicity. This study indicates that the overall attachment efficiency of AgNPs will be influenced by the hydrophobicity of the NP coating and the fraction of hydrophobic surfaces in the environment.

  19. Online Radicalization: Bangladesh Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    will work on developing a sustainable social awareness against radicalization. It will be responsible for coordinating and integrating all government...PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response , including...coordination among the counter-terrorism agencies, and lack of positive initiatives to grow enduring social resilience against radicalization. Bangladesh

  20. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 584.700 Hydrophobic silicas. (a.... It must be of purity suitable for intended use, and it must comply with the following specifications...

  1. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 584.700 Hydrophobic silicas. (a.... It must be of purity suitable for intended use, and it must comply with the following specifications...

  2. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 584.700 Hydrophobic silicas. (a.... It must be of purity suitable for intended use, and it must comply with the following specifications...

  3. Erosion and flow of hydrophobic granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brian; Benns, Thomas; Foltz, Benjamin; Mahler, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally investigate submerged granular flows of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains both in a rotating drum geometry and under erosion by a surface water flow. While slurry and suspension flows are common in nature and industry, effects of surface chemistry on flow behavior have received relatively little attention. In the rotating drum, we use varying concentrations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains of sand submerged in water rotated at a constant angular velocity. Sequential images of the resulting avalanches are taken and analyzed. High concentrations of hydrophobic grains result in an effectively cohesive interaction between the grains forming aggregates, with aggregate size and repose angle increasing with hydrophobic concentration. However, the formation and nature of the aggregates depends significantly on the presence of air in the system. We present results from a related experiment on erosion by a surface water flow designed to characterize the effects of heterogeneous granular surfaces on channelization and erosion.

  4. Erosion and flow of hydrophobic granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brian; Benns, Thomas; Mahler, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally investigate submerged granular flows of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains both in a rotating drum geometry and under erosion by a surface water flow. While slurry and suspension flows are common in nature and industry, effects of surface chemistry on flow behavior have received relatively little attention. In the rotating drum , we use varying concentrations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains of sand submerged in water rotated at a constant angular velocity. Sequential images of the resulting avalanches are taken and analyzed. High concentrations of hydrophobic grains result in an effectively cohesive interaction between the grains forming aggregates, with aggregate size and repose angle increasing with hydrophobic concentration. However, the formation and nature of the aggregates depends significantly on the presence of air in the system. We present results from a related experiment on erosion by a surface water flow designed to characterize the effects of heterogeneous granular surfaces on channelization and erosion. Supported by NSF CBET Award 1067598.

  5. Hydrophobic hydrophilic phenomena in biochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of concepts developed in the study of the hydrophobic affect is surveyed, within the more general context of solvent-induced effects. A systematic analysis of the solvent-induced contribution to the driving force for the process of protein folding has led to two important modifications in our understanding of these effects. First, the conventional concepts of hydrophobic solvation and hydrophobic interactions had to be replaced by their respective conditional effects. Second, each of the hydrophobic effects has also a corresponding hydrophilic counterpart. Some of the latter effects could contribute significantly to the total driving force for the process of protein folding, and perhaps even dominate the driving force for biochemical processes.

  6. Preparation and characterization of hydrophobic superparamagnetic gel.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Kaminski, M. D.; Guan, Y.; Chen, H.; Liu, H.; Rosengart, A. J.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Chicago; Pritzker School of Medicine; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2006-01-01

    The present study describes the preparation and analysis of a highly concentrated hydrophobic oleic acid-coated magnetite gel. By contrast to conventional techniques to prepare magnetic fluids, herein the oleic acid was introduced as a reactant during the initial crystallization phase of magnetite that was obtained by the co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts by addition of ammonium hydroxide. The resulting gelatinous hydrophobic magnetite was characterized in terms of morphology, particle size, magnetic properties, crystal structure, and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity. This magnetic gel exhibited superparamagnetism with a saturation magnetization of 46.0 emu/g at room temperature and could be well dispersed both in polar and nonpolar carrier liquids. This protocol produced highly concentrated hydrophobic magnetic gel for biopolymer encapsulations.

  7. Surface analysis of selected hydrophobic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewska, Sylwia Katarzyna

    This dissertation contains a series of studies on hydrophobic surfaces by various surface sensitive techniques such as contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Hydrophobic surfaces have been classified as mineral surfaces, organic synthetic surfaces, or natural biological surfaces. As a model hydrophobic mineral surface, elemental sulfur has been selected. The sulfur surface has been characterized for selected allotropic forms of sulfur such as rhombic, monoclinic, plastic, and cyclohexasulfur. Additionally, dextrin adsorption at the sulfur surface was measured. The structure of a dextrin molecule showing hydrophobic sites has been presented to support the proposed hydrophobic bonding nature of dextrin adsorption at the sulfur surface. As a model organic hydrophobic surface, primary fatty amines such as dodecylamine, hexadecylamine, and octadecylamine were chosen. An increase of hydrophobicity, significant changes of infrared bands, and surface topographical changes with time were observed for each amine. Based on the results it was concluded that hydrocarbon chain rearrangement associated with recrystallization took place at the surface during contact with air. A barley straw surface was selected as a model of biological hydrophobic surfaces. The differences in the contact angles for various straw surfaces were explained by the presence of a wax layer. SEM images confirmed the heterogeneity and complexity of the wax crystal structure. AFM measurements provided additional structural details including a measure of surface roughness. Additionally, straw degradation as a result of conditioning in an aqueous environment was studied. Significant contact angle changes were observed as soon as one day after conditioning. FTIR studies showed a gradual wax layer removal due to straw surface decomposition. SEM and AFM images revealed topographical changes and biological

  8. Recent progress in understanding hydrophobic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Emily E.; Rosenberg, Kenneth J.; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    We present here a brief review of direct force measurements between hydrophobic surfaces in aqueous solutions. For almost 70 years, researchers have attempted to understand the hydrophobic effect (the low solubility of hydrophobic solutes in water) and the hydrophobic interaction or force (the unusually strong attraction of hydrophobic surfaces and groups in water). After many years of research into how hydrophobic interactions affect the thermodynamic properties of processes such as micelle formation (self-assembly) and protein folding, the results of direct force measurements between macroscopic surfaces began to appear in the 1980s. Reported ranges of the attraction between variously prepared hydrophobic surfaces in water grew from the initially reported value of 80–100 Å to values as large as 3,000 Å. Recent improved surface preparation techniques and the combination of surface force apparatus measurements with atomic force microscopy imaging have made it possible to explain the long-range part of this interaction (at separations >200 Å) that is observed between certain surfaces. We tentatively conclude that only the short-range part of the attraction (<100 Å) represents the true hydrophobic interaction, although a quantitative explanation for this interaction will require additional research. Although our force-measuring technique did not allow collection of reliable data at separations <10 Å, it is clear that some stronger force must act in this regime if the measured interaction energy curve is to extrapolate to the measured adhesion energy as the surface separation approaches zero (i.e., as the surfaces come into molecular contact). PMID:17023540

  9. Designing a hydrophobic barrier within biomimetic nanopores.

    PubMed

    Trick, Jemma L; Wallace, E Jayne; Bayley, Hagan; Sansom, Mark S P

    2014-11-25

    Nanopores in membranes have a range of potential applications. Biomimetic design of nanopores aims to mimic key functions of biological pores within a stable template structure. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to test whether a simple β-barrel protein nanopore can be modified to incorporate a hydrophobic barrier to permeation. Simulations have been used to evaluate functional properties of such nanopores, using water flux as a proxy for ionic conductance. The behavior of these model pores has been characterized as a function of pore size and of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chains lining the narrow central constriction of the pore. Potential of mean force calculations have been used to calculate free energy landscapes for water and for ion permeation in selected models. These studies demonstrate that a hydrophobic barrier can indeed be designed into a β-barrel protein nanopore, and that the height of the barrier can be adjusted by modifying the number of consecutive rings of hydrophobic side chains. A hydrophobic barrier prevents both water and ion permeation even though the pore is sterically unoccluded. These results both provide insights into the nature of hydrophobic gating in biological pores and channels, and furthermore demonstrate that simple design features may be computationally transplanted into β-barrel membrane proteins to generate functionally complex nanopores.

  10. Hydrophobicity of silver surfaces with microparticle geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macko, Ján; Oriňaková, Renáta; Oriňak, Andrej; Kovaľ, Karol; Kupková, Miriam; Erdélyi, Branislav; Kostecká, Zuzana; Smith, Roger M.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the duration of the current deposition cycle and the number of current pulses on the geometry of silver microstructured surfaces and on the free surface energy, polarizability, hydrophobicity and thus adhesion force of the silver surfaces has been investigated. The changes in surface hydrophobicity were entirely dependent on the size and density of the microparticles on the surface. The results showed that formation of the silver microparticles was related to number of current pulses, while the duration of one current pulse played only a minor effect on the final surface microparticle geometry and thus on the surface tension and hydrophobicity. The conventional geometry of the silver particles has been transformed to the fractal dimension D. The surface hydrophobicity depended predominantly on the length of the dendrites not on their width. The highest silver surface hydrophobicity was observed on a surface prepared by 30 current pulses with a pulse duration of 1 s, the lowest one when deposition was performed by 10 current pulses with a duration of 0.1 s. The partial surface tension coefficients γDS and polarizability kS of the silver surfaces were calculated. Both parameters can be applied in future applications in living cells adhesion prediction and spectral method selection. Silver films with microparticle geometry showed a lower variability in final surface hydrophobicity when compared to nanostructured surfaces. The comparisons could be used to modify surfaces and to modulate human cells and bacterial adhesion on body implants, surgery instruments and clean surfaces.

  11. Characterization of surface hydrophobicity of engineered nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yao; Wiesner, Mark R

    2012-05-15

    The surface chemistry of nanoparticles, including their hydrophobicity, is a key determinant of their fate, transport and toxicity. Engineered NPs often have surface coatings that control the surface chemistry of NPs and may dominate the effects of the nanoparticle core. Suitable characterization methods for surface hydrophobicity at the nano-scale are needed. Three types of methods, surface adsorption, affinity coefficient and contact angle, were investigated in this study with seven carbon and metal based NPs with and without coatings. The adsorption of hydrophobic molecules, Rose Bengal dye and naphthalene, on NPs was used as one measure of hydrophobicity and was compared with the relative affinity of NPs for octanol or water phases, analogous to the determination of octanol-water partition coefficients for organic molecules. The sessile drop method was adapted for measuring contact angle of a thin film of NPs. Results for these three methods were qualitatively in agreement. Aqueous-nC(60) and tetrahydrofuran-nC(60) were observed to be more hydrophobic than nano-Ag coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone or gum arabic, followed by nano-Ag or nano-Au with citrate-functionalized surfaces. Fullerol was shown to be the least hydrophobic of seven NPs tested. The advantages and limitations of each method were also discussed.

  12. Evaporation-induced failure of hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Liu, T.; Ma, J.; Wang, P.; Wang, Y.; Leprince-Wang, Y.; Jing, G.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrophobic coatings have tremendous applications in many fields of industries, and their robustness is an important subject of investigation. Here we experimentally demonstrate the detachment of hydrophobic coating and the formation of the residual deposit resulting from an evaporating drop of water. A hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT) coating is employed to enhance the hydrophobicity of ZnO nanowire arrays (advancing and receding contact angle of 165° and 128°, respectively). Being a model system of the unique bonding interaction between ODT and ZnO, water drop drying on the structure of ODT/ZnO is examined. Our experimental results showed the significant depression and even failure of the hydrophobicity on this composite surface resulting from collecting the deposits of ODT molecules during the drop drying. By analyzing energy criterion and force balance, surface tension at the moving contact line is identified as a dominating destructive force to unstick the coating molecules. Interestingly, a normal rinsing stream does not damage this coating to alter its hydrophobicity, but rather is overshadowed by the evaporation of the tinny water drop. The drops of rain or condensed water outdoor may thus play the same role to damage the functional coatings after their evaporation. Our findings indicate that more delicate designs are needed to prevent the destructive effects of drop evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  13. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  14. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  15. Chemistry of ascorbic acid radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Bielski, B.H.J.

    1982-01-01

    The chemistry of ascorbic acid free radicals is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on identification and characterization of ascorbate radicals by spectrophotometric and electron paramagnetic resonance techniques, the kinetics of formation and disappearance of ascorbate free radicals in enzymatic and nonenzymatic reactions, the effect of pH upon the spectral and kinetic properties of ascorbate anion radical, and chemical reactivity of ascorbate free radicals.

  16. RF plasma based selective modification of hydrophilic regions on super hydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyun; Hwang, Sangyeon; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Hong, Jungwoo; Shin, Jennifer H.; Byun, Doyoung

    2017-02-01

    Selective modification and regional alterations of the surface property have gained a great deal of attention to many engineers. In this paper, we present a simple, a cost-effective, and amendable reforming method for disparate patterns of hydrophilic regions on super-hydrophobic surfaces. Uniform super-hydrophobic layer (Contact angle; CA > 150°, root mean square (RMS) roughness ∼0.28 nm) can be formed using the atmospheric radio frequency (RF) plasma on top of the selective hydrophilic (CA ∼ 70°, RMS roughness ∼0.34 nm) patterns imprinted by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing technology with polar alcohols (butyl carbitol or ethanol). The wettability of the modified surface was investigated qualitatively utilizing scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and wavelength scanning interferometer (WSI). Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis showed that the alcohol addiction reaction changed the types of radicals on the super-hydrophobic surface. The wettability was found to depend sensitively on chemical radicals on the surface, not on surface morphology (particle size and surface roughness). Furthermore, three different kinds of representative hydrophilic samples (polystyrene nano-particle aqueous solution, Salmonella bacteria medium, and poly(3,4-ethylenediocythiophene) ink) were tested for uniform deposition onto the desired hydrophilic regions. This simple strategy would have broad applications in various research fields that require selective deposition of target materials.

  17. Hydrophobically modified polyelectrolytes: Characterization, aggregation and adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammad Ferdous

    The focus of our work was to experimentally study the aggregation and adsorption behavior of model HM polyelectrolytes. Hydrophobically modified alkali soluble emulsions (HASE), the model HM polyelectrolytes, were chosen because they had complex architecture yet possessed key variables for systematic study. The HASE polymers have methacrylic acid (MAA) and ethyl acrylate (EA) in the backbone with pendent hydrophobic groups. Characterization of a single molecule is an important first step in understanding the aggregation and adsorption of these polymers. However, characterizations of the HASE polymers using conventional techniques such as gel permeation chromatography or static light scattering were difficult because of the hydrophobic association. In this study, two different approaches have been taken to prevent the hydrophobic association in aqueous solution: (1) hydrolyze the polymer to cleave the hydrophobic constituents, and (2) use methyl beta-cyclodextrin that has a hydrophobic cavity and a hydrophilic outer shell, to shield the hydrophobes from associating. By taking these two approaches and using gel permeation chromatography (GPC), dynamic (DLS) and static (SLS) light scattering techniques, the molecular weight, hydrodynamic radius and radius of gyration of a single molecule were determined. Except for one chemical site, we were able to determine that branching or grafting did not occur in the polymer chain during synthesis. Our aggregation studies showed that, in aqueous solutions, the HASE polymers formed small aggregates (presumably single micelles of single or a few chains) and large aggregates (presumably formed by bridging between micelles). The radii and masses of the larger aggregates, measured using DLS and SLS, were found to increase with an increase in the polymer concentration, indicating an open association process for the HASE polymers. Our SLS results also showed that, at high salt concentration, the aggregates of the HASE polymer with

  18. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy.

    PubMed

    Rendón, Gabriel J; Ramirez, Pedro T; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Pareja, Rene

    2012-01-01

    The standard treatment for patients with early-stage cervical cancer has been radical hysterectomy. However, for women interested in future fertility, radical trachelectomy is now considered a safe and feasible option. The use of minimally invasive surgical techniques to perform this procedure has recently been reported. We report the first case of a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy performed in a developing country. The patient is a nulligravid, 30-y-old female with stage IB1 adenocarcinoma of the cervix who desired future fertility. She underwent a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection. The operative time was 340 min, and the estimated blood loss was 100mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The final pathology showed no evidence of residual disease, and all pelvic lymph nodes were negative. At 20 mo of follow-up, the patient is having regular menses but has not yet attempted to become pregnant. There is no evidence of recurrence. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in a young woman who desires future fertility may also be an alternative technique in the treatment of early cervical cancer in developing countries.

  19. Laparoscopic Radical Trachelectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rendón, Gabriel J.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The standard treatment for patients with early-stage cervical cancer has been radical hysterectomy. However, for women interested in future fertility, radical trachelectomy is now considered a safe and feasible option. The use of minimally invasive surgical techniques to perform this procedure has recently been reported. Case Description: We report the first case of a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy performed in a developing country. The patient is a nulligravid, 30-y-old female with stage IB1 adenocarcinoma of the cervix who desired future fertility. She underwent a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection. The operative time was 340 min, and the estimated blood loss was 100mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The final pathology showed no evidence of residual disease, and all pelvic lymph nodes were negative. At 20 mo of follow-up, the patient is having regular menses but has not yet attempted to become pregnant. There is no evidence of recurrence. Conclusion: Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in a young woman who desires future fertility may also be an alternative technique in the treatment of early cervical cancer in developing countries. PMID:23318085

  20. Contribution of Hydrophobic Interactions to Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R.; Shirley, Bret A.; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compare our results with previous studies and reach the following conclusions. 1. Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mole per –CH2– group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mol per –CH2– group). 2. Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kcal/mol): Phe 18 (3.9), Met 13 (3.1), Phe 7 (2.9), Phe 11 (2.7), and Leu 21 (2.7). 3. Based on Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔGtr values from water to cyclohexane. 5. For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60 ± 4% and hydrogen bonds 40 ± 4% to protein stability. 6. Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominately by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21377472

  1. Contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Shirley, Bret A; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2011-05-06

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compared our results with those of previous studies and reached the following conclusions: (1) Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group). (2) Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kilocalories per mole) Phe18 (3.9), Met13 (3.1), Phe7 (2.9), Phe11 (2.7), and Leu21 (2.7). (3) Based on the Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a -CH(2)- group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1±0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. (4) The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔG(tr) values from water to cyclohexane. (5) For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60±4% and hydrogen bonds contribute 40±4% to protein stability. (6) Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominantly by hydrophobic interactions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A fluorine 1,2-migration via aryl cation/radical/radical anion/radical sequence.

    PubMed

    Pretali, Luca; Dondi, Daniele; D'Angelantonio, Mila; Manet, Ilse; Fasani, Elisa; Monti, Sandra; Bovio, Bruna; Albini, Angelo

    2013-08-02

    Irradiation of a 7-piperazino-8-fluoroquinolone causes formal 1,2-fluorine migration, piperazine loss and reduction, or nucleophile addition in 8. Product study, laser flash photolysis, and computational modeling support F(-) detachment to yield a triplet 8-quinolyl cation that either inserts intramolecularly or is trapped by Cl(-), Br(-). However, iodide and pyrrole reduce it to the radical that continues the 'redox tour' (aryl cation→ radical→ radical anion→ radical and then again radical or radical anion) leading to the rearranged products.

  3. Origin of hydrophobicity and enhanced water hydrogen bond strength near purely hydrophobic solutes

    PubMed Central

    Grdadolnik, Joze; Merzel, Franci; Avbelj, Franc

    2017-01-01

    Hydrophobicity plays an important role in numerous physicochemical processes from the process of dissolution in water to protein folding, but its origin at the fundamental level is still unclear. The classical view of hydrophobic hydration is that, in the presence of a hydrophobic solute, water forms transient microscopic “icebergs” arising from strengthened water hydrogen bonding, but there is no experimental evidence for enhanced hydrogen bonding and/or icebergs in such solutions. Here, we have used the redshifts and line shapes of the isotopically decoupled IR oxygen–deuterium (O-D) stretching mode of HDO water near small purely hydrophobic solutes (methane, ethane, krypton, and xenon) to study hydrophobicity at the most fundamental level. We present unequivocal and model-free experimental proof for the presence of strengthened water hydrogen bonds near four hydrophobic solutes, matching those in ice and clathrates. The water molecules involved in the enhanced hydrogen bonds display extensive structural ordering resembling that in clathrates. The number of ice-like hydrogen bonds is 10–15 per methane molecule. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have confirmed that water molecules in the vicinity of methane form stronger, more numerous, and more tetrahedrally oriented hydrogen bonds than those in bulk water and that their mobility is restricted. We show the absence of intercalating water molecules that cause the electrostatic screening (shielding) of hydrogen bonds in bulk water as the critical element for the enhanced hydrogen bonding around a hydrophobic solute. Our results confirm the classical view of hydrophobic hydration. PMID:28028244

  4. Evaporation rate of water in hydrophobic confinement.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sumit; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2012-03-20

    The drying of hydrophobic cavities is believed to play an important role in biophysical phenomena such as the folding of globular proteins, the opening and closing of ligand-gated ion channels, and ligand binding to hydrophobic pockets. We use forward flux sampling, a molecular simulation technique, to compute the rate of capillary evaporation of water confined between two hydrophobic surfaces separated by nanoscopic gaps, as a function of gap, surface size, and temperature. Over the range of conditions investigated (gaps between 9 and 14 Å and surface areas between 1 and 9 nm(2)), the free energy barrier to evaporation scales linearly with the gap between hydrophobic surfaces, suggesting that line tension makes the predominant contribution to the free energy barrier. The exponential dependence of the evaporation rate on the gap between confining surfaces causes a 10 order-of-magnitude decrease in the rate when the gap increases from 9 to 14 Å. The computed free energy barriers are of the order of 50 kT and are predominantly enthalpic. Evaporation rates per unit area are found to be two orders of magnitude faster in confinement by the larger (9 nm(2)) than by the smaller (1 nm(2)) surfaces considered here, at otherwise identical conditions. We show that this rate enhancement is a consequence of the dependence of hydrophobic hydration on the size of solvated objects. For sufficiently large surfaces, the critical nucleus for the evaporation process is a gap-spanning vapor tube.

  5. Radical dematerialization and degrowth.

    PubMed

    Kallis, Giorgos

    2017-06-13

    The emission targets agreed in Paris require a radical reduction of material extraction, use and disposal. The core claim of this article is that a radical dematerialization can only be part and parcel of degrowth. Given that capitalist economies are designed to grow, this raises the question of whether, and under what circumstances, the inevitable 'degrowth' can become socially sustainable. Three economic policies are discussed in this direction: work-sharing, green taxes and public money.This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Radical dematerialization and degrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallis, Giorgos

    2017-05-01

    The emission targets agreed in Paris require a radical reduction of material extraction, use and disposal. The core claim of this article is that a radical dematerialization can only be part and parcel of degrowth. Given that capitalist economies are designed to grow, this raises the question of whether, and under what circumstances, the inevitable `degrowth' can become socially sustainable. Three economic policies are discussed in this direction: work-sharing, green taxes and public money. This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'.

  7. Enzymatic Hydrophobic Modification of Jute Fibers via Grafting to Reinforce Composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruirui; Dong, Aixue; Fan, Xuerong; Yu, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Jiugang; Wang, Ping; Wang, Qiang; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-04-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/H2O2 system catalyzes the free-radical polymerization of aromatic compounds such as lignins and gallate esters. In this work, dodecyl gallate (DG) was grafted onto the surfaces of lignin-rich jute fabrics by HRP-mediated oxidative polymerization with an aim to enhance the hydrophobicity of the fibers. The DG-grafted jute fibers and reaction products of their model compounds were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results clearly indicated the grafting of DG to the jute fiber by HRP. Furthermore, the hydrophobicity of jute fabrics was determined by measuring the wetting time and static contact angle. Compared to the control sample, the wetting time and static contact angle of the grated fabrics changed from ~1 s to 1 h and from ~0° to 123.68°, respectively. This clearly proved that the hydrophobicity of jute fabrics improved considerably. Conditions of the HRP-catalyzed DG-grafting reactions were optimized in terms of the DG content of modified jute fabrics. Moreover, the results of breaking strength and elongation of DG-grafted jute/polypropylene (PP) composites demonstrated improved reinforcement of the composite due to enzymatic hydrophobic modification of jute fibers.

  8. Lipid peroxyl radicals mediate tyrosine dimerization and nitration in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bartesaghi, Silvina; Wenzel, Jorge; Trujillo, Madia; López, Marcos; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Radi, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine dimerization and nitration by biologically-relevant oxidants usually depend on the intermediate formation of tyrosyl radical (•Tyr). In the case of tyrosine oxidation in proteins associated to hydrophobic biocompartments, the participation of unsaturated fatty acids in the process must be considered since they typically constitute preferential targets for the initial oxidative attack. Thus, we postulate that lipid-derived radicals mediate the one-electron oxidation of tyrosine to •Tyr, which can afterwards react with another •Tyr or with nitrogen dioxide (•NO2) to yield 3,3´-dityrosine or 3-nitrotyrosine within the hydrophobic structure, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we have studied tyrosine oxidation in saturated and unsaturated fatty acid-containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes with an incorporated hydrophobic tyrosine analog BTBE (N-t- BOC L-tyrosine tert-butyl ester) and its relationship with lipid peroxidation promoted by three oxidations systems, namely peroxynitrite, hemin and 2,2´-azobis (2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (ABAP). In all cases, significant tyrosine (BTBE) oxidation was seen in unsaturated PC liposomes, in a way that was largely decreased at low oxygen concentrations. Tyrosine oxidation levels paralleled those of lipid peroxidation (i.e. malondialdehyde and lipid hydroperoxides) and lipid-derived radicals and BTBE phenoxyl radicals were simultaneously detected by ESR-spin trapping, supporting an association between the two processes. Indeed, α-tocopherol, a known reactant with lipid peroxyl radicals (LOO•), inhibited both tyrosine oxidation and lipid peroxidation induced by all three oxidation systems. Moreover, oxidant-stimulated liposomal oxygen consumption was dose-dependently inhibited by BTBE but not by its phenylalanine analog, BPBE (N-t-BOC L-phenylalaline tert-butyl ester), providing a direct evidence for the reaction between LOO• and the phenol moiety in BTBE, with an estimated second

  9. Controllable picoliter pipetting using hydrophobic microfluidic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Huang, J.; Qian, X.; Mi, S.; Wang, X.

    2017-06-01

    A picoliter pipetting technique using the microfluidic method is presented. Utilizing the hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer films patterned in microchannels as pressure-controlled valves, a small volume of liquid can be separated by a designed channel trap and then ejected from the channel end at a higher pressure. The liquid trap section is composed of a T-shaped channel junction and a hydrophobic patch. The liquid volume can be precisely controlled by varying the distance of the hydrophobic patch from the T-junction. By this means, liquid less than 100 pl can be separated and pipetted. The developed device is potentially useful for sample dispensing in biological, medical, and chemical applications.

  10. Hydrophobicity in Lennard-Jones solutions.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Mario; Tanaka, Hideki; Koga, Kenichiro

    2011-02-14

    The analogue of the hydrophobic hydration is explored for Lennard-Jones solutions. The free energy of solvation and its temperature derivatives, both in the constant-pressure process and in the constant-volume process, are obtained numerically for a variety of the size and energy parameters for the solute-solvent Lennard-Jones potential. We identify in the parameter space a region in which the solvation is of hydrophobic character, with an understanding that hydrophobicity is characterized by both the solvation free energy being positive and the solvation process being exothermic. Such a region is found in each case of the isobaric and isochoric conditions and the region is seen to be much wider in the isochoric process than in the isobaric one. Its origin and implication are discussed.

  11. Beyond Radical Educational Cynicism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, George H.

    1982-01-01

    An alternative is presented to counter current radical arguments that the schools cannot bring about social change because they are instruments of capitalism. The works of Samuel Bowles, Herbert Gintis, and Louis Althusser are discussed. Henry Giroux's "Ideology, Culture and the Process of Schooling" provides an alternative to cynicism.…

  12. Radical School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Beatrice, Ed.; Gross, Ronald, Ed.

    This book provides a comprehensive examination of the nature of the school crisis and the ways in which radical thinkers and educators are dealing with it. Excerpts from the writings of Jonathan Kozol, John Holt, Kenneth Clark, and others are concerned with the realities of education in ghettos and suburbs. Paul Goodman, Marshall McLuhan, Sylvia…

  13. Against Radical Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorn, Jeff

    This essay presents two strands of arguments against radical or critical emancipatory multiculturalism. In strand 1, "'Culture' is...whatever..." the looseness of the core concept of "culture," which can refer to anything at all concerning a social group that itself may exist only theoretically, is shown. In strand 2, "From ideology to leveling,…

  14. Beyond Radical Educational Cynicism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, George H.

    1982-01-01

    An alternative is presented to counter current radical arguments that the schools cannot bring about social change because they are instruments of capitalism. The works of Samuel Bowles, Herbert Gintis, and Louis Althusser are discussed. Henry Giroux's "Ideology, Culture and the Process of Schooling" provides an alternative to cynicism.…

  15. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabolsi, Ali; Khashab, Niveen; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Friedman, Douglas C.; Colvin, Michael T.; Cotí, Karla K.; Benítez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Olsen, John-Carl; Belowich, Matthew E.; Carmielli, Raanan; Khatib, Hussam A.; Goddard, William A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2010-01-01

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication.

  16. Radical Socioeducational Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This book describes an interactive-interdisciplinary way of looking at the social conditions which impinge upon schooling, and which impact upon the social facts of life. It examines current schooling problems from the perspective of radical social democratic thought. The book is organized into four major sections. Part 1 provides an overview and…

  17. The Oxonium Rydberg Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavín, C.; Martin, I.

    The Quantum Defect Orbital (QDO) method has been applied to the study of transition probabiUties in the oxonium Rydberg radical H3O. Absorption oscillator strengths and Einstein emission coefficients are reported and compared with the results of an earlier, simplified, molecular version of QDO method.

  18. Interrogating Hydrocarbon Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2010-06-01

    Motivated by astrophysical problems (and a sense of fun) for some years my research group has been obtaining new spectra of hitherto unobserved hydrocarbon radicals. We employ the complementary techniques of resonant ionization and laser induced fluorescence to rigorously identify radicals by matching their ground state vibrational frequencies to those obtained using density functional theory (DFT). While some radicals were made to order in our pulsed electrical discharge source, others of particular chemical importance have been found lurking in the congested forest of dicarbon and tricarbon fluorescence. Using a 2-dimensional fluorescence (2df) map, we have extracted pure spectra, unpolluted by C_2 and C_3, from a benzene discharge. One spectrum was first presented at this symposium in 2006, but at that stage was not identified. Subsequent measurement of a matching resonant ionization spectrum revealed a mass of 115, much higher than the benzene precursor. With the aid of DFT calculations, the species was positively identified, giving clues to hydrocarbon-building chemistry of relevance to combustion; planetary atmospheres; and the interstellar and circumstellar space. Further experiments revealed other surprising additions to the radical zoo, also identified with the help of 2df. Along the way we have also identified two new band systems of C_2, the first involving the hidden c^3Σ_u^+ state, and have ventured into the world of larger molecules, such as hexabenzocoronene, C42H18.

  19. Fluid infiltration pressure for hydrophobic nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jingwen; Li, Long; Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Dongyan; Huang, Baoling; Li, Zhigang

    2015-03-01

    We investigate water infiltration pressure for hydrophobic nanochannels through molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the entrance energy barrier significantly raises the infiltration pressure, which makes the classic Young-Laplace equation invalid for nanochannels. As the channel surface is tuned from superhydrophobic to hydrophobic, the infiltration pressure is greatly reduced mainly due to the decrease of the capillary pressure (Young-Laplace equation) caused by the contact angle change, while the contribution of the entrance energy barrier to the infiltration pressure, which is termed entrance barrier pressure, increases from 25% to 60%.

  20. The search for the hydrophobic force law

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Malte U.; Anderson, Travers H.; Chaimovich, Aviel; Scott Shell, M.

    2010-01-01

    After nearly 30 years of research on the hydrophobic interaction, the search for the hydrophobic force law is still continuing. Indeed, there are more questions than answers, and the experimental data are often quite different for nominally similar conditions, as well as, apparently, for nano-, micro-, and macroscopic surfaces. This has led to the conclusion that the experimentally observed force–distance relationships are either a combination of different ‘fundamental’ interactions, or that the hydrophobic force-law, if there is one, is complex – depending on numerous parameters. The only unexpectedly strong attractive force measured in all experiments so far has a range of D ≈ 100–200 Å, increasing roughly exponentially down to ~ 10–20 Å and then more steeply down to adhesive contact at D = 0 or, for power-law potentials, effectively at D ≈ 2 Å. The measured forces in this regime (100–200 Å) and especially the adhesive forces are much stronger, and have a different distance-dependence from the continuum VDW force (Lifshitz theory) for non-conducting dielectric media. We suggest a three-regime force-law for the forces observed between hydrophobic surfaces: In the first, from 100–200 Å to thousands of ångstroms, the dominating force is created by complementary electrostatic domains or patches on the apposing surfaces and/or bridging vapour cavities; a ‘pure’ but still not well-understood ‘long-range hydrophobic force’ dominates the second regime from ~ 150 to ~ 15 Å, possibly due to an enhanced Hamaker constant associated with the ‘proton-hopping’ polarizability of water; while below ~ 10–15 Å to contact there is another ‘pure short-range hydrophobic force’ related to water structuring effects associated with surface-induced changes in the orientation and/or density of water molecules and H-bonds at the water–hydrophobic interface. We present recent SFA and other experimental results, as well as a simplified model for

  1. Tyrosyl Radicals in Dehaloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Dumarieh, Rania; D'Antonio, Jennifer; Deliz-Liang, Alexandria; Smirnova, Tatyana; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Ghiladi, Reza A.

    2013-01-01

    Dehaloperoxidase (DHP) from Amphitrite ornata, having been shown to catalyze the hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of trihalophenols to dihaloquinones, is the first oxygen binding globin that possesses a biologically relevant peroxidase activity. The catalytically competent species in DHP appears to be Compound ES, a reactive intermediate that contains both a ferryl heme and a tyrosyl radical. By simulating the EPR spectra of DHP activated by H2O2, Thompson et al. (Thompson, M. K., Franzen, S., Ghiladi, R. A., Reeder, B. J., and Svistunenko, D. A. (2010) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 17501–17510) proposed that two different radicals, depending on the pH, are formed, one located on either Tyr-34 or Tyr-28 and the other on Tyr-38. To provide additional support for these simulation-based assignments and to deduce the role(s) that tyrosyl radicals play in DHP, stopped-flow UV-visible and rapid-freeze-quench EPR spectroscopic methods were employed to study radical formation in DHP when three tyrosine residues, Tyr-28, Tyr-34, and Tyr-38, were replaced either individually or in combination with phenylalanines. The results indicate that radicals form on all three tyrosines in DHP. Evidence for the formation of DHP Compound I in several tyrosine mutants was obtained. Variants that formed Compound I showed an increase in the catalytic rate for substrate oxidation but also an increase in heme bleaching, suggesting that the tyrosines are necessary for protecting the enzyme from oxidizing itself. This protective role of tyrosines is likely an evolutionary adaptation allowing DHP to avoid self-inflicted damage in the oxidative environment. PMID:24100039

  2. Radicals in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Strehmel, Veronika

    2012-05-14

    Stable radicals and recombination of photogenerated lophyl radicals are investigated in ionic liquids. The 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yloxyl derivatives contain various substituents at the 4-position to the nitroxyl group, including hydrogen-bond-forming or ionic substituents that undergo additional interactions with the individual ions of the ionic liquids. Some of these spin probes contain similar ions to ionic liquids to avoid counter-ion exchange with the ionic liquid. Depending on the ionic liquid anion, the Stokes-Einstein theory or the Spernol-Gierer-Wirtz theory can be applied to describe the temperature dependence of the average rotational correlation time of the spin probe in the ionic liquids. Furthermore, the spin probes give information about the micropolarity of the ionic liquids. In this context the substituent at the 4-position to the nitroxyl group plays a significant role. Covalent bonding of a spin probe to the imidazolium ion results in bulky spin probes that are strongly immobilized in the ionic liquid. Furthermore, lophyl radical recombination in the dark, which is chosen to understand the dynamics of bimolecular reactions in ionic liquids, shows a slow process at longer timescale and a rise time at a shorter timescale. Although various reactions may contribute to the slower process during lophyl radical recombination, it follows a second-order kinetics that does not clearly show solvent viscosity dependence. However, the rise time, which may be attributed to radical pair formation, increases with increasing solvent viscosity. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Distance-dependent hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts in protein folding simulations.

    PubMed

    Onofrio, Angelo; Parisi, Giovanni; Punzi, Giuseppe; Todisco, Simona; Di Noia, Maria Antonietta; Bossis, Fabrizio; Turi, Antonio; De Grassi, Anna; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo

    2014-09-21

    Successful prediction of protein folding from an amino acid sequence is a challenge in computational biology. In order to reveal the geometric constraints that drive protein folding, highlight those constraints kept or missed by distinct lattices and for establishing which class of intra- and inter-secondary structure element interactions is the most relevant for the correct folding of proteins, we have calculated inter-alpha carbon distances in a set of 42 crystal structures consisting of mainly helix, sheet or mixed conformations. The inter-alpha carbon distances were also calculated in several lattice "hydrophobic-polar" models built from the same protein set. We found that helix structures are more prone to form "hydrophobic-hydrophobic" contacts than beta-sheet structures. At a distance lower than or equal to 3.8 Å (very short-range interactions), "hydrophobic-hydrophobic" contacts are almost absent in the native structures, while they are frequent in all the analyzed lattice models. At distances in-between 3.8 and 9.5 Å (short-/medium-range interactions), the best performing lattice for reproducing mainly helix structures is the body-centered-cubic lattice. If protein structures contain sheet portions, lattice performances get worse, with few exceptions observed for double-tetrahedral and body-centered-cubic lattices. Finally, we can observe that ab initio protein folding algorithms, i.e. those based on the employment of lattices and Monte Carlo simulated annealings, can be improved simply and effectively by preventing the generation of "hydrophobic-hydrophobic" contacts shorter than 3.8 Å, by monitoring the "hydrophobic-hydrophobic/polar-polar" contact ratio in short-/medium distance ranges and by using preferentially a body-centered-cubic lattice.

  4. Anionic surfactant with hydrophobic and hydrophilic chains for nanoparticle dispersion and shape memory polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Motoyuki; Kobayakawa, Murino; Yamazaki, Miwa; Ohta, Yasuhiro; Kamiya, Hidehiro

    2009-11-18

    An anionic surfactant comprising a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain, hydrophobic alkyl chain, and polymerizable vinyl group was synthesized as a capping agent of nanoparticles. TiO(2) nanoparticles modified by this surfactant were completely dispersible in various organic solvents with a wide range of polarities, such as nitriles, alcohols, ketones, and acetates. Furthermore, these particles were found to be dispersible in various polymers with different properties, such as thermosetting epoxy resins and radical polymerized poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA). A polymer composite of surface-modified TiO(2) nanoparticles in epoxy resins prepared by using the developed surfactant also possessed temperature-induced shape memory properties.

  5. Fluoroalkyl and alkyl chains have similar hydrophobicities in binding to the "hydrophobic wall" of carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Mecinović, Jasmin; Snyder, Phillip W; Mirica, Katherine A; Bai, Serena; Mack, Eric T; Kwant, Richard L; Moustakas, Demetri T; Héroux, Annie; Whitesides, George M

    2011-09-07

    The hydrophobic effect, the free-energetically favorable association of nonpolar solutes in water, makes a dominant contribution to binding of many systems of ligands and proteins. The objective of this study was to examine the hydrophobic effect in biomolecular recognition using two chemically different but structurally similar hydrophobic groups, aliphatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic fluorocarbons, and to determine whether the hydrophobicity of the two groups could be distinguished by thermodynamic and biostructural analysis. This paper uses isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to examine the thermodynamics of binding of benzenesulfonamides substituted in the para position with alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains (H(2)NSO(2)C(6)H(4)-CONHCH(2)(CX(2))(n)CX(3), n = 0-4, X = H, F) to human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). Both alkyl and fluoroalkyl substituents contribute favorably to the enthalpy and the entropy of binding; these contributions increase as the length of chain of the hydrophobic substituent increases. Crystallography of the protein-ligand complexes indicates that the benzenesulfonamide groups of all ligands examined bind with similar geometry, that the tail groups associate with the hydrophobic wall of HCA II (which is made up of the side chains of residues Phe131, Val135, Pro202, and Leu204), and that the structure of the protein is indistinguishable for all but one of the complexes (the longest member of the fluoroalkyl series). Analysis of the thermodynamics of binding as a function of structure is compatible with the hypothesis that hydrophobic binding of both alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains to hydrophobic surface of carbonic anhydrase is due primarily to the release of nonoptimally hydrogen-bonded water molecules that hydrate the binding cavity (including the hydrophobic wall) of HCA II and to the release of water molecules that surround the hydrophobic chain of the ligands. This study defines the balance of enthalpic and entropic contributions to the

  6. A new stable perfluoroalkyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Allayarov, S.R.; Barkalov, I.M.; Mikhailov, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper uses ESR spectroscopy to study the radical formed upon the gamma-irradiation of liquid perfluoro-methyl-2-pentene (PMP). The ESR spectrum of this radical shows a well resolved doublet of triplets with splitting 6.2 and 1.5 mT with additional splitting of each component by 0.25 mT. This ESR corresponds to a radical formed upon the addition of a radical r, in particlular, CF/sub 3/ to PMP.

  7. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophobic silicas. 584.700 Section 584.700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE IN FEED AND...

  8. COSOLVENCY AND SOPRTION OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) by two soils was measured from mixed solvents containing water plus completely miscible organic solvents (CMOSs) and partially miscible organic solvents (PMOSs). The utility of the log-linear cosolvency model for predicting HOC sor...

  9. Binding Hydrated Anions with Hydrophobic Pockets.

    PubMed

    Sokkalingam, Punidha; Shraberg, Joshua; Rick, Steven W; Gibb, Bruce C

    2016-01-13

    Using a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum and molecular dynamics calculations, we demonstrate that relatively soft anions have an affinity for hydrophobic concavity. The results are consistent with the anions remaining partially hydrated upon binding, and suggest a novel strategy for anion recognition.

  10. COSOLVENCY AND SOPRTION OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) by two soils was measured from mixed solvents containing water plus completely miscible organic solvents (CMOSs) and partially miscible organic solvents (PMOSs). The utility of the log-linear cosolvency model for predicting HOC sor...

  11. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic control in polyphosphazene materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steely, Lee Brent

    This thesis is the culmination of several recent studies focused on the surface characterization of polyphosphazenes specifically the properties of water repellency or hydrophobicity. Chapter 1 is a background account of polyphosphazene chemistry and the hydrophobicity of polyphosphazenes. Chapter 2 provides an examination of the role of surface morphology on hydrophobicity. This study deals in depth with the electrospinning of poly[bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phosphazene] in tetrahydrofuran. This process yields fiber mats or bead and fiber mats which exhibit roughness in continuous contact with the water droplet (fiber mats) or discontinuous contact (bead and fiber mats). These surface roughness types are compared to spun cast films using water contact angles to measure the air-water-polymer interface. The influence of aromatic moieties and fluorine content on the air-water-polymer interface is examined in Chapter 3. This study examines the influence of fluorine content and aryloxy groups on the hydrophobicity of a polyphosphazene surface via static water contact angle measurements on a goniometer. Polymer surfaces of spun cast and electrospun mats were probed with advancing, receeding, and static water contact angle and dip coated slides of the same materials were also examined with a Langmuir-Blogett trough. Chapter 4 is a description of the environmental plasma surface treatments of polyphosphazenes as a method of functionalizing solid polymer surfaces. The treatment procedure of functionalizing spun cast and electrospun poly[bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phosphazene] surfaces with plasma gases of oxygen, nitrogen, methane, and tetrafluoromethane is detailed. The resulting functionalization of the surface is examined with XPS and water contact angle data. In Chapter 5 fluoroalkoxy polyphosphazenes were processed with liquid carbon dioxide into foams. The foams were then tested for flame retardance and hydrophobicity. Appendixes A-C contain studies on moisture

  12. Toward Radicalizing Community Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    This article advocates a radicalized theoretical construction of community service learning. To accomplish this radicalization, I initially take up a discussion of traditional understandings of CSL rooted in pragmatic/progressive thought. I then suggest that this traditional structural foundation can be radicalized by incorporating Deborah…

  13. Toward Radicalizing Community Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    This article advocates a radicalized theoretical construction of community service learning. To accomplish this radicalization, I initially take up a discussion of traditional understandings of CSL rooted in pragmatic/progressive thought. I then suggest that this traditional structural foundation can be radicalized by incorporating Deborah…

  14. Evaporation rate of water in hydrophobic confinement

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sumit; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2012-01-01

    The drying of hydrophobic cavities is believed to play an important role in biophysical phenomena such as the folding of globular proteins, the opening and closing of ligand-gated ion channels, and ligand binding to hydrophobic pockets. We use forward flux sampling, a molecular simulation technique, to compute the rate of capillary evaporation of water confined between two hydrophobic surfaces separated by nanoscopic gaps, as a function of gap, surface size, and temperature. Over the range of conditions investigated (gaps between 9 and 14 Å and surface areas between 1 and 9 nm2), the free energy barrier to evaporation scales linearly with the gap between hydrophobic surfaces, suggesting that line tension makes the predominant contribution to the free energy barrier. The exponential dependence of the evaporation rate on the gap between confining surfaces causes a 10 order-of-magnitude decrease in the rate when the gap increases from 9 to 14 Å. The computed free energy barriers are of the order of 50kT and are predominantly enthalpic. Evaporation rates per unit area are found to be two orders of magnitude faster in confinement by the larger (9 nm2) than by the smaller (1 nm2) surfaces considered here, at otherwise identical conditions. We show that this rate enhancement is a consequence of the dependence of hydrophobic hydration on the size of solvated objects. For sufficiently large surfaces, the critical nucleus for the evaporation process is a gap-spanning vapor tube. PMID:22392972

  15. Free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  16. Probability and radical behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of probability appears to be very important in the radical behaviorism of Skinner. Yet, it seems that this probability has not been accurately defined and is still ambiguous. I give a strict, relative frequency interpretation of probability and its applicability to the data from the science of behavior as supplied by cumulative records. Two examples of stochastic processes are given that may model the data from cumulative records that result under conditions of continuous reinforcement and extinction, respectively. PMID:22478114

  17. Radicals in melanin biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Riley, P A

    1988-01-01

    Melanins are light-absorbant polymeric pigments found widely dispersed in nature. They possess many interesting physicochemical properties. One of these is the expression in the polymer of stable free radicals which appear to have a protective action in cells, probably by acting as a sink for diffusible free-radical species. Polymer formation is thought to occur by a free-radical process in which semiquinones are added to the chain. Semiquinones are formed by redox equilibration interactions between metabolic intermediates formed during the tyrosinase-catalyzed oxidation process. In the continued presence of substrate, steady-state concentrations of reactive species are predicted in the reaction system, and the melanogenic pathway may be considered as potentially hazardous for pigment-generating cells. This feature has been exploited by the use of analogue substrates to generate cytotoxic species as a possible rational approach to the treatment of malignant melanoma. One such substance is 4-hydroxyanisole, the oxidation of which gives rise to semiquinone radical species. The possibility that the anisyl semiquinone initiates a mechanism leading to cell damage has not been excluded. However, the current view is that the major cytotoxicity due to the oxidation products of this compound is the result of the action of the corresponding orthoquinone. A number of mechanisms exist for detoxifying quinones if they reach the cytosol such as O-methylation and the formation of thiol adducts with cysteine or glutathione, and these can be used as markers of melanogenesis. In general, however, only small amounts of reactive intermediates of melanogenesis escape from the confines of the melanosome, probably because of their limited lipid solubility. The selective toxic action of anisyl quinone in the treatment of melanoma may, in part, be due to membrane defects in the melanosomes of malignant melanocytes.

  18. Competition of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between small hydrophobes and model enclosures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingle; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The binding affinity between a probe hydrophobic particle and model hydrophobic plates with different charge (or dipole) densities in water was investigated through molecular dynamics simulations free-energy perturbation calculations. We observed a reduced binding affinity when the plates are charged, in agreement with previous findings. With increased charge density, the plates can change from “hydrophobic like” (pulling the particle into the interplate region) to “hydrophilic like” (ejecting the particle out of the interplate region), demonstrating the competition between hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. The reduction of the binding affinity is quadratically dependent on the magnitude of the charge for symmetric systems, but linear and cubic terms also make a contribution for asymmetric systems. Statistical perturbation theory explains these results and shows when and why implicit solvent models fail. PMID:20443643

  19. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  20. Diaryldichalcogenide radical cations.

    PubMed

    Mallow, Ole; Khanfar, Monther A; Malischewski, Moritz; Finke, Pamela; Hesse, Malte; Lork, Enno; Augenstein, Timo; Breher, Frank; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Vasilieva, Nadezhda V; Zibarev, Andrey; Bogomyakov, Artem S; Seppelt, Konrad; Beckmann, Jens

    2015-01-01

    One-electron oxidation of two series of diaryldichalcogenides (C6F5E)2 (13a-c) and (2,6-Mes2C6H3E)2 (16a-c) was studied (E = S, Se, Te). The reaction of 13a and 13b with AsF5 and SbF5 gave rise to the formation of thermally unstable radical cations [(C6F5S)2]˙(+) (14a) and [(C6F5Se)2]˙(+) (14b) that were isolated as [Sb2F11](-) and [As2F11](-) salts, respectively. The reaction of 13c with AsF5 afforded only the product of a Te-C bond cleavage, namely the previously known dication [Te4](2+) that was isolated as [AsF6](-) salt. The reaction of (2,6-Mes2C6H3E)2 (16a-c) with [NO][SbF6] provided the corresponding radical cations [(2,6-Mes2C6H3E)2]˙(+) (17a-c; E = S, Se, Te) in the form of thermally stable [SbF6](-) salts in nearly quantitative yields. The electronic and structural properties of these radical cations were probed by X-ray diffraction analysis, EPR spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations and other methods.

  1. Types of radical hysterectomies

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Plesca, M; Bordea, CI; Moga, MA; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The treatment for cervical cancer is a complex, multidisciplinary issue, which applies according to the stage of the disease. The surgical elective treatment of cervical cancer is represented by the radical abdominal hysterectomy. In time, many surgeons perfected this surgical technique; the ones who stood up for this idea were Thoma Ionescu and Ernst Wertheim. There are many varieties of radical hysterectomies performed by using the abdominal method and some of them through vaginal and mixed way. Each method employed has advantages and disadvantages. At present, there are three classifications of radical hysterectomies which are used for the simplification of the surgical protocols: Piver-Rutledge-Smith classification which is the oldest, GCG-EORTC classification and Querlow and Morrow classification. The last is the most evolved and recent classification; its techniques can be adapted for conservative operations and for different types of surgical approaches: abdominal, vaginal, laparoscopic or robotic. Abbreviations: GCG-EORTC = Gynecologic Cancer Group of the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer; LEEP = loop electrosurgical excision procedure; I.O.B. = Institute of Oncology Bucharest; PRS = Piver-Rutledge-Smith PMID:25408722

  2. [Radical prostatectomy - pro robotic].

    PubMed

    Gillitzer, R

    2012-05-01

    Anatomical radical prostatectomy was introduced in the early 1980s by Walsh and Donker. Elucidation of key anatomical structures led to a significant reduction in the morbidity of this procedure. The strive to achieve similar oncological and functional results to this gold standard open procedure but with further reduction of morbidity through a minimally invasive access led to the establishment of laparoscopic prostatectomy. However, this procedure is complex and difficult and is associated with a long learning curve. The technical advantages of robotically assisted surgery coupled with the intuitive handling of the device led to increased precision and shortening of the learning curve. These main advantages, together with a massive internet presence and aggressive marketing, have resulted in a rapid dissemination of robotic radical prostatectomy and an increasing patient demand. However, superiority of robotic radical prostatectomy in comparison to the other surgical therapeutic options has not yet been proven on a scientific basis. Currently robotic-assisted surgery is an established technique and future technical improvements will certainly further define its role in urological surgery. In the end this technical innovation will have to be balanced against the very high purchase and running costs, which remain the main limitation of this technology.

  3. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a free radical propulsion system, utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust, is analyzed. The system, operating at a theoretical impulse with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, is hypothesized to bridge the gap between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. A comparative methodology is outlined by which characteristics of chemical and electric propulsion for orbit raising mission can be investigated. It is noted that free radicals proposed in rockets previously met with difficulty and complexity in terms of storage requirements; the present study proposes to eliminate the storage requirements by using electric energy to achieve a continuous-flow product of free radicals which are recombined to produce a high velocity propellant. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas is transferred to the propellant via three-body-recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Microwave plasma discharge was found in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressure in preliminary experiments, and microwave heating compared to electrothermal heating showed much higher temperatures in gasdynamic equations.

  4. 2.10 Titanium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  5. 1.35 Ruthenium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  6. 2.33 Mercury-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  7. 2.32 Gold-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  8. 2.8 Potassium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  9. 2.28 Tantalum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  10. 1.42 Iodine-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  11. 4.6.3 Vinyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, A. L. J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  12. 1.48 Gold-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  13. 2.7 Phosphorus-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  14. 1.46 Iridium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  15. 2.16 Zinc-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  16. 1.38 Cadmium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  17. 2.15 Copper-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  18. 2.4 Sodium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  19. 2.17 Gallium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  20. 2.31 Iridium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  1. 2.21 Niobium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  2. 1.36 Palladium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  3. 2.3 Boron-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  4. 1.37 Silver-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  5. 2.24 Silver-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  6. 2.18 Rubidium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  7. 2.20 Zirconium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  8. 1.40 Tin-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  9. 1.41 Tellurium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  10. 2.2 Lithium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  11. 2.5 Aluminum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  12. 2.22 Molybdenum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  13. 2.12 Chromium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  14. 2.14 Cobalt-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  15. 2.9 Scandium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  16. 2.6 Silicon-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  17. 2.19 Yttrium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  18. 2.27 Lanthanum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  19. 2.23 Rhodium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  20. 2.13 Manganese-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  1. 4.6.2 Aryl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, A. L. J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  2. 1.34 Molybdenum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  3. 1.43 Lanthanum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  4. 2.30 Osmium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  5. 2.29 Tungsten-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  6. 1.47 Platinum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  7. 2.26 Cesium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  8. 1.45 Osmium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  9. 1.44 Tantalum-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  10. 2.11 Vanadium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  11. 2.25 Cadmium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  12. 1.49 Mercury-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  13. 1.39 Indium-centered radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, R. F. C.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  14. Conformal hydrophobic coatings prepared using atomic layer deposition seed layers and non-chlorinated hydrophobic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Cari F.; DelRio, Frank W.; Bright, Victor M.; George, Steven M.

    2005-05-01

    Ultrathin and conformal films deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) can enhance the reliability and performance of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) devices. Al2O3 ALD films are particularly useful because the Al2O3 ALD surface chemistry is very favorable and amenable to growth on a wide variety of substrates. Al2O3 ALD can be utilized to deposit robust and reliable hydrophobic coatings. A thin Al2O3 ALD film is deposited and is used as a seed layer to prepare and optimize the MEMS surface for the subsequent attachment of the hydrophobic precursors. Once the Al2O3-coated surface is prepared, non-chlorinated alkylsilanes are chemically bonded to the surface hydroxyl groups on the ALD seed layer. The film growth was monitored using an in situ quartz crystal microbalance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ex situ Auger electron spectroscopy. This deposition technique results in a dense and conformal hydrophobic film with a water contact angle of 108 ± 2°. When annealed in air to 300 °C for 10 min, the hydrophobic ALD films remained hydrophobic with a contact angle greater than 90°. Using MEMS cantilever beam arrays, hydrophobic ALD-coated beams were determined to have an adhesion energy of 0.11 ± 0.03 mJ m-2 at 100% humidity as compared with an adhesion energy of 12 ± 1 mJ m-2 for the same beams without any coating.

  15. Gel formation driven by tunable hydrophobic domain: design of acrylamide macromonomer with oligo hydrophobic segment.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Kyohei; Miyake, Junpei; Watanabe, Junji; Ikeda, Yoshiyuki

    2012-04-09

    Nowadays, biomaterials with amphiphilic properties are undergoing remarkable development. Here, we present one such development, in which we prepared amphiphilic graft copolymers, with a main chain composed of hydroxyethyl acrylamide (HEAA), to introduce hydrophilicity, and a side chain composed of poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) to introduce tunable hydrophobicity. These macromonomers were created with a novel molecular design, which introduced a ring-opening polymerization by the hydroxyl end group of HEAA in the presence of 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene, and were analyzed by (1)H NMR and gel permeation chromatography. The amphiphilic graft copolymers were shown to form a hydrogel, the swelling ratio of which was greatly influenced by the number of trimethylene carbonate units. These copolymers also exhibited the Tyndall phenomenon in aqueous solution; they aggregated spontaneously due to hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions, and a sodium 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) fluorescence probe was introduced into the hydrophobic domain. The solution property of ANS in the polymer solution was analyzed by fluorescence measurement and (1)H NMR. The maximum fluorescence wavelength of ANS shifted to shorter wavelengths as the degree of polymerization of the hydrophobic PTMC, the composition of the macromonomer, and the concentration of the copolymer increased. The resulting copolymer formed a polymer micelle structure due to the tunable hydrophobic domain formation in selected solvents. Therefore, these amphiphilic graft copolymers containing a PTMC segment are excellent candidates for use as hydrophobic drug delivery carriers.

  16. Site reactivity in the free radicals induced damage to leucine residues: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Medina, M E; Galano, A; Alvarez-Idaboy, J R

    2015-02-21

    Several recent computational studies have tried to explain the observed selectivity in radical damage to proteins. In this work we use Density Functional Theory and Transition State Theory including tunnelling corrections, reaction path degeneracy, the effect of diffusion, and the role of free radicals to get further insights into this important topic. The reaction between a leucine derivative and free radicals of biological significance, in aqueous and lipid media, has been investigated. Both thermochemical and kinetic analyses, in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic environments, have been carried out. DPPH, ˙OOH, ˙OOCH3, ˙OOCH2Cl, ˙OOCHCl2 and ˙OOCHCH2 radicals do not react with the target molecule. The reactions are proposed to be kinetically controlled. The leucine gamma site was the most reactive for the reactions with ˙N3, ˙OOCCl3, ˙OCH3, ˙OCH2Cl, and ˙OCHCl2 radicals, with rate constants equal to 1.97 × 10(5), 3.24 × 10(4), 6.68 × 10(5), 5.98 × 10(6) and 8.87 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution. The ˙Cl, ˙OH and ˙OCCl3 radicals react with leucine at the beta, gamma, and delta positions at rates close to the diffusion limit with the alpha position which is the slowest path and the most thermodynamically favored. The presented results confirm that the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not apply for the reactions between amino acid residues and free radicals. Regarding the influence of the environment on the reactivity of the studied series of free radicals towards leucine residues, it is concluded that hydrophilic media slightly lower the reactivity of the studied radicals, compared to hydrophobic ones, albeit the trends in reactivity are very similar.

  17. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) is never hydrophobic.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Robert

    2010-08-15

    PNIPAM chains have hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains below and above the LCST. Temperature dependent interactions between PNIPAM and solutes arise because of changes in the local environment around the hydrophobic isopropyl domains. Below the LCST the isopropyl groups are surrounded by water, whereas above the LCST the hydrophobic groups are in contact with both water and polymer segments. Contrary to numerous claims in the literature, PNIPAM is not a hydrophobic material at temperatures above the LCST.

  18. Biodegradable, hydrophobic coatings based on crosslinked polycaprolactone

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, M.F.

    1993-12-31

    Crosslinked poly(caprolactone) (PCL) has been explored as a hydrophobic and biodegradable coating for hydrophilic substrates. Crosslinking of PCL is known to retard its degradation rate, but does not affect its biodegradability. The cross-linking efficiencies of several organic peroxides have been determined for PCL. This has been accomplished by calculating the crosslink density (M{sub c} from dynamic mechanical data) for a given molar concentration of organic peroxide. Various thicknesses of crosslinked PCL have been coated on several different hydrophilic substrates, including paper, MaterBi (regsign), and PCL/starch composites. The hydrophobicity of the coating has been measured by following the weight gain of the coated samples upon exposure to water and a high relative humidity for various lengths of time. Results show that a coating as thin as 10 {mu}m reduces water absorption of paper by a factor of five, and thicker coatings (0.25 mm) by more than two orders of magnitude.

  19. The hydrophobic force: measurements and methods.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Rico F; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C

    2014-09-14

    The hydrophobic force describes the attraction between water-hating molecules (and surfaces) that draws them together, causing aggregation, phase separation, protein folding and many other inherent physical phenomena. Attempts have been made to isolate the range and magnitude of this interaction between extended surfaces for more than four decades, with wildly varying results. In this perspective, we critically analyse the application of common force-measuring techniques to the hydrophobic force conundrum. In doing so, we highlight possible interferences to these measurements and provide physical rationalisation where possible. By analysing the most recent measurements, new approaches to establishing the form of this force become apparent, and we suggest potential future directions to further refine our understanding of this vital, physical force.

  20. Interaction between silica and hydrophobic cations.

    PubMed Central

    Depasse, J

    1978-01-01

    The interactions between silica and some molecules which have a high affinity for its surface have been studied. The hydrophobic properties and the positive charge of these molecules are likely to be responsible for their strong adsorption on to silica. These observations should be useful in research into new inhibitors of the effects of silica. One of the cations tested, chloroquine, has been shown to be an effective inhibitor of the haemolytic activity of quartz. PMID:204326

  1. Hydrophobic metallic nanorods with Teflon nanopatches.

    PubMed

    Khudhayer, Wisam J; Sharma, Rajesh; Karabacak, Tansel

    2009-07-08

    Introducing a hydrophobic property to vertically aligned hydrophilic metallic nanorods was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The platinum nanorod arrays were deposited on flat silicon substrates using a sputter glancing angle deposition technique (GLAD). Then a thin layer of Teflon (nanopatch) was partially deposited on the tips of platinum nanorods at a glancing angle of theta(dep) = 85 degrees for different deposition times. Teflon deposition on Pt nanorods at normal incidence (theta(dep) = 0 degrees) was also performed for comparison. Morphology and elemental analysis of Pt/Teflon nanocomposite structures were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. It was found that the GLAD technique is capable of depositing ultrathin isolated Teflon nanostructures on selective regions of nanorod arrays due to the shadowing effect during obliquely incident deposition. Contact angle measurements on nanocomposite Pt nanorods with Teflon nanopatches exhibited contact angle values as high as 138 degrees, indicating a significant increase in the hydrophobicity of originally hydrophilic Pt nanostructures that had an angle of about 52 degrees. The enhanced hydrophobicity of the Pt nanorod/Teflon nanopatch composite is attributed to the presence of nanostructured Teflon coating, which imparted a low surface energy. Surface energy calculations were performed on Pt nanorods, Teflon thin film, and Pt/Teflon composite using the two-liquid method to confirm the contact angle measurements. Furthermore, a new contact angle model utilizing Cassie and Baxter theory for heterogeneous surfaces was developed in order to explain the enhanced hydrophobicity of Pt/Teflon nanorods. According to our model, it is predicted that the solid-liquid interface is mainly at the Teflon tips when the composite nanorods are in contact with water.

  2. Hydrophobic metallic nanorods with Teflon nanopatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudhayer, Wisam J.; Sharma, Rajesh; Karabacak, Tansel

    2009-07-01

    Introducing a hydrophobic property to vertically aligned hydrophilic metallic nanorods was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The platinum nanorod arrays were deposited on flat silicon substrates using a sputter glancing angle deposition technique (GLAD). Then a thin layer of Teflon (nanopatch) was partially deposited on the tips of platinum nanorods at a glancing angle of θdep = 85° for different deposition times. Teflon deposition on Pt nanorods at normal incidence (θdep = 0°) was also performed for comparison. Morphology and elemental analysis of Pt/Teflon nanocomposite structures were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. It was found that the GLAD technique is capable of depositing ultrathin isolated Teflon nanostructures on selective regions of nanorod arrays due to the shadowing effect during obliquely incident deposition. Contact angle measurements on nanocomposite Pt nanorods with Teflon nanopatches exhibited contact angle values as high as 138°, indicating a significant increase in the hydrophobicity of originally hydrophilic Pt nanostructures that had an angle of about 52°. The enhanced hydrophobicity of the Pt nanorod/Teflon nanopatch composite is attributed to the presence of nanostructured Teflon coating, which imparted a low surface energy. Surface energy calculations were performed on Pt nanorods, Teflon thin film, and Pt/Teflon composite using the two-liquid method to confirm the contact angle measurements. Furthermore, a new contact angle model utilizing Cassie and Baxter theory for heterogeneous surfaces was developed in order to explain the enhanced hydrophobicity of Pt/Teflon nanorods. According to our model, it is predicted that the solid-liquid interface is mainly at the Teflon tips when the composite nanorods are in contact with water.

  3. Hydrophobic sponge structure-based triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Young; Chun, Jinsung; Lee, Ju-Hyuck; Kim, Kyeong Nam; Kang, Na-Ri; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Myung Hwa; Shin, Kyung-Sik; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Baik, Jeong Min; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-08-06

    Hydrophobic sponge structure-based triboelectric nanogenerators using an inverse opal structured film for sustainable energy harvesting over a wide range of humid atmosphere have been successfully demonstrated. The output voltage and current density reach a record value of 130 V and 0.10 mA cm(-2) , respectively, giving over 10-fold power enhancement, compared with the flat film-based triboelectric nanogenerator.

  4. Temperature dependence of amino acid hydrophobicities.

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, Richard; Lewis, Charles A; Yuan, Yang; Carter, Charles W

    2015-06-16

    The hydrophobicities of the 20 common amino acids are reflected in their tendencies to appear in interior positions in globular proteins and in deeply buried positions of membrane proteins. To determine whether these relationships might also have been valid in the warm surroundings where life may have originated, we examined the effect of temperature on the hydrophobicities of the amino acids as measured by the equilibrium constants for transfer of their side-chains from neutral solution to cyclohexane (K(w > c)). The hydrophobicities of most amino acids were found to increase with increasing temperature. Because that effect is more pronounced for the more polar amino acids, the numerical range of K(w > c) values decreases with increasing temperature. There are also modest changes in the ordering of the more polar amino acids. However, those changes are such that they would have tended to minimize the otherwise disruptive effects of a changing thermal environment on the evolution of protein structure. Earlier, the genetic code was found to be organized in such a way that--with a single exception (threonine)--the side-chain dichotomy polar/nonpolar matches the nucleic acid base dichotomy purine/pyrimidine at the second position of each coding triplet at 25 °C. That dichotomy is preserved at 100 °C. The accessible surface areas of amino acid side-chains in folded proteins are moderately correlated with hydrophobicity, but when free energies of vapor-to-cyclohexane transfer (corresponding to size) are taken into consideration, a closer relationship becomes apparent.

  5. Catalysis of Radical Reactions: A Radical Chemistry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Studer, Armido; Curran, Dennis P

    2016-01-04

    The area of catalysis of radical reactions has recently flourished. Various reaction conditions have been discovered and explained in terms of catalytic cycles. These cycles rarely stand alone as unique paths from substrates to products. Instead, most radical reactions have innate chains which form products without any catalyst. How do we know if a species added in "catalytic amounts" is a catalyst, an initiator, or something else? Herein we critically address both catalyst-free and catalytic radical reactions through the lens of radical chemistry. Basic principles of kinetics and thermodynamics are used to address problems of initiation, propagation, and inhibition of radical chains. The catalysis of radical reactions differs from other areas of catalysis. Whereas efficient innate chain reactions are difficult to catalyze because individual steps are fast, both inefficient chain processes and non-chain processes afford diverse opportunities for catalysis, as illustrated with selected examples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Hydrophobic-hydrophilic forces in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Durell, Stewart R; Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2017-08-01

    The process of protein folding is obviously driven by forces exerted on the atoms of the amino-acid chain. These forces arise from interactions with other parts of the protein itself (direct forces), as well as from interactions with the solvent (solvent-induced forces). We present a statistical-mechanical formalism that describes both these direct and indirect, solvent-induced thermodynamic forces on groups of the protein. We focus on 2 kinds of protein groups, commonly referred to as hydrophobic and hydrophilic. Analysis of this result leads to the conclusion that the forces on hydrophilic groups are in general stronger than on hydrophobic groups. This is then tested and verified by a series of molecular dynamics simulations, examining both hydrophobic alkanes of different sizes and hydrophilic moieties represented by polar-neutral hydroxyl groups. The magnitude of the force on assemblies of hydrophilic groups is dependent on their relative orientation: with 2 to 4 times larger forces on groups that are able to form one or more direct hydrogen bonds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Adsorption of dextrin on hydrophobic minerals.

    PubMed

    Beaussart, Audrey; Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Beattie, David A

    2009-09-01

    The adsorption of dextrin on talc, molybdenite, and graphite (three naturally hydrophobic minerals) has been compared. Adsorption isotherms and in situ tapping mode atomic force microscope (TMAFM) imaging have enabled polymer adsorbed amount and morphology of the adsorbed layer (area coverage and polymer domain size) to be determined and also the amount of hydration water in the structure of the adsorbed layer. The effect of the polymer on the mineral contact angles, measured by the captive bubble method on cleaved mineral surfaces, indicates clear correlations between the hydrophobicity reduction of the minerals, the adsorbed amount, and the surface coverage of the adsorbed polymer. Predictions of the flotation recovery of the treated mineral phases have been confirmed by performing batch flotation experiments. The influence of the polymer surface coverage on flotation recovery has highlighted the importance of this key parameter in the predictions of depressant efficiency. The roles of the initial hydrophobicity and the surface structure of the mineral basal plane in determining adsorption parameters and flotation response of the polymer-treated minerals are also discussed.

  8. Nonflammable, Hydrophobic Aerogel Composites for Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redouane, Begag

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel composites that are both nonflammable and hydrophobic have been developed for use as lightweight thermal- insulation materials for cryogenic systems. Aerogels are well known in the industry for their effectiveness as thermal insulators under cryogenic conditions, but the treatments used heretofore to render them hydrophobic also make them flammable. Nonflammability would make it safer to use aerogel insulation, especially in oxygen-rich environments and on cryogenic systems that contain liquid oxygen. A composite of this type is a silica aerogel reinforced with fibers. In comparison with unreinforced aerogels, the aerogel composite is about ten times as stiff and strong, better able to withstand handling, and more amenable to machining to required shapes. The composite can be made hydrophobic and nonflammable by appropriate design of a sol-gel process used to synthesize the aerogel component. In addition to very low thermal conductivity needed for insulation, aerogel composites of this type have been found to exhibit high resistance to moisture and nonflammability in oxygen-rich atmospheres: Samples floating on water for months gained no weight and showed no signs of deterioration. Samples were found to be nonflammable, even in pure oxygen at atmospheric pressure [14.7 psia (0.10 MPa)

  9. Cationic Hydrophobic Peptides with Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Margareta; Liu, Li-Ping; Deber, Charles M.

    2002-01-01

    The MICs of cationic, hydrophobic peptides of the prototypic sequence KKAAAXAAAAAXAAWAAXAAAKKKK-amide (where X is one of the 20 commonly occurring amino acids) are in a low micromolar range for a panel of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, with no or low hemolytic activity against human and rabbit erythrocytes. The peptides are active only when the average segmental hydrophobicity of the 19-residue core is above an experimentally determined threshold value (where X is Phe, Trp, Leu, Ile, Met, Val, Cys, or Ala). Antimicrobial activity could be increased by using peptides that were truncated from the prototype length to 11 core residues, with X being Phe and with 6 Lys residues grouped at the N terminus. We propose a mechanism for the interaction between these peptides and bacterial membranes similar to the “carpet model,” wherein the Lys residues interact with the anionic phospholipid head groups in the bacterial membrane surface and the hydrophobic core portion of the peptide is then able to interact with the lipid bilayer, causing disruption of the bacterial membrane. PMID:12384369

  10. Diameter-dependent hydrophobicity in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyakuno, Haruka; Fukasawa, Mamoru; Ichimura, Ryota; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Nakai, Yusuke; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Saito, Takeshi; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a good model system that provides atomically smooth nanocavities. It has been reported that water-SWCNTs exhibit hydrophobicity depending on the temperature T and the SWCNT diameter D. SWCNTs adsorb water molecules spontaneously in their cylindrical pores around room temperature, whereas they exhibit a hydrophilic-hydrophobic transition or wet-dry transition (WDT) at a critical temperature Twd ≈ 220-230 K and above a critical diameter Dc ≈ 1.4-1.6 nm. However, details of the WDT phenomenon and its mechanism remain unknown. Here, we report a systematic experimental study involving X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that water molecules inside thick SWCNTs (D > Dc) evaporate and condense into ice Ih outside the SWCNTs at Twd upon cooling, and the ice Ih evaporates and condenses inside the SWCNTs upon heating. On the other hand, residual water trapped inside the SWCNTs below Twd freezes. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that upon lowering T, the hydrophobicity of thick SWCNTs increases without any structural transition, while the water inside thin SWCNTs (D < Dc) exhibits a structural transition, forming an ordered ice. This ice has a well-developed hydrogen bonding network adapting to the cylindrical pores of the SWCNTs. Thus, the unusual diameter dependence of the WDT is attributed to the adaptability of the structure of water to the pore dimension and shape.

  11. Hydrophobic meshes for oil spill recovery devices.

    PubMed

    Deng, Da; Prendergast, Daniel P; MacFarlane, John; Bagatin, Roberto; Stellacci, Francesco; Gschwend, Philip M

    2013-02-01

    Widespread use of petrochemicals often leads to accidental releases in aquatic environments, occasionally with disastrous results. We have developed a hydrophobic and oleophilic mesh that separates oil from water continuously in situ via capillary action, providing a means of recovering spilt oil from surface waters. Steel mesh is dip-coated in a xylene solution of low-density polyethylene, creating a hydrophobic surface with tunable roughness and opening size. The hydrophobic mesh allows oil to pass through the openings while preventing the concomitant passage of water. A bench-top prototype demonstrated the efficacy of such an oil recovery device and allowed us to quantify the factors governing the ability of the mesh to separate oil and water. Preliminary data analysis suggested that the oleophilic openings behave somewhat like capillary tubes: the oil flux is inversely proportional to oil viscosity, and directly proportional to the size of the mesh openings. An unpinned meniscus model was found to predict the water intrusion pressure successfully, which increased as the opening size decreased. The trade-off between water intrusion and oil flow rate suggests an optimal pore size for given oil properties and sea conditions.

  12. Cellobiohydrolase Hydrolyzes Crystalline Cellulose on Hydrophobic Faces*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-San; Baker, John O.; Zeng, Yining; Himmel, Michael E.; Haas, Thomas; Ding, Shi-You

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradation of plant biomass is a slow process in nature, and hydrolysis of cellulose is also widely considered to be a rate-limiting step in the proposed industrial process of converting lignocellulosic materials to biofuels. It is generally known that a team of enzymes including endo- and exocellulases as well as cellobiases are required to act synergistically to hydrolyze cellulose to glucose. The detailed molecular mechanisms of these enzymes have yet to be convincingly elucidated. In this report, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to image in real-time the structural changes in Valonia cellulose crystals acted upon by the exocellulase cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) from Trichoderma reesei. Under AFM, single enzyme molecules could be observed binding only to one face of the cellulose crystal, apparently the hydrophobic face. The surface roughness of cellulose began increasing after adding CBH I, and the overall size of cellulose crystals decreased during an 11-h period. Interestingly, this size reduction apparently occurred only in the width of the crystal, whereas the height remained relatively constant. In addition, the measured cross-section shape of cellulose crystal changed from asymmetric to nearly symmetric. These observed changes brought about by CBH I action may constitute the first direct visualization supporting the idea that the exocellulase selectively hydrolyzes the hydrophobic faces of cellulose. The limited accessibility of the hydrophobic faces in native cellulose may contribute significantly to the rate-limiting slowness of cellulose hydrolysis. PMID:21282110

  13. Phenylalanine containing hydrophobic nanospheres for antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil; Oztürk, Nevra; Akgöl, Sinan; Elkak, Assem

    2008-01-01

    In this study, novel hydrophobic nanospheres with an average size of 158 nm utilizing N-methacryloyl-(L)-phenylalanine methyl ester (MAPA) as a hydrophobic monomer were produced by surfactant free emulsion polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and MAPA conducted in an aqueous dispersion medium. MAPA was synthesized using methacryloyl chloride and L-phenylalanine methyl ester. Specific surface area of the nonporous nanospheres was found to be 1874 m2/g. Poly(HEMA-MAPA) nanospheres were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Average particle size, size distribution, and surface charge measurements were also performed. Elemental analysis of MAPA for nitrogen was estimated as 0.42 mmol/g polymer. Then, poly(HEMA-MAPA) nanospheres were used in the adsorption of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in batch system. Higher adsorption values (780 mg/g) were obtained when the poly (HEMA-MAPA) nanospheres were used from both aqueous solutions and human plasma. The adsorption phenomena appeared to follow a typical Langmuir isotherm. It was observed that IgG could be repeatedly adsorbed and desorbed without significant loss in adsorption amount. These findings show considerable promise for this material as a hydrophobic support in industrial processes.

  14. Smart Cellulose Nanofluids Produced by Tunable Hydrophobic Association of Polymer-Grafted Cellulose Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yea Ram; Park, Daehwan; Choi, Sang Koo; Kim, Miju; Baek, Heung Soo; Nam, Jin; Chung, Chan Bok; Osuji, Chinedum O; Kim, Jin Woong

    2017-09-13

    Cellulose fibrils, unique plant-derived semicrystalline nanomaterials with exceptional mechanical properties, have significant potential for rheology modification of complex fluids due to their ability to form a physically associated semiflexible fibrillary network. Here, we report new associative cellulose nanocrystals (ACNCs) with stress-responsive rheological behaviors in an aqueous solution. The surface-mediated living radical polymerization was employed to graft poly(stearyl methacrylate-co-2-methacryloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) brushes onto the nanofibrils, and then 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation was conducted to produce nanoscale ACNCs in the aqueous solution. The ACNCs displayed interfibril association driven by the hydrophobic interaction that resulted in the formation of a nanofibrillar crystalline gel phase. We observed that the viscosity of the ACNC fluid showed reversible shear thinning and temperature-induced thickening in response to applied shear stress and thermal shock. Moreover, thanks to generation of a mechanically robust nanofibrillar crystalline gel network, the ACNC suspension showed extraordinary stability to changes in salinity and pH. These results highlighted that the interfibril hydrophobic association of ACNCs was vital and played an essential role in regulation of stimuli-responsive sol-gel transitions.

  15. Radically innovative steelmaking technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Julian

    1980-09-01

    The steel industry is faced with serious problems caused by the increasing cost of energy, labor and capital and by tough overseas competition, employing new highly efficient process plants. The very high cost of capital and of capital equipment renders the construction of new green field site plants, exemplifying the best available technology economically unattractive. For this reason, over the long term the development radically innovative steelmaking technologies appears to be the only satisfactory resolution of this dilemma. The purpose of this article is to present a critical review of some of the radically innovative steelmaking technologies that have been proposed during the past few years and to develop the argument that these indeed do deserve serious consideration at the present time. It should be stressed, however, that these innovative technologies can be implemented only as part of a carefully conceived long range plan, which contains as a subset short term solutions, such as trigger prices improved investment credits, and so forth and intermediate term solutions, such as more extensive use of continuous casting, external desulfurization and selective modernization in general.

  16. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Wei-Guang; Sun, Junling; Wu, Yilei; Nassar, Majed S; Botros, Youssry Y; Goddard, William A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-02-24

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components-namely oligoviologens-in which different numbers of 4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY(2+)) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY(•+) radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne-azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers.

  17. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components—namely oligoviologens—in which different numbers of 4,4′-bipyridinium (BIPY2+) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT4+) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY•+ radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne–azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  18. Dewetting and Hydrophobic Interaction in Physical and Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Berne, Bruce J.; Weeks, John D.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2013-01-01

    Hydrophobicity manifests itself differently on large and small length scales. This review focuses on large length scale hydrophobicity, particularly on dewetting at single hydrophobic surfaces and drying in regions bounded on two or more sides by hydrophobic surfaces. We review applicable theories, simulations and experiments pertaining to large scale hydrophobicity in physical and biomoleclar systems and clarify some of the critical issues pertaining to this subject. Given space constraints, we could not review all of the significant and interesting work in this very active field. PMID:18928403

  19. A new procedure for the hydrophobization of cellulose fibre using laccase and a hydrophobic phenolic compound.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ubasart, Jordi; Colom, Josep F; Vila, Carlos; Gómez Hernández, Nuria; Blanca Roncero, M; Vidal, Teresa

    2012-05-01

    A new biotechnological procedure using laccase in combination with a hydrophobic phenolic compound (lauryl gallate) for the hydrophobization of cellulose fibres and internal sizing of paper was developed. Cellulose fibres from hardwood kraft pulp were incubated with laccase (Lac), in combination with lauryl gallate (LG). The Lac-LG treatment resulted in the internal sizing of paper, and also in significantly reduced water penetration in the handsheets and wettability of the paper surface. Paper was found not to be effectively rendered hydrophobic by LG alone. SEM images of the fibre network revealed the presence of the sizing agent: a product of the reaction between laccase and lauryl gallate. Binding of lauryl gallate to cellulose fibres was suggested by the increase in kappa number of the pulp and further confirmed by IR spectroscopy.

  20. Hydrophobic peptide channels and encapsulated water wires.

    PubMed

    Raghavender, Upadhyayula S; Kantharaju; Aravinda, Subrayashastry; Shamala, Narayanaswamy; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2010-01-27

    Peptide nanotubes with filled and empty pores and close-packed structures are formed in closely related pentapeptides. Enantiomorphic sequences, Boc-(D)Pro-Aib-Xxx-Aib-Val-OMe (Xxx = Leu, 1; Val, 2; Ala, 3; Phe, 4) and Boc-Pro-Aib-(D)Xxx-Aib-(D)Val-OMe ((D)Xxx = (D)Leu, 5; (D)Val, 6; (D)Ala, 7; (D)Phe, 8), yield molecular structures with a very similar backbone conformation but varied packing patterns in crystals. Peptides 1, 2, 5, and 6 show tubular structures with the molecules self-assembling along the crystallographic six-fold axis (c-axis) and revealing a honeycomb arrangement laterally (ab plane). Two forms of entrapped water wires have been characterized in 2: 2a with d(O...O) = 2.6 A and 2b with d(O...O) = 3.5 A. The latter is observed in 6 (6a) also. A polymorphic form of 6 (6b), grown from a solution of methanol-water, was observed to crystallize in a monoclinic system as a close-packed structure. Single-file water wire arrangements encapsulated inside hydrophobic channels formed by peptide nanotubes could be established by modeling the published structures in the cases of a cyclic peptide and a dipeptide. In all the entrapped water wires, each water molecule is involved in a hydrogen bond with a previous and succeeding water molecule. The O-H group of the water not involved in any hydrogen bond does not seem to be involved in an energetically significant interaction with the nanotube interior, a general feature of the one-dimensional water wires encapsulated in hydrophobic environments. Water wires in hydrophobic channels are contrasted with the single-file arrangements in amphipathic channels formed by aquaporins.

  1. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    A free radical propulsion concept utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust was examined. The concept offered promise of a propulsion system operating at a theoretical impulse, with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, thus filling the gas existing between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas was transferred to the propellant via three body recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Power absorption by the microwave plasma discharge was in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressures. Gas temperatures inferred from gas dynamic equations showed much higher temperatures from microwave heating than from electrothermal heating. Spectroscopic analysis appeared to corroborate the inferred temperatures of one of the gases tested.

  2. Radicals in Berkeley?

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    In a previous autobiographical sketch for DNA Repair (Linn, S. (2012) Life in the serendipitous lane: excitement and gratification in studying DNA repair. DNA Repair 11, 595–605), I wrote about my involvement in research on mechanisms of DNA repair. In this Reflections, I look back at how I became interested in free radical chemistry and biology and outline some of our bizarre (at the time) observations. Of course, these studies could never have succeeded without the exceptional aid of my mentors: my teachers; the undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and senior lab visitors in my laboratory; and my faculty and staff colleagues here at Berkeley. I am so indebted to each and every one of these individuals for their efforts to overcome my ignorance and set me on the straight and narrow path to success in research. I regret that I cannot mention and thank each of these mentors individually. PMID:25713083

  3. Radicals in Berkeley?

    PubMed

    Linn, Stuart

    2015-04-03

    In a previous autobiographical sketch for DNA Repair (Linn, S. (2012) Life in the serendipitous lane: excitement and gratification in studying DNA repair. DNA Repair 11, 595-605), I wrote about my involvement in research on mechanisms of DNA repair. In this Reflections, I look back at how I became interested in free radical chemistry and biology and outline some of our bizarre (at the time) observations. Of course, these studies could never have succeeded without the exceptional aid of my mentors: my teachers; the undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and senior lab visitors in my laboratory; and my faculty and staff colleagues here at Berkeley. I am so indebted to each and every one of these individuals for their efforts to overcome my ignorance and set me on the straight and narrow path to success in research. I regret that I cannot mention and thank each of these mentors individually.

  4. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  5. Practical aspects of hydrophobic polycationic bactericidal "paints".

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Koushik; Rivera, Jaime J; Klibanov, Alexander M

    2008-10-01

    We previously discovered that coating solid surfaces with long-chained linear N-dodecyl,N-methyl-polyethylenimine makes them bactericidal and virucidal. In the present study, focusing on the use of this microbicidal paint to kill airborne Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, we have systematically investigated the dependence of this effect on the concentration and mode of application of the hydrophobic polycation, the number of coats, the nature of the solvent, and the presence of a dye in such paint. In addition, the latter's ability to be regenerated after use, stability upon repeated washings, and mammalian toxicity has been evaluated.

  6. Enhanced ordering of water at hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Strazdaite, Simona; Versluis, Jan; Backus, Ellen H G; Bakker, Huib J

    2014-02-07

    We study the properties of water molecules adjacent to a hydrophobic molecular layer with vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy. We find that the water molecules at D2O/hexane, D2O/heptane, and D2O/polydimethylsiloxane interfaces show an enhanced ordering and stronger hydrogen-bond interactions than the water molecules at a D2O/air interface. With increasing temperature (up to 80 °C) the water structure becomes significantly less ordered and the hydrogen bonds become weaker.

  7. Fast enhancement on hydrophobicity of poplar wood surface using low-pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weimin; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaotao; Bian, Jie; Shi, Shukai; Nguyen, Thiphuong; Chen, Minzhi; Wan, Jinglin

    2017-06-01

    The hydrophilicity of woody products leads to deformation and cracks, which greatly limits its applications. Low-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma using hexamethyldisiloxane was applied in poplar wood surface to enhance the hydrophobicity. The chemical properties, micro-morphology, and contact angles of poplar wood surface before and after plasma treatment were investigated by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (SEM-EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and optical contact angle measurement (OCA). Moreover, tinfoil film was used as the base to reveal the enhancement mechanism. The results showed that hexamethyldisiloxane monomer is first broken into several fragments with active sites and hydrophobic chemical groups. Meanwhile, plasma treatment results in the formation of free radicals and active sites in the poplar wood surface. Then, the fragments are reacted with free radicals and incorporated into the active sites to form a network structure based on the linkages of Si-O-Si and Sisbnd Osbnd C. Plasma treatment also leads to the formation of acicular nano-structure in poplar wood surface. These facts synergistically enhance the hydrophobicity of poplar wood surface, demonstrating the dramatically increase in the equilibrium contact angle by 330%.

  8. Thermoresponsive hyaluronic acid nanogels as hydrophobic drug carrier to macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fernandes Stefanello, Talitha; Szarpak-Jankowska, Anna; Appaix, Florence; Louage, Benoit; Hamard, Lauriane; De Geest, Bruno G; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2014-11-01

    Delivery systems for macrophages are particularly attractive since these phagocytic cells play a important role in immunological and inflammatory responses, also acting as host cells for microorganisms that are involved in deadly infectious diseases, such as leishmaniasis. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is specifically recognized by macrophages that are known to express HA receptors. Therefore, in this study, we focused on HA-based nanogels as drug carriers for these cells. The drug delivery was validated in an in vivo study on mice using intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy. HA derivatives were modified with a biocompatible oligo(ethylene glycol)-based thermoresponsive polymer to form nanogels. These HA conjugates were readily prepared by varying the molar mass of initial HA and the degree of substitution via radical-mediated thiol-ene chemistry in aqueous solution. The derivatives were shown to self-assemble into spherical gel particles with diameters ranging from 150 to 214 nm above 37 °C. A poorly water-soluble two-photon dye was successfully loaded into the nanogels during this self-assembly process. In vitro cellular uptake tests using a RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line showed successful intracellular delivery of the hydrophobic dye. After intravenous injection in mice, the nanogels circulated freely in the blood but were rapidly phagocytized within 13 min by circulating macrophages and stored in the liver and spleen, as observed by two-photon microscopy. Benefit can be thus expected in using such a delivery system for the liver and spleen macrophage-associated diseases.

  9. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    This article offers a conceptual framework to understand radical change. It opens with a typology that defines change in terms of its pace and scope...known entrepreneurs who have been successful in molding and shaping the radical change process. The implications of this conceptual framework to

  10. Development of the selective hydrophobic coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (i) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (ii) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. The technical work program was initiated on July 1, 1992. Force-distance curves were generated for DDOA Br-coated mica surfaces in water and used to calculate hydrophobicity constants and decay lengths for this system; and a new device for the measurement of water contact angles, similar to the Wilhelmy plate balance, has been built 225 kg samples of Pittsburgh No. 8 and Elkhom No. 3 seam coals were obtained; a static mixer test facility for the study of coagula growth was set up and was undergoing shakedown tests at the end of the quarter; a bench-scale lamella thickener was being constructed; and preliminary coagula/ mineral separation tests were being conducted in a bench-scale continuous drum filter.

  11. Development of the Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (Contracts AC22-86PC91221 and AC22-90PC90174). The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (1) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (2) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. During the quarter, the Anutech Mark IV surface force apparatus was used to generate surface force-distance data for the mica/dodecylamine hydrochloride system (Task 2.1.1). Work to characterize the hydrophobicity of this system and the mica/DDOA[sup [minus

  12. Hydrophobic effects on partial molar volume.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takashi; Hirata, Fumio

    2005-03-01

    The hydrophobic effects on partial molar volume (PMV) are investigated as a PMV change in the transfer of a benzenelike nonpolar solute from the nonpolar solvent to water, using an integral equation theory of liquids. The volume change is divided into two effects. One is the "packing" effect in the transfer from the nonpolar solvent to hypothetical "nonpolar water" without hydrogen bonding networks. The other is the "iceberg" effect in the transfer from nonpolar water to water. The results indicate that the packing effect is negative and a half compensated by the positive iceberg effect. The packing effect is explained by the difference in the solvent compressibility. Further investigation shows that the sign and magnitude of the volume change depend on the solute size and the solvent compressibility. The finding gives a significant implication that the exposure of a hydrophobic residue caused by protein denaturation can either increase or decrease the PMV of protein depending on the size of the residue and the fluctuation of its surroundings.

  13. Hydrophobic effects on partial molar volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takashi; Hirata, Fumio

    2005-03-01

    The hydrophobic effects on partial molar volume (PMV) are investigated as a PMV change in the transfer of a benzenelike nonpolar solute from the nonpolar solvent to water, using an integral equation theory of liquids. The volume change is divided into two effects. One is the "packing" effect in the transfer from the nonpolar solvent to hypothetical "nonpolar water" without hydrogen bonding networks. The other is the "iceberg" effect in the transfer from nonpolar water to water. The results indicate that the packing effect is negative and a half compensated by the positive iceberg effect. The packing effect is explained by the difference in the solvent compressibility. Further investigation shows that the sign and magnitude of the volume change depend on the solute size and the solvent compressibility. The finding gives a significant implication that the exposure of a hydrophobic residue caused by protein denaturation can either increase or decrease the PMV of protein depending on the size of the residue and the fluctuation of its surroundings.

  14. Potential for plastics to transport hydrophobic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Teuten, Emma L; Rowland, Steven J; Galloway, Tamara S; Thompson, Richard C

    2007-11-15

    Plastic debris litters marine and terrestrial habitats worldwide. It is ingested by numerous species of animals, causing deleterious physical effects. High concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants have also been measured on plastic debris collected from the environment, but the fate of these contaminants is poorly understood. Here, we examine the uptake and subsequent release of phenanthrene by three plastics. Equilibrium distribution coefficients for sorption of phenanthrene from seawater onto the plastics varied by more than an order of magnitude (polyethylene > polypropylene > polyvinyl chloride (PVC)). In all cases, sorption to plastics greatly exceeded sorption to two natural sediments. Desorption rates of phenanthrene from the plastics or sediments back into solution spanned several orders of magnitude. As expected, desorption occurred more rapidly from the sediments than from the plastics. Using the equilibrium partitioning method, the effects of adding very small quantities of plastic with sorbed phenanthrene to sediment inhabited by the lugworm (Arenicola marina) were evaluated. We estimate that the addition of as little as 1 microg of contaminated polyethylene to a gram of sediment would give a significant increase in phenanthrene accumulation by A. marina. Thus, plastics may be important agents in the transport of hydrophobic contaminants to sediment-dwelling organisms.

  15. The Dewetting Transition and The Hydrophobic Effect.

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Niharendu; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-03-27

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A molecular-level description of the behavior of water in hydrophobic spaces is presented in terms of the coupled effects of solute size and atomic solute-solvent interactions. For model solutes with surface areas near those of protein contacts, we identify three different regions of solute-water interaction to be associated with three distinctly different structural characteristics of water in the intersolute region: dry, oscillating, and wet. A first orderlike phase transition is confirmed from the wet to dry state bridged by a narrow region with liquid-vapor oscillations in the intersolute region as the strength of the solute-water attractive dispersion interaction decreases. We demonstrate that the recent idea that cavitation in the intersolute region of nanoscopic solutes is preceded by the formation of a vapor layer around an individual solute is not the general case. The appearance of density waves pulled up around and outside of a nanoscopic plate occurs at lower interaction strengths than are required to obtain a wet state between such plates. We further show that chemically reasonable estimates of the interaction strength lead to a microscopically wet state and a hydrophobic interaction characterized by traps and barriers to association and not by vacuum induced collapse.

  16. Hydrophobic amino acids grafted onto chitosan: a novel amphiphilic chitosan nanocarrier for hydrophobic drugs.

    PubMed

    Motiei, Marjan; Kashanian, Soheila; Taherpour, Avat Arman

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a novel biocompatible amphiphilic drug delivery for hydrophobic drugs, chitosan (CS) was grafted to a series of hydrophobic amino acids including l-alanine (A), l-proline (P), and l-tryptophan (W) by carbodiimide mediated coupling reaction. Chemical characteristics of the modified polymers were determined and confirmed by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopy and the degree of substitution was quantified by elemental analysis. The modified polymers were used to form amphiphilic chitosan nanocarriers (ACNs) by the conventional self-assembly method using ultrasound technique. The morphology and the size of ACNs were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sizes of spherical ACNs analyzed by SEM were obviously smaller than those of determined by DLS. The ACNs effectively surrounded the hydrophobic model drug, letrozole (LTZ), and demonstrated different encapsulation efficiencies (EE), loading capacities (LC), and controlled drug release profiles. The characteristics of ACNs and the mechanism of drug encapsulation were confirmed by molecular modeling method. The modeling of the structures of LTZ, profiles of A, P, and W grafted onto CS and the wrapping process around LTZ was performed by quantum mechanics (QM) methods. There was a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results. The cell viability was also evaluated in two cell lines compared with free drug by MTT assay. The hydrophobic portion effects on ACNs' characteristics and the proper selection of amino acid demonstrate a promising potential for drug delivery vector.

  17. Studies of radiation-produced radicals and radical ions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.F.

    1991-01-01

    The radiolytic oxidation of anti-5-methylbicyclo(2.1.0)pentane gives the 1-methylcyclopentene radical cation as the sole rearrangement product H migration whereas oxidation of its syn isomer results in the highly selective formation of the 3-methylcyclopentene radical cation by methyl group migration. Since exactly the same stereoselectivity of olefin formation was observed in corresponding PET (photosensitized electron transfer) studies in the liquid phase, it is concluded that the rearrangement in this case also occurs through the intermediacy of radical cations. Clearly, the radical cation rearrangement must occur very rapidly (10{sup {minus}8}--10{sup {minus}9}s) under liquid-phase conditions at room temperature to compete with back electron transfer, and therefore the hydrogen (or methyl) migration is a fast process under these conditions. An intramolecular cycloaddition reaction was demonstrated in the radical cation rearrangement of 4-vinylcyclohexene to bicyclo(3.2.1)oct-2-ene. ESR studies show that the radiolytic oxidation of quadricyclane in Freon matrices under conditions of high substrate dilution leads to the bicyclo(3.2.0)hepta-2,6-diene radical cation as well as the previously reported norbornadiene radical cation, the former species predominating at sufficiently low concentrations.

  18. The effect of lithium ions on the hydrophobic effect: does lithium affect hydrophobicity differently than other ions?

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, David L; Khajehpour, Mazdak

    2012-04-01

    Ionic species have been shown to significantly perturb the interactions between non-polar solutes in aqueous solution. These perturbations are often analyzed in terms of the interactions existing between hydrophobic surfaces and ions. It has been known for some time, that ions with a high charge density are repelled from hydrophobic surfaces while ions with a low charge density tend to stick to these surfaces. Therefore, from a continuum model standpoint, small monovalent ions promote hydrophobicity by minimizing the exposed hydrophobic surface area, while "sticky" large monovalent ions interact with the hydrophobic surfaces and discourage aggregation. However, the charge-dense lithium ion often exhibits anomalous behaviour different from these predicted trends: instead of enhancing, the addition of lithium ions often seems to weaken the hydrophobic effect and on the contrary help dissolve hydrophobic molecules. This weakening of apparent hydrophobicity is considered to be one of the reasons for the protein denaturing properties of lithium salts. Recent theoretical and experimental results however have shown that lithium cations can interact with a variety of molecular functional groups. This suggests that this apparent lithium-induced lowering of hydrophobicity, that is often reported in the literature may be a result of specific interactions between these molecular functional groups and lithium, rather than weakening the interaction between hydrophobic surfaces. This work examines these possibilities by studying the effect of various cations on the simple hydrophobic interaction existing between methyl and phenyl contact-pairs and demonstrates that the effect of lithium cations on the hydrophobic effect follows the trend predicted by continuum models. In other words, the influence of an ion on the hydrophobic interaction between two non-polar surfaces is a function of the interaction of that ion and each non-polar surface.

  19. Surface hydrophobicity of culture and water biofilm of Penicillium spp.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Virginia; Lima, Nelson

    2012-02-01

    Fungal surface hydrophobicity is involved in several functions in fungal growth and development. Water contact angles measurement has been used as a direct and simple approach for its characterisation in solid cultures. Microsphere adhesion assay is said to be the best method to assess cell hydrophobicity of filamentous fungi. This study aimed to apply these two methods to study hydrophobicity of Penicillium expansum and Penicillium brevicompactum grown as mycelial mats in solid culture, liquid culture and water biofilms. As result, both species in solid cultures were classified as hydrophobic with contact angles ≥90º, but in liquid cultures and water biofilms showed different levels of hydrophobicity when microsphere adhesion assay was applied. In addition, was found that biofilms have specific hydrophobic hyphae which may be involved in fungal ecological functions.

  20. Statistical Analyses of Hydrophobic Interactions: A Mini-Review

    DOE PAGES

    Pratt, Lawrence R.; Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Rempe, Susan B.

    2016-07-14

    Here this review focuses on the striking recent progress in solving for hydrophobic interactions between small inert molecules. We discuss several new understandings. First, the inverse temperature phenomenology of hydrophobic interactions, i.e., strengthening of hydrophobic bonds with increasing temperature, is decisively exhibited by hydrophobic interactions between atomic-scale hard sphere solutes in water. Second, inclusion of attractive interactions associated with atomic-size hydrophobic reference cases leads to substantial, nontrivial corrections to reference results for purely repulsive solutes. Hydrophobic bonds are weakened by adding solute dispersion forces to treatment of reference cases. The classic statistical mechanical theory for those corrections is not accuratemore » in this application, but molecular quasi-chemical theory shows promise. Lastly, because of the masking roles of excluded volume and attractive interactions, comparisons that do not discriminate the different possibilities face an interpretive danger.« less

  1. Self Assembled, Ultra-Hydrophobic Micro/Nano-Textured Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Self Assembled, Ultra-Hydrophobic Micro / Nano -Textured Surfaces by Adam M. Rawlett, Joshua A. Orlicki, Nicole Zander, Afia Karikari, and...5069 ARL-TN-275 April 2007 Self Assembled, Ultra-Hydrophobic Micro / Nano -Textured Surfaces Adam M. Rawlett, Joshua A. Orlicki, and...NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITL Self A bled, Ultra-Hydrophobic Micro / Nano -Textured Surfaces 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER E ssem AND SUBTITLE 5d

  2. On the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrophobic interactions at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Vembanur, Srivathsan; Patel, Amish J; Sarupria, Sapna; Garde, Shekhar

    2013-09-05

    We have studied how primitive hydrophobic interactions between two or more small nonpolar solutes are affected by the presence of surfaces. We show that the desolvation barriers present in the potential of mean force between the solutes in bulk water are significantly reduced near an extended hydrophobic surface. Correspondingly, the kinetics of hydrophobic contact formation and breakage are faster near a hydrophobic surface than near a hydrophilic surface or in the bulk. We propose that the reduction in the desolvation barrier is a consequence of the fact that water near extended hydrophobic surfaces is akin to that at a liquid-vapor interface and is easily displaced. We support this proposal with three independent observations. First, when small hydrophobic solutes are brought near a hydrophobic surface, they induce local dewetting, thereby facilitating the reduction of desolvation barriers. Second, our results and those of Patel et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2011, 108, 17678-17683) show that, whereas the association of small solutes in bulk water is driven by entropy, that near hydrophobic surfaces is driven by enthalpy, suggesting that the physics of interface deformation is important. Third, moving water away from its vapor-liquid coexistence, by applying hydrostatic pressure, leads to recovery of bulklike signatures (e.g., the presence of a desolvation barrier and an entropic driving force) in the association of solutes. These observations for simple solutes also translate to end-to-end contact formation in a model peptide with hydrophobic end groups, for which lowering of the desolvation barrier and acceleration of contact formation are observed near a hydrophobic surface. Our results suggest that extended hydrophobic surfaces, such as air-water or hydrocarbon-water surfaces, could serve as excellent platforms for catalyzing hydrophobically driven assembly.

  3. New Hydrophobic IOL Materials and Understanding the Science of Glistenings.

    PubMed

    Tetz, Manfred; Jorgensen, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    An introduction to the history of intraocular lenses (IOLs) is given, leading up to modern hydrophobic examples. The roles of hydrophobicity, hygroscopy, materials chemistry, and edge design are discussed in the context of IOLs. The four major types of IOL materials are compared in terms of their chemistry and biocompatibility. An example of a modern "hydrophobic" acrylic polymer with higher water content is discussed in detail.

  4. Conductive hydrophobic hybrid textiles modified with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, D.; Brzeziński, S.; Makowski, T.; Fortuniak, W.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of modifying and testing modern hybrid polyester-cotton woven fabrics with deposited multi-wall carbon nanotubes and imparted hydrophobicity. The effect of the carbon nanotubes deposited on these fabrics on their conductive properties and hydrophobicity has been assessed. The electro-conductive and hydrophobic composite fabrics obtained in this way, being light, elastic and resistant to mechanical effects, make it possible to be widely used in various industrial fields.

  5. Free radicals and male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Allamaneni, Shyam S R

    2011-03-01

    Male factor accounts for almost 50% cases of infertility. The exact mechanism of sperm dysfunction is not known in many cases. Extensive research in the last decade has led to the identification of free radicals (reactive oxygen species) as mediators of sperm dysfunction in both specific diagnoses and idiopathic cases of male infertility. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species are seen in up to 30-80% of men with male infertility. The role of free radicals has been studied extensively in the process of human reproduction. We know now that a certain level of free radicals is necessary for normal sperm function, whereas an excessive level of free radicals can cause detrimental effect on sperm function and subsequent fertilisation and offspring health. Oxidative stress develops when there is an imbalance between generation of free radicals and scavenging capacity of anti-oxidants in reproductive tract. Oxidative stress has been shown to affect both standard semen parameters and fertilising capacity. In addition, high levels of free radicals have been associated with lack of or poor fertility outcome after natural conception or assisted reproduction. Diagnostic techniques to quantify free radicals in infertile patients can assist physicians treating patients with infertility to plan for proper treatment strategies. In vivo anti-oxidants can be used against oxidative stress in male reproductive tract. Supplementation of in vitro anti-oxidants can help prevent the oxidative stress during sperm preparation techniques in assisted reproduction.

  6. Combined Hydrophobicity and Mechanical Durability through Surface Nanoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Paul R.; Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen; Furrer, David U.; Burlatsky, Sergei F.; Filburn, Thomas P.

    2015-04-01

    This paper reports combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through the nanoscale engineering of surfaces in the form of nanorod-polymer composites. Specifically, the hydrophobicity derives from nanoscale features of mechanically hard ZnO nanorods and the mechanical durability derives from the composite structure of a hard ZnO nanorod core and soft polymer shell. Experimental characterization correlates the morphology of the nanoengineered surfaces with the combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability, and reveals the responsible mechanisms. Such surfaces may find use in applications, such as boat hulls, that benefit from hydrophobicity and require mechanical durability.

  7. Computational Protein Design with Explicit Consideration of Surface Hydrophobic Patches

    PubMed Central

    Jacak, Ron; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Kuhlman, Brian

    2011-01-01

    De novo protein design requires the identification of amino-acid sequences that favor the target folded conformation and are soluble in water. One strategy for promoting solubility is to disallow hydrophobic residues on the protein surface during design. However, naturally occurring proteins often have hydrophobic amino acids on their surface that contribute to protein stability via the partial burial of hydrophobic surface area or play a key role in the formation of protein-protein interactions. A less restrictive approach for surface design that is used by the modeling program Rosetta is to parameterize the energy function so that the number of hydrophobic amino acids designed on the protein surface is similar to what is observed in naturally occurring monomeric proteins. Previous studies with Rosetta have shown that this limits surface hydrophobics to the naturally occurring frequency (~28%) but that it does not prevent the formation of hydrophobic patches that are considerably larger than those observed in naturally occurring proteins. Here, we describe a new score term that explicitly detects and penalizes the formation of hydrophobic patches during computational protein design. With the new term we are able to design protein surfaces that include hydrophobic amino acids at naturally occurring frequencies, but do not have large hydrophobic patches. By adjusting the strength of the new score term the emphasis of surface redesigns can be switched between maintaining solubility and maximizing folding free energy. PMID:22223219

  8. Combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through surface nanoengineering

    DOE PAGES

    Elliott, Paul R.; Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen; ...

    2015-04-08

    This paper reports combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through the nanoscale engineering of surfaces in the form of nanorod-polymer composites. Specifically, the hydrophobicity derives from nanoscale features of mechanically hard ZnO nanorods and the mechanical durability derives from the composite structure of a hard ZnO nanorod core and soft polymer shell. Experimental characterization correlates the morphology of the nanoengineered surfaces with the combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability, and reveals the responsible mechanisms. Such surfaces may find use in applications, such as boat hulls, that benefit from hydrophobicity and require mechanical durability.

  9. Modulation of hydrophobic interactions by proximally immobilized ions.

    PubMed

    Ma, C Derek; Wang, Chenxuan; Acevedo-Vélez, Claribel; Gellman, Samuel H; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2015-01-15

    The structure of water near non-polar molecular fragments or surfaces mediates the hydrophobic interactions that underlie a broad range of interfacial, colloidal and biophysical phenomena. Substantial progress over the past decade has improved our understanding of hydrophobic interactions in simple model systems, but most biologically and technologically relevant structures contain non-polar domains in close proximity to polar and charged functional groups. Theories and simulations exploring such nanometre-scale chemical heterogeneity find it can have an important effect, but the influence of this heterogeneity on hydrophobic interactions has not been tested experimentally. Here we report chemical force microscopy measurements on alkyl-functionalized surfaces that reveal a dramatic change in the surfaces' hydrophobic interaction strengths on co-immobilization of amine or guanidine groups. Protonation of amine groups doubles the strength of hydrophobic interactions, and guanidinium groups eliminate measurable hydrophobic interactions in all pH ranges investigated. We see these divergent effects of proximally immobilized cations also in single-molecule measurements on conformationally stable β-peptides with non-polar subunits located one nanometre from either amine- or guanidine-bearing subunits. Our results demonstrate the importance of nanometre-scale chemical heterogeneity, with hydrophobicity not an intrinsic property of any given non-polar domain but strongly modulated by functional groups located as far away as one nanometre. The judicious placing of charged groups near hydrophobic domains thus provides a strategy for tuning hydrophobic driving forces to optimize molecular recognition or self-assembly processes.

  10. Combined Hydrophobicity and Mechanical Durability through Surface Nanoengineering

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Paul R.; Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen; Furrer, David U.; Burlatsky, Sergei F.; Filburn, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through the nanoscale engineering of surfaces in the form of nanorod-polymer composites. Specifically, the hydrophobicity derives from nanoscale features of mechanically hard ZnO nanorods and the mechanical durability derives from the composite structure of a hard ZnO nanorod core and soft polymer shell. Experimental characterization correlates the morphology of the nanoengineered surfaces with the combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability, and reveals the responsible mechanisms. Such surfaces may find use in applications, such as boat hulls, that benefit from hydrophobicity and require mechanical durability. PMID:25851026

  11. Combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through surface nanoengineering.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul R; Stagon, Stephen P; Huang, Hanchen; Furrer, David U; Burlatsky, Sergei F; Filburn, Thomas P

    2015-04-08

    This paper reports combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through the nanoscale engineering of surfaces in the form of nanorod-polymer composites. Specifically, the hydrophobicity derives from nanoscale features of mechanically hard ZnO nanorods and the mechanical durability derives from the composite structure of a hard ZnO nanorod core and soft polymer shell. Experimental characterization correlates the morphology of the nanoengineered surfaces with the combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability, and reveals the responsible mechanisms. Such surfaces may find use in applications, such as boat hulls, that benefit from hydrophobicity and require mechanical durability.

  12. Modulation of hydrophobic interactions by proximally immobilized ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. Derek; Wang, Chenxuan; Acevedo-Vélez, Claribel; Gellman, Samuel H.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of water near non-polar molecular fragments or surfaces mediates the hydrophobic interactions that underlie a broad range of interfacial, colloidal and biophysical phenomena. Substantial progress over the past decade has improved our understanding of hydrophobic interactions in simple model systems, but most biologically and technologically relevant structures contain non-polar domains in close proximity to polar and charged functional groups. Theories and simulations exploring such nanometre-scale chemical heterogeneity find it can have an important effect, but the influence of this heterogeneity on hydrophobic interactions has not been tested experimentally. Here we report chemical force microscopy measurements on alkyl-functionalized surfaces that reveal a dramatic change in the surfaces' hydrophobic interaction strengths on co-immobilization of amine or guanidine groups. Protonation of amine groups doubles the strength of hydrophobic interactions, and guanidinium groups eliminate measurable hydrophobic interactions in all pH ranges investigated. We see these divergent effects of proximally immobilized cations also in single-molecule measurements on conformationally stable β-peptides with non-polar subunits located one nanometre from either amine- or guanidine-bearing subunits. Our results demonstrate the importance of nanometre-scale chemical heterogeneity, with hydrophobicity not an intrinsic property of any given non-polar domain but strongly modulated by functional groups located as far away as one nanometre. The judicious placing of charged groups near hydrophobic domains thus provides a strategy for tuning hydrophobic driving forces to optimize molecular recognition or self-assembly processes.

  13. Thermally stable hydrophobicity in electrospun silica/polydimethylsiloxane hybrid fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhonglin; Li, Jianjun; Wang, Chao; Cao, Jungang; Yao, Yongtao; Lu, Haibao; Li, Yibin; He, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve practical performances of silica-based inorganic/organic hybrid fibers, silica/polydimethylsiloxane hydrophobic fibers were successfully prepared by electrospinning. Silica sol and polydimethylsiloxane can be mixed homogeneously and become stable precursor solution in dichloromethane, which allows the transformation of silica/polydimethylsiloxane precursor solution into ultrafine fibers. Flame can ignite organic groups in polydimethylsiloxane directly and destroy the hydrophobicity of hybrid fibers, but hydrophobic feature may survive if electrospun hybrid membrane is combined with thin stainless-steel-304 gauze of 150 meshes due to its thermally stable hydrophobicity (>600 °C).

  14. Penetration of surfactant solutions into hydrophobic capillaries.

    PubMed

    Bain, Colin D

    2005-08-21

    The initial rise velocity of surfactant solutions in hydrophobic capillaries is independent of time (F. Tiberg, B. Zhmud, K. Hallstensson and M. von Bahr, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2000, 2, 5189). By analogy with the hydrodynamics of an overflowing cylinder, we present a steady-state solution for capillary penetration in which the velocity is determined by the adsorption kinetics at the air-water interface. Good agreement between the model predictions and experimental data of Tiberg and coworkers is obtained for the non-ionic surfactant C10E6 under the assumption of diffusion-controlled adsorption. The longer chain homologue, C14E6, shows evidence of kinetic barriers to adsorption.

  15. Floating behavior of hydrophobic glass spheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjie; Wang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yongmin; Zhou, Feng

    2009-08-15

    When a hydrophobic solid sphere is floating on water or salt solutions with different concentrations, it is at equilibrium under the impact of gravity, buoyancy force, and curvature force, the component of surface tension in the vertical direction. We have changed the diameters of the spheres and the concentrations of the two selected salts, NaCl and NaNO(3), to study the floating behaviors of these spheres and the contributions of surface tension and buoyancy force to their floatation. Generally speaking, the surface tension plays a more important role than the buoyancy force when the gravity is small, but the buoyancy force plays an identical or a more important role when the spheres are big enough. The wettability of the spheres significantly influences the height below the contact perimeter especially in salt solutions. The theoretical calculation meniscus slope angles at the sphere three-phase contact line are in agreement with experimental results.

  16. Hydrophobic blue pigment formation from phosphatidylgenipin.

    PubMed

    Takami, M; Suzuki, Y

    1994-10-01

    Phosphatidylgenipin, synthesized via the transphosphatidylation reaction of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3-sn-phosphatidylcholine to genipin by phospholipase D, was found to react with L-phenylalanine in chloroform and gave a clear blue solution. This blue solution was also formed in following organic solvents: ethanol, ethyl acetate, diethyl ether, benzene, and hexane. However, genipin and L-phenylalanine did not give any colored product under the same conditions. The blue pigment resulted from phosphatidylgenipin and L-phenylalanine showed lambda max at 615 nm in chloroform, and had a similar blue color to an aqueous solution of the natural blue pigment "gardenia blue." This is an example for the preparation of a hydrophobic pigment from a phosphatidyl derivative of a water-soluble compound.

  17. High performance hydrophobic solvent, carbon dioxide capture

    DOEpatents

    Nulwala, Hunaid; Luebke, David

    2017-05-09

    Methods and compositions useful, for example, for physical solvent carbon capture. A method comprising: contacting at least one first composition comprising carbon dioxide with at least one second composition to at least partially dissolve the carbon dioxide of the first composition in the second composition, wherein the second composition comprises at least one siloxane compound which is covalently modified with at least one non-siloxane group comprising at least one heteroatom. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) materials and ethylene-glycol based materials have high carbon dioxide solubility but suffer from various problems. PDMS is hydrophobic but suffers from low selectivity. Ethylene-glycol based systems have good solubility and selectivity, but suffer from high affinity to water. Solvents were developed which keep the desired combinations of properties, and result in a simplified, overall process for carbon dioxide removal from a mixed gas stream.

  18. Characterization and comparison of hydrophobic neutral and hydrophobic acid dissolved organic carbon isolated from three municipal landfill leachates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nanny, Mark A.; Ratasuk, Nopawan

    2002-01-01

    The acid-precipitated (AP) and acid-soluble (AS) fractions of the combined hydrophobic neutral and hydrophobic acid dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were isolated from leachate collected from three municipal landfills of different age and redox conditions. The AP and the AS combined hydrophobic neutral and hydrophobic acid DOC comprised 6–15% and 51–66%, respectively, of the leachate nonpurgable organic carbon. Elemental analysis, infra-red spectroscopy, 13C CP-MAS nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dipolar dephasing experiments, and thermochemolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry results showed that the AP and AS fractions of hydrophobic neutral and hydrophobic acid DOC are highly aliphatic, with linear and branching moieties, and less oxidized than most terrestrial and aquatic humic substances. Very little, if any, polysaccharide or cellulose, lignin, or cutin components comprise these fractions. It is hypothesized that a majority of the organic carbon in these fractions originates highly branched, cyclic aliphatic organic compounds.

  19. How the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Robert L.; Rose, George D.

    2016-01-01

    How hydrophobicity (HY) drives protein folding is studied. The 1971 Nozaki–Tanford method of measuring HY is modified to use gases as solutes, not crystals, and this makes the method easy to use. Alkanes are found to be much more hydrophobic than rare gases, and the two different kinds of HY are termed intrinsic (rare gases) and extrinsic (alkanes). The HY values of rare gases are proportional to solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), whereas the HY values of alkanes depend on special hydration shells. Earlier work showed that hydration shells produce the hydration energetics of alkanes. Evidence is given here that the transfer energetics of alkanes to cyclohexane [Wolfenden R, Lewis CA, Jr, Yuan Y, Carter CW, Jr (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112(24):7484–7488] measure the release of these shells. Alkane shells are stabilized importantly by van der Waals interactions between alkane carbon and water oxygen atoms. Thus, rare gases cannot form this type of shell. The very short (approximately picoseconds) lifetime of the van der Waals interaction probably explains why NMR efforts to detect alkane hydration shells have failed. The close similarity between the sizes of the opposing energetics for forming or releasing alkane shells confirms the presence of these shells on alkanes and supports Kauzmann's 1959 mechanism of protein folding. A space-filling model is given for the hydration shells on linear alkanes. The model reproduces the n values of Jorgensen et al. [Jorgensen WL, Gao J, Ravimohan C (1985) J Phys Chem 89:3470–3473] for the number of waters in alkane hydration shells. PMID:27791131

  20. How the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Robert L; Rose, George D

    2016-11-01

    How hydrophobicity (HY) drives protein folding is studied. The 1971 Nozaki-Tanford method of measuring HY is modified to use gases as solutes, not crystals, and this makes the method easy to use. Alkanes are found to be much more hydrophobic than rare gases, and the two different kinds of HY are termed intrinsic (rare gases) and extrinsic (alkanes). The HY values of rare gases are proportional to solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), whereas the HY values of alkanes depend on special hydration shells. Earlier work showed that hydration shells produce the hydration energetics of alkanes. Evidence is given here that the transfer energetics of alkanes to cyclohexane [Wolfenden R, Lewis CA, Jr, Yuan Y, Carter CW, Jr (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112(24):7484-7488] measure the release of these shells. Alkane shells are stabilized importantly by van der Waals interactions between alkane carbon and water oxygen atoms. Thus, rare gases cannot form this type of shell. The very short (approximately picoseconds) lifetime of the van der Waals interaction probably explains why NMR efforts to detect alkane hydration shells have failed. The close similarity between the sizes of the opposing energetics for forming or releasing alkane shells confirms the presence of these shells on alkanes and supports Kauzmann's 1959 mechanism of protein folding. A space-filling model is given for the hydration shells on linear alkanes. The model reproduces the n values of Jorgensen et al. [Jorgensen WL, Gao J, Ravimohan C (1985) J Phys Chem 89:3470-3473] for the number of waters in alkane hydration shells.

  1. Is the ether group hydrophilic or hydrophobic?

    PubMed

    Menger, Fredric M; Chlebowski, Mary E

    2005-03-29

    A series of six surfactants, each with two ether oxygens within otherwise all-hydrocarbon chains, were synthesized and examined for their colloidal properties. Since an ether oxygen is sterically and conformationally similar to the methylene group it has replaced, the ether effect on micellization should stem mainly from solvation of the oxygen and, possibly, disrupted hydrophobicity of its adjacent carbons. It was found that critical aggregation values among the surfactants differ only modestly despite the total length of the ether-separated carbon segments ranging from 12 to 18. Shorter ether surfactants with only 12 or 14 total carbons appear to form small, loose aggregates owing, presumably, to a mild hydrophilicity of the ether groups. A surfactant with 18 chain carbons has a greater tendency to associate hydrophobically, but this is counterbalanced by a relatively water-free environment encountered by the ether groups within a more conventional micelle interior. The result is a leveling effect in which the critical aggregation concentration (cac) loses it sensitivity to chain length. Above their cac's, none of the ether surfactants is a good solubilizer of tetramethysilane or mesitylene. This is not necessarily a predictable finding since it was conceivable that the presence of interior ether groups might actually enhance solubilization (much as ether is a better solvent than hexane). Foamability and solid adsorption studies also indicate that the ethers impair surface activity. In response to the question posed in the paper's title, two ether groups are not sufficiently hydrophilic to prevent aggregation, but they do manage to alter the micelles' morphology and properties considerably.

  2. Hydrophobicity and Charge Shape Cellular Metabolite Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Even, Arren; Noor, Elad; Flamholz, Avi; Buescher, Joerg M.; Milo, Ron

    2011-01-01

    What governs the concentrations of metabolites within living cells? Beyond specific metabolic and enzymatic considerations, are there global trends that affect their values? We hypothesize that the physico-chemical properties of metabolites considerably affect their in-vivo concentrations. The recently achieved experimental capability to measure the concentrations of many metabolites simultaneously has made the testing of this hypothesis possible. Here, we analyze such recently available data sets of metabolite concentrations within E. coli, S. cerevisiae, B. subtilis and human. Overall, these data sets encompass more than twenty conditions, each containing dozens (28-108) of simultaneously measured metabolites. We test for correlations with various physico-chemical properties and find that the number of charged atoms, non-polar surface area, lipophilicity and solubility consistently correlate with concentration. In most data sets, a change in one of these properties elicits a ∼100 fold increase in metabolite concentrations. We find that the non-polar surface area and number of charged atoms account for almost half of the variation in concentrations in the most reliable and comprehensive data set. Analyzing specific groups of metabolites, such as amino-acids or phosphorylated nucleotides, reveals even a higher dependence of concentration on hydrophobicity. We suggest that these findings can be explained by evolutionary constraints imposed on metabolite concentrations and discuss possible selective pressures that can account for them. These include the reduction of solute leakage through the lipid membrane, avoidance of deleterious aggregates and reduction of non-specific hydrophobic binding. By highlighting the global constraints imposed on metabolic pathways, future research could shed light onto aspects of biochemical evolution and the chemical constraints that bound metabolic engineering efforts. PMID:21998563

  3. How hydrophobic buckminsterfullerene affects surrounding water structure.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Dahlia R; Raschke, Tanya M; Levitt, Michael

    2008-03-13

    The hydrophobic hydration of fullerenes in water is of significant interest as the most common Buckminsterfullerene (C60) is a mesoscale sphere; C60 also has potential in pharmaceutical and nanomaterial applications. We use an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation lasting hundreds of nanoseconds to determine the behavior of a single molecule of C60 in a periodic box of water, and compare this to methane. A C60 molecule does not induce drying at the surface; however, unlike a hard sphere methane, a hard sphere C60 solute does. This is due to a larger number of attractive Lennard-Jones interactions between the carbon atom centers in C60 and the surrounding waters. In these simulations, water is not uniformly arranged but rather adopts a range of orientations in the first hydration shell despite the spherical symmetry of both solutes. There is a clear effect of solute size on the orientation of the first hydration shell waters. There is a large increase in hydrogen-bonding contacts between waters in the C60 first hydration shell. There is also a disruption of hydrogen bonds between waters in the first and second hydration shells. Water molecules in the first hydration shell preferentially create triangular structures that minimize the net water dipole near the surface near both the methane and C60 surface, reducing the total energy of the system. Additionally, in the first and second hydration shells, the water dipoles are ordered to a distance of 8 A from the solute surface. We conclude that, with a diameter of approximately 1 nm, C60 behaves as a large hydrophobic solute.

  4. Nitroxyl radical-containing nanoparticles for novel nanomedicine against oxidative stress injury.

    PubMed

    Yoshitomi, Toru; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2011-04-01

    This article discusses the preparation and characterization of pH-sensitive nitroxyl radical-containing nanoparticles (RNPs) possessing nitroxyl radicals in the core and reactive groups on the periphery, and its biomedical application. The RNPs prepared by a self-assembling amphiphilic block copolymers composed of a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) segment and a hydrophobic poly(chloromethylstyrene) (PCMS) segment in which the chloromethyl groups were converted to 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxyls (TEMPOs) via an amination of PEG-b-PCMS block copolymer with 4-amino-TEMPO are initially described. The cumulant average diameter of an RNP is approximately 40 nm, and the RNP has intense electron paramagnetic resonance signals. RNPs show a prolonged blood circulation time by the compartmentalization of nitroxyl radicals into the hydrophobic core, and disintegrate in response to a low pH environment, such as ischemic tissue, resulting in effectively scavenging reactive oxygen species due to an exposure of nitroxyl radicals from the RNP core. Thus, the RNP prepared was found to be effective for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Therefore, RNPs are promising as high-performance therapeutic nanomedicine for oxidative stress injuries.

  5. [Simultaneous radical retropubic prostatectomy, diverticulectomy].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Sokolov, A E; Guspanov, R I; Polegen'kiĭ, V V

    2014-01-01

    Presented clinical case demonstrates a combination of rare congenital abnormality - giant true diverticula of the bladder - and high-risk prostate cancer, as well as a successful result of simultaneous operation - a radical prostatectomy with diverticulectomy.

  6. Free radical inactivation of pepsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josimović, Lj; Ruvarac, I.; Janković, I.; Jovanović, S. V.

    1994-06-01

    Alkylperoxy radicals containing one, two or three chlorine atoms, CO -2, O 2 - were reacted with pepsin in aqueous solutions. It was found that only Cl 3COO and CO -2 inactive pepsin, attacking preferentially the disulfide bridge. Transient spectra obtained upon completion of the Cl 3COO + pepsin reaction at pH 5 indicate that 20% of initially produced Cl 3COO radicals oxidizes tryptophan residues, and 40% disulfide bridges. The inactivation induced by the Cl 3COO radical increases at lower pH, and the maximal inactivation, Gin = 5.8, was observed at pH 1.5. The inactivation of pepsin by CO -2 radicals depends on the absorbed dose. The maximal inactivation, Gin = 4.5, was determined in the dose range from 38 to 53 Gy.

  7. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  8. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  9. Peroxy radical oxidation of thymidine.

    PubMed

    Martini, M; Termini, J

    1997-02-01

    The peroxy radical (ROO) is unique among reactive oxygen species implicated in the production of DNA damage in that it possesses an extremely long half-life (order of seconds) and is predicted to have a relatively greater chemical selectivity in its reactions relative to other radical intermediates. Yet no product studies of the reactions of ROO with bases, nucleosides, or DNA have appeared, and thus no meaningful predictions can be made regarding its potential involvement in the production of DNA base damage and the mutagenic process. We report here on the reaction products formed by peroxy radical with thymidine, major target of oxidative base damage. ROO reacts with thymine to yield predominantly 5-Me oxidation products. The highly mutagenic 5-(hydroperoxymethyl)-2'-deoxyuridine, 5-formyl-2'-deoxyuridine, and 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2'-deoxyuridine are produced by peroxy radical oxidation. In contrast, 5Me oxidation products are minor products of thymidine oxidation by OH, which yields predominantly saturated derivatives via addition to the 5,6 double bound. A plausible mechanistic scheme for the formation of the base oxidation products of thymidine by peroxy radicals is presented. Attach at the deoxyribose moiety resulting in oxidative depyrimidination is also found to occur, as indicated by free base release. Phosphodiester backbone cleavage resulting in single and double strand breaks is also catalyzed by peroxy radical, as demonstrated using a plasmid nicking assay.

  10. Intermolecular Vibrations of Hydrophobic Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Michael Roy Casselman

    Hydrophobic amino acids interact with their chemical environment through a combination of electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, dipole, induced dipole, and dispersion forces. These interactions all have their own characteristic energy scale and distance dependence. The low-frequency (0.1-5 THz, 5-150 cm-1) vibrational modes of amino acids in the solid state are a direct indicator of the interactions between the molecules, which include interactions between an amino acid functional group and its surroundings. This information is central to understanding the dynamics and morphology of proteins. The alpha-carbon is a chiral center for all of the hydrophobic amino acids, meaning that they exist in two forms, traditionally referred to as L- and D-enantiomers. This nomenclature indicates which direction the molecule rotates plane-polarized visible light (levorotory and dextrorotory). Chiral a-amino acids in proteins are exclusively the L-variety In the solid state, the crystal lattice of the pure L-enantiomer is the mirror image of the D-enantiomer crystal lattice. These solids are energetically identical. Enantiomers also have identical spectroscopic properties except when the measurement is polarization sensitive. A mixture of equal amounts D- and L-amino acid enantiomers can crystallize into a racemic (DL-) structure that is different from that of the pure enantiomers. Whether a solution of both enantiomers will crystallize into a racemic form or spontaneously resolve into a mixture of separate D- and L-crystals largely depends on the interactions between molecules available in the various possible configurations. This is an active area of research. Low-frequency vibrations with intermolecular character are very sensitive to changes in lattice geometry, and consequently the vibrational spectra of racemic crystals are usually quite distinct from the spectra of the crystals of the corresponding pure enantiomers in the far-infrared (far-IR). THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz

  11. Evidence for hydrophobic catalysis of DNA strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Feng, B; Westerlund, F; Nordén, B

    2015-04-30

    The catalytic role of hydrophobic co-solutes in DNA strand exchange is demonstrated by FRET kinetics. Two mechanisms that contribute to this are base stacking destabilisation and nucleation-promoted DNA strand invasion. We propose that hydrophobic catalysis is involved in the strand-exchange activity of recombination enzymes.

  12. Developing a general interaction potential for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Stephen H; Røyne, Anja; Kristiansen, Kai; Rapp, Michael V; Das, Saurabh; Gebbie, Matthew A; Lee, Dong Woog; Stock, Philipp; Valtiner, Markus; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2015-02-24

    We review direct force measurements on a broad class of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. These measurements have enabled the development of a general interaction potential per unit area, W(D) = -2γ(i)Hy exp(-D/D(H)) in terms of a nondimensional Hydra parameter, Hy, that applies to both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between extended surfaces. This potential allows one to quantitatively account for additional attractions and repulsions not included in the well-known combination of electrostatic double layer and van der Waals theories, the so-called Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The interaction energy is exponentially decaying with decay length D(H) ≈ 0.3-2 nm for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, with the exact value of D(H) depending on the precise system and conditions. The pre-exponential factor depends on the interfacial tension, γ(i), of the interacting surfaces and Hy. For Hy > 0, the interaction potential describes interactions between partially hydrophobic surfaces, with the maximum hydrophobic interaction (i.e., two fully hydrophobic surfaces) corresponding to Hy = 1. Hydrophobic interactions between hydrophobic monolayer surfaces measured with the surface forces apparatus (SFA) are shown to be well described by the proposed interaction potential. The potential becomes repulsive for Hy < 0, corresponding to partially hydrophilic (hydrated) interfaces. Hydrated surfaces such as mica, silica, and lipid bilayers are discussed and reviewed in the context of the values of Hy appropriate for each system.

  13. Hydroglyphics: Demonstration of Selective Wetting on Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Philseok; Alvarenga, Jack; Aizenberg, Joanna; Sleeper, Raymond S.

    2013-01-01

    A visual demonstration of the difference between hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces has been developed. It involves placing a shadow mask on an optically clear hydrophobic plastic dish, corona treating the surface with a modified Tesla coil, removing the shadow mask, and visualizing the otherwise invisible message or pattern by applying water,…

  14. Hydroglyphics: Demonstration of Selective Wetting on Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Philseok; Alvarenga, Jack; Aizenberg, Joanna; Sleeper, Raymond S.

    2013-01-01

    A visual demonstration of the difference between hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces has been developed. It involves placing a shadow mask on an optically clear hydrophobic plastic dish, corona treating the surface with a modified Tesla coil, removing the shadow mask, and visualizing the otherwise invisible message or pattern by applying water,…

  15. Structures of benzylsuccinate synthase elucidate roles of accessory subunits in glycyl radical enzyme activation and activity

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Michael A.; Judd, Evan T.; Marsh, E. Neil G.; Elliott, Sean J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of the environmental pollutant toluene is initiated by the glycyl radical enzyme benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS), which catalyzes the radical addition of toluene to fumarate, forming benzylsuccinate. We have determined crystal structures of the catalytic α-subunit of BSS with its accessory subunits β and γ, which both bind a [4Fe-4S] cluster and are essential for BSS activity in vivo. We find that BSSα has the common glycyl radical enzyme fold, a 10-stranded β/α-barrel that surrounds the glycyl radical cofactor and active site. Both accessory subunits β and γ display folds related to high potential iron–sulfur proteins but differ substantially from each other in how they interact with the α-subunit. BSSγ binds distally to the active site, burying a hydrophobic region of BSSα, whereas BSSβ binds to a hydrophilic surface of BSSα that is proximal to the active site. To further investigate the function of BSSβ, we determined the structure of a BSSαγ complex. Remarkably, we find that the barrel partially opens, allowing the C-terminal region of BSSα that houses the glycyl radical to shift within the barrel toward an exit pathway. The structural changes that we observe in the BSSαγ complex center around the crucial glycyl radical domain, thus suggesting a role for BSSβ in modulating the conformational dynamics required for enzyme activity. Accompanying proteolysis experiments support these structural observations. PMID:24982148

  16. EPR studies on a stable sulfinyl radical observed in the iron-oxygen-reconstituted Y177F/I263C protein R2 double mutant of ribonucleotide reductase from mouse.

    PubMed

    Adrait, Annie; Ohrström, Maria; Barra, Anne-Laure; Thelander, Lars; Gräslund, Astrid

    2002-05-21

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the biosynthesis of deoxyribonucleotides. The active enzyme contains a diiron center and a tyrosyl free radical required for enzyme activity. The radical is located at Y177 in the R2 protein of mouse RNR. The radical is formed concomitantly with the mu-oxo-bridged diferric center in a reconstitution reaction between ferrous iron and molecular oxygen in the protein. EPR at 9.6 and 285 GHz was used to investigate the reconstitution reaction in the double-mutant Y177F/I263C of mouse protein R2. The aim was to produce a protein-linked radical derived from the Cys residue in the mutant protein to investigate its formation and characteristics. The mutation Y177F hinders normal radical formation at Y177, and the I263C mutation places a Cys residue at the same distance from the iron center as Y177 in the native protein. In the reconstitution reaction, we observed small amounts of a transient radical with a probable assignment to a peroxy radical, followed by a stable sulfinyl radical, most likely located on C263. The unusual radical stability may be explained by the hydrophobic surroundings of C263, which resemble the hydrophobic pocket surrounding Y177 in native protein R2. The observation of a sulfinyl radical in RNR strengthens the relationship between RNR and another free radical enzyme, pyruvate formate-lyase, where a similar relatively stable sulfinyl radical has been observed in a mutant. Sulfinyl radicals may possibly be considered as stabilized forms of very short-lived thiyl radicals, proposed to be important intermediates in the radical chemistry of RNR.

  17. Adsorption of crude oil on anhydrous and hydrophobized vermiculite.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Umberto G; de F Melo, Marcus A; da Silva, Adaílton F; de Farias, Robson F

    2003-04-15

    This publication reports the adsorption of crude oil on vermiculite samples, expanded and hydrophobized with carnauba (Copernícia Cerífera) wax. The adsorption studies were performed by using columns filled with the vermiculite matrices and by dispersion of the vermiculite samples in an oil-water (50 ppm of oil) emulsion. The hydrate vermiculite exhibits a very low adsorption capacity against crude oil. On the other hand, anhydrous (expanded) and hydrophobized matrices show a high adsorption capacity. The 10% hydrophobized matrix show a 50% increased adsorption capacity, in comparison with the expanded one. For adsorption performed in the water-oil emulsion, saturation of the solid hydrophobized matrix is achieved after 60 min. The hydrophobized samples exhibit adsorption factors in the 0.7-1.0 range.

  18. Plasma-induced polymerization for enhancing paper hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhaoping; Tang, Jiebin; Li, Junrong; Xiao, Huining

    2013-01-30

    Hydrophobic modification of cellulose fibers was conducted via plasma-induced polymerization in an attempt to graft the hydrophobic polymer chains on paper surface, this increasing the hydrophobicity of paper. Two hydrophobic monomers, butyl acrylate (BA) and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (2-EHA), were grafted on cellulose fibers, induced by atmospheric cold plasma. Various influencing factors associated with the plasma-induced grafting were investigated. Contact-angle measurement, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to ascertain the occurrence of the grafting and characterized the changes of the cellulose fiber after modification. The results showed that the hydrophobicity of the modified paper sheet was improved significantly after the plasma-induced grafting. The water contact angle on the paper surface reached up to 130°. The morphological differences between modified and unmodified samples were also revealed by SEM observation. The resulting paper is promising as a green-based packaging material.

  19. Prediction of Hydrophobic Cores of Proteins Using Wavelet Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa; Kuhara

    1997-01-01

    Information concerning the secondary structures, flexibility, epitope and hydrophobic regions of amino acid sequences can be extracted by assigning physicochemical indices to each amino acid residue, and information on structure can be derived using the sliding window averaging technique, which is in wide use for smoothing out raw functions. Wavelet analysis has shown great potential and applicability in many fields, such as astronomy, radar, earthquake prediction, and signal or image processing. This approach is efficient for removing noise from various functions. Here we employed wavelet analysis to smooth out a plot assigned to a hydrophobicity index for amino acid sequences. We then used the resulting function to predict hydrophobic cores in globular proteins. We calculated the prediction accuracy for the hydrophobic cores of 88 representative set of proteins. Use of wavelet analysis made feasible the prediction of hydrophobic cores at 6.13% greater accuracy than the sliding window averaging technique.

  20. Crystalline bipyridinium radical complexes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Barnes, Jonathan C.; Li, Hao; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Basuray, Ashish Neil; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2015-09-01

    Described herein are methods of generating 4,4'-bipyridinium radical cations (BIPY.sup..cndot.+), and methods for utilizing the radical-radical interactions between two or more BIPY.sup..cndot.+ radical cations that ensue for the creation of novel materials for applications in nanotechnology. Synthetic methodologies, crystallographic engineering techniques, methods of physical characterization, and end uses are described.

  1. Side Chain Hydrophobicity Modulates Therapeutic Activity and Membrane Selectivity of Antimicrobial Peptide Mastoparan-X

    PubMed Central

    Gjetting, Torben; Andresen, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of new anti-infective compounds is stagnating and multi-resistant bacteria continue to emerge, threatening to end the “antibiotic era”. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lipo-peptides such as daptomycin offer themselves as a new potential class of antibiotics; however, further optimization is needed if AMPs are to find broad use as antibiotics. In the present work, eight analogues of mastoparan-X (MPX) were investigated, having side chain modifications in position 1, 8 and 14 to modulate peptide hydrophobicity. The self-association properties of the peptides were characterized, and the peptide-membrane interactions in model membranes were compared with the bactericidal and haemolytic properties. Alanine substitution at position 1 and 14 resulted in higher target selectivity (red blood cells versus bacteria), but also decreased bactericidal potency. For these analogues, the gain in target selectivity correlated to biophysical parameters showing an increased effective charge and reduction in the partitioning coefficient for membrane insertion. Introduction of an unnatural amino acid, with an octyl side chain by amino acid substitution, at positions 1, 8 and 14 resulted in increased bactericidal potency at the expense of radically reduced membrane target selectivity. Overall, optimized membrane selectivity or bactericidal potency was achieved by changes in side chain hydrophobicity of MPX. However, enhanced potency was achieved at the expense of selectivity and vice versa in all cases. PMID:24621994

  2. PEGMA/MMA copolymer graftings: generation, protein resistance, and a hydrophobic domain.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Volker; Kirmse, Robert; Beyer, Mario; Breitling, Frank; Ludwig, Thomas; Bischoff, F Ralf

    2008-08-05

    We synthesized various graft copolymer films of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) on silicon to examine the dependency of protein-surface interactions on grafting composition. We optimized atom transfer radical polymerizations to achieve film thicknesses from 25 to 100 nm depending on the monomer mole fractions, and analyzed the resulting surfaces by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ellipsometry, contact angle measurements, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). As determined by XPS, the stoichiometric ratios of copolymer graftings correlated with the concentrations of provided monomer solutions. However, we found an unexpected and pronounced hydrophobic domain on copolymer films with a molar amount of 10-40% PEGMA, as indicated by advancing contact angles of up to 90 degrees . Nevertheless, a breakdown of the protein-repelling character was only observed for a fraction of 15% PEGMA and lower, far in the hydrophobic domain. Investigation of the structural basis of this exceptional wettability by high-resolution AFM demonstrated the independence of this property from morphological features.

  3. Hydrophobic polymers modification of mesoporous silica with large pore size for drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Di; Yang, Na

    2009-04-01

    Mesostructure cellular foam (MCF) materials were modified with hydrophobic polyisoprene (PI) through free radical polymerization in the pores network, and the resulting materials (MCF-PI) were investigated as matrices for drug storage. The successful synthesis of PI inside MCF was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. It was interesting to find the resultant system held a relatively large pore size (19.5 nm) and pore volume (1.02 cm3 g-1), which would benefit for drug storage. Ibuprofen (IBU) and vancomycin were selected as model drugs and loaded onto unmodified MCF and modified MCF (MCF-PI). The adsorption capacities of these model drugs on MCF-PI were observed increase as compared to that of on pure MCF, due to the trap effects induced by polyisoprene chains inside the pores. The delivery system of MCF-PI was found to be more favorable for the adsorption of IBU (31 wt%, IBU/silica), possibly attributing to the hydrophobic interaction between IBU and PI formed on the internal surface of MCF matrix. The release of drug through the porous network was investigated by measuring uptake and release of IBU.

  4. β-Cyclodextrin polymer brushes decorated magnetic colloidal nanocrystal clusters for the release of hydrophobic drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Shaonan; Zhao, Meiqin; Cheng, Changjing; Zhao, Zhigang

    2014-05-01

    β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD) polymer brushes decorated magnetic Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters (Fe3O4@PG-CD) were fabricated by a combination of surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization on the surface of Br-anchored Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters (Fe3O4-Br) and ring-opening reaction of epoxy groups. The resulted Fe3O4@PG-CD hybrid nanoparticles were characterized by several methods including Fourier transform infrared, transmission electron microscope, dynamic light scattering instrument, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometer. Moreover, the potential of as-synthesized Fe3O4@PG-CD as a carrier of hydrophobic anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was also investigated. The results showed that the prepared Fe3O4@PG-CD have core/shell structure and high saturated magnetism. 5-FU could be loaded into the Fe3O4@PG-CD via the formation of β-CD/5-FU inclusion complex. Furthermore, the Fe3O4@PG-CD displayed a high loading capacity and pH-dependent release behavior for 5-FU. The release behavior demonstrated a simple Fickian diffusion in the acidic environment (pH 2.0 and 4.0) but neither non-Fickian nor anomalous when neutral. The results reveal that this nanosystem seems to be a very promising vehicle for the hydrophobic drugs for pH-dependent controlled release.

  5. Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-block-poly(vinyl acetate) as a drug delivery vehicle for hydrophobic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Nathalie; Thomas, Mark; Klumperman, Bert

    2012-12-10

    Poly((N-vinylpyrrolidone)-block-poly(vinyl acetate)) (PVP-b-PVAc) block copolymers of varying molecular weight and hydrophobic block lengths were synthesized via controlled radical polymerization and investigated as carriers for the solubilization of highly hydrophobic riminophenazine compounds. These compounds have recently been shown to exhibit a strong activity against a variety of cancer types. PVP-b-PVAc self-assembles into polymer vesicles in aqueous media, and the dialysis method was used to load the water-insoluble drug (clofazimine) into these polymer vesicles. The polymer vesicles were characterized by 1H NMR spectroscopy to confirm vesicle formation and the incorporation of the anticancer drugs into the polymer vesicles. Dynamic light scattering was used to determine the particle size and particle size distribution of the drug-loaded vesicles as well as the stability of the vesicles under physiological conditions. The size of the polymer vesicles did not increase upon loading with clofazimine, and the particle size of 180-200 nm and the narrow particle size distribution were maintained. The morphology of the vesicles was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The polymer vesicles had a relatively high drug loading capacity of 20 wt %. In vitro cytotoxicity studies of PVP-b-PVAc and drug-loaded PVP-b-PVAc were performed against MDA-MB-231 multidrug-resistant breast epithelial cancer cells and MCF12A nontumorigenic breast epithelial cells. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the PVP-b-PVAc drug carrier showed no cytotoxicity, which confirms the biocompatibility of the PVP-b-PVAc drug carrier. The results indicate that the present PVP-b-PVAc block copolymer could be a potential candidate as a drug carrier for hydrophobic drugs.

  6. Polystyrene/wood composites and hydrophobic wood coatings from water-based hydrophilic-hydrophobic block copolymers

    Treesearch

    Marja-Leena Kosonen; Bo Wang; Gerard T. Caneba; Douglas J. Gardner; Tim G. Rials

    2000-01-01

    The combination of synthetic thermoplastic polymers and wood is normally problematic because wood surfaces are hydrophilic while typical thermoplastic polymers are hydrophobic. A possible solution is to use block copolymer coupling agents. In this work we show the use of a potentially useful synthetic method of producing hydrophilic-hydrophobic block copolymers as...

  7. Hydrophobic peptide auxotrophy in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Brãnes, L V; Somers, J M; Kay, W W

    1981-01-01

    The growth of a pleiotropic membrane mutant of Salmonella typhimurium with modified lipopolysaccharide composition was found to be strictly dependent on the peptone component of complex media. Nutritional Shiftdown into minimal media allowed growth for three to four generations. Of 20 commercial peptones, only enzymatic digests supported growth to varying degrees. Neither trace cations, amino acids, vitamins, carbohydrates, lipids, glutathione, polyamines, carbodimides, nor synthetic peptides stimulated growth; however, cells still metabolized carbohydrates, and amino acid transport systems were shown to be functional. A tryptic digest of casein was fractionated into four electrophoretically different peptide fractions of 1,000 to 1,200 molecular weight which supported growth to varying degrees. The best of these was further fractionated to two highly hydrophopic peptides. N-terminal modifications eliminated biological activity. Fluorescein-conjugated goat antibody to rabbit immunoglobulin G was used as a probe to detect antipeptide antibody-peptide complexes on membrane preparations. Cells grown on peptone distributed the peptide into both inner and outer membranes. The peptide could be removed with chaotropic agents, and cells had to be pregrown in peptone-containing media to bind the hydrophobic peptide. The gene (hyp) responsible for peptide auxotrophy was mapped at 44 to 45 units by conjugation. Images PMID:7024254

  8. Microstructure of Hydrophobically Modified Alkyl Acrylamide Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jun; Seery, Thomas A. P.; Ho, Derek L.; Weiss, R. A.

    2004-03-01

    Hydrophobically modified water-soluble acrylamide polymers have a variety of applications, including viscosity thickeners, microencapsulation, biosensors and controlled drug delivery systems. The microstructure of copolymer hydrogels of N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA) or N-isopropylacrylamide(NIPA) modified with 2-(N-ethylfluorooctanesulfonamido)ethyl acrylate, FOSA, was studied by small angle x-ray (SAXS) and neutron scattering (SANS). Swelling and DSC measurements showed that FOSA/NIPA gels exhibited a volume phase transition (VPT), but that FOSA/DMA gels did not. A modified interacting core-shell model was used to explain the SAXS and SANS data for both gels. The crosslink junctions of the gel consisted of nanophase-separated FOSA domains as the core surrounded by a water-poor layer of the alkyl acrylamide. These nanodomains were dispersed in a matrix of water-swollen alkyl acrylamide that had large scale heterogeneities. The average spherical core radius ranged from 1 to 3 nm and the average shell thickness ranged from 1 to 1.5 nm; the aggregation number ranged from 10 to 200.

  9. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  10. Sequestration of hydrophobic organic contaminants by geosorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luthy, Richard G.; Aiken, George R.; Brusseau, Mark L.; Cunningham, Scott D.; Gschwend, Philip M.; Pignatello, Joseph J.; Reinhard, Martin; Traina, Samuel J.; Weber, Walter J.; Westall, John C.

    1997-01-01

    The chemical interactions of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) with soils and sediments (geosorbents) may result in strong binding and slow subsequent release rates that significantly affect remediation rates and endpoints. The underlying physical and chemical phenomena potentially responsible for this apparent sequestration of HOCs by geosorbents are not well understood. This challenges our concepts for assessing exposure and toxicity and for setting environmental quality criteria. Currently there are no direct observational data revealing the molecular-scale locations in which nonpolar organic compounds accumulate when associated with natural soils or sediments. Hence macroscopic observations are used to make inferences about sorption mechanisms and the chemical factors affecting the sequestration of HOCs by geosorbents. Recent observations suggest that HOC interactions with geosorbents comprise different inorganic and organic surfaces and matrices, and distinctions may be drawn along these lines, particularly with regard to the roles of inorganic micropores, natural sorbent organic matter components, combustion residue particulate carbon, and spilled organic liquids. Certain manipulations of sorbates or sorbent media may help reveal sorption mechanisms, but mixed sorption phenomena complicate the interpretation of macroscopic data regarding diffusion of HOCs into and out of different matrices and the hysteretic sorption and aging effects commonly observed for geosorbents. Analytical characterizations at the microscale, and mechanistic models derived therefrom, are needed to advance scientific knowledge of HOC sequestration, release, and environmental risk.

  11. Electronic properties and free radical production by nitrofuran compounds.

    PubMed

    Paulino-Blumenfeld, M; Hansz, M; Hikichi, N; Stoppani, A O

    1992-01-01

    Substitution of nifurtimox tetrahydrothiazine moiety by triazol-4-yl, benzimidazol-l-yl, pyrazol-l-yl or related aromatic nitrogen heterocycles determines changes in the quantum chemistry descriptors of the molecule, namely, (a) greater negative LUMO energy; (b) lesser electron density on specific atoms, especially on the nitro group atoms, and (c) modification of individual net atomic charges at relevant atoms. These variations correlate with the greater capability of nifurtimox analogues for redox-cycling and oxygen radical production, after one-electron reduction by ascorbate or reduced flavoenzymes. Variation of the nitrofurans electronic structure can also explain the greater activity of nifurtimox analogues as inhibitors of glutathione reductase and Trypanosoma cruzi growth, although other factors, such as molecular hydrophobicity and connectivity may contribute to the latter inhibition.

  12. Standard Electrode Potentials Involving Radicals in Aqueous Solution: Inorganic Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, David A.; Huie, Robert E.; Koppenol, Willem H.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Merenyi, Gabor; Neta, Pedatsur; Ruscic, Branko; Stanbury, David M.; Steenken, Steen; Wardman, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Recommendations are made for standard potentials involving select inorganic radicals in aqueous solution at 25 °C. These recommendations are based on a critical and thorough literature review and also by performing derivations from various literature reports. The recommended data are summarized in tables of standard potentials, Gibbs energies of formation, radical pKa’s, and hemicolligation equilibrium constants. In all cases, current best estimates of the uncertainties are provided. An extensive set of Data Sheets is appended that provide original literature references, summarize the experimental results, and describe the decisions and procedures leading to each of the recommendations

  13. Role of surfactant derived intermediates in the efficacy and mechanism for radiation chemical degradation of a hydrophobic azo dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol.

    PubMed

    Das, Laboni; Chatterjee, Suchandra; Naik, Devidas B; Adhikari, Soumyakanti

    2015-11-15

    A combined methodology involving gamma and pulse radiolysis, product analysis and toxicity studies has been adopted to comprehend the degradation process of a model hydrophobic azo dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol, emphasizing the role of the surfactant, which is an integral part of textile waste. Two new and important findings are underlined in this article. The first is the direct attestation of the hydrazyl radical-parent adduct, formed in the reaction of the dye with e(-)aq followed by protonation and subsequent addition to the unreacted dye molecule. This has been confirmed from concentration dependent studies. Secondly, we have clearly shown that in the reaction of hydroxyl radical with the dye in Triton X-100 media, the initially produced TX radicals cause reductive degradation of the dye. Identification and detailed analysis of HPLC and GCMS data reveals that similar products are formed in both the reactions of e(-)aq and OH radicals. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of 10(-4)moldm(-3) dye was found to be reduced significantly after irradiation. Thus, the present study not only depicts new pathways for the degradation of hydrophobic azo dye, but also demonstrates the role of a surfactant in the entire process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Surface Hydrophobicity Causes SO2 Tolerance in Lichens

    PubMed Central

    Hauck, Markus; Jürgens, Sascha-René; Brinkmann, Martin; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The superhydrophobicity of the thallus surface in one of the most SO2-tolerant lichen species, Lecanora conizaeoides, suggests that surface hydrophobicity could be a general feature of lichen symbioses controlling their tolerance to SO2. The study described here tests this hypothesis. Methods Water droplets of the size of a raindrop were placed on the surface of air-dry thalli in 50 lichen species of known SO2 tolerance and contact angles were measured to quantify hydrophobicity. Key Results The wettability of lichen thalli ranges from strongly hydrophobic to strongly hydrophilic. SO2 tolerance of the studied lichen species increased with increasing hydrophobicity of the thallus surface. Extraction of extracellular lichen secondary metabolites with acetone reduced, but did not abolish the hydrophobicity of lichen thalli. Conclusions Surface hydrophobicity is the main factor controlling SO2 tolerance in lichens. It presumably originally evolved as an adaptation to wet habitats preventing the depression of net photosynthesis due to supersaturation of the thallus with water. Hydrophilicity of lichen thalli is an adaptation to dry or humid, but not directly rain-exposed habitats. The crucial role of surface hydrophobicity in SO2 also explains why many markedly SO2-tolerant species are additionally tolerant to other (chemically unrelated) toxic substances including heavy metals. PMID:18077467

  15. Thermodynamics of hydrophobic interaction between silica surfaces coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuoli; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    2013-02-15

    Surface force measurements conducted with thiolated gold surfaces showed previously that hydrophobic interaction entails a decrease in excess film entropy, suggesting that hydrophobic force originates from changes in the structure of the medium (water) confined between hydrophobic surfaces. As a follow-up work, surface force measurements have been conducted in the present work using an atomic force microscope (AFM) with silica surfaces coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) at temperatures in the range of 10-40°C. A thermodynamic analysis of the results show that both the excess film entropy (ΔS(f)) and excess film enthalpy (ΔH(f)) decrease with decreasing thickness of the water films between the hydrophobic surfaces. It has been found also that |ΔH(f)|>|TΔS(f)|, which represents a necessary condition for the excess free energy change (ΔG(f)) to be negative and hence the hydrophobic interaction be attractive. Thus, the results obtained with both the thiolated and silylated surfaces show that hydrophobic forces originate from the structural changes in the medium. It is believed that the water molecules in the thin liquid films (TLFs) of water form clusters as a means to reduce the free energy when they cannot form H-bonds to neighboring hydrophobic surfaces.

  16. [Laparoscopic radical cystectomy: initial experience].

    PubMed

    Núñez Mora, C; García Mediero, J Ma; Cáceres Jiménez, F; Cabrera Castillo, P M

    2007-09-01

    To review our initial experience with laparoscopic radical cystectomy. Between September 2004 and June 2006 we performed 16 laparoscopic radical cystectomies (14 males and 2 females) with a median age of 63.8 y.o. (51-85). 12 ileal neobladder (with laparoscopic ileal-urethra anastomosis), 3 cutaneous ureteroileostomies and 1 cutaneous ureterostomy were performed as derivation techniques. Median follow up was 12.4 months Mean operation time was 340 minutes. Estimated blood loss was 350 ml. and 3 cases required intra-op blood transfusion. Mean hospitalization discharged was at 7.6 days. Median linph node dissection was 22.9 finding node metastasis in 6 cases. Most frequent complication was ileo in two cases. No local recurrentes in trocar placement was achieved. Laparoscopic Radical cystectomy is a challenged long-lasting procedure but with the advantage of a less transfusion rate and short hospital stay. Oncologycal outcomes are similar as tose from open surgery.

  17. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  18. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism.

    PubMed

    O'Donohue, W T; Callaghan, G M; Ruckstuhl, L E

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers.

  19. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  20. Spatially selective modification of PLLA surface: From hydrophobic to hydrophilic or to repellent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastekova, Kristina; Guselnikova, Olga; Postnikov, Pavel; Elashnikov, Roman; Kunes, Martin; Kolska, Zdenka; Švorčík, Vaclav; Lyutakov, Oleksiy

    2017-03-01

    A universal approach to controlled surface modification of polylactic acid (PLLA) films using diazonium chemistry was proposed. The multistep procedure includes surface activation of PLLA by argon plasma treatment and chemical activation of arenediazonium tosylates by NaBH4. The surface of PLLA film was grafted with different functional organic groups (OFGs), changing the PLLA surface properties (wettability, morphology, zeta potential, chemical composition, and mechanical response). Three approaches of OFG grafting were examined: (i) plasma treatment following by PLLA immersion into diazonium salt aqueous solution; (ii) grafting of PLLA surface through the reaction with chemically created aryl radicals; (iii) mutual combination of both methods The best results were achieved in the last case, where the previous plasma treatment was combined with further reaction of PLLA surface with generated aryl radicals. Using this method PLLA surface was successfully grafted with amino, carboxyl, aliphatic and fluorinated OFGs. Further investigation of surface properties from potential biological and medical points of view was performed using zeta potential, biodegradation and biofouling tests. It was shown that proposed technique allows preparation of biorepellent or bioabsorptive surfaces, tuning of PLLA biodegradation rate and nanomechanical properties, as well as the introduction of inverse properties (such as hydrophilic and hydrophobic) on both sides of PLLA films.

  1. Solubility Enhanced Oxidation of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boving, T. B.; Eberle, D. E.; Ball, R.

    2012-12-01

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a remediation technique considered to be effective at overcoming some of the limitations of conventional subsurface treatment processes for volatile and semi-volatile organic contaminants (VOC, SVOC). ISCO reactions occur predominately in the aqueous phase and as a result, contaminant availability is a major limiting factor, i.e. contaminants with higher aqueous solubility's are typically more accessible for oxidation than more hydrophobic, sorbed compounds. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of a new integrated desorption-oxidation process for the remediation of contaminated waters and sediments. Specifically, this study examined the potential of using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD), a modified cyclic sugar, and a blend of oxidants commercially known as OxyZone® (U.S. patent No. 7,667,087) for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Laboratory scale batch experiments confirmed prior studies that HPCD increases the aqueous concentration of these contaminants, making a greater mass of contaminant available for subsequent oxidation. When exposed to the same amount of oxidant, the mass of PAH destroyed increased linearly with increasing HPCD concentration. Relative to PAH saturated solutions without HPCD, 11 times more PAH mass was destroyed when a PAH saturated 15 g/L HPCD solution was treated with the same mass of oxidant. Destruction of the aqueous phase contaminants followed first order exponential decay kinetics in both deionized water and HPCD solutions. However, the destruction of complexed PAH was slower than for uncomplexed PAH. The cause of this is likely due to the preferential destruction of the HPCD molecule by the oxidant, followed by the subsequent oxidation of the PAH. The destruction of the cyclodextrin was minimized by modifying the oxidant formulation. Overall, these findings establish the potential of utilizing HPCD and OxyZone® as an integrated desorption

  2. Electrokinetic instability near charge-selective hydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelistov, V. S.; Demekhin, E. A.; Ganchenko, G. S.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of the texture of a hydrophobic surface on the electro-osmotic slip of the second kind and the electrokinetic instability near charge selective surfaces (permselective membranes, electrodes, or systems of microchannels and nanochannels) is investigated theoretically using a simple model based on the Rubinstein-Zaltzman approach. A simple formula is derived to evaluate the decrease in the instability threshold due to hydrophobicity. The study is complemented by numerical investigations both of linear and nonlinear instabilities near a hydrophobic membrane surface. Theory predicts a significant enhancement of the ion flux to the surface and shows a good qualitative agreement with the available experimental data.

  3. Electrokinetic instability near charge-selective hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shelistov, V S; Demekhin, E A; Ganchenko, G S

    2014-07-01

    The influence of the texture of a hydrophobic surface on the electro-osmotic slip of the second kind and the electrokinetic instability near charge selective surfaces (permselective membranes, electrodes, or systems of microchannels and nanochannels) is investigated theoretically using a simple model based on the Rubinstein-Zaltzman approach. A simple formula is derived to evaluate the decrease in the instability threshold due to hydrophobicity. The study is complemented by numerical investigations both of linear and nonlinear instabilities near a hydrophobic membrane surface. Theory predicts a significant enhancement of the ion flux to the surface and shows a good qualitative agreement with the available experimental data.

  4. Strong hydrophobizer: laterally chemisorbed low-molecular-weight polydimethylsiloxane.

    PubMed

    Chae, Soo Sang; Oh, Jin Young; Park, Jee Ho; Choi, Won Jin; Han, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Jeong-O; Baik, Hong Koo; Lee, Tae Il

    2015-04-07

    We introduce a siloxane chain-based hydrophobizer that exhibits superior thermal and chemical stability compared to the conventional hydrophobizing silane agent under conditions of over 300 °C and pH 2-13. To demonstrate the capability of the siloxane chain-based hydrophobizer to serve as a highly robust chemical surface modifier, we present two applications: the formation of fine metal nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution by thermal aggregation of a metal thin film and the selective deposition of a ruthenium thin film by atomic layer deposition.

  5. Donor free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  6. Laparoscopic radical and partial cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Challacombe, Ben J.; Rose, Kristen; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2005-01-01

    Radical cystectomy remains the standard treatment for muscle invasive organ confined bladder carcinoma. Laparoscopic radical cystoprostatectomy (LRC) is an advanced laparoscopic procedure that places significant demands on the patient and the surgeon alike. It is a prolonged procedure which includes several technical steps and requires highly developed laparoscopic skills including intra-corporeal suturing. Here we review the development of the technique, the indications, complications and outcomes. We also examine the potential benefits of robotic-assisted LRC and explore the indications and technique of laparoscopic partial cystectomy. PMID:21206662

  7. VUV Photoionisation of hydrocarbon radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, C.; Noller, Bastian; Hemberger, Patrick; Fischer, Ingo; Gans, Bérenger; Boyé-Peronne, Séverine; Douin, Stéphane; Gauyacq, Dolorès; Soldi-Lose, Héloïse; Garcia, Gustavo

    2008-09-01

    Hydrocarbon radicals CxHy are constituents of various planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as a result of the methane photochemistry induced by the solar radiation. They contribute to the neutral chemistry, but are also important for the ionosphere through their photoionisation leading to their cations CxHy +. These cations are also produced by ion-molecule reactions starting from the reaction of the primary ions CH4 + and CH3 + which are created in the non-dissociative and dissociative photoionisation of CH4. This work aims at caracterizing the VUV photoionisation of small hydrocarbon radicals as a function of photon energy. The objective is to provide laboratory data for modelers on the spectroscopy, the thermochemistry, and the reactivity of the radicals and their cations. The hydrocarbon radicals are much less caracterized than stable molecules since they have to be produced in situ in the laboratory experiment. We have adapted at Orsay [1-3] a pyrolysis source (Figure 1) well suited to produce cold beams of hydrocarbon radicals to our experimental setups. Available now at Orsay, we have two new sources of VUV radiation, complementary in terms of tunability and resolution, that can be used for these studies. The first one is the DESIRS beamline [4] at the new french synchrotron, SOLEIL. The second one is the VUV laser developped at the Centre Laser de l'Université Paris-Sud (CLUPS) [5]. At SOLEIL, a photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectrometer is used to monitor the photoionisation on a large photon energy range. At the CLUPS, a pulsedfield ionisation (PFI-ZEKE) spectrometer allows studies at higher resolution on selected photon energies. The first results obtained with these new setups will be presented. References [1] Fischer, I., Schussler, T., Deyerl, H.J., Elhanine, M. & Alcaraz, C., Photoionization and dissociative photoionization of the allyl radical, C3H5. Int. J. Mass Spectrom., 261 (2-3), 227-233 (2007) [2] Schüßler, T., Roth, W., Gerber

  8. Surface hydrophobization by electrostatic deposition of hydrophobically modified poly(acrylates) and their complexes with surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gîfu, Ioana Cătălina; Maxim, Monica Elisabeta; Iovescu, Alina; Simion, Elena Livia; Aricov, Ludmila; Anastasescu, Mihai; Munteanu, Cornel; Anghel, Dan-Florin

    2016-05-01

    The present study demonstrates the hydrophobic effect of poly(electrolyte) multilayer films when they are alkyl-grafted and complexed or not with surfactants. For this purpose, sodium hydrophobically modified poly(acrylates) (PACnNa, n = 10, 18) or their anionic complexes with alkyltrimethylammonium bromides (CxTAB, x = 10, 12, 14, 18), and the cationic poly(diallyldimethyldiammonium chloride) (PDDAMAC) are assembled by layer-by-layer deposition on a glass substrate. Contact angle (CA) measurements reveal that films constructed with PACnNa-CxTAB/PDADMAC are superior water repellants than those of PACnNa/PDADMAC. For example, the highest CA is obtained for the PAC18Na-C18TAB/PDADMAC. Moreover, it has been observed that the CA increases with the alkyl chain length of PACnNa and of surfactant. The film roughness and thickness have the same trend as wettability. Thinner and less coarse films are obtained by NaCl addition, as witnessed by SEM and AFM.

  9. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions in aqueous mixtures of alcohols at a hydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Deepti; Chapman, Walter G

    2013-09-21

    Aqueous solutions of alcohols are interesting because of their anomalous behavior that is believed to be due to the molecular structuring of water and alcohol around each other in solution. The interfacial structuring and properties are significant for application in alcohol purification processes and biomolecular structure. Here we study aqueous mixtures of short alcohols (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol) at a hydrophobic surface using interfacial statistical associating fluid theory which is a perturbation density functional theory. The addition of a small amount of alcohol decreases the interfacial tension of water drastically. This trend in interfacial tension can be explained by the structure of water and alcohol next to the surface. The hydrophobic group of an added alcohol preferentially goes to the surface preserving the structure of water in the bulk. For a given bulk alcohol concentration, water mixed with the different alcohols has different interfacial tensions with propanol having a lower interfacial tension than methanol and ethanol. 2-propanol is not as effective in decreasing the interfacial tension as 1-propanol because it partitions poorly to the surface due to its larger excluded volume. But for a given surface alcohol mole fraction, all the alcohol mixtures give similar values for interfacial tension. For separation of alcohol from water, methods that take advantage of the high surface mole fraction of alcohol have advantages compared to separation using the vapor in equilibrium with a water-alcohol liquid.

  10. Investigations of the hydrophobic and scratch resistance behavior of polystyrene films deposited on bell metal using RF-PACVD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A. J.; Barve, S. A.; Chutia, Joyanti; Pal, A. R.; Chowdhury, D.; Kishore, R.; Jagannath; Mithal, N.; Pandey, M.; Patil, D. S.

    2011-02-01

    Polystyrene films are deposited on bell metal substrates using radiofrequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (RF-PACVD) process. The deposition of polystyrene film is carried out at working pressure of 1.6 × 10-1 mbar and in the RF power range of 20-110 W. The hydrophobic and mechanical behaviors of the polystyrene films are studied as a function of RF power. The chemical compositions and surface chemistry of the polystyrene films are investigated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is revealed that enhanced cross-linked chemical structure and higher loss of oxygen by peroxy polystyryl radical with increasing RF power results in the formation of polystyrene films with more hydrophobic and scratch resistance behavior. However, extensive destruction of cross-linked chemical structure due to high energetic ion bombardment tends to decrease the hydrophobic and scratch resistance behavior of the polystyrene film deposited at RF power of 110 W. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show quite uniform and crack free surfaces of the polystyrene films having rms roughness in the range of 0.35-0.87 nm. Attempts are made to correlate the characterization results with the parameters that are used for thin film depositions.

  11. Fluoroalkyl and Alkyl Chains Have Similar Hydrophobicities in Binding to the “Hydrophobic Wall” of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    J Mecinovic; P Snyder; K Mirica; S Bai; E Mack; R Kwant; D Moustakas; A Heroux; G Whitesides

    2011-12-31

    The hydrophobic effect, the free-energetically favorable association of nonpolar solutes in water, makes a dominant contribution to binding of many systems of ligands and proteins. The objective of this study was to examine the hydrophobic effect in biomolecular recognition using two chemically different but structurally similar hydrophobic groups, aliphatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic fluorocarbons, and to determine whether the hydrophobicity of the two groups could be distinguished by thermodynamic and biostructural analysis. This paper uses isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to examine the thermodynamics of binding of benzenesulfonamides substituted in the para position with alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains (H{sub 2}NSO{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CONHCH{sub 2}(CX{sub 2}){sub n}CX{sub 3}, n = 0-4, X = H, F) to human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). Both alkyl and fluoroalkyl substituents contribute favorably to the enthalpy and the entropy of binding; these contributions increase as the length of chain of the hydrophobic substituent increases. Crystallography of the protein-ligand complexes indicates that the benzenesulfonamide groups of all ligands examined bind with similar geometry, that the tail groups associate with the hydrophobic wall of HCA II (which is made up of the side chains of residues Phe131, Val135, Pro202, and Leu204), and that the structure of the protein is indistinguishable for all but one of the complexes (the longest member of the fluoroalkyl series). Analysis of the thermodynamics of binding as a function of structure is compatible with the hypothesis that hydrophobic binding of both alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains to hydrophobic surface of carbonic anhydrase is due primarily to the release of nonoptimally hydrogen-bonded water molecules that hydrate the binding cavity (including the hydrophobic wall) of HCA II and to the release of water molecules that surround the hydrophobic chain of the ligands. This study defines the balance of enthalpic and

  12. Fluoroalkyl and Alkyl Chains Have Similar Hydrophobicities in Binding to the “Hydrophobic Wall” of Carbonic Anhydrase

    PubMed Central

    Mecinović, Jasmin; Snyder, Phillip W.; Mirica, Katherine A.; Bai, Serena; Mack, Eric T.; Kwant, Richard L.; Moustakas, Demetri T.; Heroux, Annie; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrophobic effect—the free-energetically favorable association of non-polar solutes in water—makes a dominant contribution to binding of many systems of ligands and proteins. The objective of this study was to examine the hydrophobic effect in biomolecular recognition using two chemically different, but structurally similar hydrophobic groups—aliphatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic fluorocarbons—and to determine whether the hydrophobicity of the two groups could be distinguished by thermodynamic and biostructural analysis. This paper uses isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to examine the thermodynamics of binding of benzenesulfonamides substituted in the para position with alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains (H2NSO2C6H4-CONHCH2(CX2)nCX3, n = 0–4, X = H, F) to human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). Both alkyl and fluoroalkyl substituents contribute favorably to the enthalpy and the entropy of binding; these contributions increase as the length of chain of the hydrophobic substituent increases. Crystallography of the protein-ligand complexes indicates that the benzenesulfonamide groups of all ligands examined bind with similar geometry, that the tail groups associate with the hydrophobic wall of HCA II (which is made up of the side chains of residues Phe131, Val135, Pro202, and Leu204), and that the structure of the protein is indistinguishable for all but one of the complexes (the longest member of the fluoroalkyl series). Analysis of the thermodynamics of binding as a function of structure is compatible with the hypothesis that hydrophobic binding of both alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains to hydrophobic surface of carbonic anhydrase is due primarily to the release of non-optimally hydrogen-bonded water molecules that hydrate the binding cavity (including the hydrophobic wall) of HCA II and to the release of water molecules that surround the hydrophobic chain of the ligands. This study defines the balance of enthalpic and entropic contributions to the hydrophobic

  13. Inverse colloidal crystal membranes for hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vu, Anh T; Wang, Xinying; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Cong, Hailin; Luo, Yongli; Tang, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has gained interest due to its excellent performance in the purification of humanized monoclonal antibodies. The membrane material used in hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has typically been commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride. In this contribution, newly developed inverse colloidal crystal membranes that have uniform pores, high porosity and, therefore, high surface area for protein binding are used as hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography membranes for humanized monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G purification. The capacity of the inverse colloidal crystal membranes developed here is up to ten times greater than commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride membranes with a similar pore size. This work highlights the importance of developing uniform pore size high porosity membranes in order to maximize the capacity of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Hydrophobicity – Shake Flasks, Protein Folding and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Aurijit; Kellogg, Glen E.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrophobic interactions are some of the most important interactions in nature. They are the primary driving force in a number of phenomena. This is mostly an entropic effect and can account for a number of biophysical events such as protein-protein or protein-ligand binding that are of immense importance in drug design. The earliest studies on this phenomenon can be dated back to the end of the 19th century when Meyer and Overton independently correlated the hydrophobic nature of gases to their anesthetic potency. Since then, significant progress has been made in this realm of science. This review briefly traces the history of hydrophobicity research along with the theoretical estimation of partition coefficients. Finally, the application of hydrophobicity estimation methods in the field of drug design and protein folding is discussed. PMID:19929828

  15. SEQUESTRATION OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS BY GEOSORBENTS. (R822626)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical interactions of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) with soils and sediments (geosorbents) may result in strong binding and slow subsequent release rates that significantly affect remediation rates and endpoints. The underlying physical and chemical phenomena ...

  16. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  17. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-30

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  18. Gastric mucosal barrier: hydrophobicity of stretched stomach lining.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A; Lichtenberger, L M

    1985-06-01

    Surface hydrophobicity of the luminal lining of the canine stomach has been studied as a very convenient means of following the adsorbed monolayer of surfactant believed to provide the gastric mucosal barrier. Hydrophobicity has been measured as the contact angle (theta) produced when a drop of saline is placed upon the surface. theta was found to decrease from 82 to 62 degrees upon 50% linear extension of samples of oxyntic mucosa from 10 dogs. When the phospholipid believed to cause the hydrophobicity was absorbed to glass slides, the contact angle was found to decrease with lower surface concentration. Thinning or "crazing" of the absorbed surfactant monolayer imparting the very hydrophobic nature of the luminal lining is discussed as a possible reason why ulcers tend to form at the crests of the folds, i.e., at points where the surface has been stretched and the monolayer disrupted.

  19. Hydrophobic composition based on mixed-molecular weight polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlenko, Nikolay; Debelova, Natalya; Sarkisov, Yuriy; Volokitin, Gennadiy; Zavyalova, Elena; Lapova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents investigations of compositions based on low and high molecular weight polyethylene so as to synthesize a hydrophobic composition for moisture protection of timber. X-ray phase analysis and measurements of the tear-off force of hydrophobic coating needed to apply to the timber surface and the limiting wetting angle are carried out to detect the hydrophobic, adhesive, electrophysical, and physicochemical properties of compositions. Kinetic dependencies are given for moisture absorption of timber specimens. It is shown that the preliminary formation of the texture by the surface patterning or its treatment with low-temperature plasma with the following protective coating results in the improvement of hydrophobic properties of the suggested compositions. These compositions can be used in the capacity of water repellents to protect building materials from moisture including restoration works.

  20. CHEMICAL DYNAMICS OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS DURING RESUSPENSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments were designed to study the chemical-particle dynamics of toxic hydrophobic organics during resuspension episodes using a particle entrainment simulator (PES). The purpose was to obtain insight into chemical transport mechanisms during resuspension. Informat...

  1. Rapid magnetic catch-and-release purification by hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Motoyuki; Mikami, Yuzuru; Yoshioka, Tomohiko; Kim, Shokaku; Kamiya, Hidehiro; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2009-09-15

    A reversible, conventional, and rapid purification method of hydrophobically tagged products using hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles was developed. The reversible purification system entails simply controlling the polarity of solvents. First, for the catching procedure, poor solvents were added into a well-dispersed system of magnetic nanoparticles and tagged products. Once the poor solvents were added to the system, the products were recrystallized among the nanoparticles and the aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles occurred due to hydrophobic interactions. These aggregates with the products contained within them were able to be collected rapidly by magnets. Then, the releasing procedure can be easily performed by redispersing the collected aggregates into good solvents. The availability of this purification protocol was confirmed by using a hydrophobically tagged fluorescent model product. Furthermore, this rapid purification method was successfully applied to a peptide elongation reaction system which enabled the synthesis of peptides such as Leu-Enkephalin in high purity, in high yield, and in a short time.

  2. FOLDING AMPHIPATHIC HELICES INTO MEMBRANES: AMPHIPHILICITY TRUMPS HYDROPHOBICITY

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Vidal, Mónica; Jayasinghe, Sajith; Ladokhin, Alexey S.; White, Stephen H.

    2007-01-01

    High amphiphilicity is a hallmark of interfacial helices in membrane proteins and membrane-active peptides, such as toxins and antimicrobial peptides. Although there is general agreement that amphiphilicity is important for membrane-interface binding, an unanswered question is its importance relative to simple hydrophobicity-driven partitioning. We have examined this fundamental question using measurements of the interfacial partitioning of a family of seventeen-residue amidated-acetylated peptides into both neutral and anionic lipid vesicles. Composed only of Ala, Leu, and Gln residues, the amino acid sequences of the peptides were varied to change peptide amphiphilicity without changing total hydrophobicity. We found that peptide helicity in water and interface increased linearly with hydrophobic moment, as did the favorable peptide partitioning free energy. This observation provides simple tools for designing amphipathic helical peptides. Finally, our results show that helical amphiphilicity is far more important for interfacial binding than simple hydrophobicity. PMID:17532340

  3. Differentiation of hydrophobic from hydrophilic submicrometer aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Juozaitis, A.; Ulevicius, V.; Girgzdys, A. ); Willeke, K. )

    1993-02-01

    A method has been developed that differentiates hydrophobic from hydrophilic submicrometer aerosol particles in air environments containing polydisperse aerosols composed of different chemical species. First, a narrow particle size range is extracted from the polydisperse aerosol by an electrostatic aerosol classifier. Then the monodisperse aerosols of different origins are exposed to preselected supersaturation levels and are size-classified again by a second electrostatic classifier. Hydrophobic aerosol particles pass through the second classifier when its size window matches that of the first classifier. Hydrophilic aerosol particles grow to a larger size and are removed by the second classifier. The method has been applied in the field by measuring the fraction of hydrophobic atmospheric particles in a suburb of Vilnius, Lithuania, during a period of high emission of hydrophobic soot particles from residential coal and industrial oil burning in winter. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Students' Ideas and Radical Constructivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez Gómez, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I study, from the point of view of the analytic philosophy of mind, the compatibility of students' ideas studies (SIS) with radical constructivism (RC). I demonstrate that RC is based on a psychology of "narrow mental states"; that is, the idea that the mental content of an individual can be fully characterised without…

  5. The Other Women: Radicalizing Feminism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puigvert, Lidia; Darder, Antonia; Merrill, Barbara; de los Reyes, Eileen; Stromquist, Nelly

    A recent international symposium on radicalizing feminism explored ways of developing a dialogic feminism that emphasizes working in different settings under the common goal of including women who have been invisible in the dominant feminist literature by furthering theories and practices based on the principles of dialogic feminism. The seminar…

  6. [Reprodcutive results of radical trachelectomy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Chapa, Arnulfo; Alonso-Reyes, Nelly; Luna-Macías, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Historically, cervical cancer in early stages has been treated with radical hysterectomy and radiotherapy with no option in keeping the uterine-ovarian function. Since two decades ago, evidence shows these cases are candidates for radical trachelectomy, a procedure capable of preserving the fertility without affecting the oncological outcome. To analyze reproductive results among patients treated with radical trachelectomy, in a reference center from the northeast of Mexico. Between March 1999 and December 2013, 27 cases with cervical cancer in early stages were treated with vaginal or abdominal radical trachelectomy in the ISSSTE Regional Hospital in Monterrey, NL (Mexico). We obtained the gynecological, medical and surgical clinical history. Plan of analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Age range was 27-39 years. Main complications were cervical stenosis (n=1) and erosion of cerclaje (n=2). Eighteen patients tried to get pregnant, 8 of them got a spontaneous pregnancy; 1 more patient required assisted reproduction technics and did not succeed. All pregnancies were delivered by cesarean section and were preterm births; 3 underwent premature rupture of membranes. Two pregnancies ended in abortion, one at 10 weeks with severe hemorrhage that needed hysterectomy; the second one, at 1 7 weeks, received a fine uterine curettage. Only 6 cases (33%) got a live birth. Only one third of the attempted pregnancies got a live birth. Assisted reproduction technics play an important role and should be offer to all cases. Cerclaje is an important factor to carry a pregnancy up to the third trimester.

  7. Mitigating Radicalism in Northern Nigeria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    radicalization in northern Nigeria. u Active engagement of youth and communities in peacebuilding programs that facilitate interactions among individuals...leaders, sustained development investments in marginalized communities , promotion of values of inclusivity to mitigate the spread of extremist ideology...claiming to have repelled Boko Haram, the militants return, regroup, and seek revenge. As a result, social and economic activities in the northern

  8. Students' Ideas and Radical Constructivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez Gómez, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I study, from the point of view of the analytic philosophy of mind, the compatibility of students' ideas studies (SIS) with radical constructivism (RC). I demonstrate that RC is based on a psychology of "narrow mental states"; that is, the idea that the mental content of an individual can be fully characterised without…

  9. Effects of the protein environment on the spectral properties of tryptophan radicals in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin.

    PubMed

    Bernini, Caterina; Andruniów, Tadeusz; Olivucci, Massimo; Pogni, Rebecca; Basosi, Riccardo; Sinicropi, Adalgisa

    2013-03-27

    Many biological electron-transfer reactions involve short-lived tryptophan radicals as key reactive intermediates. While these species are difficult to investigate, the recent photogeneration of a long-lived neutral tryptophan radical in two Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin mutants (Az48W and ReAz108W) made it possible to characterize the electronic, vibrational, and magnetic properties of such species and their sensitivity to the molecular environment. Indeed, in Az48W the radical is embedded in the hydrophobic core while, in ReAz108W it is solvent-exposed. Here we use density functional theory and multiconfigurational perturbation theory to construct quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics models of Az48W(•) and ReAz108W(•) capable of reproducing specific features of their observed UV-vis, resonance Raman, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra. The results show that the models can correctly replicate the spectral changes imposed by the two contrasting hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments. Most importantly, the same models can be employed to disentangle the molecular-level interactions responsible for such changes. It is found that the control of the hydrogen bonding between the tryptophan radical and a single specific surface water molecule in ReAz108W(•) represents an effective means of spectral modulation. Similarly, a specific electrostatic interaction between the radical moiety and a Val residue is found to control the Az48W(•) excitation energy. These modulations appear to be mediated by the increase in nitrogen negative charge (and consequent increase in hydrogen bonding) of the spectroscopic D2 state with respect to the D0 state of the chromophore. Finally, the same protein models are used to predict the relaxed Az48W(•) and ReAz108W(•) D2 structures, showing that the effect of the environment on the corresponding fluorescence maxima must parallel that of D0 absorption spectra.

  10. Inhibition of hydroxyl radical reaction with aromatics by dissolved natural organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, M.E.; Tarr, M.A.

    2000-02-01

    Remediation of hydrophobic pollutants is complicated by sorption of these compounds to hydrophobic sites of dissolved natural organic matter (NOM), suspended particulates, soil, and sediment. This sorption causes the pollutants to be less easily degraded by remediation techniques. Reaction of aromatic compounds with hydroxyl radical is inhibited by dissolved natural organic matter (NOM). The degree of inhibition is significantly greater than that expected based on a simple model in which aromatic compound molecules bound to NOM are considered to be unreactive. In this study, hydroxyl radical was produced at steady-state concentrations using Fenton chemistry (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + Fe{sup 2+} {yields} Fe{sup 3+} + HO{sup {minus}} + HO{sm_bullet}). Suwannee River fulvic acid and humic acid were used as NOM. The most likely mechanism for the observed inhibition is that hydroxyl radical formation occurs in microenvironmental sites remote from the aromatic compounds. In addition to changes in kinetics, pyrene hydroxyl radical reaction also exhibited a mechanistic change in the presence of fulvic acid. The mechanism changed from a reaction that was apparently first-order in pyrene to one that was apparently second-order in pyrene, indicating that pyrene self-reaction may have become the dominant mechanism in the presence of fulvic acid. Dissolved NOM causes significant changes in the rate and mechanism of hydroxyl radical degradation of aromatic compounds. Consequently, literature rate constants measured in pure water will not be useful for predicting the degradation of pollutants in environmental systems. The kinetic and mechanistic information in this study will be useful for developing improved degradation methods involving Fenton chemistry.

  11. Prediction of transmembrane helices from hydrophobic characteristics of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ponnuswamy, P K; Gromiha, M M

    1993-10-01

    Membrane proteins, requiring to be embedded into the lipid bilayers, have evolved to have amino acid sequences that will fold with a hydrophobic surface in contact with the alkane chains of the lipids and polar surface in contact with the aqueous phases on both sides of the membrane and the polar head groups of the lipids. It is generally assumed that the characteristics of the aqueous parts of the membrane proteins are similar to those of normal globular proteins, and the embedded parts are highly hydrophobic. In our earlier works, we introduced the concept of 'surrounding hydrophobicity' and developed a hydrophobicity scale for the 20 amino acid residues, and applied it successfully to the study of the family of globular proteins. In this work we use the concept of surrounding hydrophobicity to indicate quantitatively how the aqueous parts of membrane proteins compare with the normal globular proteins, and how rich the embedded parts are in their hydrophobic activity. We then develop a surrounding hydrophobicity scale applicable to membrane proteins, by mixing judicially the surrounding hydrophobicities observed in the crystals of the membrane protein, photosynthetic reaction center from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis, porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus and a set of 64 globular proteins. A predictive scheme based on this scale predicts from amino acid sequence, transmembrane segments in PRC and randomly selected 26 membrane proteins to 80% level of accuracy. This is a much higher predictive power when compared to the existing popular methods. A new procedure to measure the amphipathicity of sequence segments is proposed, and it is used to characterize the transmembrane parts of the sample membrane proteins.

  12. Hydrophobic, Hydrophilic, and Charged Amino Acid Networks within Protein

    PubMed Central

    Aftabuddin, Md.; Kundu, S.

    2007-01-01

    The native three-dimensional structure of a single protein is determined by the physicochemical nature of its constituent amino acids. The 20 different types of amino acids, depending on their physicochemical properties, can be grouped into three major classes: hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and charged. The anatomy of the weighted and unweighted networks of hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and charged residues separately for a large number of proteins were studied. Results showed that the average degree of the hydrophobic networks has a significantly larger value than that of hydrophilic and charged networks. The average degree of the hydrophilic networks is slightly higher than that of the charged networks. The average strength of the nodes of hydrophobic networks is nearly equal to that of the charged network, whereas that of hydrophilic networks has a smaller value than that of hydrophobic and charged networks. The average strength for each of the three types of networks varies with its degree. The average strength of a node in a charged network increases more sharply than that of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic networks. Each of the three types of networks exhibits the “small-world” property. Our results further indicate that the all-amino-acids networks and hydrophobic networks are of assortative type. Although most of the hydrophilic and charged networks are of the assortative type, few others have the characteristics of disassortative mixing of the nodes. We have further observed that all-amino-acids networks and hydrophobic networks bear the signature of hierarchy, whereas the hydrophilic and charged networks do not have any hierarchical signature. PMID:17172302

  13. Sorption of heavy metals onto hydrophobic parts of aquatic plants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W.; Robichaud, K.; Misra, M.

    1995-12-31

    The ability of the roots of Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth), Tripha latifolia (common cattail) and Sparganium minimum (burr reed) to accumulate lead and mercury ions from aqueous solution was investigated. The relative abilities of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic portions of the root material to accumulate these ions was studied and it was found that the hydrophilic portion accumulates substantially more of the heavy metal ions than the hydrophobic portion. An attempt is made to explain this better sorption ability.

  14. Hydrogen evolution on hydrophobic aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Misra, Abha; Giri, Jyotsnendu; Daraio, Chiara

    2009-12-22

    We investigate for the first time hydrophobic carbon nanotube-based electrochemical cells as an alternative solution to hydrogen sorting. We show that the electrically conducting surface of the nanotube arrays can be used as a cathode for hydrogen generation and absorption by electrolyzing water. We support our findings with Raman and gas chromatography measurements. These results suggest that carbon nanotube forests, presenting a unique combination of hydrophobicity and conductivity, are suitable for application in fuel cells and microelectromechanical devices.

  15. Oxidation of ultrafast radical clock substrate probes by the soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Valentine, A M; LeTadic-Biadatti, M H; Toy, P H; Newcomb, M; Lippard, S J

    1999-04-16

    Radical clock substrate probes were used to assess the viability of a discrete substrate radical species in the mechanism of hydrocarbon oxidation by the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). New substituted cyclopropane probes were used with very fast ring-opening rate constants and other desirable attributes, such as the ability to discriminate between radical and cationic intermediates. Oxidation of these substrates by a reconstituted sMMO system resulted in no rearranged products, allowing an upper limit of 150 fs to be placed on the lifetime of a putative radical species. This limit strongly suggests that there is no such substrate radical intermediate. The two enantiomers of trans-1-methyl-2-phenyl-cyclopropane were prepared, and the regioselectivity of their oxidation to the corresponding cyclopropylmethanol and cyclopropylphenol products was determined. The results are consistent with selective orientation of the two enantiomeric substrates in the hydrophobic cavity at the active site of sMMO, specific models for which were examined by molecular modeling.

  16. Hydrophobic substances induce water stress in microbial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhaganna, Prashanth; Volkers, Rita J. M.; Bell, Andrew N. W.; Kluge, Kathrin; Timson, David J.; McGrath, John W.; Ruijssenaars, Harald J.; Hallsworth, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitous noxious hydrophobic substances, such as hydrocarbons, pesticides and diverse industrial chemicals, stress biological systems and thereby affect their ability to mediate biosphere functions like element and energy cycling vital to biosphere health. Such chemically diverse compounds may have distinct toxic activities for cellular systems; they may also share a common mechanism of stress induction mediated by their hydrophobicity. We hypothesized that the stressful effects of, and cellular adaptations to, hydrophobic stressors operate at the level of water : macromolecule interactions. Here, we present evidence that: (i) hydrocarbons reduce structural interactions within and between cellular macromolecules, (ii) organic compatible solutes – metabolites that protect against osmotic and chaotrope‐induced stresses – ameliorate this effect, (iii) toxic hydrophobic substances induce a potent form of water stress in macromolecular and cellular systems, and (iv) the stress mechanism of, and cellular responses to, hydrophobic substances are remarkably similar to those associated with chaotrope‐induced water stress. These findings suggest that it may be possible to devise new interventions for microbial processes in both natural environments and industrial reactors to expand microbial tolerance of hydrophobic substances, and hence the biotic windows for such processes. PMID:21255365

  17. Peptide adsorption on the hydrophobic surface: A free energy perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yuebiao; Wang, Wei; Chen, P.

    2011-05-01

    Protein adsorption is a very attractive topic which relates to many novel applications in biomaterials, biotechnology and nanotechnology. Ionic complementary peptides are a group of novel nano-biomaterials with many biomedical applications. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations of the ionic-complementary peptide EAK16-II on a hydrophobic graphite surface were performed under neutral, acidic and basic solution conditions. Adsorption free energy contour maps were obtained by analyzing the dynamical trajectories. Hydrophobic interactions were found to govern the adsorption of the first peptide molecule, and both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contributed to the adsorption of the second peptide molecule. Especially under acidic and basic solution conditions, interplay existed among chain-chain hydrophobic, chain-surface hydrophobic and chain-chain electrostatic interactions during the adsorption of the second peptide molecule. Non-charged residues were found to lie on the graphite surface, while charged residue side-chains oriented towards the solution after the peptide deposited on the surface. These results provide a basis for understanding peptide adsorption on the hydrophobic surface under different solution conditions, which is useful for novel applications such as bioactive implant devices and drug delivery material design.

  18. Hydrophobic Collapse of Trigger Factor Monomer in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Kushagra; Vreede, Jocelyne; Mashaghi, Alireza; Tans, Sander J.; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is a chaperone, found in bacterial cells and chloroplasts, that interacts with nascent polypeptide chains to suppress aggregation. While its crystal structure has been resolved, the solution structure and dynamics are largely unknown. We performed multiple molecular dynamics simulations on Trigger factor in solution, and show that its tertiary domains display collective motions hinged about inter-domain linkers with minimal or no loss in secondary structure. Moreover, we find that isolated TF typically adopts a collapsed state, with the formation of domain pairs. This collapse of TF in solution is induced by hydrophobic interactions and stabilised by hydrophilic contacts. To determine the nature of the domain interactions, we analysed the hydrophobicity of the domain surfaces by using the hydrophobic probe method of Acharya et al. [1], [2], as the standard hydrophobicity scales predictions are limited due to the complex environment. We find that the formation of domain pairs changes the hydrophobic map of TF, making the N-terminal and arm2 domain pair more hydrophilic and the head and arm1 domain pair more hydrophobic. These insights into the dynamics and interactions of the TF domains are important to eventually understand chaperone-substrate interactions and chaperone function. PMID:23565160

  19. Vector description of electric and hydrophobic interactions in protein homodimers.

    PubMed

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    This article describes the formation of homodimers from their constituting monomers, based on the rules set by a simple model of electric and hydrophobic interactions. These interactions are described in terms of the electric dipole moment (D) and hydrophobic moment vectors (H) of proteins. The distribution of angles formed by the two dipole moments of monomers constituting dimers were analysed, as well as the distribution of angles formed by the two hydrophobic moments. When these distributions were fitted to Gaussian curves, it was found that for biological dimers, the D vectors tend mostly to adopt a perpendicular arrangement with respect to each other, in which the constituting dipoles have the least interaction. A minor population tends towards an antiparallel arrangement implying maximum electric attraction. Also in biological dimers, the H vectors of most monomers tend to interact in such a way that the total hydrophobic moment of the dimer increases with respect to those of the monomers. This shows that hydrophobic moments have a tendency to align. In dimers originating in the crystallisation process, the distribution of angles formed by both hydrophobic and electric dipole moments appeared rather featureless, probably because of unspecific interactions in the crystallisation processes. The model does not describe direct interactions between H and D vectors although the distribution of angles formed by both vectors in dimers was analysed. It was found that in most cases these angles tended to be either small (both moments aligned parallel to each other) or large (antiparallel disposition).

  20. Spontaneous formation of hydrophobic domains in isolated peptides.

    PubMed

    Gloaguen, Eric; Loquais, Yohan; Thomas, Jessica A; Pratt, David W; Mons, Michel

    2013-05-02

    Aromatic amino acids are known for their hydrophobicity and the active role they play in protein folding. Here, we investigate the intrinsic propensity of small peptides to form hydrophobic domains in the absence of solvent water molecules. The structures of three aromatic-rich isolated peptides, Ac-Phe-Phe-NH2 (FF), Ac-Trp-Tyr-NH2 (WY), and Ac-Phe-Phe-Phe-NH2 (FFF), all in the gas phase, have been studied by infrared-ultraviolet (IR/UV) double resonance laser spectroscopy, aided by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. Spontaneous formation of hydrophobic domains is systematically observed, whatever the secondary structure adopted by the backbone. Various types of aromatic-aromatic arrangements have been identified and associated to specific secondary structures, illustrating the interplay between the hydrophobic clusters and the backbone. Backbone NH amide groups surrounded by aromatic rings have also been evidenced and are found to contribute significantly to the stabilization of aromatic pairs. These results suggest that the formation of aromatic clusters involving contiguous residues might be a very efficient process leading to the formation of hydrophobic domains in the early stages of protein folding, well before a hydrophobic collapse into the tertiary structure.

  1. Hydrophobicity of protein surfaces: Separating geometry from chemistry.

    PubMed

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Lopez, Carlos F; Rossky, Peter J; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2008-02-19

    To better understand the role of surface chemical heterogeneity in natural nanoscale hydration, we study via molecular dynamics simulation the structure and thermodynamics of water confined between two protein-like surfaces. Each surface is constructed to have interactions with water corresponding to those of the putative hydrophobic surface of a melittin dimer, but is flattened rather than having its native "cupped" configuration. Furthermore, peripheral charged groups are removed. Thus, the role of a rough surface topography is removed, and results can be productively compared with those previously observed for idealized, atomically smooth hydrophilic and hydrophobic flat surfaces. The results indicate that the protein surface is less hydrophobic than the idealized counterpart. The density and compressibility of water adjacent to a melittin dimer is intermediate between that observed adjacent to idealized hydrophobic or hydrophilic surfaces. We find that solvent evacuation of the hydrophobic gap (cavitation) between dimers is observed when the gap has closed to sterically permit a single water layer. This cavitation occurs at smaller pressures and separations than in the case of idealized hydrophobic flat surfaces. The vapor phase between the melittin dimers occupies a much smaller lateral region than in the case of the idealized surfaces; cavitation is localized in a narrow central region between the dimers, where an apolar amino acid is located. When that amino acid is replaced by a polar residue, cavitation is no longer observed.

  2. Ions and hydrogen bonding in a hydrophobic environment: CCl(4).

    PubMed

    Bisson, Patrick; Xiao, Han; Kuo, Margaret; Kamelamela, Noe; Shultz, Mary Jane

    2010-04-01

    It is generally expected that ions in an aqueous ionic solution in contact with a hydrophobic phase enter the hydrophobic phase accompanied by a hydration shell. This expectation suggests that the ion mole fraction in the hydrophobic phase is less than, or at most, equal to that of water. Both gravimetric and spectroscopic evidence shows that for a model hydrophobic phase, carbon tetrachloride, this is not the case: In contact with a 1 M simple salt solution (sodium or potassium halide), the salt concentration in carbon tetrachloride ranges from 1.4 to nearly 3 times that of water. Infrared spectra of the OH stretch region support a model in which water associates with the cation, primarily as water monomers. Salts containing larger, more polarizable anions can form outer-sphere ion pairs that support water dimers, giving rise to a spectral signature at 3440 cm(-1). In CCl(4), the infrared spectral signature of the normally strongly ionized acid HCl clearly shows the presence of molecular HCl. Additionally, the presence of a Q branch for HCl indicates restricted rotational motion. The spectral and gravimetric data provide compelling evidence for ion clusters in the hydrophobic phase, which is a result that may have implications for hydrophobic matter in both biological and environmental systems.

  3. Transmembrane passage of hydrophobic compounds through a protein channel wall.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Elizabeth M; Patel, Dimki R; Lepore, Bryan W; Indic, Mridhu; van den Berg, Bert

    2009-03-19

    Membrane proteins that transport hydrophobic compounds have important roles in multi-drug resistance and can cause a number of diseases, underscoring the importance of protein-mediated transport of hydrophobic compounds. Hydrophobic compounds readily partition into regular membrane lipid bilayers, and their transport through an aqueous protein channel is energetically unfavourable. Alternative transport models involving acquisition from the lipid bilayer by lateral diffusion have been proposed for hydrophobic substrates. So far, all transport proteins for which a lateral diffusion mechanism has been proposed function as efflux pumps. Here we present the first example of a lateral diffusion mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by the Escherichia coli outer membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL. A FadL mutant in which a lateral opening in the barrel wall is constricted, but which is otherwise structurally identical to wild-type FadL, does not transport substrates. A crystal structure of FadL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa shows that the opening in the wall of the beta-barrel is conserved and delineates a long, hydrophobic tunnel that could mediate substrate passage from the extracellular environment, through the polar lipopolysaccharide layer and, by means of the lateral opening in the barrel wall, into the lipid bilayer from where the substrate can diffuse into the periplasm. Because FadL homologues are found in pathogenic and biodegrading bacteria, our results have implications for combating bacterial infections and bioremediating xenobiotics in the environment.

  4. Highly hydrophobic materials for ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takebe, Yoko; Shirota, Naoko; Sasaki, Takashi; Murata, Koichi; Yokokoji, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    In immersion lithography, the impact of water on resist performance and the possibility of damage to the lens by the components eluted from the resist material are seriously concern. And much work has shown that controlling the water-resist interface is critical to enabling high scan rates. Many topcoat materials have been developed to control the aforementioned interfacial properties. Developable topcoats have been particularly investigated as suitable candidates for its applicability to the resist developing process. Achieving the balance between the low surface energy required for higher receding contact angle and the base solubility for topcoat removal is challenging. We have already reported FUGU polymer which have partially fluorinated monocyclic structure and hexafluoroalcohol(HFA) group and showed that its developer solubility was excellent but hydrophobicity was insufficient for high scan rate. We have also reported that co-polymers of FUGU and highly fluorinated monomers which have perfluorinated cyclic structure had sufficient hydrophobicity but lower developer solubility. We have found that it was difficult to use these copolymers in themselves as topcoat. But by blending of moderate amount of these copolymers into FUGU polymer, we have finally obtained highly hydrophobic developer-soluble topcoat. Hydrophobicity can be controlled by blending ratio. Furthermore we have newly successfully synthesized a series of fluoropolymers, FIT polymer partially fluorinated monocyclic structure and having carboxylic acid group as developer-soluble unit. When FIT polymer as well as FUGU polymer, was blended to highly hydrophobic copolymer, the blended polymer also showed higher hydrophobicity keeping sufficient developer solubility.

  5. Why water reorientation slows without iceberg formation around hydrophobic solutes.

    PubMed

    Laage, Damien; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Hynes, James T

    2009-02-26

    The dynamics of water molecules next to hydrophobic solutes is investigated, specifically addressing the recent controversy raised by the first time-resolved observations, which concluded that some water molecules are immobilized by hydrophobic groups, in strong contrast to previous NMR conclusions. Through molecular dynamics simulations and an analytic jump reorientation model, we identify the water reorientation mechanism next to a hydrophobic solute and provide evidence that no water molecules are immobilized by hydrophobic solutes. Their moderate rotational slowdown compared to bulk water (e.g., by a factor of less than 2 at low solute concentration) is mainly due to slower hydrogen-bond exchange. The slowdown is quantitatively described by a solute excluded volume effect at the transition state for the key hydrogen-bond exchange in the reorientation mechanism. We show that this picture is consistent with both ultrafast anisotropy and NMR experimental results and that the transition state excluded volume theory yields quantitative predictions of the rotational slowdown for diverse hydrophobic solutes of varying size over a wide concentration range. We also explain why hydrophobic groups slow water reorientation less than do some hydrophilic groups.

  6. Mechanisms for Enhanced Hydrophobicity by Atomic-Scale Roughness

    PubMed Central

    Katasho, Yumi; Liang, Yunfeng; Murata, Sumihiko; Fukunaka, Yasuhiro; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the close-packed CF3-terminated solid surface is among the most hydrophobic surfaces in nature. Molecular dynamic simulations show that this hydrophobicity can be further enhanced by the atomic-scale roughness. Consequently, the hydrophobic gap width is enlarged to about 0.6 nm for roughened CF3-terminated solid surfaces. In contrast, the hydrophobic gap width does not increase too much for a rough CH3-terminated solid surface. We show that the CF3-terminated surface exists in a microscopic Cassie–Baxter state, whereas the CH3-terminated surface exists as a microscopic Wenzel state. This finding elucidates the underlying mechanism for the different widths of the observed hydrophobic gap. The cage structure of the water molecules (with integrated hydrogen bonds) around CH3 terminal assemblies on the solid surface provides an explanation for the mechanism by which the CH3-terminated surface is less hydrophobic than the CF3-terminated surface. PMID:26337567

  7. Condensation Dynamics on Mimicked Metal Matrix Hydrophobic Nanoparticle-Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damle, Viraj; Sun, Xiaoda; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    Use of hydrophobic surfaces promotes condensation in the dropwise mode, which is significantly more efficient than the common filmwise mode. However, limited longevity of hydrophobic surface modifiers has prevented their wide spread use in industry. Recently, metal matrix composites (MMCs) having microscale hydrophobic heterogeneities dispersed in hydrophilic metal matrix have been proposed as durable and self-healing alternative to hydrophobic surface coatings interacting with deposited water droplets. While dispersion of hydrophobic microparticles in MMC is likely to lead to surface flooding during condensation, the effect of dispersion of hydrophobic nanoparticles (HNPs) with size comparable to water nuclei critical radii and spacing is not obvious. To this end, we fabricated highly ordered arrays of Teflon nanospheres on silicon substrates that mimic the top surface of the MMCs with dispersed HNPs. We used light and electron microscopy to observe breath figures resulting from condensation on these surfaces at varied degrees of subcooling. Here, we discuss the relation between the droplet size distribution, Teflon nanosphere diameter and spacing, and condensation mode. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU.

  8. Transmembrane Passage of Hydrophobic Compounds Through a Protein Channel Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn, E.; Patel, D; Lepore, D; Indic, M; van den Berg, B

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins that transport hydrophobic compounds have important roles in multi-drug resistance and can cause a number of diseases, underscoring the importance of protein-mediated transport of hydrophobic compounds. Hydrophobic compounds readily partition into regular membrane lipid bilayers, and their transport through an aqueous protein channel is energetically unfavourable3. Alternative transport models involving acquisition from the lipid bilayer by lateral diffusion have been proposed for hydrophobic substrates. So far, all transport proteins for which a lateral diffusion mechanism has been proposed function as efflux pumps. Here we present the first example of a lateral diffusion mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by the Escherichia coli outer membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL. A FadL mutant in which a lateral opening in the barrel wall is constricted, but which is otherwise structurally identical to wild-type FadL, does not transport substrates. A crystal structure of FadL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa shows that the opening in the wall of the {beta}-barrel is conserved and delineates a long, hydrophobic tunnel that could mediate substrate passage from the extracellular environment, through the polar lipopolysaccharide layer and, by means of the lateral opening in the barrel wall, into the lipid bilayer from where the substrate can diffuse into the periplasm. Because FadL homologues are found in pathogenic and biodegrading bacteria, our results have implications for combating bacterial infections and bioremediating xenobiotics in the environment.

  9. Microplastics as a vector of hydrophobic contaminants: Importance of hydrophobic additives.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung-Hwan; Chang, Sein; Hong, Sang Hee; Shim, Won Joon

    2017-05-01

    Despite a recent boom in research on the environmental fate, distribution, and harmful effects of chemical substances associated with marine plastic debris, no consensus has been reached on whether chemicals originating from microplastics cause serious environmental harm. For the risk assessment of chemical contaminants associated with microplastics, it would be useful to group organic chemicals into 2 categories: additives and nonadditives. Whereas plastic particles are not likely to be diffuse sources of chemicals that are not intentionally added to plastic products, continuous leaching of additives would result in higher concentrations, at least at a local scale. Unlike plasticizers and flame retardants, which have been relatively well investigated, antioxidants and photostabilizers have been rarely studied, even though many of them are highly hydrophobic and are not readily biodegradable. More research on the fate and effects of chemicals via microplastics should focus on those additives. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:494-499. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  10. REVERSIBILITY OF RADICAL-OLEFIN REACTIONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ALKENES, *STYRENES, *POLYVINYL CHLORIDE, CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM, POLYMERIZATION, POLYMERIZATION, FREE RADICALS , MOLECULAR ISOMERISM, TRACER STUDIES, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, DECOMPOSITION, SYNTHESIS(CHEMISTRY).

  11. Free-radical chemistry of sulfite.

    PubMed Central

    Neta, P; Huie, R E

    1985-01-01

    The free-radical chemistry of sulfite oxidation is reviewed. Chemical transformations of organic and biological molecules induced by sulfite oxidation are summarized. The kinetics of the free-radical oxidations of sulfite are discussed, as are the kinetics of the reactions of the sulfite-derived radicals SO3 and the peroxy derivative SO5 with organic compounds. PMID:3830699

  12. REACTIONS OF FREE RADICALS CONTAINING NITROGEN.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    deduced. The reactions of methyl and ethyl radicals with a variety of amino compounds were studied. The reactions of difluoroamino radicals in the...Hydrazines, Anilines and Cyanides were pyrolysed and the heats of formation of the resultant radicals and the strengths of the bonds formed by them

  13. The Radical Axis: A Motion Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGivney, Ray; McKim, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Interesting problems sometimes have surprising sources. In this paper we take an innocent looking problem from a calculus book and rediscover the radical axis of classical geometry. For intersecting circles the radical axis is the line through the two points of intersection. For nonintersecting, nonconcentric circles, the radical axis still…

  14. Surfactant Facilitated Spreading of Aqueous Drops on Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Couzis, Alex; Maldarelli, Charles; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity technologies often require aqueous phases to spread over nonwetting hydrophobic solid/surfaces. At a hydrophobic surface, the air/hydrophobic solid tension is low, and the solid/aqueous tension is high. A large contact angle forms as the aqueous/air tension acts together with the solid/air tension to balance the large solid/aqueous tension. The aqueous phase, instead of spreading, is held in a meniscus by the large angle. Surfactants facilitate the wetting of water on hydrophobic surfaces by adsorbing on the water/air and hydrophobic solid/water interfaces and lowering the surface tensions of these interfaces. The tension reductions decrease the contact angle, which increases the equilibrium wetted area. Hydrocarbon surfactants (i.e. amphiphiles with a hydrophobic chain of methylene groups attached to a large polar group to give aqueous solubility) do not reduce significantly the contact angles of the very hydrophobic surfaces such as parafilm or polyethylene. Trisiloxane surfactants (amphiphiles with a hydrophobe consisting of methyl groups linked to a trisiloxane backbone in the form of a disk ((CH3)3-Si-O-Si-O-Si(CH3)3)) and an extended ethoxylate (-(OCH2CH2)n-) polar group in the form of a chain with seven or eight units) can significantly reduce the contact angle of water on a very hydrophobic surface and cause rapid and complete (or nearly complete) spreading (lermed superspreading). The overall goal of the research described in this proposal is to establish and verify a theory for how trisiloxanes cause superspreading, and then use this knowledge as a guide to developing more general hydrocarbon based surfactant systems which superspread and can be used in microgravity. We propose that the trisiloxane surfactants superspread when the siloxane adsorbs, the hydrophobic disk parts of the molecule adsorb onto the surface removing the surface water. Since the cross sectional area of the disk is larger than that of the extended ethoxylate chain, the

  15. Surfactant Facilitated Spreading of Aqueous Drops on Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Couzis, Alex; Maldarelli, Charles; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity technologies often require aqueous phases to spread over nonwetting hydrophobic solid/surfaces. At a hydrophobic surface, the air/hydrophobic solid tension is low, and the solid/aqueous tension is high. A large contact angle forms as the aqueous/air tension acts together with the solid/air tension to balance the large solid/aqueous tension. The aqueous phase, instead of spreading, is held in a meniscus by the large angle. Surfactants facilitate the wetting of water on hydrophobic surfaces by adsorbing on the water/air and hydrophobic solid/water interfaces and lowering the surface tensions of these interfaces. The tension reductions decrease the contact angle, which increases the equilibrium wetted area. Hydrocarbon surfactants (i.e. amphiphiles with a hydrophobic chain of methylene groups attached to a large polar group to give aqueous solubility) do not reduce significantly the contact angles of the very hydrophobic surfaces such as parafilm or polyethylene. Trisiloxane surfactants (amphiphiles with a hydrophobe consisting of methyl groups linked to a trisiloxane backbone in the form of a disk ((CH3)3-Si-O-Si-O-Si(CH3)3)) and an extended ethoxylate (-(OCH2CH2)n-) polar group in the form of a chain with seven or eight units) can significantly reduce the contact angle of water on a very hydrophobic surface and cause rapid and complete (or nearly complete) spreading (lermed superspreading). The overall goal of the research described in this proposal is to establish and verify a theory for how trisiloxanes cause superspreading, and then use this knowledge as a guide to developing more general hydrocarbon based surfactant systems which superspread and can be used in microgravity. We propose that the trisiloxane surfactants superspread when the siloxane adsorbs, the hydrophobic disk parts of the molecule adsorb onto the surface removing the surface water. Since the cross sectional area of the disk is larger than that of the extended ethoxylate chain, the

  16. Highly durable photochromic radical complexes having no steric protections of radicals.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoichi; Mishima, Yasuhiro; Mutoh, Katsuya; Abe, Jiro

    2017-04-21

    Steric protection groups are usually necessary for stable radicals. However, here, we developed novel photochromic radical complexes which generate sterically unprotected imidazolyl and phenoxyl radicals upon UV light irradiation based on the phenoxyl-imidazolyl radical complex (PIC) framework. These photochromic compounds show excellent durability against repeated irradiation of intense nanosecond laser pulses even in polar protic solvents, such as ethanol.

  17. Rhodopsin/Lipid Hydrophobic Matching—Rhodopsin Oligomerization and Function

    PubMed Central

    Soubias, Olivier; Teague, Walter E.; Hines, Kirk G.; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Lipid composition of the membrane and rhodopsin packing density strongly modulate the early steps of the visual response of photoreceptor membranes. In this study, lipid-order and bovine rhodopsin function in proteoliposomes composed of the sn-1 chain perdeuterated lipids 14:0d27-14:1-PC, 16:0d31-16:1-PC, 18:0d35-18:1-PC, or 20:0d39-20:1-PC at rhodopsin/lipid molar ratios from 1:70 to 1:1000 (mol/mol) were investigated. Clear evidence for matching of hydrophobic regions on rhodopsin transmembrane helices and hydrophobic thickness of lipid bilayers was observed from 2H nuclear magnetic resonance order parameter measurements at low rhodopsin concentrations. Thin bilayers stretched to match the length of transmembrane helices observed as increase of sn-1 chain order, while thicker bilayers were compressed near the protein. A quantitative analysis of lipid-order parameter changes suggested that the protein adjusts its conformation to bilayer hydrophobic thickness as well, which confirmed our earlier circular-dichroism measurements. Changes in lipid order parameters upon rhodopsin incorporation vanished for bilayers with a hydrophobic thickness of 27 ± 1 Å, suggesting that this is the bilayer thickness at which rhodopsin packs in bilayers at the lowest membrane perturbation. The lipid-order parameter studies also indicated that a hydrophobic mismatch between rhodopsin and lipids triggers rhodopsin oligomerization with increasing rhodopsin concentrations. Both hydrophobic mismatch and rhodopsin oligomerization result in substantial shifts of the equilibrium between the photointermediates metarhodopsin I and metarhodopsin II; increasing bilayer thickness favors formation of metarhodopsin II while oligomerization favors metarhodopsin I. The results highlight the importance of hydrophobic matching for rhodopsin structure, oligomerization, and function. PMID:25762324

  18. Single water entropy: hydrophobic crossover and application to drug binding.

    PubMed

    Sasikala, Wilbee D; Mukherjee, Arnab

    2014-09-11

    Entropy of water plays an important role in both chemical and biological processes e.g. hydrophobic effect, molecular recognition etc. Here we use a new approach to calculate translational and rotational entropy of the individual water molecules around different hydrophobic and charged solutes. We show that for small hydrophobic solutes, the translational and rotational entropies of each water molecule increase as a function of its distance from the solute reaching finally to a constant bulk value. As the size of the solute increases (0.746 nm), the behavior of the translational entropy is opposite; water molecules closest to the solute have higher entropy that reduces with distance from the solute. This indicates that there is a crossover in translational entropy of water molecules around hydrophobic solutes from negative to positive values as the size of the solute is increased. Rotational entropy of water molecules around hydrophobic solutes for all sizes increases with distance from the solute, indicating the absence of crossover in rotational entropy. This makes the crossover in total entropy (translation + rotation) of water molecule happen at much larger size (>1.5 nm) for hydrophobic solutes. Translational entropy of single water molecule scales logarithmically (Str(QH) = C + kB ln V), with the volume V obtained from the ellipsoid of inertia. We further discuss the origin of higher entropy of water around water and show the possibility of recovering the entropy loss of some hypothetical solutes. The results obtained are helpful to understand water entropy behavior around various hydrophobic and charged environments within biomolecules. Finally, we show how our approach can be used to calculate the entropy of the individual water molecules in a protein cavity that may be replaced during ligand binding.

  19. Mutagenicity of Oxygen Free Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Carmella S.; Hassan, Hosni M.

    1982-05-01

    Paraquat 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride) was used as an intracellular generator of oxygen free radicals and was found to be highly mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium. It caused both base-pair substitution and frameshift mutations. Paraquat was much more toxic and mutagenic in a simple nutritionally restricted medium than in a rich complex medium. The mutagenicity of paraquat was dependent upon the presence of a supply of both electrons and oxygen. Cells containing high levels of superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) were more resistant to the toxicity and the mutagenicity of paraquat than were cells containing normal levels of this enzyme. The mutagenicity of paraquat thus appears to be due to its ability to exacerbate the intracellular production of superoxide radicals.

  20. Geoscientists and the Radical Middle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Addressing the great challenges facing society requires industry, government, and academia to work together. I call this overlap space, where compromises are made and real solutions determined, the Radical Middle. Radical because it can appear at times as if the loudest and most publicly influential voices lie outside of the actual solution space, content to provoke but not problem-solve. One key area where geoscientists can play a lead role in the Radical Middle is in the overlap between energy, the environment, and the economy. Globally, fossil fuels still represent 85% of the aggregate energy mix. As existing conventional oil and natural-gas reservoir production continues to slowly decline, unconventional reservoirs, led today by shale and other more expensive resources, will represent a growing part of the oil and gas production mix. Many of these unconventional reservoirs require hydraulic fracturing. The positive economic impact of hydraulic fracturing and associated natural gas and oil production on the United States economy is well documented and undeniable. Yet there are environmental concerns about fracking, and some states and nations have imposed moratoria. This energy-environment-economy space is ideal for leadership from the geosciences. Another such overlap space is the potential for geoscience leadership in relations with China, whose economy and global presence continue to expand. Although China is building major hydropower and natural-gas power plants, as well as nuclear reactors, coal is still king—with the associated environmental impacts. Carbon sequestration—onshore in brine and to enhance oil recovery, as well as offshore—could prove viable. It is vital that educated and objective geoscientists from industry, government, and academia leave their corners and work together in the Radical Middle to educate the public and develop and deliver balanced, economically sensible energy and environmental strategies.

  1. Radical Islam in East Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    carrying out operations. The documents paint a portrait of al-Qaeda cells operating freely in Kenya without concern about being monitored or detained...against Ethiopian Christians.80 For the United States, the Ethiopian occupation has removed the immediate problem of a radical ICU faction sheltering...the U.S. decision to support the Ethiopian invasion and occupation of 8 William Reno, review of monograph. 9 International Crisis Group, Counter

  2. Hydroxyl radical detection in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chevion, M.; Floyd, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Hydroxyl radicals have been implicated as the actual species responsible for the deleterious effects of active oxygen in biology. However, in most cases, its presence has only been inferred by circumstantial evidence. Using electrochemical detection coupled to HPLC separation technique the authors can identify and quantitate (at sub-picomole level) the hydroxylated products of 3 aromatic compounds (phenol, salicylate, and 2-deoxy-guanosine) as a direct measure of hydroxyl radical formation. Firstly, the authors showed that mixing ascorbate with copper ions (in the absence of presence of a protein) yields catechols, dihydroxybenzoic acids and 8-OH-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG). This approach has been used to study the formation of OH in vivo. Human granulocytes stimulated with TPA showed that 8-OHdG was formed in the cellular DNA at high levels (one 8-OHdG/800 DNA bases). Unstimulated granulocytes contained 8-OHdG below detection level. Formation of 8-OHdG in the TPA-stimulated granulocytes DNA was decreased by the addition of SOD and catalase. Using salicylate as an in vivo scavenger of hydroxyl radicals the authors showed that the level of trapped-dihydroxybenzoic acids is increased approx.8 and approx.3 fold in the lungs and liver of paraquat-poisoned mice, respectively, as compared to normal animals. Similarly, the detected level of dihydroxybenzoic acids in the hearts of adriamycin-treated rats was increased over 100-fold as compared to the hearts of control animals.

  3. A radical way to burn

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1996-08-01

    By manipulating chamber geometries as well as engine cycle pressures and timing, engineers are exploiting a long-obscure technology known as activated radical combustion. Piston-driven internal combustion engines generally come in two varieties: compression-ignited diesels and spark-ignited gasoline power plants. There, is however, a third way to initiate burning of the fuel-air mixture. The technique--variously called radical ignition (RI), activated radical (AR) combustion, Toyota-Soken combustion, and active thermo-atmosphere combustion--is not exactly new, but only recently have engineers begun to exploit the process in practical power plants. These new units include a lightweight two-stroke racing-motorcycle engine, truck diesels with reduced soot output, and lean-burn spark-ignited car engines. This long-obscure combustion process is based on a range of specialized chemical kinetic and physical acoustic techniques developed over decades. Engineers manipulate fundamental combustion parameter such as chamber geometries, valving and porting configurations, and engine cycle pressures and timing to foster the formation of certain highly reactive chemical species that lower the fuel-air mixture`s flash point so that even modest compression make sit self-ignite. These chemical initiators are then retained into the next cycle to start combustion, allowing the engineer to run stably with no spark.

  4. Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi

    1996-10-01

    The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

  5. Chemistry of The Oio Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, M.; Ashworth, S. H.; Plane, J. M. C.

    This paper will describe a laboratory study of the chemistry that the OIO radical under- goes in the marine boundary layer. The radical was produced by the pulsed photolysis at 193 nm of a N2O/CF3I mixture. The resulting OIO radicals, formed by the self- reaction of IO, were then observed by time-resolved cavity ringdown spectroscopy, using the vibrational bands between 540 and 620 nm. A high resoluting spectral scan found no rotational structure in these bands, indicating that the upper state of this electronic transition is predissociative (lifetime = 150 fs). Ab initio quantum calcula- tions indicate that I + O2 is formed, and this was confirmed by adding a third laser to photolyse OIO as a function of wavelength, with detection of atomic I by resonance fluorescence at 178 nm. This system was also used to measure the absolute absorption cross-section of OIO (1.6 x 10(-17) cm2 at 568 nm). The photodissociation lifetime of OIO is about 0.5 s at midday. Although of minor atmospheric importance, the reac- tions of OIO with NO and OH will also be discussed.

  6. 4.6.1 Acyl and related radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, A. L. J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  7. 4.5.2.2 Radicals from bridged rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A1 `Inorganic Radicals, Metal Complexes and Nonconjugated Carbon Centered Radicals' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  8. Free-radical-mediated DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J

    1985-01-01

    Free-radical metabolites can be generated metabolically by a one-electron reductase-catalyzed reaction or a "peroxidase" catalyzed oxidation or by photoactivation of a wide variety of aromatic xenobiotics. Radicals may also be generated during lipid peroxidation. Some radicals can react with DNA or bind covalently or noncovalently as a dismutation product or as a dimer, trimer or polymeric product. Modification to the DNA can result in single-strand breaks, loss of template activity, and crosslinking. The binding can prevent enzymic digestion. In some cases, the radicals react with oxygen, resulting before conversion to DNA reactive oxygen species. Most radicals probably do not interact with DNA. PMID:3007090

  9. Compatibility assessment of methods used for soil hydrophobicity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papierowska, Ewa; Szatyłowicz, Jan; Kalisz, Barbara; Łachacz, Andrzej; Matysiak, Wojciech; Debaene, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Soil hydrophobicity is a global problem. Effect of hydrophobicity on the soil environment is very important, because it can cause irreversible changes in ecosystems, leading to their complete degradation. The choice of method used to determine soil hydrophobicity is not simple because there is no obvious criteria for their selection. The results obtained by various methods may not be coherent and may indicate different degrees of hydrophobicity within the same soil sample. The objective of the study was to assess the compatibility between methods used to determine the hydrophobicity of selected organic and mineral-organic soils. Two groups of soil materials were examined: hydrogenic (87 soil samples) and autogenic soils (19 soil samples) collected from 41 soil profiles located in north-eastern Poland. Air-dry soil samples were used. Hydrophobicity was determined using two different methods i.e. on the basis of wetting contact angle measurements between water and solid phase of soils and with water drop penetration time tests. The value of the wetting contact angle was measured using the sessile drop method with optical goniometer CAM 100 (KSV Instruments). The wetting contact angles were determined at room temperature (20° C) within 10 min after sample preparation using standard procedure. In addition, water drop penetration time was measured. In order to compare the methods used for the assessment of soil hydrophobicity, the agreement between observers model was applied. In this model five categories of soil hydrophobicity were proposed according to the class used in the soil hydrofobicity classification based on water drop penetration time test. Based on this classification the values of the weighted kappa coefficients were calculated using SAS 9.4 (SAS Institute, 2013, Cary NC) for evaluating relationships between between the different investigated methods. The results of agreement were presented in forms of agreement charts. Research results indicated good

  10. How protein chemists learned about the hydrophobic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanford, C.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted today that the hydrophobic force is the dominant energetic factor that leads to the folding of polypeptide chains into compact globular entities. This principle was first explicitly introduced to protein chemists in 1938 by Irving Langmuir, past master in the application of hydrophobicity to other problems, and was enthusiastically endorsed by J.D. Bernal. But both proposal and endorsement came in the course of a debate about a quite different structural principle, the so-called "cyclol hypothesis" proposed by D. Wrinch, which soon proved to be theoretically and experimentally unsupportable. Being a more tangible idea, directly expressed in structural terms, the cyclol hypothesis received more attention than the hydrophobic principle and the latter never actually entered the mainstream of protein science until 1959, when it was thrust into the limelight in a lucid review by W. Kauzmann. A theoretical paper by H.S. Frank and M. Evans, not itself related to protein folding, probably played a major role in the acceptance of the hydrophobicity concept by protein chemists because it provided a crude but tangible picture of the origin of hydrophobicity per se in terms of water structure. PMID:9194199

  11. Biofilm, adherence, and hydrophobicity as virulence factors in Malassezia furfur.

    PubMed

    Angiolella, Letizia; Leone, Claudia; Rojas, Florencia; Mussin, Javier; de Los Angeles Sosa, María; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2017-03-09

    Malassezia species are natural inhabitants of the healthy skin. However, under certain conditions, they may cause or exacerbate several skin diseases. The ability of this fungus to colonize or infect is determined by complex interactions between the fungal cell and its virulence factors. This study aims to evaluate "in vitro" the hydrophobicity levels, the adherence on a plastic surface and the biofilm formation of 16 clinical isolates of Malassezia furfur. Cellular surface hydrophobicity (CSH) levels were determined by two-phase system. The biofilm formation was determined by tetrazolium salt (XTT) reduction assay and by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Results showed many isolates were hydrophobic, adherent, and producers of biofilm on abiotic surfaces with different capacity. SEM observations confirmed an abundant extracellular matrix after 48 h of biofilm formation. About 63% of strains with high production of biofilm showed medium to high percentage of hydrophobicity and/or adherence. In addition, it has been demonstrated a correlation between hydrophobicity, adherence, and biofilm formation in about 60% of strains examined. These important virulence factors could be responsible of this yeast changing from a commensal to a pathogenic status.

  12. Characterization method of hydrophobic anti-icing coatings.

    PubMed

    Morita, Katsuaki; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    For anti-icing, supercooled water should be removed before frozen onto the contact surface. We use a hydrophobic coating for anti-icing and introduce the static- and dynamic-evaluation methods. The methods describe the contact surface between the hydrophobic surface and a supercooled-water droplet. The former is based on the contact angle, and the latter is based on the sliding angle. The temperature factor is included in these models to evaluate the hydrophobic coating under the supercooled conditions. Four hydrophobic coatings are experimentally evaluated based on the static- and dynamic evaluation methods: C1-C3 (commercial fluorocarbon coatings), and Jaxa coating (original fluorocarbon coating). These are evaluated under the supercooled conditions of -10 to 0 °C. The static-evaluation shows variations in the temperature. However, change in the contact angle by the temperature is relatively small compared to that of the sliding angle for the dynamic evaluation. Only C3 and Jaxa coatings are tolerant to the sliding angle under the supercooled conditions tested. The dynamic evaluation shows that even if the coating is hydrophobic, the dynamic evaluation should be included to understand the characteristic of removal for a supercooled-water droplet.

  13. Characterization method of hydrophobic anti-icing coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Katsuaki; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    For anti-icing, supercooled water should be removed before frozen onto the contact surface. We use a hydrophobic coating for anti-icing and introduce the static- and dynamic-evaluation methods. The methods describe the contact surface between the hydrophobic surface and a supercooled-water droplet. The former is based on the contact angle, and the latter is based on the sliding angle. The temperature factor is included in these models to evaluate the hydrophobic coating under the supercooled conditions. Four hydrophobic coatings are experimentally evaluated based on the static- and dynamic evaluation methods: C1-C3 (commercial fluorocarbon coatings), and Jaxa coating (original fluorocarbon coating). These are evaluated under the supercooled conditions of -10 to 0 °C. The static-evaluation shows variations in the temperature. However, change in the contact angle by the temperature is relatively small compared to that of the sliding angle for the dynamic evaluation. Only C3 and Jaxa coatings are tolerant to the sliding angle under the supercooled conditions tested. The dynamic evaluation shows that even if the coating is hydrophobic, the dynamic evaluation should be included to understand the characteristic of removal for a supercooled-water droplet.

  14. Predicting the bioconcentration factor of highly hydrophobic organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rajni; Smith, Carr J

    2014-07-01

    Bioconcentration refers to the process of uptake and buildup of chemicals in living organisms. Experimental measurement of bioconcentration factor (BCF) is time-consuming and expensive, and is not feasible for a large number of chemicals of regulatory concern. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are used for estimating BCF values to help in risk assessment of a chemical. This paper presents the results of a QSAR study conducted to address an important problem encountered in the prediction of the BCF of highly hydrophobic chemicals. A new QSAR model is derived using a dataset of diverse organic chemicals previously tested in a United States Environmental Protection Agency laboratory. It is noted that the linear relationship between the BCF and hydrophobic parameter, i.e., calculated octanol-water partition coefficient (ClogP), breaks down for highly hydrophobic chemicals. The parabolic QSAR equation, log BCF=3.036 ClogP-0.197 ClogP(2)-0.808 MgVol (n=28, r(2)=0.817, q(2)=0.761, s=0.558) (experimental log BCF range=0.44-5.29, ClogP range=3.16-11.27), suggests that a non-linear relationship between BCF and the hydrophobic parameter, along with inclusion of additional molecular size, weight and/or volume parameters, should be considered while developing a QSAR model for more reliable prediction of the BCF of highly hydrophobic chemicals.

  15. Plugging into proteins: poisoning protein function by a hydrophobic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Guanghong; Huang, Qing; Wei, Guanghong; Zhou, Ruhong; Fang, Haiping

    2010-12-28

    Nanoscale particles have become promising materials in many fields, such as cancer therapeutics, diagnosis, imaging, drug delivery, catalysis, as well as biosensors. In order to stimulate and facilitate these applications, there is an urgent need for the understanding of the nanoparticle toxicity and other risks involved with these nanoparticles to human health. In this study, we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the interaction between several proteins (WW domains) and carbon nanotubes (one form of hydrophobic nanoparticles). We have found that the carbon nanotube can plug into the hydrophobic core of proteins to form stable complexes. This plugging of nanotubes disrupts and blocks the active sites of WW domains from binding to the corresponding ligands, thus leading to the loss of the original function of the proteins. The key to this observation is the hydrophobic interaction between the nanoparticle and the hydrophobic residues, particularly tryptophans, in the core of the domain. We believe that these findings might provide a novel route to the nanoparticle toxicity on the molecular level for the hydrophobic nanoparticles.

  16. Autoactivation of blood factor XII at hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Rui; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Vogler, Erwin A

    2006-08-01

    Contact activation of blood factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) in neat-buffer solution is shown not to be specific for anionic hydrophilic procoagulants as proposed by the accepted biochemistry of surface activation. Rather, FXII activation in the presence of plasma proteins leads to an apparent specificity for hydrophilic surfaces that is actually due to a relative diminution of the FXII-->FXIIa reaction at hydrophobic surfaces. FXII activation in neat-buffer solution was effectively instantaneous upon contact with either hydrophilic (fully water-wettable clean glass) or hydrophobic (poorly water-wettable silanized glass) procoagulant particles, with greater FXIIa yield obtained by activation with hydrophobic procoagulants. In sharp contrast, both activation rate and yield was found to be significantly attenuated at hydrophobic surfaces in the presence of plasma proteins. Putative FXIIa produced by surface activation with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic procoagulants was shown to hydrolyze blood factor XI (FXI) to the activated form FXIa (FXIFXIIa-->FXIa) that causes FXI-deficient plasma to rapidly coagulate.

  17. Kinase Regulation by Hydrophobic Spine Assembly in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Lalima G.; Meharena, Hiruy S.; Kannan, Natarajan; Kornev, Alexandr P.

    2014-01-01

    A new model of kinase regulation based on the assembly of hydrophobic spines has been proposed. Changes in their positions can explain the mechanism of kinase activation. Here, we examined mutations in human cancer for clues about the regulation of the hydrophobic spines by focusing initially on mutations to Phe. We identified a selected number of Phe mutations in a small group of kinases that included BRAF, ABL1, and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Testing some of these mutations in BRAF, we found that one of the mutations impaired ATP binding and catalytic activity but promoted noncatalytic allosteric functions. Other Phe mutations functioned to promote constitutive catalytic activity. One of these mutations revealed a previously underappreciated hydrophobic surface that functions to position the dynamic regulatory αC-helix. This supports the key role of the C-helix as a signal integration motif for coordinating multiple elements of the kinase to create an active conformation. The importance of the hydrophobic space around the αC-helix was further tested by studying a V600F mutant, which was constitutively active in the absence of the negative charge that is associated with the common V600E mutation. Many hydrophobic mutations strategically localized along the C-helix can thus drive kinase activation. PMID:25348715

  18. Titration of hydrophobic polyelectrolytes using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Serge; Laguecir, Abohachem; Stoll, Serge

    2005-03-01

    The conformation and titration curves of weak (or annealed) hydrophobic polyelectrolytes have been examined using Monte Carlo simulations with screened Coulomb potentials in the grand canonical ensemble. The influence of the ionic concentration pH and presence of hydrophobic interactions has been systematically investigated. A large number of conformations such as extended, pearl-necklace, cigar-shape, and collapsed structures resulting from the subtle balance of short-range hydrophobic attractive interactions and long-range electrostatic repulsive interactions between the monomers have been observed. Titration curves were calculated by adjusting the pH-pK(0) values (pK(0) represents the intrinsic dissociation constant of an isolated monomer) and then calculating the ionization degree alpha of the polyelectrolyte. Important transitions related to cascades of conformational changes were observed in the titration curves, mainly at low ionic concentration and with the presence of strong hydrophobic interactions. We demonstrated that the presence of hydrophobic interactions plays an important role in the acid-base properties of a polyelectrolyte in promoting the formation of compact conformations and hence decreasing the polyelectrolyte degree of ionization for a given pH-pK(0) value.

  19. Hydrophobic and electrostatic cell surface properties of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Drozd, C; Schwartzbrod, J

    1996-04-01

    Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons and microelectrophoresis were investigated in order to characterize the surface properties of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocysts exhibited low removal rates by octane (only 20% on average), suggesting that the Cryptosporidium sp. does not demonstrate marked hydrophobic properties. A zeta potential close to -25 mV at pH 6 to 6.5 in deionized water was observed for the parasite. Measurements of hydrophobicity and zeta potential were performed as a function of pH and ionic strength or conductivity. Hydrophobicity maxima were observed at extreme pH values, with 40% of adhesion of oocysts to octane. It also appeared that ionic strength (estimated by conductivity) could influence the hydrophobic properties of oocysts. Cryptosporidium oocysts showed a pH-dependent surface charge, with zeta potentials becoming less negative as pH was reduced, starting at -35 mV for alkaline pH and reaching 0 at isoelectric points for pH 2.5. On the other hand, variation of surface charge with respect to conductivity of the suspension tested in this work was quite small. The knowledge of hydrophobic properties and surface charge of the parasite provides information useful in, for example, the choice of various flocculation treatments, membrane filters, and cleaning agents in connection with oocyst recovery.

  20. Protein-induced bilayer perturbations: Lipid ordering and hydrophobic coupling.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Frederic N R; Laursen, Ib; Bohr, Henrik; Nielsen, Claus Hélix

    2009-10-02

    The host lipid bilayer is increasingly being recognized as an important non-specific regulator of membrane protein function. Despite considerable progress the interplay between hydrophobic coupling and lipid ordering is still elusive. We use electron spin resonance (ESR) to study the interaction between the model protein gramicidin and lipid bilayers of varying thickness. The free energy of the interaction is up to -6kJ/mol; thus not strongly favored over lipid-lipid interactions. Incorporation of gramicidin results in increased order parameters with increased protein concentration and hydrophobic mismatch. Our findings also show that at high protein:lipid ratios the lipids are motionally restricted but not completely immobilized. Both exchange on and off rate values for the lipid<-->gramicidin interaction are lowest at optimal hydrophobic matching. Hydrophobic mismatch of few A results in up to 10-fold increased exchange rates as compared to the 'optimal' match situation pointing to the regulatory role of hydrophobic coupling in lipid-protein interactions.

  1. Interplay Between Hydrophobic Effect and Dipole Interactions in Peptide Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Sai; Matysiak, Silvina

    In the past decade, the development of various coarse-grained models for proteins have provided key insights into the driving forces in folding and aggregation.We recently developed a low resolution Water Explicit Polarizable PROtein coarse-grained Model by adding oppositely charged dummy particles inside protein backbone beads.With this model,we were able to achieve significant α/ β secondary structure content,without any added bias.We now extend the model to study peptide aggregation at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface using elastin-like octapeptides (GV)4 as a model system.A condensation-ordering mechanism of aggregation is observed in water.Our results suggest that backbone interpeptide dipolar interactions,not hydrophobicity,plays a more significant role in fibril-like peptide aggregation.We observe a cooperative effect in hydrogen bonding or dipolar interactions, with increase in aggregate size in water and interface.Based on this cooperative effect, we provide a potential explanation for the observed nucleus size in peptide aggregation pathways.Without dipolar particles,peptide aggregation is not observed at the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interface.Thus,the presence of dipoles,not hydrophobicity plays a key role in aggregation observed at hydrophobic interfaces.

  2. Kinase regulation by hydrophobic spine assembly in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiancheng; Ahuja, Lalima G; Meharena, Hiruy S; Kannan, Natarajan; Kornev, Alexandr P; Taylor, Susan S; Shaw, Andrey S

    2015-01-01

    A new model of kinase regulation based on the assembly of hydrophobic spines has been proposed. Changes in their positions can explain the mechanism of kinase activation. Here, we examined mutations in human cancer for clues about the regulation of the hydrophobic spines by focusing initially on mutations to Phe. We identified a selected number of Phe mutations in a small group of kinases that included BRAF, ABL1, and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Testing some of these mutations in BRAF, we found that one of the mutations impaired ATP binding and catalytic activity but promoted noncatalytic allosteric functions. Other Phe mutations functioned to promote constitutive catalytic activity. One of these mutations revealed a previously underappreciated hydrophobic surface that functions to position the dynamic regulatory αC-helix. This supports the key role of the C-helix as a signal integration motif for coordinating multiple elements of the kinase to create an active conformation. The importance of the hydrophobic space around the αC-helix was further tested by studying a V600F mutant, which was constitutively active in the absence of the negative charge that is associated with the common V600E mutation. Many hydrophobic mutations strategically localized along the C-helix can thus drive kinase activation.

  3. Hydrophobic matrix-free graphene-oxide composites with isotropic and nematic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wåhlander, Martin; Nilsson, Fritjof; Carlmark, Anna; Gedde, Ulf W.; Edmondson, Steve; Malmström, Eva

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a novel route to synthesise hydrophobic matrix-free composites of polymer-grafted graphene oxide (GO) showing isotropic or nematic alignment and shape-memory effects. For the first time, a cationic macroinitiator (MI) has been immobilised on anionic GO and subsequently grafted with hydrophobic polymer grafts. Dense grafts of PBA, PBMA and PMMA with a wide range of average graft lengths (MW: 1-440 kDa) were polymerised by surface-initiated controlled radical precipitation polymerisation from the statistical MI. The surface modification is designed similarly to bimodal graft systems, where the cationic MI generates nanoparticle repulsion, similar to dense short grafts, while the long grafts offer miscibility in non-polar environments and cohesion. The state-of-the-art dispersions of grafted GO were in the isotropic state. Transparent and translucent matrix-free GO-composites could be melt-processed directly using only grafted GO. After processing, birefringence due to nematic alignment of grafted GO was observed as a single giant Maltese cross, 3.4 cm across. Permeability models for composites containing aligned 2D-fillers were developed, which were compared with the experimental oxygen permeability data and found to be consistent with isotropic or nematic states. The storage modulus of the matrix-free GO-composites increased with GO content (50% increase at 0.67 wt%), while the significant increases in the thermal stability (up to 130 °C) and the glass transition temperature (up to 17 °C) were dependent on graft length. The tuneable matrix-free GO-composites with rapid thermo-responsive shape-memory effects are promising candidates for a vast range of applications, especially selective membranes and sensors.We demonstrate a novel route to synthesise hydrophobic matrix-free composites of polymer-grafted graphene oxide (GO) showing isotropic or nematic alignment and shape-memory effects. For the first time, a cationic macroinitiator (MI) has been

  4. Oxidative stress, free radicals and protein peroxides.

    PubMed

    Gebicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    Primary free radicals generated under oxidative stress in cells and tissues produce a cascade of reactive secondary radicals, which attack biomolecules with efficiency determined by the reaction rate constants and target concentration. Proteins are prominent targets because they constitute the bulk of the organic content of cells and tissues and react readily with many of the secondary radicals. The reactions commonly lead to the formation of carbon-centered radicals, which generally convert in vivo to peroxyl radicals and finally to semistable hydroperoxides. All of these intermediates can initiate biological damage. This article outlines the advantages of the application of ionizing radiations to studies of radicals, with particular reference to the generation of desired radicals, studies of the kinetics of their reactions and correlating the results with events in biological systems. In one such application, formation of protein hydroperoxides in irradiated cells was inhibited by the intracellular ascorbate and glutathione. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ambiguous anti-fouling surfaces: Facile synthesis by light-mediated radical polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Pester, Christian W.; Poelma, Justin E.; Narupai, Benjaporn; Patel, Shrayesh N.; Su, Gregory M.; Mates, Thomas E.; Luo, Yingdong; Ober, Christopher K.; Hawker, Craig J.; Kramer, Edward J.

    2015-08-06

    In an attempt to create a polymer brush-based platform for the systematic study for anti-biofouling surfaces, the benefits of surface initiated, visible light-mediated radical polymerization are utilized to fabricate well-defined, chemically ambiguously patterned surfaces. A variety of analytical tools are used to illustrate the precise tuning of surface chemistry and thoroughly characterize spatially well-defined, hydrophilic/hydrophobic surfaces composed of poly(ethylene glycol methacrylate) and poly(trifluoroethyl methacrylate) with chemical definition on the micron scale. Advantages of both visible light-mediated photopolymerization and traditional copper-catalyzed atom transfer radical polymerization are combined to achieve both high spatial control and expanded monomer tolerance.

  6. Hydrophobicity exerts different effects on bioavailability and stability of antioxidant peptide fractions from casein during simulated gastrointestinal digestion and Caco-2 cell absorption.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ningning; Wang, Bo; Jiang, Liangping; Liu, Congcong; Li, Bo

    2015-10-01

    Alcalase-treated casein hydrolysates were separated into three hydrophobic chromatography fractions (HC-F1, HC-F2 and HC-F3) using YMC ODS C18 column. Simulated gastrointestinal (GI) digestion (stage I digestion) and Caco-2 cell absorption (stage II digestion) were sequentially applied for producing corresponding digests and adsorbates of collected peptide fractions. ANS probe and reverse-phase (RP)-HPLC were applied to detect peptide hydrophobicity, whereas trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity and oxygen radical antioxidant capacity were used to determine their antioxidant activity. Peptide nitrogen was used to evaluate bioavailability (BA) and remaining peptide content. In addition, RP-HPLC and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were performed to obtain peptide sequences. Results showed that high hydrophobic peptide fractions (HC-F3) had excellent BA and remaining antioxidant activity, but poor digestive stability in stage I digestion. Two peptides, NTVP and IV, were identified from the adsorbate of HC-F3 to be GI-resistant peptides. Therefore, utilizing high hydrophobic peptides from casein as potential functional foods or nutraceuticals was feasible. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Fluorescent graphene oxide via polymer grafting: an efficient nanocarrier for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Aniruddha; Nandi, Sudipta; Das, Pradip; Nandi, Arun K

    2015-02-18

    Functionalized graphene-based drug delivery vehicles have conquered a significant position because functionalization improves its biocompatibility and stability in cell medium, leaving sufficient graphitic basal plane for drug loading through π-π stacking. In this study, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) is covalently grafted from the surface of graphene oxide (GO) via a facile, eco-friendly and an easy procedure of free radical polymerization (FRP) using ammonium persulfate initiator. Various spectroscopic and microscopic studies confirm the successful grafting of PNIPAM from GO surface. PNIPAM-grafted GO (GPNM) exhibits enhanced thermal stability, improved dispersibility both in aqueous and cell medium, and better biocompatibility and cell viability compared to GO. Interestingly, GPNM displays an exciting fluorescence property in aqueous medium, which is a hike of intensity at 36 °C due to the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAM chains (32 °C). Moreover both hydrophilic (doxorubicin (DOX)) and hydrophobic (indomethacin (IMC)) drugs loaded on the surface of GPNM hybrid exhibits its efficacy as an efficient carrier for both types of drugs. Cellular uptakes of free DOX and DOX-loaded GPNM (GPNM-DOX) are evidenced both from optical and fluorescence imaging of live cells, and the efficiency of drug is significantly improved in the loaded system. The release of DOX from GPNM-DOX was achieved at pH 4, relevant to the environment of cancer cells. The pH-triggered release of hydrophobic drug was also studied using UV-vis spectroscopy via alginate encapsulation, showing a great enhancement at pH = 7.4. The IMC is also found to be released by human serum albumin using dialysis technique. The GPNM nanomaterial shows the property of simultaneous loading of DOX and IMC as well as pH-triggered simultaneous release of both of the drugs.

  8. A biologically inspired hydrophobic membrane for application in pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Jullok, Nora; Martínez, Rodrigo; Wouters, Christine; Luis, Patricia; Sanz, María Teresa; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2013-02-05

    An artificial polydimethylsiloxane/polyphenylsulfone (PDMS/PPSU) membrane, which emulates the hydrophobic behavior of natural membranes, was synthesized. Hydrophobicity was achieved by coating the membrane surface sublayer using conventional silicon material, which imitates the character of epicuticular wax (EW) of Prunus laurocerasus L. leaves. It was then applied as a separation medium in pervaporation (PV) of diluted mixtures of ethyl acetate and aroma compounds. The membrane's biomimetic characteristics were evaluated using surface morphology analyses, that is, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), water contact angle measurements, and SEM imaging. A comparison of properties of the membranes synthesized in this work against selected hydrophobic plant leaves indicated a good agreement. PV using these biologically inspired artificial membranes demonstrated preference for the permeation of ethyl acetate. Besides intrinsic characteristics, it was also observed that the chemical potential is highly influential in activating sorption, diffusion, and desorption of a specific compound.

  9. Surface geometry based hydrophobicity of the PDMS for microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelayo, J. C.; Badiola, R. A.; Castañares, J.; Pili, U.; Violanda, R.; Bacabac, R.

    2015-06-01

    In this report, the surface hydrophobicity of PDMS was investigated using two methods of preparations. The first method was performed by changing the surface roughness through the use of different molds. The second method was performed by varying the reconstitution ratio (volume of elastomer base to volume of elastomer curing) of the PDMS. Variation in the hydrophobicity of the PDMS was characterized by measuring the contact angle of a liquid droplet against the surface of the PDMS. The results showed that both the surface roughness and the reconstitution ratio of the PDMS positively correlated with the contact angle measured regardless of the liquid used. The maximum and minimum contact angle obtained were θr = (138 ± 3)° and θr = (99 ± 3)°, respectively. The results demonstrate a straightforward way of fabricating microfluidic devices using PDMS with controlled hydrophobicity.

  10. Protein folding, stability, and solvation structure in osmolyte solutions hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery Pettitt, B.

    2008-03-01

    The hydrophobic effect between solutes in aqueous solutions plays a central role in our understanding of recognition and folding of proteins and self assembly of lipids. Hydrophobicity induces nonideal solution behavior which plays a role in many aspects of biophysics. Work on the use of small biochemical compounds to crowd protein solutions indicates that a quantitative description of their non-ideal behavior is possible and straightforward. Here, we will show what the structural origin of this non-ideal solution behavior is from expression derived from a semi grand ensemble approach. We discuss the consequences of these findings regarding protein folding stability and solvation in crowded solutions through a structural analysis of the m-value or the change in free energy difference of a macromolecule in solution with respect to the concentration of a third component. This effect has recently been restudied and new mechanisms proposed for its origins in terms of transfer free energies and hydrophobicity.

  11. Ice friction: The effects of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Englezos, Peter

    2009-07-15

    The effect of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity on ice friction is studied systematically over a wide range of temperature and sliding speeds using several metallic interfaces. Hydrophobicity in combination with controlled roughness at the nanoscale is achieved by femtosecond laser irradiation to mimic the lotus effect on the slider's surface. The controlled roughness significantly increases the coefficient of friction at low sliding speeds and temperatures well below the ice melting point. However, at temperatures close to the melting point and relatively higher speeds, roughness and hydrophobicity significantly decrease ice friction. This decrease in friction is mainly due to the suppression of capillary bridges in spite of the presence of surface asperities that facilitate their formation. Finally, grooves oriented in the sliding direction also significantly decrease friction in the low velocity range compared to scratches and grooves randomly distributed over a surface.

  12. Preservation of York Minster historic limestone by hydrophobic surface coatings

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Rachel A.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.; Woodford, Julia; Grassian, Vicki H.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Cibin, Giannantonio; Dent, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Magnesian limestone is a key construction component of many historic buildings that is under constant attack from environmental pollutants notably by oxides of sulfur via acid rain, particulate matter sulfate and gaseous SO2 emissions. Hydrophobic surface coatings offer a potential route to protect existing stonework in cultural heritage sites, however, many available coatings act by blocking the stone microstructure, preventing it from ‘breathing' and promoting mould growth and salt efflorescence. Here we report on a conformal surface modification method using self-assembled monolayers of naturally sourced free fatty acids combined with sub-monolayer fluorinated alkyl silanes to generate hydrophobic (HP) and super hydrophobic (SHP) coatings on calcite. We demonstrate the efficacy of these HP and SHP surface coatings for increasing limestone resistance to sulfation, and thus retarding gypsum formation under SO2/H2O and model acid rain environments. SHP treatment of 19th century stone from York Minster suppresses sulfuric acid permeation. PMID:23198088

  13. Antibacterial activity and the hydrophobicity of cotton coated with hexadecyltrimethoxysilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohaeti, Eli; Rakhmawati, Anna

    2017-08-01

    In this work, cotton fiber was fabricated using silver nanoparticles to produce hydrophobic and antibacterial material. The silver nanoparticle was prepared with chemical reduction method using trisodium citrate as reducing agent and PVA as stabilizer. Silver nanoparticle was deposited on cotton fibers as antibacterial agent and HDTMS 4% v/v was coated on those as hydrophobic agent. The cotton fibers before and after modification were characterized its functional groups, contact angles, and antibacterials activities. The functional groups of cottons were determined by using ATR-FTIR, hydrophobic properties of cottons were determined by measuring contact angle, and antibacterial activities of cottons were determined by measuring clear zone. The addition of HDTMS decreased the intensity of absorption bands of functional groups but increased contact angle of cotton cloth. The cotton cloth-silver nanoparticle shows the highest antibacterial properties. The antibacterial activity of cotton cloth without and with modification against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Eschericia coli 32518 were significantly different.

  14. Hierarchical silicon etched structures for controlled hydrophobicity/superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Yonghao; Zhu, Lingbo; Hess, Dennis W; Wong, C P

    2007-11-01

    Silicon surface hydrophobicity has been varied by using silane treatments on silicon pyramid surfaces generated by KOH anisotropic etching. Results demonstrated that by altering the surface hydrophobicity, the apparent contact angle changed in accord with the Wenzel equation for surface structures with inclined side walls. Hierarchical structures were also constructed from Si pyramids where nanostructures were added by Au-assisted electroless HF/H2O2 etching. Surface hydrophobicity and superhydrophobicity were achieved by surface modification with a variety of silanes. Stability of the Cassie state of superhydrophobicity is described with respect to the Laplace pressure as indicated by the water droplet meniscus in contact with the hierarchical structures. The contact angle hysteresis observed is also discussed with respect to water/substrate adhesion.

  15. Strong, reversible underwater adhesion via gecko-inspired hydrophobic fibers.

    PubMed

    Soltannia, Babak; Sameoto, Dan

    2014-12-24

    Strong, reversible underwater adhesion using gecko-inspired surfaces is achievable through the use of a hydrophobic structural material and does not require surface modification or suction cup effects for this adhesion to be effective. Increased surface energy can aid in dry adhesion in an air environment but strongly degrades wet adhesion via reduction of interfacial energy underwater. A direct comparison of structurally identical but chemically different mushroom shaped fibers shows that strong, reversible adhesion, even in a fully wetted, stable state, is feasible underwater if the structural material of the fibers is hydrophobic and the mating surface is not strongly hydrophilic. The exact adhesion strength will be a function of the underwater interfacial energy between surfaces and the specific failure modes of individual fibers. This underwater adhesion has been calculated to be potentially greater than the dry adhesion for specific combinations of hydrophobic surfaces.

  16. Recyclable hydrophilic-hydrophobic micropatterns on glass for microarray applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Lee, Yong Yeow; Leck, Kwong Joo; Kim, Namyong Y; Ying, Jackie Y

    2007-04-24

    A novel method for fabricating recyclable hydrophilic-hydrophobic micropatterns on glass chips is presented. TiOx patterns (100-2000 microm) were sputtered on glass chips via a through-hole mask. The patterned chips were then vapor-coated with fluoroalkylsilane, for example, (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)triethoxysilane (FTES) to form a hydrophobic coating layer. The fluoroalkyl chain of FTES film on TiOx patterns was photocleaved under UV irradiation, exposing the fresh hydrophilic TiOx patterns. The resulting chip could be used multiple times by repeating the coating and photocleaving processes with negligible deterioration of the hydrophobic FTES film coated on glass. If desired, bare glass patterns could also be generated by removing the TiOx patterns with KOH. The patterned glass chips have been successfully used for microarray fabrication.

  17. Forces between hydrophobic solids in concentrated aqueous salt solution.

    PubMed

    Mastropietro, Dean J; Ducker, William A

    2012-03-09

    Much research has focused on the discovery and description of long-ranged forces between hydrophobic solids immersed in water. Here we show that the force between high contact-angle solids in concentrated salt solution (1 M KCl) agrees very well with van der Waals forces calculated from Lifshitz theory for separations greater than 5 nm. The hydrophobic solids are octadecyltrichlorosilane-coated glass, with an advancing contact angle of 108°. Thus, in 1 M salt solution, it is unnecessary to invoke the presence of a hydrophobic force at separations greater than 5 nm. Through measurement in salt solution, we avoid the necessity of accounting for large electrostatic forces that frequently occur in pure water and may obscure resolution of other forces.

  18. Preservation of York Minster historic limestone by hydrophobic surface coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Rachel A.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.; Woodford, Julia; Grassian, Vicki H.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Cibin, Giannantonio; Dent, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Magnesian limestone is a key construction component of many historic buildings that is under constant attack from environmental pollutants notably by oxides of sulfur via acid rain, particulate matter sulfate and gaseous SO2 emissions. Hydrophobic surface coatings offer a potential route to protect existing stonework in cultural heritage sites, however, many available coatings act by blocking the stone microstructure, preventing it from `breathing' and promoting mould growth and salt efflorescence. Here we report on a conformal surface modification method using self-assembled monolayers of naturally sourced free fatty acids combined with sub-monolayer fluorinated alkyl silanes to generate hydrophobic (HP) and super hydrophobic (SHP) coatings on calcite. We demonstrate the efficacy of these HP and SHP surface coatings for increasing limestone resistance to sulfation, and thus retarding gypsum formation under SO2/H2O and model acid rain environments. SHP treatment of 19th century stone from York Minster suppresses sulfuric acid permeation.

  19. Influence of hydrophobic surface treatment toward performance of air filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahfiq Zulkifli, Nazrul; Zaini Yunos, Muhamad; Ahmad, Azlinnorazia; Harun, Zawati; Akhair, Siti Hajar Mohd; Adibah Raja Ahmad, Raja; Hafeez Azhar, Faiz; Rashid, Abdul Qaiyyum Abd; Ismail, Al Emran

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the performance of hydrophobic surface treatment by using silica aerogel powder via spray coating techniques. Hydrophobic properties were determined by measuring the level of the contact angle. Meanwhile, performance was evaluated in term of the hydrogen gas flow and humidity rejection. The results are shown by contact angle that the microstructure filter, especially in the upper layer and sub-layer has been changed. The results also show an increase of hydrophobicity due to the increased quantity of silica aerogel powder. Results also showed that the absorption and rejection filter performance filter has increased after the addition of silica aerogel powder. The results showed that with the addition of 5 grams of powder of silica aerogel have the highest result of wetting angle 134.11°. The highest humidity rejection found with 5 grams of powder of silica aerogel.

  20. Compositional fingerprint of soy sauces via hydrophobic surface interaction.

    PubMed

    Jakobi, Victoria; Salmen, Paul; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the interaction of soy sauces with hydrophobic surfaces has been analyzed. Hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers on gold or silicon dioxide were used to harvest conditioning layers from soy sauce products with varying amounts of additives. The data was compared to adsorption of soy protein and glutamic acid as common ingredients. Spectral ellipsometry revealed that all tested sauces led to the formation of thin overlayers on hydrophobic surfaces. Products with less additives yielded adlayers in the same thickness range as pure soy protein. In contrast, sauces with more ingredients create distinctly thicker films. Using water contact angle goniometry, it is shown that all adlayers render the substrate more hydrophilic. Infrared spectroscopy provided a deeper insight into the adlayer chemistry and revealed that the adlayer composition is dominated by protein rich components. X-ray reflectivity on selected films provided further insight into the density profiles within the adlayers on the molecular scale.

  1. Fractionation and recovery of whey proteins by hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria João; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2011-03-01

    A method for the recovery and fractionation of whey proteins from a whey protein concentrate (80%, w/w) by hydrophobic interaction chromatography is proposed. Standard proteins and WPC 80 dissolved in phosphate buffer with ammonium sulfate 1 M were loaded in a HiPrep Octyl Sepharose FF column coupled to a fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) system and eluted by decreasing the ionic strength of the buffer using a salt gradient. The results showed that the most hydrophobic protein from whey is α-lactalbumin and the less hydrophobic is lactoferrin. It was possible to recover 45.2% of β-lactoglobulin using the HiPrep Octyl Sepharose FF column from the whey protein concentrate mixture with 99.6% purity on total protein basis.

  2. A script to highlight hydrophobicity and charge on protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hagemans, Dominique; van Belzen, Ianthe A. E. M.; Morán Luengo, Tania; Rüdiger, Stefan G. D.

    2015-01-01

    The composition of protein surfaces determines both affinity and specificity of protein-protein interactions. Matching of hydrophobic contacts and charged groups on both sites of the interface are crucial to ensure specificity. Here, we propose a highlighting scheme, YRB, which highlights both hydrophobicity and charge in protein structures. YRB highlighting visualizes hydrophobicity by highlighting all carbon atoms that are not bound to nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The charged oxygens of glutamate and aspartate are highlighted red and the charged nitrogens of arginine and lysine are highlighted blue. For a set of representative examples, we demonstrate that YRB highlighting intuitively visualizes segments on protein surfaces that contribute to specificity in protein-protein interfaces, including Hsp90/co-chaperone complexes, the SNARE complex and a transmembrane domain. We provide YRB highlighting in form of a script that runs using the software PyMOL. PMID:26528483

  3. Determining protein similarity by comparing hydrophobic core structure.

    PubMed

    Gadzała, M; Kalinowska, B; Banach, M; Konieczny, L; Roterman, I

    2017-02-01

    Formal assessment of structural similarity is - next to protein structure prediction - arguably the most important unsolved problem in proteomics. In this paper we propose a similarity criterion based on commonalities between the proteins' hydrophobic cores. The hydrophobic core emerges as a result of conformational changes through which each residue reaches its intended position in the protein body. A quantitative criterion based on this phenomenon has been proposed in the framework of the CASP challenge. The structure of the hydrophobic core - including the placement and scope of any deviations from the idealized model - may indirectly point to areas of importance from the point of view of the protein's biological function. Our analysis focuses on an arbitrarily selected target from the CASP11 challenge. The proposed measure, while compliant with CASP criteria (70-80% correlation), involves certain adjustments which acknowledge the presence of factors other than simple spatial arrangement of solids.

  4. Super-Hydrophobic Green Corrosion Inhibitor On Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, H.; Ismail, A.; Ahmad, S.; Soon, C. F.

    2017-06-01

    There are many examples of organic coatings used for corrosion protection. In particular, hydrophobic and super-hydrophobic coatings are shown to give good protection because of their enhanced ability to slow down transport of water and ions through the coating. The purpose of this research is to develop water repellent coating to avoid direct contact between metal and environment corrosive and mitigate corrosion attack at pipeline system. This water repellent characteristic on super-hydrophobic coating was coated by electrodeposition method. Wettability of carbon steel with super-hydrophobic coating (cerium chloride and myristic acid) and oxidized surface was investigated through contact angle and inhibitor performance test. The inhibitor performance was studied in 25% tannin acid corrosion test at 30°C and 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl). The water contact angle test was determined by placing a 4-μL water droplet of distilled water. It shows that the wettability of contact angle super-hydrophobic with an angle of 151.60° at zero minute can be classified as super-hydrophobic characteristic. By added tannin acid as inhibitor the corrosion protection on carbon steel becomes more consistent. This reveals that the ability of the coating to withstand with the corrosion attack in the seawater at different period of immersions. The results elucidate that the weight loss increased as the time of exposure increased. However, the corrosion rates for uncoated carbon steel is high compared to coated carbon steel. As a conclusion, from both samples it can be seen that the coated carbon steel has less corrosion rated compared to uncoated carbon steel and addition of inhibitor to the seawater provides more protection to resist corrosion attack on carbon steel.

  5. Activity of catalytic silver nanoparticles modulated by capping agent hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Janani, Seralathan; Stevenson, Priscilla; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a facile in situ method is reported for the preparation of catalytic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using N-acyl tyramine (NATA) with variable hydrophobic acyl length. Scanning electron microscopic analysis shows that NATA exists initially as larger aggregates in alkaline aqueous solution. The addition of AgNO3 dissociates these larger aggregate and subsequently promotes the formation of self-assembled NATA and AgNPs. Characterization of AgNPs using UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope revealed that the hydrophobic acyl chain length of NATA does not influence the particle size, shape and morphology. All NATA-AgNPs yielded relatively identical values in full width at half-maximum (FWHM) analysis, indicating that the AgNPs prepared with NATA are relatively polydispersed at all tested acyl chain lengths. These nanoparticles are able to efficiently catalyze the reduction of 4-nitro phenol to 4-amino phenol, 2-nitro aniline to 1,2-diamino benzene, 2,4,6-trinitro phenol to 2,4,6-triamino phenol by NaBH4 in an aqueous environment. The reduction reaction rate is determined to be pseudo-first order and the apparent rate constant is linearly dependent on the hydrophobic acyl chain length of the NATA. All reaction kinetics presented an induction period, which is dependent on the N-acyl chain length, indicating that the hydrophobic effects play a critical role in bringing the substrate to the metal nanoparticle surface to induce the catalytic reaction. In this study, however, the five catalytic systems have similar size and polydispersity, differing only in terms of capping agent hydrophobicity, and shows different catalytic activity with respect to the alkyl chain length of the capping agent. As discussed, the ability to modulate the metal nanoparticles catalytic property, by modifying the capping agent hydrophobicity represents a promising future for developing an efficient nanocatalyst without altering the size

  6. Sticking polydisperse hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Michael; Degen, Patrick; Brenner, Thorsten; Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Struth, Bernd; Tolan, Metin; Rehage, Heinz

    2010-10-19

    The formation of a layer of hydrophobic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles stabilized by lauric acid is analyzed by in situ X-ray reflectivity measurements. The data analysis shows that the nanoparticles partially disperse their hydrophobic coating. Consequently, a Langmuir layer was formed by lauric acid molecules that can be compressed into an untilted condensed phase. A majority of the nanoparticles are attached to the Langmuir film integrating lauric acid residue on their surface into the Langmuir film. Hence, the particles at the liquid-gas interface can be identified as so-called Janus beads, which are amphiphilic solids having two sides with different functionality.

  7. Intercalation of small hydrophobic molecules in lipid bilayers containing cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, D.L.; Hamacher, K.; Kaiser, H.; Kulasekere, R.; Torbet, J.

    1994-12-31

    Partitioning of small hydrophobic molecules into lipid bilayers containing cholesterol has been studied using the 2XC diffractometer at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. Locations of the compounds were determined by Fourier difference methods with data from both deuterated and undeuterated compounds introduced into the bilayers from the vapor phase. Data fitting procedures were developed for determining how well the compounds were localized. The compounds were found to be localized in a narrow region at the center of the hydrophobic layer, between the two halves of the bilayer. The structures are therefore intercalated structures with the long axis of the molecules in the plane of the bilayer.

  8. Hydrophobically modified nanoparticle suspensions to enhance water evaporation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi; Li, Xiaoying; Yuan, Hao; Feng, Yanhui; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-10-01

    The evaporation rates of water can be enhanced by adding the hydrophobically modified nanoparticles as a suspension. The magnitudes of enhancement are related to the diameter and mass concentration of nanoparticles. In particular, a 15% enhancement was achieved after adding the modified Al2O3 nanoparticle with a diameter of 13 nm and mass percentage of 0.02%. A theoretical model was established in order to estimate the evaporation rates of hydrophobic particle-based nanofluids. The obtained results indicate that the enhanced evaporation rates are attributed to the elevated saturated vapor pressures of the nanofluids. These results may have important applications for energy-efficient enhancement of water evaporation rates.

  9. Wetting in hydrophobic nanochannels: a challenge of classical capillarity.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Roy; Kazakevich, Yuri; Ni, Chaoying; Fadeev, Alexander Y

    2005-09-14

    We report an investigation of the water-hydrophobic interface in well-defined nanochannels (R approximately 2-4 nm). Wetting in these systems cannot be described by classical (macroscopic) capillary theory: (1) water occupies only a fraction ( approximately 60%) of the pore volume, and (2) the capillary pressures are approximately 60-90% greater than predicted by the Laplace equation. The results suggest the presence of approximately 0.6 nm layer of low-density fluid (vapor) separating water from the hydrophobic solid.

  10. Biological activity of Leu-enkephalin containing hydrophobic moieties.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, R E; Reig, F; Valencia, G; Herrero, J F; Garcia Anton, J

    1986-01-01

    A series of enkephalin analogues (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu-C-NH-R;R=C6,C8,C10,C12 and C14; C=CH2 groups) with increasing hydrophobic character have been tested behaviourally in the analgesic hot plate and tail flick tests. The analogues were administered intraperitoneally and were found to possess anti-nociceptive activity. The results indicate that apparently there is not a direct relationship between increasing hydrophobicity and activity of the enkephalin-alkyl-amide analogues. The enkephalin analogues were found to behave in the same way as the enkephalins in producing tolerance.

  11. Thermodynamics of solvophobic interaction between hydrophobic surfaces in ethanol.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuoli; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    2014-11-11

    AFM surface force measurements were conducted in pure ethanol using gold surfaces hydrophobized with alkanethiols (CnSH) with n = 2-16. The forces measured at 5-35 °C were net attractive and became stronger with decreasing temperature and with increasing surface hydrophobicity. Thermodynamic analysis of the experimental data showed that the macroscopic solvophobic interactions were enthalpic but exhibited significant enthalpy-entropy compensations. The enthalpy decreases may represent the energy gained in forming H-bonded structures of ethanol, while the entropy decreases represent the thermodynamic costs for building structures. These results are consistent with those obtained previously in pure water.

  12. Microgravity spreading of water spheres on hydrophobic capillary plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steub, Laura; Kollmer, Jonathan; Paxson, Derek; Sack, Achim; Pöschel, Thorsten; Bartlett, John; Berman, Douglas; Richardson, Yaateh; Louge, Michel Y.

    2017-06-01

    We create nearly perfect centimetric spheres of water by splitting a cavity consisting of two metal hemispheres coated with a hydrophobic paint and under-filled with liquid, while releasing the apparatus in free-fall. A high-speed camera captures how water spread on hydrophobic aluminum and polycarbonate plates perforated with cylindrical capillaries. We compare observations at the ZARM drop tower in Bremen with Lattice-Boltzmann numerical simulations of Frank, Perré and Li for the inertial phase of imbibition.

  13. Robust hydrophobic Fe-based amorphous coating by thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Wu, Y.; Liu, L.

    2012-09-01

    Metallic surface is intrinsically hydrophilic due to its high surface energy. In this work, we present a different picture that highly hydrophobic metallic coatings could be directly fabricated by thermal spraying of Fe-based amorphous powders through the surface roughness control. These hydrophobic coatings are amorphous, exhibiting super-high hardness and excellent corrosion resistance. With low surface energy modification, the coatings become superhydrophobic and exhibit clearly self-cleaning effect. The present work opens a window for the applications of the amorphous coatings.

  14. Global thermodynamics of hydrophobic cavitation, dewetting, and hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2005-11-01

    Pure water experimental and simulation results are combined to predict the thermodynamics of cavity formation, spanning atomic to macroscopic length scales, over the entire ambient liquid temperature range. The resulting cavity equation of state is used to quantify dewetting excess contributions to cavity formation thermodynamics and construct a thermodynamic perturbation theory of hydrophobic hydration. Predictions are compared with large cavity simulations and experimental rare-gas hydration thermodynamics data (for He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn). Key findings include the strong temperature dependence of the critical length scale for hydrophobic dewetting and the evaluation of fundamental solute-solvent interaction contributions to rare-gas hydration chemical potentials.

  15. Urinary incontinence following radical vulvectomy.

    PubMed

    Reid, G C; DeLancey, J O; Hopkins, M P; Roberts, J A; Morley, G W

    1990-05-01

    Although incontinence has been reported after radical vulvectomy, its relationship to operative technique, anatomy, and treatment has not been defined. Twenty-one patients having vulvectomies for vulvar cancer were prospectively evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with urodynamic function studies. A portion of the urethra was removed in four patients undergoing radical vulvectomy, and 14 had a vulvectomy excision that came within 1 cm of the distal urethra. Six patients (28%) developed a change of continence, with three developing total incontinence, two stress incontinence, and one urge incontinence. All four patients who had a portion of the urethra excised developed stress or total incontinence. The other two patients with incontinence (one total, one urge) had the vulvectomy excision that came close to the urethra. No patient had a change in continence when surgery did not involve or come close to the urethra. When the four patients with a distal urethral resection were compared with patients in whom the urethra was not excised, there was a significant decrease postoperatively in functional urethral length (P less than .0001), anatomical urethral length (P less than .0001), and distal urethral pressure transmission ratios in Q3 (P = .004), Q4 (P = .02), and Q5 (P = .005); but no difference in urethral support (Q-tip test), flow rates, residual urine, bladder capacity, maximal urethral pressure, resting closure pressure, or squeeze pressure. Histologic examination of urethral specimens demonstrated that a portion of the compressor urethrae muscle was often excised. Radical vulvectomy by itself does not cause incontinence, but it would appear that removal of a portion of the urethra increases the chance of incontinence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K.

    1993-12-01

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  18. Laser spectroscopy of hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1993-12-01

    The author reports the application of supersonic jet flash pyrolysis to the specific preparation of a range of organic radicals, biradicals, and carbenes in a skimmed molecular beam. Each species was produced cleanly and specifically, with little or no secondary reactions by the thermal dissociation of appropriately designed and synthesized organic precursors. Photoelectron spectra of the three isomeric C{sub 3}H{sub 2} carbenes, ortho-benzyne, and the {alpha},3-dehydrotoluene biradical, were used to establish adiabatic ionization potentials for use in thermochemical determinations.

  19. Neuroprotective strategies in radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Jonathan D; Mulhall, John P

    2005-01-01

    In this section, authors from New York give their views on the various neuroprotective strategies for patients having a radical prostatectomy, such as the use of nerve grafts and other approaches. A joint study from Korea, the USA, Canada and the UK is presented in a paper on the importance of patient perception in the clinical assessment and management of BPH. There is also a review of robotic urological surgery. Finally, authors from New York give a review on the life of Isaac Newton. This is a new historical review in the journal, but one that will be of general interest.

  20. The hydrophobic effect. 2. Relative importance of the hydrophobic effect on the solubility of hydrophobes and pharmaceuticals in H-bonded solvents.

    PubMed

    Ruelle, P; Kesselring, U W

    1998-08-01

    The quantitative development of the nonergodic mobile order thermodynamics involving the new interpretation of the hydrophobic effect leads to a general solubility equation. This equation is applied to predict the aqueous and alcohol solubility of chemicals ranging from nonpolar or slightly polar with no H-bonding capacity to polyfunctional polar compounds including pharmaceuticals. The analysis of the relative importance of the contributions involved in the solubility model [i.e., the fluidization of the solute (for solids), the correction for the mixing entropy, the change of the nonspecific cohesion forces, and the formation of solvent-solvent (hydrophobic effect), solute-solute, and solute-solvent H-bonds] unambiguously demonstrates that the hydrophobic effect is essential for predicting the aqueous or alcohol solubility of any substance in general, and of nonpolar compounds in particular. The difference between the origin of the solubility of hydrocarbons in water and of water in hydrocarbons is furthermore presented. In both cases, the quasilinear solubility dependence on the molar volume of the hydrocarbon is of an entropic nature.

  1. Biochemical characterization of the small hydrophobic protein of avian metapneumovirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is a paramyxovirus that has three membrane-associate proteins: glycoprotein (G), fusion (F), and small hydrophobic (SH) proteins. Among them, the SH protein is a small type II integral membrane protein that is incorporated into virions and is only present in certain para...

  2. Water uptake in biochars: The roles of porosity and hydrophobicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    We assessed the effects of porosity and hydrophobicity on water uptake by biochars. Biochars were produced from two feedstocks (hazelnut shells and Douglas fir chips) at three production temperatures (370 °C, 500 °C, and 620 °C). To distinguish the effects of porosity from the ...

  3. Flexible starch-polyurethane films: Physiochemical characteristics and hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Tai, N L; Adhikari, Raju; Shanks, Robert; Adhikari, Benu

    2017-05-01

    Starch-polyurethane (PU) composite films with improved mechanical and hydrophobic properties were developed in this work. A simple and effective microwave-aided starch gelatinisation instrument was used to prepare glycerol plasticized high amylose starch (HAGS) material. Polyethylene glycol-isocyanate (PEG-iso) linker was prepared by reacting PEG 1000 with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI). PEG-iso linker was then grafted into HAGS forming three dimensional urethane networks (PEG-PU). HAGS-PEG-PU composite blends were prepared and dried at ambient temperature to obtain HAGS-PEG-PU films. The mechanical properties and hydrophobicity (as contact angle, CA) of the HAGS-PEG-PU films were measured and analysed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed good grafting of PEG-iso into starch structure. Increase of PEG-iso concentration up to 20% (w/w) improved the molecular mixing and interpenetration between the starch and PEG-PU. The HAGS-PEG-PU films had improved hydrophobicity as indicated by CA values ranging from 51 to 110°and very high flexibility as evidenced from elongation at break (εB) values from 17 to 1000%. The HAGS-PEG-PU film formulation containing 20% (w/w) PEG-iso provided the best flexibility (εB>1000%) and hydrophobicity (CA>110°). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Water repellency in hydrophobic nanocapsules--molecular view on dewetting.

    PubMed

    Müller, Achim; Garai, Somenath; Schäffer, Christian; Merca, Alice; Bögge, Hartmut; Al-Karawi, Ahmed Jasim M; Prasad, Thazhe Kootteri

    2014-05-26

    The hydrophobic effect plays a major role in a variety of important phenomena in chemistry, materials science and biology, for instance in protein folding and protein-ligand interactions. Studies--performed within cavities of the unique metal oxide based porous capsules of the type {(pentagon)12(linker)30}≡{(W)W5}12{Mo2(ligand)}30 with different acetate/water ligand ratios--have provided unprecedented results revealing segregation/repellency of the encapsulated "water" from the internal hydrophobic ligand walls of the capsules, while the disordered water molecules, interacting strongly with each other via hydrogen bonding, form in all investigated cases the same type of spherical shell. The present results can be (formally) compared--but only regarding the repellency effect--with the amazing "action" of the (super)hydrophobic Lotus (Nelumbo) leaves, which are self-cleaning based on water repellency resulting in the formation of water droplets picking up dirt. The present results were obtained by constructing deliberately suitable hydrophobic interiors within the mentioned capsules. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Nanocarriers from GRAS Zein Proteins to Encapsulate Hydrophobic Actives.

    PubMed

    Weissmueller, Nikolas T; Lu, Hoang D; Hurley, Amanda; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2016-11-14

    One factor limiting the expansion of nanomedicines has been the high cost of the materials and processes required for their production. We present a continuous, scalable, low cost nanoencapsulation process, Flash Nanoprecipitation (FNP) that enables the production of nanocarriers (NCs) with a narrow size distribution using zein corn proteins. Zein is a low cost, GRAS protein (having the FDA status of "Generally Regarded as Safe") currently used in food applications, which acts as an effective encapsulant for hydrophobic compounds using FNP. The four-stream FNP configuration allows the encapsulation of very hydrophobic compounds in a way that is not possible with previous precipitation processes. We present the encapsulation of several model active compounds with as high as 45 wt % drug loading with respect to zein concentration into ∼100 nm nanocarriers. Three examples are presented: (1) the pro-drug antioxidant, vitamin E-acetate, (2) an anticholera quorum-sensing modulator CAI-1 ((S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one; CAI-1 that reduces Vibrio cholerae virulence by modulating cellular communication), and (3) hydrophobic fluorescent dyes with a range of hydrophobicities. The specific interaction between zein and the milk protein, sodium caseinate, provides stabilization of the NCs in PBS, LB medium, and in pH 2 solutions. The stability and size changes in the three media provide information on the mechanism of assembly of the zein/active/casein NC.

  6. Nanoparticle flotation collectors II: the role of nanoparticle hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Songtao; Pelton, Robert

    2011-09-20

    The ability of polystyrene nanoparticles to facilitate the froth flotation of glass beads was correlated to the hydrophobicity of the nanoparticles. Contact angle measurements were used to probe the hydrophobicity of hydrophilic glass surfaces decorated with hydrophobic nanoparticles. Both sessile water drop advancing angles, θ(a), and attached air bubble receding angle measurements, θ(r), were performed. For glass surfaces saturated with adsorbed nanoparticles, flotation recovery, a measure of flotation efficiency, increased with increasing values of each type of contact angle. As expected, the advancing water contact angle on nanoparticle-decorated, dry glass surfaces increased with surface coverage, the area fraction of glass covered with nanoparticles. However, the nanoparticles were far more effective at raising the contact angle than the Cassie-Baxter prediction, suggesting that with higher nanoparticle coverages the water did not completely wet the glass surfaces between the nanoparticles. A series of polystyrene nanoparticles was prepared to cover a range of surface energies. Water contact angle measurements, θ(np), on smooth polymer films formed from organic solutions of dissolved nanoparticles were used to rank the nanoparticles in terms of hydrophobicity. Glass spheres were saturated with adsorbed nanoparticles and were isolated by flotation. The minimum nanoparticle water contact angle to give high flotation recovery was in the range of 51° < θ(np(min)) ≤ 85°.

  7. Water uptake in biochars: The roles of porosity and hydrophobicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    We assessed the effects of porosity and hydrophobicity on water uptake by biochars. Biochars were produced from two feedstocks (hazelnut shells and Douglas fir chips) at three production temperatures (370 °C, 500 °C, and 620 °C). To distinguish the effects of porosity from the ...

  8. Highly efficient hydrophobic titania ceramic membranes for water desalination.

    PubMed

    Kujawa, Joanna; Cerneaux, Sophie; Koter, Stanisław; Kujawski, Wojciech

    2014-08-27

    Hydrophobic titania ceramic membranes (300 kD) were prepared by grafting of C6F13C2H4Si(OC2H5)3 and C12F25C2H4Si(OC2H5)3 molecules and thus applied in membrane distillation (MD) process of NaCl solutions. Grafting efficiency and hydrophobicity were evaluated by contact angle measurement, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, and liquid entry pressure measurement of water. Desalination of NaCl solutions was performed using the modified hydrophobic membranes in air gap MD (AGMD) and direct contact MD (DCMD) processes in various operating conditions. High values of NaCl retention coefficient (>99%) were reached. The permeate fluxes were in the range 231-3692 g·h(-1)·m(-2), depending on applied experimental conditions. AGMD mode appeared to be more efficient showing higher fluxes and selectivity in desalination. Overall mass transfer coefficients (K) for membranes tested in AGMD were constant over the investigated temperature range. However, K values in DCMD increased at elevated temperature. The hydrophobic layer was also stable after 4 years of exposure to open air.

  9. Lipid-Rhodopsin Hydrophobic Mismatch Alters Rhodopsin Helical Content

    SciTech Connect

    Soubias,O.; Niu, S.; Mitchell, D.; Gawrisch, K.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of photoactivated rhodopsin to achieve the enzymatically active metarhodopsin II conformation is exquisitely sensitive to bilayer hydrophobic thickness. The sensitivity of rhodopsin to the lipid matrix has been explained by the hydrophobic matching theory, which predicts that lipid bilayers adjust elastically to the hydrophobic length of transmembrane helices. Here, we examined if bilayer thickness adjusts to the length of the protein or if the protein alters its conformation to adapt to the bilayer. Purified bovine rhodopsin was reconstituted into a series of mono-unsaturated phosphatidylcholines with 14-20 carbons per hydrocarbon chain. Changes of hydrocarbon chain length were measured by 2H NMR, and protein helical content was quantified by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism and conventional circular dichroism. Experiments were conducted on dark-adapted rhodopsin, the photo-intermediates metarhodopsin I/II/III, and opsin. Changes of bilayer thickness upon rhodopsin incorporation and photoactivation were mostly absent. In contrast, the helical content of rhodopsin increased with membrane hydrophobic thickness. Helical content did not change measurably upon photoactivation. The increases of bilayer thickness and helicity of rhodopsin are accompanied by higher metarhodopsin II/metarhodopsin I ratios, faster rates of metarhodopsin II formation, an increase of tryptophan fluorescence, and higher temperatures of rhodopsin denaturation. The data suggest a surprising adaptability of this G protein-coupled membrane receptor to properties of the lipid matrix.

  10. Anionic and cationic Hofmeister effects on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schwierz, Nadine; Horinek, Dominik; Netz, Roland R

    2013-02-26

    Using a two-step modeling approach, we address the full spectrum of direct, reversed, and altered ionic sequences as the charge of the ion, the charge of the surface, and the surface polarity are varied. From solvent-explicit molecular dynamics simulations, we extract single-ion surface interaction potentials for halide and alkali ions at hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. These are used within Poisson-Boltzmann theory to calculate ion density and electrostatic potential distributions at mixed polar/unpolar surfaces for varying surface charge. The resulting interfacial tension increments agree quantitatively with experimental data and capture the Hofmeister series, especially the anomaly of lithium, which is difficult to obtain using continuum theory. Phase diagrams that feature different Hofmeister series as a function of surface charge, salt concentration, and surface polarity are constructed from the long-range force between two surfaces interacting across electrolyte solutions. Large anions such as iodide have a high hydrophobic surface affinity and increase the effective charge magnitude on negatively charged unpolar surfaces. Large cations such as cesium also have a large hydrophobic surface affinity and thereby compensate an external negative charge surface charge most efficiently, which explains the well-known asymmetry between cations and anions. On the hydrophilic surface, the size-dependence of the ion surface affinity is reversed, explaining the Hofmeister series reversal when comparing hydrophobic with hydrophilic surfaces.

  11. The Hydrophobic Effect in Solute Partitioning and Interfacial Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Meyer B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the partitioning of hydrophobic solutes between water and nonpolar solvents provide estimates for the energy cost of creating hydrophobic-water contacts. This energy is a factor of three lower than the work of adhesion derived from interfacial tension measurements. This discrepancy noted by Tanford in 1979 is widely viewed as a serious challenge to our understanding of hydrophobic interactions. However, the interfacial energy of a water-alkane interface depends on chain length. A simple analysis of published data shows that the loss of rotational freedom of an alkane chain at an interface accounts quantitatively for the length-dependent contribution to interfacial tension, leaving a length-independent contribution very close to the free energy of transfer per unit of solvent accessible surface area. This analysis thus clarifies the discrepancy between the thermodynamic and interfacial tension measurements of hydrophobic interaction energy. Alkanes do not loose rotational freedom when transferred between two different liquid phases but they do at an interface. This reconciles the difference between microscopic and macroscopic measurements. Like the partitioning free energy, the work of adhesion also has a large entropy and small enthalpy at 20 oC.

  12. Case study of hydrogen bonding in a hydrophobic cavity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Cheng, Chao-Sheng; Tjong, Siu-Cin; Yin, Hsien-Sheng; Sue, Shih-Che

    2014-12-18

    Protein internal hydrogen bonds and hydrophobicity determine protein folding and structure stabilization, and the introduction of a hydrogen bond has been believed to represent a better interaction for consolidating protein structure. We observed an alternative example for chicken IL-1β. The native IL-1β contains a hydrogen bond between the Y157 side-chain OηH and I133 backbone CO, whereby the substitution from Tyr to Phe abolishes the connection and the mutant without the hydrogen bond is more stable. An attempt to explain the energetic view of the presence of the hydrogen bond fails when only considering the nearly identical X-ray structures. Here, we resolve the mechanism by monitoring the protein backbone dynamics and interior hydrogen bond network. IL-1β contains a hydrophobic cavity in the protein interior, and Y157 is one of the surrounding residues. The Y157 OηH group introduces an unfavorable energy in the hydrophobic cavity, therefore sequestering itself by forming a hydrogen bond with the proximate residue I133. The hydrogen bonding confines Y157 orientation but exerts a force to disrupt the hydrogen bond network surrounding the cavity. The effect propagates over the entire protein and reduces the stability, as reflected in the protein backbone dynamics observed by an NMR hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange experiment. We describe the particular case in which a hydrogen bond does not necessarily confer enhanced protein stability while the disruption of hydrophobicity must be integrally considered.

  13. Controlled effect of ultrasonic cavitation on hydrophobic/hydrophilic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Belova, Valentina; Gorin, Dmitry A; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2011-02-01

    Controlling cavitation at the solid surface is of increasing interest, as it plays a major role in many physical and chemical processes related to the modification of solid surfaces and formation of multicomponent nanoparticles. Here, we show a selective control of ultrasonic cavitation on metal surfaces with different hydrophobicity. By applying a microcontact printing technique we successfully formed hydrophobic/hydrophilic alternating well-defined microstructures on aluminium surfaces. Fabrication of patterned surfaces provides the unique opportunity to verify a model of heterogeneous nucleation of cavitation bubbles near the solid/water interface by varying the wettability of the surface, temperature and ultrasonic power. At the initial stage of sonication (up to 30 min), microjets and shock waves resulting from the collapsing bubbles preferably impact the hydrophobic surface, whereas the hydrophilic areas of the patterned Al remain unchanged. Longer sonication periods affect both surfaces. These findings confirm the expectation that higher contact angle causes a lower energy barrier, thus cavitation dominates at the hydrophobic surfaces. Experimental results are in good agreement with expectations from nucleation theory. This paper illustrates a new approach to ultrasound induced modification of solid surfaces resulting in the formation of foam-structured metal surfaces.

  14. Azide reduces the hydrophobic barrier of the bacteriorhodopsin proton channel.

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, H J; Pfeiffer, M; Rink, T; Burlon, O; Kurz, M; Riesle, J; Heuberger, E; Gerwert, K; Oesterhelt, D

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of a nitroxide spin label to the polarity of its environment has been used to estimate the hydrophobic barrier of the proton channel of the transmembrane proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. By means of site-specific mutagenesis, single cysteine residues were introduced at 10 positions located at the protein surface, in the protein interior, and along the proton pathway. After reaction with a methanethiosulfonate spin label, the principle values of the hyperfine tensor A and the g-tensor were determined from electron paramagnetic resonance spectra measured at 170 K. The shape of the hydrophobic barrier of the proton channel is characterized in terms of a polarity index, DeltaA, determined from the variation of the hyperfine coupling constant Azz. The maximum of the hydrophobic barrier is found to be close to the retinal chromophore in the proton uptake pathway. The effect of the asymmetric distribution of charged and polar residues in the proton release and uptake pathways is clearly reflected in the behavior of the hydrophobic barrier. The presence of azide reduces the barrier height of both the cytoplasmic and extracellular channels. This finding supports the view of azide and other weakly acidic anions as catalysts for the formation of hydrogen-bonded networks in proton pathways of proteins. PMID:10233084

  15. Hydrophobic mismatch in gramicidin A prime /lecithin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Watnick, P.I.; Chan, S.I. ); Dea, P. )

    1990-07-03

    Gramicidin A{prime} (GA{prime}) has been added to three lipid systems of varying hydrophobic thickness: dimyristoyllecithin (DML), dipalmitoyllecithin (DPL), and distearoyllecithin (DSL). The similarity in length between the hydrophobic portion of GA{prime} and the hydrocarbon chains of the lipid bilayers has been studied by using {sup 31}P and {sup 2}H NMR. Hydrophobic mismatch has been found to be most severe in the DML bilayer system and minimal in the case of DSL. In addition, the effects of hydrophobic mismatch on the cooperative properties of the bilayer have been obtained from {sup 2}H NMR relaxation measurements. The results indicate that incorporation of the peptide into the bilayer disrupts the cooperative director fluctuations characteristic of pure multilamellar lipid dispersions. Finally, the GA{prime}/lecithin ratio at which the well-known transformation from bilayer to reverse hexagonal (H{sub II}) phase occurs is shown to depend on the acyl chain length of the phospholipid. A rationale is proposed for this chain length dependence.

  16. Biomimetic solution against dewetting in a highly hydrophobic nanopore.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Fabien; Paris, Guillaume; Gharbi, Tijani; Balme, Sébastien; Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Tangaraj, Vidhyadevi; Bechelany, Mikhael; Janot, Jean Marc; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Henn, François

    2016-06-14

    A water molecule is the foundation of life and is the primary compound in every living system. While many of its properties are understood in a bulk solvent, its behavior in a small hydrophobic nanopore still raises fundamental questions. For instance, a wetting/dewetting transition in a hydrophobic solid-state or a polymer nanopore occurs stochastically and can only be prevented by external physical stimuli. Controlling these transitions would be a primary requirement to improve many applications. Some biological channels, such as gramicidin A (gA) proteins, show a high rate of water and ion diffusion in their central subnanochannel while their external surface is highly hydrophobic. The diameter of this channel is significantly smaller than the inner size of the lowest artificial nanopore in which water drying occurs (i.e. 1.4 nm). In this paper, we propose an innovative idea to generate nanopore wetting as a result of which the application of an external field is no longer required. In a nanopore, the drying or wetting of the inner walls occurs randomly (in experiments and in simulations). However, we have shown how the confinement of gA, in a dried hydrophobic nanopore, rapidly generates a stable wetting of the latter. We believe that this simple idea, based on biomimetism, could represent a real breakthrough that could help to improve and develop new nanoscale applications.

  17. Hydrophobic Flocculation of Galena Fines in Aqueous Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Song; Lopez-Valdivieso; Reyes-Bahena; Bermejo-Perez; Trass

    2000-07-15

    The hydrophobic flocculation of galena fines induced by potassium amyl xanthate (PAX) in aqueous suspensions has been studied using laser diffraction, electrophoretic light scattering, contact angle, and microflotation measurements. The measurements were performed on <2 µm, 2-5 µm, 5-10 µm, and <30 µm size galena by varying several parameters, including PAX concentration, pH, original particle size, kerosene concentration, and suspension stirring. The experimental results have demonstrated that the hydrophobic flocculation was closely correlated with the particle hydrophobicity, but was not lowered upon increasing the particle surface charges due to PAX adsorption, which is contrary to the DLVO theory. This flocculation has been observed to increase with a reduction of the original particle size and an increase in kerosene concentration, and to require sufficient stirring strength and magnitudes of kinetic energy input to achieve the maximum aggregation degree. From the microflotation results, it has been found that the flotation response of galena fines is markedly improved due to the formation of hydrophobic flocs, suggesting that floc flotation is a promising means to recover galena in the fine size range. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  18. Role of the lid hydrophobicity pattern in pancreatic lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Annick; Allouche, Maya; Basyn, Frédéric; Brasseur, Robert; Kerfelec, Brigitte

    2005-12-02

    Pancreatic lipase is a soluble globular protein that must undergo structural modifications before it can hydrolyze oil droplets coated with bile salts. The binding of colipase and movement of the lipase lid open access to the active site. Mechanisms triggering lid mobility are unclear. The *KNILSQIVDIDGI* fragment of the lid of the human pancreatic lipase is predicted by molecular modeling to be a tilted peptide. Tilted peptides are hydrophobicity motifs involved in membrane fusion and more globally in perturbations of hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces. Analysis of this lid fragment predicts no clear consensus of secondary structure that suggests that its structure is not strongly sequence determined and could vary with environment. Point mutations were designed to modify the hydrophobicity profile of the [240-252] fragment and their consequences on the lipase-mediated catalysis were tested. Two mutants, in which the tilted peptide motif was lost, also have poor activity on bile salt-coated oil droplets and cannot be reactivated by colipase. Conversely, one mutant in which a different tilted peptide is created retains colipase dependence. These results suggest that the tilted hydrophobicity pattern of the [240-252] fragment is neither important for colipase binding to lipase, nor for interfacial binding but is important to trigger the maximal catalytic efficiency of lipase in the presence of bile salt.

  19. Hydrophobic kenaf nanocrystalline cellulose for the binding of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Zainuddin, Norhidayu; Ahmad, Ishak; Kargarzadeh, Hanieh; Ramli, Suria

    2017-05-01

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) extracted from lignocellulosic materials has been actively investigated as a drug delivery excipients due to its large surface area, high aspect ratio, and biodegradability. In this study, the hydrophobically modified NCC was used as a drug delivery excipient of hydrophobic drug curcumin. The modification of NCC with a cationic surfactant, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was used to modulate the loading of hydrophobic drugs that would not normally bind to NCC. The FTIR, Elemental analysis, XRD, TGA, and TEM were used to confirm the modification of NCC with CTAB. The effect of concentration of CTAB on the binding efficiency of hydrophobic drug curcumin was investigated. The amounts of curcumin bound onto the CTAB-NCC nanoparticles were analyzed by UV-vis Spectrophotometric. The result showed that the modified CTAB-NCC bound a significant amount of curcumin, in a range from 80% to 96% curcumin added. Nevertheless, at higher concentration of CTAB resulted in lower binding efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Use and application of hydrophobic interaction chromatography for protein purification.

    PubMed

    McCue, Justin T

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this section is to provide the reader with guidelines and background on the use and experimental application of Hydrophobic Interaction chromatography (HIC) for the purification of proteins. The section will give step by step instructions on how to use HIC in the laboratory to purify proteins. General guidelines and relevant background information is also provided.

  1. A comprehensive study to protein retention in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Baca, Martyna; De Vos, Jelle; Bruylants, Gilles; Bartik, Kristin; Liu, Xiaodong; Cook, Ken; Eeltink, Sebastiaan

    2016-10-01

    The effect of different kosmotropic/chaotropic salt systems on retention characteristics of intact proteins has been examined in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The performance was assessed using different column chemistries, i.e., polyalkylamide, alkylamine incorporating hydrophobic moieties, and a butyl chemistry. Selectivity in HIC is mainly governed by the salt concentration and by the molal surface tension increment of the salt. Typically, a linear relationship between the natural logarithm of the retention factor and the salt concentration is obtained. Using a 250mm long column packed with 5μm polyalkylamide functionalized silica particles and applying a 30min linear salt gradient, a peak capacity of 78 was achieved, allowing the baseline separation of seven intact proteins. The hydrophobicity index appeared to be a good indicator to predict the elution order of intact proteins in HIC mode. Furthermore, the effect of adding additives in the mobile phase, such as calcium chloride (stabilizing the 3D conformation of α-lactalbumin) and isopropanol, on retention properties has been assessed. Results indicate that HIC retention is also governed by conformational in the proteins which affect the number of accessible hydrophobic moieties.

  2. Bioinspired terpene synthesis: a radical approach.

    PubMed

    Justicia, José; Álvarez de Cienfuegos, Luis; Campaña, Araceli G; Miguel, Delia; Jakoby, Verena; Gansäuer, Andreas; Cuerva, Juan M

    2011-07-01

    This tutorial review highlights the development of radical-based bioinspired synthesis of terpenes from the initial proposal to the development of modern catalytic methods for performing such processes. The power of the radical approach is demonstrated by the straightforward syntheses of many natural products from readily available starting materials. The efficiency of these processes nicely complements the described cationic polyolefin cyclisations and even suggests that modern radical methods provide means to improve upon nature's synthetic pathways.

  3. Emergence of oxyl radicals as selective oxidants.

    PubMed

    Ramasarma, T

    2012-10-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (HO*) are derived in Fenton reaction with ferrous salt and H2O2 in acid medium, and at neutral pH, metal-oxyl radicals (M-O*) predominate. Evidence is accumulating that M-O* radicals are also active in oxidation reactions, in addition to metal-oxo (M=O) now shown in many publications. Reactivity of these radicals gives selective oxidized products useful in cellular activities, in contrast to purported indiscriminate cell damage by hydroxyl radicals. Reactions with vanadium compounds, such as diperoxovanadate, peroxo-bridged mixed valency divanadate, vanadium-oxyl radical, tetravalent vanadyl and decavanadate illustrates selective gain in oxidative capacity of oxo- and oxyl- species. Occurrence of ESR signals typical of hydroxyl radicals is demonstrated in cell homogenates and tissue perfusates treated with spin trap agents. It is known for a long time lipid peroxides are formed in tissue microsomal systems exclusively in presence of salts of iron, among many metals tested. Oxygen and a reducing agent, ascorbate (non-enzymic) or NADPH (enzymic) are required to produce 'ferryl', the chelated Fe=O active form (possibly Fe-O* and Fe-O-O-Fe ?) for the crucial step of H-atom abstraction. Yet literature is replete with unsupported affirmations that hydroxyl radicals initiate lipid peroxidation, an unexplained fixation of mindset. The best-known *OH generator, a mixture of ferrous salt and H2O2, does not promote lipid peroxidation, nor do the many hydroxyl radical quenching agents stop it. The availability of oxo and oxyl-radical forms with transition metals, and also with non metals, P, S, N and V, calls for expansion of vision beyond superoxide and hydroxyl radicals and explore functions of multiple oxygen radicals for their biological relevance.

  4. Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical

    DOEpatents

    Springston, Stephen R.; Lloyd, Judith; Zheng, Jun

    2007-10-23

    A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.

  5. Laser induced photoluminescence spectroscopy of cometary radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, W. M.; Cody, R. J.; Sabety-Dzvonik, M.

    1976-01-01

    Flash photolysis together with laser excitation of the product fragments was used in laboratory studies of cometary radicals. The LIPS method has been applied to the CN radical to determine: (1) Radiative lifetimes of individual rotational levels in the zeroth vibrational level of the B state; (2) energy partitioning during photodissociation of C2N2; and (3) vibrational and rotational excitation during formation of CN radicals in the photodissociation of dicyanoacetylene.

  6. The tyrosyl free radical in ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Gräslund, A; Sahlin, M; Sjöberg, B M

    1985-01-01

    The enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase, catalyses the formation of deoxyribonucleotides from ribonucleotides, a reaction essential for DNA synthesis in all living cells. The Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase, which is the prototype of all known eukaryotic and virus-coded enzymes, consists of two nonidentical subunits, proteins B1 and B2. The B2 subunit contains an antiferromagnetically coupled pair of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of an electron, has its unpaired spin density delocalized in the aromatic ring of tyrosine. Effects of iron-radical interaction indicate a relatively close proximity between the iron center and the radical. The EPR signal of the radical can be studied directly in frozen packed cells of E. coli or mammalian origin, if the cells are made to overproduce ribonucleotide reductase. The hypothetic role of the tyrosyl free radical in the enzymatic reaction is not yet elucidated, except in the reaction with the inhibiting substrate analogue 2'-azido-CDP. In this case, the normal tyrosyl radical is destroyed with concomitant appearance of a 2'-azido-CDP-localized radical intermediate. Attempts at spin trapping of radical reaction intermediates have turned out negative. In E. coli the activity of ribonucleotide reductase may be regulated by enzymatic activities that interconvert a nonradical containing form and the fully active protein B2. In synchronized mammalian cells, however, the cell cycle variation of ribonucleotide reductase, studied by EPR, was shown to be due to de novo protein synthesis. Inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase are of medical interest because of their ability to control DNA synthesis. One example is hydroxyurea, used in cancer therapy, which selectively destroys the tyrosyl free radical. PMID:3007085

  7. Formation of free radicals during phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Holst, A; Rolfsen, W; Svensson, B; Ollinger, K; Lundgren, B

    1993-04-01

    During phacoemulsification cavitation bubbles are formed. These bubbles are believed to be one source of damage to corneal endothelium seen after phacoemulsification. Free radicals are induced whenever cavitation bubbles implode. The aim of this study was to confirm the initiation of free radicals by phacoemulsification and to correlate the power of ultrasound in the phacoemulsification process to the amount of free radicals formed, using both in vitro and in vivo techniques. The formation of free radicals was determined by adding luminol to a buffer and measuring the chemoluminescence in vitro and in rabbit eyes (Lumacounter 2080 or a single-photon-counting apparatus) during phacoemulsification. The data obtained show that free radicals are formed during phacoemulsification and that the amount of free radicals correlates with the power of ultrasound. Furthermore, the radical formation could be inhibited by the radical scavengers SOD, Healon and Healon GV. These results were achieved both in vitro in the test tube and in vivo in rabbit eyes. By showing that the addition of SOD to the irrigation buffer during phacoemulsification decreases the corneal endothelial cell damage, we show that free radicals could have a role in postoperative complications seen clinically.

  8. Physiological aspects of free-radical reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, I; Tamura, M; Nakajima, R; Nakamura, M

    1985-01-01

    Enzymes which catalyze the formation of free radicals in vitro will catalyze similar reactions in vivo. We believe that the formation of some kinds of free radicals has definite physiological meanings in metabolism. In this sense, the enzymes forming such free radicals are concluded to be in evolutionally advanced states. Elaborated structure and function of enzymes such as horseradish peroxidase and microsomal flavoproteins support the idea. Deleterious and side reactions caused by free radicals are assumed to be minimized in vivo by localizing the reactions, but this assumption should be verified by future studies. PMID:3007098

  9. Dynamics of Radical-Mediated Enzyme Catalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke, Kurt

    1997-11-01

    An emergent class of enzymes harnesses the extreme reactivity of electron-deficient free radical species to perform some of the most difficult reactions in biology. The regio- and stereo-selectivity achieved by these enzymes defies long-held ideas that radical reactions are non-specific. The common primary step in these catalyses is metal- or metallocenter-assisted generation of an electron-deficient organic "initiator radical". The initiator radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrate, opening a new reaction channel for rearrangement to the product. Our aim is to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms of the radical pair separation and radical rearrangement steps. Radical pair separation and substrate radical rearrangement are tracked by using time-resolved (10-7 to 10-3 s) techniques of pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FT-EPR, ESEEM). Synchronous time-evolution of the reactions is attained by triggering with a visible laser pulse. Transient non-Boltzmann population of the states of the spin-coupled systems, and resultant electron spin polarization, facilitates study at or near room temperature under conditions where the enzymes are operative. The systems examined include ethanolamine deaminase, a vitamin B12 coenzyme-dependent enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase and photosynthetic reaction centers. The electronic and nuclear structural and kinetic information obtained from the pulsed-EPR studies is used to address how the initiator radicals are stabilized against deleterious recombination with the metal, and to distinguish the participation of concerted versus sequential rearrangement pathways.

  10. How water meets a hydrophobic surface: Reluctantly and with flucuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poynor Torigoe, Adele Nichole

    By definition hydrophobic substances hate water. Water placed on a hydrophobic surface will form a drop in order to minimize its contact area. What happens when water is forced into contact with a hydrophobic surface? One theory is that an ultra-thin low density region forms near the surface. This depleted region would have implications in such diverse areas as colloidal self-assembly, and the boundary conditions of fluid flow. However, the literature still remains divided as to whether or not such a depleted region exists. To investigate the existence of this layer, we have employed three surface-sensitive techniques, time-resolved phase-modulated ellipsometry, surface plasmon resonance, and X-ray reflectivity. Both ellipsometry and X-ray reflectivity provide strong evidence for the low-density layer and illuminate unexpected temporal behavior. Using all three techniques, we found surprising fluctuations at the interface with a non-Gaussian distribution and a single characteristic time on the order of tenths of seconds. This information supports the idea that the boundary fluctuates with something akin to capillary waves. We have also investigated the dependence of the static and dynamic properties of the hydrophobic/water interface on variables such as temperature, contact angle, pH, dissolved gasses, and sample quality, among others, in a hope to discover the root of the controversy in the literature. We found that the depletion layer is highly dependent on temperature, contact angle and sample quality. This dependence might explain some of the discrepancies in the literature as different groups often use hydrophobic surfaces with different properties.

  11. Rhizosphere hydrophobicity: A positive trait in the competition for water

    PubMed Central

    Balkenhol, Niko; Kóvacs, Kristóf; Carminati, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The ability to acquire water from the soil is a major driver in interspecific plant competition and it depends on several root functional traits. One of these traits is the excretion of gel-like compounds (mucilage) that modify physical soil properties. Mucilage secreted by roots becomes hydrophobic upon drying, impedes the rewetting of the soil close to the root, the so called rhizosphere, and reduces water availability to plants. The function of rhizosphere hydrophobicity is not easily understandable when looking at a single plant, but it may constitute a competitive advantage at the ecosystem level. We hypothesize that by making the top soil hydrophobic, deep-rooted plants avoid competititon with shallow-rooted plants. To test this hypothesis we used an individual-based model to simulate water uptake and growth of two virtual plant species, one deep-rooted plant capable of making the soil hydrophobic and a shallow-rooted plant. We ran scenarios with different precipitation regimes ranging from dry to wet (350, 700, and 1400 mm total annual precipitation) and from high to low precipitation frequencies (1, 7, and 14 days). Plant species abundance and biomass were chosen as indicators for competitiveness of plant species. At constant precipitation frequency mucilage hydrophobicity lead to a benefit in biomass and abundance of the tap-rooted population. Under wet conditions this effect diminished and tap-rooted plants were less productive. Without this trait both species coexisted. The effect of root exudation trait remained constant under different precipitation frequencies. This study shows that mucilage secretion is a competitive trait for the acquisition of water. This advantage is achieved by the modification of the soil hydraulic properties and specifically by inducing water repellency in soil regions which are shared with other species. PMID:28753673

  12. Rhizosphere hydrophobicity: A positive trait in the competition for water.

    PubMed

    Zeppenfeld, Thorsten; Balkenhol, Niko; Kóvacs, Kristóf; Carminati, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The ability to acquire water from the soil is a major driver in interspecific plant competition and it depends on several root functional traits. One of these traits is the excretion of gel-like compounds (mucilage) that modify physical soil properties. Mucilage secreted by roots becomes hydrophobic upon drying, impedes the rewetting of the soil close to the root, the so called rhizosphere, and reduces water availability to plants. The function of rhizosphere hydrophobicity is not easily understandable when looking at a single plant, but it may constitute a competitive advantage at the ecosystem level. We hypothesize that by making the top soil hydrophobic, deep-rooted plants avoid competititon with shallow-rooted plants. To test this hypothesis we used an individual-based model to simulate water uptake and growth of two virtual plant species, one deep-rooted plant capable of making the soil hydrophobic and a shallow-rooted plant. We ran scenarios with different precipitation regimes ranging from dry to wet (350, 700, and 1400 mm total annual precipitation) and from high to low precipitation frequencies (1, 7, and 14 days). Plant species abundance and biomass were chosen as indicators for competitiveness of plant species. At constant precipitation frequency mucilage hydrophobicity lead to a benefit in biomass and abundance of the tap-rooted population. Under wet conditions this effect diminished and tap-rooted plants were less productive. Without this trait both species coexisted. The effect of root exudation trait remained constant under different precipitation frequencies. This study shows that mucilage secretion is a competitive trait for the acquisition of water. This advantage is achieved by the modification of the soil hydraulic properties and specifically by inducing water repellency in soil regions which are shared with other species.

  13. Hydrophobic Agglomeration of Mineral Fines in Aqueous Suspensions and its Application in Flotation: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingqiao; Song, Shaoxian

    2014-05-01

    Hydrophobic agglomeration is originated from the hydrophobic attraction between particles, which is essentially different from electrolyte coagulation and polymer flocculation. It is applied to mineral processing in floc-flotation process to improve the recovery of mineral fines. In this paper, the applications of this phenomenon in mineral fines were summarized, including the origin of hydrophobic agglomeration, the main factors affect hydrophobic agglomeration (particle hydrophobicity, shear rate and duration, nonpolar oil and tank geometry), as well as hydrophobic agglomeration based separation processes (carrier flotation and floc-flotation).

  14. Magnitude and spatial orientation of the hydrophobic moments of multi-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruhong; Royyuru, Ajay; Athma, Prasanna; Suits, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The distributions of residue hydrophobicity for individual domains as well as for the aggregates of domains on a single chain have been found to exhibit well-defined second-order hydrophobic moment profiles. This indicates that most of the domains do fold into a stable entity with a core composed predominantly of hydrophobic residues as well as a prevalence of hydrophobic residues at the interface between domains. A simple scoring function based upon the relative hydrophobic moment dipole orientations shows that 80% of the dipoles of adjacent domains point to each other, highlighting hydrophobic residue prevalence at the domain interfaces.

  15. Application of controlled radical polymerization (CRP) in the design of functional biomedical architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegwart, Daniel John

    In this thesis, atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization were utilized in the design of synthetic polymers to create tissue engineering scaffolds and drug delivery systems with improved control over structure and functionality. Thermo-sensitive injectable hydrogels based on poly(NIPAAm) with degradable ester units within the polymer backbone and at the cross-linking sites were prepared using ATRP and RAFT. Solvent induced morphologies of poly(methyl methacrylate-b-ethylene oxide-b-methyl methacrylate) triblock copolymers synthesized by ATRP were described. A micellar structure, composed of a hydrophobic PMMA core and a PEO shell was constructed for delivery of hydrophobic drugs. ATRP was carried out in inverse miniemulsion to prepare well defined functional nanogels that were capable of entrapping and releasing various molecules (Doxorubicin, carbohydrate-based drugs, fluorophores, and gold nanoparticles). The results demonstrated that nanogels prepared by ATRP in inverse miniemulsion could be internalized into cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Nanogels functionalized with integrin-binding peptides increased cellular uptake. A process called Atom Transfer Radical Coupling (ATRC) was also described, which illustrated the power of functionality in ATRP. Finally, linear polymers and cross-linked nanogels were synthesized by ATRP and functionalized with biotin, pyrene, and peptide sequences, tying together the overall themes of structural control and functionality.

  16. Hydrophobic modification of polymethyl methacrylate as intraocular lenses material to improve the cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bailiang; Lin, Quankui; Shen, Chenghui; Tang, Junmei; Han, Yuemei; Chen, Hao

    2014-10-01

    The development of posterior capsule opacification (PCO) after intraocular lenses (IOL) implantation for dealing with cataract is mainly due to the severe loss of the human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) during surgery contact. A novel poly (hedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-co-methyl methacrylate) copolymer (allyl POSS-PMMA) was synthesized by free radical polymerization method to promote the adhesion of HLECs. FT-IR and (1)H NMR measurements indicated the existence of POSS cage in the product, which demonstrated the successful synthesis of allyl POSS-PMMA copolymer. Effect of allyl POSS in the hybrids on crystal structure, surface wettability and morphology, optical transmission, thermodynamic properties and cytocompatibility was investigated in detail. X-ray diffraction peaks at 2θ∼11° and 12° indicated that POSS molecules had aggregated and crystallized. Thermogravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimeter and optical transmission measurements confirmed that the allyl POSS-PMMA copolymer had high glass transition temperatures (more than 100°C) and good transparency. The hydrophilicity and morphology of PMMA and copolymers surfaces were characterized by static water contact angle and atomic force microscopy. The results revealed that the surface of the allyl POSS-PMMA copolymer displayed higher hydrophobicity and higher roughness than that of pure PMMA. The surface biocompatibility was evaluated by morphology and activity measurement with HLECs in vitro. The results verified that the surface of allyl POSS-PMMA copolymer films had more HLECs adhesion and better spreading morphology than that of PMMA film.

  17. Photophysical and electron-transfer properties of pseudoisocyanine in the hydrophobic microdomain of an aqueous polyelectrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II; Oh, C. )

    1994-03-03

    The binding of pseudoisocyanine (PIC[sup +]) to the polyelectrolyte poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) has profound effects on the photophysical and photochemical properties of this prototypical cyanine dye. The hydrophobic dye was bound in the microdomain of the compact conformation of the polymer in its (uncharged, [open quotes]hypercoiled[close quotes]) acid form at pH < 4.0 in water. Under these conditions, the fluorescence quantum yield for PIC[sup +] was increased 600-fold and its lifetime is extended to 2.7 ns. The dye triplet state observed by flash photolysis provided a very long-lived phototransient ([lambda][sub max] = 640 nm, 50-100-[mu]s decay time). Electron-transfer quenching was investigated using the oxidant tetranitromethane (TNM) which provided the semioxidized dye radical intermediate (440-nm transient) on cobinding within PMAA hypercoils. The dye was also bound to a covalently modified form of PMAA in which polymer chains were end-labeled with 9-methylanthracene moieties. Electron transfer between anthracene chromophores and PIC[sup +] within the polymer domain was observed. 71 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Partitioning MOF-5 into Confined and Hydrophobic Compartments for Carbon Capture under Humid Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Nan; Li, Haiwei; Feng, Xiao; Wang, Qianyou; Wang, Shan; Ma, Li; Zhou, Junwen; Wang, Bo

    2016-08-17

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), by virtue of their remarkable uptake capability, selectivity, and ease of regeneration, hold great promise for carbon capture from fossil fuel combustion. However, their stability toward moisture together with the competitive adsorption of water against CO2 drastically dampens their capacity and selectivity under real humid flue gas conditions. In this work, an effective strategy was developed to tackle the above obstacles by partitioning the channels of MOFs into confined, hydrophobic compartments by in situ polymerization of aromatic acetylenes. Specifically, polynaphthylene was formed via a radical reaction inside the channels of MOF-5 and served as partitions without altering the underlying structure of the framework. Compared with pristine MOF-5, the resultant material (PN@MOF-5) exhibits a doubled CO2 capacity (78 vs 38 cm(3)/g at 273 K and 1 bar), 23 times higher CO2/N2 selectivity (212 vs 9), and significantly improved moisture stability. The dynamic CO2 adsorption capacity can be largely maintained (>90%) under humid conditions during cycles. This strategy can be applied to other MOF materials and may shed light on the design of new MOF-polymer materials with tunable pore sizes and environments to promote their practical applications.

  19. Kinetics Studies of Radical-Radical Reactions: The NO2 + N2H3 System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    investigating the kinetics of this elementary reaction . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...Viewgraph 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) September 2013- October 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Kinetics Studies of Radical-Radical Reactions (I): The NO2...characteristics in relevant operating environments. Here we report theoretical results obtained on the prototypical radical- radical reaction : NO2 + N2H3

  20. Instantaneous Directional Growth of Block Copolymer Nanowires During Heterogeneous Radical Polymerization (HRP).

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunliang; Urban, Marek W

    2016-04-13

    Polymeric nanowires that consist of ultrahigh molecular weight block copolymers were instantaneously prepared via one-step surfactant-free heterogeneous radical polymerization (HRP). Under heterogeneous reaction and initiator-starvation conditions, the sequential copolymerization of hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers facilitates the formation of amphiphilic ultrahigh molecular weight block copolymers, which instantaneously assemble to polymeric nanowires. As polymerization progresses, initially formed nanoparticles exhibit the directional growth due to localized repulsive forces of hydrophilic blocks and confinement of the hydrophobic blocks that adopt favorable high aspect ratio nanowire morphologies. Using one-step synthetic approach that requires only four ingredients (water as a solvent, two polymerizable monomers (one hydrophilic and one hydrophobic), and water-soluble initiator), block copolymer nanowires ∼70 nm in diameter and hundreds of microns in length are instantaneously grown. For example, when 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and styrene (St) were copolymerized, high aspect ratio nanowires consist of ultrahigh (>10(6) g/mol) molecular weight pDMAEMA-b-St block copolymers and the presence of temperature responsive pDMAEMA blocks facilitates nanowire diameter changes as a function of temperature. These morphologies may serve as structural components of the higher order biological constructs at micro and larger length scales, ranging from single strand nanowires to engineered biomolecular networks capable of responding to diverse and transient environmental signals, and capable of dimensional changes triggered by external stimuli.

  1. Peroxy radical measurements with NCAR's chemical amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Christopher; Shetter, Richard; Calvert, Jack G.

    1994-01-01

    The present NCAR instrument for HO2/RO2 measurements has been described previously. It is based on the reactions involving HO2, RO2, and HO radicals with CO and NO. Since (HO2) + (RO2) + (HO) is much greater than (HO) for most atmospheres, it is useful as a peroxy radical detector. Operation of the instrument depends on the creation of a chemical chain reaction which is initiated as HO2 and RO2 radicals in ambient air encounter added NO gas; this forms an NO2 molecule and an HO or RO radical: HO2(RO2) + NO yields HO(RO) + NO2. RO radicals react relatively efficiently with O2 to form an HO2 radical, and subsequently an HO-radical, by reaction with NO. CO gas added to the reaction chamber during part of the operating cycle, recycles the HO to HO2; HO + CO (+O2) yields HO2 + CO2. The reaction sequence may form several hundred NO2 molecules per HO2 (RO2) originally present, before chain termination occurs. The added CO is replaced by N2 addition periodically so that the chain reaction is suppressed, and a 'blank' signal resulting from NO2, O3 and possibly other NO2-forming species (non-chain processes) in ambient air is recorded. The difference between the signal with and without CO is proportional to the peroxy radical concentration. The NO2 produced is monitored using a sensitive luminol chemiluminescence detector system. In the NCAR instrument the length of the amplification chain is determined using a stable source of HO2 radicals (H2O2 thermal decomposition); the ratio of the signal seen with CO present to that with N2 present gives the sensitivity of the instrument to HO2 (molecules of NO2 formed/peroxy radical). The instrument is automated to carry out in hourly repeated cycles: (1) chain length determination; (2) NO2 calibration; and (3) linearity check on the response of signals. One minute averages of signals are normally recorded. The sensitivity of the instrument to detect peroxy radicals is in the pptv range. The present instrument has operated

  2. Peroxy radical measurements with NCAR's chemical amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Christopher; Shetter, Richard; Calvert, Jack G.

    1994-01-01

    The present NCAR instrument for HO2/RO2 measurements has been described previously. It is based on the reactions involving HO2, RO2, and HO radicals with CO and NO. Since (HO2) + (RO2) + (HO) is much greater than (HO) for most atmospheres, it is useful as a peroxy radical detector. Operation of the instrument depends on the creation of a chemical chain reaction which is initiated as HO2 and RO2 radicals in ambient air encounter added NO gas; this forms an NO2 molecule and an HO or RO radical: HO2(RO2) + NO yields HO(RO) + NO2. RO radicals react relatively efficiently with O2 to form an HO2 radical, and subsequently an HO-radical, by reaction with NO. CO gas added to the reaction chamber during part of the operating cycle, recycles the HO to HO2; HO + CO (+O2) yields HO2 + CO2. The reaction sequence may form several hundred NO2 molecules per HO2 (RO2) originally present, before chain termination occurs. The added CO is replaced by N2 addition periodically so that the chain reaction is suppressed, and a 'blank' signal resulting from NO2, O3 and possibly other NO2-forming species (non-chain processes) in ambient air is recorded. The difference between the signal with and without CO is proportional to the peroxy radical concentration. The NO2 produced is monitored using a sensitive luminol chemiluminescence detector system. In the NCAR instrument the length of the amplification chain is determined using a stable source of HO2 radicals (H2O2 thermal decomposition); the ratio of the signal seen with CO present to that with N2 present gives the sensitivity of the instrument to HO2 (molecules of NO2 formed/peroxy radical). The instrument is automated to carry out in hourly repeated cycles: (1) chain length determination; (2) NO2 calibration; and (3) linearity check on the response of signals. One minute averages of signals are normally recorded. The sensitivity of the instrument to detect peroxy radicals is in the pptv range. The present instrument has operated

  3. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy of Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrs, Henry William

    Radicals occur in many areas of chemistry as they are intermediates in reactions. They arise in combustion processes and several atmospheric phenomena and they have been located in interstellar space. In order to elucidate these areas of chemistry it is important to understand radicals. This is no easy task as these species are short -lived. This work focuses on determining the structure and bonding of these species using experimental measurements. Since it is specifically aimed at gas phase radicals, spectroscopy is the tool of choice for probing the radicals. This work developed a general technique for taking the rotation-vibration spectra of jet-cooled radicals. The work was based in the infrared since the desired structural information can be obtained in this region of the spectrum. The jet-cooling simplifies the enormous task of spectral assignment. A BOMEM FTIR was optically coupled to a supersonic expansion of radicals streaming from a homemade silicon carbide pyrolysis nozzle. This nozzle was heated to wall temperatures of 1500 K. A suitable organic precursor was entrained in an inert carrier gas, usually helium. Conditions were adjusted such that this precursor was nearly completely decomposed to produce high number densities of the radical of choice. The gas flows were adjusted such that the time for recombination and other radical destroying reactions were minimized. The first radical species observed was nitric oxide, NO, made from the pyrolysis of alkyl nitrites. Spectra with rotational temperatures from 20 K to 80 K were observed. This proved the viability of the method. It also demonstrated that fluid dynamics modeling and a separate photoionization mass spectrometry experiment would be invaluable aids in maximizing radical concentrations since the best chance of recording the spectra is when the most radicals are present.

  4. Photoionisation of the tropyl radical

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kathrin H; Bodi, Andras

    2013-01-01

    Summary We present a study on the photoionisation of the cycloheptatrienyl (tropyl) radical, C7H7, using tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. Tropyl is generated by flash pyrolysis from bitropyl. Ions and electrons are detected in coincidence, permitting us to record mass-selected photoelectron spectra. The threshold photoelectron spectrum of tropyl, corresponding to the X + 1A1’ ← X 2E2” transition, reveals an ionisation energy of 6.23 ± 0.02 eV, in good agreement with Rydberg extrapolations, but slightly lower than the value derived from earlier photoelectron spectra. Several vibrations can be resolved and are reassigned to the C–C stretch mode ν16 + and to a combination of ν16 + with the ring breathing mode ν2 +. Above 10.55 eV dissociative photoionisation of tropyl is observed, leading to the formation of C5H5 + and C2H2. PMID:23616813

  5. Students' Ideas and Radical Constructivism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Gómez, Pedro J.

    2016-08-01

    In this article, I study, from the point of view of the analytic philosophy of mind, the compatibility of students' ideas studies (SIS) with radical constructivism (RC). I demonstrate that RC is based on a psychology of narrow mental states; that is, the idea that the mental content of an individual can be fully characterised without any reference external to her or him. I show that this fact imposes some severe restrictions to SIS to be incorporated into RC. In particular, I argue that only qualitative studies can comply with the requirement of narrowness. Nevertheless, I propose that quantitative works can be employed as sources of types in order to study token actual students. I use this type-token dichotomy to put forward an outline of a theory of the relation between school contents and mental contents. In this view, token mental contents regarding a given topic can be defined, and probed, only by resorting to typical school contents.

  6. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2012-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA.

  7. Flocculation, hydrophobic agglomeration and filtration of ultrafine coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhimin

    In coal preparation plant circuits, fine coal particles are aggregated either by oil agglomeration or by flocculation. In a new hydrophobic agglomeration process, recently developed hydrophobic latices are utilized. While the selectivity of such aggregation processes determines the beneficiation results, the degree of aggregation has a strong effect on fine coal filtration. The aim of this research was to study the fundamentals and analyze the common grounds for these processes, including the potential effect of the coal surface properties. The selective flocculation tests, in which three types of coal, which differed widely in surface wettability, and three additives (hydrophobic latices, a semi-hydrophobic flocculant and a typical hydrophilic polyelectrolyte) were utilized, showed that coal wettability plays a very important role in selective flocculation. The abstraction of a hydrophobic latex on coal and silica revealed that the latex had a much higher affinity towards hydrophobic coal than to hydrophilic mineral matter. As a result, the UBC-1 hydrophobic latex flocculated only hydrophobic coal particles while the polyelectrolyte (PAM) flocculated all the tested coal samples and minerals, showing no selectivity in the fine coal beneficiation. The oil agglomeration was tested using kerosene emulsified with various surfactants (e.g. cationic, anionic and non-ionic). Surfactants enhance not only oil emulsification, hence reducing oil consumption (down to 0.25--0.5%), but also entirely change the electrokinetic properties of the droplets and affect the interaction energy between oil droplets and coal particles. Consequently, the results found in the course of the experimental work strongly indicate that even oxidized coals can be agglomerated if cationic surfactants are used to emulsify the oil. Oil agglomeration of the Ford-4 ultrafine coal showed that even at extremely low oil consumption (0.25 to 0.5%), a clean coal product with an ash content around 5% at over

  8. Hydroxyl radical reaction with trans-resveratrol: initial carbon radical adduct formation followed by rearrangement to phenoxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan-Dan; Han, Rui-Min; Liang, Ran; Chen, Chang-Hui; Lai, Wenzhen; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2012-06-21

    In the reaction between trans-resveratrol (resveratrol) and the hydroxyl radical, kinetic product control leads to a short-lived hydroxyl radical adduct with an absorption maximum at 420 nm and a lifetime of 0.21 ± 0.01 μs (anaerobic acetonitrile at 25 °C) as shown by laser flash photolysis using N-hydroxypyridine-2(1H)-thione (N-HPT) as a "photo-Fenton" reagent. The transient spectra of the radical adduct are in agreement with density functional theory (DFT) calculations showing an absorption maximum at 442 or 422 nm for C2 and C6 hydroxyl adducts, respectively, and showing the lowest energy for the transition state leading to the C2 adduct compared to other radical products. From this initial product, the relative long-lived 4'-phenoxyl radical of resveratrol (τ = 9.9 ± 0.9 μs) with an absorption maximum at 390 nm is formed in a process with a time constant (τ = 0.21 ± 0.01 μs) similar to the decay constant for the C2 hydroxyl adduct (or a C2/C6 hydroxyl adduct mixture) and in agreement with thermodynamics identifying this product as the most stable resveratrol radical. The hydroxyl radical adduct to phenoxyl radical conversion with concomitant water dissociation has a rate constant of 5 × 10(6) s(-1) and may occur by intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer or by stepwise proton-assisted electron transfer. Photolysis of N-HPT also leads to a thiyl radical which adds to resveratrol in a parallel reaction forming a sulfur radical adduct with a lifetime of 0.28 ± 0.04 μs and an absorption maximum at 483 nm.

  9. Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Maoyuan; Besford, Quinn Alexander; Mulvaney, Thomas; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2015-03-21

    The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom’s test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach the correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by

  10. Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maoyuan; Besford, Quinn Alexander; Mulvaney, Thomas; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2015-03-01

    The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom's test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach the correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by

  11. Free Radical Mechanisms in Autoxidation Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simic, Michael G.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the use of steady-state radiation chemistry and pulse radiolysis for the generation of initial free radicals and formation of peroxy radicals in the autoxidation process. Provides information regarding the autoxidation process. Defines autoxidation reactions and antioxidant action. (CS)

  12. Radical Constructivism: Between Realism and Solipsism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Delgado, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Criticizes radical constructivism of the Glasersfeld type, pointing out some contradictions between the declared radical principles and their theoretical and practical development. Suggests the possibility of an ideological substratum in the construction and hegemonic success of subjective constructivism, and briefly advances an alternative…

  13. THE RADICAL OF A JORDAN ALGEBRA

    PubMed Central

    McCrimmon, Kevin

    1969-01-01

    In this paper we define a Jacobson radical for Jordan algebras analogous to that for associative algebras and show that it enjoys many of the properties of the associative radical. We then relate the corresponding notion of “semisimplicity” to the previously defined notion of “nondegeneracy” (Jacobson, N., these Proceedings, 55, 243-251 (1966)). PMID:16591736

  14. Rearrangement of sulfonamidyl radicals with hydrogen migration

    SciTech Connect

    Troyanskii, E.I.; Lazareva, M.I.; Nikishin, G.I.

    1987-01-20

    One-step outlying oxidative chlorination of alkanesulfonamides by the action of the Na/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/-CuCl/sub 2/ system via intermediate sulfonamidyl radicals gives 3- and 4-chloroalkanesulfonamides. Rearrangements of sulfonamidyl radicals with H atom migration from the sulfonyl segment predominates over rearrangement with H atom migration from the amide segment.

  15. Radical Puppets and the Language of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asher, Rikki

    2009-01-01

    Radical puppets are puppets with a social message. Radical puppets encourage creative ideas that lead toward understanding global and environmental aspects of society through the "art of the puppet," a phrase coined by American puppeteer Bill Baird (1965). There is a blending of performance and visual art in puppetry. Through radical…

  16. Ideals Adrift: An Educational Approach to Radicalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van San, Marion; Sieckelinck, Stijn; de Winter, Micha

    2013-01-01

    These days, the radicalization of young people is above all viewed as a security risk. Almost all research into this phenomenon has been carried out from a legal, criminological or socio-psychological perspective with a focus on detecting and containing the risks posed by radicalization. In the light of the political developments since September…

  17. Free Radical Mechanisms in Autoxidation Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simic, Michael G.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the use of steady-state radiation chemistry and pulse radiolysis for the generation of initial free radicals and formation of peroxy radicals in the autoxidation process. Provides information regarding the autoxidation process. Defines autoxidation reactions and antioxidant action. (CS)

  18. Victimology: A Consideration of the Radical Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrichs, David O.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the emergence of a new radical model in criminology and a new subdisciplinary area of concern, victimology, with roots in Marx and Engels' original formulations. Argues that the radical understanding of victimization provides an important corrective to mainstream approaches and broadens the focus of the concept of victimization. (JAC)

  19. Alex Bloom, Pioneer of Radical State Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Alex Bloom is one of the greatest figures of radical state education in England. His approach to "personalised learning" and the development of a negotiated curriculum was immeasurably more profound and more inspiring than anything to emerge thus far from the current DfES. His approach to student voice was much more radical than anything…

  20. Victimology: A Consideration of the Radical Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrichs, David O.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the emergence of a new radical model in criminology and a new subdisciplinary area of concern, victimology, with roots in Marx and Engels' original formulations. Argues that the radical understanding of victimization provides an important corrective to mainstream approaches and broadens the focus of the concept of victimization. (JAC)

  1. Ideals Adrift: An Educational Approach to Radicalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van San, Marion; Sieckelinck, Stijn; de Winter, Micha

    2013-01-01

    These days, the radicalization of young people is above all viewed as a security risk. Almost all research into this phenomenon has been carried out from a legal, criminological or socio-psychological perspective with a focus on detecting and containing the risks posed by radicalization. In the light of the political developments since September…

  2. Radical Behaviorism and Buddhism: Complementarities and Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diller, James W.; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2008-01-01

    Comparisons have been made between Buddhism and the philosophy of science in general, but there have been only a few attempts to draw comparisons directly with the philosophy of radical behaviorism. The present review therefore considers heretofore unconsidered points of comparison between Buddhism and radical behaviorism in terms of their…

  3. Radical Behaviorism and Buddhism: Complementarities and Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diller, James W.; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2008-01-01

    Comparisons have been made between Buddhism and the philosophy of science in general, but there have been only a few attempts to draw comparisons directly with the philosophy of radical behaviorism. The present review therefore considers heretofore unconsidered points of comparison between Buddhism and radical behaviorism in terms of their…

  4. Organic chemistry: A radical step forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenhao; Li, Ang

    2017-02-01

    Free radicals are notorious for unselective coupling reactions; however, the coupling of free radicals generated from acyl tellurides has now been shown to form C-C bonds with remarkable fidelity, which enables easy one-step assembly of densely oxygenated natural product motifs.

  5. Radical Voices; A Film Course Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kernan, Margot

    The leftist radical ideas current in the 1960s and 1970s are expressed in the films discussed in this cinema study guide. The radical film takes extreme and avant-garde approaches to the somewhat publicly taboo topics of sex, social issues, and religion. Among the films discussed, I AM CURIOUS (YELLOW) and SOMETHING DIFFERENT show women in their…

  6. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sebren, Leanne J; Devery, James J; Stephenson, Corey R J

    2014-02-07

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes.

  7. Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

  8. Measurement of atmospheric radicals by chemical amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Maria Corina

    1998-11-01

    In this work, atmospheric radicals were measured using the chemical amplification technique. To calibrate the chemical amplifier, an UV water photolysis radical source was built and tested. This source proved to be reliable and portable, and capable of delivering radical concentrations within the range of values found in the troposphere. We tested the performance of our instrument at the Peroxy Radical InterComparison Exercise II (PRICE II). In this intercomparison seven chemical amplifiers participated measuring several HO2 and CH3O2 concentrations. Results from this campaign indicate that all of the chemical amplifiers are equally capable of measuring HO2 and CH3O2 radicals from two different radical sources (ICG-HO2 source and UEA- CH3O2 source). The average response towards the ICG and UEA sources were 70% and 45%, respectively. Losses in the delivery system are thought to be responsible for these low responses. Radical measurements were taken at 4 contrasting sites: Atlantic '96 (clean continental), SONTOS '92 and '93 (rural), Calabozo '93 (tropical clean continental), and Pacific '93 (predominantly urban), where maximum ROx concentrations ranged from 17 to 52 pptv. These values are consistent with those found in the literature for similar regions. The measured radical concentrations reflect the interaction between the main production and loss processes at the different sites, as for example ozone photolysis and HNO3 formation. At Calabozo, the combination of moderate O3, low NOx and small Zenith angles resulted in the highest ROx measured. At the Pacific '93 site, O3 is higher, but NOx concentrations are also very high, enhancing the radical loss processes, and explaining the moderate radical concentrations observed. At Atlantic '96 the very low NOx concentration might account for the radical concentrations observed, even in the presence of low O3 concentrations. At SONTOS, the highest ozone concentrations were observed, so we would expect the radical

  9. Polymers based on stable phenoxyl radicals for the use in organic radical batteries.

    PubMed

    Jähnert, Thomas; Häupler, Bernhard; Janoschka, Tobias; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2014-05-01

    Polymers with pendant phenoxyl radicals are synthesized and the electrochemical properties are investigated in detail. The monomers are polymerized using ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) or free-radical polymerization methods. The monomers and polymers, respectively, are oxidized to the radical either before or after the polymerization. These phenoxyl radicals containing polymers reveal a reversible redox behavior at a potential of -0.6 V (vs Ag/AgCl). Such materials can be used as anode-active material in organic radical batteries (ORBs).

  10. Synchrotron threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a pyrolysis source: The methyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yupeng; Wu, Xiangkun; Tang, Xiaofeng; Wen, Zuoying; Liu, Fuyi; Zhou, Xiaoguo; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-11-01

    We present here a flash pyrolysis source coupled with a threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) spectrometer and vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation to investigate the spectroscopy and photochemistry of free radicals. The radicals are produced from pyrolysis in a heated silicon carbide tube, and the TPEPICO scheme provides a strategy to obtain pure spectra of the radicals without contamination from other byproducts. As a representative example, the methyl radical was studied, and its threshold photoelectron spectrum shows a series of umbrella vibrational transitions. The adiabatic ionization energy of the methyl radical was determined to be 9.84 ± 0.01 eV.

  11. Purification and in vitro antioxidative effects of giant squid muscle peptides on free radical-mediated oxidative systems.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Niranjan; Mendis, Eresha; Byun, Hee-Guk; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2005-09-01

    Low molecular weight peptides obtained from ultrafiltration (UF) of giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) muscle protein were studied for their antioxidative effects in different in vitro oxidative systems. The most potent two peptides, Asn-Ala-Asp-Phe-Gly-Leu-Asn-Gly-Leu-Glu-Gly-Leu-Ala (1307 Da) and Asn-Gly-Leu-Glu-Gly-Leu-Lys (747 Da), exhibited their antioxidant potential to act as chain-breaking antioxidants by inhibiting radical-mediated peroxidation of linoleic acid, and their activities were closer to highly active synthetic antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene. Addition of these peptides could enhance the viability of cytotoxic embryonic lung fibroblasts significantly (P<.05) at a low concentration of 50 microg/ml, and it was presumed due to the suppression of radical-induced oxidation of membrane lipids. Electron spin trapping studies revealed that the peptides were potent scavengers of free radicals in the order of carbon-centered (IC(50) 396.04 and 304.67 microM), hydroxyl (IC(50) 497.32 and 428.54 microM) and superoxide radicals (IC(50) 669.34 and 573.83 microM). Even though the exact molecular mechanism for scavenging of free radicals was unclear, unusually high hydrophobic amino acid composition (more than 75%) of giant squid muscle peptides was presumed to be involved in the observed activities.

  12. Morphology of Air Nanobubbles Trapped atHydrophobic Nanopatterned Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Checco, A.; Hofmann, T.; DiMasi, E.; Black, C.T.; Ocko, B.M.

    2010-04-01

    The details of air nanobubble trapping at the interface between water and a nanostructured hydrophobic silicon surface are investigated using X-ray scattering and contact angle measurements. Large-area silicon surfaces containing hexagonally packed, 20 nm wide hydrophobic cavities provide ideal model surfaces for studying the morphology of air nanobubbles trapped inside cavities and its dependence on the cavity depth. Transmission small-angle X-ray scattering measurements show stable trapping of air inside the cavities with a partial water penetration of 5-10 nm into the pores, independent of their large depth variation. This behavior is explained by consideration of capillary effects and the cavity geometry. For parabolic cavities, the liquid can reach a thermodynamically stable configuration - a nearly planar nanobubble meniscus - by partially penetrating into the pores. This microscopic information correlates very well with the macroscopic surface wetting behavior.

  13. Fabrication of Hydrophobic Nanostructured Surfaces for Microfluidic Control.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Kyojiro; Tsukahara, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    In the field of micro- and nanofluidics, various kinds of novel devices have been developed. For such devices, not only fluidic control but also surface control of micro/nano channels is essential. Recently, fluidic control by hydrophobic nanostructured surfaces have attracted much attention. However, conventional fabrication methods of nanostructures require complicated steps, and integration of the nanostructures into micro/nano channels makes fabrication procedures even more difficult and complicated. In the present study, a simple and easy fabrication method of nanostructures integrated into microchannels was developed. Various sizes of nanostructures were successfully fabricated by changing the plasma etching time and etching with a basic solution. Furthermore, it proved possible to construct highly hydrophobic nanostructured surfaces that could effectively control the fluid in microchannels at designed pressures. We believe that the fabrication method developed here and the results obtained are valuable contributions towards further applications in the field of micro- and nanofluidics.

  14. Interfacial entropy of water on rigid hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Taherian, Fereshte; Leroy, Frédéric; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2013-08-06

    A simple theoretical model is proposed for computing the interfacial entropy of water at rigid hydrophobic surfaces. The interfacial entropy, which is not considered in mean field models of static wettability, is evaluated from the fluctuations of the water-surface dispersion energy at the single particle level and represents the configurational bias imposed on the fluid molecules by the attractive external potential of a solid wall. A comparison with results obtained from molecular dynamics simulations shows that the model quantitatively describes the entropy loss of water when a water-vapor interface turns to water in contact with hydrophobic surfaces such as graphene, graphite, and diamond, while it overestimates this quantity on hydrophilic surfaces.

  15. Phase behavior of a lattice hydrophobic oligomer in explicit water.

    PubMed

    Romero-Vargas Castrillón, Santiago; Matysiak, Silvina; Stillinger, Frank H; Rossky, Peter J; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2012-08-09

    We investigate the thermodynamics of hydrophobic oligomer collapse using a water-explicit, three-dimensional lattice model. The model captures several aspects of protein thermodynamics, including the emergence of cold- and thermal-unfolding, as well as unfolding at high solvent density (a phenomenon akin to pressure-induced denaturation). We show that over a range of conditions spanning a ≈14% increase in solvent density, the oligomer transforms into a compact, strongly water-penetrated conformation at low temperature. This contrasts with thermal unfolding at high temperature, where the system "denatures" into an extended random coil conformation. We report a phase diagram for hydrophobic collapse that correctly captures qualitative aspects of cold and thermal unfolding at low to intermediate solvent densities.

  16. Structural and Spectroscopic Properties of Water Around Small Hydrophobic Solutes

    PubMed Central

    Montagna, Maria; Sterpone, Fabio; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the structural, dynamical and spectroscopic properties of water molecules around a solvated methane by means of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Despite their mobility, in the first-shell water molecules are dynamically displaced in a clathrate-like cage around the hydrophobic solute. No significant differences in water geometrical parameters, in molecular dipole moments or in hydrogen bonding properties are observed between in-shell and out-shell molecules, indicating that liquid water can accommodate a small hydrophobic solute without altering its structural properties. The calculated contribution of the first shell water molecules to the infrared spectra does not show significant differences with respect the bulk signal once the effects of the missing polarization of second-shell molecules has been taken into account. Small fingerprints of the clathrate-like structure appear in the vibrational density of states in the libration and OH stretching regions. PMID:22946539

  17. A method for detecting hydrophobic patches on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lijnzaad, P; Berendsen, H J; Argos, P

    1996-10-01

    A method for the detection of hydrophobic patches on the surfaces of protein tertiary structures is presented. It delineates explicit contiguous pieces of surface of arbitrary size and shape that consist solely of carbon and sulphur atoms using a dot representation of the solvent-accessible surface. The technique is also useful in detecting surface segments with other characteristics, such as polar patches. Its potential as a tool in the study of protein-protein interactions and substrate recognition is demonstrated by applying the method to myoglobin, Leu/IIe/Val-binding protein, lipase, lysozyme, azurin, triose phosphate isomerase, carbonic anhydrase, and phosphoglycerate kinase. Only the largest patches, having sizes exceeding random expectation, are deemed meaningful. In addition to well-known hydrophobic patches on these proteins, a number of other patches are found, and their significance is discussed. The method is simple, fast, and robust. The program text is obtainable by anonymous ftp.

  18. Direct Biofluid Analysis Using Hydrophobic Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Damon, Deidre E; Davis, Kathryn M; Moreira, Camila R; Capone, Patricia; Cruttenden, Riley; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K

    2016-02-02

    Ambient electrostatic paper spray ionization from a hydrophobic paper occurs when a DC potential is applied to the dry paper triangle. Online liquid/liquid extraction of small organic compounds from a drop of biological fluid present on the dry hydrophobic paper is achieved with an organic spray solvent in under 1 min and utilizes in situ electrostatic-spray ionization for more efficient detection of extracted molecules. Direct analysis of small volumes of biofluids with no sample pretreatment is possible, which is applicable in point-of-care analyses. High sensitivity and quantitative accuracy was achieved for the direct analysis of illicit drugs in 4 μL of raw blood, serum, and whole urine. The study was extended to monitor the activity of alanine transaminase enzyme, a key biomarker for the detection of liver injury in patients (with HIV and tuberculosis) who typically take several medications at once.

  19. How does a hydrocarbon staple affect peptide hydrophobicity?

    PubMed

    Sim, Adelene Y L; Verma, Chandra

    2015-04-15

    Water is essential for the proper folding of proteins and the assembly of protein-protein/ligand complexes. How water regulates complex formation depends on the chemical and topological details of the interface. The dynamics of water in the interdomain region between an E3 ubiquitin ligase (MDM2) and three different peptides derived from the tumor suppressor protein p53 are studied using molecular dynamics. The peptides show bimodal distributions of interdomain water densities across a range of distances. The addition of a hydrocarbon chain to rigidify the peptides (in a process known as stapling) results in an increase in average hydrophobicity of the peptide-protein interface. Additionally, the hydrophobic staple shields a network of water molecules, kinetically stabilizing a water chain hydrogen-bonded between the peptide and MDM2. These properties could result in a decrease in the energy barrier associated with dehydrating the peptide-protein interface, thereby regulating the kinetics of peptide binding.

  20. Influence of chemistry on wetting dynamics of nanotextured hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Di Mundo, Rosa; Palumbo, Fabio; d'Agostino, Riccardo

    2010-04-06

    In this work, the role of a chemical parameter, such as the degree of fluorination, on the wetting behavior of nanotextured hydrophobic surfaces is investigated. Texture and chemistry tuning of the surfaces has been accomplished with single batch radiofrequency low-pressure plasma processes. Polystyrene substrates have been textured by CF(4) plasma etching and subsequently covered by thin films with a tunable F-to-C ratio, obtained in discharges fed with C(4)F(8)-C(2)H(4). Measurements of wetting dynamics reveal a regime transition from adhesive-hydrophobic to slippery-superhydrophobic, i.e., from wet to non wet states, as the F-to-C rises at constant topography. Such achievements are strengthened by calculation of the solid fraction of surface water contact area applying Cassie-Baxter advancing and receding equations to water contact angle data of textured and flat reference surfaces.